Science.gov

Sample records for polarized radiative transfer

  1. ASTRORAY: General relativistic polarized radiative transfer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, Roman V.

    2014-07-01

    ASTRORAY employs a method of ray tracing and performs polarized radiative transfer of (cyclo-)synchrotron radiation. The radiative transfer is conducted in curved space-time near rotating black holes described by Kerr-Schild metric. Three-dimensional general relativistic magneto hydrodynamic (3D GRMHD) simulations, in particular performed with variations of the HARM code, serve as an input to ASTRORAY. The code has been applied to reproduce the sub-mm synchrotron bump in the spectrum of Sgr A*, and to test the detectability of quasi-periodic oscillations in its light curve. ASTRORAY can be readily applied to model radio/sub-mm polarized spectra of jets and cores of other low-luminosity active galactic nuclei. For example, ASTRORAY is uniquely suitable to self-consistently model Faraday rotation measure and circular polarization fraction in jets.

  2. Polar firn layering in radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linow, Stefanie; Hoerhold, Maria

    2016-04-01

    For many applications in the geosciences, remote sensing is the only feasible method of obtaining data from large areas with limited accessibility. This is especially true for the cryosphere, where light conditions and cloud coverage additionally limit the use of optical sensors. Here, instruments operating at microwave frequencies become important, for instance in polar snow parameters / SWE (snow water equivalent) mapping. However, the interaction between snow and microwave radiation is a complex process and still not fully understood. RT (radiative transfer) models to simulate snow-microwave interaction are available, but they require a number of input parameters such as microstructure and density, which are partly ill-constrained. The layering of snow and firn introduces an additional degree of complexity, as all snow parameters show a strong variability with depth. Many studies on RT modeling of polar firn deal with layer variability by using statistical properties derived from previous measurements, such as the standard deviations of density and microstructure, to configure model input. Here, the variability of microstructure parameters, such as density and particle size, are usually assumed to be independent of each other. However, in the case of the firn pack of the polar ice sheets, we observe that microstructure evolution depends on environmental parameters, such as temperature and snow deposition. Accordingly, density and microstructure evolve together within the snow and firn. Based on CT (computer tomography) microstructure measurements of antarctic firn, we can show that: first, the variability of density and effective grain size are linked and can thus be implemented in the RT models as a coupled set of parameters. Second, the magnitude of layering is captured by the measured standard deviation. Based on high-resolution density measurements of an Antarctic firn core, we study the effect of firn layering at different microwave wavelengths. By means of

  3. IPRT polarized radiative transfer model intercomparison project - Phase A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emde, Claudia; Barlakas, Vasileios; Cornet, Céline; Evans, Frank; Korkin, Sergey; Ota, Yoshifumi; Labonnote, Laurent C.; Lyapustin, Alexei; Macke, Andreas; Mayer, Bernhard; Wendisch, Manfred

    2015-10-01

    The polarization state of electromagnetic radiation scattered by atmospheric particles such as aerosols, cloud droplets, or ice crystals contains much more information about the optical and microphysical properties than the total intensity alone. For this reason an increasing number of polarimetric observations are performed from space, from the ground and from aircraft. Polarized radiative transfer models are required to interpret and analyse these measurements and to develop retrieval algorithms exploiting polarimetric observations. In the last years a large number of new codes have been developed, mostly for specific applications. Benchmark results are available for specific cases, but not for more sophisticated scenarios including polarized surface reflection and multi-layer atmospheres. The International Polarized Radiative Transfer (IPRT) working group of the International Radiation Commission (IRC) has initiated a model intercomparison project in order to fill this gap. This paper presents the results of the first phase A of the IPRT project which includes ten test cases, from simple setups with only one layer and Rayleigh scattering to rather sophisticated setups with a cloud embedded in a standard atmosphere above an ocean surface. All scenarios in the first phase A of the intercomparison project are for a one-dimensional plane-parallel model geometry. The commonly established benchmark results are available at the IPRT website.

  4. Polarized radiative transfer equation in several astrophysically interesting coordinate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freimanis, J.

    2012-04-01

    While modeling multiple light scattering in astrophysical objects generally it is necessary to make numerical 3D radiative transfer calculations in objects of irregular morphology. But often their shape can be approximated by some regular geometry, e.g. plane-parallel, spherical, cylindrical, conical, spheroidal or toroidal. There are few theoretical results concerning radiative transfer in nonplanar geometries, namely, only for spherical and cylindrical coordinate systems. But the numerical solution of any equation generally performs best if the numerical method accounts for the analytical properties of the solution, first of all - its singularities and asymptotics. This justifies further theoretical research of radiative transfer in different coordinate systems, and first of all, the transfer equation itself in different coordinate systems must be written down. General method allowing to obtain clear expression for the differential operator of polarized radiative transfer equation (PRTE) in arbitrary curvilinear spatial coordinate system was recently described [1]. Here it is applied to several orthogonal coordinate systems essential for astrophysical applications. PRTE in circular conical coordinate system is treated as a particular look upon PRTE in spherical coordinate system. Previously obtained expressions for PRTE in elliptic conical coordinate system [2] are simplified using Lukáčs [3] trigonometric parameterization of the coordinates. PRTE in triaxial ellipsoidal system is obtained by merger of parameterization of angular coordinates described in [3] with my own ideas; PRTE in oblate spheroidal and prolate spheroidal system appear as particular cases of it in two types of the ellipsoidal system. PRTE in two different kinds of toroidal coordinate system (classical and simple) is derived as well.

  5. On the derivation of vector radiative transfer equation for polarized radiative transport in graded index media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. M.; Tan, J. Y.; Liu, L. H.

    2012-02-01

    Light transport in graded index media follows a curved trajectory determined by Fermat's principle. Besides the effect of variation of the refractive index on the transport of radiative intensity, the curved ray trajectory will induce geometrical effects on the transport of polarization ellipse. This paper presents a complete derivation of vector radiative transfer equation for polarized radiation transport in absorption, emission and scattering graded index media. The derivation is based on the analysis of the conserved quantities for polarized light transport along curved trajectory and a novel approach. The obtained transfer equation can be considered as a generalization of the classic vector radiative transfer equation that is only valid for uniform refractive index media. Several variant forms of the transport equation are also presented, which include the form for Stokes parameters defined with a fixed reference and the Eulerian forms in the ray coordinate and in several common orthogonal coordinate systems.

  6. grtrans: Polarized general relativistic radiative transfer via ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason

    2016-05-01

    grtrans calculates ray tracing radiative transfer in the Kerr metric, including the full treatment of polarised radiative transfer and parallel transport along geodesics, for comparing theoretical models of black hole accretion flows and jets with observations. The code is written in Fortran 90 and parallelizes with OpenMP; the full code and several components have Python interfaces. grtrans includes Geokerr (ascl:1011.015) and requires cfitsio (ascl:1010.001) and pyfits (ascl:1207.009).

  7. SPARTA - Solver for Polarized Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Applications: Introduction and application to Saharan dust fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlakas, Vasileios; Macke, Andreas; Wendisch, Manfred

    2016-07-01

    Non-spherical particles in the atmosphere absorb and scatter solar radiation. They change the polarization state of solar radiation depending on their shape, size, chemical composition and orientation. To quantify polarization effects, a new three-dimensional (3D) vector radiative transfer model, SPARTA (Solver for Polarized Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Applications) is introduced and validated against benchmark results. SPARTA employs the statistical forward Monte Carlo technique for efficient column-response pixel-based radiance calculations including polarization for 3D inhomogeneous cloudless and cloudy atmospheres. A sensitivity study has been carried out and exemplarily results are presented for two lidar-based mineral dust fields. The scattering and absorption properties of the dust particles have been computed for spheroids and irregular shaped particles. Polarized radiance fields in two-dimensional (2D) and one-dimensional (1D) inhomogeneous Saharan dust fields have been calculated at 532 nm wavelength. The domain-averaged results of the normalized reflected radiance are almost identical for the 1D and 2D modes. In the areas with large spatial gradient in optical thickness with expected significant horizontal photon transport, the radiance fields of the 2D mode differ by about ±12% for the first Stokes component (radiance, I) and ±8% for the second Stokes component (linear polarization, Q) from the fields of the 1D mode.

  8. Polarized multi-dimensional radiative transfer using the discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Haferman, J.L.; Smith, T.F.; Krajewski, W.F.

    1996-11-01

    A polarized multi-dimensional radiative transfer model based on the discrete-ordinates method is developed. The model solves the monochromatic vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) that considers polarization using the four Stokes parameters. For the VRTE, the intensity of the scalar radiative transfer equation is replaced by the Stokes intensity vector; the position-dependent scalar extinction coefficient is replaced by a direction- and position-dependent 4 x 4 extinction matrix; the position-dependent scalar absorption coefficient is replaced by a direction- and position-dependent emission vector; and the scalar phase function is replaced by a scattering phase matrix. The model is capable of solving the VRTE in anisotropically scattering one-, two-, or three-dimensional Cartesian geometries. The model is validated for one-dimensional polarized radiative transfer by comparing its results to several benchmark cases available in the literature. The model results are accurate so long as a quadrature set is chosen so that all phase functions used for a given problem normalize to unity. The model has been developed using a parallel computing paradigm, where each Stokes parameter is solved for on a separate computer processing unit.

  9. Radiative Transfer Modeling of the Enigmatic Scattering Polarization in the Solar Na I D1 Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belluzzi, Luca; Trujillo Bueno, Javier; Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2015-12-01

    The modeling of the peculiar scattering polarization signals observed in some diagnostically important solar resonance lines requires the consideration of the detailed spectral structure of the incident radiation field as well as the possibility of ground level polarization, along with the atom's hyperfine structure and quantum interference between hyperfine F-levels pertaining either to the same fine structure J-level, or to different J-levels of the same term. Here we present a theoretical and numerical approach suitable for solving this complex non-LTE radiative transfer problem. This approach is based on the density-matrix metalevel theory (where each level is viewed as a continuous distribution of sublevels) and on accurate formal solvers of the transfer equations and efficient iterative methods. We show an application to the D-lines of Na i, with emphasis on the enigmatic D1 line, pointing out the observable signatures of the various physical mechanisms considered. We demonstrate that the linear polarization observed in the core of the D1 line may be explained by the effect that one gets when the detailed spectral structure of the anisotropic radiation responsible for the optical pumping is taken into account. This physical ingredient is capable of introducing significant scattering polarization in the core of the Na i D1 line without the need for ground-level polarization.

  10. Polarized radiative transfer in two-dimensional scattering medium with complex geometries by natural element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Kim, Yong-Jun; Yi, Hong-Liang; Xie, Ming; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-08-01

    The natural element method (NEM) is extended to solve the polarized radiative transfer problem in a two-dimensional scattering medium with complex geometries, in which the angular space is discretized by the discrete-ordinates approach, and the spatial discretization is conducted by the Galerkin weighted residuals approach. The Laplace interpolation scheme is adopted to obtain the shape functions used in the Galerkin weighted residuals approach. The NEM solution to the vector radiative transfer in a square enclosure filled with a Mie scattering medium is first examined to validate our program. We then study the polarized radiative transfer in two kinds of geometries filled with scattering medium which is equivalent to a suspension of latex spheres in water. Three sizes of spheres are considered. The results for non-dimensional polarized radiative flux along the boundaries and the angular distributions of the Stokes vector at specific positions are presented and discussed. For the complex geometry bounded by the square and circular object, numerical solutions are presented for the cases both with Lambertian (diffuse) reflection and with Fresnel reflection. Some interesting phenomenon are found and analyzed.

  11. Radiative transfer with POLARIS. I. Analysis of magnetic fields through synthetic dust continuum polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reissl, S.; Wolf, S.; Brauer, R.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: We present POLARIS (POLArized RadIation Simulator), a newly developed three-dimensional Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code. POLARIS was designed to calculate dust temperature, polarization maps, and spectral energy distributions. It is optimized to handle data that results from sophisticated magneto-hydrodynamic simulations. The main purpose of the code is to prepare and analyze multi-wavelength continuum polarization measurements in the context of magnetic field studies in the interstellar medium. An exemplary application is the investigation of the role of magnetic fields in star formation processes. Methods: We combine currently discussed state-of-the-art grain alignment theories with existing dust heating and polarization algorithms. We test the POLARIS code on multiple scales in complex astrophysical systems that are associated with different stages of star formation. POLARIS uses the full spectrum of dust polarization mechanisms to trace the underlying magnetic field morphology. Results: Resulting temperature distributions are consistent with the density and position of radiation sources resulting from magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) - collapse simulations. The calculated layers of aligned dust grains in the considered cirumstellar disk models are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Finally, we compute unique patterns in synthetic multi-wavelength polarization maps that are dependent on applied dust-model and grain-alignment theory in analytical cloud models.

  12. Multiple scattering of polarized light: comparison of Maxwell theory and radiative transfer theory.

    PubMed

    Voit, Florian; Hohmann, Ansgar; Schäfer, Jan; Kienle, Alwin

    2012-04-01

    For many research areas in biomedical optics, information about scattering of polarized light in turbid media is of increasing importance. Scattering simulations within this field are mainly performed on the basis of radiative transfer theory. In this study a polarization sensitive Monte Carlo solution of radiative transfer theory is compared to exact Maxwell solutions for all elements of the scattering Müller matrix. Different scatterer volume concentrations are modeled as a multitude of monodisperse nonabsorbing spheres randomly positioned in a cubic simulation volume which is irradiated with monochromatic incident light. For all Müller matrix elements effects due to dependent scattering and multiple scattering are analysed. The results are in overall good agreement between the two methods with deviations related to dependent scattering being prominent for high volume concentrations and high scattering angles.

  13. Comparison of polarized radiative transfer programs with applications to atmospheric and oceanic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Dennis

    We first introduce the topic of radiative transfer and how it applies to a range of problems in physics from remote sensing of the Earth's atmospheres and oceans to investigating skin cancer. We then review the theoretical basis for radiative transfer modeling, which is further supplemented by Appendices 1-3. Afterwards a comparison is presented of two different methods for polarized radiative transfer in coupled media consisting of two adjacent slabs with different refractive indices, each slab being a stratified medium with no change in optical properties except in the direction of stratification. One of the methods is based on solving the integro-differential radiative transfer equation for the two coupled slabs using the discrete ordinate approximation. The other method is based on probabilistic and statistical concepts and simulates the propagation of polarized light using the Monte Carlo approach. The emphasis is on non-Rayleigh scattering for particles in the Mie regime. Comparisons with benchmark results available for a slab with constant refractive index show that both methods reproduce these benchmark results when the refractive index is set to be the same in the two slabs. We then we present a simple study to investigate the sensitivity of the Stokes components I, Q, and U to changes in a bimodal aerosol model for atmosphere-ocean scenes. Preliminary results show that there is significant promise in using the Q Stokes parameter in addition to I, while for this case U is deemed to be insensitive to our simple aerosol model. Lastly we conclude the work completed and suggest possible avenues for future work.

  14. Microwave Polarized Signatures Generated within Cloud Systems: SSM/I Observations Interpreted with Radiative Transfer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prigent, Catherine; Pardo, Juan R.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Rossow, Willaim B.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Special Sensor Microwave /Imager (SSM/I) observations in cloud systems are studied over the tropics. Over optically thick cloud systems, presence of polarized signatures at 37 and 85 GHz is evidenced and analyzed with the help of cloud top temperature and optical thickness extracted from visible and IR satellite observations. Scattering signatures at 85 GHz (TbV(85) less than or = 250 K) are associated with polarization differences greater than or = 6 K, approx. 50%, of the time over ocean and approx. 40% over land. In addition. over thick clouds the polarization difference at 37 GHz is rarely negligible. The polarization differences at 37 and 85 GHz do not stem from the surface but are generated in regions of relatively homogeneous clouds having high liquid water content. To interpret the observations, a radiative transfer model that includes the scattering by non-spherical particles is developed. based on the T-matrix approach and using the doubling and adding method. In addition to handling randomly and perfectly oriented particles, this model can also simulate the effect of partial orientation of the hydrometeors. Microwave brightness temperatures are simulated at SSM/I frequencies and are compared with the observations. Polarization differences of approx. 2 K can be simulated at 37 GHz over a rain layer, even using spherical drops. The polarization difference is larger for oriented non-spherical particles. The 85 GHz simulations are very sensitive to the ice phase of the cloud. Simulations with spherical particles or with randomly oriented non-spherical ice particles cannot replicate the observed polarization differences. However, with partially oriented non-spherical particles, the observed polarized signatures at 85 GHz are explained, and the sensitivity of the scattering characteristics to the particle size, asphericity, and orientation is analyzed. Implications on rain and ice retrievals are discussed.

  15. Polarized radiance fields under a dynamic ocean surface: a three-dimensional radiative transfer solution

    SciTech Connect

    You Yu; Zhai Pengwang; Kattawar, George W.; Yang Ping

    2009-06-01

    The hybrid matrix operator, Monte Carlo (HMOMC) method previously reported [Appl. Opt.47, 1063-1071 (2008)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.47.001063] is improved by neglecting higher-order terms in the coupling of the matrix operators and by introducing a dual grid scheme. The computational efficiency for solving the vector radiative transfer equation in a full 3D coupled atmosphere-surface-ocean system is substantially improved, and, thus, large-scale simulations of the radiance distribution become feasible. The improved method is applied to the computation of the polarized radiance field under realistic surface waves simulated by the power spectral density method. To the authors' best knowledge, this is the first time that the polarized radiance field under a dynamic ocean surface and the underwater image of an object above such an ocean surface have been reported.

  16. Pymiedap: a versatile radiative transfer code with polarization for terrestrial (exo)planets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Loïc; Stam, Daphne; Hogenboom, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Polarimetry promises to be an important method to detect exoplanets: the light of a star is usually unpolarized te{kemp1987} while scattering by gas and clouds in an atmosphere can generate high levels of polarization. Furthermore, the polarization of scattered light contains information about the properties of the atmosphere and surface of a planet, allowing a possible characterization te{stam2008}, a method already validated in the solar system with Venus te{hansen1974,rossi2015}. We present here Pymiedap (Python Mie Doubling-Adding Program): a set of Python objects interfaced with Fortran radiative transfer codes that allows to define a planetary atmosphere and compute the flux and polarization of the light that is scattered. Several different properties of the planet can be set interactively by the user through the Python interface such as gravity, distance to the star, surface properties, atmospheric layers, gaseous and aerosol composition. The radiative transfer calculations are then computed following the doubling-adding method te{deHaan1987}. We present some results of the code and show its possible use for different planetary atmospheres for both resolved and disk-integrated measurements. We investigate the effect of gas, clouds and aerosols composition and surface properties for horizontally homogeneous and inhomogenous planets, in the case of Earth-like planets. We also study the effect of gaseous absorption on the flux and polarization as a marker for gaseous abundance and cloud top altitude. [1]{kemp1987} Kemp et al. The optical polarization of the sun measured at a sensitivity of parts in ten million. Nature, 1987, 326, 270-273 [2]{stam2008} Stam, D. M. Spectropolarimetric signatures of Earth-like extrasolar planets. A&A, 2008, 482, 989-1007 [3]{hansen1974} Hansen, J. E. & Hovenier, J. W. Interpretation of the polarization of Venus. Journal of Atmospheric Sciences, 1974, 31, 1137-1160 [4]{rossi2015} Rossi et al. Preliminary study of Venus cloud layers

  17. Markov chain formalism for generalized radiative transfer in a plane-parallel medium, accounting for polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Davis, Anthony B.; Diner, David J.

    2016-11-01

    A Markov chain formalism is developed for computing the transport of polarized radiation according to Generalized Radiative Transfer (GRT) theory, which was developed recently to account for unresolved random fluctuations of scattering particle density and can also be applied to unresolved spectral variability of gaseous absorption as an improvement over the standard correlated-k method. Using Gamma distribution to describe the probability density function of the extinction or absorption coefficient, a shape parameter a that quantifies the variability is introduced, defined as the mean extinction or absorption coefficient squared divided by its variance. It controls the decay rate of a power-law transmission that replaces the usual exponential Beer-Lambert-Bouguer law. Exponential transmission, hence classic RT, is recovered when a→∞. The new approach is verified to high accuracy against numerical benchmark results obtained with a custom Monte Carlo method. For a<∞, angular reciprocity is violated to a degree that increases with the spatial variability, as observed for finite portions of real-world cloudy scenes. While the degree of linear polarization in liquid water cloudbows, supernumerary bows, and glories is affected by spatial heterogeneity, the positions in scattering angle of these features are relatively unchanged. As a result, a single-scattering model based on the assumption of subpixel homogeneity can still be used to derive droplet size distributions from polarimetric measurements of extended stratocumulus clouds.

  18. Radiative transfer model for the computation of radiance and polarization in an ocean-atmosphere system: polarization properties of suspended matter for remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Chami, M; Santer, R; Dilligeard, E

    2001-05-20

    A radiative transfer code termed OSOA for the ocean-atmosphere system that is able to predict the total and the polarized signals has been developed. The successive-orders-of-scattering method is used. The air-water interface is modeled as a planar mirror. Four components grouped by their optical properties, pure seawater, phytoplankton, nonchlorophyllose matter, and yellow substances, are included in the water column. Models are validated through comparisons with standard models. The numerical accuracy of the method is better than 2%; high computational efficiency is maintained. The model is used to study the influence of polarization on the detection of suspended matter. Polarizing properties of hydrosols are discussed: phytoplankton cells exhibit weak polarization and small inorganic particles, which are strong backscatterers, contribute appreciably to the polarized signal. Therefore the use of the polarized signal to extract the sediment signature promises good results. Also, polarized radiance could improve characterization of aerosols when open ocean waters are treated.

  19. Radiative Transfer Model for the Computation of Radiance and Polarization in an Ocean -Atmosphere System: Polarization Properties of Suspended Matter for Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chami, Malik; Santer, Richard; Dilligeard, Eric

    2001-05-01

    A radiative transfer code termed OSOA for the ocean -atmosphere system that is able to predict the total and the polarized signals has been developed. The successive-orders-of-scattering method is used. The air -water interface is modeled as a planar mirror. Four components grouped by their optical properties, pure seawater, phytoplankton, nonchlorophyllose matter, and yellow substances, are included in the water column. Models are validated through comparisons with standard models. The numerical accuracy of the method is better than 2%; high computational efficiency is maintained. The model is used to study the influence of polarization on the detection of suspended matter. Polarizing properties of hydrosols are discussed: phytoplankton cells exhibit weak polarization and small inorganic particles, which are strong backscatterers, contribute appreciably to the polarized signal. Therefore the use of the polarized signal to extract the sediment signature promises good results. Also, polarized radiance could improve characterization of aerosols when open ocean waters are treated.

  20. Graphene-assisted near-field radiative heat transfer between corrugated polar materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. L.; Zhang, Z. M.

    2014-06-23

    Graphene has attracted great attention in nanoelectronics, optics, and energy harvesting. Here, the near-field radiative heat transfer between graphene-covered corrugated silica is investigated based on the exact scattering theory. It is found that graphene can improve the radiative heat flux between silica gratings by more than one order of magnitude and alleviate the performance sensitivity to lateral shift. The underlying mechanism is mainly attributed to the improved photon tunneling of modes away from phonon resonances. Besides, coating with graphene leads to nonlocal radiative transfer that breaks Derjaguin's proximity approximation and enables corrugated silica to outperform bulk silica in near-field radiation.

  1. Chlorophyll fluorescence and the polarized underwater light field: comparison of vector radiative transfer simulations and multi-angular hyperspectral polarization field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-habashi, Ahmed; Ahmed, Samir

    2016-05-01

    Previous partial simulations and field measurements by us, had demonstrated the impact of the un-polarized nature of algal chlorophyll fluorescence to reduce the observed degree of polarization of the underwater light field in the spectral vicinity of fluorescence. (Polarization otherwise existing as a result of non-algal particulate (NAP) and molecular elastic scattering). The magnitude of this fluorescence driven dip in the observed degree of polarization was also seen to be theoretically related to the fluorescence magnitude. The recent availability to us of the RayXP vector radiative transfer code (VRTE) for the coupled atmosphere ocean system now permits us to make complete simulations of the underwater polarized light field, using measured inherent optical properties (IOPs) as inputs. Based on these simulations, a much more comprehensive analysis of the fluorescence impact is now possible. Combining the results of these new simulations with underwater field measurements in eutrophic waters using our hyperspectral multi angle polarimeter, we verified the theoretical relationship. In addition, comparisons of VRTE simulations and hyperspectral polarized field measurements for various coastal water conditions permit retrieval of fluorescence magnitudes. Comparisons of these polarization based fluorescence retrievals with retrievals obtained using fluorescence height over baseline or Hydrolight scalar simulations, together with total unpolarized radiance measurements, show good agreement.

  2. Generation and transfer of polarized radiation in the solar atmosphere: Physical mechanisms and magnetic-field diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deglinnocenti, E. L.

    1985-01-01

    The main physical mechanisms responsible for the generation and transfer of polarized radiation in the solar atmosphere can be classified in a suitable bidimensional diagram with an indicator of the magnetic field strength on its vertical axis and an indicator of the radiation field anisotropy on its horizontal axis. The various polarimetric observations performed on solar spectral lines are interpreted with different theoretical schemes according to their classification in the diagram and to the optical depths involved. These theoretical schemes, and the associated diagnostic tools for inferring the magnetic field vector from observations are reviewed. In particular, the role of magneto-optical effects in determining the direction of the observed linear polarization in active regions is discussed in some detail.

  3. Polarization discrimination fluorescence retrieval from reflectance spectra of algae in seawater: comparison of multicomponent Mie scattering and polarized radiative transfer models with laboratory and field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilerson, A.; Oo, M.; Chowdhary, J.; Gross, B. M.; Moshary, F.; Ahmed, S. A.

    2005-10-01

    Previously, it was shown that it is possible to separate the elastic scattering from the chlorophyll fluorescence signal using a polarization discrimination technique. The separation procedure depends however fundamentally on the degree of polarization of the water leaving radiance. In this paper, we compare polarization effects and efficiency of the fluorescence retrieval by simulating the total and polarized reflectance of waterleaving radiances originating from elastic scattering in case 1 and case 2 waters using radiative transfer and multiple component Mie scattering programs. This is done by superimposing upon these reflectances the contribution of known fluorescence spectra, and by using our polarization discrimination procedure to invert the resulting data back into fluorescence spectra. It is shown that a Mie scattering code which does not take into account multiple scattering effects can strongly overestimate the degree of polarization for case 1 and case 2 waters as well as reflectances in the green part of the spectra. Making use of these results we propose and evaluate an improvement for the traditional height over baseline fluorescence extraction method which strongly overestimates fluorescence value for case 2 waters. For our approach we use inverse absorption spectra of water and chlorophyll a scaled up and fitted to the reflectance spectra in the red and near IR bands with the subsequent retrieval of the fluorescence spectrum and chlorophyll a concentration. Results and potential of this approach are discussed.

  4. Polarized bidirectional reflectance of optically thick sparse particulate layers: An efficient numerically exact radiative-transfer solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Chowdhary, Jacek; Zakharova, Nadezhda T.

    2015-05-01

    We describe a simple yet efficient numerical algorithm for computing polarized bidirectional reflectance of an optically thick (semi-infinite), macroscopically flat layer composed of statistically isotropic and mirror symmetric random particles. The spatial distribution of the particles is assumed to be sparse, random, and statistically uniform. The 4×4 Stokes reflection matrix is calculated by iterating the Ambartsumian's vector nonlinear integral equation. The result is a numerically exact solution of the vector radiative transfer equation and as such fully satisfies the energy conservation law and the fundamental reciprocity relation. Since this technique bypasses the computation of the internal radiation field, it is very fast and highly accurate. The FORTRAN implementation of the technique is publicly available on the World Wide Web at

  5. Cyclotron line formation in the magnetized atmospheres of compact stars - I. The transfer equations for polarized radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garasev, M. A.; Derishev, E. V.; Kocharovsky, Vl. V.; Kocharovsky, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    We find the forms of the transfer equations for polarized cyclotron radiation in the atmospheres of compact stars, which are simple enough to allow practical implementation and still preserve all important physical effects. We take into account a frequency redistribution of radiation within the cyclotron line as well as the relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic effects. Our analysis is valid for the magnetic fields up to 1013 G and for temperatures well below 500 keV. We present and compare two forms of the radiation transfer equations. The first form, for the intensities of ordinary and extraordinary modes, is applicable for the compact stars with a moderate magnetic field strength up to 1011 G for typical neutron star and up to 109 G for magnetic white dwarfs. The second form, for the Stokes parameters, is more complex, but applicable even if a linear mode coupling takes place somewhere in the scattering-dominated atmosphere. Analysing dispersion properties of a magnetized plasma in the latter case, we describe a range of parameters where the linear mode coupling is possible and essential.

  6. Polarization transfer NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; van Hulsteyn, David B.

    1990-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

  7. Radiative Transfer: Methods and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Bernhard; Emde, Claudia; Buras, Robert; Kylling, Arve

    Solar and terrestrial radiation is the driver of atmospheric dynamics and chemistry and can be exploited by remote sensing algorithms to determine atmospheric composition. For this purpose, accurate radiative transfer models are needed. Here, a modern radiative transfer tool developed over many years at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics is explained. As an application, the remote sensing of cloud microphysics using the angular distribution of reflected solar radiance in the rainbow and backscatter glory is shown, with special emphasis on the polarization of radiation.

  8. Salinity, Temperature and Polarization Effects on Top of Atmosphere Radiance's for Case One Waters Using a Simple but Realistic Bio Optical Model and Full Radiative Transfer Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollstein, A.; Fischer, J.

    2011-12-01

    Salinity, temperature and polarization have non negligible effects on water leaving radiance's for pure and case one waters. The salinity and temperature of the ocean body has an impact on the refractive index, the bulk scattering coefficient and the absorption coefficient of the sea water. In addition these are specially dependent and we use the channels of the satellite ocean color instruments MERIS and the upcoming OLCI instrument to discuss the effects. The changes in top of atmosphere radiance's caused by changes in temperature and salinity are spectral dependent and depend on viewing geometry also. For the clearest waters these effects are in the order of two to six percent and can be reduced to the order of one percent by increased chlorophyll concentration. We present our new simple but realistic bio optical model used in our full polarized radiative transfer model. The model relates the oceanic chlorophyll concentration to scattering matrices and absorption coefficients for the chlorophyll and colored dissolved organic matter. We discuss the model's advantages and limitations and its relation to other models. Polarization has impact in this scheme if it is neglected in the radiative transfer and that the polarization parameters and the degree of polarization caries information about the state of the ocean. The effects of neglecting polarization depend strongly on direction and wavelength and can reach values of six percent. Hence salinity, temperature and polarization can have impacts of similar magnitude on top of atmosphere radiance's. The degree of polarization is sensitive to chlorophyll concentration and salinity but may also be an issue for radiance sensors showing probably unknown dependencies with respect to polarization. We can conclude that all three parameters can lead to non negligible effects on top of atmosphere radiance's and hence ocean color retrieval schemes.

  9. Ultrafast charge transfer and atomic orbital polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Deppe, M.; Foehlisch, A.; Hennies, F.; Nagasono, M.; Beye, M.; Sanchez-Portal, D.; Echenique, P. M.; Wurth, W.

    2007-11-07

    The role of orbital polarization for ultrafast charge transfer between an atomic adsorbate and a substrate is explored. Core hole clock spectroscopy with linearly polarized x-ray radiation allows to selectively excite adsorbate resonance states with defined spatial orientation relative to the substrate surface. For c(4x2)S/Ru(0001) the charge transfer times between the sulfur 2s{sup -1}3p*{sup +1} antibonding resonance and the ruthenium substrate have been studied, with the 2s electron excited into the 3p{sub perpendicular}* state along the surface normal and the 3p{sub parallel}* state in the surface plane. The charge transfer times are determined as 0.18{+-}0.07 and 0.84{+-}0.23 fs, respectively. This variation is the direct consequence of the different adsorbate-substrate orbital overlap.

  10. Numerical Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    2009-07-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Operator Perturbation: 1. Survey of operator perturbation methods W. Kalkofen; 2. Line formation in expanding atmospheres: multilevel calculations using approximate lambda operators W. R. Hamann; 3. Stellar atmospheres in non-LTE: model construction and line formation calculations using approximate lambda operators K. Werner; 4. Acceleration of convergence L. H. Auer; 5. Line formation in a time-dependent atmosphere W. Kalkofen; 6. Iterative solution of multilevel transfer problems Eugene H. Avrett and Rudolf Loeser; 7. An algorithm for the simultaneous solution of thousands of transfer equations under global constraints Lawrence S. Anderson; 8. Operator perturbation for differential equations W. Kalkofen; Part II. Polarised Radiation: 9. A gentle introduction to polarised radiative transfer David E. Rees; 10. Non-LTE polarised radiative transfer in special lines David E. Rees and Graham A. Murphy; 11. Transfer of polarised radiation using 4x4 matrices E. Landi Degli'Innocenti; 12. Radiative transfer in the presence of strong magnetic fields A. A. van Ballegooijen; 13. An integral operator technique of radiative transfer in spherical symmetry A. Peraiah; 14. Discrete ordinate matrix method M. Schmidt and R. Wehrse.

  11. Probing the magnetic field structure in Sgr A* on Black Hole Horizon Scales with Polarized Radiative Transfer Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Roman; McKinney, Jonathan; Johnson, Michael; Doeleman, Sheperd; Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Accreting black holes (BHs) are at the core of relativistic astrophysics as messengers of the strong-field regime of General Relativity and prime targets of several observational campaigns, including imaging the black hole shadow in SagA* and M87 with the Event Horizon Telescope. I will present results from general-relativistic, polarized radiatiative transfer models for the inner accretion flow in Sgr A*. The models use time dependent, global GRMHD simulations of hot accretion flows including standard-and-normal-evolution (SANE) and magnetically arrested disks (MAD). I present comparisons of these synthetic data sets to the most recent observations with the Event Horizon Telescope and show how the data distinguishes the models and probes the magnetic field structure.

  12. The radiative impact of Polar Stratospheric Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, T.; Merrelli, A. J.; Poole, L. R.; Pitts, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) are an ubiquitous feature in the stratosphere over the polar regions on the winter hemisphere. Heterogeneous chemistry and microphysics of these clouds play a pivotal role in the formation of the ozone hole. We constrain the radiative impact of these clouds utilizing observations from the space-borne lidar CALIPSO and the state of the art radiative transfer model LBLDIS.In addition to spatial and vertical distribution of PSCs, CALIPSO also provides their composition which is used in LBLDIS to calculate their radiative impact.This analysis focuses on the Antarctic winter season of 2008. Here, CALIPSO shows a distinct maximum in integrated optical depth of PSCs east of the Antarctic peninsula which is present throughout the entire winter season. Under clear-sky conditions PSCs can warm the lower stratosphere by several K/day in this region. However, the radiative impact of PSCs is greatly reduced in the presence of underlying tropospheric clouds. With tropospheric cloud parameters provided by CALIPSO we calculate the radiative impact of PSCs for several tropospheric cloud conditions to constrain the potential impact of PSCs on stratospheric temperatures.We find that high tropospheric clouds reduce the heating effect of PSCs and eventually PSCs have a cooling effect on lower stratospheric temperatures. We investigate how the radiative impact of PSCs changes throughout the winter with changing tropospheric conditions and how these locally forced temperature fluctuations impact the formation of PSCs.

  13. Vacuum polarization and Hawking radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmati, Shohreh

    Quantum gravity is one of the interesting fields in contemporary physics which is still in progress. The purpose of quantum gravity is to present a quantum description for spacetime at 10-33cm or find the 'quanta' of gravitational interaction.. At present, the most viable theory to describe gravitational interaction is general relativity which is a classical theory. Semi-classical quantum gravity or quantum field theory in curved spacetime is an approximation to a full quantum theory of gravity. This approximation considers gravity as a classical field and matter fields are quantized. One interesting phenomena in semi-classical quantum gravity is Hawking radiation. Hawking radiation was derived by Stephen Hawking as a thermal emission of particles from the black hole horizon. In this thesis we obtain the spectrum of Hawking radiation using a new method. Vacuum is defined as the possible lowest energy state which is filled with pairs of virtual particle-antiparticle. Vacuum polarization is a consequence of pair creation in the presence of an external field such as an electromagnetic or gravitational field. Vacuum polarization in the vicinity of a black hole horizon can be interpreted as the cause of the emission from black holes known as Hawking radiation. In this thesis we try to obtain the Hawking spectrum using this approach. We re-examine vacuum polarization of a scalar field in a quasi-local volume that includes the horizon. We study the interaction of a scalar field with the background gravitational field of the black hole in the desired quasi-local region. The quasi-local volume is a hollow cylinder enclosed by two membranes, one inside the horizon and one outside the horizon. The net rate of particle emission can be obtained as the difference of the vacuum polarization from the outer boundary and inner boundary of the cylinder. Thus we found a new method to derive Hawking emission which is unitary and well defined in quantum field theory.

  14. Radiative Transfer Modeling of Radio-Band Linear Polarization Observations as a Probe of the Physical Conditions in the Jets of γ-Ray Flaring Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Margo; Hughes, Philip; Aller, Hugh; Hovatta, Talvikki; Ramakrishnan, Venkatessh

    2016-09-01

    Since the mid-1980s the shock-in-jet model has been the preferred paradigm to explain radio-band flaring in blazar jets. We describe our radiative transfer model incorporating relativistically-propagating shocks, and illustrate how the 4.8, 8, and 14.5 GHz linear polarization and total flux density data from the University of Michigan monitoring program, in combination with the model, constrain jet flow conditions and shock attributes. Results from strong Fermi-era flares in 4 blazars with widely-ranging properties are presented. Additionally, to investigate jet evolution on decadal time scales we analyze 3 outbursts in OT 081 spanning nearly 3 decades and find intrinsic changes attributable to flow changes at a common spatial location, or, alternatively, to a change in the jet segment viewed. The model's success in reproducing these data supports a scenario in which relativistic shocks compress a plasma with an embedded passive, initially-turbulent magnetic field, with additional ordered magnetic field components, one of which may be helical.

  15. Utrecht Radiative Transfer Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Utrecht course ``The Generation and Transport of Radiation'' teaches basic radiative transfer to second-year students. It is a much-expanded version of the first chapter of Rybicki & Lightman's ``Radiative Processes in Astrophysics''. After this course, students understand why intensity is measured per steradian, have an Eddington-Barbier feel for optically thick line formation, and know that scattering upsets LTE. The text is a computer-aided translation by Ruth Peterson of my 1992 Dutch-language course. My aim is to rewrite this course in non-computer English and make it web-available at some time. In the meantime, copies of the Peterson translation are made yearly at Uppsala -- ask them, not me. Eventually it should become a textbook. The Utrecht course ``Radiative Transfer in Stellar Atmospheres'' is a 30-hour course for third-year students. It treats NLTE line formation in plane-parallel stellar atmospheres at a level intermediate between the books by Novotny and Boehm-Vitense, and Mihalas' ``Stellar Atmospheres''. After this course, students appreciate that epsilon is small, that radiation can heat or cool, and that computers have changed the field. This course is web-available since 1995 and is regularly improved -- but remains incomplete. Eventually it should become a textbook. The three Utrecht exercise sets ``Stellar Spectra A: Basic Line Formation'', ``Stellar Spectra B: LTE Line Formation'', and ``Stellar Spectra C: NLTE Line Formation'' are IDL-based computer exercises for first-year, second-year, and third-year students, respectively. They treat spectral classification, Saha-Boltzmann population statistics, the curve of growth, the FAL-C solar atmosphere model, the role of H-minus in the solar continuum, LTE formation of Fraunhofer lines, inversion tactics, the Feautrier method, classical lambda iteration, and ALI computation. The first two sets are web-available since 1998; the third will follow. Acknowledgement. Both courses owe much to previous

  16. Polarization of Cerenkov radiation in anisotropic media

    SciTech Connect

    Orisa, B.D.

    1995-10-01

    Using the method of Stokes parameters, we examine the polarization of Cerenkov radiation in anisotropic media. The study reveals that the radiation is totally polarized and that circular polarization is purely a quantum effect. We examine two cases; when the particle initially moves along the optical axis and when the particle initially moves perpendicular to the optical axis.

  17. Radiative transfer model: matrix operator method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Ruprecht, E

    1996-07-20

    A radiative transfer model, the matrix operator method, is discussed here. The matrix operator method is applied to a plane-parallel atmosphere within three spectral ranges: the visible, the infrared, and the microwave. For a homogeneous layer with spherical scattering, the radiative transfer equation can be solved analytically. The vertically inhomogeneous atmosphere can be subdivided into a set of homogeneous layers. The solution of the radiative transfer equation for the vertically inhomogeneous atmosphere is obtained recurrently from the analytical solutions for the subdivided layers. As an example for the application of the matrix operator method, the effects of the cirrus and the stratocumulus clouds on the net radiation at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere are investigated. The relationship between the polarization in the microwave range and the rain rates is also studied. Copies of the FORTRAN program and the documentation of the FORTRAN program on a diskette are available.

  18. Polar solvation and electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-13

    The report is divided into the following sections: completion of previous studies on solvation dynamics, dipole lattice studies, inertial components of solvation response, simple models of solvation dynamics, rotational dynamics and dielectric friction, intramolecular electron transfer reactions, and intermolecular donor-acceptor complexes.

  19. Forward Monte Carlo Computations of Polarized Microwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battaglia, A.; Kummerow, C.

    2000-01-01

    Microwave radiative transfer computations continue to acquire greater importance as the emphasis in remote sensing shifts towards the understanding of microphysical properties of clouds and with these to better understand the non linear relation between rainfall rates and satellite-observed radiance. A first step toward realistic radiative simulations has been the introduction of techniques capable of treating 3-dimensional geometry being generated by ever more sophisticated cloud resolving models. To date, a series of numerical codes have been developed to treat spherical and randomly oriented axisymmetric particles. Backward and backward-forward Monte Carlo methods are, indeed, efficient in this field. These methods, however, cannot deal properly with oriented particles, which seem to play an important role in polarization signatures over stratiform precipitation. Moreover, beyond the polarization channel, the next generation of fully polarimetric radiometers challenges us to better understand the behavior of the last two Stokes parameters as well. In order to solve the vector radiative transfer equation, one-dimensional numerical models have been developed, These codes, unfortunately, consider the atmosphere as horizontally homogeneous with horizontally infinite plane parallel layers. The next development step for microwave radiative transfer codes must be fully polarized 3-D methods. Recently a 3-D polarized radiative transfer model based on the discrete ordinate method was presented. A forward MC code was developed that treats oriented nonspherical hydrometeors, but only for plane-parallel situations.

  20. Polarization Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, D.J.; Annand, J.R.M.; Mamyan, V.H.; Aniol, K.A.; Margaziotis, D.J.; Bertin, P.Y.; Camsonne, A.; Laveissiere, G.; Bosted, P.; Paschke, K.; Calarco, J.R.; Chang, G.C.; Horn, T.; Savvinov, N.; Chang, T.-H.; Danagoulian, A.; Nathan, A.M.; Roedelbronn, M.; Chen, J.-P.

    2005-06-24

    Compton scattering from the proton was investigated at s=6.9 GeV{sup 2} and t=-4.0 GeV{sup 2} via polarization transfer from circularly polarized incident photons. The longitudinal and transverse components of the recoil proton polarization were measured. The results are in disagreement with a prediction of perturbative QCD based on a two-gluon exchange mechanism, but agree well with a prediction based on a reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton.

  1. Radiative transfer in atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Z.; Stamnes, K.; Weeks, W.F.; Tsay, S.C.

    1996-04-01

    Radiative energy is critical in controlling the heat and mass balance of sea ice, which significantly affects the polar climate. In the polar oceans, light transmission through the atmosphere and sea ice is essential to the growth of plankton and algae and, consequently, to the microbial community both in the ice and in the ocean. Therefore, the study of radiative transfer in the polar atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean system is of particular importance. Lacking a properly coupled radiative transfer model for the atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system, a consistent study of the radiative transfer in the polar atmosphere, snow, sea ice, and ocean system has not been undertaken before. The radiative transfer processes in the atmosphere and in the ice and ocean have been treated separately. Because the radiation processes in the atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean depend on each other, this separate treatment is inconsistent. To study the radiative interaction between the atmosphere, clouds, snow, sea ice, and ocean, a radiative transfer model with consistent treatment of radiation in the coupled system is needed and is under development.

  2. Viktor V. Sobolev and radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagirner, Dmitrij I.

    2016-11-01

    Invited review A detailed review of V.V. Sobolev's contributions to the theory of radiative transfer is presented. First, the basic problems of the theory of monochromatic scattering are formulated, which were introduced and solved approximately by the founders of the theory (E. Milne, A. Eddington, and others). Then the fundamental contribution by academician V.A. Ambartsumian, Sobolev's scientific adviser, to the analytical radiative transfer theory is summarized. Academician V.V. Sobolev continued and profoundly developed this theory. He pioneered new areas of the theory of multiple light scattering: the scattering of polarized radiation; the theory of a time-dependent radiation field; and the scattering in inhomogeneous media, in plane-parallel media with reflecting boundaries, and in media expanding with a velocity gradient. He proposed new approximate methods for solving the problems of anisotropic monochromatic scattering as well as scattering in spectral lines in stationary and expanding media which are still in use today. The most important Sobolev's contribution was to the exact analytical theory of radiative transfer. He proposed the probability method to solve radiative transfer problems and the probabilistic treatment of scattering processes; he introduced and justified the approximation of CFR in spectral lines; he developed the resolvent method for the exact solution to the basic integral equation describing monochromatic scattering and scattering in spectral lines; and he developed the theory of anisotropic scattering to analytic perfection. V.V. Sobolev applied these solutions to the interpretation of observation data for many astrophysical objects: photometric, polarimetric, and spectral characteristics of planetary atmospheres; spectra of stationary and non-stationary stars; and polarization of X-ray sources and quasars. V.V. Sobolev coauthored several papers with his students. The publications by Sobolev's disciples that continued his research

  3. A FORMALISM FOR COVARIANT POLARIZED RADIATIVE TRANSPORT BY RAY TRACING

    SciTech Connect

    Gammie, Charles F.; Leung, Po Kin

    2012-06-20

    We write down a covariant formalism for polarized radiative transfer appropriate for ray tracing through a turbulent plasma. The polarized radiation field is represented by the polarization tensor (coherency matrix) N{sup {alpha}{beta}} {identical_to} (a{sup {alpha}}{sub k} a*{sup {beta}}{sub k}), where a{sub k} is a Fourier coefficient for the vector potential. Using Maxwell's equations, the Liouville-Vlasov equation, and the WKB approximation, we show that the transport equation in vacuo is k{sup {mu}}{nabla}{sub {mu}} N{sup {alpha}{beta}} = 0. We show that this is equivalent to Broderick and Blandford's formalism based on invariant Stokes parameters and a rotation coefficient, and suggest a modification that may reduce truncation error in some situations. Finally, we write down several alternative approaches to integrating the transfer equation.

  4. Polarization effects in radiative decay of a polarized τ lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Gakh, G. I.; Konchatnij, M. I. Korchin, A. Yu.; Merenkov, N. P.

    2015-02-15

    The polarization effects in the one-meson radiative decay of a polarized τ lepton, τ → π{sup −}γν{sub τ}, are investigated. The inner bremsstrahlung and structural amplitudes are taken into account. The asymmetry of the differential decay width caused by the τ-lepton polarization and the Stokes parameters of the emitted photon itself are calculated depending on the polarization of the decaying τ lepton. These physical quantities are estimated numerically for an arbitrary direction of the τ lepton polarization 3-vector in the rest frame. The vector and axial-vector form factors describing the structure-dependent part of the decay amplitude are determined using the chiral effective theory with resonances (RχT)

  5. Auroral resonance line radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gladstone, G.R. )

    1992-02-01

    A model is developed for simulating the two-dimensional radiative transfer of resonance line emissions in auroras. The method of solution utilizes Fourier decomposition of the horizontal dependence in the intensity field so that the two-dimensional problem becomes a set of one-dimensional problems having different horizontal wavenumbers. The individual one-dimensional problems are solved for using a Feautrier-type solution of the differential-integral form of the radiative transfer equation. In the limit as the horizontal wavenumber becomes much larger than the local line-center extinction coefficient, the scattering integral becomes considerably simplified, and the final source function is evaluated in closed form. The two-dimensional aspects of the model are tested against results for nonresonance radiative transfer studies, and the resonance line part of the model is tested against results of existing plane-parallel resonance line radiative transfer codes. Finally, the model is used to simulate the intensity field of O{sub I} 1,304{angstrom} for hard and soft auroras of various Gaussian horizontal widths. The results demonstrate the importance of considering the effects of two-dimensional radiative transfer when analyzing auroral resonance line data.

  6. Radiative transfer in realistic planetary atmospheres. [bibliographies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plass, G. N.; Kattawar, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    Some 40 publications that appeared in scientific journals from 1973 to 1981 as well as 45 scientific reports issued during the grant period are listed by title. Topics cover the development of a matrix operator theory of radiative transfer which made possible the exact model calculations of the radiance as a function of height in planetary atmospheres; calculation of the Mie phase matrix for various types of particles as well as for radiance and polarization in planetary atmospheres; analysis of high dispersion spectroscopic observations of Venus; calculation of curves of growth for Venus; the development of a theory for calculating radiative transfer in spherical shell atmospheres; investigations of zonal winds on Venus; and examination of Rayleigh scattering.

  7. Radiative habitable zones in martian polar environments.

    PubMed

    Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Zorzano, María-Paz; Selsis, Franck; Patel, Manish R; Cockell, Charles S

    2005-06-01

    The biologically damaging solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation (quantified by the DNA-weighted dose) reaches the martian surface in extremely high levels. Searching for potentially habitable UV-protected environments on Mars, we considered the polar ice caps that consist of a seasonally varying CO2 ice cover and a permanent H2O ice layer. It was found that, though the CO2 ice is insufficient by itself to screen the UV radiation, at approximately 1 m depth within the perennial H2O ice the DNA-weighted dose is reduced to terrestrial levels. This depth depends strongly on the optical properties of the H2O ice layers (for instance snow-like layers). The Earth-like DNA-weighted dose and Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) requirements were used to define the upper and lower limits of the northern and southern polar Radiative Habitable Zone (RHZ) for which a temporal and spatial mapping was performed. Based on these studies we conclude that photosynthetic life might be possible within the ice layers of the polar regions. The thickness varies along each martian polar spring and summer between approximately 1.5 and 2.4 m for H2O ice-like layers, and a few centimeters for snow-like covers. These martian Earth-like radiative habitable environments may be primary targets for future martian astrobiological missions. Special attention should be paid to planetary protection, since the polar RHZ may also be subject to terrestrial contamination by probes.

  8. Radiative transfer in spherical atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkofen, W.; Wehrse, R.

    A method for defining spherical model atmospheres in radiative/convective and hydrostatic equilibrium is presented. A finite difference form is found for the transfer equation and a matrix operator is developed as the discrete space analog (in curvilinear coordinates) of a formal integral in plane geometry. Pressure is treated as a function of temperature. Flux conservation is maintained within the energy equation, although the correct luminosity transport must be assigned for any given level of the atmosphere. A perturbed integral operator is used in a complete linearization of the transfer and constraint equations. Finally, techniques for generating stable solutions in economical computer time are discussed.

  9. ARTIST: Adaptable Radiative Transfer Innovations for Submillimeter Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Jes; Brinch, Christian; Girart, Josep Miquel; Padovani, Marco; Frau, Pau; Schaaf, Reinhold; Kuiper, Rolf; Bertoldi, Frank; Hogerheijde, Michiel; Juhasz, Attila; Vlemmings, Wouter

    2014-02-01

    ARTIST is a suite of tools for comprehensive multi-dimensional radiative transfer calculations of dust and line emission, as well as their polarization, to help interpret observations from submillimeter telescopes. The ARTIST package consists of LIME, a radiative transfer code that uses adaptive gridding allowing simulations of sources with arbitrary multi-dimensional (1D, 2D, 3D) and time-dependent structures, thus ensuring rapid convergence; the DustPol and LinePol tools for modeling the polarization of the line and dust emission; and an interface run from Python scripts that manages the interaction between a general model library and LIME, and a graphical interface to simulate images.

  10. Polarization of the cosmic background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, Philip M.; Smoot, George F.

    1980-08-01

    We discuss the technique and results of a measurement of the linear polarization of the Cosmic Background Radiation. Data taken between May 1978 and February 1980 from both the northern hemisphere (Berkeley Lat. 38{sup o}N) and the southern hemisphere (Lima Lat. 12{sup o}s) over 11 declinations from -37{sup o} to +63{sup o} show the radiation to be essentially unpolarized over all areas surveyed. Fitting all data gives the 95% confidence level limit on a linearly polarized component of 0.3 mK for spherical harmonics through third order. A fit of all data to the anisotropic axisymmetric model of Rees (1968) yields a 95% confidence level limit of 0.15 mK for the magnitude of the polarized component. Constraints on various cosmological models are discussed in light of these limits.

  11. Polarization of the cosmic background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, P.M.

    1980-03-01

    The results and technique of a measurement of the linear polarization of the Cosmic Background Radiation are discussed. The ground-based experiment utilizes a single horn (7/sup 0/ beam width) Dicke-type microwave polarimeter operating at 33 GHz (9.1 mm). Data taken between May 1978 and February 1980 from both the northern hemisphere (Berkeley Lat. = 38/sup 0/N) and the southern hemisphere (Lima Lat. = 12/sup 0/S) show the radiation to be essentially unpolarized over all areas surveyed. For the 38/sup 0/ declination data the 95% confidence level limit on a linearly polarized component is 0.3 mK for the average and 12 and 24 hour periods. Fitting all data gives the 95% confidence level limit on a linearly polarized component of 0.3 mK for spherical harmonics through third order. Constraints on various cosmological models are discussed in light of these limits.

  12. Nonlinear response matrix methods for radiative transfer. [Radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.F. Jr.; Lewis, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear response matrix formalism is presented for the solution of time-dependent radiative transfer problems. The essential feature of the method is that within each computational cell the temperature is calculated in response to the incoming photons from all frequency groups. Thus the updating of the temperature distribution is placed within the iterative solution of the spaceangle transport problem, instead of being placed outside of it. The method is formulated for both grey and multifrequency problems and applied in slab geometry. The method is compared to the more conventional source iteration technique. 7 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. Polarized curvature radiation in pulsar magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. F.; Wang, C.; Han, J. L.

    2014-07-01

    The propagation of polarized emission in pulsar magnetosphere is investigated in this paper. The polarized waves are generated through curvature radiation from the relativistic particles streaming along curved magnetic field lines and corotating with the pulsar magnetosphere. Within the 1/γ emission cone, the waves can be divided into two natural wave-mode components, the ordinary (O) mode and the extraordinary (X) mode, with comparable intensities. Both components propagate separately in magnetosphere, and are aligned within the cone by adiabatic walking. The refraction of O mode makes the two components separated and incoherent. The detectable emission at a given height and a given rotation phase consists of incoherent X-mode and O-mode components coming from discrete emission regions. For four particle-density models in the form of uniformity, cone, core and patches, we calculate the intensities for each mode numerically within the entire pulsar beam. If the corotation of relativistic particles with magnetosphere is not considered, the intensity distributions for the X-mode and O-mode components are quite similar within the pulsar beam, which causes serious depolarization. However, if the corotation of relativistic particles is considered, the intensity distributions of the two modes are very different, and the net polarization of outcoming emission should be significant. Our numerical results are compared with observations, and can naturally explain the orthogonal polarization modes of some pulsars. Strong linear polarizations of some parts of pulsar profile can be reproduced by curvature radiation and subsequent propagation effect.

  14. Pulsed polarization transfer for 13C NMR in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bax, Ad; Szeverenyi, Nikolaus M.; Maciel, Gary E.

    A new pulsed polarization transfer experiment method is described for the polarization of 13C spins in a solid by magnetization transfer from protons. The method is directly analogous to the INEPT sequence for liquids introduced by Freeman and Morris. As polarization is transferred in PPT between individual 1H 13C pairs, rather than between spin reservoirs, different opportunities exist for structurally selective experiments. Results on p-diethoxybenzene and coronene are presented.

  15. Radiative transfer in dusty nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dana, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of dust scattering on observable optical and infrared parameters, and the accuracy of approximate solutions were examined. The equation of radiative transfer in a static and homogeneous, but not necessarily uniform, distribution gas and dust around a central empty core with a point source of energy at its center was solved. The dust properties were characterized by a phenomenological extinction cross section, albedo and parameters describing the anisotropy of dust scattering. For ultraviolet photons, ionization equilibrium equations for the gas were solved, and for infrared photons a self-consistent dust temperature was calculated. Ray tracing was used to solve for the angular dependence of the intensity.

  16. Stabilization of radiation reaction with vacuum polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Keita; Zhang, Sen; Koga, James; Nagatomo, Hideo; Nakai, Mitsuo; Mima, Kunioki

    2014-04-01

    From the development of the electron theory by H. A. Lorentz in 1906, many authors have tried to reformulate this model. P. A. M. Dirac derived the relativistic-classical electron model in 1938, which is now called the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac model. But this model has the big difficulty of the runaway solution. Recently, this equation has become important for ultra-intense laser-electron (plasma) interactions. For simulations in this research field, it is desirable to stabilize this model of the radiation reaction. In this paper, we will discuss this ability for radiation reaction with the inclusion of vacuum polarization.

  17. Polarized Continuum Radiation from Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, J. Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Continuum scattering by free electrons can be significant in early type stars, while in late type stars Rayleigh scattering by hydrogen atoms or molecules may be important. Computer programs used to construct models of stellar atmospheres generally treat the scattering of the continuum radiation as isotropic and unpolarized, but this scattering has a dipole angular dependence and will produce polarization. We review an accurate method for evaluating the polarization and limb darkening of the radiation from model stellar atmospheres. We use this method to obtain results for: (i) Late type stars, based on the MARCS code models (Gustafsson et al. 2008), and (ii) Early type stars, based on the NLTE code TLUSTY (Lanz and Hubeny 2003). These results are tabulated at http://www.astro.umd.edu/~jph/Stellar_Polarization.html. While the net polarization vanishes for an unresolved spherical star, this symmetry is broken by rapid rotation or by the masking of part of the star by a binary companion or during the transit of an exoplanet. We give some numerical results for these last cases.

  18. Super-Eddington radiation transfer in soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Andrew

    1994-12-01

    Bursts from soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) have been shown to be super-Eddington by a factor of 1000 and have been persuasively associated with compact objects. Super-Eddington radiation transfer on the surface of a strongly magnetic (greater than or equal to 1013 G) neutron star is studied and related to the observational constraints on SGRs. In strong magnetic fields, Thompson scattering is suppressed in one polarization state, so super-Eddington fluxes can be radiated while the plasma remains in hydrostatic equilibrium. We discuss a model which offers a somewhat natural explanation for the observation that the energy spectra of bursts with varying intensity are similar. The radiation produced is found to be linearly polarized to one part in 1000 in a direction determined by the local magnetic field, and intensity variations between bursts are understood as a change in the radiating area on the source. The net polarization is inversely correlated with burst intensity. Further, it is shown that for radiation transfer calculations in limit of superstrong magnetic fields, it is sufficient to solve the radiation transfer for the low opacity state rather than the coupled equations for both. With this approximation, standard stellar atmosphere techniques are utilized to calculate the model energy spectrum.

  19. Super-Eddington radiation transfer in soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    Bursts from soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) have been shown to be super-Eddington by a factor of 1000 and have been persuasively associated with compact objects. Super-Eddington radiation transfer on the surface of a strongly magnetic (greater than or equal to 10(exp 13) G) neutron star is studied and related to the observational constraints on SGRs. In strong magnetic fields, Thompson scattering is suppressed in one polarization state, so super-Eddington fluxes can be radiated while the plasma remains in hydrostatic equilibrium. We discuss a model which offers a somewhat natural explanation for the observation that the energy spectra of bursts with varying intensity are similar. The radiation produced is found to be linearly polarized to one part in 1000 in a direction determined by the local magnetic field, and intensity variations between bursts are understood as a change in the radiating area on the source. The net polarization is inversely correlated with burst intensity. Further, it is shown that for radiation transfer calculations in limit of superstrong magnetic fields, it is sufficient to solve the radiation transfer for the low opacity state rather than the coupled equations for both. With this approximation, standard stellar atmosphere techniques are utilized to calculate the model energy spectrum.

  20. Stochastic Radiative transfer and real cloudiness

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, F.

    1995-09-01

    Plane-parallel radiative transfer modeling of clouds in GCMs is thought to be an inadequate representation of the effects of real cloudiness. A promising new approach for studying the effects of cloud horizontal inhomogeneity is stochastic radiative transfer, which computes the radiative effects of ensembles of cloud structures described by probability distributions. This approach is appropriate because cloud information is inherently statistical, and it is the mean radiative effect of complex 3D cloud structure that is desired. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  1. BART: Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer fitting code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, Patricio; Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Rojo, Patricio; Lust, Nate; Bowman, Oliver; Stemm, Madison; Foster, Andrew; Loredo, Thomas J.; Fortney, Jonathan; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2016-08-01

    BART implements a Bayesian, Monte Carlo-driven, radiative-transfer scheme for extracting parameters from spectra of planetary atmospheres. BART combines a thermochemical-equilibrium code, a one-dimensional line-by-line radiative-transfer code, and the Multi-core Markov-chain Monte Carlo statistical module to constrain the atmospheric temperature and chemical-abundance profiles of exoplanets.

