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Sample records for polarized quark matter

  1. Spin Polarization in High Density Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Henrik; Panda, Prafulla K.; Providência, Constança; da Providência, João

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the occurrence of a ferromagnetic phase transition in high density hadronic matter (e.g., in the interior of a neutron star). This could be induced by a four-fermion interaction analogous to the one which is responsible for chiral symmetry breaking in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, to which it is related through a Fierz transformation. Flavor SU(2) and flavor SU(3) quark matter are considered. A second-order phase transition is predicted at densities about 5 times the normal nuclear matter density. It is also found that in flavor SU(3) quark matter, a first-order transition from the so-called 2 flavor super-conducting phase to the ferromagnetic phase arises. The color-flavor-locked phase may be completely hidden by the FP.

  2. Spin polarization in high density quark matter under a strong external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsue, Yasuhiko; da Providência, João; Providência, Constança; Yamamura, Masatoshi; Bohr, Henrik

    In high density quark matter under a strong external magnetic field, possible phases are investigated by using the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model with tensor-type four-point interaction between quarks, as well as the axial-vector-type four-point interaction. In the tensor-type interaction under the strong external magnetic field, it is shown that a quark spin polarized phase is realized in all regions of the quark chemical potential under consideration within the lowest Landau level approximation. In the axial-vector-type interaction, it is also shown that the quark spin polarized phase appears in the wide range of the quark chemical potential. In both the interactions, the quark mass in zero and small chemical potential regions increases which indicates that the chiral symmetry breaking is enhanced, namely the magnetic catalysis occurs.

  3. Spin polarization versus color-flavor locking in high-density quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsue, Yasuhiko; da Providência, João; Providência, Constança; Yamamura, Masatoshi; Bohr, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that spin polarization with respect to each flavor in three-flavor quark matter occurs instead of color-flavor locking at high baryon density by using the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with four-point tensor-type interaction. Also, it is indicated that the order of phase transition between the color-flavor-locked phase and the spin-polarized phase is the first order by means of second-order perturbation theory.

  4. Quark matter or new particles?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    It has been argued that compression of nuclear matter to somewhat higher densities may lead to the formation of stable quark matter. A plausible alternative, which leads to radically new astrophysical scenarios, is that the stability of quark matter simply represents the stability of new particles compounded of quarks. A specific example is the SU(3)-symmetric version of the alpha particle, composed of spin-zero pairs of each of the baryon octet (an 'octet' particle).

  5. Cool Quark Matter.

    PubMed

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-22

    We generalize the state-of-the-art perturbative equation of state of cold quark matter to nonzero temperatures, needed in the description of neutron star mergers and core collapse processes. The new result is accurate to O(g^{5}) in the gauge coupling, and is based on a novel framework for dealing with the infrared sensitive soft field modes of the theory. The zero Matsubara mode sector is treated via a dimensionally reduced effective theory, while the soft nonzero modes are resummed using the hard thermal loop approximation. This combination of known effective descriptions offers unprecedented access to small but nonzero temperatures, both in and out of beta equilibrium.

  6. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan-e~Alam; Subhasis~Chattopadhyay; Tapan~Nayak

    2008-10-01

    Quark Matter 2008—the 20th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions was held in Jaipur, the Pink City of India, from 4-10 February, 2008. Organizing Quark Matter 2008 in India itself indicates the international recognition of the Indian contribution to the field of heavy-ion physics, which was initiated and nurtured by Bikash Sinha, Chair of the conference. The conference was inaugurated by the Honourable Chief Minister of Rajasthan, Smt. Vasundhara Raje followed by the key note address by Professor Carlo Rubbia. The scientific programme started with the theoretical overview, `SPS to RHIC and onwards to LHC' by Larry McLerran followed by several theoretical and experimental overview talks on the ongoing experiments at SPS and RHIC. The future experiments at the LHC, FAIR and J-PARC, along with the theoretical predictions, were discussed in great depth. Lattice QCD predictions on the nature of the phase transition and critical point were vigorously debated during several plenary and parallel session presentations. The conference was enriched by the presence of an unprecedented number of participants; about 600 participants representing 31 countries across the globe. This issue contains papers based on plenary talks and oral presentations presented at the conference. Besides invited and contributed talks, there were also a large number of poster presentations. Members of the International Advisory Committee played a pivotal role in the selection of speakers, both for plenary and parallel session talks. The contributions of the Organizing Committee in all aspects, from helping to prepare the academic programme down to arranging local hospitality, were much appreciated. We thank the members of both the committees for making Quark Matter 2008 a very effective and interesting platform for scientific deliberations. Quark Matter 2008 was financially supported by: Air Liquide (New Delhi) Board of Research Nuclear Sciences (Mumbai) Bose

  7. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Jan-e.; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Nayak, Tapan; Sinha, Bikash; Viyogi, Yogendra P.

    2008-10-01

    Quark Matter 2008—the 20th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions was held in Jaipur, the Pink City of India, from 4-10 February, 2008. Organizing Quark Matter 2008 in India itself indicates the international recognition of the Indian contribution to the field of heavy-ion physics, which was initiated and nurtured by Bikash Sinha, Chair of the conference. The conference was inaugurated by the Honourable Chief Minister of Rajasthan, Smt. Vasundhara Raje followed by the key note address by Professor Carlo Rubbia. The scientific programme started with the theoretical overview, `SPS to RHIC and onwards to LHC' by Larry McLerran followed by several theoretical and experimental overview talks on the ongoing experiments at SPS and RHIC. The future experiments at the LHC, FAIR and J-PARC, along with the theoretical predictions, were discussed in great depth. Lattice QCD predictions on the nature of the phase transition and critical point were vigorously debated during several plenary and parallel session presentations. The conference was enriched by the presence of an unprecedented number of participants; about 600 participants representing 31 countries across the globe. This issue contains papers based on plenary talks and oral presentations presented at the conference. Besides invited and contributed talks, there were also a large number of poster presentations. Members of the International Advisory Committee played a pivotal role in the selection of speakers, both for plenary and parallel session talks. The contributions of the Organizing Committee in all aspects, from helping to prepare the academic programme down to arranging local hospitality, were much appreciated. We thank the members of both the committees for making Quark Matter 2008 a very effective and interesting platform for scientific deliberations. Quark Matter 2008 was financially supported by: Air Liquide (New Delhi) Board of Research Nuclear Sciences (Mumbai) Bose

  8. Quark description of nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, Jurgen

    2001-07-01

    We discuss the role of an adjoint chiral condensate for color superconducting quark matter. Its presence leads to color-flavor locking in two-flavor quark matter. Color is broken completely as well as chiral symmetry in the two-flavor theory with coexisting adjoint quark-antiquark and antitriplet quark-quark condensates. The qualitative properties of this phase match the properties of ordinary nuclear matter without strange baryons. This complements earlier proposals by Schaefer and Wilczek for a quark description of hadronic phases. We show for a class of models with effective four-fermion interactions that adjoint chiral and diquark condensates do not compete, in the sense that simultaneous condensation occurs for sufficiently strong interactions in the adjoint chiral channel.

  9. Anisotropic Optical Response of Dense Quark Matter under Rotation: Compact Stars as Cosmic Polarizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirono, Yuji; Nitta, Muneto

    2012-08-01

    Quantum vortices in the color-flavor locked phase of QCD have bosonic degrees of freedom, called the orientational zero modes, localized on them. We show that the orientational zero modes are electromagnetically charged. As a result, a vortex in the color-flavor locked phase nontrivially interacts with photons. We show that a lattice of vortices acts as a polarizer of photons with wavelengths larger than some critical length.

  10. Quark Matter '87: Concluding remarks

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.

    1988-03-01

    This year marked the beginning of the experimental program at BNL and CERN to probe the properties of ultra dense hadronic matter and to search for the quark-gluon plasma phase of matter. Possible implications of the preliminary findings are discussed. Problems needing further theoretical and experimental study are pointed out. 50 refs.

  11. Wigner Distributions of Quarks for Different Polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, Jai; Mukherjee, Asmita; Nair, Sreeraj

    2017-03-01

    We calculate quark Wigner distributions using the light-front wave functions in a dressed quark model. In this model, a proton target is replaced by a simplified spin-1/2 state, namely a quark dressed with a gluon. We calculate the Wigner distributions for different polarization configuration of quark and the target state in this model.

  12. STRANGE GOINGS ON IN QUARK MATTER.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHAFER,T.

    2001-06-05

    We review recent work on how the superfluid state of three flavor quark matter is affected by non-zero quark masses and chemical potentials. The study of hadronic matter at high baryon density has recently attracted a lot of interest. At zero baryon density chiral symmetry is broken by a quark-anti-quark condensate. At high density condensation in the quark-anti-quark channel is suppressed. Instead, attractive interactions in the color anti-symmetric quark-quark channel favor the formation of diquark condensates. As a consequence, cold dense quark matter is expected to be a color superconductor. The symmetry breaking pattern depends on the density, the number of quark flavors, and their masses. A particularly symmetric phase is the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase of three flavor quark matter. This phase is believed to be the true ground state of ordinary matter at very large density.

  13. Rotating compact star with superconducting quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, P.K.; Nataraj, H.S.

    2006-02-15

    A compact star with a superconducting quark core, a hadron crust, and a mixed phase between the two is considered. The quark-meson coupling model for hadron matter and the color-flavor-locked quark model for quark matter is used to construct the equation of state for the compact star. The effect of pairing of quarks in the color-flavor-locked phase and the mixed phase on the mass, radius, and period of the rotating star is studied.

  14. Magnetism in Dense Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Efrain J.; de la Incera, Vivian

    We review the mechanisms via which an external magnetic field can affect the ground state of cold and dense quark matter. In the absence of a magnetic field, at asymptotically high densities, cold quark matter is in the Color-Flavor-Locked (CFL) phase of color superconductivity characterized by three scales: the superconducting gap, the gluon Meissner mass, and the baryonic chemical potential. When an applied magnetic field becomes comparable with each of these scales, new phases and/or condensates may emerge. They include the magnetic CFL (MCFL) phase that becomes relevant for fields of the order of the gap scale; the paramagnetic CFL, important when the field is of the order of the Meissner mass, and a spin-one condensate associated to the magnetic moment of the Cooper pairs, significant at fields of the order of the chemical potential. We discuss the equation of state (EoS) of MCFL matter for a large range of field values and consider possible applications of the magnetic effects on dense quark matter to the astrophysics of compact stars.

  15. Neutrino propagation in color superconducting quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Gregory W.; Reddy, Sanjay

    2000-11-01

    We calculate the neutrino mean free path in color superconducting quark matter, and employ it to study the cooling of matter via neutrino diffusion in the superconducting phase as compared to a free quark phase. The cooling process slows when quark matter undergoes a second order phase transition to a superconducting phase at the critical temperature Tc. Cooling subsequently accelerates as the temperature decreases below Tc. This will directly impact the early evolution of a newly born neutron star, should its core contain quark matter. Consequently, there may be observable changes in the early neutrino emission which would provide evidence for superconductivity in hot and dense matter.

  16. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2006 Conference Quark Matter 2006 Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang; Wang, En-Ke; Cai, Xu; Huang, Huan-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    The Quark Matter 2006 conference was held on 14-20 November 2006 at the Shanghai Science Hall of the Shanghai Association of Sciences and Technology in Shanghai, China. It was the 19th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions. The conference was organized jointly by SINAP (Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)) and CCNU (Central China Normal University, Wuhan). Over 600 scientists from 32 countries in five continents attended the conference. This is the first time that China has hosted such a premier conference in the field of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, an important event for the Chinese high energy nuclear physics community. About one half of the conference participants are junior scientists—a clear indication of the vigor and momentum for this field, in search of the fundamental nature of the nuclear matter at extreme conditions. Professor T D Lee, honorary chair of the conference and one of the founders of the quark matter research, delivered an opening address with his profound and philosophical remarks on the recent discovery of the nature of strongly-interacting quark-gluon-plasma (sQGP). Professor Hongjie Xu, director of SINAP, gave a welcome address to all participants on behalf of the two hosting institutions. Dr Peiwen Ji, deputy director of the Mathematics and Physics Division of the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), also addressed the conference participants and congratulated them on the opening of the conference. Professor Mianheng Jiang, vice president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), gave a concise introduction about the CAS as the premier research institution in China. He highlighted continued efforts at CAS to foster international collaborations between China and other nations. The Quark Matter 2006 conference is an example of such a successful collaboration between high energy nuclear physicists in China and other nations all over the world. The

  17. Strange Quark Matter Status and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandweiss, J.

    2004-01-01

    The existence of quark states with more than three quarks is allowed in QCD. The stability of such quark matter states has been studied with lattice QCD and phenomenological bag models, but is not well constrained by theory. The addition of strange quarks to the system allows the quarks to be in lower energy states despite the additional mass penalty. There is additional stability from reduced Coulomb repulsion. SQM is expected to have a low Z/A. Stable or metastable massive multiquark states contain u, d, and s quarks.

  18. Superconducting quark matter in the Chromodielectric Model

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, L.; Malheiro, M.; Fiolhais, M.; Taurines, A.R.

    2004-12-02

    In this work we study the strange quark matter in an extended version of the Chromodielectric Model (CDM) with a BCS quark pairing implemented, and analyze the superconducting color flavor locked (CFL) phase. We compare the equation of state and the stability of the strange quark matter from QCD in the CFL phase with the superconducting version of the CDM. In the CDM there is a confining potential which originates a dynamical bag constant in the sense that its value depends on the density. Our results indicate that the inclusion in the energy density of the pairing quark interaction allows for an absolutely stable quark matter state even for large potential energies, preventing the metastability of quark matter found in the CDM at high densities.

  19. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2006 Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang; Wang, En-Ke; Cai, Xu; Huang, Huan-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    The Quark Matter 2006 conference was held on 14 20 November 2006 at the Shanghai Science Hall of the Shanghai Association of Sciences and Technology in Shanghai, China. It was the 19th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus Nucleus Collisions. The conference was organized jointly by SINAP (Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)) and CCNU (Central China Normal University, Wuhan). Over 600 scientists from 32 countries in five continents attended the conference. This is the first time that China has hosted such a premier conference in the field of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, an important event for the Chinese high energy nuclear physics community. About one half of the conference participants are junior scientists—a clear indication of the vigor and momentum for this field, in search of the fundamental nature of the nuclear matter at extreme conditions. Professor T D Lee, honorary chair of the conference and one of the founders of the quark matter research, delivered an opening address with his profound and philosophical remarks on the recent discovery of the nature of strongly-interacting quark-gluon-plasma (sQGP). Professor Hongjie Xu, director of SINAP, gave a welcome address to all participants on behalf of the two hosting institutions. Dr Peiwen Ji, deputy director of the Mathematics and Physics Division of the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), also addressed the conference participants and congratulated them on the opening of the conference. Professor Mianheng Jiang, vice president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), gave a concise introduction about the CAS as the premier research institution in China. He highlighted continued efforts at CAS to foster international collaborations between China and other nations. The Quark Matter 2006 conference is an example of such a successful collaboration between high energy nuclear physicists in China and other nations all over the world. The

  20. Strange-quark-matter stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1989-11-01

    We investigate the implications of rapid rotation corresponding to the frequency of the new pulsar reported in the supernovae remnant SN1987A. It places very stringent conditions on the equation of state if the star is assumed to be bound by gravity alone. We find that the central energy density of the star must be greater than 13 times that of nuclear density to be stable against the most optimistic estimate of general relativistic instabilities. This is too high for the matter to consist of individual hadrons. We conclude that it is implausible that the newly discovered pulsar, if its half-millisecond signals are attributable to rotation, is a neutron star. We show that it can be a strange quark star, and that the entire family of strange stars can sustain high rotation if strange matter is stable at an energy density exceeding about 5.4 times that of nuclear matter. We discuss the conversion of a neutron star to strange star, the possible existence of a crust of heavy ions held in suspension by centrifugal and electric forces, the cooling and other features. 34 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Strange quark matter and quark stars with the Dyson-Schwinger quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Wei, J.-B.; Schulze, H.-J.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the equation of state of strange quark matter and the interior structure of strange quark stars in a Dyson-Schwinger quark model within rainbow or Ball-Chiu vertex approximation. We emphasize constraints on the parameter space of the model due to stability conditions of ordinary nuclear matter. Respecting these constraints, we find that the maximum mass of strange quark stars is about 1.9 solar masses, and typical radii are 9-11km. We obtain an energy release as large as 3.6 × 10^{53} erg from conversion of neutron stars into strange quark stars.

  2. Magnetized strange quark matter and magnetized strange quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Felipe, R. Gonzalez; Martinez, A. Perez; Rojas, H. Perez; Orsaria, M.

    2008-01-15

    Strange quark matter could be found in the core of neutron stars or forming strange quark stars. As is well known, these astrophysical objects are endowed with strong magnetic fields that affect the microscopic properties of matter and modify the macroscopic properties of the system. In this article we study the role of a strong magnetic field in the thermodynamical properties of a magnetized degenerate strange quark gas, taking into account {beta}-equilibrium and charge neutrality. Quarks and electrons interact with the magnetic field via their electric charges and anomalous magnetic moments. In contrast to the magnetic field value of 10{sup 19} G, obtained when anomalous magnetic moments are not taken into account, we find the upper bound B < or approx. 8.6x10{sup 17} G, for the stability of the system. A phase transition could be hidden for fields greater than this value.

  3. Quark matter droplets in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiselberg, H.; Pethick, C. J.; Staubo, E. F.

    1993-01-01

    We show that, for physically reasonable bulk and surface properties, the lowest energy state of dense matter consists of quark matter coexisting with nuclear matter in the presence of an essentially uniform background of electrons. We estimate the size and nature of spatial structure in this phase, and show that at the lowest densities the quark matter forms droplets embedded in nuclear matter, whereas at higher densities it can exhibit a variety of different topologies. A finite fraction of the interior of neutron stars could consist of matter in this new phase, which would provide new mechanisms for glitches and cooling.

  4. Quark matter droplets in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiselberg, H.; Pethick, C. J.; Staubo, E. F.

    1993-01-01

    We show that, for physically reasonable bulk and surface properties, the lowest energy state of dense matter consists of quark matter coexisting with nuclear matter in the presence of an essentially uniform background of electrons. We estimate the size and nature of spatial structure in this phase, and show that at the lowest densities the quark matter forms droplets embedded in nuclear matter, whereas at higher densities it can exhibit a variety of different topologies. A finite fraction of the interior of neutron stars could consist of matter in this new phase, which would provide new mechanisms for glitches and cooling.

  5. Single quark polarization in quantum chromodynamics subprocesses

    SciTech Connect

    Dharmaratna, W.G.; Goldstein, G.R.

    1996-02-01

    It is well known that the single-polarization asymmetries vanish in QCD with massless quarks. But, heavy quarks with a nonzero mass should be transversely polarized due to the breakdown of the helicity conservation. In this paper we give the exact fourth-order perturbative QCD predictions for the transverse polarization from all QCD subprocesses, {ital q}+{ital q}{prime}{r_arrow}{ital q}+{ital q}{prime}, {ital q}+{ital g}{r_arrow}{ital q}+{ital g}, {ital g}+{ital g}{r_arrow}{ital q}+{bar {ital q}}, and {ital q}+{bar {ital q}}{r_arrow}{ital q}{prime}+{bar {ital q}}{prime}, which are significant for heavy quark production, with a description of the method of calculation. The kinematical dependence of the polarization is discussed. Top quark polarization from gluon fusion and quark annihilation processes, which are the important subprocesses at high energies, is estimated and its significance is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. Nuclear Matter from Effective Quark-Quark Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, M.; Fukukawa, K.

    2014-12-01

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces.

  7. Nuclear matter from effective quark-quark interaction.

    PubMed

    Baldo, M; Fukukawa, K

    2014-12-12

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces.

  8. Nucleons, Nuclear Matter and Quark Matter: A unified NJL approach

    SciTech Connect

    S. Lawley; W. Bentz; A.W. Thomas

    2006-02-10

    We use an effective quark model to describe both hadronic matter and deconfined quark matter. By calculating the equations of state and the corresponding neutron star properties, we show that the internal properties of the nucleon have important implications for the properties of these systems.

  9. QUARK MATTER IN MASSIVE COMPACT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Weissenborn, Simon; Pagliara, Giuseppe; Schaffner-Bielich, Juergen; Sagert, Irina; Hempel, Matthias

    2011-10-10

    The recent observation of the pulsar PSR J1614-2230 with a mass of 1.97 {+-} 0.04 M{sub sun} gives a strong constraint on the quark and nuclear matter equations of state (EoS). We explore the parameter ranges for a parameterized EoS for quark stars. We find that strange stars, made of absolutely stable strange quark matter, comply with the new constraint only if effects from the strong coupling constant and color-superconductivity are taken into account. Hybrid stars, compact stars with a quark matter core and a hadronic outer layer, can be as massive as 2 M{sub sun}, but only for a significantly limited range of parameters. We demonstrate that the appearance of quark matter in massive stars crucially depends on the stiffness of the nuclear matter EoS. We show that the masses of hybrid stars stay below the ones of hadronic and pure quark stars, due to the softening of the EoS at the quark-hadron phase transition.

  10. Early neutron stars and quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, You-chen; Kong, Xiao-jun; Wei, Cheng-wen; Ge, Yun-zhao

    1988-03-01

    There may exist quark matter inside early hot neutron stars. Using the general method of Baym and Chin, we evaluated the pressure and density at neutron matterquark matter phase transition for different temperatures and compared the values for stable hot neutron stars. We found (1) that whenever the neutron star temperature exceeds (+10)K, there will be a core of quark matter; (2) that the bag constant B is the most important determining factor of the quark core size. For a given temperature, the core is the larger, the smaller B is; (3) that by the conservation of baryon number, the total energy released by a star during its cooling is about (+53) ergs.

  11. Holographic Quark Matter and Neutron Stars.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Carlos; Jokela, Niko; Rodríguez Fernández, David; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-15

    We use a top-down holographic model for strongly interacting quark matter to study the properties of neutron stars. When the corresponding equation of state (EOS) is matched with state-of-the-art results for dense nuclear matter, we consistently observe a first-order phase transition at densities between 2 and 7 times the nuclear saturation density. Solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations with the resulting hybrid EOSs, we find maximal stellar masses in excess of two solar masses, albeit somewhat smaller than those obtained with simple extrapolations of the nuclear matter EOSs. Our calculation predicts that no quark matter exists inside neutron stars.

  12. Strange quark matter fragmentation in astrophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulucci, L.; Horvath, J. E.

    2014-06-01

    The conjecture of Bodmer-Witten-Terazawa suggesting a form of quark matter (Strange Quark Matter) as the ground state of hadronic interactions has been studied in laboratory and astrophysical contexts by a large number of authors. If strange stars exist, some violent events involving these compact objects, such as mergers and even their formation process, might eject some strange matter into the interstellar medium that could be detected as a trace signal in the cosmic ray flux. To evaluate this possibility, it is necessary to understand how this matter in bulk would fragment in the form of strangelets (small lumps of strange quark matter in which finite effects become important). We calculate the mass distribution outcome using the statistical multifragmentation model and point out several caveats affecting it. In particular, the possibility that strangelets fragmentation will render a tiny fraction of contamination in the cosmic ray flux is discussed.

  13. Single top quarks and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, Deborah; Zucchetta, Alberto; Buckley, Matthew R.; Canelli, Florencia

    2017-08-01

    Processes with dark matter interacting with the standard model fermions through new scalars or pseudoscalars with flavor-diagonal couplings proportional to fermion mass are well motivated theoretically, and provide a useful phenomenological model with which to interpret experimental results. Two modes of dark matter production from these models have been considered in the existing literature: pairs of dark matter produced through top quark loops with an associated monojet in the event, and pair production of dark matter with pairs of heavy flavored quarks (tops or bottoms). In this paper, we demonstrate that a third, previously overlooked channel yields a non-negligible contribution to LHC dark matter searches in these models. In spite of a generally lower production cross section at LHC when compared to the associated top-pair channel, non-flavor violating single top quark processes are kinematically favored and can significantly increase the sensitivity to these models. Including dark matter production in association with a single top quark through scalar or pseudoscalar mediators, the exclusion limit set by the LHC searches for dark matter can be improved by 30% up to a factor of two, depending on the mass assumed for the mediator particle.

  14. Nucleation of quark matter in protoneutron star matter

    SciTech Connect

    Mintz, B. W.; Fraga, E. S.; Pagliara, G.; Schaffner-Bielich, J.

    2010-06-15

    The phase transition from hadronic to quark matter may take place already during the early post-bounce stage of core collapse supernovae when matter is still hot and lepton rich. If the phase transition is of first order and exhibits a barrier, the formation of the new phase occurs via the nucleation of droplets. We investigate the thermal nucleation of a quark phase in supernova matter and calculate its rate for a wide range of physical parameters. We show that the formation of the first droplet of a quark phase might be very fast and therefore the phase transition to quark matter could play an important role in the mechanism and dynamics of supernova explosions.

  15. Superfluid vortices in dense quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallavarapu, S. Kumar; Alford, Mark; Windisch, Andreas; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2016-03-01

    Superfluid vortices in the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase of dense quark matter are known to be energetically disfavored as compared to well-separated triplets of ``semi-superfluid'' color flux tubes. In this talk we will provide results which will identify regions in parameter space where the superfluid vortex spontaneously decays. We will also discuss the nature of the mode that is responsible for the decay of a superfluid vortex in dense quark matter. We will conclude by mentioning the implications of our results to neutron stars.

  16. Early neutron stars and quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, You-Chen; Kong, Xiao-Jun; Wei, Cheng-Wen; Ge, Yun-Zhao

    1988-03-01

    The existence of quark matter (QM) in hot early neutron stars is considered theoretically, using the method of Baym and Chin (1976) to calculate the pressure and density at the phase transition between neutron and quark matter for various temperatures. The results are presented in tables and graphs and discussed in detail. It is found that QM cores can exist whenever the temperature exceeds 10 to the 10th K, and that their radii increase with decreasing QM bag constant. The total energy emitted by a star during cooling is estimated as 10 to the 53rd erg, assuming conservation of baryon number.

  17. Nuclear and quark matter at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biró, Tamás S.; Jakovác, Antal; Schram, Zsolt

    2017-03-01

    We review important ideas on nuclear and quark matter description on the basis of high-temperature field theory concepts, like resummation, dimensional reduction, interaction scale separation and spectral function modification in media. Statistical and thermodynamical concepts are spotted in the light of these methods concentrating on the -partially still open- problems of the hadronization process.

  18. Seismic Search for Strange Quark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teplitz, Vigdor

    2004-01-01

    Two decades ago, Witten suggested that the ground state of matter might be material of nuclear density made from up, down and strange quarks. Since then, much effort has gone into exploring astrophysical and other implications of this possibility. For example, neutron stars would almost certainly be strange quark stars; dark matter might be strange quark matter. Searches for stable strange quark matter have been made in various mass ranges, with negative, but not conclusive results. Recently, we [D. Anderson, E. Herrin, V. Teplitz, and I. Tibuleac, Bull. Seis. Soc. of Am. 93, 2363 (2003)] reported a positive result for passage through the Earth of a multi-ton "nugget" of nuclear density in a search of about a million seismic reports, to the U.S. Geological Survey for the years 1990-93, not associated with known Earthquakes. I will present the evidence (timing of first signals to the 9 stations involved, first signal directions, and unique waveform characteristics) for our conclusion and discuss potential improvements that could be obtained from exploiting the seismologically quieter environments of the moon and Mars.

  19. Superfluidity and vortices in dense quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallavarapu, Satyanarayana Kumar

    This dissertation will elucidate specific features of superfluid behavior in dense quark matter, It will start with issues regarding spontaneous decay of superfluid vortices in dense quark matter. This will be followed by topics that explain superfluid phenomena from field theoretical viewpoint. In particular the first part of the dissertation will talk about superfluid vortices in the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase of dense quark matter which are known to be energetically disfavored as compared to well-separated triplets of "semi-superfluid" color flux tubes. In this talk we will provide results which will identify regions in parameter space where the superfluid vortex spontaneously decays. We will also discuss the nature of the mode that is responsible for the decay of a superfluid vortex in dense quark matter. We will conclude by mentioning the implications of our results to neutron stars. In the field theoretic formulation of a zero-temperature superfluid one connects the superfluid four-velocity which is a macroscopic observable with a microscopic field variable namely the gradient of the phase of a Bose-Condensed scalar field. On the other hand, a superfluid at nonzero temperatures is usually described in terms of a two-fluid model: the superfluid and the normal fluid. In the later part of the dissertation we offer a deeper understanding of the two-fluid model by deriving it from an underlying microscopic field theory. In particular, we shall obtain the macroscopic properties of a uniform, dissipationless superfluid at low temperatures and weak coupling within the framework of a ϕ 4 model. Though our study is very general, it may also be viewed as a step towards understanding the superfluid properties of various phases of dense nuclear and quark matter in the interior of compact star.

  20. Transverse force on transversely polarized quarks in longitudinally polarized nucleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Manal; Burkardt, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    We study the semiclassical interpretation of the x3 and x4 moments of twist-3 parton distribution functions (PDFs). While no semiclassical interpretation for the higher moments of gT(x ) and e (x ) was found, the x3 moment of the chirally odd spin-dependent twist-3 PDF hL3(x ) can be related to the longitudinal gradient of the transverse force on transversely polarized quarks in longitudinally polarized nucleons in a deep-inelastic scattering experiment. We discuss how this result relates to the torque acting on a quark in the same experiment. This has further implications for comparisons between the Jaffe-Manohar and the Ji decompositions of the nucleon spin.

  1. Quark degrees of freedom in nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, Marcello

    2017-06-01

    The microscopic theory of Nuclear Matter has been approached along the years by different many-body methods and different nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions. The realistic NN interactions can be classified mainly into two categories. One relies on the meson-nucleon coupling scheme, within relativistic or non-relativistic framework. The so-called chiral interactions are based on the assumption that, once the pion exchange contribution has been explicitly isolated, it is possible to expand the NN interaction in a series of point interaction terms which respect the underlying QCD chiral symmetry. In both schemes three-body (TBF) or higher forces can be constructed, which can have different degrees of phenomenological character. The TBF are essential to get the Nuclear Matter saturation point close to the phenomenological one. However the QCD quark degrees of freedom are not explicitly introduced. It will be shown that a realistic NN interaction that is constructed from the quark degrees of freedom can produce the correct saturation point without the need of TBF. The corresponding Equation of State is compatible with all the phenomenological constraints, including the Neutron Star maximum mass limit. Taking this result literally, one can say that quarks have been revealed in Nuclear Matter. Another conclusion is that the effect of TBF is model dependent.

  2. Generation of strong magnetic fields in dense quark matter driven by the electroweak interaction of quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2016-12-01

    We study the generation of strong large scale magnetic fields in dense quark matter. The magnetic field growth is owing to the magnetic field instability driven by the electroweak interaction of quarks. We discuss the situation when the chiral symmetry is unbroken in the degenerate quark matter. In this case we predict the amplification of the seed magnetic field 1012G to the strengths (1014 -1015)G. In our analysis we use the typical parameters of the quark matter in the core of a hybrid star or in a quark star. We also discuss the application of the obtained results to describe the magnetic fields generation in magnetars.

  3. Survey of top quark polarization at a polarized linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider

    SciTech Connect

    Groote, S.; Koerner, J. G.; Melic, B.; Prelovsek, S.

    2011-03-01

    We discuss in detail top quark polarization in above-threshold (tt) production at a polarized linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We pay particular attention to the minimization and maximization of the polarization of the top quark by tuning the longitudinal polarization of the e{sup +} and e{sup -} beams. The polarization of the top quark is calculated in full next-to-leading order QCD. We also discuss the beam polarization dependence of the longitudinal spin-spin correlations of the top and antitop quark spins.

  4. Quark matter and quark stars at finite temperature in Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Peng-Cheng; Li, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Bin; Dong, Yu-Min; Jia, Yu-Yue; Wang, Shu-Mei; Ma, Hong-Yang

    2017-08-01

    We extend the SU(3) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model to include two types of vector interaction. Using these two types of vector interaction in NJL model, we study the quark symmetry free energy in asymmetric quark matter, the constituent quark mass, the quark fraction, the equation of state (EOS) for β -equilibrium quark matter, the maximum mass of QSs at finite temperature, the maximum mass of proto-quark stars (PQSs) along the star evolution, and the effects of the vector interaction on the QCD phase diagram. We find that comparing zero temperature case, the values of quark matter symmetry free energy get larger with temperature increasing, which will reduce the difference between the fraction of u, d and s quarks and stiffen the EoS for β -equilibrium quark matter. In particular, our results indicate that the maximum masses of the quark stars increase with temperature because of the effects of the quark matter symmetry free energy, and we find that the heating(cooling) process for PQSs will increase (decrease) the maximum mass within NJL model.

  5. New phases in color-flavor-locked quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kryjevski, Andrei; Kaplan, David B.; Schaefer, Thomas

    2005-02-01

    We consider O({alpha}{sub s}) corrections to the squared masses of the pseudo-Goldstone excitations about the ground state of dense quark matter. We show that these contributions tend to destabilize the vacuum, leading to a surprisingly complex phase structure for quark matter as a function of quark mass, even for small {alpha}{sub s}. In particular we find two new phases of CFL quark matter possibly relevant for the real world, for which {theta}{sub QCD}={pi}/2.

  6. GENERAL: Non-Spherical Gravitational Collapse of Strange Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Zade S.; D, Patil K.; N, Mulkalwar P.

    2008-05-01

    We study the non-spherical gravitational collapse of the strange quark null fluid. The interesting feature which emerges is that the non-spherical collapse of charged strange quark matter leads to a naked singularity whereas the gravitational collapse of neutral quark matter proceeds to form a black hole. We extend the earlier work of Harko and Cheng [Phys. Lett. A 266 (2000) 249] to the non-spherical case.

  7. Dark matter, neutron stars, and strange quark matter.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garcia, M Angeles; Silk, Joseph; Stone, Jirina R

    2010-10-01

    We show that self-annihilating weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter accreted onto neutron stars may provide a mechanism to seed compact objects with long-lived lumps of strange quark matter, or strangelets, for WIMP masses above a few GeV. This effect may trigger a conversion of most of the star into a strange star. We use an energy estimate for the long-lived strangelet based on the Fermi-gas model combined with the MIT bag model to set a new limit on the possible values of the WIMP mass that can be especially relevant for subdominant species of massive neutralinos.

  8. Phenomenological determination of polarized quark distributions in the nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelski, Jan; Tatur, Stanisław

    1996-03-01

    We present a fit to spin asymmetries which gives polarized quark distributions. These functions are closely related to the ones given by the Martin, Roberts and Stirling fit for unpolarized structure functions. The integrals of polarized distributions are discussed and compared with the corresponding quantities obtained from neutron and hyperon β-decay data. We use the combination of proton, neutron and deuteron spin asymmetries in order to determine the coefficients of our polarized quark distributions. Our fit shows that phenomenologically there is no need for taking polarized gluons into account.

  9. Transport Properties in Cold Dense Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braby, Matt; Schaefer, Thomas; Chao, Jingyi; Alford, Mark; Mahmoodifar, Simin

    2010-02-01

    We have calculated several transport properties of the low energy degrees of freedom of the color-flavor locked phase in dense quark matter. The low energy degrees of freedom are the superfluid phonon and the meson octet of which the lightest excitation is the kaon. In some choices of the parameters, the kaon can condense. The basis of the calculation is a matching of kinetic theory and hydrodynamics to extract the transport properties and calculating the appropriate scattering rates for each process. From this, we have calculated the bulk viscosity of condensed and massive kaons, the shear viscosity of condensed kaons, and the thermal conductivity of the superfluid phonons and massive kaons. We present the results and analyze how these transport properties could affect observables in compact stars. )

  10. Higgs effects in the polarization of top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Sivers, D.

    1990-10-09

    Top quarks produced in high-energy collisions should exhibit a parity-conserving spin polarization normal to the production plane which can be measured by the asymmetry in their leptonic decays. A portion of this effect, which can be calculated in perturbation theory, is attributable to the quark`s QCD interactions. In addition, there is a component of the polarization due to the Yukawa coupling (g{sub Y} {congruent} m{sub T}/(250 GeV)) of the top quark with the Higgs sector. We can demonstrate the interplay of QCD and Yukawa forces in the polarization for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} 4 T{bar T}. Assuming M{sub H} > 2M{sub T} and that the Higgs particle is not discovered before the top quark, measurement of top quark polarization in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} or hadron-hadron collisions can be used to specify an approximate mass for the Higgs and guide direct searches.

  11. Polarized hyperons probe dynamics of quark spin

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel S. Carman; T. S. Harry Lee; Mac Mestayer; Reinhard Schumacher

    2007-08-01

    Researchers at Jefferson Laboratory demonstrate how two analyses of the same data provide two plausible models of spin transfer in exclusive hyperon production, yielding quite different pictures of quark spin dynamics and challenging existing theories.

  12. The rigidity of three flavor quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rishi; Mannarelli, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Cold three flavor quark matter at large (but not asymptotically large) densities may exist in a crystalline color superconducting phase. These phases are characterized by a gap parameter {Delta} that varies periodieally in space, forming a crystal structure. A Ginzburg-Landau expansion in {Delta} shows that two crystal structures based on cubic symetry are particularly favorable, and may be the ground state of matter at densities present in neutron star cores. We derive the effective action for the phonon fields that describe space-and time-dependent fluctuations of the crystal structure formed by {Delta}, and obtain the shear modulus from the coefficients of the spatial derivative terms. Within a Ginzburg-Landau approximation, we find shear moduli which are 20 to 1000 times larger than those of neutron star crusts. This phase ofmatter is thus more rigid than any known material in the universe, but at the same time the crystalline color superconducting phase is also superftuid. These properties raise the possibility that the presence of this phase within neutron stars may have distinct implications for their phenomenology. For example, (some) pulsar glitches may originate in crystalline superconducting neutron star cores.

  13. Effects of quark matter and color superconductivity in compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, D.; Grigorian, H.; Aguilera, D. N.; Yasui, S.; Toki, H.

    2003-04-01

    The equation of state for quark matter is derived for a nonlocal, chiral quark model within the mean field approximation. We investigate the effects of a variation of the form factors of the interaction on the phase diagram of quark matter under the condition of β- equilibrium and charge neutrality. Special emphasis is on the occurrence of a diquark condensate which signals a phase transition to color superconductivity and its effects on the equation of state. We calculate the quark star configurations by solving the Tolman- Oppenheimer- Volkoff equations and obtain for the transition from a hot, normal quark matter core of a protoneutron star to a cool diquark condensed one a release of binding energy of the order of ΔMc2 ~ 1053 erg. We study the consequences of antineutrino trapping in hot quark matter for quark star configurations with possible diquark condensation and discuss the claim that this energy could serve as an engine for explosive phenomena. A ``phase diagram'' for rotating compact stars (angular velocity-baryon mass plane) is suggested as a heuristic tool for obtaining constraints on the equation of state of QCD at high densities. It has a critical line dividing hadronic from quark core stars which is correlated with a local maximum of the moment of inertia and can thus be subject to experimental verification by observation of the rotational behavior of accreting compact stars.

  14. Topology and stability of the Kondo phase in quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Shigehiro; Suzuki, Kei; Itakura, Kazunori

    2017-07-01

    We investigate properties of the ground state of a light-quark matter with heavy-quark impurities. This system exhibits the "QCD Kondo effect" where the interaction strength between a light quark near the Fermi surface and a heavy quark increases with decreasing energy of the light quark toward the Fermi energy and diverges at some scale near the Fermi energy, called the Kondo scale. Around and below the Kondo scale, we must treat the dynamics nonperturbatively. As a typical nonperturbative method to treat the strong coupling regime, we adopt a mean-field approach where we introduce a condensate, the Kondo condensate, representing a mixing between a light quark and a heavy quark, and determine the ground state in the presence of the Kondo condensate. We show that the ground state is a topologically nontrivial state and the heavy-quark spin forms the hedgehog configuration in the momentum space. We can define the Berry phase for the ground-state wave function in the momentum space, which is associated with a monopole at the position of a heavy quark. We also investigate fluctuations around the mean field in the random-phase approximation and show the existence of (excitonlike) collective excitations made of a hole h of a light quark and a heavy quark Q .

  15. Vacuum polarization corrections to low energy quark effective couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Ademar; Braghin, Fabio L.

    2014-07-01

    In this work corrections to low energy punctual effective quark couplings up to the eighth order are calculated by considering vacuum polarization effects with the scalar quark-antiquark condensate. The departing point is a QCD-based Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. By separating the quark field into two components, one that condenses and another one for interacting quarks, the former is integrated out with the help of usual auxiliary fields and an effective action in terms of interacting quark fields is found. The scalar auxiliary field reduces to the quark-antiquark condensate in the vacuum and the determinant is expanded in powers of the quark-antiquark bilinears generating chiral invariant effective 2N-quark interactions (N =2,3…). The corresponding coupling constants and effective masses are estimated, and the general trend is that for increasing the effective gluon mass the values of the effective coupling constants decrease. All the values are in good agreement with phenomenological fits.

  16. Tidal deformations of compact stars with crystalline quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, S. Y.; Leung, P. T.; Lin, L.-M.

    2017-05-01

    We study the tidal deformability of bare quark stars and hybrid compact stars composed of a quark-matter core in general relativity, assuming that the deconfined quark matter exists in a crystalline color superconducting phase. We find that taking the elastic property of crystalline quark matter into account in the calculation of the tidal deformability can break the universal I-Love relation discovered for fluid compact stars, which connects the moment of inertia and tidal deformability. Our result suggests that measurements of the moment of inertia and tidal deformability can in principle be used to test the existence of solid quark stars, despite our ignorance of the high-density equation of state. Assuming that the moment of inertia can be measured to 10% level, one can then distinguish a 1.4 (1 ) M⊙ solid quark star described by our quark-matter equation of state model with a gap parameter Δ =25 MeV from a fluid compact star if the tidal deformability can be measured to about 10% (45%) level. On the other hand, we find that the nuclear matter fluid envelope of a hybrid star can screen out the effect of the solid core significantly so that the resulting I-Love relation for hybrid stars still agrees with the universal relation for fluid stars to about 1% level.

  17. Spinodal instabilities in baryon-rich quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Che Ming; Li, Feng

    For quark matter at finite baryon chemical potential, its density develops large fluctuations when it undergoes a first-order phase transition. Based on the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model, we have used the linear response theory to study the growth rate of density fluctuations and its dependence on the wavelength of unstable modes. Using the transport equation derived from the NJL model, we have also studied the time evolution of the unstable modes and the density fluctuations in a baryon-rich quark matter that is confined in a finite volume. Allowing the expansion of the quark matter, we have further studied the survivability of the density fluctuations as the density and temperature of the quark matter decrease. Possible experimental signatures of the density fluctuations have been suggested.

  18. Recalling Quark Matter '83 and the birth of RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludlam, Thomas W.

    2016-12-01

    I provide a brief review of the Quark Matter '83 meeting at Brookhaven, in the context of the decisive U.S. science policy actions during the summer of 1983 that led up to it. At the Brookhaven meeting a large community of nuclear and high energy physicists came together for the first time to examine the parameters for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, setting the stage for decades of quark matter research to follow.

  19. Higher dimensional strange quark matter solutions in self creation cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Şen, R.; Aygün, S.

    2016-03-25

    In this study, we have generalized the higher dimensional flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe solutions for a cloud of string with perfect fluid attached strange quark matter (SQM) in Self Creation Cosmology (SCC). We have obtained that the cloud of string with perfect fluid does not survive and the string tension density vanishes for this model. However, we get dark energy model for strange quark matter with positive density and negative pressure in self creation cosmology.

  20. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2011 (QM11) Quark Matter 2011 (QM11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutz, Yves; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2011-12-01

    Since the early 1980s, the Quark Matter conferences have been the most important forum for presenting results in the field of high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The 22nd conference in this series took place in Annecy, France, on 22-29 May 2011, and it attracted a record attendance of almost 800 participants. More than 500 requests to give presentations were received and, based on the recommendations of the International Advisory Committee, almost 200 were selected. This special issue of Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics contains the written reports of those oral presentations. Quark Matter 2011 was scheduled to take place six months after the start of the heavy ion program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Hence, these proceedings mark a historical milestone: two decades after starting to prepare for the LHC, the present volume documents the first substantial harvest of LHC heavy-ion data. In addition, these proceedings feature a complete overview of recent theoretical and experimental developments over two orders of magnitude in the center-of-mass energy of heavy-ion collisions. In particular, they include prominently the latest results from the heavy-ion experiments at Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and a broad range of theoretical highlights. Early in the organization of Quark Matter 2011, it was recognized that the novelty of the results expected at this conference argues for a very rapid publication of the proceedings. We would like to thank all who helped meet the ambitious production schedule. In particular, we would like to thank the paper committees of the LHC experiments ATLAS, ALICE and CMS, and the RHIC experiments PHENIX and STAR who ensured, in a coordinated action, that all experimental contributions were received within four weeks of the end of the conference. We would also like to thank the many individual contributors, as well as the anonymous referees appointed by Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics

  1. Color superconductivity in dense quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, Mark G.; Schmitt, Andreas; Rajagopal, Krishna; Schaefer, Thomas

    2008-10-15

    Matter at high density and low temperature is expected to be a color superconductor, which is a degenerate Fermi gas of quarks with a condensate of Cooper pairs near the Fermi surface that induces color Meissner effects. At the highest densities, where the QCD coupling is weak, rigorous calculations are possible, and the ground state is a particularly symmetric state, the color-flavor locked (CFL) phase. The CFL phase is a superfluid, an electromagnetic insulator, and breaks chiral symmetry. The effective theory of the low-energy excitations in the CFL phase is known and can be used, even at more moderate densities, to describe its physical properties. At lower densities the CFL phase may be disfavored by stresses that seek to separate the Fermi surfaces of the different flavors, and comparison with the competing alternative phases, which may break translation and/or rotation invariance, is done using phenomenological models. We review the calculations that underlie these results and then discuss transport properties of several color-superconducting phases and their consequences for signatures of color superconductivity in neutron stars.

  2. Crystallography of three-flavor quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, Krishna; Sharma, Rishi

    2006-11-01

    We analyze and compare candidate crystal structures for the crystalline color superconducting phase that may arise in cold, dense but not asymptotically dense, three-flavor quark matter. We determine the gap parameter {delta} and free energy {omega}({delta}) for many possible crystal structures within a Ginzburg-Landau approximation, evaluating {omega}({delta}) to order {delta}{sup 6}. In contrast to the two-flavor case, we find a positive {delta}{sup 6} term and hence an {omega}({delta}) that is bounded from below for all the structures that we analyze. This means that we are able to evaluate {delta} and {omega} as a function of the splitting between Fermi surfaces for all the structures we consider. We find two structures with particularly robust values of {delta} and the condensation energy, within a factor of 2 of those for the CFL phase which is known to characterize QCD at asymptotically large densities. The robustness of these phases results in their being favored over wide ranges of density. However, it also implies that the Ginzburg-Landau approximation is not quantitatively reliable. We develop qualitative insights into what makes a crystal structure favorable, and use these to winnow the possibilities. The two structures that we find to be most favorable are both built from condensates with face-centered cubic symmetry: in one case, the and condensates are separately face-centered cubic; in the other case and combined make up a face-centered cube.

  3. Heavy quark dynamics in QCD matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. K.; Scardina, F.; Plumari, S.; Greco, V.

    2017-01-01

    Simultaneous description of heavy quark nuclear modification factor RAA and the elliptic flow v 2 is a top challenge for all the existing models. We highlight how the temperature dependence of the energy loss/transport coefficients is responsible for addressing a large part of such a puzzle along with the full solution of the Boltzmann collision integral for the momentum evolution of heavy quarks in the medium. We consider four different models to evaluate the temperature dependence of drag coefficients of the heavy quark in the QGP. We have also highlighted the heavy quark dynamics in the presence of an external electromagnetic field which induces a sizable heavy quark directed flow, v 1(y), that can be measurable at LHC.

