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Sample records for pole kunagi kllalt

  1. Inflatable Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swan, Scott A.

    1995-01-01

    Lightweight, portable tool reaches object at height or across gap. Extends reach up to 20 feet (6 meters). When not in use, tool collapses to 3 to 5 percent of its inflated length. Developed for use as self-rescue device by astronaut who becomes untethered outside spacecraft: astronaut uses pole to reach grapple on spacecraft and pull to it. Useful on Earth as rescue device or in performing routine tasks like changing high light bulb without ladder. When task with inflatable pole completed, operator opens vent valve to deflate tube. Operator then opens gun, removes fabric cover, and repacks tube.

  2. Magnet pole tips

    DOEpatents

    Thorn, Craig E.; Chasman, Chellis; Baltz, Anthony J.

    1984-04-24

    An improved magnet which more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

  3. Magnet pole tips

    DOEpatents

    Thorn, C.E.; Chasman, C.; Baltz, A.J.

    1981-11-19

    An improved magnet more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

  4. Lunar South Pole Illumination

    NASA Video Gallery

    Simulated illumination conditions over the lunar South Pole region, from ~80°S to the pole. The movie runs for 28 days, centered on the LCROSS impact date on October 9th, 2009. The illumination ca...

  5. The Totem Pole Recycled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewall, Susan Breyer

    1991-01-01

    Presents an activity that integrates science, environmental education, art, and social studies. Students identify and research an endangered species and construct a totem pole depicting the species using a recyclable material. (MDH)

  6. Periodically poled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Jalali, Bahram

    2009-03-01

    We propose a new class of photonic devices based on periodic stress fields in silicon that enable second-order nonlinearity as well as quasi-phase matching. Periodically poled silicon (PePSi) adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on second-order nonlinear effects. As an example of the utility of the PePSi technology, we present simulations showing that midwave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50%.

  7. Neptune's 'Hot' South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    These thermal images show a 'hot' south pole on the planet Neptune. These warmer temperatures provide an avenue for methane to escape out of the deep atmosphere.

    The images were obtained with the Very Large Telescope in Chile, using an imager/spectrometer for mid-infrared wavelengths on Sept. 1 and 2, 2006. The telescope is operated by the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (known as ESO).

    Scientists say Neptune's south pole is 'hotter' than anywhere else on the planet by about 10 degrees Celsius (50 degrees Fahrenheit). The average temperature on Neptune is about minus 200 degrees Celsius (minus 392 degrees Fahrenheit).

    The upper left image samples temperatures near the top of Neptune's troposphere (near 100 millibar pressure, which is one-tenth the Earth atmospheric pressure at sea level). The hottest temperatures are indicated at the lower part of the image, at Neptune's south pole (see the graphic at the upper right). The lower two images, taken 6.3 hours apart, sample temperatures at higher altitudes in Neptune's stratosphere. They do show generally warmer temperatures near, but not at, the south pole. They also show a distinct warm area which can be seen in the lower left image and rotated completely around the back of the planet and returned to the earth-facing hemisphere in the lower right image.

  8. Pole pulling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    McIntire, Gary L.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus for removal of embedded utility-type poles which removes the poles quickly and efficiently from their embedded position without damage to the pole or surrounding structures. The apparatus includes at least 2 piston/cylinder members equally spaced about the pole, and a head member affixed to the top of each piston. Elongation of the piston induces rotation of the head into the pole to increase the gripping action and reduce slippage. Repeated actuation and retraction of the piston and head member will "jack" the pole from its embedded position.

  9. A LINE POLE 3, HISTORIC POLE WITH ORIGINAL GLASS PINTYPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A LINE POLE 3, HISTORIC POLE WITH ORIGINAL GLASS PIN-TYPE INSULATORS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Mystic Lake Hydroelectric Facility, Electric Transmission A Line, Along West Rosebud Creek, Fishtail, Stillwater County, MT

  10. A LINE POLE 20, STUBBED HISTORIC POLE WITH ORIGINAL GLASS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A LINE POLE 20, STUBBED HISTORIC POLE WITH ORIGINAL GLASS PIN-TYPE INSULATORS AND INTACT COMMUNICATION LINE CROSS ARM. VIEW TO WEST. - Mystic Lake Hydroelectric Facility, Electric Transmission A Line, Along West Rosebud Creek, Fishtail, Stillwater County, MT

  11. Single phase two pole/six pole motor

    DOEpatents

    Kirschbaum, Herbert S.

    1984-01-01

    A single phase alternating current two pole/six pole motor is provided with a main stator winding having six coils disposed unequally around the periphery of the machine. These coils are divided into two groups. When these groups are connected such that their magnetomotive forces are additive, two pole motor operation results. When the polarity of one of the groups is then reversed, six pole motor operation results. An auxiliary stator winding which is similar to the main stator winding is displaced from the main stator winding by 90 electrical degrees on a two pole basis.

  12. Single phase two pole/six pole motor

    DOEpatents

    Kirschbaum, H.S.

    1984-09-25

    A single phase alternating current two pole/six pole motor is provided with a main stator winding having six coils disposed unequally around the periphery of the machine. These coils are divided into two groups. When these groups are connected such that their magnetomotive forces are additive, two pole motor operation results. When the polarity of one of the groups is then reversed, six pole motor operation results. An auxiliary stator winding which is similar to the main stator winding is displaced from the main stator winding by 90 electrical degrees on a two pole basis. 12 figs.

  13. Rad Pole Cam Development

    SciTech Connect

    Heckendorn, F. M.; Odell, D. M. C; Harpring, L. J.; Peterson, K. D.

    2005-10-05

    The RadPoleCam was developed to provide Department Of Energy (DOE) first responders the capability to assess the radiological and visual condition of remote or inaccessible locations. Real time gamma isotopic identification is provided to the first responder in the form of audio feedback (i.e. spoken through head phones) from a gamma detector mounted on a collapsible pole that can extend from 1 to 9 meters (6 to 29 feet). Simultaneously, selectable direct and side looking visual images are provided from the 5cm (2in) diameter, waterproof probe tip. The lightweight, self contained, ruggedized, system will provide a rapidly deployable field system for visual and radiological search and assessment of confined spaces and extended reach locations.

  14. South Pole Telescope optics.

    PubMed

    Padin, S; Staniszewski, Z; Keisler, R; Joy, M; Stark, A A; Ade, P A R; Aird, K A; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; Dobbs, M A; Halverson, N W; Heimsath, S; Hills, R E; Holzapfel, W L; Lawrie, C; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Leong, J; Lu, W; Lueker, M; McMahon, J J; Meyer, S S; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Ruhl, J E; Schaffer, K K; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Vieira, J D

    2008-08-20

    The South Pole Telescope is a 10 m diameter, wide-field, offset Gregorian telescope with a 966-pixel, millimeter-wave, bolometer array receiver. The telescope has an unusual optical system with a cold stop around the secondary. The design emphasizes low scattering and low background loading. All the optical components except the primary are cold, and the entire beam from prime focus to the detectors is surrounded by cold absorber. PMID:18716649

  15. South Pole Telescope optics.

    PubMed

    Padin, S; Staniszewski, Z; Keisler, R; Joy, M; Stark, A A; Ade, P A R; Aird, K A; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; Dobbs, M A; Halverson, N W; Heimsath, S; Hills, R E; Holzapfel, W L; Lawrie, C; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Leong, J; Lu, W; Lueker, M; McMahon, J J; Meyer, S S; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Ruhl, J E; Schaffer, K K; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Vieira, J D

    2008-08-20

    The South Pole Telescope is a 10 m diameter, wide-field, offset Gregorian telescope with a 966-pixel, millimeter-wave, bolometer array receiver. The telescope has an unusual optical system with a cold stop around the secondary. The design emphasizes low scattering and low background loading. All the optical components except the primary are cold, and the entire beam from prime focus to the detectors is surrounded by cold absorber.

  16. Mercury's South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Mercury's south pole was photographed by one of Mariner 10's TV cameras as the spacecraft made its second close flyby of the planet September 21. The pole is located inside the large crater (180 kilometers, 110 miles) on Mercury's limb (lower center). The crater floor is shadowed and its far rim, illuminated by the sun, appears to de disconnected from the edge of the planet. Just above and to the right of the South Pole is a double ring basin about 100 kilometers (125 miles) in diameter. A bright ray system, splashed out of a 50 kilometer (30 mile) crater is seen at upper right. The stripe across the top is an artifact introduced during computer processing. The picture (FDS 166902) was taken from a distance of 85,800 kilometers (53,200 miles) less than two hours after Mariner 10 reached its closest point to the planet.

    The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  17. Six pole/eight pole single-phase motor

    DOEpatents

    Kirschbaum, Herbert S.

    1984-01-01

    A single phase alternating current electric motor is provided with a main stator winding having two coil groups which are connected to form eight poles for eight-pole operation and to form six poles for six-pole operation. Each group contains four series connected coil elements with each element spanning approximately one-seventh of the periphery of the machine. The coil groups are spaced 180 mechanical degrees apart such that each end coil of one group overlaps one of the end coils of the other group. An auxiliary stator winding having two coil groups with the same relative angular displacement as the main stator winding coil groups is included.

  18. Periodically poled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-02-01

    Bulk centrosymmetric silicon lacks second-order optical nonlinearity χ(2) - a foundational component of nonlinear optics. Here, we propose a new class of photonic device which enables χ(2) as well as quasi-phase matching based on periodic stress fields in silicon - periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). This concept adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics, and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on χ(2)) effects. The concept can also be simply achieved by having periodic arrangement of stressed thin films along a silicon waveguide. As an example of the utility, we present simulations showing that mid-wave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50% based on χ(2) values measurements for strained silicon reported in the literature [Jacobson et al. Nature 441, 199 (2006)]. The use of PePSi for frequency conversion can also be extended to terahertz generation. With integrated piezoelectric material, dynamically control of χ(2)nonlinearity in PePSi waveguide may also be achieved. The successful realization of PePSi based devices depends on the strength of the stress induced χ(2) in silicon. Presently, there exists a significant discrepancy in the literature between the theoretical and experimentally measured values. We present a simple theoretical model that produces result consistent with prior theoretical works and use this model to identify possible reasons for this discrepancy.

  19. The South Pole Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhl, J.E.; Ade, P.A.R.; Carlstrom, J.E.; Cho, H.M.; Crawford,T.; Dobbs, M.; Greer, C.H.; Halverson, N.W.; Holzapfel, W.L.; Lanting,T.M.; Lee, A.T.; Leitch, E.M.; Leong, J.; Lu, W.; Lueker, M.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S.S.; Mohr, J.J.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Runyan, M.C.; Schwan, D.; Sharp, M.K.; Spieler, H.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A.A.

    2004-11-04

    A new 10 meter diameter telescope is being constructed for deployment at the NSF South Pole research station. The telescope is designed for conducting large-area millimeter and sub-millimeter wave surveys of faint, low contrast emission, as required to map primary and secondary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. To achieve the required sensitivity and resolution, the telescope design employs an off-axis primary with a 10 m diameter clear aperture. The full aperture and the associated optics will have a combined surface accuracy of better than 20 microns rms to allow precision operation in the submillimeter atmospheric windows. The telescope will be surrounded with a large reflecting ground screen to reduce sensitivity to thermal emission from the ground and local interference. The optics of the telescope will support a square degree field of view at 2mm wavelength and will feed a new 1000-element micro-lithographed planar bolometric array with superconducting transition-edge sensors and frequency-multiplexed readouts. The first key project will be to conduct a survey over 4000 degrees for galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect. This survey should find many thousands of clusters with a mass selection criteria that is remarkably uniform with redshift. Armed with redshifts obtained from optical and infrared follow-up observations, it is expected that the survey will enable significant constraints to be placed on the equation of state of the dark energy.

  20. Lightweight extendable and retractable pole

    DOEpatents

    Warren, J.L.; Brandt, J.E.

    1994-08-02

    A lightweight extendable and retractable telescopic pole is disclosed comprising a plurality of non-metallic telescoping cylinders with sliding and sealing surfaces between the cylinders, a first plug member on the upper end of the smallest cylinder, and a second plug member on the lower end of the largest cylinder, whereby fluid pressure admitted to the largest cylinder will cause the telescoping cylinders to slide relative to one another causing the pole to extend. An elastomeric member connects the first plug member with one of the intermediate cylinders to urge the cylinders back into a collapsed position when the fluid pressure in the cylinders is vented. Annular elastomer members are provided which seal one cylinder to another when the pole is fully extended and further serve to provide a cushion to prevent damage to the cylinders when the pole is urged back into its retractable position by the elastomeric members and the venting of the pressure. A value mechanism associated with the pole is provided to admit a fluid under pressure to the interior of the telescoping cylinders of the pole while pressurizing a pressure relief port having an opening larger than the inlet port in a closed position whereby removal of the pressure on the relief port will cause the relief port to open to quickly lower the pressure in the interior of the telescoping cylinders to thereby assist in the rapid retraction of the extended pole. 18 figs.

  1. Lightweight extendable and retractable pole

    DOEpatents

    Warren, John L.; Brandt, James E.

    1994-01-01

    A lightweight extendable and retractable telescopic pole is disclosed comprising a plurality of non-metallic telescoping cylinders with sliding and sealing surfaces between the cylinders, a first plug member on the upper end of the smallest cylinder, and a second plug member on the lower end of the largest cylinder, whereby fluid pressure admitted to the largest cylinder will cause the telescoping cylinders to slide relative to one another causing the pole to extend. An elastomeric member connects the first plug member with one of the intermediate cylinders to urge the cylinders back into a collapsed position when the fluid pressure in the cylinders is vented. Annular elastomer members are provided which seal one cylinder to another when the pole is fully extended and further serve to provide a cushion to prevent damage to the cylinders when the pole is urged back into its retractable position by the elastomeric members and the venting of the pressure. A value mechanism associated with the pole is provided to admit a fluid under pressure to the interior of the telescoping cylinders of the pole while pressurizing a pressure relief port having an opening larger than the inlet port in a closed position whereby removal of the pressure on the relief port will cause the relief port to open to quickly lower the pressure in the interior of the telescoping cylinders to thereby assist in the rapid retraction of the extended pole.

  2. Recycling of treated wood poles

    SciTech Connect

    Fansham, P.

    1995-11-01

    There are approximately 150 million utilities poles in service in North America. Of the 3 million poles removed from service each year, many poles still contain a sound and structurally intact core and only the outer layer has deteriorated. Since most of the old poles are treated with either pentachlorophenol or creosote there are limited disposal options available to pole users. The practice of giving old poles away to farmers or other interested parties in falling into disfavour since this practice does not absolve the utility of the environmental liability associated with the treated wood. TWT has commercialised a thermolysis (Pyrolysis) based process capable of removing oil based preservatives from treated wood. The patented process involves: the shaving of the weathered pole exterior; the rapid distillation of oil based preservatives in an oxygen depleted environment; condensation of the vapours; and separation of liquids. TWT has constructed a 30,000 pole per year facility east of Calgary and has provided recycled poles for the construction of two power lines now in use by TransAlta Utilities Corporation, Canada`s largest investor owned electric utility. TWT has tested two thermolysis (Pyrolysis) technologies and has determined that contact thermolysis using a heated auger design performed better and with less plugging than a fast fluid bed reactor. The fluid bed reactor is prone to coke formation and contamination of the oil by fine char particles. Residual PCP concentration in the shavings was reduced from 9500 ppm to 10 ppm. Leachate testing on the char yielded a PCP concentration of 1.43 ppm in the Leachate, well below the EPA standard maximum of 100 ppm.

  3. Six pole/eight pole single-phase motor

    DOEpatents

    Kirschbaum, H.S.

    1984-07-31

    A single phase alternating current electric motor is provided with a main stator winding having two coil groups which are connected to form eight poles for eight-pole operation and to form six poles for six-pole operation. Each group contains four series connected coil elements with each element spanning approximately one-seventh of the periphery of the machine. The coil groups are spaced 180 mechanical degrees apart such that each end coil of one group overlaps one of the end coils of the other group. An auxiliary stator winding having two coil groups with the same relative angular displacement as the main stator winding coil groups is included. 10 figs.

  4. Single phase four pole/six pole motor

    DOEpatents

    Kirschbaum, H.S.

    1984-10-09

    A single phase alternating current electric motor is provided with a main stator winding having two coil groups each including the series connection of three coils. These coil groups can be connected in series for six pole operation and in parallel for four pole operation. The coils are approximately equally spaced around the periphery of the machine but are not of equal numbers of turns. The two coil groups are identically wound and spaced 180 mechanical degrees apart. One coil of each group has more turns and a greater span than the other two coils. 10 figs.

  5. Single phase four pole/six pole motor

    DOEpatents

    Kirschbaum, Herbert S.

    1984-01-01

    A single phase alternating current electric motor is provided with a main stator winding having two coil groups each including the series connection of three coils. These coil groups can be connected in series for six pole operation and in parallel for four pole operation. The coils are approximately equally spaced around the periphery of the machine but are not of equal numbers of turns. The two coil groups are identically wound and spaced 180 mechanical degrees apart. One coil of each group has more turns and a greater span than the other two coils.

  6. Calligraphic Poling for WGM Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohageg, Makan; Strekalov, Dmitry; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    By engineering the geometry of a nonlinear optical crystal, the effective efficiency of all nonlinear optical oscillations can be increased dramatically. Specifically, sphere and disk shaped crystal resonators have been used to demonstrate nonlinear optical oscillations at sub-milliwatt input power when cs light propagates in a Whispering Gallery Mode (WGM) of such a resonant cavity. in terms of both device production and experimentation in quantum optics, some nonlinear optical effects with naturally high efficiency can occult the desired nonlinear scattering process. the structure to the crystal resonator. In this paper, I will discuss a new method for generating poling structures in ferroelectric crystal resonators called calligraphic poling. The details of the poling apparatus, experimental results and speculation on future applications will be discussed.

  7. Calligraphic Poling of Ferroelectric Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohageg, Makan; Strekalov, Dmitry; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Adrey; Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Calligraphic poling is a technique for generating an arbitrary, possibly complex pattern of localized reversal in the direction of permanent polarization in a wafer of LiNbO3 or other ferroelectric material. The technique is so named because it involves a writing process in which a sharp electrode tip is moved across a surface of the wafer to expose the wafer to a polarizing electric field in the desired pattern. The technique is implemented by use of an apparatus, denoted a calligraphic poling machine (CPM), that includes the electrode and other components as described in more detail below.

  8. Mechanical behaviour of cross-country ski racing poles during double poling.

    PubMed

    Stöggl, Thomas; Karlöf, Lars

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the behaviour of cross-country ski poles during double poling on a treadmill using three-dimensional kinematics. The results were compared with standard laboratory tests of the pole manufacturers. A total of 18 skiers were analysed at two speeds (85% and 95% of the maximal speed) at grades of 1.5% and 7%. Variables describing cycle characteristics, bending stiffness, bending behaviour, and trajectories of the pole markers were analysed. Triangular-shaped poles demonstrated the greatest stiffness and lowest variability in maximal bending. Softer poles demonstrated greater variability in bending behaviour and lost ground contact at high skiing speeds, which for some skiers resulted in failure to complete high-speed tests. Considerable variations in pole behaviour for similar poles between skiers were observed, which might be attributed to differences in technique, indicating that mechanical properties of the poles did not exclusively determine pole behaviour in the dynamic situation. The greatest magnitude of pole bending was in the middle part of the pole, which differed from the standard static pole analysis of the manufacturer. Increases in grade demonstrated the greatest effect on pole bending. Distinct differences from the pole manufacturers' laboratory measures were apparent, suggesting that basic pole testing might be adapted.

  9. Method and apparatus for assembling a permanent magnet pole assembly

    DOEpatents

    Carl, Jr., Ralph James; Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Dawson, Richard Nils; Qu, Ronghai; Avanesov, Mikhail Avramovich

    2009-08-11

    A pole assembly for a rotor, the pole assembly includes a permanent magnet pole including at least one permanent magnet block, a plurality of laminations including a pole cap mechanically coupled to the pole, and a plurality of laminations including a base plate mechanically coupled to the pole.

  10. A LINE POLE 77A, HISTORIC POLE WITH HISTORIC REPLACEMENT PINTYPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A LINE POLE 77A, HISTORIC POLE WITH HISTORIC REPLACEMENT PIN-TYPE INSULATORS MADE OF BROWN PORCELAIN. VIEW TO WEST-SOUTHWEST. - Mystic Lake Hydroelectric Facility, Electric Transmission A Line, Along West Rosebud Creek, Fishtail, Stillwater County, MT

  11. Tectonic Maps of the Poles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These tectonic relief maps of the north (left, view large [540k]) and south (right, view large [411k]) poles are the result of new satellite-based technologies which are being used to analyze tectonic activity in the Earth's crust. These maps, known as Digital Tectonic Activity Maps (DTAMs), synoptically depict the architecture of the Earth's crust including current and past tectonic activity. This is significant because it permits researchers to view broad zones of activity over the entire surface of the Earth, rather than focusing on single boundary features. By looking at these 'big pictures,' scientists can possibly identify regions of activity which were not previously recognized or mapped using traditional methods. For more information, see: DTAM web site Putting Earthquakes in Their Place Images courtesy Brian Montgomery, NASA GSFC; data by Paul Lowman and Jacob Yates, NASA GSFC

  12. Vibration Monitoring of Power Distribution Poles

    SciTech Connect

    Clark Scott; Gail Heath; John Svoboda

    2006-04-01

    Some of the most visible and least monitored elements of our national security infrastructure are the poles and towers used for the distribution of our nation’s electrical power. Issues surrounding these elements within the United States include safety such as unauthorized climbing and access, vandalism such as nut/bolt removal or destructive small arms fire, and major vandalism such as the downing of power poles and towers by the cutting of the poles with a chainsaw or torches. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has an ongoing research program working to develop inexpensive and sensitive sensor platforms for the monitoring and characterization of damage to the power distribution infrastructure. This presentation covers the results from the instrumentation of a variety of power poles and wires with geophone assemblies and the recording of vibration data when power poles were subjected to a variety of stimuli. Initial results indicate that, for the majority of attacks against power poles, the resulting signal can be seen not only on the targeted pole but on sensors several poles away in the distribution network and a distributed sensor system can be used to monitor remote and critical structures.

  13. 78 FR 52868 - Pole Attachment Complaint Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... regulations concerning pole attachments outlined in the DATES section. DATES: Effective August 27, 2013, the amendments to Sec. Sec. 1.1403(e) and 1.1404 published at 63 FR 12025, March 12, 1998,have been approved by... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 1 Pole Attachment Complaint Procedures AGENCY: Federal Communications...

  14. Macro Fiber Piezocomposite Actuator Poling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudy J.; Bryant, Robert G.; Manos, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    The performance and advantages of Piezocomposite Actuators are to provide a low cost, in-situ actuator/sensor that is flexible, low profile and high strain per volt performance in the same plane of poled voltage. This paper extends reported data for the performance of these Macrofiber Composite (MFC) Actuators to include 4 progressively narrower Intedigitized electrode configurations with several line widths and spacing ratios. Data is reported for max free strain, average strain per applied volt, poling (alignment of the electric dipoles of the PZT ceramic) voltage vs. strain and capacitance, time to poling voltage 95% saturation. The output strain per volt progressively increases as electrode spacing decreases, with saturation occurring at lower poling voltages. The narrowest spacing ratio becomes prone to voltage breakdown or short circuits limiting the spacing width with current fabrication methods. The capacitance generally increases with increasing poling voltage level but has high sensitivity to factors such as temperature, moisture and time from poling which limit its usefulness as a simple indicator. The total time of applied poling voltage to saturate or fully line up the dipoles in the piezoceramic was generally on the order of 5-20 seconds. Less sensitivity to poling due to the applied rate of voltage increase over a 25 to 500 volt/second rate range was observed.

  15. Pole position studied with artificial earth satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1972-01-01

    Long-arc orbit computation of highest accuracy can provide pole positions. Optical Baker-Nunn and laser range observations of several satellites are combined. The accuracy of the pole position is comparable to that of the mean satellite-tracking station coordinates (plus or minus 5 m) when sufficient tracking data are available. Exploitation of the technique requires more accurate tracking data.

  16. 47 CFR 32.2411 - Poles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Poles. 32.2411 Section 32.2411 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2411 Poles. This...

  17. 47 CFR 32.2411 - Poles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Poles. 32.2411 Section 32.2411 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2411 Poles. This...

  18. Pole placement with constant gain output feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, B.; Lindorff, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Given a linear time invariant multivariable system with m inputs and p outputs, it was shown that p closed loop poles of the system can be preassigned arbitrarily using constant gain output feedback provided (A circumflex, B circumflex) is controllable. These data show that if (A circumflex, B circumflex, C circumflex) is controllable and observable, and Rank B circumflex = m, Rank C circumflex = p, then max (m,p) poles of the system can be assigned arbitarily using constant gain output feedback. Further, it is shown that in some cases more than max (m,p) poles can be arbitrarily assigned. A least square design technique is outlined to approximate the desired pole locations when it is not possible to place all the poles.

  19. What does the "mean pole" mean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, J. C.; Petit, G.; Luzum, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Rotational deformation (also called the pole tide) is the response of the solid earth and ocean to the Earth's wobble, which includes gravitational and surface displacement components. An important part of the model is the Conventional Mean Pole, which is required to remove the slow variation in the polar motion. This ensures that the rotational deformation model removes only the principal periodic motions (annual, Chandler and any other high frequency variations). Previously, no dependable mean pole product had been available. Consequently, for the 2010 Conventions, a cubic was fit to a filtered time series of polar motion and this model was adopted, along with a simple linear extrapolation into the future that was expected to be adequate until the next Conventions update. In light of the large changes in the mean pole due to recent ice mass losses, such extrapolations may not be reliable. To avoid this, the next Conventions update will include the use of a regularly updated mean pole table. Some subtleties in that choice will be noted. However, the original pole tide model was conceived when the mean pole was moving (more or less) linearly, largely in response to glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). With the recent ice mass losses, particularly in Greenland, this motion is decidedly non-linear, and it is unclear whether the pole tide model correctly reflects this new reality. There are questions as to whether the mean pole should be the slow variation as conceived currently or should it reflect only the long-term linear motion (either based on a GIA model or a linear fit over an appropriate time span).

  20. Feynman rules of higher-order poles in CHY construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rijun; Feng, Bo; Luo, Ming-xing; Zhu, Chuan-Jie

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we generalize the integration rules for scattering equations to situations where higher-order poles are present. We describe the strategy to deduce the Feynman rules of higher-order poles from known analytic results of simple CHY-integrands, and propose the Feynman rules for single double pole and triple pole as well as duplex-double pole and triplex-double pole structures. We demonstrate the validation and strength of these rules by ample non-trivial examples.

  1. Cold Hole Over Jupiter's Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Observations with two NASA telescopes show that Jupiter has an arctic polar vortex similar to a vortex over Earth's Antarctica that enables depletion of Earth's stratospheric ozone.

    These composite images of Jupiter's north polar region from the Hubble Space Telescope (right) and the Infrared Telescope Facility (left) show a quasi-hexagonal shape that extends vertically from the stratosphere down into the top of the troposphere. A sharp temperature drop, compared to surrounding air masses, creates an eastward wind that tends to keep the polar atmosphere, including the stratospheric haze, isolated from the rest of the atmosphere.

    The linear striations in the composite projections are artifacts of the image processing. The area closest to the pole has been omitted because it was too close to the edge of the planet in the original images to represent the planet reliably.

    The composite on the right combines images from the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 of the Hubble Space Telescope taken at a wavelength of 890 nanometers, which shows stratospheric haze particles.

    The sharp boundary and wave-like structure of the haze layer suggest a polar vortex and a similarity to Earth's stratospheric polar clouds. Images of Jupiter's thermal radiation clinch that identification. The composite on the left, for example, is made from images taken with Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mid-Infrared Large-Well Imager at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility at a wavelength of 17 microns. It shows polar air mass that is 5 to 6 degrees Celsius (9 to 10 degrees Fahrenheit) colder than its surroundings, with the same border as the stratospheric haze. Similar observations at other infrared wavelengths show the cold air mass extends at least as high as the middle stratosphere down to the top of the troposphere.

    These images were taken Aug. 11 through Aug. 13, 1999, near a time when Jupiter's north pole was most visible from Earth. Other Infrared Telescope Facility images at

  2. The pole tide in deep oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.

    1990-01-01

    The fluid-dynamical theory of the pole tide is examined by describing the oceanic response to the Chandler wobble and assessing its implications for mantle anelasticity and low-frequency ocean dynamics. The Laplace tide equations accounting for bottom friction are given, and a spherical harmonic approach is delineated in which the time-independent portion of the tide height is expanded. Pole-tide height and related inertia products are linearly proportional to wobble amplitude, and the final equations are modified to account for mantle elasticity and oceanic loading. Results for pole tide effects are given for various earth models with attention to the role of boundary constraints. A dynamic effect is identified which lengthens the Chandler period by about 1 day more than static lengthening, a contribution that suggests a vigorous low-frequency response. The values derived are shown to agree with previous models that do not incorporate the effects of the pole tide.

  3. Assessment of structural integrity of wooden poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craighead, Ian A.; Thackery, Steve; Redstall, Martin; Thomas, Matthew R.