  2. Radiative transfer analyses of Titan's tropical atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.; Doose, Lyn; Tomasko, Martin G.; Penteado, Paulo F.; See, Charles

    2012-04-01

    Titan's optical and near-IR spectra result primarily from the scattering of sunlight by haze and its absorption by methane. With a column abundance of 92 km amagat (11 times that of Earth), Titan's atmosphere is optically thick and only ˜10% of the incident solar radiation reaches the surface, compared to 57% on Earth. Such a formidable atmosphere obstructs investigations of the moon's lower troposphere and surface, which are highly sensitive to the radiative transfer treatment of methane absorption and haze scattering. The absorption and scattering characteristics of Titan's atmosphere have been constrained by the Huygens Probe Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) experiment for conditions at the probe landing site (Tomasko, M.G., Bézard, B., Doose, L., Engel, S., Karkoschka, E. [2008a]. Planet. Space Sci. 56, 624-247; Tomasko, M.G. et al. [2008b]. Planet. Space Sci. 56, 669-707). Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) data indicate that the rest of the atmosphere (except for the polar regions) can be understood with small perturbations in the high haze structure determined at the landing site (Penteado, P.F., Griffith, C.A., Tomasko, M.G., Engel, S., See, C., Doose, L., Baines, K.H., Brown, R.H., Buratti, B.J., Clark, R., Nicholson, P., Sotin, C. [2010]. Icarus 206, 352-365). However the in situ measurements were analyzed with a doubling and adding radiative transfer calculation that differs considerably from the discrete ordinates codes used to interpret remote data from Cassini and ground-based measurements. In addition, the calibration of the VIMS data with respect to the DISR data has not yet been tested. Here, VIMS data of the probe landing site are analyzed with the DISR radiative transfer method and the faster discrete ordinates radiative transfer calculation; both models are consistent (to within 0.3%) and reproduce the scattering and absorption characteristics derived from in situ measurements. Constraints on the atmospheric

  3. One-way radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Rodríguez, Pedro; Ilan, Boaz; Kim, Arnold D.

    2016-06-01

    We introduce the one-way radiative transfer equation (RTE) for modeling the transmission of a light beam incident normally on a slab composed of a uniform forward-peaked scattering medium. Unlike the RTE, which is formulated as a boundary value problem, the one-way RTE is formulated as an initial value problem. Consequently, the one-way RTE is much easier to solve. We discuss the relation of the one-way RTE to the Fokker-Planck, small-angle, and Fermi pencil beam approximations. Then, we validate the one-way RTE through systematic comparisons with RTE simulations for both the Henyey-Greenstein and screened Rutherford scattering phase functions over a broad range of albedo, anisotropy factor, optical thickness, and refractive index values. We find that the one-way RTE gives very good approximations for a broad range of optical property values for thin to moderately thick media that have moderately to sharply forward-peaked scattering. Specifically, we show that the error made by the one-way RTE decreases monotonically as the anisotropic factor increases and as the albedo increases. On the other hand, the error increases monotonically as the optical thickness increases and the refractive index mismatch at the boundary increases.

  4. Basic theory for polarized, astrophysical maser radiation in a magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, William D.

    1994-01-01

    Fundamental alterations in the theory and resulting behavior of polarized, astrophysical maser radiation in the presence of a magnetic field have been asserted based on a calculation of instabilities in the radiative transfer. I reconsider the radiative transfer and find that the relevant instabilities do not occur. Calculational errors in the previous investigation are identified. In addition, such instabilities would have appeared -- but did not -- in the numerous numerical solutions to the same radiative transfer equations that have been presented in the literature. As a result, all modifications that have been presented in a recent series of papers (Elitzur 1991, 1993) to the theory for polarized maser radiation in the presence of a magnetic field are invalid. The basic theory is thus clarified.

  5. Reducing Cross-Polarized Radiation From A Microstrip Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John

    1991-01-01

    Change in configuration of feed of nominally linearly polarized microstrip-patch transmitting array antenna reduces cross-polarized component of its radiation. Patches fed on opposing sides, in opposite phases. Combination of spatial symmetry and temporal asymmetry causes copolarized components of radiation from fundamental modes of patches to reinforce each other and cross-polarized components of radiation from higher-order modes to cancel each other.

  6. Radiative heat transfer in porous uranium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, S.L.

    1992-12-01

    Due to low thermal conductivity and high emissivity of UO{sub 2}, it has been suggested that radiative heat transfer may play a significant role in heat transfer through pores of UO{sub 2} fuel. This possibility was computationally investigated and contribution of radiative heat transfer within pores to overall heat transport in porous UO{sub 2} quantified. A repeating unit cell was developed to model approximately a porous UO{sub 2} fuel system, and the heat transfer through unit cells representing a wide variety of fuel conditions was calculated using a finite element computer program. Conduction through solid fuel matrix as wekk as pore gas, and radiative exchange at pore surface was incorporated. A variety of pore compositions were investigated: porosity, pore size, shape and orientation, temperature, and temperature gradient. Calculations were made in which pore surface radiation was both modeled and neglected. The difference between yielding the integral contribution of radiative heat transfer mechanism to overall heat transport. Results indicate that radiative component of heat transfer within pores is small for conditions representative of light water reactor fuel, typically less than 1% of total heat transport. It is much larger, however, for conditions present in liquid metal fast breeder reactor fuel; during restructuring of this fuel type early in life, the radiative heat transfer mode was shown to contribute as much as 10-20% of total heat transport in hottest regions of fuel.

  7. Polarization radiation in the planetary atmosphere delimited by a heterogeneous diffusely reflecting surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strelkov, S. A.; Sushkevich, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    Spatial frequency characteristics (SFC) and the scattering functions were studied in the two cases of a uniform horizontal layer with absolutely black bottom, and an isolated layer. The mathematical model for these examples describes the horizontal heterogeneities in a light field with regard to radiation polarization in a three dimensional planar atmosphere, delimited by a heterogeneous surface with diffuse reflection. The perturbation method was used to obtain vector transfer equations which correspond to the linear and nonlinear systems of polarization radiation transfer. The boundary value tasks for the vector transfer equation that is a parametric set and one dimensional are satisfied by the SFC of the nonlinear system, and are expressed through the SFC of linear approximation. As a consequence of the developed theory, formulas were obtained for analytical calculation of albedo in solving the task of dissemination of polarization radiation in the planetary atmosphere with uniform Lambert bottom.

  8. THE RADIATIVE TRANSFER OF SYNCHROTRON RADIATION THROUGH A COMPRESSED RANDOM MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Cawthorne, T. V.; Hughes, P. A.

    2013-07-01

    This paper examines the radiative transfer of synchrotron radiation in the presence of a magnetic field configuration resulting from the compression of a highly disordered magnetic field. It is shown that, provided Faraday rotation and circular polarization can be neglected, the radiative transfer equations for synchrotron radiation separate for this configuration, and the intensities and polarization values for sources that are uniform on large scales can be found straightforwardly in the case where opacity is significant. Although the emission and absorption coefficients must, in general, be obtained numerically, the process is much simpler than a full numerical solution to the transfer equations. Some illustrative results are given and an interesting effect, whereby the polarization increases while the magnetic field distribution becomes less strongly confined to the plane of compression, is discussed. The results are of importance for the interpretation of polarization near the edges of lobes in radio galaxies and of bright features in the parsec-scale jets of active galactic nuclei, where such magnetic field configurations are believed to exist.

  9. Millimeter wave radiative transfer studies for precipitation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Evans, Frank

    1989-01-01

    Scattering calculations using the discrete dipole approximation and vector radiative transfer calculations were performed to model multiparameter radar return and passive microwave emission for a simple model of a winter storm. The issue of dendrite riming was addressed by computing scattering properties of thin ice disks with varying bulk density. It was shown that C-band multiparameter radar contains information about particle density and the number concentration of the ice particles. The radiative transfer modeling indicated that polarized multifrequency passive microwave emission may be used to infer some properties of ice hydrometers. Detailed radar modeling and vector radiative transfer modeling is in progress to enhance the understanding of simultaneous radar and radiometer measurements, as in the case of the proposed TRMM field program. A one-dimensional cloud model will be used to simulate the storm structure in detail and study the microphysics, such as size and density. Multifrequency polarized radiometer measurements from the SSMI satellite instrument will be analyzed in relation to dual-frequency and dual-polarization radar measurements.

  10. Microwave frequency modulation for improving polarization transfer in DNP experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Mallory; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a driven process that transfers the inherently high electron polarization to surrounding nuclear spins via microwave irradiation at or near the electron Larmor frequency. In a typical DNP experiment, the amplitude and frequency of the applied microwaves are constant. However, by adding time dependence in the form of frequency modulation, the electron excitation bandwidth is increased, thereby increasing the number of electron spins active in the polarization transfer process and improving overall efficiency. Both triangular and sinusoidal modulation show a 3 fold improvement over monochromatic irradiation. In the present study, we compare the nuclear spin polarization after DNP experiments with no modulation of the applied microwaves, triangular and sinusoidal modulation, and modulation schemes derived from the sample's ESR spectrum. We characterize the polarization as a function of the modulation amplitude and frequency and compare the optimal results from each modulation scheme. Working at a field of 3.34 T and at a temperature of 4 K, we show that by using a modulation scheme tailored to the electronic environment of the sample, polarization transfer is improved over other modulation schemes. Small-scale simulations of the spin system are developed to gain further insight into the dynamics of this driven open system. This understanding could enable the design of modulation schemes to achieve even higher polarization transfer efficiencies. With support from NSF (CHE-1410504) and by NIH (U19-A1091173).

  11. Methods of studying polarization of variable star radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakhovskoy, N. M.

    1973-01-01

    Polarized light from variable stars can be used to determine radiation intensity and wavelength. Various types of polarization analyzers are discussed (single-beam and double-beam) as well as their modes of use (continuous and discrete). Modulation of polarizers and determination of measurement accuracy are also covered.

  12. [Study on the thermal radiation polarization characteristics of ice].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting-Ting; Zhao, Yun-Sheng; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Xia; Zhang, Li-Li

    2014-03-01

    As an important parameter of the global energy balance, climate, hydrological and ecological model, ice directly affects the energy balance of the earth-atmosphere system, weather and climate. It is of great significance to use the thermal infrared polarization technology to study ice thermal radiation. For the ice monitoring and the impact of global climate change on the ice, studies on ice thermal radiation polarization characteristics were conducted based on the wavelength, detection angle and azimuth angle. The results show that the wavelength has an obvious impact on the ice thermal radiation polarization properties. The polarized radiance of four bands shows that L(CH1) > L(CH3) > L(CH4) > L(CH2) while the polarization brightness temperature shows that T(CH4) > T(CH1) > TCH2 > TCH3. It's better to use the brightness temperature of the third channel than the radiance to study the thermal radiation polarization. The detection angle affects the ice thermal radiation polarization characteristics greatly and there are some differences between the polarization angles. The brightness temperature of ice is the lowest in the detection angle of 10 degrees and the polarization angle of 30 degrees, which are non-accidental factors. These was closely related to ice physical and chemical properties. The degree of ice polarization performance shows that P0 < P40 polarization angles. The degree of polarization changes with the azimuth angles and plays an important role in ice physical and chemical characteristics monitoring. The impact of azimuth angle on the ice thermal radiation polarization characteristics was not significant. And it is affected by the roughness of the surface, organizational structure and other factors which are direct results of ice emitted radiation at different azimuth angles.

  13. Radiation heat transfer shapefactors for combustion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, A. F.; Johansson, O.; Abrous, A.

    1987-01-01

    The computation of radiation heat transfer through absorbing media is commonly done through the zoning method which relies upon values of the geometric mean transmittance and absorptance. The computation of these values is difficult and expensive, particularly if many spectral bands are used. This paper describes the extension of a scan line algorithm, based upon surface-surface radiation, to the computation of surface-gas and gas-gas radiation transmittances.

  14. Spectrally Invariant Approximation within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, J. C.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    Certain algebraic combinations of single scattering albedo and solar radiation reflected from, or transmitted through, vegetation canopies do not vary with wavelength. These spectrally invariant relationships are the consequence of wavelength independence of the extinction coefficient and scattering phase function in vegetation. In general, this wavelength independence does not hold in the atmosphere, but in cloud-dominated atmospheres the total extinction and total scattering phase function vary only weakly with wavelength. This paper identifies the atmospheric conditions under which the spectrally invariant approximation can accurately describe the extinction and scattering properties of cloudy atmospheres. The validity of the assumptions and the accuracy of the approximation are tested with 1D radiative transfer calculations using publicly available radiative transfer models: Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) and Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART). It is shown for cloudy atmospheres with cloud optical depth above 3, and for spectral intervals that exclude strong water vapor absorption, that the spectrally invariant relationships found in vegetation canopy radiative transfer are valid to better than 5%. The physics behind this phenomenon, its mathematical basis, and possible applications to remote sensing and climate are discussed.

  15. Spin polarization transfer by the radical pair mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Zarea, Mehdi Ratner, Mark A.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2015-08-07

    In a three-site representation, we study a spin polarization transfer from radical pair spins to a nearby electron or nuclear spin. The quantum dynamics of the radical pair spins is governed by a constant exchange interaction between the radical pair spins which have different Zeeman frequencies. Radical pair spins can recombine to the singlet ground state or to lower energy triplet states. It is then shown that the coherent dynamics of the radical pair induces spin polarization on the nearby third spin in the presence of a magnetic field. The spin polarization transfer depends on the difference between Zeeman frequencies, the singlet and triplet recombination rates, and on the exchange and dipole-dipole interactions between the different spins. In particular, the sign of the polarization depends on the exchange coupling between radical pair spins and also on the difference between singlet and triplet recombination rate constants.

  16. Transfer of a polarized proton beam from AGS to RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas, N.; Roser, T.; Syphers, M.; Luccio, A.; Underwood, D.

    1997-07-01

    As part of the RHIC project, the RHIC machine will also be able to accelerate polarized proton beam bunches. The bunches will be extracted from the AGS machine, with kinetic energy T = 25 GeV, and transferred into RHIC via the AtR transfer line. When the RHIC machine accelerates polarized protons, it will operate with two full snakes, which define the stable spin direction of a polarized proton beam circulating in each ring, along the vertical. Therefore a polarized proton beam should be injected into the RHIC machine with the stable spin direction along the vertical in order to match that of the RHIC machine. The layout of the dipole magnets of the AtR line creates a dependence, on the injection energy, of the stable spin direction of a polarized proton beam injected into the RHIC machine. In this paper, the study of the stable spin direction (at the RHIC injection point) of a polarized proton beam as a function of the injection energy is presented. A modification of the AtR transfer line, which eliminates this energy dependence (within the range of proton injection energies) of the stable spin direction is also presented.

  17. Lattice Boltzmann method for one-dimensional vector radiative transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hongliang; Tan, Heping

    2016-02-01

    A one-dimensional vector radiative transfer (VRT) model based on lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) that considers polarization using four Stokes parameters is developed. The angular space is discretized by the discrete-ordinates approach, and the spatial discretization is conducted by LBM. LBM has such attractive properties as simple calculation procedure, straightforward and efficient handing of boundary conditions, and capability of stable and accurate simulation. To validate the performance of LBM for vector radiative transfer, four various test problems are examined. The first case investigates the non-scattering thermal-emitting atmosphere with no external collimated solar. For the other three cases, the external collimated solar and three different scattering types are considered. Particularly, the LBM is extended to solve VRT in the atmospheric aerosol system where the scattering function contains singularities and the hemisphere space distributions for the Stokes vector are presented and discussed. The accuracy and computational efficiency of this algorithm are discussed. Numerical results show that the LBM is accurate, flexible and effective to solve one-dimensional polarized radiative transfer problems. PMID:26906779

  18. Efficient vector radiative transfer calculations in vertically inhomogeneous cloudy atmospheres.

    PubMed

    van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Hasekamp, Otto P; Landgraf, Jochen

    2006-08-10

    Accurate radiative transfer calculations in cloudy atmospheres are generally time consuming, limiting their practical use in satellite remote sensing applications. We present a model to efficiently calculate the radiative transfer of polarized light in atmospheres that contain homogeneous cloud layers. This model combines the Gauss-Seidel method, which is efficient for inhomogeneous cloudless atmospheres, with the doubling method, which is efficient for homogeneous cloud layers. Additionally to reduce the computational effort for radiative transfer calculations in absorption bands, the cloud reflection and transmission matrices are interpolated over the absorption and scattering optical thicknesses within the cloud layer. We demonstrate that the proposed radiative transfer model in combination with this interpolation technique is efficient for the simulation of satellite measurements for inhomogeneous atmospheres containing one homogeneous cloud layer. For example, the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY) measurements in the oxygen A band (758-773 nm) and the Hartley-Huggins ozone band (295-335 nm) with a spectral resolution of 0.4 nm can be simulated for these atmospheres within 1 min on a 2.8 GHz PC with an accuracy better than 0.1%.

  19. PRESTO polarization transfer to quadrupolar nuclei: Implications for dynamic nuclear polarization

    DOE PAGES

    Perras, Frederic A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-08-04

    In this study, we show both experimentally and numerically on a series of model systems that in experiments involving transfer of magnetization from 1H to the quadrupolar nuclei under magic-angle-spinning (MAS), the PRESTO technique consistently outperforms traditionally used cross polarization (CP), affording more quantitative intensities, improved lineshapes, better overall sensitivity, and straightforward optimization. This advantage derives from the fact that PRESTO circumvents the convoluted and uncooperative spin dynamics during the CP transfer under MAS, by replacing the spin-locking of quadrupolar nuclei with a single central transition selective 90° pulse and using a symmetry-based recoupling sequence in the 1H channel. Thismore » is important in the context of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR of quadrupolar nuclei, where the efficient transfer of enhanced 1H polarization is desired to obtain the highest sensitivity.« less

  20. PRESTO polarization transfer to quadrupolar nuclei: Implications for dynamic nuclear polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-08-04

    In this study, we show both experimentally and numerically on a series of model systems that in experiments involving transfer of magnetization from 1H to the quadrupolar nuclei under magic-angle-spinning (MAS), the PRESTO technique consistently outperforms traditionally used cross polarization (CP), affording more quantitative intensities, improved lineshapes, better overall sensitivity, and straightforward optimization. This advantage derives from the fact that PRESTO circumvents the convoluted and uncooperative spin dynamics during the CP transfer under MAS, by replacing the spin-locking of quadrupolar nuclei with a single central transition selective 90° pulse and using a symmetry-based recoupling sequence in the 1H channel. This is important in the context of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR of quadrupolar nuclei, where the efficient transfer of enhanced 1H polarization is desired to obtain the highest sensitivity.

  1. Astronomical polarization studies at radio and infrared wavelengths. Part 1: Gravitational deflection of polarized radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, B. K.

    1976-01-01

    The gravitational field is probed in a search for polarization dependence in the light bending. This involves searching for a splitting of a source image into orthogonal polarizations as the radiation passes through the solar gravitational field. This search was carried out using the techniques of very long and intermediate baseline interferometry, and by seeking a relative phase delay in orthogonal polarizations of microwaves passing through the solar gravitational field. In this last technique a change in the total polarization of the Helios 1 carrier wave was sought as the spacecraft passed behind the sun. No polarization splitting was detected.

  2. Tests of Exoplanet Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Joseph; Challener, Ryan; DeLarme, Emerson; Cubillos, Patricio; Blecic, Jasmina; Foster, Austin; Garland, Justin

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric radiative transfer codes are used both to predict planetary spectra and in retrieval algorithms to interpret data. Observational plans, theoretical models, and scientific results thus depend on the correctness of these calculations. Yet, the calculations are complex and the codes implementing them are often written without modern software-verification techniques. In the process of writing our own code, we became aware of several others with artifacts of unknown origin and even outright errors in their spectra. We present a series of tests to verify atmospheric radiative-transfer codes. These include: simple, single-line line lists that, when combined with delta-function abundance profiles, should produce a broadened line that can be verified easily; isothermal atmospheres that should produce analytically-verifiable blackbody spectra at the input temperatures; and model atmospheres with a range of complexities that can be compared to the output of other codes. We apply the tests to our own code, Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) and to several other codes. The test suite is open-source software. We propose this test suite as a standard for verifying current and future radiative transfer codes, analogous to the Held-Suarez test for general circulation models. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G.

  3. Groups in the radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikoghossian, Arthur

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents a group-theoretical description of radiation transfer in inhomogeneous and multi-component atmospheres with the plane-parallel geometry. It summarizes and generalizes the results obtained recently by the author for some standard transfer problems of astrophysical interest with allowance of the angle and frequency distributions of the radiation field. We introduce the concept of composition groups for media with different optical and physical properties. Group representations are derived for two possible cases of illumination of a composite finite atmosphere. An algorithm for determining the reflectance and transmittance of inhomogeneous and multi-component atmospheres is described. The group theory is applied also to determining the field of radiation inside an inhomogeneous atmosphere. The concept of a group of optical depth translations is introduced. The developed theory is illustrated with the problem of radiation diffusion with partial frequency distribution assuming that the inhomogeneity is due to depth-variation of the scattering coefficient. It is shown that once reflectance and transmittance of a medium are determined, the internal field of radiation in the source-free atmosphere is found without solving any new equations. The transfer problems for a semi-infinite atmosphere and an atmosphere with internal sources of energy are discussed. The developed theory allows to derive summation laws for the mean number of scattering events underwent by the photons in the course of diffusion in the atmosphere.

  4. Multiple scattered radiation emerging from continental haze layers. 1: Radiance, polarization, and neutral points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattawar, G. W.; Plass, G. N.; Hitzfelder, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    The complete radiation field is calculated for scattering layers of various optical thicknesses. Results obtained for Rayleigh and haze scattering are compared. Calculated radiances show differences as large as 23% compared to the approximate scalar theory of radiative transfer, while the same differences are approximately 0.1% for a continental haze phase function. The polarization of reflected and transmitted radiation is given for various optical thicknesses, solar zenith angles, and surface albedos. Two types of neutral points occur for aerosol phase functions. Rayleigh-like neutral points arise from zero polarization that occurs at scattering angles of 0 deg and 180 deg. For Rayleigh phase functions, the position of these points varies with the optical thickness of the scattering layer. Non-Rayleigh neutral points are associated with the zeros of polarization which occur between the end points of the single scattering curve, and are found over a wide range of azimuthal angles.

  5. Infrared radiative energy transfer in gaseous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1991-01-01

    Analyses and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the radiative interactions in various energy transfer processes in gaseous systems. Both gray and non-gray radiative formulations for absorption and emission by molecular gases are presented. The gray gas formulations are based on the Planck mean absorption coefficient and the non-gray formulations are based on the wide band model correlations for molecular absorption. Various relations for the radiative flux and divergence of radiative flux are developed. These are useful for different flow conditions and physical problems. Specific plans for obtaining extensive results for different cases are presented. The procedure developed was applied to several realistic problems. Results of selected studies are presented.

  6. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation and its Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollack, Edward

    2016-03-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation and its faint polarization have provided a unique means to constrain the physical state of the early Universe. Continued advances in instrumentation, observation, and analysis have revealed polarized radiation signatures associated with gravitational lensing and have heightened the prospects for using precision polarimetry to experimentally confront the inflationary paradigm. Characterization of this relic radiation field has the power to constrain or reveal the detailed properties of astroparticle species and long wave gravitational radiation. On going and planned CMB polarization efforts from the ground, balloon, and space borne platforms will be briefly surveyed. Recent community activities by the Inflation Probe Science Interest Group (IPSIG) will also be summarized. NASA PCOS mini-symposium (invited IPSIG talk).

  7. RRTM: A rapid radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    Mlawer, E.J.; Taubman, S.J.; Clough, S.A.

    1996-04-01

    A rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) for the calculation of longwave clear-sky fluxes and cooling rates has been developed. The model, which uses the correlated-k method, is both accurate and computationally fast. The foundation for RRTM is the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) from which the relevant k-distributions are obtained. LBLRTM, which has been extensively validated against spectral observations e.g., the high-resolution sounder and the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, is used to validate the flux and cooling rate results from RRTM. Validations of RRTM`s results have been performed for the tropical, midlatitude summer, and midlatitude winter atmospheres, as well as for the four Intercomparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) cases from the Spectral Radiance Experiment (SPECTRE). Details of some of these validations are presented below. RRTM has the identical atmospheric input module as LBLRTM, facilitating intercomparisons with LBLRTM and application of the model at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed sites.

  8. Modeling of Radiative Transfer in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VonAllmen, Paul; Turner, Neal

    2007-01-01

    This program implements a spectral line, radiative transfer tool for interpreting Spitzer Space Telescope observations by matching them with models of protostellar disks for improved understanding of planet and star formation. The Spitzer Space Telescope detects gas phase molecules in the infrared spectra of protostellar disks, with spectral lines carrying information on the chemical composition of the material from which planets form. Input to the software includes chemical models developed at JPL. The products are synthetic images and spectra for comparison with Spitzer measurements. Radiative transfer in a protostellar disk is primarily affected by absorption and emission processes in the dust and in molecular gases such as H2, CO, and HCO. The magnitude of the optical absorption and emission is determined by the population of the electronic, vibrational, and rotational energy levels. The population of the molecular level is in turn determined by the intensity of the radiation field. Therefore, the intensity of the radiation field and the population of the molecular levels are inter-dependent quantities. To meet the computational challenges of solving for the coupled radiation field and electronic level populations in disks having wide ranges of optical depths and spatial scales, the tool runs in parallel on the JPL Dell Cluster supercomputer with C++ and Fortran compiler with a Message Passing Interface. Because this software has been developed on a distributed computing platform, the modeling of systems previously beyond the reach of available computational resources is possible.

  9. Transfer of infrared radiation through clouds.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, P M; Weickmann, H K; Lojko, M J; Stearns, L P

    1974-03-01

    Calculations of radiative through and resulting ir cooling of cloud forms is certainly more difficult than observations. Based on observations, a radiative transfer model has been developed for absorption in clouds employing an observationally determined volume absorption coefficient, ranging from 0.0005 to 0.0007 cm(-1). This model does not require any assumption of cloud blackness or thickness and permits clouds to remain partially transparent or opaque as their thickness and absorption dictate. Agreement within a standard deviation of 12.0 W m(-2) between observation and calculation has been maintained in approximately twenty profiles through clouds. The standard deviation was determined from some 140 observations.

  10. Arabidopsis thalianafrom Polarization Transfer Solid-State NMR

    SciTech Connect

    White, Paul B; Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Hong, Mei

    2014-07-23

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are hydrated under functional conditions, but the molecular interactions between water and polysaccharides in the wall have not been investigated. In this work, we employ polarization transfer solid-state NMR techniques to study the hydration of primary-wall polysaccharides of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. By transferring water 1H polarization to polysaccharides through distance- and mobility-dependent 1H–1H dipolar couplings and detecting it through polysaccharide 13C signals, we obtain information about water proximity to cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins as well as water mobility. Both intact and partially extracted cell wall samples are studied. Our results show that water–pectin polarization transfer is much faster than water–cellulose polarization transfer in all samples, but the extent of extraction has a profound impact on the water–polysaccharide spin diffusion. Removal of calcium ions and the consequent extraction of homogalacturonan (HG) significantly slowed down spin diffusion, while further extraction of matrix polysaccharides restored the spin diffusion rate. These trends are observed in cell walls with similar water content, thus they reflect inherent differences in the mobility and spatial distribution of water. Combined with quantitative analysis of the polysaccharide contents, our results indicate that calcium ions and HG gelation increase the amount of bound water, which facilitates spin diffusion, while calcium removal disrupts the gel and gives rise to highly dynamic water, which slows down spin diffusion. The recovery of spin diffusion rates after more extensive extraction is attributed to increased water-exposed surface areas of the polysaccharides. Water–pectin spin diffusion precedes water–cellulose spin diffusion, lending support to the single-network model of plant primary walls in which a substantial fraction of the cellulose surface is surrounded by pectins.

  11. Enhancing radiative energy transfer through thermal extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yixuan; Liu, Baoan; Shen, Sheng; Yu, Zongfu

    2016-06-01

    Thermal radiation plays an increasingly important role in many emerging energy technologies, such as thermophotovoltaics, passive radiative cooling and wearable cooling clothes [1]. One of the fundamental constraints in thermal radiation is the Stefan-Boltzmann law, which limits the maximum power of far-field radiation to P0 = σT4S, where σ is the Boltzmann constant, S and T are the area and the temperature of the emitter, respectively (Fig. 1a). In order to overcome this limit, it has been shown that near-field radiations could have an energy density that is orders of magnitude greater than the Stefan-Boltzmann law [2-7]. Unfortunately, such near-field radiation transfer is spatially confined and cannot carry radiative heat to the far field. Recently, a new concept of thermal extraction was proposed [8] to enhance far-field thermal emission, which, conceptually, operates on a principle similar to oil immersion lenses and light extraction in light-emitting diodes using solid immersion lens to increase light output [62].Thermal extraction allows a blackbody to radiate more energy to the far field than the apparent limit of the Stefan-Boltzmann law without breaking the second law of thermodynamics. Thermal extraction works by using a specially designed thermal extractor to convert and guide the near-field energy to the far field, as shown in Fig. 1b. The same blackbody as shown in Fig. 1a is placed closely below the thermal extractor with a spacing smaller than the thermal wavelength. The near-field coupling transfers radiative energy with a density greater than σT4. The thermal extractor, made from transparent and high-index or structured materials, does not emit or absorb any radiation. It transforms the near-field energy and sends it toward the far field. As a result, the total amount of far-field radiative heat dissipated by the same blackbody is greatly enhanced above SσT4, where S is the area of the emitter. This paper will review the progress in thermal

  12. Elliptically polarized terahertz radiation from a chiral oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, R.; Kida, N. Sotome, M.; Okamoto, H.

    2015-09-28

    Polarization control of terahertz wave is a challenging subject in terahertz science and technology. Here, we report a simple method to control polarization state of the terahertz wave in terahertz generation process. At room temperature, terahertz radiation from a noncentrosymmetric and chiral oxide, sillenite Bi{sub 12}GeO{sub 20}, is observed by the irradiation of linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulses at 800 nm. The polarization state of the emitted terahertz wave is found to be elliptic with an ellipticity of ∼0.37 ± 0.10. Furthermore, the ellipticity was altered to a nearly zero (∼0.01 ± 0.01) by changing the polarization of the incident linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulses. Such a terahertz radiation characteristic is attributable to variation of the polarization state of the emitted terahertz waves, which is induced by retardation due to the velocity mismatch between the incident femtosecond laser pulse and generated terahertz wave and by the polarization tilting due to the optical activity at 800 nm.

  13. Introductory Tools for Radiative Transfer Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, D.; Kuai, L.; Natraj, V.; Yung, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Satellite data are currently so voluminous that, despite their unprecedented quality and potential for scientific application, only a small fraction is analyzed due to two factors: researchers' computational constraints and a relatively small number of researchers actively utilizing the data. Ultimately it is hoped that the terabytes of unanalyzed data being archived can receive scientific scrutiny but this will require a popularization of the methods associated with the analysis. Since a large portion of complexity is associated with the proper implementation of the radiative transfer model, it is reasonable and appropriate to make the model as accessible as possible to general audiences. Unfortunately, the algorithmic and conceptual details that are necessary for state-of-the-art analysis also tend to frustrate the accessibility for those new to remote sensing. Several efforts have been made to have web- based radiative transfer calculations, and these are useful for limited calculations, but analysis of more than a few spectra requires the utilization of home- or server-based computing resources. We present a system that is designed to allow for easier access to radiative transfer models with implementation on a home computing platform in the hopes that this system can be utilized in and expanded upon in advanced high school and introductory college settings. This learning-by-doing process is aided through the use of several powerful tools. The first is a wikipedia-style introduction to the salient features of radiative transfer that references the seminal works in the field and refers to more complicated calculations and algorithms sparingly5. The second feature is a technical forum, commonly referred to as a tiki-wiki, that addresses technical and conceptual questions through public postings, private messages, and a ranked searching routine. Together, these tools may be able to facilitate greater interest in the field of remote sensing.

  14. Polarization measurement and vertical aperture optimization for obtaining circularly polarized bend-magnet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M.; Hussain, Z.

    1995-10-01

    Using multilayer linear polarizers, we have studied the polarization state of radiation from bend magnet beamline 9.3.2 at Advanced Light Source as function of vertical oping angle at photon energies 367 and 722 eV. Both a fine slit and a coarse semi-aperture were stepped across the beam to accept different parts of the vertical radiation fan. Polarimetry yields the degree of linear polarization directly and the degree of circular polarization indirectly assuming an immeasurably small amount of unpolarized radiation based on close agreement of theory and experiment for linear polarization. Results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations, with departures from theory owing to uncertainty in effective aperture of the measured beam. The narrow 0.037 mrad aperture on the orbit plane transmits a beam whose degree of linear polarization exceeds 0.99 at these energies. The wide semi-aperture blocking the beam from above and below transmits a beam with a max figure of merit, given by the square root of flux times degree of circular polarization, when the aperture edge is on the orbit plane thus blocking only half of the total available flux.

  15. Polarized Radiation Diagnostics for Measuring the Magnetic Field of the Outer Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2012-12-01

    The basic idea of optical pumping, for which Alfred Kastler received the 1966 Nobel Prize in physics, is that the absorption and scattering of light that is near-resonant with an optical transition can produce large population imbalances among the magnetic sublevels of atomic ground states as well as in excited states. The degree of this radiatively-induced atomic level polarization, which is very sensitive to the presence of magnetic fields, can be determined by observing the polarization of the scattered or transmitted spectral line radiation. Probably, the most important point for solar physics is that the outer solar atmosphere is indeed an optically pumped vapor and that the polarization of the emergent spectral line radiation can be exploited for detecting magnetic fields that are too weak and/or too tangled so as to produce measurable Zeeman polarization signals. In this talk we review some recent radiative transfer simulations of the polarization produced by optical pumping in selected IR, FUV and EUV spectral lines, showing that their sensitivity to the Hanle effect is very suitable for magnetic field measurements in the outer solar atmosphere. We argue that solar magnetometry using the spectral lines of optically pumped atoms in the chromosphere, transition region and corona should be a high-priority goal for large aperture solar telescopes, such as ATST, EST and SOLAR-C.

  16. Comparison of the University of California at Los Angeles Line-by-Line Equivalent Radiative Transfer Model and the Moderate-Resolution Transmission Model for accuracy assessment of the National Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System's Visible-Infrared Imager-Radiometer Suite cloud algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ou, S C; Liou, K N; Takano, Y; Wong, E; Hutchison, K; Samec, T

    2005-10-10

    To support the verification and implementation of the National Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System's Visible-Infrared Imaging-Radiometric Suite (VIIRS) algorithms used for inferring cloud environmental data records, an intercomparison effort has been carried out to assess the consistency between the simulated cloudy radiances-reflectances from the University of California at Los Angeles Line-by-Line Equivalent Radiative Transfer Model and those from the Moderate-Resolution Transmission Model (MODTRAN) with the 16 stream Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer Model (DISORT) incorporated. For typical ice and water cloud optical depths and particle sizes, we found discrepancies in the visible and near-infrared reflectances from the two models, which presumably are due to the difference in phase function (nonspherical versus Henyey-Greenstein), different numbers of phase function expansion terms (16 versus 200 terms), and different treatment of forward peak truncation in each model. Using the MODTRAN4, we also found substantial differences in the infrared radiances for optically thick clouds. These differences led to the discovery by MODTRAN4 developers of an inconsistency in the MODTRAN4-DISORT interface. MODTRAN4 developers corrected the inconsistency, which provided dramatic reductions in the differences between the two radiative transfer models. The comparison not only affects the prospective test plan for the VIIRS cloud algorithms but also should lead to improvements in future MODTRAN releases.

  17. Radiative polarization of electrons in a strong laser wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlovets, Dmitry V.

    2011-12-01

    We reanalyze the problem of radiative polarization of electrons brought into collision with a circularly polarized strong plane wave. We present an independent analytical verification of formulas for the cross section given by Ivanov [Eur. Phys. J. CEPCFFB1434-604410.1140/epjc/s2004-01861-x 36, 127 (2004)]. By choosing the exact electron's helicity as the spin quantum number we show that the self-polarization effect exists only for the moderately relativistic electrons with energy γ=E/mc2≲10 and only for a non-head-on collision geometry. In these conditions polarization degree may achieve values up to 65%, but the effective polarization time is found to be larger than 1 s even for a high-power optical or infrared laser with intensity parameter ξ=|E|mc2/Ecℏω˜0.1 (Ec=m2c3/eℏ). This makes such a polarization practically unrealizable. We also compare these results with the ones of some papers where the high degree of polarization was predicted for ultrarelativistic case. We argue that this apparent contradiction arises due to the different choice of the spin quantum numbers. In particular, the quantum numbers that provide the high degree of polarization represent neither helicity nor transverse polarization, which makes the use of them inconvenient in practice.

  18. Radiative polarization of electrons in a strong laser wave

    SciTech Connect

    Karlovets, Dmitry V.

    2011-12-15

    We reanalyze the problem of radiative polarization of electrons brought into collision with a circularly polarized strong plane wave. We present an independent analytical verification of formulas for the cross section given by Ivanov et al.[Eur. Phys. J. C 36, 127 (2004)]. By choosing the exact electron's helicity as the spin quantum number we show that the self-polarization effect exists only for the moderately relativistic electrons with energy {gamma}=E/mc{sup 2} < or approx. 10 and only for a non-head-on collision geometry. In these conditions polarization degree may achieve values up to 65%, but the effective polarization time is found to be larger than 1 s even for a high-power optical or infrared laser with intensity parameter {xi}=|E|mc{sup 2}/E{sub c}({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}{approx}0.1 (E{sub c}=m{sup 2}c{sup 3}/e({Dirac_h}/2{pi})). This makes such a polarization practically unrealizable. We also compare these results with the ones of some papers where the high degree of polarization was predicted for ultrarelativistic case. We argue that this apparent contradiction arises due to the different choice of the spin quantum numbers. In particular, the quantum numbers that provide the high degree of polarization represent neither helicity nor transverse polarization, which makes the use of them inconvenient in practice.

  19. Search for Linear Polarization of the Cosmic Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lubin, P. M.; Smoot, G. F.

    1978-10-01

    We present preliminary measurements of the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background (3 deg K blackbody) radiation. These ground-based measurements are made at 9 mm wavelength. We find no evidence for linear polarization, and set an upper limit for a polarized component of 0.8 m deg K with a 95% confidence level. This implies that the present rate of expansion of the Universe is isotropic to one part in 10{sup 6}, assuming no re-ionization of the primordial plasma after recombination

  20. Polarization Bremsstrahlung radiation on a nanosphere in a dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astapenko, V. A.

    2011-11-01

    Within the limits of a new approach based on the Mie scattering theory, polarization bremsstrahlung radiation (PBR), arising during electron scattering on a metallic nanosphere with radius from 10 to 100 nm placed in a dielectric medium is theoretically investigated. The spectral range close to the plasmon resonance is considered, where the contribution of the polarized channel to bremsstrahlung radiation dominates. Spectral, velocity, and angular PBR characteristics are calculated. The sensitivity of the PBR spectrum to the dielectric permittivity of the medium surrounding the nanosphere is demonstrated.

  1. Radiative transfer in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Amanda J. L.

    In recent years, much debate has surrounded phenomena such as the depletion of the ozone layer and the onset of greenhouse warming, which have occurred due to the changing concentrations of various constituents in the earth's atmosphere. The influx into the middle atmosphere of unnatural quantities of trace gases such as carbon dioxide and methane is likely to affect global climate both adversely and irreversibly. In order to model the response of the atmosphere to these changes, and to evaluate the relative importance of various gases in the interlinked radiative, dynamical, and chemical processes taking place, it is vital that we understand as fully as possible the role played by radiative transfer. To this end, a detailed yet flexible numerical model, covering the entire infrared spectrum, was developed for the study of radiative transfer processes in the stratosphere and mesosphere. The scheme is intended to be as accurate as possible within the constraints of available computer resources, and to produce reference heating rates against which those derived using more approximate methods may be checked. Particular consideration was given to minor constituents, including water vapor, methane, and nitrous oxide, whose roles were underestimated in many previous studies, and to minor spectral bands of major constituents, such as the 4.3 micron and 10 micron bands of carbon dioxide and the 14.3 micron band of ozone, whose importance with regard to the radiative balance of the middle atmosphere has not yet been fully evaluated. Considerable attention is paid to the calculation of atmospheric transmittance: the sensitivity of the heating rates to the choice of narrow band Goody or Malkmus model transmittances, as opposed to those generated using the high-resolution GENLN2 line-by-line model is assessed. Diffuse radiation is accounted for by explicit Gaussian integration over zenith angle, and the way in which heating rates thus generated differ from those derived with

  2. Radiative Transfer in the Middle Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Amanda J. L.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. In recent years, much debate has surrounded phenomena such as the depletion of the ozone layer and the onset of greenhouse warming, which have occurred due to the changing concentrations of various constituents in the earth's atmosphere. The influx into the middle atmosphere of unnatural quantities of trace gases such as carbon dioxide and methane is likely to affect global climate both adversely and irreversibly. In order to model the response of the atmosphere to these changes, and to evaluate the relative importance of various gases in the interlinked radiative, dynamical and chemical processes taking place, it is vital that we understand as fully as possible the role played by radiative transfer. To this end, a detailed yet flexible numerical model, covering the entire infrared spectrum, has been developed for the study of radiative transfer processes in the stratosphere and mesosphere. The scheme is intended to be as accurate as possible within the constraints of available computer resources, and to produce reference heating rates against which those derived using more approximate methods may be checked. Particular consideration has been given to minor constituents, including water vapour, methane and nitrous oxide, whose roles have been underestimated in many previous studies, and to minor spectral bands of major constituents, such as the 4.3 μm and 10 μm bands of carbon dioxide and the 14.3 μm band of ozone, whose importance with regard to the radiative balance of the middle atmosphere has not yet been fully evaluated. Considerable attention is paid to the calculation of atmospheric transmittance: the sensitivity of the heating rates to the choice of narrow band Goody or Malkmus model transmittances, as opposed to those generated using the high-resolution GENLN2 line -by-line model, is assessed. Diffuse radiation is accounted for by explicit Gaussian integration over zenith

  3. Polarimetric signatures of a coniferous forest canopy based on vector radiative transfer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karam, M. A.; Fung, A. K.; Amar, F.; Mougin, E.; Lopes, A.; Beaudoin, A.

    1992-01-01

    Complete polarization signatures of a coniferous forest canopy are studied by the iterative solution of the vector radiative transfer equations up to the second order. The forest canopy constituents (leaves, branches, stems, and trunk) are embedded in a multi-layered medium over a rough interface. The branches, stems and trunk scatterers are modeled as finite randomly oriented cylinders. The leaves are modeled as randomly oriented needles. For a plane wave exciting the canopy, the average Mueller matrix is formulated in terms of the iterative solution of the radiative transfer solution and used to determine the linearly polarized backscattering coefficients, the co-polarized and cross-polarized power returns, and the phase difference statistics. Numerical results are presented to investigate the effect of transmitting and receiving antenna configurations on the polarimetric signature of a pine forest. Comparison is made with measurements.

  4. Markov chain formalism for polarized light transfer in plane-parallel atmospheres, with numerical comparison to the Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Davis, Anthony B; West, Robert A; Esposito, Larry W

    2011-01-17

    Building on the Markov chain formalism for scalar (intensity only) radiative transfer, this paper formulates the solution to polarized diffuse reflection from and transmission through a vertically inhomogeneous atmosphere. For verification, numerical results are compared to those obtained by the Monte Carlo method, showing deviations less than 1% when 90 streams are used to compute the radiation from two types of atmospheres, pure Rayleigh and Rayleigh plus aerosol, when they are divided into sublayers of optical thicknesses of less than 0.03.

  5. Radiation measurements from polar and geosynchronous satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.

    1973-01-01

    During the 1960's, radiation budget measurements from satellites have allowed quantitative study of the global energetics of our atmosphere-ocean system. A continuing program is planned, including independent measurement of the solar constant. Thus far, the measurements returned from two basically different types of satellite experiments are in agreement on the long term global scales where they are most comparable. This fact, together with independent estimates of the accuracy of measurement from each system, shows that the energy exchange between earth and space is now measured better than it can be calculated. Examples of application of the radiation budget data were shown. They can be related to the age-old problem of climate change, to the basic question of the thermal forcing of our circulation systems, and to the contemporary problems of local area energetics and computer modeling of the atmosphere.

  6. Elliptical polarization of Saturn Kilometric Radiation observed from high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, G.; Cecconi, B.; Lamy, L.; Ye, S.-Y.; Taubenschuss, U.; Macher, W.; Zarka, P.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2009-08-01

    The high-inclination orbits of the Cassini spacecraft from autumn 2006 until spring 2007 allowed the Cassini/RPWS (Radio and Plasma Wave Science) instrument to observe Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) from latitudes up to 60° for the first time. This has revealed a surprising new property of SKR: above ˜30° in observational latitude, a significant amount of SKR is strongly elliptically polarized, in marked contrast to previous observations from low latitudes, which showed only circular polarization. There are transitional latitudes where the elliptical polarization occurs in “patches” in the time-frequency spectrograms next to regions of still completely circularly polarized SKR. From ˜45° to 60° in northern latitude, it is found that most of the SKR is elliptically polarized throughout its entire frequency range with an average degree of ˜0.7 in linear polarization. We demonstrate the ellipticity of SKR by using the concept of “apparent polarization” in case of two-antenna measurements, but also show three-antenna measurements from which the polarization can be unambiguously determined. Possible reasons for the variation of SKR polarization with the observer's latitude will be discussed.

  7. Evaluation of three different radiative transfer equation solvers for combined conduction and radiation heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yujia; Zhang, Xiaobing; Howell, John R.

    2016-11-01

    This work investigates the performance of P1 method, FVM and SP3 method for 2D combined conduction and radiation heat transfer problem. Results based on the Monte Carlo method coupled with the energy equation are used as the benchmark solutions. Effects of the conduction-radiation parameter and optical thickness are considered. Performance analyses in term of the accuracy of heat flux and temperature predictions and of computing time are presented and analyzed.

  8. Spectra of circularly polarized radiation from astrophysical OH masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Watson, William D.

    1990-01-01

    A striking feature of astrophysical masers is the tendency for either one or the other of the circular polarizations to dominate in the radiation from the strong, widely observed masing transitions of OH at 18 cm. Spectral line profiles are calculated for polarized maser radiation due to the combined effects of a velocity gradient and, as is indicated for these transitions, a Zeeman splitting that is at least comparable with the thermal contributions to the breadths of the spectral lines. The resulting spectral features are similar in appearance, including the presence of large net circular polarization and narrow line breadths, to the commonly observed spectra of OH masers in molecular clouds. The calculations presented here are performed as a function of frequency without making the approximations of a large velocity gradient. Rapid cross relaxation, which has been advocated by others for the OH masers, is assumed.

  9. Spectromicroscopy Study of the Organic Molecules Utilizing Polarized Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Y.J.; Wei, D.H.; Yin, G.C.; Chung, S.C.; Hu, W.S.; Tao, Y.T.

    2004-05-12

    Spectromicroscopy combined with polarized synchrotron radiation is a powerful tool for imaging and characterizing the molecular properties on surface. In this work we utilized the photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) with linear polarized radiation provided by an elliptically polarized undulator to investigate the molecular orientations of pentacene on self-assembled monolayer (SAMs) modified gold surface and to observe the cluster domain of mixed monolayers after reorganization on silver. Varying the electric vector parallel or perpendicular to the surface, the relative intensity of {pi}* and {sigma}* transition in carbon K-edge can be used to determine the orientation of the planar-shaped pentacene molecule or long carbon chain of carboxylic acids which are important for organic semiconductor.

  10. Radiation and Polarization Signatures of the 3D Multizone Time-dependent Hadronic Blazar Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Diltz, Chris; Böttcher, Markus

    2016-10-01

    We present a newly developed time-dependent three-dimensional multizone hadronic blazar emission model. By coupling a Fokker-Planck-based lepto-hadronic particle evolution code, 3DHad, with a polarization-dependent radiation transfer code, 3DPol, we are able to study the time-dependent radiation and polarization signatures of a hadronic blazar model for the first time. Our current code is limited to parameter regimes in which the hadronic γ-ray output is dominated by proton synchrotron emission, neglecting pion production. Our results demonstrate that the time-dependent flux and polarization signatures are generally dominated by the relation between the synchrotron cooling and the light-crossing timescale, which is largely independent of the exact model parameters. We find that unlike the low-energy polarization signatures, which can vary rapidly in time, the high-energy polarization signatures appear stable. As a result, future high-energy polarimeters may be able to distinguish such signatures from the lower and more rapidly variable polarization signatures expected in leptonic models.

  11. Planar spin-transfer device with dynamical polarizer and analizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazaliy, Yaroslaw; Kravchenko, Anton

    2011-03-01

    The behavior of the planar spin-transfer devices with monodomain magnetic layers can be described by the macrospin Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation with spin-transfer terms. The LLG description of a device with two layers is simplified after applying the overdamped, large easy-plane anisotropy approximation. A decrease of the magnetic layer thickness asymmetry creates a transition from the conventional polarizer-analizer (``fixed layer -- free layer'') operation regime to the regime of the nearly identical magnets. Here electric current leads to a ``Slonczewski windmill'' dynamic state, rather than producing the magnetic switching. The ``windmill'' precession state of a device with two free layers was investigated by numerical solution of the LLG equation.

  12. A rapid radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiang, X.; Smith, E. A.; Justus, C. G.

    1994-01-01

    A rapid analytical radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation in plane-parallel atmospheres is developed based on the Sobolev approach and the delta function transformation technique. A distinct advantage of this model over alternative two-stream solutions is that in addition to yielding the irradiance components, which turn out to be mathematically equivalent to the delta-Eddington approximation, the radiance field can also be expanded in a mathematically consistent fashion. Tests with the model against a more precise multistream discrete ordinate model over a wide range of input parameters demonstrate that the new approximate method typically produces average radiance differences of less than 5%, with worst average differences of approximately 10%-15%. By the same token, the computational speed of the new model is some tens to thousands times faster than that of the more precise model when its stream resolution is set to generate precise calculations.

  13. A Rapid Radiative Transfer Model for Reflection of Solar Radiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, X.; Smith, E. A.; Justus, C. G.

    1994-07-01

    A rapid analytical radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation in plane-parallel atmospheres is developed based on the Sobolev approach and the delta function transformation technique. A distinct advantage of this model over alternative two-stream solutions is that in addition to yielding the irradiance components, which turn out to be mathematically equivalent to the delta-Eddington approximation, the radiance field can also be expanded in a mathematically consistent fashion. Tests with the model against a more precise multistream discrete ordinate model over a wide range of input parameters demonstrate that the new approximate method typically produces average radiance differences of less than 5%, with worst average differences of 10%-15%. By the same token, the computational speed of the new model is some tens to thousands times faster than that of the more precise model when its stream resolution is set to generate precise calculations.

  14. Monte Carlo Calculations of Polarized Microwave Radiation Emerging from Cloud Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Roberti, Laura

    1998-01-01

    The last decade has seen tremendous growth in cloud dynamical and microphysical models that are able to simulate storms and storm systems with very high spatial resolution, typically of the order of a few kilometers. The fairly realistic distributions of cloud and hydrometeor properties that these models generate has in turn led to a renewed interest in the three-dimensional microwave radiative transfer modeling needed to understand the effect of cloud and rainfall inhomogeneities upon microwave observations. Monte Carlo methods, and particularly backwards Monte Carlo methods have shown themselves to be very desirable due to the quick convergence of the solutions. Unfortunately, backwards Monte Carlo methods are not well suited to treat polarized radiation. This study reviews the existing Monte Carlo methods and presents a new polarized Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. The code is based on a forward scheme but uses aliasing techniques to keep the computational requirements equivalent to the backwards solution. Radiative transfer computations have been performed using a microphysical-dynamical cloud model and the results are presented together with the algorithm description.

  15. Radiative Transfer and Retrievals in EOF Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen; Smith, William L.; Schluessel, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) is a hyperspectral sensor with 8461 spectral channels and a nominal spectral resolution of 0.25 cm(sup -1). It is computationally intensive to perform radiative transfer calculations and inversions using all these channels. We will present a Principal Component-based Radiative Transfer Model (PCRTM) and a retrieval algorithm which perform all the necessary calculations in EOF domain. Since the EOFs are orthogonal to each other, only about 100 principal components are needed to represent the information content of the 8461 channels. The PCRTM provides the EOF coefficients and associated derivatives with respect to atmospheric and surface parameters needed by the inversion algorithm. The inversion algorithm is based on a non-linear Levenberg-Marquardt method with climatology covariance and a priori information as constraints. The retrieved parameters include atmospheric temperature, moisture and ozone profiles, cloud parameters, surface skin temperature, and surface emissivities. To make the retrieval system even more compact and stable. The atmospheric vertical profiles are compressed into the EOF space as well. The surface emissivities are also compressed into EOF space.

  16. Tunable Circularly Polarized Terahertz Radiation from Magnetized Gas Plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, W-M; Gibbon, P; Sheng, Z-M; Li, Y-T

    2015-06-26

    It is shown, by simulation and theory, that circularly or elliptically polarized terahertz radiation can be generated when a static magnetic (B) field is imposed on a gas target along the propagation direction of a two-color laser driver. The radiation frequency is determined by √[ω(p)(2)+ω(c)(2)/4]+ω(c)/2, where ω(p) is the plasma frequency and ω(c) is the electron cyclotron frequency. With the increase of the B field, the radiation changes from a single-cycle broadband waveform to a continuous narrow-band emission. In high-B-field cases, the radiation strength is proportional to ω(p)(2)/ω(c). The B field provides a tunability in the radiation frequency, spectrum width, and field strength.

  17. Clouds Radiative Transfer Study at Microwave Region-RTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heredia, S. D.; Masuelli, S.; Caranti, G. M.; Jones, L.

    2011-12-01

    The objective of the recently launched SAC-D/Aquarius satellite mission is to globally and indirectly measure certain geophysical parameters such as: sea surface salinity (Sal), column water vapor (CWV), column liquid water (CLW), rain rate (RR), wind speed (WS), wind direction (WD), ice concentration (SIC) and others. On board the satellite there are several instruments designed for specific purposes like the passive microwave sensor MWR (Fig. 1) whose specifications are shown in Table 1. The aim of the latter is to determine the following parameters: CWV, CLW, RR, WS, WD and SIC. The MWR sensor measures brightness temperatures at two frequencies: 23.8 and 36.5GHz. In the case of 36.5GHz, it measures both polarizations (vertical and horizontal) while for 23.8GHz it only measures the horizontal component. Since this sensor measures brightness temperatures and not geophysical variables, it is necessary to establish a relationship that links both. These relationships are determined by radiative transfer models (RTM). In remote sensing there are two types of models, namely: Forward and Inverse Model. The radiative transfer model in the forward direction obtains brightness temperatures for a given configuration within the pixel (geophysical variables). The most important applications of these models are: * Simulator Development: spectral bands selection to meet the high-level requirements within the expected error. * Intercalibration: in the calculation of corrections due to differences in incidence angles and frequencies between sensors involved in this process. * Inverse Radiative Transfer Models to obtain geophysical variables from brightness temperatures. In this paper, we developed a module that simulates the interaction of radiation with cloud droplets and raindrops. These modules were incorporated into a radiative transfer model from CFRSL (Central Florida Remote Sensing Lab) to calculate the brightness temperatures that would measure a passive microwave sensor

  18. Radiative energy transfer in molecular gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1992-01-01

    Basic formulations, analyses, and numerical procedures are presented to study radiative interactions in gray as well as nongray gases under different physical and flow conditions. After preliminary fluid-dynamical considerations, essential governing equations for radiative transport are presented that are applicable under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Auxiliary relations for relaxation times and spectral absorption models are also provided. For specific applications, several simple gaseous systems are analyzed. The first system considered consists of a gas bounded by two parallel plates having the same temperature. Within the gas there is a uniform heat source per unit volume. For this system, both vibrational nonequilibrium effects and radiation conduction interactions are studied. The second system consists of fully developed laminar flow and heat transfer in a parallel plate duct under the boundary condition of a uniform surface heat flux. For this system, effects of gray surface emittance are studied. With the single exception of a circular geometry, the third system is considered identical to the second system. Here, the influence of nongray walls is also studied.

  19. Radiation energy transfer in RNA polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempner, E. S.; Salovey, R.; Bernstein, S. L.

    1996-11-01

    Ribozymes are a special class of polyribonucleotide (RNA) molecules which possess intrinsic catalytic activity, capable of cleaving nucleic acid substrates. RNA molecules were synthesized containing a hammerhead ribozyme moiety of 52 nucleotides linked to an inactive leader sequence, for total lengths of either 262 or 1226 nucleotides. These RNAs were frozen and irradiated with high energy electrons. Surviving ribozyme activity was determined, using the ability of the irradiated ribozymes to cleave a labeled substrate. From the same irradiated samples, the amount of intact RNA remaining was determined following denaturing gel electrophoresis. Radiation target analyses of these data revealed a structural target size of 80 kDa and a ribozyme activity target size of 15 kDa for the smaller ribozyme, and 319 and 16 kDa, respectively, for the larger ribozyme. The disparity in target size for activity vs structure indicates that, in contrast to proteins, there is no spread of radiation damage far from the primary site of ionization in RNA molecules. The smaller target size for activity indicates that only primary ionizations occurring in the specific active region are effective. This is similar to the case for oligosaccharides. It is concluded that the presence of the ribose sugar in the polymer chain restricts radiation damage to a small region and prevents major energy transfer throughout the molecule.

  20. Matrix operator theory of radiative transfer. I - Rayleigh scattering.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plass, G. N.; Kattawar, G. W.; Catchings, F. E.

    1973-01-01

    An entirely rigorous method for the solution of the equations for radiative transfer based on the matrix operator theory is reviewed. The advantages of the present method are: (1) all orders of the reflection and transmission matrices are calculated at once; (2) layers of any thickness may be combined, so that a realistic model of the atmosphere can be developed from any arbitrary number of layers, each with different properties and thicknesses; (3) calculations can readily be made for large optical depths and with highly anisotropic phase functions; (4) results are obtained for any desired value of the surface albedo including the value unity and for a large number of polar and azimuthal angles; (5) all fundamental equations can be interpreted immediately in terms of the physical interactions appropriate to the problem; and (6) both upward and downward radiance can be calculated at interior points from relatively simple expressions.

  1. Radiative transfer theory applied to ocean bottom modeling.

    PubMed

    Quijano, Jorge E; Zurk, Lisa M

    2009-10-01

    Research on the propagation of acoustic waves in the ocean bottom sediment is of interest for active sonar applications such as target detection and remote sensing. The interaction of acoustic energy with the sea floor sublayers is usually modeled with techniques based on the full solution of the wave equation, which sometimes leads to mathematically intractable problems. An alternative way to model wave propagation in layered media containing random scatterers is the radiative transfer (RT) formulation, which is a well established technique in the electromagnetics community and is based on the principle of conservation of energy. In this paper, the RT equation is used to model the backscattering of acoustic energy from a layered elastic bottom sediment containing distributions of independent scatterers due to a constant single frequency excitation in the water column. It is shown that the RT formulation provides insight into the physical phenomena of scattering and conversion of energy between waves of different polarizations.

  2. Radiative Transfer Theory Verified by Controlled Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Goldstein, Dennis H.; Chowdhary, Jacek; Lompado, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of high-accuracy controlled laboratory measurements of the Stokes reflection matrix for suspensions of submicrometer-sized latex particles in water and compare them with the results of a numerically exact computer solution of the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE). The quantitative performance of the VRTE is monitored by increasing the volume packing density of the latex particles from 2 to 10. Our results indicate that the VRTE can be applied safely to random particulate media with packing densities up to 2. VRTE results for packing densities of the order of 5 should be taken with caution, whereas the polarized bidirectional reflectivity of suspensions with larger packing densities cannot be accurately predicted. We demonstrate that a simple modification of the phase matrix entering the VRTE based on the so-called static structure factor can be a promising remedy that deserves further examination.

  3. Transfer of polarized 3He ions in the AtR beam transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas N.; MacKay, W.W.; Meot, F.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.

    2012-05-20

    In addition to collisions of electrons with various unpolarized ion species as well as polarized protons, the proposed electron-hadron collider (eRHIC) will facilitate the collisions of electrons with polarized {sup 3}He ions. The AGS is the last acceleration stage, before injection into one of the RHIC's collider ring for final acceleration. The AtR (AGS to RHIC) transfer line will be utilized to transport the polarized {sup 3}He ions from AGS into one of the RHIC's collider rings. Some of the peculiarities of the AtR line's layout (simultaneous horizontal and vertical bends) may degrade the matching of the stable spin direction of the AtR line with that of RHIC's. In this paper we discuss possible simple modifications of the AtR line to accomplish a perfect matching of the stable spin direction of the injected {sup 3}He beam with the stable spin direction at the injection point of RHIC.

  4. APPLICATION OF JITTER RADIATION: GAMMA-RAY BURST PROMPT POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Jirong; Wang, Jiancheng

    2013-10-10

    A high degree of polarization of gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission has been confirmed in recent years. In this paper, we apply jitter radiation to study the polarization feature of GRB prompt emission. In our framework, relativistic electrons are accelerated by turbulent acceleration. Random and small-scale magnetic fields are generated by turbulence. We further determine that the polarization property of GRB prompt emission is governed by the configuration of the random and small-scale magnetic fields. A two-dimensional compressed slab, which contains a stochastic magnetic field, is applied in our model. If the jitter condition is satisfied, the electron deflection angle in the magnetic field is very small and the electron trajectory can be treated as a straight line. A high degree of polarization can be achieved when the angle between the line of sight and the slab plane is small. Moreover, micro-emitters with mini-jet structures are considered to be within a bulk GRB jet. The jet 'off-axis' effect is intensely sensitive to the observed polarization degree. We discuss the depolarization effect on GRB prompt emission and afterglow. We also speculate that the rapid variability of GRB prompt polarization may be correlated with the stochastic variability of the turbulent dynamo or the magnetic reconnection of plasmas.