  4. PREFACE: Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2009) Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Eduardo; Kodama, Takeshi; Padula, Sandra; Takahashi, Jun

    2010-09-01

    The 14th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2009) was held in Brazil from 27 September to 2 October 2009 at Hotel Atlântico, Búzios, Rio de Janeiro. The conference was jointly organized by Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Universidade de São Paulo, Universidade Estadual Paulista and Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. Over 120 scientists from Argentina, Brazil, China, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, South Africa, Switzerland, the UK and the USA gathered at the meeting to discuss the physics of hot and dense matter through the signals of strangeness and also the behavior of heavy quarks. Group photograph The topics covered were strange and heavy quark production in nuclear collisions, strange and heavy quark production in elementary processes, bulk matter phenomena associated with strange and heavy quarks, and strangeness in astrophysics. In view of the LHC era and many other upcoming new machines, together with recent theoretical developments, sessions focused on `New developments and new facilities' and 'Open questions' were also included. A stimulating round-table discussion on 'Physics opportunities in the next decade in the view of strangeness and heavy flavor in matter' was chaired in a relaxed atmosphere by Grazyna Odyniec and conducted by P Braun-Munzinger, W Florkowski, K Redlich, K Šafařík and H Stöcker, We thank these colleagues for pointing out to young participants new physics directions to be pursued. We also thank J Dunlop and K Redlich for excellent introductory lectures given on the Sunday evening pre-conference session. In spite of the not-so-helpful weather, the beauty and charm of the town of Búzios helped to make the meeting successful. Nevertheless, the most important contributions were the excellent talks, whose contents are part of these proceedings, given

  5. Magnetic Effect Versus Thermal Effect on Quark Matter with a Running Coupling at Finite Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Wen, Xin-Jian

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the quark matter in a strong magnetic field in the framework of SU(2) NJL model with a magnetic-field-dependent coupling. The spin polarization, the entropy per baryon, and the energy are studied by analyzing the competition of the magnetic effect and the thermal effect. The stronger magnetic field can enhance the spin polarization, arrange quarks in a uniform spin orientation, and change the energy per baryon drastically. However, it can hardly affect the entropy per baryon, which is dominated by the temperature. As the temperature increases, more quarks will be excited from the lowest Landau level up to higher Landau levels. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11475110, 11135011, and 11575190

  6. Mutual friction in color-flavor locked quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Motoi

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a possible astrophysical application of physics of dense matter, which is related to the r-mode instability of rapidly rotating compact star. We discuss some microscopic consideration to compute the time scale for energy dissipation in the presence of superfluid vortices. As such an example, color-flavor locked (CFL) quark matter is considered.

  7. Thermodynamics of polarized relativistic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovtun, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    We give the free energy of equilibrium relativistic matter subject to external gravitational and electromagnetic fields, to one-derivative order in the gradients of the external fields. The free energy allows for a straightforward derivation of bound currents and bound momenta in equilibrium. At leading order, the energy-momentum tensor admits a simple expression in terms of the polarization tensor. Beyond the leading order, electric and magnetic polarization vectors are intrinsically ambiguous. The physical effects of polarization, such as the correlation between the magneto-vortically induced surface charge and the electro-vortically induced surface current, are not ambiguous.

  8. Dark matter and dark energy from quark bag model

    SciTech Connect

    Brilenkov, Maxim; Eingorn, Maxim; Jenkovszky, Laszlo; Zhuk, Alexander E-mail: maxim.eingorn@gmail.com E-mail: ai.zhuk2@gmail.com

    2013-08-01

    We calculate the present expansion of our Universe endowed with relict colored objects — quarks and gluons — that survived hadronization either as isolated islands of quark-gluon ''nuggets'' or spread uniformly in the Universe. In the first scenario, the QNs can play the role of dark matter. In the second scenario, we demonstrate that uniform colored objects can play the role of dark energy providing the late-time accelerating expansion of the Universe.

  9. Hadron-quark phase transition in asymmetric matter with dynamical quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, G. Y.; Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M.; Greco, V.; Plumari, S.; Liu, B.; Liu, Y. X.

    2011-05-01

    The two-equation-of-state model is used to describe the hadron-quark phase transition in asymmetric matter formed at high density in heavy-ion collisions. For the quark phase, the three-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio effective theory is used to investigate the influence of dynamical quark mass effects on the phase transition. At variance to the MIT-Bag results, with fixed-current quark masses, the main important effect of the chiral dynamics is the appearance of an end point for the coexistence zone. We show that a first-order hadron-quark phase transition may take place in the region T subset of (50-80) MeV and {rho}{sub B} subset of (2-4){rho}{sub 0}, which is possible to be probed in the new planned facilities, such as FAIR at GSI-Darmstadt and NICA at JINR-Dubna. From the isospin properties of the mixed phase, some possible signals are suggested. The importance of chiral symmetry and dynamical quark mass on the hadron-quark phase transition is stressed. The difficulty of an exact location of a critical end point comes from its appearance in a region of competition between chiral symmetry breaking and confinement, where our knowledge of effective QCD theories is still rather uncertain.

  10. Prospects for collider searches for dark matter with heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Artoni, Giacomo; Lin, Tongyan; Penning, Bjoern; Sciolla, Gabriella; Venturini, Alessio

    2013-08-05

    We present projections for future collider searches for dark matter produced in association with bottom or top quarks. Such production channels give rise to final states with missing transverse energy and one or more b-jets. Limits are given assuming an effective scalar operator coupling dark matter to quarks, where the dedicated analysis discussed here improves significantly over a generic monojet analysis. We give updated results for an anticipated high-luminosity LHC run at 14 TeV and for a 33 TeV hadron collider.

  11. Probing Quark-Gluon Interactions with Transverse Polarized Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Slifer, Kurt; Aghalaryan, A; Ahmidouch, A; Asaturyan, R; Bloch, F; Boeglin, W; Bosted, P; Carasco, C; Carlini, R; Cha, J; Chen, J P; Christy, M E; Cole, L; Coman, L; Crabb, D; Danagoulian, S; Day, D; Dunne, J; Elaasar, M; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Frlez, E; Gaskell, D; Gan, L; Gomez, J; Hu, B; Jourdan, J; Jones, M K; Keith, C; Keppel, C E; Khandaker, M; Klein, A; Kramer, L; Liang, Y; Lichtenstadt, J; Lindgren, R; Mack, D; McKee, P; McNulty, D; Meekins, D; Mkrtchyan, H; Nasseripour, R; Niculescu, I; Normand, K; Norum, B; Pocanic, D; Prok, Y; Raue, B; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Kiselev, D; Savvinov, N; Sawatzky, B; Seely, M; Sick, I; Smith, C; Smith, G; Stepanyan, S; Tang, L; Tajima, S; Testa, G; Vulcan, W; Wang, K; Warren, G; Wesselmann, F R; Wood, S; Yan, C; Yuan, L; Yun, J; Zeier, M

    2010-09-01

    We have extracted QCD matrix elements from our data on doubly polarized inelastic scattering of electrons on nuclei. We find the higher twist matrix element d2˜, which arises strictly from quark-gluon interactions, to be unambiguously nonzero. The data also reveal an isospin dependence of higher twist effects if we assume that the Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule is valid. The fundamental Bjorken sum rule obtained from the a0 matrix element is satisfied at our low momentum transfer.

  12. Magnetic Phases in Dense Quark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Incera, Vivian de la

    2007-10-26

    In this paper I discuss the magnetic phases of the three-flavor color superconductor. These phases can take place at different field strengths in a highly dense quark system. Given that the best natural candidates for the realization of color superconductivity are the extremely dense cores of neutron stars, which typically have very large magnetic fields, the magnetic phases here discussed could have implications for the physics of these compact objects.

  13. Interacting Quark Matter Equation of State for Compact Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Eduardo S.; Kurkela, Aleksi; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2014-02-01

    Lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) studies of the thermodynamics of hot quark-gluon plasma demonstrate the importance of accounting for the interactions of quarks and gluons if one wants to investigate the phase structure of strongly interacting matter. Motivated by this observation and using state-of-the-art results from perturbative QCD, we construct a simple, effective equation of state (EOS) for cold quark matter that consistently incorporates the effects of interactions and furthermore includes a built-in estimate of the inherent systematic uncertainties. This goes beyond the MIT bag model description in a crucial way, yet leads to an EOS that is equally straightforward to use. We also demonstrate that, at moderate densities, our EOS can be made to smoothly connect to hadronic EOSs, with the two exhibiting very similar behavior near the matching region. The resulting hybrid stars are seen to have masses similar to those predicted by the purely nucleonic EOSs.

  14. INTERACTING QUARK MATTER EQUATION OF STATE FOR COMPACT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Fraga, Eduardo S.; Kurkela, Aleksi; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2014-02-01

    Lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) studies of the thermodynamics of hot quark-gluon plasma demonstrate the importance of accounting for the interactions of quarks and gluons if one wants to investigate the phase structure of strongly interacting matter. Motivated by this observation and using state-of-the-art results from perturbative QCD, we construct a simple, effective equation of state (EOS) for cold quark matter that consistently incorporates the effects of interactions and furthermore includes a built-in estimate of the inherent systematic uncertainties. This goes beyond the MIT bag model description in a crucial way, yet leads to an EOS that is equally straightforward to use. We also demonstrate that, at moderate densities, our EOS can be made to smoothly connect to hadronic EOSs, with the two exhibiting very similar behavior near the matching region. The resulting hybrid stars are seen to have masses similar to those predicted by the purely nucleonic EOSs.

  15. Aharonov-Bohm phase in high density quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Chandrasekhar; Nitta, Muneto

    2016-03-01

    Stable non-Abelian vortices, which are color magnetic flux tubes as well as superfluid vortices, are present in the color-flavor locked phase of dense quark matter with diquark condensations. We calculate the Aharanov-Bohm phases of charged particles, that is, electrons, muons, and color-flavor locked mesons made of tetraquarks around a non-Abelian vortex.

  16. Final Report for Project. Quark matter under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Incera, Vivian; Ferrer, Efrain

    2015-12-31

    The results obtained in the two years of the grant have served to shine new light on several important questions about the phases of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) under extreme conditions that include quark matter at high density, as well quark-gluon plasma at high temperatures, both in the presence of strong magnetic fields. The interest in including an external magnetic field on these studies is motivated by the generation of large magnetic fields in off-central heavy-ion collisions and by their common presence in astrophysical compact objects, the two scenarios where the physics of quark matter becomes relevant. The tasks carried out in this DOE project led us, among other things, to discover the first connection between the physics of very dense quark matter and novel materials as for instance topological insulators and Weyl semimetals; they allowed us to find a physical explanation for and a solution to a standing puzzle in the apparent effect of a magnetic field on the critical temperature of the QCD chiral transition; and they led us to establish by the first time that the core of the observed two-solar-mass neutron stars could be made up of quark matter in certain inhomogeneous chiral phases in a magnetic field and that this was consistent with current astrophysical observations. A major goal established by the Nuclear Science Advisory committee in its most recent report “Reaching for the Horizon” has been “to truly understand how nuclei and strongly interacting matter in all its forms behave and can predict their behavior in new settings.” The results found in this DOE project have all contributed to address this goal, and thus they are important for advancing fundamental knowledge in the area of nuclear physics and for enhancing our understanding of the role of strong magnetic fields in the two settings where they are most relevant, neutron stars and heavy-ion collisions.

  17. Surface tension of highly magnetized degenerate quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugones, G.; Grunfeld, A. G.

    2017-01-01

    We study the surface tension of highly magnetized three-flavor quark matter within the formalism of multiple reflection expansion. Quark matter is described as a mixture of free Fermi gases composed of quarks u , d , s and electrons in chemical equilibrium under weak interactions. Due to the presence of strong magnetic fields the particles' transverse motion is quantized into Landau levels, and the surface tension has a different value in the parallel and transverse directions with respect to the magnetic field. We calculate the transverse and longitudinal surface tension for different values of the magnetic field and for quark-matter drops with different sizes, from a few fm to the bulk limit. For baryon number densities between 2 to 10 times the nuclear saturation density, the surface tension falls in the range of 2 to 20 MeV /fm2 . The largest contribution comes from strange quarks which have a surface tension an order of magnitude larger than the one for u or d quarks and more than two orders of magnitude larger than for electrons. Our results show that the total surface tension is quite insensitive to the size of the drop. We also find that the surface tensions in the transverse and parallel directions are almost unaffected by the magnetic field if e B is below ˜5 ×10-3GeV2 . Nevertheless, for higher values of e B , there is a significant increase in the parallel surface tension and a significant decrease in the transverse one with respect to the unmagnetized case.

  18. Quark Gluon Plasma: Surprises from strongly coupled QCD matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacak, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics has long predicted a transition from normal hadronic matter to a phase where the quarks and gluons are no longer bound together and can move freely. Quark gluon plasma is now produced regularly in collisions of heavy nuclei at very high energy at both the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the U.S. and at the LHC in Europe. Quark gluon plasma exhibits remarkable properties. Its vanishingly small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio means that it flows essentially without internal friction, making it one of the most ``perfect'' liquids known. It is also very opaque to transiting particles including heavy charm quarks, though the exact mechanism for this is not yet understood. Recent data suggest that even very small colliding systems may produce a droplet of plasma. The similarities to strongly coupled or correlated systems in ultra-cold atoms and condensed matter are striking, and have inspired novel theoretical descriptions growing out of string theory. It remains a mystery how this plasma emerges from cold, dense gluonic matter deep inside nuclei. I will discuss how a future electron-ion collider can help address this question.

  19. Stability of superfluid vortices in dense quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Mark G.; Mallavarapu, S. Kumar; Vachaspati, Tanmay; Windisch, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Superfluid vortices in the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase of dense quark matter are known to be energetically disfavored relative to well-separated triplets of so-called semi-superfluid color flux tubes. However, the short-range interaction (metastable versus unstable) has not been established. In this paper we perform numerical calculations using the effective theory of the condensate field, mapping the regions in the parameter space of coupling constants where the vortices are metastable versus unstable. For the case of zero-gauge coupling we analytically identify a candidate for the unstable mode and show that it agrees well with the results of the numerical calculations. We find that in the region of the parameter space that seems likely to correspond to real-world CFL quark matter the vortices are unstable, indicating that if such matter exists in neutron star cores it is very likely to contain semi-superfluid color flux tubes rather than superfluid vortices.

  20. Transverse top quark polarization and the forward-backward asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Matthew; Tweedie, Brock

    2013-08-01

    The forward-backward asymmetry in top pair production at the Tevatron has long been in tension with the Standard Model prediction. One of the only viable new physics scenarios capable of explaining this anomaly is an s-channel axigluon-like resonance, with the quantum numbers of the gluon but with significant axial couplings to quarks. While such a resonance can lead to a clear bump or excess in the or dijet mass spectra, it may also simply be too broad to cleanly observe. Here, we point out that broad resonances generally lead to net top and antitop polarizations transverse to the production plane. This polarization is consistent with all discrete spacetime symmetries, and, analogous to the forward-backward asymmetry itself, is absent in QCD at leading order. Within the parameter space consistent with the asymmetry measurements, the induced polarization can be sizable, and might be observable at the Tevatron or the LHC.

  1. Warm stellar matter within the quark-meson-coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, P. K.; Providência, C.; Menezes, D. P.

    2010-10-01

    In the present article, we investigate stellar matter obtained within the quark-meson-coupling (QMC) model for fixed temperature and with the entropy of the order of 1 or 2 Boltzmann units per baryon for neutrino-free matter and matter with trapped neutrinos. A new prescription for the calculation of the baryon effective masses in terms of the free energy is used. Comparing the results of the present work with those obtained from the nonlinear Walecka model, smaller strangeness and neutrino fractions are predicted within QMC. As a consequence, QMC has a smaller window of metastability for conversion into a low-mass blackhole during cooling.

  2. Warm stellar matter within the quark-meson-coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, P. K.; Providencia, C.; Menezes, D. P.

    2010-10-15

    In the present article, we investigate stellar matter obtained within the quark-meson-coupling (QMC) model for fixed temperature and with the entropy of the order of 1 or 2 Boltzmann units per baryon for neutrino-free matter and matter with trapped neutrinos. A new prescription for the calculation of the baryon effective masses in terms of the free energy is used. Comparing the results of the present work with those obtained from the nonlinear Walecka model, smaller strangeness and neutrino fractions are predicted within QMC. As a consequence, QMC has a smaller window of metastability for conversion into a low-mass blackhole during cooling.

  3. A search for dark matter with bottom quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruskal, Michael Evans

    2016-01-01

    Despite making up over 80% of the matter in the universe, very little is known about dark matter. Its only well-established property is that it interacts gravitationally, but does not interact with ordinary matter through any of the other known forces. Specific details such as the number of dark matter particles, their quantum properties, and their interactions remain elusive and are only loosely constrained by experiments. In this dissertation I describe a novel search for a particular type of dark matter that couples preferentially to heavy quarks, using LHC proton-proton collisions at ATLAS. With a model-independent framework, comparisons are made to results obtained from other dark matter searches, and new limits are set on various interaction strengths.

  4. Properties of color-flavor locked strange quark matter and strange stars in a new quark mass scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Qian; Chen, ShiWu; Peng, GuangXiong; Xu, JianFeng

    2013-09-01

    Considering the effect of one-gluon-exchange interaction between quarks, the color-flavor locked strange quark matter and strange stars are investigated in a new quark mass density-dependent model. It is found that the color-flavor locked strange quark matter can be more stable if the one-gluon-exchange effect is included. The lower density behavior of the sound velocity in this model is different from the previous results. Moreover, the new equation of state leads to a heavier acceptable maximum mass, supporting the recent observation of a compact star mass as large as about 2 times the solar mass.

  5. Measurement of W Boson Polarization in Top Quark Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Vickey, Trevor Neil

    2004-01-01

    A measurement of the polarization of the W boson from top quark decay is an excellent test of the V-A form of the charged-current weak interaction in the standard model. Since the longitudinal W boson is intimately related to the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism, and the standard model gives a specific prediction for the fraction of longitudinal W bosons from top decays, it is of particular interest for study. This thesis presents a measurement of W boson polarization in top quark decays through an analysis of the cosθ* distribution in the lepton-plus-jets channel of t$\\bar{t}$ candidate events from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. This measurement uses an integrated luminosity of ~ 162 pb-1 of data collected with the CDF Run II detector, resulting in 31 t$\\bar{t}$ candidate events with at least one identified b jet. Using a binned likelihood fit to the cosθ* distribution from the t$\\bar{t}$ candidate events found in this sample, the fraction of W bosons with longitudinal polarization is determined to be F0 = 0.99$+0.29\\atop{-0.35}$stat.) ± 0.19(syst.), F0 > 0.33 @ 95% CL. This result is consistent with the standard model prediction, given a top quark mass of 174.3 GeV/c2, of F0 = 0.701 ± 0.012.

  6. Reviving quark nuggets as a candidate for dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atreya, Abhishek; Sarkar, Anjishnu; Srivastava, Ajit M.

    2014-08-01

    We discuss a novel mechanism for segregation of baryons and antibaryons in the quark-gluon plasma phase which can lead to formation of quark and antiquark nuggets in the early universe, irrespective of the order of the quark-hadron phase transition. This happens due to CP violating scattering of quarks and antiquarks from moving Z(3) domain walls. CP violation here is spontaneous in nature and arises from the nontrivial profile of the background gauge field (A0) between different Z(3) vacua. We study the effect of this spontaneous CP violation on the baryon transport across the collapsing large Z(3) domain walls (which can arise in the context of certain low energy scale inflationary models). Our results show that this CP violation can lead to large concentrations of baryons and antibaryons in the early universe. The quark and antiquark nuggets, formed by this alternate mechanism, can provide a viable dark matter candidate within standard model without violating any observational constraints.

  7. Probing Quark-Gluon Interactions with Transverse Polarized Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Slifer, K.; Rondon, O. A.; Crabb, D.; Day, D.; Frlez, E.; Lindgren, R.; McKee, P.; Norum, B.; Pocanic, D.; Prok, Y.; Sawatzky, B.; Smith, C.; Tajima, S.; Wang, K.; Zeier, M.; Zhu, H.; Aghalaryan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Ahmidouch, A.

    2010-09-03

    We have extracted QCD matrix elements from our data on doubly polarized inelastic scattering of electrons on nuclei. We find the higher twist matrix element d{sub 2}-tilde, which arises strictly from quark-gluon interactions, to be unambiguously nonzero. The data also reveal an isospin dependence of higher twist effects if we assume that the Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule is valid. The fundamental Bjorken sum rule obtained from the a{sub 0} matrix element is satisfied at our low momentum transfer.

  8. Quark matter nucleation in neutron stars and astrophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, Ignazio; Logoteta, Domenico; Vidaña, Isaac; Providência, Constança

    2016-03-01

    A phase of strong interacting matter with deconfined quarks is expected in the core of massive neutron stars. We investigate the quark deconfinement phase transition in cold (T=0 and hot β -stable hadronic matter. Assuming a first order phase transition, we calculate and compare the nucleation rate and the nucleation time due to quantum and thermal nucleation mechanisms. We show that above a threshold value of the central pressure a pure hadronic star (HS) (i.e. a compact star with no fraction of deconfined quark matter) is metastable to the conversion to a quark star (QS) (i.e. a hybrid star or a strange star). This process liberates an enormous amount of energy, of the order of 1053erg, which causes a powerful neutrino burst, likely accompanied by intense gravitational waves emission, and possibly by a second delayed (with respect to the supernova explosion forming the HS) explosion which could be the energy source of a powerful gamma-ray burst (GRB). This stellar conversion process populates the QS branch of compact stars, thus one has in the Universe two coexisting families of compact stars: pure hadronic stars and quark stars. We introduce the concept of critical mass M_{cr} for cold HSs and proto-hadronic stars (PHSs), and the concept of limiting conversion temperature for PHSs. We show that PHSs with a mass M < M_{cr} could survive the early stages of their evolution without decaying to QSs. Finally, we discuss the possible evolutionary paths of proto-hadronic stars.

  9. Surface effects in color superconducting strange-quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Oertel, Micaela; Urban, Michael

    2008-04-01

    Surface effects in strange-quark matter play an important role for certain observables which have been proposed in order to identify strange stars, and color superconductivity can strongly modify these effects. We study the surface of color superconducting strange-quark matter by solving the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equations for finite systems ('strangelets') within the MIT bag model, supplemented with a pairing interaction. Because of the bag-model boundary condition, the strange-quark density is suppressed at the surface. This leads to a positive surface charge, concentrated in a layer of {approx}1 fm below the surface, even in the color-flavor locked (CFL) phase. However, since in the CFL phase all quarks are paired, this positive charge is compensated by a negative charge, which turns out to be situated in a layer of a few tens of fm below the surface, and the total charge of CFL strangelets is zero. We also study the surface and curvature contributions to the total energy. Because of the strong pairing, the energy as a function of the mass number is very well reproduced by a liquid-drop type formula with curvature term.

  10. Models of quark-hadron matter and compact stars

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, S.; Steinheimer, J.; Dexheimer, V.; Negreiros, R.

    2016-01-22

    Phenomenological approaches to Quantum Chromodynamics covering the whole region of low and high temperatures and/or densities must address the problem that the effective degrees of freedom change from hadrons to quarks and gluons. We approach this task with a unified description of hadronic and quark matter allowing for cross-over as well as first or second-order phase transitions. As a further benefit of such an approach, a quantitatively satisfactory description of nuclear ground state matter as well as nuclear and hypernuclear properties can be achieved. We apply this model to neutron stars and consider potential constraints on star properties arising from lattice gauge results in relation with the observation of 2 solar mass stars.

  11. The physics of hot and dense quark-gluon matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    2012-05-10

    This technical report describes the work done under the DOE grant DE-FG-88ER41723 (final award number DE-SC0005645), "The physics of hot and dense quark-gluon matter", during the year of 12/01/2010 through 11/30/2011. As planned in the proposal, the performed research focused along two main thrusts: 1) topological effects in hot quark-gluon matter and 2) phenomenology of relativistic heavy ion collisions. The results of research are presented in 12 papers published in reputable refereed journals (Physical Review Letters, Physical Review, Physics Letters and Nuclear Physics). All of the performed research is directly related to the experimental programs of DOE, especially at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Much of it also has broader interdisciplinary implications - for example, the work on the non-dissipative chiral magnetic current is directly relevant for quantum computing. The attached report describes the performed work in detail.

  12. Measuring top-quark polarization in top-pair + missing-energy events.

    PubMed

    Berger, Edmond L; Cao, Qing-Hong; Yu, Jiang-Hao; Zhang, Hao

    2012-10-12

    The polarization of a top quark can be sensitive to new physics beyond the standard model. Since the charged lepton from top-quark decay is maximally correlated with the top-quark spin, it is common to measure the polarization from the distribution in the angle between the charged lepton and the top-quark directions. We propose a novel method based on the charged lepton energy fraction and illustrate the method with a detailed simulation of top-quark pairs produced in supersymmetric top squark pair production. We show that the lepton energy ratio distribution that we define is very sensitive to the top-quark polarization but insensitive to the precise measurement of the top-quark energy.

  13. Quark matter under strong magnetic fields in chiral models

    SciTech Connect

    Rabhi, Aziz; Providencia, Constanca

    2011-05-15

    The chiral model is used to describe quark matter under strong magnetic fields and is compared to other models, the MIT bag model and the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. The effect of vacuum corrections due to the magnetic field is discussed. It is shown that if the magnetic-field vacuum corrections are not taken into account explicitly, the parameters of the models should be fitted to low-density meson properties in the presence of the magnetic field.

  14. Quark matter in the Hartree-Fock approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Grassi, F.

    1987-07-01

    An equation of state is computed for quark matter interacting through a phenomenological potential in the Hartree-Fock approximation. It is shown that for color-independent confining potentials, it can be approximated by the Hartree result and leads to a first order mass phase transition. For color-dependent confining potentials, a phase transition from a Fermi sphere to a Fermi shell is possible.

  15. Bulk viscosity of strange quark matter: Urca versus nonleptonic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sa'd, Basil A.; Shovkovy, Igor A.; Rischke, Dirk H.

    2007-06-15

    A general formalism for calculating the bulk viscosity of strange quark matter is developed. Contrary to the common belief that the nonleptonic processes alone give the dominant contribution to the bulk viscosity, the inclusion of the Urca processes is shown to play an important role at intermediate densities when the characteristic r-mode oscillation frequencies are not too high. The interplay of nonleptonic and Urca processes is analyzed in detail.

  16. Quark Matter Equation of State from Perturbative QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2017-03-01

    In this proceedings contribution, we discuss recent developments in the perturbative determination of the Equation of State of dense quark matter, relevant for the microscopic description of neutron star cores. First, we introduce the current state of the art in the problem, both at zero and small temperatures, and then present results from two recent perturbative studies that pave the way towards extending the EoS to higher orders in perturbation theory.

  17. Hadronic-to-Quark-Matter Phase Transition: Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niebergal, Brian

    There are three Parts to this Thesis; the first gives an introduction to the search for quark-gluon plasmas, both in theory and experiment, and provides motivation for using astrophysics to complement this search. The second explores the phase transition from hadronic matter to a quark-gluon plasma in an astrophysical setting, through the conversion of u,d - to u,d,s-quarks via weak reactions. This transition is formulated in terms of a reactive-diffusive-hydrodynamical problem with the effects of neutrino cooling included, as well as the entropy change due to heat released in forming the stable quark phase. These equations are solved numerically with my newly developed, freely-available, numerical code (the BURN-UD CODE) - which is then applied to the problem of neutron matter inside a cold neutron star burning into stable u,d,s-quark matter. Analytic solutions to the equation set are found and used to verify the BURN-UD code and its findings. The most important findings are as follows; (i) the laminar speed of the combustion interface is 0.002 - 0.04 times the speed of light, much faster than previous estimates derived without hydrodynamic considerations, (ii) neutrino cooling (deleptonization) is essential as it results in the unexpected destabilization of the combustion interface, which causes it to halt at lower densities (≈ 2 times nuclear saturation density). Also, (iii) by appealing to this newly discovered deleptonization instability it is shown for the first time exactly why the transition from a neutron star to a u,d,s-quark star must be explosive; these results validate the Quark-Nova model. Instructions are then given on how the BURN-UD code may be used to model relativistic heavy-ion collision experiments as well as the reverse transition, which is expected to have occurred in the first few moments following the Big-Bang. The last Part of this Thesis concerns the phenomenology of color-superconductivity in compact stars, which occurs much later than

  18. Introductory Overview of Quark Matter 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2013-05-01

    The two arguably most generic phenomena seen in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions are the flow of essentially all soft hadronic observables and the quenching of essentially all hard hadronic observables. Limiting the discussion to these two classes of phenomena, I review what can be said so far about the properties of hot and dense QCD matter from the heavy ion programs at RHIC and at the LHC, and I discuss the opportunities for further progress in the coming years.

  19. Thermal conductivity of color-flavor-locked quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braby, Matt; Chao, Jingyi; Schäfer, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    We compute the thermal conductivity of color-flavor-locked (CFL) quark matter. At temperatures below the scale set by the gap in the quark spectrum, transport properties are determined by collective modes. In this work we focus on the contribution from the lightest modes, the superfluid phonon and the massive neutral kaon. The calculation is done in the framework of kinetic theory, using variational solutions of the linearized Boltzmann equation. We find that the thermal conductivity owing to phonons is κ(P)~1.04×1026μ5008Δ50-6ergcm-1s-1K-1 and the contribution of kaons is κ(K)~2.81×1021fπ,1004TMeV1/2m10-5/2ergcm-1s-1K-1. These values are smaller than previous estimates but still much larger than (in the case of phonons) or similar to (for kaons) the corresponding values in nuclear matter. From the phonon thermal conductivity we estimate that a CFL quark matter core of a compact star becomes isothermal on a time scale of a few seconds.

  20. Thermal conductivity of color-flavor-locked quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Braby, Matt; Chao Jingyi; Schaefer, Thomas

    2010-04-15

    We compute the thermal conductivity of color-flavor-locked (CFL) quark matter. At temperatures below the scale set by the gap in the quark spectrum, transport properties are determined by collective modes. In this work we focus on the contribution from the lightest modes, the superfluid phonon and the massive neutral kaon. The calculation is done in the framework of kinetic theory, using variational solutions of the linearized Boltzmann equation. We find that the thermal conductivity owing to phonons is kappa{sup (P)}approx1.04x10{sup 26} mu{sub 500}{sup 8}DELTA{sub 50}{sup -6} erg cm{sup -1} s{sup -1} K{sup -1} and the contribution of kaons is kappa{sup (K)}approx2.81x10{sup 21} f{sub p}i{sub ,100}{sup 4}T{sub MeV}{sup 1/2}m{sub 10}{sup -5/2} erg cm{sup -1} s{sup -1} K{sup -1}. These values are smaller than previous estimates but still much larger than (in the case of phonons) or similar to (for kaons) the corresponding values in nuclear matter. From the phonon thermal conductivity we estimate that a CFL quark matter core of a compact star becomes isothermal on a time scale of a few seconds.

  1. Estimating transport coefficients in hot and dense quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Paramita; Kadam, Guru Prakash; Mishra, Hiranmaya

    2016-11-01

    We compute the transport coefficients, namely, the coefficients of shear and bulk viscosity, as well as thermal conductivity, for hot and dense quark matter. The calculations are performed within the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model. The estimation of the transport coefficients is made using a quasiparticle approach of solving the Boltzmann kinetic equation within the relaxation time approximation. The transition rates are calculated in a manifestly covariant manner to estimate the thermal-averaged cross sections for quark-quark and quark-antiquark scattering. The calculations are performed for finite chemical potential also. Within the parameters of the model, the ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density has a minimum at the Mott transition temperature. At vanishing chemical potential, the ratio of bulk viscosity to entropy density, on the other hand, decreases with temperature, with a sharp decrease near the critical temperature, and vanishes beyond it. At finite chemical potential, however, it increases slowly with temperature beyond the Mott temperature. The coefficient of thermal conductivity also shows a minimum at the critical temperature.

  2. Vortices and other topological solitons in dense quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Minoru; Hirono, Yuji; Nitta, Muneto; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2014-01-01

    Dense quantum chromodynamic matter accommodates various kind of topological solitons such as vortices, domain walls, monopoles, kinks, boojums, and so on. In this review, we discuss various properties of topological solitons in dense quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and their phenomenological implications. Particular emphasis is placed on the topological solitons in the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase, which exhibits both superfluidity and superconductivity. The properties of topological solitons are discussed in terms of effective field theories such as the Ginzburg-Landau theory, the chiral Lagrangian, or the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation. The most fundamental string-like topological excitations in the CFL phase are non-Abelian vortices, which are 1/3 quantized superfluid vortices and color magnetic flux tubes. These vortices are created at a phase transition by the Kibble-Zurek mechanism or when the CFL phase is realized in compact stars, which rotate rapidly. The interaction between vortices is found to be repulsive and consequently a vortex lattice is formed in rotating CFL matter. Bosonic and fermionic zero-energy modes are trapped in the core of a non-Abelian vortex and propagate along it as gapless excitations. The former consists of translational zero modes (a Kelvin mode) with a quadratic dispersion and {mathbb {C}}P^2 Nambu-Goldstone gapless modes with a linear dispersion, associated with the CFL symmetry spontaneously broken in the core of a vortex, while the latter is Majorana fermion zero modes belonging to the triplet of the symmetry remaining in the core of a vortex. The low-energy effective theory of the bosonic zero modes is constructed as a non-relativistic free complex scalar field and a relativistic {mathbb {C}}P^2 model in 1+1 dimensions. The effects of strange quark mass, electromagnetic interactions, and non-perturbative quantum corrections are taken into account in the {mathbb {C}}P^2 effective theory. Various topological objects associated

  3. Polar and apolar active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2008-03-01

    Assemblies of interacting self-driven units form a new type of active soft matter with collective behavior qualitatively different from that of its individual constituents, nonequilibrium phase transitions, and unusual mechanical and rheological properties. Examples include cytoskeletal filaments crosslinked by motor proteins, bacterial colonies, migrating cells, and vibrated layers of granular rods. In this talk I will review our work on using nonequilibrium statistical physics to derive a continuum description of these systems from specific models of single particle dynamics. This approach aims at understanding the interplay between physical mechanisms (such as formation or loss of physical connections, excluded volume effects, directional forces) and biochemical or other processes in regulating the large-scale organization and function of active matter. I will contrast the behavior of units with a head and a tail that can exhibit a macroscopic polar state, where all organisms move coherently in a preferred direction, with that of units with head-tail symmetry, that can order in a nematic state, with no net motion on macroscopic scale. Finally, I will use a simple model of active rods on a substrate to discuss the interplay between equilibrium steric effects and self-propulsion in controlling order and fluctuations in active fluids.

  4. Numerical simulation of the hydrodynamical combustion to strange quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Niebergal, Brian; Ouyed, Rachid; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2010-12-15

    We present results from a numerical solution to the burning of neutron matter inside a cold neutron star into stable u,d,s quark matter. Our method solves hydrodynamical flow equations in one dimension with neutrino emission from weak equilibrating reactions, and strange quark diffusion across the burning front. We also include entropy change from heat released in forming the stable quark phase. Our numerical results suggest burning front laminar speeds of 0.002-0.04 times the speed of light, much faster than previous estimates derived using only a reactive-diffusive description. Analytic solutions to hydrodynamical jump conditions with a temperature-dependent equation of state agree very well with our numerical findings for fluid velocities. The most important effect of neutrino cooling is that the conversion front stalls at lower density (below {approx_equal}2 times saturation density). In a two-dimensional setting, such rapid speeds and neutrino cooling may allow for a flame wrinkle instability to develop, possibly leading to detonation.

  5. Nonthermal dark matter and the top polarization at collider

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yu

    2016-06-21

    We discuss the characteristic collider signatures, in particular a highly polarized resonant single-top channel for a minimal color triplet extension to the Standard Model. This extension provides baryogensis and a non-thermal production history of a dark matter candidate. We further discuss the implementation of both completely left and right-handed chiral interaction in the model and the difference in phenomenology between the two scenarios. If the color triplets are isospin singlets, the dark matter candidate mass is 1 GeV and the single-top quarks are strictly right-handed polarized. Alternatively, the isospin-doublet color triplets lead to strictly left-handed single top events and a more extended particle spectrum.

  6. Cooling of Compact Stars with Color Superconducting Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, T.; Yasutake, N.; Hashimoto, M.; Maruyama, T.; Tatsumi, T.; Fujimoto, M. Y.

    2015-11-01

    We show a scenario for the cooling of compact stars considering the central source of Cassiopeia A (Cas A).The Cas A observation shows that the central source is a compact star with a high effective temperature, and it is consistent with the cooling without exotic phases. The Cas A observation also gives the mass range of M ≥ 1.5 M_⊙.It may conflict with the current cooling scenarios of compact stars that heavy stars show rapid cooling. We include the effect of the color superconducting (CSC) quark matter phase on the thermal evolution of compact stars.We assume the gap energy of CSC quark phase is large (Δ ≳ 10 MeV),and we simulate the cooling of compact stars. We present cooling curves obtained from the evolutionary calculations of compact stars: while heavier stars cool slowly, and lighter ones indicate the opposite tendency.

  7. Chiral symmetry and density waves in quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, E.; Tatsumi, T.

    2005-06-01

    A density wave in quark matter is discussed at finite temperature, which occurs along with the chiral condensation, and is described by a dual standing wave in scalar and pseudoscalar condensates on the chiral circle. The mechanism is quite similar to that for the spin density wave suggested by Overhauser and entirely reflects many-body effects. It is found within a mean-field approximation for the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model that the chiral-condensed phase with the density wave develops at a high-density region just outside the usual chiral-transition line in phase diagram. A magnetic property of the density wave is also elucidated.

  8. Neutrino emissivities and bulk viscosity in neutral two-flavor quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdermann, J.; Blaschke, D.; Fischer, T.; Kachanovich, A.

    2016-12-01

    We study thermodynamic and transport properties for the isotropic color-spin-locking (iso-CSL) phase of two-flavor superconducting quark matter under compact star constraints within a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type chiral quark model. Chiral symmetry breaking and the phase transition to superconducting quark matter leads to a density dependent change of quark masses, chemical potentials, and diquark gap. A self-consistent treatment of these physical quantities influences the microscopic calculations of transport properties. We present results for the iso-CSL direct URCA emissivities and bulk viscosities, which fulfil the constraints on quark matter derived from cooling and rotational evolution of compact stars. We compare our results with the phenomenologically successful, but yet heuristic 2 SC +X phase. We show that the microscopically founded iso-CSL phase can replace the purely phenomenological 2 SC +X phase in modern simulations of the cooling evolution for compact stars with color-superconducting quark matter interior.

  9. Bulk viscosity in 2SC and CFL quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, Mark G.; Schmitt, Andreas

    2007-11-19

    The bulk viscosities of two color-superconducting phases, the color-flavor locked (CFL) phase and the 2SC phase, are computed and compared to the result for unpaired quark matter. In the case of the CFL phase, processes involving kaons and the superfluid mode give the largest contribution to the bulk viscosity since all fermionic modes are gapped. In the case of the 2SC phase, ungapped fermionic modes are present and the process u+d{r_reversible}u+s provides the dominant contribution. In both cases, the bulk viscosity can become larger than that of the unpaired phase for sufficiently large temperatures (T > or approx. 1 MeV for CFL, T > or approx. 0.1 MeV for 2SC). Bulk viscosity (as well as shear viscosity) is important for the damping of r-modes in compact stars and thus can potentially be used as an indirect signal for the presence or absence of color-superconducting quark matter.

  10. Plane Symmetric Cosmological Model with Quark and Strange Quark Matter in f ( R, T) Theory of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, P. K.; Pawar, D. D.

    2017-03-01

    We studied plane symmetric cosmological model in the presence of quark and strange quark matter with the help of f( R, T) theory. To decipher solutions of plane symmetric space-time, we used power law relation between scale factor and deceleration parameter. We considered the special law of variation of Hubble's parameter proposed by Berman ( Nuovo Cimento B74, 182, 1983) which yields constant deceleration parameter. We also discussed the physical behavior of the solutions by using some physical parameters.

  11. Shear and bulk viscosities of quark matter from quark-meson fluctuations in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Peixoto, Thiago C.; Roy, Victor; Serna, Fernando E.; Krein, Gastão

    2016-04-01

    We have calculated the temperature dependence of shear η and bulk ζ viscosities of quark matter due to quark-meson fluctuations. The quark thermal width originating from quantum fluctuations of quark-π and quark-σ loops at finite temperature is calculated with the formalism of real-time thermal field theory. Temperature-dependent constituent-quark and meson masses and quark-meson couplings are obtained in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We found a nontrivial influence of the temperature-dependent masses and couplings on the Landau-cut structure of the quark self-energy. Our results for the ratios η /s and ζ /s , where s is the entropy density (also determined in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in the quasiparticle approximation), are in fair agreement with results of the literature obtained from different models and techniques. In particular, our result for η /s has a minimum very close to the quantum lower bound, η /s =1 /4 π .

  12. Kondo cloud of single heavy quark in cold and dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Shigehiro

    2017-10-01

    The Kondo effect is a universal phenomena observed in a variety of fermion systems containing a heavy impurity particle whose interaction is governed by the non-Abelian interaction. At extremely high density, I study the Kondo effect by color exchange in quark matter containing a single heavy (charm or bottom) quark as an impurity particle. To obtain the ground state with the Kondo effect, I introduce the condensate mixing the light quark and the heavy quark (Kondo cloud) in the mean-field approximation. I estimate the energy gain by formation of the Kondo cloud, and present that the Kondo cloud exhibits the resonant structure. I also evaluate the scattering cross section for the light quark and the heavy quark, and discuss its effect to the finite size quark matter.

  13. Phase Diagram and Instability of Dense Neutral Three-Flavor Quark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, Kenji

    2006-07-11

    We address the phase structure of color superconducting quark matter at high quark density. Under the electric and color neutrality conditions there appear various phases as a result of the Fermi surface mismatch among different quark flavors induced by finite strange quark mass; the color-flavor locked (CFL) phase, the u-quark superconducting (uSC) phase, the d-quark superconducting (dSC) phase, the two-flavor superconducting (2SC) phase, and the unpaired quark matter (UQM). Besides, when the Fermi surface mismatch is large enough to surpass the gap energy, the gapless superconducting phase is expected. We discuss the chromomagnetic instability problem and explore the instability regions on the phase diagram.

  14. Wormhole geometries supported by quark matter at ultra-high densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Mak, M. K.

    2015-11-01

    A fundamental ingredient in wormhole physics is the presence of exotic matter, which involves the violation of the null energy condition (NEC). In this context, we investigate the possibility that wormholes could be supported by quark matter at extreme densities. Theoretical and experimental investigations of the structure of baryons show that strange quark matter, consisting of the u, d and s quarks, is the most energetically favorable state of baryonic matter. Moreover, at ultra-high densities, quark matter may exist in a variety of superconducting states, namely, the Color-Flavor-Locked (CFL) phase. Motivated by these theoretical models, we explore the conditions under which wormhole geometries may be supported by the equations of state (EOS) considered in the theoretical investigations of quark-gluon interactions. For the description of the normal quark matter, we adopt the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) bag model EOS, while the color superconducting quark phases are described by a first-order approximation of the free energy. By assuming specific forms for the bag and gap functions, several wormhole models are obtained for both normal and superconducting quark matter. The effects of the presence of an electrical charge are also taken into account.

  15. Viscous damping of r-mode oscillations in compact stars with quark matter.

    SciTech Connect

    Jaikumar, P.; Rupak, G.; Steiner, A. W.; Physics; Inst. of Mathematical Sciences; North Carolina State Univ.; Michigan State Univ.

    2008-12-01

    We determine characteristic time scales for the viscous damping of r-mode oscillations in rapidly rotating compact stars that contain quark matter. We present results for the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase of dense quark matter, in which the up, down, and strange quarks are gapped, as well as the normal (ungapped) quark phase. While the ungapped quark phase supports a temperature window 10{sup 8} K < = T < = 5 x 10{sup 9} K where the r mode is damped even for rapid rotation, the r mode in a rapidly rotating pure CFL star is not damped in the temperature range 10{sup 10} K < = T < = 10{sup 11} K. Rotating hybrid stars with quark matter cores display an instability window whose width is determined by the amount of quark matter present, and they can have large spin frequencies outside this window. Except at high temperatures T > = 10{sup 10} K, the presence of a quark phase allows for larger critical frequencies and smaller spin periods compared to rotating neutron stars. If low-mass x-ray binaries contain a large amount of ungapped or CFL quark matter, then our estimates of the r-mode instability suggest that there should be a population of rapidly rotating binaries at nu > {approx} 1000 Hz which have not yet been observed.

  16. Viscous damping of r-mode oscillations in compact stars with quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Jaikumar, Prashanth; Rupak, Gautam; Steiner, Andrew W.

    2008-12-15

    We determine characteristic time scales for the viscous damping of r-mode oscillations in rapidly rotating compact stars that contain quark matter. We present results for the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase of dense quark matter, in which the up, down, and strange quarks are gapped, as well as the normal (ungapped) quark phase. While the ungapped quark phase supports a temperature window 10{sup 8} K{<=}T{<=}5x10{sup 9} K where the r mode is damped even for rapid rotation, the r mode in a rapidly rotating pure CFL star is not damped in the temperature range 10{sup 10} K{<=}T{<=}10{sup 11} K. Rotating hybrid stars with quark matter cores display an instability window whose width is determined by the amount of quark matter present, and they can have large spin frequencies outside this window. Except at high temperatures T{>=}10{sup 10} K, the presence of a quark phase allows for larger critical frequencies and smaller spin periods compared to rotating neutron stars. If low-mass x-ray binaries contain a large amount of ungapped or CFL quark matter, then our estimates of the r-mode instability suggest that there should be a population of rapidly rotating binaries at {nu} > or approx. 1000 Hz which have not yet been observed.

  17. Heating (gapless) color-flavor locked quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, Kenji; Kouvaris, Chris; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2005-02-01

    We explore the phase diagram of neutral quark matter at high baryon density as a function of the temperature T and the strange quark mass M{sub s}. At T=0, there is a sharp distinction between the insulating color-flavor locked (CFL) phase, which occurs where M{sub s}{sup 2}/{mu}<2{delta}, and the metallic gapless CFL phase, which occurs at larger M{sub s}{sup 2}/{mu}. Here, {mu} is the chemical potential for quark number and {delta} is the gap in the CFL phase. We find this distinction blurred at T{ne}0, as the CFL phase undergoes an insulator to metal crossover when it is heated. We present an analytic treatment of this crossover. At higher temperatures, we map out the phase transition lines at which the gap parameters {delta}{sub 1}, {delta}{sub 2}, and {delta}{sub 3} describing ds pairing, us pairing and ud pairing, respectively, go to zero in an Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model. For small values of M{sub s}{sup 2}/{mu}, we find that {delta}{sub 2} vanishes first, then {delta}{sub 1}, then {delta}{sub 3}. We find agreement with a previous Ginzburg-Landau analysis of the form of these transitions and find quantitative agreement with results obtained in full QCD at asymptotic density for ratios of coefficients in the Ginzburg-Landau potential. At larger M{sub s}{sup 2}/{mu}, we find that {delta}{sub 1} vanishes first, then {delta}{sub 2}, then {delta}{sub 3}. Hence, we find a ''doubly critical'' point in the (M{sub s}{sup 2}/{mu},T) plane at which two lines of second order phase transitions ({delta}{sub 1}{yields}0 and {delta}{sub 2}{yields}0) cross. Because we do not make any small-M{sub s} approximation, if we choose a relatively strong coupling leading to large gap parameters, we are able to pursue the analysis of the phase diagram all the way up to such large values of M{sub s} that there are no strange quarks present.

  18. Aspects regarding decay of superfluid vortices in dense quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallavarapu, S. Kumar; Alford, Mark

    2015-04-01

    It has been mentioned in current literature that the so called superfluid vortices/strings in high density color flavor locked phase of dense quark matter might be unstable. A regular superfluid string could decay into more fundamental strings known as semi-superfluid strings. Each semi-superfluid string has a non-zero color flux. It has been calculated that a combination of three such semi-superfluid strings which have zero net color flux is more stable than a single superfluid string, so long as the separation between the semi-superfluid strings is much larger than the size of each one. Is the semi-superfluid string configuration more stable than the superfluid string even for small separations? Does the single superfluid string spontaneously break into semi-superfluid strings? In this talk we offer results and insight that would help us answer these questions.