    2000-05-01

    Despite recent advances in the development of new materials, wood continues to be used globally for the support of overhead cable networks used by telecommunications and electrical utility companies. As a natural material, wood is subject to decay and will eventually fail, causing disruption to services and danger to public and company personnel. Internal decay, due to basidomycetes fungi or attack by termites, can progress rapidly and is often difficult to detect by casual inspection. The traditional method of testing poles for decay involves hitting them with a hammer and listening to the sound that results. However, evidence suggests that a large number of poles are replaced unnecessarily and a significant number of poles continue to fail unexpectedly in service. Therefore, a more accurate method of assessing the structural integrity of wooden poles is required. Over the last 25 years there have been a number of attempts at improving decay detection. Techniques such as ultrasound, drilling X rays etc. have been developed but have generally failed to improve upon the practicality and accuracy of the traditional testing method. The paper describes the use of signal processing techniques to analyze the acoustic response of the pole and thereby determine the presence of decay. Development of a prototype meter is described and the results of initial tests on several hundred poles are presented.

  4. South-Pole Swiss Cheese

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 9 March 2004

    The Odyssey spacecraft has completed a full Mars year of observations of the red planet. For the next several weeks the Image of the Day will look back over this first mars year. It will focus on four themes: 1) the poles - with the seasonal changes seen in the retreat and expansion of the caps; 2) craters - with a variety of morphologies relating to impact materials and later alteration, both infilling and exhumation; 3) channels - the clues to liquid surface flow; and 4) volcanic flow features. While some images have helped answer questions about the history of Mars, many have raised new questions that are still being investigated as Odyssey continues collecting data as it orbits Mars.

    This image was collected December 29, 2003 during the southern summer season. This image shows the surface texture that the ice cap develops after long term sun exposure. The central portion of the image has an appearance similar to swiss cheese and represents surface ice loss.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 86.9, Longitude 356.4 East (3.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen

  5. HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) Data from CDIAC's HIPPO Data Archive

    DOE Data Explorer

    The HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) study of the carbon cycle and greenhouse gases measured meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and aerosol constituents along transects from approximately pole-to-pole over the Pacific Ocean. HIPPO flew hundreds of vertical profiles from the ocean/ice surface to as high as the tropopause, at five times during different seasons over a three year period from 2009-2011. HIPPO provides the first high-resolution vertically-resolved global survey of a comprehensive suite of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols pertinent to understanding the carbon cycle and challenging global climate models.

  6. Pion scattering poles and chiral symmetry restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Fraile, D.; Nicola, A. Gomez; Herruzo, E. T.

    2007-10-15

    Using unitarized chiral perturbation theory methods, we perform a detailed analysis of the {pi}{pi} scattering poles f{sub 0}(600) and {rho}(770) behavior when medium effects such as temperature or density drive the system towards chiral symmetry restoration. In the analysis of real poles below threshold, we show that it is crucial to extend properly the unitarized amplitudes so that they match the perturbative Adler zeros. Our results do not show threshold enhancement effects at finite temperature in the f{sub 0}(600) channel, which remains as a pole of broad nature. We also implement T=0 finite-density effects related to chiral symmetry restoration, by varying the pole position with the pion decay constant. Although this approach takes into account only a limited class of contributions, we reproduce the expected finite-density restoration behavior, which drives the poles towards the real axis, producing threshold enhancement and {pi}{pi} bound states. We compare our results with several model approaches and discuss the experimental consequences, both in relativistic heavy ion collisions and in {pi}{yields}{pi}{pi} and {gamma}{yields}{pi}{pi} reactions in nuclei.

  7. New magnet pole shape for isochronous cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, C.E.; Chasman, C.; Baltz, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    A new design has been developed for shaping pole tips to produce the radially increasing fields required for isochronous cyclotrons. The conventional solid hill poles are replaced by poles mounted over a small secondary gap which tapers radially from maximum at the magnet edge to zero near the center. Field measurements with a model magnet and calculations with the code TRIM show an increase in field at the edge of the magnet without the usual corresponding large increase in fringing, and a radial field shape more nearly field independent than for conventional hills. The flying hills have several advantages for variable energy multiparticle cyclotrons: (1) a large reduction in the power dissipated by isochronizing trim coils; (2) a more constant shape and magnitude flutter factor, eliminating flutter coils and increasing the operating range; and (3) a sharper fall-off of the fringe field, simplifying beam extraction.

  8. Gravity increase at the south pole

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behrendt, John C.

    1967-01-01

    Abstract. Measurements made between December 1957 and January 1966 of the gravity difference between the McMurdo Sound pendulum station, which is on bedrock, and the South Pole station, which is on the Antarctic ice sheet, show a gravity increase at the South Pole of 0.11 milligals per year. The most likely hypothesis for the increase is that it was caused by ice flowing downslope across a gravity gradient and by the sinking of the South Pole station as a result of accumulation of ice. An alternate hypothesis that the gravity increase was caused by a decrease in ice thickness, of about 40 centimeters per year, is theoretically possible but is not supported by direct evidence.

  9. Log amplifier with pole-zero compensation

    DOEpatents

    Brookshier, William

    1987-01-01

    A logarithmic amplifier circuit provides pole-zero compensation for improved stability and response time over 6-8 decades of input signal frequency. The amplifier circuit includes a first operational amplifier with a first feedback loop which includes a second, inverting operational amplifier in a second feedback loop. The compensated output signal is provided by the second operational amplifier with the log elements, i.e., resistors, and the compensating capacitors in each of the feedback loops having equal values so that each break point or pole is offset by a compensating break point or zero.

  10. Light propagation in the South Pole ice

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dawn; Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is located in the ice near the geographic South Pole. Particle showers from neutrino interactions in the ice produce light which is detected by IceCube modules, and the amount and pattern of deposited light are used to reconstruct the properties of the incident neutrino. Since light is scattered and absorbed by ice between the neutrino interaction vertex and the sensor, IceCube event reconstruction depends on understanding the propagation of light through the ice. This paper presents the current status of modeling light propagation in South Pole ice, including the recent observation of an azimuthal anisotropy in the scattering.

  11. Switched RC Multi-Pole Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuler, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    The design and experimental verification of a switched RC multi-pole filter is presented. This highly compact circuit easily obtains sub-Hz, adjustable response utilizing reasonable sized on-chip components, and multiplexing the main resistor and op amp among filter stages. Design considerations for anti-aliasing, noise avoidance, and dynamic op amp compensation are presented.

  12. Poling of Microwave Electro-Optic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Kenneth D.

    1997-01-01

    The desire to transmit high frequency, microwave RF signals over fiber optic cables has necessitated the need for electro-optic modulation devices. However, in order to reap these potential benefits, it is necessary to develop the devices and their associated fabrication processes, particularly those processes associated with the poling of the devices. To this end, we entered into a cooperative research agreement with Richard Kunath of NASA LeRC. A graduate student in my group, Tony Kowalczyk, worked closely with the group at NASA to develop processes for construction of a microwave frequency electro-optic modulator. Materials were commercially obtained from Amoco Chemical and in collaboration with Lockheed-Martin. The photolithography processes were developed at NASA LeRC and the electric-field poling process was carried out in our laboratory at CWRU. During the grant period, the poling process conditions were investigated for these multilayer devices. Samples were poled and the resulting nonlinear optical properties were evaluated in our laboratory. Following the grant period, Kowalczyk went to NASA under a NRC fellowship, and I continued to collaborate as a consultant. Publications listed at the end of this report came out of this work. Another manuscript is in preparation and will be submitted shortly.

  13. Why is g Larger at the Poles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iona, Mario

    1978-01-01

    Explains that the larger value of g at the poles is not due only to differences in the radii of the earth, but that other factors are also responsible such as the rotation of the earth and the increase in the earth's density toward its center. (GA)

  14. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laihem, Karim; IceCube Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    New detection techniques for (GZK) neutrinos are required for instrumenting a large detector volume needed to observe the low neutrino fluxes at the EeV energy range. Studies on a larger IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole have been intensively investigated in the last decade. A larger effective volume at a reasonable cost is possible if an acoustic array is a part of a large hybrid detector which includes radio and the existing optical array. The feasibility and the physics capabilities of an acoustic array at the South Pole depend on the knowledge of the acoustic properties of the ice such as the sound speed, the attenuation length, the background noise level and the transient rate. To investigate the ice properties, the first three acoustic strings of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) have been deployed in the austral summer 2006/2007, then completed with an additional string in 2007/2008. With its four strings SPATS was able to evaluate in situ the acoustic properties of the South Pole ice in the 10-100 kHz frequency range. In this paper the performance of SPATS is described, results on the acoustic ice properties are presented and a new drilling method to deploy acoustic strings in ice is introduced.

  15. Multiplicative-cascade dynamics in pole balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Henry S.; Kelty-Stephen, Damian G.; Vaz, Daniela V.; Michaels, Claire F.

    2014-06-01

    Pole balancing is a key task for probing the prospective control that organisms must engage in for purposeful action. The temporal structure of pole-balancing behaviors will reflect the on-line operation of control mechanisms needed to maintain an upright posture. In this study, signatures of multifractality are sought and found in time series of the vertical angle of a pole balanced on the fingertip. Comparisons to surrogate time series reveal multiplicative-cascade dynamics and interactivity across scales. In addition, simulations of a pole-balancing model generating on-off intermittency [J. L. Cabrera and J. G. Milton, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 158702 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.89.158702] were analyzed. Evidence of multifractality is also evident in simulations, though comparing simulated and participant series reveals a significantly greater contribution of cross-scale interactivity for the latter. These findings suggest that multiplicative-cascade dynamics are an extension of on-off intermittency and play a role in prospective coordination.

  16. POLE-ZERO Cancellation in Structures: Repeated Roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MOTTERSHEAD, J. E.; LI, T.; HE, J.

    2000-03-01

    The conditions for the creation of nodes of normal modes of vibration from the cancellation of poles and zeros are established when either the poles or the zeros (or both) appear as repeated eigenvalues. The analysis is illustrated by numerical examples including the case of a pole-zero cancellation at every co-ordinate at the same frequency which is shown to occur whenever there are repeated poles. If there are repeated poles and repeated zeros at the same frequency then the number of poles must be either one more, one less or equal to the number of zeros.

  17. Third Pole Environment (TPE) -Latest Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Yao, T.; Zhang, F.; Yang, X.; Wang, W.; Ping, F.

    2014-12-01

    Centered on the Tibetan Plateau, the Third Pole region is a unique geographical unit, which represents one of the largest ice masses on the Earth. The region has great impacts on environmental changes in China, the Northern Hemisphere and the globe.It also demonstrates sensitive feedbacks to global changes and the impacts of anthropogenic activities in surrounding regions. Like the Arctic and Antarctica, the Third Pole region is an especially sensitive area that draws great attention from the scientific community. In 2009, with support from the Chinese Academy of Sciences and international organizations, the Third Pole Environment (TPE) program, led by Chinese scientists, was officially launched. The program focuses on the theme of "water-ice-air-ecosystem-human" interactions, with the aim to address the following scientific questions, such as the spatial and temporal characteristics of past environmental changes in the Third pole, the interactions between hydrosphere and cryosphere and hazard processes, the ecological systems' impacts on and response to environmental changes, and the impacts of anthropogenic activities on environmental changes in the region and adaptation strategies. The goal of the program is to reveal environmental change processes and mechanisms on the Third Pole and their influences on and responses to global changes, and thus to serve for enhancement of human adaptation to the changing environment and realization of human-nature harmony. Under the leadership of the co-chairs, and relying on Scientific Committee and the TPE office, the program has accomplished a number of scientific tasks since its inauguration. TPE has made tremendous progress in the research of glacier changes, interactions between the westerlies and monsoon, establishment of field stations, data sharing and education.

  18. A Warm South Pole? Yes, on Neptune!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-09-01

    Summer season on Neptune creates escape route for methane An international team of astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope has discovered that the south pole of Neptune is much hotter than the rest of the planet. This is consistent with the fact that it is late southern summer and this region has been in sunlight for about 40 years. ESO PR Photo 41/07 ESO PR Photo 41/07 Neptune's 'Hot' South Pole (VISIR/VLT) The scientists are publishing the first temperature maps of the lowest portion of Neptune's atmosphere, showing that this warm south pole is providing an avenue for methane to escape out of the deep atmosphere. "The temperatures are so high that methane gas, which should be frozen out in the upper part of Neptune's atmosphere (the stratosphere), can leak out through this region," said Glenn Orton, lead author of the paper reporting the results. "This solves a long-standing problem of identifying the source of Neptune's high stratospheric methane abundances." The temperature at the south pole is higher than anywhere else on the planet by about 10 degrees Celsius. The average temperature on Neptune is about minus 200 degrees Celsius. Neptune, the farthest planet of our solar system, is located about 30 times farther away from the Sun than Earth is. Only about 1/900th as much sunlight reaches Neptune as our planet. Yet, the small amount of sunlight it receives significantly affects the planet's atmosphere. The astronomers found that these temperature variations are consistent with seasonal changes. A Neptunian year lasts about 165 Earth years. It has been summer in the south pole of Neptune for about 40 years now, and they predict that as winter turns to summer in the north pole, an abundance of methane will leak out of a warm north pole in about 80 years. "Neptune's south pole is currently tilted toward the Sun, just like the Earth's south pole is tilted toward the Sun during summer in the Southern Hemisphere," explains Orton. "But on Neptune the antarctic

  19. Remarks on the origin of Castillejo-Dalitz-Dyson poles

    SciTech Connect

    Krivoruchenko, M. I.

    2010-07-15

    Castillejo-Dalitz-Dyson (CDD) poles are known to be connected with bound states and resonances. We discuss a new type of CDD pole associated with primitives i.e., poles of the P matrix that correspond to zeros of the D function on the unitary cut. The Low scattering equation is generalized for amplitudes with primitives. The relationship between the CDD poles and the primitives is illustrated by a description of the S-wave nucleon-nucleon phase shifts.

  20. Pole and global shape of 25143 Itokawa.

    PubMed

    Demura, Hirohide; Kobayashi, Shingo; Nemoto, Etsuko; Matsumoto, Naoya; Furuya, Motohiro; Yukishita, Akira; Muranaka, Noboru; Morita, Hideo; Shirakawa, Ken; Maruya, Makoto; Ohyama, Hiroshi; Uo, Masashi; Kubota, Takashi; Hashimoto, Tatsuaki; Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro; Fujiwara, Akira; Saito, Jun; Sasaki, Sho; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Hirata, Naru

    2006-06-01

    The locations of the pole and rotation axis of asteroid 25143 Itokawa were derived from Asteroid Multiband Imaging Camera data on the Hayabusa spacecraft. The retrograde pole orientation had a right ascension of 90.53 degrees and a declination of -66.30 degrees (52000 equinox) or equivalently 128.5 degrees and -89.66 degrees in ecliptic coordinates with a 3.9 degrees margin of error. The surface area is 0.393 square kilometers, the volume is 0.018378 cubic kilometers with a 5% margin of error, and the three axis lengths are 535 meters by 294 meters by 209 meters. The global Itokawa revealed a boomerang-shaped appearance composed of two distinct parts with partly faceted regions and a constricted ring structure. PMID:16741112

  1. Photocouplings at the pole from pion photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ronchen, D.; Doring, M.; Huang, F.; Haberzettl, H.; Haidenbauer, J.; Hanhart, C.; Krewald, S.; MeiBner, U. -G.; Nakayama, K.

    2014-06-24

    The reactions γp → π0p and γp → π+n are analyzed in a semi-phenomenological approach up to E ~ 2.3 GeV. Fits to differential cross section and single and double polarization observables are performed. A good overall reproduction of the available photoproduction data is achieved. The Julich2012 dynamical coupled-channel model -which describes elastic πN scattering and the world data base of the reactions πN → ηN, KΛ, and KΣ at the same time– is employed as the hadronic interaction in the final state. Furthermore, the framework guarantees analyticity and, thus, allows for a reliable extraction of resonance parameters in terms of poles and residues. In particular, the photocouplings at the pole can be extracted and are presented.

  2. Photocouplings at the pole from pion photoproduction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ronchen, D.; Doring, M.; Huang, F.; Haberzettl, H.; Haidenbauer, J.; Hanhart, C.; Krewald, S.; MeiBner, U. -G.; Nakayama, K.

    2014-06-24

    The reactions γp → π0p and γp → π+n are analyzed in a semi-phenomenological approach up to E ~ 2.3 GeV. Fits to differential cross section and single and double polarization observables are performed. A good overall reproduction of the available photoproduction data is achieved. The Julich2012 dynamical coupled-channel model -which describes elastic πN scattering and the world data base of the reactions πN → ηN, KΛ, and KΣ at the same time– is employed as the hadronic interaction in the final state. Furthermore, the framework guarantees analyticity and, thus, allows for a reliable extraction of resonance parameters in termsmore » of poles and residues. In particular, the photocouplings at the pole can be extracted and are presented.« less

  3. Permanent magnet machine and method with reluctance poles and non-identical PM poles for high density operation

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2010-05-18

    A method and apparatus in which a stator (11) and a rotor (12) define a primary air gap (20) for receiving AC flux and at least one source (23, 40), and preferably two sources (23, 24, 40) of DC excitation are positioned for inducing DC flux at opposite ends of the rotor (12). Portions of PM material (17, 17a) are provided as boundaries separating PM rotor pole portions from each other and from reluctance poles. The PM poles (18) and the reluctance poles (19) can be formed with poles of one polarity having enlarged flux paths in relation to flux paths for pole portions of an opposite polarity, the enlarged flux paths communicating with a core of the rotor (12) so as to increase reluctance torque produced by the electric machine. Reluctance torque is increased by providing asymmetrical pole faces. The DC excitation can also use asymmetric poles and asymmetric excitation sources. Several embodiments are disclosed with additional variations.

  4. NASA satellite to track North Pole expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The proposed expedition of a lone explorer and the use of Nimbus 6 (NASA meteorological research satellite) to track his journey is reported. The journey is scheduled to start March 4, 1978, and will cover a distance of 6.000 Km (3,728 miles) from northern Canada to the North Pole and return, traveling the length of Greenland's isolated interior. The mode of transportation for the explorer will be by dog sled. Instrumentation and tracking techniques are discussed.

  5. Pole EXpansion and Selected Inversion (PEXSI)

    2014-03-01

    The Pole EXpansion and Selected Inversion method (PEXSI) is a fast method for evaluating certain selected elements of a matrix function. PEXSI is highly scalable on distributed memory parallel machines. For sparse matrices, the PEXSI method can be more efficient than the widely used diagonalization method for evaluating matrix functions, especially when a relatively large number of eigenpairs are needed to be computed in the diagonalization methond

  6. The Gattini South Pole UV experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Anna M.; Ahmed, Sara; Ashley, Michael C. B.; Croner, Ernest; Delacroix, Alex; Ebihara, Yusuke; Fucik, Jason; Martin, D. Christopher; Velur, Viswa; Weatherwax, Allan

    2012-09-01

    The Gattini South Pole UV experiment (Gattini SPUV) was deployed to the South Pole dark sector in February 2010 and has recently completed a highly successful first season of winter time observations. The experiment has, for the first time ever, measured and categorized the optical night sky brightness at the very blue wavelengths. The experiment consists of a remotely operated 6” aperture custom designed telescope. The telescope feeds a blue sensitive imager with 4 degree field of view that contains a bank of 3 filters: SDSS g’, Bessel U and a custom “super U” filter specifically designed to probe the sky emission at wavelengths approaching the atmospheric cut-off. The filters are continually cycled with exposure times ranging from 30 to 300 seconds throughout the winter period. The telescope, in addition, feeds a 2 degree long slit VPH grating spectrograph with R~1000. The bandwidth is 350-450nm. The spectra are recorded simultaneously with the imager exposures. The experiment is designed for low temperature Antarctic operation and resides on the roof of the MAPO building in the South Pole Antarctic sector. The primary science goals are to categorize the Antarctic winter-time sky background at the very bluest of wavelengths as a pathfinder for the Antarctic Cosmic Web Imager. We present a technical overview of the experiment and results from the first winter season.

  7. The South Pole and the Ross Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image shows a rare clear view of the South Pole (lower right) and the Ross Sea, Antarctica. The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) acquired the scene on December 26, 2001. The geographic South Pole is located in the center of Antarctica, at an altitude of 2,900 meters (9,300 feet). It rests on a continent-wide ice sheet that is 2,870 m thick, with the underlying bedrock only 30 m (98 feet) above sea level. The ice underlying the South Pole is as much as 140,000 years old, and is currently accumulating at about 82 cm (32 inches) per year. Roughly 2,500 km (1,550 miles) away is the green water of the Ross Sea, which indicates the presence of large numbers of phytoplankton. This is a highly productive part of the world's oceans. Also note the ice gathered around McMurdo Sound, seen toward the lefthand shoreline of the Ross Sea, at the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf. According to National Science Foundation researchers, this ice is making it difficult for penguins to reach their food supply. Separating the continental Antarctic ice sheet from the Ross Sea are the Queen Maud Mountains and the Ross Ice Shelf. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  8. Regularized estimation of Euler pole parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktuğ, Bahadir; Yildirim, Ömer

    2013-07-01

    Euler vectors provide a unified framework to quantify the relative or absolute motions of tectonic plates through various geodetic and geophysical observations. With the advent of space geodesy, Euler parameters of several relatively small plates have been determined through the velocities derived from the space geodesy observations. However, the available data are usually insufficient in number and quality to estimate both the Euler vector components and the Euler pole parameters reliably. Since Euler vectors are defined globally in an Earth-centered Cartesian frame, estimation with the limited geographic coverage of the local/regional geodetic networks usually results in highly correlated vector components. In the case of estimating the Euler pole parameters directly, the situation is even worse, and the position of the Euler pole is nearly collinear with the magnitude of the rotation rate. In this study, a new method, which consists of an analytical derivation of the covariance matrix of the Euler vector in an ideal network configuration, is introduced and a regularized estimation method specifically tailored for estimating the Euler vector is presented. The results show that the proposed method outperforms the least squares estimation in terms of the mean squared error.

  9. Life cycle economics of wood pole utility structures

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, A.H.; Goodman, J.R. )

    1990-04-01

    Due to the major expansions of the nation's electrification infrastructure, which closely followed World War II, many existing utility lines are now more than thirty years old and are approaching a critical stage in their useful life. This paper discusses the economics of life cycle management of wood pole utility structures. Recently developed technology which enables innovative management techniques for wood poles are discussed. Results of full-scale tests of in-service wood poles are reviewed which provide vital information on rates of pole degradation. These data enable realistic cost assessments for frequency of pole replacement and/or repair. Finally, methods for calculating life cycle costs are presented.

  10. The science of the lunar poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucey, P. G.

    2011-12-01

    It was the great geochemist Harold Urey who first called attention to peculiar conditions at the poles of the Moon where the very small inclination of the lunar spin axis with respect to the sun causes craters and other depressions to be permanently shaded from sunlight allowing very low temperatures. Urey suggested that the expected low temperature surfaces could cold trap and collect any vapors that might transiently pass through the lunar environment. Urey's notion has led to studies of the poles as a new research area in lunar science. The conditions and science of the poles are utterly unlike those of the familiar Moon of Neil Armstrong, and the study of the poles is similar to our understanding of the Moon itself at the dawn of the space age, with possibilities outweighing current understanding. Broadly, we can treat the poles as a dynamic system of input, transport, trapping, and loss. Volatile sources range from continuous, including solar wind, the Earth's polar fountain and micrometeorites, to episodic, including comets and wet asteroids, to nearly unique events including late lunar outgassing and passage through giant molecular clouds. The lunar exosphere transports volatiles to the poles, complicated by major perturbances to the atmosphere by volatile-rich sources. Trapping includes cold trapping, but also in situ creation of more refractory species such as organics, clathrates and water-bearing minerals, as well as sequester by regolith overturn or burial by larger impacts. Finally, volatiles are lost to space by ionization and sweeping. Spacecraft results have greatly added to the understanding of the polar system. Temperatures have been precisely measured by LRO, and thermal models now allow determination of temperature over the long evolution of the lunar orbit, and show very significant changes in temperature and temperature distribution with time and depth. Polar topography is revealed in detail by Selene and LRO laser altimeters while direct

  11. Purification of fluorescently labeled Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spindle Pole Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Trisha N.

    2016-01-01

    Centrosomes are components of the mitotic spindle responsible for organizing microtubules and establishing a bipolar spindle for accurate chromosome segregation. In budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the centrosome is called the spindle pole body, a highly organized tri-laminar structure embedded in the nuclear envelope. Here we describe a detailed protocol for the purification of fluorescently labeled spindle pole bodes from S. cerevisiae. Spindle pole bodies are purified from yeast using a TAP-tag purification followed by velocity sedimentation. This highly reproducible TAP-tag purification method improves upon previous techniques and expands the scope of in vitro characterization of yeast spindle pole bodies. The genetic flexibility of this technique allows for the study of spindle pole body mutants as well as the study of spindle pole bodies during different stages of the cell cycle. The ease and reproducibility of the technique makes it possible to study spindle pole bodies using a variety of biochemical, biophysical, and microscopic techniques. PMID:27193850

  12. Enhanced Hydrogen Abundances Near Both Lunar Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Maurice, S.; Lawrence, D. J.; Getenay, I.; Elphic, R. C.; Barraclough, B. L.; Binder, A. B.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical analyses of all samples of the Moon returned to Earth show that the lunar surface is highly depleted in volatiles. Specifically, the H content of lunar soils averages only 50 ppm, which can be explained in terms of surface implantation of solar-wind H. We note that all returned samples come from near-equatorial latitudes where daytime temperatures are sufficiently high that water is not stable to evaporation, photo dissociation, ionization, and eventual loss to space through pickup by the solar wind. However, it has long been postulated that a significant fraction of water delivered to the Moon by comets, meteoroids, and interplanetary dust can be stably trapped within the permanently shaded floors of polar craters where temperatures are sufficiently low so that sublimation times can be longer than several billion years. Recent results from analysis of the high-altitude (100 +/- 20 km) portion of the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer (LPNS) dataset have revealed that H abundances near both lunar poles are enhanced relative to that which exist at equatorial latitudes. Because this average enhancement is not much larger than the near-equatorial average of 50 ppm, it is reasonable to ask how much of the polar-H enhancement comes from the solar wind and how much comes from lunar impacts by solid interplanetary materials. Perhaps the low temperatures at polar latitudes could reduce loss rates of solar-wind-implanted H sufficiently to account for the inferred difference between average polar and equatorial H abundances. Although the foregoing suggestion is plausible, neither laboratory simulations on returned soil samples nor numerical simulations of H loss rates from the radiation-damaged surfaces of soil grains have been performed to prove its feasibility. We try to address this question by analyzing the low-altitude (30 +/- 15 km) portion of LPNS data to search for relatively small spatial-scale enhancements in H data to search for relatively small

  13. Constraining the African pole of rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaw, Laike M.

    1992-08-01

    In the absence of well defined transform faults in the East African rift system for constraining the plate kinematic reconstruction, the pole of relative motion for the African (Nubian) and Somalian plates has been determined from residual motion. If Africa and Somalia are to continue to drift apart along the East African rift system (which would then evolve into a series of ridges offset by transform faults) then incipient transform faults that may reflect the direction of relative motion should already be in place along the East African rift system. The incipient transforms along the East African rift system are characterized by shear zones, such as the Zambezi shear zone in the south and the Aswa and Hamer shear zones in the north. Some of these shear zones have been associated with recent strike-slip faulting in the NW-SE direction during periods of earthquakes. Provided that these, consistently NW-SE oriented, strike-slip movements in the shear zones give the direction of relative motion of the adjacent plates, then they can be used to constrain the position of the Africa-Somalia Euler pole. Due to the fact that identifying transform faults in the East African rift system is difficult and because the genesis of transform faults characterizing a plate boundary at an inception stage is not well known, the discussion here is limited to the northern segment of the East African rift system where shear zones are better characterized by the existing geophysical data. The characterizing features vary with latitude, indicating the complexity of the problem of the genesis of transform faults. I believe, however, that the relatively well defined intra-continental transform fault in the northern East African rift system, which is characterized by strike-slip faulting and earthquakes, constrains the pole of relative motion for the African and Somalian plates to a position near 1.5°S and 29.0°E.

  14. Log amplifier with pole-zero compensation

    DOEpatents

    Brookshier, W.

    1985-02-08

    A logarithmic amplifier circuit provides pole-zero compensation for improved stability and response time over 6-8 decades of input signal frequency. The amplifer circuit includes a first operational amplifier with a first feedback loop which includes a second, inverting operational amplifier in a second feedstock loop. The compensated output signal is provided by the second operational amplifier with the log elements, i.e., resistors, and the compensating capacitors in each of the feedback loops having equal values so that each break point is offset by a compensating break point or zero.

  15. Management of lower-pole caliceal stones.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Glenn S

    2003-09-01

    A series of 205 urologists answered questions about their choice of treatment for lower-caliceal stones. The preferred approaches were extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) for stones <1 cm and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for those >2 cm. For stones of 1 to 2 cm, 65% preferred SWL and 30% would advise PCNL. Thus, SWL is recommended for lower-caliceal stones more frequently than is justified by published success rates. Continued efforts need to be made to inform practicing urologists regarding the most appropriate therapy for patients with lower-pole stones >1 cm.

  16. The Pole Orientation, Pole Precession, and Moment of Inertia Factor of Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, R. A.; French, R. G.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M.; Colwell, J. E.; Marouf, E.; Rappaport, N.; McGhee, C.; Sepersky, T.; Lonergan, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses our determination of the Saturn's pole orientation and precession using a combination of Earthbased and spacecraft based observational data. From our model of the polar motion and the observed precession rate we obtain a value for Saturn's polar moment of inertia

  17. Principle of Magnetodynamics for Composite Magnetic Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Animalu, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    It is shown in this paper that geometry provides the key to the new magnetodynamics principle of operation of the machine (invented by Dr. Ezekiel Izuogu) which has an unexpected feature of driving a motor with static magnetic field. Essentially, because an array of like magnetic poles of the machine is arranged in a half circular array of a cylindrical geometry, the array creates a non-pointlike magnet pole that may be represented by a ``magnetic current loop'' at the position of the pivot of the movable arm. As a result, in three-dimensional space, it is possible to characterize the symmetry of the stator magnetic field B and the magnetic current loop J as a cube-hexagon system by a 6-vector (J,B) (with J.B ≠0) comprising a 4x4 antisymmetric tensor analogous to the conventional electric and magnetic 6-vector (E,B) (with E.B ≠0) comprising the 4x4 antisymmetric tensor of classical electrodynamics The implications are discussed. Supported by International Centre for Basic Research, Abuja, Nigeria.