  5. A stochastic formation of radiative transfer in clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, G.L.; Gabriel, P.M.

    1993-03-01

    The research carried out under this award dealt with issues involving deterministic radiative transfer, remote sensing, Stochastic radiative transfer, and parameterization of cloud optical properties. A number of different forms of radiative transfer models in one, two, and three dimensions were developed in an attempt to build an understanding of the radiative transfer in clouds with realistic spatial structure and to determine the key geometrical parameter that influence this transfer. The research conducted also seeks to assess the relative importance of these geometrical effects in contrast to microphysical effects of clouds. The main conclusion of the work is that geometry has a profound influence on all aspects of radiative transfer and the interpretation of this transfer. We demonstrate how this geometry can influence estimate of particle effective radius to the 30-50% level and also how geometry can significantly bias the remote sensing of cloud optical depth.

  6. Planetary Atmosphere Dynamics and Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, David H.

    1996-01-01

    This research program has dealt with two projects in the field of planetary atmosphere dynamics and radiative energy transfer, one theoretical and one experimental. The first project, in radiative energy transfer, incorporated the capability to isolate and quantify the contribution of individual atmospheric components to the Venus radiative balance and thermal structure to greatly improve the current understanding of the radiative processes occurring within the Venus atmosphere. This is possible by varying the mixing ratios of each gas species, and the location, number density and aerosol size distributions of the clouds. This project was a continuation of the work initiated under a 1992 University Consortium Agreement. Under the just completed grant, work has continued on the use of a convolution-based algorithm that provided the capability to calculate the k coefficients of a gas mixture at different temperatures, pressures and spectral intervals from the separate k-distributions of the individual gas species. The second primary goal of this research dealt with the Doppler wind retrieval for the Successful Galileo Jupiter probe mission in December, 1995. In anticipation of the arrival of Galileo at Jupiter, software development continued to read the radioscience and probe/orbiter trajectory data provided by the Galileo project and required for Jupiter zonal wind measurements. Sample experiment radioscience data records and probe/orbiter trajectory data files provided by the Galileo Radioscience and Navigation teams at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, respectively, were used for the first phase of the software development. The software to read the necessary data records was completed in 1995. The procedure by which the wind retrieval takes place begins with initial consistency checks of the raw data, preliminary data reductions, wind recoveries, iterative reconstruction of the probe descent profile, and refined wind recoveries. At each stage of the wind recovery

  7. Simulation of solar radiative transfer in cumulus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Zuev, V.E.; Titov, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    This work presents a 3-D model of radiative transfer which is used to study the relationship between the spatial distribution of cumulus clouds and fluxes (albedo and transmittance) of visible solar radiation.

  8. Radiative Transfer Simulations of Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyuchenkov, Yaroslav; Wiebe, Dmitry; Fateeva, Anna; Vasyunina, Tatiana

    2011-04-01

    The determination of prestellar core structure is often based on observations of (sub)millimeter dust continuum. However, recently the Spitzer Space Telescope provided us with IR images of many objects not only in emission but also in absorption. We developed a technique to reconstruct the density and temperature distributions of protostellar objects based on radiation transfer (RT) simulations both in mm and IR wavelengths. Best-fit model parameters are obtained with the genetic algorithm. We apply the method to two cores of Infrared Dark Clouds and show that their observations are better reproduced by a model with an embedded heating source despite the lack of 70 μm emission in one of these cores. Thus, the starless nature of massive cores can only be established with the careful case-by-case RT modeling.

  9. Radiative polarization in high-energy storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Mane, S.R.

    1989-03-01

    Electron and positron beams circulating in high-energy storage rings become spontaneously polarized by the emission of synchrotron radiation. The asymptotic degree of polarization that can be attained is strongly affected by so-called depolarizing resonances. Detailed experimental measurements of the polarization were made SPEAR about ten years ago, but due to lack of a suitable theory only a limited theoretical fit to the data has so far been achieved. I present a general formalism for calculating depolarizing resonances, which as been coded into a computer program called SMILE, and use it to fit the SPEAR data. By the use of suitable approximations, I am able to fit both higher order and nonlinear resonances, and thereby to interpret many hitherto unexplained features in the data, and to resolve a puzzle concerning the asymmetry of certain resonance widths seen in the data. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Polarizing Grids, their Assemblies and Beams of Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houde, Martin; Akeson, Rachel L.; Carlstrom, John E.; Lamb, James W.; Schleuning, David A.; Woody, David P.

    2001-01-01

    This article gives an analysis of the behavior of polarizing grids and reflecting polarizers by solving Maxwell's equations, for arbitrary angles of incidence and grid rotation, for cases where the excitation is provided by an incident plane wave or a beam of radiation. The scattering and impedance matrix representations are derived and used to solve more complicated configurations of grid assemblies. The results are also compared with data obtained in the calibration of reflecting polarizers at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO). From these analysis, we propose a method for choosing the optimum grid parameters (wire radius and spacing). We also provide a study of the effects of two types of errors (in wire separation and radius size) that can be introduced in the fabrication of a grid.

  11. Attosecond nonlinear polarization and light-matter energy transfer in solids.

    PubMed

    Sommer, A; Bothschafter, E M; Sato, S A; Jakubeit, C; Latka, T; Razskazovskaya, O; Fattahi, H; Jobst, M; Schweinberger, W; Shirvanyan, V; Yakovlev, V S; Kienberger, R; Yabana, K; Karpowicz, N; Schultze, M; Krausz, F

    2016-06-01

    Electric-field-induced charge separation (polarization) is the most fundamental manifestation of the interaction of light with matter and a phenomenon of great technological relevance. Nonlinear optical polarization produces coherent radiation in spectral ranges inaccessible by lasers and constitutes the key to ultimate-speed signal manipulation. Terahertz techniques have provided experimental access to this important observable up to frequencies of several terahertz. Here we demonstrate that attosecond metrology extends the resolution to petahertz frequencies of visible light. Attosecond polarization spectroscopy allows measurement of the response of the electronic system of silica to strong (more than one volt per ångström) few-cycle optical (about 750 nanometres) fields. Our proof-of-concept study provides time-resolved insight into the attosecond nonlinear polarization and the light-matter energy transfer dynamics behind the optical Kerr effect and multi-photon absorption. Timing the nonlinear polarization relative to the driving laser electric field with sub-30-attosecond accuracy yields direct quantitative access to both the reversible and irreversible energy exchange between visible-infrared light and electrons. Quantitative determination of dissipation within a signal manipulation cycle of only a few femtoseconds duration (by measurement and ab initio calculation) reveals the feasibility of dielectric optical switching at clock rates above 100 terahertz. The observed sub-femtosecond rise of energy transfer from the field to the material (for a peak electric field strength exceeding 2.5 volts per ångström) in turn indicates the viability of petahertz-bandwidth metrology with a solid-state device. PMID:27251280

  12. Attosecond nonlinear polarization and light–matter energy transfer in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, A.; Bothschafter, E. M.; Sato, S. A.; Jakubeit, C.; Latka, T.; Razskazovskaya, O.; Fattahi, H.; Jobst, M.; Schweinberger, W.; Shirvanyan, V.; Yakovlev, V. S.; Kienberger, R.; Yabana, K.; Karpowicz, N.; Schultze, M.; Krausz, F.

    2016-06-01

    Electric-field-induced charge separation (polarization) is the most fundamental manifestation of the interaction of light with matter and a phenomenon of great technological relevance. Nonlinear optical polarization produces coherent radiation in spectral ranges inaccessible by lasers and constitutes the key to ultimate-speed signal manipulation. Terahertz techniques have provided experimental access to this important observable up to frequencies of several terahertz. Here we demonstrate that attosecond metrology extends the resolution to petahertz frequencies of visible light. Attosecond polarization spectroscopy allows measurement of the response of the electronic system of silica to strong (more than one volt per ångström) few-cycle optical (about 750 nanometres) fields. Our proof-of-concept study provides time-resolved insight into the attosecond nonlinear polarization and the light–matter energy transfer dynamics behind the optical Kerr effect and multi-photon absorption. Timing the nonlinear polarization relative to the driving laser electric field with sub-30-attosecond accuracy yields direct quantitative access to both the reversible and irreversible energy exchange between visible–infrared light and electrons. Quantitative determination of dissipation within a signal manipulation cycle of only a few femtoseconds duration (by measurement and ab initio calculation) reveals the feasibility of dielectric optical switching at clock rates above 100 terahertz. The observed sub-femtosecond rise of energy transfer from the field to the material (for a peak electric field strength exceeding 2.5 volts per ångström) in turn indicates the viability of petahertz-bandwidth metrology with a solid-state device.

  13. Attosecond nonlinear polarization and light-matter energy transfer in solids.

    PubMed

    Sommer, A; Bothschafter, E M; Sato, S A; Jakubeit, C; Latka, T; Razskazovskaya, O; Fattahi, H; Jobst, M; Schweinberger, W; Shirvanyan, V; Yakovlev, V S; Kienberger, R; Yabana, K; Karpowicz, N; Schultze, M; Krausz, F

    2016-05-23

    Electric-field-induced charge separation (polarization) is the most fundamental manifestation of the interaction of light with matter and a phenomenon of great technological relevance. Nonlinear optical polarization produces coherent radiation in spectral ranges inaccessible by lasers and constitutes the key to ultimate-speed signal manipulation. Terahertz techniques have provided experimental access to this important observable up to frequencies of several terahertz. Here we demonstrate that attosecond metrology extends the resolution to petahertz frequencies of visible light. Attosecond polarization spectroscopy allows measurement of the response of the electronic system of silica to strong (more than one volt per ångström) few-cycle optical (about 750 nanometres) fields. Our proof-of-concept study provides time-resolved insight into the attosecond nonlinear polarization and the light-matter energy transfer dynamics behind the optical Kerr effect and multi-photon absorption. Timing the nonlinear polarization relative to the driving laser electric field with sub-30-attosecond accuracy yields direct quantitative access to both the reversible and irreversible energy exchange between visible-infrared light and electrons. Quantitative determination of dissipation within a signal manipulation cycle of only a few femtoseconds duration (by measurement and ab initio calculation) reveals the feasibility of dielectric optical switching at clock rates above 100 terahertz. The observed sub-femtosecond rise of energy transfer from the field to the material (for a peak electric field strength exceeding 2.5 volts per ångström) in turn indicates the viability of petahertz-bandwidth metrology with a solid-state device.

  14. Attosecond nonlinear polarization and light-matter energy transfer in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, A.; Bothschafter, E. M.; Sato, S. A.; Jakubeit, C.; Latka, T.; Razskazovskaya, O.; Fattahi, H.; Jobst, M.; Schweinberger, W.; Shirvanyan, V.; Yakovlev, V. S.; Kienberger, R.; Yabana, K.; Karpowicz, N.; Schultze, M.; Krausz, F.

    2016-06-01

    Electric-field-induced charge separation (polarization) is the most fundamental manifestation of the interaction of light with matter and a phenomenon of great technological relevance. Nonlinear optical polarization produces coherent radiation in spectral ranges inaccessible by lasers and constitutes the key to ultimate-speed signal manipulation. Terahertz techniques have provided experimental access to this important observable up to frequencies of several terahertz. Here we demonstrate that attosecond metrology extends the resolution to petahertz frequencies of visible light. Attosecond polarization spectroscopy allows measurement of the response of the electronic system of silica to strong (more than one volt per ångström) few-cycle optical (about 750 nanometres) fields. Our proof-of-concept study provides time-resolved insight into the attosecond nonlinear polarization and the light-matter energy transfer dynamics behind the optical Kerr effect and multi-photon absorption. Timing the nonlinear polarization relative to the driving laser electric field with sub-30-attosecond accuracy yields direct quantitative access to both the reversible and irreversible energy exchange between visible-infrared light and electrons. Quantitative determination of dissipation within a signal manipulation cycle of only a few femtoseconds duration (by measurement and ab initio calculation) reveals the feasibility of dielectric optical switching at clock rates above 100 terahertz. The observed sub-femtosecond rise of energy transfer from the field to the material (for a peak electric field strength exceeding 2.5 volts per ångström) in turn indicates the viability of petahertz-bandwidth metrology with a solid-state device.

  15. A Consummate Radiative Transfer Package for Studying the Atmosphere and Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, P.; Hu, Y.; Trepte, C. R.; Winker, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    We will present a radiative transfer package based on the successive order of scattering method. This code is capable to calculate the radiation field in turbid media, which can be either the atmosphere-land or atmosphere-ocean coupled systems. The outputs include all four Stokes parameters at arbitrary detector locations and viewing angles in the turbid medium. Both the elastic and inelastic scattering are implemented in the package. This radiative transfer tool has been used in various applications, for instance, generating an aerosol look-up table for atmospheric correction in ocean color remote sensing; retrieving water cloud size distribution using the polarized multi-angle measurements; simulating the OCO2 O2 A band radiance measurement, etc. Our radiative transfer package is a great tool to interpret and predict the measurements from the future polarimeters and multipolarization-state lidars for Earth observing missions.

  16. Radiative Møller scattering involving polarized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykunov, V. A.

    2015-06-01

    A method for taking into account radiative events in experiments aimed at studying Møller scattering with polarized particles was developed for an arbitrary implementation of such experiments. A computer code used to perform a numerical analysis with allowance for the kinematical conditions of the MOLLER experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab or JLab) was constructed. The respective results were compared with their counterparts obtained in the soft-photon approximation.

  17. Radiative Møller scattering involving polarized particles

    SciTech Connect

    Zykunov, V. A.

    2015-06-15

    A method for taking into account radiative events in experiments aimed at studying Møller scattering with polarized particles was developed for an arbitrary implementation of such experiments. A computer code used to perform a numerical analysis with allowance for the kinematical conditions of the MOLLER experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab or JLab) was constructed. The respective results were compared with their counterparts obtained in the soft-photon approximation.

  18. A Radiative Transfer Model for Climate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Sokolik, Irina N.; Clough, Shepard A.; Toon, Owen B.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a radiative transfer model developed to accurately predict the atmospheric radiant flux in both the infrared and the solar spectrum with a minimum of computational effort. We use a newly developed k-distribution model for both the thermal and solar parts of the spectrum. We employ a generalized two-stream approximation for the scattering by aerosol and clouds. To assess the accuracy of the model, the results are compared to other more detailed models for several standard cases in the solar and thermal spectrum. We perform several calculations focussing primarily on the question of absorption of solar radiation by gases and aerosols. We estimate the accuracy of the k-distribution to be approx. 1 W/sq m for the gaseous absorption in the solar spectrum. We estimate the accuracy of the two-stream method to be 3-12 W/sq m for the downward solar flux and 1-5 W/sq m for the upward solar flux at the top of atmosphere depending on the optical depth of the aerosol layer. We also show that the effect of ignoring aerosol absorption on the downward solar flux at the surface is 50 W/sq m for the TARFOX aerosol for an optical depth of 0.5 and 150 W/sq m for a highly absorbing mineral aerosol. Thus, we conclude that the uncertainty introduced by the aerosol solar radiative properties (and merely assuming some "representative" model) can be considerably larger than the error introduced by the use of a two-stream method.

  19. Radiation Exchange Between Stratus Clouds and Polar Marine Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, D.; Kottmeier, Ch.

    The radiative energy exchange between arctic sea-ice and stratiform clouds is studied by means of aircraft measurements and a two-stream radiation transfer model. The data have been obtained by flights of two identically instrumented aircraft during the Radiation and Eddy Flux Experiments REFLEX I in autumn 1991 and REFLEX II in winter 1993 over the arctic marginal ice zone of Fram Strait. The instrumental equipment comprised Eppley pyranometers and pyrgeometers, which measure the solar and terrestrial upwelling and downwelling hemispheric radiation flux densities, and a line-scan-camera on one aircraft to monitor the surface structure of the sea-ice. An empirical parametrization of the albedo of partly ice-covered ocean surfaces is obtained from the data, which describes the albedo increasing linearly with the concentration of the snow-covered sea-ice and with the cosine of the sun zenith angle at sun elevations below 10°. Cloud optical parameters, such as single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor and shortwave and longwave height-dependent extinction coefficient are determined by adjusting modeled radiation flux densities to observations. We found significant influence of the multiple reflection of shortwave radiation between the ice surface and the cloud base on the radiation regime. Consistent with the data, a radiation transfer model shows that stratus clouds of 400 m thickness with common cloud parameters may double the global radiation at the surface of sea-ice compared to open water values. The total cloud-surface-albedo under these circumstances is 30% larger over sea-ice than over water. Parametrizations of the global and reflected radiation above and below stratus clouds are proposed on the basis of the measurements and modeling. The upwelling and downwelling longwave emission of stratus clouds with thicknesses of more than 500 m can be satisfactorily estimated by Stefan's law with an emissivity of nearly 1 and when the maximum air temperature within

  20. Truncation of the scattering phase matrix for vector radiative transfer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hioki, Souichiro; Yang, Ping; Kattawar, George W.; Hu, Yongxiang

    2016-11-01

    This short communication interprets the delta-fit technique in a context of similarity transformation and the correction to the source function, and derives the analogous form of the method to be applied for the scattering phase matrix. To adapt the delta-fit method to vector radiative transfer, the mathematically exact form of the similarity principle is used in the theoretical development. Some examples of relevant radiative transfer simulations are also presented for atmospheric ice particles. The performance of the adopted delta-fit method is comparable to the delta-M method with single scattering correction except for worse delta-fit performance for polarized radiance calculations in forward directions.

  1. Three-dimensional radiative transfer calculations on an SIMD machine applied to accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vath, H.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a tool to solve the radiative transfer equation for a three-dimensional astrophysical object on the SIMD computer MasPar MP-1. With this tool we can rapidly calculate the image of such an object as seen from an arbitrary direction and at an arbitrary wavelength. Such images and spectra can then be used to directly compare observations with the model. This tool can be applied to many different areas in astrophysics, e.g., HI disks of galaxies and polarized radiative transfer of accretion columns onto white dwarfs. Here we use this tool to calculate the image and spectrum of a simple model of an accretion disk.

  2. Radiative transfer solutions for coupled atmosphere ocean systems using the matrix operator technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollstein, André; Fischer, Jürgen

    2012-05-01

    Accurate radiative transfer models are the key tools for the understanding of radiative transfer processes in the atmosphere and ocean, and for the development of remote sensing algorithms. The widely used scalar approximation of radiative transfer can lead to errors in calculated top of atmosphere radiances. We show results with errors in the order of±8% for atmosphere ocean systems with case one waters. Variations in sea water salinity and temperature can lead to variations in the signal of similar magnitude. Therefore, we enhanced our scalar radiative transfer model MOMO, which is in use at Freie Universität Berlin, to treat these effects as accurately as possible. We describe our one-dimensional vector radiative transfer model for an atmosphere ocean system with a rough interface. We describe the matrix operator scheme and the bio-optical model for case one waters. We discuss some effects of neglecting polarization in radiative transfer calculations and effects of salinity changes for top of atmosphere radiances. Results are shown for the channels of the satellite instruments MERIS and OLCI from 412.5 nm to 900 nm.

  3. Matrix operator theory of radiative transfer. 1: rayleigh scattering.

    PubMed

    Plass, G N; Kattawar, G W; Catchings, F E

    1973-02-01

    An entirely rigorous method for the solution of the equations for radiative transfer based on the matrix operator theory is reviewed. The advantages of the present method are: (1) all orders of the reflection and transmission matrices are calculated at once; (2) layers of any thickness may be combined, so that a realistic model of the atmosphere can be developed from any arbitrary number of layers, each with different properties and thicknesses; (3) calculations can readily be made for large optical depths and with highly anisotropic phase functions; (4) results are obtained for any desired value of the surface albedo including the value unity and for a large number of polar and azimuthal angles including the polar angle theta = 0 degrees ; (5) all fundamental equations can be interpreted immediately in terms of the physical interactions appropriate to the problem; (6) both upward and downward radiance can be calculated at interior points from relatively simple expressions. Both the general theory and its history together with the method of calculation are discussed. As a first example of the method numerous curves are given for both the reflected and transmitted radiance for Rayleigh scattering from a homogeneous layer for a range of optical thicknesses from 0.0019 to 4096, surface albedo A = 0, 0.2, and 1, and cosine of solar zenith angle micro = 1, 0.5397, and 0.1882. It is shown that the matrix operator approach contains the doubling method as a special case.

  4. [Effect of decimeter polarized electromagnetic radiation on germinating capacity of seeds].

    PubMed

    Polevik, N D

    2013-01-01

    The effect of a polarization structure of electromagnetic radiation on the germinating capacity of seeds of such weeds as Green foxtail (Setaria viridis) and Green amaranth (Amaranthus retroflexus) has been studied. Seeds have been exposed to impulse electromagnetic radiation in a frequency of 896 MHz with linear, elliptical right-handed and elliptical left-handed polarizations at different power flux density levels. It is determined that the effect of the right-handed polarized electromagnetic radiation increases and the influence of the left-handed polarized one reduces the germinating capacity of seeds compared to the effect of the linearly polarized electromagnetic radiation. It is shown that the seeds have an amplitude polarization selectivity as evinced by the major effect of the right-handed polarized radiation on seeds. An electrodynamic model as the right-handed elliptically polarized antenna with the given quantity of the ellipticity of polarization is suggested to use in description of this selectivity.

  5. Radiative Transfer Modeling and Retrievals for Advanced Hyperspectral Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Smith, William L., Sr.; Mango, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    A novel radiative transfer model and a physical inversion algorithm based on principal component analysis will be presented. Instead of dealing with channel radiances, the new approach fits principal component scores of these quantities. Compared to channel-based radiative transfer models, the new approach compresses radiances into a much smaller dimension making both forward modeling and inversion algorithm more efficient.

  6. Martian Radiative Transfer Modeling Using the Optimal Spectral Sampling Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eluszkiewicz, J.; Cady-Pereira, K.; Uymin, G.; Moncet, J.-L.

    2005-01-01

    The large volume of existing and planned infrared observations of Mars have prompted the development of a new martian radiative transfer model that could be used in the retrievals of atmospheric and surface properties. The model is based on the Optimal Spectral Sampling (OSS) method [1]. The method is a fast and accurate monochromatic technique applicable to a wide range of remote sensing platforms (from microwave to UV) and was originally developed for the real-time processing of infrared and microwave data acquired by instruments aboard the satellites forming part of the next-generation global weather satellite system NPOESS (National Polarorbiting Operational Satellite System) [2]. As part of our on-going research related to the radiative properties of the martian polar caps, we have begun the development of a martian OSS model with the goal of using it to perform self-consistent atmospheric corrections necessary to retrieve caps emissivity from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) spectra. While the caps will provide the initial focus area for applying the new model, it is hoped that the model will be of interest to the wider Mars remote sensing community.

  7. Radiative transfer during the reflooding step of a LOCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérardin, J.; Seiler, N.; Ruyer, P.; Boulet, P.

    2013-10-01

    Within the evaluation of the heat transfer downstream a quench front during the reflood phase of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in a nuclear power plant, a numerical study has been conducted on radiative transfer through a vapor-droplet medium. The non-grey behavior of the medium is obvious since it can be optically thin or thick depending on the wavelength. A six wide bands model has been tested, providing a satisfactory accuracy for the description of the radiative properties. Once the radiative properties of the medium computed, they have been introduced in a model solving the radiative heat transfer based on the Improved Differential Approximation. The fluxes and the flux divergence have been computed on a geometry characteristic of the reactor core showing that radiative transfer plays a relevant role, quite as important as convective heat transfer.

  8. On the fundamental solution of the radiative transfer equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatau, Piotr J.; Stephens, Graeme L.

    1988-09-01

    This paper outlines the general solution of the one-dimensional, azimuthally averaged radiative transfer equation in terms of a matrix exponential. The link between this fundamental solution and those more commonly used in radiative transfer is established. The formulation is developed for a general vertically inhomogeneous atmosphere with sources. Several new concepts, based on properties of the matrix exponentials, are described in the context of radiative transfer, including the use of the commutator and product integrals. It is also demonstrated how the matrix exponential formulation provides for new insights, not only into improvements of the numerical efficiency and stability of the solution, but also into the understanding of radiative transfer through a layered atmosphere. The various concepts introduced in this paper are illustrated throughout by the two-stream simplification of the general radiative transfer equation.

  9. Application of ray tracing in radiation heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Joseph F.

    1993-01-01

    This collection of presentation figures displays the capabilities of ray tracing for radiation propagation calculations as compared to an analytical approach. The goal is to introduce the terminology and solution process used in ray tracing, and provide insight into radiation heat transfer principles and analysis tools. A thermal analysis working environment is introduced that solves demanding radiation heat transfer problems based on ray tracing. This information may serve as a reference for designing and building ones own analysis environment.

  10. Radiative heat transfer in the extreme near field.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeongtae; Song, Bai; Fernández-Hurtado, Víctor; Lee, Woochul; Jeong, Wonho; Cui, Longji; Thompson, Dakotah; Feist, Johannes; Reid, M T Homer; García-Vidal, Francisco J; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2015-12-17

    Radiative transfer of energy at the nanometre length scale is of great importance to a variety of technologies including heat-assisted magnetic recording, near-field thermophotovoltaics and lithography. Although experimental advances have enabled elucidation of near-field radiative heat transfer in gaps as small as 20-30 nanometres (refs 4-6), quantitative analysis in the extreme near field (less than 10 nanometres) has been greatly limited by experimental challenges. Moreover, the results of pioneering measurements differed from theoretical predictions by orders of magnitude. Here we use custom-fabricated scanning probes with embedded thermocouples, in conjunction with new microdevices capable of periodic temperature modulation, to measure radiative heat transfer down to gaps as small as two nanometres. For our experiments we deposited suitably chosen metal or dielectric layers on the scanning probes and microdevices, enabling direct study of extreme near-field radiation between silica-silica, silicon nitride-silicon nitride and gold-gold surfaces to reveal marked, gap-size-dependent enhancements of radiative heat transfer. Furthermore, our state-of-the-art calculations of radiative heat transfer, performed within the theoretical framework of fluctuational electrodynamics, are in excellent agreement with our experimental results, providing unambiguous evidence that confirms the validity of this theory for modelling radiative heat transfer in gaps as small as a few nanometres. This work lays the foundations required for the rational design of novel technologies that leverage nanoscale radiative heat transfer.

  11. Radiative heat transfer in the extreme near field.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeongtae; Song, Bai; Fernández-Hurtado, Víctor; Lee, Woochul; Jeong, Wonho; Cui, Longji; Thompson, Dakotah; Feist, Johannes; Reid, M T Homer; García-Vidal, Francisco J; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2015-12-17

    Radiative transfer of energy at the nanometre length scale is of great importance to a variety of technologies including heat-assisted magnetic recording, near-field thermophotovoltaics and lithography. Although experimental advances have enabled elucidation of near-field radiative heat transfer in gaps as small as 20-30 nanometres (refs 4-6), quantitative analysis in the extreme near field (less than 10 nanometres) has been greatly limited by experimental challenges. Moreover, the results of pioneering measurements differed from theoretical predictions by orders of magnitude. Here we use custom-fabricated scanning probes with embedded thermocouples, in conjunction with new microdevices capable of periodic temperature modulation, to measure radiative heat transfer down to gaps as small as two nanometres. For our experiments we deposited suitably chosen metal or dielectric layers on the scanning probes and microdevices, enabling direct study of extreme near-field radiation between silica-silica, silicon nitride-silicon nitride and gold-gold surfaces to reveal marked, gap-size-dependent enhancements of radiative heat transfer. Furthermore, our state-of-the-art calculations of radiative heat transfer, performed within the theoretical framework of fluctuational electrodynamics, are in excellent agreement with our experimental results, providing unambiguous evidence that confirms the validity of this theory for modelling radiative heat transfer in gaps as small as a few nanometres. This work lays the foundations required for the rational design of novel technologies that leverage nanoscale radiative heat transfer. PMID:26641312

  12. Study on radiation transfer in human skin for cosmetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Jun; Kawamura, Ayumu; Miura, Yoshimasa; Takata, Sadaki; Ogawa, Katsuki

    2005-06-01

    In order to design cosmetics producing the optical properties that are required for a beautiful skin, the radiation transfer in the skin has been numerically investigated by the Monte Carlo method and the effects of skin texture and cosmetics on the radiation transfer have been empirically investigated using an artificial skin. The numerical analysis showed that the total internal reflection suppresses large portion of radiation going out through the skin surface Additionally, the experimental study revealed that skin texture and cosmetics not only diffusely reflect the incoming radiation, but also lead the internally reflected radiation to the outside of the skin.

  13. MHD-based modeling of radiation and polarization signatures of blazar emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Li, Hui; Boettcher, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Observations have shown that sometimes strong multiwavelength flares are accompanied by drastic polarization variations, indicating active participation of magnetic fields during flares. We have developed a 3D numerical tool set of magnetohydrodynamics, Fokker-Planck particle evolution, and polarization-dependent radiation transfer codes. This allows us to study the snap-shot spectra, multiwavelength light curves, and time-dependent optical polarization signatures self-consistently. We have made a simultaneous fit of a multiwavelength flare with 180 degree polarization angle swing of the blazar 3C279 reported by Abdo et al. 2010. Our work has shown that this event requires an increase in the nonthermal particles, a decrease in the magnetic field strength, and a change in the magnetic field structure. We conclude that this event is likely due to a shock-initiated magnetic reconnection in an emission environment with relatively strong magnetic energy. We have performed magnetrohydrodynamic simulations to support this statement. Our simulations have found that the blazar emission region may be strongly magnetized. In this situation, polarization angle swings are likely to be correlated with strong gamma-ray flares.

  14. Spectra of polarized thermal radiation in a cloudy atmosphere: Line-by-Line and Monte Carlo model for passive remote sensing of cirrus and polar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Boris; Falaleeva, Victoria

    2016-07-01

    A polarized high-resolution 1-D model has been presented for TIR (Thermal Infrared) remote sensing application. It is based on the original versions of MC (Monte Carlo) and LbL (Line-by-Line) algorithms, which have shown their effectiveness when modelling the thermal radiation atmospheric transfer, taking into account, the semi-transparent Ci-type and polar clouds scattering, as well as the direct consideration of the spectra of molecular absorption. This model may be useful in the planning of satellite experiments and in the validation of similar models, which use the "k-distribution" or other approximations, to account for gaseous absorption. The example simulations demonstrate that, the selective gas absorption does not only significantly affect the absorption and emission of radiation, but also, its polarization in the Ci-type clouds. As a result, the spectra of polarized radiation contain important information about the clouds, and a high-resolution polarized limb sounding in the TIR, seems to be a useful tool in obtaining information on cloud types and their vertical structures.

  15. Electroweak radiative corrections to polarized Mo/ller scattering asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, Andrzej; Marciano, William J.

    1996-02-01

    One loop electroweak radiative corrections to left-right parity-violating Mo/ller scattering (e-e--->e-e-) asymmetries are presented. They reduce the standard model (tree level) prediction by 40+/-3% where the main shift and uncertainty stem from hadronic vacuum polarization loops. A similar reduction also occurs for the electron-electron atomic parity-violating interaction. That effect can be attributed to an increase of sin2θW(q2) by 3% in running from q2=m2Z to 0. The sensitivity of the asymmetry to ``new physics'' is also discussed.

  16. Multi-Dimensional Simulations of Radiative Transfer in Aspherical Core-Collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Maeda, Keiichi; Mazzali, Paolo A.; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2008-05-21

    We study optical radiation of aspherical supernovae (SNe) and present an approach to verify the asphericity of SNe with optical observations of extragalactic SNe. For this purpose, we have developed a multi-dimensional Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code, SAMURAI (SupernovA Multidimensional RAdIative transfer code). The code can compute the optical light curve and spectra both at early phases (< or approx. 40 days after the explosion) and late phases ({approx}1 year after the explosion), based on hydrodynamic and nucleosynthetic models. We show that all the optical observations of SN 1998bw (associated with GRB 980425) are consistent with polar-viewed radiation of the aspherical explosion model with kinetic energy 20x10{sup 51} ergs. Properties of off-axis hypernovae are also discussed briefly.

  17. Extended emission wavelength of random dye lasers by exploiting radiative and non-radiative energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan Ismail, Wan Zakiah; Goldys, Ewa M.; Dawes, Judith M.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate long-wavelength operation (>700 nm) of random dye lasers (using a methylene blue dye) with the addition of rhodamine 6G and titania, enabled by radiative and non-radiative energy transfer. The pump energy is efficiently absorbed and transferred to the acceptors, to support lasing in random dye lasers in the near infrared. The optimum random laser performance with the highest emission intensity and the lowest lasing threshold was achieved for a concentration of methylene blue as the acceptor equal to 6× the concentration of rhodamine 6G (donor). Excessive levels of methylene blue increased the lasing threshold and broadened the methylene blue emission linewidth due to dye quenching from re-absorption. This is due to competition between the donor emission and energy transfer and between absorption loss and fluorescence quenching. The radiative and non-radiative energy transfer is analyzed as a function of the acceptor concentration and pump energy density, with consideration of the spectral overlap. The dependence of the radiative and non-radiative transfer efficiency on the acceptor concentration is obtained, and the energy transfer parameters, including the radiative and non-radiative energy transfer rate constants ( K R and K NR), are investigated using Stern-Volmer analysis. The analysis indicates that radiative energy transfer is the dominant energy transfer mechanism in this system.

  18. Measurement of the linear polarization of channeling radiation in silicon and diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Rzepka, M.; Buschhorn, G.; Diedrich, E.; Kotthaus, R.; Kufner, W.; Roessl, W.; Schmidt, K.H.; Hoffmann-Stascheck, P.; Genz, H.; Nething, U.; Richter, A.; Sellschop, J.P.F.

    1995-07-01

    Utilizing 90{degree} Compton scattering the linear polarization of channeling radiation produced at the superconducting accelerator S-DALINAC with 62 MeV electrons in silicon and diamond has been measured in the energy range between 50 and 400 keV. Planar channeling radiation due to transitions involving transversal bound as well as unbound states is completely linearly polarized perpendicular to the channeling plane. Axial channeling radiation does not show linear polarization.

  19. Radiative Transfer Model for Translucent Slab Ice on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrieu, F.; Schmidt, F.; Douté, S.; Schmitt, B.; Brissaud, O.

    2016-09-01

    We developed a radiative transfer model that simulates in VIS/NIR the bidirectional reflectance of a contaminated slab layer of ice overlaying a granular medium, under geometrical optics conditions to study martian ices.

  20. Analysis of the effect anisotropic retards collimation turns on polarization and energy radiation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotaev, Valery V.; Ryzhova, Victoria A.; Trushkina, Anna V.

    2015-02-01

    The research of changes of the parameters for the polarized radiation output anisotropic linear phase-shifting elements, with their minor collimation turns about the source of spatial orientation in the optical scheme of measuring polarization device, is performed. Comparative analysis of the polarization and energy parameters of the radiation output retards of crystalline silica, magnesium fluoride, and polyvinyl alcohol are accomplished. The dependencies of changes of the ellipticity and azimuth of the output radiation, as well as the transmission coefficient of the phase plate with the changing spatial orientation from the hade on refracting side and azimuth of linearly polarized radiation at its input are considered.

  1. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffrey D; Kelly, Thompson G; Urbatish, Todd J

    2010-11-17

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique.

  2. Nonlinear vacuum polarization in intense blackbody radiation and its effects on the radiation spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sheldon; Hartemann, Frederic; Siders, Craig; Barty, Christopher

    2009-11-01

    A study of thermally induced vacuum polarization stemming from the Euler-Heisenberg radiation correction to Maxwell equations is conducted. While nonlinear effects associated with interactions of electromagnetic pulse with a background photon gas had been previously calculated, we examine the possibility of nonlinear corrective terms to the blackbody radiation spectrum. Suitable conditions can be found in both astrophysical and laboratory environments. Inertial confined, ignited thermonuclear plasmas will produce intense blackbody radiation at temperatures in excess of 20 keV. In this theoretical investigation, our analysis shows that in an ideal incoherent blackbody the radiation spectrum is unaffected in the regime studied. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Probing membrane protein structure using water polarization transfer solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jonathan K.; Hong, Mei

    2014-10-01

    Water plays an essential role in the structure and function of proteins, lipid membranes and other biological macromolecules. Solid-state NMR heteronuclear-detected 1H polarization transfer from water to biomolecules is a versatile approach for studying water-protein, water-membrane, and water-carbohydrate interactions in biology. We review radiofrequency pulse sequences for measuring water polarization transfer to biomolecules, the mechanisms of polarization transfer, and the application of this method to various biological systems. Three polarization transfer mechanisms, chemical exchange, spin diffusion and NOE, manifest themselves at different temperatures, magic-angle-spinning frequencies, and pulse irradiations. Chemical exchange is ubiquitous in all systems examined so far, and spin diffusion plays the key role in polarization transfer within the macromolecule. Tightly bound water molecules with long residence times are rare in proteins at ambient temperature. The water polarization-transfer technique has been used to study the hydration of microcrystalline proteins, lipid membranes, and plant cell wall polysaccharides, and to derive atomic-resolution details of the kinetics and mechanism of ion conduction in channels and pumps. Using this approach, we have measured the water polarization transfer to the transmembrane domain of the influenza M2 protein to obtain information on the structure of this tetrameric proton channel. At short mixing times, the polarization transfer rates are site-specific and depend on the pH, labile protons, sidechain conformation, as well as the radial position of the residues in this four-helix bundle. Despite the multiple dependences, the initial transfer rates reflect the periodic nature of the residue positions from the water-filled pore, thus this technique provides a way of gleaning secondary structure information, helix tilt angle, and the oligomeric structure of membrane proteins.

  4. A study of Monte Carlo radiative transfer through fractal clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Gautier, C.; Lavallec, D.; O`Hirok, W.; Ricchiazzi, P.

    1996-04-01

    An understanding of radiation transport (RT) through clouds is fundamental to studies of the earth`s radiation budget and climate dynamics. The transmission through horizontally homogeneous clouds has been studied thoroughly using accurate, discreet ordinates radiative transfer models. However, the applicability of these results to general problems of global radiation budget is limited by the plane parallel assumption and the fact that real clouds fields show variability, both vertically and horizontally, on all size scales. To understand how radiation interacts with realistic clouds, we have used a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model to compute the details of the photon-cloud interaction on synthetic cloud fields. Synthetic cloud fields, generated by a cascade model, reproduce the scaling behavior, as well as the cloud variability observed and estimated from cloud satellite data.

  5. New mechanism of radiation polarization in type 1 Seyfert active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silant'ev, N. A.; Gnedin, Yu. N.; Piotrovich, M. Yu.; Natsvlishvili, T. M.; Buliga, S. D.

    2016-10-01

    In most type 1 Seyfert active galactic nuclei (AGNs), the optical linear continuum polarization degree is usually small (less than 1 per cent) and the polarization position angle is nearly parallel to the AGN radio axis. However, there are many type 1 AGNs with unexplained intermediate values for both positional angles and polarization degrees. Our explanation of polarization degree and positional angle of type 1 Seyfert AGNs focuses on the reflection of non-polarized radiation from sub-parsec jets in optically thick accretion discs. The presence of a magnetic field surrounding the scattering media will induce Faraday rotation of the polarization plane, which may explain the intermediate values of positional angles if there is a magnetic field component normal to the accretion disc. The Faraday rotation depolarization effect in the disc diminishes the competition between polarization of the reflected radiation with the parallel component of polarization and the perpendicular polarization from internal radiation of the disc (the Milne problem) in favour of polarization of the reflected radiation. This effect allows us to explain the observed polarization of type 1 Seyfert AGN radiation even though the jet optical luminosity is much lower than the luminosity of the disc. We present the calculation of polarization degrees for a number of type 1 Seyfert AGNs.

  6. Radiation Transfer in the Atmosphere: Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, M.; Travis, L.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Sunlight illuminating the Earth's atmosphere is scattered by gas molecules and suspended particles, giving rise to blue skies, white clouds, and optical displays such as rainbows and halos. By scattering and absorbing the shortwave solar radiation and the longwave radiation emitted by the underlying surface, cloud and aerosol particles strongly affect the radiation budget of the terrestrial climate system. As a consequence of the dependence of scattering characteristics on particle size, morphology, and composition, scattered light can be remarkably rich in information on particle properties and thus provides a sensitive tool for remote retrievals of macro- and microphysical parameters of clouds and aerosols.

  7. Radiative interactions with micromachined surfaces: Spectral polarized emittance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zemel, J.N.

    1995-05-01

    This report covers work aimed at obtaining additional information on the electromagnetic emissions from heated, microstructured surface. Earlier work had established that thermal emission was a useful means for obtaining broad band information on the electromagnetic properties of these surfaces. Among the earlier results obtained was a demonstration that there was an increased amount of coherent radiation emitted from these structures. Also found was that the nature of the emission was dependent on the carrier concentration of the emitting material as well as the details of the geometry of surface structures. Described in this report is the normal polarized emissivity of undoped silicon gratings of different dimensions measured with a new emissometer. Deep grating fabrication, formation of a titanium silicide layer, and wafer cutting is described.

  8. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer: Applications to Black-Hole Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Kinwah; Fuerst, Steven V.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Lee, Khee-Gan

    2007-01-01

    We present general relativistic radiation transfer formulations which include opacity effects due to absorption, emission and scattering explicitly. We consider a moment expansions for the transfer in the presence of scattering. The formulation is applied to calculation emissions from accretion and outflows in black-hole systems. Cases with thin accretion disks and accretion tori are considered. Effects, such as emission anisotropy, non-stationary flows and geometrical self-occultation are investigated. Polarisation transfer in curved space-time is discussed qualitatively.

  9. Effects of UV radiation on marine ectotherms in polar regions.

    PubMed

    Dahms, Hans-U; Dobretsov, Sergey; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2011-05-01

    Ozone-related increase in solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) during the last decades provided an important ecological stressor, particularly for polar ecosystems since these are less adapted to such changes. All life forms appear to be susceptible to UVR to a highly variable extent that depends on individual species and their environment. Differences in sensitivity between organisms may relate to efficiency differences of their protection mechanisms and repair systems. UVR impacts are masked by large seasonal and geographic differences even in confined areas like the polar regions. UVR has effects and responses on various integration levels: from genetics, physiology, biology, populations, communities, to functional changes as in food webs with consequences on material and energy circulations through ecosystems. Even at current levels, solar UV-B affects consumer organisms, such as ectotherms (invertebrates and fish), particularly through impediments on critical phases of their development (early life history stages such as gametes, zygotes and larvae). Despite the overall negative implications of UVR, effect sizes vary widely in, e.g., molecular damage, cell and tissue damage, survival, growth, behavior, histology, and at the level of populations, communities and ecosystems.

  10. Spectrally-Invariant Approximation Within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, J. C.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    Certain algebraic combinations of single scattering albedo and solar radiation reflected from, or transmitted through, vegetation canopies do not vary with wavelength. These "spectrally invariant relationships" are the consequence of wavelength independence of the extinction coefficient and scattering phase function in vegetation. In general, this wavelength independence does not hold in the atmosphere, but in clouddominated atmospheres the total extinction and total scattering phase function vary only weakly with wavelength. This paper identifies the atmospheric conditions under which the spectrally invariant approximation can accurately describe the extinction. and scattering properties of cloudy atmospheres. The validity of the assumptions and the accuracy of the approximation are tested with ID radiative transfer calculations using publicly available radiative transfer models: Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) and Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART). It is shown for cloudy atmospheres with cloud optical depth above 3, and for spectral intervals that exclude strong water vapor absorption, that the spectrally invariant relationships found in vegetation canopy radiative transfer are valid to better than 5%. The physics behind this phenomenon, its mathematical basis, and possible applications to remote sensing and climate are discussed.

  11. Radiative heat transfer in low-dimensional systems -- microscopic mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Lilia; Phan, Anh; Drosdoff, David

    2013-03-01

    Radiative heat transfer between objects can increase dramatically at sub-wavelength scales. Exploring ways to modulate such transport between nano-systems is a key issue from fundamental and applied points of view. We advance the theoretical understanding of radiative heat transfer between nano-objects by introducing a microscopic model, which takes into account the individual atoms and their atomic polarizabilities. This approach is especially useful to investigate nano-objects with various geometries and give a detailed description of the heat transfer distribution. We employ this model to study the heat exchange in graphene nanoribbon/substrate systems. Our results for the distance separations, substrates, and presence of extended or localized defects enable making predictions for tailoring the radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale. Financial support from the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-06ER46297 is acknowledged.

  12. 3D Radiative Transfer in Cloudy Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Davis, Anthony

    Developments in three-dimensional cloud radiation over the past few decades are assessed and distilled into this contributed volume. Chapters are authored by subject-matter experts who address a broad audience of graduate students, researchers, and anyone interested in cloud-radiation processes in the solar and infrared spectral regions. After two introductory chapters and a section on the fundamental physics and computational techniques, the volume extensively treats two main application areas: the impact of clouds on the Earth's radiation budget, which is an essential aspect of climate modeling; and remote observation of clouds, especially with the advanced sensors on current and future satellite missions. http://www.springeronline.com/alert/article?a=3D1_1fva7w_1j826l_41z_6

  13. User's Manual: Routines for Radiative Heat Transfer and Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risch, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the intensity and spectral distribution of radiation emanating from a heated surface has applications in many areas of science and engineering. Areas of research in which the quantification of spectral radiation is used routinely include thermal radiation heat transfer, infrared signature analysis, and radiation thermometry. In the analysis of radiation, it is helpful to be able to predict the radiative intensity and the spectral distribution of the emitted energy. Presented in this report is a set of routines written in Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington) and incorporating functions specific to Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington) that are useful for predicting the radiative behavior of heated surfaces. These routines include functions for calculating quantities of primary importance to engineers and scientists. In addition, the routines also provide the capability to use such information to determine surface temperatures from spectral intensities and for calculating the sensitivity of the surface temperature measurements to unknowns in the input parameters.

  14. Assessment of a differential total absorptivity solution to the radiative transfer equation as applied in the discrete transfer radiation model

    SciTech Connect

    Bressloff, N.W.; Moss, J.B.; Rubini, P.A.

    1996-04-01

    A differential total absorptivity (DTA) solution to the radiative transfer equation is assessed for application in the discrete transfer radiation model (DTRM). The new solution technique treats the source temperature dependence of adsorption explicitly, without the need for spectral integration. Predictions are presented for the radiative intensity across single lines of sight, and for the volumetric source variations in a full DTRM calculation between solid walls. DTA exhibits superior performance relative to a differential total transmissivity solution and the weighted sum of gray gases solution. Additionally, gray gas solutions and a homogeneous isothermal path solution are shown to be unsatisfactory.

  15. Modeling Polarized Solar Radiation from Various Scene Types for Satellite Remote-Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W.

    2015-12-01

    To correct the polarization-induced errors in measured reflected solar spectra, the polarization state of the reflected solar light must be known. In this presentation, recent modeling of the polarized solar radiation from the ocean, desert, forest, and clouds is reported. The modeled polarized solar radiation quantities are compared with the PARASOL satellite measurements for various scene types. A novel super-thin cloud optical depth (OD) retrieval method based on polarization measurement is also introduced. This study provides a reliable approach for making the spectral Polarization Distribution Models (PDMs) for satellite inter-calibration applications of NASA's future Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission. This study also reports the advance in developing a technique to retrieve super-thin clouds with OD < ~0.3, which are missed by passive satellite sensors like the MODIS. Key words: Reflected solar radiation, polarization, correction of satellite data, retrieval of super-thin clouds.

  16. Radiation heat transfer calculations for space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, A. F.; Johansson, O.; Abrous, A.

    1987-01-01

    A method is presented for the computation of radiant heat flux between arbitrary surfaces which permits a user defined level of accuracy. The method can be applied to directionally dependent surface properties, specular radiation, or solar illumination, and ensures conservation of energy. The method is compared with others to demonstrate its value.

  17. GAUSS-SEIDEL AND SUCCESSIVE OVERRELAXATION METHODS FOR RADIATIVE TRANSFER WITH PARTIAL FREQUENCY REDISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Sampoorna, M.; Bueno, J. Trujillo

    2010-04-01

    The linearly polarized solar limb spectrum that is produced by scattering processes contains a wealth of information on the physical conditions and magnetic fields of the solar outer atmosphere, but the modeling of many of its strongest spectral lines requires solving an involved non-local thermodynamic equilibrium radiative transfer problem accounting for partial redistribution (PRD) effects. Fast radiative transfer methods for the numerical solution of PRD problems are also needed for a proper treatment of hydrogen lines when aiming at realistic time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar chromosphere. Here we show how the two-level atom PRD problem with and without polarization can be solved accurately and efficiently via the application of highly convergent iterative schemes based on the Gauss-Seidel and successive overrelaxation (SOR) radiative transfer methods that had been previously developed for the complete redistribution case. Of particular interest is the Symmetric SOR method, which allows us to reach the fully converged solution with an order of magnitude of improvement in the total computational time with respect to the Jacobi-based local accelerated lambda iteration method.

  18. Heat Transfer Analysis of a Closed Brayton Cycle Space Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical analysis of the heat transfer processes taking place in a radiator for a closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT), also referred to as a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) space power system. The resulting equations and relationships have been incorporated into a radiator sub-routine of a numerical triple objective CCGT optimization program to determine operating conditions yielding maximum cycle efficiency, minimum radiator area and minimum overall systems mass. Study results should be of interest to numerical modeling of closed cycle Brayton space power systems and to the design of fluid cooled radiators in general.

  19. Principal Component-Based Radiative Transfer Model (PCRTM) for Hyperspectral Sensors. Part I; Theoretical Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen

    2005-01-01

    Modern infrared satellite sensors such as Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CrIS), Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) are capable of providing high spatial and spectral resolution infrared spectra. To fully exploit the vast amount of spectral information from these instruments, super fast radiative transfer models are needed. This paper presents a novel radiative transfer model based on principal component analysis. Instead of predicting channel radiance or transmittance spectra directly, the Principal Component-based Radiative Transfer Model (PCRTM) predicts the Principal Component (PC) scores of these quantities. This prediction ability leads to significant savings in computational time. The parameterization of the PCRTM model is derived from properties of PC scores and instrument line shape functions. The PCRTM is very accurate and flexible. Due to its high speed and compressed spectral information format, it has great potential for super fast one-dimensional physical retrievals and for Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) large volume radiance data assimilation applications. The model has been successfully developed for the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System Airborne Sounder Testbed - Interferometer (NAST-I) and AIRS instruments. The PCRTM model performs monochromatic radiative transfer calculations and is able to include multiple scattering calculations to account for clouds and aerosols.

  20. Radiative-recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting: Polarization insertions in the muon factor

    SciTech Connect

    Eides, Michael I.; Shelyuto, Valery A.

    2009-09-01

    We consider three-loop radiative-recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting in muonium due to insertions of a one-loop polarization operator in the muon factor. The contribution produced by electron polarization insertions is enhanced by the large logarithm of the electron-muon mass ratio. We obtained all single-logarithmic and nonlogarithmic radiative-recoil corrections of order {alpha}{sup 3}(m/M)E{sub F} generated by the diagrams with electron and muon polarization insertions.

  1. A Non-Radiative Transfer Approach to Radiometric Vicarious Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara; Pagnutti, Mary; Stanley, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    TOA (top-of-atmosphere) radiance from high-spatial-resolution satellite imagery systems is important for a wide variety of research and applications. Many research initiatives require data with absolute radiometric accuracy better than a few percent. The conversion of satellite digital numbers to radiance depends on accurate radiometric calibration. A common method for determining and validating radiometric calibrations is to rely upon vicarious calibration approaches. Historically, vicarious calibration methods use radiative transfer codes with ground-based atmosphere and surface reflectance or radiance inputs for estimating TOA radiance values. These TOA radiance values are compared against the satellite digital numbers to determine the radiometric calibration. However, the radiative transfer codes used depend on many assumptions about the aerosol properties and the atmospheric point spread function. A measurement-based atmospheric radiance estimation approach for high-spatial-resolution, multispectral, visible/near-infrared sensors is presented that eliminates the use of radiative transfer codes and many of the underlying assumptions. A comparison between the radiative transfer and non-radiative transfer approaches is made.

  2. Polarization Transfer in 4He(e-vector,e[prime]p-vector)3H

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Paolone

    2007-10-01

    Polarization transfer in quasi-elastic nucleon knockout is sensitive to the properties of the nucleon in the nuclear medium, including possible modification of the nucleon form factor and/or spinor. In our recently completed experiment E03-104 at Jefferson Lab we measured the proton recoil polarization in the 4He(e-vector,e[prime]p-vector)3H reaction at a Q2 of 0.8 (GeV/c)2 and 1.3 (GeV/c)2 with unprecedented precision. These data complement earlier data between 0.4 and 2.6 (GeV/c)2 from both Mainz and Jefferson Lab, in which the measured ratio of polarization-transfer coefficients differs from a fully relativistic DWIA calculation. Preliminary results hint at a possible unexpected Q2 dependence in the polarization transfer coefficient ratio. Final analysis will help constrain FSI models

  3. Radiation Heat Transfer Procedures for Space-Related Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, John C.

    2000-01-01

    Over the last contract year, a numerical procedure for combined conduction-radiation heat transfer using unstructured grids has been developed. As a result of this research, one paper has been published in the Numerical Heat Transfer Journal. One paper has been accepted for presentation at the International Center for Heat and Mass Transfer's International Symposium on Computational Heat Transfer to be held in Australia next year. A journal paper is under review by my NASA's contact. A conference paper for the ASME National Heat Transfer conference is under preparation. In summary, a total of four (4) papers (two journal and two conference) have been published, accepted or are under preparation. There are two (2) to three (3) more papers to be written for the project. In addition to the above publications, one book chapter, one journal paper and six conference papers have been published as a result of this project. Over the last contract year, the research project resulted in one Ph.D. thesis and partially supported another Ph.D. student. My NASA contact and myself have formulated radiation heat transfer procedures for materials with different indices of refraction and for combined conduction-radiation heat transfer. We are trying to find other applications for the procedures developed under this grant.

  4. Transfer of radiation technology to developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, Vitomir; Ridwan, Mohammad

    1993-10-01

    Transfer of technology is a complex process with many facets, options and constraints. While the concept is an important step in bringing industrialization process to agricultural based countries, it is clear, however, that a country will only benefit from a new technology if it addresses a real need, and if it can be absorbed and adapted to suit the existing cultural and technological base. International Atomic Energy Agency, as UN body, has a mandate to promote nuclear applicationsand assist Member States in transfer of technology for peaceful applications. This mandate has been pursued by many different mechanisms developed in the past years: technical assistance, coordinated research programmes, scientific and technical meetings, publications, etc. In all these activities the Agency is the organizer and initiator, but main contributions come from expert services from developed countries and, increasingly, from developing countries themselves. The technical cooperation among developing coutries more and more becomes part of different programmes. In particular, regional cooperation has been demonstrated as an effective instrument for transfer of technology from developed and among developing countries. Some examples of actual programmes are given.

  5. A modified Henyey method for computing radiative transfer hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The implicit hydrodynamic code of Kutter and Sparks (1972), which is limited to optically thick regions and employs the diffusion approximation for radiative transfer, is modified to include radiative transfer effects in the optically thin regions of a model star. A modified Henyey method is used to include the solution of the radiative transfer equation in this implicit code, and the convergence properties of this method are proven. A comparison is made between two hydrodynamic models of a classical Cepheid with a 12-day period, one of which was computed with the diffusion approximation and the other with the modified Henyey method. It is found that the two models produce nearly identical light and velocity curves, but differ in the fact that the former never has temperature inversions in the atmosphere while the latter does when sufficiently strong shocks are present.

  6. Partial moment entropy approximation to radiative heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Martin . E-mail: frank@mathematik.uni-kl.de; Dubroca, Bruno . E-mail: Bruno.Dubroca@math.u-bordeaux.fr; Klar, Axel . E-mail: klar@mathematik.uni-kl.de

    2006-10-10

    We extend the half moment entropy closure for the radiative heat transfer equations presented in Dubroca and Klar [B. Dubroca, A. Klar, Half moment closure for radiative transfer equations, J. Comput. Phys. 180 (2002) 584-596] and Turpault et al. [R. Turpault, M. Frank, B. Dubroca, A. Klar, Multigroup half space moment approximations to the radiative heat transfer equations, J. Comput. Phys. 198 (2004) 363-371] to multi-D. To that end, we consider a partial moment system with general partitions of the unit sphere closed by an entropy minimization principle. We give physical and mathematical reasons for this choice of model and study its properties. Several numerical examples in different physical regimes are presented.

  7. Radiative transfer theory for polarimetric remote sensing of pine forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C. C.; Han, H. C.; Shin, Robert T.; Kong, Jin AU; Beaudoin, A.; Letoan, T.

    1992-01-01

    The radiative transfer theory is applied to interpret polarimetric radar backscatter from pine forest with clustered vegetation structures. To take into account the clustered structures with the radiative transfer theory, the scattering function of each cluster is calculated by incorporating the phase interference of scattered fields from each component. Subsequently, the resulting phase matrix is used in the radiative transfer equations to evaluate the polarimetric backscattering coefficients from random medium layers embedded with vegetation clusters. Upon including the multi-scale structures, namely, trunks, primary and secondary branches, as well as needles, we interpret and simulate the polarimetric radar responses from pine forest for different frequencies and looking angles. The preliminary results are shown to be in good agreement with the measured backscattering coefficients at the Landes maritime pine forest during the MAESTRO-1 experiment.

  8. A simplified scheme for computing radiation transfer in the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katayama, A.

    1973-01-01

    A scheme is presented, for the heating of clear and cloudy air by solar and infrared radiation transfer, designed for use in tropospheric general circulation models with coarse vertical resolution. A bulk transmission function is defined for the infrared transfer. The interpolation factors, required for computing the bulk transmission function, are parameterized as functions of such physical parameters as the thickness of the layer, the pressure, and the mixing ratio at a reference level. The computation procedure for solar radiation is significantly simplified by the introduction of two basic concepts. The first is that the solar radiation spectrum can be divided into a scattered part, for which Rayleigh scattering is significant but absorption by water vapor is negligible, and an absorbed part for which absorption by water vapor is significant but Rayleigh scattering is negligible. The second concept is that of an equivalent cloud water vapor amount which absorbs the same amount of radiation as the cloud.

  9. Many-body radiative heat transfer theory.

    PubMed

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Biehs, Svend-Age; Joulain, Karl

    2011-09-01

    In this Letter, an N-body theory for the radiative heat exchange in thermally nonequilibrated discrete systems of finite size objects is presented. We report strong exaltation effects of heat flux which can be explained only by taking into account the presence of many-body interactions. Our theory extends the standard Polder and van Hove stochastic formalism used to evaluate heat exchanges between two objects isolated from their environment to a collection of objects in mutual interaction. It gives a natural theoretical framework to investigate the photon heat transport properties of complex systems at the mesoscopic scale. PMID:22026672

  10. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han -Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, Ramesh G.

    2015-10-09

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. As a result, for circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response is hardly sensitive to θ.

  11. Combined conduction and radiation heat transfer in concentric cylindrical media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, D. K.

    1987-01-01

    The exact radiative transfer expressions for gray and nongray gases which are absorbing, emitting and nonscattering, contained between infinitely long concentric cylinders with black surfaces, are given in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Resulting energy equations due to the combination of conduction and radiation modes of heat transfer, under steady state conditions for gray and nongray media, are solved numerically using the undetermined parameters method. A single 4.3-micron band of CO2 is considered for the nongray problems. The present solutions for gray and nongray gases obtained in the plane-parallel limit (radius ratio approaches to one) are compared with the plane-parallel results reported in the literature.

  12. Computation of Radiation Heat Transfer in Aeroengine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patankar, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    In this report the highlights of the research completed for the NASA are summarized. This research has been completed in the form of two Ph.D. theses by Chai (1994) and Parthasarathy (1996). Readers are referred to these theses for a complete details of the work and lists of references. In the following sections, first objectives of this research are introduced, then the finite-volume method for radiation heat transfer is described, and finally computations of radiative heat transfer in non-gray participating media is presented.

  13. Modelling of Radiation Heat Transfer in Reacting Hot Gas Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thellmann, A.; Mundt, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the interaction between a turbulent flow including chemical reactions and radiation transport is investigated. As a first step, the state-of-the art radiation models P1 based on the moment method and Discrete Transfer Model (DTM) based on the discrete ordinate method are used in conjunction with the CFD code ANSYS CFX. The absorbing and emitting medium (water vapor) is modeled by Weighted Sum of Gray Gases. For the chemical reactions the standard Eddy dissipation model combined with the two equation turbulence model k-epsilon is employed. A demonstration experiment is identified which delivers temperature distribution, species concentration and radiative intensity distribution in the investigated combustion enclosure. The simulation results are compared with the experiment and reveals that the P1 model predicts the location of the maximal radiation intensity unphysically. On the other hand the DTM model does better but over predicts the maximum value of the radiation intensity. This radiation sensitivity study is a first step on the way to identify a suitable radiation transport and spectral model in order to implement both in an existing 3D Navier-Stokes Code. Including radiation heat transfer we intend to investigate the influence on the overall energy balance in a hydrogen/oxygen rocket combustion chamber.

  14. Surface spin-polarized currents generated in topological insulators by circularly polarized synchrotron radiation and their photoelectron spectroscopy indication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikin, A. M.; Klimovskikh, I. I.; Filyanina, M. V.; Rybkina, A. A.; Pudikov, D. A.; Kokh, K. A.; Tereshchenko, O. E.

    2016-08-01

    A new method for generating spin-polarized currents in topological insulators has been proposed and investigated. The method is associated with the spin-dependent asymmetry of the generation of holes at the Fermi level for branches of topological surface states with the opposite spin orientation under the circularly polarized synchrotron radiation. The result of the generation of holes is the formation of compensating spin-polarized currents, the value of which is determined by the concentration of the generated holes and depends on the specific features of the electronic and spin structures of the system. The indicator of the formed spin-polarized current can be a shift of the Fermi edge in the photoelectron spectra upon photoexcitation by synchrotron radiation with the opposite circular polarization. The topological insulators with different stoichiometric compositions (Bi1.5Sb0.5Te1.8Se1.2 and PbBi2Se2Te2) have been investigated. It has been found that there is a correlation in the shifts and generated spin-polarized currents with the specific features of the electronic spin structure. Investigations of the graphene/Pt(111) system have demonstrated the possibility of using this method for other systems with a spin-polarized electronic structure.