  19. Vortex structure in superfluid color-flavor locked quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Mark G.; Mallavarapu, S. Kumar; Vachaspati, Tanmay; Windisch, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    The core region of a neutron star may feature quark matter in the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase. The CFL condensate breaks the baryon number symmetry, such that the phenomenon of superfluidity arises. If the core of the star is rotating, vortices will form in the superfluid, carrying the quanta of angular momentum. In a previous study we have solved the question of stability of these vortices, where we found numerical proof of a conjectured instability, according to which superfluid vortices will decay into an arrangement of so-called semi-superfluid fluxtubes. Here we report first results of an extension of our framework that allows us to study multi-vortex dynamics. This will in turn enable us to investigate the structure of semi-superfluid string lattices, which could be relevant to study pinning phenomena at the boundary of the core.

  20. Search for Stable Strange Quark Matter in Lunar Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Han, K.; Chikanian, A.; Emmet, W.; Finch, L. E.; Majka, R. D.; Sandweiss, J.; Ashenfelter, J.; Heinz, A.; Madsen, J.; Monreal, B.

    2009-08-28

    We report results from a search for strangelets (small chunks of strange quark matter) in lunar soil using the Yale WNSL accelerator as a mass spectrometer. We have searched over a range in mass from A=42 to A=70 amu for nuclear charges 5, 6, 8, 9, and 11. No strangelets were found in the experiment. For strangelets with nuclear charge 8, a concentration in lunar soil higher than 10{sup -16} is excluded at the 95% confidence level. The implied limit on the strangelet flux in cosmic rays is the most sensitive to date for the covered range and is relevant to both recent theoretical flux predictions and a strangelet candidate event found by the AMS-01 experiment.

  1. Strange quark-antiquark asymmetry of nucleon sea from Λ /Λ ¯ polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiaozhen; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Distinctions between quark to Λ and Λ ¯ longitudinal spin transfers in the semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering process were observed by the E665 and COMPASS Collaborations. There are suggestions that the difference between Λ and Λ ¯ production is related to the asymmetric strange-antistrange distribution inside the nucleon. However, previous calculations are still too small to explain the experimental data. From a realistic consideration of quark to Λ fragmentation due to different flavors, we investigate the strange quark contribution for Λ production and polarization. We find that the strange quark-antiquark asymmetry of the nucleon sea can be amplified into an observable quantity from the difference between Λ and Λ ¯ polarizations after taking into account the larger probability of the Λ produced from the s quark fragmentation process compared to that from the u or d quark. The qualitative agreement between our calculation and the experimental data supports the existence of the intrinsic strange sea and the strange-antistrange asymmetry. Thus the polarization of Λ /Λ ¯ does open a new window to probe the nucleon sea properties, especially the strange content and its quark-antiquark asymmetry.

  2. New LUX result constrains exotic quark mediators with the vector dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan-Ren; Li, Ming-Jie

    2016-12-01

    The scenario of the compressed mass spectrum between heavy quark and dark matter is a challenge for LHC searches. However, the elastic scattering cross-section between dark matter and nuclei in dark matter direct detection experiments can be enhanced with nearly degenerate masses between heavy quarks and dark matter. In this paper, we illustrate such scenario with a vector dark matter, using the latest result from LUX 2016. The mass constraints on heavy quarks can be more stringent than current limits from LHC, unless the coupling strength is very small. However, the compress mass spectrum with allowed tiny coupling strength makes the decay lifetime of heavy quarks longer than the timescale of QCD hadronization.

  3. Polarized heavy baryon production in quark-diquark model considering two different scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosavi Nejad, S. Mohammad; Delpasand, M.

    2017-09-01

    At sufficiently large transverse momentum, the dominant production mechanism for heavy baryons is actually the fragmentation. In this work, we first study the direct fragmentation of a heavy quark into the unpolarized triply heavy baryons in the leading order of perturbative QCD. In a completely different approach, we also analyze the two-stage fragmentation of a heavy quark into a scalar diquark followed by the fragmentation of such a scalar diquark into a triply heavy baryon: quark-diquark model of baryons. The results of this model are in acceptable agreement with those obtained through a full perturbative regime. Relying on the quark-diquark model and considering two different scenarios we determine the spin-dependent fragmentation functions of polarized heavy baryons in such a way that a vector or a pseudoscalar heavy diquark is an intermediate particle between the initial heavy quark and the final state baryon.

  4. Gluons and the Quark Sea at High Energies: Distributions, Polarization, Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Boer, Daniel; Diehl, Markus; Milner, Richard; Venugopalan, Raju; Vogelsang, Werner; Kaplan, David; Montgomery, Hugh; Vigdor, Steven; Accardi, A.; Aschenauer, E.C.; Burkardt, M.; Ent, R.; Guzey, V.; Hasch, D.; Kumar, K.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Li, Ying-chuan; Marciano, W.; Marquet, C.; Sabatie, F.; Stratmann, M.; /more authors..

    2012-06-07

    femtoscope scale lepton-collider ever, exceeding the intensity of the HERA collider a thousand fold. HERA, with its center-of-mass (CM) energy of 320 GeV, was built to search for quark substructure. An EIC, with its scientific focus on studying QCD in the regime where the sea quarks and gluons dominate, would have a lower CM energy. In a staged EIC design, the CM energy will range from 50-70 GeV in stage I to approximately twice that for the full design. In addition to being the first lepton collider exploring the structure of polarized protons, an EIC will also be the first electron-nucleus collider, probing the gluon and sea quark structure of nuclei for the first time. Following the same structure as the scientific discussions at the INT, this report is organized around the following four major themes: (1) The spin and flavor structure of the proton; (2) Three dimensional structure of nucleons and nuclei in momentum and configuration space; (3) QCD matter in nuclei; and (4) Electroweak physics and the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. In this executive summary, we will briefly outline the outstanding physics questions in these areas and the suite of measurements that are available with an EIC to address these. The status of accelerator and detector designs is addressed at the end of the summary. Tables of golden measurements for each of the key science areas outlined are presented on page 12. In addition, each chapter in the report contains a comprehensive overview of the science topic addressed. Interested readers are encouraged to read these and the individual contributions for more details on the present status of EIC science.

  5. Density-Dependent Relations among Properties of Hadronic Matter and Applications to Hadron-Quark Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Uechi, Hiroshi; Uechi, Schun T.

    2011-05-06

    Density-dependent relations among the saturation properties of symmetric nuclear matter and hyperonic matter, and properties of hadron-(strange) quark stars are shown by applying the conserving nonlinear {sigma}-{omega}-{rho} hadronic mean-field theory. Nonlinear interactions are renormalized self-consistently as effective coupling constants, effective masses, and sources of equations of motion by maintaining thermodynamic consistency to the mean-field approximation. Effective masses and coupling constants at the saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter simultaneously determine the binding energy and saturation properties of hyperonic matter. The coupling constants expected from the hadronic mean-field model and SU(6) quark model for the vector coupling constants are compared by calculating masses of hadron-quark neutron stars. The nonlinear {sigma}-{omega}-{rho} mean-field approximation with vacuum fluctuation corrections and strange quark matter defined by the MIT-bag model were employed to examine properties of hadron-(strange) quark stars. We found that hadron-(strange) quark stars become more stable at high densities compared to pure hadronic and strange quark stars.

  6. Bulk Properties of Hybrid Stars with the Color-Flavor Locked Quark Matter Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-Yan; Liu, Guang-Zhou; Wu, Yao-Rui; Xu, Yan; Zhu, Ming-Feng; Bao, Tmurbagan; Zhao, En-Guang

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the influence of the energy gap (Δ) of the color-flavor locked (CFL) quark phase on the bulk properties of hybrid stars. The relativistic mean field model is used for hadronic matter and the MIT bag model for CFL quark matter. In our calculation results, we find that with the increase of the CFL energy gap there exists a transition behavior, which goes from the hadron star range through the transition range into the CFL quark star range. The observation data of PRS J1614-2230 are in the hadron star range (with Δ < 40 MeV). We also find that with hyperons the equation of state (EOS) for the hybrid star matter with the CFL quark matter core has a small change, which can be disregarded.

  7. Hydrodynamical study on the conversion of hadronic matter to quark matter. II. Diffusion-induced conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Shun; Sanada, Takahiro; Yamada, Shoichi

    2016-02-01

    We study transitions of hadronic matter (HM) to three-flavor quark matter (3QM), regarding the conversion processes as combustion and describing them hydrodynamically. Under the assumption that HM is metastable with their free energies being larger than those of 3QM but smaller than those of two-flavor quark matter, we consider in this paper the conversion induced by diffusions of the seed 3QM. This is a sequel to our previous paper, in which the shock-induced conversion was studied in the same framework. We not only pay attention to the jump condition on both sides of the conversion front, but the structures inside the front are also considered by taking into account what happens during the conversion processes on the time scale of weak interactions. We employ for HM Shen's equation of state (EOS), which is based on the relativistic mean field theory, and the bag model-based EOS for quark matter just as in the previous paper. We demonstrated in that paper that in this combination of EOSs, the combustion will occur for a wide range of the bag constant and strong coupling constant in the so-called endothermic regime, in which the Hugoniot curve for combustion runs below the initial state. Elucidating the essential features of the diffusion-induced conversion both in the exothermic and endothermic regimes first by a toy model, we then analyze more realistic models. We find that weak deflagration nearly always occurs and that weak detonation is possible only when the diffusion constant is (unrealistically) large and the critical strange fraction is small. The velocities of the conversion front are ˜103- 107 cm /s depending on the initial temperature and density as well as the parameters in the quark matter EOS and become particularly small when the final state is in the mixed phase. Finally we study linear stability of the laminar weak-deflagration front and find that it is unstable in the exothermic regime (Darrius-Landau instability) but stable in the endothermic

  8. Magnetic moments of octet baryons, angular momenta of quarks, and sea antiquark polarizations

    SciTech Connect

    Bartelski, Jan; Tatur, Stanislaw

    2010-03-01

    One can determine antiquark polarizations in a proton using the information from deep inelastic scattering, {beta} decays of baryons, orbital angular momenta of quarks, as well as their integrated magnetic distributions. The last quantities were determined previously by us performing a fit to magnetic moments of a baryon octet. However, because of the SU(3) symmetry our results depend on two parameters. The quantity {Gamma}{sub V}, measured recently in a COMPASS experiment, gives the relation between these parameters. We can fix the last unknown parameter using the ratio of up and down quark magnetic moments which one can get from the fit to radiative vector meson decays. We calculate antiquark polarizations with the orbital momenta of valence quarks that follow from lattice calculations. The value of the difference of up and down antiquark polarizations obtained in our calculations is consistent with the result obtained in a HERMES experiment.

  9. PREFACE: SQM2007 International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šafařík, Karel; Šándor, Ladislav; Tomášik, Boris

    2008-04-01

    The International Conference on `Strangeness in Quark Matter' (SQM) was held from 24-29 June 2007 at the Congress Hall of the city cultural centre in the charming mediaeval town of Levoča in north-eastern Slovakia. The Institute of Experimental Physics of the Slovak Academy of Science and the Faculty of Science of the P J Šafárik University in Košice shared the duties of main organizers of the conference. SQM2007 was attended by more than 100 participants from about 20 countries. The natural beauty and the rich cultural and historical monuments of the surrounding Spiš (Scepusium) region created an inspiring setting for the scientific, social and cultural framework of the conference. Continuing the trend started at the SQM2006 conference, heavy flavour physics in heavy-ion collisions was a topic given equal importance in the SQM2007 programme alongside strange quark physics. The Symposium for Students, from Students, organized by Christian Klein-Boesing and Boris Tomášik on the basis of the contributed abstracts, was again an integral and successful part of the conference. The jury, drawn from the organizers, awarded William A Horowitz (Columbia University) the title of best student contribution. The good news is that many students and younger researchers attended the conference. This could not have happened without generous support from our sponsors whom we would like to thank for valuable financial support: CERN, Journal of Physics G, the Prešov self-governing region authorities and the Slovak Physical Society. The kind assistance of the mayor of the town of Levoča is also warmly acknowledged. We would like to extend our gratitude to our colleagues and students from the organizing institutions for their diligent work prior to and during the conference, which ensured that everything worked smoothly. Our special thanks go to our secretaries, Adri Chomičová and Mery Šemš'aková, as well as to the management of the SATEL Hotel in Levoča for their highly

  10. Measurement of top quark polarization in t t ¯ lepton +jets final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shkola, O.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; D0 Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present a measurement of top quark polarization in t t ¯ pair production in p p ¯ collisions at √{s }=1.96 TeV using data corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We consider final states containing a lepton and at least three jets. The polarization is measured through the distribution of lepton angles along three axes: the beam axis, the helicity axis, and the transverse axis normal to the t t ¯ production plane. This is the first measurement of top quark polarization at the Tevatron using lepton +jet final states and the first measurement of the transverse polarization in t t ¯ production. The observed distributions are consistent with standard model predictions of nearly no polarization.

  11. QCD constraints on the shape of polarized quark and gluon distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Burkardt, Matthias; Schmidt, Ivan

    1995-02-01

    We develop simple analytic representations of the polarized quark and gluon distributions in the nucleon at low Q2 which incorporate general constraints obtained from the requirements of color coherence of gluon couplings at x ˜ 0 and the helicity retention properties of perturbative QCD couplings at x ˜ 1. The unpolarized predictions are similar to the Do' distributions given by Martin, Roberts, and Stirling. The predictions for the quark helicity distributions are compared with polarized structure functions measured by the E142 experiment at SLAC and the SMC experiment at CERN.

  12. Accessing sea quark's angular momentum through polarized target Drell-Yan single-spin asymmetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaodong; P-1039 Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    A Letter-Of-Intent (P-1039) has been submitted to the Fermilab's Program Advisory Committee in May 2013, for a measurement of transversely polarized proton target (NH3) single-spin asymmetry (SSA) in Drell-Yan reaction with a 120 GeV/c unpolarized proton beam using a similar setup as in the ongoing unpolarized target experiment (E906). The goal of this LOI is to clearly pin down the u -quark Sivers distribution in the x range of 0.1-0.3, where a large sea flavor asymmetry (d / u) has been observed. A non-vanishing quark Sivers distribution arises from the imaginary piece of amplitudes interference between quark angular momentum L = 0 , and L ≠ 0 wave functions. Existing semi-inclusive DIS Sivers-type SSA data from HERMES, COMPASS and JLab-Hall A, while sensitive to valence quarks' Sivers distributions, do not provide much constrains on sea quarks' Sivers distributions. In the case that u -quark carries zero angular momentum, one expects u -quark's Sivers distribution to vanish, therefore observing a zero target SSA in Drell-Yan reaction in P-1039.

  13. Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gell-Mann, M.

    In these lectures I want to speak about at least two interpretations of the concept of quarks for hadrons and the possible relations between them. First I want to talk about quarks as "constituent quarks". These were used especially by G. Zweig (1964) who referred to them as aces. One has a sort of a simple model by which one gets elementary results about the low-lying bound and resonant states of mesons and baryons, and certain crude symmetry properties of these states, by saying that the hadrons act as if they were made up of subunits, the constituent quarks q. These quarks are arranged in an isotopic spin doublet u, d and an isotopic spin singlet s, which has the same charge as d and acts as if it had a slightly higher mass…

  14. Model for nuclear matter in terms of clusters of quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltun, D. S.; Tosa, S.

    1986-05-01

    A system of nonrelativistic fermions (quarks) carrying color, moving in one dimension, interacts through delta-function potentials. Properties of the ground state as a function of density can be found exactly, using a Bethe ansatz method, and approximately, using a variational method. The model shows interesting limiting behavior: at low density the ground state consists of a Fermi gas of clusters of quarks (nucleons); at high density, a Fermi gas of quarks. Present address: Department of Physics, Campus Box 390, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA.

  15. Detection of magnetized quark-nuggets, a candidate for dark matter.

    PubMed

    VanDevender, J Pace; VanDevender, Aaron P; Sloan, T; Swaim, Criss; Wilson, Peter; Schmitt, Robert G; Zakirov, Rinat; Blum, Josh; Cross, James L; McGinley, Niall

    2017-08-18

    Quark nuggets are theoretical objects composed of approximately equal numbers of up, down, and strange quarks and are also called strangelets and nuclearites. They have been proposed as a candidate for dark matter, which constitutes ~85% of the universe's mass and which has been a mystery for decades. Previous efforts to detect quark nuggets assumed that the nuclear-density core interacts directly with the surrounding matter so the stopping power is minimal. Tatsumi found that quark nuggets could well exist as a ferromagnetic liquid with a ~10(12)-T magnetic field. We find that the magnetic field produces a magnetopause with surrounding plasma, as the earth's magnetic field produces a magnetopause with the solar wind, and substantially increases their energy deposition rate in matter. We use the magnetopause model to compute the energy deposition as a function of quark-nugget mass and to analyze testing the quark-nugget hypothesis for dark matter by observations in air, water, and land. We conclude the water option is most promising.

  16. Bulk viscosity due to kaons in color-flavor-locked quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, Mark G.; Braby, Matt; Reddy, Sanjay; Schaefer, Thomas

    2007-05-15

    We calculate the bulk viscosity of color-superconducting quark matter in the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase. We assume that the lightest bosons are the superfluid mode H and the kaons K{sup 0} and K{sup +}, and that there is no kaon condensate. We calculate the rate of strangeness-equilibrating processes that convert kaons into superfluid modes, and the resultant bulk viscosity. We find that for oscillations with a timescale of milliseconds, at temperatures T<1 MeV, the CFL bulk viscosity is much less than that of unpaired quark matter, but at higher temperatures the bulk viscosity of CFL matter can become larger.

  17. Color-flavor locked strange quark matter in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xin-Jian

    2013-08-01

    The quark quasiparticle model is extended to study the properties of color-flavor locked strange quark matter at finite chemical potential and in a strong magnetic field. We present a self-consistent thermodynamic treatment by employing a chemical potential dependent bag function. It is found that the magnetized color-flavor locked (MCFL) matter is more stable than other phases within a proper magnitude of magnetic field. The stability window is graphically shown for the MCFL matter compared with ordinate magnetized matter. The anisotropic structure of MCFL matter is dominated by the magnetic field and almost independent of the energy gaps. A critical maximum magnetic field of about 1.56×1018G is found, under which MCFL matter is absolutely stable with respect to nuclear matter.

  18. Modern compact star observations and the quark matter equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klähn, T.; Blaschke, D.; Sandin, F.; Fuchs, Ch.; Faessler, A.; Grigorian, H.; Röpke, G.; Trümper, J.

    2007-10-01

    We present a hybrid equation of state (EoS) for dense matter that satisfies phenomenological constraints from modern compact star (CS) observations which indicate high maximum masses (M ∼ 2M⊙) and large radii (R > 12 km). The corresponding isospin symmetric EoS is consistent with flow data analyses of heavy-ion collisions and a deconfinement transition at ∼ 0.55 fm-3. The quark matter phase is described by a 3-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model that accounts for scalar diquark condensation and vector meson interactions while the nuclear matter phase is obtained within the Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (DBHF) approach using the Bonn-A potential. We demonstrate that both pure neutron stars and neutron stars with quark matter cores are consistent with modern CS observations. Hybrid star configurations with a CFL quark core are unstable within the present model.

  19. Curvature energy effects on strange quark matter nucleation at finite density

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J.E. Department of Space Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Texas 77251 )

    1994-05-15

    We consider the effects of the curvature energy term on thermal strange quark matter nucleation in dense neutron matter. Lower bounds on the temperature at which this process can take place are given and compared to those without the curvature term.

  20. Gluons and the quark sea at high energies: distributions, polarization, tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Boer, D.; Venugopalan, R.; Diehl, M.; Milner, R.; Vogelsang, W.; et al.

    2011-09-30

    This report is based on a ten-week program on Gluons and the quark sea at high-energies, which took place at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle in Fall 2010. The principal aim of the program was to develop and sharpen the science case for an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), a facility that will be able to collide electrons and positrons with polarized protons and with light to heavy nuclei at high energies, offering unprecedented possibilities for in-depth studies of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). This report is organized around the following four major themes: (i) the spin and flavor structure of the proton, (ii) three dimensional structure of nucleons and nuclei in momentum and configuration space, (iii) QCD matter in nuclei, and (iv) Electroweak physics and the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Beginning with an executive summary, the report contains tables of key measurements, chapter overviews for each of the major scientific themes, and detailed individual contributions on various aspects of the scientific opportunities presented by an EIC.

  1. Spinodal instabilities of baryon-rich quark matter in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Ko, Che Ming

    2017-05-01

    Using the test-particle method to solve the transport equation derived from the Nambu-Jona-Lasino (NJL) model, we study how phase separation occurs in expanding quark matter like that in a heavy ion collision. To test our method, we first investigate the growth rates of unstable modes of quark matter in a static cubic box and find them to agree with the analytical results that were previously obtained using the linear response theory. In this case, we also study the higher-order scaled density moments in the quark matter, which have values of 1 for a uniform density distribution or a distribution where the nonzero density regions all have same value, and they are found to increase with time and saturate at values significantly larger than 1 after the phase separation. The skewness of the quark number event-by-event distribution in a small subvolume of the system is also found to increase, but this feature disappears if the subvolume is large. For the expanding quark matter, two cases are considered: one using a blast-wave model for the initial conditions and the other using initial conditions from a multiphase transport (AMPT) model. In both cases, we find that the expansion of the quark matter is slowed down by the presence of a first-order phase transition. Also, density clumps appear in the system and the momentum distribution of partons becomes anisotropic, which can be characterized by large scale density moments and nonvanishing anisotropic elliptic and quadrupolar flows, respectively. The large density fluctuations further lead to an enhancement in the dilepton yield. In the case with the AMPT initial conditions, the presence of a first-order phase transition also results in a narrower distribution of partons in rapidity. These effects of density fluctuations can be regarded as possible signals for a first-order phase transition that occurs in the baryon-rich quark matter formed in relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  2. Measurement of top quark polarization in top-antitop lepton+jets final states at DØ

    SciTech Connect

    Augsten, Kamil

    2017-01-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of the top quark polarization in the $t\\overline{t}$ events produced in $p\\overline{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV using data corresponding to 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The final states used in the measurement contain one lepton and at least three jets. The polarization is measured using the angular distribution of leptons along three different axes: the beam axis, the helicity axis, and the transverse axis normal to the $t\\overline{t}$ production plane. This is the first measurement of top quark polarization at the Tevatron Collider in lepton+jets final states, and the first measurement of transverse polarization in $t\\overline{t}$ production. The polarization along the beam axis is combined with the previous result in the dilepton final states by the D0 experiment. The observed distributions are consistent with the Standard Model of nearly no polarization and no indication for beyond Standard Model physics is observed. The measurement offers legacy result from unique Tevatron Collider data and provides more information about the top quark production and decays, about the properties of the heaviest elementary particle.

  3. Fate of pion condensation in quark matter: From the chiral limit to the physical pion mass

    SciTech Connect

    Abuki, H.; Anglani, R.; Pellicoro, M.; Ruggieri, M.; Gatto, R.

    2009-02-01

    We study aspects of the pion condensation in two-flavor neutral quark matter using the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model of QCD at finite density. We investigate the role of electric charge neutrality, and explicit symmetry breaking via quark mass, both of which control the onset of the charged pion ({pi}{sup c}) condensation. We show that the equality between the electric chemical potential and the in-medium pion mass, {mu}{sub e}=M{sub {pi}{sup -}}, as a threshold, persists even for a composite pion system in the medium, provided the transition to the pion condensed phase is of the second order. Moreover, we find that the pion condensate in neutral quark matter is extremely fragile with respect to the symmetry breaking effect via a current quark mass m, and is ruled out for m larger than the order of 10 keV.

  4. Cold Nuclear Matter Effects on Heavy Quark Production in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, John Matthew

    2011-12-01

    The experimental collaborations at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) have established that dense nuclear matter with partonic degrees of freedom is formed in collisions of heavy nuclei at 200 GeV. Information from heavy quarks has given significant insight into the dynamics of this matter. Charm and bottom quarks are dominantly produced by gluon fusion in the early stages of the collision, and thus experience the complete evolution of the medium. The production baseline measured in p + p collisions can be described by fixed order plus next to leading log perturbative QCD calculations within uncertainties. In central Au+Au collisions, suppression has been measured relative to the yield in p + p scaled by the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions, indicating a significant energy loss by heavy quarks in the medium. The large elliptic flow amplitude v2 provides evidence that the heavy quarks flow along with the lighter partons. The suppression and elliptic flow of these quarks are in qualitative agreement with calculations based on Langevin transport models that imply a viscosity to entropy density ratio close to the conjectured quantum lower bound of 1/4pi. However, a full understanding of these phenomena requires measurements of cold nuclear matter (CNM) effects, which should be present in Au+Au collisions but are difficult to distinguish experimentally from effects due to interactions with the medium. This thesis presents measurements of electrons at midrapidity from the decays of heavy quarks produced in d+Au collisions at RHIC. A significant enhancement of these electrons is seen at a transverse momentum below 5 GeV/c, indicating strong CNM effects on charm quarks that are not present for lighter quarks. A simple model of CNM effects in Au+Au collisions suggests that the level of suppression in the hot nuclear medium is comparable for all quark flavors.

  5. Recent Results on Polarized Quark and Gluon Distributions at Compass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, I.; Jinr; Dubna

    2005-04-01

    The latest results of deep inelastic scattering (DIS) studies of 160 GeV muons on the deuterated polarized target are reported. They include estimations of virtual photon-deuteron asymmetries, gluon contributions to the nucleon spin and Collins asymmetries in hadron production on the transversely polarized target.

  6. Landau levels of cold dense quark matter in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xin-Jian; Liang, Jun-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The occupied Landau levels of strange quark matter are investigated in the framework of the SU(3) NJL model with a conventional coupling and a magnetic-field dependent coupling respectively. At lower density, the Landau levels are mainly dominated by u and d quarks. Threshold values of the chemical potential for the s quark onset are shown in the μ -B plane. The magnetic-field-dependent running coupling can broaden the region of three-flavor matter by decreasing the dynamical masses of s quarks. Before the onset of s quarks, the Landau level number of light quarks is directly dependent on the magnetic field strength B by a simple inverse proportional relation ki ,max≈Bi0/B with Bd0=5 ×1 019 G , which is approximately 2 times Bu0 of u quarks at a common chemical potential. When the magnetic field increases up to Bd0, almost all three flavors are lying in the lowest Landau level.

  7. J/{Psi} suppression as an evidence for quark gluon matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kharzeev, D.

    1998-08-10

    The J/{psi} suppression was originally proposed as a signature of the quark-gluon plasma. Strong suppression of J/{psi} production was indeed observed recently by the NA50 Collaboration at CERN SPS. Is it the first signature of a long-awaited quark-gluon matter, or just a peculiar combination of ''conventional'' effects acting together to produce the puzzling pattern observed experimentally? In this lecture, I am trying to summarize the existing theoretical explanations.

  8. Phase diagram of three-flavor quark matter under compact star constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Blaschke, D.; Fredriksson, S.; Sandin, F.; Grigorian, H.; Oeztas, A.M.

    2005-09-15

    The phase diagram of three-flavor quark matter under compact star constraints is investigated within a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. Global color and electric charge neutrality is imposed for {beta}-equilibrated superconducting quark matter. The constituent quark masses and the diquark condensates are determined self-consistently in the plane of temperature and quark chemical potential. Both strong and intermediate diquark coupling strengths are considered. We show that in both cases, gapless superconducting phases do not occur at temperatures relevant for compact star evolution, i.e., below T{approx}50 MeV. The stability and structure of isothermal quark star configurations are evaluated. For intermediate coupling, quark stars are composed of a mixed phase of normal (NQ) and two-flavor superconducting (2SC) quark matter up to a maximum mass of 1.21 M{sub {center_dot}}. At higher central densities, a phase transition to the three-flavor color flavor locked (CFL) phase occurs and the configurations become unstable. For the strong diquark coupling we find stable stars in the 2SC phase, with masses up to 1.33 M{sub {center_dot}}. A second family of more compact configurations (twins) with a CFL quark matter core and a 2SC shell is also found to be stable. The twins have masses in the range 1.30...1.33 M{sub {center_dot}}. We consider also hot isothermal configurations at temperature T=40 MeV. When the hot maximum mass configuration cools down, due to emission of photons and neutrinos, a mass defect of 0.1 M{sub {center_dot}} occurs and two final state configurations are possible.

  9. Nucleation of quark matter in the PQM model

    SciTech Connect

    Mintz, Bruno W.; Stiele, Rainer; Schaffner-Bielich, Juergen; Ramos, Rudnei O.

    2013-03-25

    We use Langer's theory to calculate the surface tension of critical bubbles in a first-order quark-hadron phase transition at moderate and high baryon chemical potential, as predicted by the Polyakov-Quark-Meson (PQM) model at the mean-field level. We define an effective 4-dimensional order parameter, which is used to overestimate the surface tension of nucleating bubbles within the thin-wall approximation. We find relatively low values for the surface tension, {Sigma} Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 15MeV/fm{sup 2}. This implies that a metastable state, such as a supercooled quark-gluon plasma (QGP), quickly decays even in regions relatively close to the coexistence line of the phase diagram. Possible consequences for cosmology are briefly outlined.

  10. Production of heavy Higgs bosons and decay into top quarks at the LHC. II. Top-quark polarization and spin correlation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernreuther, W.; Galler, P.; Si, Z.-G.; Uwer, P.

    2017-05-01

    We analyze, within several parameter scenarios of type-II two-Higgs doublet extensions of the standard model, the impact of heavy neutral Higgs-boson resonances on top-quark pair production and their subsequent decay to dileptonic final states at the LHC (13 TeV). In particular, we investigate the effects of heavy Higgs bosons on top-spin observables, that is, the longitudinal top-quark polarization and top-quark spin correlations. We take into account NLO QCD as well as weak interaction corrections and show that top-spin observables, if evaluated in judiciously chosen top-quark pair invariant mass bins, can significantly enhance the sensitivity to heavy Higgs resonances in top-quark pair events.

  11. PREFACE: SQM2008-International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter SQM2008-International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Xiao, Zhigang; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2009-06-01

    The International Conference on `Strangeness in Quark Matter' (SQM2008) was held from 5-10 October 2008 at the Tsinghua University campus, Beijing, China. The Department of Physics, Tsinghua University and the School of Physics, Central China Normal University (CCNU) shared the organizational duties of this conference. SQM2008 was attended by more than 200 participants from approximately 20 countries. The SQM2008 scientific programme comprised 49 plenary talks in 14 sessions and 36 parallel talks in 4 sessions. Continuing the tradition of the previous conferences, the talks were mainly dedicated to the most recent progress in strangeness, heavy flavour, collective phenomena and particle productions in relativistic nuclear collisions. In addition, the recent status of various projects on SPS, LHC, FAIR and HIRFL-CSR was also reported. Particularly, with their enjoyable presentations, many young students and junior physicists shared their research with the audience. Thirty posts were presented during the five day conference. We would like to express our gratitude to the sponsors for their generous financial support, which allowed many young researchers to attend the conference: Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics, STAR Collaboration, Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), CCNU, Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP), China Center of Advanced Science and Technology (CCAST), Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (SINAP), Sandong University (SDU), University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), The Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, the Chinese Academy of Sciences (TPCSF-CAS). The support from Tsinghua University was especially appreciated. We would also like to extend our gratitude to our colleagues and students from the organizing institutions for their diligent work prior to and during the conference that made everything run smoothly. We thank all the speakers for their inspiring

  12. Quark matter under strong magnetic fields in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, D. P.; Pinto, M. Benghi; Avancini, S. S.; Martinez, A. Perez; Providencia, C.

    2009-03-15

    In the present work we use the large-N{sub c} approximation to investigate quark matter described by the SU(2) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model subject to a strong magnetic field. The Landau levels are filled in such a way that usual kinks appear in the effective mass and other related quantities. {beta} equilibrium is also considered and the macroscopic properties of a magnetar described by this quark matter is obtained. Our study shows that the magnetar masses and radii are larger if the magnetic field increases but only very large fields ({>=}10{sup 18} G) affect the equation of state in a non-negligible way.

  13. EMMI rapid reaction task force meeting on quark matter in compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buballa, Michael; Dexheimer, Veronica; Drago, Alessandro; Fraga, Eduardo; Haensel, Pawel; Mishustin, Igor; Pagliara, Giuseppe; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen; Schramm, Stefan; Sedrakian, Armen; Weber, Fridolin

    2014-12-01

    The recent measurement of two solar mass pulsars has initiated an intense discussion on its impact on our understanding of the high-density matter in the cores of neutron stars. A task force meeting was held from 7-10 October 2013 at the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies to address the presence of quark matter in these massive stars. During this meeting, the recent observational astrophysical data and heavy-ion data was reviewed. The possibility of pure quark stars, hybrid stars and the nature of the QCD phase transition were discussed and their observational signals delineated.

  14. Polarized single-pion photoproduction: Test for various quark models

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, P.; Gupta, M.; Prasher, A.K.

    1982-08-01

    The multipole analysis of resonance photocouplings of Babcock and Rosner is extended to the case of single-pion photoproduction by polarized photons. The various polarized cross sections dsigma/sub parallel/(n..pi../sup +/), dsigma/sub parallel/(p..pi../sup 0/), dsigma/sub perpendicular/(n..pi../sup +/), and dsigma/sub perpendicular/(p..pi../sup 0/) are well reproduced. The present analysis is exploited for discriminating different models which predict photocouplings of nonstrange baryon resonances. Data is found to strongly favor a negative relative sign for P- and F-wave pionic decays in accordance with the findings of Babcock and Rosner.

  15. Quark-gluon tagging with shower deconstruction: Unearthing dark matter and Higgs couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira de Lima, Danilo; Petrov, Petar; Soper, Davison; Spannowsky, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The separation of quark and gluon initiated jets can be an important way to improve the sensitivity in searches for new physics or in measurements of Higgs boson properties. We present a simplified version of the shower deconstruction approach as a novel observable for quark-gluon tagging. Assuming topoclusterlike objects as input, we compare our observable with energy correlation functions and find a favorable performance for a large variety of jet definitions. We address the issue of infrared sensitivity of quark-gluon discrimination. When this approach is applied to dark matter searches in monojet final states, limitations from small signal-to-background ratios can be overcome. We also show that quark-gluon tagging is an alternative way of separating weak boson from gluon-fusion production in the process p +p →H +jet+jet+X .

  16. Bulk viscosity of quark-gluon matter in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Agasian, N. O.

    2013-11-15

    On the basis of low-energy QCD theorems, the bulk viscosity {zeta}(T, Micro-Sign , H) is expressed in terms of basic thermodynamic quantities that characterizes quark-gluon matter at finite temperature and a finite baryon density in a magnetic field. Various limiting cases are considered.

  17. The polarized structure function of the nucleons with a non-extensive statistical quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Trevisan, Luis A.; Mirez, Carlos

    2013-05-06

    We studied an application of nonextensive thermodynamics to describe the polarized structure function of nucleon, in a model where the usual Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein energy distribution, often used in the statistical models, were replaced by the equivalent functions of the q-statistical. The parameters of the model are given by an effective temperature T, the q parameter (from Tsallis statistics), and the chemical potentials given by the corresponding up (u) and down (d) quark normalization in the nucleon and by {Delta}u and {Delta}d of the polarized functions.

  18. Color-spin locking phase in two-flavor quark matter for compact star phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, D. N.; Blaschke, D.; Buballa, M.; Yudichev, V.L.

    2005-08-01

    We study a spin-1 single-flavor color-superconducting phase which results from a color-spin locking (CSL) interaction in two-flavor quark matter. This phase is particularly interesting for compact star cooling applications since the CSL phase may survive under charge neutrality constraints implying a mismatch between up- and down-quark chemical potentials which can destroy the scalar diquark condensate. CSL gaps are evaluated within an NJL model and they are found to be consistent with cooling phenomenology if a density dependent coupling constant is used.

  19. A New Phase of Matter: Quark-Gluon Plasma Beyond the Hagedorn Critical Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Berndt

    I retrace the developments from Hagedorn's concept of a limiting temperature for hadronic matter to the discovery and characterization of the quark-gluon plasma as a new state of matter. My recollections begin with the transformation more than 30 years ago of Hagedorn's original concept into its modern interpretation as the "critical" temperature separating the hadron gas and quark-gluon plasma phases of strongly interacting matter. This was followed by the realization that the QCD phase transformation could be studied experimentally in high-energy nuclear collisions. I describe here my personal effort to help develop the strangeness experimental signatures of quark and gluon deconfinement and recall how the experimental program proceeded soon to investigate this idea, at first at the SPS, then at RHIC, and finally at LHC. As is often the case, the experiment finds more than theory predicts, and I highlight the discovery of the "perfectly" liquid quark-gluon plasma at RHIC. I conclude with an outline of future opportunities, especially the search for a critical point in the QCD phase diagram.

  20. Polarization of photons emitted by decaying dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonivento, W.; Gorbunov, D.; Shaposhnikov, M.; Tokareva, A.

    2017-02-01

    Radiatively decaying dark matter may be searched through investigating the photon spectrum of galaxies and galaxy clusters. We explore whether the properties of dark matter can be constrained through the study of a polarization state of emitted photons. Starting from the basic principles of quantum mechanics we show that the models of symmetric dark matter are indiscernible by the photon polarization. However, we find that the asymmetric dark matter consisted of Dirac fermions is a source of circularly polarized photons, calling for the experimental determination of the photon state.

  1. Dark matter and triality symmetry of leptons and quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furui, Sadataka

    2012-11-01

    The radiation in the universe has a mass equivalent of approximately 2% of the luminous matter. Presence of a large amount of non-luminous matter is a problem. In order to solve this puzzle, I use quaternion basis for the leptons, and make an octonion from a combination of two quaternions. With a principle that the electro-magnetic interaction selects one triality and photon couples with a gluon of one triality sector, color-flavor locking becomes natural, and the problem of dark matter may be solved.

  2. Dark matter and triality symmetry of leptons and quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Furui, Sadataka

    2012-11-12

    The radiation in the universe has a mass equivalent of approximately 2% of the luminous matter. Presence of a large amount of non-luminous matter is a problem. In order to solve this puzzle, I use quaternion basis for the leptons, and make an octonion from a combination of two quaternions. With a principle that the electro-magnetic interaction selects one triality and photon couples with a gluon of one triality sector, color-flavor locking becomes natural, and the problem of dark matter may be solved.

  3. Equation of state for nucleonic matter and its quark mass dependence from the nuclear force in lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takashi; Aoki, Sinya; Doi, Takumi; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Ikeda, Yoichi; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Murano, Keiko; Nemura, Hidekatsu; Sasaki, Kenji

    2013-09-13

    Quark mass dependence of the equation of state (EOS) for nucleonic matter is investigated, on the basis of the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock method with the nucleon-nucleon interaction extracted from lattice QCD simulations. We observe saturation of nuclear matter at the lightest available quark mass corresponding to the pseudoscalar meson mass ≃469  MeV. Mass-radius relation of the neutron stars is also studied with the EOS for neutron-star matter from the same nuclear force in lattice QCD. We observe that the EOS becomes stiffer and thus the maximum mass of neutron star increases as the quark mass decreases toward the physical point.

  4. String cloud and domain walls with quark matter for a higher dimensional FRW universe in self creation cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halife, Caǧlar; Sezgin, Aygün

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we research a higher dimensional flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe in Barber-s second theory when strange quark matter (SQM) and normal matter (NM) are attached to the string cloud and domain walls. We obtain zero string tension density for this model. We obtain dust quark matter solutions. This result agrees with Kiran and Reddy, Krori et al, Sahoo and Mishra and Reddy. In our solutions the quark matter transforms to other particles over time. We also obtain two different solutions for domain walls with quark and normal matters by using a deceleration parameter. Also, the features of the obtained solutions are discussed and some physical and kinematical quantities are generalized and discussed. Our results are consistent with Yılmaz, Adcox et al and Back et al in four and five dimensions.

  5. Exotic four quark matter: Z1(4475)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Li; Liu, Xiao-Hai; Liu, Xiang; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2014-08-01

    Motivated by the LHCb's recent confirmation of Z1(4475) as the JP=1+ resonance, we investigate various exotic interpretations of Z1(4475), which may be an axial vector tetraquark state, the P-wave excitation of the S-wave D1D¯* or D2D¯* molecule, the S-wave molecule composed of a D or D* meson and a D-wave vector D meson, or the cousin molecular state of Zc(3900) and Zc(4020) composed of a D or D* meson and their radial excitations. With the help of the heavy quark symmetry, we predict the typical radiative and hidden-charm and open-charm strong decay patterns of Z1(4475), which are crucial to further identify the molecular state assignment of Z1(4475).

  6. Pion dissociation and Levinson's theorem in hot PNJL quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wergieluk, A.; Blaschke, D.; Kalinovsky, Yu. L.; Friesen, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    Pion dissociation by the Mott effect of quark plasma is described within the generalized Beth-Uhlenbeck approach on the basis of the PNJL model which allows for a unified description of bound, resonant and scattering states. As a first approximation, we utilize the Breit-Wigner ansatz for the spectral function and clarify its relation to the complex mass pole solution of the pion Bethe-Salpeter equation. Application of the Levinson theorem proves that describing the pion Mott dissociation solely by means of spectral broadening of the pion bound state beyond T Mott leaves out a significant aspect. Thus we acknowledge the importance of the continuum of scattering states and show its role for the thermodynamics of pion dissociation.

  7. Maximum mass of neutron stars with quark matter core

    SciTech Connect

    Takatsuka, Tatsuyuki; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Masuda, Kota

    2012-11-12

    We propose a new strategy to construct the equation of state (EOS) for neutron stars (NSs) with hadron-quark (H-Q) phase transition, by considering three density-regions. We supplement the EOS at H-Q region, very uncertain due to the confinement-deconfinement problems, by sandwitching in between and matching to the relatively 'well known' EOSs, i.e., the EOS at lower densities (H-phase up to several times nuclear density, calculated from a G-matrix approach) and that at ultra high densities (Q-phase, form a view of asymptotic freedom). Here, as a first step, we try a simple case and discuss the maximum mass of NSs.

  8. Critical temperature of chiral symmetry restoration for quark matter with a chiral chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggieri, M.; Peng, G. X.

    2016-12-01

    In this article we study the restoration of chiral symmetry at a finite temperature for quark matter with a chiral chemical potential, {μ }5, by means of a nonlocal Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. This model allows the introduction of, in the simplest way possible, a Euclidean momentum, p E , dependent quark mass function which decays (neglecting logarithms) as 1/{p}{E}2 for large p E , in agreement with the asymptotic behaviour expected in quantum chromodynamics in the presence of a nonperturbative quark condensate. We focus on the critical temperature for chiral symmetry restoration in the chiral limit, T c, versus {μ }5, as well as on the order of the phase transition. We find that T c increases with {μ }5, and that the transition remains of the second order for the whole range of {μ }5 considered.

  9. Diquarks in the color-flavor locked phase of dense quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, D.; Klimenko, K. G.

    2007-02-15

    Diquark excitations of dense quark matter are considered in the framework of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with three types of massless quarks in the presence of a quark number chemical potential {mu}. We investigate the effective action of meson and diquark fields at sufficiently high values of {mu}, where the color-flavor locked (CFL) phase is realized, and prove the existence of NG bosons in the sector of pseudoscalar diquarks. In the sector of scalar diquarks an additional NG boson is found, corresponding to the spontaneous breaking of the U(1){sub B} baryon symmetry in the CFL phase. Finally, the existence of massive scalar and pseudoscalar diquark excitations is demonstrated.

  10. Fault system polarity: A matter of chance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöpfer, Martin; Childs, Conrad; Manzocchi, Tom; Walsh, John; Nicol, Andy; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Many normal fault systems and, on a smaller scale, fracture boudinage exhibit asymmetry so that one fault dip direction dominates. The fraction of throw (or heave) accommodated by faults with the same dip direction in relation to the total fault system throw (or heave) is a quantitative measure of fault system asymmetry and termed 'polarity'. It is a common belief that the formation of domino and shear band boudinage with a monoclinic symmetry requires a component of layer parallel shearing, whereas torn boudins reflect coaxial flow. Moreover, domains of parallel faults are frequently used to infer the presence of a common décollement. Here we show, using Distinct Element Method (DEM) models in which rock is represented by an assemblage of bonded circular particles, that asymmetric fault systems can emerge under symmetric boundary conditions. The pre-requisite for the development of domains of parallel faults is however that the medium surrounding the brittle layer has a very low strength. We demonstrate that, if the 'competence' contrast between the brittle layer and the surrounding material ('jacket', or 'matrix') is high, the fault dip directions and hence fault system polarity can be explained using a random process. The results imply that domains of parallel faults are, for the conditions and properties used in our models, in fact a matter of chance. Our models suggest that domino and shear band boudinage can be an unreliable shear-sense indicator. Moreover, the presence of a décollement should not be inferred on the basis of a domain of parallel faults only.

  11. Transverse polarization of the Λ hyperon from unpolarized quark fragmentation in the diquark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongliang; Lu, Zhun; Schmidt, Ivan

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the spin-dependent (naive) T-odd fragmentation function D1T ⊥, which can provide an explanation on the transverse polarization of the Λ0 hyperon produced in an unpolarized process. We calculate D1T ⊥ for light flavors in the spectator diquark model, with a Gaussian form factor at the hyperon-quark-diquark vertex. We include in the calculation both the scalar diquark and axial-vector diquark spectators. We determine the values of the model parameters by fitting the unpolarized fragmentation function D1Λ to the parametrization for D1Λ by de Florian, Stratmann and Vogelsang. In addition, we compute the longitudinal polarization fragmentation function G1Λ and compare it with the known parametrization of G1Λ. We also estimate the transverse polarizations of Λ production, in both semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering and single inclusive e+e- annihilation.

  12. Effect of temperature and magnetic field on two-flavor superconducting quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Tanumoy; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the effect of turning on temperature for the charge neutral phase of two-flavor color superconducting (2SC) dense quark matter in the presence of constant external magnetic field. Within the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, by tuning the diquark coupling strength, we study the interdependent evolution of the quark Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer gap and dynamical mass as functions of temperature and magnetic field. We find that magnetic field B ≳0.02 GeV2 (1 018 G ) leads to anomalous temperature behavior of the gap in the gapless 2SC phase (moderately strong coupling), reminiscent of previous results in the literature found in the limit of weak coupling without magnetic field. The 2SC gap in the strong coupling regime is abruptly quenched at ultrahigh magnetic field due to the mismatched Fermi surfaces of up and down quarks imposed by charge neutrality and oscillation of the gap due to Landau level quantization. The dynamical quark mass also displays strong oscillation and magnetic catalysis at high magnetic field, although the latter effect is tempered by nonzero temperature. We discuss the implications for newly born compact stars with superconducting quark cores.

  13. Measurement of Quark Energy Loss in Cold Nuclear Matter at Fermilab E906/SeaQuest

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Po-Ju

    2017-01-01

    Parton energy loss is a process within QCD that draws considerable interest. The measurement of parton energy loss can provide valuable information for other hard-scattering processes in nuclei, and also serves as an important tool for exploring the properties of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Quantifying the energy loss in cold nuclear matter will help to set a baseline relative to energy loss in the QGP. With the Drell-Yan process, the energy loss of incoming quarks in cold nuclear matter can be ideally investigated since the final state interaction is expected to be minimal. E906/SeaQuest is a fixed-target experiment using the 120 GeV proton beam from the Fermilab Main Injector and has been collecting data from p+p, p+d, p+C, p+Fe, and p+W collisions. Within the E906 kinematic coverage of Drell-Yan production via the dimuon channel, the quark energy loss can be measured in a regime where other nuclear effects are expected to be small. In this thesis, the study of quark ener gy loss from different cold nuclear targets is presented.

  14. Strange quark matter in the presence of explicit symmetry breaking interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, J.; Morais, J.; Hiller, B.; Osipov, A. A.; Blin, A. H.