  18. a New Ediacaran Pole from Easternmost Baltica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meert, J. G.; Levashova, N. M.; Kuznetsov, N. B.; Sergeeva, N. D.; Golovanova, I. V.; Danukalov, K. N.; Bazhenov, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Ediacaran paleogeography is notoriously messy due to equally confusing paleomagnetic data from both Laurentia and Baltica. Ediacaran (~Vendian) rocks have been studied from several localities from Baltica, but the so far published poles can be used to place the Baltic craton at nearly any latitude and orientation [Meert et al., 2007]. At the same time, it is challenging to understand the paleogeography of the Ediacaran world given all the biologic, climatic and tectonic changes during the time interval from 635-542 Ma. We present preliminary paleomagnetic and geochronological data from (late?) Ediacaran sediments from the deformed (low metamorphic grade) peri-Uralian margin of Baltica. We successfully isolated a dual-polarity high-temperature component from eleven sites; the primary origin of this remanence is strongly supported by a positive reversal test (class B). The corresponding paleomagnetic pole is in close agreement with the coeval results from the Winter Coast of northern Baltica [Popov et al., 2002; 2005; Iglesia Llanos et al., 2005], despite a ~1600 km separation between two study areas. These data jointly indicate a very low (<10 degrees N or S) paleolatitude for eastern Baltica in Ediacaran time. Paleogeographic implications of these new data will be discussed in the context of Ediacaran-Cambrian tectonic models. This study is supported by RFBR grant 11-05-00037 and NSF grant EAR11-19038.

  19. Automatic Arrangement of Utility Poles by Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Yutaka; Iba, Hitoshi

    In this paper, Genetic Algorithms (GAs) have been applied to designing the arrangement of utility poles. There are two purposes of this study. One is to lower the construction cost, i.e., to reduce the number of necessary utility poles. Another goal is to eliminate designer’s load to some extent. In our method, the arrangement is determined with the following three steps: (1) Determine the arrangement of utility poles necessary for supplying the electric power to each customer. (2) Obtain the positions of other utility poles required to support electric wires by searching for the route of electric wires. (3) Adaptively tune the arrangement and the number of utility poles. Experimental results show that the method is more effective in designing for utility poles than the usual approach. The simulation domains include realistic areas with various characteristics. We can confirm that the above two goals are achieved satisfactorily.

  20. LODGEPOLE BRIDGE, FACING NORTHWEST Generals Highway, Lodge Pole Bridge, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LODGEPOLE BRIDGE, FACING NORTHWEST - Generals Highway, Lodge Pole Bridge, Spanning Marble Fork of Kaweah River, approximately 21 miles northwest of Ash Mountain Entrance, Three Rivers, Tulare County, CA

  1. LODGEPOLE BRIDGE, FACING SOUTHEAST Generals Highway, Lodge Pole Bridge, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LODGEPOLE BRIDGE, FACING SOUTHEAST - Generals Highway, Lodge Pole Bridge, Spanning Marble Fork of Kaweah River, approximately 21 miles northwest of Ash Mountain Entrance, Three Rivers, Tulare County, CA

  2. Generalized pole inflation: Hilltop, natural, and chaotic inflationary attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Takahiro

    2016-09-01

    A reformulation of inflationary model analyses appeared recently, in which inflationary observables are determined by the structure of a pole in the inflaton kinetic term rather than the shape of the inflaton potential. We comprehensively study this framework with an arbitrary order of the pole taking into account possible additional poles in the kinetic term or in the potential. Depending on the setup, the canonical potential becomes the form of hilltop or plateau models, variants of natural inflation, power-law inflation, or monomial/polynomial chaotic inflation. We demonstrate attractor behaviors of these models and compute corrections from the additional poles to the inflationary observables.

  3. BLDG 101, OVERVIEW WITH LIGHTNING POLES Naval Magazine Lualualei, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG 101, OVERVIEW WITH LIGHTNING POLES - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Operational Storage Building, Fifteenth Street near Kolekole Road intersection, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. Bridging the Poles: Education Linked with Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfirman, S.; Bell, R. E.; Turrin, M.; Maru, P.

    2004-12-01

    An international group of 65 scientists, educators and media specialists gathered at the "Bridging the Poles" workshop in Washington, DC on June 23-25, to define strategies that will inspire the general public and engage the next generation of polar scientists, engineers and leaders. This NSF-sponsored workshop was the first effort to develop an integrated education and outreach program for the International Polar Year of 2007-2009. Through a series of plenary talks and roundtable discussions, workshop participants focused on: engaging diverse communities, opportunities and needs for different levels, possibilities for thematic areas, and programs to feature nationally and internationally over the next 5 years. To maximize the potential of the International Polar Year, we need to coordinate research, education and outreach efforts, at the international as well as national level, with the goal of building an integrated and exciting public presence during 2007-2009. Successful education and outreach programming requires leveraging existing resources, creating new programs, connecting communities, and developing partnerships between agencies, scientists, educators, and the public. We need to consider the rich heritage of indigenous Arctic peoples, build capacity within communities through targeted efforts, and focus on making the poles relevant to diverse communities by using interdisciplinary approaches, e.g. cultural as well as scientific. A series of education and outreach packages for large-scale science endeavors should be rolled out to the public as major media events. The media -- television, radio and print -- as well as educators, zoos and museums are eager to use timely, accessible, and meaningful content. An Interagency Working Group on IPY Education and Outreach, with a staff and a central office, must be created to coordinate and leverage programs. A sophisticated web portal should be developed to serve content and contacts for researchers, educators, the

  5. Experimental comparison of all-pole, all zero, and pole-zero predictors for ADPCM speech coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, B.; Gibson, J. D.

    1986-03-01

    Simulation results are presented which compare the performance of all-pole, all-zero, and pole-zero predictors in ADPCM at data rates of 16 and 32 kbits/g over both ideal and noisy channels. Separate backward adaptive gradient algorithms are used to adapt the poles and the zeros independently. The performance indicators used are signal-to-quantization noise ratio (SNR), signal-to-prediction error ratio (SPER), segmental SNR (SNRSEG), and subjective listening tests. For speech sources, the all-zero and pole-zero predictors produce SNR and SNRSEG values that are approximately 1-3 dB higher than those generated by the all-pole predictor. Subjective listening tests reveal that an eight-order all-zero predictor performs as well or better than an all-pole predictor for all conditions studied.

  6. Single-pole ladder at quarter filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, D. N.; Kiselev, M. N.; Kikoin, K.

    2007-06-01

    We study the ground state and excitation spectrum of a quasi-one-dimensional system consisting of a pole and rungs oriented in opposite directions (“centipede ladder,” CL) at quarter filling. The spin and charge excitation spectra are found in the limits of small and large longitudinal hoppings t‖ compared to the on-rung hopping rate t⊥ and exchange coupling I⊥ . At small t‖ , the system with ferromagnetic on-rung exchange demonstrates instability against dimerization. Coherent propagation of charge-transfer excitons is possible in this limit. At large t‖ , CL behaves like two-orbital Hubbard chain, but the gap opens in the charge excitation spectrum, thus reducing the symmetry from SU(4) to SU(2). The spin excitations are always gapless and their dispersion changes from quadratic magnonlike for ferromagnetic on-rung exchange to linear spinonlike for antiferromagnetic on-rung exchange in weak longitudinal hopping limit.

  7. Efficiently poled electro-optic polymer modulators.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Feng; Yokoyama, Shiyoshi

    2016-08-22

    A titanium dioxide (TiO2) / electro-optic (EO) polymer hybrid waveguide modulator was designed and fabricated. This modulator possessed a significant advantage for realizing high poling efficiency regardless of the EO polymer resistivity. The in-device EO coefficient was measured to be 100 pm/V, which was 32% higher than that of the thin polymer film. As a result, the phase modulator displayed a VπL figure of merit of 3.5 V∙cm at 1550 nm, which can be reduced further in a push-pull Mach-Zehnder interferometer structure. Temporal stability test of the modulator at 85°C indicated only 8% change of Vπ over 500 hours. The propagation loss in the waveguide was measured as ~3 dB/cm. PMID:27557181

  8. Aerosol measurements at the South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodhaine, Barry A.; Deluisi, John J.; Harris, Joyce M.; Houmere, Pamela; Bauman, Sene

    1986-09-01

    Some results are given regarding the aerosol measurement program conducted by the NOAA at their atmospheric monitoring observatory at Amundsen-Scott Station, South Pole. The program consists of the continuous measurement of condensation nuclei (CN) concentration and aerosol scattering extinction coefficient. A time series of sodium, chlorine, and sulfur concentrations shows that the sulfur and CN records are similar and that the sodium, chlorine, and extinction coefficient records are similar. Large episodes of sodium are measured at the ground in the austral winter and are apparently caused by large-scale warming and weakening of the surface temperature inversion. The CN data show an annual cycle with a maximum exceeding 100 per cubic centimeter in the austral summer and a minimum of about 10 per cubic centimeter in the winter. The extinction coefficient data show an anual cycle markedly different from that of CN with a maximum in late winter, a secondary maximum in summer, and a minimum in May.

  9. CMB Observations with the South Pole Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keisler, Ryan

    2013-04-01

    I will describe a program of cosmological research centered on using measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) to address questions relevant to physics: What is the absolute mass scale of neutrinos? How many species of neutrino-like particles were present in the early Universe? How does gravity behave on cosmological scales? Did inflation occur, and, if so, at what energy scale? A new generation of CMB experiments is targeting these questions, and I will focus on recent results from the South Pole Telescope (SPT). The SPT is a ground-based mm-wave observatory located at the geographic south pole in Antarctica, and in 2011 finished its initial, 2500 square-degree ``SPT-SZ'' survey. The data from this survey provided an unprecedented combination of resolution, area, and sensitivity, and has been used to make ground-breaking measurements of the CMB anisotropy and the gravitational lensing of the CMB. These measurements have, in conjunction with data from the WMAP satellite, led to strong constraints on the number of neutrino-like particle species present in the early universe and the shape of the power spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. The SPT-SZ data overlaps with the ongoing Dark Energy Survey (DES) footprint, and the joint dataset will provide new probes of large-scale structure, such as the relative velocities of massive galaxy clusters. In 2012, a new polarization-sensitive camera, SPTpol, was installed on the SPT, and I will summarize its performance and prospects for detecting the B-mode CMB polarization pattern. Finally, I will touch on what will be possible with a third-generation camera, SPT-3G. The leap in sensitivity provided by this camera will yield, for example, a constraint on the sum of the neutrino masses relevant for exploring the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  10. Development of a Multiple Input Integrated Pole-to-Pole Global CMORPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, R.; Xie, P.

    2013-12-01

    A test system is being developed at NOAA Climate Prediction Center (CPC) to produce a passive microwave (PMW), IR-based, and model integrated high-resolution precipitation estimation on a 0.05olat/lon grid covering the entire globe from pole to pole. Experiments have been conducted for a summer Test Bed period using data for July and August of 2009. The pole-to-pole global CMORPH system is built upon the Kalman Filter based CMORPH algorithm of Joyce and Xie (2011). First, retrievals of instantaneous precipitation rates from PMW observations aboard nine low earth orbit (LEO) satellites are decoded and pole-to-pole mapped onto a 0.05olat/lon grid over the globe. Also precipitation estimates from LEO AVHRR retrievals are derived using a PDF matching of LEO IR with calibrated microwave combined (MWCOMB) precipitation retrievals. The motion vectors for the precipitating cloud systems are defined using information from both satellite IR observations and precipitation fields generated by the NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR). To this end, motion vectors are first computed for the CFSR hourly precipitation fields through cross-correlation analysis of consecutive hourly precipitation fields on the global T382 (~35 km) grid. In a similar manner, separate processing is also performed on satellite IR-based precipitation estimates to derive motion vectors from observations. A blended analysis of precipitating cloud motion vectors is then constructed through the combination of CFSR and satellite-derived vectors utilizing a two-dimensional optimal interpolation (2D-OI) method, in which CFSR-derived motion vectors are used as the first guess and subsequently satellite derived vectors modify the first guess. Weights used to generate the combinations are defined under the OI framework as a function of error statistics for the CFSR and satellite IR based motion vectors. The screened and calibrated PMW and AVHRR derived precipitation estimates are then separately

  11. A LINE POLE 1 IN FOREGROUND AND MYSTIC LAKE POWERHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A LINE POLE 1 IN FOREGROUND AND MYSTIC LAKE POWERHOUSE IN BACKGROUND. A LINE POLE 1 IS A MODERN REPLACEMENT STRUCTURE WITH BROWN PORCELAIN SUSPENSION-TYPE INSULATORS. VIEW TO EAST. - Mystic Lake Hydroelectric Facility, Electric Transmission A Line, Along West Rosebud Creek, Fishtail, Stillwater County, MT

  12. 1. Launch facility, delta 6, approach road and gate, pole ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Launch facility, delta 6, approach road and gate, pole marking the hardened intersite cable system in right center, commercial power pole outside fence in left center, view towards south - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility D-6, 4 miles north of Badlands National Park Headquarters, 4.5 miles east of Jackson County line on county road, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  13. pbx is required for pole and eye regeneration in planarians.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chieh G; Wang, Irving E; Reddien, Peter W

    2013-02-01

    Planarian regeneration involves regionalized gene expression that specifies the body plan. After amputation, planarians are capable of regenerating new anterior and posterior poles, as well as tissues polarized along the anterior-posterior, dorsal-ventral and medial-lateral axes. Wnt and several Hox genes are expressed at the posterior pole, whereas Wnt inhibitory genes, Fgf inhibitory genes, and prep, which encodes a TALE-family homeodomain protein, are expressed at the anterior pole. We found that Smed-pbx (pbx for short), which encodes a second planarian TALE-family homeodomain transcription factor, is required for restored expression of these genes at anterior and posterior poles during regeneration. Moreover, pbx(RNAi) animals gradually lose pole gene expression during homeostasis. By contrast, pbx was not required for initial anterior-posterior polarized responses to wounds, indicating that pbx is required after wound responses for development and maintenance of poles during regeneration and homeostatic tissue turnover. Independently of the requirement for pbx in pole regeneration, pbx is required for eye precursor formation and, consequently, eye regeneration and eye replacement in homeostasis. Together, these data indicate that pbx promotes pole formation of body axes and formation of regenerative progenitors for eyes.

  14. Detail of 25' highband reflector screen pole showing the horizontal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of 25' high-band reflector screen pole showing the horizontal wood beams and vertical wires hung from ceramic insulators, note the dipole antenna element and 94' low-band reflector screen poles in background, view facing north - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Detail of 25' highband reflector screen poles with monopole antenna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of 25' high-band reflector screen poles with monopole antenna elements behind, note the metal sleeve bases of the reflector screen poles and the guy wire anchors from the dipole antenna elements (left foreground), view facing north northwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  16. 49 CFR 229.81 - Emergency pole; shoe insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency pole; shoe insulation. 229.81 Section 229.81 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... System § 229.81 Emergency pole; shoe insulation. (a) Each locomotive equipped with a pantograph...

  17. 49 CFR 229.81 - Emergency pole; shoe insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency pole; shoe insulation. 229.81 Section 229.81 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... System § 229.81 Emergency pole; shoe insulation. (a) Each locomotive equipped with a pantograph...

  18. 49 CFR 229.81 - Emergency pole; shoe insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency pole; shoe insulation. 229.81 Section 229.81 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... System § 229.81 Emergency pole; shoe insulation. (a) Each locomotive equipped with a pantograph...

  19. 49 CFR 229.81 - Emergency pole; shoe insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency pole; shoe insulation. 229.81 Section 229.81 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... System § 229.81 Emergency pole; shoe insulation. (a) Each locomotive equipped with a pantograph...

  20. 49 CFR 229.81 - Emergency pole; shoe insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency pole; shoe insulation. 229.81 Section 229.81 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... System § 229.81 Emergency pole; shoe insulation. (a) Each locomotive equipped with a pantograph...

  1. Control of subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) infesting power poles.

    PubMed

    Horwood, Martin A; Westlake, Terry; Kathuria, Amrit

    2010-12-01

    A trial was conducted to determine the efficacy of termiticidal dusts (arsenic trioxide, triflumuron, and Metarhizium anisopliae), a timber fumigant (dazomet) and liquid termiticides (bifenthrin, chlorfenapyr, chlorpyrifos, fipronil, and imidacloprid) for controlling subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) infesting in-service power poles in New South Wales, Australia. Dusts were applied to parts of the pole where termites were present. Fumigant was inserted into holes drilled into the base of the pole. Liquid termiticides were mixed with soil around the base of the pole and injected into internal voids if present. Poles were inspected for up to 5 yr, and the time taken for reinfestation to occur was recorded. Before the start of the trial, the major Australian pole owners were surveyed to obtain an estimate of the annual national cost of termite infestation to the power supply industry. The annual costs of termite treatment and replacing damaged poles were estimated at AU$2 million and AU$13 million, respectively. Infestation rates were lower for all treatments compared with controls within the first 12 mo of the study. Dazomet, arsenic trioxide, fipronil, and chlorpyrifos were the most efficacious treatments. Efficacy was positively related to the amount of termiticide applied and negatively related to the infestation severity but was unaffected by geographical location. Survival curves were calculated of the time elapsed before the recurrence of termite infestations (survival absence of reinfestation). Survival was highest for poles treated with liquid termiticides.

  2. 46 CFR 111.79-3 - Grounding pole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Grounding pole. 111.79-3 Section 111.79-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Receptacles § 111.79-3 Grounding pole. Each receptacle outlet that operates at 100 volts or...

  3. 46 CFR 111.79-3 - Grounding pole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Grounding pole. 111.79-3 Section 111.79-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Receptacles § 111.79-3 Grounding pole. Each receptacle outlet that operates at 100 volts or...

  4. 46 CFR 111.79-3 - Grounding pole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Grounding pole. 111.79-3 Section 111.79-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Receptacles § 111.79-3 Grounding pole. Each receptacle outlet that operates at 100 volts or...

  5. 46 CFR 111.79-3 - Grounding pole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Grounding pole. 111.79-3 Section 111.79-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Receptacles § 111.79-3 Grounding pole. Each receptacle outlet that operates at 100 volts or...

  6. 46 CFR 111.79-3 - Grounding pole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Grounding pole. 111.79-3 Section 111.79-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Receptacles § 111.79-3 Grounding pole. Each receptacle outlet that operates at 100 volts or...

  7. Identity Pole: Confronting Issues of Personal and Cultural Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciminero, Sandra Elser

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the "Identity Pole" was to explore the big idea of identity. Students would confront issues of personal and cultural meaning, and draw upon interdisciplinary connections for inspiration. The author chose to present totem poles of the Northwest Coast Native Americans/First Nations of Canada, as well as school, state and national…

  8. Trekking poles: Can you save your knees and the environment?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marion, J.L.; Martinez, T.A.; Proudman, R.D.

    2001-01-01

    The increasing use of trekking poles has stimulated a growing awareness of some environmental and social impacts associated with their use. These impacts have not been documented in the scientific literature. This article reviews the impacts of trekking pole use to provide a basis for further dialogue, and suggests how they may be altered or used in ways that will minimize impact.

  9. pbx is required for pole and eye regeneration in planarians

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Chieh G.; Wang, Irving E.; Reddien, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Planarian regeneration involves regionalized gene expression that specifies the body plan. After amputation, planarians are capable of regenerating new anterior and posterior poles, as well as tissues polarized along the anterior-posterior, dorsal-ventral and medial-lateral axes. Wnt and several Hox genes are expressed at the posterior pole, whereas Wnt inhibitory genes, Fgf inhibitory genes, and prep, which encodes a TALE-family homeodomain protein, are expressed at the anterior pole. We found that Smed-pbx (pbx for short), which encodes a second planarian TALE-family homeodomain transcription factor, is required for restored expression of these genes at anterior and posterior poles during regeneration. Moreover, pbx(RNAi) animals gradually lose pole gene expression during homeostasis. By contrast, pbx was not required for initial anterior-posterior polarized responses to wounds, indicating that pbx is required after wound responses for development and maintenance of poles during regeneration and homeostatic tissue turnover. Independently of the requirement for pbx in pole regeneration, pbx is required for eye precursor formation and, consequently, eye regeneration and eye replacement in homeostasis. Together, these data indicate that pbx promotes pole formation of body axes and formation of regenerative progenitors for eyes. PMID:23318641

  10. Heavy Cratering near Callisto's South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Images from NASA's Galileo spacecraft provide new insights into this region near Callisto's south pole. This two frame mosaic shows a heavily cratered surface with smooth plains in the areas between craters. North is to the top of the image. The smoothness of the plains appears to increase toward the south pole, approximately 480 kilometers (293 miles) south of the bottom of the image. This smoothness of Callisto's surface was not evident in images taken during the 1979 flyby of NASA's Voyager spacecraft because the resolution was insufficient to show the effect. This smooth surface, and the process(es) that cause it, are among the most intriguing aspects of Callisto. Although not fully understood, the process(es) responsible for this smoothing could include erosion by tiny meteorites and energetic ions. Some craters, such as Keelut, the 47 kilometer (29 mile) crater in the lower right corner, have sharp, well defined rims. Keelut contains an inner ring surrounding a central depression about 17 kilometers (11 miles) in diameter. Keelut, and the more irregularly shaped, degraded Reginleif, the 32 kilometer (19.5 mile) crater in the top center of the image, are very shallow and have flat floors. Crater forms can be seen down to less than 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) in diameter in the image. Each picture element (pixel) in this image is approximately 0.68 kilometers (0.41 miles) across.

    This image which was taken by the Galileo spacecraft's solid state imaging (CCD) system during its eighth orbit around Jupiter, on May 6th, 1997. The center of the image is located at 71.3 degrees south latitude, 97.6 degrees west longitude, and was taken when the spacecraft was approximately 35,470 kilometers (21,637 miles) from Callisto.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at

  11. Glacier melt on the Third Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, T.

    2015-12-01

    With an average elevation above 4,000 metres, the Third Pole (TP) is a unique region with many high mountains centered on the Tibetan Plateau stretching over 5 million square kilometers. Major environmental changes are taking place on the TP characterized by complex interactions of atmospheric, cryospheric, hydrological, geological and environmental processes. These processes are critical for the well-being of the three billion people inhabiting the plateau and the surrounding regions. Glacier melt is one of the most significant environmental changes observed on the TP. Over the past decade, most of the glaciers on the TP have undergone considerable melt. The Third Pole Environment (TPE) has focused on the causes of the glacier melt by conducting large-scale ground in-situ observation and monitoring, analyzing satellite images and remote sensing data, and applying numerical modeling to environmental research on the TP. The studies of long-term record of water stable isotopes in precipitation and ice core throughout the TP have revealed different features with regions, thus proposing significant influence of atmospheric circulations on spatial precipitation pattern over the TP. Validation of the result by isotope-equipped general circulation models confirms the spatial distribution of different atmospheric circulation dominances on the TP, with northern part dominated by the westerlies, southern part by the summer monsoon, and central part featuring the influences of both circulation systems. Such unique circulation patterns also bear directly on the status of glaciers and lakes over the TP and its surroundings. The studies therefore found the largest glacier melt in the monsoon-dominated southern part, moderate melt in the central part of transition, and the least melt, or even slight advance in the westerlies-dominated northern TP. It is clear that some mountains on the TP are undergoing rapid melt and the consequence of without ice and snow will be very soon. The

  12. Uranus, towards the planet's pole of rotation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    These two pictures of Uranus were compiled from images recorded by Voyager 2 on Jan. 1O, 1986, when the NASA spacecraft was 18 million kilometers (11 million miles) from the planet. The images were obtained by Voyager's narrow-angle camera; the view is toward the planet's pole of rotation, which lies just left of center. The picture on the left has been processed to show Uranus as human eyes would see it from the vantage point of the spacecraft. The second picture is an exaggerated false-color view that reveals details not visible in the true-color view -- including indications of what could be a polar haze of smog-like particles. The true-color picture was made by combining pictures taken through blue, green and orange filters. The dark shading of the upper right edge of the disk is the terminator, or day-night boundary. The blue-green appearance of Uranus results from methane in the atmosphere; this gas absorbs red wavelengths from the incoming sunlight, leaving the predominant bluish color seen here. The picture on the right uses false color and contrast enhancement to bring out subtle details in the polar region of the atmosphere. Images shuttered through different color filters were added and manipulated by computer, greatly enhancing the low-contrast details in the original images. Ultraviolet, violet- and orange-filtered images were displayed, respectively, as blue, green and red to produce this false-color picture. The planet reveals a dark polar hood surrounded by a series of progressively lighter convective bands. The banded structure is real, though exaggerated here. The brownish color near the center of the planet could be explained as being caused by a thin haze concentrated over the pole -- perhaps the product of chemical reactions powered by ultraviolet light from the Sun. One such reaction produces acetylene from methane -- acetylene has been detected on Uranus by an Earth-orbiting spacecraft -- and further reactions involving acetylene are known to

  13. Changes in performance and poling kinetics during cross-country sprint skiing competition using the double-poling technique.

    PubMed

    Mikkola, Jussi; Laaksonen, Marko S; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Nummela, Ari; Linnamo, Vesa

    2013-11-01

    In this study, changes in skiing performance and poling kinetics during a simulated cross-country sprint skiing competition were investigated. Twelve elite male cross-country skiers performed simulated sprint competition (4 x 1,150 m heat with 20 min recovery between the heats) using the double-poling technique. Vertical and horizontal pole forces and cycle characteristics were measured using a force plate system (20-m long) during the starting spurt, racing speed, and finishing spurt of each heat. Moreover, heat and 20-m phase velocities were determined. Vertical and horizontal pole impulses as well as mean cycle length were calculated. The velocities of heats decreased by 2.7 +/- 1.7% (p = 0.003) over the simulated competition. The 20-m spurting velocity decreased by 16 +/- 5% (p < 0.002) and poling time increased by 18 +/- 9% (p < 0.003) in spurt phases within heats. Vertical and horizontal poling impulses did not change significantly during the simulation; however, the mean forces decreased (p < 0.039) (vertical by 24 +/- 11% and horizontal by 20 +/- 10%) within heats but not between the heats. Decreased heat velocities over the simulated sprint and spurting velocities within heats indicated fatigue among the skiers. Fatigue was also manifested by decreased pole force production and increased poling time.

  14. Pole preservatives in soils adjacent to in-service utility poles in the United States. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, B.B.; Ripp, J.A.; Sims, R.; Ladwig, K.

    1997-12-01

    As a result of increasing concerns regarding the environmental fate of wood preservatives, EPRI carried out a study of soils in the vicinity of in-service wood pole sites. More than 8,000 soil samples adjacent to 180 PCP-treated and 22 creosote-treated wood poles were collected and analyzed for chemicals of interest. The results showed that concentrations of wood preservative chemicals tended to be highest in soils located in very close proximity to the poles with rapid decreases in concentrations observed with distance from the poles. Soil partitioning, biodegradation, and modeling studies on PCP were also completed to augment the soil data and to provide additional information on the release, migration, and fate of wood preservatives at in-service pole sites.

  15. In Situ Poling and Imidization of Amorphous Piezoelectric Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Wise, Kristopher E.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An amorphous piezoelectric polyimide containing polar functional groups has been developed using a combination of experimental and molecular modeling for potential use in high temperature applications. This amorphous polyimide, (Beta-CN)APB/ODPA, has exhibited good thermal stability and piezoelectric response at temperatures up to 150C. Density functional calculations predicted that a partially cured amic acid (open imide ring) possesses a dipole moment four times larger than the fully imidized closed ring. In situ poling and imidization of the partially cured (Beta-CN)APB/ODPA, was studied in an attempt to maximize the degree of dipolar orientation and the resultant piezoelectric response. A positive corona poling was used to minimize localized arcing during poling and to allow use of higher poling fields without dielectric breakdown. The dielectric relaxation strength, remanent polarization, and piezoelectric response were evaluated as a function of the poling profile. The partially cured, corona poled polymers exhibited higher dielectric relaxation strength (delta varepsilon), remanent polarization (Pr) and piezoelectric strain coefficient (d33) than the fully cured, conventionally poled ones.

  16. Evidence for Phyllosilicates near the Lunar South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilas, Faith; Jensen, E.; Domingue, Deborah; McFadden, L.; Coombs, Cassandraa; Mendell, Wendell

    1998-01-01

    While theoretically water ice could be stable in permanently shadowed areas near the lunar poles, there is conflicting observational evidence for the existence of water ice at either pole. Clementine's bistatic radar resumed a weak signal commensurate with water ice in the South Pole Aitken Basin; however, groundbased radar searches have not detected such a signal at either pole. Lunar Prospector measured large amounts of H (attributed to water) at both poles; however, Galileo near-infrared spectral measurements of the north polar region did not detect the prominent 3.0 micron absorption feature due to interlayer and adsorbed water in phyllosilicates. Evidence for the existence of water at the lunar poles is still ambiguous and controversial. We present evidence, based on the analysis of Galileo SSI images, for the presence of phyllosilicates near the lunar south pole. Using the color image sequence (560 nm, 670 nm, 756 nm, and 889 nm) of Lunmap 14 taken during the Galileo Earth-Moon pass I, we have identified areas that show evidence for a 0.7 microns absorption feature present in Fe-bearing phyllosilicates.