  15. Theory of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance of oil radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariamov, N B

    1942-01-01

    In the present report the coefficients of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance are theoretically obtained for the case of laminar flow of a heated viscous liquid in a narrow rectangular channel. The results obtained are applied to the computation of oil radiators, which to a first approximation may be considered as made up of a system of such channels. In conclusion, a comparison is given of the theoretical with the experimental results obtained from tests on airplane oil radiators.

  16. Complete polarization analysis of extreme ultraviolet radiation with a broadband phase retarder and analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhanshan; Wang Hongchang; Zhu Jingtao; Zhang Zhong; Wang Fengli; Xu Yao; Zhang Shumin; Wu Wenjuan; Chen Lingyan; Michette, Alan G.; Pfauntsch, Slawka J.; Powell, A. Keith; Schaefers, Franz; Gaupp, Andreas; Cui Mingqi; Sun Lijuan; MacDonald, Mike

    2007-02-19

    The polarization state of the BESSY UE56/1-PGM beamline radiation in the broad wavelength range of 12.7-15.5 nm was measured using a molybdenum/silicon transmission phase retarder and a reflection analyzer with aperiodic multilayer interference structures, which can broaden the spectral response of these optical elements. The characteristics of the circular polarized undulator radiation, as well as the polarization properties of the two polarizing elements, were determined by a complete polarization analysis. Furthermore, the polarization of the radiation as a function of the undulator shift setting was also measured at the wavelength of 13.1 nm by use of the broadband phase retarder-analyzer pair.

  17. Flux Transfer Event in the Subsolar Region and Near the Cusp: Simultaneous Polar and Cluster Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Zheng, Y.; Russell, C. T.; Pfaff, R. F.; Slavin, J. A.; Lin, N.; Mozer, F.; Parks, G.; Petrinec, S. M.; Lucek, e. A.; Reme, Henri

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon called flux transfer events (FTEs) is widely accepted as the manifestation of time-dependent reconnection. In this paper, we present an observational evidence of a flux transfer event observed simultaneously at low-latitude by Polar and high-latitude by Cluster. This event occurred on March 21, 2002, when both Cluster and Polar were located near the local noon but with large latitudinal distance. Cluster was moving outbound from polar cusp to the magnetosheath, and Polar was in the magnetosheath near the equatorial magnetopause. The observations show that a flux transfer event was formed between the equator and the northern cusp. Polar and Cluster observed the FTE's two open flux tubes: Polar saw the southward moving flux tube near the equator; and Cluster the , northward moving flux tube at high latitude. Unlike low-latitude FTEs, the high-latitude FTE did not exhibit the characteristic bi-polar BN signature. But the plasma data clearly showed its open flux tube configuration. Enhanced electric field fluctuations were observed within the FTE core, both at low- and high-attitudes. This event provides us a unique opportunity to understand high-latitude FTE signatures and the nature of time-varying reconnection.

  18. Hierarchicalp-version finite elements for radiation heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Dana Craig

    Methods to compute surface-to-surface radiation heat transfer between diffuse-gray surfaces using hierarchical p-version finite elements have been developed and applied to the analysis of a high-speed aircraft wing. A review of traditional methods for surface-to-surface radiation exchange is given. Traditional methods rely on the assumption of isothermal surfaces with incoming and outgoing radiation heat flux assumed constant over the surface. These assumptions are not appropriate for p-version finite elements, so new methods for evaluating the incoming and outgoing radiation flux over a finite element surface were required. Two methods for computing the surface-to-surface radiation heat transfer that do not rely on the above assumptions are developed and validated. The first approach uses traditional methods to compute the radiation exchange on an element sub-mesh, then transfers this data back to the parent element for the computation of the radiation heat flux. The second method requires the numerical integration of the net radiation exchange equation for each element. The methods are validated and evaluated using simple problems with analytical solutions. The radiation sub-element method is less costly than the direct integration method, but it is also less accurate. Both methods are computationally more expensive than traditional methods for a given number of degrees of freedom; however, for a given accuracy, they are less expensive. The new methods are used to analyze the wing of a High Speed Civil Transport vehicle. The p-elements were effective in capturing significant temperature variations over large sections of the wing and reduced the mesh complexity and associated modeling time while maintaining accuracy.

  19. Near-field radiative heat transfer between metamaterials coated with silicon carbide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Soumyadipta Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping

    2015-01-19

    In this letter, we study the near-field radiative heat transfer between two metamaterial substrates coated with silicon carbide (SiC) thin films. It is known that metamaterials can enhance the near-field heat transfer over ordinary materials due to excitation of magnetic plasmons associated with s polarization, while strong surface phonon polariton exists for SiC. By careful tuning of the optical properties of metamaterial, it is possible to excite electrical and magnetic resonances for the metamaterial and surface phonon polaritons for SiC at different spectral regions, resulting in the enhanced heat transfer. The effect of the SiC film thickness at different vacuum gaps is investigated. Results obtained from this study will be beneficial for application of thin film coatings for energy harvesting.

  20. Validation of the Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhuravleva, Tatiana; Marshak, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    A new approach to validation of the Poisson stochastic radiative transfer method is proposed. In contrast to other validations of stochastic models, the main parameter of the Poisson model responsible for cloud geometrical structure - cloud aspect ratio - is determined entirely by matching measurements and calculations of the direct solar radiation. If the measurements of the direct solar radiation is unavailable, it was shown that there is a range of the aspect ratios that allows the stochastic model to accurately approximate the average measurements of surface downward and cloud top upward fluxes. Realizations of the fractionally integrated cascade model are taken as a prototype of real measurements.

  1. A modular radiative transfer program for gas filter correlation radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casas, J. C.; Campbell, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    The fundamentals of a computer program, simulated monochromatic atmospheric radiative transfer (SMART), which calculates atmospheric path transmission, solar radiation, and thermal radiation in the 4.6 micrometer spectral region, are described. A brief outline of atmospheric absorption properties and line by line transmission calculations is explained in conjunction with an outline of the SMART computational procedures. Program flexibility is demonstrated by simulating the response of a gas filter correlation radiometer as one example of an atmospheric infrared sensor. Program limitations, input data requirements, program listing, and comparison of SMART transmission calculations are presented.

  2. Fractional integration and radiative transfer in a multifractal atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Naud, C.; Schertzer, D.; Lovejoy, S.

    1996-04-01

    Recently, Cess et al. (1995) and Ramathan et al. (1995) cited observations which exhibit an anomalous absorption of cloudy skies in comparison with the value predicted by usual models and which thus introduce large uncertainties for climatic change assessments. These observation raise questions concerning the way general circulation models have been tuned for decades, relying on classical methods, of both radiative transfer and dynamical modeling. The observations also tend to demonstrate that homogeneous models are simply not relevant in relating the highly variable properties of clouds and radiation fields. However smoothed, the intensity of cloud`s multi-scattered radiation fields reflect this extreme variability.

  3. Heat transfer studies on the liquid droplet radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattick, A. T.; Nelson, M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines radiation transfer in the droplet sheet of a liquid droplet radiator including non-isotropic scattering by the droplets. Non-isotropic scattering becomes significant for small droplets (diameter less than 0.1 mm) and for low emissivity liquids. For droplets with an emittance of 0.1 and for a droplet sheet optical depth or 5, the radiated power varies by about 12 percent, depending on whether scattering is predominantly forward or backward. An experimental measurement of the power emitted by a cylindrical cloud of heated droplets of silicone fluid is also reported. The measured cloud emissivity correlates, within experimental error, with the analytical model.

  4. A portable cryostat for the cold transfer of polarized solid HD targets: HDice-I

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, C. D.; Bade, C.; Blecher, M.; Caracappa, A.; D'Angelo, A.; Deur, A.; Dezern, G.; Glueckler, H.; Hanretty, C.; Ho, D.; Honig, A.; Kageya, T.; Khandaker, M.; Laine, V.; Lincoln, F.; Lowry, M. M.; Mahon, J. C.; O'Connell, T.; Pap, M.; Peng, P.; Preedom, B.; Sandorfi, A. M.; Seyfarth, H.; Stroeher, H.; Thorn, C. E.; Wei, X.; Whisnant, C. S.

    2014-02-01

    We developed a device with moveable liquid nitrogen and liquid helium volumes that is capable of reaching over 2 m into the coldest regions of a cryostat or dilution refrigerator and reliably extracting or installing a target of solid, polarized hydrogen deuteride (HD). This Transfer Cryostat incorporates a cylindrical neodymium rare-earth magnet that is configured as a Halbach dipole, which is maintained at 77 K and produces a 0.1 T field around the HD target. Multiple layers provide a hermetic 77 K-shield as the device is used to maintain a target at 2 K during a transfer between cryostats. Our tests with frozen-spin HD show very little polarization loss for either H (-1±2%, relative) or D (0±3%, relative) over typical transfer periods. Multiple target transfers with this apparatus have shown an overall reliability of about 95% per transfer, which is a significant improvement over earlier versions of the device.

  5. A portable cryostat for the cold transfer of polarized solid HD targets: HDice-I

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Christopher D.; Sandorfi, Andy M.; Bade, C.; Blecher, M.; Caracappa, A.; D'Angelo, A.; Deur, A.; Dezern, G.; Glueckler, H.; Hanretty, C.; Ho, D.; Kageya, T.; Khandaker, M.; Laine, V.; Lincoln, F.; Lowry, M. M.; Mahon, J. C.; Connell, T. O.; Peng, P.; Preedom, B.; Seyfarth, H.; Stroeher, H.; Thorn, C. E.; Wei, X.; Whisnant, C. S.

    2014-02-01

    A device has been developed with moveable liquid nitrogen and liquid helium volumes that is capable of reaching over two meters into the coldest regions of a cryostat or dilution refrigerator and reliably extracting or installing a target of solid, polarized hydrogen deuteride (HD). This Transfer Cryostat incorporates a cylindrical neodymium rare-earth magnet that is configured as a Halbach dipole, which is maintained at 77 K and produces a 0.1 T field around the HD target. Multiple layers provide a hermetic 77 K-shield as the device is used to maintain a target at 2 K during a transfer between cryostats. Tests with frozen-spin HD show negligible polarization loss for either H or D over typical transfer periods. Multiple target transfers with this apparatus have shown an overall reliability of about 95% per transfer, which is a significant improvement over earlier versions of the device.

  6. Bidirectional reflection of polarized laser radiation by heat-insulating materials and thermoregulating coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voshchula, I. V.; Dlugunovich, V. A.; Zhumar', A. Yu.; Tsaryuk, O. V.

    2012-03-01

    We have investigated the change in the degree of polarization of radiation reflected in the mirror direction by thermoregulating coatings (white, black, and silver paints) sprayed on aluminum, as well as by polymeric composite materials (phenol plastic painted green and bare carbon-filled plastic) illuminated at various angles by linearly polarized radiation from a He-Ne laser. Angular dependences of the bidirectional regular reflectance of the surface of the investigated materials taking into account only the polarized component of reflected radiation have been obtained.

  7. Radiative transfer simulations of magnetar flare beaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Putten, T.; Watts, A. L.; Baring, M. G.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetar giant flares show oscillatory modulations in the tails of their light curves, which can only be explained via some form of beaming. The fireball model for magnetar bursts has been used successfully to fit the phase-averaged light curves of the tails of giant flares, but so far no attempts have been made to fit the pulsations. We present a relatively simple numerical model to simulate beaming of magnetar flare emission. In our simulations, radiation escapes from the base of a fireball trapped in a dipolar magnetic field, and is scattered through the optically thick magnetosphere of the magnetar until it escapes. Beaming is provided by the presence of a relativistic outflow, as well as by the geometry of the system. We find that a simple picture for the relativistic outflow is enough to create the pulse fraction and sharp peaks observed in pulse profiles of magnetar flares, while without a relativistic outflow the beaming is insufficient to explain giant flare rotational modulations.

  8. Radiative effects of polar stratospheric clouds during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment and the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfield, Joan E.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of a study of the radiative effects of polar stratospheric clouds during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) and the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) in which daily 3D Type I nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and Type II water ice polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were generated in the polar regions during AAOE and the AASE aircraft missions. Mission data on particular composition and size, together with NMC-analyzed temperatures, are used. For AAOE, both Type I and Type II clouds were formed for the time period August 23 to September 17, after which only Type I clouds formed. During AASE, while Type I clouds were formed for each day between January 3 and February 10, Type II clouds formed on only two days, January 24 and 31. Mie theory and a radiative transfer model are used to compute the radiative heating rates during the mission periods, for clear and cloudy lower sky cases. Only the Type II water ice clouds have a significant radiative effect, with the Type I NATO PSCs generating a net heating or cooling of 0.1 K/d or less.

  9. Polarization Transfer in Wide-Angle Compton Scattering and Single-Pion Photoproduction from the Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanelli, C.; Cisbani, E.; Hamilton, D. J.; Salmé, G.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ahmidouch, A.; Annand, J. R. M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Beaufait, J.; Bosted, P.; Brash, E. J.; Butuceanu, C.; Carter, P.; Christy, E.; Chudakov, E.; Danagoulian, S.; Day, D.; Degtyarenko, P.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Fowler, M.; Frlez, E.; Gaskell, D.; Gilman, R.; Horn, T.; Huber, G. M.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jones, M. K.; Kelleher, A.; Keppel, C.; Khandaker, M.; Kohl, M.; Kumbartzki, G.; Lassiter, S.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Lovelace, H.; Luo, W.; Mack, D.; Mamyan, V.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Maxwell, J.; Mbianda, G.; Meekins, D.; Meziane, M.; Miller, J.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Mulholland, J.; Nelyubin, V.; Pentchev, L.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Piasetzky, E.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Punjabi, V.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Slifer, K.; Smith, G.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wood, S.; Ye, Z.; Zheng, X.

    2015-10-01

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The wide-angle Compton scattering polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θcmp=70 ° . The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ±0.059 ±0.048 , where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ˜3 times larger than predicted by the generalized-parton-distribution-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  10. Polarization transfer in wide-angle Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton

    DOE PAGES

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-10-06

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The WACS polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θPcm = 70°. The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ± 0.059 ± 0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton.more » However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the GPD-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.« less

  11. Polarization transfer in wide-angle Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.

    2015-10-06

    Wide-angle exclusive Compton scattering and single-pion photoproduction from the proton have been investigated via measurement of the polarization transfer from a circularly polarized photon beam to the recoil proton. The WACS polarization transfer was analyzed at an incident photon energy of 3.7 GeV at a proton scattering angle of θPcm = 70°. The longitudinal transfer KLL, measured to be 0.645 ± 0.059 ± 0.048, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic, has the same sign as predicted for the reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton. However, the observed value is ~3 times larger than predicted by the GPD-based calculations, which indicates a significant unknown contribution to the scattering amplitude.

  12. A radiative transfer model for microwave emissions from bare agricultural soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, W. J.; Paris, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    A radiative transfer model for microwave emissions from bare, stratified agricultural soils was developed to assist in the analysis of data gathered in the joint soil moisture experiment. The predictions of the model were compared with preliminary X band (2.8 cm) microwave and ground based observations. Measured brightness temperatures at vertical and horizontal polarizations can be used to estimate the moisture content of the top centimeter of soil with + or - 1 percent accuracy. It is also shown that the Stokes parameters can be used to distinguish between moisture and surface roughness effects.

  13. A Thermokinetic Approach to Radiative Heat Transfer at the Nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Madrid, Agustín; Lapas, Luciano C.; Rubí, J. Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Radiative heat exchange at the nanoscale presents a challenge for several areas due to its scope and nature. Here, we provide a thermokinetic description of microscale radiative energy transfer including phonon-photon coupling manifested through a non-Debye relaxation behavior. We show that a lognormal-like distribution of modes of relaxation accounts for this non-Debye relaxation behavior leading to the thermal conductance. We also discuss the validity of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The general expression for the thermal conductance we obtain fits existing experimental results with remarkable accuracy. Accordingly, our approach offers an overall explanation of radiative energy transfer through micrometric gaps regardless of geometrical configurations and distances. PMID:23527019

  14. Radiative transfer in a polluted urban planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viskanta, R.; Johnson, R. O.; Bergstrom, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Radiative transfer in a polluted urban atmosphere is studied using a dynamic model. The diurnal nature of radiative transfer for summer conditions is simulated for an urban area 40 km in extent and the effects of various parameters arising in the problem are investigated. The results of numerical computations show that air pollution has the potential of playing a major role in the radiative regime of the urban area. Absorption of solar energy by aerosols in realistic models of urban atmosphere are of the same order of magnitude as that due to water vapor. The predicted effect of the air pollution aerosol in the city is to warm the earth-atmosphere system, and the net effect of gaseous pollutant is to warm the surface and cool the planetary boundary layer, particularly near the top.

  15. Radiation transfer in plant canopies - Scattering of solar radiation and canopy reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verstraete, Michel M.

    1988-01-01

    The one-dimensional vertical model of radiation transfer in a plant canopy described by Verstraete (1987) is extended to account for the transfer of diffuse radiation. This improved model computes the absorption and scattering of both visible and near-infrared radiation in a multilayer canopy as a function of solar position and leaf orientation distribution. Multiple scattering is allowed, and the spectral reflectance of the vegetation stand is predicted. The results of the model are compared to those of other models and actual observations.

  16. A Fast Infrared Radiative Transfer Model for Overlapping Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niu, Jianguo; Yang, Ping; Huang, Huang-Lung; Davies, James E.; Li, Jun; Baum, Bryan A.; Hu, Yong X.

    2006-01-01

    A fast infrared radiative transfer model (FIRTM2) appropriate for application to both single-layered and overlapping cloud situations is developed for simulating the outgoing infrared spectral radiance at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). In FIRTM2 a pre-computed library of cloud reflectance and transmittance values is employed to account for one or two cloud layers, whereas the background atmospheric optical thickness due to gaseous absorption can be computed from a clear-sky radiative transfer model. FIRTM2 is applicable to three atmospheric conditions: 1) clear-sky, 2) single-layered ice or water cloud, and 3) two simultaneous cloud layers in a column (e.g., ice cloud overlying water cloud). Moreover, FIRTM2 outputs the derivatives (i.e., Jacobians) of the TOA brightness temperature with respect to cloud optical thickness and effective particle size. Sensitivity analyses have been carried out to assess the performance of FIRTM2 for two spectral regions, namely the longwave (LW) band (587.3 - 1179.5/cm) and the short-to-medium wave (SMW) band (1180.1 - 2228.9/cm). The assessment is carried out in terms of brightness temperature differences (BTD) between FIRTM2 and the well-known discrete ordinates radiative transfer model (DISORT), henceforth referred to as BTD (F-D). The BTD (F-D) values for single-layered clouds are generally less than 0.8 K. For the case of two cloud layers (specifically ice cloud over water cloud), the BTD(F-D) values are also generally less than 0.8 K except for the SMW band for the case of a very high altitude (>15 km) cloud comprised of small ice particles. Note that for clear-sky atmospheres, FIRTM2 reduces to the clear-sky radiative transfer model that is incorporated into FIRTM2, and the errors in this case are essentially those of the clear-sky radiative transfer model.

  17. Polarized 3He+2 ions in the Alternate Gradient Synchrotron to RHIC transfer line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoupas, N.; Huang, H.; Méot, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.

    2016-09-01

    The proposed electron-hadron collider (eRHIC) to be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) will allow the collisions of 20 GeV polarized electrons with 250 GeV polarized protons, or 100 GeV /n polarized 3He+2 ions, or other unpolarized ion species. The large value of the anomalous magnetic moment of the 3He nucleus GHe=(g -2 )/2 =-4.184 (where g is the g -factor of the 3He nuclear spin) combined with the peculiar layout of the transfer line which transports the beam bunches from the Alternate Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) makes the transfer and injection of polarized 3He ions from AGS to RHIC (AtR) a special case as we explain in the paper. Specifically in this paper we calculate the stable spin direction of a polarized 3He beam at the exit of the AtR line which is also the injection point of RHIC, and we discuss a simple modifications of the AtR beam-transfer-line, to perfectly match the stable spin direction of the injected polarized 3He beam to that of the circulating beam, at the injection point of RHIC.

  18. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING AND ANALYZING POLARIZED GAMMA RADIATION

    DOEpatents

    Hamermesh, M.; Hanna, S.S.; Perlow, G.J.

    1964-04-21

    A method of polarizing and resolving the plane of polarization of gamma rays is described. Polarization is produced by positioning a thin disc of ferromagnetic metal, cortaining /sup 57/Co, in a magnetic field. Resolution is accomplished by rotating a thin disc of iron enriched in /sup 57/Fe relative to a second magnetic field and noting the change of gamma absorption at each rotational position. (AEC)

  19. Probing lung physiology with xenon polarization transfer contrast (XTC).

    PubMed

    Ruppert, K; Brookeman, J R; Hagspiel, K D; Mugler, J P

    2000-09-01

    One of the major goals of hyperpolarized-gas MRI has been to obtain (129)Xe dissolved-phase images in humans. So far, this goal has remained elusive, mainly due to the low concentration of xenon that dissolves in tissue. A method is proposed and demonstrated in dogs that allows information about the dissolved phase to be obtained by imaging the gas phase following the application of a series of RF pulses that selectively destroy the longitudinal magnetization of xenon dissolved in the lung parenchyma. During the delay time between consecutive RF pulses, the depolarized xenon rapidly exchanges with the gas phase, thus lowering the gas polarization. It is demonstrated that the resulting contrast in the (129)Xe gas image provides information about the local tissue density. It is further argued that minor pulse-sequence modifications may provide information about the alveolar surface area or lung perfusion.

  20. Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Veron, Dana E

    2009-03-12

    This project had two primary goals: 1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and 2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed below.

  1. Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Dana E. Veron

    2012-04-09

    This project had two primary goals: (1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and (2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, climatology of cloud properties was developed at the ARM CART sites, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed in the final report.

  2. First Measurement of the Linear Polarization of Radiative Electron Capture Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Tashenov, S.; Stoehlker, Th.; Gumberidze, A.; Hagmann, S.; Spillmann, U.; Banas, D.; Beckert, K.; Beller, P.; Beyer, H. F.; Bosch, F.; Kozhuharov, C.; Liesen, D.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Fritzsche, S.; Surzhykov, A.; Krings, T.; Protic, D.; Sierpowski, D.

    2006-12-01

    For radiative electron capture into the K shell of bare uranium ions, a study of the polarization properties has been performed. For this purpose a position sensitive germanium detector has been used as an efficient Compton polarimeter. This enabled us to measure the degree of linear polarization by analyzing Compton scattering inside the detector and to determine the orientation of the polarization plane. Depending on the observation angle and the beam energy used, the radiation is found to be linearly polarized by up to 80%. In all cases studied, the plane of polarization coincides with the collision plane. The results will be discussed in the context of rigorous relativistic calculations, showing that relativistic effects tend to lead to a depolarization of the radiation emitted.

  3. Asymmetric simultaneous phase-inversion cross-polarization in solid-state MAS NMR: Relaxing selective polarization transfer condition between two dilute spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengfeng; Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jianping; Yang, Jun

    2014-05-01

    Double cross polarization (DCP) has been widely used for heteronuclear polarization transfer between 13C and 15N in solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR. However, DCP is such sensitive to experimental settings that small variations or deviations in RF fields would deteriorate its efficiency. Here, we report on asymmetric simultaneous phase-inversion cross polarization (referred as aSPICP) for selective polarization transfer between low-γ 13C and 15N spins. We have demonstrated through simulations and experiments using biological solids that the asymmetric duration in the simultaneous phase-inversion cross polarization scheme leads to efficient polarization transfer between 13C and 15N even with large chemical shift anisotropies in the presence of B1 field variations or mismatch of the Hartmann-Hahn conditions. This could be very useful in the aspect of long-duration experiments for membrane protein studies at high fields.

  4. Coupling radiative heat transfer in participating media with other heat transfer modes

    SciTech Connect

    Tencer, John; Howell, John R.

    2015-09-28

    The common methods for finding the local radiative flux divergence in participating media through solution of the radiative transfer equation are outlined. The pros and cons of each method are discussed in terms of their speed, ability to handle spectral properties and scattering phenomena, as well as their accuracy in different ranges of media transport properties. The suitability of each method for inclusion in the energy equation to efficiently solve multi-mode thermal transfer problems is discussed. Lastly, remaining topics needing research are outlined.

  5. Cloud Property Retrieval and 3D Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.

    2003-01-01

    Cloud thickness and photon mean-free-path together determine the scale of "radiative smoothing" of cloud fluxes and radiances. This scale is observed as a change in the spatial spectrum of cloud radiances, and also as the "halo size" seen by off beam lidar such as THOR and WAIL. Such of beam lidar returns are now being used to retrieve cloud layer thickness and vertical scattering extinction profile. We illustrate with recent measurements taken at the Oklahoma ARM site, comparing these to the-dependent 3D simulations. These and other measurements sensitive to 3D transfer in clouds, coupled with Monte Carlo and other 3D transfer methods, are providing a better understanding of the dependence of radiation on cloud inhomogeneity, and to suggest new retrieval algorithms appropriate for inhomogeneous clouds. The international "Intercomparison of 3D Radiation Codes" or I3RC, program is coordinating and evaluating the variety of 3D radiative transfer methods now available, and to make them more widely available. Information is on the Web at: http://i3rc.gsfc.nasa.gov/. Input consists of selected cloud fields derived from data sources such as radar, microwave and satellite, and from models involved in the GEWEX Cloud Systems Studies. Output is selected radiative quantities that characterize the large-scale properties of the fields of radiative fluxes and heating. Several example cloud fields will be used to illustrate. I3RC is currently implementing an "open source" 3d code capable of solving the baseline cases. Maintenance of this effort is one of the goals of a new 3DRT Working Group under the International Radiation Commission. It is hoped that the 3DRT WG will include active participation by land and ocean modelers as well, such as 3D vegetation modelers participating in RAMI.

  6. Coherent transfer of nuclear spin polarization in field-cycling NMR experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2013-12-28

    Coherent polarization transfer effects in a coupled spin network have been studied over a wide field range. The transfer mechanism is based on exciting zero-quantum coherences between the nuclear spin states by means of non-adiabatic field jump from high to low magnetic field. Subsequent evolution of these coherences enables conversion of spin order in the system, which is monitored after field jump back to high field. Such processes are most efficient when the spin system passes through an avoided level crossing during the field variation. The polarization transfer effects have been demonstrated for N-acetyl histidine, which has five scalar coupled protons; the initial spin order has been prepared by applying RF-pulses at high magnetic field. The observed oscillatory transfer kinetics is taken as a clear indication of a coherent mechanism; level crossing effects have also been demonstrated. The experimental data are in very good agreement with the theoretical model of coherent polarization transfer. The method suggested is also valid for other types of initial polarization in the spin system, most notably, for spin hyperpolarization.

  7. Coherent transfer of nuclear spin polarization in field-cycling NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Vieth, Hans-Martin; Ivanov, Konstantin L

    2013-12-28

    Coherent polarization transfer effects in a coupled spin network have been studied over a wide field range. The transfer mechanism is based on exciting zero-quantum coherences between the nuclear spin states by means of non-adiabatic field jump from high to low magnetic field. Subsequent evolution of these coherences enables conversion of spin order in the system, which is monitored after field jump back to high field. Such processes are most efficient when the spin system passes through an avoided level crossing during the field variation. The polarization transfer effects have been demonstrated for N-acetyl histidine, which has five scalar coupled protons; the initial spin order has been prepared by applying RF-pulses at high magnetic field. The observed oscillatory transfer kinetics is taken as a clear indication of a coherent mechanism; level crossing effects have also been demonstrated. The experimental data are in very good agreement with the theoretical model of coherent polarization transfer. The method suggested is also valid for other types of initial polarization in the spin system, most notably, for spin hyperpolarization. PMID:24387362

  8. Radiative heat transfer between two dielectric-filled metal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, J.; Dyakov, S. A.; Yan, M.

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale surface corrugation is known to be able to drastically enhance radiative heat transfer between two metal plates. Here we numerically calculate the radiative heat transfer between two dielectric-filled metal gratings at dissimilar temperatures based on a scattering approach. It is demonstrated that, compared to unfilled metal gratings, the heat flux for a fixed geometry can be further enhanced, by up to 650% for the geometry separated by a vacuum gap of g =1 μ m and temperature values concerned in our study. The enhancement in radiative heat transfer is found to depend on refractive index of the filling dielectric, the specific grating temperatures, and naturally the gap size between the two gratings. The enhancement can be understood through examining the transmission factor spectra, especially the spectral locations of the spoof surface plasmon polariton modes. Of more practical importance, it's shown that the radiative heat flux can exceed that between two planar SiC plates with same thickness, separation, and temperature settings over a wide temperature range. This reaffirms that one can harness rich electromagnetic modal properties in nanostructured materials for efficient thermal management at nanoscale.

  9. SGPGET: AN SBDART Module for Aerosol Radiative Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    McComiskey, A.; Ricchiazzi, P.; Ogren, J.A.; Dutton, E.

    2005-03-18

    Quantification of the aerosol direct effect and climate sensitivity requires accurate estimates of optical properties as inputs to a radiative transfer model. Long-term measurements of aerosol properties at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site can be used as an improvement over a best guess or global average for optical properties (e.g., asymmetry factor of 0.7) used in Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) products such as the Broadband Heating Rate Profile VAP. To make this information readily available to the ARM community and others, an add-on module for a commonly used radiative transfer model, SBDART (Ricchiazzi et al. 1998), is being developed. A look up table and algorithm will provide aerosol related model inputs including aerosol optical and atmospheric state properties at high temporal resolution. These inputs can be used in conjunction with any mode of operation and with any other information, for example, cloud properties, in SBDART or any other radiative transfer model. Aerosol properties measured at three visible wavelengths are extrapolated so that flux calculations can be made in any desired wavelength across the shortwave spectrum. Several sources of uncertainty contribute to degraded accuracy of the aerosol property estimation. The effect of these uncertainties is shown through error analysis and comparisons of modeled and observed surface irradiance. A module is also being developed for the North Slope of Alaska site.

  10. Polarization and charge transfer in the hydration of chloride ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Zhen; Rogers, David M.; Beck, Thomas L.

    2010-01-07

    A theoretical study of the structural and electronic properties of the chloride ion and water molecules in the first hydration shell is presented. The calculations are performed on an ensemble of configurations obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of a single chloride ion in bulk water. The simulations utilize the polarizable AMOEBA force field for trajectory generation and MP2-level calculations are performed to examine the electronic structure properties of the ions and surrounding waters in the external field of more distant waters. The ChelpG method is employed to explore the effective charges and dipoles on the chloride ions and first-shell waters. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) is further utilized to examine charge transfer from the anion to surrounding water molecules. The clusters extracted from the AMOEBA simulations exhibit high probabilities of anisotropic solvation for chloride ions in bulk water. From the QTAIM analysis, 0.2 elementary charges are transferred from the ion to the first-shell water molecules. The default AMOEBA model overestimates the average dipole moment magnitude of the ion compared to the quantum mechanical value. The average magnitude of the dipole moment of the water molecules in the first shell treated at the MP2-level, with the more distant waters handled with an AMOEBA effective charge model, is 2.67 D. This value is close to the AMOEBA result for first-shell waters (2.72 D) and is slightly reduced from the bulk AMOEBA value (2.78 D). The magnitude of the dipole moment of the water molecules in the first solvation shell is most strongly affected by the local water-water interactions and hydrogen bonds with the second solvation shell, rather than by interactions with the ion.

  11. Preliminary results of a three-dimensional radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hirok, W.

    1995-09-01

    Clouds act as the primary modulator of the Earth`s radiation at the top of the atmosphere, within the atmospheric column, and at the Earth`s surface. They interact with both shortwave and longwave radiation, but it is primarily in the case of shortwave where most of the uncertainty lies because of the difficulties in treating scattered solar radiation. To understand cloud-radiative interactions, radiative transfer models portray clouds as plane-parallel homogeneous entities to ease the computational physics. Unfortunately, clouds are far from being homogeneous, and large differences between measurement and theory point to a stronger need to understand and model cloud macrophysical properties. In an attempt to better comprehend the role of cloud morphology on the 3-dimensional radiation field, a Monte Carlo model has been developed. This model can simulate broadband shortwave radiation fluxes while incorporating all of the major atmospheric constituents. The model is used to investigate the cloud absorption anomaly where cloud absorption measurements exceed theoretical estimates and to examine the efficacy of ERBE measurements and cloud field experiments. 3 figs.

  12. Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-López, Pablo; Tse, Wang-Kong; Dalvit, Diego A R

    2015-06-01

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. Finally, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials. PMID:25965703

  13. On the planetary and Milne problems in complex radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viik, T.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we consider two classical problems in radiative transfer - the planetary and the Milne problems - in an isotropic homogeneous optically semi-infinite medium where the albedo of single scattering may be defined anywhere in the complex plane. It appeared that the method of approximating the kernel in the integral equation for the Sobolev resolvent function can be used even in such a case. This approach allows to express almost all the relevant functions of transfer for those problems by simply determinable auxiliary functions.

  14. Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials

    DOE PAGES

    Rodriguez-López, Pablo; Tse, Wang -Kong; Dalvit, Diego A. R.

    2015-05-12

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. In conclusion, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials.

  15. Retaining space and time coherence in radiative transfer models.

    PubMed

    Rosato, J

    2015-05-01

    A recent model for radiative transfer that accounts for spatial coherence is extended in such a way as to retain temporal coherence. The method employs Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy techniques. Both spatial and temporal coherence are shown to affect the formation of atomic line spectra. Calculations of Lyman α radiation transport in optically thick divertor plasma conditions are reported as an illustration of the model. A possible extension of the formalism to dense media involving correlations between atoms is discussed in an appendix. A link to partial frequency redistribution modeling is also discussed.

  16. Fire Intensity Data for Validation of the Radiative Transfer Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Jernigan, Dann A.

    2016-01-01

    A set of experiments and test data are outlined in this report that provides radiation intensity data for the validation of models for the radiative transfer equation. The experiments were performed with lightly-sooting liquid hydrocarbon fuels that yielded fully turbulent fires 2 m diameter). In addition, supplemental measurements of air flow and temperature, fuel temperature and burn rate, and flame surface emissive power, wall heat, and flame height and width provide a complete set of boundary condition data needed for validation of models used in fire simulations.

  17. An Improved Radiative Transfer Model for Climate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Sokolik, Irina N.; Clough, Shepard A.; Toon, Owen B.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a radiative transfer model that has been developed to accurately predict the atmospheric radiant flux in both the infrared and the solar spectrum with a minimum of computational effort. The model is designed to be included in numerical climate models To assess the accuracy of the model, the results are compared to other more detailed models for several standard cases in the solar and thermal spectrum. As the thermal spectrum has been treated in other publications, we focus here on the solar part of the spectrum. We perform several example calculations focussing on the question of absorption of solar radiation by gases and aerosols.

  18. Radiative transfer model validations during the First ISLSCP Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, Robert; Breon, Francois-Marie; Gautier, Catherine

    1990-01-01

    Two simple radiative transfer models, the 5S model based on Tanre et al. (1985, 1986) and the wide-band model of Morcrette (1984) are validated by comparing their outputs with results obtained during the First ISLSCP Field Experiment on concomitant radiosonde, aerosol turbidity, and radiation measurements and sky photographs. Results showed that the 5S model overestimates the short-wave irradiance by 13.2 W/sq m, whereas the Morcrette model underestimated the long-wave irradiance by 7.4 W/sq m.

  19. Polarized IR studies of silica glasses exposed to polarized excimer radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Charlene M.; Borrelli, Nicholas F.; Tingley, James E.

    2006-12-15

    Silica glass exhibits a permanent anisotropic response, polarization-induced birefringence (PIB), when exposed to short-wavelength polarized light. This behavior has been correlated with the OH content of the glass. In this paper we describe polarized infrared studies of silica glasses of different OH content exposed with polarized 157 nm laser light. Changes in the fundamental OH band as a consequence of exposure are shown. We find differential bleaching of a particular OH band where OH species that are oriented parallel to the incident exposing polarization undergo greater bleaching than those oriented perpendicular. The preferential bleaching as a function of exposure time correlates strongly with the evolution of PIB, leading to a bleaching model of OH that is causally linked to PIB.

  20. Human Regional Pulmonary Gas Exchange with Xenon Polarization Transfer (XTC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muradian, Iga; Butler, James; Hrovat, Mirko; Topulos, George; Hersman, Elizabeth; Ruset, Iulian; Covrig, Silviu; Frederick, Eric; Ketel, Stephen; Hersman, F. W.; Patz, Samuel

    2007-03-01

    Xenon Transfer Contrast (XTC) is an existing imaging method (Ruppert et al, Magn Reson Med, 51:676-687, 2004) that measures the fraction F of ^129Xe magnetization that diffuses from alveolar gas spaces to septal parenchymal tissue in lungs in a specified exchange time. As previously implemented, XTC is a 2-breath method and has been demonstrated in anesthetized animals. To use XTC in humans and to avoid issues associated with obtaining identical gas volumes on subsequent breath-hold experiments as well as precise image registration in post-processing, a single breath XTC method was developed that acquires three consecutive gradient echo images in an 8s acquisition. We report here initial measurements of the mean and variance of F for 5 normal healthy subjects as well as 7 asymptomatic smokers. The experiments were performed at two lung volumes (˜45 and 65% of TLC). We found that both the mean and variance of F increased with smoking history. In comparison, standard pulmonary function tests such as DLCO FEV1 showed no correlation with smoking history.

  1. Radiative recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting: Polarization insertions in the electron factor

    SciTech Connect

    Eides, M. I.; Shelyuto, V. A.

    2010-01-15

    We consider three-loop radiative recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting in muonium due to insertions of the one-loop polarization operator in the electron factor. The contribution generated by electron polarization insertions is a cubic polynomial in the large logarithm of the electron-muon mass ratio. The leading logarithm cubed and logarithm squared terms are well known for some time. We calculate all single-logarithmic and nonlogarithmic radiative recoil corrections of the order {alpha}{sup 3}(m/M)E{sub F} generated by diagrams with the electron and muon polarization insertions.

  2. A Radiation Transfer Solver for Athena Using Short Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.; Jiang, Yan-Fei

    2012-03-01

    We describe the implementation of a module for the Athena magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code that solves the time-independent, multi-frequency radiative transfer (RT) equation on multidimensional Cartesian simulation domains, including scattering and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) effects. The module is based on well known and well tested algorithms developed for modeling stellar atmospheres, including the method of short characteristics to solve the RT equation, accelerated Lambda iteration to handle scattering and non-LTE effects, and parallelization via domain decomposition. The module serves several purposes: it can be used to generate spectra and images, to compute a variable Eddington tensor (VET) for full radiation MHD simulations, and to calculate the heating and cooling source terms in the MHD equations in flows where radiation pressure is small compared with gas pressure. For the latter case, the module is combined with the standard MHD integrators using operator splitting: we describe this approach in detail, including a new constraint on the time step for stability due to radiation diffusion modes. Implementation of the VET method for radiation pressure dominated flows is described in a companion paper. We present results from a suite of test problems for both the RT solver itself and for dynamical problems that include radiative heating and cooling. These tests demonstrate that the radiative transfer solution is accurate and confirm that the operator split method is stable, convergent, and efficient for problems of interest. We demonstrate there is no need to adopt ad hoc assumptions of questionable accuracy to solve RT problems in concert with MHD: the computational cost for our general-purpose module for simple (e.g., LTE gray) problems can be comparable to or less than a single time step of Athena's MHD integrators, and only few times more expensive than that for more general (non-LTE) problems.

  3. Application of nonlinear Krylov acceleration to radiative transfer problems

    SciTech Connect

    Till, A. T.; Adams, M. L.; Morel, J. E.

    2013-07-01

    The iterative solution technique used for radiative transfer is normally nested, with outer thermal iterations and inner transport iterations. We implement a nonlinear Krylov acceleration (NKA) method in the PDT code for radiative transfer problems that breaks nesting, resulting in more thermal iterations but significantly fewer total inner transport iterations. Using the metric of total inner transport iterations, we investigate a crooked-pipe-like problem and a pseudo-shock-tube problem. Using only sweep preconditioning, we compare NKA against a typical inner / outer method employing GMRES / Newton and find NKA to be comparable or superior. Finally, we demonstrate the efficacy of applying diffusion-based preconditioning to grey problems in conjunction with NKA. (authors)

  4. A study of thermal radiation transfer in a solar thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswaran, S.; Thynell, S.T.; Merkle, C.L. )

    1991-11-01

    Combined convective and radiative heat transfer in an axisymmetric solar thruster is analyzed. In a solar thruster, focused solar energy is converted into thermal energy by volumetric absorption, resulting in a significant increase in the temperature of the propellant gas. The heated gas is then expanded through a propulsive nozzle in order to generate thrust. In the present theoretical analysis, submicron size particles are employed for providing the mechanism of solar energy absorption. The two-dimensional radiation problem is solved using both an exact integral method and the P{sub 1}-approximation. The overall energy transfer is solved iteratively by numerical means. The computational model is used to perform parametric studies of the effects of Boltzmann number, optical dimensions of the medium, and wall emissivity. The overall performance of the solar thruster is assessed by determining the thrust levels and the specific impulses of the device under different operating conditions.

  5. Radiative transfer theory for polarimetric remote sensing of pine forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C. C.; Han, H. C.; Shin, R. T.; Kong, J. A.; Beaudoin, A.; Le Toan, T.

    1992-01-01

    The radiative transfer theory is applied to interpret polarimetric radar backscatter from pine forest with clustered vegetation structures. The scattering function of each cluster is calculated by incorporating the phase interference of scattered fields from each component. The resulting phase matrix is used in the radiative transfer equations to evaluate the polarimetric backscattering coefficients from random medium layers embedded with vegetation clusters. Upon including multiscale structures (trunks, primary and secondary branches, and needles), polarimetric radar responses from pine forest for different frequencies and looking angles are interpreted and simulated. Preliminary results are shown to be in good agreement with the measured backscattering coefficients at the Landes maritime pine forest during the MAESTRO-1 experiment.

  6. Analytical solution of beam spread function for ocean light radiative transfer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zao; Yue, Dick K P

    2015-07-13

    We develop a new method to analytically obtain the beam spread function (BSF) for light radiative transfer in oceanic environments. The BSF, which is defined as the lateral distribution of the (scalar) irradiance with increasing depth in response to a uni-directional beam emanating from a point source in an infinite ocean, must in general be obtained by solving the three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer equation (RTE). By taking advantage of the highly forward-peaked scattering property of the ocean particles, we assume, for a narrow beam source, the dependence of radiance on polar angle and azimuthal angle is deliberately separated; only single scattering takes place in the azimuthal direction while multiple scattering still occurs in the polar direction. This assumption enables us to reduce the five-variable 3D RTE to a three-variable two-dimensional (2D) RTE. With this simplification, we apply Fourier spectral method to both spatial and angular variables so that we are able to analytically solve the 2D RTE and obtain the 2D BSF accordingly. Using the relations between 2D and 3D solutions acquired during the process of simplification, we are able to obtain the 3D BSF in explicit form. The 2D and 3D analytical solutions are validated by comparing with Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations. The 2D analytical BSF agrees excellently with the Monte Carlo result. Despite assumptions of axial symmetry and spike-like azimuthal profile of the radiance in deriving the 3D BSF, the comparisons to numerical simulations are very satisfactory especially for limited optical depths (< O(5)) for single scattering albedo values typical in the ocean. The explicit form of the analytical BSF and the significant gain in computational efficiency (several orders higher) relative to RTE simulations make many forward and inverse problems in ocean optics practical for routine applications.

  7. TWILIGHT: A Cellular Framework for Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatami, David; Madore, Barry

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new framework for solving three-dimensional radiative transfer of arbitrary geometries, including a full characterisation of the wavelength-dependent anisotropic scattering, absorption, and thermal reemission of light by dust. By adopting a cellular approach to discretising the light and dust, the problem can be efficiently solved through a fully deterministic iterative process. As a proof of concept we present TWILIGHT, our implementation of the cellular approach, in order to demonstrate and benchmark the new method. TWILIGHT simultaneously renders over one hundred unique images of a given environment with no additional slowdown, enabling a close study of inclination effects of three-dimensional dust geometries. In addition to qualitative rendering tests, TWILIGHT is successfully tested against two Monte-Carlo radiative transfer benchmarks, producing similar brightness profiles at varying inclinations. With the proof-of-concept established, we describe the improvements and current developments underway using the cellular framework, including a technique to resolve the subgrid physics of dust radiative transfer from micron-scale grain models to kiloparsec-sized dust environments.

  8. Radiation heat transfer within an optical fiber draw tower furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Issa, J.; Jaluria, Y.; Polymeropoulos, C.E.; Yin, Z.

    1995-12-31

    Study of the thermal transport and material flow processes associated with the drawing of optical fiber in a graphite draw furnace requires modeling of the heat transfer from the furnace wall. Previous work has shown that accurate knowledge of the furnace heater element axial temperature distribution is essential for proper modeling of the radiative transfer process. The present work is aimed at providing this information, as well as generating a set of data for the study of radiation exchange in the furnace cavity. The experimental procedure involved measuring the centerline temperature distribution in graphite and fused silica rods inserted into an optical fiber draw tower furnace. The temperature measurements were then used along with a model for radiative-convective heat transfer in the furnace in order to obtain the furnace temperature profile. This is an inverse problem since the centerline temperature in the rod is known whereas the furnace thermal conditions are not. The results obtained showed that the furnace temperature distribution was independent of rod material and size. The shape of the computed temperature distributions suggest that they can be well represented by a Gaussian function.

  9. Radiative transfer solution for rugged and heterogeneous scene observations.

    PubMed

    Miesch, C; Briottet, X; Kerr, Y H; Cabot, F

    2000-12-20

    A physical algorithm is developed to solve the radiative transfer problem in the solar reflective spectral domain. This new code, Advanced Modeling of the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Inhomogeneous Surfaces (AMARTIS), takes into account the relief, the spatial heterogeneity, and the bidirectional reflectances of ground surfaces. The resolution method consists of first identifying the irradiance and radiance components at ground and sensor levels and then modeling these components separately, the rationale being to find the optimal trade off between accuracy and computation times. The validity of the various assumptions introduced in the AMARTIS model are checked through comparisons with a reference Monte Carlo radiative transfer code for various ground scenes: flat ground with two surface types, a linear sand dune landscape, and an extreme mountainous configuration. The results show a divergence of less than 2% between the AMARTIS code and the Monte Carlo reference code for the total signals received at satellite level. In particular, it is demonstrated that the environmental and topographic effects are properly assessed by the AMARTIS model even for situations in which the effects become dominant. PMID:18354698

  10. Giant cross-polarization conversion of terahertz radiation by plasmons in an active graphene metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polischuk, O. V.; Melnikova, V. S.; Popov, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    Results of theoretical investigation of the cross-polarization conversion of terahertz (THz) radiation by the graphene metasurface formed by a periodic array of graphene nanoribbons located at the surface of a high-refractive-index dielectric substrate are presented. Giant polarization conversion at the plasmon resonance frequencies takes place without applying external DC magnetic field. Pumping graphene by its direct optical illumination or diffusion pumping allows for compensating the Drude losses in graphene and leads to further enhancement of the polarization conversion. It is shown that the total polarization conversion can be achieved in the total internal reflection regime of THz wave from the graphene metasurface at room temperature.

  11. Radiative-condensation instability in gravitating strongly coupled dusty plasma with polarization force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, R. P.; Bhakta, S.

    2015-06-01

    The radiative-condensation instability (RCI) in self-gravitating strongly coupled dusty plasma (SCDP) is investigated considering the effects of dust thermal velocity and polarization force on the massive dust particulates. In particular, the outer core of the dense neutron star which is supposed to be strongly coupled in nature with temperature T˜107 K and number density n˜1.3×1030 cm-3 is analyzed. The modified generalized hydrodynamic (GH) equations and electron temperature perturbation equation with radiative effects are solved using the linear perturbation method. In the classical hydrodynamic limit, the modified condition of Jeans instability owing to radiative condensation, polarization force and dust thermal velocity is obtained. In the kinetic limit, velocity of compressional mode also modifies the condition of Jeans instability. The dust thermal velocity and viscoelastic effects have stabilizing whereas polarization force and radiative cooling have destabilizing influence on the growth rate of the Jeans instability. The radiative effects stabilize the growth rate of unstable radiative modes. In isobaric mode (short wavelength), the basic condition of radiative instability is obtained which is unaffected due to the presence of polarization force and viscoelastic effects. The radiative cooling time in the outer core of neutron star is estimated and compared with the gravitational free fall time, and it is found that the cooling takes place too fast for self-gravity to be important.

  12. Radiative corrections to polarization observables in elastic electron-deuteron scattering in leptonic variables

    SciTech Connect

    Gakh, G. I.; Konchatnij, M. I. Merenkov, N. P.

    2012-08-15

    The model-independent QED radiative corrections to polarization observables in elastic scattering of unpolarized and longitudinally polarized electron beams by a deuteron target are calculated in leptonic variables. The experimental setup when the deuteron target is arbitrarily polarized is considered and the procedure for applying the derived results to the vector or tensor polarization of the recoil deuteron is discussed. The calculation is based on taking all essential Feynman diagrams into account, which results in the form of the Drell-Yan representation for the cross section, and the use of the covariant parameterization of the deuteron polarization state. Numerical estimates of the radiative corrections are given in the case where event selection allows undetected particles (photons and electron-positron pairs) and the restriction on the lost invariant mass is used.

  13. Radiation forces on a Rayleigh particle by a highly focused elliptically polarized beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Jianhua; Liu, Yongxin; Chen, Ziyang; Pu, Jixiong

    2014-06-01

    The radiation force of highly focused elliptically polarized beams on a Rayleigh particle is theoretically studied. The numerical results show that elliptically polarized beams can be used to trap particles. The influence of the beam widths, phase retardations of the incident beam, and numerical apertures of an objective lens on the radiation force distribution has been studied. Studies in transverse scattering forces reveal that torques can be produced by elliptically polarized beams carrying spin angular momentum, and that the torque, in the focal plane, produced by elliptically polarized beams can be regarded as the superposition of those by right-hand circularly and left-hand circularly polarized beams with different ratios between them.

  14. Polarization measurement and vertical aperture optimization for obtaining circularly polarized bend-magnet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M.; Hussain, Z.

    1997-04-01

    Growing interest in utilizing circular polarization prompted the design of bend-magnet beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source, covering the 30-1500 eV spectral region, to include vertical aperturing capabilities for optimizing the collection of circular polarization above and below the orbit plane. After commissioning and early use of the beamline, a multilayer polarimeter was used to characterize the polarization state of the beam as a function of vertical aperture position. This report partially summarizes the polarimetry measurements and compares results with theoretical calculations intended to simulate experimental conditions.

  15. Radiative heat transfer in rocket thrust chambers and nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammad, K. J.; Naraghi, M. H. N.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical models based on the discrete exchange factor (DEF) and the zonal methods for radiative analysis of rocket engines containing a radiatively participating medium have been developed. These models implement a new technique for calculating the direct exchange factors to account for possible blockage by the nozzle throat. Given the gas and surface temperature distributions, engine geometry, and radiative properties, the models compute the wall radiative heat fluxes at different axial positions. The results of sample calculations for a typical rocket engine (engine 700 at NASA), which uses RP-1 (a kerosene-type propellant), are presented for a wide range of surface and gas properties. It is found that the heat transfer by radiation can reach up to 50 percent of that due to convection. The maximum radiative heat flux is at the inner side of the engine, where the gas temperature is the highest. While the results of both models are in excellent agreement, the computation time of the DEF method is found to be much smaller.

  16. SPAMCART: a code for smoothed particle Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, O.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    We present a code for generating synthetic spectral energy distributions and intensity maps from smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation snapshots. The code is based on the Lucy Monte Carlo radiative transfer method, i.e. it follows discrete luminosity packets as they propagate through a density field, and then uses their trajectories to compute the radiative equilibrium temperature of the ambient dust. The sources can be extended and/or embedded, and discrete and/or diffuse. The density is not mapped on to a grid, and therefore the calculation is performed at exactly the same resolution as the hydrodynamics. We present two example calculations using this method. First, we demonstrate that the code strictly adheres to Kirchhoff's law of radiation. Secondly, we present synthetic intensity maps and spectra of an embedded protostellar multiple system. The algorithm uses data structures that are already constructed for other purposes in modern particle codes. It is therefore relatively simple to implement.

  17. Near-field radiative heat transfer in mesoporous alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Li; Yan-Hui, Feng; Xin-Xin, Zhang; Cong-Liang, Huang; Ge, Wang

    2015-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of mesoporous material has aroused the great interest of scholars due to its wide applications such as insulation, catalyst, etc. Mesoporous alumina substrate consists of uniformly distributed, unconnected cylindrical pores. Near-field radiative heat transfer cannot be ignored, when the diameters of the pores are less than the characteristic wavelength of thermal radiation. In this paper, near-field radiation across a cylindrical pore is simulated by employing the fluctuation dissipation theorem and Green function. Such factors as the diameter of the pore, and the temperature of the material are further analyzed. The research results show that the radiative heat transfer on a mesoscale is 2˜4 orders higher than on a macroscale. The heat flux and equivalent thermal conductivity of radiation across a cylindrical pore decrease exponentially with pore diameter increasing, while increase with temperature increasing. The calculated equivalent thermal conductivity of radiation is further developed to modify the thermal conductivity of the mesoporous alumina. The combined thermal conductivity of the mesoporous alumina is obtained by using porosity weighted dilute medium and compared with the measurement. The combined thermal conductivity of mesoporous silica decreases gradually with pore diameter increasing, while increases smoothly with temperature increasing, which is in good agreement with the experimental data. The larger the porosity, the more significant the near-field effect is, which cannot be ignored. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51422601), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB720404), and the National Key Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013BAJ01B03).

  18. Sensitizing solid state nuclear magnetic resonance of dilute nuclei by spin-diffusion assisted polarization transfers.

    PubMed

    Lupulescu, Adonis; Frydman, Lucio

    2011-10-01

    Recent years have witnessed efforts geared at increasing the sensitivity of NMR experiments, by relying on the suitable tailoring and exploitation of relaxation phenomena. These efforts have included the use of paramagnetic agents, enhanced (1)H-(1)H incoherent and coherent transfers processes in 2D liquid state spectroscopy, and homonuclear (13)C-(13)C spin diffusion effects in labeled solids. The present study examines some of the opportunities that could open when exploiting spontaneous (1)H-(1)H spin-diffusion processes, to enhance relaxation and to improve the sensitivity of dilute nuclei in solid state NMR measurements. It is shown that polarization transfer experiments executed under sufficiently fast magic-angle-spinning conditions, enable a selective polarization of the dilute low-γ spins by their immediate neighboring protons. Repolarization of the latter can then occur during the time involved in monitoring the signal emitted by the low-γ nuclei. The basic features involved in the resulting approach, and its potential to improve the effective sensitivity of solid state NMR measurements on dilute nuclei, are analyzed. Experimental tests witness the advantages that could reside from utilizing this kind of approach over conventional cross-polarization processes. These measurements also highlight a number of limitations that will have to be overcome for transforming selective polarization transfers of this kind into analytical methods of choice.

  19. Three Dimensional Atmospheric Radiative Transfer-Applications and Methods Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We review applications of 3D radiative transfer in the atmosphere, emphasizing the wide spectrum of scales important to remote sensing and modeling of cloud fields, and the characteristic scales introduced into observed radiances and fluxes by the distribution of photon pathlengths at conservative and absorbing wavelengths. We define the "plane-parallel bias", which is a measure of the importance of 3D cloud structure in large-scale models, and the "independent pixel errors" that quantify the significance of 3D effects in remote sensing, and emphasize their relative magnitude and scale dependence. A variety of approaches in current use in 3D radiative transfer, and issues of speed, accuracy, and flexibility are summarized. We also describe a recently initiated "International Intercomparison of 3-Dimensional Radiation Codes", or I3RC. I3RC is a 3-phase effort that has as its goals to: (1) understand the errors and limits of 3D methods; (2) provide "baseline" cases for future 3D code development; (3) promote sharing of 3D tools; (4) derive guidelines for 3D tool selection; and (5) improve atmospheric science education in 3D radiative transfer. Selected results from Phases 1 and 2 of I3RC are discussed. These are taken from five cloud fields: a 1D field of bar clouds, a 2D radar-derived field, a 3D Landsat-derived field, a stratiform cloud from the model of C. Moeng, and a convective cloud from the model of B. Stevens. Computations have been carried out for three monochromatic wavelengths (one conservative, one absorptive, and one thermal) and two solar zenith angles (0, 60 degrees).

  20. Recoil polarization measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio at high momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Puckett

    2009-12-01

    Electromagnetic form factors are fundamental properties of the nucleon that describe the effect of its internal quark structure on the cross section and spin observables in elastic lepton-nucleon scattering. Double-polarization experiments have become the preferred technique to measure the proton and neutron electric form factors at high momentum transfers. The recently completed GEp-III experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility used the recoil polarization method to extend the knowledge of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio GpE/GpM to Q2 = 8.5 GeV2. In this paper we present the preliminary results of the experiment.

  1. Three Dimensional Radiative Transfer In Tropical Deep Convective Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Giuseppe, F.

    In this study the focus is on the interaction between short-wave radiation with a field of tropical deep convective events generated using a 3D cloud resolving model (CRM) to assess the significance of 3D radiative transport (3DRT). It is not currently un- derstood what magnitude of error is involved when a two stream approximation is used to describe the radiative transfer through such a cloud field. It seems likely that deep convective clouds could be the most complex to represent, and that the error in neglecting horizontal transport could be relevant in these cases. The field here con- sidered has an extention of roughly 90x90 km, approximately equivalent to the grid box dimension of many global models. The 3DRT results are compared both with the calculations obtained by an Independent Pixel Approximation (IPA) approch and by the Plane Parallel radiative scheme (PP) implemented in ECMWF's Forecast model. The differences between the three calculations are used to assess both problems in current GCM's representation of radiative heating and inaccuracies in the dynamical response of CRM simulations due to the Independent Column Approximation (ICA). The understanding of the mechanisms involved in the main 3DRT/1D differences is the starting point for the future attempt to develop a parameterization procedure.

  2. Polarization of far-infrared radiation from molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, G.; Gonatas, D. P.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Platt, S. R.; Dragovan, M.

    1989-01-01

    The paper reports measurements of the polarization of far-infrared emission from dust in nine molecular clouds. Detections were obtained in Mon R2, in the Kleinmann-Low (KL) nebula in Orion, and in Sgr A. Upper limits were set for six other clouds. A comparison of the 100 micron polarization of KL with that previously measured at 270 microns provides new evidence that the polarization is due to emission from magnetically aligned dust grains. Comparing the results for Orion with measurements at optical wavelengths, it is inferred that the magnetic field direction in the outer parts of the Orion cloud is the same as that in the dense core. This direction is nearly perpendicular to the ridge of molecular emission and is parallel to both the molecular outflow in KL and the axis of rotation of the cloud core. In Mon R2, the field direction which the measurements imply does not agree withthat derived from 0.9-2.2 micron polarimetry. The discrepancy is attributed to scattering in the near-infrared. In Orion and Sgr A, where comparisons are possible, the measurements are in good agreement with 10 micron polarization measurements.

  3. Polarization evolution of radiation in hot magnetized plasma with dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segre, S. E.; Zanza, V.

    2005-06-01

    A formalism is presented for the analysis of polarization evolution in a magnetized plasma with dissipation due to kinetic effects. Such a plasma in addition to the Faraday and Cotton-Mouton effects also presents dichroism, namely anisotropic absorption. As expected this effect is significant near the cyclotron harmonics.

  4. Polarization evolution of radiation in hot magnetized plasma with dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    Segre, S.E.; Zanza, V.

    2005-06-15

    A formalism is presented for the analysis of polarization evolution in a magnetized plasma with dissipation due to kinetic effects. Such a plasma in addition to the Faraday and Cotton-Mouton effects also presents dichroism, namely anisotropic absorption. As expected this effect is significant near the cyclotron harmonics.

  5. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer imaging in vivo with approximated Radiative Transfer Equation

    PubMed Central

    Soloviev, Vadim Y.; McGinty, James; Stuckey, Daniel W.; Laine, Romain; Wylezinska-Arridge, Marzena; Wells, Dominic J.; Sardini, Alessandro; Hajnal, Joseph V.; French, Paul M.W.; Arridge, Simon R.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a new light transport model that we have applied to 3-D image reconstruction of in vivo fluorescence lifetime tomography data applied to read out Förster Resonance Energy Transfer in mice. The model is an approximation to the Radiative Transfer Equation and combines light diffusion and rays optics. This approximation is well adopted to wide-field time-gated intensity based data acquisition. Reconstructed image data are presented and compared with results obtained by using the Telegraph Equation approximation. The new approach provides improved recovery of absorption and scattering parameters while returning similar values for the fluorescence parameters. PMID:22193187

  6. Poynting-Stokes tensor and radiative transfer in discrete random media: the microphysical paradigm.

    PubMed

    Mishchenko, Michael I

    2010-09-13

    This paper solves the long-standing problem of establishing the fundamental physical link between the radiative transfer theory and macroscopic electromagnetics in the case of elastic scattering by a sparse discrete random medium. The radiative transfer equation (RTE) is derived directly from the macroscopic Maxwell equations by computing theoretically the appropriately defined so-called Poynting-Stokes tensor carrying information on both the direction, magnitude, and polarization characteristics of local electromagnetic energy flow. Our derivation from first principles shows that to compute the local Poynting vector averaged over a sufficiently long period of time, one can solve the RTE for the direction-dependent specific intensity column vector and then integrate the direction-weighted specific intensity over all directions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the specific intensity (or specific intensity column vector) can be measured with a well-collimated radiometer (photopolarimeter), which provides the ultimate physical justification for the use of such instruments in radiation-budget and particle-characterization applications. However, the specific intensity cannot be interpreted in phenomenological terms as signifying the amount of electromagnetic energy transported in a given direction per unit area normal to this direction per unit time per unit solid angle. Also, in the case of a densely packed scattering medium the relation of the measurement with a well-collimated radiometer to the time-averaged local Poynting vector remains uncertain, and the theoretical modeling of this measurement is likely to require a much more complicated approach than solving an RTE. PMID:20940872

  7. Three-dimensional radiative transfer on a massively parallel computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vath, H. M.