    2015-06-01

    It is shown that a first-order transition associated with a jump in the strange-quark mass appears in a generalized three-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio treatment of quark matter. The generalization of the Lagrangian displays the complete set of spin-0 interactions at leading and subleading orders (LO and NLO) in 1/Nc counting, including the recently derived NLO explicit chiral symmetry breaking interactions which are of the same order as the 't Hooft flavor determinant. The parameters of the model are tightly constrained by the low-energy characteristics in both the pseudoscalar and scalar meson sectors. The transition occurs in a moderate chemical potential region (μ ≃400 MeV for zero temperature) in addition to the usual chiral transition associated with the light-quark sector. This feature has at its root the inclusion of the explicit chiral symmetry breaking interactions, which therefore can be seen to act as a catalyst in the production of strange-quark matter when compared to the conventional version of the model that takes only into account the 't Hooft interaction in the NLO. It can be traced back to the effect of the interactions which do not violate the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka rule, without which the empirical ordering of the scalars (mK⋆

  15. Bulk viscosity of two-flavor quark matter from the Kubo formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, Arus; Sedrakian, Armen

    2017-08-01

    We study the bulk viscosity of quark matter in the strong coupling regime within the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. The dispersive effects that lead to nonzero bulk viscosity arise from quark-meson fluctuations above the Mott transition temperature, where meson decay into two quarks is kinematically allowed. We adopt the Kubo-Zubarev formalism and compute the equilibrium imaginary-time correlation function for pressure in the O (1 /Nc) power counting scheme. The bulk viscosity of matter is expressed in terms of the Lorentz components of the quark spectral function and includes multiloop contributions which arise via resummation of infinite geometrical series of loop diagrams. We show that the multiloop contributions dominate the single-loop contribution close to the Mott line, whereas at high temperatures the one-loop contribution is dominant. The multiloop bulk viscosity dominates the shear viscosity close to the Mott temperature by factors 5 to 20, but, with increasing temperature, the shear viscosity becomes the dominant dissipation mechanism of stresses as the one-loop contribution becomes the main source of bulk viscosity.

  16. Measurement of the W boson polarization in top quark decays with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; /SUNY, Albany /Alberta U. /Ankara U. /Dumlupinar U. /Gazi U. /TOBB ETU, Ankara /TAEK, Ankara /Annecy, LAPP /Argonne /Arizona U. /Texas U., Arlington

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents measurements of the polarization ofW bosons in top quark decays, derived from t{bar t} events with missing transverse momentum, one charged lepton and at least four jets, or two charged leptons and at least two jets. Data from pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV were collected with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.04 fb{sup -1}. The measured fractions of longitudinally, left- and right-handed polarization are F{sub 0} = 0.67 {+-} 0.07, F{sub L} = 0.32 {+-} 0.04 and F{sub R} = 0.01 {+-} 0.05, in agreement with the Standard Model predictions. As the polarization of the W bosons in top quark decays is sensitive to the Wtb vertex Lorentz structure and couplings, the measurements were used to set limits on anomalous contributions to the Wtb couplings.

  17. Beyond WIMPs: the Quark (Anti) Nugget Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhitnitsky, Ariel

    2017-03-01

    We review a testable dark matter (DM) model outside of the standard WIMP paradigm. The model is unique in a sense that the observed ratio Ωdark ≃ Ωvisible for visible and dark matter densities finds its natural explanation as a result of their common QCD origin when both types of matter (DM and visible) are formed during the QCD phase transition and both are proportional to single dimensional parameter of the system, Λqcd. We argue that the charge separation effect also inevitably occurs during the same QCD phase transition in the presence of the CP odd axion field a(x). It leads to preferential formation of one species of nuggets on the scales of the visible Universe where the axion field a(x) is coherent. A natural outcome of this preferential evolution is that only one type of the visible baryons (not anti- baryons) remain in the system after the nuggets complete their formation. Unlike conventional WIMP dark matter candidates, the nuggets and anti-nuggets are strongly interacting but macroscopically large objects. The rare events of annihilation of the anti-nuggets with visible matter lead to a number of observable effects. We argue that the relative intensities for a number of measured excesses of emission from the centre of galaxy (covering more than 11 orders of magnitude) are determined by standard and well established physics. At the same time the absolute intensity of emission is determined by a single new fundamental parameter of the theory, the axion mass, 10-6eV ≲ ma ≲ 10-3eV. Finally, we comment on implications of these studies for the axion search experiments, including microwave cavity and the Orpheus experiments.

  18. Shear viscosity from kaon condensation in color-flavor-locked quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Mark G.; Braby, Matt; Mahmoodifar, Simin

    2010-02-01

    We calculate the kaonic contribution to the shear viscosity of quark matter in the kaon-condensed color-flavor-locked phase (CFL-K0). This contribution comes from a light pseudo-Goldstone boson that arises from the spontaneous breaking of the flavor symmetry by the kaon condensate. The other contribution, from the exactly massless superfluid “phonon,” has been calculated previously. We specialize to a particular form of the interaction Lagrangian, parameterized by a single coupling. We find that if we make reasonable guesses for the values of the parameters of the effective theory, the kaons have a much smaller shear viscosity than the superfluid phonons but also a much shorter mean free path, so they could easily provide the dominant contribution to the shear viscosity of CFL-K0 quark matter in a neutron star in the temperature range 0.01 to 1 MeV (108 to 1010 K).

  19. Shear viscosity from kaon condensation in color-flavor-locked quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, Mark G.; Mahmoodifar, Simin; Braby, Matt

    2010-02-15

    We calculate the kaonic contribution to the shear viscosity of quark matter in the kaon-condensed color-flavor-locked phase (CFL-K0). This contribution comes from a light pseudo-Goldstone boson that arises from the spontaneous breaking of the flavor symmetry by the kaon condensate. The other contribution, from the exactly massless superfluid 'phonon', has been calculated previously. We specialize to a particular form of the interaction Lagrangian, parameterized by a single coupling. We find that if we make reasonable guesses for the values of the parameters of the effective theory, the kaons have a much smaller shear viscosity than the superfluid phonons but also a much shorter mean free path, so they could easily provide the dominant contribution to the shear viscosity of CFL-K0 quark matter in a neutron star in the temperature range 0.01 to 1 MeV (10{sup 8} to 10{sup 10} K).

  20. Multi-Dimensional Structure of Crystalline Chiral Condensates in Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tong-Gyu; Nishiyama, Kazuya; Yasutake, Nobutoshi; Maruyama, Toshiki; Tatsumi, Toshitaka

    We explore the multi-dimensional structure of inhomogeneous chiral condensates in quark matter. For a one-dimensional structure, the system becomes unstable at finite temperature due to the Nambu-Goldstone excitations. However, inhomogeneous chiral condensates with multi-dimensional modulations may be realized as a true long-range order at any temperature, as inferred from the Landau-Peierls theorem. We here present some possible strategies for searching the multi-dimensional structure of chiral crystals.

  1. Combustion of Hadrons to Strange Quark Matter Inside a Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosero, Jhon Andersson; Kemp, Ernesto

    We have studied the phase transition from hadronic to quark matter inside neutron stars, we calculate the rate and emissivity for all the relevant weak interaction processes and solve the Boltzmann transport equation, considering the effect of strong interactions in the perturbative regime to the order of QCD coupling constant αc. We find that the neutrino and antineutrino emissivity is around of 1053 erg.

  2. Dissipationless Hall current in dense quark matter in a magnetic field

    DOE PAGES

    Ferrer, Efrain J.; de la Incera, V.

    2017-03-29

    Here, we show the realization of axion electrodynamics within the Dual Chiral Density Wave phase of dense quark matter in the presence of a magnetic field. This system exhibits an anomalous dissipationless Hall current perpendicular to the magnetic field and an anomalous electric charge density. This connection to topological insulators and 3D optical lattices, as well as possible implications for heavy-ion collisions and neutron stars are outlined.

  3. Probing Quark-Gluon Structure of Matter with e-p and e-A Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2011-11-01

    Understanding the strong interaction (QCD) in the truly strong ('non-perturbative') region remains a major challenge in modern physics. Nucleon and nuclei provide natural laboratories to study the strong interaction. The quark-gluon structure of the nucleon and nuclei are important by themselves since they are the main (>99%) part of the visible world. With electroweak interaction well-understood, e-p and e-A are clean means to probe the nucleon and nuclear structure and to study the strong interaction (QCD). Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering (DIS) experiments have provided us with the most extensive information on the unpolarized and longitudinally-polarized parton (quark and gluon) distributions (PDFs). It has becoming clear that transverse spin and transverse structure (both transverse spatial structure via generalized parton distributions (GPDs) and transverse momentum structure via transverse- momentum-dependent distributions (TMDs)) study are crucial for a more complete understanding of the nucleon structure and the dynamics of the strong interaction(QCD). The transverse spin, GPDs and TMDs have been the subjects of increasingly intense theoretical and experimental study recently. With 12 GeV energy upgrade, Jefferson Lab (JLab) will provide the most precise multi-dimensional map of the TMDs and GPDs in the valence quark region through Semi-Inclusive DIS (SIDIS) and Deep-Exclusive experiments, providing a 3-d partonic picture of the nucleon in momentum and spatial spaces. The precision information on TMDs and GPDs will provide access to the quark orbital angular momentum and its correlation with the quark and the nucleon spins. The planned future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) will enable a precision study of the TMDs and GPDs of the sea quarks and gluons, in addition to completing the study in the valence region. The EIC will also open a new window to study the role of gluons in nuclei.

  4. Anomalies and asymmetries in quark-gluon matter

    SciTech Connect

    Teryaev, O. V.

    2012-06-15

    The manifestations of axial anomaly and related effects in heavy-ion collisions are considered. Special role is played by various asymmetries. The azimuthal correlational asymmetries of neutron pairs at NICA/FAIR energy range may probe the global rotation of strongly interacting matter. The conductivity is related to the angular asymmetries of dilepton pairs. The strong magnetic field generated in heavy-ion collisions leads to the excess of soft dileptons flying predominantly in the scattering plane.

  5. Nuclear matter in nontopological soliton models with quark-meson coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnea, Nir; Walhout, Timothy S.

    2000-09-01

    A system of nontopological solitons interacting through meson exchange is used to model dense nuclear matter. The models studied are of the Friedberg-Lee type, which exhibit dynamical bag formation due to the coupling of quarks to a scalar composite gluon field σ. It is shown in the Wigner-Seitz approximation that the high density behavior of such models depends essentially on the leading power of the quark- σ coupling vertex. By insisting that the parameters of any soliton model be chosen to reproduce single nucleon properties, this high-density behavior then selects a promising class of models that better fit the empirical results — the chiral chromodielectric models. The presence of a scalar meson is shown to provide saturation as well as an increase of the proton charge radius with nuclear density. We go beyond the usual Wigner-Seitz approximation by introducing the disorder necessary to reproduce the liquid state, using the significant structure theory of physical chemistry. We study nuclear matter, with particular interest in the transition to a quark plasma, showing that even the simplest version of the model provides a reasonable qualitative fit to both the empirical nuclear matter equation of state and single nucleon properties.

  6. Equation of state of hadronic matter with dibaryons in an effective quark model

    SciTech Connect

    R. Aguirre; M. Schvellinger

    1998-06-01

    The equation of state of symmetric nuclear matter with the inclusion of non-strange dibaryons is studied. They pay special attention to the existence of a dibaryon condensate at zero temperature. These calculations have been performed in an extended quark-meson coupling model with density-dependent parameters, which takes into account the finite size of nucleons and dibaryons. A first-order phase-transition to pure dibaryon matter has been found. The corresponding critical density is strongly dependent on the value of the dibaryon mass. The density behavior of the nucleon and dibaryon effective masses and confining volumes have also been discussed.

  7. Polarization of a top quark produced in the decay of a gluino or a stop in an arbitrary frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunprasath, V.; Godbole, Rohini M.; Singh, Ritesh K.

    2017-04-01

    We show that for values of masses of the gluino and stop favored by "naturalness," the top quark produced in the decay g ˜→t t˜1 can be polarized. This polarization depends only on the mixing in the stop sector as opposed to that of the top quark produced in decays t ˜ →t χ˜i 0 , b ˜ →t χ˜i - . In both the cases the polarization constructed through the distribution of top decay products in the laboratory frame, is different from the top polarization predicted in the rest frame of the mother particle (gluino/stop), which depends on the SUSY parameters as mentioned above. Here, we propose an estimator of lab frame top quark polarization, starting from the rest frame polarization of the top. This estimator depends only on the magnitude of velocity of the mother particle and assumes a narrow width for the mother particle. With a Monte-Carlo simulation of the full production and decay chain we establish our estimator to be accurate within 1% and the computation is a much simpler exercise compared to calculating from first principle. We also study effects of finite width of the mother particle using a suitably modified estimator and find it most useful for stop-quarks decays.

  8. Three-dimensional super Yang-Mills with compressible quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faedo, Antón F.; Kundu, Arnab; Mateos, David; Pantelidou, Christiana; Tarrío, Javier

    2016-03-01

    We construct the gravity dual of three-dimensional, SU(N c) super Yang-Mills theory with N f flavors of dynamical quarks in the presence of a non-zero quark density N q. The supergravity solutions include the backreaction of N c color D2-branes and N f flavor D6-branes with N q units of electric flux on their worldvolume. For massless quarks, the solutions depend non-trivially only on the dimensionless combination ρ = N c 2 N q/ λ 2 N f 4 , with λ = g YM 2 N c the 't Hooft coupling, and describe renormalization group flows between the super Yang-Mills theory in the ultraviolet and a non-relativistic theory in the infrared. The latter is dual to a hyperscaling-violating, Lifshitz-like geometry with dynamical and hyperscaling-violating exponents z = 5 and θ = 1, respectively. If ρ ≪ 1 then at intermediate energies there is also an approximate AdS4 region, dual to a conformal Chern-Simons-Matter theory, in which the flow exhibits quasi-conformal dynamics. At zero temperature we compute the chemical potential and the equation of state and extract the speed of sound. At low temperature we compute the entropy density and extract the number of low-energy degrees of freedom. For quarks of non-zero mass M q the physics depends non-trivially on ρ and M q N c /λ N f.

  9. Quark nugget dark matter: no contradiction with 511 keV line emission from dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Kyle; Zhitnitsky, Ariel

    2017-02-01

    The observed galactic 511 keV line has been interpreted in a number of papers as a possible signal of dark matter annihilation within the galactic bulge. If this is the case then it is possible that a similar spectral feature may be observed in association with nearby dwarf galaxies. These objects are believed to be strongly dark matter dominated and present a relatively clean observational target. Recently INTEGRAL observations have provided new constraints on the 511 keV flux from nearby dwarf galaxies [1] motivating further investigation into the mechanism by which this radiation may arise. In the model presented here dark matter in the form of heavy quark nuggets produces the galactic 511 keV emission line through interactions with the visible matter. It is argued that this type of interaction is not strongly constrained by the flux limits reported in [2].

  10. Quark seesaw mechanism, dark U (1 ) symmetry, and the baryon-dark matter coincidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Pei-Hong; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.

    2017-09-01

    We attempt to understand the baryon-dark matter coincidence problem within the quark seesaw extension of the standard model where parity invariance is used to solve the strong C P problem. The S U (2 )L×S U (2 )R×U (1 )B -L gauge symmetry of this model is extended by a dark U (1 )X group plus inclusion of a heavy neutral vector-like fermion χL ,R charged under the dark group which plays the role of dark matter. All fermions are Dirac type in this model. Decay of heavy scalars charged under U (1 )X leads to simultaneous asymmetry generation of the dark matter and baryons after sphaleron effects are included. The U (1 )X group not only helps to stabilize the dark matter but also helps in the elimination of the symmetric part of the dark matter via χ -χ ¯ annihilation. For dark matter mass near the proton mass, it explains why the baryon and dark matter abundances are of similar magnitude (the baryon-dark matter coincidence problem). This model is testable in low threshold (sub-keV) direct dark matter search experiments.

  11. Ginzburg-Landau phase diagram for dense matter with axial anomaly, strange quark mass, and meson condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Andreas; Stetina, Stephan; Tachibana, Motoi

    2011-02-01

    We discuss the phase structure of dense matter, in particular, the nature of the transition between hadronic and quark matter. Calculations within a Ginzburg-Landau approach show that the axial anomaly can induce a critical point in this transition region. This is possible because in three-flavor quark matter with instanton effects a chiral condensate can be added to the color-flavor locked phase without changing the symmetries of the ground state. In (massless) two-flavor quark matter such a critical point is not possible since the corresponding color superconductor (2SC) does not break chiral symmetry. We study the effects of a nonzero but finite strange quark mass which interpolates between these two cases. Since at ultrahigh density the first reaction of the color-flavor locked phase to a nonzero strange quark mass is to develop a kaon condensate, we extend previous Ginzburg-Landau studies by including such a condensate. We discuss the fate of the critical point systematically and show that the continuity between hadronic and quark matter can be disrupted by the onset of a kaon condensate. Moreover, we identify the mass terms in the Ginzburg-Landau potential which are needed for the 2SC phase to occur in the phase diagram.

  12. Does cell polarity matter during spermatogenesis?

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-01-01

    Cell polarity is crucial to development since apico-basal polarity conferred by the 3 polarity protein modules (or complexes) is essential during embryogenesis, namely the Par (partition defective)-, the CRB (Crumbs)-, and the Scribble-based polarity protein modules. While these protein complexes and their component proteins have been extensively studied in Drosophila and C. elegans and also other mammalian tissues and/or cells, their presence and physiological significance in the testis remain unexplored until the first paper on the Par-based protein published in 2008. Since then, the Par-, the Scribble- and the CRB-based protein complexes and their component proteins in the testis have been studied. These proteins are known to confer Sertoli and spermatid polarity in the seminiferous epithelium, and they are also integrated components of the tight junction (TJ) and the basal ectoplasmic specialization (ES) at the Sertoli cell-cell interface near the basement membrane, which in turn constitute the blood-testis barrier (BTB). These proteins are also found at the apical ES at the Sertoli-spermatid interface. Thus, these polarity proteins also play a significant role in regulating Sertoli and spermatid adhesion in the testis through their actions on actin-based cytoskeletal function. Recent studies have shown that these polarity proteins are having antagonistic effects on the BTB integrity in which the Par6- and CRB3-based polarity complexes promotes the integrity of the Sertoli cell TJ-permeability barrier, whereas the Scribble-based complex promotes restructuring/remodeling of the Sertoli TJ-barrier function. Herein, we carefully evaluate these findings and provide a hypothetic model regarding their role in the testis in the context of the functions of these polarity proteins in other epithelia, so that better experiments can be designed in future studies to explore their significance in spermatogenesis.

  13. Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model of homogeneous neutral quark matter: Pseudoscalar diquark condensates revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, H.; Buballa, M.

    2010-03-01

    We use a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio type model to investigate the phase diagram of dense quark matter under neutron star conditions in mean-field approximation. The model contains self-consistently determined quark masses and allows for diquark condensation in the scalar as well as in the pseudoscalar channel. The latter gives rise to the possibility of K0 condensation in the color-flavor locked phase. In agreement with earlier studies we find that this CFLK0 phase covers large regions of the phase diagram and that the predominant part of this phase is fully gapped. We show, however, that there exists a region at very low temperatures where the CFLK0 solutions become gapless, possibly indicating an instability towards anisotropic or inhomogeneous phases. The physical significance of solutions with pseudoscalar diquark condensates in the 2SC phase is discussed as well.

  14. Quark matter with strong magnetic field and possibility of the third family of compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotani, Hajime; Tatsumi, Toshitaka

    2017-05-01

    We consider the possibility for the existence of the third family of compact objects, considering the effect of strong magnetic fields inside the hybrid stars. As a result, we demonstrate such new sequences of stable equilibrium configurations for some hadronic equations of state. Through the analysis of the adiabatic index inside stars, we find the conditions for appearing the third family of compact objects, i.e. for hadronic stars without quarks, that the maximum mass should be small, the central density for the maximum mass should be also small, and the radius for the maximum mass should be large. Even for soft hadronic equations of state, the two solar-mass stars might survive as the third family of compact objects, once quark matter with strong magnetic field, such as {˜ } O(10^{19} G), is taken into account. It might give a hint to solve the so-called hyperon puzzle in nuclear physics.

  15. Stable strange quark matter objects with running masses and coupling constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Cheng-Jun; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2017-03-01

    We improve our recently proposed unified description for strange quark matter (SQM) objects, in the way that analytical expressions are derived and used to calculate the distribution of particles inside an SQM object. In the improved model, the computational time is greatly reduced without losing accuracy. The properties of SQM objects are then investigated by adopting perturbative quantum chromodynamics (pQCD) with running quark masses and coupling constant. Aside from the increase of masses and radii of strange stars, it is found that the perturbative interactions also make the electric field on the surface stronger and extends deeper into the core, while small SQM objects become less compact and more positively charged. These may affect the experimental searches of SQM.

  16. PERSPECTIVE: Snow matters in the polar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodeau, John

    2010-03-01

    to 30 times greater than those found in ice-free areas. The main question to ask is: how might the bromine have become released to the atmosphere? Many ideas have, in fact, been put forward over the last few years as to how such polar ocean-troposphere exchanges can take place. Much of the interest was driven by the so-called 'sudden' ozone depletion episodes first detected in Arctic air during the 1990s alongside simultaneous bromine 'explosions' which were monitored by ground-based instrumentation and satellite (as the radical BrO) over sea-ice covered by snowpack (Hausmann and Platt 1994, Schonhardt et al 2008). The likely precursors suggested, to date, have been sea-salt, frost-flowers and anthropogenic contents rather than organo- bromine matter (Simpson et al 2007). Associated processing routes including the formation of HOBr, the need for acidity, the involvement of trihalide ions and the potential role of freezing processes and the quasi-liquid layer have all been discussed in this context (Abbatt 1994, Neshyba et al 2009, O'Driscoll et al 2006). Computational work has also led to suggestions that preferential surface dispersion of the more highly polarizable halides (iodide and bromide ions) may lead to their direct interfacial reaction with atmospheric ozone leading to BrO or IO formation (Jungwirth and Winter 2008). The involvement of snow micro-algae in the production of halo-compounds such as CHBr3 and CH2Br2 in Antarctica cannot, of course, be ignored following the measurement of these compounds by Sturges and co-workers over 15 years ago (Sturges et al 1993). And the measurement of high levels of nutrient discussed in the recent work by Antony et al (2010) in the ice-cap areas do provide a basis for understanding why micro- algae growth in snow might be promoted. However the question still comes back to: how are these halo-compounds processed to produce 'active' species like BrO radicals, HOBr, Br atoms, Br2 gas or interhalogens such as BrCl? The

  17. Exploring the Quark-Gluon Content of Hadrons: From Mesons to Nuclear Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Matevosyan, Hrayr

    2007-08-01

    Even though Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) was formulated over three decades ago, it poses enormous challenges for describing the properties of hadrons from the underlying quark-gluon degrees of freedom. Moreover, the problem of describing the nuclear force from its quark-gluon origin is still open. While a direct solution of QCD to describe the hadrons and nuclear force is not possible at this time, we explore a variety of developed approaches ranging from phenomenology to first principle calculations at one or other level of approximation in linking the nuclear force to QCD. The Dyson Schwinger formulation (DSE) of coupled integral equations for the QCD Green’s functions allows a non-perturbative approach to describe hadronic properties, starting from the level of QCD n-point functions. A significant approximation in this method is the employment of a finite truncation of the system of DSEs, that might distort the physical picture. In this work we explore the effects of including a more complete truncation of the quark-gluon vertex function on the resulting solutions for the quark 2-point functions as well as the pseudoscalar and vector meson masses. The exploration showed strong indications of possibly large contributions from the explicit inclusion of the gluon 3- and 4-point functions that are omitted in this and previous analyses. We then explore the possibility of extrapolating state of the art lattice QCD calculations of nucleon form factors to the physical regime using phenomenological models of nucleon structure. Finally, we further developed the Quark Meson Coupling model for describing atomic nuclei and nuclear matter, where the quark-gluon structure of nucleons is modeled by the MIT bag model and the nucleon many body interaction is mediated by the exchange of scalar and vector mesons. This approach allows us to formulate a fully relativistic theory, which can be expanded in the nonrelativistic limit to reproduce the well known phenomenological Skyrme

  18. Role of correlations in spin-polarized neutron matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidaña, Isaac; Polls, Artur; Durant, Victoria

    2016-11-01

    Background: The possible existence of a phase transition to a ferromagnetic state in neutron matter as origin of the extremely high magnetic fields of neutron stars is still an open issue. Whereas many phenomenological interactions predict this transition at densities accessible in neutron stars, microscopic calculations based on realistic interactions show no indication of it. The existence or non-existence of this transition is a consequence of the different role of nucleon-nucleon correlations in polarized and unpolarized neutron matter. Therefore, to give a definite answer to this issue it is necessary to analyze the behavior of these correlations. Purpose: Using the Hellmann-Feynman theorem we analyze the contribution of the different terms of the nucleon-nucleon interaction to the spin symmetry energy of neutron matter with the purpose of identifying the nature and role of correlations in polarized and unpolarized neutron matter. Methods: The analysis is performed within the microscopic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach using the Argonne V18 realistic potential plus the Urbana IX three-body force. Results: Our results show no indication of a ferromagnetic transition as the spin symmetry energy of neutron matter is always an increasing function of density. They show also that the main contribution to it comes from the S =0 channel, acting only in non-polarized neutron matter, in particular from the 1S0 and the 1D2 partial waves. Three-body forces are found to play a secondary role in the determination of the spin symmetry energy. Conclusions: By evaluating the kinetic energy difference between the correlated system and the underlying Fermi sea to estimate the importance of correlations in spin-polarized neutron matter, we conclude that non-polarized neutron matter is more correlated than totally polarized one.

  19. QCD analysis of light charged Higgs production through polarized top quark decay in two different frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejad, S. Mohammad Moosavi; Abbaspour, S.

    2017-03-01

    Light and heavy charged Higgs bosons are predicted by many models with an extended Higgs sector such as the two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM). Searches for the charged Higgs bosons have been done by the ATLAS and the CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in proton-proton collision. However, a definitive search of charged Higgs bosons still has to be carried out by the LHC experiments. The experimental observation of charged Higgs bosons would indicate physics beyond the Standard Model. In the present work we study the O({α}_s) correction to the energy spectrum of the inclusive bottom-flavored mesons ( X b ) in polarized top quark decays into a light charged Higgs boson ( m H+ < m t ) and a massless bottom quark followed by the hadronization process b → X b in the type-I 2HDM, i.e. t(↑) → H + b → H + X b + Jet. This spin-dependent energy distribution is studied in two different helicity coordinate systems. This study could be considered as a new channel to indirect search for the charged Higgs bosons. To present our phenomenological predictions, we restrict ourselves to the constraints on the m H+ - tan β parameter space determined by the recent results of the CMS and the ATLAS collaborations.

  20. Polarizing matter and antimatter: A new method

    SciTech Connect

    Onel, Y.

    1992-02-01

    Several years ago a self-polarization effect for stored (anti)- protons and ions was investigated theoretically. The effect is based on the well-known Stern-Gerlach effect in gradient fields. The aim of the ongoing measurements at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) is to verify experimentally the various assumptions on which this effect is based. The final goal is to demonstrate this new polarization effect. The proposed effect could be a powerful tool to produce polarized stored hadron beams both in the low-energy range and at SSC and LHC energies. In this progress report we will describe our progress in three parts: (A) Experimental work at IUCF Cooler Ring; (B) Our extensive computer simulations of the spin stability for the IUCF Cooler Ring; and (C) Theoretical studies.

  1. Measuring the anti-quark contribution to the proton spin using parity violating W production in polarized proton proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Ciprian

    Since the 1980s the spin puzzle has been at the heart of many experimental measurements. The initial discovery that only ~30% of the spin of the proton comes from quarks and anti-quarks has been refined and cross checked by several other deep inelastic scattering (DIS) and semi inclusive DIS (SIDIS) experiments. Through measurements of polarized parton distribution functions (PDFs) the individual contributions of the u, d, u, d, quarks have been measured. The flavor separation done in SIDIS experiments requires knowledge of fragmentation functions (FFs). However, due to the higher uncertainty of the anti-quark FFs compared to the quark FFs, the quark polarized PDFs (Deltau(x), Delta d(x)) are significantly better constrained than the anti-quark distributions (Deltau( x), Deltad(x). By accessing the anti-quarks directly through W boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions (ud → W+ → e+/mu+ and du→ W- → e-/mu-), the large FF uncertainties are avoided and a cleaner measurement can be done. The parity violating single spin asymmetry of the W decay leptons can be directly related to the polarized PDFs of the anti-quarks. The W+/- → e+/- measurement has been performed with the PHENIX central arm detectors at √s=510 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and is presented in this thesis. Approximately 40 pb-1 of data from the 2011 and 2012 was analyzed and a large parity violating single spin asymmetry for W+/- has been measured. The combined data for 2011 and 2012 provide a single spin asymmetry for both charges: W+: -0.27 +/- 0.10(stat) +/- 0.01(syst) W -: 0.28 +/- 0.16(stat) +/- 0.02(syst) These results are consistent with the different theoretical predictions at the 1sigma level. The increased statistical precision enabled and required a more careful analysis of the background contamination for the this measurement. A method based on Gaussian Processes for Regression has been employed to determine this background contribution. This

  2. Relativistic Static Thin Disks of Polarized Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Anamaria; Lora-Clavijo, F. D.; González, Guillermo A.

    2017-03-01

    An infinite family of exact solutions of the electrovacuum Einstein-Maxwell equations is presented. The family is static, axially symmetric and describe thin disks composed by electrically polarized material in a conformastatic spacetime. The form of the conformastatic metric allows us to write down the metric functions and the electromagnetic potentials in terms of a solution of the Laplace equation. We find a general expression for the surface energy density of the disk, the pressure, the polarization vector, the electromagnetic fields and the velocity rotation for circular orbits. As an example, we present the first model of the family and show the behavior of the different physical variables.

  3. Measurement of top quark polarization in top-antitop lepton+jets final states at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Augsten, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of the top quark polarization in the $t\\overline{t}$ events produced in $p\\overline{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV using data corresponding to 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The final states used in the measurement contain one lepton and at least three jets. The polarization is measured using the angular distribution of leptons along three different axes: the beam axis, the helicity axis, and the transverse axis normal to the $t\\overline{t}$ production plane. This is the first measurement of top quark polarization at the Tevatron Collider in lepton+jets final states, and the first measurement of transverse polarization in $t\\overline{t}$ production. The polarization along the beam axis is combined with the previous result in the dilepton final states by the D0 experiment. The observed distributions are consistent with the Standard Model of nearly no polarization and no indication for beyond Standard Model physics is observed. The measurement offers legacy result from unique Tevatron Collider data and provides more information about the top quark production and decays, about the properties of the heaviest elementary particle.

  4. Measurement of the polarized forward-backward asymmetry of s-quarks at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Narita, Shinya

    1998-03-01

    This thesis presents a direct measurement of the parity-violating parameter As by analyzing the polarized forward-backward asymmetry of s quarks in e+e- →} Z0 → s$\\bar{s}$. The author has used the data taken at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), from the SLAC Large Detector (SLD), which records the products of e+e- interactions at a center of mass energy √s = 91.2 GeV at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The unique features of the SLC/SLD experimental apparatus provide interesting tests of the electroweak and the QCD physics. The small, stable SLC beam spot, and the precise tracking capability of the SLD allow the isolation of light flavor events. Charged hadrons are identified over wide momentum range with the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID). High momentum charged kaon, Λ0/$\\bar{Λ}$0, and K$0\\atop{s}$ are used to select Z0 → s$\\bar{s}$ events and to identify the s-quark direction. The averaged polarization was 63.0% in 1993 SLD run and 77.3% in 1994-95 run. The author obtained As = 0.86 ± 0.17(stat.) ± 0.10(syst.). This value is consistent with the prediction from the Standard Model and with the values of Ab measurements from SLD and LEP experiments.

  5. Simulating Hadronic-to-Quark-Matter with Burn-UD: Recent work and astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welbanks, Luis; Ouyed, Amir; Koning, Nico; Ouyed, Rachid

    2017-06-01

    We present the new developments in Burn-UD, our in-house hydrodynamic combustion code used to model the phase transition of hadronic-to-quark matter. Our two new modules add neutrino transport and the time evolution of a (u, d, s) quark star (QS). Preliminary simulations show that the inclusion of neutrino transport points towards new hydrodynamic instabilities that increase the burning speed. A higher burning speed could elicit the deflagration to detonation of a neutron star (NS) into a QS. We propose that a Quark-Nova (QN: the explosive transition of a NS to a QS) could help us explain the most energetic astronomical events to this day: superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). Our models consider a QN occurring in a massive binary, experiencing two common envelope stages and a QN occurring after the supernova explosion of a Wolf-Rayet (WO) star. Both models have been successful in explaining the double humped light curves of over half a dozen SLSNe. We also introduce SiRop our r-process simulation code and propose that a QN site has the hot temperatures and neutron densities required to make it an ideal site for the r-process.

  6. Transport coefficients of two-flavor quark matter from the Kubo formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, Arus; Rischke, Dirk H.; Sedrakian, Armen

    2017-06-01

    The transport coefficients of quark matter at nonzero chemical potential and temperature are computed within the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We apply the Kubo formalism to obtain the thermal (κ ) and electrical (σ ) conductivities as well as an update of the shear viscosity (η ) by evaluating the corresponding equilibrium two-point correlation functions to leading order in the 1 /Nc expansion. The Dirac structure of the self-energies and spectral functions is taken into account as these are evaluated from the meson-exchange Fock diagrams for on-mass-shell quarks. We find that the thermal and electrical conductivities are decreasing functions of temperature and density above the Mott temperature TM of dissolution of mesons into quarks, the main contributions being generated by the temporal and vector components of the spectral functions. The coefficients show a universal dependence on the ratio T /TM for different densities, i.e., the results differ by a chemical-potential dependent constant. We also show that the Wiedemann-Franz law for the ratio σ /κ does not hold. The ratio η /s , where s is the entropy density, is of order of unity (or larger) close to the Mott temperature and, as the temperature increases, approaches the AdS /CFT bound 1 /4 π . It is also conjectured that the ratio κ T /cV, with cV being the specific heat, is bounded from below by 1 /18 .

  7. Signatures from scalar dark matter with a vector-like quark mediator

    SciTech Connect

    Giacchino, Federica; Tytgat, Michel H.G.; Ibarra, Alejandro; Wild, Sebastian; Honorez, Laura Lopez E-mail: ibarra@tum.de E-mail: mtytgat@ulb.ac.be

    2016-02-01

    We present a comprehensive study of a model where the dark matter is composed of a singlet real scalar that couples to the Standard Model predominantly via a Yukawa interaction with a light quark and a colored vector-like fermion. A distinctive feature of this scenario is that thermal freeze-out in the early universe may be driven by annihilation both into gluon pairs at one-loop (gg) and by virtual internal Bremsstrahlung of a gluon (q q-bar  g). Such a dark matter candidate may also be tested through direct and indirect detection and at the LHC; viable candidates have either a mass nearly degenerate with that of the fermionic mediator or a mass above about 2 TeV.

  8. Signatures from scalar dark matter with a vector-like quark mediator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacchino, Federica; Ibarra, Alejandro; Lopez Honorez, Laura; Tytgat, Michel H. G.; Wild, Sebastian

    2016-02-01

    We present a comprehensive study of a model where the dark matter is composed of a singlet real scalar that couples to the Standard Model predominantly via a Yukawa interaction with a light quark and a colored vector-like fermion. A distinctive feature of this scenario is that thermal freeze-out in the early universe may be driven by annihilation both into gluon pairs at one-loop (gg) and by virtual internal Bremsstrahlung of a gluon (qbar q g). Such a dark matter candidate may also be tested through direct and indirect detection and at the LHC; viable candidates have either a mass nearly degenerate with that of the fermionic mediator or a mass above about 2 TeV.

  9. Measurement of the polarized forward-backward asymmetry of b quarks at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Serbo, V.V.

    1997-07-01

    This thesis presents a direct measurement of the parity-violating parameter A{sub b} using the Left-Right Forward-Backward asymmetry of b{anti b} pair production at the Z{sup 0} pole. The measurement was done at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) using data from the SLAC Large Detector (SLD). The authors take advantage of the high polarization of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) electron beam. To identify heavy flavor decays of the Z{sup 0}, they use a b-tag based on the topological reconstruction of the mass of the B vertex. Discrimination between the b and {anti b} quark directions is provided by a self-calibrating jet-charge technique. This technique allows calibration of the analyzing power from data and gives a much reduced model dependence. Based on the 1994--95 (1993) sample of 100,000 (50,000) Z{sup 0} decays recorded with an electron beam polarization of = 77% (63%), they have obtained A{sub b} = 0.911 {+-} 0.045(stat) {+-} 0.045(syst). This value is in goo d agreement with the Standard Model.

  10. Medium polarization and pairing in asymmetric nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, J. M.; Lombardo, U.; Zhang, H. F.; Zuo, W.

    2017-01-01

    The many-body theory of asymmetric nuclear matter is developed beyond the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation to incorporate the medium polarization effects. The extension is performed within the Babu-Brown induced interaction theory. After deriving the particle-hole interaction in the form of Landau-Migdal parameters, the effects of the induced component on the symmetry energy are investigated along with the screening of 1 S 0 proton-proton and 3 PF 2 neutron-neutron pairing, which are relevant for the neutron-star cooling. The crossover from repulsive (screening) to attractive (anti-screening) interaction going from pure neutron matter to symmetric nuclear matter is discussed.

  11. Bulk viscosity coefficients due to phonons and kaons in superfluid color-flavor locked quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierkandt, Robert; Manuel, Cristina

    2011-07-01

    We evaluate the three bulk viscosity coefficients ζ1, ζ2 and ζ3 in the color-flavor locked superfluid phase due to phonons and kaons, which are the lightest modes in that system. We first show that the computation is rather analogous to the computation of the same coefficients in superfluid He4, as due to phonons and rotons. For astrophysical applications, we also find the value of the viscosities when there is a periodic disturbance, and the viscosities also depend on the frequency of the disturbance. In a temperature regime that might be of astrophysical relevance, we find that the contributions of both the phonons and kaons should be considered, and that ζ2 is much less that the same coefficient in unpaired quark matter.

  12. Onset Transition to Cold Nuclear Matter from Lattice QCD with Heavy Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, M.; Langelage, J.; Lottini, S.; Neuman, M.; Philipsen, O.

    2013-03-01

    Lattice QCD at finite density suffers from a severe sign problem, which has so far prohibited simulations of the cold and dense regime. Here we study the onset of nuclear matter employing a three-dimensional effective theory derived by combined strong coupling and hopping expansions, which is valid for heavy but dynamical quarks and has a mild sign problem only. Its numerical evaluations agree between a standard Metropolis and complex Langevin algorithm, where the latter is free of the sign problem. Our continuum extrapolated data approach a first order phase transition at μB≈mB as the temperature approaches zero. An excellent description of the data is achieved by an analytic solution in the strong coupling limit.

  13. Onset transition to cold nuclear matter from lattice QCD with heavy quarks.

    PubMed

    Fromm, M; Langelage, J; Lottini, S; Neuman, M; Philipsen, O

    2013-03-22

    Lattice QCD at finite density suffers from a severe sign problem, which has so far prohibited simulations of the cold and dense regime. Here we study the onset of nuclear matter employing a three-dimensional effective theory derived by combined strong coupling and hopping expansions, which is valid for heavy but dynamical quarks and has a mild sign problem only. Its numerical evaluations agree between a standard Metropolis and complex Langevin algorithm, where the latter is free of the sign problem. Our continuum extrapolated data approach a first order phase transition at μ(B) ≈ m(B) as the temperature approaches zero. An excellent description of the data is achieved by an analytic solution in the strong coupling limit.

  14. Effect of polarization on superfluidity in low density neutron matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, J. W.; Kallman, C.-G.; Yang, C.-H.; Chakkalakal, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    The singlet-state quasi-particle interaction in neutron matter is examined on the basis of results of a detailed evaluation of the Landau Fermi-liquid parameters for pure neutron effects, including polarization effects. This means that the interaction induced by exchange of density and spin-density excitations is taken into account. It is shown that polarization actually works to suppress the pairing matrix elements, owing to the spin dependence of the quasi-particle interaction and, ultimately, the balance of attraction, repulsion, and spin dependence in the fundamental two-neutron interaction. Since the isotropic energy gap and the condensation energy in low-density neutron-star matter are extremely sensitive functions of the pairing matrix elements, they will also be suppressed by the polarizability of the neutron medium.

  15. Spectral Induced Polarization Signature of Soil Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Nimrod; Furman, Alex

    2015-04-01

    Although often composing a non-negligible fraction of soil cation exchange capacity (CEC), the impact of soil organic matter (OM) on the electrical properties of soil has not been thoroughly investigated. In this research the impact of soil OM on the spectral induced polarization (SIP) signature of soil was investigated. Electrical and chemical measurements for two experiments using the same soil, one with calcium as the dominant cation and the other with sodium, with different concentration of OM were performed. Our results show that despite the high CEC of OM, a decrease in polarization and an increase in relaxation time with increasing concentration of OM is observed. For the soil with calcium as the dominant cation, the decreases in polarization and the increase in relaxation time were stronger. We explain these non-trivial results by accounting for the interactions between the OM and the soil minerals. We suggest that the formation of organo-mineral complexes reduce ionic mobility, explaining both the decrease in polarization and the increase in relaxation time. These results demonstrate the important role of OM on SIP response of soil, and call for a further research in order to establish a new polarization model that will include the impact of OM on soil polarization.

  16. On the spectral induced polarization signature of soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, N.; Furman, A.

    2015-01-01

    Although often composing a non-negligible fraction of soil cation exchange capacity (CEC), the impact of soil organic matter (OM) on the electrical properties of soil has not been thoroughly investigated. In this research the impact of soil OM on the spectral induced polarization (SIP) signature of soil was investigated. Electrical and chemical measurements for two experiments using the same soil, one with calcium as the dominant cation and the other with sodium, with different concentration of OM were performed. Our results show that despite the high CEC of OM, a decrease in polarization and an increase in relaxation time with increasing concentration of OM is observed. For the soil with calcium as the dominant cation, the decreases in polarization and the increase in relaxation time were stronger. We explain these non-trivial results by accounting for the interactions between the OM and the soil minerals. We suggest that the formation of organo-mineral complexes reduce ionic mobility, explaining both the decrease in polarization and the increase in relaxation time. These results demonstrate the important role of OM on SIP response of soil, and call for a further research in order to establish a new polarization model that will include the impact of OM on soil polarization.

  17. Search for dark matter in events with heavy quarks and missing transverse momentum in pp collisions with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.

    2015-02-24

    This article reports on a search for dark matter pair production in association with bottom or top quarks in 20.3 fb–1 of pp collisions collected at √s=8 TeV by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Events with large missing transverse momentum are selected when produced in association with high-momentum jets of which one or more are identified as jets containing b-quarks. Final states with top quarks are selected by requiring a high jet multiplicity and in some cases a single lepton. The data are found to be consistent with the Standard Model expectations and limits are set on the massmore » scale of effective field theories that describe scalar and tensor interactions between dark matter and Standard Model particles. Limits on the dark-matter–nucleon cross-section for spin-independent and spin-dependent interactions are also provided. These limits are particularly strong for low-mass dark matter. Using a simplified model, constraints are set on the mass of dark matter and of a colored mediator suitable to explain a possible signal of annihilating dark matter.« less

  18. Search for dark matter in events with heavy quarks and missing transverse momentum in pp collisions with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-02-24

    This article reports on a search for dark matter pair production in association with bottom or top quarks in 20.3 fb–1 of pp collisions collected at √s = 8 TeV by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Events with large missing transverse momentum are selected when produced in association with high-momentum jets of which one or more are identified as jets containing b-quarks. Final states with top quarks are selected by requiring a high jet multiplicity and in some cases a single lepton. The data are found to be consistent with the Standard Model expectations and limits are set on the mass scale of effective field theories that describe scalar and tensor interactions between dark matter and Standard Model particles. Limits on the dark-matter–nucleon cross-section for spin-independent and spin-dependent interactions are also provided. These limits are particularly strong for low-mass dark matter. Using a simplified model, constraints are set on the mass of dark matter and of a colored mediator suitable to explain a possible signal of annihilating dark matter.

  19. Dynamics of semi-superfluid fluxtubes in color-flavor locked quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Mark G.; Windisch, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    At very high densities, as for example in the core of a neutron star, matter may appear in the color-flavor locked (CFL) phase, which is a superfluid. This phase features topologically stable vortex solutions, which arise in a spinning superfluid as localized configurations carrying quanta of angular momentum. Despite the topological stability of these vortices they are not the lowest energy state of the system at neutron star densities and decay into triplets of semi-superfluid fluxtubes. In these proceedings we report on the progress of our numerical study in the Ginzburg-Landau approach, where we investigate lattices of semi-superfluid fluxtubes. The fluxtubes are obtained through controlled decay of global vortex configurations in the presence of a gauge field. Understanding the dynamics of semi-superfluid string configurations is important in the context of angular momentum transfer from a quark matter core of a neutron star beyond the core boundary, since not vortex-, but fluxtube pinning seems to be the relevant mechanism in this scenario.

  20. Constraining phases of quark matter with studies of r-mode damping in compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupak, Gautam; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2010-11-01

    With the goal of constraining the phase of matter at high density, we study r-mode damping in the color-flavor-locked phase with kaon condensation (CFL-K0) and contrast it with the CFL phase. The mode frequencies in these phases are found to differ very slightly. While the bulk viscosity in either phase is only effective at damping the r-mode at temperatures T≳1011 K, the shear viscosity in the CFL-K0 phase is the only effective damping agent all the way down to temperatures T≳108 K characteristic of cooling neutron stars. However, it cannot keep the star from becoming unstable to gravitational wave emission for rotation frequencies ν≈56-11 Hz at T≈108-109 K. Stars composed almost entirely of CFL or CFL-K0 matter are ruled out by observation of rapidly rotating neutron stars, indicating that dissipation at the quark-hadron interface or nuclear crust interface must play a key role in damping the instability.

  1. New upper limit on strange quark matter abundance in cosmic rays with the PAMELA space experiment.

    PubMed

    Adriani, O; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; De Donato, C; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergè, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Panico, B; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N

    2015-09-11

    In this work we present results of a direct search for strange quark matter (SQM) in cosmic rays with the PAMELA space spectrometer. If this state of matter exists it may be present in cosmic rays as particles, called strangelets, having a high density and an anomalously high mass-to-charge (A/Z) ratio. A direct search in space is complementary to those from ground-based spectrometers. Furthermore, it has the advantage of being potentially capable of directly identifying these particles, without any assumption on their interaction model with Earth's atmosphere and the long-term stability in terrestrial and lunar rocks. In the rigidity range from 1.0 to ∼1.0×10^{3}  GV, no such particles were found in the data collected by PAMELA between 2006 and 2009. An upper limit on the strangelet flux in cosmic rays was therefore set for particles with charge 1≤Z≤8 and mass 4≤A≤1.2×10^{5}. This limit as a function of mass and as a function of magnetic rigidity allows us to constrain models of SQM production and propagation in the Galaxy.

  2. New Upper Limit on Strange Quark Matter Abundance in Cosmic Rays with the PAMELA Space Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; de Donato, C.; de Santis, C.; de Simone, N.; di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Mergè, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Pamela Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present results of a direct search for strange quark matter (SQM) in cosmic rays with the PAMELA space spectrometer. If this state of matter exists it may be present in cosmic rays as particles, called strangelets, having a high density and an anomalously high mass-to-charge (A /Z ) ratio. A direct search in space is complementary to those from ground-based spectrometers. Furthermore, it has the advantage of being potentially capable of directly identifying these particles, without any assumption on their interaction model with Earth's atmosphere and the long-term stability in terrestrial and lunar rocks. In the rigidity range from 1.0 to ˜1.0 ×103 GV , no such particles were found in the data collected by PAMELA between 2006 and 2009. An upper limit on the strangelet flux in cosmic rays was therefore set for particles with charge 1 ≤Z ≤8 and mass 4 ≤A ≤1.2 ×105 . This limit as a function of mass and as a function of magnetic rigidity allows us to constrain models of SQM production and propagation in the Galaxy.