  17. Asteroid 45 Eugenia - Lightcurves and the pole orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. C.; Birch, P. V.; Surdej, J.; Pospieszalska-Surdej, A.

    1988-01-01

    Three lightcurves obtained in 1969 and six from 1984 are presented for the 250-km U-type asteroid Eugenia. The asteroid's north pole is within + or - 10 deg of ecliptic longitude 106 deg and a latitude of +26 deg, in keeping with an amplitude-aspect pole analysis. While only one maximum and one minimum are present when observations are closest to both the north and south poles, there are two of each at other oppositions. It is suggested that this effect may be due to the surface albedo features of Eugenia.

  18. The self-consistent dynamic pole tide in global oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamic pole tide is characterized in a self-consistent manner by means of introducing a single nondifferential matrix equation compatible with the Liouville equation, modelling the ocean as global and of uniform depth. The deviations of the theory from the realistic ocean, associated with the nonglobality of the latter, are also given consideration, with an inference that in realistic oceans long-period modes of resonances would be increasingly likely to exist. The analysis of the nature of the pole tide and its effects on the Chandler wobble indicate that departures of the pole tide from the equilibrium may indeed be minimal.

  19. Cluster observations with the South Pole Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plagge, Thomas Jeffrey

    The South Pole Telescope (SPT) is an instrument designed to survey galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. In this thesis I describe the telescope, its first-generation receiver, and its readout and control systems. I also present Sunyaev-Zel'dovich measurements of 15 massive X-ray selected galaxy clusters obtained with the SPT. The cluster signals are measured at 150 GHz, and concurrent 220 GHz data are used to reduce astrophysical contamination. Radial profiles are computed using a technique that takes into account the effects of the beams and filtering. In several clusters, significant SZ decrements are detected out to a substantial fraction of the virial radius. The profiles are fit to the beta-model and to a generalized NFW pressure profile, and are scaled and stacked to probe their average behavior. The best-fit model parameters are consistent with previous studies: beta = 0.86 and rcore/r500 = 0.20 for the beta-model, and (alphan, betan, gamman, c500)=(1.0, 5.5, 0.5, 1.0) for the generalized NFW model. Both models fit the SPT data comparably well, and both are consistent with the average SZ profile out to the virial radius. The integrated Compton-y parameter YSZ is computed for each cluster using both model-dependent and model-independent techniques, and the results are compared to X-ray estimates of cluster parameters. YSZ is found to scale with YX and gas mass with low scatter. Since these observables have been found to scale with total mass, these results point to a tight mass-observable relation for the SPT cluster survey.

  20. 31. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1973. WELL WITH POLE DERRICK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1973. WELL WITH POLE DERRICK AND COMPLETE SET OF WHEELS, ROADWAY ACCESS. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  1. LODGEPOLE BRIDGE DETAIL, FACING SOUTHEAST Generals Highway, Lodge Pole ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LODGEPOLE BRIDGE DETAIL, FACING SOUTHEAST - Generals Highway, Lodge Pole Bridge, Spanning Marble Fork of Kaweah River, approximately 21 miles northwest of Ash Mountain Entrance, Three Rivers, Tulare County, CA

  2. A LINE POLE 2, DETAIL OF MODERN BROWN PORCELAIN SUSPENSIONTYPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A LINE POLE 2, DETAIL OF MODERN BROWN PORCELAIN SUSPENSION-TYPE INSULATORS. VIEW TO WEST. - Mystic Lake Hydroelectric Facility, Electric Transmission A Line, Along West Rosebud Creek, Fishtail, Stillwater County, MT

  3. BLDG 2, FRONT ELEVATION (PIER SIDE) WITH POLE. Naval ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG 2, FRONT ELEVATION (PIER SIDE) WITH POLE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch Branch, Explosive & Small Train Depot, Main wharf area between wharves W2 & W3, north of First Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. Asymmetric spindle pole formation in CPAP-depleted mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Miseon; Chang, Jaerak; Chang, Sunghoe; Lee, Kyung S; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2014-02-21

    CPAP is an essential component for centriole formation. Here, we report that CPAP is also critical for symmetric spindle pole formation during mitosis. We observed that pericentriolar material between the mitotic spindle poles were asymmetrically distributed in CPAP-depleted cells even with intact numbers of centrioles. The length of procentrioles was slightly reduced by CPAP depletion, but the length of mother centrioles was not affected. Surprisingly, the young mother centrioles of the CPAP-depleted cells are not fully matured, as evidenced by the absence of distal and subdistal appendage proteins. We propose that the selective absence of centriolar appendages at the young mother centrioles may be responsible for asymmetric spindle pole formation in CPAP-depleted cells. Our results suggest that the neural stem cells with CPAP mutations might form asymmetric spindle poles, which results in premature initiation of differentiation.

  5. Detail of base of monopole antenna element with graduated pole, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of base of monopole antenna element with graduated pole, view facing north - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  6. 9. VIEW SHOWING TRUSSES FROM DECK WITH 4' RANGE POLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW SHOWING TRUSSES FROM DECK WITH 4' RANGE POLE AT SECOND VERTICAL POST ON SOUTH SIDE, LOOKING WEST - White River Bridge, Spanning White River at U.S. Highway 70, De Valls Bluff, Prairie County, AR

  7. Forbush Effects on the Martian Surface and Earth's Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posner, A.; Guo, J.; Heber, B.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Zeitlin, C.; Zheng, Y.; MacNeice, P. J.; Odstrcil, D.; Rastaetter, L.; Steigies, C. T.; Andrews, J. P.; Appel, J. K.; Beaujean, R.; Berger, L.; Boettcher, S. I.; Brinza, D. E.; Bullock, M.; Burmeister, S.; Cucinotta, F.; Dresing, N.; Drews, C.; Ehresmann, B.; Epperly, M. E.; Hassler, D.; Herbst, K.; Kim, M. H. Y.; Kohler, J.; Kühl, P.; Lohf, H.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Müller-Mellin, R.; Neal, K.; Rafkin, S. C.; Reitz, G.; Smith, K. D.; Tyler, Y.; weigle, G., II

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed MSL/RAD observation of Forbush effects on the surface of Mars over a full Mars year from landing through the Mars opposition period in 2014. For the extended Mars opposition phase we compared the observed Forbush effects with those identified at Earth's south pole utilizing observations of the South Pole neutron monitor. Identification of the drivers of Forbush effects, recurrent and transient solar wind structures in the inner heliosphere, is aided by WSA-ENLIL simulations. We show that a remarkable correlations of count rates of (secondary) cosmic rays at Mars' surface and at the Earth's south pole is established for a minimum duration of 6 months around the Mars opposition, in particular when time shifted with propagation and/or corotation delays of the drivers of cosmic ray decreases in the solar wind. Moreover, the magnitude of Forbush effects on Mars is larger statistically than the equivalent near Earth's poles.

  8. Cassini Observes the Active South Pole of Enceladus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porco, C. C.; Helfenstein P.; Thomas, P. C.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Wisdom, J.; West, R.; Neukum, G.; Denk, T.; Wagner, R.; Roatsch, T.; Kieffer, S.; Turtle, E.; McEwen, A.; Johnson, T. V.; Rathbun, J.; Veverka, J.; Wilson, D.; Perry, J.; Spitale, J.; Brahic, A.; Burns, J. A.; DelGenio, A. D.; Dones, L.; Murray, C. D.; Squyres, S.

    2007-01-01

    Cassini has identified a geologically active province a the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus. The shape of Enceladus suggests a possible intense heating epoch in the past by capture into a 1:4 secondary spin/orbit resonance.

  9. TOWER 450 WITH POLE. Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOWER 450 WITH POLE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch Branch, Guard-Watch Tower Type, Near A Avenue between Fourth & Sixth Streets, Ninth Street & D Avenue intersection, & F Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. TOWER S389, WITH POLE. MAGAZINES IN BACKGROUND. Naval Magazine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOWER S389, WITH POLE. MAGAZINES IN BACKGROUND. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch Branch, Guard-Watch Tower Type, Near A Avenue between Fourth & Sixth Streets, Ninth Street & D Avenue intersection, & F Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. 4. Interior view to northwest, showing tiers of poles for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Interior view to northwest, showing tiers of poles for hanging tobacco to cure. - Edgewood Farm, Tobacco Barn, West side of State Route 600, .8 mile north of State Route 778, Clover, Halifax County, VA

  12. 3. FENCE AND POLE WITH BUILDINGS 600608 IN THE BACKGROUND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FENCE AND POLE WITH BUILDINGS 600-608 IN THE BACKGROUND, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Mill Valley Air Force Station, Military Family Housing, East Ridgecrest Boulevard, Mount Tamalpais, Mill Valley, Marin County, CA

  13. 28. ELEVATION LOOKING EAST, ORIGINAL MARCONI ANTENNA POLES WERE 300' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. ELEVATION LOOKING EAST, ORIGINAL MARCONI ANTENNA POLES WERE 300' TALL (AT LEAST TWICE THE HEIGHT OF THOSE APPEARING IN PICTURE). - Marconi Radio Sites, Transmitting, Point Reyes Station, Marin County, CA

  14. MAGAZINE 243, FRONT ELEVATION WITH POLE. MAGAZINE 242 IN BACKGROUND. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MAGAZINE 243, FRONT ELEVATION WITH POLE. MAGAZINE 242 IN BACKGROUND. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch Branch, Magazine Type 2, Fourth Place, Seventh & Eighth Streets, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Dynamic Electromechanical Characterization of Axially Poled PZT 95/5

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, Lalit C.; Furnish, Michael D.; Montgomery, Stephen T.; Setchell, Robert E.

    1999-06-25

    We are conducting a comprehensive experimental study of the electromechanical behavior of poled PZT 95/5 (lead zirconate titattate). As part of this study, eight plane-wave tests have been conducted on axially poled PZT 95/5 at stress levels ranging from 0.9 to 4.6 GPa, using VISAR and electrical diagnos- tics. Observed wave velocities were slightly decreased from ultrasonic vahtes, by contrast' with unpoled samples. Compression waveforms show a step at 0.6 GPa more marked than for normally poled or unpoled samples; this may correspond to a poling effect on the ferroelectric/antiferroelectric transition. A similar step is observed on release. The released charge upon loading to 0.9 GPa is consistent with nearly complete depoling. Loading to higher stresses gave lower currents (factor of 10), suggesting shock-induced conduc- tivity or electrical breakdown.

  16. The microtubules dance and the spindle poles swing.

    PubMed

    Munro, Edwin

    2007-05-01

    Using live imaging and computer simulation, Kozlowski et al. (2007) show that an interplay between spindle pole movements, microtubule dynamics, and microtubule bending contribute to asymmetric spindle placement in the C. elegans embryo. PMID:17482539

  17. NORTH ELEVATION WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. ABOVEGROUND PORTION IS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH ELEVATION WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. ABOVE-GROUND PORTION IS ON THE LEFT. VIEW FACING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. EAST ELEVATION WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. VIEW FACING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST ELEVATION WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. VIEW FACING WEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. Multijet final states: exact results and the leading pole approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.K.; Owens, J.F.

    1984-09-01

    Exact results for the process gg ..-->.. ggg are compared with those obtained using the leading pole approximation. Regions of phase space where the approximation breaks down are discussed. A specific example relevant for background estimates to W boson production is presented. It is concluded that in this instance the leading pole approximation may underestimate the standard QCD background by more than a factor of two in certain kinematic regions of physical interest.

  20. Pentachlorophenol Contamination of Private Drinking Water From Treated Utility Poles

    PubMed Central

    Cragin, Lori; Center, Gail; Giguere, Cary; Comstock, Jeff; Boccuzzo, Linda; Sumner, Austin

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, after resident calls regarding an odor, the Vermont Department of Health and state partners responded to 2 scenarios of private drinking water contamination from utility poles treated with pentachlorophenol (PCP), an organochlorine wood preservative used in the United States. Public health professionals should consider PCP contamination of private water if they receive calls about a chemical or gasoline-like odor with concurrent history of nearby utility pole replacement. PMID:23237185

  1. Supracostal percutaneous nephrolithotomy for upper pole caliceal calculi.

    PubMed

    Stening, S G; Bourne, S

    1998-08-01

    The incidence of upper pole calculi is 15% of all caliceal calculi. The management of such calculi has been simplified since the advent of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL). In our experience, however, there is a subset of upper pole caliceal calculi wherein certain features can render SWL less than adequate treatment, namely diameter >1.5 cm, narrowing of the caliceal infundibulum, either singly or combined, and morbid obesity. In such instances, percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is indicated. Percutaneous access to an upper pole calix can be difficult by a subcostal track. The supracostal 12th rib approach provides direct and efficient access to an upper pole calix and is ideally suited for upper pole calculi. Twenty-one patients with large or complex upper pole calculi were treated by supracostal PCNL. The maximum diameter of the calculi ranged from 7 to 40 mm. Eight were branched (staghorn). There was one horseshoe kidney, and calculi were bilaterally represented in another patient. Two patients were morbidly obese. All procedures were performed in one stage under general anesthesia. Following cystoscopy and ureteral catheterization, the upper pole calix was accessed directly with the aid of C-arm fluoroscopy and retrograde ureteral contrast injection. The percutaneous tract was dilated to a maximum of 26 F, a working sheath was inserted, and the calculi were extracted after ultrasonic or pneumatic fragmentation. One patient required secondary SWL for residual fragments. There were no intrathoracic complications, and blood loss was minimal. Large or complex upper pole caliceal calculi, particularly in the morbidly obese, can be treated effectively by PCNL using supracostal percutaneous access.

  2. Higher Pole Linear Traps for Atomic Clock Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    2000-01-01

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically higher pole linear ion traps for frequency standard use. We have built a 12-pole trap and have successfully loaded ions into it from a linear quadrupole trap. By solving the Boltzmann equation describing large ion clouds where space charge interactions are important, we show that clock frequency changes due to ion number fluctuations are much smaller in ion clocks based multipole traps than comparable clocks based on quadrupole linear traps.

  3. Another look at North Sea pole tide dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.; Preisig, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism proposed by Wunsch (1974) to explain pole tide observations in the North Sea is evaluated. Wunsch's equations governing pole tide in the North Sea are presented, and solutions for correcting the depth, stream function, and deviation of the tidal height from the equilibrium values are described. The similarity between the Stokes paradox and the tidal equations of the North Sea, and the need for inclusion of inertial terms in the tidal equations are discussed.

  4. Pentachlorophenol contamination of private drinking water from treated utility poles.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Lee; Cragin, Lori; Center, Gail; Giguere, Cary; Comstock, Jeff; Boccuzzo, Linda; Sumner, Austin

    2013-02-01

    In 2009, after resident calls regarding an odor, the Vermont Department of Health and state partners responded to 2 scenarios of private drinking water contamination from utility poles treated with pentachlorophenol (PCP), an organochlorine wood preservative used in the United States. Public health professionals should consider PCP contamination of private water if they receive calls about a chemical or gasoline-like odor with concurrent history of nearby utility pole replacement.

  5. Gamma Oscillations in the Temporal Pole in Response to Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Uono, Shota; Matsuda, Kazumi; Usui, Keiko; Usui, Naotaka; Inoue, Yushi; Toichi, Motomi

    2016-01-01

    The eyes of an individual act as an indispensable communication medium during human social interactions. Functional neuroimaging studies have revealed that several brain regions are activated in response to eyes and eye gaze direction changes. However, it remains unclear whether the temporal pole is one of these regions. Furthermore, if the temporal pole is activated by these stimuli, the timing and manner in which it is activated also remain unclear. To investigate these issues, we analyzed intracranial electroencephalographic data from the temporal pole that were obtained during the presentation of eyes and mosaics in averted or straight directions and their directional changes. Time–frequency statistical parametric mapping analyses revealed that the bilateral temporal poles exhibited greater gamma-band activation beginning at 215 ms in response to eyes compared with mosaics, irrespective of the direction. Additionally, the right temporal pole showed greater gamma-band activation beginning at 197 ms in response to directional changes of the eyes compared with mosaics. These results suggest that gamma-band oscillations in the temporal pole were involved in the processing of the presence of eyes and changes in eye gaze direction at a relatively late temporal stage compared with the posterior cortices. PMID:27571204

  6. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy or percutaneous nephrolithotomy for lower pole nephrolithiasis?

    PubMed

    Cass, A S

    1996-02-01

    A controversy has arisen as to whether the initial form of therapy for lower pole nephrolithiasis should be extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) or percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). We reviewed our results with 968 single lower pole stones treated by SWL and reviewed publications comparing SWL and PCNL for lower pole nephrolithiasis. In our cases, the stone-free rate was 71.2%, the rate of repeat treatment and post-treatment secondary procedures was 6.4%, the complication rate was 0.5%, and the hospital stay was less than 24 hours in 99.3% of patients. In published series of PCNL for lower pole nephrolithiasis, the stone free rate was 70.5% to 100%, repeat treatment rates were 4% to 62.5%, the complication rates were 13% to 38%, and the hospital stay was 3.1 to 6.1 days. The rates of recurrent stone disease with PCNL were 11% to 22%, similar to the rates after SWL. The percentage of renal urolithiasis patients with lower pole calculi since we started our unit in late 1986 has remained essentially constant at 38%. Although the stone-free rate with PCNL is higher than with SWL, the lower complication rate, lower repeat treatment/secondary procedure rate, the shorter hospital stay, and the similar recurrent stone rate with SWL make SWL more clinically effective as the primary therapy for lower pole calculi less than 2 cm in diameter.

  7. POLE mutations in families predisposed to cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Aoude, Lauren G; Heitzer, Ellen; Johansson, Peter; Gartside, Michael; Wadt, Karin; Pritchard, Antonia L; Palmer, Jane M; Symmons, Judith; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Tomlinson, Ian; Kearsey, Stephen; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2015-12-01

    Germline mutations in the exonuclease domain of POLE have been shown to predispose to colorectal cancers and adenomas. POLE is an enzyme involved in DNA repair and chromosomal DNA replication. In order to assess whether such mutations might also predispose to cutaneous melanoma, we interrogated whole-genome and exome data from probands of 34 melanoma families lacking pathogenic mutations in known high penetrance melanoma susceptibility genes: CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, TERT, POT1, ACD and TERF2IP. We found a novel germline mutation, POLE p.(Trp347Cys), in a 7-case cutaneous melanoma family. Functional assays in S. pombe showed that this mutation led to an increased DNA mutation rate comparable to that seen with a Pol ε mutant with no exonuclease activity. We then performed targeted sequencing of POLE in 1243 cutaneous melanoma cases and found that a further ten probands had novel or rare variants in the exonuclease domain of POLE. Although this frequency is not significantly higher than that in unselected Caucasian controls, we observed multiple cancer types in the melanoma families, suggesting that some germline POLE mutations may predispose to a broad spectrum of cancers, including melanoma. In addition, we found the first mutation outside the exonuclease domain, p.(Gln520Arg), in a family with an extensive history of colorectal cancer.

  8. POLE mutations in families predisposed to cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Aoude, Lauren G; Heitzer, Ellen; Johansson, Peter; Gartside, Michael; Wadt, Karin; Pritchard, Antonia L; Palmer, Jane M; Symmons, Judith; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Tomlinson, Ian; Kearsey, Stephen; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2015-12-01

    Germline mutations in the exonuclease domain of POLE have been shown to predispose to colorectal cancers and adenomas. POLE is an enzyme involved in DNA repair and chromosomal DNA replication. In order to assess whether such mutations might also predispose to cutaneous melanoma, we interrogated whole-genome and exome data from probands of 34 melanoma families lacking pathogenic mutations in known high penetrance melanoma susceptibility genes: CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, TERT, POT1, ACD and TERF2IP. We found a novel germline mutation, POLE p.(Trp347Cys), in a 7-case cutaneous melanoma family. Functional assays in S. pombe showed that this mutation led to an increased DNA mutation rate comparable to that seen with a Pol ε mutant with no exonuclease activity. We then performed targeted sequencing of POLE in 1243 cutaneous melanoma cases and found that a further ten probands had novel or rare variants in the exonuclease domain of POLE. Although this frequency is not significantly higher than that in unselected Caucasian controls, we observed multiple cancer types in the melanoma families, suggesting that some germline POLE mutations may predispose to a broad spectrum of cancers, including melanoma. In addition, we found the first mutation outside the exonuclease domain, p.(Gln520Arg), in a family with an extensive history of colorectal cancer. PMID:26251183

  9. Gamma Oscillations in the Temporal Pole in Response to Eyes.

    PubMed

    Sato, Wataru; Kochiyama, Takanori; Uono, Shota; Matsuda, Kazumi; Usui, Keiko; Usui, Naotaka; Inoue, Yushi; Toichi, Motomi

    2016-01-01

    The eyes of an individual act as an indispensable communication medium during human social interactions. Functional neuroimaging studies have revealed that several brain regions are activated in response to eyes and eye gaze direction changes. However, it remains unclear whether the temporal pole is one of these regions. Furthermore, if the temporal pole is activated by these stimuli, the timing and manner in which it is activated also remain unclear. To investigate these issues, we analyzed intracranial electroencephalographic data from the temporal pole that were obtained during the presentation of eyes and mosaics in averted or straight directions and their directional changes. Time-frequency statistical parametric mapping analyses revealed that the bilateral temporal poles exhibited greater gamma-band activation beginning at 215 ms in response to eyes compared with mosaics, irrespective of the direction. Additionally, the right temporal pole showed greater gamma-band activation beginning at 197 ms in response to directional changes of the eyes compared with mosaics. These results suggest that gamma-band oscillations in the temporal pole were involved in the processing of the presence of eyes and changes in eye gaze direction at a relatively late temporal stage compared with the posterior cortices. PMID:27571204

  10. Prognostic Significance of POLE Proofreading Mutations in Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Church, David N.; Stelloo, Ellen; Nout, Remi A.; Valtcheva, Nadejda; Depreeuw, Jeroen; ter Haar, Natalja; Noske, Aurelia; Amant, Frederic; Wild, Peter J.; Lambrechts, Diether; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Jobsen, Jan J.; Smit, Vincent T. H. B. M.; Creutzberg, Carien L.; Bosse, Tjalling

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current risk stratification in endometrial cancer (EC) results in frequent over- and underuse of adjuvant therapy, and may be improved by novel biomarkers. We examined whether POLE proofreading mutations, recently reported in about 7% of ECs, predict prognosis. Methods: We performed targeted POLE sequencing in ECs from the PORTEC-1 and -2 trials (n = 788), and analyzed clinical outcome according to POLE status. We combined these results with those from three additional series (n = 628) by meta-analysis to generate multivariable-adjusted, pooled hazard ratios (HRs) for recurrence-free survival (RFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) of POLE-mutant ECs. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: POLE mutations were detected in 48 of 788 (6.1%) ECs from PORTEC-1 and-2 and were associated with high tumor grade (P < .001). Women with POLE-mutant ECs had fewer recurrences (6.2% vs 14.1%) and EC deaths (2.3% vs 9.7%), though, in the total PORTEC cohort, differences in RFS and CSS were not statistically significant (multivariable-adjusted HR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.13 to 1.37, P = .15; HR = 0.19, 95% CI = 0.03 to 1.44, P = .11 respectively). However, of 109 grade 3 tumors, 0 of 15 POLE-mutant ECs recurred, compared with 29 of 94 (30.9%) POLE wild-type cancers; reflected in statistically significantly greater RFS (multivariable-adjusted HR = 0.11, 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.84, P = .03). In the additional series, there were no EC-related events in any of 33 POLE-mutant ECs, resulting in a multivariable-adjusted, pooled HR of 0.33 for RFS (95% CI = 0.12 to 0.91, P = .03) and 0.26 for CSS (95% CI = 0.06 to 1.08, P = .06). Conclusion: POLE proofreading mutations predict favorable EC prognosis, independently of other clinicopathological variables, with the greatest effect seen in high-grade tumors. This novel biomarker may help to reduce overtreatment in EC. PMID:25505230

  11. Pole-to-pole biogeography of surface and deep marine bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Ghiglione, Jean-François; Galand, Pierre E.; Pommier, Thomas; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos; Maas, Elizabeth W.; Bakker, Kevin; Bertilson, Stefan; Kirchman, David L.; Lovejoy, Connie; Yager, Patricia L.; Murray, Alison E.

    2012-01-01

    The Antarctic and Arctic regions offer a unique opportunity to test factors shaping biogeography of marine microbial communities because these regions are geographically far apart, yet share similar selection pressures. Here, we report a comprehensive comparison of bacterioplankton diversity between polar oceans, using standardized methods for pyrosequencing the V6 region of the small subunit ribosomal (SSU) rRNA gene. Bacterial communities from lower latitude oceans were included, providing a global perspective. A clear difference between Southern and Arctic Ocean surface communities was evident, with 78% of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) unique to the Southern Ocean and 70% unique to the Arctic Ocean. Although polar ocean bacterial communities were more similar to each other than to lower latitude pelagic communities, analyses of depths, seasons, and coastal vs. open waters, the Southern and Arctic Ocean bacterioplankton communities consistently clustered separately from each other. Coastal surface Southern and Arctic Ocean communities were more dissimilar from their respective open ocean communities. In contrast, deep ocean communities differed less between poles and lower latitude deep waters and displayed different diversity patterns compared with the surface. In addition, estimated diversity (Chao1) for surface and deep communities did not correlate significantly with latitude or temperature. Our results suggest differences in environmental conditions at the poles and different selection mechanisms controlling surface and deep ocean community structure and diversity. Surface bacterioplankton may be subjected to more short-term, variable conditions, whereas deep communities appear to be structured by longer water-mass residence time and connectivity through ocean circulation. PMID:23045668

  12. Revisiting the pole tide for and from satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Shailen; Wahr, John; Beckley, Brian

    2015-12-01

    Satellite altimeter sea surface height observations include the geocentric displacements caused by the pole tide, namely the response of the solid Earth and oceans to polar motion. Most users of these data remove these effects using a model that was developed more than 20 years ago. We describe two improvements to the pole tide model for satellite altimeter measurements. Firstly, we recommend an approach that improves the model for the response of the oceans by including the effects of self-gravitation, loading, and mass conservation. Our recommended approach also specifically includes the previously ignored displacement of the solid Earth due to the load of the ocean response, and includes the effects of geocenter motion. Altogether, this improvement amplifies the modeled geocentric pole tide by 15 %, or up to 2 mm of sea surface height displacement. We validate this improvement using two decades of satellite altimeter measurements. Secondly, we recommend that the altimetry pole tide model exclude geocentric sea surface displacements resulting from the long-term drift in polar motion. The response to this particular component of polar motion requires a more rigorous approach than is used by conventional models. We show that erroneously including the response to this component of polar motion in the pole tide model impacts interpretation of regional sea level rise by ± 0.25 mm/year.

  13. Assessment of Pole Erosion in a Magnetically Shielded Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Ortega, Alejandro L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of a 6-kW laboratory Hall thruster called H6 have been performed to quantify the erosion rate at the inner pole. The assessments have been made in two versions of the thruster, namely the unshielded (H6US) and magnetically shielded (H6MS) configurations. The simulations have been performed with the 2-D axisymmetric code Hall2De which employs a new multi-fluid ion algorithm to capture the presence of low-energy ions in the vicinity of the poles. It is found that the maximum computed erosion rate at the inner pole of the H6MS exceeds the measured rate of back-sputtered deposits by 4.5 times. This explains only part of the surface roughening that was observed after a 150-h wear test, which covered most of the pole area exposed to the plasma. For the majority of the pole surface the computed erosion rates are found to be below the back-sputter rate and comparable to those in the H6US which exhibited little to no sputtering in previous tests. Possible explanations for the discrepancy are discussed.

  14. Avoidance of a Landau pole by flat contributions in QED

    SciTech Connect

    Klaczynski, Lutz; Kreimer, Dirk

    2014-05-15

    We consider massless Quantum Electrodynamics in the momentum scheme and carry forward an approach based on Dyson–Schwinger equations to approximate both the β-function and the renormalized photon self-energy (Yeats, 2011). Starting from the Callan–Symanzik equation, we derive a renormalization group (RG) recursion identity which implies a non-linear ODE for the anomalous dimension and extract a sufficient but not necessary criterion for the existence of a Landau pole. This criterion implies a necessary condition for QED to have no such pole. Solving the differential equation exactly for a toy model case, we integrate the corresponding RG equation for the running coupling and find that even though the β-function entails a Landau pole it exhibits a flat contribution capable of decreasing its growth, in other cases possibly to the extent that such a pole is avoided altogether. Finally, by applying the recursion identity, we compute the photon propagator and investigate the effect of flat contributions on both spacelike and timelike photons. -- Highlights: •We present an approach to approximate both the β-function and the photon self-energy. •We find a sufficient criterion for the self-energy to entail the existence of a Landau pole. •We study non-perturbative ‘flat’ contributions that emerge within the context of our approach. •We discuss a toy model and how it is affected by flat contributions.

  15. Bioactivity of electro-thermally poled bioactive silicate glass.

    PubMed

    Mariappan, C R; Yunos, D M; Boccaccini, A R; Roling, B

    2009-05-01

    A 45S5 bioactive glass (nominal composition: 46.1 mol.% SiO2, 2.6 mol.% P2O5, 26.9 mol.% CaO, 24.4 mol.% Na2O) was electrothermally poled by applying voltages up to 750 V for 45 min at 200 degrees C, and the thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDCs) were recorded. Changes in chemical composition and electrical properties after poling were investigated by TSDC measurements, impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). The poling led to the formation of interfacial layers underneath the surface in contact with the electrodes. Under the positive electrode, the layer was characterized by Na+ ion depletion and by a negative charge density, and the layer was more resistive than the bulk. The influence of poling on the bioactivity was studied by immersion of samples in simulated body fluid (SBF) with subsequent cross-sectional SEM/EDX and X-ray diffraction analysis. It was found that poling leads to morphological changes in the silica-rich layer and to changes in the growth rate of amorphous calcium phosphate and bone-like apatite on the glass surface. The bone-like apatite layer under the positive electrode was slightly thicker than that under the negative electrode.