    1994-01-01

    We perform 3D radiative transfer calculations in non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) in the simple two-level atom approximation on the Mas-Par MP-1, which contains 8192 processors and is a single instruction multiple data (SIMD) machine, an example of the new generation of massively parallel computers. On such a machine, all processors execute the same command at a given time, but on different data. To make radiative transfer calculations efficient, we must re-consider the numerical methods and storage of data. To solve the transfer equation, we adopt the short characteristic method and examine different acceleration methods to obtain the source function. We use the ALI method and test local and non-local operators. Furthermore, we compare the Ng and the orthomin methods of acceleration. We also investigate the use of multi-grid methods to get fast solutions for the NLTE case. In order to test these numerical methods, we apply them to two problems with and without periodic boundary conditions.

  8. Coupled Convective and Radiative Heat Transfer Simulation for Urban Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracik, Stefan; Sadeghipour, Mostapha; Pitchurov, George; Liu, Jiying; Heidarinejad, Mohammad; Srebric, Jelena; Building Science Group, Penn State Team

    2013-11-01

    A building's surroundings affect its energy use. An analysis of building energy use needs to include the effects of its urban environment, as over half of the world's population now lives in cities. To correctly model the energy flow around buildings, an energy simulation needs to account for both convective and radiative heat transfer. This study develops a new model by coupling OpenFOAM and Radiance, open source packages for simulating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and solar radiation, respectively. The model currently provides themo-fluid parameters including convective heat transfer coefficients, pressure coefficients, and solar heat fluxes that will be used as inputs for building energy simulations in a follow up study. The model uses Penn State campus buildings immersed in the atmospheric boundary layer flow as a case study to determine the thermo-fluid parameters around buildings. The results of this case study show that shadows can reduce the solar heat flux of a building's surface by eighty percent during a sunny afternoon. Convective heat transfer coefficients can vary by around fifty percent during a windy day.

  9. Computing Radiative Transfer in a 3D Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Allmen, Paul; Lee, Seungwon

    2012-01-01

    A package of software computes the time-dependent propagation of a narrow laser beam in an arbitrary three- dimensional (3D) medium with absorption and scattering, using the transient-discrete-ordinates method and a direct integration method. Unlike prior software that utilizes a Monte Carlo method, this software enables simulation at very small signal-to-noise ratios. The ability to simulate propagation of a narrow laser beam in a 3D medium is an improvement over other discrete-ordinate software. Unlike other direct-integration software, this software is not limited to simulation of propagation of thermal radiation with broad angular spread in three dimensions or of a laser pulse with narrow angular spread in two dimensions. Uses for this software include (1) computing scattering of a pulsed laser beam on a material having given elastic scattering and absorption profiles, and (2) evaluating concepts for laser-based instruments for sensing oceanic turbulence and related measurements of oceanic mixed-layer depths. With suitable augmentation, this software could be used to compute radiative transfer in ultrasound imaging in biological tissues, radiative transfer in the upper Earth crust for oil exploration, and propagation of laser pulses in telecommunication applications.

  10. Conjugate conductive, convective, and radiative heat transfer in rocket engines

    SciTech Connect

    Naraghi, M.H.N.; DeLise, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    A comprehensive conductive, convective and radiative model for thermal analysis of rocket thrust chambers and nozzles is presented. In this model, the rocket thrust chamber and nozzle are subdivided into a number of stations along the longitudinal direction. At each station a finite element scheme is used to evaluate wall temperature distribution. The hot-gas-side convective heat transport is evaluated by numerically solving the compressible boundary layer equations and the radiative fluxes are evaluated by implementing an exchange factor scheme. The convective heat flux in the cooling channel is modeled based on the existing closed form correlations for rocket cooling channels. The conductive, convective and radiative processes are conjugated through an iterative procedure. The hot-gas-side heat transfer coefficients evaluated based on this model are compared to the experimental results reported in the literature. The computed convective heat transfer coefficients agree very well with experimental data for most of the engine except the throat where a discrepancy of approximately 20% exists. The model is applied to a typical regeneratively cooled rocket engine and the resulting wall temperature and heat flux distribution are presented.

  11. Fluorescence resonance energy transfers measurements on cell surfaces via fluorescence polarization.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Kashi, Meir; Moshkov, Sergey; Zurgil, Naomi; Deutsch, Mordechai

    2002-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of the efficiency of fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency between moieties located on cell surfaces by performing individual cell fluorescence polarization (FP) measurements. The absolute value of energy transfer efficiency (E) is calculated on an individual cell basis. The examination of this methodology was carried out using model experiments on human T lymphocyte cells. The cells were labeled with fluorescein-conjugated Concanavalin A (ConA) as donor, or rhodamine-conjugated ConA as acceptor. The experiments and results clearly indicate that determination of E via FP measurements is possible, efficient, and more convenient than other methods. PMID:12202365

  12. Imaging and modeling of collagen architecture in living tissue with polarized light transfer (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Stoff, Susan; Chue-Sang, Joseph; Bai, Yuqiang

    2016-03-01

    The extra-cellular space in connective tissue of animals and humans alike is comprised in large part of collagen. Monitoring of collagen arrangement and cross-linking has been utilized to diagnose a variety of medical conditions and guide surgical intervention. For example, collagen monitoring is useful in the assessment and treatment of cervical cancer, skin cancer, myocardial infarction, and non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. We have developed a suite of tools and models based on polarized light transfer for the assessment of collagen presence, cross-linking, and orientation in living tissue. Here we will present some example of such approach applied to the human cervix. We will illustrate a novel Mueller Matrix (MM) imaging system for the study of cervical tissue; furthermore we will show how our model of polarized light transfer through cervical tissue compares to the experimental findings. Finally we will show validation of the methodology through histological results and Second Harmonic imaging microscopy.

  13. Global sensitivity analysis of the radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelam, Maheshwari; Mohanty, Binayak P.

    2015-04-01

    With the recently launched Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, it is very important to have a complete understanding of the radiative transfer model for better soil moisture retrievals and to direct future research and field campaigns in areas of necessity. Because natural systems show great variability and complexity with respect to soil, land cover, topography, precipitation, there exist large uncertainties and heterogeneities in model input factors. In this paper, we explore the possibility of using global sensitivity analysis (GSA) technique to study the influence of heterogeneity and uncertainties in model inputs on zero order radiative transfer (ZRT) model and to quantify interactions between parameters. GSA technique is based on decomposition of variance and can handle nonlinear and nonmonotonic functions. We direct our analyses toward growing agricultural fields of corn and soybean in two different regions, Iowa, USA (SMEX02) and Winnipeg, Canada (SMAPVEX12). We noticed that, there exists a spatio-temporal variation in parameter interactions under different soil moisture and vegetation conditions. Radiative Transfer Model (RTM) behaves more non-linearly in SMEX02 and linearly in SMAPVEX12, with average parameter interactions of 14% in SMEX02 and 5% in SMAPVEX12. Also, parameter interactions increased with vegetation water content (VWC) and roughness conditions. Interestingly, soil moisture shows an exponentially decreasing sensitivity function whereas parameters such as root mean square height (RMS height) and vegetation water content show increasing sensitivity with 0.05 v/v increase in soil moisture range. Overall, considering the SMAPVEX12 fields to be water rich environment (due to higher observed SM) and SMEX02 fields to be energy rich environment (due to lower SM and wide ranges of TSURF), our results indicate that first order as well as interactions between the parameters change with water and energy rich environments.

  14. Radiative transfer of X-rays in the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. W.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of resonance scattering of X-ray emission lines in the solar corona is investigated. For the resonance lines of some helium-like ions, significant optical depths are reached over distances small compared with the size of typical coronal features. A general integral equation for the transfer of resonance-line radiation under solar coronal conditions is derived. This expression is in a form useful for modeling the complex three-dimensional temperature and density structure of coronal active regions. The transfer equation is then cast in a form illustrating the terms which give rise to the attenuation or enhancement of the resonance-line intensity. The source function for helium-like oxygen (O VII) under coronal conditions is computed and discussed in terms of the relative importance of scattering.

  15. Generation of circularly polarized high harmonic radiation using a transmission multilayer quarter waveplate.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jürgen; Guggenmos, Alexander; Hofstetter, Michael; Chew, Soo Hoon; Kleineberg, Ulf

    2015-12-28

    High harmonic radiation is meanwhile nearly extensively used for the spectroscopic investigation of electron dynamics with ultimate time resolution. The majority of high harmonic beamlines provide linearly polarized radiation created in a gas target. However, circular polarization greatly extends the spectroscopic possibilities for high harmonics, especially in the analysis of samples with chirality or prominent spin polarization. We produced a free-standing multilayer foil as a transmission EUV quarter waveplate and applied it for the first time to high harmonic radiation. We measured a broadband (4.6 eV FWHM) ellipticity of 75% at 66 eV photon energy with a transmission efficiency of 5%. The helicity is switchable and the ellipticity can be adjusted to lower values by angle tuning. As a single element it can be easily integrated in any existing harmonic beamline without major changes.

  16. Generation of circularly polarized high harmonic radiation using a transmission multilayer quarter waveplate.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jürgen; Guggenmos, Alexander; Hofstetter, Michael; Chew, Soo Hoon; Kleineberg, Ulf

    2015-12-28

    High harmonic radiation is meanwhile nearly extensively used for the spectroscopic investigation of electron dynamics with ultimate time resolution. The majority of high harmonic beamlines provide linearly polarized radiation created in a gas target. However, circular polarization greatly extends the spectroscopic possibilities for high harmonics, especially in the analysis of samples with chirality or prominent spin polarization. We produced a free-standing multilayer foil as a transmission EUV quarter waveplate and applied it for the first time to high harmonic radiation. We measured a broadband (4.6 eV FWHM) ellipticity of 75% at 66 eV photon energy with a transmission efficiency of 5%. The helicity is switchable and the ellipticity can be adjusted to lower values by angle tuning. As a single element it can be easily integrated in any existing harmonic beamline without major changes. PMID:26832020

  17. Spectrum splitting for fast polarization switching of undulator radiation.

    PubMed

    Kinjo, Ryota; Tanaka, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    A simple scheme to quickly switch the polarity of circular radiation is proposed, which is based on spectrum splitting of undulator radiation. In this scheme, two helical undulators with opposite helicities are placed tandem in one straight section, both of which are divided into several segments. The optical phases between segments are tuned so that light waves from one of the two undulators are out of phase, while those from the other are in phase. Then the radiation spectrum of the former is split and the intensity at the fundamental photon energy vanishes. As a consequence, the monochromated photon beam at the fundamental energy is circularly polarized with the helicity specified by the in-phase undulator, which can be quickly flipped by tuning the optical phase. Numerical calculations carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme show that a relatively high degree of circular polarization is expected if the angular acceptance of the beamline is not too large. PMID:27140155

  18. Spectrum splitting for fast polarization switching of undulator radiation.

    PubMed

    Kinjo, Ryota; Tanaka, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    A simple scheme to quickly switch the polarity of circular radiation is proposed, which is based on spectrum splitting of undulator radiation. In this scheme, two helical undulators with opposite helicities are placed tandem in one straight section, both of which are divided into several segments. The optical phases between segments are tuned so that light waves from one of the two undulators are out of phase, while those from the other are in phase. Then the radiation spectrum of the former is split and the intensity at the fundamental photon energy vanishes. As a consequence, the monochromated photon beam at the fundamental energy is circularly polarized with the helicity specified by the in-phase undulator, which can be quickly flipped by tuning the optical phase. Numerical calculations carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme show that a relatively high degree of circular polarization is expected if the angular acceptance of the beamline is not too large.

  19. Polarization of microwave noise source radiation in the 30 GHz to 300 GHz range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poutous, M. K.; Petrone, P.; Ghaemi, A.; Moller, K. D.; Heaney, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation spectra have been obtained in order to calculate the frequency bandwidth and polarization of three microwave noise sources. Results were obtained in the 1-10-mm wavelength region using a lamellar grating Fourier transform spectrometer and a helium-cooled bolometer detector. A secondary transmission region was found to have an input current as well as a polarization dependence, despite the directional output of the waveguide antenna.

  20. A field test of a simple stochastic radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, N.

    1995-09-01

    The problem of determining the effect of clouds on the radiative energy balance of the globe is of well-recognized importance. One can in principle solve the problem for any given configuration of clouds using numerical techniques. This knowledge is not useful however, because of the amount of input data and computer resources required. Besides, we need only the average of the resulting solution over the grid scale of a general circulation model (GCM). Therefore, we are interested in estimating the average of the solutions of such fine-grained problems using only coarse grained data, a science or art called stochastic radiation transfer. Results of the described field test indicate that the stochastic description is a somewhat better fit to the data than is a fractional cloud cover model, but more data are needed. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  1. The Chandrasekhar method and its applications to atmospheric radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Stamnes, K.

    1994-12-31

    Problems involving radiation and particle transport in a host medium require solution of the linear (or linearized) Boltzmann equation. A convenient strategy for solving such problems is to apply a multigroup procedure in which the problem is reformulated as a series of one-group problems in such a way that each one-group problem may be cast into a form identical to the monochromatic radiative transfer equation. In essence, Chandrasekhar`s method consists of converting the integro-differential equation for the resulting one-group problem into a system of coupled differential equations for which eigensolutions are sought. The basic method is well described in Chandrasekhar`s classic text in which applications to simple problems were used to demonstrate the potential power of the method before the advent of the modern computer.

  2. Comparative analysis of selected radiative transfer approaches for aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Sokoletsky, Leonid

    2005-01-01

    A comparative analysis is presented of simple approaches to radiative transfer in plane-parallel layers, such as the self-consistent Haltrin approach, the Chandrasekhar-Klier exact solution for isotropic scatters, an extended version of two-flux radiative Kubelka-Munk theory, the neutron-diffuse Gate-Brinkworth theory, and different versions of the delta-Eddington theory. It is shown that the Haltrin approach is preferable to others and can be used for the solution of an inverse optical problem of the estimation of absorption and backscattering coefficients of aquatic environments from measured apparent optical properties. Two different methods of transformation from measured irradiance reflectance at combined illumination to irradiance reflectance induced by diffuse illumination only are developed. An analysis of the use of the different models for estimation of the effect of the bottom albedo is also presented. PMID:15662895

  3. Peregrinations through topics in light scattering and radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattawar, George W.

    2016-07-01

    In this van de Hulst essay, I have taken the liberty to present a journey through some topics in light scattering and radiative transfer which I feel were major contributions to the field but the number of topics I would like to cover is far more numerous than I have the time or the space to present. I also wanted to share with the reader some heartwarming memories I have of my wonderful friend and truly distinguished colleague Hendrik Christoffel van de Hulst (affectionately known to his colleagues as "Henk") whom I consider to be one of the preeminent scientists of his era.

  4. Odyssey: Ray tracing and radiative transfer in Kerr spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Hung-Yi; Yun, Kiyun; Younsi, Ziri; Yoon, Suk-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Odyssey is a GPU-based General Relativistic Radiative Transfer (GRRT) code for computing images and/or spectra in Kerr metric describing the spacetime around a rotating black hole. Odyssey is implemented in CUDA C/C++. For flexibility, the namespace structure in C++ is used for different tasks; the two default tasks presented in the source code are the redshift of a Keplerian disk and the image of a Keplerian rotating shell at 340GHz. Odyssey_Edu, an educational software package for visualizing the ray trajectories in the Kerr spacetime that uses Odyssey, is also available.

  5. Introduction of acoustical diffraction in the radiative transfer method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reboul, Emeline; Le Bot, Alain; Perret-Liaudet, Joël

    2004-07-01

    This Note presents an original approach to include diffraction in the radiative transfer method when applied to acoustics. This approach leads to a better spatial description of the acoustical energy. An energetic diffraction coefficient and some diffraction sources are introduced to model the diffraction phenomena. The amplitudes of these sources are determined by solving a linear sytem of equations resulting from the power balance between all acoustical sources. The approach is applied on bidimensional examples and gives good results except at geometrical boundaries. To cite this article: E. Reboul et al., C. R. Mecanique 332 (2004).

  6. A multilevel method for conductive-radiative heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Banoczi, J.M.; Kelley, C.T.

    1996-12-31

    We present a fast multilevel algorithm for the solution of a system of nonlinear integro-differential equations that model steady-state combined radiative-conductive heat transfer. The equations can be formulated as a compact fixed point problem with a fixed point map that requires both a solution of the linear transport equation and the linear heat equation for its evaluation. We use fast transport solvers developed by the second author, to construct an efficient evaluation of the fixed point map and then apply the Atkinson-Brakhage, method, with Newton-GMRES as the coarse mesh solver, to the full nonlinear system.

  7. 3D Monte Carlo radiation transfer modelling of photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. Louise; Christison, Craig; Brown, C. Tom A.; Wood, Kenneth; Valentine, Ronan M.; Moseley, Harry

    2015-06-01

    The effects of ageing and skin type on Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) for different treatment methods have been theoretically investigated. A multilayered Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer model is presented where both daylight activated PDT and conventional PDT are compared. It was found that light penetrates deeper through older skin with a lighter complexion, which translates into a deeper effective treatment depth. The effect of ageing was found to be larger for darker skin types. The investigation further strengthens the usage of daylight as a potential light source for PDT where effective treatment depths of about 2 mm can be achieved.

  8. Structure and dynamics of a dizinc metalloprotein: effect of charge transfer and polarization.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong L; Mei, Ye; Zhang, Da W; Xie, Dai Q; Zhang, John Z H

    2011-08-25

    Structures and dynamics of a recently designed dizinc metalloprotein (DFsc) (J. Mol. Biol. 2003, 334, 1101) are studied by molecular dynamics simulation using a dynamically adapted polarized force field derived from fragment quantum calculation for protein in solvent. To properly describe the effect of charge transfer and polarization in the present approach, quantum chemistry calculation of the zinc-binding group is periodically performed (on-the-fly) to update the atomic charges of the zinc-binding group during the MD simulation. Comparison of the present result with those obtained from simulations under standard AMBER force field reveals that charge transfer and polarization are critical to maintaining the correct asymmetric metal coordination in the DFsc. Detailed analysis of the result also shows that dynamic fluctuation of the zinc-binding group facilitates solvent interaction with the zinc ions. In particular, the dynamic fluctuation of the zinc-zinc distance is shown to be an important feature of the catalytic function of the di-ion zinc-binding group. Our study demonstrates that the dynamically adapted polarization approach is computationally practical and can be used to study other metalloprotein systems.

  9. Polarization transfer in inelastic scattering and pionic models of the EMC effect

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, T.A.; Jones, K.W.; McClelland, J.B.; Moss, J.M.; Rees, L.B.; Tanaka, N.; Bacher, A.D.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of the experiment reported was to make a precise test of the enhanced pion field model in a medium-energy scattering experiment. The quantity probed is the spin-longitudinal response function, a measure of the nuclear pion density which is used explicitly in the pion-excess models of the EMC effect. The point of reference used is deuterium. The spin-dependent response functions for heavy targets and /sup 2/H are compared using identical experimental techniques. The technique of complete polarization transfer is used to separate the spin-longitudinal and spin-transverse response in the continuum. The experiment consisted of precise determinations of the polarization transfer coefficients for 500 MeV protons inelastically scattered from Pb, Ca, and /sup 2/H. The experiment utilized longitudinal, sideways, and normal polarized beams in conjunction with final polarization analysis from the focal-plane polarimeter of the high-resolution spectrometer. Quantities constructed from these data are the longitudinal and transverse spin-flip probabilities. Calculations were performed of the ratio of longitudinal to transverse response functions and of the EMC effect with the same model. No evidence was found for collectivity in the isovector spin-longitudinal response function. 10 refs. (LEW)

  10. Transfer of directional information between the polarization compass and the sun compass in desert ants.

    PubMed

    Lebhardt, Fleur; Ronacher, Bernhard

    2015-06-01

    Desert ants, Cataglyphis fortis, perform large foraging excursions during which they continuously compute a home vector that allows them to return to the nest on the shortest way. This type of navigation, termed path integration, needs a compass system and an odometer. Ants use several cues to determine their walking direction, two of the most important ones being the sun position and the polarization pattern of the sky. We tested whether an information transfer is possible from one compass system to the other, which depend on different anatomical substrates. Since the sky's polarization pattern is detected by UV-photoreceptors located in the dorsal rim area (DRA), we used an orange Perspex filter that eliminated the UV part of the spectrum to prevent the use of the polarization compass. The use of the sun compass could be excluded by appropriate screens. In the critical tests the ants had learned a nest-feeder direction with e.g. the sun compass only, and were later tested with the polarization compass, or vice versa. The results show that a transfer is possible in both directions.

  11. II. The Second Law in Relation to Thermal Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesudason, Christopher G.

    2011-12-01

    Planck introduced the quantum hypothesis from his Blackbody radiation studies, where he and subsequent workers opined that classical mechanics and electrodynamical theories could not account for the phenomenon. Hence a statistical mechanics with an appropriate Second law entropy was invented and coupled to the First law to account for quantum effects. Here, as an academic exercise we derive the quantum of energy by considering two structures, that of the dipole oscillators on a 2-D surface and the scattering of radiation into the 3-D cavity. Previous derivations are briefly cited and reviewed where none followed this approach. One prediction from this first order Brownian motion development is that a 2-D sheet of oscillators should emit radiation largely with energy density factor T1 of the Kelvin temperature T, rather than that deduced as T4 from detailed balance. Preliminary measurements conducted here seemed to verify the the T1 density. The first order theory also admits a possibility of nonlinear quanta and the consequences are explored briefly. It was noticed in passing during the experimentation that certain bodies suspended in a vacuum exhibited small persistent temperature differentials. A Second law statement is presented for such cases and consequences explored for processes that are not coupled by Newtonian momentum energy transfer mechanisms, such as for the radiation field as deduced by Planck. The different forms of heat transfer due to different laws (e.g. gravity waves and electromagnetic waves) are strictly separable and cannot be confused or forced to an equivalence. We generalize on the Zeroth law, the Kirchoff law and postulate an appropriate entropy form due to these generalizations.

  12. Changes in polarization and angular distribution of scattered radiation during cloud formation.

    PubMed

    Harris, F S

    1969-01-01

    Changes in radiation scattering due to changes in droplet size distribution during development of stratus clouds have been calculated. The development model of Neiburger and Chien was used to give the droplet size distribution at various stages. Mie theory was used to calculate the angular variation for both parallel and perpendicular polarization of incident radiation at 0.4880 micro, 0.6328 micro, 3.50 micro, and 10.6 micro. The marked variations in the nature of the scattered radiation as the droplet size distribution varies with time indicate the measurement of radiation scattering may be a useful method of studying cloud formation processes.

  13. Polarization of radiation of point-like source reflected from turbulent magnetized atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silant'ev, N. A.; Gnedin, Yu. N.

    2008-04-01

    We consider the multiple scattering of the light from a point-like source located above the semi-infinite electron, turbulent, and magnetized atmospheres. The frozen magnetic field has both the regular B0 and stochastic B' components (B= B_0+ B'). The stochastic Faraday rotations due to fluctuations B' decrease the intensity of each separate polarized beam (the extinction factor is proportional to λ^4< B'^2>). This decrease at large λ dominates the usual decrease (∝λ^2B_0 cosΘ_0) caused by summing beams with very different Faraday's rotation angles. This effect changes the spectrum of polarization degree as compared with what is influenced by the regular magnetic field. We calculated the integral (observed) polarization of the reflected radiation with the inclusion of unpolarized radiation going directly from the point-like source. We present the observed polarization for various degrees of true absorption of the radiation into the atmosphere and the values of magnetic energy fluctuations. The spectra of polarization in the optical (λ =0-1 μm), infrared (λ =1-5 μ m), and X-ray (E=1-50 keV) regions of the wavelengths are presented. We discuss the possibility of estimating parameters of magnetic field fluctuations from the observation of the spectra of polarization in AGNs with the X-ray excesses and in the turbulent accretion disk in NGC 4258.

  14. Numerical Radiative Transfer and the Hydrogen Reionization of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, M.

    2011-03-01

    One of the most interesting questions in cosmology is to understand how the Universe evolved from its nearly uniform and simple state briefly after the Big Bang to the complex state we see around us today. In particular, we would like to explain how galaxies have formed, and why they have the properties that we observe in the local Universe. Computer simulations play a highly important role in studying these questions, because they allow one to follow the dynamical equations of gravity and hydrodynamics well into the non-linear regime of the growth of cosmic structures. The current generation of simulation codes for cosmological structure formation calculates the self-gravity of dark matter and cosmic gas, and the fluid dynamics of the cosmic gas, but radiation processes are typically not taken into account, or only at the level of a spatially uniform, externally imposed background field. However, we know that the radiation field has been highly inhomogeneous during certain phases of the growth of structure, and may have in fact provided important feedback effects for galaxy formation. In particular, it is well established that the diffuse gas in the universe was nearly fully neutral after recombination at very high redshift, but today this gas is highly ionized. Sometime during the evolution, a transition to the ionized state must have occurred, a process we refer to as reionization. The UV radiation responsible for this reionization is now permeating the universe and may in part explain why small dwarf galaxies have so low luminosities. It is therefore clear that accurate and self-consistent studies of galaxy formation and of the dynamics of the reionization process should ideally be done with simulation codes that directly include a treatment of radiative transfer, and that account for all relevant source and sink terms of the radiation. We present a novel numerical implementation of radiative transfer in the cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH

  15. Observation of linear-polarization-sensitivity in the microwave-radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, R. G.; Ramanayaka, A. N.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-12-04

    We examine the linear polarization sensitivity of the radiation- induced magneto-resistance oscillations by investigating the effect of rotating in-situ the electric field of linearly polarized microwaves relative to the current, in the GaAs/AlGaAs system. We find that the frequency and the phase of the photo-excited magneto-resistance oscillations are insensitive to the polarization. On the other hand, the amplitude of the resistance oscillations are strongly sensitive to the relative orientation between the microwave antenna and the current-axis in the specimen.

  16. Multielectron signatures in the polarization of high-order harmonic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Zengxiu; Yuan Jianmin; Brabec, Thomas

    2007-09-15

    The polarization of high-order harmonic radiation emitted from N{sub 2} molecules interacting with a linearly polarized laser pulse is investigated theoretically. We find that the exchange effect between the recombining electron and the bound core electrons imprints a clear signature onto the high-order harmonic polarization and its dependence on the alignment angle between the molecular axis and driving laser electric field. Our analysis reveals an observable for the experimental investigation of many-electron dynamics in intense laser fields.

  17. Terahertz radiation from bacteriorhodopsin reveals correlated primary electron and proton transfer processes

    PubMed Central

    Groma, G. I.; Hebling, J.; Kozma, I. Z.; Váró, G.; Hauer, J.; Kuhl, J.; Riedle, E.

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics of electrogenic events associated with the different steps of the light-induced proton pump of bacteriorhodopsin is well studied in a wide range of time scales by direct electric methods. However, the investigation of the fundamental primary charge translocation phenomena taking place in the functional energy conversion process of this protein, and in other biomolecular assemblies using light energy, has remained experimentally unfeasible because of the lack of proper detection technique operating in the 0.1- to 20-THz region. Here, we show that extending the concept of the familiar Hertzian dipole emission into the extreme spatial and temporal range of intramolecular polarization processes provides an alternative way to study ultrafast electrogenic events on naturally ordered biological systems. Applying a relatively simple experimental arrangement based on this idea, we were able to observe light-induced coherent terahertz radiation from bacteriorhodopsin with femtosecond time resolution. The detected terahertz signal was analyzed by numerical simulation in the framework of different models for the elementary polarization processes. It was found that the principal component of the terahertz emission can be well described by excited-state intramolecular electron transfer within the retinal chromophore. An additional slower process is attributed to the earliest phase of the proton pump, probably occurring by the redistribution of a H bond near the retinal. The correlated electron and proton translocation supports the concept, assigning a functional role to the light-induced sudden polarization in retinal proteins. PMID:18456840

  18. A general Monte Carlo simulation of ED-XRF spectrometers. II: Polarized monochromatic radiation, homogeneous samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincze, László; Janssens, Koen; Adams, Fred; Rivers, M. L.; Jones, K. W.

    1995-03-01

    A general Monte Carlo code for the simulation of X-ray fluorescence spectrometers, described in a previous paper is extended to predict the spectral response of instruments employing polarized exciting radiation. Details of the calculation method specific for the correct simulation of photon-matter scatter interactions in case of polarized X-ray beams are presented. Comparisons are made with experimentally collected spectral data obtained from a monochromatic X-ray fluorescence setup installed at a synchrotron radiation source. The use of the simulation code for quantitative analysis of intermediate and massive samples is also demonstrated.

  19. The libRadtran software package for radiative transfer calculations (Version 2.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emde, C.; Buras-Schnell, R.; Kylling, A.; Mayer, B.; Gasteiger, J.; Hamann, U.; Kylling, J.; Richter, B.; Pause, C.; Dowling, T.; Bugliaro, L.

    2015-12-01

    libRadtran is a widely used software package for radiative transfer calculations. It allows to compute (polarized) radiances, irradiances, and actinic fluxes in the solar and thermal spectral regions. libRadtran has been used for various applications, including remote sensing of clouds, aerosols and trace gases in the Earth's atmosphere, climate studies, e.g., for the calculation of radiative forcing due to different atmospheric components, for UV-forcasting, the calculation of photolysis frequencies, and for remote sensing of other planets in our solar system. The package has been described in Mayer and Kylling (2005).. Since then several new features have been included, for example polarization, Raman scattering, a new molecular gas absorption parameterization, and several new cloud and aerosol scattering parameterizations. Furthermore a graphical user interface is now available which greatly simplifies the usage of the model, especially for new users. This paper gives an overview of libRadtran version 2.0 with focus on new features. A complete description of libRadtran and all its input options is given in the user manual included in the libRadtran software package, which is freely available at http://www.libradtran.org.

  20. The libRadtran software package for radiative transfer calculations (version 2.0.1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emde, Claudia; Buras-Schnell, Robert; Kylling, Arve; Mayer, Bernhard; Gasteiger, Josef; Hamann, Ulrich; Kylling, Jonas; Richter, Bettina; Pause, Christian; Dowling, Timothy; Bugliaro, Luca

    2016-05-01

    libRadtran is a widely used software package for radiative transfer calculations. It allows one to compute (polarized) radiances, irradiance, and actinic fluxes in the solar and thermal spectral regions. libRadtran has been used for various applications, including remote sensing of clouds, aerosols and trace gases in the Earth's atmosphere, climate studies, e.g., for the calculation of radiative forcing due to different atmospheric components, for UV forecasting, the calculation of photolysis frequencies, and for remote sensing of other planets in our solar system. The package has been described in Mayer and Kylling (2005). Since then several new features have been included, for example polarization, Raman scattering, a new molecular gas absorption parameterization, and several new parameterizations of cloud and aerosol optical properties. Furthermore, a graphical user interface is now available, which greatly simplifies the usage of the model, especially for new users. This paper gives an overview of libRadtran version 2.0.1 with a focus on new features. Applications including these new features are provided as examples of use. A complete description of libRadtran and all its input options is given in the user manual included in the libRadtran software package, which is freely available at http://www.libradtran.org.

  1. Energy Transfer Based Nanocomposite Scintillator for Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Soha; Sahi, Sunil; Chen, Wei; Ma, Lun; Kenarangui, Rasool

    2014-09-01

    Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum yield and size dependent emission, nanoparticles have attracted interested in various field of research. Here, we have studies the nanoparticles for radiation detection. We have synthesized nanoparticles of Cerium fluoride (CeF3), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Copper complex and Zinc sulfide (ZnS). We have used Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) principle to enhance the luminescence properties of nanocomposite scintillator. Nanocomposites scintillators are structurally characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Optical properties are studied using Photoluminescence, UV-Visible and X-ray. Enhancements in the luminescence are observed under UV and X-ray excitation. Preliminary studies shows nanocomposite scintillators are promising for radiation detection. Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum

  2. Comparative study of microwave radiation-induced magnetoresistive oscillations induced by circularly- and linearly- polarized photo-excitation

    DOE PAGES

    Ye, Tianyu; Liu, Han -Chun; Wang, Zhuo; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, Ramesh G.

    2015-10-09

    A comparative study of the radiation-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure two dimensional electron system (2DES) under linearly- and circularly- polarized microwave excitation indicates a profound difference in the response observed upon rotating the microwave launcher for the two cases, although circularly polarized microwave radiation induced magnetoresistance oscillations observed at low magnetic fields are similar to the oscillations observed with linearly polarized radiation. For the linearly polarized radiation, the magnetoresistive response is a strong sinusoidal function of the launcher rotation (or linear polarization) angle, θ. As a result, for circularly polarized radiation, the oscillatory magnetoresistive response ismore » hardly sensitive to θ.« less

  3. Radiative interactions with micromachined surfaces: Spectral polarized emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Zemel, J.N.

    1991-01-01

    The spectral, angular, polarized emittance (SAPE) is a simple means for observing the allowed electromagnetic energy states associated with periodic structures whose dimensions are comparable to the wavelength of the observed light. Other methods for measuring absorption are far more time consuming when a broad survey is of interest. An extensive body of SAPE data was obtained on 350-- 400{degrees}C intrinsic silicon lamellar gratings. Current approximations to the vector wave equation such as guided wave, modal and Bloch wave methods provided insight into our experiments. A qualitative picture of the stationary electromagnetic states (SES) of lamellar gratings has been developed which agrees with experiment for a number of polarizations, and angular orientations of the emission k vector relative to the gratings. However, one type of emission does not fit any simple model we have examined and raises intriguing questions about emission from grating structures. A new, higher angular resolution emissometer (0.8{degrees} instead of 5{degrees}) has been completed. This system significantly increases the wavelength range from the current 3--14 {mu}m range to 2-25{mu}m, a doubling of the spectral regime. The system is currently in a shakedown'' mode. Preliminary data indicates that the new emissometer meets the design goals. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Suomi NPP VIIRS Striping Analysis using Radiative Transfer Model Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Cao, C.

    2015-12-01

    Modern satellite radiometers such as VIIRS have many detectors with slightly different relative spectral response (RSR). These differences can introduce artifacts such as striping in the imagery. In recent studies we have analyzed the striping pattern related to the detector level RSR difference in VIIRS Thermal Emissive Bands (TEB) M15 and M16, which includes line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) detector level response study and onboard detector stability evaluation using the solar diffuser. Now we extend these analysis to the Reflective Solar Bands (RSB) using MODTRAN atmospheric radiative transfer model (RTM) for detector level radiance simulation. Previous studies analyzed the striping pattern in the images of VIIRS ocean color and reflectance in RSB, further studies about the root cause for striping are still needed. In this study, we will use the MODTRAN model at spectral resolution of 1 cm^-1 under different atmospheric conditions for VIIRS RSB, for example band M1 centered at 410nm which is used for Ocean Color product retrieval. The impact of detector level RSR difference, atmospheric dependency, and solar geometry on the striping in VIIRS SDR imagery will be investigated. The cumulative histogram method used successfully for the TEB striping analysis will be used to quantify the striping. These analysis help S-NPP and J1 to better understand the root cause for VIIRS image artifacts and reduce the uncertainties in geophysical retrievals to meet the user needs.

  5. Infrared radiative transfer through a regular array of cuboidal clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    HARSHVARDHAN; Weinman, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared radiative transfer through a regular array of cuboidal clouds is studied and the interaction of the sides of the clouds with each other and the ground is considered. The theory is developed for black clouds and is extended to scattering clouds using a variable azimuth two-stream approximation. It is shown that geometrical considerations often dominate over the microphysical aspects of radiative transfer through the clouds. For example, the difference in simulated 10 micron brightness temperature between black isothermal cubic clouds and cubic clouds of optical depth 10, is less than 2 deg for zenith angles less than 50 deg for all cloud fractions when viewed parallel to the array. The results show that serious errors are made in flux and cooling rate computations if broken clouds are modeled as planiform. Radiances computed by the usual practice of area-weighting cloudy and clear sky radiances are in error by 2 to 8 K in brightness temperature for cubic clouds over a wide range of cloud fractions and zenith angles. It is also shown that the lapse rate does not markedly affect the exiting radiances for cuboidal clouds of unit aspect ratio and optical depth 10.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann model for a steady radiative transfer equation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hong-Liang; Yao, Feng-Ju; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-08-01

    A complete lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) is proposed for the steady radiative transfer equation (RTE). The RTE can be regarded as a pure convection equation with a source term. To derive the expressions for the equilibrium distribution function and the relaxation time, an artificial isotropic diffusion term is introduced to form a convection-diffusion equation. When the dimensionless relaxation time has a value of 0.5, the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) is exactly applicable to the original steady RTE. We also perform a multiscale analysis based on the Chapman-Enskog expansion to recover the macroscopic RTE from the mesoscopic LBE. The D2Q9 model is used to solve the LBE, and the numerical results obtained by the LBM are comparable to the results obtained by other methods or analytical solutions, which demonstrates that the proposed model is highly accurate and stable in simulating multidimensional radiative transfer. In addition, we find that the convergence rate of the LBM depends on the transport properties of RTE: for diffusion-dominated RTE with a large optical thickness, the LBM shows a second-order convergence rate in space, while for convection-dominated RTE with a small optical thickness, a lower convergence rate is observed. PMID:27627417

  7. A deterministic photon free method to solve radiation transfer equations

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Britton . E-mail: bchang@llnl.gov

    2007-03-01

    A new method to solve radiation transfer equations is presented. In the absence of scattering, material motion, and heat conduction, the photon variables can be eliminated from the fully implicit, multi-group, discrete-ordinate, finite difference (finite element) equations of continuum radiation transfer to yield a smaller set of equations which depends only on temperature. The solution to this smaller set of equations is used to generate the solution to the original set of equations from which the reduced set is derived. The reduced system simplifies to a nonlinear heat equation in the regime of strong absorption and strong emission. We solve the reduced set of equations by the Newton-GMRES method in which the Jacobian update is preconditioned by a linearization of this nonlinear heat equation. The performances of this new method and of the semi-implicit linear method, which is preconditioned by grey transport acceleration combined with diffusion synthetic acceleration, are compared on two test problems. The test results indicate that the new method can take larger time steps, requires less memory, is more accurate, and is competitive in speed with the semi-implicit linear method.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann model for a steady radiative transfer equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hong-Liang; Yao, Feng-Ju; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-08-01

    A complete lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) is proposed for the steady radiative transfer equation (RTE). The RTE can be regarded as a pure convection equation with a source term. To derive the expressions for the equilibrium distribution function and the relaxation time, an artificial isotropic diffusion term is introduced to form a convection-diffusion equation. When the dimensionless relaxation time has a value of 0.5, the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) is exactly applicable to the original steady RTE. We also perform a multiscale analysis based on the Chapman-Enskog expansion to recover the macroscopic RTE from the mesoscopic LBE. The D2Q9 model is used to solve the LBE, and the numerical results obtained by the LBM are comparable to the results obtained by other methods or analytical solutions, which demonstrates that the proposed model is highly accurate and stable in simulating multidimensional radiative transfer. In addition, we find that the convergence rate of the LBM depends on the transport properties of RTE: for diffusion-dominated RTE with a large optical thickness, the LBM shows a second-order convergence rate in space, while for convection-dominated RTE with a small optical thickness, a lower convergence rate is observed.

  9. Preliminary design for Arctic atmospheric radiative transfer experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, B. D.; Church, H. W.; Stamnes, K.; Shaw, G.; Filyushkin, V.; Jin, Z.; Ellingson, R. G.; Tsay, S. C.

    1995-01-01

    If current plans are realized, within the next few years, an extraordinary set of coordinated research efforts focusing on energy flows in the Arctic will be implemented. All are motivated by the prospect of global climate change. SHEBA (Surface Energy Budget of the Arctic Ocean), led by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Office of Naval Research (ONR), involves instrumenting an ice camp in the perennial Arctic ice pack, and taking data for 12-18 months. The ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) focuses on atmospheric radiative transport, especially in the presence of clouds. The NSA/AAO CART involves instrumenting a sizeable area on the North Slope of Alaska and adjacent waters in the vicinity of Barrow, and acquiring data over a period of about 10 years. FIRE (First ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program) Regional Experiment) Phase 3 is a program led by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) which focuses on Arctic clouds, and which is coordinated with SHEBA and ARM. FIRE has historically emphasized data from airborne and satellite platforms. All three program anticipate initiating Arctic data acquisition during spring, 1997. In light of his historic opportunity, the authors discuss a strawman atmospheric radiative transfer experimental plan that identifies which features of the radiative transport models they think should be tested, what experimental data are required for each type of test, the platforms and instrumentation necessary to acquire those data, and in general terms, how the experiments could be conducted. Aspects of the plan are applicable to all three programs.

  10. Preliminary design for Arctic atmospheric radiative transfer experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, B. D.; Church, H. W.; Stamnes, K.; Shaw, G.; Filyushkin, V.; Jin, Z.; Ellingson, R. G.; Tsay, S. C.

    If current plans are realized, within the next few years, an extraordinary set of coordinated research efforts focusing on energy flows in the Arctic will be implemented. All are motivated by the prospect of global climate change. SHEBA (Surface Energy Budget of the Arctic Ocean), led by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Office of Naval Research (ONR), involves instrumenting an ice camp in the perennial Arctic ice pack, and taking data for 12-18 months. The ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) focuses on atmospheric radiative transport, especially in the presence of clouds. The NSA/AAO CART involves instrumenting a sizeable area on the North Slope of Alaska and adjacent waters in the vicinity of Barrow, and acquiring data over a period of about 10 years. FIRE (First ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program) Regional Experiment) Phase 3 is a program led by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) which focuses on Arctic clouds, and which is coordinated with SHEBA and ARM. FIRE has historically emphasized data from airborne and satellite platforms. All three program anticipate initiating Arctic data acquisition during spring, 1997. In light of his historic opportunity, the authors discuss a strawman atmospheric radiative transfer experimental plan that identifies which features of the radiative transport models they think should be tested, what experimental data are required for each type of test, the platforms and instrumentation necessary to acquire those data, and in general terms, how the experiments could be conducted. Aspects of the plan are applicable to all three programs.

  11. 3ARM: A Fast, Accurate Radiative Transfer Model for Use in Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Kinne, S.; Sokolik, I. N.; Toon, O. B.; Mlawer, E. J.; Clough, S. A.; Ackerman, T. P.; Mather, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new radiative transfer model combining the efforts of three groups of researchers is discussed. The model accurately computes radiative transfer in a inhomogeneous absorbing, scattering and emitting atmospheres. As an illustration of the model, results are shown for the effects of dust on the thermal radiation.

  12. 3ARM: A Fast, Accurate Radiative Transfer Model for use in Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Kinne, S.; Sokolik, I. N.; Toon, O. B.; Mlawer, E. J.; Clough, S. A.; Ackerman, T. P.; Mather, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new radiative transfer model combining the efforts of three groups of researchers is discussed. The model accurately computes radiative transfer in a inhomogeneous absorbing, scattering and emitting atmospheres. As an illustration of the model, results are shown for the effects of dust on the thermal radiation.

  13. Magnon emission and radiation induced by spin-polarized current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zholud, Andrei; Freeman, Ryan; Cao, Rongxing; Urazhdin, Sergei

    The spin-torque effect due to spin injection into ferromagnets can affect their effective dynamical damping, and modify the magnon populations. The latter leads to the onset of nonlinear damping that can prevent spontaneous current-induced magnetization oscillations. It has been argued that these nonlinear processes can be eliminate by the radiation of magnons excited by local spin injection in extended magnetic films. To test these effects, studied of the effects of spin injection on the magnon populations in nanoscale spin valves and magnetic point contacts. Measurements of the giant magnetoresistance show a significant resistance component that is antisymmetric in current, and linearly dependent on temperature T. This component is significantly larger for the nanopatterned ferromagnets than for point contacts. We interpret our observations in terms of stimulated generation of magnons by the spin current, and their radiation in point contacts. Supported by NSF ECCS-1305586, ECCS-1509794.

  14. Elliptical polarization of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) observed by Cassini/RPWS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, G.; Cecconi, B.; Lamy, L.; Ye, S.-Y.; Taubenschuss, U.; Macher, W.; Zarka, P.; Lecacheux, A.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2009-04-01

    The high-inclination orbits of the Cassini spacecraft from autumn 2006 until spring 2007 allowed the Cassini/RPWS (Radio and Plasma Wave Science) instrument to observe Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) from latitudes up to 60° for the first time. This has revealed a surprising new property of SKR: Above 30° in observational latitude a significant amount of SKR is strongly elliptically polarized, in marked contrast to previous observations from low latitudes which showed only circular polarization. There are transitional latitudes where the elliptical polarization occurs in "patches" in the time-frequency spectrograms next to regions of still completely circularly polarized SKR. From 45°-60° in latitude it is found that almost all of SKR (especially from the northern hemisphere and less from the southern hemisphere) is elliptically polarized throughout its entire frequency range with an average degree of 0.7 in linear polarization. We demonstrate the ellipticity of SKR by using the concept of "apparent polarization" in case of 2-antenna measurements, but also show 3-antenna measurements from which the polarization can be unambiguously determined.

  15. Multi-Scale Distributed Sensitivity Analysis of Radiative Transfer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelam, M.; Mohanty, B.

    2015-12-01

    Amidst nature's great variability and complexity and Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission aims to provide high resolution soil moisture products for earth sciences applications. One of the biggest challenges still faced by the remote sensing community are the uncertainties, heterogeneities and scaling exhibited by soil, land cover, topography, precipitation etc. At each spatial scale, there are different levels of uncertainties and heterogeneities. Also, each land surface variable derived from various satellite mission comes with their own error margins. As such, soil moisture retrieval accuracy is affected as radiative model sensitivity changes with space, time, and scale. In this paper, we explore the distributed sensitivity analysis of radiative model under different hydro-climates and spatial scales, 1.5 km, 3 km, 9km and 39km. This analysis is conducted in three different regions Iowa, U.S.A (SMEX02), Arizona, USA (SMEX04) and Winnipeg, Canada (SMAPVEX12). Distributed variables such as soil moisture, soil texture, vegetation and temperature are assumed to be uncertain and are conditionally simulated to obtain uncertain maps, whereas roughness data which is spatially limited are assumed a probability distribution. The relative contribution of the uncertain model inputs to the aggregated model output is also studied, using various aggregation techniques. We use global sensitivity analysis (GSA) to conduct this analysis across spatio-temporal scales. Keywords: Soil moisture, radiative transfer, remote sensing, sensitivity, SMEX02, SMAPVEX12.

  16. Detectivity of gas leakage based on electromagnetic radiation transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yunting; Wang, Lingxue; Li, Jiakun; Zhang, Changxing; Zhang, Bei

    2011-05-01

    Standoff detection of gas leakage is a fundamental need in petrochemical and power industries. The passive gas imaging system using thermal imager has been proven to be efficient to visualize leaking gas which is not visible to the naked eye. The detection probability of gas leakage is the basis for designing a gas imaging system. Supposing the performance parameters of the thermal imager are known, the detectivity based on electromagnetic radiation transfer model to image gas leakage is analyzed. This model takes into consideration a physical analysis of the gas plume spread in the atmosphere-the interaction processes between the gas and its surrounding environment, the temperature of the gas and the background, the background surface emissivity, and also gas concentration, etc. Under a certain environmental conditions, through calculating the radiation reaching to the detector from the camera's optical field of view, we obtain an entity "Gas Equivalent Blackbody Temperature Difference (GEBTD)" which is the radiation difference between the on-plume and off-plume regions. Comparing the GEBTD with the Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD) of the thermal imager, we can know whether the system can image the gas leakage. At last, an example of detecting CO2 gas by JADE MWIR thermal imager with a narrow band-pass filter is presented.

  17. Uncertainties in radiative transfer computations: consequences on the ocean color products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilligeard, Eric; Zagolski, Francis; Fischer, Juergen; Santer, Richard P.

    2003-05-01

    Operational MERIS (MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) level-2 processing uses auxiliary data generated by two radiative transfer tools. These two codes simulate upwelling radiances within a coupled 'Atmosphere-Ocean' system, using different approaches based on the matrix-operator method (MOMO) and the successive orders (SO) technique. Intervalidation of these two radiative transfer codes was performed in order to implement them in the MERIS level-2 processing. MOMO and SO simulations were then conducted on a set of representative test cases. Results stressed both for all test cases good agreements were observed. The scattering processes are retrieved within a few tenths of a percent. Nevertheless, some substantial discrepancies occurred if the polarization is not taken into account mainly in the Rayleigh scattering computations. A preliminary study indicates that the impact of the code inaccuracy in the water leaving radiances retrieval (a level-2 MERIS product) is large, up to 50% in relative difference. Applying the OC2 algorithm, the effect on the retrieval chlorophyll concentration is less than 10%.

  18. On the theory of polarization radiation in media with sharp boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Karlovets, D. V.

    2011-07-15

    Polarization radiation generated when a point charge moves uniformly along a straight line in vacuum in the vicinity of media with a finite permittivity {epsilon}({omega}) = {epsilon} Prime + i{epsilon} Double-Prime and sharp boundaries is considered. A method is developed in which polarization radiation is represented as the field of the current induced in the substance by the field of the moving charge. The solution to the problem of radiation induced when a charge moves along the axis of a cylindrical vacuum channel in a thin screen with a finite radius and a finite permittivity is obtained. Depending on the parameters of the problem, this solution describes various types of radiation (Cherenkov, transition, and diffraction radiation). In particular, when the channel radius tends to zero and the outer radius of the screen tends to infinity, the expression derived for the emitted energy coincides with the known solution for transition radiation in a plate. In another particular case of ideal conductivity ({epsilon} Double-Prime {yields} {infinity}), the relevant formula coincides with the known results for diffraction radiation from a circular aperture in an infinitely thin screen. The solution is obtained to the problem of radiation generated when the charge flies near a thin rectangular screen with a finite permittivity. This solution describes the diffraction and Cherenkov mechanisms of radiation and takes into account possible multiple re-reflections of radiation in the screen. The solution to the problem of radiation generated when a particles flies near a thin grating consisting of a finite number of strips having a rectangular cross section and a finite permittivity and separated by vacuum gaps (Smith-Purcell radiation) is also obtained. In the special case of ideal conductivity, the expression derived for the emitted energy coincides with the known result in the model of surface currents.

  19. Emission, absorption and polarization of gyrosynchrotron radiation of mildly relativistic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.; Mctiernan, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Approximate analytic expressions are presented for the emissivity and absorption coefficient of synchrotron radiation of mildly relativistic particles with an arbitrary energy spectrum and pitch angle distribution. From these, an expression for the degree of polarization is derived. The analytic results are compared with numerical results for both thermal and non-thermal (power law) distributions of particles.

  20. The polarization of the far-infrared radiation from the Galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, M. W.; Davidson, J. A.; Morris, M.; Novak, G.; Platt, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    The first detection of linear polarization of the far-infrared (100-micron) radiation from the about 3-pc-diameter dust ring surrounding the galactic nucleus is reported. The percentage of polarization is between 1 and 2 percent at the three measured positions. It is argued that the polarized radiation is produced by thermal emission from elongated interstellar grains oriented by the local magnetic field. The dust ring is optically thin at 100 microns; therefore the observations sample dust through the entire depth of the cloud and are free of confusing effects due to embedded sources, scattering, or selective absorption. These data provide the first information about the configuration of the magnetic field in the dust ring.

  1. Escape factors in zero-dimensional radiation-transfer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, G. J.; Wark, J. S.; Kerr, F. M.; Rose, S. J.; Lee, R. W.

    2008-04-01

    Several zero-dimensional non-LTE radiation-transfer codes are in common use within the laser-plasma community (for example, RATION, FLY, FLYCHK and GALAXY). These codes are capable of generating calculated emission spectra for a plasma of given density and temperature in the presence of a radiation field. Although dimensionless in nature, these codes can take into account the coupling of radiation and populations by use of the escape factor method, and in this sense the codes incorporate the finite size of the plasma of interest in two ways - firstly in the calculation of the effect of the radiation on the populations and secondly when using these populations to generate a spectrum. Different lengths can be used within these two distinct operations, though it has not been made clear what these lengths should be. We submit that the appropriate length to use for the calculation of populations in such zero-dimensional codes is the mean chord of the system, whilst when calculating the spectrum the appropriate length is the size of the plasma along the line of sight. Indeed, for specific plasma shapes using the appropriate escape factors it can be shown that this interpretation agrees with analytic results. However, this is only the case if the correct escape factor is employed: use of the Holstein escape factor (which is in widely distributed versions of the codes mentioned above) is found to be significantly in error under most conditions. We also note that for the case where a plasma is close to coronal equilibrium, some limited information concerning the shape of the plasma can be extracted merely from the ratio of optically thick to optically thin lines, without the need for any explicit spatial resolution.

  2. Radiative transfer and radiative driving of outflows in active galactic nuclei and starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, G. S.; Ostriker, J. P.; Ciotti, L.

    2012-12-01

    To facilitate the study of black hole fuelling, star formation and feedback in galaxies, we outline a method for treating the radial forces on interstellar gas due to absorption of photons by dust grains. The method gives the correct behaviour in all of the relevant limits [dominated by the central point source; dominated by the distributed isotropic source; optically thin; optically thick to ultraviolet (UV)/optical; optically thick to infrared (IR)] and reasonably interpolates between the limits when necessary. The method is explicitly energy conserving so that UV/optical photons that are absorbed are not lost, but are rather redistributed to the IR where they may scatter out of the galaxy. We implement the radiative transfer algorithm in a two-dimensional hydrodynamical code designed to study feedback processes in the context of early-type galaxies. We find that the dynamics and final state of simulations are measurably but only moderately affected by radiative forces on dust, even when assumptions about the dust-to-gas ratio are varied from zero to a value appropriate for the Milky Way. In simulations with high gas densities designed to mimic ultraluminous IR galaxies with a star formation rate of several hundred solar masses per year, dust makes a more substantial contribution to the dynamics and outcome of the simulation. We find that, despite the large opacity of dust to UV radiation, the momentum input to the flow from radiation very rarely exceeds L/c due to two factors: the low opacity of dust to the re-radiated IR and the tendency for dust to be destroyed by sputtering in hot gas environments. We also develop a simplification of our radiative transfer algorithm that respects the essential physics but is much easier to implement and requires a fraction of the computational cost.

  3. MULTI-DIMENSIONAL RADIATIVE TRANSFER TO ANALYZE HANLE EFFECT IN Ca II K LINE AT 3933 A

    SciTech Connect

    Anusha, L. S.; Nagendra, K. N. E-mail: knn@iiap.res.in

    2013-04-20

    Radiative transfer (RT) studies of the linearly polarized spectrum of the Sun (the second solar spectrum) have generally focused on line formation, with an aim to understand the vertical structure of the solar atmosphere using one-dimensional (1D) model atmospheres. Modeling spatial structuring in the observations of the linearly polarized line profiles requires the solution of multi-dimensional (multi-D) polarized RT equation and a model solar atmosphere obtained by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations of the solar atmosphere. Our aim in this paper is to analyze the chromospheric resonance line Ca II K at 3933 A using multi-D polarized RT with the Hanle effect and partial frequency redistribution (PRD) in line scattering. We use an atmosphere that is constructed by a two-dimensional snapshot of the three-dimensional MHD simulations of the solar photosphere, combined with columns of a 1D atmosphere in the chromosphere. This paper represents the first application of polarized multi-D RT to explore the chromospheric lines using multi-D MHD atmospheres, with PRD as the line scattering mechanism. We find that the horizontal inhomogeneities caused by MHD in the lower layers of the atmosphere are responsible for strong spatial inhomogeneities in the wings of the linear polarization profiles, while the use of horizontally homogeneous chromosphere (FALC) produces spatially homogeneous linear polarization in the line core. The introduction of different magnetic field configurations modifies the line core polarization through the Hanle effect and can cause spatial inhomogeneities in the line core. A comparison of our theoretical profiles with the observations of this line shows that the MHD structuring in the photosphere is sufficient to reproduce the line wings and in the line core, but only line center polarization can be reproduced using the Hanle effect. For a simultaneous modeling of the line wings and the line core (including the line center), MHD atmospheres with

  4. Radiative Forcing by Long-Lived Greenhouse Gases: Calculations with the AER Radiative Transfer Models

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, William; Iacono, Michael J.; Delamere, Jennifer S.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Shephard, Mark W.; Clough, Shepard A.; Collins, William D.

    2008-04-01

    A primary component of the observed, recent climate change is the radiative forcing from increased concentrations of long-lived greenhouse gases (LLGHGs). Effective simulation of anthropogenic climate change by general circulation models (GCMs) is strongly dependent on the accurate representation of radiative processes associated with water vapor, ozone and LLGHGs. In the context of the increasing application of the Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) radiation models within the GCM community, their capability to calculate longwave and shortwave radiative forcing for clear sky scenarios previously examined by the radiative transfer model intercomparison project (RTMIP) is presented. Forcing calculations with the AER line-by-line (LBL) models are very consistent with the RTMIP line-by-line results in the longwave and shortwave. The AER broadband models, in all but one case, calculate longwave forcings within a range of -0.20 to 0.23 W m{sup -2} of LBL calculations and shortwave forcings within a range of -0.16 to 0.38 W m{sup -2} of LBL results. These models also perform well at the surface, which RTMIP identified as a level at which GCM radiation models have particular difficulty reproducing LBL fluxes. Heating profile perturbations calculated by the broadband models generally reproduce high-resolution calculations within a few hundredths K d{sup -1} in the troposphere and within 0.15 K d{sup -1} in the peak stratospheric heating near 1 hPa. In most cases, the AER broadband models provide radiative forcing results that are in closer agreement with high 20 resolution calculations than the GCM radiation codes examined by RTMIP, which supports the application of the AER models to climate change research.

  5. 3D Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Cloud System-Resolving Models: Forward Modelling and Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Howard Barker; Jason Cole

    2012-05-17

    Utilization of cloud-resolving models and multi-dimensional radiative transfer models to investigate the importance of 3D radiation effects on the numerical simulation of cloud fields and their properties.

  6. Vector and parallel Monte Carlo radiative heat transfer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, P.J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pryor, D.V. )

    1989-01-01

    A fully vectorized version of a Monte Carlo algorithm of radiative heat transfer in two-dimensional geometries is presented. This algorithm differs from previous applications in that its capabilities are more extensive, with arbitrary numbers of surfaces, arbitrary numbers of material properties, and surface characteristics that include transmission, specular reflection, and diffuse reflection (all of which may be functions of the angle of incidence). The algorithm is applied to an irregular, experimental geometry and implemented on a Cyber 205. A speedup factor of approximately 16, for this combination of geometry and material properties, is achieved for the vector version over the scalar code. Issues related to the details of vectorization, including heavy use of bit addressability, the maintaining of long vector lengths, and gather/scatter use, are discussed. The parallel application of this algorithm is straightforward and is discussed in light of architectural differences among several current supercomputers.

  7. Casimir effect and radiative heat transfer between Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Lopez, Pablo; Grushin, Adolfo; Tse, Wang-Kong; Dalvit, Diego

    2015-03-01

    Chern Insulators are a class of two-dimensional topological materials. Their electronic properties are different from conventional materials, and lead to interesting new physics as quantum Hall effect in absence of an external magnetic field. Here we will review some of their special properties and, in particular, we will discuss the radiative heat transfer and the Casimir effect between two planar Chern Insulators sheets. Finally, we will see how to control the intensity and sign of this Casimir force and the requirements to observe a repulsive Casimir force in the lab with those materials. The research leading to these results has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under REA Grant Agreement No. 302005.

  8. Radiation pressure acceleration of protons to 93 MeV with circularly polarized petawatt laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I. Jong; Pae, Ki Hong; Choi, Il Woo; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Kim, Hyung Taek; Singhal, Himanshu; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Lee, Hwang Woon; Nickles, Peter V.; Jeong, Tae Moon; Kim, Chul Min; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-07-01

    The radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) of charged particles has been a challenging task in laser-driven proton/ion acceleration due to its stringent requirements in laser and target conditions. The realization of radiation-pressure-driven proton acceleration requires irradiating ultrathin targets with an ultrahigh contrast and ultraintense laser pulses. We report the generation of 93-MeV proton beams achieved by applying 800-nm 30-fs circularly polarized laser pulses with an intensity of 6.1 × 10 20 W / cm 2 to 15-nm-thick polymer targets. The radiation pressure acceleration was confirmed from the obtained optimal target thickness, quadratic energy scaling, polarization dependence, and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We expect this clear demonstration of RPA to facilitate the realization of laser-driven proton/ion sources delivering energetic and short-pulse particle beams for novel applications.

  9. Application of 3-D radiative transfer theory to atmospheric correction of land surface images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, D. J.; Martonchik, J. V.; Danielson, E. D.; Bruegge, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    Three dimensional radiative transfer theory was applied to computation of atmospheric effects on remotely sensed imagery. The atmospheric correction algorithm derived is used to estimate aerosol opacity.