  3. Constraining phases of quark matter with studies of r-mode damping in compact stars

    SciTech Connect

    Rupak, Gautam; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2010-11-15

    With the goal of constraining the phase of matter at high density, we study r-mode damping in the color-flavor-locked phase with kaon condensation (CFL-K0) and contrast it with the CFL phase. The mode frequencies in these phases are found to differ very slightly. While the bulk viscosity in either phase is only effective at damping the r-mode at temperatures T > or approx. 10{sup 11} K, the shear viscosity in the CFL-K0 phase is the only effective damping agent all the way down to temperatures T > or approx. 10{sup 8} K characteristic of cooling neutron stars. However, it cannot keep the star from becoming unstable to gravitational wave emission for rotation frequencies {nu}{approx_equal}56-11 Hz at T{approx_equal}10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} K. Stars composed almost entirely of CFL or CFL-K0 matter are ruled out by observation of rapidly rotating neutron stars, indicating that dissipation at the quark-hadron interface or nuclear crust interface must play a key role in damping the instability.

  4. Are superheavy stable quark clusters viable candidates for the dark matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borštnik, Norma Mankoč; Rosina, Mitja

    2015-08-01

    The explanation for the origin of families of quarks and leptons and their properties is one of the most promising ways to understand the assumptions of the Standard Model. The Spin-Charge-Family theory [N. S. M. Borštnik, Phys. Lett. B 292 (1992) 25; J. Math. Phys. 34 (1993) 3731; Int. J. Theor. Phys. 40 (2001) 315; Mod. Phys. Lett. A 10 (1995) 587; J. Modern Phys. 4 (2013) 823; arXiv:1312.15; Phys. Rev. D 91 (2015) 065004; [arXiv:1409.7791; arXiv:1312.1542; arXiv:1502.06786v1, http://arXiv.org/abs/1409.4981; A. Borštnik and N. S. M. Borštnik, Phys. Rev. D 74 (2006) 073013, arXiv:hep-ph/0512062, arXiv:hep-ph/0401043, arXiv:hep-ph/0401055, arXiv:hep-ph/0301029; G. Bregar and N. S. M. Borštnik, arXiv:1412.5866; G. Bregar et al., New J. Phys. 10 (2008) 093002; G. Bregar and N. S. M. Borštnik, arXiv:1502.06786v1, arXiv:1412.5866; N. S. M. Borštnik, Proc. 13th Workshop "What Comes Beyond the Standard Models", Bled, 12-22 July 2010, eds. N. S. M. Borštnik et al., DMFA Založništvo, Ljubljana, December 2010, pp. 105-129], which does propose the mechanism for the appearance of families and offers an explanation for all the assumptions of the Standard Model, predicts two decoupled groups of four families. The lightest of the upper four families has stable members, which are correspondingly candidates to constitute the dark matter [G. Bregar and N. S. M. Borštnik, Phys. Rev. D 80 (2009) 083534, arXiv:1412.5866]. In this paper, we study the weak and the "nuclear" (determined by the color interaction among the heavy fifth family quarks) scattering of such a very heavy baryon by ordinary nucleons in order to show that the cross-section is very small and consistent with the observation in most experiments so far, provided that the quark mass of this baryon is about 100TeV or above.

  5. Bianchi type-I universe in f(R, T) modified gravity with quark matter and Λ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćaǧlar, Halife; Aygün, Sezgin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we investigate homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type I universe in the presence of quark matter source in f(R, T) gravity (Harko et al. in Phys. Rev. D 84:024020, 2011) with cosmological constant Λ (where R is the Ricci scalar and T is the trace of the energy momentum tensor). For this aim we have used the anisotropy feature of Bianchi type I universe and equation of states (EoS) of quark matter. We explore the exact solution f(R,T)=R+2f(T) model for Bianchi type I universe model. When t→∞, we get very small cosmological constant value, this result agrees with recent observations.

  6. Constraining phases of quark matter with studies of r-mode damping in neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupak, Gautam; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2010-11-01

    We study r-mode damping in the color-flavor-locked phase with kaon condensation (CFL-K0) and contrast it with the CFL phase. The mode frequency in these phases are found to differ very slightly. While the bulk viscosity in either phase is only effective at damping the r-mode at temperatures T10^11K, the shear viscosity in the CFL-K0 phase is the only effective damping agent all the way down to temperatures T10^8K characteristic of cooling neutron stars. However, it cannot keep the star from becoming unstable to gravitational wave emission for rotation frequencies ν 56-11Hz at T 10^8-10^9K. Stars composed almost entirely of CFL or CFL-K0 matter are ruled out by observation of rapidly rotating neutron stars, indicating that dissipation at the quark-hadron interface or nuclear crust interface must play a key role in damping the instability.

  7. Nuclear matter equation of state from a quark-model nucleon-nucleon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukukawa, K.; Baldo, M.; Burgio, G. F.; Lo Monaco, L.; Schulze, H.-J.

    2015-12-01

    Starting from a realistic constituent quark model for the nucleon-nucleon interaction, we derive the equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter within the Bethe-Brueckner-Goldstone approach up to the three-hole-line level, without the need to introduce three-nucleon forces. To estimate the uncertainty of the calculations both the gap and the continuous choices for the single-particle potential are considered and compared. The resultant EOS is compatible with the phenomenological analysis of the saturation point, the incompressibility, the symmetry energy at a low density, and its slope at saturation, together with the high-density pressure extracted from flow data on heavy-ion collisions. Although the symmetry energy is appreciably higher in the gap choice in the high-density region, the maximum neutron star masses derived from the continuous-choice EOS and the gap-choice EOS are similar and close to two solar masses, which is again compatible with recent observational data. A comparison with other microscopic equations of state is presented and discussed.

  8. Generalized Beth-Uhlenbeck approach to mesons and diquarks in hot, dense quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, D.; Buballa, M.; Dubinin, A.; Röpke, G.; Zablocki, D.

    2014-09-01

    An important first step in the program of hadronization of chiral quark models is the bosonization in meson and diquark channels. This procedure is presented at finite temperatures and chemical potentials for the SU(2) flavor case of the NJL model with special emphasis on the mixing between scalar meson and scalar diquark modes which occurs in the 2SC color superconducting phase. The thermodynamic potential is obtained in the Gaussian approximation for the meson and diquark fields and it is given in the Beth-Uhlenbeck form. This allows a detailed discussion of bound state dissociation in hot, dense matter (Mott effect) in terms of the in-medium scattering phase shift of two-particle correlations. It is shown for the case without meson-diquark mixing that the phase shift can be separated into a continuum and a resonance part. In the latter, the Mott transition manifests itself by a change of the phase shift at threshold by π in accordance with Levinson's theorem, when a bound state transforms to a resonance in the scattering continuum. The consequences for the contribution of pionic correlations to the pressure are discussed by evaluating the Beth-Uhlenbeck equation of state in different approximations. A similar discussion is performed for the scalar diquark channel in the normal phase. Further developments and applications of the developed approach are outlined.

  9. Connection between the nuclear matter mean-field equation of state and the quark and gluon condensates at high density

    SciTech Connect

    Malheiro, M.; Dey, M.; Delfino, A.; Dey, J. |||

    1997-01-01

    It is known now that chiral symmetry restoration requires the meson-nucleon couplings to be density-dependent in nuclear-matter mean-field models. We further show that, quite generally, the quark and gluon condensates in medium are related to the trace of the energy-momentum tensor of nuclear matter and in these models the incompressibility K must be less than 3 times the chemical potential {mu}. In the critical density {rho}{sub c}, the gluon condensate is only reduced by 20{percent}, indicating a larger effective nucleon mass. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Aspects of the strongly interacting matter phase diagram within non-local quark models

    SciTech Connect

    Pagura, V.; Dumm, D. G.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2013-03-25

    We study a nonlocal extension of the so-called Polyakov Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model at finite temperature and chemical potential, considering the impact of the presence of dynamical quarks on the scale parameter appearing in the Polyakov potential. Both real and imaginary chemical potentials are considered. The effect of varying the current quark mass is also investigated.

  11. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-05-01

    The 2013 Strangeness in Quark Matter conference took place at the University of Birmingham in July 2013, in a period of remarkably good weather that gave a very welcome boost to the event. 158 physicists from 25 countries gathered for a week of discussions on the production of strangeness and heavy flavour in heavy ion collisions. The dates for the meeting had been set two years earlier in Cracow, so as to allow it to offer the first major examination of proton-lead collisions from the Large Hadron Collider. It had originally been thought that these collisions would be recorded by the end of 2012, but in the event it turned out that the running period was postponed until January and February of 2013, giving the LHC collaborations - all four major collaborations since LHCb also took part in pPb data taking - very little time to prepare their results. Nevertheless, new results were provided, and their presentation and interpretation formed one of the highlights of the conference. In addition, there was a more detailed assessment of the RHIC beam energy scan, many new heavy flavour results from the RHIC and LHC heavy ion runs and detailed discussions of the future FAIR and NICA programmes. The conference also hosted a good cross-section of current topics in theoretical talks. In the last few years there has been much interest in thermalization and in the use of hydrodynamics to describe the fluctuations visible in higher-order flow coefficients. Discussions of both of these features were well represented, indicating the maturing of this field. We gratefully acknowledge support from The University of Birmingham, CERN, The Extreme Matter Institute (EMMI), the Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology (IPPP), Institute of Physics Publishing and from the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC). This assistance allowed us to support over twenty young physicists, and allowed us to ensure that we had the breadth of programme needed for a successful conference

  12. PREFACE: SQM2004 The 8th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleymans, Jean; Steinberg, Peter; Vilakazi, Zeblon

    2005-06-01

    The 8th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2004) was held at at the Breakwater Lodge, which is part of the Graduate School of Business of the University of Cape Town. The architecture of the Breakwater Lodge is a stark reminder of the fact that its original purpose was to serve as a municipal jail. It appears that the spectacular background of Table Mountain and the V&A Waterfront and an excellent set of speakers were sufficient to keep the lecture rooms full to capacity, despite the numerous temptations of Cape Town. This is the first time a major heavy ion conference has been held in South Africa, and the timing is fortuitous, with a long-delayed MoU between South Africa and CERN at last being signed and finalized. At last, funding is being made available for South African scientists to play a meaningful role and make contributions to the international effort in heavy ion physics. Despite the substantial distance from the major cities in the northern hemisphere, the conference was very well attended and the number of participants was about 50% larger than originally anticipated. Participants came from China, India, Japan, the United States, Brazil and many European countries. We would like to thank all of the SQM2004 participants for their efforts and, in particlular, all of the plenary and parallel speakers for their hard work in making this conference such a success. Of course, even more thanks go to all the chairpersons of the various sessions who struggled to keep the conference program on the (admittedly tight) schedule. For future conferences, we recommend keeping a bell handy! Photograph Participants gather on the UCT campus with Table Mountain in the backgound. We would like to thank Professor Tony Fairall for a most entertaining after-dinner talk about all that is unusual and fascinating about the southern hemisphere. It could not be emphasized enough that the daily working of the meeting would have ground to a halt without the

  13. Charge balance functions in a scenario of continuing charge production in quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Ying-Hua; Zhang, Wei-Ning

    2015-11-01

    We study the charge balance functions of π+π- and K+K- in a scenario of continuing charge creation in a strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma (QGP) in high-energy heavy-ion collisions, using relativistic hydrodynamics and the lattice QCD results of quark susceptibilities and the equation of state of the QGP. We find that the charge balance functions are dominated by their QGP components because most charges are produced before the hadronic stage. The hadronic component of the balance function of π+π- is small but non-negligible. The balance function of K+K- has a negative hadronic component because the strangeness decreases during the system evolution. The correlation between light and strange quarks leads to small enhancements of the balance functions at small rapidity difference.

  14. PREFACE: 15th International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Castillo, D.; Blaschke, D.; Kekelidze, V.; Matveev, V.; Sorin, A.

    2016-01-01

    The 15th International Conference Strangeness in Quark Matter (SQM) took place at the Veksler and Baldin Laboratory of High Energy Physics (VBLHEP) of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna in the period July 6 -11, with a record participation of 244 people from 31 countries! The previous meeting of the series in Birmingham 2013 had collected 158 physicists from 25 countries [J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 509, 011001 (2014)]. At SQM-2015, there was also a record participation of young scientist; every 4th conference attendee did not yet hold a PhD degree! There was a special program of 4 general lectures, a devoted session of parallel talks for Young Talents and the Helmholtz International Summer School (HISS) with 16 lecturers on the topics regarding Dense Matter (29.06.-11.07.) as a satellite event at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics (BLTP) and at VBLHEP. Another satellite event was the Round TableWorkshop on Physics at NICA, jointly organized by JINR and the Republic of South Africa on July 5, 2015. The selection of Dubna as the place for SQM-2015 conference by the International Advisory Committee (IAC) demonstrates the broad interest of the community in the progress of the Russian Megascience Project on the Nuclotron-based Ion Collider Facility (NICA) hosted at JINR Dubna. In a few years from now the experiments planned at NICA will produce data that provide new information of unprecedented accuracy which will help to answer some of the key questions which are topical at this conference. The SQM-2015 conference had an ambitious scientific program with 38 plenary talks, 97 parallel talks in 7 topical directions and 39 posters reporting the state of the research and the future directions in the fields of strangeness, heavy avors and bulk physics, suggested by the IAC to be the subtitle of the conference from 2016 onwards. Most of the contributions are represented in these Proceedings which we recommend to the community! We gratefully

  15. Magnetized color superconducting quark matter under compact star conditions: Phase structure within the SU(2 ) f NJL model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, M.; Allen, P.; Grunfeld, A. G.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2017-09-01

    The properties of magnetized color superconducting cold dense quark matter under compact star conditions are investigated using an S U (2 )f Nambu Jona-Lasinio (NJL)-type model in which the divergences are treated using a magnetic field independent regularization scheme in order to avoid unphysical oscillations. We study the phase diagram for several model parametrizations. The features of each phase are analyzed through the behavior of the chiral and superconducting condensates together with the different particle densities for increasing chemical potential or magnetic field. While confirming previous results derived for the zero magnetic field or isospin symmetric matter case, we show how the phases are modified in the presence of β -equilibrium as well as color and electric charge neutrality conditions.

  16. Exact solutions of bulk viscous with string cloud attached to strange quark matter for higher dimensional FRW universe in Lyra geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Çağlar, Halife; Aygün, Sezgin

    2016-03-25

    In this study, we have investigated bulk viscous with strange quark matter attached to the string cloud for higher dimensional Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe in Lyra geometry. By using varying deceleration parameter and conservation equations we have solved Einstein Field Equations (EFE’s) and obtained generalized exact solutions for our model. Also we have found that string is not survived for bulk viscous with strange quark matter attached to the string cloud in framework higher dimensional FRW universe in Lyra geometry. This result agrees with Kiran and Reddy, Krori et al, Sahoo and Mishra and Mohanty et al. in four and five dimensions.

  17. Exact solutions of bulk viscous with string cloud attached to strange quark matter for higher dimensional FRW universe in Lyra geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćaǧlar, Halife; Aygün, Sezgin

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we have investigated bulk viscous with strange quark matter attached to the string cloud for higher dimensional Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe in Lyra geometry. By using varying deceleration parameter and conservation equations we have solved Einstein Field Equations (EFE's) and obtained generalized exact solutions for our model. Also we have found that string is not survived for bulk viscous with strange quark matter attached to the string cloud in framework higher dimensional FRW universe in Lyra geometry. This result agrees with Kiran and Reddy, Krori et al, Sahoo and Mishra and Mohanty et al. in four and five dimensions.

  18. Towards a quantitative kinetic theory of polar active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihle, T.

    2014-06-01

    A recent kinetic approach for Vicsek-like models of active particles is reviewed. The theory is based on an exact Chapman- Kolmogorov equation in phase space. It can handle discrete time dynamics and "exotic" multi-particle interactions. A nonlocal mean-field theory for the one-particle distribution function is obtained by assuming molecular chaos. The Boltzmann approach of Bertin, et al., Phys. Rev. E 74, 022101 (2006) and J. Phys. A 42, 445001 (2009), is critically assessed and compared to the current approach. In Boltzmann theory, a collision starts when two particles enter each others action spheres and is finished when their distance exceeds the interaction radius. The average duration of such a collision, τ0, is measured for the Vicsek model with continuous time-evolution. If the noise is chosen to be close to the flocking threshold, the average time between collisions is found to be roughly equal to τ0 at low densities. Thus, the continuous-time Vicsek-model near the flocking threshold cannot be accurately described by a Boltzmann equation, even at very small density because collisions take so long that typically other particles join in, rendering Boltzmann's binary collision assumption invalid. Hydrodynamic equations for the phase space approach are derived by means of a Chapman-Enskog expansion. The equations are compared to the Toner-Tu theory of polar active matter. New terms, absent in the Toner-Tu theory, are highlighted. Convergence problems of Chapman-Enskog and similar gradient expansions are discussed.

  19. Quark confinement in a constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Langfeld, K.; Rho, M.

    1995-07-01

    On the level of an effective quark theory, we define confinement by the absence of quark anti-quark thresholds in correlation function. We then propose a confining Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type model. The confinement is implemented in analogy to Anderson localization in condensed matter systems. We study the model`s phase structure as well as its behavior under extreme conditions, i.e. high temperature and/or high density.

  20. Measurement of the polarized forward-backward asymmetry of B quarks using momentum-weighted track charge at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Junk, Thomas Robert

    1995-11-01

    This thesis presents a direct measurement of the parity-violating parameter Ab by analyzing the polarized forward-backward asymmetry of b quarks in e+e- → Z0 → b$\\bar{b}$. Data were taken at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), with the Stanford Large Detector (SLD), which records the products of e+e- interactions at a center of mass energy √s = 91.2 GeV/c2 at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The SLC/SLD experimental apparatus provides a unique and ideal environment for measuring electroweak asymmetries. Heavy flavor decays of the Z0 were identified inclusively by taking advantage of the long lifetime of B hadrons, the small, stable SLC beam spot, and SLD`s precise tracking detectors. Two analysis techniques for measuring Ab are presented: a binned fit to the left-right forward-backwards asymmetry of tagged events signed with momentum-weighted track charge, and a self-calibrating maximum-likelihood technique using momentum-weighted charge from the two hemispheres in each tagged event. From our 1994-1995 sample of 3.6 pb-1, having a luminosity-weighted average e- polarization of 77.3%, and our 1993 sample of 1.8 pb-1, having a luminosity-weighted polarization of 63.1%, we obtain Ab = 0.848 ± 0.046(stat.) ± 0.050(syst.).

  1. Measurements of tt¯ spin correlations and top quark polarization using dilepton final states in pp collisions at s=8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; ...

    2016-03-09

    We presented measurements of the top quark-antiquark (tt¯) spin correlations and the top quark polarization for tt¯ pairs produced in pp collisions at √s=8 TeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1 collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurements are performed using events with two oppositely charged leptons (electrons or muons) and two or more jets, where at least one of the jets is identified as originating from a bottom quark. The spin correlations and polarization are measured from the angular distributions of the two selected leptons, both inclusively and differentially, with respect tomore » the invariant mass, rapidity, and transverse momentum of the tt¯ system. Moreover, the measurements are unfolded to the parton level and found to be in agreement with predictions of the standard model. A search for new physics in the form of anomalous top quark chromo moments is performed. Lastly, no evidence of new physics is observed, and exclusion limits on the real part of the chromo-magnetic dipole moment and the imaginary part of the chromo-electric dipole moment are evaluated.« less

  2. Search for a Dark Matter Candidate Produced in Association with a Single Top Quark in pp¯ Collisions at s=1.96TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Anzá, F.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Fuks, B.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2012-05-01

    We report a new search for dark matter in a data sample of an integrated luminosity of 7.7fb-1 of Tevatron pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV, collected by the CDF II detector. We search for production of a dark-matter candidate, D, in association with a single top quark. We consider the hadronic decay mode of the top quark exclusively, yielding a final state of three jets with missing transverse energy. The data are consistent with the standard model; we thus set 95% confidence level upper limits on the cross section of the process pp¯→t+D as a function of the mass of the dark-matter candidate. The limits are approximately 0.5 pb for a dark-matter particle with mass in the range of 0-150GeV/c2.

  3. Why Not Start with Quarks? Teachers Investigate a Learning Unit on the Subatomic Structure of Matter with 12-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Gerfried J.; Schmeling, Sascha M.; Hopf, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the second in a series of studies exploring the acceptance of the subatomic structure of matter by 12-year-olds. The studies focus on a novel learning unit introducing an atomic model from electrons down to quarks, which is aimed to be used at an early stage in the physics curriculum. Three features are fundamental to the…

  4. Measurements of tt spin correlations and top-quark polarization using dilepton final states in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=7  TeV.

    PubMed

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Luyckx, S; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Heracleous, N; Kalogeropoulos, A; Keaveney, J; Kim, T J; Lowette, S; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Favart, L; Gay, A P R; Hreus, T; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Mohammadi, A; Perniè, L; Reis, T; Seva, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Dildick, S; Garcia, G; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Walsh, S; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Da Silveira, G G; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Alves, G A; Correa Martins Junior, M; Martins, T; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá Júnior, W L; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Malek, M; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santaolalla, J; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Marinov, A; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Du, R; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Plestina, R; Tao, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Guo, Y; Li, Q; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Zhang, L; Zou, W; Avila, C; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Morovic, S; Tikvica, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Abdelalim, A A; Assran, Y; Elgammal, S; Ellithi Kamel, A; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Nayak, A; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Daci, N; Dahms, T; Dalchenko, M; Dobrzynski, L; Florent, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Yilmaz, Y; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Brom, J-M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Goetzmann, C; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Boudoul, G; Brochet, S; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fan, J; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Ruiz Alvarez, J D; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Xiao, H; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Bontenackels, M; Calpas, B; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Hindrichs, O; Klein, K; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Caudron, J; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Erdmann, M; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klingebiel, D; Knutzen, S; Kreuzer, P; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Olschewski, M; Padeken, K; Papacz, P; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Teyssier, D; Thüer, S; Weber, M; Cherepanov, V; Erdogan, Y; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Geisler, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hoehle, F; Kargoll, B; Kress, T; 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Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Smith, W H

    2014-05-09

    Spin correlations and polarization in the top quark-antiquark system are measured using dilepton final states produced in pp collisions at the LHC at sqrt[s]=7  TeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.0  fb(-1) collected with the CMS detector. The measurements are performed using events with two oppositely charged leptons (electrons or muons), a significant imbalance in transverse momentum, and two or more jets, where at least one of the jets is identified as originating from a b quark. The spin correlations and polarization are measured through asymmetries in angular distributions of the two selected leptons, unfolded to the parton level. All measurements are found to be in agreement with predictions of the standard model.

  5. Magnetic effects on color-flavor-locked quark matter and non-Abelian vortices via Ginzburg-Landau approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Bu, Zhi-Cheng; Peng, Fu-Ping; Zhang, Yi

    2015-06-01

    By using a general Ginzburg-Landau approach, we study the effects of external magnetic background on color-flavor-locked quark color-superconducting matter. The rotated magnetic field B ˜ is introduced, not only accounting for the unbroken symmetry with the rotated electric charge, but also resulting in new effects for the collective excitations such as the Nambu-Goldstone and Higgs modes. In particular, it is found that the masses of Higgs octet are no longer degenerated and part of them acquire the magnetic-induced contribution. To the leading order in the applied field, we construct an effective Ginzburg-Landau formalism through these B ˜ -related masses. As the application, we investigate magnetic responses of the non-Abelian vortices arising from color-flavor-locked symmetry breaking pattern. The B ˜ -field dependence of their spatial configurations and tension energies are calculated for the first time.

  6. C P violation and chiral symmetry breaking in hot and dense quark matter in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Bhaswar; Mishra, Hiranmaya; Mishra, Amruta

    2015-02-01

    We investigate chiral symmetry breaking and strong charge parity (C P ) violation effects on the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter in the presence of a constant magnetic field. The effects of a magnetic field and strong C P violating term on the phase structure at finite temperature and density are studied within a three flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model including the Kobayashi-Maskawa-t'Hooft determinant term. This is investigated using an explicit variational ansatz for ground state with quark-antiquark pairs leading to condensates both in scalar and pseudoscalar channels. A magnetic field enhances the condensate in both the channels. Inverse magnetic catalysis for C P transition at finite chemical potential is seen for zero temperature and for small magnetic fields. The C P transition becomes first order at finite baryon chemical potential and could be relevant for generating C P -odd metastable domains in heavy ion collision experiments.

  7. Search for dark matter in events with heavy quarks and missing transverse momentum in [Formula: see text] collisions with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

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    This article reports on a search for dark matter pair production in association with bottom or top quarks in [Formula: see text] of [Formula: see text] collisions collected at [Formula: see text] TeV by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Events with large missing transverse momentum are selected when produced in association with high-momentum jets of which one or more are identified as jets containing [Formula: see text]-quarks. Final states with top quarks are selected by requiring a high jet multiplicity and in some cases a single lepton. The data are found to be consistent with the Standard Model expectations and limits are set on the mass scale of effective field theories that describe scalar and tensor interactions between dark matter and Standard Model particles. Limits on the dark-matter-nucleon cross-section for spin-independent and spin-dependent interactions are also provided. These limits are particularly strong for low-mass dark matter. Using a simplified model, constraints are set on the mass of dark matter and of a coloured mediator suitable to explain a possible signal of annihilating dark matter.

  8. Lunar Seismic Detector to Advance the Search for Strange Quark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galitzki, Nicholas B.

    2005-01-01

    Detection of small seismic signals on the Moon are needed to study lunar internal structure and to detect possible signals from Strange Quark m&er transit events. The immediate objective is to create a prototype seismic detector using a tunnel diode oscillator with a variable capacitor attached to a proof mass. The device is designed to operate effectively on the Moon, which requires a low power consumption to operate through lunar night, while preserving sensitivity. The goal is capacitance resolution of better than 1 part in 10' and power consumption of less than 1 watt.

  9. Lunar Seismic Detector to Advance the Search for Strange Quark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galitzki, Nicholas B.

    2005-01-01

    Detection of small seismic signals on the Moon are needed to study lunar internal structure and to detect possible signals from Strange Quark m&er transit events. The immediate objective is to create a prototype seismic detector using a tunnel diode oscillator with a variable capacitor attached to a proof mass. The device is designed to operate effectively on the Moon, which requires a low power consumption to operate through lunar night, while preserving sensitivity. The goal is capacitance resolution of better than 1 part in 10' and power consumption of less than 1 watt.

  10. High density quark matter in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with dimensional versus cutoff regularization

    SciTech Connect

    Fujihara, T.; Kimura, D.; Inagaki, T.; Kvinikhidze, A.

    2009-05-01

    We investigate color superconducting phase at high density in the extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model for two-flavor quarks. Because of the nonrenormalizability of the model, physical observables may depend on the regularization procedure; that is why we apply two types of regularization, the cutoff and the dimensional one to evaluate the phase structure, the equation of state, and the relationship between the mass and the radius of a dense star. To obtain the phase structure we evaluate the minimum of the effective potential at finite temperature and chemical potential. The stress tensor is calculated to derive the equation of state. Solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation, we show the relationship between the mass and the radius of a dense star. The dependence on the regularization is found not to be small, interestingly. The dimensional regularization predicts color superconductivity phase at rather large values of {mu} (in agreement with perturbative QCD in contrast to the cutoff regularization), in the larger temperature interval, the existence of heavier and larger quark stars.

  11. Fully analytical O( α s ) results for on-shell and off-shell polarized W-boson decays into massive quark pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groote, S.; Körner, J. G.; Tuvike, P.

    2013-05-01

    We provide analytical O( α s ) results for the three polarized decay structure functions H ++, H 00 and H - that describe the decay of a polarized W boson into massive quark-antiquark pairs. As an application we consider the decay t→ b+ W + involving the helicity fractions ρ mm of the W + boson followed by the polarized decay W+(\\uparrow)to q1bar{q}2 described by the polarized decay structure functions H mm . We thereby determine the O( α s ) polar angle decay distribution of the cascade decay process tto b+W+(to q1bar{q}2). As a second example we analyze quark mass and off-shell effects in the cascade decays Hto W-+W^{ast+}(to q1bar{q}2) and Hto Z+Z^{ast}(to qbar{q}). For the decays Hto W-+W^{ast+}(to cbar{b}) and Hto Z+Z^{ast}(to bbar{b}) we find substantial deviations from the mass-zero approximation in particular in the vicinity of the threshold region.

  12. Spin-dependent structure functions in nuclear matter and the polarized EMC effect

    SciTech Connect

    I.C. Cloet; W. Bentz; A.W. Thomas

    2005-04-01

    An excellent description of both spin-independent and spin-dependent quark distributions and structure functions has been obtained with a modified Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, which is free of unphysical thresholds for nucleon decay into quarks--hence incorporating an important aspect of confinement. We utilize this model to investigate nuclear medium modifications to structure functions, and find that we are readily able to reproduce both nuclear matter saturation and the experimental F{sub 2N}{sup A}/F{sub 2N} ratio, that is, the EMC effect. Applying this framework to determine g{sub 1p}{sup A}, we find that the ratio g{sub 1p}{sup A}/g{sub 1p} differs significantly from 1, with the quenching caused by the nuclear medium being about twice that of the spin-independent case. This represents an exciting result, which if confirmed experimentally, will reveal much about the quark structure of nuclear matter.

  13. From quarks and gluons to hadronic matter: A bridge too far?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In the third edition of the QCD-TNT workshop the traditional focus of the last two editions (that is gaining a firmer grasp on the infrared behavior of the QCD Green's functions) will be slightly shifted towards attempts to implement the transition from the fundamental (quarks and gluons) to the effective (mesons and hadrons) degrees of freedom. So in addition to the traditional QCD-TNT themes (e.g., confinement, gluon mass generation, lattice simulations in different gauges, QCD at finite temperature and density) we plan to have more phenomenologically oriented topics (e.g., experimental reviews, determination of form factors from first principle, construction of Bethe-Salpeter kernels). In addition, a special session will be dedicated to review talks, summarizing the state-of-the-art, as well as highlighting the future perspectives, of simulating non-Abelian gauge fields using ultracold neutral atoms trapped in optical lattices, and other systems.

  14. Coherent control of light-matter interactions in polarization standing waves

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xu; MacDonald, Kevin F.; Plum, Eric; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that standing waves formed by two coherent counter-propagating light waves can take a variety of forms, offering new approaches to the interrogation and control of polarization-sensitive light-matter interactions in ultrathin (subwavelength thickness) media. In contrast to familiar energy standing waves, polarization standing waves have constant electric and magnetic energy densities and a periodically varying polarization state along the wave axis. counterintuitively, anisotropic ultrathin (meta)materials can be made sensitive or insensitive to such polarization variations by adjusting their azimuthal angle. PMID:27514307

  15. Coherent control of light-matter interactions in polarization standing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xu; MacDonald, Kevin F.; Plum, Eric; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2016-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that standing waves formed by two coherent counter-propagating light waves can take a variety of forms, offering new approaches to the interrogation and control of polarization-sensitive light-matter interactions in ultrathin (subwavelength thickness) media. In contrast to familiar energy standing waves, polarization standing waves have constant electric and magnetic energy densities and a periodically varying polarization state along the wave axis. counterintuitively, anisotropic ultrathin (meta)materials can be made sensitive or insensitive to such polarization variations by adjusting their azimuthal angle.

  16. Can spin-polarized photoemission measure spin properties in condensed matter?

    PubMed

    Osterwalder, Jürg

    2012-05-02

    Photoemitted electrons move in a vacuum; their quantum state can be completely characterized in terms of energy, momentum and spin polarization by spin-polarized photoemission experiments. A review article in this issue by Heinzmann and Dil (2012 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 24 173001) considers whether the measured spin properties, i.e. the magnitude and direction of the spin polarization vector, can be traced back to the quantum state from which these electrons originate. The careful conclusion is that they can, which is highly relevant in view of the current interest in these experiments and their application to topological insulators, where the spin-orbit interaction produces spin-polarized surface states.

  17. Next-to-leading order corrections to the spin-dependent energy spectrum of hadrons from polarized top quark decay in the general two Higgs doublet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosavi Nejad, S. Mohammad; Abbaspour, S.

    2017-08-01

    In recent years, searches for the light and heavy charged Higgs bosons have been done by the ATLAS and the CMS collaborations at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in proton-proton collision. Nevertheless, a definitive search is a program that still has to be carried out at the LHC. The experimental observation of charged Higgs bosons would indicate physics beyond the Standard Model. In the present work, we study the scaled-energy distribution of bottom-flavored mesons (B) inclusively produced in polarized top quark decays into a light charged Higgs boson and a massless bottom quark at next-to-leading order in the two-Higgs-doublet model; t (↑) → bH+ → BH+ + X. This spin-dependent energy distribution is studied in a specific helicity coordinate system where the polarization vector of the top quark is measured with respect to the direction of the Higgs momentum. The study of these energy distributions could be considered as a new channel to search for the charged Higgs bosons at the LHC. For our numerical analysis and phenomenological predictions, we restrict ourselves to the unexcluded regions of the MSSM mH+ - tan ⁡ β parameter space determined by the recent results of the CMS [13] and ATLAS [14] collaborations.

  18. Characterization of polar organics in airborne particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokouchi, Y.; Ambe, Y.

    The methanol-extractable highly polar organics in atmospheric aerosol were characterized using GC-MS. Dicarboxylic acids having 2-16 carbon numbers were detected with a total concentration of 172 ng m -3. Azelaic acid ( C9) was the most abundant diacid and it possibly originated from the ozonolysis of unsaturated carboxylic acids such as oleic acid and linoleic acid, which mainly originate from terrestrial plants. A compound, which was tentatively identified as tetrahydrofuroic acid, contributed to about 10% of the highly polar organics. Other polyfunctional compounds found in the samples included some ketocarboxylic acids and aromatic acids such as phthalic acids, anisic acid and vanillic acid.

  19. Spontaneous magnetization through non-Abelian vortex formation in rotating dense quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinci, Walter; Cipriani, Mattia; Nitta, Muneto

    2012-10-01

    When a color superconductor of high density QCD is rotating, superfluid vortices are inevitably created along the rotation axis. In the color-flavor locked phase realized at the asymptotically large chemical potential, there appear non-Abelian vortices carrying both circulations of superfluid and color magnetic fluxes. A family of solutions has a degeneracy characterized by the Nambu-Goldstone modes CP2, associated with the color-flavor locked symmetry spontaneously broken in the vicinity of the vortex. In this paper, we study electromagnetic coupling of the non-Abelian vortices and find that the degeneracy is removed with the induced effective potential. We obtain one stable vortex solution and a family of metastable vortex solutions, both of which carry ordinary magnetic fluxes in addition to color magnetic fluxes. We discuss quantum mechanical decay of the metastable vortices by quantum tunneling and compare the effective potential with the other known potentials, the quantum mechanically induced potential and the potential induced by the strange quark mass.

  20. Characterization and origin of polar dissolved organic matter from the Great Salt Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Noyes, T.I.; Rostad, C.E.; Davisson, M.L.

    2004-01-01

    Polar dissolved organic matter (DOM) was isolated from a surface-water sample from the Great Salt Lake by separating it from colloidal organic matter by membrane dialysis, from less-polar DOM fractions by resin sorbents, and from inorganic salts by a combination of sodium cation exchange followed by precipitation of sodium salts by acetic acid during evaporative concentration. Polar DOM was the most abundant DOM fraction, accounting for 56% of the isolated DOM. Colloidal organic matter was 14C-age dated to be about 100% modern carbon and all of the DOM fractions were 14C-age dated to be between 94 and 95% modern carbon. Average structural models of each DOM fraction were derived that incorporated quantitative elemental and infrared, 13C-NMR, and electrospray/mass spectrometric data. The polar DOM model consisted of open-chain N-acetyl hydroxy carboxylic acids likely derived from N-acetyl heteropolysaccharides that constituted the colloidal organic matter. The less polar DOM fraction models consisted of aliphatic alicyclic ring structures substituted with carboxyl, hydroxyl, ether, ester, and methyl groups. These ring structures had characteristics similar to terpenoid precursors. All DOM fractions in the Great Salt Lake are derived from algae and bacteria that dominate DOM inputs in this lake.

  1. Equation of state of hot polarized nuclear matter using the generalized Skyrme interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Alla, M.; Hager, S. A.

    2000-04-01

    We used the generalized Skyrme potential to study the equation of state of polarized nuclear matter in the frame of the Thomas-Fermi model. The critical temperature of the liquid-gas phase transition is found to be Tc=16.2 MeV. This critical temperature was found to decease with the asymmetry, spin, and spin-isospin excess parameters. The isothermal compressibility of polarized nuclear matter was also studied. The volume compressibility Kv was found to decrease with temperature. The symmetry compressibility Kx, the spin symmetry compressibility Ky, and the spin-isospin symmetry compressibility Kz were found to have a little increasing behavior with temperature.

  2. Quark matter in a parallel electric and magnetic field background: Chiral phase transition and equilibration of chiral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggieri, M.; Peng, G. X.

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we study spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking for quark matter in the background of static and homogeneous parallel electric field E and magnetic field B . We use a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with a local kernel interaction to compute the relevant quantities to describe chiral symmetry breaking at a finite temperature for a wide range of E and B . We study the effect of this background on the inverse catalysis of chiral symmetry breaking for E and B of the same order of magnitude. We then focus on the effect of the equilibration of chiral density n5 , produced dynamically by an axial anomaly on the critical temperature. The equilibration of n5 , a consequence of chirality-flipping processes in the thermal bath, allows for the introduction of the chiral chemical potential μ5, which is computed self-consistently as a function of the temperature and field strength by coupling the number equation to the gap equation and solving the two within an expansion in E /T2 , B /T2 , and μ52/T2 . We find that even if chirality is produced and equilibrates within a relaxation time τM , it does not change drastically the thermodynamics, with particular reference to the inverse catalysis induced by the external fields, as long as the average μ5 at equilibrium is not too large.

  3. Polar Ring Galaxies Favor Milgromian Dynamics over Standard Dark-Matter-Based Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüghausen, F.; Famaey, B.; Kroupa, P.

    2014-05-01

    Polar ring galaxies are ideal objects with which to study the 3-dimensional shapes of galactic gravitational potentials since two rotation curves can be measured in two perpendicular planes. Observational studies have uncovered systematically larger rotation velocities in the extended polar rings than in the associated host galaxies. In the dark matter context, this can only be explained through dark halos that are systematically flattened along the polar rings. Here, we point out that these objects can also be used as very effective tests of gravity theories, such as those based on Milgromian dynamics. We run a set of polar ring models using both Milgromian and Newtonian dynamics to predict the expected shapes of the rotation curves in both planes, varying the total mass of the system, the mass of the ring with respect to the host, as well as the size of the hole at the center of the ring. We find that Milgromian dynamics not only naturally leads to rotation velocities being typically higher in the extended polar rings than in the hosts, as would be the case in Newtonian dynamics without dark matter, but that it also gets the shape and amplitude of velocities correct. Observational data on polar ring galaxies thus favour Milgromian dynamics over Newtonian dynamics plus dark matter.

  4. Einstein's Gravitational Field Approach to Dark Matter and Dark Energy-Geometric Particle Decay into the Vacuum Energy Generating Higgs Boson and Heavy Quark Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Walter James

    2015-08-01

    During an interview at the Niels Bohr Institute David Bohm stated, "according to Einstein, particles should eventually emerge as singularities, or very strong regions of stable pulses of (the gravitational) field" [1]. Starting from this premise, we show spacetime, indeed, manifests stable pulses (n-valued gravitons) that decay into the vacuum energy to generate all three boson masses (including Higgs), as well as heavy-quark mass; and all in precise agreement with the 2010 CODATA report on fundamental constants. Furthermore, our relativized quantum physics approach (RQP) answers to the mystery surrounding dark energy, dark matter, accelerated spacetime, and why ordinary matter dominates over antimatter.

  5. Collective excitations in a superfluid of color-flavor locked quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, Kenji; Iida, Kei

    2005-04-01

    We investigate collective excitations coupled with baryon density in a system of massless three-flavor quarks in the collisionless regime. By using the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model in the mean-field approximation, we field-theoretically derive the spectra both for the normal and color-flavor locked (CFL) superfluid phases at zero temperature. In the normal phase, we obtain usual zero sound as a low-lying collective mode in the particle-hole (vector) channel. In the CFL phase, the nature of collective excitations varies in a way dependent on whether the excitation energy, {omega}, is larger or smaller than the threshold given by twice the pairing gap {delta}, at which pair excitations with nonzero total momentum become allowed to break up into two quasiparticles. For {omega}<<2{delta}, a phonon corresponding to fluctuations in the U(1) phase of {delta} appears as a sharp peak in the particle-particle ('H') channel. We reproduce the property known from low-energy effective theories that this mode propagates at a velocity of v{sub H}=1/{radical}(3) in the low momentum regime; the decay constant f{sub H} obtained in the NJL model is identical with the QCD result obtained in the mean-field approximation. We also find that, as the momentum of the phonon increases, the excitation energy goes up and asymptotically approaches {omega}=2{delta}. Above the threshold for pair excitations ({omega}>2{delta}), zero sound manifests itself in the vector channel. By locating the zero sound pole of the vector propagator in the complex energy plane, we investigate the attenuation and energy dispersion relation of zero sound. In the long wavelength limit, the phonon mode, the only low-lying excitation, has its spectral weight in the H channel alone, while the spectral function vanishes in the vector channel. This is due to nontrivial mixing between the H and vector channels in the superfluid medium. We finally extend our study to the case of nonzero temperature. We demonstrate how

  6. Light in condensed matter in the upper atmosphere as the origin of homochirality: circularly polarized light from Rydberg matter.

    PubMed

    Holmlid, Leif

    2009-01-01

    Clouds of the condensed excited Rydberg matter (RM) exist in the atmospheres of comets and planetary bodies (most easily observed at Mercury and the Moon), where they surround the entire bodies. Vast such clouds are recently proposed to exist in the upper atmosphere of Earth (giving rise to the enormous features called noctilucent clouds, polar mesospheric clouds, and polar mesospheric summer radar echoes). It has been shown in experiments with RM that linearly polarized visible light scattered from an RM layer is transformed to circularly polarized light with a probability of approximately 50%. The circular Rydberg electrons in the magnetic field in the RM may be chiral scatterers. The magnetic and anisotropic RM medium acts as a circular polarizer probably by delaying one of the perpendicular components of the light wave. The delay process involved is called Rabi-flopping and gives delays of the order of femtoseconds. This strong effect thus gives intense circularly polarized visible and UV light within RM clouds. Amino acids and other chiral molecules will experience a strong interaction with this light field in the upper atmospheres of planets. The interaction will vary with the stereogenic conformation of the molecules and in all probability promote the survival of one enantiomer. Here, this strong effect is proposed to be the origin of homochirality. The formation of amino acids in the RM clouds is probably facilitated by the catalytic effect of RM.

  7. NICA at JINR: New prospects for exploration of quark-gluon matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kekelidze, V. D. Kovalenko, A. D.; Meshkov, I. N.; Sorin, A. S.; Trubnikov, G. V.

    2012-05-15

    A new scientific program is proposed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna aimed at studies of hot and dense baryonic matter in the wide energy range from 2 GeV/u kinetic energy in fixed target experiments to {radical}s{sub NN} = 4 - 11 GeV/u in the collider mode. To realize this program the development of the JINR accelerator facility in high-energy physics (HEP) has been started. This facility is based on the existing superconducting synchrotron-the Nuclotron. The program foresees both experiments at the beams extracted from the Nuclotron, and the construction of a heavy-ion collider-the Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility (NICA) which is designed to reach the required parameters with an average luminosity of L = 10{sup 27} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}.

  8. Correlation of soil and sediment organic matter polarity to aqueous sorption of nonionic compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.; Wershaw, R. L.; Chiou, C.T.

    1999-01-01

    Polarities of the soiL/sediment organic matter (SOM) in 19 soil and 9 freshwater sediment sam pies were determined from solid-state 13C-CP/MAS NMR spectra and compared with published partition coefficients (K(oc)) of carbon tetrachloride (CT) from aqueous solution. Nondestructive analysis of whole samples by solid-state NMR permits a direct assessment of the polarity of SOM that is not possible by elemental analysis. The percent of organic carbon associated with polar functional groups was estimated from the combined fraction of carbohydrate and carboxylamide-ester carbons. A plot of the measured partition coefficients (K(oc)) of carbon tetrachloride (CT) vs. percent polar organic carbon (POC) shows distinctly different populations of soils and sediments as well as a roughly inverse trend among the soil/sediment populations. Plots of K(oc) values for CT against other structural group carbon fractions did not yield distinct populations. The results indicate that the polarity of SOM is a significant factor in accounting for differences in K(oc) between the organic matter in soils and sediments. The alternate direct correlation of the sum of aliphatic and aromatic structural carbons with K(oc) illustrates the influence of nonpolar hydrocarbon on solute partition interaction. Additional elemental analysis data of selected samples further substantiate the effect of the organic matter polarity on the partition efficiency of nonpolar solutes. The separation between soil and sediment samples based on percent POC reflects definite differences of the properties of soil and sediment organic matters that are attributable to diagenesis.Polarities of the soil/sediment organic matter (SOM) in 19 soil and 9 freshwater sediment samples were determined from solid-state 13C-CP/MAS NMR spectra and compared with published partition coefficients (Koc) of carbon tetrachloride (CT) from aqueous solution. Nondestructive analysis of whole samples by solid-state NMR permits a direct

  9. Correlation of soil and sediment organic matter polarity to aqueous sorption of nonionic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kile, D.E. ); Wershaw, R.L.; Chiou, C.T. )

    1999-06-15

    Polarities of the soil/sediment organic matter (SOM) in 19 soil and 9 freshwater sediment samples were determined from solid-state [sup 13]C-CP/MAS NMR spectra and compared with published partition coefficients (K[sub oc]) of carbon tetrachloride (CT) from aqueous solution. Nondestructive analysis of whole samples by solid-state NMR permits a direct assessment of the polarity of SOM that is not possible by elemental analysis. The percent of organic carbon associated with polar functional groups was estimated from the combined fraction of carbohydrate and carboxyl-amide-ester carbons. A plot of the measured partition coefficients (K[sub oc]) of carbon tetrachloride (CT) vs. percent polar organic carbon (POC) shows distinctly different populations of soils and sediments as well as a roughly inverse trend among the soil/sediment populations. Plots of K[sub oc] values for CT against other structural group carbon fractions did not yield distinct populations. The results indicate that the polarity of SOM is a significant factor in accounting for differences in K[sub oc] between the organic matter in soils and sediments. The alternate direct correlation of the sum of aliphatic and aromatic structural carbons with K[sub oc] illustrates the influence of nonpolar hydrocarbon on solute partition interaction. Additional elemental analysis data of selected samples further substantiate the effect of the organic matter polarity on the partition efficiency of nonpolar solutes. The separation between soil and sediment samples based on percent POC reflects definite differences of the properties of soil and sediment organic matters that are attributable to diagenesis.

  10. Spin-polarized neutron matter: Critical unpairing and BCS-BEC precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Martin; Sedrakian, Armen; Huang, Xu-Guang; Clark, John W.

    2016-01-01

    We obtain the critical magnetic field required for complete destruction of S -wave pairing in neutron matter, thereby setting limits on the pairing and superfluidity of neutrons in the crust and outer core of magnetars. We find that for fields B ≥1017 G the neutron fluid is nonsuperfluid—if weaker spin 1 superfluidity does not intervene—a result with profound consequences for the thermal, rotational, and oscillatory behavior of magnetars. Because the dineutron is not bound in vacuum, cold dilute neutron matter cannot exhibit a proper BCS-BEC crossover. Nevertheless, owing to the strongly resonant behavior of the n n interaction at low densities, neutron matter shows a precursor of the BEC state, as manifested in Cooper-pair correlation lengths being comparable to the interparticle distance. We make a systematic quantitative study of this type of BCS-BEC crossover in the presence of neutron fluid spin polarization induced by an ultrastrong magnetic field. We evaluate the Cooper-pair wave function, quasiparticle occupation numbers, and quasiparticle spectra for densities and temperatures spanning the BCS-BEC crossover region. The phase diagram of spin-polarized neutron matter is constructed and explored at different polarizations.