  16. Global plate tectonics and the secular motion of the pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soler, T.

    1977-01-01

    Astronomical data compiled during the last 70 years by the international organizations providing the coordinates of the instantaneous pole clearly shows a persistent drift of the mean pole. The differential contributions to the earth's second-order tensor of inertia were obtained and applied, resulting in no significant displacement of the earth's principal axis. In view of the above, the effect that theoretical geophysical models for absolute plate velocities may have on an apparent displacement of the mean pole as a consequence of station drifting was analyzed. The investigation also reports new values for the crustal tensor of inertia (assuming an ellipsoidal earth) and the orientation of its axis of figure, reopening the old speculation of a possible sliding of the whole crustover the upper mantle, including the supporting geophysical and astronomic evidence.

  17. Images and topographic relief at the north pole of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leberl, Franz W.; Maurice, Kelly E.; Thomas, John K.; Leff, Craig E.; Wall, Stephen D.

    1992-01-01

    The analysis of unique coverage of the north pole of Venus using a subset of 13 images from a total of about 775 synthetic aperture radar orbits during cycle 1 of the Magellan mission is reported. Images at 13 distinctly different azimuths are reported that range over 360 deg in longitude and that show the topographic relief at vastly different imaging geometries at intervals of about 20 deg. A pair of intersecting or crossing orbits is used to assess the topographic relief with stereo radargrammetric techniques, and to refine this assessment using a multiimage clinometric approach. It is shown that the pole is located in accentuated topography with elevation differences in the range of no more than 1 km. It is concluded that pinpointing the location of the pole from the overlapping images and standard mission data is accurate to within about 100 pixels or 8 km (RMS).

  18. Electromagnetic Radial Forces in a Hybrid Eight-Stator-Pole, Six-Rotor-Pole Bearingless Switched-Reluctance Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Siebert, Mark W.; Ho, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis and experimental measurement of the electromagnet force loads on the hybrid rotor in a novel bearingless switched-reluctance motor (BSRM) have been performed. A BSRM has the combined characteristics of a switched-reluctance motor and a magnetic bearing. The BSRM has an eight-pole stator and a six-pole hybrid rotor, which is composed of circular and scalloped lamination segments. The hybrid rotor is levitated using only one set of stator poles. A second set of stator poles imparts torque to the scalloped portion of the rotor, which is driven in a traditional switched reluctance manner by a processor. Analysis was done for nonrotating rotor poles that were oriented to achieve maximum and minimum radial force loads on the rotor. The objective is to assess whether simple one-dimensional magnetic circuit analysis is sufficient for preliminary evaluation of this machine, which may exhibit strong three-dimensional electromagnetic field behavior. Two magnetic circuit geometries, approximating the complex topology of the magnetic fields in and around the hybrid rotor, were employed in formulating the electromagnetic radial force equations. Reasonable agreement between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions was obtained with typical magnetic bearing derating factors applied to the predictions.

  19. Self-Tuning Power System Stabilizer Design Based on Pole-Assignment and Pole-Shifting Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataei, M.; Hooshmand, R.; Parastegari, M.

    In order to improve dynamic stability of the power systems, the use of Power System Stabilizer (PSS) has been recently increased. For this purpose, there are varieties of methods for determining the controller coefficients of the system stabilizers. If these coefficients are tuned in each operational point by an adaptive mechanism, the robust performance of the system is improved. In this study, a new method for determining the coefficients of a self-tuning PSS with lead-lag controller based on pole-assignment and pole-shifting techniques is presented. In the design procedure, the required identification in self-tuning regulator is performed by using active and reactive power values. Moreover, the properties of the proposed methodology are compared with self-tuning PID stabilizer whose coefficients are determined by using pole assignment technique. Then, the advantages of the proposed stabilizer in which parameter adaptation is accomplished based on the proposed self-tuning method by combining the pole-assignment and pole-shifting techniques, is expressed with respect to other stabilizers. Finally, in order to show the effectiveness of the proposed methodology, some simulation results on a power system with definite parameters and different operational points are provided and compared by using ITAE performance index which denotes the integral of time multiplied by absolute error.

  20. The solar photon thruster as a terrestrial pole sitter.

    PubMed

    Matloff, Gregory L

    2004-05-01

    Geosynchronous satellites are invisible at high latitudes. A pole-sitting spacecraft would have communication, climate-studies, and near-polar Earth observation applications. We present a pole-sitter based on the solar photon thruster (SPT), a two-sail variant of the solar sail using a large curved collector sail (always normal to the Sun) to direct sunlight against a much smaller thruster. Thrust decreases slower for an SPT than for a conventional sail arrangement as the angle between sunlight and the collector normal increases. An SPT pole-sitter is offset from the terrestrial pole so that a component of Earth gravity balances the solar radiation-pressure component pushing the SPT off station. The component of gravitational attraction of the Earth pulling the spacecraft towards Earth is also balanced by a solar radiation-pressure component. Results are presented for 80-100% collector/thruster reflectivities. For a spacecraft areal mass thickness of 0.002 kg/m(2), collector and thruster reflectivities of 0.9, the SPT can be situated above latitude 45 degrees at a distance of approximately 60 Earth radii. An SPT pole sitter would be affected by lunar perturbation, which can be compensated for by an on-board rocket thruster producing 2 x 10(-6) g acceleration, a second SPT thruster sail thrusting against the influence of the Moon, or by directing a microwave beam against the spacecraft. Since an SPT pole sitter is in a position rather than an orbit, the effect of terrestrial gravitation limits the size and design of the payload package, which limits terrestrial target resolution.

  1. Third Pole Environment (TPE): a new frontier for interdisciplinary research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Yao, T.; Thompson, L. G.; Mosbrugger, V.; Zhang, F.; Ma, Y.; Yang, X.; Wang, W.; Joswiak, D.; Liu, X.; Devkota, L. P.; Tayal, S.; Luo, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau and surrounding mountain ranges, referred to by scientists as the Third Pole (TP), represent one of the largest ice masses of the Earth. The region is one of the most sensitive areas responding to global climate change due to its high altitude and the presence of permafrost and glaciers. The near 100,000 km2 of glaciers ensure the permanent flow of major rivers in this region and provide water to 1.4 billion people in Asia. Thus, environmental changes taking place on the TP significantly influences social and economic development of countries in this region such as China, India, Nepal, Tajikistan, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Bhutan. With an average elevation higher than 4,000 metres above sea level, the Third Pole is characterized by complex interactions of atmospheric, cryospheric, hydrological, geological and environmental processes that bear special significance for the Earth's biodiversity, climate and water cycles. For a comprehensive understanding of the environment of the TP and its implications on the development of the region, we need to integrate different disciplines under a them of 'water-ice-air-ecosystem -human' interactions and reveal environmental change processes and mechanisms on the TP and their influences on and regional responses to global changes, and thus to serve for enhancement of human adaptation to the changing environment. Like Antarctica and the Arctic, the Third Pole region is drawing increased attention of the international academic community. A series of observations and monitoring programs in the Third Pole region has been widely implemented. However, data necessary to precisely assess the environmental, societal and economic changes caused by alterations in the Third Pole dynamics are either lacking or insufficient. The Third Pole Environment (TPE) program is thus established as a comprehensive and coordinated international research, monitoring and capacity building initiative, with goals to address the influence

  2. Bacterial scaffold directs pole-specific centromere segregation

    PubMed Central

    Ptacin, Jerod L.; Gahlmann, Andreas; Bowman, Grant R.; Perez, Adam M.; von Diezmann, Alexander R. S.; Eckart, Michael R.; Moerner, W. E.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria use partitioning systems based on the ParA ATPase to actively mobilize and spatially organize molecular cargoes throughout the cytoplasm. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses a ParA-based partitioning system to segregate newly replicated chromosomal centromeres to opposite cell poles. Here we demonstrate that the Caulobacter PopZ scaffold creates an organizing center at the cell pole that actively regulates polar centromere transport by the ParA partition system. As segregation proceeds, the ParB-bound centromere complex is moved by progressively disassembling ParA from a nucleoid-bound structure. Using superresolution microscopy, we show that released ParA is recruited directly to binding sites within a 3D ultrastructure composed of PopZ at the cell pole, whereas the ParB-centromere complex remains at the periphery of the PopZ structure. PopZ recruitment of ParA stimulates ParA to assemble on the nucleoid near the PopZ-proximal cell pole. We identify mutations in PopZ that allow scaffold assembly but specifically abrogate interactions with ParA and demonstrate that PopZ/ParA interactions are required for proper chromosome segregation in vivo. We propose that during segregation PopZ sequesters free ParA and induces target-proximal regeneration of ParA DNA binding activity to enforce processive and pole-directed centromere segregation, preventing segregation reversals. PopZ therefore functions as a polar hub complex at the cell pole to directly regulate the directionality and destination of transfer of the mitotic segregation machine. PMID:24778223

  3. Plate motion and the secular shift of the mean pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.; Carpenter, L.; Agreen, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The global plate motion indicates that changes in the products of inertia of the earth due to tectonic plate movement may provide a secular shift of the mean pole. A mathematical procedure for calculating this shift based on the plate theory is presented. Explicit expressions were obtained for the dependence of the secular polar shift on the dimensions and locations of the plate boundaries. Numerical results show that the secular motion of the mean pole is 0.0002 sec/year in the direction of 67 W. Hence, it is deduced that the influence of the plate motion on the secular polar shift may account for 10% of the observed value.

  4. Pole and prime meridian expressions for Phobos and Deimos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, T. C.; Callahan, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Simple trigonometric expressions are derived for the right ascensions and declinations of the spin axes of Phobos and Deimos as well as for their prime meridians. Simple expressions are possible since both satellites are in synchronous rotation about Mars and since the orbits of both satellites are accurately modeled as precessing ellipses. Spin axis expressions reflect the offset and precession of the orbit pole about the Laplacian pole. Prime meridian expressions include orbital mean motion, long-period solar perturbations, secular acceleration, and short-period, tidally induced forced libration. These simple expressions agree with rigorous expressions to + or - 0.2 deg.

  5. Synchronized Lunar Pole Impact Plume Sample Return Trajectory Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genova, Anthony L.; Foster, Cyrus; Colaprete, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The presented trajectory design enables two maneuverable spacecraft launched onto the same trans-lunar injection trajectory to coordinate a steep impact of a lunar pole and subsequent sample return of the ejecta plume to Earth. To demonstrate this concept, the impactor is assumed to use the LCROSS missions trajectory and spacecraft architecture, thus the permanently-shadowed Cabeus crater on the lunar south pole is assumed as the impact site. The sample-return spacecraft is assumed to be a CubeSat that requires a complimentary trajectory design that avoids lunar impact after passing through the ejecta plume to enable sample-return to Earth via atmospheric entry.

  6. Traumatic amputation of the left lower renal pole in children

    SciTech Connect

    Waxman, J.; Belman, A.B.; Kass, E.J.

    1985-07-01

    Four children between 5 and 10 years old suffered traumatic amputation of the left lower renal pole following flank trauma. All patients were evaluated with excretory urography and isotope renography. The renal scan clearly demonstrated failure of perfusion of the lower renal pole and urinary extravasation, and was believed to be more valuable than the standard excretory urogram as a diagnostic tool. All children were managed similarly: delayed (72 to 96 hours) exploration, simple removal of the amputated segment and insertion of a Penrose drain. They all have done well. The patients were normotensive at followup and had excellent function of the remaining portion of the kidney.

  7. Paleo-Pole Positions from Martian Magnetic Anomaly Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frawley, James J.; Taylor, Patrick T.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic component anomaly maps were made from five mapping cycles of the Mars Global Surveyor's magnetometer data. Our goal was to find and isolate positive and negative anomaly pairs which would indicate magnetization of a single source body. From these anomalies we could compute the direction of the magnetizing vector and subsequently the location of the magnetic pole existing at the time of magnetization. We found nine suitable anomaly pairs and from these we computed paleo-poles that were nearly equally divided between north, south and mid-latitudes. These results suggest that during the existence of the martian main magnetic field it experienced several reversals and excursions.

  8. Paleo-Pole Positions from Martian Magnetic Anomaly Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; Frawley, James J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic component anomaly maps were made from five mapping cycles of the Mars Global Surveyor s magnetometer data. Our goal was to find and isolate positive and negative anomaly pairs which would indicate magnetization of a single source body. From these anomalies we could compute the direction of the magnetizing vector and subsequently the location of the magnetic pole existing at the time of magnetization. We found nine suitable anomaly pairs and from these we computed four North and 3 South poles with two at approximately 60 degrees north latitude. These results suggest that during the existence of the Martian main magnetic field it experienced several reversals.

  9. Challenges of Rover Navigation at the Lunar Poles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nefian, Ara; Deans, Matt; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Edwards, Larry; Dille, Michael; Fong, Terry; Colaprete, Tony; Miller, Scott; Vaughan, Ryan; Andrews, Dan; Allan, Mark; Furlong, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Observations from Lunar Prospector, LCROSS, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), and other missions have contributed evidence that water and other volatiles exist at the lunar poles in permanently shadowed regions. Combining a surface rover and a volatile prospecting and analysis payload would enable the detection and characterization of volatiles in terms of nature, abundance, and distribution. This knowledge could have impact on planetary science, in-situ resource utilization, and human exploration of space. While Lunar equatorial regions of the Moon have been explored by manned (Apollo) and robotic missions (Lunokhod, Cheng'e), no surface mission has reached the lunar poles.

  10. Revised paleomagnetic pole for the Sonoma Volcanics, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mankinen, E.A.

    1989-01-01

    Paleomagnetic sampling of the Miocene and Pliocene Sonoma Volcanics, northern California, was undertaken to supplement an earlier collection. Data from 25 cooling units yield positive fold and reversal tests, and a paleomagnetic pole located at 80.2??N., 069.2??E., with ??95 = 6.8??. This paleopole is significantly displaced (9.6?? ?? 5.3?? of latitude) to the farside of the geographic pole. A highly elliptical distribution of the data in both direction and VGP space indicates that incomplete averaging of geomagnetic secular variation is a more likely explanation for this anomaly than is northward translation of the volcanic field. -Author

  11. Adaptive Pole Placement Controllers For Robotic Manipulators With Predictive Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaynak, Okyay; Hoyer, Helmut

    1987-10-01

    This paper proposes two pole assignment control schemes for robotic manipulators, based on an anticipatory action. In one, the control objective is for the velocity tracking error to decay with a prespecified dynamics. In the other, a generalised cost function is minimized and the weighting factors in the cost function are determined to achieve desired closed loop pole locations for the tracking error. The prediction scheme used ensures a high degree of robustness against system-model mismatch as demonstrated by the simulation results presented.

  12. Large-scale magnetic variances near the South Solar Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jokipii, J. R.; Kota, J.; Smith, E.; Horbury, T.; Giacalone, J.

    1995-01-01

    We summarize recent Ulysses observations of the variances over large temporal scales in the interplanetary magnetic field components and their increase as Ulysses approached the South Solar Pole. A model of these fluctuations is shown to provide a very good fit to the observed amplitude and temporal variation of the fluctuations. In addition, the model predicts that the transport of cosmic rays in the heliosphere will be significantly altered by this level of fluctuations. In addition to altering the inward diffusion and drift access of cosmic rays over the solar poles, we find that the magnetic fluctuations also imply a large latitudinal diffusion, caused primarily by the associated field-line random walk.

  13. From 'third pole' to north pole: a Himalayan origin for the arctic fox.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Tseng, Zhijie Jack; Li, Qiang; Takeuchi, Gary T; Xie, Guangpu

    2014-07-22

    The 'third pole' of the world is a fitting metaphor for the Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau, in allusion to its vast frozen terrain, rivalling the Arctic and Antarctic, at high altitude but low latitude. Living Tibetan and arctic mammals share adaptations to freezing temperatures such as long and thick winter fur in arctic muskox and Tibetan yak, and for carnivorans, a more predatory niche. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first evolutionary link between an Early Pliocene (3.60-5.08 Myr ago) fox, Vulpes qiuzhudingi new species, from the Himalaya (Zanda Basin) and Kunlun Mountain (Kunlun Pass Basin) and the modern arctic fox Vulpes lagopus in the polar region. A highly hypercarnivorous dentition of the new fox bears a striking resemblance to that of V. lagopus and substantially predates the previous oldest records of the arctic fox by 3-4 Myr. The low latitude, high-altitude Tibetan Plateau is separated from the nearest modern arctic fox geographical range by at least 2000 km. The apparent connection between an ancestral high-elevation species and its modern polar descendant is consistent with our 'Out-of-Tibet' hypothesis postulating that high-altitude Tibet was a training ground for cold-environment adaptations well before the start of the Ice Age.

  14. From 'third pole' to north pole: a Himalayan origin for the arctic fox.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Tseng, Zhijie Jack; Li, Qiang; Takeuchi, Gary T; Xie, Guangpu

    2014-07-22

    The 'third pole' of the world is a fitting metaphor for the Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau, in allusion to its vast frozen terrain, rivalling the Arctic and Antarctic, at high altitude but low latitude. Living Tibetan and arctic mammals share adaptations to freezing temperatures such as long and thick winter fur in arctic muskox and Tibetan yak, and for carnivorans, a more predatory niche. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first evolutionary link between an Early Pliocene (3.60-5.08 Myr ago) fox, Vulpes qiuzhudingi new species, from the Himalaya (Zanda Basin) and Kunlun Mountain (Kunlun Pass Basin) and the modern arctic fox Vulpes lagopus in the polar region. A highly hypercarnivorous dentition of the new fox bears a striking resemblance to that of V. lagopus and substantially predates the previous oldest records of the arctic fox by 3-4 Myr. The low latitude, high-altitude Tibetan Plateau is separated from the nearest modern arctic fox geographical range by at least 2000 km. The apparent connection between an ancestral high-elevation species and its modern polar descendant is consistent with our 'Out-of-Tibet' hypothesis postulating that high-altitude Tibet was a training ground for cold-environment adaptations well before the start of the Ice Age. PMID:24920475

  15. Charge quantisation without magnetic poles: A topological approach to electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solha, Romero

    2016-01-01

    The present work provides a theoretical explanation for the quantisation of electric charges, an open problem since Millikan's oil drop experiment in 1909. This explanation is based solely on Maxwell's theory, it recasts Electromagnetic theory under the language of complex line bundles; therefore, neither magnetic poles nor quantum mechanics are invoked.

  16. Detail of double pole utility tower at the edge of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of double pole utility tower at the edge of the mesa. National Old Trails Road right-of-way crosses in foreground over a dry laid basaltic rock retaining wall. View south. - La Bajada Historic Trails and Roads, Approximately 1 mile East/Northeast of intersection of State Highway 16 and Indian Service Road 841, La Bajada, Santa Fe County, NM

  17. Ultrasonic Imaging for Poling Uniformity Measurements in PZT Ceramic Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, E.E.

    2000-03-14

    This report summarizes the results of a project sponsored by Honeywell Corporation (formerly AlliedSignal Inc.) Federal Manufacturing and Technologies/Kansas City (FM and T/KC) and conducted jointly with the University of Missouri, Rolla, titled ''Ultrasonic Imaging for Poling Uniformity Measurements in PZT Ceramic Elements.'' In this three-month research project, a series of experiments was performed on soft and hard lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) structures to determine the effectiveness of ultrasonic measurements as a nondestructive method of evaluating poling quality and uniformity. The study revealed that acoustic velocity correlates well with the degree of poling of PZT structures, as predicted by elastic theory. Additionally, time-of-flight (TOF) imaging was shown to be an ideal tool for viewing the spatial distribution of poled material and of material affected by the electric field beyond the edge of electroded regions. Finally, the effectiveness of ultrasonic methods for flaw detection and evaluation of PZT/stainless steel bonds was also demonstrated.

  18. A LINE POLE 75, DETAIL OF ORIGINAL GLASS PINTYPE INSULATORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A LINE POLE 75, DETAIL OF ORIGINAL GLASS PIN-TYPE INSULATORS AND INTACT COMMUNICATION LINE CROSS ARM WITH ONE GLASS INSULATOR. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Mystic Lake Hydroelectric Facility, Electric Transmission A Line, Along West Rosebud Creek, Fishtail, Stillwater County, MT

  19. A LINE POLE 20, DETAIL OF ORIGINAL GLASS PINTYPE INSULATORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A LINE POLE 20, DETAIL OF ORIGINAL GLASS PIN-TYPE INSULATORS AND INTACT COMMUNICATION LINE CROSS ARM WITH TWO GLASS INSULATORS. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Mystic Lake Hydroelectric Facility, Electric Transmission A Line, Along West Rosebud Creek, Fishtail, Stillwater County, MT

  20. Late 20th Century increase in South Pole snow accumulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosley-Thompson, E.; Paskievitch, J.F.; Gow, A.J.; Thompson, L.G.

    1999-01-01

    A compilation of the 37-year history of net accumulation at the South Pole [Mosley-Thompson et al., 1995] suggests an increase in net annual accumulation since 1965. This record is sporadic and its quality is compromised by spatially restricted observations and nonsystematic measurement procedures. Results from a new, spatially extensive network of 236 accumulation poles document that the current 5-year (1992-1997) average annual net accumulation at the South Pole is 84.5??8.9 mm water equivalent (w.e.). This accumulation rate reflects a 30% increase since the 1960s when the best, although not optimal, records indicate that it was 65 mm w.e. Identification of two prominent beta radioactivity horizons (1954/1955 and 1964/1965) in six firn cores confirms an increase in accumulation since 1965. Viewed from a longer perspective of accumulation provided by ice cores and a snow mine study, the net accumulation of the 30-year period, 1965-1994, is the highest 30-year average of this millennium. Limited data suggest this recent accumulation increase extends beyond the South Pole region and may be characteristic of the high East Antarctic Plateau. Enhanced accumulation over the polar ice sheets has been identified as a potential early indicator of warmer sea surface temperatures and may offset a portion of the current rise in global sea level. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. S-matrix pole trajectories for Yukawa potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Roriz, L.A.L.; Delfino, A.

    1988-08-01

    Using the two-body K matrix extended to the whole complex-momentum plane, we construct the S matrix as a function of the strength lambda of attractive Yukawa potentials. By varying lambda we study pole trajectories for the s, p, and d waves.

  2. On POLE-ZERO Placement by Unit-Rank Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prells, U.; Mottershead, J. E.; Friswell, M. I.

    2003-05-01

    The dynamic behaviour of a general linear system is characterised by the poles (resonances) and the zeros (antiresonances). This paper deals with the general class of dynamical systems that can be described by a second-order ordinary differential equation. For spatially discretised models the poles are given by the roots of the characteristic polynomial of the system matrix whilst the zeros correspond to the roots of the polynomials related to the elements of the adjugate of the system matrix. The question of how the poles and zeros can be assigned by a structural modification is important in many areas of application, for example in control, vibration absorption and model updating. In this paper we derive the basic equation of pole-zero placement by unit-rank modification. For simple real matrix pencils we simplify the basic equation which enables an analytical solution of the transformed vector of the modification. These results are related to the original unit-rank modification by a system of linear equations. Finally, we will give insight into solution methods of the original problem, and suggest a method which is based on the incorporation of additional model structure information.

  3. Poling process optimization of piezo nano composite PZT/polimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridlo, M. Rosyid; Lestari, Titik; Mardiyanto, Oemry, Achiar

    2013-09-01

    The objective of poling process is to make the electric dipole directions to be parallel in the inside perovskite crystal of piezo materials. In simply way, poling was carried out by giving the two sides of a piezo material by highly electrical potential. More parallel of electrical dipoles, it is more strength the piezo characteristics. The optimization involved control of temperature, time depth and the electrical voltage. The samples was prepared by solgel method with precursor tetrabutyl titanat Ti(OC4H9)4, zirconium nitrat Zr(NO3)4ṡ5H2O, Pb(CH3COO)2ṡ3H2O and solution ethylene glycol. Molar ratio Pb:Zr:Ti = 1,1:0,52:0,48 with concidering lossed Pb. Result of solgel process is nano powder PZT. The formed nano powder PZT was then mixed with polimer PVDF and pressed 10 MPa at 150 °C with the size 15 mm in diameter. After poling, piezoelectric constant d33 was measured. The highest d33 = 45 pC/N was found at poling parameters V = 5 kV/ mm, T = 120 °C dan time depth = 1 hours.

  4. Compositional mapping of Titan's North Pole with VIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, Shannon; Barnes, Jason W.; Sotin, Christophe; Soderblom, Jason M.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Baines, Kevin; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Clark, Roger Nelson

    2016-10-01

    Titan's methane lakes and seas are almost exclusively found at the moon's north polar region. The factors that drive this distribution are not yet well understood. The poles are generally lower in elevation and a few Kelvin colder than the equator. But the south pole looks very different from the north with only one large lake and a few smaller bodies. To further illuminate what processes might make the north pole unique, we investigate the region's compositional variability and the connection to morphology by analyzing the entirety of the publically available data from Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) that cover the north pole. Because VIMS can only observe the surface in seven IR windows, we identify the relative composition ("spectral units") of the north polar terrain (90N - 45N) and compare our results to those of Birch et al. (Icarus, in revision), who defined geomorphological units in Cassini RADAR north polar data. We find interesting correlations and examples of distinct composition boundaries in VIMS that aren't reflected in the RADAR data. These results provide a more complete context for lake formation/retention hypotheses as well as identify features for further study.

  5. Catapult effect in pole vaulting: is muscle coordination determinant?

    PubMed

    Frère, Julien; Göpfert, Beat; Hug, François; Slawinski, Jean; Tourny-Chollet, Claire

    2012-02-01

    This study focused on the phase between the time of straightened pole and the maximum height (HP) of vaulter and aimed at determining the catapult effect in pole vaulting on HP. Seven experienced vaulters performed 5-10 vaults recorded by two video cameras, while the surface electromyography (sEMG) activity of 10 upper limbs muscles was recorded. HP was compared with an estimated maximum height (HP(est)) allowing the computation of a push-off index. Muscle synergies were extracted from the sEMG activity profiles using a non-negative matrix factorization algorithm. No significant difference (p>0.47) was found between HP(est) (4.64±0.21m) and HP (4.69±0.23m). Despite a high inter-individual variability in sEMG profiles, two muscle synergies were extracted for all the subjects which accounted for 96.1±2.9% of the total variance. While, the synergy activation coefficients were very similar across subjects, a higher variability was found in the muscle synergy vectors. Consequently, whatever the push-off index among the pole vaulters, the athletes used different muscle groupings (i.e., muscle synergy vectors) which were activated in a similar fashion (i.e., synergy activation coefficients). Overall, these results suggested that muscle coordination adopted between the time of straightened pole and the maximum height does not have a major influence on HP.

  6. Design and performance of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdou, Y.; Becker, K.-H.; Berdermann, J.; Bissok, M.; Bohm, C.; Böser, S.; Bothe, M.; Carson, M.; Descamps, F.; Fischer-Wolfarth, J.-H.; Gustafsson, L.; Hallgren, A.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Heller, R.; Hundertmark, S.; Karg, T.; Krieger, K.; Laihem, K.; Meures, T.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Oberson, F.; Paul, L.; Pohl, M.; Price, B.; Ribordy, M.; Ryckbosch, D.; Schunck, M.; Semburg, B.; Stegmaier, J.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Tosi, D.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Wiebusch, C.

    2012-08-01

    The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) was built to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of the South Pole ice in the 10-100 kHz frequency range, for the purpose of assessing the feasibility of an acoustic neutrino detection array at the South Pole. The SPATS hardware consists of four vertical strings deployed in the upper 500 m of the South Pole ice cap. The strings form a trapezoidal array with a maximum baseline of 543 m. Each string has seven stages equipped with one transmitter and one sensor module (glaciophone). Sound is detected or generated by piezoelectric ceramic elements inside the modules. Analogue signals are sent to the surface on electric cables where they are digitized by a PC-based data acquisition system. The data from all strings are collected on a central computer in the IceCube Laboratory from where they are sent to a central data storage facility via a satellite link or stored locally on tape. A technical overview of SPATS and its performance is presented.

  7. Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun (Part II)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duoos, Bridget A.

    2012-01-01

    Part I of Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun, which was published in last issue, discussed how to select cross-country ski equipment, dress for the activity and the biomechanics of the diagonal stride. Part II focuses on teaching the diagonal stride technique and begins with a progression of indoor activities. Incorporating this fun,…

  8. SOUTH ELEVATION OF BATTERY COMMAND CENTER WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH ELEVATION OF BATTERY COMMAND CENTER WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. THE ENTRY STAIRWAY IS IN THE FOREGROUND. THE ABOVE-GROUND SECTION OF THE STRUCTURE IS ON THE RIGHT, UNDERGROUND PORTION ON THE LEFT. VIEW FACING NORTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. WEST ELEVATION WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. NOTE THE CIRCULAR OPENINGS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WEST ELEVATION WITH GRADUATED MEASURING POLE. NOTE THE CIRCULAR OPENINGS INTO THE UNDERGROUND PORTION OF THE STRUCTURE. VIEW FACING EAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Titan's Gas Behavior During the South Pole Fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottini, Valeria; Nixon, Conor A.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Jennings, Donald E.; Gorius, Nicolas; Irwin, Patrick G. J.