  10. Spin polarization transfer mechanisms of SABRE: A magnetic field dependent study.

    PubMed

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Ivanov, Konstantin L; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Petrov, Pavel A; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Kaptein, Robert; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the magnetic field dependence of Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange (SABRE) arising from binding of para-hydrogen (p-H2) and a substrate to a suitable transition metal complex. The magnetic field dependence of the amplification of the (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) signals of the released substrates and dihydrogen, and the transient transition metal dihydride species shows characteristic patterns, which is explained using the theory presented here. The generation of SABRE is most efficient at low magnetic fields due to coherent spin mixing at nuclear spin Level Anti-Crossings (LACs) in the SABRE complexes. We studied two Ir-complexes and have shown that the presence of a (31)P atom in the SABRE complex doubles the number of LACs and, consequently, the number of peaks in the SABRE field dependence. Interestingly, the polarization of SABRE substrates is always accompanied by the para-to-ortho conversion in dihydride species that results in enhancement of the NMR signal of free (H2) and catalyst-bound H2 (Ir-HH). The field dependences of hyperpolarized H2 and Ir-HH by means of SABRE are studied here, for the first time, in detail. The field dependences depend on the chemical shifts and coupling constants of Ir-HH, in which the polarization transfer takes place. A negative coupling constant of -7Hz between the two chemically equivalent but magnetically inequivalent hydride nuclei is determined, which indicates that Ir-HH is a dihydride with an HH distance larger than 2Å. Finally, the field dependence of SABRE at high fields as found earlier has been investigated and attributed to polarization transfer to the substrate by cross-relaxation. The present study provides further evidence for the key role of LACs in the formation of SABRE-derived polarization. Understanding the spin dynamics behind the SABRE method opens the way to optimizing its performance and overcoming the main limitation of NMR, its notoriously low sensitivity.

  11. Polarization and mass transfer during the electrolysis of molten salts with liquid metallic electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhalev, Yu. G.

    2014-08-01

    Calculations are used to show that the fraction of the overvoltage of the stage of discharge-ionization can be significant in the total overvoltage during the polarization of liquid metallic electrodes in molten chlorides depleted of electrochemically active particles (depending on the type of the dissipative structures that appear near the electrode/electrolyte interface). This finding is taken into account to obtain criterion equations to describe the mass-transfer rate as a function of the physicochemical properties of the electrolyte and the metal electrode.

  12. Measurement of Tensor Polarization in Elastic Electron-Deuteron Scattering at Large Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    David Abbott; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Heinz Anklin; Francois Arvieux; Jacques Ball; S. Beedoe; Elizabeth Beise; Louis Bimbot; Werner Boeglin; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Nicholas Chant; Samuel Danagoulian; K. Dow; Jean-Eric Ducret; James Dunne; Lars Ewell; Laurent Eyraud; Christophe Furget; Michel Garcon; Ronald Gilman; Charles Glashausser; Paul Gueye; Kenneth Gustafsson; Kawtar Hafidi; Adrian Honegger; Juerg Jourdan; Serge Kox; Gerfried Kumbartzki; L. Lu; Allison Lung; David Mack; Pete Markowitz; Justin McIntyre; David Meekins; Fernand Merchez; Joseph Mitchell; R. Mohring; Sekazi Mtingwa; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; David Pitz; Liming Qin; Ronald Ransome; Jean-Sebastien Real; Philip Roos; Paul Rutt; Reyad Sawafta; Samuel Stepanyan; Raphael Tieulent; Egle Tomasi-Gustafsson; William Turchinetz; Kelley Vansyoc; Jochen Volmer; Eric Voutier; William Vulcan; Claude Williamson; Stephen Wood; Chen Yan; Jie Zhao; Wenxia Zhao

    2000-05-01

    Tensor polarization observables (t20, t21 and t22) have been measured in elastic electron-deuteron scattering for six values of momentum transfer between 0.66 and 1.7 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The experiment was performed at the Jefferson Laboratory in Hall C using the electron HMS Spectrometer, a specially designed deuteron magnetic channel and the recoil deuteron polarimeter POLDER. The new data determine to much larger Q{sup 2} the deuteron charge form factors G{sub C} and G{sub Q}. They are in good agreement with relativistic calculations and disagree with pQCD predictions.

  13. Incorporation of charge transfer into the explicit polarization fragment method by grand canonical density functional theory

    PubMed Central

    Isegawa, Miho; Gao, Jiali; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular fragmentation algorithms provide a powerful approach to extending electronic structure methods to very large systems. Here we present a method for including charge transfer between molecular fragments in the explicit polarization (X-Pol) fragment method for calculating potential energy surfaces. In the conventional X-Pol method, the total charge of each fragment is preserved, and charge transfer between fragments is not allowed. The description of charge transfer is made possible by treating each fragment as an open system with respect to the number of electrons. To achieve this, we applied Mermin's finite temperature method to the X-Pol wave function. In the application of this method to X-Pol, the fragments are open systems that partially equilibrate their number of electrons through a quasithermodynamics electron reservoir. The number of electrons in a given fragment can take a fractional value, and the electrons of each fragment obey the Fermi–Dirac distribution. The equilibrium state for the electrons is determined by electronegativity equalization with conservation of the total number of electrons. The amount of charge transfer is controlled by re-interpreting the temperature parameter in the Fermi–Dirac distribution function as a coupling strength parameter. We determined this coupling parameter so as to reproduce the charge transfer energy obtained by block localized energy decomposition analysis. We apply the new method to ten systems, and we show that it can yield reasonable approximations to potential energy profiles, to charge transfer stabilization energies, and to the direction and amount of charge transferred. PMID:21895159

  14. A treatment of the Zeeman effect using Stokes formalism and its implementation in the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Richard; Buehler, Stefan A.; Eriksson, Patrick; Mendrok, Jana

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the practical theory that was used to implement the Zeeman effect using Stokes formalism in the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS). ARTS now treats the Zeeman effect in a general manner for several gas species for all polarizations and takes into account variations in both magnetic and atmospheric fields along a full 3D geometry. We present how Zeeman splitting affects polarization in radiative transfer simulations and find that the effect may be large in Earth settings for polarized receivers in limb observing geometry. We find that not taking a spatially varying magnetic field into account can result in absolute errors in the measurement vector of at least 10 K in Earth magnetic field settings. The paper also presents qualitative tests for O2 lines against previous models (61.15 GHz line) and satellite data from Odin-SMR (487.25 GHz line), and the overall consistency between previous models, satellite data, and the new ARTS Zeeman module seems encouraging.

  15. Relativistic radiative transfer and relativistic spherical shell flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2016-06-01

    We examine a radiatively driven spherical flow from a central object, whose thickness is smaller than the radius of the central object, and a plane-parallel approximation can be used-a spherical shell flow. We first solve the relativistic radiative transfer equation iteratively, using a given velocity field, and obtain specific intensities as well as moment quantities. Using the obtained comoving flux, we then solve the relativistic hydrodynamical equation, and obtain a new velocity field. We repeat these double iteration processes until both the intensity and velocity profiles converge. We found that the flow speed v(τ) is roughly approximated as β ≡ v/c = βs(1 - τ/τb), where τ is the optical depth, τb the flow total optical depth, and c the speed of light. We further found that the flow terminal speed vs is roughly expressed as β _s ≡ v_s/c = (Γ hat{F}_0-1)τ_b/dot{m} , where Γ is the central luminosity normalized by the Eddington luminosity, hat{F}_0 the comoving flux normalized by the incident flux, and of the order of unity, and dot{m} the mass-loss rate normalized by the critical mass loss.

  16. Radiative transfer of HCN: interpreting observations of hyperfine anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, A. M.; Loughnane, R. M.; Redman, M. P.; Wiles, B.; Guegan, N.; Barrett, J.; Keto, E. R.

    2016-07-01

    Molecules with hyperfine splitting of their rotational line spectra are useful probes of optical depth, via the relative line strengths of their hyperfine components. The hyperfine splitting is particularly advantageous in interpreting the physical conditions of the emitting gas because with a second rotational transition, both gas density and temperature can be derived. For HCN however, the relative strengths of the hyperfine lines are anomalous. They appear in ratios which can vary significantly from source to source, and are inconsistent with local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). This is the HCN hyperfine anomaly, and it prevents the use of simple LTE models of HCN emission to derive reliable optical depths. In this paper, we demonstrate how to model HCN hyperfine line emission, and derive accurate line ratios, spectral line shapes and optical depths. We show that by carrying out radiative transfer calculations over each hyperfine level individually, as opposed to summing them over each rotational level, the anomalous hyperfine emission emerges naturally. To do this requires not only accurate radiative rates between hyperfine states, but also accurate collisional rates. We investigate the effects of different sets of hyperfine collisional rates, derived via the proportional method and through direct recoupling calculations. Through an extensive parameter sweep over typical low-mass star-forming conditions, we show the HCN line ratios to be highly variable to optical depth. We also reproduce an observed effect whereby the red-blue asymmetry of the hyperfine lines (an infall signature) switches sense within a single rotational transition.

  17. Radiation transfer in metallic-powder beds during laser forming

    SciTech Connect

    Gusarov, A V

    2010-08-03

    This paper presents numerical simulations of two-dimensional radiation transfer in a powder layer that resides on a substrate of the same material and is exposed to a normally incident laser beam with an axisymmetric bell-shaped or top-hat intensity profile. The powder layer is treated as an equivalent homogeneous absorbing/scattering medium with radiative properties defined by the reflectance of the solid phase, the porosity of the powder and its surface area. The model used is applicable when the laser beam diameter far exceeds the particle size of the powder. It is shown that the absorptance of an optically thick layer of opaque powder particles is a universal function of the absorptance of the solid phase and is independent of surface area and porosity, in agreement with experimental data in the literature. The fraction of laser energy absorbed in the powder-substrate system and that absorbed in the substrate decrease with an increase in the reflectance of the material, but the powder bed is then more uniformly heated. (laser technologies)

  18. Flux Transfer Events Simultaneously Observed by Polar and Cluster: Flux Rope in the Subsolar Region and Flux Tube Addition to the Polar Cusp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Zheng, Y.; Russell, C. T.; Pfaff, R. F.; Lin, N.; Slavin, J. A.; Parks, G.; Wilber, M.; Petrinec, S. M.; Lucek, E. A.; Reme, H.

    2007-01-01

    The phenomenon called flux transfer events (FTEs) is widely accepted as the manifestation of time-dependent reconnection. In this paper, we present observational evidence of a flux transfer event observed simultaneously at low-latitude by Polar and at high-latitude by Cluster. This event occurs on March 21, 2002, when both Cluster and Polar are located near local noon but with a large latitudinal separation. During the event, Cluster is moving outbound from the polar cusp to the magnetosheath, and Polar is in the magnetosheath near the equatorial magnetopause. The observations show that a flux transfer event occurs between the equator and the northern cusp. Polar and Cluster observe the FTE s two open flux tubes: Polar encounters the southward moving flux tube near the equator; and Cluster the northward moving flux tube at high latitude. The low latitude FTE appears to be a flux rope with helical magnetic field lines as it has a strong core field and the magnetic field component in the boundary normal direction exhibits a strong bi-polar variation. Unlike the low-latitude FTE, the high-latitude FTE observed by Cluster does not exhibit the characteristic bi-polar perturbation in the magnetic field. But the plasma data clearly reveal its open flux tube configuration. It shows that the magnetic field lines have straightened inside the FTE and become more aligned to the neighboring flux tubes as it moves to the cusp. Enhanced electrostatic fluctuations have been observed within the FTE core, both at low- and high-latitudes. This event provides a unique opportunity to understand high-latitude FTE signatures and the nature of time-varying reconnection.

  19. Intercomparison of Shortwave Radiative Transfer Codes and Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Halthore, Rangasayi N.; Crisp, David; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Anderson, Gail; Berk, A.; Bonnel, B.; Boucher, Olivier; Chang, Fu-Lung; Chou, Ming-Dah; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Dubuisson, P.; Fomin, Boris; Fouquart, Y.; Freidenreich, S.; Gautier, Catherine; Kato, Seiji; Laszlo, Istvan; Li, Zhanqing; Mather, Jim H.; Plana-Fattori, Artemio; Ramaswamy, V.; Ricchiazzi, P.; Shiren, Y.; Trishchenko, A.; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2005-06-03

    Computation of components of shortwave (SW) or solar irradiance in the surface-atmospheric system forms the basis of intercomparison between 16 radiative transfer models of varying spectral resolution ranging from line-by-line models to broadband and general circulation models. In order of increasing complexity the components are: direct solar irradiance at the surface, diffuse irradiance at the surface, diffuse upward flux at the surface, and diffuse upward flux at the top of the atmosphere. These components allow computation of the atmospheric absorptance. Four cases are considered from pure molecular atmospheres to atmospheres with aerosols and atmosphere with a simple uniform cloud. The molecular and aerosol cases allow comparison of aerosol forcing calculation among models. A cloud-free case with measured atmospheric and aerosol properties and measured shortwave radiation components provides an absolute basis for evaluating the models. For the aerosol-free and cloud-free dry atmospheres, models agree to within 1% (root mean square deviation as a percentage of mean) in broadband direct solar irradiance at surface; the agreement is relatively poor at 5% for a humid atmosphere. A comparison of atmospheric absorptance, computed from components of SW radiation, shows that agreement among models is understandably much worse at 3% and 10% for dry and humid atmospheres, respectively. Inclusion of aerosols generally makes the agreement among models worse than when no aerosols are present, with some exceptions. Modeled diffuse surface irradiance is higher than measurements for all models for the same model inputs. Inclusion of an optically thick low-cloud in a tropical atmosphere, a stringent test for multiple scattering calculations, produces, in general, better agreement among models for a low solar zenith angle (SZA = 30?) than for a high SZA (75?). All models show about a 30% increase in broadband absorptance for 30? SZA relative to the clear-sky case and almost no

  20. Spatial distribution of doubly scattered polarized laser radiation in the focal plane of a lidar receiver.

    PubMed

    Griaznov, Vadim; Veselovskii, Igor; Di Girolamo, Paolo; Korenskii, Michail; Summa, Donato

    2007-09-20

    Depolarization lidars are widely used to study clouds and aerosols because of their ability to discriminate between spherical particles and particles of irregular shape. Depolarization of cloud backscattered radiation can be caused also by multiple scattering events. One of the ways to gain information about particle parameters in the presence of strong multiple scattering is the measurement of radial and azimuthal dependence of the polarization patterns in the focal plane of receiver. We present an algorithm for the calculation of corresponding polarized patterns in the frame of double scattering approximation. Computations are performed for various receiver field of views, for different parameters of the scattering geometry, e.g., cloud base and sounding depth, as well as for different values of cloud particle size and refractive index. As the spatial distribution of cross-polarized radiation is of cross shape and rotated at 45 degrees with respect to laser polarization, the use of a properly oriented cross-shaped mask in the receiver focal plane allows the removal of a significant portion of the depolarized component of the backscattered radiation produced by double scattering. This has been verified experimentally based on cloud depolarization measurements performed at different orientations of the cross-shaped mask. Results obtained from measurements are in agreement with model predictions.

  1. Effects of differently polarized microwave radiation on the microscopic structure of the nuclei in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Shckorbatov, Yuriy G; Pasiuga, Vladimir N; Goncharuk, Elena I; Petrenko, Tatiana Ph; Grabina, Valentin A; Kolchigin, Nicolay N; Ivanchenko, Dmitry D; Bykov, Victor N; Dumin, Oleksandr M

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the influence of microwave radiation on the human fibroblast nuclei, the effects of three variants of electromagnetic wave polarization, linear and left-handed and right-handed elliptically polarized, were examined. Experimental conditions were: frequency (f) 36.65 GHz, power density (P) at the surface of exposed object 1, 10, 30, and 100 µW/cm(2), exposure time 10 s. Human fibroblasts growing in a monolayer on a cover slide were exposed to microwave electromagnetic radiation. The layer of medium that covered cells during microwave exposure was about 1 mm thick. Cells were stained immediately after irradiation by 2% (w/v) orcein solution in 45% (w/v) acetic acid. Experiments were made at room temperature (25 °C), and control cell samples were processed in the same conditions. We assessed heterochromatin granule quantity (HGQ) at 600× magnification. Microwave irradiation at the intensity of 1 µW/cm(2) produced no effect, and irradiation at the intensities of 10 and 100 µW/cm(2) induced an increase in HGQ. More intense irradiation induced more chromatin condensation. The right-handed elliptically polarized radiation revealed more biological activity than the left-handed polarized one.

  2. Polarization Transfer in {sup 4}He(e-vector,e{sup '}p-vector){sup 3}H

    SciTech Connect

    Paolone, Michael

    2007-10-26

    Polarization transfer in quasi-elastic nucleon knockout is sensitive to the properties of the nucleon in the nuclear medium, including possible modification of the nucleon form factor and/or spinor. In our recently completed experiment E03-104 at Jefferson Lab we measured the proton recoil polarization in the {sup 4}He(e-vector,e{sup '}p-vector){sup 3}H reaction at a Q{sup 2} of 0.8 (GeV/c){sup 2} and 1.3 (GeV/c){sup 2} with unprecedented precision. These data complement earlier data between 0.4 and 2.6 (GeV/c){sup 2} from both Mainz and Jefferson Lab, in which the measured ratio of polarization-transfer coefficients differs from a fully relativistic DWIA calculation. Preliminary results hint at a possible unexpected Q{sup 2} dependence in the polarization transfer coefficient ratio. Final analysis will help constrain FSI models.

  3. [Ellipticity of He-Ne-laser linearly polarized radiation reflected by leaves of plants and leaf cuticle characteristics].

    PubMed

    Voshchula, I V; Zhumar', A Iu; Tsariuk, O V

    2007-01-01

    The elliptical polarization of He-Ne laser radiation reflected by plant leaves (Begonia Fista and Hedera Helix) was investigated. It was supposed that the elliptic polarization component of reflected radiation is caused by the acts of total reflection of incident radiation on cuticle inhomogeneities. By using the model of the phase-shifting ability of a scattering layer, the cuticle refractive index and the mean angle of inclination of cuticle roughness microfacets to leaf surface was evaluated.

  4. Radiative transfer with finite elements. II. Lyalpha line transfer in moving media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinköhn, E.; Richling, S.

    2002-09-01

    A finite element method for solving the resonance line transfer problem in moving media is presented. The algorithm works in three spatial dimensions on unstructured grids which are adaptively refined by means of an a posteriori error indicator. Frequency discretization is implemented via a first-order Euler scheme. We discuss the resulting matrix structure for coherent isotropic scattering and complete redistribution. The solution is performed using an iterative procedure, where monochromatic radiative transfer problems are successively solved. The present implementation is applicable for arbitrary model configurations with an optical depth up to 103-4. Results of Lyalpha line transfer calculations for a spherically symmetric model, a disk-like configuration, and a halo containing three source regions are discussed. We find the characteristic double-peaked Lyalpha line profile for all models with an optical depth ga 1. In general, the blue peak of the profile is enhanced for models with infall motion and the red peak for models with outflow motion. Both velocity fields produce a triangular shape in the two-dimensional Lyalpha spectra, whereas rotation creates a shear pattern. Frequency-resolved Lyalpha images may help to find the number and position of multiple Lyalpha sources located in a single halo. A qualitative comparison with observations of extended Lyalpha halos associated with high redshift galaxies shows that even models with lower hydrogen column densities than required from profile fitting yield results which reproduce many features in the observed line profiles and two-dimensional spectra.

  5. POLARIZATION STUDIES OF CdZnTe DETECTORS USING SYNCHROTRON X-RAY RADIATION.

    SciTech Connect

    CAMARDA,G.S.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CUI, Y.; HOSSAIN, A.; JAMES, R.B.

    2007-07-01

    New results on the effects of small-scale defects on the charge-carrier transport in single-crystal CdZnTe (CZT) material were produced. We conducted detailed studies of the role of Te inclusions in CZT by employing a highly collimated synchrotron x-ray radiation source available at Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). We were able to induce polarization effects by irradiating specific areas with the detector. These measurements allowed the first quantitative comparison between areas that are free of Te inclusions and those with a relatively high concentration of inclusions. The results of these polaration studies will be reported.

  6. Magnetic Field Generation through Angular Momentum Exchange between Circularly Polarized Radiation and Charged Particles

    SciTech Connect

    G. Shvets; N.J. Fisch; J.-M. Rax

    2002-01-18

    The interaction between circularly polarized (CP) radiation and charged particles can lead to generation of magnetic field through an inverse Faraday effect. The spin of the circularly polarized electromagnetic wave can be converted into the angular momentum of the charged particles so long as there is dissipation. We demonstrate this by considering two mechanisms of angular momentum absorption relevant for laser-plasma interactions: electron-ion collisions and ionization. The precise dissipative mechanism, however, plays a role in determining the efficiency of the magnetic field generation.

  7. Propagation of Polarized Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation in an Anisotropic Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moskaliuk, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    The polarization plane of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) can be rotated either in a space-time with metric of anisotropic type and in a magnetized plasma or in the presence of a quintessential background with pseudoscalar coupling to electromagnetism. A unified treatment of these three phenomena is presented for cold anisotropic plasma at the pre-recombination epoch. It is argued that the generalized expressions derived in the present study may be relevant for direct searches of a possible rotation of the cosmic microwave background polarization.

  8. The DRESOR method for radiative heat transfer in semitransparent graded index cylindrical medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qiang; Zhang, Xian; Huang, Zhifeng; Wang, Zhichao; Zhou, Huaichun

    2014-08-01

    During a numerical analysis of radiative transfer in some cylindrical optical thermal analysis and thermal design, applying a cylindrical coordinate system would be much more convenient and precise than that using a Cartesian coordinate system. In this paper, the DRESOR method under a cylindrical coordinate system is proposed to address radiative transfer in a semitransparent graded index cylindrical medium. The dimensionless incident radiation and net radiative heat flux are obtained using the DRESOR method. The accuracy and validity of the proposed method is verified by comparison with other techniques. The effects of isotropic scattering albedo and graded index on radiative transfer are also considered. Additionally, the high directional radiative intensity information is obtained to show the performance of the DRESOR method. It shows that the DRESOR method is an effective technique to address the radiative transfer problem in the graded index cylindrical medium with complex surface temperature characteristics.

  9. A 1. 5--4 Kelvin detachable cold-sample transfer system: Application to inertially confined fusion with spin-polarized hydrogens fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, N.; Barden, J.; Fan, Q.; Honig, A.

    1990-01-01

    A compact cold-transfer apparatus for engaging and retrieving samples at liquid helium temperatures (1.5--4K), maintaining the samples at such temperatures for periods of hours, and subsequently inserting them in diverse apparatuses followed by disengagement, is described. The properties of several thermal radiation-insulating shrouds, necessary for very low sample temperatures, are presented. The immediate intended application is transportable target-shells containing highly spin-polarized deuterons in solid HD or D{sub 2} for inertially confined fusion (ICF) experiments. The system is also valuable for unpolarized high-density fusion fuels, as well as for other applications which are discussed. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Beyond frontier molecular orbital theory: a systematic electron transfer model (ETM) for polar bimolecular organic reactions.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Katharine J; Johnson, Richard P

    2013-03-01

    Polar bimolecular reactions often begin as charge-transfer complexes and may proceed with a high degree of electron transfer character. Frontier molecular orbital (FMO) theory is predicated in part on this concept. We have developed an electron transfer model (ETM) in which we systematically transfer one electron between reactants and then use density functional methods to model the resultant radical or radical ion intermediates. Sites of higher reactivity are revealed by a composite spin density map (SDM) of odd electron character on the electron density surface, assuming that a new two-electron bond would occur preferentially at these sites. ETM correctly predicts regio- and stereoselectivity for a broad array of reactions, including Diels-Alder, dipolar and ketene cycloadditions, Birch reduction, many types of nucleophilic additions, and electrophilic addition to aromatic rings and polyenes. Conformational analysis of radical ions is often necessary to predict reaction stereochemistry. The electronic and geometric changes due to one-electron oxidation or reduction parallel the reaction coordinate for electrophilic or nucleophilic addition, respectively. The effect is more dramatic for one-electron reduction.

  11. Production of Highly Polarized Positrons Using Polarized Electrons at MeV Energies

    DOE PAGES

    Abbott, D.; Adderley, P.; Adeyemi, A.; Aguilera, P.; Ali, M.; Areti, H.; Baylac, M.; Benesch, J.; Bosson, G.; Cade, B.; et al

    2016-05-27

    The Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons experiment at the injector of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility has demonstrated for the first time the efficient transfer of polarization from electrons to positrons produced by the polarized bremsstrahlung radiation induced by a polarized electron beam in a high-Z target. Positron polarization up to 82% have been measured for an initial electron beam momentum of 8.19~MeV/c, limited only by the electron beam polarization. We report that this technique extends polarized positron capabilities from GeV to MeV electron beams, and opens access to polarized positron beam physics to a wide community.

  12. Production of Highly Polarized Positrons Using Polarized Electrons at MeV Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, D.; Adderley, P.; Adeyemi, A.; Aguilera, P.; Ali, M.; Areti, H.; Baylac, M.; Benesch, J.; Bosson, G.; Cade, B.; Camsonne, A.; Cardman, L. S.; Clark, J.; Cole, P.; Covert, S.; Cuevas, C.; Dadoun, O.; Dale, D.; Dong, H.; Dumas, J.; Fanchini, E.; Forest, T.; Forman, E.; Freyberger, A.; Froidefond, E.; Golge, S.; Grames, J.; Guèye, P.; Hansknecht, J.; Harrell, P.; Hoskins, J.; Hyde, C.; Josey, B.; Kazimi, R.; Kim, Y.; Machie, D.; Mahoney, K.; Mammei, R.; Marton, M.; McCarter, J.; McCaughan, M.; McHugh, M.; McNulty, D.; Mesick, K. E.; Michaelides, T.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Moser, D.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Muraz, J.-F.; Opper, A.; Poelker, M.; Réal, J.-S.; Richardson, L.; Setiniyaz, S.; Stutzman, M.; Suleiman, R.; Tennant, C.; Tsai, C.; Turner, D.; Ungaro, M.; Variola, A.; Voutier, E.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; PEPPo Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons experiment at the injector of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility has demonstrated for the first time the efficient transfer of polarization from electrons to positrons produced by the polarized bremsstrahlung radiation induced by a polarized electron beam in a high-Z target. Positron polarization up to 82% have been measured for an initial electron beam momentum of 8.19 MeV /c , limited only by the electron beam polarization. This technique extends polarized positron capabilities from GeV to MeV electron beams, and opens access to polarized positron beam physics to a wide community.

  13. Production of Highly Polarized Positrons Using Polarized Electrons at MeV Energies.

    PubMed

    Abbott, D; Adderley, P; Adeyemi, A; Aguilera, P; Ali, M; Areti, H; Baylac, M; Benesch, J; Bosson, G; Cade, B; Camsonne, A; Cardman, L S; Clark, J; Cole, P; Covert, S; Cuevas, C; Dadoun, O; Dale, D; Dong, H; Dumas, J; Fanchini, E; Forest, T; Forman, E; Freyberger, A; Froidefond, E; Golge, S; Grames, J; Guèye, P; Hansknecht, J; Harrell, P; Hoskins, J; Hyde, C; Josey, B; Kazimi, R; Kim, Y; Machie, D; Mahoney, K; Mammei, R; Marton, M; McCarter, J; McCaughan, M; McHugh, M; McNulty, D; Mesick, K E; Michaelides, T; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Moser, D; Muñoz Camacho, C; Muraz, J-F; Opper, A; Poelker, M; Réal, J-S; Richardson, L; Setiniyaz, S; Stutzman, M; Suleiman, R; Tennant, C; Tsai, C; Turner, D; Ungaro, M; Variola, A; Voutier, E; Wang, Y; Zhang, Y

    2016-05-27

    The Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons experiment at the injector of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility has demonstrated for the first time the efficient transfer of polarization from electrons to positrons produced by the polarized bremsstrahlung radiation induced by a polarized electron beam in a high-Z target. Positron polarization up to 82% have been measured for an initial electron beam momentum of 8.19  MeV/c, limited only by the electron beam polarization. This technique extends polarized positron capabilities from GeV to MeV electron beams, and opens access to polarized positron beam physics to a wide community. PMID:27284661

  14. Production of Highly Polarized Positrons Using Polarized Electrons at MeV Energies.

    PubMed

    Abbott, D; Adderley, P; Adeyemi, A; Aguilera, P; Ali, M; Areti, H; Baylac, M; Benesch, J; Bosson, G; Cade, B; Camsonne, A; Cardman, L S; Clark, J; Cole, P; Covert, S; Cuevas, C; Dadoun, O; Dale, D; Dong, H; Dumas, J; Fanchini, E; Forest, T; Forman, E; Freyberger, A; Froidefond, E; Golge, S; Grames, J; Guèye, P; Hansknecht, J; Harrell, P; Hoskins, J; Hyde, C; Josey, B; Kazimi, R; Kim, Y; Machie, D; Mahoney, K; Mammei, R; Marton, M; McCarter, J; McCaughan, M; McHugh, M; McNulty, D; Mesick, K E; Michaelides, T; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Moser, D; Muñoz Camacho, C; Muraz, J-F; Opper, A; Poelker, M; Réal, J-S; Richardson, L; Setiniyaz, S; Stutzman, M; Suleiman, R; Tennant, C; Tsai, C; Turner, D; Ungaro, M; Variola, A; Voutier, E; Wang, Y; Zhang, Y

    2016-05-27

    The Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons experiment at the injector of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility has demonstrated for the first time the efficient transfer of polarization from electrons to positrons produced by the polarized bremsstrahlung radiation induced by a polarized electron beam in a high-Z target. Positron polarization up to 82% have been measured for an initial electron beam momentum of 8.19  MeV/c, limited only by the electron beam polarization. This technique extends polarized positron capabilities from GeV to MeV electron beams, and opens access to polarized positron beam physics to a wide community.

  15. Effect of atmospheric refraction on radiative transfer in visible and near-infrared band: Model development, validation, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shuai; Gao, Tai-chang; Li, Hao; Liu, Lei; Liu, Xi-chuan; Zhang, Ting; Cheng, Tian-ji; Li, Wan-tong; Dai, Zhong-hua; Su, Xiaojian

    2016-03-01

    Refraction is an important factor influencing radiative transfer since it can modify the propagation trajectory and polarization states of lights; therefore, it is necessary to quantitively evaluate the effect of atmospheric refraction on radiative transfer process. To this end, a new atmospheric radiative transfer model including refraction process is proposed. The model accuracy is validated against benchmark results, literature results, and well-tested radiative transfer models such as discrete coordinate method and RT3/PolRadtran. The impact of atmospheric refraction on both polarized radiance and fluxes is discussed for pure Rayleigh scattering atmosphere, atmosphere with aerosol, and cloud. The results show that atmospheric refraction has a significant influence on both the radiance and polarization states of diffuse light, where the relative change of the radiance of reflected light and transmitted light due to refraction can achieve 6.3% and 7.4% for Rayleigh scattering atmosphere, 7.2% and 7.8% for atmosphere with aerosol, and 6.2% and 6.8% for cloudy atmosphere, respectively. The relative change of the degree of polarization ranges from near zero in the horizon to 9.5% near neutral points. The angular distribution pattern of the relative change of the radiance for atmosphere with aerosol and cloud is very similar to that for pure Rayleigh scattering case, where its magnitude decreases gradually with the increasing of zenith angle for reflected light; but for transmitted light, the variation characteristics is opposite. The impact of refraction is gradually enhanced with the increasing of solar zenith angles and the optical depth of aerosol and cloud. As the wavelength of incident light increases, the impact declines rapidly for Rayleigh scattering medium. The relative change of the fluxes due to refraction is most notable for Middle Latitude Winter profile (about 8.2043% and 7.3225% for the transmitted and reflected light, respectively, at 0.35 µm). With

  16. Comptonization in Ultra-Strong Magnetic Fields: Numerical Solution to the Radiative Transfer Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceccobello, C.; Farinelli, R.; Titarchuk, L.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the radiative transfer problem in a plane-parallel slab of thermal electrons in the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field (B approximately greater than B(sub c) approx. = 4.4 x 10(exp 13) G). Under these conditions, the magnetic field behaves like a birefringent medium for the propagating photons, and the electromagnetic radiation is split into two polarization modes, ordinary and extraordinary, that have different cross-sections. When the optical depth of the slab is large, the ordinary-mode photons are strongly Comptonized and the photon field is dominated by an isotropic component. Aims. The radiative transfer problem in strong magnetic fields presents many mathematical issues and analytical or numerical solutions can be obtained only under some given approximations. We investigate this problem both from the analytical and numerical point of view, provide a test of the previous analytical estimates, and extend these results with numerical techniques. Methods. We consider here the case of low temperature black-body photons propagating in a sub-relativistic temperature plasma, which allows us to deal with a semi-Fokker-Planck approximation of the radiative transfer equation. The problem can then be treated with the variable separation method, and we use a numerical technique to find solutions to the eigenvalue problem in the case of a singular kernel of the space operator. The singularity of the space kernel is the result of the strong angular dependence of the electron cross-section in the presence of a strong magnetic field. Results. We provide the numerical solution obtained for eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the space operator, and the emerging Comptonization spectrum of the ordinary-mode photons for any eigenvalue of the space equation and for energies significantly lesser than the cyclotron energy, which is on the order of MeV for the intensity of the magnetic field here considered. Conclusions. We derived the specific intensity of the

  17. A scalable plant-resolving radiative transfer model based on optimized GPU ray tracing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new model for radiative transfer in participating media and its application to complex plant canopies is presented. The goal was to be able to efficiently solve complex canopy-scale radiative transfer problems while also representing sub-plant heterogeneity. In the model, individual leaf surfaces ...

  18. Impact of Multiple Scattering on Infrared Radiative Transfer involving Ice Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C. P.; Yang, P.; Huang, X.; Feldman, D.; Flanner, M.

    2015-12-01

    General circulation models (GCMs) facilitate a major tool to investigate climate on global scale. Since solar and terrestrial radiation control energy budget of global climate, developing an accurate yet computationally efficient radiative transfer model in GCMs is important. However, in most of the GCMs, absorption of ice cloud is the only mechanism considered for the longwave radiative transfer process. Implementation of longwave scattering in GCMs requires parameterizations of ice cloud. This study utilizes spectrally consistent ice particle model in MODIS collection 6 and more than 14,000 particle size distributions from aircraft in-situ observations to parameterize ice cloud longwave optical properties. The new parameterizations are compared with Fu-Liou parameterization implemented in the RRTM_LW (Longwave Rapid Radiative Transfer Model). As accurate and computationally efficient radiative transfer model is important in GCMs, comparison of different radiative transfer methods are performed. Specifically, RRTMG_LW (GCM version of RRTM_LW), one of the most widely utilized radiative transfer schemes in the GCMs, will be modified to include different scattering approximation methods. To evaluate the accuracy, DISORT (Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer Program for a Multi-Layered Plane-Parallel Medium) is implemented and compared with other methods in terms of cloud radiative effect and heating rate.

  19. Classification and radiative-transfer modeling of meteorite spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentikäinen, H.; Penttilä, A.; Peltoniemi, J.; Muinonen, K.

    2014-07-01

    The interpretation of asteroid spectra is closely tied to surface structure and composition. Asteroid surfaces are usually assumed to be covered with a regolith, which is a mixture of mineral grains ranging from micrometers to centimeters in size. The inverse problem of deducing the characteristics of the grains from the scattering of light (e.g., using photometric and polarimetric observations) is difficult. Meteorite spectroscopy can be a valuable alternative source of information considering that unweathered meteoritic ''falls'' are almost pristine samples of their parent bodies. Reflectance spectra of 18 different meteorite samples were measured with the Finnish Geodetic Institute Field Goniospectrometer (FIGIFIGO) covering a wavelength range of 450--2250 nm [1,2]. The measurements expand the database of reflectance spectra obtained by Paton et al. [3] and Gaffey [4]. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) performed on the spectra indicates a separation of the undifferentiated ordinary chondrites and the differentiated achondrites. The principal components also suggest a discrimination between the spectra of ordinary chondrites with petrologic grades 5 and 6. The distinction is not present when the data are supplemented with the spectra from the two other data sets obtained with differing measuring techniques. To further investigate the different classifications, the PCA is implemented with selected spectral features contrary to the previous analyses, which encompassed the complete spectra. Single-scattering albedos for meteoritic fundamental scatterers were derived with a Monte Carlo radiative-transfer model [1]. In the derivation, realistic scattering phase functions were utilized. The functions were obtained by fitting triple Henyey-Greenstein functions to the measured scattering phase functions of olivine powder for two different size distributions [5,6]. The simulated reflectances for different scattering phase functions were matched to the measured meteorite

  20. Three-Loop Radiative-Recoil Corrections to Hyperfine Splitting in Muonium: Diagrams with Polarization Loops

    SciTech Connect

    Eides, Michael I.; Shelyuto, Valery A.

    2009-09-25

    We consider three-loop radiative-recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting in muonium generated by the diagrams with electron and muon vacuum polarizations. We calculate single-logarithmic and nonlogarithmic contributions of order alpha{sup 3}(m/M)E{sub F} generated by gauge invariant sets of diagrams with electron and muon polarization insertions in the electron and muon factors. Combining these corrections with the older results, we obtain total contribution to hyperfine splitting generated by all diagrams with electron and muon polarization loops. The calculation of this contribution completes an important stage in the implementation of the program of reduction of the theoretical uncertainty of hyperfine splitting below 10 Hz. The new results improve the theory of hyperfine splitting and affect the value of the electron-muon mass ratio extracted from experimental data on muonium hyperfine splitting.

  1. The Occurence Rate, Polarization Character, and Intensity of Broadband Jovian Kilometric Radiation. [Voyager Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    The major observational features of one new component of Jupiter's radio emission spectrum, the broadband kilometer-wavelenth radiation or bKOM are described. The Voyager planetary radio astronomy experiments reveal that the overall occurrence morphology, total power, and polarization character of bKOM are strong functions of the latitude and/or local time geometry of the observations. The post-encounter data show a decline in the mean occurrence rates and power level of bKOM and, in particular, a depletion in the occurrence rate at those same longitudes where the detection rate is a maximum before encounter. Additionally, the polarization sense undergoes a permanent reversal in sign after encounter, whereas the time-averaged wave axial ratio and degrees of polarization remain relatively unchanged. No evidence of any control by Io is found. The strong dependence of the morphology on local time suggests a source whose beam is nearly fixed relative to the Jupiter-sun line.

  2. Linearly polarized radiation from astrophysical masers due to magnetic fields of intermediate strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Watson, William D.

    1990-01-01

    Previous solutions for polarization of astrophysical maser radiation due to closed-shell molecules in a magnetic field have potentially serious limitations. These solutions are mostly based on the approximation that the Zeeman frequency g-Omega is much greater than the rate for stimulated emission R and the rate for decay Gamma of the molecular state. Others are asymptotic solutions obtained for an angular momentum J = 1-0 transition. It has been unclear whether the polarizations due to plausible Zeeman splittings are adequately represented by the solutions obtained for g-Omega/Gamma much greater than 1 and g-Omega/R much greater than 1. Actual masing transitions tend to involve molecular states with angular momenta that are higher than J = 1 and 0. Numerical solutions for the linear polarization are presented here which do not have the foregoing restrictions on the g-Omega and which are not limited to a J = 1-0 transition.

  3. Polarized thermal radiation by layer-by-layer metallic emitters with sub-wavelength grating.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Leung, Wai; Kim, Tae Guen; Constant, Kristen; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2008-06-01

    Metallic thermal emitters consisting of two layers of differently structured nickel gratings on a homogeneous nickel layer are fabricated by soft lithography and studied for polarized thermal radiation. A thermal emitter in combination with a sub-wavelength grating shows a high extinction ratio, with a maximum value close to 5, in a wide mid-infrared range from 3.2 to 7.8 mum, as well as high emissivity up to 0.65 at a wavelength of 3.7 microm. All measurements show good agreement with theoretical predictions. Numerical simulations reveal that a high electric field exists within the localized air space surrounded by the gratings and the intensified electric-field is only observed for the polarizations perpendicular to the top sub-wavelength grating. This result suggests how the emissivity of a metal can be selectively enhanced at a certain range of wavelengths for a given polarization. PMID:18545587

  4. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIATION TRANSFER IN YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, B. A.; Honor, J.; Robitaille, T. P.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Dong, R.; Wolff, M. J.; Wood, K.

    2013-08-15

    We have updated our publicly available dust radiative transfer code (HOCHUNK3D) to include new emission processes and various three-dimensional (3D) geometries appropriate for forming stars. The 3D geometries include warps and spirals in disks, accretion hotspots on the central star, fractal clumping density enhancements, and misaligned inner disks. Additional axisymmetric (2D) features include gaps in disks and envelopes, ''puffed-up inner rims'' in disks, multiple bipolar cavity walls, and iteration of disk vertical structure assuming hydrostatic equilibrium (HSEQ). We include the option for simple power-law envelope geometry, which, combined with fractal clumping and bipolar cavities, can be used to model evolved stars as well as protostars. We include non-thermal emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and very small grains, and external illumination from the interstellar radiation field. The grid structure was modified to allow multiple dust species in each cell; based on this, a simple prescription is implemented to model dust stratification. We describe these features in detail, and show example calculations of each. Some of the more interesting results include the following: (1) outflow cavities may be more clumpy than infalling envelopes. (2) PAH emission in high-mass stars may be a better indicator of evolutionary stage than the broadband spectral energy distribution slope; and related to this, (3) externally illuminated clumps and high-mass stars in optically thin clouds can masquerade as young stellar objects. (4) Our HSEQ models suggest that dust settling is likely ubiquitous in T Tauri disks, in agreement with previous observations.

  5. Three-dimensional inhomogeneous rain fields: implications for the distribution of intensity and polarization of the microwave thermal radiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyushin, Yaroslaw; Kutuza, Boris

    Observations and mapping of the upwelling thermal radiation of the Earth is the very promising remote sensing technique for the global monitoring of the weather and precipitations. For reliable interpretation of the observation data, numerical model of the microwave radiative transfer in the precipitating atmosphere is necessary. In the present work, numerical simulations of thermal microwave radiation in the rain have been performed at three wavelengths (3, 8 and 22 mm). Radiative properties of the rain have been simulated using public accessible T-matrix codes (Mishchenko, Moroz) for non-spherical particles of fixed orientation and realistic raindrop size distributions (Marshall-Palmer) within the range of rain intensity 1-100 mm/h. Thermal radiation of infinite flat slab medium and isolated rain cell of kilometer size has been simulated with finite difference scheme for the vectorial radiative transfer equation (VRTE) in dichroic scattering medium. Principal role of cell structure of the rain field in the formation of angular and spatial distribution of the intensity and polarization of the upwelling thermal radiation has been established. Possible approaches to interpretation of satellite data are also discussed. It is necessary that spatial resolution of microwave radiometers be less than rain cell size. At the present time the resolution is approximately 15 km. It can be considerably improved, for example by two-dimensional synthetic aperture millimeter-wave radiometric interferometer for measuring full-component Stokes vector of emission from hydrometeors. The estimates show that in millimeter band it is possible to develop such equipment with spatial resolution of the order of 1-2 km, which is significantly less than the size of rain cell, with sensitivity 0.3-0.5 K. Under this condition the second Stokes parameter may by successfully measured and may be used for investigation of precipitation regions. Y-shaped phased array antenna is the most promising to

  6. A method for computing visible and infrared polarized monochromatic radiation in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauben, W. M. F.; de Haan, J. F.; Hovenier, J. W.

    1994-02-01

    In this paper we present a computational method, based on the so-called adding principle, for calculating the polarized monochromatic radiation in plane-parallel vertically inhomogeneous atmospheres. Our computer code is verified by comparing numerical results with those obtained by other investigators using different methods. We consider not only the well-known case of illumination by a unidirectional beam of light at the top of the atmosphere, but also illumination by isotropically radiating internal sources and illumination by an isotropically radiating ground surface below the atmosphere. Numerical results for all relevant Stokes parameters are tabulated for a two-layer atmosphere containing molecules and haze particles. These results pertain to the three types of illumination mentioned above. Furthermore, we describe some general features of polarized radiation in an optically thick homogeneous atmosphere containing cloud C1 water droplets. It is shown that multiple scattering of radiation in such a cloudy atmosphere may not be ignored at infrared wavelengths if molecular absorption is negligible.

  7. Enhanced polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation from thermal gravitational waves.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Mohanty, Subhendra; Nautiyal, Akhilesh

    2006-12-22

    If inflation was preceded by a radiation era, then at the time of inflation there will exist a decoupled thermal distribution of gravitons. Gravitational waves generated during inflation will be amplified by the process of stimulated emission into the existing thermal distribution of gravitons. Consequently, the usual zero temperature scale invariant tensor spectrum is modified by a temperature dependent factor. This thermal correction factor amplifies the B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation by an order of magnitude at large angles, which may now be in the range of observability of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe.

  8. Optimization of radiative heat transfer in hyperbolic metamaterials for thermophotovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Simovski, Constantin; Maslovski, Stanislav; Nefedov, Igor; Tretyakov, Sergei

    2013-06-17

    Using our recently developed method we analyze the radiative heat transfer in micron-thick multilayer stacks of metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion. The metamaterials are especially designed for prospective thermophotovoltaic systems. We show that the huge transfer of near-infrared thermal radiation across micron layers of metamaterials is achievable and can be optimized. We suggest an approach to the optimal design of such metamaterials taking into account high temperatures of the emitting medium and the heating of the photovoltaic medium by the low-frequency part of the radiation spectrum. We show that both huge values and frequency selectivity are achievable for the radiative heat transfer in hyperbolic multilayer stacks.

  9. Emission, absorption and polarization of gyrosynchrotron radiation of mildly relativistic paricles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, V.; Mctiernan, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Approximate analytic expressions for the emissivity and absorption coefficient of synchrotron radiation of mildly relativistic particles with an arbitrary energy spectrum and pitch angle distribution are given. From these, an expression for the degree of polarization is derived. To accomplish this, previously developed methods of integration are used. The analytic results are compared with numerical results for both thermal and non-thermal (power law) distributions of particles.

  10. Radiative condensation instability in partially ionized dusty plasma with polarization force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prerana; Jain, Shweta

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of polarization force on the radiative condensation (RC) instability of a partially ionized dusty medium both in the presence and absence of self-gravitation. The temperature and density dependent heat loss function is considered in the process of heating and radiative cooling. The linear-perturbation analysis is used to derive general dispersion relation and criteria for both the Jeans and RC instability. The condition of Jeans instability is modified due to the RC, polarization force, magnetic field and dust thermal speed, whereas in the case of RC instability the instability criterion is modified due to the presence of dust thermal speed, magnetic field and polarization force. The effects of various parameters have been numerically estimated on RC instability. It is clear from figure that the presence of polarization parameter and density dependent heat-loss function destabilize the system while the presence of temperature dependent heat-loss function, dust neutral collision frequency and ratio of neutral dust density stabilize the system. These findings are relevant for many areas of space and laboratory plasma research prime examples being the formation of dense molecular clouds in interstellar and intergalactic medium, condensations in planetary nebulae and in laboratory plasmas like tokamak edge plasma.

  11. Electron spin polarization in photosynthesis and the mechanism of electron transfer in photosystem I. Experimental observations.

    PubMed Central

    Dismukes, G C; McGuire, A; Blankenship, R; Sauer, K

    1978-01-01

    Transient electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods are used to examine the spin populations of the light-induced radicals produced in spinach chloroplasts, photosystem I particles, and Chlorella pyrenoidosa. We observe both emission and enhanced absorption within the hyperfine structure of the EPR spectrum of P700+, the photooxidized reaction-center chlorophyll radical (Signal I). By using flow gradients or magnetic fields to orient the chloroplasts in the Zeeman field, we are able to influence both the magnitude and sign of the spin polarization. Identification of the polarized radical and P700+ is consistent with the effects of inhibitors, excitation light intensity and wavelength, redox potential, and fractionation of the membranes. The EPR signal of the polarized P700+ radical displays a 30% narrower line width than P700+ after spin relaxation. This suggests a magnetic interaction between P700+ and its reduced (paramagnetic) acceptor, which leads to a collapse of the P700+ hyperfine structure. Narrowing of the spectrum is evident only in the spectrum of polarized P700+, because prompt electron transfer rapidly separates the radical pair. Evidence of cross-relaxation between the adjacent radicals suggests the existence of an exchange interaction. The results indicate that polarization is produced by a radical pair mechanism between P700+ and the reduced primary acceptor of photosystem I. The orientation dependence of the spin polarization of P700+ is due to the g-tensor anisotropy of the acceptor radical to which it is exchange-coupled. The EPR spectrum of P700+ is virtually isotropic once the adjacent acceptor radical has passed the photoionized electron to a later, more remote acceptor molecule. This interpretation implies that the acceptor radical has g-tensor anisotropy significantly greater than the width of the hyperfine field on P700+ and that the acceptor is oriented with its smallest g-tensor axis along the normal to the thylakoid membranes. Both

  12. Electron spin polarization in photosynthesis and the mechanism of electron transfer in photosystem I. Experimental observations.

    PubMed

    Dismukes, G C; McGuire, A; Blankenship, R; Sauer, K

    1978-03-01

    Transient electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods are used to examine the spin populations of the light-induced radicals produced in spinach chloroplasts, photosystem I particles, and Chlorella pyrenoidosa. We observe both emission and enhanced absorption within the hyperfine structure of the EPR spectrum of P700+, the photooxidized reaction-center chlorophyll radical (Signal I). By using flow gradients or magnetic fields to orient the chloroplasts in the Zeeman field, we are able to influence both the magnitude and sign of the spin polarization. Identification of the polarized radical and P700+ is consistent with the effects of inhibitors, excitation light intensity and wavelength, redox potential, and fractionation of the membranes. The EPR signal of the polarized P700+ radical displays a 30% narrower line width than P700+ after spin relaxation. This suggests a magnetic interaction between P700+ and its reduced (paramagnetic) acceptor, which leads to a collapse of the P700+ hyperfine structure. Narrowing of the spectrum is evident only in the spectrum of polarized P700+, because prompt electron transfer rapidly separates the radical pair. Evidence of cross-relaxation between the adjacent radicals suggests the existence of an exchange interaction. The results indicate that polarization is produced by a radical pair mechanism between P700+ and the reduced primary acceptor of photosystem I. The orientation dependence of the spin polarization of P700+ is due to the g-tensor anisotropy of the acceptor radical to which it is exchange-coupled. The EPR spectrum of P700+ is virtually isotropic once the adjacent acceptor radical has passed the photoionized electron to a later, more remote acceptor molecule. This interpretation implies that the acceptor radical has g-tensor anisotropy significantly greater than the width of the hyperfine field on P700+ and that the acceptor is oriented with its smallest g-tensor axis along the normal to the thylakoid membranes. Both

  13. A fast all-sky radiative transfer model and its implications for solar energy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Y.; Sengupta, M.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative transfer models simulating broadband solar radiation, e.g. Rapid Radiation Transfer Model (RRTM) and its GCM applications, have been widely used by atmospheric scientists to model solar resource for various energy applications such as operational forecasting. Due to the complexity of solving the radiative transfer equation, simulating solar radiation under cloudy conditions can be extremely time consuming though many approximations, e.g. two-stream approach and delta-M truncation scheme, have been utilized. To provide a new option to approximate solar radiation, we developed a Fast All-sky Radiation Model for Solar applications (FARMS) using simulated cloud transmittance and reflectance from 16-stream RRTM model runs. The solar irradiances at the land surface were simulated by combining parameterized cloud properties with a fast clear-sky radiative transfer model. Using solar radiation measurements from the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) central facility in Oklahoma as a benchmark against the model simulations, we were able to demonstrate that the accuracy of FARMS was comparable to the two-stream approach. However, FARMS is much more efficient since it does not explicitly solve the radiative transfer equation for each individual cloud condition. We further explored the use of FARMS to promote solar resource assessment and forecasting research through the increased ability to accommodate higher spatial and temporal resolution calculations for the next generation of satellite and numerical weather prediction (NWP) models.

  14. A study of electric dipole radiation via scattering of polarized laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Natthi L.; Behringer, Ernest R.; Crombez, Rene C.

    2003-12-01

    We have developed an advanced undergraduate experiment to explore electric dipole radiation in the optical frequency domain. A polarized laser beam is used to illuminate an aqueous suspension of skim milk, and the light scattered from the suspension is measured in the plane perpendicular to the laser beam as a function of the angle θ with respect to the polarization direction and as a function of the perpendicular distance R from the laser beam. When the length of the scattering region, d, is much smaller than R, the measurements agree very well with the sin2 θ/R2 dependence of electric dipole radiation. Increasing the scatterer concentration increases the background of multiply scattered light and decreases the degree of polarization of the scattered light with no appreciable change in the observed sin2 θ/R2 dependence. We discuss variations of the experiment for different instructional needs and describe how an understanding of dipole radiation helps students to appreciate a number of optical phenomena.

  15. SRTC++: a New Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer Model for Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Jason W.; MacKenzie, Shannon; Young, Eliot F.

    2016-10-01

    Titan's vertically extended and highly scattering atmosphere poses a challenge to interpreting near-infrared observations of its surface. Not only does Titan's extended atmosphere often require accommodation of its spherical geometry, it is also difficult to separate surface albedos from scattering or absorption within low-altitude atmospheric layers. One way to disentangle the surface and atmosphere is to combine observations in which terrain on Titan is imaged from a range of viewing geometries. To address this type of problem, we have developed a new algorithm, Spherical Radiative Transfer in C++ or SRTC++.This code is written from scratch in fast C++ and designed from the ground up to run efficiently in parallel. We see SRTC++ as complementary to existing plane-parallel codes, not in competition with them as the first problems that we seek to address will be spatial in nature. For example, we will be able to investigate spatial resolution limits in the various spectral windows, discrimination of vertical atmospheric layers, the adjacency effect, and indirect illumination past Titan's terminator.

  16. History of one family of atmospheric radiative transfer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Gail P.; Wang, Jinxue; Hoke, Michael L.; Kneizys, F. X.; Chetwynd, James H., Jr.; Rothman, Laurence S.; Kimball, L. M.; McClatchey, Robert A.; Shettle, Eric P.; Clough, Shepard (.; Gallery, William O.; Abreu, Leonard W.; Selby, John E. A.

    1994-12-01

    Beginning in the early 1970's, the then Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory initiated a program to develop computer-based atmospheric radiative transfer algorithms. The first attempts were translations of graphical procedures described in a 1970 report on The Optical Properties of the Atmosphere, based on empirical transmission functions and effective absorption coefficients derived primarily from controlled laboratory transmittance measurements. The fact that spectrally-averaged atmospheric transmittance (T) does not obey the Beer-Lambert Law (T equals exp(-(sigma) (DOT)(eta) ), where (sigma) is a species absorption cross section, independent of (eta) , the species column amount along the path) at any but the finest spectral resolution was already well known. Band models to describe this gross behavior were developed in the 1950's and 60's. Thus began LOWTRAN, the Low Resolution Transmittance Code, first released in 1972. This limited initial effort has how progressed to a set of codes and related algorithms (including line-of-sight spectral geometry, direct and scattered radiance and irradiance, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, etc.) that contain thousands of coding lines, hundreds of subroutines, and improved accuracy, efficiency, and, ultimately, accessibility. This review will include LOWTRAN, HITRAN (atlas of high-resolution molecular spectroscopic data), FASCODE (Fast Atmospheric Signature Code), and MODTRAN (Moderate Resolution Transmittance Code), their permutations, validations, and applications, particularly as related to passive remote sensing and energy deposition.

  17. Verification of snowpack radiation transfer models using actinometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Gavin J.; Simpson, William R.

    2005-04-01

    Actinometric measurements of photolysis rate coefficients within artificial snow have been used to test calculations of these coefficients by two radiative transfer models. The models used were based upon the delta-Eddington method or the discrete ordinate method, as implemented in the tropospheric ultraviolet and visible snow model, and were constrained by irradiance measurements and light attenuation profiles within the artificial snow. Actinometric measurements of the photolysis rate coefficient were made by observing the unimolecular conversion of 2-nitrobenzaldehyde (NBA) to its photoproduct under ultraviolet irradiation. A control experiment using liquid solutions of NBA determined that the quantum yield for conversion was ϕ = 0.41 ± 0.04 (±2σ). Measured photolysis rate coefficients in the artificial snow are enhanced in the near-surface layer, as predicted in the model calculations. The two models yielded essentially identical results for the depth-integrated photolysis rate coefficient of NBA, and their results quantitatively agreed with the actinometric measurements within the experimental precision of the measurement (±10%, ±2σ). The study shows that these models accurately determine snowpack actinic fluxes. To calculate in-snow photolysis rates for a molecule of interest, one must also have knowledge of the absorption spectrum and quantum yield for the specific photoprocess in addition to the actinic flux. Having demonstrated that the actinic flux is well determined by these models, we find that the major remaining uncertainty in prediction of snowpack photochemical rates is the measurement of these molecular photophysical properties.

  18. Algorithmic vs. finite difference Jacobians for infrared atmospheric radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Vasquez, Mayte; Xu, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Jacobians, i.e. partial derivatives of the radiance and transmission spectrum with respect to the atmospheric state parameters to be retrieved from remote sensing observations, are important for the iterative solution of the nonlinear inverse problem. Finite difference Jacobians are easy to implement, but computationally expensive and possibly of dubious quality; on the other hand, analytical Jacobians are accurate and efficient, but the implementation can be quite demanding. GARLIC, our "Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Infrared Code", utilizes algorithmic differentiation (AD) techniques to implement derivatives w.r.t. atmospheric temperature and molecular concentrations. In this paper, we describe our approach for differentiation of the high resolution infrared and microwave spectra and provide an in-depth assessment of finite difference approximations using "exact" AD Jacobians as a reference. The results indicate that the "standard" two-point finite differences with 1 K and 1% perturbation for temperature and volume mixing ratio, respectively, can exhibit substantial errors, and central differences are significantly better. However, these deviations do not transfer into the truncated singular value decomposition solution of a least squares problem. Nevertheless, AD Jacobians are clearly recommended because of the superior speed and accuracy.

  19. Test plan for validation of the radiative transfer equation.

    SciTech Connect

    Ricks, Allen Joseph; Grasser, Thomas W.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Jernigan, Dann A.; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2010-09-01

    As the capabilities of numerical simulations increase, decision makers are increasingly relying upon simulations rather than experiments to assess risks across a wide variety of accident scenarios including fires. There are still, however, many aspects of fires that are either not well understood or are difficult to treat from first principles due to the computational expense. For a simulation to be truly predictive and to provide decision makers with information which can be reliably used for risk assessment the remaining physical processes must be studied and suitable models developed for the effects of the physics. A set of experiments are outlined in this report which will provide soot volume fraction/temperature data and heat flux (intensity) data for the validation of models for the radiative transfer equation. In addition, a complete set of boundary condition measurements will be taken to allow full fire predictions for validation of the entire fire model. The experiments will be performed with a lightly-sooting liquid hydrocarbon fuel fire in the fully turbulent scale range (2 m diameter).

  20. Modeling Planet-Building Stellar Disks with Radiative Transfer Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swearingen, Jeremy R.; Sitko, Michael L.; Whitney, Barbara; Grady, Carol A.; Wagner, Kevin Robert; Champney, Elizabeth H.; Johnson, Alexa N.; Warren, Chelsea C.; Russell, Ray W.; Hammel, Heidi B.; Lisse, Casey M.; Cure, Michel; Kraus, Stefan; Fukagawa, Misato; Calvet, Nuria; Espaillat, Catherine; Monnier, John D.; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Wilner, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the nature of the many planetary systems found outside of our own solar system cannot be completed without knowledge of the beginnings these systems. By detecting planets in very young systems and modeling the disks of material around stars from which they form, we can gain a better understanding of planetary origin and evolution. The efforts presented here have been in modeling two pre-transitional disk systems using a radiative transfer code. With the first of these systems, V1247 Ori, a model that fits the spectral energy distribution (SED) well and whose parameters are consistent with existing interferometry data (Kraus et al 2013) has been achieved. The second of these two systems, SAO 206462, has presented a different set of challenges but encouraging SED agreement between the model and known data gives hope that the model can produce images that can be used in future interferometry work. This work was supported by NASA ADAP grant NNX09AC73G, and the IR&D program at The Aerospace Corporation.

  1. Nonlinear Vacuum Polarization In Intense Blackbody Radiation And The Generation Of Cherenkov Radiation By Energetic Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sheldon S. Q.; Hartemann, F. V.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2010-03-01

    A study of thermally-induced vacuum polarization stemming from the Euler-Heisenberg nonlinear radiation correction to Maxwell equations is conducted. While nonlinear effects associated with photon-photon scattering in the photon gas had been previously calculated, we present an analysis in the framework of stochastic electrodynamics. To lowest order of approximation, it is shown that the phase velocity of light is reduced in the presence of intense ambient electromagnetic radiation. Therefore Cherenkov radiation can be generated when charged particles traverse a region of intense blackbody radiation. Suitable conditions may be found in astrophysical environments. Cosmic ray electrons and positrons in the GeV to TeV range meet the energy requirement for this process to occur. We present calculations of the emission characteristics and conditions under which Cherenkov radiation may be observed. This effect combined with synchrotron and inverse Compton processes may lead to a more complete understanding of cosmic ray propagation. Also of interest, the question of the linearity of the relic cosmic microwave background is under investigation using this formalism and will be discussed. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Numerical model for combined conductive and radiative heat transfer in annular packed beds

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiuto, K.; Saito, S.; Ito, K. . Dept. of Production Systems Engineering)

    1993-06-01

    A numerical model is developed for quantitatively analyzing combined conductive and radiative heat transfer in concentric annular packed beds. A packed bed is considered to be a continuous medium for heat transfer, but the porosity distribution within a packed bed is taken into account. To examine the validity of the proposed model, combined conductive and radiative heat transfer through annular packed beds of cordierite or porcelain beads is analyzed numerically using finite differences under conditions corresponding to heat transfer experiments of these packed beds. The resultant temperature profiles and heat transfer characteristics are compared with the experimental results.