  11. Current trends in non-accelerator particle physics: 1, Neutrino mass and oscillation. 2, High energy neutrino astrophysics. 3, Detection of dark matter. 4, Search for strange quark matter. 5, Magnetic monopole searches

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yudong |

    1995-07-01

    This report is a compilation of papers reflecting current trends in non-accelerator particle physics, corresponding to talks that its author was invited to present at the Workshop on Tibet Cosmic Ray Experiment and Related Physics Topics held in Beijing, China, April 4--13, 1995. The papers are entitled `Neutrino Mass and Oscillation`, `High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics`, `Detection of Dark Matter`, `Search for Strange Quark Matter`, and `Magnetic Monopole Searches`. The report is introduced by a survey of the field and a brief description of each of the author`s papers.

  12. Effects of polar and nonpolar groups on the solubility of organic compounds in soil organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.; Kile, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    Vapor sorption capacities on a high-organic-content peat, a model for soil organic matter (SOM), were determined at room temperature for the following liquids: n-hexane, 1,4-dioxane, nitroethane, acetone, acetonitrile, 1-propanol, ethanol, and methanol. The linear organic vapor sorption is in keeping with the dominance of vapor partition in peat SOM. These data and similar results of carbon tetrachloride (CT), trichloroethylene (TCE), benzene, ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGME), and water on the same peat from earlier studies are used to evaluate the effect of polarity on the vapor partition in SOM. The extrapolated liquid solubility from the vapor isotherm increases sharply from 3-6 wt % for low-polarity liquids (hexane, CT, and benzene) to 62 wt % for polar methanol and correlates positively with the liquid's component solubility parameters for polar interaction (??P) and hydrogen bonding (??h). The same polarity effect may be expected to influence the relative solubilities of a variety of contaminants in SOM and, therefore, the relative deviations between the SOM-water partition coefficients (Kom) and corresponding octanol-water partition coefficients (Kow) for different classes of compounds. The large solubility disparity in SOM between polar and nonpolar solutes suggests that the accurate prediction of Kom from Kow or Sw (solute water solubility) would be limited to compounds of similar polarity.

  13. Measurement of W-boson polarization in Top-Quark Decay in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96  TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramanov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2010-07-23

    We report measurements of the polarization of W bosons from top-quark decays using 2.7 fb{-1} of pp collisions collected by the CDF II detector. Assuming a top-quark mass of 175  GeV/c{2}, three measurements are performed. A simultaneous measurement of the fraction of longitudinal (f{0}) and right-handed (f{+}) W bosons yields the model-independent results f{0}=0.88±0.11(stat)±0.06(syst) and f{+}=-0.15±0.07(stat)±0.06(syst) with a correlation coefficient of -0.59. A measurement of f{0} [f{+}] constraining f{+} [f{0}] to its standard model value of 0.0 [0.7] yields f{0}=0.70±0.07(stat)±0.04(syst) [f{+}=-0.01±0.02(stat)±0.05(syst)]. All these results are consistent with standard model expectations. We achieve the single most precise measurements of f{0} for both the model-independent and model-dependent determinations.

  14. Measurement of W-Boson Polarization in Top-quark Decay in ppbar Collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-03-01

    We report measurements of the polarization of W bosons from top-quark decays using 2.7 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected by the CDF II detector. Assuming a top-quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2}, three measurements are performed. A simultaneous measurement of the fraction of longitudinal (f{sub 0}) and right-handed (f{sub +}) W bosons yields the model-independent results f{sub 0} = 0.88 {+-} 0.11(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst) and f{sub +} = -0.15 {+-} 0.07(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst) with a correlation coefficient of -0.59. A measurement of f{sub 0} (f{sub +}) constraining f{sub +} (f{sub 0}) to its standard model value of 0.0 (0.7) yields f{sub 0} = 0.70 {+-} 0.07(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst) (f{sub +} = 0.01 {+-} 0.02(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst)). All these results are consistent with standard model expectations.

  15. Measurement of W-Boson Polarization in Top-Quark Decay in pp¯ Collisions at s=1.96TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; di Canto, A.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramanov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2010-07-01

    We report measurements of the polarization of W bosons from top-quark decays using 2.7 fb-1 of pp¯ collisions collected by the CDF II detector. Assuming a top-quark mass of 175GeV/c2, three measurements are performed. A simultaneous measurement of the fraction of longitudinal (f0) and right-handed (f+) W bosons yields the model-independent results f0=0.88±0.11(stat)±0.06(syst) and f+=-0.15±0.07(stat)±0.06(syst) with a correlation coefficient of -0.59. A measurement of f0 [f+] constraining f+ [f0] to its standard model value of 0.0 [0.7] yields f0=0.70±0.07(stat)±0.04(syst) [f+=-0.01±0.02(stat)±0.05(syst)]. All these results are consistent with standard model expectations. We achieve the single most precise measurements of f0 for both the model-independent and model-dependent determinations.

  16. Broken valence chiral symmetry and chiral polarization of Dirac spectrum in N{sub f}=12 QCD at small quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandru, Andrei; Horváth, Ivan

    2016-01-22

    The validity of recently proposed equivalence between valence spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking (vSChSB) and chiral polarization of low energy Dirac spectrum (ChP) in SU(3) gauge theory, is examined for the case of twelve mass–degenerate fundamental quark flavors. We find that the vSChSB–ChP correspondence holds for regularized systems studied. Moreover, our results suggest that vSChSB occurs in two qualitatively different circumstances: there is a quark mass m{sub c} such that for m > m{sub c} the mode condensing Dirac spectrum exhibits standard monotonically increasing density, while for m{sub ch} < m < m{sub c} the peak around zero separates from the bulk of the spectrum, with density showing a pronounced depletion at intermediate scales. Valence chiral symmetry restoration may occur at yet smaller masses m < m{sub ch}, but this has not yet been seen by overlap valence probe, leaving the m{sub ch} = 0 possibility open. The latter option could place massless N{sub f}=12 theory outside of conformal window. Anomalous behavior of overlap Dirac spectrum for m{sub ch} < m < m{sub c} is qualitatively similar to one observed previously in zero and few–flavor theories as an effect of thermal agitation.

  17. Measurement of top quark polarization in top-antitop events from proton-proton collisions at √s=7  TeV using the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

    Aad, G; Abajyan, T; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdel Khalek, S; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abi, B; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Agustoni, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahmad, A; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alio, L; Alison, J; Allbrooke, B M M; Allison, L J; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Altheimer, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; 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Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Zivković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zurzolo, G; Zutshi, V; Zwalinski, L

    2013-12-06

    This Letter presents measurements of the polarization of the top quark in top-antitop quark pair events, using 4.7  fb(-1) of proton-proton collision data recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider at √s=7  TeV. Final states containing one or two isolated leptons (electrons or muons) and jets are considered. Two measurements of α(ℓ)P, the product of the leptonic spin-analyzing power and the top quark polarization, are performed assuming that the polarization is introduced by either a CP conserving or a maximally CP violating production process. The measurements obtained, α(ℓ)P(CPC)=-0.035±0.014(stat)±0.037(syst) and α(ℓ)P(CPV)=0.020±0.016(stat)(-0.017)(+0.013)(syst), are in good agreement with the standard model prediction of negligible top quark polarization.

  18. Inhomogeneous charged pion condensation in chiral asymmetric dense quark matter in the framework of a NJL2 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khunjua, T. G.; Klimenko, K. G.; Zhokhov, R. N.; Zhukovsky, V. C.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we investigate the phase structure of a (1 +1 )-dimensional quark model with four-quark interaction and in the presence of baryon (μB), isospin (μI), and chiral isospin (μI 5) chemical potentials. Spatially inhomogeneous chiral density wave (for chiral condensate) and single wave (for charged pion condensate) approaches are used. It is established that in the large-Nc limit (Nc is the number of colored quarks) there exists a duality correspondence between the chiral symmetry breaking phase and the charged pion condensation (PC) one. Moreover, it is shown that inhomogeneous charged PC phase with nonzero baryon density is induced in the model by arbitrary small values of the chemical potential μI 5 (for a rather large region of μB and μI).

  19. Quantum Collapse in Quark Stars?

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Martinez, A.; Perez Rojas, H.; Mosquera Cuesta, H. J.

    2006-06-19

    Quark matter is expected to exist in the interior of compact stellar objects as neutron stars or even the more exotic strange stars. Bare strange quark stars and (normal) strange quark-matter stars, those possessing a baryon (electron-supported) crust, are hypothesized as good candidates to explain the properties of a set of peculiar stellar sources. In this presentation, we modify the MIT Bag Model by including the electromagnetic interaction. We also show that this version of the MIT model implies the anisotropy of the Bag pressure due to the presence of the magnetic field. The equations of state of degenerate quarks gases are studied in the presence of ultra strong magnetic fields. The behavior of a system made-up of quarks having (or not) anomalous magnetic moment is reviewed. A structural instability is found, which is related to the anisotropic nature of the pressures in this highly magnetized matter.

  20. Attosecond nonlinear polarization and light-matter energy transfer in solids.

    PubMed

    Sommer, A; Bothschafter, E M; Sato, S A; Jakubeit, C; Latka, T; Razskazovskaya, O; Fattahi, H; Jobst, M; Schweinberger, W; Shirvanyan, V; Yakovlev, V S; Kienberger, R; Yabana, K; Karpowicz, N; Schultze, M; Krausz, F

    2016-06-02

    Electric-field-induced charge separation (polarization) is the most fundamental manifestation of the interaction of light with matter and a phenomenon of great technological relevance. Nonlinear optical polarization produces coherent radiation in spectral ranges inaccessible by lasers and constitutes the key to ultimate-speed signal manipulation. Terahertz techniques have provided experimental access to this important observable up to frequencies of several terahertz. Here we demonstrate that attosecond metrology extends the resolution to petahertz frequencies of visible light. Attosecond polarization spectroscopy allows measurement of the response of the electronic system of silica to strong (more than one volt per ångström) few-cycle optical (about 750 nanometres) fields. Our proof-of-concept study provides time-resolved insight into the attosecond nonlinear polarization and the light-matter energy transfer dynamics behind the optical Kerr effect and multi-photon absorption. Timing the nonlinear polarization relative to the driving laser electric field with sub-30-attosecond accuracy yields direct quantitative access to both the reversible and irreversible energy exchange between visible-infrared light and electrons. Quantitative determination of dissipation within a signal manipulation cycle of only a few femtoseconds duration (by measurement and ab initio calculation) reveals the feasibility of dielectric optical switching at clock rates above 100 terahertz. The observed sub-femtosecond rise of energy transfer from the field to the material (for a peak electric field strength exceeding 2.5 volts per ångström) in turn indicates the viability of petahertz-bandwidth metrology with a solid-state device.

  1. Attosecond nonlinear polarization and light-matter energy transfer in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, A.; Bothschafter, E. M.; Sato, S. A.; Jakubeit, C.; Latka, T.; Razskazovskaya, O.; Fattahi, H.; Jobst, M.; Schweinberger, W.; Shirvanyan, V.; Yakovlev, V. S.; Kienberger, R.; Yabana, K.; Karpowicz, N.; Schultze, M.; Krausz, F.

    2016-06-01

    Electric-field-induced charge separation (polarization) is the most fundamental manifestation of the interaction of light with matter and a phenomenon of great technological relevance. Nonlinear optical polarization produces coherent radiation in spectral ranges inaccessible by lasers and constitutes the key to ultimate-speed signal manipulation. Terahertz techniques have provided experimental access to this important observable up to frequencies of several terahertz. Here we demonstrate that attosecond metrology extends the resolution to petahertz frequencies of visible light. Attosecond polarization spectroscopy allows measurement of the response of the electronic system of silica to strong (more than one volt per ångström) few-cycle optical (about 750 nanometres) fields. Our proof-of-concept study provides time-resolved insight into the attosecond nonlinear polarization and the light-matter energy transfer dynamics behind the optical Kerr effect and multi-photon absorption. Timing the nonlinear polarization relative to the driving laser electric field with sub-30-attosecond accuracy yields direct quantitative access to both the reversible and irreversible energy exchange between visible-infrared light and electrons. Quantitative determination of dissipation within a signal manipulation cycle of only a few femtoseconds duration (by measurement and ab initio calculation) reveals the feasibility of dielectric optical switching at clock rates above 100 terahertz. The observed sub-femtosecond rise of energy transfer from the field to the material (for a peak electric field strength exceeding 2.5 volts per ångström) in turn indicates the viability of petahertz-bandwidth metrology with a solid-state device.

  2. Implications of the measurement of pulsars with two solar masses for quark matter in compact stars and heavy-ion collisions: A Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klähn, T.; Łastowiecki, R.; Blaschke, D.

    2013-10-01

    The precise measurements of the high masses of the pulsars PSR J1614-2230 (M1614=1.97±0.04M⊙) and PSR J0348-0432 (M0348=2.01±0.04M⊙) provide an important constraint for the equation of state of cold, dense matter and are suited to give interesting insights regarding the nature and existence of the possible phase transition to deconfined quark matter in the cores of neutron stars. We analyze the stability and composition of compact star sequences for a class of hybrid nuclear-quark-matter equations of state. The quark matter phase is described in the framework of a standard color superconducting 3-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, and the hadronic phase is given by the Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock equation of state for the Bonn-A potential. The phase transition is obtained by a Maxwell construction. Within this model setup, we aim to constrain otherwise not strictly fixed parameters of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, namely, the coupling strengths in the vector meson and diquark interaction channels. We perform this investigation for two different parametrizations characterized by a different scalar coupling constant. The analysis of flow data obtained in heavy-ion collisions resulted in a further constraint that we account for in our discussion. Massive hybrid stars with extended quark matter cores can be obtained in accordance with all of the considered constraints.

  3. Runaway quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Gurarie, V.

    1995-08-01

    When heavy nuclei collide, a quark-gluon plasma is formed. The plasma is subject to a strong electric field due to the charge of the colliding nuclei. The electric field can influence the behavior of the quark-gluon plasma. In particular, we might observe an increased number of quarks moving in the direction of that field, as we do in the standard electron-ion plasma. In this paper we show that this phenomenon, called the runaway quarks, does not exist.

  4. Stabilization of polar soils organic matter: insights from 13-C NMR and ESR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abakumov, Evgeny

    2017-04-01

    Polar soils play a key role in the global carbon balance, as they contain maximum stocks of soil organic matter (SOM) within the whole pedosphere. Low temperature and severe conditions provides the accumulation of large amounts of organic matter in permafrost soils over thousands of years. The quality and composition of organic matter of polar soils is underestimated. In order to better understand the implication of permafrost SOM to greenhouse gas emissions, an accurate knowledge of its spatial distribution, both in terms of quantity and quality (i.e. biodegradability, chemical composition and humification degree) is needed. The chemical composition of SOM determines its decomposability and, therefore, it determines the rate at which carbon may be transferred from soils to the atmosphere under warming conditions. Biodegradability of SOM has been related to humification degree, as more advanced stages in the humification process imply a depletion of the labile molecules, as well as an increase in the bulk aromaticity, which provides a higher stability of the SOM. Soils from Antarctic and different sectors of Arctic biome were investigated by 13-C NMR and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. It was shown, that the characteristic feature of polar soils humic acids is the dominance of aliphatic compounds on the aromatic one. This is related to the humification precursors component composition, namely to dominance of the remnants of lower plants, especially in Antarctic and low period of biological activity, which regulates the humification rate. Humic acids of Antarctic and various Arctic soils show the portion of aromatic components not more than 30 %. ESR spectroscopy shown that the concentration of free radicals is proportional to the humic acids stabilization degree. Less humified organic materials show the highest portion of free radical content, while the most developed soils and buried organic layers show decreased contents of free radicals. The database on

  5. Model of dark matter and dark energy based on gravitational polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, Luc; Le Tiec, Alexandre

    2008-07-15

    A model of dark matter and dark energy based on the concept of gravitational polarization is investigated. We propose an action in standard general relativity for describing, at some effective or phenomenological level, the dynamics of a dipolar medium, i.e. one endowed with a dipole moment vector, and polarizable in a gravitational field. Using first-order cosmological perturbations, we show that the dipolar fluid is undistinguishable from standard dark energy (a cosmological constant {lambda}) plus standard dark matter (a pressureless perfect fluid), and therefore benefits from the successes of the {lambda}-cold-dark-matter scenario at cosmological scales. Invoking an argument of 'weak clusterization' of the mass distribution of dipole moments, we find that the dipolar dark matter reproduces the phenomenology of the modified Newtonian dynamics at galactic scales. The dipolar medium action naturally contains a cosmological constant, and we show that if the model is to come from some fundamental underlying physics, the cosmological constant {lambda} should be of the order of a{sub 0}{sup 2}/c{sup 4}, where a{sub 0} denotes the modified Newtonian dynamics constant acceleration scale, in good agreement with observations.

  6. Search for a Dark Matter Candidate Produced in Association with a Single Top Quark in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Anzá, F.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Fuks, B.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2012-05-15

    We report a new search for dark matter in a data sample of an integrated luminosity of 7.7 fb⁻¹ of Tevatron pp¯ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV, collected by the CDF II detector. We search for production of a dark-matter candidate, D, in association with a single top quark. We consider the hadronic decay mode of the top quark exclusively, yielding a final state of three jets with missing transverse energy. The data are consistent with the standard model; we thus set 95% confidence level upper limits on the cross section of the process pp̄→t+D as a function of the mass of the dark-matter candidate. The limits are approximately 0.5 pb for a dark-matter particle with mass in the range of 0–150 GeV/c².

  7. Search for a Dark Matter Candidate Produced in Association with a Single Top Quark in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; ...

    2012-05-15

    We report a new search for dark matter in a data sample of an integrated luminosity of 7.7 fb⁻¹ of Tevatron pp¯ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV, collected by the CDF II detector. We search for production of a dark-matter candidate, D, in association with a single top quark. We consider the hadronic decay mode of the top quark exclusively, yielding a final state of three jets with missing transverse energy. The data are consistent with the standard model; we thus set 95% confidence level upper limits on the cross section of the process pp̄→t+D as a function of the massmore » of the dark-matter candidate. The limits are approximately 0.5 pb for a dark-matter particle with mass in the range of 0–150 GeV/c².« less

  8. Search for a dark matter candidate produced in association with a single top quark in pp collisions at √[s]=1.96  TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Anzá, F; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fuks, B; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Mastrandrea, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Sorin, V; Song, H; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2012-05-18

    We report a new search for dark matter in a data sample of an integrated luminosity of 7.7  fb-1 of Tevatron pp[over ¯] collisions at √[s]=1.96  TeV, collected by the CDF II detector. We search for production of a dark-matter candidate, D, in association with a single top quark. We consider the hadronic decay mode of the top quark exclusively, yielding a final state of three jets with missing transverse energy. The data are consistent with the standard model; we thus set 95% confidence level upper limits on the cross section of the process pp[over ¯]→t+D as a function of the mass of the dark-matter candidate. The limits are approximately 0.5 pb for a dark-matter particle with mass in the range of 0-150  GeV/c2.

  9. Search for a dark matter candidate produced in association with a single top quark in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Anza, F.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2012-02-01

    We report a new search for dark matter in a data sample of an integrated luminosity of 7.7 fb{sup -1} of Tevatron p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected by the CDF II detector. We search for production of a dark matter candidate, D, in association with a single top quark. We consider the hadronic decay mode of the top quark exclusively, yielding a final state of three jets with missing transverse energy. The data are consistent with the standard model; we thus set 95% confidence level upper limits on the cross section of the process p{bar p} {yields} t + D as a function of the mass of the dark-matter candidate. The limits are approximately 0.5 pb for a dark-matter particle with mass in the range of 0 - 150 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. Search for the Production of Dark Matter in Association with Top-Quark Pairs in the Single-Lepton Final State in Proton-Proton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-06-17

    A search is presented for particle dark matter produced in association with a pair of top quarks in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of s√=8 TeV. The data were collected with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. This search requires the presence of one lepton, multiple jets, and large missing transverse energy. No excess of events is found above the SM expectation, and upper limits are derived on the production cross section. Interpreting the findings in the context of a scalar contact interaction between fermionic dark matter particles and top quarks, lower limits on the interaction scale are set. These limits are also interpreted in terms of the dark matter-nucleon scattering cross sections for the spin-independent scalar operator and they complement direct searches for dark matter particles in the low mass region.

  11. Search for the Production of Dark Matter in Association with Top-Quark Pairs in the Single-Lepton Final State in Proton-Proton Collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-06-17

    A search is presented for particle dark matter produced in association with a pair of top quarks in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of s√=8 TeV. The data were collected with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. This search requires the presence of one lepton, multiple jets, and large missing transverse energy. No excess of events is found above the SM expectation, and upper limits are derived on the production cross section. Interpreting the findings in the context of a scalar contact interaction between fermionic dark matter particles and topmore » quarks, lower limits on the interaction scale are set. These limits are also interpreted in terms of the dark matter-nucleon scattering cross sections for the spin-independent scalar operator and they complement direct searches for dark matter particles in the low mass region.« less

  12. Unexpected manifestation of quark condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovjev, G. M.; Molodtsov, S. V.

    2015-05-15

    A comparative analysis of some quark ensembles governed by a four-fermion interaction is performed. Arguments in support of the statement that the presence of a gas-liquid phase transition is a feature peculiar to them are adduced. The instability of small quark droplets is discussed and is attributed to the formation of a chiral soliton. The stability of baryon matter is due to a mixed phase of the vacuum and baryon matter.

  13. The proton's spin: A quark model perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Close, F.E. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN )

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic moments and g{sub A}/g{sub V} provide information on the correlations among quark spins and flavors in the proton. I compare this information with the deep inelastic polarized data from EMC which has been claimed to show that very little of the proton's spin is due to the quarks. The possibility that there is significant polarization of strange quarks within protons is discussed. 38 refs.

  14. Antimatter and Dark Matter Search in Space: BESS-Polar Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, John W.; Yamamoto, Akira

    2009-01-01

    The apex of the Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer program was reached with the Antarctic flight of BESS-Polar II, during the 2007-2008 Austral Summer, that obtained 24.5 days of data on over 4.7 billion cosmic-ray events. The US-Japan BESS Collaboration uses elementary particle measurements to study the early Universe and provides fundamental data on the spectra of light cosmic-ray elements and isotopes. BESS measures the energy spectra of cosmic-ray antiprotons to investigate signatures of possible exotic sources, such as dark-matter candidates, and searches for heavier anti-nuclei that might reach Earth from antimatter domains formed during symmetry breaking processes in the early Universe. Since 1993, BESS has carried out eleven high-latitude balloon flights, two of long duration, that together have defined the study of antiprotons below about 4 GeV, provided standard references for light element and isotope spectra, and set the most sensitive limits on the existence of anti-deuterons and anti-helium, The BESS-Polar II flight took place at Solar Minimum, when the sensitivity of the low-energy antiproton measurements to a primary source is greatest. The rich BESS-Polar II dataset more than doubles the combined data from all earlier BESS flights and has 10-20 times the statistics of BESS data from the previous Solar Minimum. Here, we summarize the scientific results of BESS program, focusing on the results obtained using data from the long-duration flights of BESS-Polar I (2004) and BESS-Polar II.

  15. Antimatter and Dark Matter Search in Space: BESS-Polar Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, John W.; Yamamoto, Akira

    2009-01-01

    The apex of the Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer program was reached with the Antarctic flight of BESS-Polar II, during the 2007-2008 Austral Summer, that obtained 24.5 days of data on over 4.7 billion cosmic-ray events. The US-Japan BESS Collaboration uses elementary particle measurements to study the early Universe and provides fundamental data on the spectra of light cosmic-ray elements and isotopes. BESS measures the energy spectra of cosmic-ray antiprotons to investigate signatures of possible exotic sources, such as dark-matter candidates, and searches for heavier anti-nuclei that might reach Earth from antimatter domains formed during symmetry breaking processes in the early Universe. Since 1993, BESS has carried out eleven high-latitude balloon flights, two of long duration, that together have defined the study of antiprotons below about 4 GeV, provided standard references for light element and isotope spectra, and set the most sensitive limits on the existence of anti-deuterons and anti-helium, The BESS-Polar II flight took place at Solar Minimum, when the sensitivity of the low-energy antiproton measurements to a primary source is greatest. The rich BESS-Polar II dataset more than doubles the combined data from all earlier BESS flights and has 10-20 times the statistics of BESS data from the previous Solar Minimum. Here, we summarize the scientific results of BESS program, focusing on the results obtained using data from the long-duration flights of BESS-Polar I (2004) and BESS-Polar II.

  16. Quark Gluon Plasma

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    Matter is malleable and can change its properties with temperature. This is most familiar when comparing ice, liquid water and steam, which are all different forms of the same thing. However beyond the usual states of matter, physicists can explore other states, both much colder and hotter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the hottest known state of matter – a state that is so hot that protons and neutrons from the center of atoms can literally melt. This form of matter is called a quark gluon plasma and it is an important research topic being pursued at the LHC.

  17. Quark Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-05-07

    Matter is malleable and can change its properties with temperature. This is most familiar when comparing ice, liquid water and steam, which are all different forms of the same thing. However beyond the usual states of matter, physicists can explore other states, both much colder and hotter. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the hottest known state of matter – a state that is so hot that protons and neutrons from the center of atoms can literally melt. This form of matter is called a quark gluon plasma and it is an important research topic being pursued at the LHC.

  18. Softening of the Equation of State of Matter at Large Densities and Temperatures: Chiral-Symmetry Restoration Versus Quark Deconfinement

    SciTech Connect

    Bonanno, Luca; Drago, Alessandro; Lavagno, Andrea

    2007-12-14

    We discuss two models in which a softening of the equation of state takes place due to the appearance of new degrees of freedom. The first is a hadronic model in which the softening is due to chiral symmetry restoration. In the second model the softening is associated with the formation of clusters of quarks in the mixed phase. We show that in the first case the bulk modulus is mainly dependent on the density, while in the mixed-phase model the bulk modulus strongly depends on the temperature and it is not vanishing due to the presence of two conserved charges, the baryon and the isospin one.

  19. Low density instabilities in asymmetric nuclear matter within the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model with the {delta} meson

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Alexandre M.; Providencia, Constanca; Panda, Prafulla K.

    2009-04-15

    In the present work we include the isovector-scalar {delta} meson in the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model and study the properties of asymmetric nuclear within QMC without and with the {delta} meson. Recent constraints set by isospin diffusion on the slope parameter of the nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density are used to adjust the model parameters. The thermodynamical spinodal surfaces are obtained and the instability region at subsaturation densities within QMC and QMC{delta} models are compared with mean-field relativistic models. The distillation effect in the QMC model is discussed.

  20. Automatic identification of gray and white matter components in polarized light imaging.

    PubMed

    Dammers, Jürgen; Breuer, Lukas; Axer, Markus; Kleiner, Melanie; Eiben, Björn; Grässel, David; Dickscheid, Timo; Zilles, Karl; Amunts, Katrin; Shah, N Joni; Pietrzyk, Uwe

    2012-01-16

    Polarized light imaging (PLI) enables the visualization of fiber tracts with high spatial resolution in microtome sections of postmortem brains. Vectors of the fiber orientation defined by inclination and direction angles can directly be derived from the optical signals employed by PLI analysis. The polarization state of light propagating through a rotating polarimeter is varied in such a way that the detected signal of each spatial unit describes a sinusoidal signal. Noise, light scatter and filter inhomogeneities, however, interfere with the original sinusoidal PLI signals, which in turn have direct impact on the accuracy of subsequent fiber tracking. Recently we showed that the primary sinusoidal signals can effectively be restored after noise and artifact rejection utilizing independent component analysis (ICA). In particular, regions with weak intensities are greatly enhanced after ICA based artifact rejection and signal restoration. Here, we propose a user independent way of identifying the components of interest after decomposition; i.e., components that are related to gray and white matter. Depending on the size of the postmortem brain and the section thickness, the number of independent component maps can easily be in the range of a few ten thousand components for one brain. Therefore, we developed an automatic and, more importantly, user independent way of extracting the signal of interest. The automatic identification of gray and white matter components is based on the evaluation of the statistical properties of the so-called feature vectors of each individual component map, which, in the ideal case, shows a sinusoidal waveform. Our method enables large-scale analysis (i.e., the analysis of thousands of whole brain sections) of nerve fiber orientations in the human brain using polarized light imaging.

  1. Quark stars with the density-dependent quark mass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Zheng, Xiao-Ping

    2012-09-01

    The recent observation of the pulsar PSR J1614-2230 with a mass of 1.97±0.04M⊙ gives a strong constraint on the equation of state (EoS) of the dense matter in compact stars. In this work, we calculate the maximum mass of quark stars with the density-dependent quark mass model, and explore the parameter ranges for this model fully, by considering the constraints of absolute stability of strange quark matter and the mass of PSR J1614-2230. Without the color-superconductivity, the maximum mass of unpaired quark stars is more sensitive to the parameter C, and complies with the constraints within the range of 96MeVfm≲C≲130MeVfm. The largest mass can reach 2.25M⊙ at C≃96.54MeVfm and m≃145MeV. For the quark stars composed of the quark matter in color-flavor locked (CFL) phase, we can obtain quite large maximum masses at a sufficiently high gap value, but the value of m is very important in deciding the maximum mass of the CFL quark stars.

  2. Results on top-quark physics and top-quark-like signatures by CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabert, Eric; CMS Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    This report reviews the results obtained by the CMS Collaboration on top quark physics, focusing on the latest ones based on p-p collisions provided by the LHC at \\sqrt{s}=13{{TeV}} during Run II. It covers measurements of single-top, top quark pairs and associated productions as well as measurements of top quark properties. Finally several beyond the standard model searches involving top quark in the final states are presented, such as searches for supersymmetry in the third generation, heavy resonances decaying into a top quark pair, or dark matter produced in association to a single-top or a top quark pair.

  3. Top quark physics results from CDF and D-Zero

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, D.

    1996-10-01

    I summarize recent top quark physics results from the Fermilab Tevatron experiments. Since the observation of the top quark by CDF and D{null} in 1995, the experimental focus has shifted to a detailed study of the top quark`s properties. This article describes recent measurements of the top quark production cross section, mass, kinematic properties, branching ratios, V{sub {ital tb}}, and the {ital W} polarization in top decays.

  4. Is the vast polar structure of dwarf galaxies a serious problem for Λ cold dark matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipnicky, Andrew; Chakrabarti, Sukanya

    2017-06-01

    The dwarf galaxies around the Milky Way are distributed in a so-called vast polar structure (VPOS) that may be in conflict with Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) simulations. Here, we seek to determine if the VPOS poses a serious challenge to the ΛCDM paradigm on galactic scales. Specifically, we investigate if the VPOS remains coherent as a function of time. Using the measured Hubble Space Telescope (HST) proper motions and associated uncertainties, we integrate the orbits of the classical Milky Way satellites backwards in time and find that the structure disperses well before a dynamical time. We also examine, in particular, Leo I and Leo II using their most recent proper motion data, both of which have extreme kinematic properties, but these satellites do not appear to drive the polar fit that is seen at the present day. We have studied the effect of the uncertainties on the HST proper motions on the coherence of the VPOS as a function of time. We find that 8 of the 11 classical dwarfs have reliable proper motions; for these eight, the VPOS also loses significance in less than a dynamical time, indicating that the VPOS is not a dynamically stable structure. Obtaining more accurate proper motion measurements of Ursa Minor, Sculptor and Carina would bolster these conclusions.

  5. Evaluating fibre orientation dispersion in white matter: Comparison of diffusion MRI, histology and polarized light imaging.

    PubMed

    Mollink, Jeroen; Kleinnijenhuis, Michiel; Cappellen van Walsum, Anne-Marie van; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Cottaar, Michiel; Mirfin, Christopher; Heinrich, Mattias P; Jenkinson, Mark; Pallebage-Gamarallage, Menuka; Ansorge, Olaf; Jbabdi, Saad; Miller, Karla L

    2017-08-15

    Diffusion MRI is an exquisitely sensitive probe of tissue microstructure, and is currently the only non-invasive measure of the brain's fibre architecture. As this technique becomes more sophisticated and microstructurally informative, there is increasing value in comparing diffusion MRI with microscopic imaging in the same tissue samples. This study compared estimates of fibre orientation dispersion in white matter derived from diffusion MRI to reference measures of dispersion obtained from polarized light imaging and histology. Three post-mortem brain specimens were scanned with diffusion MRI and analyzed with a two-compartment dispersion model. The specimens were then sectioned for microscopy, including polarized light imaging estimates of fibre orientation and histological quantitative estimates of myelin and astrocytes. Dispersion estimates were correlated on region - and voxel-wise levels in the corpus callosum, the centrum semiovale and the corticospinal tract. The region-wise analysis yielded correlation coefficients of r = 0.79 for the diffusion MRI and histology comparison, while r = 0.60 was reported for the comparison with polarized light imaging. In the corpus callosum, we observed a pattern of higher dispersion at the midline compared to its lateral aspects. This pattern was present in all modalities and the dispersion profiles from microscopy and diffusion MRI were highly correlated. The astrocytes appeared to have minor contribution to dispersion observed with diffusion MRI. These results demonstrate that fibre orientation dispersion estimates from diffusion MRI represents the tissue architecture well. Dispersion models might be improved by more faithfully incorporating an informed mapping based on microscopy data. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impacts of Polar Changes on the UV-induced Mineralization of Terrigenous Dissolved Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Sulzberger, Barbara; Arey, J Samuel

    2016-07-05

    Local climates in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere are influenced by Arctic Amplification and by interactions of the Antarctic ozone hole with climate change, respectively. Polar changes may affect hydroclimatic conditions in temperate regions, for example, by increasing the length and intensity of precipitation events at Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes. Additionally, global warming has led to the thawing of ancient permafrost soils, particularly in Arctic regions, due to Arctic Amplification. Both heavy precipitation events and thawing of permafrost are increasing the net transfer of terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) from land to surface waters. In aquatic ecosystems, UV-induced oxidation of terrigenous DOM (tDOM) produces atmospheric CO2 and this process is one of several mechanisms by which natural organic matter in aquatic and soil environments may play an important role in climate feedbacks. The Arctic is particularly affected by these processes: for example, melting of Arctic sea ice allows solar UV radiation to penetrate into the ice-free Arctic Ocean and to cause photochemical reactions that result in bleaching and mineralization of tDOM. Open questions, in addition to those shown in the Graphical Abstract, remain regarding the resulting contributions of tDOM photomineralization to CO2 production and global warming.

  7. Possible evidence that pulsars are quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Renxin

    2008-01-10

    It is a pity that the real state of matter in pulsar-like stars is still not determined confidently because of the uncertainty about cold matter at supranuclear density, even 40 years after the discovery of pulsar. Nuclear matter (related to neutron stars) is one of the speculations for the inner constitution of pulsars even from the Landau's time more than 70 years ago, but quark matter (related to quark stars) is an alternative due to the fact of asymptotic freedom of interaction between quarks as the standard model of particle physics develops since 1960s. Therefore, one has to focus on astrophysical observations in order to answer what the nature of pulsars is. In this presentation, I would like to summarize possible observational evidence/hints that pulsar-like stars could be quark stars, and to address achievable clear evidence for quark stars in the future experiments.

  8. Quark-Cluster Stars: the Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Xiaoyu; Xu, Renxin

    2013-01-01

    The nature of pulsar-like compact stars is still in controversy although the first pulsar was found more than 40 years ago. Generally speaking, conventional neutron stars and non-mainstream quark stars are two types of models to describe the inner structure of pulsars, with the former composed mainly of hadrons and the latter of a peculiar kind of matter whose state equation should be understood in the level of quarks rather than hadrons. To construct a more realistic model from both theoretical and observational points of view, we conjecture that pulsars could be "quark-cluster stars" which are composed of quark-clusters with almost equal numbers of up, down and strange quarks. Clustering quark matter could be the result of strong coupling between quarks inside realistic compact stars. The lightest quark clusters could be of H-dibaryons, while quark clusters could also be heavier with more quarks. Being essentially related to the non-perturbative quantum-chromo dynamics (QCD), the state of supra-nuclear condensed matter is really difficult to obtain strictly by only theoretical QCD-calculations, and we expect, nevertheless, that astrophysical observations could help us to have a final solution.

  9. Properties of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Wicke, Daniel; /Wuppertal U., Dept. Math.

    2009-08-01

    The aim of particle physics is the understanding of elementary particles and their interactions. The current theory of elementary particle physics, the Standard Model, contains twelve different types of fermions which (neglecting gravity) interact through the gauge bosons of three forces. In addition a scalar particle, the Higgs boson, is needed for theoretical consistency. These few building blocks explain all experimental results found in the context of particle physics, so far. Nevertheless, it is believed that the Standard Model is only an approximation to a more complete theory. First of all the fourth known force, gravity, has withstood all attempts to be included until now. Furthermore, the Standard Model describes several features of the elementary particles like the existence of three families of fermions or the quantisation of charges, but does not explain these properties from underlying principles. Finally, the lightness of the Higgs boson needed to explain the symmetry breaking is difficult to maintain in the presence of expected corrections from gravity at high scales. This is the so called hierarchy problem. In addition astrophysical results indicate that the universe consists only to a very small fraction of matter described by the Standard Model. Large fractions of dark energy and dark matter are needed to describe the observations. Both do not have any correspondence in the Standard Model. Also the very small asymmetry between matter and anti-matter that results in the observed universe built of matter (and not of anti-matter) cannot be explained until now. It is thus an important task of experimental particle physics to test the predictions of the Standard Model to the best possible accuracy and to search for deviations pointing to necessary extensions or modifications of our current theoretical understanding. The top quark was predicted to exist by the Standard Model as the partner of the bottom quark. It was first observed in 1995 by the

  10. Radial Correlations Between Two Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, A. M.; Koponen, J.; Pennanen, P.; Michael, C.

    2002-04-01

    In nuclear many-body problems the short-range correlation between two nucleons is well described by the corresponding correlation in the two-body problem. Therefore, as a first step in any attempt at an analogous description of many-quark systems, it is necessary to know the two-quark correlation. With this in mind, we study the light quark distribution in a heavy-light meson with a static heavy quark. The charge and matter radial distributions of these heavy-light mesons are measured on a lattice with a light quark mass about that of the strange quark. Both distributions can be well fitted upto r ≈ 0.7 fm with the exponential form wi2 (r), where Wi(r) = A exp(-r/ri). For the charge(c) and matter(m) distributions rc ≈ 0.32(2)fm and rm ≈ 0.24(2)fm. We also discuss the normalisation of the total charge (defined to be unity in the continuum limit) and matter integrated over all space, finding 1.30(5) and 0.4(1) respectively for a lattice spacing ≈ 0.17 fm.

  11. Hadrons and Quark-Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letessier, Jean; Rafelski, Johann

    2002-06-01

    Before matter as we know it emerged, the universe was filled with the primordial state of hadronic matter called quark gluon plasma. This hot soup of quarks and gluon is effectively an inescapable consequence of our current knowledge about the fundamental hadronic interactions, quantum chromodynamics. This book covers the ongoing search to verify this prediction experimentally and discusses the physical properties of this novel form of matter.

  12. Exposure to atmospheric particulate matter enhances Th17 polarization through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    van Voorhis, Michael; Knopp, Samantha; Julliard, Walker; Fechner, John H; Zhang, Xiaoji; Schauer, James J; Mezrich, Joshua D

    2013-01-01

    Lung diseases, including asthma, COPD, and other autoimmune lung pathologies are aggravated by exposure to particulate matter (PM) found in air pollution. IL-17 has been shown to exacerbate airway disease in animal models. As PM is known to contain aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligands and the AHR has recently been shown to play a role in differentiation of Th17 T cells, the aim of this study was to determine whether exposure to PM could impact Th17 polarization in an AHR-dependent manner. This study used both cell culture techniques and in vivo exposure in mice to examine the response of T cells to PM. Initially experiments were conducted with urban dust particles from a standard reference material, and ultimately repeated with freshly collected samples of diesel exhaust and cigarette smoke. The readout for the assays was increased T cell differentiation as indicated by increased generation of IL-17A in culture, and increased populations of IL-17 producing cells by intracellular flow cytometry. The data illustrate that Th17 polarization was significantly enhanced by addition of urban dust in a dose dependent fashion in cultures of wild-type but not AHR(-/-) mice. The data further suggest that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons played a primary role in this enhancement. There was both an increase of Th17 cell differentiation, and also an increase in the amount of IL-17 secreted by the cells. In summary, this paper identifies a novel mechanism whereby PM can directly act on the AHR in T cells, leading to enhanced Th17 differentiation. Further understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for pathologic Th17 differentiation and autoimmunity seen after exposure to pollution will allow direct targeting of proteins involved in AHR activation and function for treatment of PM exposures.

  13. Cold-nuclear-matter effects on heavy-quark production in d+Au collisions at sqrt[S(NN)]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D J; Kim, E-J; Kim, Y-J; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kleinjan, D; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhou, S

    2012-12-14

    The PHENIX experiment has measured electrons and positrons at midrapidity from the decays of hadrons containing charm and bottom quarks produced in d+Au and p+p collisions at sqrt[S(NN)]=200 GeV in the transverse-momentum range 0.85 ≤ p(T)(e) ≤ 8.5 GeV/c. In central d+Au collisions, the nuclear modification factor R(dA) at 1.5matter effects on light- and heavy-flavor mesons could contribute to the observed differences between the π(0) and heavy-flavor-electron nuclear modification factors R(AA).

  14. New State of Nuclear Matter: Nearly Perfect Fluid of Quarks and Gluons in Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC Energies From Charged Particle Density to Jet Quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Nouicer, R.

    2016-03-28

    This article reviews several important results from RHIC experiments and discusses their implications. They were obtained in a unique environment for studying QCD matter at temperatures and densities that exceed the limits wherein hadrons can exist as individual entities and raises to prominence the quark-gluon degrees of freedom. These findings are supported by major experimental observations via measuring of the bulk properties of particle production, particle ratios and chemical freeze-out conditions, and elliptic ow; followed by hard probe measurements: high-pT hadron suppression, dijet fragment azimuthal correlations, and heavy favor probes. These measurements are presented for particles of different species as a function of system sizes, collision centrality, and energy carried out in RHIC experiments. The results reveal that a dense, strongly-interacting medium is created in central Au + Au collisions at p sNN = 200 GeV at RHIC. This revelation of a new state of nuclear matter has also been observed in measurements at the LHC. Further, the IP-Glasma model coupled with viscous hydrodynamic models, which assumes the formation of a QGP, reproduces well the experimental ow results from Au + Au at p sNN = 200 GeV. This implies that the fluctuations in the initial geometry state are important and the created medium behaves as a nearly perfect liquid of nuclear matter because it has an extraordinarily low ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density, =s 0.12. However, these discoveries are far from being fully understood. Furthermore, recent experimental results from RHIC and LHC in small p + A, d + Au and 3He+Au collision systems provide brand new insight into the role of initial and final state effects. These have proven to be interesting and more surprising than originally anticipated; and could conceivably shed new light in our understanding of collective behavior in heavy-ion physics. Accordingly, the focus of the experiments at both facilities RHIC and the LHC

  15. New State of Nuclear Matter: Nearly Perfect Fluid of Quarks and Gluons in Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC Energies From Charged Particle Density to Jet Quenching

    DOE PAGES

    Nouicer, R.

    2016-03-28

    This article reviews several important results from RHIC experiments and discusses their implications. They were obtained in a unique environment for studying QCD matter at temperatures and densities that exceed the limits wherein hadrons can exist as individual entities and raises to prominence the quark-gluon degrees of freedom. These findings are supported by major experimental observations via measuring of the bulk properties of particle production, particle ratios and chemical freeze-out conditions, and elliptic ow; followed by hard probe measurements: high-pT hadron suppression, dijet fragment azimuthal correlations, and heavy favor probes. These measurements are presented for particles of different species asmore » a function of system sizes, collision centrality, and energy carried out in RHIC experiments. The results reveal that a dense, strongly-interacting medium is created in central Au + Au collisions at p sNN = 200 GeV at RHIC. This revelation of a new state of nuclear matter has also been observed in measurements at the LHC. Further, the IP-Glasma model coupled with viscous hydrodynamic models, which assumes the formation of a QGP, reproduces well the experimental ow results from Au + Au at p sNN = 200 GeV. This implies that the fluctuations in the initial geometry state are important and the created medium behaves as a nearly perfect liquid of nuclear matter because it has an extraordinarily low ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density, =s 0.12. However, these discoveries are far from being fully understood. Furthermore, recent experimental results from RHIC and LHC in small p + A, d + Au and 3He+Au collision systems provide brand new insight into the role of initial and final state effects. These have proven to be interesting and more surprising than originally anticipated; and could conceivably shed new light in our understanding of collective behavior in heavy-ion physics. Accordingly, the focus of the experiments at both facilities RHIC and

  16. New state of nuclear matter: Nearly perfect fluid of quarks and gluons in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies. From charged particle density to jet quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouicer, R.

    2016-03-01

    This article reviews several important results from RHIC experiments and discusses their implications. They were obtained in a unique environment for studying QCD matter at temperatures and densities that exceed the limits wherein hadrons can exist as individual entities and raises to prominence the quark-gluon degrees of freedom. These findings are supported by major experimental observations via measuring of the bulk properties of particle production, particle ratios and chemical freeze-out conditions, and elliptic flow; followed by hard probe measurements: high- pT hadron suppression, dijet fragment azimuthal correlations, and heavy-flavor probes. These measurements are presented for particles of different species as a function of system sizes, collision centrality, and energy carried out in RHIC experiments. The results reveal that a dense, strongly interacting medium is created in central Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV at RHIC. This revelation of a new state of nuclear matter has also been observed in measurements at the LHC. Further, the IP-Glasma model coupled with viscous hydrodynamic models, which assumes the formation of a QGP, reproduces well the experimental flow results from Au+Au at sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV. This implies that the fluctuations in the initial geometry state are important and the created medium behaves as a nearly perfect liquid of nuclear matter because it has an extraordinarily low ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density, η/s≈ 0.12. However, these discoveries are far from being fully understood. Furthermore, recent experimental results from RHIC and LHC in small p+A, d+ Au and 3He+Au collision systems provide brand new insight into the role of initial and final state effects. These have proven to be interesting and more surprising than originally anticipated; and could conceivably shed new light in our understanding of collective behavior in heavy-ion physics. Accordingly, the focus of the experiments at both

  17. Concluding Remarks: Connecting Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions and Neutron Star Mergers by the Equation of State of Dense Hadron- and Quark Matter as signalled by Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanauske, Matthias; Steinheimer, Jan; Bovard, Luke; Mukherjee, Ayon; Schramm, Stefan; Takami, Kentaro; Papenfort, Jens; Wechselberger, Natascha; Rezzolla, Luciano; Stöcker, Horst

    2017-07-01

    The underlying open questions in the fields of general relativistic astrophysics and elementary particle and nuclear physics are strongly connected and their results are interdependent. Although the physical systems are quite different, the 4D-simulation of a merger of a binary system of two neutron stars and the properties of the hot and dense matter created in high energy heavy ion collisions, strongly depend on the equation of state of fundamental elementary matter. Neutron star mergers represent optimal astrophysical laboratories to investigate the QCD phase structure using a spectrogram of the post-merger phase of the emitted gravitational waves. These studies can be supplemented by observations from heavy ion collisions to possibly reach a conclusive picture on the QCD phase structure at high density and temperature. As gravitational waves (GWs) emitted from merging neutron star binaries are on the verge of their first detection, it is important to understand the main characteristics of the underlying merging system in order to predict the expected GW signal. Based on numerical-relativity simulations of merging neutron star binaries, the emitted GW and the interior structure of the generated hypermassive neutron stars (HMNS) have been analyzed in detail. This article will focus on the internal and rotational HMNS properties and their connection with the emitted GW signal. Especially, the appearance of the hadon-quark phase transition in the interior region of the HMNS and its conjunction with the spectral properties of the emitted GW will be addressed and confronted with the simulation results of high energy heavy ion collisions.

  18. Quark description of hadronic phases

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, T.; Wilczek, F.