    2015-11-01

    Titan’s southern middle atmosphere has been showing several changes since the start of fall season in 2009. In 2012 a large cloud appeared [1], [2], [3], temperatures became very low and condensation and gas concentration at the South Pole increased [3], [4].In this work we will show the results of gas abundances retrievals in the South Pole and their latitudinal variation changes as the cold season evolved with time.We analyzed several Cassini Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS [5]) mid-infrared observations of the South Pole acquired during 2013-2014. The data coordinates were converted in order to be centered on the atmospheric pole and refer to the 1 mbar level and not to the surface. We first determine stratospheric temperatures from the same data and latitudes from the n4 band of methane centered around 1300 cm-1. We retrieve the temperature profiles applying a radiative transfer forward model combined with a non-linear optimal estimation inversion method [6]. We then retrieve the main gases abundances and track their variation with latitude using the same method.Latitudinal changes of the main Titan’s gases - HC3N, C4H2, C6H6, C2H2, C2H4, C3H8 and HCN - show different trends in the Southern polar regions over 2014, when winter was getting closer. We observe a ring-shape in some of the gas abundance distributions, with a local maximum peak around -75 deg of latitude. We also observe an increase of abundance of most of the gases toward the south pole, as seen previously in the North during the winter. The observed increase of benzene over the South Pole is definitely evident and strong. References: [1] West, R. A. et al. (2013) BAAS, 45, 305.03. [2] Jennings, D. E. et al. (2012) ApJ, 754, L3. [3] de Kok, R. et al. (2014), Nature, 514, 7520, 65-67. [4] Vinatier S. et al. (2015) Icarus, Volume 250, p. 95-115. [5] Flasar et al. (2004) Space Sci. Rev., 115, 169-297. [6] Irwin, P.G.J. et al. (2008) J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans., 109, 1136-1150.

  11. Effect of Materials and Manufacturing on the Bending Stiffness of Vaulting Poles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, C. L.; Kukureka, S. N.

    2012-01-01

    The increase in the world record height achieved in pole vaulting can be related to the improved ability of the athletes, in terms of their fitness and technique, and to the change in materials used to construct the pole. For example in 1960 there was a change in vaulting pole construction from bamboo to glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP)…

  12. View of worlds tallest totem pole, 136.5 feet tall. First ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of worlds tallest totem pole, 136.5 feet tall. First potlatch pole since 1904. Dedicated to all things and all peoples of southeast Alaska, 1971. Oct potlatch, looking northwest - Kake Salmon Cannery, Totem Pole, Kake, Wrangell-Petersburg Census Area, AK

  13. The Revised Pole Model and New Observations of Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.-Y.; Shen, K.-X.; Qiao, R.-Ch; Dourneau, G.; Yu, Y.

    2015-10-01

    We used 3108 Earth-based astrometric observations from the Natural Satellite Data Center (NSDC) over more than 30 years time span from 1975 to 2006 for determining the epoch state vectors of the Neptunes largest satellite Triton. In integrating the perturbation equation, the barycentric frame of Neptune-Triton system is adopted, and in considering the oblateness perturbation due to Neptune, a revised pole model describing the precession of the Neptune's pole is used in our calculation. Moreover, a total of 1095 new observed positions of Triton were collected during 46 nights of observations in 2007, 2008 and 2009. We compared our observations to two ephemerides of Triton and most of the available planetary ephemerides of Neptune.

  14. Laparoscopic upper pole splenectomy of the simple splenic cyst

    PubMed Central

    Aparício, David João Silva; Leichsenring, Carlos; Rodrigues, Ângela Reis; Alves, Ana Catarina

    2013-01-01

    Splenic cysts are rare clinic entities. Non-parasitic cysts are the most frequent cystic lesions of the spleen. In the last decade acknowledgment of the importance of the spleen function, along with development of imaging methods and surgery technics, allowed a conservative approach to be increasingly considered as the best approach in splenic cysts treatment. We present the case of a 34-year-old woman with an asymptomatic simple splenic cyst in the upper pole incidentally diagnosed in a thoracic CT. A laparoscopic upper pole splenectomy was performed on the patient, with no complications. Despite the rareness of this procedure and the fact that it was used in a simple splenic cyst, this article emphasises the idea that this approach is safe, reproducible and advantageous for the patient. PMID:24287475

  15. Atmospheric ozone at South Pole, Antarctica, in 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komhyr, W. D.; Oltmans, S. J.; Grass, R. D.

    1988-01-01

    Results of NOAA's measurements of the ozone vertical distributions at the South Pole and of the annual course of total ozone, conducted in 1986 with balloon-borne electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesondes and a Dobson spectrophotometer, are described. The major finding was that the stratospheric ozone decreases abruptly between September 20 and October 15, with the bulk decrease occurring between 12 and 21 km. In this period, the column ozone and ozone volume mixing ratio at 16 km (the altitude of the normal ozone maximum at South Pole) decreased by 78 percent, and column ozone between 12 and 21 km decreased by 50 percent. The results of these measurements are compared with data obtained in 1971, and the changes observed in the ozone vertical distributions and in the temporal variations of atmospheric ozone are discussed.

  16. Direct detection of variable tropospheric clouds near Titan's south pole.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael E; Bouchez, Antonin H; Griffith, Caitlin A

    Atmospheric conditions on Saturn's largest satellite, Titan, allow the possibility that it could possess a methane condensation and precipitation cycle with many similarities to Earth's hydrological cycle. Detailed imaging studies of Titan have hitherto shown no direct evidence for tropospheric condensation clouds, although there has been indirect spectroscopic evidence for transient clouds. Here we report images and spectra of Titan that show clearly transient clouds, concentrated near the south pole, which is currently near the point of maximum solar heating. The discovery of these clouds demonstrates the existence of condensation and localized moist convection in Titan's atmosphere. Their location suggests that methane cloud formation is controlled seasonally by small variations in surface temperature, and that the clouds will move from the south to the north pole on a 15-year timescale.

  17. Lunar Prospecting: Searching for Volatiles at the South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay; Carvalho, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The Resource Prospector is an in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) technology demonstration mission, planned for a 2021 launch to search for and analyze volatiles at the Lunar South Pole. The mission poses unique operational challenges. Operating at the Lunar South Pole requires navigating a surface with lighting, shadow and regolith characteristics unlike those of previous missions. The short round trip communications time enables reactive surface operations for science and engineering. Navigation of permanently shadowed regions with a solar powered rover creates risks, including power and thermal management, and requires constant real time decision making for safe entry, path selection and egress. The mission plan requires a faster rover egress from the lander than any previous NASA rover mission.

  18. The South Pole Imaging Fabry Perot Interferometer (SPIFI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, G. J.; Bradford, C. M.; Swain, M. R.; Jackson, J. M.; Bolato, A. D.; Davidson, J. A.; Savage, M.

    1996-01-01

    The design and construction of the South Pole imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer (SPIFI) is reported. The SPIFI is a direct detection imaging spectrometer for use in the far infrared and submillimeter bands accessible to the 1.7 m telescope at the South Pole, and in the submillimeter bands accessible to the 15 m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), HI. It employs a 5 x 5 silicon bolometer array and three cryogenic Fabry Perot interferometers in series in order to achieve velocity resolutions of between 300 km/s and 30 km/s over the entire field of view with a resolution of up to 1 km/s at the center pixel. The scientific justification for the instrument is discussed, considering the spectral lines available to SPIFI. The optical path, the cryogenic Fabry-Perot, the adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator and the detector array are described. The instrument's sensitivity is presented and compared with coherent systems.

  19. The South Pole Telescope: Unraveling the Mystery of Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, Christian L.; de Haan, Tijmen; Bleem, Lindsey E.

    2016-07-01

    The South Pole Telescope (SPT) is a 10-meter telescope designed to survey the millimeter-wave sky, taking advantage of the exceptional observing conditions at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. The telescope and its ground-breaking 960-element bolometric camera finished surveying 2500 square degrees at 95. 150, and 220 GHz in November 2011. We have discovered hundreds of galaxy clusters in the SPT-SZ survey through the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich (SZ) effect. The formation of galaxy clusters the largest bound objects in the universe is highly sensitive to dark energy and the history of structure formation. I will discuss the cosmological constraints from the SPT-SZ galaxy cluster sample as well as future prospects with the soon to-be-installed SPT-3G camera.

  20. General circulation model sensitivity experiments with pole-centered supercontinents

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, T.J.; Baum, S.K.; Kim, Kwang-Yul )

    1993-05-20

    The authors present model studies related to the general question of whether there could have been nearly ice-free climates in the past history of the Earth. Energy balance models and general circulation model calculations have addressed this question. In general this appears impossible, even with moving continents around, without postulating enhanced levels of CO[sub 2]. Early work indicated that pole centered continents could have snow free summers, but later work, with models with better physics, but poorer resolution seemed to contradict this conclusion. The authors apply the GENESIS (ver 1.02) general circulation model to this problem. Their conclusion is that with certain modifications to the application of this model, they could find pole-centered supercontinents which would be snow free in the summer.

  1. 8. Finish line, marked by white poles, as viewed from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Finish line, marked by white poles, as viewed from infield tote board. Shown are all the best locations for viewing the finish line, including the Clubhouse on the left and Original Grandstand on the right. For a similar view taken in 1939 by a photographer for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper, see photo WA-201-24. (August 1993) - Longacres, 1621 Southwest Sixteenth Street, Renton, King County, WA

  2. Observations of a Filament in the North Ecliptic Pole Supercluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Joseph Henry

    2005-01-01

    Our work on the ROSAT All-Sky Survey at the North Ecliptic Pole has increased from 7 to 21 the group and cluster membership of a previously known supercluster there, revealing a particularly striking example of a filament. We obtained observations of two clusters in this filament to elucidate its dynamics. However, these observations were severely compromised by flares: less than 20% of the requested time survived screening. Consequently the data were inadequate for the project.

  3. Seasonal Evolution of Titan's South Pole 220 cm-1 Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Donald

    2016-06-01

    A cloud of ices that had been seen only in Titan's north during winter began to emerge at the south pole in 2012. Discovered by Voyager IRIS as an emission feature at 220 cm-1, the cloud has been studied extensively in both the north and south by Cassini CIRS. The spectral feature acts as a tracer of the seasonal changes at Titan's poles, relating to evolving composition, temperature structure and dynamics. Although candidates have been proposed, the chemical makeup of the cloud has never been identified. The cloud is composed of condensates derived from gases created at high altitude and transported to the cold, shadowed pole. In the north the cloud has diminished gradually over the Cassini mission as Titan has transitioned from winter to spring. The southern cloud, on the other hand, grew rapidly after 2012. By late 2014 it had developed a complex ring structure that was confined to latitudes poleward of 70°S within the deep temperature well that had formed at the south pole [1]. The location of the cloud coincides in latitude with the HCN cloud reported by ISS and VIMS [2,3]. CIRS also saw enhanced gas emissions at those latitudes [4]. When it first formed, the cloud was abundant at altitudes as high as 250 km, while later it was found mostly at 100-150 km, suggesting that the material that had been deposited from above had gathered at the lower altitudes. Radiance from the southern cloud increased until mid-2015 and since then has decreased. The cloud may be transitioning to the more uniform hood morphology familiar in the north. Taking the north and south together, by the end of the Cassini mission in 2017 we will have observed almost an entire seasonal cycle of the ice cloud.

  4. Pole-phase modulated toroidal winding for an induction machine

    DOEpatents

    Miller, John Michael; Ostovic, Vlado

    1999-11-02

    A stator (10) for an induction machine for a vehicle has a cylindrical core (12) with inner and outer slots (26, 28) extending longitudinally along the inner and outer peripheries between the end faces (22, 24). Each outer slot is associated with several adjacent inner slots. A plurality of toroidal coils (14) are wound about the core and laid in the inner and outer slots. Each coil occupies a single inner slot and is laid in the associated outer slot thereby minimizing the distance the coil extends from the end faces and minimizing the length of the induction machine. The toroidal coils are configured for an arbitrary pole phase modulation wherein the coils are configured with variable numbers of phases and poles for providing maximum torque for cranking and switchable to a another phase and pole configuration for alternator operation. An adaptor ring (36) circumferentially positioned about the stator improves mechanical strength, and provides a coolant channel manifold (34) for removing heat produced in stator windings during operation.

  5. Analysis of ECG from pole-zero models.

    PubMed

    Murthy, I S; Prasad, G S

    1992-07-01

    A complete solution to the fundamental problem of ECG analysis, viz., delineation of the signal into its component waves, is proposed from a system theoretic point of view. The discrete cosine transform of a bell shaped biphasic function is approximated mathematically by a system function with two poles and two zeros, i.e., of order (2, 2). Using this concept as the basis, a pole-zero model of suitable order is derived from the discrete cosine transform (DCT) of the given signal using Steiglitz-McBride method. This model is expanded into a unique set of partial fractions each of order (2, 2), and a biphasic function is recovered from each one of these fractions in the inverse process. Each of the P and T waves usually requires only one biphasic function, while the QRS complex needs two or at most three such fractions. A one-to-one relationship between the pole pattern in the z-plane and component wave pattern in the time signal is established. Results of analysis of continuous strips of ECG show that the delineated component waves are in excellent agreement with the original waves both qualitatively and quantitatively. The method is robust for the analysis of signals with artifacts of various kinds, independent of the sampling rate used, and is free from ad hoc back and forth search procedures. PMID:1516941

  6. Manliness and Exploration: The Discovery of the North Pole.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Americans crowded newsstands in early 1910 to read Robert Peary's firsthand account of his expedition to the North Pole. As they read "The Discovery of the North Pole," serialized exclusively in Hampton's Magazine, few knew that this harrowing, hypermasculine tale was really crafted by New York poet Elsa Barker. Barker's authorship of the North Pole story put her at the center of a large community of explorers, writers, patrons, and fans who were taken with Arctic exploration as much for its national symbolism as for its thrilling tales. The fact that Barker was a woman made her ascent into elite expeditionary circles remarkable. Yet this essay argues that it was also representative: women shaped the ideas and practices of manly exploration at home as well as in the field. Peary's dependence upon women writers, patrons, and audiences came at a time when explorers were breaking away from their traditional base of support: male scientific networks that had promoted their expeditions since the 1850s. Despite the "go-it-alone" ideals of their expedition accounts, explorers adopted masculine roles shaped by the world around them: by the growing influence of women writers, readers, and lecture-goers and, simultaneously, by the declining influence of traditional scientific peers and patrons. Barker and Peary's story, then, reveals a new fault line that opened up between scientists and explorers in the late nineteenth century over the issue of manliness, a fault line still largely uncharted in historical scholarship.

  7. Lunar South Pole Illumination: Review, Reassessment, and Power System Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fincannon, James

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews past analyses and research related to lunar south pole illumination and presents results of independent illumination analyses using an analytical tool and a radar digital elevation model. The analysis tool enables assessment at most locations near the lunar poles for any time and any year. Average illumination fraction, energy storage duration, solar/horizon terrain elevation profiles and illumination fraction profiles are presented for various highly illuminated sites which have been identified for manned or unmanned operations. The format of the data can be used by power system designers to develop mass optimized solar and energy storage systems. Data are presented for the worse case lunar day (a critical power planning bottleneck) as well as three lunar days during lunar south pole winter. The main site under consideration by present lunar mission planners (on the Crater Shackleton rim) is shown to have, for the worse case lunar day, a 0.71 average illumination fraction and 73 to 117 hours required for energy storage (depending on power system type). Linking other sites and including towers at either site are shown to not completely eliminate the need for energy storage.

  8. Narrow-band ELF events observed from South Pole Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavisides, J.; Weaver, C.; Lessard, M.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) waves are typically in the range of 3 Hz - 3 kHz and can play a role in acceleration and pitch-angle scattering of energetic particles in the radiation belts. Observations of a not uncommon, but not well studied ELF phenomenon are presented with ground-based data from South Pole Station. The narrow-band waves last approximately one or two minutes maintaining bandwidth over the course of the event, begin around 100 Hz, decrease to about 70 Hz, and typically show a higher frequency harmonic. The waves have only been documented at four locations - Heacock, 1974 (Alaska); Sentman and Ehring, 1994 (California); Wang et al, 2005 and Wang et al, 2011 (Taiwan); and Kim et al, 2006 (South Pole). The waves observed at the South Pole are not detected when the Sun drops below a 10 degree elevation angle, which is not true for the other locations. We extend the study of Kim et al, 2006, and explore possible generation mechanisms including sunlit ionosphere and ion cyclotron wave modes, as well as correspondence with energetic particle precipitation.

  9. Means and method for nonuniform poling of piezoelectric transducers

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, D.K.; Margetan, F.J.; Hasselbusch, M.D.; Wormley, S.J.; Hughes, M.S.; Thompson, D.O.

    1990-10-09

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for nonuniform poling of piezoelectric transducers includes machining one or more indentation into an end of a piezoelectric rod and cutting the rod to present a thickened disk shape. Highly electrically conductive material is deposited on at least the indentations in the one end and on at least portions of the opposite face of the member. One or more electrodes are configured to matingly fit within the indentations on the one face of the disk, with a like number of electrodes being positionable on the opposite face of the material. Electrical power is then applied to the electrodes in desired amounts, polarity, and duration. The indentations vary the electrical field produced within the piezoelectric material to produce nonuniform poling in the material. The thick disk is then cut to remove the indentations and to present a thin, flat two sided disk for installation in a conventional piezoelectric transducer probe. The indentations are selected to produce poling in accordance with desired transducer response profiles such as Gaussian or Bessel functions. 14 figs.

  10. Means and method for nonuniform poling of piezoelectric transducers

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, David K.; Margetan, Frank J.; Hasselbusch, Michael D.; Wormley, Samuel J.; Hughes, Michael S.; Thompson, Donald O.

    1990-10-09

    An apparatus and method for nonuniform poling of piezoelectric transducers includes machining one or more indentation into an end of a piezoelectric rod and cutting the rod to present a thickened disk shape. Highly electrically conductive material is deposited on at least the indentations in the one end and on at least portions of the opposite face of the member. One or more electrodes are configured to matingly fit within the indentations on the one face of the disk, with a like number of electrodes being positionable on the opposite face of the material. Electrical power is then applied to the electrodes in desired amounts, polarity, and duration. The indentations vary the electrical field produced within the piezoelectric material to produce nonuniform poling in the material. The thick disk is then cut to remove the indentations and to present a thin, flat two sided disk for installation in a conventional piezoelectric transducer probe. The indentations are selected to produce poling in accordance with desired transducer response profiles such as Gaussian or Bessel functions.

  11. Sample return from the lunar South Pole-Aitken Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, M. B.

    2003-06-01

    Automated sample return missions to the South Pole — Aitken Basin on the lunar far side are proposed as the best means of addressing major problems concerning the early impact history of the inner solar system, the nature of very large impact events, and the early differentiation of rocky planets. The opportunity to propose such missions has been opened by the recommendations of the U. S. National Research Council's Decadal Study of Solar System Exploration and the creation by NASA of the New Frontiers Program, which will support missions of intermediate cost, between the Discovery Program and large missions. A proposal for a South Pole — Aitken Basin Sample Return Mission was submitted to the Discovery Program in 2000, but not fimded. The New Frontiers Program, with a somewhat less stringent budget constraint, should allow several of the potential risks associated with the Discovery proposal to be addressed, including scientific and programmatic risks. A principal goal of current mission studies is to determine whether, within the New Frontiers Program's cost constraints, two separate samples could be collected from areas of different post-Basin geological history. If accepted by the New Frontiers Program, a South Pole — Aitken Basin sample return mission could be flown as early as 2008-2009.

  12. Wind stress forcing of the North Sea `pole tide'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, William P.; Chao, Benjamin Fong; Zheng, Dawei; Au, Andrew Y.

    2000-08-01

    We conduct numerical simulations of the wind forcing of sea level variations in the North Sea using a barotropic ocean model with realistic geography and bathymetry to examine the forcing of the 14 month `pole tide', which is known to be anomalously large along the Denmark-Netherlands coast. The simulation input is the monthly mean surface wind stress field from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis for the 40 year period 1958-1997. The ocean model output sea level response is then compared with 10 coastal tide gauge records from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) over the same period of time. Besides the strong seasonal variations, several prominent quasi-periodicities exist near 7 years, 3 years, 14 months, 9 months and 6.5 months. Correlations and spectral analyses show remarkable agreement between the model output and the observations, particularly in the 14 month, or Chandler, period band. The latter indicates that the enhanced pole tide found in the North Sea along the Denmark-Netherlands coast is actually the coastal set-up response to wind stress forcing with a periodicity of around 14 months. We find no need to invoke a geophysical explanation involving resonance enhancement of the pole tide in the North Sea to explain the observations.

  13. Poling of PVDF matrix composites for integrated structural load sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghiashtiani, Ghazaleh; Greminger, Michael A.; Zhao, Ping

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to create and evaluate a smart composite structure that can be used for integrated load sensing and structural health monitoring. In this structure, PVDF films are used as the matrix material instead of epoxy resin or other thermoplastics. The reinforcements are two layers of carbon fiber with one layer of Kevlar separating them. Due to the electrical conductivity properties of carbon fiber and the dielectric effect of Kevlar, the structure acts as a capacitor. Furthermore, the piezoelectric properties of the PVDF matrix can be used to monitor the response of the structure under applied loads. In order to exploit the piezoelectric properties of PVDF, the PVDF material must be polarized to align the dipole moments of its crystalline structure. The optimal condition for poling the structure was found by performing a 23 factorial design of experiment (DoE). The factors that were studied in DoE were temperature, voltage, and duration of poling. Finally, the response of the poled structure was monitored by exposing the samples to an applied load.

  14. Wind Stress Forcing of the North Sea "Pole Tide"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnor, William P.; Chao, Benjamin Fong; Zheng, Dawei; Au, Andrew Y.

    1998-01-01

    We conducted numerical simulations of the wind-forcing of the sea level variations in the North Sea using a barotropic ocean model with realistic geography, bathymetry, and boundary conditions, to examine the forcing of the 14-month "pole tide" which is known to be strong along the Denmark- Netherlands coast. The simulation input is the monthly-mean surface wind stress field from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis for the 40-year period 1958-1997. The output sea level response was then compared with 10 coastal tide gauge records from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL). Besides the strong seasonal variations, several prominent quasi-periodicities exist at around 7 years, 3 years, 14 months, 9 months, and 6.5 months. Correlation and spectral analyses show remarkable agreement between the model output and the observations, particularly in the 14-month, or Chandler period band. The latter indicates that the enhanced pole tide found in the North Sea along the Denmark-Netherlands coast is actually the coastal setup response to wind stress forcing with a periodicity of 14 months. We find no need to invoke a geophysical explanation involving resonance-enhancement of pole tide in the North Sea to explain the observations.

  15. Pole-Like Object Extraction from Mobile LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Han; Tan, Feitong; Wang, Ruisheng

    2016-06-01

    Object detection and recognition from LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) data has been a research topic in the fields of photogrammetry and computer vision. Unlike point clouds collected in well-controlled indoor environments, point clouds in urban environments are more complex due to complexity of the real world. For example, trees sometimes close to signs or buildings, which will cause occlusions in the point clouds. Current object detection or reconstruction algorithms will have problems when recognizing objects with severe occlusions caused by trees etc. In this paper, a robust vegetation removal method and a DBSCAN based pole-like object detection method are proposed. Based on observation that major difference between vegetation and other rigid objects is their penetrability with respect to LiDAR, we introduce a local roughness measure to differentiate rigid objects from non-rigid ones (vegetation in this paper). First, a local sphere with a small radius is generated for each input point. Three principal components of the local sphere are then calculated, and a plane is determined. The roughness is obtained through calculating the standard deviation of distances from all inside points to the plane by a weighted summation of the normalized distances. The further the point to the plane, the smaller the weight is. Finally, a graph cuts based method is introduced to classify the input point sets into two groups. The data term is defined by the normalized roughness of the current point, and the smoothness term is defined by the normalized distance between the point and its nearest neighbour point. In terms of pole-like object detection, first, a uniformed 2D grid is generated through projecting all the points to the XY-plane. The seed points of the pole-like objects are obtained by determining the x and y coordinates by the centres of the highest density cells of the grid and the z coordinate by the mean height of the point sets of each object. Finally, a DBSCAN

  16. Autumn at Titan's South Pole: The 220 cm-1 Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Cottini, V.; Achterberg, R. K.; Anderson, C. M.; Flasar, F. M.; de Kok, R. J.; Teanby, N. A.; Coustenis, A.; Vinatier, S.

    2015-10-01

    Beginning in 2012 an atmospheric cloud known by its far-infrared emission has formed rapidly at Tit an's South Pole [1, 2]. The build-up of this condensate is a result of deepening temperatures and a gathering of gases as Winter approaches. Emission from the cloud in the south has been doubling each year since 2012, in contrast to the north where it has halved every 3.8 years since 2004. The morphology of the cloud in the south is quite different from that in the north. In the north, the cloud has extended over the whole polar region beyond 55 N, whereas in the south the cloud has been confined to within about 10 degrees of the pole. The cloud in the north has had the form of a uniform hood, whereas the southern cloud has been much more complex. A map from December 2014,recorded by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on Cassini, showed the 220 cm-1 emission coming from a distinct ring with a maximum at about 80 S. In contrast, emissions from the gases HC3N, C4H2 and C6H6 peaked near the pole and had a ring at 70 S. The 220 cm-1 ring at 80 S coincided with the minimum in the gas emission pattern. The80 S condensate ring encompassed the vortex cloud seen by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS)[3, 4]. Both the 220 cm-1 ring and the gas "bull's-eye" pattern were centered on a point that was shifted from the geographic South Pole by 4 degrees in the direction of the Sun. This corresponds to the overall tilt of Titan's atmosphere discovered from temperature maps early in the Cassini mission by Achterberg et al. [5]. The tilt may be reinforced by the presumably twice-yearly (north and south) spin-up of the atmosphere at the autumnal pole. The bull's-eye pattern of the gas emissions can be explained by the retrieved abundance distributions, which are maximum near the pole and decrease sharply toward lower latitudes, together with temperatures that are minimum at the pole and increase toward lower latitudes

  17. Rotation of the Colorado Plateau: An updated analysis of paleomagnetic poles

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, P.; Gordon, R.G. )

    1990-09-01

    All available Jurassic, Triassic, and late Paleozoic paleomagnetic poles from the Colorado Plateau and stable North America are used to estimate the rotation of the Colorado Plateau relative to stable North America since Jurassic time. The paleomagnetic poles differ from those of a prior study (Bryan and Gordon, 1986) through the addition of seven recently published poles, the deletion of one pole, and the replacement of two others. The authors also improve on the prior analysis by omitting Cretaceous poles. From the systematic offset between plateau poles and stable North American poles they estimate rotation of the Colorado Plateau to be 5.0{degree} {sup +2.4{degree}}{sub {minus}2.3{degree}} (95% confidence limits) clockwise, {approximately}1{degree} larger than they found before. The null hypothesis of no systematic difference between plateau poles and stable North American poles can be rejected with a formally high level of confidence (99.99%). The hypothesis that the systematic differences between plateau and off-plateau poles is as large as 10{degree}, as proposed by several workers using fewer poles, can be rejected at an equally high level of confidence.

  18. Poling force analysis in diagonal stride at different grades in cross country skiers.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, B; Bortolan, L; Schena, F

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the dynamic parameters of poling action during low to moderate uphill skiing in the diagonal stride technique. Twelve elite cross country skiers performed an incremental test using roller skis on a treadmill at 9 km/h at seven different grades, from 2° to 8°. The pole ground reaction force and the pole inclination were measured, and the propulsive force component and poling power were then calculated. The duration of the active poling phase remained unchanged, while the recovery time decreased with the increase in the slope. The ratio between propulsive and total poling forces (effectiveness) was approximately 60% and increased with the slope. Multiple regression estimated that approximately 80% of the variation of the poling power across slopes was explained by the increase of the poling force, the residual variation was explained by the decrease of the pole inclination, while a small contribution was provided by the increase of the poling relative to the cycle time. The higher power output required to ski at a steeper slope was partially supplied by a greater contribution of the power generated through the pole that arises not only by an increase of the force exerted but also by an increase of its effectiveness.