  3. Radiative heat transfer in anisotropic many-body systems: Tuning and enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Nikbakht, Moladad

    2014-09-07

    A general formalism for calculating the radiative heat transfer in many body systems with anisotropic component is presented. Our scheme extends the theory of radiative heat transfer in isotropic many body systems to anisotropic cases. In addition, the radiative heating of the particles by the thermal bath is taken into account in our formula. It is shown that the radiative heat exchange (HE) between anisotropic particles and their radiative cooling/heating (RCH) could be enhanced several order of magnitude than that of isotropic particles. Furthermore, we demonstrate that both the HE and RCH can be tuned dramatically by particles relative orientation in many body systems.

  4. Numerical Investigation of Radiative Heat Transfer in Laser Induced Air Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J.; Chen, Y. S.; Wang, T. S.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Radiative heat transfer is one of the most important phenomena in the laser induced plasmas. This study is intended to develop accurate and efficient methods for predicting laser radiation absorption and plasma radiative heat transfer, and investigate the plasma radiation effects in laser propelled vehicles. To model laser radiation absorption, a ray tracing method along with the Beer's law is adopted. To solve the radiative transfer equation in the air plasmas, the discrete transfer method (DTM) is selected and explained. The air plasma radiative properties are predicted by the LORAN code. To validate the present nonequilibrium radiation model, several benchmark problems are examined and the present results are found to match the available solutions. To investigate the effects of plasma radiation in laser propelled vehicles, the present radiation code is coupled into a plasma aerodynamics code and a selected problem is considered. Comparisons of results at different cases show that plasma radiation plays a role of cooling plasma and it lowers the plasma temperature by about 10%. This change in temperature also results in a reduction of the coupling coefficient by about 10-20%. The present study indicates that plasma radiation modeling is very important for accurate modeling of aerodynamics in a laser propelled vehicle.

  5. Parameterization and Analysis of 3-D Solar Radiative Transfer in Clouds: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Y. Harrington

    2012-09-21

    This document reports on the research that we have done over the course of our two-year project. The report also covers the research done on this project during a 1 year no-cost extension of the grant. Our work has had two main, inter-related thrusts: The first thrust was to characterize the response of stratocumulus cloud structure and dynamics to systematic changes in cloud infrared radiative cooling and solar heating using one-dimensional radiative transfer models. The second was to couple a three-dimensional (3-D) solar radiative transfer model to the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model that we use to simulate stratocumulus. The purpose of the studies with 3-D radiative transfer was to examine the possible influences of 3-D photon transport on the structure, evolution, and radiative properties of stratocumulus. While 3-D radiative transport has been examined in static cloud environments, few studies have attempted to examine whether the 3-D nature of radiative absorption and emission influence the structure and evolution of stratocumulus. We undertook this dual approach because only a small number of LES simulations with the 3-D radiative transfer model are possible due to the high computational costs. Consequently, LES simulations with a 1-D radiative transfer solver were used in order to examine the portions of stratocumulus parameter space that may be most sensitive to perturbations in the radiative fields. The goal was then to explore these sensitive regions with LES using full 3-D radiative transfer. Our overall goal was to discover whether 3-D radiative processes alter cloud structure and evolution, and whether this may have any indirect implications for cloud radiative properties. In addition, we collaborated with Dr. Tamas Varni, providing model output fields for his attempt at parameterizing 3-D radiative effects for cloud models.

  6. Study of the proton structure by measurements of polarization transfers in real Compton scattering at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Cristiano Fanelli; Cisbani, Evarostp; Hamilton, David; Salme, G.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-03-01

    A preliminary analysis of polarization-transfer data at large scattering angle (70°), obtained in an experiment of real Compton scattering on proton, performed in Hall-C of Jefferson Lab, is presented. It is also discussed the relevance of this kind of experiments for shedding light on the non-perturbative structure of the proton, at low energy, and on the transition from the non-perturbative regime to the perturbative one, that occurs at high energy. Moreover, the possibility to extract Compton form factors and the Generalized Parton Distributions, one of the most promising theoretical tool to determine the total angular momentum contribution of quarks and gluons to nucleon spin, is emphasized.

  7. Search for effects beyond the Born approximation in polarization transfer observables in $\\vec{e}p$ elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, M; Brash, E J; Jones, M K; Luo, W; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Puckett, A J.R.; Punjabi, V; Wesselmann, F R; Ahmidouch, A; Albayrak, I; Aniol, K A; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, A; Ates, O; Baghdasaryan, H; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bimbot, L; Bosted, P; Boeglin, W; Butuceanu, C; Carter, P; Chernenko, S; Christy, E; Commisso, M; Cornejo, J C; Covrig, S; Danagoulian, S; Daniel, A; Davidenko, A; Day, D; Dhamija, S; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Frullani, S; Fenker, H; Frlez, E; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Goncharenko, Y; Hafidi, K; Hamilton, D; Higinbothan, D W; Hinton, W; Horn, T; Hu, B; Huang, J; Huber, G M; Jensen, E; Kang, H; Keppel, C; Khandaker, M; King, P; Kirillov, D; Kohl, M; Kravtsov, V; Kumbartzki, G; Li, Y; Mamyan, V; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marsh, A; Matulenko, Y; Maxwell, J; Mbianda, G; Meekins, D; Melnick, Y; Miller, J; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Moffit, B; Moreno, O; Mulholland, J; Narayan, A; Nuruzzaman,; Nedev, S; Piasetzky, E; Pierce, W; Piskunov, N M; Prok, Y; Ransome, R D; Razin, D S; Reimer, P E; Reinhold, J; Rondon, O; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Shestermanov, K; Sirca, S; Sitnik, I; Smykov, L; Smith, G; Solovyev, L; Solvignon, P; Subedi, R; Suleiman, R; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Vasiliev, A; Vanderhaeghen, M; Veilleux, M; Wojtsekhowski, B B; Wood, S; Ye, Z; Zanevsky, Y; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2011-04-01

    Intensive theoretical and experimental efforts over the past decade have aimed at explaining the discrepancy between data for the proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio, $G_{E}/G_{M}$, obtained separately from cross section and polarization transfer measurements. One possible explanation for this difference is a two-photon-exchange (TPEX) contribution. In an effort to search for effects beyond the one-photon-exchange or Born approximation, we report measurements of polarization transfer observables in the elastic $H(\\vec{e},e'\\vec{p})$ reaction for three different beam energies at a fixed squared momentum transfer $Q^2 = 2.5$ GeV$^2$, spanning a wide range of the virtual photon polarization parameter, $\\epsilon$. From these measured polarization observables, we have obtained separately the ratio $R$, which equals $\\mu_p G_{E}/G_{M}$ in the Born approximation, and the longitudinal polarization transfer component $P_\\ell$, with statistical and systematic uncertainties of $\\Delta R \\approx \\pm 0.01 \\mbox{(stat)} \\pm 0.013 \\mbox{(syst)}$ and $\\Delta P_\\ell/P^{Born}_{\\ell} \\approx \\pm 0.006 \\mbox{(stat)}\\pm 0.01 \\mbox{(syst)}$. The ratio $R$ is found to be independent of $\\epsilon$ at the 1.5% level, while the $\\epsilon$ dependence of $P_\\ell$ shows an enhancement of $(2.3 \\pm 0.6) %$ relative to the Born approximation at large $\\epsilon$.

  8. Microwave radiation force and torque on a disk resonator excited by a circularly polarized plane wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, S.; Kulkarni, S.

    2004-05-01

    A numerical simulation method [S. Makarov and S. Kulkarni, Appl. Phys. Lett. 84, 1600 (2004)] is used in order to determine the radiation force and radiation torque on a parallel-plate disk resonator, whose size is comparable to wavelength. The method is based on the MOM solution of the electric-field integral equation, accurate calculation of the near field, and removal of the self-interaction terms responsible for the pinch effect. The local force/torque distribution at the normal incidence of a circularly polarized plane wave is found. It is observed that, at the resonance, the individual disks are subject to unexpectedly large local force densities, despite the fact that the net radiation force on the resonator remains very small. On the other hand, the total axial torque on the disk resonator also increases at the resonance.

  9. Anisotropy and polarization of the microwave background radiation as a test of nonequilibrium ionization of the pregalactic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nasel'skii, P.D.; Polnarev, A.G.

    1987-11-01

    The formation of small-scale anisotropy and polarization in a model of nonstationary ionization of the pregalactic plasma is considered. It is shown that the ratio of the degree of polarization to the degree of anisotropy is rather insensitive to the actual regime of ionization and is 7-8%. However, the characteristic correlation angle is in the distribution of the anisotropy and polarization of the background radiation on the celestial sphere depends strongly on the parameters of the nonequilibrium.

  10. HELIOS: A new open-source radiative transfer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Matej; Grosheintz, Luc; Lukas Grimm, Simon; Mendonça, João; Kitzmann, Daniel; Heng, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    I present the new open-source code HELIOS, developed to accurately describe radiative transfer in a wide variety of irradiated atmospheres. We employ a one-dimensional multi-wavelength two-stream approach with scattering. Written in Cuda C++, HELIOS uses the GPU’s potential of massive parallelization and is able to compute the TP-profile of an atmosphere in radiative equilibrium and the subsequent emission spectrum in a few minutes on a single computer (for 60 layers and 1000 wavelength bins).The required molecular opacities are obtained with the recently published code HELIOS-K [1], which calculates the line shapes from an input line list and resamples the numerous line-by-line data into a manageable k-distribution format. Based on simple equilibrium chemistry theory [2] we combine the k-distribution functions of the molecules H2O, CO2, CO & CH4 to generate a k-table, which we then employ in HELIOS.I present our results of the following: (i) Various numerical tests, e.g. isothermal vs. non-isothermal treatment of layers. (ii) Comparison of iteratively determined TP-profiles with their analytical parametric prescriptions [3] and of the corresponding spectra. (iii) Benchmarks of TP-profiles & spectra for various elemental abundances. (iv) Benchmarks of averaged TP-profiles & spectra for the exoplanets GJ1214b, HD189733b & HD209458b. (v) Comparison with secondary eclipse data for HD189733b, XO-1b & Corot-2b.HELIOS is being developed, together with the dynamical core THOR and the chemistry solver VULCAN, in the group of Kevin Heng at the University of Bern as part of the Exoclimes Simulation Platform (ESP) [4], which is an open-source project aimed to provide community tools to model exoplanetary atmospheres.-----------------------------[1] Grimm & Heng 2015, ArXiv, 1503.03806[2] Heng, Lyons & Tsai, Arxiv, 1506.05501Heng & Lyons, ArXiv, 1507.01944[3] e.g. Heng, Mendonca & Lee, 2014, ApJS, 215, 4H[4] exoclime.net

  11. First Measurement of Transferred Polarization in the Exclusive e p --> e' K+ Lambda Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel S. Carman; Et. Al.

    2003-04-04

    The first measurements of the transferred polarization for the exclusive {rvec e}p {yields} e{prime}K{sup +}{rvec {Lambda}} reaction have been performed in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility using the CLAS spectrometer. A 2.567 GeV electron beam was used to measure the hyperon polarization over a range of Q{sup 2} from 0.3 to 1.5 (GeV/c){sup 2}, W from 1.6 to 2.15 GeV, and over the full center-of-mass angular range of the K{sup +} meson. Comparison with predictions of hadrodynamic models indicates strong sensitivity to the underlying resonance contributions. A non-relativistic quark model interpretation of our data suggests that the s{bar s} quark pair is produced with spins predominantly anti-aligned. Implications for the validity of the widely used {sup 3}P{sub o} quark-pair creation operator are discussed.

  12. A high-order photon Monte Carlo method for radiative transfer in direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Modest, M.F.; Haworth, D.C. . E-mail: dch12@psu.edu

    2007-05-01

    A high-order photon Monte Carlo method is developed to solve the radiative transfer equation. The statistical and discretization errors of the computed radiative heat flux and radiation source term are isolated and quantified. Up to sixth-order spatial accuracy is demonstrated for the radiative heat flux, and up to fourth-order accuracy for the radiation source term. This demonstrates the compatibility of the method with high-fidelity direct numerical simulation (DNS) for chemically reacting flows. The method is applied to address radiative heat transfer in a one-dimensional laminar premixed flame and a statistically one-dimensional turbulent premixed flame. Modifications of the flame structure with radiation are noted in both cases, and the effects of turbulence/radiation interactions on the local reaction zone structure are revealed for the turbulent flame. Computational issues in using a photon Monte Carlo method for DNS of turbulent reacting flows are discussed.

  13. Modeling photosynthesis of discontinuous plant canopies by linking Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer model with biochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Q.; Gong, P.; Li, W.

    2015-02-01

    Modeling vegetation photosynthesis is essential for understanding carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The radiative transfer process within plant canopies is one of the key drivers that regulate canopy photosynthesis. Most vegetation cover consists of discrete plant crowns, of which the physical observation departs from the underlying assumption of a homogenous and uniform medium in classic radiative transfer theory. Here we advance the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer (GORT) model to simulate photosynthesis activities for discontinuous plant canopies. We separate radiation absorption into two components that are absorbed by sunlit and shaded leaves, and derive analytical solutions by integrating over the canopy layer. To model leaf-level and canopy-level photosynthesis, leaf light absorption is then linked to the biochemical process of gas diffusion through leaf stomata. The canopy gap probability derived from GORT differs from classic radiative transfer theory, especially when the leaf area index is high, due to leaf clumping effects. Tree characteristics such as tree density, crown shape, and canopy length affect leaf clumping and regulate radiation interception. Modeled gross primary production (GPP) for two deciduous forest stands could explain more than 80% of the variance of flux tower measurements at both near hourly and daily time scales. We also demonstrate that the ambient CO2 concentration influences daytime vegetation photosynthesis, which needs to be considered in state-of-the-art biogeochemical models. The proposed model is complementary to classic radiative transfer theory and shows promise in modeling the radiative transfer process and photosynthetic activities over discontinuous forest canopies.

  14. ULTRAVIOLET RADIATIVE TRANSFER MODELING OF NEARBY GALAXIES WITH EXTRAPLANAR DUSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, Jong-Ho; Seon, Kwang-Il

    2015-12-20

    In order to examine their relation to the host galaxy, the extraplanar dusts of six nearby galaxies are modeled, employing a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. The targets are from the highly inclined galaxies that show dust-scattered ultraviolet halos, and the archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer FUV band images were fitted with the model. The observed images are generally well-reproduced by two dust layers and one light source layer, whose vertical and radial distributions have exponential profiles. We obtained several important physical parameters, such as star formation rate (SFR{sub UV}), face-on optical depth, and scale-heights. Three galaxies (NGC 891, NGC 3628, and UGC 11794) show clear evidence for the existence of an extraplanar dust layer. However, it is found that the remaining three targets (IC 5249, NGC 24, and NGC 4173) do not necessarily need a thick dust disk to model the ultraviolet (UV) halo, because its contribution is too small and the UV halo may be caused by the wing part of the GALEX point spread function. This indicates that the galaxy samples reported to have UV halos may be contaminated by galaxies with negligible extraplanar (halo) dust. The galaxies showing evidence of an extraplanar dust layer fall within a narrow range on the scatter plots between physical parameters such as SFR{sub UV} and extraplanar dust mass. Several mechanisms that could possibly produce the extraplanar dust are discussed. We also found a hint that the extraplanar dust scale-height might not be much different from the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission characteristic height.

  15. Testing quasar unification: radiative transfer in clumpy winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, J. H.; Knigge, C.; Long, K. S.; Sim, S. A.; Higginbottom, N.; Mangham, S. W.

    2016-05-01

    Various unification schemes interpret the complex phenomenology of quasars and luminous active galactic nuclei (AGN) in terms of a simple picture involving a central black hole, an accretion disc and an associated outflow. Here, we continue our tests of this paradigm by comparing quasar spectra to synthetic spectra of biconical disc wind models, produced with our state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. Previously, we have shown that we could produce synthetic spectra resembling those of observed broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, but only if the X-ray luminosity was limited to 1043 erg s-1. Here, we introduce a simple treatment of clumping, and find that a filling factor of ˜0.01 moderates the ionization state sufficiently for BAL features to form in the rest-frame UV at more realistic X-ray luminosities. Our fiducial model shows good agreement with AGN X-ray properties and the wind produces strong line emission in, e.g., Lyα and C IV 1550 Å at low inclinations. At high inclinations, the spectra possess prominent LoBAL features. Despite these successes, we cannot reproduce all emission lines seen in quasar spectra with the correct equivalent-width ratios, and we find an angular dependence of emission line equivalent width despite the similarities in the observed emission line properties of BAL and non-BAL quasars. Overall, our work suggests that biconical winds can reproduce much of the qualitative behaviour expected from a unified model, but we cannot yet provide quantitative matches with quasar properties at all viewing angles. Whether disc winds can successfully unify quasars is therefore still an open question.

  16. Ultraviolet Radiative Transfer Modeling of Nearby Galaxies with Extraplanar Dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, Jong-Ho; Seon, Kwang-Il

    2015-12-01

    In order to examine their relation to the host galaxy, the extraplanar dusts of six nearby galaxies are modeled, employing a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. The targets are from the highly inclined galaxies that show dust-scattered ultraviolet halos, and the archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer FUV band images were fitted with the model. The observed images are generally well-reproduced by two dust layers and one light source layer, whose vertical and radial distributions have exponential profiles. We obtained several important physical parameters, such as star formation rate (SFRUV), face-on optical depth, and scale-heights. Three galaxies (NGC 891, NGC 3628, and UGC 11794) show clear evidence for the existence of an extraplanar dust layer. However, it is found that the remaining three targets (IC 5249, NGC 24, and NGC 4173) do not necessarily need a thick dust disk to model the ultraviolet (UV) halo, because its contribution is too small and the UV halo may be caused by the wing part of the GALEX point spread function. This indicates that the galaxy samples reported to have UV halos may be contaminated by galaxies with negligible extraplanar (halo) dust. The galaxies showing evidence of an extraplanar dust layer fall within a narrow range on the scatter plots between physical parameters such as SFRUV and extraplanar dust mass. Several mechanisms that could possibly produce the extraplanar dust are discussed. We also found a hint that the extraplanar dust scale-height might not be much different from the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission characteristic height.

  17. Magnetic field and radiative transfer modelling of a quiescent prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, S.; Schwartz, P.; Dudík, J.; Schmieder, B.; Heinzel, P.; Jurčák, J.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to analyse the multi-instrument observations of the June 22, 2010 prominence to study its structure in detail, including the prominence-corona transition region and the dark bubble located below the prominence body. Methods: We combined results of the 3D magnetic field modelling with 2D prominence fine structure radiative transfer models to fully exploit the available observations. Results: The 3D linear force-free field model with the unsheared bipole reproduces the morphology of the analysed prominence reasonably well, thus providing useful information about its magnetic field configuration and the location of the magnetic dips. The 2D models of the prominence fine structures provide a good representation of the local plasma configuration in the region dominated by the quasi-vertical threads. However, the low observed Lyman-α central intensities and the morphology of the analysed prominence suggest that its upper central part is not directly illuminated from the solar surface. Conclusions: This multi-disciplinary prominence study allows us to argue that a large part of the prominence-corona transition region plasma can be located inside the magnetic dips in small-scale features that surround the cool prominence material located in the dip centre. We also argue that the dark prominence bubbles can be formed because of perturbations of the prominence magnetic field by parasitic bipoles, causing them to be devoid of the magnetic dips. Magnetic dips, however, form thin layers that surround these bubbles, which might explain the occurrence of the cool prominence material in the lines of sight intersecting the prominence bubbles. Movie and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Modeling multi-layer effects in passive microwave remote sensing of dry snow using Dense Media Radiative Transfer Theory (DMRT) based on quasicrystalline approximation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liang, D.; Xu, X.; Tsang, L.; Andreadis, K.M.; Josberger, E.G.

    2008-01-01

    The Dense Media Radiative Transfer theory (DMRT) of Quasicrystalline Approximation of Mie scattering by sticky particles is used to study the multiple scattering effects in layered snow in microwave remote sensing. Results are illustrated for various snow profile characteristics. Polarization differences and frequency dependences of multilayer snow model are significantly different from that of the single-layer snow model. Comparisons are also made with CLPX data using snow parameters as given by the VIC model. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  19. Minimum radiative heat transfer between two metallic half-spaces due to propagating waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanaswamy, A.; Mayo, J.

    2016-11-01

    The gap dependence of radiative energy transfer due to propagating waves between two identical metallic half-spaces separated by vacuum is investigated. The dielectric function of the metallic half-spaces is described by the Drude model. Analytical expressions for the minimum radiative heat transfer coefficient, hmin, and the gap, dmin, at which the minimum value of radiative transfer is attained are determined in terms of the parameters of the dielectric function and the absolute temperature T. We show that hmin ∝T2 in the high temperature limit and hmin ∝T 7 / 2 in the low temperature limit.

  20. Mathematical modeling of sulfide flash smelting process. Part 2; Quantitative analysis of radiative heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Y.B. ); Sohn, H.Y. )

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports on a mathematical model developed to describe the rate processes in an axisymmetric copper flash smelting furnace shaft. A particular feature of the model is the incorporation of the four-flux model to describe the radiative heat transfer by combining the absorbing, emitting, and anisotropic scattering phenomena. The importance of various subprocesses of the radiative heat transfer in a flash smelting furnace has been studied. Model predictions showed that the radiation from the furnace walls and between the particles and the surrounding is the dominant mode of heat transfer in a flash smelting furnace.

  1. Cloud Radiative Effect by Cloud Types Based on Radiative Transfer Model Calculations and Collocated A-Train Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Q.; Fetzer, E. J.; Schreier, M. M.; Kahn, B. H.; Huang, X.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud radiative effect is sensitive to both cloud types and the atmospheric conditions that are correspondent with the clouds. It is important to separate the radiative effects due to the microphysical and radiative properties of clouds and the impact of clouds on clear atmosphere radiation. To better quantify these components of cloud radiative effects, we construct a data record of water vapor, temperature, TOA shortwave and long-wave radiations, and cloud properties from collocated A-Train satellite observations and NASA MERRA reanalysis, stratified according to cloud types determined by MODIS observations. The sensitivity of cloud radiative effects on the properties of cloud is investigated in this study using the observation data. The cloud masking effect is quantified for different cloud types using the Fu and Liou radiative transfer model and the observed cloudy and clear atmospheric conditions. The sampling biases of the satellite observed temperature and water vapor vertical distributions are quantified based on comparisons between satellite observations and reanalysis, and then incorporated into the radiative transfer calculations to study the impact of these observational biases on cloud radiative effect estimation from the temperature and water vapor profiles obtained from satellite.

  2. Radiance, polarization, and ellipticity of the radiation in the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hitzfelder, S. J.; Plass, G. N.; Kattawar, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    The complete radiation field including polarization is calculated for a model of the real atmosphere by the matrix operator method. The radiance, direction and amount of polarization, and ellipticity are obtained at the top and bottom of the atmosphere for three values of the surface albedo (0; 0.15 0.90) and five solar zenith angles. Scattering and absorption by molecules (including ozone) and by aerosols are taken into account together with the variation of the number density of these substances with height. All results are calculated for both a normal aerosol number and a distribution which is one-third of the normal amount at all heights. The calculated values show general qualitative agreement with the available experimental measurements. The position of the neutral points of the polarization in the principal plane is a sensitive indicator of the characteristics of the aerosol particles in the atmosphere, since it depends on the sign and value of the single scattered polarization for scattering angles around 20 deg and 160 deg for transmitted and reflected photons respectively.

  3. Multiple acquisitions via sequential transfer of orphan spin polarization (MAeSTOSO): How far can we push residual spin polarization in solid-state NMR?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, T.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2016-06-01

    Conventional multidimensional magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (ssNMR) experiments detect the signal arising from the decay of a single coherence transfer pathway (FID), resulting in one spectrum per acquisition time. Recently, we introduced two new strategies, namely DUMAS (DUal acquisition Magic Angle Spinning) and MEIOSIS (Multiple ExperIments via Orphan SpIn operatorS), that enable the simultaneous acquisitions of multidimensional ssNMR experiments using multiple coherence transfer pathways. Here, we combined the main elements of DUMAS and MEIOSIS to harness both orphan spin operators and residual polarization and increase the number of simultaneous acquisitions. We show that it is possible to acquire up to eight two-dimensional experiments using four acquisition periods per each scan. This new suite of pulse sequences, called MAeSTOSO for Multiple Acquisitions via Sequential Transfer of Orphan Spin pOlarization, relies on residual polarization of both 13C and 15N pathways and combines low- and high-sensitivity experiments into a single pulse sequence using one receiver and commercial ssNMR probes. The acquisition of multiple experiments does not affect the sensitivity of the main experiment; rather it recovers the lost coherences that are discarded, resulting in a significant gain in experimental time. Both merits and limitations of this approach are discussed.

  4. Solvent polarity effect on photoinduced electron transfer between C{sub 60} and tetramethylbenzidine studied by laser flash photolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Watanabe, Akira; Sasaki, Yoshiko

    1995-06-15

    The photoinduced electron transfer between C{sub 60} and N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetramethylbenzidine (NTMB) in polar and nonpolar solvents and their mixtures has been investigated by nanosecond laser flash photolysis/transient absorption spectroscopy in the visible and near-IR regions. The transient absorption bands of the C{sub 60} triplet state ({sup T}C{sub 60}*) and the NTMB radical cation were observed in both nonpolar and polar solvents. In polar solvents such as benzonitrile, the reaction rate constants were determined from the decay of {sup T}C{sub 60}* at 740 nm, which were consistent with the rate constants evaluated from the growth of the NTMB radical cation, suggesting that direct electron transfer occurs from ground-state NTMB to {sup T}C{sub 60}*. In nonpolar solvents such as benzene, the NTMB radical cation and C{sub 60} radical anion were produced immediately after the nanosecond laser pulse, simultaneous with the formation of {sup T}C{sub 60}*, indicating that a different electron transfer mechanism exists in nonpolar solvents. In the solvent mixtures, two simultaneous reaction routes are present for both forward and back electron transfer reactions. Pronounced solvent effects found for electron transfer reaction kinetics and rates are characteristic of the photoinduced electron transfer reactions between C{sub 60} and some kinds of aromatic amines. 25 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Nonlinear polarization response of a gaseous medium in the regime of atom stabilization in a strong radiation field

    SciTech Connect

    Volkova, E. A.; Popov, A. M. Tikhonova, O. V.

    2013-03-15

    The nonlinear polarization response of a quantum system modeling a silver atom in the field of high-intensity radiation in the IR and UV spectral ranges has been studied by direct numerical integration of a nonstationary Schroedinger equation. The domains of applicability of perturbation theory and polarization expansion in powers of the field intensity are determined. The contribution of excited atoms and electrons in a continuum to the atomic polarization response at the field frequency, which arises due to the radiation-induced excitation and photoionization processes, is analyzed. Features of the nonlinear response to an external field under conditions of atom stabilization are considered.

  6. Direct method for solving transfer equation by expansion in spherical harmonics: Scattering in atmosphere with Lambertian lower boundary and thermal radiation transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustinov, Y. A.

    1978-01-01

    The direct method for the solution of the spherical harmonics approximation to the equation of transfer of radiation is applied to the cases of (1) scattering of the solar radiation in the atmosphere with the Lambertian boundary and (2) thermal radiation transfer.

  7. Polarization Measurements of Radiative Electron Capture Transitions in Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuning, H.; Hess, S.; Geyer, S.; Spillmann, U.; Kozhuharov, Ch.; Krings, Th.; Kumar, A.; Märtin, R.; Protic, D.; Reuschl, R.; Trassinelli, M.; Trotsenko, S.; Weber, G.; Winters, D.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2009-03-01

    A dedicated Si(Li) Compton polarimeter combining energy and time resolution with a large detection area of 64×64 mm2 and a two dimensional position resolution of 2 mm has been used for the first time to study the polarization of x-rays emitted via radiative electron capture (REC) into the K and L-shell of heavy highly charged ions. First data for the collision system 96.6 MeV/u U92+→H2 are presented. The angular distribution of the Compton scattered photons inside the detector indicates that both K- and L-REC processes lead to the emission of strongly linearly polarized light.

  8. Gravitational time delay in orthogonally polarized radiation passing by the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwit, M.

    1979-01-01

    Two parallel investigations into the degree, if any, to which orthogonally polarized rays are deflected differently on passing through the gravitational field of the sun were previously conducted. The first involved very long and intermediate length baseline radio interferometry. The second was initially based on observations of radiation transmitted by the Pioneer 6 spacecraft, on passing behind the sun in 1968. This work was extended by using Helios-A and Helios-B spacecraft. It was calculated that the differential deflection between orthogonally polarized components is less than one part in 10 to the 7th power of the total gravitational deflection, or less than about 10 to the -7th power arc sec, in total.

  9. Radiative recombination from dark excitons in nanocrystals: Activation mechanisms and polarization properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodina, Anna V.; Efros, Alexander L.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze theoretically physical mechanisms responsible for the radiative recombination of the ground optically passive ("dark") exciton (DE), which dominates in photoluminescence (PL) of colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) at low temperatures. The DE becomes optically active due to its mixing with the bright excitons caused by an external magnetic field, dangling-bond spins or by acoustic and optical phonons. These activation mechanisms mix the DE with different bright excitons and, consequently, lead to different PL polarization properties, because they are determined by dipole orientations of the bright excitons, which the DE is coupled with. We show that the PL polarization properties of prolate and oblate shape NCs are different due to different activation mechanisms responsible for the DE recombination.

  10. Emission and propagation of Saturn kilometric radiation: Magnetoionic modes, beaming pattern, and polarization state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, L.; Cecconi, B.; Zarka, P.; Canu, P.; Schippers, P.; Kurth, W. S.; Mutel, R. L.; Gurnett, D. A.; Menietti, D.; Louarn, P.

    2011-04-01

    The Cassini mission crossed the source region of the Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR) on 17 October 2008. On this occasion, the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) experiment detected both local and distant radio sources, while plasma parameters were measured in situ by the magnetometer and the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer. A goniopolarimetric inversion was applied to RPWS three-antenna electric measurements to determine the wave vector k and the complete state of polarization of detected waves. We identify broadband extraordinary (X) mode as well as narrowband ordinary (O) mode SKR at low frequencies. Within the source region, SKR is emitted just above the X mode cutoff frequency in a hot plasma, with a typical electron-to-wave energy conversion efficiency of ˜1% (2% peak). The knowledge of the k vector is then used to derive the locus of SKR sources in the kronian magnetosphere, which shows X and O components emanating from the same regions. We also compute the associated beaming angle at the source θ‧ = (k, -B) either from (1) in situ measurements or a model of the magnetic field vector (for local to distant sources) or (2) polarization measurements (for local sources). Obtained results, similar for both modes, suggest quasi-perpendicular emission for local sources, whereas the beaming pattern of distant sources appears as a hollow cone with a frequency-dependent constant aperture angle: θ‧ = 75° ± 15° below 300 kHz, decreasing at higher frequencies to reach θ‧ (1000 kHz) = 50° ± 25°. Finally, we investigate quantitatively the SKR polarization state, observed to be strongly elliptical at the source, and quasi-purely circular for sources located beyond approximately two kronian radii. We show that conditions of weak mode coupling are achieved along the raypath, under which the magnetoionic theory satisfactorily describes the evolution of the observed polarization. These results are analyzed comparatively with the auroral kilometric radiation at

  11. [Polarization selectivity of interaction of DNA molecules by the action of X-ray radiation].

    PubMed

    Semchenko, I V; Kakhomov, S A; Balmakov, A P

    2010-01-01

    The optimum form of a long helical molecule, which DNA is, has been calculated in terms of the classical electromagnetic theory. Three different methods of classical electrodynamics are used: the theory of dipole radiation of electromagnetic waves, the energetic power approach, and a helical model of molecules of chiral medium. In all three cases, an identical result for the optimum geometrical form of a long spiral molecule has been obtained. The lead angle between the tangent to the helix and the plane normal to the axis of the helix should be equal to 24.5 degrees. This condition imposes restrictions on the radius and the pitch of the helical molecule. The experimentally measured geometrical characteristics of the DNA molecule satisfy the theoretically calculated condition precisely enough. Having the optimum geometrical form, the DNA molecule is not influenced by a circularly right-handed polarized electromagnetic wave in the soft X-ray range lambda = 7-8 nm. This wave, for which the right-handed DNA molecule is "transparent", should propagate orthogonally to the helix axis and form a right-handed screw in space. The wave radiated by the right-handed DNA molecule orthogonally to helix axis in the range of lambda = 7-8 nm has, accordingly, the left-handed circular polarization. The polarization selectivity of the DNA molecule by the action of X-ray radiation is exhibited strongly enough in the wavelength range of lambda = 1-35 nm. The results obtained are valid for any distribution of electric currents in DNA, i.e., for any sequence of nitrus bases in DNA.

  12. Improving satellite-retrieved surface radiative fluxes in polar regions using a smart sampling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tricht, Kristof; Lhermitte, Stef; Gorodetskaya, Irina V.; van Lipzig, Nicole P. M.

    2016-10-01

    The surface energy budget (SEB) of polar regions is key to understanding the polar amplification of global climate change and its worldwide consequences. However, despite a growing network of ground-based automatic weather stations that measure the radiative components of the SEB, extensive areas remain where no ground-based observations are available. Satellite remote sensing has emerged as a potential solution to retrieve components of the SEB over remote areas, with radar and lidar aboard the CloudSat and CALIPSO satellites among the first to enable estimates of surface radiative long-wave (LW) and short-wave (SW) fluxes based on active cloud observations. However, due to the small swath footprints, combined with a return cycle of 16 days, questions arise as to how CloudSat and CALIPSO observations should be optimally sampled in order to retrieve representative fluxes for a given location. Here we present a smart sampling approach to retrieve downwelling surface radiative fluxes from CloudSat and CALIPSO observations for any given land-based point-of-interest (POI) in polar regions. The method comprises a spatial correction that allows the distance between the satellite footprint and the POI to be increased in order to raise the satellite sampling frequency. Sampling frequency is enhanced on average from only two unique satellite overpasses each month for limited-distance sampling < 10 km from the POI, to 35 satellite overpasses for the smart sampling approach. This reduces the root-mean-square errors on monthly mean flux estimates compared to ground-based measurements from 23 to 10 W m-2 (LW) and from 43 to 14 W m-2 (SW). The added value of the smart sampling approach is shown to be largest on finer temporal resolutions, where limited-distance sampling suffers from severely limited sampling frequencies. Finally, the methodology is illustrated for Pine Island Glacier (Antarctica) and the Greenland northern interior. Although few ground-based observations are

  13. Uncertainty of microwave radiative transfer computations in rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung Wook

    Currently, the effect of the vertical resolution on the brightness temperature (BT) has not been examined in depth. The uncertainty of the freezing level (FL) retrieved using two different satellites' data is large. Various radiative transfer (RT) codes yield different BTs in strong scattering conditions. The purposes of this research were: (1) to understand the uncertainty of the BT contributed by the vertical resolution numerically and analytically; (2) to reduce the uncertainty of the FL retrieval using new thermodynamic observations; and (3) to investigate the characteristics of four different RT codes. Firstly, a plane-parallel RT Model (RTM) of n layers in light rainfall was used for the analytical and computational derivation of the vertical resolution effect on the BT. Secondly, a new temperature profile based on observations was absorbed in the Texas A&M University (TAMU) algorithm. The Precipitation Radar (PR) and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) data were utilized for the improved FL retrieval. Thirdly, the TAMU, Eddington approximation (EDD), Discrete Ordinate, and backward Monte Carlo codes were compared under various view angles, rain rates, FLs, frequencies, and surface properties. The uncertainty of the BT decreased as the number of layers increased. The uncertainty was due to the optical thickness rather than due to relative humidity, pressure distribution, water vapor, and temperature profile. The mean TMI FL showed a good agreement with mean bright band height. A new temperature profile reduced the uncertainty of the TMI FL by about 10%. The differences of the BTs among the four different RT codes were within 1 K at the current sensor view angle over the entire dynamic rain rate range of 10-37 GHz. The differences between the TAMU and EDD solutions were less than 0.5 K for the specular surface. In conclusion, this research suggested the vertical resolution should be considered as a parameter in the forward model

  14. Directional Radiometry and Radiative Transfer: the Convoluted Path From Centuries-old Phenomenology to Physical Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    This Essay traces the centuries-long history of the phenomenological disciplines of directional radiometry and radiative transfer in turbid media, discusses their fundamental weaknesses, and outlines the convoluted process of their conversion into legitimate branches of physical optics.

  15. The lattice Boltzmann method for one-dimensional transient radiative transfer in graded index gray medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2014-04-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is extended to solve transient radiative transfer in one-dimensional slab containing absorbing and scattering media with graded index subjected to a short square laser irradiation. By using a fully implicit backward differencing scheme to discretize the transient term in the radiative transfer equation, a new type of lattice structure is devised. Firstly, for the case of the refractive index matched boundary, LBM solutions to transient radiative transfer in graded index medium are validated by comparison with results reported in the literature. Afterward, LBM is employed to investigate transient radiative transfer in graded index medium with a refractive index discontinuity at the boundaries. Effects of the graded index distributions, the optical thickness, and scattering phase function on transmittance and reflectance signals are investigated, and several interesting trends on the time-resolved signals are observed and analyzed.

  16. 3D Continuum Radiative Transfer. An adaptive grid construction algorithm based on the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niccolini, G.; Alcolea, J.

    Solving the radiative transfer problem is a common problematic to may fields in astrophysics. With the increasing angular resolution of spatial or ground-based telescopes (VLTI, HST) but also with the next decade instruments (NGST, ALMA, ...), astrophysical objects reveal and will certainly reveal complex spatial structures. Consequently, it is necessary to develop numerical tools being able to solve the radiative transfer equation in three dimensions in order to model and interpret these observations. I present a 3D radiative transfer program, using a new method for the construction of an adaptive spatial grid, based on the Monte Claro method. With the help of this tools, one can solve the continuum radiative transfer problem (e.g. a dusty medium), computes the temperature structure of the considered medium and obtain the flux of the object (SED and images).

  17. Two Experiments for Estimating Free Convection and Radiation Heat Transfer Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economides, Michael J.; Maloney, J. O.

    1978-01-01

    This article describes two simple undergraduate heat transfer experiments which may reinforce a student's understanding of free convection and radiation. Apparatus, experimental procedure, typical results, and discussion are included. (Author/BB)

  18. POMS, Polar Meteorological Satellite: A contribution for global radiation budget measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puls, J.

    1981-01-01

    A proposal for a climate research mission specialized to Earth radiation budget measurements is given. This mission requires daily global coverage established by a system of three orbiting satellites. One of them is represented by the European Space Agency satellite SEOCS that is on a drifting orbit with respect to the Sun with 57 degrees inclination. The two others are polar orbiting satellites (POMS). The mission concept is treated with reference to the payload side requirements, the choice of orbit, orbital analysis, and satellite requirements.

  19. Radiation-Pressure Acceleration of Ion Beams Driven by Circularly Polarized Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Henig, A.; Hoerlein, R.; Kiefer, D.; Jung, D.; Habs, D.; Steinke, S.; Schnuerer, M.; Sokollik, T.; Nickles, P. V.; Sandner, W.; Schreiber, J.; Hegelich, B. M.; Yan, X. Q.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Tajima, T.

    2009-12-11

    We present experimental studies on ion acceleration from ultrathin diamondlike carbon foils irradiated by ultrahigh contrast laser pulses of energy 0.7 J focused to peak intensities of 5x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. A reduction in electron heating is observed when the laser polarization is changed from linear to circular, leading to a pronounced peak in the fully ionized carbon spectrum at the optimum foil thickness of 5.3 nm. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that those C{sup 6+} ions are for the first time dominantly accelerated in a phase-stable way by the laser radiation pressure.

  20. Mapping radiation transfer through sea ice using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaus, M.; Katlein, C.

    2012-09-01

    Light (solar short-wave radiation) transmission into and through sea ice is of high importance for various processes in Polar Regions. The amount of energy transferred through the ice determines formation and melt of sea ice and finally contributes to warming of the uppermost ocean. At the same time the amount and distribution of light, as the primary source of energy, is of critical importance for sea-ice associated organisms and bio-geochemical processes. However, our current understanding of these processes and their interdisciplinary interactions is still sparse. The main reason is that the under-ice environment is difficult to access and measurements require large logistical and instrumental efforts. Particularly, it was not possible to map light conditions under sea ice over larger areas. Here we present a detailed methodical description of operating spectral radiometers on a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) in the Central Arctic under sea ice. This new measurement concept resulted in a~most comprehensive data set of spectral radiance and irradiance under and above sea ice, complemented through various additional in-situ measurements of sea-ice, snow, and surface properties. Finally, such data sets allow quantifying the spatial variability of light under sea ice, especially highlighting differences between ponded and white ice as well as different ice types.

  1. Approximate Solution Methods for Spectral Radiative Transfer in High Refractive Index Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    Some ceramic materials for high temperature applications are partially transparent for radiative transfer. The refractive indices of these materials can be substantially greater than one which influences internal radiative emission and reflections. Heat transfer behavior of single and laminated layers has been obtained in the literature by numerical solutions of the radiative transfer equations coupled with heat conduction and heating at the boundaries by convection and radiation. Two-flux and diffusion methods are investigated here to obtain approximate solutions using a simpler formulation than required for exact numerical solutions. Isotropic scattering is included. The two-flux method for a single layer yields excellent results for gray and two band spectral calculations. The diffusion method yields a good approximation for spectral behavior in laminated multiple layers if the overall optical thickness is larger than about ten. A hybrid spectral model is developed using the two-flux method in the optically thin bands, and radiative diffusion in bands that are optically thick.

  2. Multiple scattering, radiative transfer, and weak localization in discrete random media: Unified microphysical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2008-06-01

    The radiative transfer theory has been extensively used in geophysics, remote sensing, and astrophysics for more than a century, but its physical basis had remained uncertain until quite recently. This ambiguous situation has finally changed, and the theory of radiative transfer in random particulate media has become a legitimate branch of Maxwell's electromagnetics. This tutorial review is intended to provide an accessible outline of recent basic developments. It discusses elastic electromagnetic scattering by random many-particle groups and summarizes the unified microphysical approach to radiative transfer and the effect of weak localization of electromagnetic waves (otherwise known as coherent backscattering). It explains the exact meaning of such fundamental concepts as single and multiple scattering, demonstrates how the theories of radiative transfer and weak localization originate in the Maxwell equations, and exposes and corrects certain misconceptions of the traditional phenomenological approach to radiative transfer. It also discusses the challenges facing the theories of multiple scattering, radiative transfer, and weak localization in the context of geophysical applications.

  3. Adipose veno-lymphatic transfer for management of post-radiation lymphedema

    SciTech Connect

    Pho, R.W.; Bayon, P.; Tan, L.

    1989-01-01

    In a patient who had post-radiation lymphedema after excision of liposarcoma, a method is described that is called adipose veno-lymphatic transfer. The technique involves transferring adipose tissue containing lymphatic vessels that surround the long saphenous vein, from the normal, healthy leg to the irradiated leg, with the creation of an arteriovenous fistula.

  4. Prediction of radiative heat transfer using multi-flux method in space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Cho Young

    2015-10-01

    Interaction between fluid flow and thermal radiation has received considerable attention due to its numerous applications in engineering field including space applications. To analyse the radiation heat transfer in a radiating fluid, the simultaneous solution of the radiation transfer equation (RTE) and the fluid dynamics equations is required. This means that the numerical procedure used for the RTE must be computationally efficient to permit its inclusion in the other submodels, and must be compatible with the other transport equations. In this context the finite volume method (FVM) and the discrete ordinates method (DOM) are usually being incorporated to simulate radiation problems with curvilinear coordinates. In this paper these two representative methods are examined and compared, especially in terms of the directional dependence of radiation intensity due to the discrete division of a solid angle. The FVM shows more reasonable results than the DOM does, as it has less constraint on the angular discretisation.

  5. The occurrence rate, polarization character, and intensity of broadband Jovian kilometric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes the major observational features of one new component of Jupiter's radio emission spectrum, the broadband kilometer wavelength radiation, or bKOM. This study, using the Voyager Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) experiments, reveals that the overall occurrence morphology, dynamic spectra, and polarization character of bKOM are strong functions of the latitude and/or local time geometry of the observations. The postencounter data show a decline in the mean occurrence rates and power level of bKOM and, in particular, a depletion in the occurrence rate at those same longitudes where the detection rate is a maximum before encounter. Additionally, the polarization sense undergoes a permanent reversal in sign after encounter, whereas the time-averaged wave axial ratio and degree of polarization remain relatively unchanged. Finally, no evidence of any control by Io is found. The strong dependence of the morphology on local time suggests a source whose beam is nearly fixed relative to the Jupiter-sun line

  6. Influence of diffusion on photoinduced electron transfer. [laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Song, L.; Dorfman, R.C.; Swallen, S.F.; Fayer, M.D. )

    1991-05-02

    Electron transfer from an optically excited donor (rubrene) to randomly distributed acceptors (duroquinone) has been investigated experimentally. The forward electron-transfer process under the influence of diffusion in liquid solution (diethyl sebacate) is compared with that in solid solution (sucrose octaacetate). Steady-state fluorescence yield and time-resolved fluorescence measurements were used to measure the excited-state population of the donor (rubrene). The parameters were used to analyze the electron-transfer dynamics under a variety of acceptor concentrations. The agreement between theoretical predictions and experiments is very good. The forward transfer parameters (a{sub f} and R{sub 0}) in liquid solution are almost identical with those obtained in solid solution.

  7. Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation Strategy for Polar Drive at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; McKenty, P. W.; Zuegel, J. D.; Radha, P. B.; Marshall, F. J.; Seka, W.; Michel, D. T.; Hohenberger, M.

    2014-10-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) causes two-beam energy exchange via stimulated Brillouin scattering, which reduces absorbed light and implosion velocity, alters time-resolved scattered-light spectra, and redistributes absorbed light. These effects reduce target performance in symmetric direct-drive and polar-drive (PD) experiments on the OMEGA Laser System and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The CBET package (Adaawam) incorporated into the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO is an integral part of the 3-D ray-trace package (Mazinisin). The CBET exchange occurs primarily over the equatorial region in PD, where successful mitigation strategies concentrate. Detuning the initial laser wavelength (dλ0) reduces the CBET interaction volume, which can be combined with spot-shape alterations. Employing opposed +/-dλ0 in each hemisphere offers the best single CBET mitigation option. The current NIF layout can be used to test detuning by altering the NIF PD repointing strategy while maintaining adequate symmetry. Simulations (2-D DRACO) predict measurable results: shell trajectory and shape and scattered-light spectrum and distribution. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  8. Realistic NLTE Radiative Transfer for Modeling Stellar Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Philip D.

    1999-01-01

    This NASA grant supported the development of codes to solve the non-LTE multi-level spherical radiative transfer problem in the presence of velocity fields. Much of this work was done in collaboration with Graham Harper (CASA, University of Colorado). These codes were developed for application to the cool, low-velocity winds of evolved late-type stars. Particular emphasis was placed on modeling the wind of lambda Velorum (K4 lb), the brightest K supergiant in the sky, based on extensive observations of the ultraviolet spectrum with the HST/GHRS from GO program 5307. Several solution techniques were examined, including the Eddington factor Approach described in detail by Bennett & Harper (1997). An Eddington factor variant of Harper's S-MULTI code (Harper 1994) for stationary atmospheres was developed and implemented, although full convergence was not realized. The ratio of wind terminal velocity to turbulent velocity is large (approx. 0.3-0.5) in these cool star winds so this assumption of stationarity provides reasonable starting models. Final models, incorporating specified wind laws, were converged using the comoving CRD S-MULTI code. Details of the solution procedure were published by Bennett & Harper (1997). Our analysis of the wind of lambda Vel, based on wind absorption superimposed on chromospheric emission lines in the ultraviolet, can be found in Carpenter et al. (1999). In this paper, we compare observed wind absorption features to an exact CRD calculation in the comoving frame, and also to a much quicker, but approximate, method using the SEI (Sobolev with Exact Integration) code of Lamers, Cerruti-Sola, & Perinotto (1987). Carpenter et al. (1999) provide detailed comparisons of the exact CRD and approximate SEI results and discuss when SEI is adequate to use for computing wind line profiles. Unfortunately, the observational material is insufficient to unambiguously determine the wind acceleration law for lambda Vel. Relatively few unblended Fe II lines

  9. Comparison of Methods for Calculating Radiative Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred; Abbate, M J

    2012-01-19

    Various approximations for calculating radioactive heat transfer between parallel surfaces are evaluated. This is done by applying the approximations based on total emissivities to a special case of known spectral emissivities, for which exact heat transfer calculations are possible. Comparison of results indicates that the best approximation is obtained by basing the emissivity of the receiving surface primarily on the temperature of the emitter. A specific model is shown to give excellent agreement over a very wide range of values.

  10. Parameterization and analysis of 3-D radiative transfer in clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Varnai, Tamas

    2012-03-16

    This report provides a summary of major accomplishments from the project. The project examines the impact of radiative interactions between neighboring atmospheric columns, for example clouds scattering extra sunlight toward nearby clear areas. While most current cloud models don't consider these interactions and instead treat sunlight in each atmospheric column separately, the resulting uncertainties have remained unknown. This project has provided the first estimates on the way average solar heating is affected by interactions between nearby columns. These estimates have been obtained by combining several years of cloud observations at three DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility sites (in Alaska, Oklahoma, and Papua New Guinea) with simulations of solar radiation around the observed clouds. The importance of radiative interactions between atmospheric columns was evaluated by contrasting simulations that included the interactions with those that did not. This study provides lower-bound estimates for radiative interactions: It cannot consider interactions in cross-wind direction, because it uses two-dimensional vertical cross-sections through clouds that were observed by instruments looking straight up as clouds drifted aloft. Data from new DOE scanning radars will allow future radiative studies to consider the full three-dimensional nature of radiative processes. The results reveal that two-dimensional radiative interactions increase overall day-and-night average solar heating by about 0.3, 1.2, and 4.1 Watts per meter square at the three sites, respectively. This increase grows further if one considers that most large-domain cloud simulations have resolutions that cannot specify small-scale cloud variability. For example, the increases in solar heating mentioned above roughly double for a fairly typical model resolution of 1 km. The study also examined the factors that shape radiative interactions between atmospheric columns and

  11. Circumstellar shells, the formation of grains, and radiation transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefevre, Jean

    1987-01-01

    Advances in infrared astronomy during the last decade have firmly established the presence of dust around a large number of cold giant and supergiant stars. To describe the properties of stars and to understand their evolution, it is necessary to know the nature of the giants and their influence on stellar radiation. Two questions are considered: the formation of grains around cold stars and the modification of stellar radiation by the stellar shell.

  12. Single-node orbit analsyis with radiation heat transfer only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peoples, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The steady-state temperature of a single node which dissipates energy by radiation only is discussed for a nontime varying thermal environment. Relationships are developed to illustrate how shields can be utilized to represent a louver system. A computer program is presented which can assess periodic temperature characteristics of a single node in a time varying thermal environment having energy dissipation by radiation only. The computer program performs thermal orbital analysis for five combinations of plate, shields, and louvers.

  13. Introduction to the Theory of Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buglia, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    The fundamental physical and mathematical principles governing the transmission of radiation through the atmosphere are presented, with emphasis on the scattering of visible and near-IR radiation. The classical two-stream, thin-atmosphere, and Eddington approximations, along with some of their offspring, are developed in detail, along with the discrete ordinates method of Chandrasekhar. The adding and doubling methods are discussed from basic principles, and references for further reading are suggested.

  14. Effect of radiator position and mass flux on the dryer room heat transfer rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirmanto, M.; Sulistyowati, E. D.; Okariawan, I. D. K.

    A room radiator as usually used in cold countries, is actually able to be used as a heat source to dry goods, especially in the rainy season where the sun seldom shines due to much rain and cloud. Experiments to investigate effects of radiator position and mass flux on heat transfer rate were performed. This study is to determine the best position of the radiator and the optimum mass flux. The radiator used was a finned radiator made of copper pipes and aluminum fins with an overall dimension of 220 mm × 50 mm × 310 mm. The prototype room was constructed using plywood and wood frame with an overall size of 1000 mm × 1000 mm × 1000 mm. The working fluid was heated water flowing inside the radiator and air circulating naturally inside the prototype room. The nominal mass fluxes employed were 800, 900 and 1000 kg/m2 s. The water was kept at 80 °C at the radiator entrance, while the initial air temperature inside the prototype room was 30 °C. Three positions of the radiator were examined. The results show that the effect of the mass flux on the forced and free convection heat transfer rate is insignificant but the radiator position strongly affects the heat transfer rate for both forced and free convection.

  15. Parallel processing approach for radiative heat transfer prediction in participating media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltiel, C.; Naraghi, M. H. N.

    1993-10-01

    Numerical analysis of radiative transfer in participating media can be very complex. Computer simulations of practical situations often require both large computer memory and long calculation times. The use of massively parallel machines has proven very effective in simulating large complex systems. This technical note presents a unified matrix formulation for node-to-node-based radiative exchange in isotropically scattering homogeneous media using the discrete exchange factor (DEF) method. Computational implementation is compared between serial and parallel computing machines. The results demonstrate that parallel computing has the potential for changing the nature of radiative transfer calculations. Parallel computing allows for faster, more manageable calculations; it is especially effective for nonlinear problems.

  16. Numerical radiative transfer with state-of-the-art iterative methods made easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Julien; Paletou, Frédéric; Josselin, Eric; Glorian, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an on-line tool and its accompanying software resources for the numerical solution of basic radiation transfer out of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). State-of-the-art stationary iterative methods such as Accelerated Λ-iteration and Gauss-Seidel schemes, using a short characteristics-based formal solver are used. We also comment on typical numerical experiments associated to the basic non-LTE radiation problem. These resources are intended for the largest use and benefit, in support to more classical radiation transfer lectures usually given at the Master level.

  17. Solvent electronic polarization effects on a charge transfer excitation studied by the mean-field QM/MM method

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Hiroshi

    2015-12-31

    Electronic polarization effects of a medium can have a significant impact on a chemical reaction in condensed phases. We discuss the effects on the charge transfer excitation of a chromophore, N,N-dimethyl-4-nitroaniline, in various solvents using the mean-field QM/MM method with a polarizable force field. The results show that the explicit consideration of the solvent electronic polarization effects is important especially for a solvent with a low dielectric constant when we study the solvatochromism of the chromophore.

  18. Bidirectional plant canopy reflection models derived from the radiation transfer equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeth, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    A collection of bidirectional canopy reflection models was obtained from the solution of the radiation transfer equation for a horizontally homogeneous canopy. A phase function is derived for a collection of bidirectionally reflecting and transmitting planar elements characterized geometrically by slope and azimuth density functions. Two approaches to solving the radiation transfer equation for the canopy are presented. One approach factors the radiation transfer equation into a solvable set of three first-order linear differential equations by assuming that the radiation field within the canopy can be initially approximated by three components: uniformly diffuse downwelling, uniformly diffuse upwelling, and attenuated specular. The solution to these equations, which can be iterated to any degree of accuracy, was used to obtain overall canopy reflection from the formal solution to the radiation transfer equation. A programable solution to canopy overall bidirectional reflection is given for this approach. The special example of Lambertian leaves with constant leaf bidirectional reflection and scattering functions is considered, and a programmable solution for this example is given. The other approach to solving the radiation transfer equation, a generalized Chandrasekhar technique, is presented in the appendix.

  19. Trace formulas for nonequilibrium Casimir interactions, heat radiation, and heat transfer for arbitrary objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Matthias; Bimonte, Giuseppe; Emig, Thorsten; Kardar, Mehran

    2012-09-01

    We present a detailed derivation of heat radiation, heat transfer, and (Casimir) interactions for N arbitrary objects in the framework of fluctuational electrodynamics in thermal nonequilibrium. The results can be expressed as basis-independent trace formulas in terms of the scattering operators of the individual objects. We prove that heat radiation of a single object is positive, and that heat transfer (for two arbitrary passive objects) is from the hotter to a colder body. The heat transferred is also symmetric, exactly reversed if the two temperatures are exchanged. Introducing partial wave expansions, we transform the results for radiation, transfer, and forces into traces of matrices that can be evaluated in any basis, analogous to the equilibrium Casimir force. The method is illustrated by (re)deriving the heat radiation of a plate, a sphere, and a cylinder. We analyze the radiation of a sphere for different materials, emphasizing that a simplification often employed for metallic nanospheres is typically invalid. We derive asymptotic formulas for heat transfer and nonequilibrium interactions for the cases of a sphere in front a plate and for two spheres, extending previous results. As an example, we show that a hot nanosphere can levitate above a plate with the repulsive nonequilibrium force overcoming gravity, an effect that is not due to radiation pressure.

  20. Validation of Aquarius Measurements Using Radiative Transfer Models at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinnat, E.; LeVine, David M.; Abraham, S.; DeMattheis, P.; Utku, C.

    2012-01-01

    Aquarius/SAC-D was launched in June 2011 by NASA and CONAE (Argentine space agency). Aquarius includes three L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometers dedicated to measuring sea surface salinity. We report detailed comparisons of Aquarius measurements with radiative transfer model predictions. These comparisons were used as part ofthe initial assessment of Aquarius data. In particular, they were used successfully to estimate the radiometer calibration bias and stability. Further comparisons are being performed to assess the performance of models in the retrieval algorithm for correcting the effect of sources of geophysical "noise" (e.g. the galactic background, atmospheric attenuation and reflected signal from the Sun). Such corrections are critical in bringing the error in retrieved salinity down to the required 0.2 practical salinity unit (psu) on monthly global maps at 150 km by 150 km resolution. The forward models making up the Aquarius simulator have been very useful for preparatory studies in the years leading to Aquarius' launch. The simulator includes various components to compute effects ofthe following processes on the measured signal: 1) emission from Earth surfaces (ocean, land, ice), 2) atmospheric emission and absorption, 3) emission from the Sun, Moon and celestial Sky (directly through the antenna sidelobes or after reflection/scattering at the Earth surface), 4) Faraday rotation, and 5) convolution of the scene by the antenna gain patterns. Since the Aquarius radiometers tum-on in late July 2011, the simulator has been used to perform a first order validation of the data. This included checking the order of magnitude ofthe signal over ocean, land and ice surfaces, checking the relative amplitude of signal at different polarizations, and checking the variation with incidence angle. The comparisons were also used to assess calibration bias and monitor instruments calibration drift. The simulator is also being used in the salinity retrieval. For example, initial

  1. Effective-medium model of wire metamaterials in the problems of radiative heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Mirmoosa, M. S. Nefedov, I. S. Simovski, C. R.; Rüting, F.

    2014-06-21

    In the present work, we check the applicability of the effective medium model (EMM) to the problems of radiative heat transfer (RHT) through so-called wire metamaterials (WMMs)—composites comprising parallel arrays of metal nanowires. It is explained why this problem is so important for the development of prospective thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems. Previous studies of the applicability of EMM for WMMs were targeted by the imaging applications of WMMs. The analogous study referring to the transfer of radiative heat is a separate problem that deserves extended investigations. We show that WMMs with practically realizable design parameters transmit the radiative heat as effectively homogeneous media. Existing EMM is an adequate tool for qualitative prediction of the magnitude of transferred radiative heat and of its effective frequency band.

  2. Tools for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer: Streamer and FluxNet. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, Jeffrey R.; Schweiger, Axel J.

    1998-01-01

    Two tools for the solution of radiative transfer problems are presented. Streamer is a highly flexible medium spectral resolution radiative transfer model based on the plane-parallel theory of radiative transfer. Capable of computing either fluxes or radiances, it is suitable for studying radiative processes at the surface or within the atmosphere and for the development of remote-sensing algorithms. FluxNet is a fast neural network-based implementation of Streamer for computing surface fluxes. It allows for a sophisticated treatment of radiative processes in the analysis of large data sets and potential integration into geophysical models where computational efficiency is an issue. Documentation and tools for the development of alternative versions of Fluxnet are available. Collectively, Streamer and FluxNet solve a wide variety of problems related to radiative transfer: Streamer provides the detail and sophistication needed to perform basic research on most aspects of complex radiative processes while the efficiency and simplicity of FluxNet make it ideal for operational use.

  3. a Radiative Transfer Equation/phase Function Approach to Vegetation Canopy Reflectance Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randolph, Marion Herbert

    Vegetation canopy reflectance models currently in use differ considerably in their treatment of the radiation scattering problem, and it is this fundamental difference which stimulated this investigation of the radiative transfer equation/phase function approach. The primary objective of this thesis is the development of vegetation canopy phase functions which describe the probability of radiation scattering within a canopy in terms of its biological and physical characteristics. In this thesis a technique based upon quadrature formulae is used to numerically generate a variety of vegetation canopy phase functions. Based upon leaf inclination distribution functions, phase functions are generated for plagiophile, extremophile, erectophile, spherical, planophile, blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis), and soybean canopies. The vegetation canopy phase functions generated are symmetric with respect to the incident and exitant angles, and hence satisfy the principle of reciprocity. The remaining terms in the radiative transfer equation are also derived in terms of canopy geometry and optical properties to complete the development of the radiative transfer equation/phase function description for vegetation canopy reflectance modeling. In order to test the radiative transfer equation/phase function approach the iterative discrete ordinates method for solving the radiative transfer equation is implemented. In comparison with field data, the approach tends to underestimate the visible reflectance and overestimate infrared reflectance. The approach does compare well, however, with other extant canopy reflectance models; for example, it agrees to within ten to fifteen percent of the Suits model (Suits, 1972). Sensitivity analysis indicates that canopy geometry may influence reflectance as much as 100 percent for a given wavelength. Optical thickness produces little change in reflectance after a depth of 2.5 (Leaf area index of 4.0) is reached, and reflectance generally increases

  4. A Numerical Scheme for Special Relativistic Radiation Magnetohydrodynamics Based on Solving the Time-dependent Radiative Transfer Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsuga, Ken; Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.