    1999-10-01

    We extend our proposal that major universality classes of hadronic matter can be understood, and in favorable cases calculated, directly in the microscopic quark variables, to allow for a splitting between strange and light quark masses. A surprisingly simple but apparently viable picture emerges, featuring essentially three phases, distinguished by whether strangeness is conserved (standard nuclear matter), conserved modulo 2 (hypernuclear matter), or locked to color (color flavor locking). These are separated by sharp phase transitions. There is also, potentially, a quark phase matching hadronic {ital K} condensation. The smallness of the secondary gap in two-flavor color superconductivity corresponds to the disparity between the primary dynamical energy scales of QCD and the much smaller energy scales of nuclear physics. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Vortical susceptibility of finite-density QCD matter

    DOE PAGES

    Aristova, A.; Frenklakh, D.; Gorsky, A.; ...

    2016-10-07

    Here, the susceptibility of finite-density QCD matter to vorticity is introduced, as an analog of magnetic susceptibility. It describes the spin polarization of quarks and antiquarks in finite-density QCD matter induced by rotation. We estimate this quantity in the chirally broken phase using the mixed gauge-gravity anomaly at finite baryon density. It is proposed that the vortical susceptibility of QCD matter is responsible for the polarization of Λ and Λ¯ hyperons observed recently in heavy ion collisions at RHIC by the STAR collaboration.

  20. Properties of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, A. W.

    2014-09-24

    Recent measurements of top-quark properties at the LHC and the Tevatron are presented. Most recent measurements of the top quark mass have been carried out by CMS using $19.7/$fb of $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV data including the study of the dependence on event kinematics. ATLAS uses the full Run I data at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV for a "3D" measurement that significantly reduces systematic uncertainties. D0 employs the full Run II data using the matrix element method to measure the top quark mass with significantly reduced systematic uncertainties. Many different measurements of the top quark exist to date and the most precise ones per decay channel per experiment have been combined into the first world combination with a relative precision of 0.44%. Latest updates of measurements of production asymmetries include the measurement of the \\ttbar production asymmetry by D0 employing the full Run II data set, by CMS and ATLAS (including the polarization of the top quark) employing both the full data set at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV. CMS uses the full $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV data to measure the top quark polarization in single top production, the ratio ${\\cal R}$ of the branching fractions ${\\cal B}(t \\rightarrow Wb) / {\\cal B}(t \\rightarrow Wq)$ and to search for flavor changing neutral currents. The results from all these measurements agree well with their respective Standard Model expectation.

  1. Massive Compact Stars as Quark Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Hilário; Barbosa Duarte, Sérgio; de Oliveira, José Carlos T.

    2011-03-01

    High-mass compact stars have been reported recently in the literature, providing strong constraints on the properties of the ultra dense matter beyond the saturation nuclear density. In view of these results, the calculations of quark star or hybrid star equilibrium structure must be compatible with the provided observational data. But since the equations of state used in describing quark matter are in general too soft in comparison with the equation of states used to describe the hadronic or nuclear matter, the calculated quark star models presented in the literature are in general not suitable to explain the stability of highly-compact massive objects. In this work, we present the calculations of a spherically symmetric quark star structure by using an equation of state that takes into account the superconducting color-flavor locked phase of the strange quark matter. In addition, some fundamental aspects of QCD (asymptotic freedom and confinement) are considered by means of a phenomenological description of the deconfined quark phase, the density-dependent quark mass model. The quark matter behavior introduced by this model stiffens the corresponding equation of state. We thus investigate the influence of this model on the mass-radius diagram of quark stars. We obtain massive quark stars due to the stiffness of the equation of state, when a reasonable parameterization of the color superconducting gap is used. Models of quark stars enveloped by a nucleonic crust composed of a nuclear lattice embedded in an electron gas, with nuclei close to neutron drip line, are also discussed.

  2. Cfl-Quark Star in the Density-Dependent Quark Mass Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. C. T.; Rodrigues, H.; Duarte, S. B.

    2010-04-01

    The static spherically symmetric quark star structure is calculated by using an equation of state which takes into account the superconducting Color-Flavor Locked (CFL) phase of the strange quark matter. Some fundamental aspects of QCD (asymptotic freedom and confinement) are considered by using the phenomenological density-dependent quark mass model. We discuss the influence of model parameters on the conventional mass-radius relationship of a quark star structure. Massive quark stars are found due to the stiffness of the equation of state at low densities.

  3. Measurement of the correlation between the polar angles of leptons from top quark decays in the helicity basis at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.

    2016-01-13

    A measurement of the correlations between the polar angles of leptons from the decay of pair-produced t and $\\bar{t}$ quarks in the helicity basis is reported, using proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb$^{-1}$ at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV collected during 2011. Candidate events are selected in the dilepton topology with large missing transverse momentum and at least two jets. The angles θ$_1$ and θ$_2$ between the charged leptons and the direction of motion of the parent quarks in the $t\\bar{t}$ rest frame are sensitive to the spin information, and the distribution of cosθ$_1$ ∙ cosθ$_2$ is sensitive to the spin correlation between the t and $\\bar{t}$ quarks. The distribution is unfolded to parton level and compared to the next-to-leading order prediction. A good agreement is observed.

  4. Measurement of the correlation between the polar angles of leptons from top quark decays in the helicity basis at √s=7 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2016-01-13

    A measurement of the correlations between the polar angles of leptons from the decay of pair-produced t andmore » $$\\bar{t}$$ quarks in the helicity basis is reported, using proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of √s=7 TeV collected during 2011. Candidate events are selected in the dilepton topology with large missing transverse momentum and at least two jets. The angles θ1 and θ2 between the charged leptons and the direction of motion of the parent quarks in the t$$\\bar{t}$$ rest frame are sensitive to the spin information, and the distribution of cosθ1•cosθ2 is sensitive to the spin correlation between the t and $$\\bar{t}$$ quarks. The distribution is unfolded to parton level and compared to the next-to-leading order prediction. A good agreement is observed.« less

  5. Measurement of the correlation between the polar angles of leptons from top quark decays in the helicity basis at √{s }=7 T e V using the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; da Cunha Sargedas de Sousa, M. J.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Benedetti, A.; de Castro, S.; de Cecco, S.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de la Torre, H.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; di Ciaccio, A.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Domenico, A.; di Donato, C.; di Girolamo, A.; di Girolamo, B.; di Mattia, A.; di Micco, B.; di Nardo, R.; di Simone, A.; di Sipio, R.; di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; Do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Geng, C.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de La Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. 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C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reisin, H.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Ryzhov, A.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales de Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van den Wollenberg, W.; van der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A measurement of the correlations between the polar angles of leptons from the decay of pair-produced t and t ¯ quarks in the helicity basis is reported, using proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=7 TeV collected during 2011. Candidate events are selected in the dilepton topology with large missing transverse momentum and at least two jets. The angles θ1 and θ2 between the charged leptons and the direction of motion of the parent quarks in the t t ¯ rest frame are sensitive to the spin information, and the distribution of cos θ1.cos θ2 is sensitive to the spin correlation between the t and t ¯ quarks. The distribution is unfolded to parton level and compared to the next-to-leading order prediction. A good agreement is observed.

  6. EMC and polarized EMC effects in Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Cloet; Wolfgang Bentz; Anthony Thomas

    2006-05-23

    We determine nuclear structure functions and quark distributions for {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 15}N and {sup 27}Al. For the nucleon bound state we solve the covariant quark-diquark equations in a confining Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model, which yields excellent results for the free nucleon structure functions. The nucleus is described using a relativistic shell model, including mean scalar and vector fields that couple to the quarks in the nucleon. The nuclear structure functions are then obtained as a convolution of the structure function of the bound nucleon with the light-cone nucleon distributions. We find that we are readily able to reproduce the EMC effect in finite nuclei and confirm earlier nuclear matter studies that found a large polarized EMC effect.

  7. Spin-orbit-induced photoelectron spin polarization in angle-resolved photoemission from both atomic and condensed matter targets.

    PubMed

    Heinzmann, Ulrich; Dil, J Hugo

    2012-05-02

    The existence of highly spin polarized photoelectrons emitted from non-magnetic solids as well as from unpolarized atoms and molecules has been found to be very common in many studies over the past 40 years. This so-called Fano effect is based upon the influence of the spin-orbit interaction in the photoionization or the photoemission process. In a non-angle-resolved photoemission experiment, circularly polarized radiation has to be used to create spin polarized photoelectrons, while in angle-resolved photoemission even unpolarized or linearly polarized radiation is sufficient to get a high spin polarization. In past years the Rashba effect has become very important in the angle-resolved photoemission of solid surfaces, also with an observed high photoelectron spin polarization. It is the purpose of the present topical review to cross-compare the spin polarization experimentally found in angle-resolved photoelectron emission spectroscopy of condensed matter with that of free atoms, to compare it with the Rashba effect and topological insulators to describe the influence and the importance of the spin-orbit interaction and to show and disentangle the matrix element and phase shift effects therein.The relationship between the energy dispersion of these phase shifts and the emission delay of photoelectron emission in attosecond-resolved photoemission is also discussed. Furthermore the influence of chiral structures of the photo-effect target on the spin polarization, the interferences of different spin components in coherent superpositions in photoemission and a cross-comparison of spin polarization in photoemission from non-magnetic solids with XMCD on magnetic materials are presented; these are all based upon the influence of the spin-orbit interaction in angle-resolved photoemission.

  8. Top Quark Production Asymmetries AFBt and AFBl

    DOE PAGES

    Berger, Edmond L.; Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; ...

    2012-02-14

    A large forward-backward asymmetry is seen in both the top quark rapidity distribution AFBt and in the rapidity distribution of charged leptons AFBl from top quarks produced at the Tevatron. We study the kinematic and dynamic aspects of the relationship of the two observables arising from the spin correlation between the charged lepton and the top quark with different polarization states. We emphasize the value of both measurements, and we conclude that a new physics model which produces more right-handed than left-handed top quarks is favored by the present data.

  9. Physics of the Charm Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Elsa Fabiola

    2006-09-25

    This is a brief summary about the development of the charm quark physics in the area of experimental physics. The summary is centered in what is done by mexican physicists, particularly in the E791 and the FOCUS Experiment at FERMILAB. FOCUS (or E831) was designed to detect states of matter combining one or more charm quarks with light quarks (strange, up, down). The experiment created 10 times as many such particles as in previous experiments and investigated several topics on charm physics including high precision studies of charm semileptonic decays, studies of hadronic charm decays (branching ratios and Daltiz analyses), lifetime measurements of all charm particles, searches for mixing, CP/CPT violation, rare and forbidden decays, spectroscopy of excited charm mesons and baryons, charm production asymmetry measurements, light quark diffractive studies, QCD studies using charm pair events and searches for and upper limits on: charm pentaquarks, double charm baryons, DSJ(2632)

  10. Bag model and quark star

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hua; Luo Xinlian; Zong Hongshi

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, incorporating the property of the vacuum negative pressure, namely, the bag constant, we present a new model of the equation of state (EOS) of quark matter at finite chemical potential and zero temperature. By comparing our EOS with Fraga et al.'s EOS and SQM1 model, one finds that our EOS is softer than Fraga et al.'s EOS and SQM1 model. The reason for this difference is analyzed. With these results we investigate the structure of a quark star. A comparison between our model of the quark star and other models is made. The obtained mass of the quark star is 1.3{approx}1.66M{sub {center_dot}}and the radius is 9.5{approx}14 Km. One can see that our star's compactness is smaller than that of the other two models.

  11. Quarks and gluons in hadrons and nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Close, F.E. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN )

    1989-12-01

    These lectures discuss the particle-nuclear interface -- a general introduction to the ideas and application of colored quarks in nuclear physics, color, the Pauli principle, and spin flavor correlations -- this lecture shows how the magnetic moments of hadrons relate to the underlying color degree of freedom, and the proton's spin -- a quark model perspective. This lecture reviews recent excitement which has led some to claim that in deep inelastic polarized lepton scattering very little of the spin of a polarized proton is due to its quarks. This lecture discusses the distribution functions of quarks and gluons in nucleons and nuclei, and how knowledge of these is necessary before some quark-gluon plasma searches can be analyzed. 56 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Quarks and gluons in hadrons and nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Close, F.E. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN )

    1989-01-01

    These lectures discuss the particle-nuclear interface -- a general introduction to the ideas and application of colored quarks in nuclear physics, color, the Pauli principle, and spin flavor correlations -- this lecture shows how the magnetic moments of hadrons relate to the underlying color degree of freedom, and the proton's spin -- a quark model perspective. This lecture reviews recent excitement which has led some to claim that in deep inelastic polarized lepton scattering very little of the spin of a polarized proton is due to its quarks. 38 refs.

  13. Search for dark matter in association with a Higgs boson decaying to b-quarks in pp collisions at √{ s} = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M.-S.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelijn, R.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'amen, G.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duffield, E. M.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dumancic, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edwards, N. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Ennis, J. S.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farina, E. M.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisen, M.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Geng, C.; Gentile, S.; Gentsos, C.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghneimat, M.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuli, F.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, G.; Gonella, L.; Gongadze, A.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goudet, C. R.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gravila, P. M.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grevtsov, K.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groh, S.; Grohs, J. P.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guan, W.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Hadef, A.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hartmann, N. M.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J. J.; Heinrich, L.; Heinz, C.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Henkelmann, S.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hooberman, B. H.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Huo, P.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Ishijima, N.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ito, F.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jain, V.; Jakobi, K. B.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansky, R.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanneau, F.; Jeanty, L.; Jeng, G.-Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, H.; Jiang, Y.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Johnson, W. J.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, S.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Juste Rozas, A.; Köhler, M. K.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kaluza, A.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneti, S.; Kanjir, L.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kaplan, L. S.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karentzos, E.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kasahara, K.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. 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A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2017-02-01

    A search for dark matter pair production in association with a Higgs boson decaying to a pair of bottom quarks is presented, using 3.2 fb-1 of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The decay of the Higgs boson is reconstructed as a high-momentum b b bar system with either a pair of small-radius jets, or a single large-radius jet with substructure. The observed data are found to be consistent with the expected backgrounds. Results are interpreted using a simplified model with a Z‧ gauge boson mediating the interaction between dark matter and the Standard Model as well as a two-Higgs-doublet model containing an additional Z‧ boson which decays to a Standard Model Higgs boson and a new pseudoscalar Higgs boson, the latter decaying into a pair of dark matter particles.

  14. Nitrogen isotopic relationship between diatom-bound and bulk organic matter of cultured polar diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Matthew G.; Robinson, Rebecca S.; Rynearson, Tatiana A.; Sigman, Daniel M.

    2011-09-01

    Using batch cultures, the 15N/14N (hereafter δ15N) of diatom-bound organic matter was measured and compared to the δ15N of total diatom biomass during the progressive consumption of a nitrate pool in four polar diatom species (Fragilariopsis cylindrus, Fragilariopsis kerguelensis, Pseudo-nitzschia seriata, and Thalassiosira nordenskioeldii) and one temperate species (Thalassiosira aestivalis). In general, the δ15N of the dissolved nitrate in seawater was greater than that of the biomass, which was greater than that of the diatom-bound N. Rayleigh-type relationships were observed, allowing for estimation of the isotope effect (ɛ) for each species, with a range from 1.0‰ to 14.0‰ across all species. For all cultured strains, the δ15N values of the diatom-bound (δ15NDB) fraction was lower than those of the total diatom biomass (δ15Nbiomass). The isotopic offset between the biomass and diatom-bound N (δ15NDBoffset = δ15Nbiomass - δ15NDB) was relatively constant along the growth curve for each individual species but varied among species, with a range of 1.9‰-11.2‰. Weak relationships were determined when ɛ and the δ15NDBoffset were compared to cellular size and surface area:volume ratio. More significantly, with the exception of Pseudo-nitzschia seriata, a strong positive relationship was found between ɛ and δ15NDBoffset. While the culture data indicate a positive δ15NDBoffset across all studied diatom species, surface sediment data suggest a negative δ15NDBoffset for sedimentary assemblages. This indicates that either (1) the growth conditions of our cultures had some effect on δ15NDBoffset or (2) a low-δ15N component of the N that we measure as diatom frustule-bound is lost during early diagenesis. Given documented assemblage changes, our culture data for relevant species do not suggest that the higher δ15NDB observed in the Antarctic during ice ages can be explained by species related changes in the sedimentary bulk-to-diatom-bound isotopic

  15. Quark Matter 2011 (QM11) Quark Matter 2011 (QM11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    International Advisory Committee Antinori, FedericoPaic, Guy Braun-Munzinger, PeterPajares, Carlos Cifarelli, LuisaPeitzmann, Thomas Erazmus, BarbaraRedlich, Krzysztof Eskola, KariRiccati, Lodovico Gaardhøje, Jens JørgenRoland, Gunther Gale, CharlesRoy, Christelle Gelis, FrancoisSchukraft, Jürgen Giubellino, PaoloSinha, Bikash Greiner, CarstenSrivastava, Dinesh Gyulassy, MiklosStachel, Johanna Harris, JohnSteinberg, Peter Hatsuda, TetsuoStroth, Joachim Heinz, UlrichSugitate, Toru Jacak, BarbaraTserruya, Itzhak Karsch, FrithjofVelkovska, Julia Kharzeev, DimaWang, Enke Kodama, TakeshiWang, Xin, Nian Lévai, PéterWessels, Johannes Manko, VladislavXu, Nu Müller, BerndtZajc, William Ollitrault, Jean-Yves Organizing Committee Arleo, FrancoisDupieux, Pascal Bastid, NicoleFurget, Christophe Bourgeois, Marie-LaureGranier de Cassagnac, Raphael Bregant, MarcoGuernane, Rachid Carminati, FedericoHervet, Carnita Castillo, JavierKuhn, Christian Cheynis, BrigitteOlivier, Nathalie Conesa, DelValle, Zaida Connor, MichelleRenshall, Lucy Crochet, PhilippeSuire, Christophe Delagrange, HuguesTihinen, Ulla Program Committee Schutz, Yves (Chair)Baldisseri, Alberto Wiedemann, Urs (co-Chair)Safarik, Karel Aurenche, Patrick

  16. The effect of natural organic matter polarity and molecular weight on NDMA formation from two antibiotics containing dimethylamine functional groups.

    PubMed

    Leavey-Roback, Shannon L; Krasner, Stuart W; Suffet, Irwin H Mel

    2016-12-01

    N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is a disinfection byproduct preferentially formed in chloraminated water. NDMA may be formed from certain chemicals containing dimethylamine (DMA) functional groups. This reaction may be slowed by the presence of natural organic matter (NOM). In this study, NOM fractionated by size or polarity was tested for its ability to slow or impede the formation of NDMA from two DMA-containing precursors, the antibiotics tetracycline and spiramycin. The high molecular weight NOM fractions (>10KDa) were shown to be the most effective in reducing the amount of NDMA formed from the precursor chemicals. The filtrate of a C-18 non-polar cartridge was also effective at reducing NDMA formation from tetracycline (spyramycin not tested). Therefore, polar and charged NOM components may be responsible for the reduction in NDMA formation. A possible mechanism for the reduction of NDMA formation from tetracycline is complexation due to the hydrogen bonding of the DMA functional group on tetracycline to polar phenolic functional groups in the NOM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Quark Stars and Magnetic Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Martinez, A.; Perez Rojas, H.; Mosquera Cuesta, H. J.; Boligan, M.

    2005-09-28

    Quark matter is expected to exist in the interior of compact stellar objects as neutron stars or even the more exotic strange stars, based on the Bodmer-Witten conjecture. Bare strange quark stars and (normal) strange quark-matter stars, those possessing a baryon (electron) crust, are hypothesized as good candidates to explain the properties of a set of peculiar stellar sources as the enigmatic X-ray source RX J1856.5-3754, some pulsars as PSR B1828-11 and PSR B1642-03 (Xu 2003), and the anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma-ray repeaters (Zhang et al. 2000). In the MIT bag model, quarks are treated as a degenerate Fermi gas confined to a region of space having a vacuum energy density Bbag (the Bag constant). In this note, we modified the MIT Bag Model by including the electromagnetic interaction. We also show that this version of the MIT model implies the anisotropy of the Bag pressure due to the presence of the magnetic field. The equations of state of degenerate quarks gases are studied in the presence of ultra strong magnetic fields. The behavior of a system made-up of quarks having (or not) an anomalous magnetic moment is reviewed. A structural instability is found, which is related to the anisotropic nature of the pressures in this highly magnetized matter. The conditions for the collapse of this system are obtained and compared to a previous model of neutron stars build-up on a neutron gas having anomalous magnetic moment.

  18. Measurement of top quark polarization in tt¯ lepton+jets final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shkola, O.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2017-01-01

    We present a study of top quark polarization in $t \\overline{t}$ events produced in $p \\overline{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV. Data correspond to 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the D0 detector at the Tevatron. We use final states containing a lepton and at least three jets. The polarization is measured using the distribution of leptons along the beam and helicity axes, and the axis normal to the production plane. This is the first measurement of top quark polarization at the Tevatron in $\\ell$+jets final states, and first measurement of transverse polarization in $t \\overline{t}$ production. The observed distributions are consistent with the standard model.

  19. Collision between variably polarized plane gravitational wave and a shell of null matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinstein, Alexander; Senovilla, Josém. M.

    1989-06-01

    We construct a solution to the Einstein field equations which describes the collision between a variably polarized gravitational wave and a shell of null dust. Depending on the choice of the parameters the variably polarized wave can have an arbitrarily smooth wavefront. The shell of null dust is followed by a constantly polarized plane gravitational wave. Also Grupo de Física Teórica, Departamento de Física, Ingeniería y Radiología Médica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca, Spain.

  20. Vortons in dense quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedaque, Paulo F.; Berkowitz, Evan; Cherman, Aleksey

    2011-07-01

    At large baryon number density, it is likely that the ground state of QCD is a color-flavor-locked phase with a K0 condensate. The CFL+K0 phase is known to support superconducting vortex strings, and it has been previously suggested that it may also support vortons, which are superconducting vortex rings. We reexamine the question of the stability of vortons, taking into account electromagnetic effects, which make leading-order contributions to vorton dynamics but were not investigated in previous work. We find that current-carrying and electrically charged vortons can be stabilized either by their angular momentum, by Coulomb repulsion, or by a combination of both effects.

  1. The anomalous solid state decomposition of ammonium dinitramide: a matter of surface polarization.

    PubMed

    Rahm, Martin; Brinck, Tore

    2009-05-28

    Polarized dinitramide anions on the surface of solid ammonium dinitramide (ADN) have a decomposition barrier that is reduced by 16 kcal mol(-1) and explain the anomalous solid state decomposition of ADN.

  2. Probing Sea Quarks and Gluons: The Electron-Ion Collider Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Tanja

    2014-03-01

    The 21st century holds great promise for reaching a new era for unlocking the mysteries of the structure of the atomic nucleus and the nucleons inside it governed by the theory of strong interactions (QCD). In particular, much remains to be learned about the dynamical basis of the structure of hadrons and nuclei in terms of the fundamental quarks and gluons. One of the main goals of existing and nearly completed facilities is to map out the spin flavor structure of the nucleons in the valence region. A future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) would be the world's first polarized electron-proton collider, and the world's first e-A collider, and would seek the QCD foundation of nucleons and nuclei in terms of the sea quarks and gluons, matching to these valence quark studies. The EIC will provide a versatile range of kinematics and beam polarization, as well as beam species, to allow for mapping the spin and spatial structure of the quark sea and gluons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in atomic nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge.

  3. Can Stellar Mass Black Holes BE Quark Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Cheng, K. S.; Kovács, Zoltán

    We investigate the possibility that stellar mass black holes, with masses in the range of 3:8M⊙ and 6M⊙, respectively, could be in fact quark stars in the Color-Flavor-Locked (CFL) phase. Depending on the value of the gap parameter, rapidly rotating CFL quark stars can achieve much higher masses than standard neutron stars, thus making them possible stellar mass black hole candidates. Moreover, quark stars have a very low luminosity and a completely absorbing surface - the infalling matter on the surface of the quark star is converted into quark matter. A possibility of distinguishing CFL quark stars from stellar mass black holes could be through the study of thin accretion disks around rapidly rotating quark stars and Kerr type black holes, respectively. Strange stars exhibit a low luminosity, but high temperature bremsstrahlung spectrum, which, in combination with the emission properties of the accretion disk, may be the key signature to differentiate massive strange stars from black hole.

  4. The polarized EMC effect

    SciTech Connect

    W. Bentz; I. C. Cloet; A. W. Thomas

    2007-02-01

    We calculate both the spin independent and spin dependent nuclear structure functions in an effective quark theory. The nucleon is described as a composite quark-diquark state, and the nucleus is treated in the mean field approximation. We predict a sizable polarized EMC effect, which could be confirmed in future experiments.

  5. Calcium quarks.

    PubMed

    Niggli, Ernst; Egger, Marcel

    2002-05-01

    Elementary subcellular Ca2+ signals arising from the opening of single ion channels may offer the possibility to examine the stochastic behavior and the microscopic chemical reaction rates of these channel proteins in their natural environment. Such an analysis can yield detailed information about the molecular function that cannot be derived from recordings obtained from an ensemble of channels. In this review, we summarize experimental evidence suggesting that Ca2+ sparks, elementary Ca2+ signaling events of cardiac and skeletal muscle excitation contraction coupling, may be comprised of a number of smaller Ca2+ signaling events, the Ca2+ quarks.

  6. Cell polarity in fission yeast: a matter of confining, positioning, and switching growth zones.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Stephen M; Brunner, Damian

    2011-10-01

    The two key processes in growth polarisation are the generation of a confined region and the correct positioning of that region. Fission yeast has greatly contributed to the study of cell polarisation, particularly in the aspect of growth site positioning, which involves the interphase microtubule cytoskeleton. Here we review the mechanisms of growth polarity in vegetatively growing fission yeast cells. These seemingly simple cells show astonishingly complex growth polarity behaviour, including polarity switching and integrating multiple levels of control by the cell cycle machinery. We aim to extract and highlight the underlying concepts and discuss these in context of current understanding; showing how relevant proteins are networked to integrate the various machineries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Getting to the root of plant iron uptake and cell-cell transport: Polarity matters!

    PubMed

    Dubeaux, Guillaume; Zelazny, Enric; Vert, Grégory

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins play pivotal roles in mediating responses to endogenous and environmental cues. Regulation of membrane protein levels and establishment of polarity are fundamental for many cellular processes. In plants, IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER 1 (IRT1) is the major root iron transporter but is also responsible for the absorption of other divalent metals such as manganese, zinc and cobalt. We recently uncovered that IRT1 is polarly localized to the outer plasma membrane domain of plant root epidermal cells upon depletion of its secondary metal substrates. The endosome-recruited FYVE1 protein interacts with IRT1 in the endocytic pathway and plays a crucial role in the establishment of IRT1 polarity, likely through its recycling to the cell surface. Our work sheds light on the mechanisms of radial transport of nutrients across the different cell types of plant roots toward the vascular tissues and raises interesting parallel with iron transport in mammals.

  8. Generation of strong magnetic fields in hybrid and quark stars driven by the electroweak interaction of quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2017-01-01

    We study the generation of strong large scale magnetic fields in compact stars containing degenerate quark matter with unbroken chiral symmetry. The magnetic field growth is owing to the magnetic field instability driven by the electroweak interaction of quarks. In this system we predict the enhancement of the seed magnetic field 1012 G to the strengths (1014 - 1015) G. In our analysis we use the typical parameters of the quark matter in the core of a hybrid star or in a quark star. We also apply of the obtained results to model the generation of magnetic fields in magnetars.

  9. Ultracold Polar Molecules: New Phases of Matter for Quantum Information and Quantum Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Devil’s staircase” where Mott solids appear at rational fillings of the lattice.   Studied 1D  fermionic  and bosonic gases with repulsive power‐law...superfluid transition in single‐component  fermionic  gas in a trap with dipole  moments polarized in perpendicular layers, finding that many‐body effects...Zoller, Bilayer superfluidity of fermionic polar molecules: Many‐Body effects, Phys. Rev. A 83, 043602 (2011).  2012 Phase   1) N. Henkel, F. Cinti, P

  10. Cooking Up Hot Quark Soup

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Walsh, Karen McNulty

    2011-03-28

    Near-light-speed collisions of gold ions provide a recipe for in-depth explorations of matter and fundamental forces. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has produced the most massive antimatter nucleus ever discovered—and the first containing an anti-strange quark. The presence of strange antimatter makes this antinucleus the first to be entered below the plane of the classic Periodic Table of Elements, marking a new frontier in physics.

  11. Fluctuation Probes of Quark Deconfinement

    SciTech Connect

    Asakawa, Masayuki; Heinz, Ulrich; Mueller, Berndt

    2000-09-04

    The size of the average fluctuations of net baryon number and electric charge in a finite volume of hadronic matter differs widely between the confined and deconfined phases. These differences may be exploited as indicators of the formation of a quark-gluon plasma in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, because fluctuations created in the initial state survive until freeze-out due to the rapid expansion of the hot fireball. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  12. Comparison of two polarity measurements of hydrophobic organic matter for the evaluation of water treatment processes: XAD resin and PRAM.

    PubMed

    Philibert, Marc; Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando; Suffet, Mel

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a mixture of thousands of organic molecules wide-ranging in molecular weight, polarity and physicochemical properties. DOM is responsible for multiple water treatment issues such as trihalomethane (THM) formation potential and membrane fouling. Two methods of evaluating the polarity of DOM are being used for water treatment application: a serial XAD resin adsorption method at acid pH and the polarity rapid assessment method (PRAM) by parallel solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridges at natural pH. These two methods have been described by their authors as able to define a hydrophobic fraction though they do so by sorption onto different types of material at different pHs. The first part of this study compared the PRAM and XAD methods and showed that the hydrophobic fractions defined by the two approaches were not correlated. This result highlighted the difficulties in defining fractions as 'hydrophobic material'. It appeared that the sorbents for XAD-8 (an acrylic polymer containing oxygen) at pH <3 and C-18 (a pure hydrocarbon polymer coating on silica particles) at neutral or pH <3 did not retain similar hydrophobic fractions. This hypothesis was verified by fluorescence spectroscopy of the effluent of the XAD-8 resin and PRAM C-18 SPE cartridge. Finally the study concentrated on the use of fluorescence and ultrafiltration methods in series with PRAM to gain more insight into the structure and characteristics of the hydrophobic DOM present in drinking water sources. This evaluation showed that the smaller molecular weight fraction of DOM (<1 kDa) had a higher percentage of hydrophobic character and that the fluorescence-defined aromatic protein fraction was the most hydrophilic.

  13. The impact of emotion intensity on recognition memory: Valence polarity matters.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianxin; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Wenwen; Ding, XinSheng; Li, Hong; Yang, Jiemin; Yuan, JiaJin

    2017-06-01

    Although the effects of emotion of different emotional intensity on memory have been investigated, it remain unclear whether the influence of emotional intensity on memory varies depending on the stimulus valence polarity (i.e., positive or negative). To address this, event-related potentials were recorded when subjects performed a continuous old/new discrimination task, for highly negative (HN), mildly negative (MN) and neutral pictures in the negative session; and for highly positive (HP), mildly positive (MP) and neutral pictures in the positive session. The results showed that relative to neutral stimuli, both HN and MN stimuli showed increased memory discrimination scores, and enhanced old/new effect in early FN400 (Frontal Negativity), but not late positive component (LPC) amplitudes. By contrast, relative to MP stimuli, HP and neutral stimuli showed increased memory discrimination scores and enhanced old/new effect in LPC but not FN400 amplitudes. Additionally, we observed a significant positive correlation between the memory discrimination score and the old/new effect in the amplitudes of the FN400 and LPC, respectively. These results indicate that both HN and MN stimuli were remembered better than neutral stimuli; whereas the recognition was worse for MP stimuli than Neutral and HP stimuli. In conclusion, in the present study, we observed that the effect of emotion intensity on memory depends on the stimulus valence polarity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Search for dark matter produced in association with a Higgs boson decaying to two bottom quarks in pp collisions at s=8  TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2016-04-18

    This study reports on a search for dark matter pair production in association with a Higgs boson decaying to a pair of bottom quarks, using data from 20.3 fb–1 of pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The decay of the Higgs boson is reconstructed as a high-momentum bb¯ system with either a pair of small-radius jets, or a single large-radius jet with substructure. The observed data are found to be consistent with the expected Standard Model backgrounds. Model-independent upper limits are placed on the visible cross sections for eventsmore » with a Higgs boson decaying into bb¯ and large missing transverse momentum with thresholds ranging from 150 to 400 GeV. Results are interpreted using a simplified model with a Z' gauge boson decaying into different Higgs bosons predicted in a two-Higgs-doublet model, of which the heavy pseudoscalar Higgs decays into a pair of dark matter particles. Exclusion limits are also presented for the mass scales of various effective field theory operators that describe the interaction between dark matter particles and the Higgs boson.« less

  15. Search for dark matter in association with a Higgs boson decaying to b-quarks in pp collisions at s=13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2016-11-24

    A search for dark matter pair production in association with a Higgs boson decaying to a pair of bottom quarks is presented, using 3.2 fb-1 of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The decay of the Higgs boson is reconstructed as a high-momentummore » $$b\\bar{b}$$ system with either a pair of small-radius jets, or a single large-radius jet with substructure. The observed data are found to be consistent with the expected backgrounds. Results are interpreted using a simplified model with a Z' gauge boson mediating the interaction between dark matter and the Standard Model as well as a two-Higgs-doublet model containing an additional Z' boson which decays to a Standard Model Higgs boson and a new pseudoscalar Higgs boson, the latter decaying into a pair of dark matter particles.« less

  16. Search for dark matter produced in association with a Higgs boson decaying to two bottom quarks in p p collisions at √{s }=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.

    2016-04-01

    This article reports on a search for dark matter pair production in association with a Higgs boson decaying to a pair of bottom quarks, using data from 20.3 fb-1 of p p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The decay of the Higgs boson is reconstructed as a high-momentum b b ¯ system with either a pair of small-radius jets, or a single large-radius jet with substructure. The observed data are found to be consistent with the expected Standard Model backgrounds. Model-independent upper limits are placed on the visible cross sections for events with a Higgs boson decaying into b b ¯ and large missing transverse momentum with thresholds ranging from 150 to 400 GeV. Results are interpreted using a simplified model with a Z' gauge boson decaying into different Higgs bosons predicted in a two-Higgs-doublet model, of which the heavy pseudoscalar Higgs decays into a pair of dark matter particles. Exclusion limits are also presented for the mass scales of various effective field theory operators that describe the interaction between dark matter particles and the Higgs boson.

  17. Production and decay of heavy top quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.P.

    1989-08-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that the top quark exists and has a mass between 50 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}. The decays of a top quark with a mass in this range are studied with emphasis placed on the mass region near the threshold for production of real W bosons. Topics discussed are: (1) possible enhancement of strange quark production when M{sub W} + m{sub s} < m{sub t} < M{sub W} + m{sub b}; (2) exclusive decays of T mesons to B and B{asterisk} mesons using the non-relativistic quark model; (3) polarization of intermediate W's in top quark decay as a source of information on the top quark mass. The production of heavy top quarks in an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider with a center-of-mass energy of 2 TeV is studied. The effective-boson approximation for photons, Z{sup 0}'s and W's is reviewed and an analogous approximation for interfaces between photons and Z{sup 0}'s is developed. The cross sections for top quark pair production from photon-photon, photon-Z{sup 0}, Z{sup 0}Z{sup 0}, and W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} fusion are calculated using the effective-boson approximation. Production of top quarks along with anti-bottom quarks via {gamma}W{sup +} and Z{sup 0}W{sup +} fusion is studied. An exact calculation of {gamma}e{sup +} {yields} {bar {nu}}t{bar b} is made and compared with the effective-W approximation. 31 refs., 46 figs.

  18. Heavy quark interactions and quarkonium binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satz, Helmut

    2009-06-01

    We consider heavy quark interactions in quenched and unquenched lattice QCD. In a region just above the deconfinement point, non-Abelian gluon polarization leads to a strong increase in the binding. Comparing quark-antiquark and quark-quark interaction, the dependence of the binding on the separation distance r is found to be the same for the colorless singlet Q{\\skew3\\bar{Q}} and the colored anti-triplet QQ state. In a potential model description of in-medium J/ψ behavior, this enhancement of the binding leads to a survival up to temperatures of 1.5 Tc or higher; it could also result in J/ψ flow. Based on joint work with O Kaczmarek and F Karsch.

  19. Dynamic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohner, Jack

    2003-05-01

    First postulate: Following the Big Bang, quarks, born from zero point mass, did not acquire a constant size. They are growing. Atomic distances remain relative to increasing quark diameter resulting in molecular density remaining constant. Current rate of quark growth results in an increase of Earth radius of approximately 2.8 cm/year. The perpetual growth is sustained by the conversion of space to matter. The equality of space to matter is algebraically derived from Newton's law of gravity. There results an inward flow of space at each quark. This creates a vector field of space flowing inward at the Earth. Next postulate: Einstein space curvature is actually inward flow of space. Although this appears as an ether theory, it does not conflict with relativity. The combined vector fields of all stars in the universe create a scalar field equal to C. Inward velocity of space at the surface of the Earth is calculated at 1.46 cm/sec. This is derived from space curvature formula from relativity. This value accelerates toward the nucleus of each atom until it terminates at C at the diameter of a quark. These two predictions of the velocity C demonstrate why it is the universal constant. This work predicts the gravitational constant from a derivation based on C. Several unifying aspects emerge including; equivalence principle, 5 dimensions, time, strong nuclear force, decreasing rotational velocity of Earth, dark matter, red shift and quantum mechanics. This theory is an extension of Einstein and Newton.

  20. Recent Results on Top-Quark Physics at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, Kenneth

    2015-10-23

    We present the most recent measurements on top-quark physics obtained with Tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ collisions recorded by the D0 experiment at $\\sqrt{s}= 1.96$ TeV. The full Run II data set of 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ is analyzed. Both lepton+jets and dilepton channels of top-quark pair production are used to measure the differential and inclusive cross sections, the forward-backward asymmetries, the top-quark mass, the spin correlations, and the top-quark polarization.

  1. Measurement of the helicity of W bosons in top quark decays

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, David Jerome

    2000-01-01

    This thesis describes a measurement o f the decay properties of the top quark. The six quarks are fundamental building blocks matter in the universe. The most common quarks, named up and down, combine to form the protons and neutrons which exist at the nucleus of all atoms.

  2. The parton distributions in nuclei and in polarized nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Close, F.E.

    1988-01-01

    The emerging information was reviewed on the way quark and anti-quark, and gluon distributions are modified in nuclei relative to free nucleons. Some implications of the recent data on polarized leptoproduction are discussed. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Cold-nuclear-matter effects on heavy-quark production at forward and backward rapidity in d + Au collisions at √sNN = 200  GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Ta'ani, H; Alexander, J; Andrews, K R; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Appelt, E; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Ben-Benjamin, J; Bennett, R; Bhom, J H; Blau, D S; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Broxmeyer, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Castera, P; Chen, C-H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Conesa Del Valle, Z; Connors, M; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gal, C; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Gustafsson, H-Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Harper, C; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; John, D; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kamin, J; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D J; Kim, E-J; Kim, Y-J; Kim, Y K; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotov, D; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Linden Levy, L A; Liška, T; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mitchell, J T; Miyachi, Y; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Motschwiller, S; Moukhanova, T V; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, B H; Park, I H; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Qu, H; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sarsour, M; Sato, T; Savastio, M; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shim, H H; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Sodre, T; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sun, J; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Takahara, A; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Taneja, S; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tennant, E; Themann, H; Thomas, D; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Tomášek, M; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Utsunomiya, K; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Virius, M; Vossen, A; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, Y S; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Yoo, J S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zelenski, A; Zhou, S

    2014-06-27

    The PHENIX experiment has measured open heavy-flavor production via semileptonic decay over the transverse momentum range 1 < p(T) < 6  GeV/c at forward and backward rapidity (1.4 < |y| < 2.0) in d+Au and p + p collisions at √sNN = 200  GeV. In central d+Au collisions, relative to the yield in p + p collisions scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions, a suppression is observed at forward rapidity (in the d-going direction) and an enhancement at backward rapidity (in the Au-going direction). Predictions using nuclear-modified-parton-distribution functions, even with additional nuclear-p(T) broadening, cannot simultaneously reproduce the data at both rapidity ranges, which implies that these models are incomplete and suggests the possible importance of final-state interactions in the asymmetric d + Au collision system. These results can be used to probe cold-nuclear-matter effects, which may significantly affect heavy-quark production, in addition to helping constrain the magnitude of charmonia-breakup effects in nuclear matter.

  4. The Unquenched Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Santopinto, E.; Bijker, R.

    2008-10-13

    We present a new generation of unquenched quark models for baryons in which the effects of quark-antiquark pairs are taken into account in an explicit form via a microscopic, QCD-inspired, pair creation mechanism. As an application, we study the effect of quark-antiquark pairs on the spin of the proton.

  5. Observability of quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1985-12-01

    Even if stable hadrons with fractional charge do not exist, most of the criteria of observability used for ordinary elementary particles apply in principle to quarks as well. This is especially true in a simplified world containing only hadrons made of top quarks and gluons. In the real world containing light quarks, essential complications do occur, but most of the conclusions survive.

  6. Characterizing the compositional variation of dissolved organic matter over hydrophobicity and polarity using fluorescence spectra combined with principal component analysis and two-dimensional correlation technique.

    PubMed

    Su, Ben-Sheng; Qu, Zhen; He, Xiao-Song; Song, Ying-Hao; Jia, Li-Min

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) obtained from three leachates with different landfill ages was fractionated, and its compositional variation based on hydrophobicity and polarity was characterized by synchronous fluorescence spectra combined with principal component analysis (PCA) and two-dimensional correlation technique. The results showed that the bulk DOM and its fractions were comprised of tryosine-, tryptophan-, fulvic-, and humic-like substances. Tyrosine-like matter was dominant in the young leachate DOM and its fractions, while tryptophan-, fulvic-, and humic-like substances were the main components in the intermediate and old leachate DOMs and their fractions. Tryosine-, tryptophan-, fulvic-, and humic-like substances varied concurrently with the hydrophobicity and polarity. However, the change ratio of these substances was different for the three leachates. Tyrosine-like matter, humic-like materials, and fulvic-like substances were the most sensitive to the hydrophobicity and polarity in the young, intermediate, and old leachates, respectively. Such an integrated approach jointly enhances the characterization of the hydrophobicity- and polarity-dependent DOM fractions and provides a promising way to elucidate the environmental behaviors of different DOM species.

  7. Anisotropic structure equations in magnetized quark stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manreza Paret, D.; Horvath, J. E.; Perez Martinez, A.

    2015-11-01

    It is well-known that a magnetic field in a fermion system breaks the SO(3) symmetry, giving rise to an anisotropy in the energy-momentum tensor and consequently in the equation of state (EoS). Thus, the stellar structure equations of magnetized quark stars (QS) demand to be derived from a more appropriate cylindrical metric. In this work we obtain these equations considering the magnetized quark matter in two phases: Magnetized Strange Quark Matter (MSQM) and Magnetized Color Flavor Locked Phase (MCFL). The main outcome of our work is the value of the maximum magnetic field that an star can hold, i.e. 1018 G. This upper bound is closely related to the violation of the virial relations and also with the instability associated with parity-violation weak processes during the collapse of supernovae.

  8. Nanofiltration and Tight Ultrafiltration Membranes for Natural Organic Matter Removal—Contribution of Fouling and Concentration Polarization to Filtration Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Joerg; Bérubé, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Nanofiltration (NF) and tight ultrafiltration (tight UF) membranes are a viable treatment option for high quality drinking water production from sources with high concentrations of contaminants. To date, there is limited knowledge regarding the contribution of concentration polarization (CP) and fouling to the increase in resistance during filtration of natural organic matter (NOM) with NF and tight UF. Filtration tests were conducted with NF and tight UF membranes with molecular weight cut offs (MWCOs) of 300, 2000 and 8000 Da, and model raw waters containing different constituents of NOM. When filtering model raw waters containing high concentrations of polysaccharides (i.e., higher molecular weight NOM), the increase in resistance was dominated by fouling. When filtering model raw waters containing humic substances (i.e., lower molecular weight NOM), the increase in filtration resistance was dominated by CP. The results indicate that low MWCO membranes are better suited for NOM removal, because most of the NOM in surface waters consist mainly of humic substances, which were only effectively rejected by the lower MWCO membranes. However, when humic substances are effectively rejected, CP can become extensive, leading to a significant increase in filtration resistance by the formation of a cake/gel layer at the membrane surface. For this reason, cross-flow operation, which reduces CP, is recommended. PMID:28671604

  9. Magnetic moments of JP=3/2+ decuplet baryons using effective quark masses in a chiral constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girdhar, Aarti; Dahiya, Harleen; Randhawa, Monika

    2015-08-01

    The magnetic moments of JP=3/2+ decuplet baryons have been calculated in the chiral constituent quark model (χ CQM ) with explicit results for the contribution coming from the valence quark polarizations, sea quark polarizations, and their orbital angular momentum. Since the JP=3/2+ decuplet baryons have short lifetimes, the experimental information about them is limited. The χ CQM has important implications for chiral symmetry breaking as well as SU(3) symmetry breaking since it works in the region between the QCD confinement scale and the chiral symmetry breaking scale. The predictions in the model not only give a satisfactory fit when compared with the experimental data but also show improvement over the other models. The effect of the confinement on quark masses has also been discussed in detail and the results of χ CQM are found to improve further with the inclusion of effective quark masses.

  10. HDAC inhibition prevents white matter injury by modulating microglia/macrophage polarization through the GSK3β/PTEN/Akt axis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guohua; Shi, Yejie; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Leak, Rehana K.; Hu, Xiaoming; Wu, Yun; Pu, Hongjian; Li, Wei-Wei; Tang, Bo; Wang, Yun; Gao, Yanqin; Zheng, Ping; Bennett, Michael V. L.; Chen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) elicits destruction of both gray and white matter, which is exacerbated by secondary proinflammatory responses. Although white matter injury (WMI) is strongly correlated with poor neurological status, the maintenance of white matter integrity is poorly understood, and no current therapies protect both gray and white matter. One candidate approach that may fulfill this role is inhibition of class I/II histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here we demonstrate that the HDAC inhibitor Scriptaid protects white matter up to 35 d after TBI, as shown by reductions in abnormally dephosphorylated neurofilament protein, increases in myelin basic protein, anatomic preservation of myelinated axons, and improved nerve conduction. Furthermore, Scriptaid shifted microglia/macrophage polarization toward the protective M2 phenotype and mitigated inflammation. In primary cocultures of microglia and oligodendrocytes, Scriptaid increased expression of microglial glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β), which phosphorylated and inactivated phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), thereby enhancing phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K)/Akt signaling and polarizing microglia toward M2. The increase in GSK3β in microglia and their phenotypic switch to M2 was associated with increased preservation of neighboring oligodendrocytes. These findings are consistent with recent findings that microglial phenotypic switching modulates white matter repair and axonal remyelination and highlight a previously unexplored role for HDAC activity in this process. Furthermore, the functions of GSK3β may be more subtle than previously thought, in that GSK3β can modulate microglial functions via the PTEN/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and preserve white matter homeostasis. Thus, inhibition of HDACs in microglia is a potential future therapy in TBI and other neurological conditions with white matter destruction. PMID:25691750

  11. UV-screening Organic Matter (CDOM and MAA) as indicators for monitoring changes of the polar marine ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PARK, M. O.; Kang, S. H.; Ha, S. Y.