  19. Laparoscopic upper pole heminephroureterectomy in children: Seven-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Marte, Antonio; Papparella, Alfonso; Pintozzi, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Minimally invasive surgery is the current approach to perform heminephroureterectomy (HN) in children. This can be obtained through a transperitoneal (TP) or a retroperitoneal approach. Here, we report our experience using a TP approach. Materials and Methods: From 2005 to 2014, 22 TP laparoscopic upper poles HN were performed at our institution. There were nine girls and 13 boys aged between 20 months and 6 years (mean age 3.9). Eight patients were diagnosed prenatally, 17 patients presented with urinary tract infection (UTI) and three with vomiting and failure to thrive. The indication for HN was reflux nephropathy and UTI in non-functioning upper pole in 19 patients and cystic dysplasia in 1 patient. The surgical technique involved the following steps: Cystoscopic recognition; positioning of 3-4 trocar (right HN); identification of the kidney (detachment of the colon); isolation and low ligation of the dilated ureter; decrossing from renal vessels; section of the parenchyma by LigaSure; haemostasis with clips and LigaSure; drain. Results: The mean operative time was 154 min (range: 81-220 min). All patients were discharged from the 2nd to 4th day. Neither major complication nor conversion was recorded. 1 patient presented leakage of urine for 7 days from the drainage which resolved spontaneously. At ultrasound follow-up, 5 patients showed a secondary perirenal cyst, 2-5 cm diameter that resolved spontaneously. Conclusion: The results indicate that laparoscopic upper pole heminephrectomy is the treatment of choice in cases of non-functioning dilated lower segments of duplicated kidneys. The use of laparoscopic approach offers a good working space, a good visual control of the vessels and allows a very low isolation of the ureteral stump which counterbalance the peritoneal violation. PMID:26712285

  20. GREM 1 and POLE variants in hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Eiengård, Frida; Lundstam, Ulf; Zagoras, Theofanis; Nilsson, Staffan; Edsjö, Anders; Pedersen, Jan; Svensson, Janhenry; Skullman, Stefan; Karlsson, B. Göran; Björk, Jan; Nordling, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary factors are thought to play a role in at least one third of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) but only a limited proportion of these have mutations in known high‐penetrant genes. In a relatively large part of patients with a few or multiple colorectal polyps the underlying genetic cause of the disease is still unknown. Using exome sequencing in combination with linkage analyses together with detection of copy‐number variations (CNV), we have identified a duplication in the regulatory region of the GREM1 gene in a family with an attenuated/atypical polyposis syndrome. In addition, 107 patients with colorectal cancer and/or polyposis were analyzed for mutations in the candidate genes identified. We also performed screening of the exonuclease domain of the POLE gene in a subset of these patients. The duplication of 16 kb in the regulatory region of GREM1 was found to be disease‐causing in the family. Functional analyses revealed a higher expression of the GREM1 gene in colorectal tissue in duplication carriers. Screening of the exonuclease domain of POLE in additional CRC patients identified a probable causative novel variant c.1274A>G, p.Lys425Arg. In conclusion a high penetrant duplication in the regulatory region of GREM1, predisposing to CRC, was identified in a family with attenuated/atypical polyposis. A POLE variant was identified in a patient with early onset CRC and a microsatellite stable (MSS) tumor. Mutations leading to increased expression of genes can constitute disease‐causing mutations in hereditary CRC syndromes. © 2015 The Authors. Genes, Chromosomes & Cancer Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26493165

  1. High-Resolution Radar Imaging of Mercury's North Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, J. K.; Perillat, P. J.; Slade, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    The recently upgraded Arecibo S-band (λ12.6-cm) radar was used to make delay-Doppler images of Mercury's north polar region, where earlier observations had shown strong echoes from putative ice deposits in craters. The image resolution of 1.5-3 km is a substantial improvement over the 15-km resolution of the older Arecibo images (J. K. Harmon et al. 1994, Nature369, 213-215). The new observations confirm all the original polar features and reveal many additional features, including several at latitudes as low as 72-75°N and several from craters less than 10 km in diameter. All of the new features located on the Mariner-imaged side of the planet can be matched with known craters or other shaded areas. We find the north pole to be located 65 km from the original Mariner-based pole and 15 km from the new Mariner-based pole of M. S. Robinson et al. (1999, J. Geophys. Res.104, 30,847-30,852). The improved resolution reveals fine structure in the radar features and their respective host craters, including radar shadowing/highlighting by central peaks and rim walls, rim terracing, and preferential concentration of radar-bright deposits in shaded southern floor areas. The radar features' high brightness, circular polarization inversion (μ c=1.25), and confinement to regions permanently shaded from direct sunlight are all consistent with volume scattering from a cold-trapped volatile such as clean water ice. The sizes and locations of most of the features show good agreement with the thermal model of A. R. Vasavada, D. A. Paige, and S. E. Wood (1999, Icarus141, 179-193) for insulated (buried) water ice, although the problems of explaining radar features in small craters and the rapid burial required at lower latitudes suggest that other factors may be suppressing ice loss after emplacement.

  2. IMF sector behavior estimated from geomagnetic data at South Pole

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, S.; Xu, W.h.

    1981-05-01

    IMF sector behavior which has previously been estimated from the geomagnetic data at Godhavn is confirmed by study of the data at South Pole for 1959--1970 with the same estimation technique, taking the difference between northern and southern hemispheres into consideration. A method to improve (about 18%) the agreement between assigned and actual sector structures by study of the data at the two stations is suggested. Geomagnetic disturbance effects on sector estimation are discussed, and reversed sector effects in winter are given special emphasis.

  3. Evidence of water ice near the lunar poles

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, W. C.; Maurice, S.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Little, R. C.; Lawrence, S. L.; Gasnault, O. M.; Wiens, R. C.; Barraclough, B. L.; Elphic, Richard C.,; Prettyman, T. H.; Steinberg, John Tyree; Binder, A. B.

    2001-01-01

    Lunar Prospector epithermal neutron data were studied to evaluate the probable chemical state of enhanced hydrogen, [H], reported previously to be near both lunar poles [1,2]. Improved versions of thermal and epithermal neutron data were developed for this purpose. Most important is the improved spatial resolution obtained by using shortened integration times. A new data set was created, Epi* = [Epithermal - 0.057 x Thermal], to reduce effects of composition variations other than those due to hydrogen. The Epi* counting rates are generally low near both lunar poles and high over terrane near recent impact events such as Tycho and Jackson. However, other lunar features are also associated with high Epi* rates, which represent a wide range of terrane types that seem to have little in common. If we postulate that one property all bright Epi* features do have in common is low [H], then measured Epi* counting rates appear to be quantitatively self consistent. If we assume that [H]=O above the top 98th percentile of Epi* counting rates at 2{sup o} x 2{sup o} spatial resolution, then [H]{sub ave} = 55 ppm for latitudes equatorward of [75{sup o}]. This value is close to the average found in returned lunar soil samples, [H]{sub ave} {approx} 50 ppm [3]. Using the foregoing physical interpretation of Epi* counting rates, we find that the Epi* counts within most of the large craters poleward of {+-}70{sup o} are higher, and therefore [H] is lower, than that in neighboring inter-crater plains, as shown in Figure 1. Fourteen of these craters that have areas larger than the LP epithermal spatial resolution (55 km diameter at 30 km altitude), were singled out for study. [H] is generally found to increase with decreasing distance from the poles (hence decreasing temperature). However, quantitative estimates of the diffusivity of hydrogen at low temperature show that diffusion can not be an important factor in explaining the difference between the relatively low [H] observed within

  4. SNAP sky background at the north ecliptic pole

    SciTech Connect

    Aldering, Greg

    2002-07-01

    I summarize the extant direct and indirect data on the sky background SNAP will see at the North Ecliptic Pole over the wavelength range 0.4 < {lambda} < 1.7 {micro}m. At the spatial resolution of SNAP the sky background due to stars and galaxies is resolved, so the only source considered is zodiacal light. Several models are explored to provide interpolation in wavelength between the broadband data from HST and COBE observations. I believe the input data are now established well enough that the accuracy of the sky background presented here is sufficient for SNAP simulations, and that it will stand up to scrutiny by reviewers.

  5. Electron muon scattering in the exotic Z(0)' pole

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, H.; Ravinez, O.; Romero, D.; Reyes, J.

    2009-04-30

    The search for new physics in the future Internacional Linear Collider ILC, implies the existence of new particles, among them, the Z(0)' particle. In this regard, we calculate the e{sup +}+e{sup -}{yields}{mu}{sup +}+{mu}{sup -} scattering cross section near the Z(0)' pole, whitin the contex of the SU(3){sub L}xU(1){sub Y} weak model, which contains exotic leptons, quarks, and bosons (E,J,U,V) with the finality of obtain constraints in the parameters of the model.

  6. Approximation by simple partial fractions with constraints on the poles

    SciTech Connect

    Borodin, Petr A

    2012-11-30

    Under various constraints on a compact subset K of the complex plane C and a subset E subset of C disjoint from K, the problem of density in the space AC(K) (the space of functions that are continuous on a compact set K and analytic in its interior) of the set of simple partial fractions (logarithmic derivatives of polynomials) with poles in E is studied. The present investigation also involves examining some properties of additive subgroups of a Hilbert space. Bibliography: 19 titles.

  7. Multi-Body Orbit Architectures for Lunar South Pole Coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebow, D. J.; Ozimek, M. T.; Howell, K. C.; Folta, D. C.

    2006-01-01

    A potential ground station at the lunar south pole has prompted studies of orbit architectures that ensure adequate coverage. Constant communications can be achieved with two spacecraft in different combinations of Earth-Moon libration point orbits. Halo and vertical families, as well as other orbits near L1 and L2 are considered. The investigation includes detailed results using nine different orbits with periods ranging from 7 to 16 days. Natural solutions are generated in a full ephemeris model, including solar perturbations. A preliminary station-keeping analysis is also completed.

  8. A new air-Cherenkov array at the South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, J. E.; Gill, J. R.; Hart, S. P.; Hill, G. C.; Hinton, J. A.; Lloyd-Evans, J.; Potter, D.; Pryke, C.; Rochester, K.; Schwarz, R.; Watson, A. A.

    2000-01-01

    VULCAN comprises a 9 element array of air-Cherenkov radiation detectors established at the South Pole. VULCAN operates in coincidence with the air-shower array SPASE-2 and the two Antarctic Muon And Neutrino Detector Arrays, AMANDA A and B, supplementing the data gathered by these instruments with a measurement of the lateral distribution of air-Cherenkov light from extensive air-showers. An overview of the aims and methods of the whole coincidence experiment (SPASE-2, VULCAN and AMANDA) can be found in an accompanying paper (Dickinson et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A (1999), to be published).

  9. Elliptical Chandler pole motions of the Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yury; Ferrandiz, Jose

    2010-05-01

    In the work the values of the period and eccentricity of Chandler motion of poles of axes of rotation of the Earth and Mars have been determined. The research has been carried out on the basis of developed earlier by authors an intermediate rotary Chandler-Euler motion of the weakly deformable celestial bodies (Barkin, Ferrandiz and Getino, 1996; Barkin, 1998). An influence of a liquid core on Chandler motion of a pole in the given work has not considered. The periods of the specified pole motions make 447.1 d for the Earth and 218.1 d for Mars. In comparison with Euler motions of poles because of elastic properties of planets the Chandler periods are increased accordingly on 142.8 d (about 46.9 %) for the Earth and on 26.2 d (on 13.7 %) for Mars. Values of eccentricities of specified Chandler motions of pole e = √b2 --a2- b (here a both b are smaller and big semi-axes of Chandler ellipse) make 0.09884 for the Earth and 0.3688 for Mars (accordingly, on 21.1 % and 6.2 % more than the appropriate values of eccentricities for models of planets as rigid non-spherical bodies). Axes of an ellipse a also b correspond to the principal equatorial axes of inertia of a planet Ox and Oyfor which the moments of inertia have the smallest valueA and middle value B. The pole of the principal axis of inertia Ox for the Earth is displaced to the west on the angle 14°9285, and the pole of the principal axis of inertia Ox for Mars is displaced to the west on the angle 105°0178 (in the appropriate basic geographical systems of coordinates of the given planets). For ellipticties of Chandler trajectories ɛ = (b- a)-b the values 0.004897 (for the Earth) and 0.07048 (for Mars) have been obtained. The specified values surpass by Euler values of appropriate ellipticties on 46.8 % (in case of the Earth) and on 13.3 % (in the case of Mars). Love number k2describing the elastic properties of planets, were accepted equal 0.30 for the Earth and 0.153 for Mars. Estimations of Chandler periods

  10. Pole-zero form fractional model identification in frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Mansouri, R.; Djamah, T.; Djennoune, S.; Bettayeb, M.

    2009-03-05

    This paper deals with system identification in the frequency domain using non integer order models given in the pole-zero form. The usual identification techniques cannot be used in this case because of the non integer orders of differentiation which makes the problem strongly nonlinear. A general identification method based on Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is developed and allows to estimate the (2n+2m+1) parameters of the model. Its application to identify the ''skin effect'' of a squirrel cage induction machine modeling is then presented.

  11. Wind Forcing of the North Sea Pole Tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnor, W.; Chao, B. F.; Zheng, D. W.; Au, Z. Y.

    1998-01-01

    The Chandler wobble of the earth's rotation has a period near 14 months and sets up the 0.5 cm amplitude pole tide in the deep oceans, However, the pole tide is anomalously large in the North Sea, where the amplitude increases sharply up to 3 cm along the continental coast. It is shown here that the sea levels are well correlated with winds at the pole tide frequency. The Princeton Ocean Model is used to investigate the response of the North Sea to wind forcing. The barotropic numerical ocean model depicts realistic coastlines and bathymetry at 5 ft x 5 ft resolution, with 97 x 73 grid points. The monthly mean wind fields for the 40-year period (1958-1997) from the National Centers for Atmospheric Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis were used to force the model. The winds were converted to stress with a neutral drag coefficient that varied linearly with windspeed (instead of using the NCEP windstress). A 5-day simulation was made for each month until the resulting flow regime came into equilibrium, and model water levels at various station locations were saved for comparison with tidal-gauge observed sea levels from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL). The comparison is made for 10 North Sea stations with high quality tide gauge data. We find: (1) good agreement in annual and semi-annual phases and in the trend of amplitude w.r.t. latitude; (2) more importantly for this study, the model-predicted and observed non-seasonal sea level variations show a very significant temporal correlation as well as spectral coherence. However, a large amplitude difference exists between the two sets -- the overall amplitude variability of the observed is generally a factor of 2-3 larger than the model prediction (this same phenomenon has been reported in ocean circulation studies, although the cause is not yet clear.) Our results indicate that the wind forcing is the main cause of the observed large pole tide in the North Sea.

  12. Edge detection, cosmic strings and the south pole telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Andrew; Brandenberger, Robert E-mail: rhb@physics.mcgill.ca

    2009-02-15

    We develop a method of constraining the cosmic string tension G{mu} which uses the Canny edge detection algorithm as a means of searching CMB temperature maps for the signature of the Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We test the potential of this method using high resolution, simulated CMB temperature maps. By modeling the future output from the South Pole Telescope project (including anticipated instrumental noise), we find that cosmic strings with G{mu} > 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} could be detected.

  13. Detection and Classification of Pole-Like Objects from Mobile Mapping Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukano, K.; Masuda, H.

    2015-08-01

    Laser scanners on a vehicle-based mobile mapping system can capture 3D point-clouds of roads and roadside objects. Since roadside objects have to be maintained periodically, their 3D models are useful for planning maintenance tasks. In our previous work, we proposed a method for detecting cylindrical poles and planar plates in a point-cloud. However, it is often required to further classify pole-like objects into utility poles, streetlights, traffic signals and signs, which are managed by different organizations. In addition, our previous method may fail to extract low pole-like objects, which are often observed in urban residential areas. In this paper, we propose new methods for extracting and classifying pole-like objects. In our method, we robustly extract a wide variety of poles by converting point-clouds into wireframe models and calculating cross-sections between wireframe models and horizontal cutting planes. For classifying pole-like objects, we subdivide a pole-like object into five subsets by extracting poles and planes, and calculate feature values of each subset. Then we apply a supervised machine learning method using feature variables of subsets. In our experiments, our method could achieve excellent results for detection and classification of pole-like objects.

  14. The Effect of Polar Vortex Disturbances on Mesopause Gravity Wave Drag in Relation to Mesopause Pole-to-Pole Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wit, R.; Hibbins, R. E.; Espy, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) play an important role in the dynamics of the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) region, linking the lower to the upper atmosphere. GW filtering by the background zonal wind is furthermore believed to be the fundamental mechanism coupling the winter stratosphere to the summer polar mesopause, in which increased planetary wave (PW) activity in the former is related to enhanced temperatures in the latter through a chain of global MLT temperature anomalies. During major Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) the interaction between PWs and the background flow leads to increased polar stratospheric temperatures and a reversal of the climatological winds from eastward to westward. As a result, large changes in GW filtering conditions occur, making SSWs an excellent tool to empirically test the inter-hemispheric coupling mechanism. In this study, mesopause GW forcing derived from meteor radar observations over Trondheim, Norway (63°N, 10°E) during the January 2013 major SSW is discussed in light of the polar vortex strength and selective filtering conditions over the same location to show the coupling between the polar winter stratosphere and MLT. Global temperature observations obtained with the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) are subsequently used to study the temperature signature of the SSW in the MLT region over the winter pole in relation to the observed GW forcing. Furthermore, the temperature effect of the SSW throughout the middle atmosphere is tracked, away from the winter pole toward the summer pole, and compared to the temperature structure expected from the inter-hemispheric coupling mechanism.

  15. Perpendicular oriented single-pole nano-optical transducer.

    PubMed

    Sendur, Kürşat

    2010-03-01

    Nano-optical transducers have been utilized in existing and emerging applications due to their ability to obtain small optical spots, large transmission efficiency, and narrow and adjustable spectral response. In emerging nano-optical applications, such as heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), these features are not sufficient. For example, in HAMR a transducer should also satisfy additional requirements, such as massproduction and integrability with other device components. In this study, the basic principles of Maxwell's equations and image theory for good metals are utilized to design a perpendicular oriented single-pole nano-optical transducer, which can be integrated into the manufacturing technologies of current hard disk drive heads. The perpendicular oriented single-pole nano-optical transducer is investigated using 3-D finite element method. Gold transducers are investigated for both longitudinal and perpendicular orientations. The optical intensity profiles and spot sizes of longitudinal and perpendicular oriented transducers are compared for various fly heights. It is shown that a perpendicular ridge waveguide provides localized optical spots with intensities comparable to longitudinal transducers.

  16. Elemental Mercury Diffusion Processes and Concentration at the Lunar Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moxley, F. I.; Killen, R. M.; Hurley, D. M.; Dream

    2011-12-01

    In 2009, the Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) spectrograph onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft made the first detection of element mercury (Hg) vapor in the lunar exosphere after the Lunar Crater Observing and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) Centaur rocket impacted into the Cabeus crater in the southern polar region of the Moon. The lunar regolith core samples from the Apollo missions determined that Hg had a devolatilized pattern with a concentration gradient increasing with depth, in addition to a layered pattern suggesting multiple episodes of burial and volatile loss. Hg migration on the lunar surface resulted in cold trapping at the poles. We have modeled the rate at which indigenous Hg is lost from the regolith through diffusion out of lunar grains. We secondly modeled the migration of Hg vapor in the exosphere and estimated the rate of cold-trapping at the poles using a Monte Carlo technique. The Hg vapor may be lost from the exosphere via ionization, Jeans escape, or re-impact into the surface causing reabsorption.

  17. Semantic representations in the temporal pole predict false memories.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Martin J; Anjum, Raeesa S; Kumaran, Dharshan; Schacter, Daniel L; Spiers, Hugo J; Hassabis, Demis

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience have given us unprecedented insight into the neural mechanisms of false memory, showing that artificial memories can be inserted into the memory cells of the hippocampus in a way that is indistinguishable from true memories. However, this alone is not enough to explain how false memories can arise naturally in the course of our daily lives. Cognitive psychology has demonstrated that many instances of false memory, both in the laboratory and the real world, can be attributed to semantic interference. Whereas previous studies have found that a diverse set of regions show some involvement in semantic false memory, none have revealed the nature of the semantic representations underpinning the phenomenon. Here we use fMRI with representational similarity analysis to search for a neural code consistent with semantic false memory. We find clear evidence that false memories emerge from a similarity-based neural code in the temporal pole, a region that has been called the "semantic hub" of the brain. We further show that each individual has a partially unique semantic code within the temporal pole, and this unique code can predict idiosyncratic patterns of memory errors. Finally, we show that the same neural code can also predict variation in true-memory performance, consistent with an adaptive perspective on false memory. Taken together, our findings reveal the underlying structure of neural representations of semantic knowledge, and how this semantic structure can both enhance and distort our memories.

  18. Semantic representations in the temporal pole predict false memories.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Martin J; Anjum, Raeesa S; Kumaran, Dharshan; Schacter, Daniel L; Spiers, Hugo J; Hassabis, Demis

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience have given us unprecedented insight into the neural mechanisms of false memory, showing that artificial memories can be inserted into the memory cells of the hippocampus in a way that is indistinguishable from true memories. However, this alone is not enough to explain how false memories can arise naturally in the course of our daily lives. Cognitive psychology has demonstrated that many instances of false memory, both in the laboratory and the real world, can be attributed to semantic interference. Whereas previous studies have found that a diverse set of regions show some involvement in semantic false memory, none have revealed the nature of the semantic representations underpinning the phenomenon. Here we use fMRI with representational similarity analysis to search for a neural code consistent with semantic false memory. We find clear evidence that false memories emerge from a similarity-based neural code in the temporal pole, a region that has been called the "semantic hub" of the brain. We further show that each individual has a partially unique semantic code within the temporal pole, and this unique code can predict idiosyncratic patterns of memory errors. Finally, we show that the same neural code can also predict variation in true-memory performance, consistent with an adaptive perspective on false memory. Taken together, our findings reveal the underlying structure of neural representations of semantic knowledge, and how this semantic structure can both enhance and distort our memories. PMID:27551087

  19. [Variation of irradiance in the arctic pole during the summer].

    PubMed

    Tao, An-qi; Ke, Chang-qing; Xie, Hong-jie; Sun, Bo

    2012-08-01

    The variation of irradiance affect the melting rate of the sea ice in the arctic pole, and the research on it is an important component of the global climate change research. The present research was based on the spectrum data collected during the 4th scientific research on the arctic of China in 2010, analyzed the variation of irradiance in the arctic pole during the summer and discussed the reasons for the change. This research shows that many factors lead to the change, among which the weather and the solar elevation angle affect the irradiance directly. The weather factors determine the amount of solar radiation that reached the ground after the absorption and attenuation of the clouds; In high-latitude areas, there is a low solar elevation angle and the attenuation of solar radiation was obvious. Our research shows that the spectrum at shorter wavelength is more sensitive to the changes in altitude of the sun, while the impact of weather on the irradiance increases with wavelength. Moreover, moisture content in the atmosphere also affects the solar radiation reaching the ground and the its impact is in a particular band but not for the entire spectrum range.

  20. Development and structures of the venous pole of the heart.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robert H; Brown, Nigel A; Moorman, Antoon F M

    2006-01-01

    In the past, our interpretations of cardiac development depended on analysis of serially sectioned embryos, supported by three-dimensional reconstructions. It was not possible, using these techniques, to trace the fate of the various embryonic building blocks. This has all changed with the advent of the new techniques in molecular biology. Combining our experience with these new techniques and our previous studies using the classic approach, we have reviewed how the recent advances clarify controversies that still exist concerning the development of the venous pole. The arguments devolve on whether the pulmonary vein is itself a new development or whether its primordium is derived from the systemic venous tributaries, the so-called sinus venosus. The new techniques show that, rather than developing in the form of a segmented tube, the heart is built up by addition of material to both its arterial and venous poles. At no stage is it possible to recognize a discrete part of the tube that can be identified as the sinus venosus. The confluence of the systemic venous tributaries does not become recognizable as a discrete anatomic entity until compartmented into the newly formed right atrium concomitant with formation of the venous valves. The new molecular techniques show that the pulmonary vein is a new structure, anatomically and developmentally, that is derived from mediastinal myocardium. It gains its connection to the morphologically left atrium between the right- and left-sided systemic venous tributaries. PMID:16193508

  1. Severity of seabed spatial competition decreases towards the poles.

    PubMed

    Barnes, D K A; Neutel, A M

    2016-04-25

    For more than a century ecologists have considered that competitive interactions between species are more intense at low latitudes [1,2]. This is frequently invoked as either an explanation or a consequence of higher species richness in the tropics, also suggesting that competition shifts from intra- to inter-specific towards the tropics [1]. Another common assumption is that within a community, intraspecific competition needs to be relatively strong, compared to inter-specific competition, in order to enable stable coexistence of species [3]. However, many analyses have found no consistent large scale geographic patterns in the intensity of intra- or interspecific competition [4]. Here, we show a clear latitudinal trend in contest competition for space in nearshore marine environments, for bryozoans (sessile, colonial, suspension feeding animals). Bryozoans form species-rich assemblages with other encrusting fauna and flora (corraline algae), and are highly abundant across the globe [5]. We find that whilst the intensity of competition (percentage of bryozoan colonies involved in direct physical spatial interactions with bryozoan or other encrusters) differed little with latitude, its severity (percentage of bryozoan colonies involved in contests with a win/loss outcome, leading to death of the loser) was three times lower at the poles than in the tropics. The cause of this change in severity was a strong shift in taxonomic relatedness of competitors, from interactions between species of different families dominating at lower latitudes, to mainly intraspecific competition at the poles.

  2. Geologic Mapping of the Lunar South Pole Quadrangle (LQ-30)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mest, S. C.; Berman, D. C.; Petro, N. E.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we use recent image, spectral and topographic data to map the geology of the lunar South Pole quadrangle (LQ-30) at 1:2.5M scale [1-7]. The overall objective of this research is to constrain the geologic evolution of LQ-30 (60 -90 S, 0 - 180 ) with specific emphasis on evaluation of a) the regional effects of impact basin formation, and b) the spatial distribution of ejecta, in particular resulting from formation of the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin and other large basins. Key scientific objectives include: 1) Determining the geologic history of LQ-30 and examining the spatial and temporal variability of geologic processes within the map area. 2) Constraining the distribution of impact-generated materials, and determining the timing and effects of major basin-forming impacts on crustal structure and stratigraphy in the map area. And 3) assessing the distribution of potential resources (e.g., H, Fe, Th) and their relationships with surface materials.

  3. [Variation of irradiance in the arctic pole during the summer].

    PubMed

    Tao, An-qi; Ke, Chang-qing; Xie, Hong-jie; Sun, Bo

    2012-08-01

    The variation of irradiance affect the melting rate of the sea ice in the arctic pole, and the research on it is an important component of the global climate change research. The present research was based on the spectrum data collected during the 4th scientific research on the arctic of China in 2010, analyzed the variation of irradiance in the arctic pole during the summer and discussed the reasons for the change. This research shows that many factors lead to the change, among which the weather and the solar elevation angle affect the irradiance directly. The weather factors determine the amount of solar radiation that reached the ground after the absorption and attenuation of the clouds; In high-latitude areas, there is a low solar elevation angle and the attenuation of solar radiation was obvious. Our research shows that the spectrum at shorter wavelength is more sensitive to the changes in altitude of the sun, while the impact of weather on the irradiance increases with wavelength. Moreover, moisture content in the atmosphere also affects the solar radiation reaching the ground and the its impact is in a particular band but not for the entire spectrum range. PMID:23156748

  4. Semantic representations in the temporal pole predict false memories

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Martin J.; Anjum, Raeesa S.; Kumaran, Dharshan; Schacter, Daniel L.; Spiers, Hugo J.; Hassabis, Demis

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience have given us unprecedented insight into the neural mechanisms of false memory, showing that artificial memories can be inserted into the memory cells of the hippocampus in a way that is indistinguishable from true memories. However, this alone is not enough to explain how false memories can arise naturally in the course of our daily lives. Cognitive psychology has demonstrated that many instances of false memory, both in the laboratory and the real world, can be attributed to semantic interference. Whereas previous studies have found that a diverse set of regions show some involvement in semantic false memory, none have revealed the nature of the semantic representations underpinning the phenomenon. Here we use fMRI with representational similarity analysis to search for a neural code consistent with semantic false memory. We find clear evidence that false memories emerge from a similarity-based neural code in the temporal pole, a region that has been called the “semantic hub” of the brain. We further show that each individual has a partially unique semantic code within the temporal pole, and this unique code can predict idiosyncratic patterns of memory errors. Finally, we show that the same neural code can also predict variation in true-memory performance, consistent with an adaptive perspective on false memory. Taken together, our findings reveal the underlying structure of neural representations of semantic knowledge, and how this semantic structure can both enhance and distort our memories. PMID:27551087

  5. Effect of plasticity on the dynamics of Enceladus's south pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behounkova, M.; Cadek, O.; Tobie, G.; Choblet, G.

    2012-09-01

    The intense activity at the south pole of Enceladus hints at an internal water reservoir. However, there is no direct evidence of liquid water at present and its long-term stability in the interior remains problematic. By modeling heat production and transfer in the ice shell in a spherical geometry, in a previous study Behounková et al. [1], we have shown that tidal heating naturally leads to a concentration of convective hot upwellings in the south polar region, favoring the preservation of liquid water at depth. We show that large volumes of water are produced within the ice shell at the south pole during periods of elevated orbital eccentricity (3-5 times the present-day value). Strong lateral variations in the melt production and crystallization rates result in stress concentration in the south polar region, thus providing an explanation for the tectonic activity observed today. We predict that an internal ocean may be sustained over the long term as the consequence of repeated periods with elevated orbital eccentricity, leading to episodic melting and resurfacing events. In order to model the resurfacing event following a tidally-induced melting episode, we are currently incorporating plasticity effects. We also improve the modeling of tidal deformation by incorporating the Andrade model, which is expected to better reproduce the viscoelastic properties of water ice Castillo-Rogez et al. [2].

  6. Towards a research pole in photonics in Western Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, Virgil-Florin; Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Rominu, Mihai; Miutescu, Eftimie; Burlea, Amelia; Vlascici, Miomir; Gheorghiu, Nicolae; Cira, Octavian; Hutiu, Gheorghe; Mnerie, Corina; Demian, Dorin; Marcauteanu, Corina; Topala, Florin; Rolland, Jannick P.; Voiculescu, Ioana; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-07-01

    We present our efforts in establishing a Research Pole in Photonics in the future Arad-Timisoara metropolitan area projected to unite two major cities of Western Romania. Research objectives and related training activities of various institutions and groups that are involved are presented in their evolution during the last decade. The multi-disciplinary consortium consists principally of two universities, UAVA (Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad) and UMF (Victor Babes Medicine and Pharmacy University of Timisoara), but also of the Arad County Emergency University Hospital and several innovative SMEs, such as Bioclinica S.A. (the largest array of medical analysis labs in the region) and Inteliform S.R.L. (a competitive SME focused on mechatronics and mechanical engineering). A brief survey of the individual and joint projects of these institutions is presented, together with their teaching activities at graduate and undergraduate level. The research Pole collaborates in R&D, training and education in biomedical imaging with universities in USA and Europe. Collaborative activities, mainly on Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) projects are presented in a multidisciplinary approach that includes optomechatronics, precision mechanics and optics, dentistry, medicine, and biology.