    2016-02-01

    We develop a numerical scheme for solving the equations of fully special relativistic, radiation magnetohydrodynamics (MHDs), in which the frequency-integrated, time-dependent radiation transfer equation is solved to calculate the specific intensity. The radiation energy density, the radiation flux, and the radiation stress tensor are obtained by the angular quadrature of the intensity. In the present method, conservation of total mass, momentum, and energy of the radiation magnetofluids is guaranteed. We treat not only the isotropic scattering but also the Thomson scattering. The numerical method of MHDs is the same as that of our previous work. The advection terms are explicitly solved, and the source terms, which describe the gas-radiation interaction, are implicitly integrated. Our code is suitable for massive parallel computing. We present that our code shows reasonable results in some numerical tests for propagating radiation and radiation hydrodynamics. Particularly, the correct solution is given even in the optically very thin or moderately thin regimes, and the special relativistic effects are nicely reproduced.

  5. SCATTERING POLARIZATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Štěpán, Jiří; Heinzel, Petr

    2013-11-20

    There is ongoing debate about the origin and even the very existence of a high degree of linear polarization of some chromospheric spectral lines observed in solar flares. The standard explanation of these measurements is in terms of the impact polarization caused by non-thermal proton and/or electron beams. In this work, we study the possible role of resonance line polarization due to radiation anisotropy in the inhomogeneous medium of the flare ribbons. We consider a simple two-dimensional model of the flaring chromosphere and we self-consistently solve the non-LTE problem taking into account the role of resonant scattering polarization and of the Hanle effect. Our calculations show that the horizontal plasma inhomogeneities at the boundary of the flare ribbons can lead to a significant radiation anisotropy in the line formation region and, consequently, to a fractional linear polarization of the emergent radiation of the order of several percent. Neglecting the effects of impact polarization, our model can provide a clue for resolving some of the common observational findings, namely: (1) why a high degree of polarization appears mainly at the edges of the flare ribbons; (2) why polarization can also be observed during the gradual phase of a flare; and (3) why polarization is mostly radial or tangential. We conclude that radiation transfer in realistic multi-dimensional models of solar flares needs to be considered as an essential ingredient for understanding the observed spectral line polarization.

  6. Transient radiative energy transfer in incompressible laminar flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Singh, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the transient radiative interactions of nongray absorbing-emitting species in laminar fully-developed flows between two parallel plates. The particular species considered are OH, CO, CO2, and H2O and different mixtures of these. Transient and steady-state results are obtained for the temperaure distribution and bulk temperature for different plate spacings, wall temperatures, and pressures. Results, in general, indicate that the rate of radiative heating can be quite high during earlier times. This information is useful in designing thermal protection systems for transient operations.

  7. A source of high-power pulses of elliptically polarized ultrawideband radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Yu. A. Efremov, A. M.; Koshelev, V. I.; Kovalchuk, B. M.; Petkun, A. A.; Sukhushin, K. N.; Zorkaltseva, M. Yu.

    2014-10-01

    Here, we describe a source of high-power ultrawideband radiation with elliptical polarization. The source consisting of a monopolar pulse generator, a bipolar pulse former, and a helical antenna placed into a radioparent container may be used in tests for electromagnetic compatibility. In the source, the helical antenna with the number of turns N = 4 is excited with a high-voltage bipolar pulse. Preliminary, we examined helical antennas at a low-voltage source aiming to select an optimal N and to estimate a radiation center position and boundary of a far-field zone. Finally, characteristics of the source in the operating mode at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz are presented in the paper as well. Energy efficiency of the antenna is 0.75 at the axial ratio equal to 1.3. The effective potential of radiation of the source at the voltage amplitudes of the bipolar pulse generator equal to -175/+200 kV reaches 280 kV.

  8. Application of circularly polarized laser radiation for sensing of crystal clouds.

    PubMed

    Balin, Yurii; Kaul, Bruno; Kokhanenko, Grigorii; Winker, David

    2009-04-13

    The application of circularly polarized laser radiation and measurement of the fourth Stokes parameter of scattered radiation considerably reduce the probability of obtaining ambiguous results for radiation depolarization in laser sensing of crystal clouds. The uncertainty arises when cloud particles appear partially oriented by their large diameters along a certain azimuth direction. Approximately in 30% of all cases, the measured depolarization depends noticeably on the orientation of the lidar reference plane with respect to the particle orientation direction. In this case, the corridor of the most probable depolarization values is about 0.1-0.15, but in individual cases, it can be noticeably wider. The present article considers theoretical aspects of this phenomenon and configuration of a lidar capable of measuring the fourth Stokes parameter together with an algorithm of lidar signal processing in the presence of optically thin cloudiness when molecular scattering cannot be neglected. It is demonstrated that the element ?44 of the normalized backscattering phase matrix (BSPM) can be measured. Results of measurements are independent of the presence or absence of azimuthal particle orientation. For sensing in the zenith or nadir, this element characterizes the degree of horizontal orientation of long particle diameters under the action of aerodynamic forces arising during free fall of particles.

  9. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer Code in Rotating Black Hole Spacetime: {ARTIST}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Rohta; Umemura, Masayuki

    2016-10-01

    We present a general relativistic radiative transfer code, {ARTIST} (Authentic Radiative Transfer In Space-Time), which is a perfectly causal scheme to pursue the propagation of radiation with absorption and scattering around a Kerr black hole. The code explicitly solves the invariant radiation intensity along null geodesics in the Kerr-Schild coordinates, and therefore properly includes light bending, Doppler boosting, frame dragging, and gravitational redshifts. The notable aspect of {ARTIST} is that it conserves the radiative energy with high accuracy, and is not subject to the numerical diffusion, since the transfer is solved on long characteristics along null geodesics. We first solve the wavefront propagation around a Kerr black hole, which was originally explored by Hanni (1977). This demonstrates repeated wavefront collisions, light bending, and causal propagation of radiation with the speed of light. We show that the decay rate of the total energy of wavefronts near a black hole is determined solely by the black hole spin in late phases, in agreement with analytic expectations. As a result, the {ARTIST} turns out to correctly solve the general relativistic radiation fields until late phases as t ˜ 90M. We also explore the effects of absorption and scattering, and apply this code for a photon wall problem and an orbiting hot spot problem. All the simulations in the present study are performed in the equatorial plane around a Kerr black hole. The {ARTIST} is the first step to realize the general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics.

  10. Numerical Solution of the Radiative Transfer Equation: X-Ray Spectral Formation from Cylindrical Accretion onto a Magnetized Neutron Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairnelli, R.; Ceccobello, C.; Romano, P.; Titarchuk, L.

    2011-01-01

    Predicting the emerging X-ray spectra in several astrophysical objects is of great importance, in particular when the observational data are compared with theoretical models. This requires developing numerical routines for the solution of the radiative transfer equation according to the expected physical conditions of the systems under study. Aims. We have developed an algorithm solving the radiative transfer equation in the Fokker-Planck approximation when both thermal and bulk Comptonization take place. The algorithm is essentially a relaxation method, where stable solutions are obtained when the system has reached its steady-state equilibrium. Methods. We obtained the solution of the radiative transfer equation in the two-dimensional domain defined by the photon energy E and optical depth of the system pi using finite-differences for the partial derivatives, and imposing specific boundary conditions for the solutions. We treated the case of cylindrical accretion onto a magnetized neutron star. Results. We considered a blackbody seed spectrum of photons with exponential distribution across the accretion column and for an accretion where the velocity reaches its maximum at the stellar surface and at the top of the accretion column, respectively. In both cases higher values of the electron temperature and of the optical depth pi produce flatter and harder spectra. Other parameters contributing to the spectral formation are the steepness of the vertical velocity profile, the albedo at the star surface, and the radius of the accretion column. The latter parameter modifies the emerging spectra in a specular way for the two assumed accretion profiles. Conclusions. The algorithm has been implemented in the XPEC package for X-ray fitting and is specifically dedicated to the physical framework of accretion at the polar cap of a neutron star with a high magnetic field (approx > 10(exp 12) G). This latter case is expected to be of typical accreting systems such as X

  11. On the linear properties of the nonlinear radiative transfer problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikichyan, H. V.

    2016-11-01

    In this report, we further expose the assertions made in nonlinear problem of reflection/transmission of radiation from a scattering/absorbing one-dimensional anisotropic medium of finite geometrical thickness, when both of its boundaries are illuminated by intense monochromatic radiative beams. The new conceptual element of well-defined, so-called, linear images is noteworthy. They admit a probabilistic interpretation. In the framework of nonlinear problem of reflection/transmission of radiation, we derive solution which is similar to linear case. That is, the solution is reduced to the linear combination of linear images. By virtue of the physical meaning, these functions describe the reflectivity and transmittance of the medium for a single photon or their beam of unit intensity, incident on one of the boundaries of the layer. Thereby the medium in real regime is still under the bilateral illumination by external exciting radiation of arbitrary intensity. To determine the linear images, we exploit three well known methods of (i) adding of layers, (ii) its limiting form, described by differential equations of invariant imbedding, and (iii) a transition to the, so-called, functional equations of the "Ambartsumyan's complete invariance".

  12. Heat Transfer Issues in Thin-Film Thermal Radiation Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Mamadou Y.

    1999-01-01

    The Thermal Radiation Group at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University has been working closely with scientists and engineers at NASA's Langley Research Center to develop accurate analytical and numerical models suitable for designing next generation thin-film thermal radiation detectors for earth radiation budget measurement applications. The current study provides an analytical model of the notional thermal radiation detector that takes into account thermal transport phenomena, such as the contact resistance between the layers of the detector, and is suitable for use in parameter estimation. It was found that the responsivity of the detector can increase significantly due to the presence of contact resistance between the layers of the detector. Also presented is the effect of doping the thermal impedance layer of the detector with conducting particles in order to electrically link the two junctions of the detector. It was found that the responsivity and the time response of the doped detector decrease significantly in this case. The corresponding decrease of the electrical resistance of the doped thermal impedance layer is not sufficient to significantly improve the electrical performance of the detector. Finally, the "roughness effect" is shown to be unable to explain the decrease in the thermal conductivity often reported for thin-film layers.

  13. The effects of radiative transfer on low-level cyclogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, M.J.; Raman, S.

    1995-04-01

    Many investigators have documented the role that thermodynamic forcing due to radiative flux divergence plays in the enhancement or generation of circulation. Most of these studies involve large-scale systems, small-scale systems such as thunderstorms, and squall lines. The generation of circulation on large scales results from the creation of divergence in the upper troposphere and the maintenance of low-level potentially unstable air, and the maintenance of baroclinicity throughout the atmosphere. On smaller scales, radiative flux divergence acts similarly. In the thunderstorms and squall lines, the radiative forcing acts as a pump, increasing the divergence at the top of the storm systems and increasing the updraft velocity and the intensity of inflow at mid-levels in the storm systems. Other researchers have examined the role of surface processes and low-level baroclinicity in east coast cyclogenesis. In this paper, we examine the interactive role that radiative flux divergence, clouds, and surface processes play in low-level cyclogenesis and the creation or maintenance of the boundary layer baroclinicity.

  14. The polarization trajectory of terahertz magnetic dipole radiation in (110)-oriented PrFeO{sub 3} single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Gaibei; Jin, Zuanming; Lin, Xian; Jiang, Junjie; Wang, Xinyan; Wu, Hailong; Ma, Guohong E-mail: sxcao@shu.edu.cn; Cao, Shixun E-mail: sxcao@shu.edu.cn

    2014-04-28

    By using the polarized terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy, the macro-magnetization motion in (110)-oriented PrFeO{sub 3} single crystal was constructed. We emphasize that the trajectory of the emitted THz waveforms relies on not only the motion of macroscopic magnetization vector, but also the spin configuration in the ground state and the propagation of THz pulse. The azimuthal angle (the incident THz pulse polarization with respect to the crystal axes) enables us to control the polarization trajectories of the quasiferromagnetic and quasiantiferromagnetic mode radiations that can lead to further applications on multiple information storing and quantum processing.

  15. Linearly polarized radiation from astrophysical masers due to magnetic fields when the rate for stimulated emission exceeds the Zeeman frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deguchi, Shuji; Watson, William D.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented of reformulating the treatment of polarized maser radiation in the presence of magnetic fields in a way that seems somewhat more convenient for calculations with masing states having angular momenta greater than J = 1 and 0. Calculations are then performed for the case of small Zeeman splitting using idealizations which are equivalant to those made previously in calculations for a J = 1-0 transition. The results provide a complete, general description of the polarization characteristics of astrophysical maser radiation involving states of higher angular momentum of closed-shell molecules.

  16. Vector Radiative Transfer Equation for Arbitrarily Shaped and Arbitrarily Oriented Particles: A Microphysical Derivation from Statistical Electromagnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2003-01-01

    We use the concepts of statistical electromagnetics to derive the general radiative transfer equation (RTE) describing multiple scattering of polarized light by sparse discrete random media consisting of arbitrarily shaped and arbitrarily oriented particles. The derivation starts from the volume integral and Lippmann-Schwinger equations for the electric field scattered by a fixed N-particle system and proceeds to the vector form of the Foldy-Lax equations and their approximate far-field version. We then assume that particle positions are completely random and derive the vector RTE by applying the Twersky approximation to the coherent electric field and the Twersky and ladder approximations to the coherency dyad of the diffuse field in the limit N -> infinity. The concluding section discusses the physical meaning of the quantities entering the general vector RTE and the assumptions made in its derivation.

  17. Verification of radiative transfer results by inserting them into the RTE: A demonstration for Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollstein, André

    2012-10-01

    The verification of a new or updated radiative transfer model (RTM) is one of the important steps in its development; this is usually achieved by comparisons with real measurements or published tables of generally accepted radiative transfer results. If such tables do not exist, verification becomes more complicated and an external review of the implementation is often unpractical due to the sheer amount and complexity of the code. The presented verification approach is to “simply” insert results of radiative transfer (RT) calculations into the radiative transfer equation (RTE). The evaluation of the RTE consists of numerically calculating partial derivatives and integrals, which is much simpler to implement than a solution of the RTE. Presented is a demonstration of this approach for a case of Rayleigh scattering in a plane parallel atmosphere, which showed only very small deviation from the radiative transfer equation.This approach has two key benefits. First, its implementation into a high level computer language can be very short (≈60 lines in MATHEMATICA) and clear compared to a full RTM; and such code is much more easy to review. Second, this approach can be easily extended to cases where no other independent RT implementation is available for validation. The proposed implementation and data are provided with this paper.

  18. Dominance of the Breit interaction in the cross section and circular polarization of x-ray radiation following longitudinally-polarized-electron-impact excitation of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhan-Bin; Dong, Chen-Zhong; Jiang, Jun

    2014-08-01

    Longitudinally-polarized-electron-impact excitation cross sections from the ground state to the individual magnetic sublevels of the excited state 1s2s22p3/2(J = 2) of highly charged Be-like ions are calculated using a fully relativistic distorted-wave method. The contributions of the Breit interaction to the cross sections and circular polarizations of the 1s2s22p3/2(J = 2)→1s22s2(J = 0) magnetic quadrupole (M2) line for selected Be-like Ag43+, Ho63+, and Bi79+ ions are investigated systematically. It is found that the Breit interaction has a large effect and makes the cross sections increase, especially to the mf = -1 and -2 sublevels, the Breit interaction can modify the cross sections by several orders of magnitude. These dramatic influences also lead to a remarkable decrease in the circular polarization of subsequent x-ray radiation, the character of which becomes more and more evident with increasing incident energy and atomic number. And all these characteristics are very different from the conclusions for the linear polarization of radiation following the electron-impact process [S. Fritzsche, A. Surzhykov, and T. Stöhlker, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 113001 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.113001; Z. W. Wu, J. Jiang, and C. Z. Dong, Phys. Rev. A 84, 032713 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.84.032713].

  19. Radiation Heat Transfer Between Diffuse-Gray Surfaces Using Higher Order Finite Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Dana C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents recent work on developing methods for analyzing radiation heat transfer between diffuse-gray surfaces using p-version finite elements. The work was motivated by a thermal analysis of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) wing structure which showed the importance of radiation heat transfer throughout the structure. The analysis also showed that refining the finite element mesh to accurately capture the temperature distribution on the internal structure led to very large meshes with unacceptably long execution times. Traditional methods for calculating surface-to-surface radiation are based on assumptions that are not appropriate for p-version finite elements. Two methods for determining internal radiation heat transfer are developed for one and two-dimensional p-version finite elements. In the first method, higher-order elements are divided into a number of sub-elements. Traditional methods are used to determine radiation heat flux along each sub-element and then mapped back to the parent element. In the second method, the radiation heat transfer equations are numerically integrated over the higher-order element. Comparisons with analytical solutions show that the integration scheme is generally more accurate than the sub-element method. Comparison to results from traditional finite elements shows that significant reduction in the number of elements in the mesh is possible using higher-order (p-version) finite elements.

  20. Master equation theory applied to the redistribution of polarized radiation in the weak radiation field limit. IV. Application to the second solar spectrum of the Na i D1 and D2 lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommier, Véronique

    2016-06-01

    Context. The spectrum of the linear polarization, which is formed by scattering and observed on the solar disk close to the limb, is very different from the intensity spectrum and thus able to provide new information, in particular about anisotropies in the solar surface plasma and magnetic fields. In addition, a large number of lines show far wing polarization structures assigned to partial redistribution (PRD), which we prefer to denote as Rayleigh/Raman scattering. The two-level or two-term atom approximation without any lower level polarization is insufficient for many lines. Aims: In the previous paper of this series, we presented our theory generalized to the multilevel and multiline atom and comprised of statistical equilibrium equations for the atomic density matrix elements and radiative transfer equation for the polarized radiation. The present paper is devoted to applying this theory to model the second solar spectrum of the Na i D1 and D2 lines. Methods: The solution method is iterative, of the lambda-iteration type. The usual acceleration techniques were considered or even applied, but we found these to be unsuccessful, in particular because of nonlinearity or large number of quantities determining the radiation at each depth. Results: The observed spectrum is qualitatively reproduced in line center, but the convergence is yet to be reached in the far wings and the observed spectrum is not totally reproduced there. Conclusions: We need to investigate noniterative resolution methods. The other limitation lies in the one-dimensional (1D) atmosphere model, which is unable to reproduce the intermittent matter structure formed of small loops or spicules in the chromosphere. This modeling is rough, but the computing time in the presence of hyperfine structure and PRD prevents us from envisaging a three-dimensional (3D) model at this instant.

  1. Development of soft X-ray polarized light beamline on Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    SciTech Connect

    Phase, D. M. Gupta, Mukul Potdar, S. Behera, L. Sah, R. Gupta, Ajay

    2014-04-24

    This article describes the development of a soft x-ray beamline on a bending magnet source of Indus-2 storage ring (2.5 GeV) and some preliminary results of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements using the same. The beamline layout is based on a spherical grating monochromator. The beamline is able to accept synchrotron radiation from the bending magnet port BL-1 of the Indus-2 ring with a wide solid angle. The large horizontal and vertical angular acceptance contributes to high photon flux and selective polarization respectively. The complete beamline is tested for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) ∼ 10{sup −10} mbar. First absorption spectrum was obtained on HOPG graphite foil. Our performance test indicates that modest resolving power has been achieved with adequate photon flux to carry out various absorption experiments.

  2. Measurement of the radiative decay of polarized muons in the MEG experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, A. M.; Bao, Y.; Baracchini, E.; Bemporad, C.; Berg, F.; Biasotti, M.; Boca, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavoto, G.; Cei, F.; Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; de Bari, A.; De Gerone, M.; D'Onofrio, A.; Dussoni, S.; Fujii, Y.; Galli, L.; Gatti, F.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grassi, M.; Graziosi, A.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Haruyama, T.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hodge, Z.; Ieki, K.; Ignatov, F.; Iwamoto, T.; Kaneko, D.; Kang, Tae Im; Kettle, P.-R.; Khazin, B. I.; Khomutov, N.; Korenchenko, A.; Kravchuk, N.; Lim, G. M. A.; Mihara, S.; Molzon, W.; Mori, Toshinori; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Nakaura, S.; Nicolò, D.; Nishiguchi, H.; Nishimura, M.; Ogawa, S.; Ootani, W.; Panareo, M.; Papa, A.; Pepino, A.; Piredda, G.; Pizzigoni, G.; Popov, A.; Renga, F.; Ripiccini, E.; Ritt, S.; Rossella, M.; Rutar, G.; Sawada, R.; Sergiampietri, F.; Signorelli, G.; Tassielli, G. F.; Tenchini, F.; Uchiyama, Y.; Venturini, M.; Voena, C.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, K.; You, Z.; Yudin, Yu. V.

    2016-03-01

    We studied the radiative muon decay {\\upmu }+ → {e}+ {\\upnu }bar{{\\upnu }}{\\upgamma } by using for the first time an almost fully polarized muon source. We identified a large sample (˜ 13,000) of these decays in a total sample of 1.8× 10^{14} positive muon decays collected in the MEG experiment in the years 2009-2010 and measured the branching ratio {B}({\\upmu } → {e} {\\upnu }bar{{\\upnu }}{\\upgamma }) = (6.03± 0.14{(stat.)}± 0.53{(sys.)})× 10^{-8} for E_{e}>45 {MeV} and E_{{\\upgamma }}>40 {MeV}, consistent with the Standard Model prediction. The precise measurement of this decay mode provides a basic tool for the timing calibration, a normalization channel, and a strong quality check of the complete MEG experiment in the search for {\\upmu }+ → {e}+ {\\upgamma } process.

  3. EPR detected polarization transfer between Gd3+ and protons at low temperature and 3.3 T: the first step of dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Vijayasarathi; Hovav, Yonatan; Feintuch, Akiva; Vega, Shimon; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2010-06-01

    Electron-electron double resonance pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at 95 GHz (3.3 T) is used to follow the dynamics of the electron spin polarization during the first stages of dynamic nuclear polarization in solids. The experiments were performed on a frozen solution of Gd(+3) (S=7/2) in water/glycerol. Focusing on the central vector -1/2 --> vector +1/2 transition we measured the polarization transfer from the Gd(3+) electron spin to the adjacent (1)H protons. The dependence of the echo detected EPR signal on the length of the microwave irradiation at the EPR "forbidden" transition corresponding to an electron and a proton spin flip is measured for different powers, showing dynamics on the microsecond to millisecond time scales. A theoretical model based on the spin density matrix formalism is suggested to account for this dynamics. The central transition of the Gd(3+) ion is considered as an effective S = 1/2 system and is coupled to (1)H (I = 1/2) nuclei. Simulations based on a single electron-single nucleus four level system are shown to deviate from the experimental results and an alternative approach taking into account the more realistic multinuclei picture is shown to agree qualitatively with the experiments.

  4. QED radiative effects in the processes of exclusive photon electroproduction from polarized protons with the next-to-leading accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Akushevich, Igor V.; Ilyichev, Alexander; Shumeiko, Nikolai M

    2014-08-01

    Radiative effects in the electroproduction of photons in polarized ep-scattering are calculated with the next-to-leading (NLO) accuracy. The contributions of loops and two photon emission were presented in analytical form. The covariant approach of Bardin and Shumeiko was used to extract the infrared divergence. All contributions to the radiative correction were presented in the form of the correction to the leptonic tensor thus allowing for further applications in other experiments, e.g., deep inelastic scattering. The radiative corrections (RC) to the cross sections and polarization asymmetries were analyzed numerically for kinematical conditions of the current measurement at Jefferson Lab. Specific attention was paid on analyzing kinematical conditions for the process with large radiative effect when momenta of two photons in the final state are collinear to momenta of initial and final electrons, respectively.

  5. Design, fabrication and performance optimization of bi-polar blocking planar HPGe radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khizar, Muhammad; Wang, Guojian; Mei, Dongming

    2013-03-01

    A prototype planar radiation detector is designed, fabricated and characterized using bi-polar contact deposited on high purity single crystal germanium (HPGe). Performances of planar and semi-planar detectors are carried out for their low background counting and high absolute efficiency for high-energy photons applications. For this study, 40mm ? 15mm (diameter to vertical height) p-type HPGe samples with dislocation density EPD <3000 cm-2 are taken from HPGe ingots grown by Czochralski method. After a successful mechanical preparation, and standard cleaning and polishing procedure, samples are chemically etched by using a mixture of highly concentrated acids HF:HNO3 (1:4) in order to remove the surface oxides. A bi-polar blocking layer of amorphous germanium (a-Ge) is deposited on both the samples using low temperature RF sputtering plasma in a pre-mix precursor of H2 (15%) and Ar. For this, an optimized dose of the plasma power and chamber pressure is used for a controlled low temperature. The process was completed with the evaporation of Ohmic contacts using electron beam evaporator. This is worth noticing that special care is introduced during the handling of these samples, especially for the bi-polar blocking and metal contact layers deposition. Finally, the fabricated detectors are characterized at 77K temperature. In this paper, we show the results from the first prototype detector made of home grown crystals at USD. This work is supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-10ER46709 and the state of South Dakota.

  6. Simplified multiple scattering model for radiative transfer in turbid water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghovanlou, A. H.; Gupta, G. N.

    1978-01-01

    Quantitative analytical procedures for relating selected water quality parameters to the characteristics of the backscattered signals, measured by remote sensors, require the solution of the radiative transport equation in turbid media. Presented is an approximate closed form solution of this equation and based on this solution, the remote sensing of sediments is discussed. The results are compared with other standard closed form solutions such as quasi-single scattering approximations.

  7. The spectral-angular and polarization characteristics of radiation from an electron beam traversing an inhomogeneous electromagnetic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Koltsov, A.V.; Serov, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    The generation of frequency harmonics of a radiation when the electron beam traverse the inhomogeneous electromagnetic wave was investigated. The electromagnetic wave are linearly polarized. The plane beam of particles enters the wave at right angle with respect to the direction of propogation of the wave and the vector E of the wave. The spartial distribution of radiation from the higher harmonics and the power density contours are caculated.

  8. Case studies of aerosol and ocean color retrieval using a Markov chain radiative transfer model and AirMSPI measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, F.; Diner, D. J.; Seidel, F. C.; Dubovik, O.; Zhai, P.

    2014-12-01

    A vector Markov chain radiative transfer method was developed for forward modeling of radiance and polarization fields in a coupled atmosphere-ocean system. The method was benchmarked against an independent Successive Orders of Scattering code and linearized through the use of Jacobians. Incorporated with the multi-patch optimization algorithm and look-up-table method, simultaneous aerosol and ocean color retrievals were performed using imagery acquired by the Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) when it was operated in step-and-stare mode with 9 viewing angles ranging between ±67°. Data from channels near 355, 380, 445, 470*, 555, 660*, and 865* nm were used in the retrievals, where the asterisk denotes the polarimetric bands. Retrievals were run for AirMSPI overflights over Southern California and Monterey Bay, CA. For the relatively high aerosol optical depth (AOD) case (~0.28 at 550 nm), the retrieved aerosol concentration, size distribution, water-leaving radiance, and chlorophyll concentration were compared to those reported by the USC SeaPRISM AERONET-OC site off the coast of Southern California on 6 February 2013. For the relatively low AOD case (~0.08 at 550 nm), the retrieved aerosol concentration and size distribution were compared to those reported by the Monterey Bay AERONET site on 28 April 2014. Further, we evaluate the benefits of multi-angle and polarimetric observations by performing the retrievals using (a) all view angles and channels; (b) all view angles but radiances only (no polarization); (c) the nadir view angle only with both radiance and polarization; and (d) the nadir view angle without polarization. Optimized retrievals using different initial guesses were performed to provide a measure of retrieval uncertainty. Removal of multi-angular or polarimetric information resulted in increases in both parameter uncertainty and systematic bias. Potential accuracy improvements afforded by applying constraints on the surface

  9. Radiative transfer in the dynamic atmospheres of long period variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luttermoser, Donald G.; Bowen, George H.

    1990-01-01

    An iterative procedure is presented for determining the thermal structure and dynamics of Mira-type stellar atmospheres, where the non-LTE radiative transfer code PANDORA is used in conjunction with the Bowen hydrodynamics code of Iowa State University. Preliminary results are reported for an atmospheric model of a pulsating AGB star of 1 solar mass, 240 solar radii, Teff = 3000 K, and a period of 320 days. At the present time, H, H(-), Mg I, and Mg II radiative transfer calculations have been completed and synthetic spectra are shown for H-alpha. The radiative transfer calculations demonstrate that cooling in the innermost shock of the original Bowen model is underestimated due to the omission of various hydrogen transitions. These initial results suggest that the main shock of the Bowen models are too hot and/or too deep.

  10. Numerical calculation of the radiation heat transfer between rocket motor nozzle's wall and gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yipeng; Zhu, Dingqiang

    2014-11-01

    The heat flux density of radiation heat transfer between rocket motor nozzle's wall and gas is one of the most important factors to decide temperature of nozzle's wall. It also provides an invaluable references advice for choosing the material of wall and type of cooling. The numerical calculation based on finite volume method is introduced in the paper. After analysis of the formula of FVM without the influence of scattering, a formula that is used to let spectral radiant intensity that is the calculation of FVM be converted into heat flux density of radiation heat transfer is deduced. It is compiled that the program based on FVM is used to calculate the heat flux density. At the end, the heat flux density of radiation heat transfer of 3D model of double-arc nozzle's wall is calculated under different condition, then simply analysis cooling system is performed.

  11. Heat transfer including radiation and slag particles evolution in MHD channel-I

    SciTech Connect

    Im, K H; Ahluwalia, R K

    1980-01-01

    Accurate estimates of convective and radiative heat transfer in the magnetohydrodynamic channel are provided. Calculations performed for a base load-size channel indicate that heat transfer by gas radiation almost equals that by convection for smooth walls, and amounts to 70% as much as the convective heat transfer for rough walls. Carbon dioxide, water vapor, and potassium atoms are the principal participating gases. The evolution of slag particles by homogeneous nucleation and condensation is also investigated. The particle-size spectrum so computed is later utilized to analyze the radiation enhancement by slag particles in the MHD diffuser. The impact of the slag particle spectrum on the selection of a workable and design of an efficient seed collection system is discussed.

  12. Angular momentum transfer between a circularly polarized photon and an electron spin in double quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Asayama, T.; Fujita, T.; Kiyama, H.; Oiwa, A.; Tarucha, S.

    2011-12-23

    We propose an experimental scheme of photon-spin quantum interface using a semiconductor double quantum dot. A polarized electron spin is excited by a circularly polarized photon. We detect the spin state applying Pauli spin blockade which is often employed to detect orientation of a single electron spin in double quantum dots.

  13. Two-dimensional HID light source radiative transfer using discrete ordinates method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghrib, Basma; Bouaoun, Mohamed; Elloumi, Hatem

    2016-08-01

    This paper shows the implementation of the Discrete Ordinates Method for handling radiation problems in High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps. Therefore, we start with presenting this rigorous method for treatment of radiation transfer in a two-dimensional, axisymmetric HID lamp. Furthermore, the finite volume method is used for the spatial discretization of the Radiative Transfer Equation. The atom and electron densities were calculated using temperature profiles established by a 2D semi-implicit finite-element scheme for the solution of conservation equations relative to energy, momentum, and mass. Spectral intensities as a function of position and direction are first calculated, and then axial and radial radiative fluxes are evaluated as well as the net emission coefficient. The results are given for a HID mercury lamp on a line-by-line basis. A particular attention is paid on the 253.7 nm resonance and 546.1 nm green lines.

  14. Potentially Missing Physics of the Early Universe: Nonlinear Vacuum Polarization in Intense Blackbody Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S Q; Hartemann, F V

    2010-04-13

    The standard Big Bang universe model is mainly based on linear interactions, except during exotic periods such as inflation. The purpose of the present proposal is to explore the effects, if any, of vacuum polarization in the very high energy density environment of the early universe. These conditions can be found today in astrophysical settings and may also be emulated in the laboratory using high intensity advanced lasers. Shortly after the Big Bang, there once existed a time when the energy density of the universe corresponded to a temperature in the range 10{sup 8} - 10{sup 9} K, sufficient to cause vacuum polarization effects. During this period, the nonlinear vacuum polarization may have had significant modifications on the propagation of radiation. Thus the thermal spectrum of the early universe may have been starkly non-Planckian. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background today show a spectrum relatively close to an ideal blackbody. Could the early universe have shown spectral deviations due to nonlinear vacuum effects? If so, is it possible to detect traces of those relic photons in the universe today? Found in galactic environments, compact objects such as blazars and magnetars can possess astronomically large energy densities that far exceed anything that can be created in the laboratory. Their field strengths are known to reach energy levels comparable to or surpassing the energy corresponding to the Schwinger critical field E {approx} 10{sup 18} V/m. Nonlinear vacuum effects become prominent under these conditions and have garnered much interest from the astronomical and theoretical physics communities. The effects of a nonlinear vacuum may be of crucial importance for our understanding of these objects. At energies of the order of the electron rest mass, the most important interactions are described by quantum electrodynamics (QED). It is predicted that nonlinear photon-photon interactions will occur at energies approaching the Schwinger

  15. PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission): an extended white paper

    SciTech Connect

    André, Philippe; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bielewicz, Pawel; Banday, Anthony; Barbosa, Domingos; Barreiro, Belen; Battistelli, Elia; Battye, Richard; Bonaldi, Anna; Bendo, George; Benoȋt, Alain; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bersanelli, Marco; Béthermin, Matthieu; and others

    2014-02-01

    PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission) was proposed to ESA in May 2013 as a large-class mission for investigating within the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision program a set of important scientific questions that require high resolution, high sensitivity, full-sky observations of the sky emission at wavelengths ranging from millimeter-wave to the far-infrared. PRISM's main objective is to explore the distant universe, probing cosmic history from very early times until now as well as the structures, distribution of matter, and velocity flows throughout our Hubble volume. PRISM will survey the full sky in a large number of frequency bands in both intensity and polarization and will measure the absolute spectrum of sky emission more than three orders of magnitude better than COBE FIRAS. The data obtained will allow us to precisely measure the absolute sky brightness and polarization of all the components of the sky emission in the observed frequency range, separating the primordial and extragalactic components cleanly from the galactic and zodiacal light emissions. The aim of this Extended White Paper is to provide a more detailed overview of the highlights of the new science that will be made possible by PRISM, which include: (1) the ultimate galaxy cluster survey using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect, detecting approximately 10{sup 6} clusters extending to large redshift, including a characterization of the gas temperature of the brightest ones (through the relativistic corrections to the classic SZ template) as well as a peculiar velocity survey using the kinetic SZ effect that comprises our entire Hubble volume; (2) a detailed characterization of the properties and evolution of dusty galaxies, where the most of the star formation in the universe took place, the faintest population of which constitute the diffuse CIB (Cosmic Infrared Background); (3) a characterization of the B modes from primordial gravity waves generated during inflation

  16. Review of relative biological effectiveness dependence on linear energy transfer for low-LET radiations.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Nezahat; Muirhead, Colin R

    2009-03-01

    Information on Japanese A-bomb survivors exposed to gamma radiation has been used to estimate cancer risks for the whole range of photon (x-rays) and electron energies which are commonly encountered by radiation workers in the work place or by patients and workers in diagnostic radiology. However, there is some uncertainty regarding the radiation effectiveness of various low-linear energy transfer (low-LET) radiations (x-rays, gamma radiation and electrons). In this paper we review information on the effectiveness of low-LET radiations on the basis of epidemiological and in vitro radiobiological studies. Data from various experimental studies for chromosome aberrations and cell transformation in human lymphocytes and from epidemiological studies of the Japanese A-bomb survivors, patients medically exposed to radiation for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and occupational exposures of nuclear workers are considered. On the basis of in vitro cellular radiobiology, there is considerable evidence that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-energy low-LET radiation (gamma radiation, electrons) is less than that of low-energy low-LET radiation (x-rays, betas). This is a factor of about 3 to 4 for 29 kVp x-rays (e.g. as in diagnostic radiation exposures of the female breast) and for tritium beta-rays (encountered in parts of the nuclear industry) relative to Co-60 gamma radiation and 2-5 MeV gamma-rays (as received by the Japanese A-bomb survivors). In epidemiological studies, although for thyroid and breast cancer there appears to be a small tendency for the excess relative risks to decrease as the radiation energy increases for low-LET radiations, it is not statistically feasible to draw any conclusion regarding an underlying dependence of cancer risk on LET for the nominally low-LET radiations. PMID:19225189

  17. Review of relative biological effectiveness dependence on linear energy transfer for low-LET radiations.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Nezahat; Muirhead, Colin R

    2009-03-01

    Information on Japanese A-bomb survivors exposed to gamma radiation has been used to estimate cancer risks for the whole range of photon (x-rays) and electron energies which are commonly encountered by radiation workers in the work place or by patients and workers in diagnostic radiology. However, there is some uncertainty regarding the radiation effectiveness of various low-linear energy transfer (low-LET) radiations (x-rays, gamma radiation and electrons). In this paper we review information on the effectiveness of low-LET radiations on the basis of epidemiological and in vitro radiobiological studies. Data from various experimental studies for chromosome aberrations and cell transformation in human lymphocytes and from epidemiological studies of the Japanese A-bomb survivors, patients medically exposed to radiation for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and occupational exposures of nuclear workers are considered. On the basis of in vitro cellular radiobiology, there is considerable evidence that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-energy low-LET radiation (gamma radiation, electrons) is less than that of low-energy low-LET radiation (x-rays, betas). This is a factor of about 3 to 4 for 29 kVp x-rays (e.g. as in diagnostic radiation exposures of the female breast) and for tritium beta-rays (encountered in parts of the nuclear industry) relative to Co-60 gamma radiation and 2-5 MeV gamma-rays (as received by the Japanese A-bomb survivors). In epidemiological studies, although for thyroid and breast cancer there appears to be a small tendency for the excess relative risks to decrease as the radiation energy increases for low-LET radiations, it is not statistically feasible to draw any conclusion regarding an underlying dependence of cancer risk on LET for the nominally low-LET radiations.

  18. Dipole radiation in a one-dimensional photonic crystal: TE polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado-Rodriguez, I.; Halevi, P.; Sánchez, Adán S.

    2001-05-01

    We study the power emitted by an oscillating dipole in a superlattice (SL) modeled by means of a periodic distribution of Dirac δ functions (Dirac comb SL). The radiation is permitted to propagate in all directions in space; however, it is restricted to the transverse electric (TE) polarization mode. The calculation is based on a classical theory of radiation in nonuniform dielectric media by Dowling and Bowden [Phys. Rev. A 46, 612 (1992)]. The emitted power is derived in terms of a single integral, with no approximations. A SL has no omnidirectional photonic band gaps, and therefore the power is always finite. The power spectrum exhibits slope discontinuities, which occur at the band edges for on-axis propagation. It also depends strongly on the dipole's position in the SL and on the grating strength that characterizes the Dirac comb model. The power peaks for low frequencies, and there can be large enhancement of emission as compared to free space. The closer the dipole is to a barrier (Dirac δ) and the greater the grating strength, the stronger the enhancement is. These conclusions are expected to be relevant for a real SL.

  19. Derivation and application of the reciprocity relations for radiative transfer with internal illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogley, A. C.

    1975-01-01

    A Green's function formulation is used to derive basic reciprocity relations for planar radiative transfer in a general medium with internal illumination. Reciprocity (or functional symmetry) allows an explicit and generalized development of the equivalence between source and probability functions. Assuming similar symmetry in three-dimensional space, a general relationship is derived between planar-source intensity and point-source total directional energy. These quantities are expressed in terms of standard (universal) functions associated with the planar medium, while all results are derived from the differential equation of radiative transfer.

  20. Comparative accuracy of the Albedo, transmission and absorption for selected radiative transfer approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, M. D.; HARSHVARDHAN

    1986-01-01

    Illustrations of both the relative and absolute accuracy of eight different radiative transfer approximations as a function of optical thickness, solar zenith angle and single scattering albedo are given. Computational results for the plane albedo, total transmission and fractional absorption were obtained for plane-parallel atmospheres composed of cloud particles. These computations, which were obtained using the doubling method, are compared with comparable results obtained using selected radiative transfer approximations. Comparisons were made between asymptotic theory for thick layers and the following widely used two stream approximations: Coakley-Chylek's models 1 and 2, Meador-Weaver, Eddington, delta-Eddington, PIFM and delta-discrete ordinates.

  1. Plant architecture, growth and radiative transfer for terrestrial and space environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, John M.; Goel, Narendra S.

    1993-01-01

    The overall objective of this research was to develop a hardware implemented model that would incorporate realistic and dynamic descriptions of canopy architecture in physiologically based models of plant growth and functioning, with an emphasis on radiative transfer while accommodating other environmental constraints. The general approach has five parts: a realistic mathematical treatment of canopy architecture, a methodology for combining this general canopy architectural description with a general radiative transfer model, the inclusion of physiological and environmental aspects of plant growth, inclusion of plant phenology, and integration.

  2. Efficient application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function to radiative transfer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrarov, Sanjar

    We present a new application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function (SIVF) to the radiative transfer spectroscopy that enables computation of the spectral radiance and radiance at reduced spectral resolution. Applying a technique based on the Fourier expansion of the exponential multiplier we obtain the series approximations providing high-accuracy and rapid SIVF computation. In contrast to traditional line-by-line (LBL) radiative transfer models, the proposed SIVF algorithm prevents underestimation in the absorption coefficients and, therefore, preserves the radiant energy. LBL sample computations utilizing SIVF algorithm show the advantages of the proposed methodology in terms of the accuracy and computational speed.

  3. Application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function to line-by-line radiative transfer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quine, B. M.; Abrarov, S. M.

    2013-09-01

    We show that a new approach based on the spectrally integrated Voigt function (SIVF) enables the computation of line-by-line (LBL) radiative transfer at reduced spectral resolution without loss of accuracy. The algorithm provides rapid and accurate computation of area under the Voigt function in a way that preserves spectral radiance and, consequently, radiant intensity. The error analysis we provide shows the high-accuracy of the proposed SIVF approximations. A comparison of the performance of the method with that of the traditional LBL approach is presented. Motivations for the use and advantage of the SIVF as a replacement for conventional line function computations in radiative transfer are discussed.

  4. Radiative transfer in nonuniformly refracting layered media: atmosphere-ocean system.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z; Stamnes, K

    1994-01-20

    We have applied the discrete-ordinate method to solve the radiative-transfer problem pertaining to a system consisting of two strata with different indices of refraction. The refraction and reflection at the interface are taken into account. The relevant changes (as compared with the standard problem with a constant index of refraction throughout the medium) in formulation and solution of the radiative-transfer equation, including the proper application of interface and boundary conditions, are described. Appropriate quadrature points (streams) and weights are chosen for the interface-continuity relations. Examples of radiative transfer in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system are provided. To take into account the region of total reflection in the ocean, additional angular quadrature points are required, compared with those used in the atmosphere and in the refractive region of the ocean that communicates directly with the atmosphere. To verify the model we have tested for energy conservation. We also discuss the effect of the number of streams assigned to the refractive region and the total reflecting region on the convergence. Our results show that the change in the index of refraction between the two strata significantly affects the radiation field. The radiative-transfer model we present is designed for application to the atmosphere-ocean system, but it can be applied to other systems that need to consider the change in the index of refraction between two strata. PMID:20862035

  5. A Fast Radiative Transfer Parameterization Under Cloudy Condition in Solar Spectral Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Liu, X.; Yang, P.; Wang, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) system, which is proposed and developed by NASA, will directly measure the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (IR), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (RS), and radio occultation (RO). IR, RS, and RO measurements provide information on the most critical but least understood climate forcings, responses, and feedbacks associated with the vertical distribution of atmospheric temperature and water vapor, broadband reflected and emitted radiative fluxes, cloud properties, surface albedo, and surface skin temperature. To perform Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE) for long term climate observations, accurate and fast radiative transfer models are needed. The principal component-based radiative transfer model (PCRTM) is one of the efforts devoted to the development of fast radiative transfer models for simulating radiances and reflecatance observed by various hyperspectral instruments. Retrieval algorithm based on PCRTM forward model has been developed for AIRS, NAST, IASI, and CrIS. It is very fast and very accurate relative to the training radiative transfer model. In this work, we are extending PCRTM to UV-VIS-near IR spectral region. To implement faster cloudy radiative transfer calculations, we carefully investigated the radiative transfer process under cloud condition. The cloud bidirectional reflectance was parameterized based on off-line 36-stream multiple scattering calculations while few other lookup tables were generated to describe the effective transmittance and reflectance of the cloud-clear-sky coupling system in solar spectral region. The bidirectional reflectance or the irradiance measured by satellite may be calculated using a simple fast radiative transfer model providing the type of cloud (ice or water), optical depth of the cloud, optical depth of both atmospheric trace gases above and below clouds, particle size of the cloud, as well

  6. Radiative transfer equations in broad-band, time-varying fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J.; Zoller, P.

    1984-01-01

    A derivation of the equation of transfer is obtained by starting with Maxwell's equations in the 'slowly varying envelope' form. Particular attention is paid to characterizing the intensity that is 'seen' by the atom (which is found to be related to a Wigner distribution of the electric field). The equation of transfer is found to be valid for 'broad-band' slowly varying radiation fields.

  7. Radiative transfer in spatially heterogeneous, two-dimensional anisotropically scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, G. L.

    1986-07-01

    A method is presented for solving the radiative transfer equation for a general anisotropically scattering and emitting medium exposed to arbitrary boundary radiation conditions. The method allows, in principle, for quite arbitrary spatial variability in the scattering and extinction and general solution procedures, based on the principles of invariant imbedding, which are applied in the form of doubling algorithms to obtain solutions for optically thick media. Some selected results are shown to demonstrate the versatility of the approach.

  8. Theory of Radiation Transfer in Neutron Star Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavlin, Vyacheslav

    2006-01-01

    The possibility for direct investigation of thermal emission from isolated neutron stars opened about a quarter of century ago with the launch of the first X-ray observatories Einstein and EXOSAT stimulated developing models of the neutron star surface radiation which began at the end of 80's. Confronting observational data with theoretical models of thermal emission allows one to infer the surface temperatures, magnetic fields, chemical composition, and neutron star masses and radii. This information, supplemented with the model equations of state and neutron star cooling models, provides an opportunity to understand the fundamental properties of the superdense matter in the stars' interiors. Almost all available models are based on the assumption that thermal radiation emitted by a neutron star is formed in the superficial star's layers--atmosphere. The neutron star atmospheres are very different from those of usual stars due to the immense gravity and huge magnetic fields. In this presentation we review the current status of the neutron star atmosphere modeling, present most important results, discuss problems and possible future developments.

  9. Polarization and spectral characteristics of the two-photon luminescence from colloidal gold nanoparticles excited by tunable laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yashunin, D. A. Korytin, A. I.; Stepanov, A. N.

    2015-12-15

    We have experimentally studied two-photon luminescence from a colloidal solution of spherical gold nanoparticles by tuning the wavelength of the exciting radiation. The measured polarization and spectral characteristics of the two-photon luminescence signal show that the observed nonlinear optical response is determined by the dimers present in the solution with a concentration of a few percent of total nanoparticle number.

  10. Influence of dust charge fluctuation and polarization force on radiative condensation instability of magnetized gravitating dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, R. P.; Bhakta, S.

    2015-10-01

    The influence of dust charge fluctuation, thermal speed and polarization force due to massive charged dust grains is studied on the radiative condensation instability (RCI) of magnetized self-gravitating astrophysical dusty (complex) plasma. The dynamics of the charged dust and inertialess electrons are considered while the Boltzmann distributed ions are assumed to be thermal. The dusty fluid model is formulated and the general dispersion relations are derived analytically using the plane wave solutions under the long wavelength limits in both the presence and the absence of dust charge fluctuations. The combined effects of polarization force, dust thermal speed, dust charge fluctuation and dust cyclotron frequency are observed on the low frequency wave modes and radiative modified Jeans Instability. The classical criterion of RCI is also derived which remains unaffected due to the presence of these parameters. Numerical calculations have been performed to calculate the growth rate of the system and plotted graphically. We find that dust charge fluctuation, radiative cooling and polarization force have destabilizing while dust thermal speed and dust cyclotron frequency have stabilizing influence on the growth rate of Jeans instability. The results have been applied to understand the radiative cooling process in dusty molecular cloud when both the dust charging and polarization force are dominant.

  11. Analysis of polarization observables and radiative effects for the reaction p-bar+p{yields}e{sup +}+e{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Gakh, G. I.; Merenkov, N. P.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.

    2011-04-15

    The expressions for the differential cross section and polarization observables for the reaction p-bar+p{yields}e{sup +}+e{sup -} are given in terms of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors in the laboratory system, assuming the one-photon exchange. Radiative corrections due to the emission of virtual and real soft photons from the leptons are also calculated. Unlike in the center-of-mass system, they depend on the scattering angle. Polarization effects are derived in the case when the antiproton beam, the target, and the electron in the final state are polarized. Numerical estimations have been done for all observables, using models for the nucleon electromagnetic form factors in the time-like region. The radiative corrections to the differential cross section are calculated as functions of the beam energy and electron angle.

  12. Radiative heat transfer in molten and glassy obsidian

    SciTech Connect

    Gable, C.W.; Shankland, T.J.

    1984-08-10

    We have measured optical transmittance spectra in rhyolitic obsidian samples in the wavelength range lambda = 380-5500 nm and at temperatures T from 19/sup 0/-1145/sup 0/C, above and below the softening point. From the transmittance, we calculated the absorption coefficient ..cap alpha..(lambda,T) and the radiative thermal conductivity K/sub R/(T). K/sub R/ ranges from 3 x 10/sup -3/ cal cm/sup -1/s/sup -1/K/sup -1/ (1.2Wm/sup -1/K/sup -1/) at 700/sup 0/C to 12 x 10/sup -3/ cal cm/sup -1/s/sup -1/K/sup -1/(5Wm/sup -1/K/sup -1/) at 1145/sup 0/C. The 700/sup 0/C value is comparable with lattice thermal conductivity K/sub L/ of about 4 x 10/sup -3/ cal cm/sup -1/ s/sup -1/K/sup -1/(1.7 Wm/sup -1/K/sup -1/). Removing scattering effects due to bubbles from the transmittance spectra by lowering the absorption baseline increased K/sub R/ to 20 x 10/sup -3/ cal cm/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ K/sup -1/(8.4Wm/sup -1/K/sup -1/) at 1145/sup 0/C. Because scattering bubbles is likely to be small in confined magmas, these numbers are probably minimum values for K/sub R/ and indicate that in active plutons radiative heat transport could be greater than lattice conductivity by more than a factor of 2 at 1000/sup 0/C. Thus melting markedly strengthens K/sub R/, and radiative heat transport is probably the dominant component of the total conductivity K = K/sub L/+K/sub R/ in silicic magmas. These relatively large values of K can be applied to models of the thermal evolution of magma bodies and to cooling of intrusives.

  13. Polarized and persistent Ca²⁺ plumes define loci for formation of wall ingrowth papillae in transfer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-Ming; Imtiaz, Mohammad S; Laver, Derek R; McCurdy, David W; Offler, Christina E; van Helden, Dirk F; Patrick, John W

    2015-03-01

    Transfer cell morphology is characterized by a polarized ingrowth wall comprising a uniform wall upon which wall ingrowth papillae develop at right angles into the cytoplasm. The hypothesis that positional information directing construction of wall ingrowth papillae is mediated by Ca(2+) signals generated by spatiotemporal alterations in cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]cyt) of cells trans-differentiating to a transfer cell morphology was tested. This hypothesis was examined using Vicia faba cotyledons. On transferring cotyledons to culture, their adaxial epidermal cells synchronously trans-differentiate to epidermal transfer cells. A polarized and persistent Ca(2+) signal, generated during epidermal cell trans-differentiation, was found to co-localize with the site of ingrowth wall formation. Dampening Ca(2+) signal intensity, by withdrawing extracellular Ca(2+) or blocking Ca(2+) channel activity, inhibited formation of wall ingrowth papillae. Maintenance of Ca(2+) signal polarity and persistence depended upon a rapid turnover (minutes) of cytosolic Ca(2+) by co-operative functioning of plasma membrane Ca(2+)-permeable channels and Ca(2+)-ATPases. Viewed paradermally, and proximal to the cytosol-plasma membrane interface, the Ca(2+) signal was organized into discrete patches that aligned spatially with clusters of Ca(2+)-permeable channels. Mathematical modelling demonstrated that these patches of cytosolic Ca(2+) were consistent with inward-directed plumes of elevated [Ca(2+)]cyt. Plume formation depended upon an alternating distribution of Ca(2+)-permeable channels and Ca(2+)-ATPase clusters. On further inward diffusion, the Ca(2+) plumes coalesced into a uniform Ca(2+) signal. Blocking or dispersing the Ca(2+) plumes inhibited deposition of wall ingrowth papillae, while uniform wall formation remained unaltered. A working model envisages that cytosolic Ca(2+) plumes define the loci at which wall ingrowth papillae are deposited.

  14. Polarized and persistent Ca2+ plumes define loci for formation of wall ingrowth papillae in transfer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui-Ming; Imtiaz, Mohammad S.; Laver, Derek R.; McCurdy, David W.; Offler, Christina E.; van Helden, Dirk F.; Patrick, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Transfer cell morphology is characterized by a polarized ingrowth wall comprising a uniform wall upon which wall ingrowth papillae develop at right angles into the cytoplasm. The hypothesis that positional information directing construction of wall ingrowth papillae is mediated by Ca2+ signals generated by spatiotemporal alterations in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) of cells trans-differentiating to a transfer cell morphology was tested. This hypothesis was examined using Vicia faba cotyledons. On transferring cotyledons to culture, their adaxial epidermal cells synchronously trans-differentiate to epidermal transfer cells. A polarized and persistent Ca2+ signal, generated during epidermal cell trans-differentiation, was found to co-localize with the site of ingrowth wall formation. Dampening Ca2+ signal intensity, by withdrawing extracellular Ca2+ or blocking Ca2+ channel activity, inhibited formation of wall ingrowth papillae. Maintenance of Ca2+ signal polarity and persistence depended upon a rapid turnover (minutes) of cytosolic Ca2+ by co-operative functioning of plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable channels and Ca2+-ATPases. Viewed paradermally, and proximal to the cytosol–plasma membrane interface, the Ca2+ signal was organized into discrete patches that aligned spatially with clusters of Ca2+-permeable channels. Mathematical modelling demonstrated that these patches of cytosolic Ca2+ were consistent with inward-directed plumes of elevated [Ca2+]cyt. Plume formation depended upon an alternating distribution of Ca2+-permeable channels and Ca2+-ATPase clusters. On further inward diffusion, the Ca2+ plumes coalesced into a uniform Ca2+ signal. Blocking or dispersing the Ca2+ plumes inhibited deposition of wall ingrowth papillae, while uniform wall formation remained unaltered. A working model envisages that cytosolic Ca2+ plumes define the loci at which wall ingrowth papillae are deposited. PMID:25504137

  15. Three-dimensional radiation transfer modeling in a dicotyledon leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govaerts, Yves M.; Jacquemoud, Stéphane; Verstraete, Michel M.; Ustin, Susan L.

    1996-11-01

    The propagation of light in a typical dicotyledon leaf is investigated with a new Monte Carlo ray-tracing model. The three-dimensional internal cellular structure of the various leaf tissues, including the epidermis, the palisade parenchyma, and the spongy mesophyll, is explicitly described. Cells of different tissues are assigned appropriate morphologies and contain realistic amounts of water and chlorophyll. Each cell constituent is characterized by an index of refraction and an absorption coefficient. The objective of this study is to investigate how the internal three-dimensional structure of the tissues and the optical properties of cell constituents control the reflectance and transmittance of the leaf. Model results compare favorably with laboratory observations. The influence of the roughness of the epidermis on the reflection and absorption of light is investigated, and simulation results confirm that convex cells in the epidermis focus light on the palisade parenchyma and increase the absorption of radiation.

  16. Radiative transfer effects on reflected shock waves. II - Absorbing gas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, F. Y.; Olfe, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    Radiative cooling effects behind a reflected shock wave are calculated for an absorbing-emitting gas by means of an expansion procedure in the small density ratio across the shock front. For a gray gas shock layer with an optical thickness of order unity or less the absorption integral is simplified by use of the local temperature approximation, whereas for larger optical thicknesses a Rosseland diffusion type of solution is matched with the local temperature approximation solution. The calculations show that the shock wave will attenuate at first and then accelerate to a constant velocity. Under appropriate conditions the gas enthalpy near the wall may increase at intermediate times before ultimately decreasing to zero. A two-band absorption model yields end-wall radiant-heat fluxes which agree well with available shock-tube measurements.

  17. ANALYTICAL MODELS OF EXOPLANETARY ATMOSPHERES. II. RADIATIVE TRANSFER VIA THE TWO-STREAM APPROXIMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Heng, Kevin; Mendonça, João M.; Lee, Jae-Min E-mail: joao.mendonca@csh.unibe.ch

    2014-11-01

    We present a comprehensive analytical study of radiative transfer using the method of moments and include the effects of non-isotropic scattering in the coherent limit. Within this unified formalism, we derive the governing equations and solutions describing two-stream radiative transfer (which approximates the passage of radiation as a pair of outgoing and incoming fluxes), flux-limited diffusion (which describes radiative transfer in the deep interior), and solutions for the temperature-pressure profiles. Generally, the problem is mathematically underdetermined unless a set of closures (Eddington coefficients) is specified. We demonstrate that the hemispheric (or hemi-isotropic) closure naturally derives from the radiative transfer equation if energy conservation is obeyed, while the Eddington closure produces spurious enhancements of both reflected light and thermal emission. We concoct recipes for implementing two-stream radiative transfer in stand-alone numerical calculations and general circulation models. We use our two-stream solutions to construct toy models of the runaway greenhouse effect. We present a new solution for temperature-pressure profiles with a non-constant optical opacity and elucidate the effects of non-isotropic scattering in the optical and infrared. We derive generalized expressions for the spherical and Bond albedos and the photon deposition depth. We demonstrate that the value of the optical depth corresponding to the photosphere is not always 2/3 (Milne's solution) and depends on a combination of stellar irradiation, internal heat, and the properties of scattering in both the optical and infrared. Finally, we derive generalized expressions for the total, net, outgoing, and incoming fluxes in the convective regime.

  18. Natural element method for radiative heat transfer in a semitransparent medium with irregular geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2013-05-01

    This paper develops a numerical solution to the radiative heat transfer problem coupled with conduction in an absorbing, emitting and isotropically scattering medium with the irregular geometries using the natural element method (NEM). The walls of the enclosures, having temperature and mixed boundary conditions, are considered to be opaque, diffuse as well as gray. The NEM as a meshless method is a new numerical scheme in the field of computational mechanics. Different from most of other meshless methods such as element-free Galerkin method or those based on radial basis functions, the shape functions used in NEM are constructed by the natural neighbor interpolations, which are strictly interpolant and the essential boundary conditions can be imposed directly. The natural element solutions in dealing with the coupled heat transfer problem for the mixed boundary conditions have been validated by comparison with those from Monte Carlo method (MCM) generated by the authors. For the validation of the NEM solution to radiative heat transfer in the semicircular medium with an inner circle, the results by NEM have been compared with those reported in the literatures. For pure radiative transfer, the upwind scheme is employed to overcome the oscillatory behavior of the solutions in some conditions. The steady state and transient heat transfer problem combined with radiation and conduction in the semicircular enclosure with an inner circle are studied. Effects of various parameters such as the extinction coefficient, the scattering albedo, the conduction-radiation parameter and the boundary emissivity are analyzed on the radiative and conductive heat fluxes and transient temperature distributions.

  19. Performance tuning Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on Intel Xeon Phi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielikainen, Jarno; Huang, Bormin; Huang, Allen H.

    2015-10-01

    Next-generation mesoscale numerical weather prediction system, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, is a designed for dual use for forecasting and research. WRF offers multiple physics options that can be combined in any way. One of the physics options is radiance computation. The major source for energy for the earth's climate is solar radiation. Thus, it is imperative to accurately model horizontal and vertical distribution of the heating. Goddard solar radiative transfer model includes the absorption duo to water vapor,ozone, ozygen, carbon dioxide, clouds and aerosols. The model computes the interactions among the absorption and scattering by clouds, aerosols, molecules and surface. Finally, fluxes are integrated over the entire longwave spectrum.In this paper, we present our results of optimizing the Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on Intel Many Integrated Core Architecture (MIC) hardware. The Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor is the first product based on Intel MIC architecture, and it consists of up to 61 cores connected by a high performance on-die bidirectional interconnect. The coprocessor supports all important Intel development tools. Thus, the development environment is familiar one to a vast number of CPU developers. Although, getting a maximum performance out of MICs will require using some novel optimization techniques. Those optimization techniques are discusses in this paper. The optimizations improved the performance of the original Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on Xeon Phi 7120P by a factor of 2.2x. Furthermore, the same optimizations improved the performance of the Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme on a dual socket configuration of eight core Intel Xeon E5-2670 CPUs by a factor of 2.1x compared to the original Goddard longwave radiative transfer scheme code.

  20. The Radiative Transfer Of CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2} Plasma Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Benallal, R.; Liani, B.

    2008-09-23

    Any physical modelling of a circuit-breaker arc therefore requires an understanding of the radiated energy which is taken into account in the form of a net coefficient. The evaluation of the net emission coefficient is performed by the knowledge of the chemical plasma composition and the resolution of the radiative transfer equation. In this paper, the total radiation which escapes from a CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2} plasma is calculated in the temperature range between 5000 and 30000K on the assumption of a local thermodynamic equilibrium and we have studied the nitrogen effect in the hydrocarbon plasmas.