    2014-12-01

    At Kongsfjorden bay, DOC, CDOM, FDOM, composition of phytoplankton and MAAs were measured from seawater. The relationship between CDOM, DOC vs Chl a was also investigated. DOC of seawater in 2010 and 2011 was increased 68% and 34% respectively in average compared to DOC in 2009. CDOM was in the range of acdom(375): 0.1855 m-1 ~ 0.0965 m-1, and it showed clear decreasing gradient form inside bay to offshore. CDOM vs DOC and Chl a was inversely related in the study area. Biomass of phytoplankton during 2009~2011 was 0.43~ 0.76 mg/m3 and little change was observed, but the composition and dominant classes have changed. Phaeocystis sp. was rare and diatom and cryptophyte were dominant in the center of bay and coastal area, respectively. 5 different MAAs, shinorine, palythine, mycosporine-glycine, porphyra-334, asterine-330 are identified and separated from Arctic phytoplanktons by HPLC and an unknown MAA was identified from Phaeocystis pouchetti. The spatial distribution pattern of MAAs in the study area was similar with the distribution of Phaeocystis sp. in 2009. The concentration of MAA in 2011 was decreased upto 50% with maximum concentration and seems to related with very low abundance of Phaeocystis sp. in the bay. The results from UV B exposure experiment with Phaeocystis pouchetti. and Porosira glacialis revealed clear discrepancy in the response to carbon uptake rate and photo-inhibition, and also the organic matter from these phytoplankton showed a different photo reactivity. Porosira glacialis, larger than Phaeocystis pouchetti. was more resistant to harmful UV B effect and result of carbon uptake rate using 13C support this tendency. In case Phaeocystis pouchetti becomes the dominant species, it is likely CDOM will be easily degraded and the UV screening effect of seawater will be reduced. acdom(375) 0.14m-1in spring in the arctic was higher than 0.11m-1 in the antarctic at monitoring station. These 3 year monitoring in the arctic Kongsfjorden showed a

  12. Global Λ hyperon polarization in nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alekseev, I.; Anderson, D. M.; Aoyama, R.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Behera, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Brown, D.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; de La Barca Sánchez, M. Calderón; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chankova-Bunzarova, N.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; de Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Elsey, N.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Esumi, S.; Evdokimov, O.; Ewigleben, J.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Federicova, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Harlenderova, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, P.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jowzaee, S.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Kocmanek, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulathunga, N.; Kumar, L.; Kvapil, J.; Kwasizur, J. H.; Lacey, R.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Lidrych, J.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, H.; Liu, P.; Liu, Y.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Mallick, D.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nie, M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Nonaka, T.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Rehbein, M. J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roth, J. D.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Saur, M.; Schambach, J.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Schweid, B. R.; Seger, J.; Sergeeva, M.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sugiura, T.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Z.; Zyzak, M.

    2017-08-01

    The extreme energy densities generated by ultra-relativistic collisions between heavy atomic nuclei produce a state of matter that behaves surprisingly like a fluid, with exceptionally high temperature and low viscosity. Non-central collisions have angular momenta of the order of 1,000ћ, and the resulting fluid may have a strong vortical structure that must be understood to describe the fluid properly. The vortical structure is also of particular interest because the restoration of fundamental symmetries of quantum chromodynamics is expected to produce novel physical effects in the presence of strong vorticity. However, no experimental indications of fluid vorticity in heavy ion collisions have yet been found. Since vorticity represents a local rotational structure of the fluid, spin-orbit coupling can lead to preferential orientation of particle spins along the direction of rotation. Here we present measurements of an alignment between the global angular momentum of a non-central collision and the spin of emitted particles (in this case the collision occurs between gold nuclei and produces Λ baryons), revealing that the fluid produced in heavy ion collisions is the most vortical system so far observed. (At high energies, this fluid is a quark-gluon plasma.) We find that Λ and hyperons show a positive polarization of the order of a few per cent, consistent with some hydrodynamic predictions. (A hyperon is a particle composed of three quarks, at least one of which is a strange quark; the remainder are up and down quarks, found in protons and neutrons.) A previous measurement that reported a null result, that is, zero polarization, at higher collision energies is seen to be consistent with the trend of our observations, though with larger statistical uncertainties. These data provide experimental access to the vortical structure of the nearly ideal liquid created in a heavy ion collision and should prove valuable in the development of hydrodynamic models that

  13. Ultra-Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions And The Quark-Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Baym, Gordon

    1986-11-06

    The expected form of nuclear matter under extreme conditions of temperature or baryon density is a quark-gluon plasma. The basic physics of such a plasma and the transition from hadronic to deconfined matter are reviewed.

  14. Hot Neutron Stars with Hadron-Quark Crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kota; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Takatsuka, Tatsuyuki

    2016-12-01

    The effects of the hadron-quark crossover on the bulk properties of cold and hot neutron stars (NSs) are studied. We suggested a new phenomenological equation of state (EOS), which interpolates the two phases at around 3 times the nuclear matter density (ρ0), and found that the cold NSs with the gravitational mass larger than 2M⊙ can be sustained. This is in sharp contrast to the case of the first-order hadron-quark transition where the quark matter inevitably leads to soft EOS. The interpolated EOS is also generalized to the supernova matter at finite temperature to describe the hot NSs at birth. The hadron-quark crossover is found to decrease the central temperature of the hot NSs under isentropic condition due to the color degrees of freedom.

  15. Top quark physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadov, A.; Azuelos, G.; Bauer, U.; Belyaev, A.; Berger, E. L.; Sullivan, Z.; Tait, T. M. P.

    2000-03-24

    The top quark, when it was finally discovered at Fermilab in 1995 completed the three-generation structure of the Standard Model (SM) and opened up the new field of top quark physics. Viewed as just another SM quark, the top quark appears to be a rather uninteresting species. Produced predominantly, in hadron-hadron collisions, through strong interactions, it decays rapidly without forming hadrons, and almost exclusively through the single mode t {r_arrow} Wb. The relevant CKM coupling V{sub tb} is already determined by the (three-generation) unitarity of the CKM matrix. Rare decays and CP violation are unmeasurable small in the SM. Yet the top quark is distinguished by its large mass, about 35 times larger than the mass of the next heavy quark, and intriguingly close to the scale of electroweak (EW) symmetry breaking. This unique property raises a number of interesting questions. Is the top quark mass generated by the Higgs mechanism as the SM predicts and is its mass related to the top-Higgs-Yukawa coupling? Or does it play an even more fundamental role in the EW symmetry breaking mechanism? If there are new particles lighter than the top quark, does the top quark decay into them? Could non-SM physics first manifest itself in non-standard couplings of the top quark which show up as anomalies in top quark production and decays? Top quark physics tries to answer these questions. Several properties of the top quark have already been examined at the Tevatron. These include studies of the kinematical properties of top production, the measurements of the top mass, of the top production cross-section, the reconstruction of t{bar t}pairs in the fully hadronic final states, the study of {tau} decays of the top quark, the reconstruction of hadronic decays of the W boson from top decays, the search for flavor changing neutral current decays, the measurement of the W helicity in top decays, and bounds on t{bar t} spin correlations. Most of these measurements are limited by

  16. Heavy quark masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Testa, Massimo

    1990-01-01

    In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

  17. Quark Deconfinement in Rotating Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellinger, Richard; Weber, Fridolin; Spinella, William; Contrera, Gustavo; Orsaria, Milva

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we use a three flavor non-local Nambu--Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model, an~improved effective model of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) at low energies, to investigate the existence of deconfined quarks in the cores of neutron stars. Particular emphasis is put on the possible existence of quark matter in the cores of rotating neutron stars (pulsars). In contrast to non-rotating neutron stars, whose particle compositions do not change with time (are frozen in), the type and structure of the matter in the cores of rotating neutron stars depends on the spin frequencies of these stars, which opens up a possible new window on the nature of matter deep in the cores of neutron stars. Our study shows that, depending on mass and rotational frequency, up to around 8% of the mass of a massive neutron star may be in the mixed quark-hadron phase, if the phase transition is treated as a Gibbs transition. We also find that the gravitational mass at which quark deconfinement occurs in rotating neutron stars varies quadratically with spin frequency, which can be fitted by a simple formula.

  18. Polarizing matter and antimatter: A new method. The study of a repetitive Stern-Gerlach on stored polarized protons and the spin-splitter experiment: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Onel, Y.

    1992-02-01

    Several years ago a self-polarization effect for stored (anti)- protons and ions was investigated theoretically. The effect is based on the well-known Stern-Gerlach effect in gradient fields. The aim of the ongoing measurements at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) is to verify experimentally the various assumptions on which this effect is based. The final goal is to demonstrate this new polarization effect. The proposed effect could be a powerful tool to produce polarized stored hadron beams both in the low-energy range and at SSC and LHC energies. In this progress report we will describe our progress in three parts: (A) Experimental work at IUCF Cooler Ring; (B) Our extensive computer simulations of the spin stability for the IUCF Cooler Ring; and (C) Theoretical studies.

  19. Heavy quark production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    M. Bishai

    2002-12-13

    Heavy quark production cross-sections, correlations and polarizations have been measured at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) using 118 pb{sup -1} of data collected from the 1992 to 1995 Run I of the Fermilab Tevatron. There is still disagreement between theoretical predictions of bottom and charm hadro-production cross-sections and the Run I results. The observed transverse momentum spectrum of the prompt J/{psi} production polarization is still not understood. Run II of the Tevatron began in July of 2001 and the CDF Run II detector [11] has collected 70 pb{sup -1} of physics quality data since January 2002. Large statistics of onia states have been collected. Exclusive B meson decay modes have been reconstructed and the SVT level 2 displaced track trigger has produced large samples of D mesons. The prompt charm and b {yields} cX fractions in both charmonium and D meson samples have been measured. Run II is now poised to greatly enhance the knowledge of heavy quark production dynamics well beyond the reach of the Run I detector.

  20. The Quark - A Decade Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dakin, James T.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews theoretical principles underlying the quark model. Indicates that the agreement with experimental results and the understanding of the quark-quark force are two hurdles for the model to survive in the future. (CC)

  1. The Quark - A Decade Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dakin, James T.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews theoretical principles underlying the quark model. Indicates that the agreement with experimental results and the understanding of the quark-quark force are two hurdles for the model to survive in the future. (CC)

  2. Spin-dependent quark beam function at NNLO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boughezal, Radja; Petriello, Frank; Schubert, Ulrich; Xing, Hongxi

    2017-08-01

    We calculate the beam function for longitudinally polarized quarks through next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD perturbation theory. This is the last missing ingredient needed to apply the factorization theorem for the N -jettiness event-shape variable in a variety of polarized collisions through the NNLO level. We present all technical details of our derivation. As a by-product of our calculation we provide the first independent check of the previously obtained unpolarized quark beam function. We anticipate that our result will have phenomenological applications in describing data from polarized collisions.

  3. Effects of strong interaction on the structure of color-flavor-locked quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, J. C. T.; Rodrigues, H.; Duarte, S. B.

    2008-12-15

    The static spherically symmetric quark star structure is calculated by using an equation of state which takes into account the superconducting color-flavor locked phase of the strange quark matter. Some fundamental aspects of QCD (asymptotic freedom and confinement) are considered by means of a phenomenological description of the deconfined quark phase, namely, the density-dependent quark mass model. The effects from the strong interaction described by these models can affect the equation of state of the quark matter substantially. In this work we discuss the influence of these effects on the conventional mass-radius relationship of quark stars. Massive quark stars are found due to the stiffness of the equation of state at low densities, when reasonable values of the superconducting gap, taken as a free parameter, are used.

  4. Using the Moon As A Low-Noise Seismic Detector For Strange Quark Nuggets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerdt, W. Bruce; Chui, Talso; Griggs, Cornelius E.; Herrin, Eugene T.; Nakamura, Yosio; Paik, Ho Jung; Penanen, Konstantin; Rosenbaum, Doris; Teplitz, Vigdor L.; Young, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Strange quark matter made of up, down and strange quarks has been postulated by Witten [1]. Strange quark matter would be nearly charge neutral and would have density of nuclear matter (10(exp 14) gm/cu cm). Witten also suggested that nuggets of strange quark matter, or strange quark nuggets (SQNs), could have formed shortly after the Big Bang, and that they would be viable candidates for cold dark matter. As suggested by de Rujula and Glashow [2], an SQN may pass through a celestial body releasing detectable seismic energy along a straight line. The Moon, being much quieter seismically than the Earth, would be a favorable place to search for such events. We review previous searches for SQNs to illustrate the parameter space explored by using the Moon as a low-noise detector of SQNs. We also discuss possible detection schemes using a single seismometer, and using an International Lunar Seismic Network.

  5. Using the Moon As A Low-Noise Seismic Detector For Strange Quark Nuggets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerdt, W. Bruce; Chui, Talso; Griggs, Cornelius E.; Herrin, Eugene T.; Nakamura, Yosio; Paik, Ho Jung; Penanen, Konstantin; Rosenbaum, Doris; Teplitz, Vigdor L.; Young, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Strange quark matter made of up, down and strange quarks has been postulated by Witten [1]. Strange quark matter would be nearly charge neutral and would have density of nuclear matter (10(exp 14) gm/cu cm). Witten also suggested that nuggets of strange quark matter, or strange quark nuggets (SQNs), could have formed shortly after the Big Bang, and that they would be viable candidates for cold dark matter. As suggested by de Rujula and Glashow [2], an SQN may pass through a celestial body releasing detectable seismic energy along a straight line. The Moon, being much quieter seismically than the Earth, would be a favorable place to search for such events. We review previous searches for SQNs to illustrate the parameter space explored by using the Moon as a low-noise detector of SQNs. We also discuss possible detection schemes using a single seismometer, and using an International Lunar Seismic Network.

  6. Lambda Polarization in Lead-Lead Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillings, Eelco

    2003-05-01

    In this thesis the production and polarization of Lambda particles produced in Pb-Pb collisions at a beam energy of 158 GeV/c per nucleon are studied. In these collisions nuclear matter is compressed and heated and under these conditions it is possible that a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is created. In a QGP the boundaries between individual particles disappear and the quarks and gluons can move around freely. One of the probes to study the creation of the QGP is the so-called Strangeness Enhancement, which is the enhanced production of strange particles, with respect to the production in proton-induced collisions. Another proposed signature of the QGP is the disappearance of transverse Lambda polarization around mid-rapidity. Transverse Lambda polarization can occur when the spin of the produced Lambda has its preferred direction perpendicular to the production plane. In proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions a negative transverse polarization has been observed and its magnitude was largest for the Lambdas produced in the direction of the beam (i.e. at high xF). This is an indication that the projectile plays an important role and in semi-classical models the following picture is assumed: in the interaction region a spin-zero ud-diquark from the projectile recombines with a negatively polarized s-quark from the sea. This s-quark also gives transverse momentum (pT) to the Lambda and as a result the polarization is dependent on pT. Recently it has been shown that also in nucleus-nucleus collisions a negative transverse polarization occurs, so even in large interaction regions the information on the nature of the projectile is kept. In a QGP however this information is lost and no production plane can be defined. This will cause the transverse polarization of the Lambdas produced in this region to disappear. The transverse polarization of the produced Lambdas has been measured in the NA57 experiment at CERN around two values of xF: for xF = 0.09 a value of +0.6 +7

  7. HUNTING THE QUARK GLUON PLASMA.

    SciTech Connect

    LUDLAM, T.; ARONSON, S.

    2005-04-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) construction project was completed at BNL in 1999, with the first data-taking runs in the summer of 2000. Since then the early measurements at RHIC have yielded a wealth of data, from four independent detectors, each with its international collaboration of scientists: BRAHMS, PHENIX, PHOBOS, and STAR [1]. For the first time, collisions of heavy nuclei have been carried out at colliding-beam energies that have previously been accessible only for high-energy physics experiments with collisions of ''elementary'' particles such as protons and electrons. It is at these high energies that the predictions of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory that describes the role of quarks and gluons in nuclear matter, come into play, and new phenomena are sought that may illuminate our view of the basic structure of matter on the sub-atomic scale, with important implications for the origins of matter on the cosmic scale. The RHIC experiments have recorded data from collisions of gold nuclei at the highest energies ever achieved in man-made particle accelerators. These collisions, of which hundreds of millions have now been examined, result in final states of unprecedented complexity, with thousands of produced particles radiating from the nuclear collision. All four of the RHIC experiments have moved quickly to analyze these data, and have begun to understand the phenomena that unfold from the moment of collision as these particles are produced. In order to provide benchmarks of simpler interactions against which to compare the gold-gold collisions, the experiments have gathered comparable samples of data from collisions of a very light nucleus (deuterium) with gold nuclei, as well as proton-proton collisions, all with identical beam energies and experimental apparatus. The early measurements have revealed compelling evidence for the existence of a new form of nuclear matter at extremely high

  8. The effects of dissolved organic matter and pH on sampling rates for polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS).

    PubMed

    Li, Hongxia; Helm, Paul A; Paterson, Gordon; Metcalfe, Chris D

    2011-04-01

    The effect of solution pH and levels of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the sampling rates for model pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and endocrine disrupting substance (EDS) by polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) was investigated in laboratory experiments. A commercially available POCIS configuration containing neutral Oasis HLB (hydrophilic-lipophilic balance) resin (i.e. pharmaceutical POCIS) and two POCIS configurations prepared in-house containing MAX and MCX anion and cation exchange resins, respectively were tested for uptake of 21 model PPCPs and EDS, including acidic, phenolic, basic and neutral compounds. Laboratory experiments were conducted with dechlorinated tap water over a pH range of 3, 7 and 9. The effects of DOM were studied using natural water from an oligotrophic lake in Ontario, Canada (i.e. Plastic Lake) spiked with different amounts of DOM (the concentration of dissolved organic carbon ranged from 3 to 5mgL(-1) in uptake experiments). In experiments with the commercial (HLB) POCIS, the MCX-POCIS and the MAX-POCIS, the sampling rates generally increased with pH for basic compounds and declined with pH for acidic compounds. However, the sampling rates were relatively constant across the pH range for phenols with high pKa values (i.e. bisphenol A, estrone, estradiol, triclosan) and for the neutral pharmaceutical, carbamazepine. Thus, uptake was greatest when the amount of the neutral species in solution was maximized relative to the ionized species. Although the solution pH affected the uptake of some model ionic compounds, the effect was by less than a factor of 3. There was no significant effect of DOM on sampling rates from Plastic Lake. However, uptake rates in different aqueous matrixes declined in the order of deionized water>Plastic Lake water>dechlorinated tap water, so other parameters must affect uptake into POCIS, although this influence will be minor. MAX-POCIS and MCX-POCIS showed little advantage

  9. PREFACE: 5th International Workshop on Top Quark Physics (TOP2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamanna, G.; Boisvert, V.; Cerrito, L.; Khan, A.; Moretti, S.; Owen, M.; Schwanenberger, C.

    2013-07-01

    The 5th International Workshop on Top Quark Physics (TOP 2012) took place in Winchester, UK, from the 16-21 September. It gathered students as well as people active in the top quark sector and provided a framework to highlight the newest results and matters related to top quark physics. Discovered in 1995, the top quark is the sixth and heaviest of all quarks, and it is the only one with a lifetime short enough to be observed 'naked'. This makes it an important testing ground in the search for new physics. In fact, the fact of its mass being so much larger than the other quarks, hints at its special role in the Higgs mechanism. For the same reason, in many models of New Physics, new heavy resonances are expected to couple mostly with top quarks. Even if no new particles are observed, the direct correlation between its angular momentum and that of its detectable decay products allows us to probe indirectly New Physics in action when top quarks are created. In this edition of the TOP conference series, for the first time, the agenda was equally balanced between 'traditional' measurements and the now vast number of searches for physics BSM in the top quark sector, thanks mostly to the amount of data collected at the LHC in its Run I. New results were presented by both the Tevatron and the LHC collaborations: improved ttbar and single top cross-section measurements, refined techniques to measure the top quark mass and a large number of results on properties such as spin correlation and W boson polarization in top quark decays were shown. More technical discussions on the experimental issues, both from the detector and the simulation side also took place, drawing together experimentalists and theorists. Reviews of the latest results on ttbar asymmetry both from CDF and D0 and from ATLAS and CMS were shown, and theorists active in the field made some interesting points on this hot topic. Additionally, results on the search for fourth generation fermions and new

  10. Compact stars with a quark core within the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model

    SciTech Connect

    Lenzi, C. H.; Schneider, A. S.; Providencia, C.; Marinho, R. M. Jr.

    2010-07-15

    An ultraviolet cutoff dependent on the chemical potential as proposed by Casalbuoni et al. is used in the SU(3) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. The model is applied to the description of stellar quark matter and compact stars. It is shown that with a new cutoff parametrization it is possible to obtain stable hybrid stars with a quark core. A larger cutoff at finite densities leads to a partial chiral symmetry restoration of quark s at lower densities. A direct consequence is the onset of the s quark in stellar matter at lower densities and a softening of the equation of state.

  11. Electroweak Measurements with Heavy Quarks at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Bellodi, Giulia

    2000-10-03

    The SLD detector collected a sample of 550K hadronic events at the Z{sup 0} peak from e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions at the SLC during the 1993 to 1998 period. Polarized electron beams, a small and stable interaction point and the excellent performance of the 3-D CCD vertex detector provide a unique environment for precision electroweak tests of the Standard Model. Improved measurements of heavy quark electroweak parameters are presented here.

  12. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Spin-Polarized Carriers Injection from Ferromagnetic Metal into Organic Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Shi-Zhu; Zhao, Jun-Qing; Jia, Zhen-Feng; Zhang, Tian-You

    2010-10-01

    Charge carriers in organic semiconductor are different from that of traditional inorganic semiconductor. Based on three-current model, considering electrical field effect, we present a theoretical model to discuss spin-polarized injection from ferromagnetic electrode into organic semiconductor by analyzing electrochemical potential both in ferromagnetic electrode and organic semiconductors. The calculated result of this model shows effects of electrode's spin polarization, equilibrium value of polarons ratio, interfacial conductance, bulk conductivity of materials and electrical field. It is found that we could get decent spin polarization with common ferromagnetic electrode by increasing equilibrium value of polarons ratio. We also find that large and matched bulk conductivity of organic semiconductor and electrode, small spin-dependent interfacial conductance, and enough large electrical field are critical factors for increasing spin polarization.

  13. Evolution of Proto-Neutron Stars with Quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Pons, Jose A.; Steiner, Andrew W.; Prakash, Madappa; Lattimer, James M.

    2001-06-04

    Neutrino fluxes from proto-neutron stars with and without quarks are studied. Observable differences become apparent after 10{endash}20s of evolution. Sufficiently massive stars containing negatively charged, strongly interacting, particles collapse to black holes during the first minute of evolution. Since the neutrino flux vanishes when a black hole forms, this is the most obvious signal that quarks (or other types of strange matter) have appeared. The metastability time scales for stars with quarks are intermediate between those containing hyperons and kaon condensates.

  14. Evolution of proto-neutron stars with quarks.

    PubMed

    Pons, J A; Steiner, A W; Prakash, M; Lattimer, J M

    2001-06-04

    Neutrino fluxes from proto-neutron stars with and without quarks are studied. Observable differences become apparent after 10-20 s of evolution. Sufficiently massive stars containing negatively charged, strongly interacting, particles collapse to black holes during the first minute of evolution. Since the neutrino flux vanishes when a black hole forms, this is the most obvious signal that quarks (or other types of strange matter) have appeared. The metastability time scales for stars with quarks are intermediate between those containing hyperons and kaon condensates.

  15. Nuclear equation of state in a relativistic independent quark model with chiral symmetry and dependence on quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, N.; Mishra, R. N.; Mohanty, D. K.; Panda, P. K.; Frederico, T.

    2013-07-01

    We have calculated the properties of nuclear matter in a self-consistent manner with a quark-meson coupling mechanism incorporating the structure of nucleons in vacuum through a relativistic potential model; where the dominant confining interaction for the free independent quarks inside a nucleon is represented by a phenomenologically average potential in equally mixed scalar-vector harmonic form. Corrections due to spurious center of mass motion as well as those due to other residual interactions, such as the one gluon exchange at short distances and quark-pion coupling arising out of chiral symmetry restoration, have been considered in a perturbative manner to obtain the nucleon mass in vacuum. The nucleon-nucleon interaction in nuclear matter is then realized by introducing additional quark couplings to σ and ω mesons through mean field approximations. The relevant parameters of the interaction are obtained self-consistently while realizing the saturation properties such as the binding energy, pressure, and compressibility of the nuclear matter. We also discuss some implications of chiral symmetry in nuclear matter along with the nucleon and nuclear σ term and the sensitivity of nuclear matter binding energy with variations in the light quark mass.

  16. Color sextet vector bosons and same-sign top quark pairs at the LHC.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Berger, E. L.; Cao, Q.-H.; Chen, C.-R.; Shaughnessy, G.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Tokyo; Northwestern Univ.; Peking Univ.

    2010-12-08

    We investigate the production of beyond-the-standard-model color sextet vector bosons at the Large Hadron Collider and their decay into a pair of same-sign top quarks. We demonstrate that the energy of the charged lepton from the top quark semi-leptonic decay serves as a good measure of the top quark polarization, which, in turn determines the quantum numbers of the boson and distinguishes vector bosons from scalars.

  17. Top quark mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Christopher S.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2004-12-01

    The top quark, with its extraordinarily large mass (nearly that of a gold atom), plays a significant role in the phenomenology of EWSB in the Standard Model. In particular, the top quark mass when combined with the W mass constrains the mass of the as yet unobserved Higgs boson. Thus, a precise determination of the mass of the top quark is a principal goal of the CDF and D0 experiments. With the data collected thus far in Runs 1 and 2 of the Tevatron, CDF and D0 have measured the top quark mass in both the lepton+jets and dilepton decay channels using a variety of complementary experimental techniques. The author presents an overview of the most recent of the measurements.

  18. Heavy quark physics from SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, R.

    1997-01-01

    This report covers preliminary measurements from SLD on heavy quark production at the Z{sup 0}, using 150,000 hadronic Z{sup 0} decays accumulated during the 1993-1995 runs. A measurement of R{sub b} with a lifetime double tag is presented. The high electron beam polarization of the SLC is employed in the direct measurement of the parity-violating parameters A{sub b} and A{sub c} by use of the left-right forward-backward asymmetry. The lifetimes of B{sup +} and B{sup 0} mesons have been measured by two analyses. The first identifies semileptonic decays of B mesons with high (p,p{sub t}) leptons; the second analysis isolates a sample of B meson decays with a two-dimensional impact parameter tag and reconstructs the decay length and charge using a topological vertex reconstruction method.

  19. Top quark properties

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Ziqing

    2014-10-31

    The top quark physics has entered the precision era. The CDF and D0 collaborations are finalizing their legacy results of the properties of the top quark after the shutdown of the Fermilab Tevatron three years ago. The ATLAS and CMS collaborations have been publishing results from the LHC Run I with 7 TeV and 8 TeV proton-proton collisions, with many more forthcoming. We present a selection of recent results produced by the Tevatron and LHC experiments.

  20. Quark-meson coupling model with the cloudy bag

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, S.; Miyatsu, T.; Saito, Kenji; Tsushima, Kazuo

    2008-07-01

    Using the volume coupling version of the cloudy bag model, the quark-meson coupling model is extended to study the role of pion field and the properties of nuclear matter. The extended model includes the effect of gluon exchange as well as the pion-cloud effect, and provides a good description of the nuclear matter properties. The relationship between the extended model and the EFT approach to nuclear matter is also discussed.

  1. Nucleating quark droplets in the core of magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroff, D.; Fraga, E. S.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the possibility of homogeneous nucleation of quark matter in magnetars, we investigate the formation of chirally symmetric droplets in a cold and dense environment in the presence of an external magnetic field. As a framework, we use the one-loop effective potential of the two-flavor quark-meson model. Within the thin-wall approximation, we extract all relevant nucleation parameters and provide an estimate for the typical time scales for the chiral phase conversion in magnetized compact star matter. We show how the critical chemical potential, critical radius, correlation length and surface tension are affected, and how their combination to define the nucleation time seems to allow for nucleation of quark droplets in magnetar matter even for not so small values of the surface tension.

  2. Soliton matter as a model of dense nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1985-01-01

    We employ the hybrid soliton model of the nucleon consisting of a topological meson field and deeply bound quarks to investigate the behavior of the quarks in soliton matter as a function of density. To organize the calculation, we place the solitons on a spatial lattice. The model suggests the transition of matter from a color insulator to a color conductor above a critical density of a few times normal nuclear density. 9 references, 5 figures.

  3. Quark-gluon plasma fireball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamieh, Salah; Letessier, Jean; Rafelski, Johann

    2000-12-01

    Lattice quantum chromodynamics results provide an opportunity to model, and extrapolate to finite baryon density, the properties of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Upon fixing the scale of the thermal coupling constant and vacuum energy to the lattice data, the properties of resulting QGP equations of state (EoS) are developed. We show that the physical properties of the dense matter fireball formed in heavy ion collision experiments at CERN-SPS are well described by the QGP-EoS we presented. We also estimate the properties of the fireball formed in early stages of nuclear collision, and argue that QGP formation must be expected down to 40A GeV in central Pb-Pb interactions.

  4. Quark-gluon plasma fireball

    SciTech Connect

    Hamieh, Salah; Letessier, Jean; Rafelski, Johann

    2000-12-01

    Lattice quantum chromodynamics results provide an opportunity to model, and extrapolate to finite baryon density, the properties of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Upon fixing the scale of the thermal coupling constant and vacuum energy to the lattice data, the properties of resulting QGP equations of state (EoS) are developed. We show that the physical properties of the dense matter fireball formed in heavy ion collision experiments at CERN-SPS are well described by the QGP-EoS we presented. We also estimate the properties of the fireball formed in early stages of nuclear collision, and argue that QGP formation must be expected down to 40A GeV in central Pb-Pb interactions.

  5. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Controllable Spin Polarization of Charge Current by Rashba Spin Orbital Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Juan; Yang, Yong-Hong; Wang, Jun

    2009-11-01

    We report a theoretic study on modulating the spin polarization of charge current in a mesoscopic four-terminal device of cross structure by using the inverse spin hall effect. The scattering region of device is a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) with Rashba spin orbital interaction (RSOI), one of lead is ferromagnetic metal and other three leads are spin-degenerate normal metals. By using Landauer-Büttiker formalism, we found that when a longitudinal charge current flows through 2DEG scattering region from FM lead by external bias, the transverse current can be either a pure spin current or full-polarized charge current due to the combined effect of spin hall effect and its inverse process, and the polarization of this transverse current can be easily controlled by several device parameters such as the Fermi energy, ferromagnetic magnetization, and the RSOI constant. Our method may pave a new way to control the spin polarization of a charge current.

  6. Interactions of quarks and gluons with nuclei at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, A.H.

    1994-04-01

    Some processes involving the interaction of medium energy quarks and gluons with nuclear matter are described. Possible mechanisms for the A-dependence of the energy loss of leading protons produced in proton-nucleus collisions are given, and an experiment which may help to distinguish these mechanisms is described. A possible color transparency experiment at CEBAF is described. Experiments to measure energy loss of quarks in nuclear matter and the formation time of hadrons are discussed along with the possibilities of measuring {sigma}{sub J}/{psi} and {sigma}{sub {psi}{prime}} at CEBAF.

  7. High energy cosmic ray signature of quark nuggets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audouze, J.; Schaeffer, R.; Silk, J.

    1985-01-01

    It has been recently proposed that dark matter in the Universe might consist of nuggets of quarks which populate the nuclear desert between nucleons and neutron star matter. It is further suggested that the Centauro events which could be the signature of particles with atomic mass A approx. 100 and energy E approx. 10 to 15th power eV might also be related to debris produced in the encounter of two neutron stars. A further consequence of the former proposal is examined, and it is shown that the production of relativistic quark nuggets is accompanied by a substantial flux of potentially observable high energy neutrinos.

  8. Quark Helicity Distributions at Large Longitudinal Momentum Fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Harutyun Avakian; Stanley Brodsky; Alexandre Deur; Feng Yuan

    2007-08-01

    We study the quark helicity distributions at large $x$ in perturbative QCD, taking into account contributions from the valence Fock states of the nucleon which have nonzero orbital angular momentum. These states are necessary to have a nonzero anomalous magnetic moment. We find that the quark orbital angular momentum contributes a large logarithm to the negative helicity quark distribution in addition to its power behavior, scaling as $(1-x)^5\\log^2(1-x)$ in the limit of $x\\to 1$. Our analysis show that the ratio of the polarized over unpolarized down quark distributions, $\\Delta d/d$, will still approach 1 in this limit. By comparing with the current experimental data, we find that this ratio will cross zero at $x\\approx 0.75$.

  9. QCD in heavy quark production and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wiss, J.

    1997-06-01

    The author discusses how QCD is used to understand the physics of heavy quark production and decay dynamics. His discussion of production dynamics primarily concentrates on charm photoproduction data which are compared to perturbative QCD calculations which incorporate fragmentation effects. He begins his discussion of heavy quark decay by reviewing data on charm and beauty lifetimes. Present data on fully leptonic and semileptonic charm decay are then reviewed. Measurements of the hadronic weak current form factors are compared to the nonperturbative QCD-based predictions of Lattice Gauge Theories. He next discusses polarization phenomena present in charmed baryon decay. Heavy Quark Effective Theory predicts that the daughter baryon will recoil from the charmed parent with nearly 100% left-handed polarization, which is in excellent agreement with present data. He concludes by discussing nonleptonic charm decay which is traditionally analyzed in a factorization framework applicable to two-body and quasi-two-body nonleptonic decays. This discussion emphasizes the important role of final state interactions in influencing both the observed decay width of various two-body final states as well as modifying the interference between interfering resonance channels which contribute to specific multibody decays. 50 refs., 77 figs.

  10. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Transport Through a Precessing Spin Coupled to Noncollinearly Polarized Ferromagnetic Leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-Chao; Xin, Zi-Hua; Feng, Li-Ya

    2010-02-01

    The quantum electronic transport through a precessing magnetic spin coupled to noncollinearly polarized ferromagnetic leads (F-MS-F) has been studied in this paper. The nonequilibrium Green function approach is used to calculate local density of states (LDOS) and current in the presence of external bias. The characters of LDOS and the electronic current are obtained. The tunneling current is investigated for different precessing angle and different configurations of the magnetization of the leads. The investigation reveals that when the precessing angle takes θ < π/2 and negative bias is applied, the resonant tunneling current appears, otherwise, it appears when positive bias is applied. When the leads are totally polarized and the precessing angel takes 0, the tunneling current changes with the configuration of two leads; and it becomes zero when the two leads are antiparallel.

  11. Quark mean field model with pion and gluon corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xueyong; Hu, Jinniu; Shen, Hong

    2016-10-01

    The properties of nuclear matter and finite nuclei are studied within the quark mean field (QMF) model by taking the effects of pions and gluons into account at the quark level. The nucleon is described as the combination of three constituent quarks confined by a harmonic oscillator potential. To satisfy the spirit of QCD theory, the contributions of pions and gluons on the nucleon structure are treated in second-order perturbation theory. In a nuclear many-body system, nucleons interact with each other by exchanging mesons between quarks. With different constituent quark mass, mq, we determine three parameter sets for the coupling constants between mesons and quarks, named QMF-NK1, QMF-NK2, and QMF-NK3, by fitting the ground-state properties of several closed-shell nuclei. It is found that all of the three parameter sets can give a satisfactory description of properties of nuclear matter and finite nuclei, moreover they also predict a larger neutron star mass around 2.3 M⊙ without hyperon degrees of freedom.

  12. Heavy quark quenching from RHIC to LHC and the consequences of gluon damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossiaux, P. B.; Nahrgang, M.; Bluhm, M.; Gousset, Th.; Aichelin, J.

    2013-05-01

    In this contribution to the Quark Matter 2012 conference, we study whether energy loss models established for RHIC energies to describe the quenching of heavy quarks can be applied at LHC with the same success. We also benefit from the larger pT-range accessible at this accelerator to test the impact of gluon damping on observables such as the nuclear modification factor.

  13. Introduction to quantum chromo transport theory for quark-gluon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.; Elze, H.Th.; Iwazaki, A.; Vasak, D.

    1986-08-01

    Upcoming heavy ion experiments at the AGS and SPS are aimed at producing and diagnosing a primordial form of matter, the quark-gluon plasma. In these lectures some recent developments on formulating a quantum transport theory for quark-gluon plasmas are introduced. 46 refs.

  14. The discovery of quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    In the period following World War II, there was a rapid development of particle physics. With the construction of synchrotrons and the development of detector technology, many new particles were discovered and the systematics of their interactions investigated. The invention of the bubble chamber played an especially important role in uncovering the rich array of hadrons that were discovered in this period.In 1961 Murray Gell-Mann [1] and Yuval Ne'eman [2] independently introduced a classification scheme, based on SU(3) symmetry, which placed hadrons into families on the basis of spin and parity. Like the periodic table for the elements, this scheme was predictive as well as descriptive, and various hadrons, such as the - , were predicted within this framework and were later discovered.In 1964 Gell-Mann [3] and George Zweig [4] independently proposed quarks as the building blocks of hadrons as a way of generating the SU(3) classification scheme. When the quark model was first proposed, it postulated three types of quarks: up (u), down (d), and strange (s), with charges 2/3, - 1/3, and - 1/3 respectively. Each of these was hypothesized to be a spin1/2 particle. In this model the nucleon (and all other baryons) is made up of three quarks, and each meson consists of a quark and an antiquark. For example, as the proton and neutron both have ero strangeness, they are (u,u,d) and (d,d,u) systems respectively.

  15. QCD tests with polarized beams

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Takashi; SLD Collaboration

    1996-09-01

    The authors present three QCD studies performed by the SLD experiment at SLAC, utilizing the highly polarized SLC electron beam. They examined particle production differences in light quark and antiquark hemispheres, and observed more high momentum baryons and K{sup {minus}}`s than antibaryons and K{sup +}`s in quark hemispheres, consistent with the leading particle hypothesis. They performed a search for jet handedness in light q- and {anti q}-jets. Assuming Standard Model values of quark polarization in Z{sup 0} decays, they have set an improved upper limit on the analyzing power of the handedness method. They studied the correlation between the Z{sup 0} spin and the event-plane orientation in polarized Z{sup 0} decays into three jets.

  16. The Quark's Model and Confinement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novozhilov, Yuri V.

    1977-01-01

    Quarks are elementary particles considered to be components of the proton, the neutron, and others. This article presents the quark model as a mathematical concept. Also discussed are gluons and bag models. A bibliography is included. (MA)

  17. Quark search at the CBA

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.C.; Leipuner, L.B.; Morse, W.M.; Adair, R.K.; Kasha, H.; Schmidt, M.P.

    1983-03-13

    An experiment to search for quarks at the CBA is described. The cross sections for the production of massive quark-antiquark pairs in nucleon-nucleon interactions is estimated, and the experimental design and procedures are described. (WHK)

  18. Quark structure of chiral solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitri Diakonov

    2004-05-01

    There is a prejudice that the chiral soliton model of baryons is something orthogonal to the good old constituent quark models. In fact, it is the opposite: the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in strong interactions explains the appearance of massive constituent quarks of small size thus justifying the constituent quark models, in the first place. Chiral symmetry ensures that constituent quarks interact very strongly with the pseudoscalar fields. The ''chiral soliton'' is another word for the chiral field binding constituent quarks. We show how the old SU(6) quark wave functions follow from the ''soliton'', however, with computable relativistic corrections and additional quark-antiquark pairs. We also find the 5-quark wave function of the exotic baryon Theta+.

  19. The Quark's Model and Confinement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novozhilov, Yuri V.

    1977-01-01

    Quarks are elementary particles considered to be components of the proton, the neutron, and others. This article presents the quark model as a mathematical concept. Also discussed are gluons and bag models. A bibliography is included. (MA)

  20. Heavy quarks and lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2003-11-05

    This paper is a review of heavy quarks in lattice gauge theory, focusing on methodology. It includes a status report on some of the calculations that are relevant to heavy-quark spectroscopy and to flavor physics.

  1. Last orbits of binary strange quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Limousin, Francois; Gourgoulhon, Eric; Gondek-Rosinska, Dorota

    2005-03-15

    We present the first relativistic calculations of the final phase of inspiral of a binary system consisting of two stars built predominantly of strange quark matter (strange quark stars). We study the precoalescing stage within the Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews approximation of general relativity using a multidomain spectral method. A hydrodynamical treatment is performed under the assumption that the flow is either rigidly rotating or irrotational, taking into account the finite density at the stellar surface--a distinctive feature with respect to the neutron star case. The gravitational-radiation driven evolution of the binary system is approximated by a sequence of quasiequilibrium configurations at fixed baryon number and decreasing separation. We find that the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) is given by an orbital instability both for synchronized and irrotational systems. This contrasts with neutron stars for which the ISCO is given by the mass-shedding limit in the irrotational case. The gravitational wave frequency at the ISCO, which marks the end of the inspiral phase, is found to be {approx}1400 Hz for two irrotational 1.35 M{sub {center_dot}} strange stars and for the MIT bag model of strange matter with massless quarks and a bag constant B=60 MeV fm{sup -3}. Detailed comparisons with binary neutrons star models, as well as with third order post-Newtonian point-mass binaries are given.

  2. Detecting heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Benenson, G.; Chau, L.L.; Ludlam, T.; Paige, F.E.; Platner, E.D.; Protopopescu, S.D.; Rehak, P.

    1983-01-01

    In this exercise we examine the performance of a detector specifically configured to tag heavy quark (HQ) jets through direct observations of D-meson decays with a high resolution vertex detector. To optimize the performance of such a detector, we assume the small diamond beam crossing configuration as described in the 1978 ISABELLE proposal, giving a luminosity of 10/sup 32/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/. Because of the very large backgrounds from light quark (LQ) jets, most triggering schemes at this luminosity require high P/sub perpendicular to/ leptons and inevitably give missing neutrinos. If alternative triggering schemes could be found, then one can hope to find and calculate the mass of objects decaying to heavy quarks. A scheme using the high resolution detector will also be discussed in detail. The study was carried out with events generated by the ISAJET Monte Carlo and a computer simulation of the described detector system. (WHK)

  3. Estimating pesticide sampling rates by the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) in the presence of natural organic matter and varying hydrodynamic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Charlestra, Lucner; Amirbahman, Aria; Courtemanch, David L.; Alvarez, David A.; Patterson, Howard

    2012-01-01

    The polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) was calibrated to monitor pesticides in water under controlled laboratory conditions. The effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on the sampling rates (Rs) was evaluated in microcosms containing -1 of total organic carbon (TOC). The effect of hydrodynamics was studied by comparing Rs values measured in stirred (SBE) and quiescent (QBE) batch experiments and a flow-through system (FTS). The level of NOM in the water used in these experiments had no effect on the magnitude of the pesticide sampling rates (p > 0.05). However, flow velocity and turbulence significantly increased the sampling rates of the pesticides in the FTS and SBE compared to the QBE (p < 0.001). The calibration data generated can be used to derive pesticide concentrations in water from POCIS deployed in stagnant and turbulent environmental systems without correction for NOM.

  4. Diquark condensation effects on hot quark star configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, D.; Fredriksson, S.; Grigorian, H.; Öztasş, A. M.

    2004-05-01

    The equation of state for quark matter is derived for a nonlocal, chiral quark model within the mean field approximation. We investigate the effects of a variation of the formfactors of the interaction on the phase diagram of quark matter. Special emphasis is on the occurrence of a diquark condensate which signals a phase transition to color superconductivity and its effects on the equation of state under the condition of β-equilibrium and charge neutrality. We calculate the quark star configurations by solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations and obtain for the transition from a hot, normal quark matter core of a protoneutron star to a cool diquark condensed one a release of binding energy of the order of ΔMc2~1053 erg. We find that this energy could not serve as an engine for explosive phenomena since the phase transition is not first order. Contrary to naive expectations the mass defect increases when for a given temperature we neglect the possibility of diquark condensation.

  5. Diquark condensation effects on hot quark star configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztas, A.; Blaschke, D.; Fredriksson, S.; Grigorian, H.

    The equation of state for quark matter is derived for a nonlocal, chiral quark model within the mean field approximation. We investigate the effects of a variation of the form-factors of the interaction on the phase diagram of quark matter. Special emphasis is on the occurrence of a diquark condensate which signals a phase transition to color superconductivity and its effects on the equation of state under the condition of β- equilibrium and charge neutrality. We calculate the quark star configurations by solving the Tolman- Oppenheimer- Volkoff equations and obtain for the transition from a hot, normal quark matter core of a protoneutron star to a cool diquark condensed one a release of binding energy of the order of ΔMc2 ~ 1053 erg. We find that this energy could not serve as an engine for explosive phenomena since the phase transition is not first order. Contrary to naive expectations the mass defect increases when for a given temperature we neglect the possibility of diquark condensation.

  6. Quark confinement dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.J.; Olsson, M.G.; Veseli, S.; Williams, K. |

    1997-05-01

    Starting from Buchm{umlt u}ller{close_quote}s observation that a chromoelectric flux tube meson will exhibit only the Thomas-type spin-orbit interaction, we show that a model built upon the related assumption that a quark feels only a constant radial chromoelectric field in its rest frame implies a complete relativistic effective Hamiltonian that can be written explicitly in terms of quark canonical variables. The model yields linear Regge trajectories and exhibits some similarities to scalar confinement, but with the advantage of being more closely linked to QCD. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Choosing the polarity of the phase-encoding direction in diffusion MRI: Does it matter for group analysis?

    PubMed Central

    Kennis, M.; van Rooij, S.J.H.; Kahn, R.S.; Geuze, E.; Leemans, A.

    2016-01-01

    Notorious for degrading diffusion MRI data quality are so-called susceptibility-induced off-resonance fields, which cause non-linear geometric image deformations. While acquiring additional data to correct for these distortions alleviates the adverse effects of this artifact drastically – e.g., by reversing the polarity of the phase-encoding (PE) direction – this strategy is often not an option due to scan time constraints. Especially in a clinical context, where patient comfort and safety are of paramount importance, acquisition specifications are preferred that minimize scan time, typically resulting in data obtained with only one PE direction. In this work, we investigated whether choosing a different polarity of the PE direction would affect the outcome of a specific clinical research study. To address this methodological question, fractional anisotropy (FA) estimates of FreeSurfer brain regions were obtained in civilian and combat controls, remitted posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients, and persistent PTSD patients before and after trauma-focused therapy and were compared between diffusion MRI data sets acquired with different polarities of the PE direction (posterior-to-anterior, PA and anterior-to-posterior, AP). Our results demonstrate that regional FA estimates differ on average in the order of 5% between AP and PA PE data. In addition, when comparing FA estimates between different subject groups for specific cingulum subdivisions, the conclusions for AP and PA PE data were not in agreement. These findings increase our understanding of how one of the most pronounced data artifacts in diffusion MRI can impact group analyses and should encourage users to be more cautious when interpreting and reporting study outcomes derived from data acquired along a single PE direction. PMID:27158586

  8. Choosing the polarity of the phase-encoding direction in diffusion MRI: Does it matter for group analysis?

    PubMed

    Kennis, M; van Rooij, S J H; Kahn, R S; Geuze, E; Leemans, A

    2016-01-01

    Notorious for degrading diffusion MRI data quality are so-called susceptibility-induced off-resonance fields, which cause non-linear geometric image deformations. While acquiring additional data to correct for these distortions alleviates the adverse effects of this artifact drastically - e.g., by reversing the polarity of the phase-encoding (PE) direction - this strategy is often not an option due to scan time constraints. Especially in a clinical context, where patient comfort and safety are of paramount importance, acquisition specifications are preferred that minimize scan time, typically resulting in data obtained with only one PE direction. In this work, we investigated whether choosing a different polarity of the PE direction would affect the outcome of a specific clinical research study. To address this methodological question, fractional anisotropy (FA) estimates of FreeSurfer brain regions were obtained in civilian and combat controls, remitted posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients, and persistent PTSD patients before and after trauma-focused therapy and were compared between diffusion MRI data sets acquired with different polarities of the PE direction (posterior-to-anterior, PA and anterior-to-posterior, AP). Our results demonstrate that regional FA estimates differ on average in the order of 5% between AP and PA PE data. In addition, when comparing FA estimates between different subject groups for specific cingulum subdivisions, the conclusions for AP and PA PE data were not in agreement. These findings increase our understanding of how one of the most pronounced data artifacts in diffusion MRI can impact group analyses and should encourage users to be more cautious when interpreting and reporting study outcomes derived from data acquired along a single PE direction.

  9. Top quark physics: Future measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, R.; Vejcik, S.; Berger, E.L.

    1997-04-04

    The authors discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top`s large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. They emphasize measurements of the top quark`s mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  10. Improving the Top Quark Forward-Backward Asymmetry Measurement at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Yan