  7. Uncertainty maps for asteroid shape and pole solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartczak, Przemyslaw; Dudzinski, Grzegorz

    2016-10-01

    SAGE (Shaping Asteroids with Genetic Evolution) inversion method is based on genetic algorithm to obtain pole solutions, rotation periods and non-convex shapes of asteroids (Bartczak et.al, 2014). During the process computer graphics methods are used to compare model's synthetic lightcurves to photometric observations. The method is suitable for modelling both single and binary objects. A modelling run starts with a sphere, with no assumptions about the shape, and subsequently it converges to a stable spin and shape solution. Center of mas and moment of inertia are calculated for each model.Modelling of an asteroid consists of multiple runs of the process, each of them following different path towards a stable solution. As a result we obtain a family of solutions. If enough data is provided, solutions are consistent with each other and can be used for error estimation.We choose only the best models from a family of solutions, meaning every model that fits 5% threshold above best χ2 found. By comparing them we are able to construct a map of uncertainties for the shape, showing areas in good and poor agreement with chosen models. Such map can then be represented with a 3D visualisation. Moreover, we create a map of errors for pole solutions and periods.

  8. DISCOVERY OF FOG AT THE SOUTH POLE OF TITAN

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. E.; Smith, A. L.; Chen, C.; Adamkovics, M.

    2009-11-20

    While Saturn's moon Titan appears to support an active methane hydrological cycle, no direct evidence for surface-atmosphere exchange has yet appeared. The indirect evidence, while compelling, could be misleading. It is possible, for example, that the identified lake features could be filled with ethane, an involatile long-term residue of atmospheric photolysis; the apparent stream and channel features could be ancient remnants of a previous climate; and the tropospheric methane clouds, while frequent, could cause no rain to reach the surface. We report here the detection of fog at the south pole of Titan during late summer using observations from the VIMS instrument on board the Cassini spacecraft. While terrestrial fog can form from a variety of causes, most of these processes are inoperable on Titan. Fog on Titan can only be caused by evaporation of nearly pure liquid methane; the detection of fog provides the first direct link between surface and atmospheric methane. Based on the detections presented here, liquid methane appears widespread at the south pole of Titan in late southern summer, and the hydrological cycle on Titan is currently active.

  9. Submillimeter Astronomy from the South Pole (AST/RO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Antony A.

    2013-01-01

    The Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO), a 1.7 m diameter offset Gregorian telescope for astronomy and aeronomy studies at wavelengths between 200 and 2000 μm, saw first light in 1995 and operated until 2005. It was the first radio telescope to operate continuously throughout the winter on the Antarctic Plateau. It served as a site testing instrument and prototype for later instruments, as well as executing a wide variety of scientific programs that resulted in six doctoral theses and more than one hundred scientific publications. The South Pole environment is unique among observatory sites for unusually low wind speeds, low absolute humidity, and the consistent clarity of the submillimeter sky. Especially significant are the exceptionally low values of sky noise found at this site, a result of the small water vapor content of the atmosphere. Multiple submillimeter-wave and Terahertz detector systems were in operation on AST/RO, including heterodyne and bolometric arrays. AST/RO's legacy includes comprehensive submillimeter-wave site testing of the South Pole, spectroscopic studies of 492 GHz and 809 GHz neutral atomic carbon and 460 GHz and 806 GHz carbon monoxide in the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds, and the first detection of the 1.46 THz [N II] line from a ground-based observatory.

  10. Elemental Mercury Diffusion Processes and Concentration at the Lunar Poles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moxley, Frederick; Killen, Rosemary M.; Hurley, Dana M.

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, the Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) spectrograph onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft made the first detection of element mercury (Hg) vapor in the lunar exosphere after the Lunar Crater Observing and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) Centaur rocket impacted into the Cabeus crater in the southern polar region of the Moon. The lunar regolith core samples from the Apollo missions determined that Hg had a devolatilized pattern with a concentration gradient increasing with depth, in addition to a layered pattern suggesting multiple episodes of burial and volatile loss. Hg migration on the lunar surface resulted in cold trapping at the poles. We have modeled the rate at which indigenous Hg is lost from the regolith through diffusion out of lunar grains. We secondly modeled the migration of Hg vapor in the exosphere and estimated the rate of cold-trapping at the poles using a Monte Carlo technique. The Hg vapor may be lost from the exosphere via ionization, Jeans escape, or re-impact into the surface causing reabsorption.

  11. Transient Broad Specular Reflections from Titan's North Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhingra, Rajani D.; Barnes, Jason W.

    2016-10-01

    In 2014, Cassini observed rough patches or transient broad specular reflections on one of Titan's seas, Punga Mare. These observations were made by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). The rough patches were interpreted to be waves on the surface of the hydrocarbon sea with slopes of 60 ± 10. Although long anticipated, this was an important observation since there was no detection of waves in the initial flybys of north polar lakes and seas until the northern summer approached.We have analyzed several recent VIMS flybys of Titan's north pole looking for these rough surfaces. Our observations are classified as clouds, mudflats, specular reflections, or waves based on VIMS color composites. We observe waves in at least two seas at the north pole, Ligeia Mare and Kraken Mare. In addition, we also observe specular reflections from the shoreline or land, indicating the wet sidewalk effect or mudflat in other flybys. Wet sidewalk observations indicate a recent rainfall event causing diffuse specular reflection.These new observations help us understand more about the weather conditions and sea-wind interaction generating waves on the seas.

  12. Albedo of Permanently Shadowed Regions of the Lunar Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riner, M. A.; Lucey, P. G.; Bussey, B.; Cahill, J. T.; McGovern, A.

    2012-12-01

    Due to the slight tilt in the Moon's spin axis, some topographic depressions near the lunar poles experience permanent shadow and may serve as cold traps, harboring water ice and/or other volatile compounds [1]. Permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) provide an opportunity toward understanding the amount, nature and transport of volatiles on the Moon and may also be a potential resource for human exploration. While many different data sets have suggested the presence of water ice in PSRs near the lunar poles many questions remain. For example, ice does not appear to be uniformly distributed across identified PSRs. More work is needed to understand the distribution of ice in PSRs and how delivery and retention mechanisms influence the distribution. The active illumination of the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) provides a unique contribution toward exploration PSR exploration. While LOLA is principally a laser altimeter used for quantitative topography and related cartographic and geodetic applications [2], LOLA also measures the intensity and width of the return laser pulse (1064 nm) from the surface. Here we use a global mosaic (4 pixels per degree) of LOLA albedo data corrected for instrumental drift, irregular variations, and calibrated to normal albedo using local equatorial measurements of normal albedo obtained by the Kaguya Multiband Imager [3]. Recent work using LOLA albedo shows the floor of Shackleton crater, near the lunar south pole, is brighter than the surrounding terrain (and the interior of nearby craters) at 1064 nm [4]. This albedo difference may be due to decreased space weathering due to shadowing from the Sun or to a 1 μm thick layer with 20% water ice a the surface of the crater floor [4]. Here we use LOLA dayside reflectance measurements to examine the albedo of PSRs catalogued by [5] derived from illumination modeling of a hybrid 100 m/pixel LOLA-LROC digital terrain model (DTM) up to 83° north and south latitudes. The upper latitude

  13. Field analysis and enhancement of multi-pole magnetic components fabricated on printed circuit board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Kuo-Chi; Chen, Chin-Sen

    2007-09-01

    A multi-pole magnetic component magnetized with a fine magnetic pole pitch of less than 1 mm is very difficult to achieve by using traditional methods. Moreover, it requires a precise mechanical process and a complicated magnetization system. Different fine magnetic pole pitches of 300, 350 and 400 μm have been accomplished on 9-pole magnetic components through the printed circuit board (PCB) manufacturing technology. Additionally, another fine magnetic pole pitch of 500 μm was also fabricated on a dual-layered (DL) wire circuit structure to investigate the field enhancement. After measurements, a gain factor of 1.37 was obtained in the field strength. The field variations among different magnetic pole pitches were analyzed in this paper.

  14. Pole-Like Street Furniture Decompostion in Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Oude Elberink, S.; Vosselman, G.

    2016-06-01

    Automatic semantic interpretation of street furniture has become a popular topic in recent years. Current studies detect street furniture as connected components of points above the street level. Street furniture classification based on properties of such components suffers from large intra class variability of shapes and cannot deal with mixed classes like traffic signs attached to light poles. In this paper, we focus on the decomposition of point clouds of pole-like street furniture. A novel street furniture decomposition method is proposed, which consists of three steps: (i) acquirement of prior-knowledge, (ii) pole extraction, (iii) components separation. For the pole extraction, a novel global pole extraction approach is proposed to handle 3 different cases of street furniture. In the evaluation of results, which involves the decomposition of 27 different instances of street furniture, we demonstrate that our method decomposes mixed classes street furniture into poles and different components with respect to different functionalities.

  15. Loading effect of a self-consistent equilibrium ocean pole tide on the gravimetric parameters of the gravity pole tides at superconducting gravimeter stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Ducarme, Bernard; Sun, Heping; Xu, Jianqiao

    2008-05-01

    The gravimetric parameters of the gravity pole tide are the amplitude factor δ, which is the ratio of gravity variations induced by polar motion for a real Earth to variations computed for a rigid one, and the phase difference κ between the observed and the rigid gravity pole tide. They can be estimated from the records of superconducting gravimeters (SGs). However, they are affected by the loading effect of the ocean pole tide. Recent results from TOPEX/Poseidon (TP) altimeter confirm that the ocean pole tide has a self-consistent equilibrium response. Accordingly, we calculate the gravity loading effects as well as their influence on the gravimetric parameters of gravity pole tide at all the 26 SG stations in the world on the assumption of a self-consistent equilibrium ocean pole tide model. The gravity loading effect is evaluated between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2006. Numerical results show that the amplitude of the gravity loading effect reaches 10 -9 m s -2, which is larger than the accuracy (10 -10 m s -2) of a SG. The gravimetric factor δ is 1% larger at all SG stations. Then, the contribution of a self-consistent ocean pole tide to the pole tide gravimetric parameters cannot be ignored as it exceeds the current accuracy of the estimation of the pole tide gravity factors. For the nine stations studied in Ducarme et al. [Ducarme, B., Venedikov, A.P., Arnoso, J., et al., 2006. Global analysis of the GGP superconducting gravimeters network for the estimation of the pole tide gravimetric amplitude factor. J. Geodyn. 41, 334-344.], the mean of the modeled tidal factors δm = 1.1813 agrees very well with the result of a global analysis δCH = 1.1816 ± 0.0047 in that paper. On the other hand, the modeled phase difference κm varies from -0.273° to 0.351°. Comparing to the two main periods of the gravity pole tide, annual period and Chandler period, κm is too small to be considered. Therefore, The computed time difference κL induced by a self

  16. Paleomagnetic poles and polarity zonation from Cambrian and Devonian strata of Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elston, D.P.; Bressler, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    Basal Paleozoic Tapeats Sandstone (Early and Middle Cambrian) in northern and central Arizona exhibits mixed polarity and a low-latitude paleomagnetic pole. Carbonates of Middle and early Late Cambrian age, and directly superposed carbonate and carbonate-cemented strata of latest Middle(?) and early Late Devonian age, are characterized by reversed polarity and high-latitude poles. The high-latitude Middle Cambrian pole, which appears to record a large but brief excursion of the polar wandering path, is considered provisional pending additional work. The Devonian data from Arizona indicate that a shift of the pole to a "late Paleozoic" position had occurred by Middle Devonian time. ?? 1977.

  17. Formation of a Bright Polar Hood over the Summer North Pole of Saturn in 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Blalock, John J.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Ewald, Shawn P.

    2016-10-01

    We report that a bright polar hood has formed over the north pole of Saturn, seen first in images captured by the Cassini ISS camera in 2016. When the north pole was observed during the previous period of Cassini spacecraft's high-inclination orbits in 2012-2013, the concentration of light-scattering aerosols within 2-degree latitude of the north pole appeared to be less than that of the surrounding region, and appeared as a dark hole in all ISS filters, in particular in the shorter wavelength filters BL1 (460 nm), and VIO (420 nm). The north pole's appearance in 2012 was in contrast to that of the south pole in 2007, when the south pole had a bright polar hood in those short wavelengths; the south pole appeared dark in all other ISS filters in 2007. The difference between the south pole in 2007 and the north pole in 2012 was interpreted to be seasonal; in 2007, Saturn was approaching the equinox of 2009 and the south pole had been continuously illuminated since the previous equinox in 1995. In 2012, the north pole had been illuminated for only ~3 years after the long winter polar night. The bright hood over the summer south pole in 2007 was hypothesized to consist of aerosols produced by ultraviolet photodissociation of hydrocarbon molecules. Fletcher et al (2015) predicted that a similar bright hood should form over the north pole as Saturn approaches the 2017 solstice. In 2016, the Cassini spacecraft raised its orbital inclination again in preparation for its Grande Finale phase of the mission, from where it has a good view of the north pole. New images captured in 2016 show that the north pole has developed a bright polar hood. We present new images of the north polar region captured in 2016 that show the north pole, and other seasonally evolving high-latitude features including the northern hexagon. Our research has been supported by the Cassini Project, NASA grants OPR NNX11AM45G, CDAPS NNX15AD33G PATM NNX14AK07G, and NSF grant AAG 1212216.

  18. Experimental study of flow around a pole standing in a scour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Takayuki

    2015-05-01

    The characteristics of fluid flow and fluid force of the pole standing in scour were investigated with several different scour depths conditions by using a wind tunnel. The scour was modeled into a mortar, with an inverted circular cone. The diameter of the pole was 40 mm and the scour depth was changed from H / D (= depth / diameter of the pole) 0.25 to 1.75. The free stream velocity was 16 m / s, making the Reynolds number 4.2 × 104. Flow visualization was carried out using a surface oil-film method and smoke-wire method. The surface pressure distributions on the pole and the scour were measured and the drag coefficient acting on the pole was determined by integrating the surface pressure distribution on the pole. The characteristics of the flow around the pole and the drag acting on the pole standing on the scour were clarified. The results show that as the scour depth become deep, the flow around the pole is extremely characteristic and the drag coefficient has a maximum value at Z / D = 0.25 and a minimum value at about the midpoint between the ground level and the bottom of the scour.

  19. Clarifications concerning the definition and determination of the celestial ephemeris pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capitaine, N.; Williams, J. G.; Seidelmann, P. K.

    1985-01-01

    The precise meaning and consequences of the introduction beginning in 1984 of the 1980 IAU theory of nutation (Wahr, 1980; Seidelmann, 1982) based on the celestial ephemeris pole (CEP) rather than the instantaneous pole of rotation (IPR) of the previous theory (Woolard, 1953) are analyzed and discussed. The CEP implicitly accounts for the forced diurnal polar motion and thus implies a fixed change of 0.0087 arcsec in the mean celestial pole. It is pointed out that past determinations of the obliquity and the celestial pole which were assumed to be referred to the IPR were actually referred to the CEP. A number of clarified formulations of the new theory are proposed.

  20. Reliability and validity of a new double poling ergometer for cross-country skiers.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Nilsson, Johnny

    2008-01-15

    Thirty-eight competitive cross-country skiers were divided into three groups to assess the reliability and validity of a new double poling ergometer. Group A (n = 22) performed two maximal 60-s tests, Group B (n = 8) repeated peak oxygen uptake tests on the double poling ergometer, and Group C (n = 8) performed a maximal 6-min test on the double poling ergometer and a double poling time-trial on snow. The correlation between the power calculated at the flywheel and the power applied at the base of the poles was r = 0.99 (P < 0.05). The power at the poles was 50-70% higher than that at the flywheel. There was a high test-retest reliability in the two 60-s power output tests (coefficient of variation = 3.0%) and no significant difference in peak oxygen uptake in the two 6-min all-out tests (coefficient of variation = 2.4%). There was a strong correlation between the absolute (W) and relative power (W x kg(-1)) output in the 6-min double poling ergometer test and the double poling performance on snow (r = 0.86 and 0.89 respectively; both P < 0.05). In conclusion, our results show that the double poling ergometer has both high reliability and validity. However, the power calculated at the flywheel underestimated the total power produced and needs to be corrected for in ergonomic estimations. PMID:17899473

  1. BLDG 1 FRONT ELEVATION W/POLE Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG 1 FRONT ELEVATION W/POLE - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Administration Building, Between Constitution & Constellation Streets, east side of main quad, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. Lack of exposed ice inside lunar south pole Shackleton Crater.

    PubMed

    Haruyama, Junichi; Ohtake, Makiko; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Morota, Tomokatsu; Honda, Chikatoshi; Yokota, Yasuhiro; Pieters, Carle M; Hara, Seiichi; Hioki, Kazuyuki; Saiki, Kazuto; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Iwasaki, Akira; Abe, Masanao; Ogawa, Yoshiko; Takeda, Hiroshi; Shirao, Motomaro; Yamaji, Atsushi; Josset, Jean-Luc

    2008-11-01

    The inside of Shackleton Crater at the lunar south pole is permanently shadowed; it has been inferred to hold water-ice deposits. The Terrain Camera (TC), a 10-meter-resolution stereo camera onboard the Selenological and Engineering Explorer (SELENE) spacecraft, succeeded in imaging the inside of the crater, which was faintly lit by sunlight scattered from the upper inner wall near the rim. The estimated temperature of the crater floor, based on the crater shape model derived from the TC data, is less than approximately 90 kelvin, cold enough to hold water-ice. However, at the TC's spatial resolution, the derived albedo indicates that exposed relatively pure water-ice deposits are not on the crater floor. Water-ice may be disseminated and mixed with soil over a small percentage of the area or may not exist at all.

  3. A very deep IRAS survey at the north ecliptic pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. R.; Hacking, P. B.; Condon, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    The data from approximately 20 hours observation of the 4- to 6-square degree field surrounding the north ecliptic pole have been combined to produce a very deep IR survey at the four IRAS bands. Scans from both pointed and survey observations were included in the data analysis. At 12 and 25 microns the deep survey is limited by detector noise and is approximately 50 times deeper than the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC). At 60 microns the problems of source confusion and Galactic cirrus combine to limit the deep survey to approximately 12 times deeper than the PSC. These problems are so severe at 100 microns that flux values are only given for locations corresponding to sources selected at 60 microns. In all, 47 sources were detected at 12 microns, 37 at 25 microns, and 99 at 60 microns. The data-analysis procedures and the significance of the 12- and 60-micron source-count results are discussed.

  4. Position of the South Magnetic Pole, January 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C. E.

    The present location of the South Magnetic Pole (SMP) in the southern ocean provides an opportunity to determine its position well removed from local (coastal) anomalies. An experiment is being conducted jointly by the Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources and Antarctic Division, Department of Science to make direct shipboard observations of the position and daily motion of the SMP. The technique involves determination of the horizontal component of the field (H) by using a gimbal-mounted three-axis fluxgate magnetometer. First-order compensation for the magnetic effects of the vessel is provided by a system of Helmholtz coils. During observations, the vessel is spun about a vertical axis so that any residual horizontal field due to the vessel can be eliminated by integration along two horizontal axes fixed in space.

  5. Dynamical Origin and the Pole Structure of X(3872)

    SciTech Connect

    Danilkin, I. V.; Simonov, Yu. A.

    2010-09-03

    The dynamical mechanism of channel coupling with the decay channels is applied to the case of coupled charmonium--DD{sup *} states with J{sup PC}=1{sup ++}. A pole analysis is done and the DD{sup *} production cross section is calculated in qualitative agreement with experiment. The sharp peak at the D{sub 0}D{sub 0}{sup *} threshold and flat background are shown to be due to Breit-Wigner resonance, shifted by channel coupling from the original position of 3954 MeV for the 2{sup 3}P{sub 1}, QQ state. A similar analysis, applied to the n=2, {sup 3}P{sub 2}, {sup 1}P{sub 1}, {sup 3}P{sub 0}, allows us to associate the first one with the observed Z(3930) J=2 and explains the destiny of {sup 3}P{sub 0}.

  6. A New Source of Micrometeorites: The South Pole Water Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S.; Lever, J.; Harvey, R.

    1996-03-01

    In 1995 we built, tested and deployed a collector to suction particulates from the bottom of the South Pole drinking water well (SPWW) in the hope of finding large numbers of micrometeorites. The SPWW, because it melts huge amounts of firn and ice, provides an efficient way of concentrating micrometeorites, which occur ubiquitously but in low concentrations in terrestrial environments. We made 5 separate collections, traversing an area of about 30 m^2 and collecting approximately 200 g of material. Microscopic examination of the 250-425 micrometer size fraction from 2 of the 5 collections suggests that 1 of every 1000 particles in this size fraction is a melted micrometeorite. There are also translucent and transparent spherules, similar to those described by Maurette et al., which are thought to be extraterrestrial and particles which appear to be unmelted micrometeorites. Dating of the ice brackets the depositional age of any micrometeorites collected between 1000-1500 AD.

  7. Titan's temporal evolution in stratospheric trace gases near the poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, A.; Jennings, D.; Achterberg, R.; Bampasidis, G.; Lavvas, P.; Nixon, C.; Teanby numeration="7">Teanby, N.; Anderson, C.; Cottini, V.; Flasar, F. M.

    2015-10-01

    We analyze spectra acquired by the Cassini/Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) at high resolution from October 2010 until September 2014 in nadir mode. Up until mid 2012, Titan's Northern atmosphere exhibited the enriched chemical content found since the Voyager days (November 1980), with a peak around the Northern Spring Equinox (NSE) in 2009. Since then, we have observed the appearance at Titan's south pole of several trace species for the first time, such as HC3N and C6H6, observed only at high northern latitudes before equinox. We investigate here latitudes poleward of 50°S and 50°N from 2010 (after the Southern Autumnal Equinox : SAE) until 2014.

  8. Sturm-Liouville eigenproblems with an interior pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    The eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of self-adjoint Sturm-Liouville problems with a simple pole on the interior of an interval are investigated. Three general theorems are proved, and it is shown that as n approaches infinity, the eigenfunctions more and more closely resemble those of an ordinary Sturm-Liouville problem. The low-order modes differ significantly from those of a nonsingular eigenproblem in that both eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are complex, and the eigenvalues for all small n may cluster about a common value in contrast to the widely separated eigenvalues of the corresponding nonsingular problem. In addition, the WKB is shown to be accurate for all n, and all eigenvalues of a normal one-dimensional Sturm-Liouville equation with nonperiodic boundary conditions are well separated.

  9. Roadside tree/pole crash barrier field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    A series of tests was carried out to evaluate the performance of a crash barrier designed to protect the occupants of an automobile from serious injury. The JPL barrier design is a configuration of empty aluminum beverage cans contained in a tear-resistant bag which, in turn, is encased in a collapsible container made of plywood and steel. Tests were conducted with a driven vehicle impacting the barrier. The basic requirements of NCHRP Report 153 were followed except that speeds of 30 mph rather than 60 mph were used. Accelerometer readings on the driver's helmet showed that the driver was never subjected to dangerous decelerations, and never experienced more than temporary discomfort. Also, all of the requirements of the cited report were met. An extrapolation of data indicated that the JPL barrier installed in front of a tree or telephone pole along a roadside would also have met the requirements at a speed of 40 mph.

  10. Lunar South Pole space water extraction and trucking system

    SciTech Connect

    Zuppero, A. |; Zupp, G.; Schnitzler, B.; Larson, T.K.; Rice, J.W.

    1998-03-01

    This concept proposes to use thermal processes alone to extract water from the lunar South Pole and launch payloads to low lunar orbit. Thermal steam rockets would use water propellant for space transportation. The estimated mass of a space water tanker powered by a nuclear heated steam rocket suggests it can be designed for launch in the Space Shuttle bay. The performance depends on the feasibility of a nuclear reactor rocket engine producing steam at 1,100 degrees Kelvin, with a power density of 150 Megawatts per ton of rocket, and operating for thousands of 20 minute cycles. An example uses reject heat from a small nuclear electric power supply to melt 17,800 tons per year of lunar ice. A nuclear heated steam rocket would use the propellant water to launch and deliver 3,800 tons of water per year to a 100 km low lunar orbit.

  11. Regge poles of the Schwarzschild black hole: A WKB approach

    SciTech Connect

    Decanini, Yves; Folacci, Antoine

    2010-01-15

    We provide simple and accurate analytical expressions for the Regge poles of the Schwarzschild black hole. This is achieved by using third-order WKB approximations to solve the radial wave equations for spins 0, 1, and 2. These results permit us to obtain analytically the dispersion relation and the damping of the 'surface waves' lying close to the photon sphere of the Schwarzschild black hole and which generate the weakly damped quasinormal modes of its spectrum. Our results could be helpful in order to simplify considerably the description of wave scattering from the Schwarzschild black hole as well as the analysis of the gravitational radiation created in many black hole processes. Furthermore, the existence of nonlinear dispersion relations for the photons propagating close to the photon sphere could have also important consequences in the context of gravitational lensing.

  12. Crystal oscillators using negative voltage gain, single pole response amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive crystal oscillator is provided which employs negative voltage gain, single pole response amplifiers. The amplifiers may include such configurations as gate inverters, operational amplifiers and conventional bipolar transistor amplifiers, all of which operate at a frequency which is on the roll-off portion of their gain versus frequency curve. Several amplifier feedback circuit variations are employed to set desired bias levels and to allow the oscillator to operate at the crystal's fundamental frequency or at an overtone of the fundamental frequency. The oscillator is made less expensive than comparable oscillators by employing relatively low frequency amplifiers and operating them at roll-off, at frequencies beyond which they are customarily used. Simplicity is provided because operation at roll-off eliminates components ordinarily required in similar circuits to provide sufficient phase-shift in the feedback circuitry for oscillation to occur.

  13. Co-activation based parcellation of the human frontal pole.

    PubMed

    Ray, K L; Zald, D H; Bludau, S; Riedel, M C; Bzdok, D; Yanes, J; Falcone, K E; Amunts, K; Fox, P T; Eickhoff, S B; Laird, A R

    2015-12-01

    Historically, the human frontal pole (FP) has been considered as a single architectonic area. Brodmann's area 10 is located in the frontal lobe with known contributions in the execution of various higher order cognitive processes. However, recent cytoarchitectural studies of the FP in humans have shown that this portion of cortex contains two distinct cytoarchitectonic regions. Since architectonic differences are accompanied by differential connectivity and functions, the frontal pole qualifies as a candidate region for exploratory parcellation into functionally discrete sub-regions. We investigated whether this functional heterogeneity is reflected in distinct segregations within cytoarchitectonically defined FP-areas using meta-analytic co-activation based parcellation (CBP). The CBP method examined the co-activation patterns of all voxels within the FP as reported in functional neuroimaging studies archived in the BrainMap database. Voxels within the FP were subsequently clustered into sub-regions based on the similarity of their respective meta-analytically derived co-activation maps. Performing this CBP analysis on the FP via k-means clustering produced a distinct 3-cluster parcellation for each hemisphere corresponding to previously identified cytoarchitectural differences. Post-hoc functional characterization of clusters via BrainMap metadata revealed that lateral regions of the FP mapped to memory and emotion domains, while the dorso- and ventromedial clusters were associated broadly with emotion and social cognition processes. Furthermore, the dorsomedial regions contain an emphasis on theory of mind and affective related paradigms whereas ventromedial regions couple with reward tasks. Results from this study support previous segregations of the FP and provide meta-analytic contributions to the ongoing discussion of elucidating functional architecture within human FP. PMID:26254112

  14. An atmospheric history of ethane from South Pole firn air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhulst, K. R.; Aydin, K. M.; Lang, P.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2009-12-01

    Ethane (C2H6) is the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon in the atmosphere and is important to tropospheric photochemistry. Sources of ethane include natural gas and oil leaks, automotive emissions and biomass burning, with smaller contributions from oceanic, vegetative, and soil emissions. The primary loss pathway for ethane is via reaction with hydroxyl radical, which controls ethane seasonality and lifetime (1-2 months during summer). There is a relatively limited database of atmospheric ethane measurements, which is insufficient to characterize long-term trends in the sources and sinks of this compound or to determine anthropogenic influence on the ethane budget. In this study, an atmospheric history of ethane over the past century is reconstructed from South Pole firn air measurements, in conjunction with a 1-D firn air diffusion model. Eighty firn air samples were collected in glass flasks from two adjacent holes drilled to 118 m at South Pole, Antarctica during the 2008/2009 season. The flasks were shipped back and analyzed by high resolution GC/MS at UCI. Firn air dating was based on the measured CO2 profile and known atmospheric history of CO2. Ethane levels in the firn increased from about 132 ppt in the deepest sample, to 259 ppt at 106 m, then decreased to 230 ppt at 30 m. Dating based on mean CO2 ages indicates that the ethane levels over Antarctica roughly doubled (from 130 to 260 ppt) between 1930 and the 1980’s. Over this time period, ethane increased at a rate of about 0.7 ppt yr-1 from 1930-1950 and 3.2 ppt yr-1 from 1950-1987. Ethane levels stabilized during the 1980’s and declined by approximately 1.8 ppt yr-1 from 1988-2004. Surface air measurements from several high latitude southern hemisphere sites indicate that the modern mean atmospheric ethane level is approximately 200 ppt.

  15. Orographic Condensation at the South Pole of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corlies, Paul; Hayes, Alexander; Adamkovics, Mate

    2016-10-01

    Although many clouds have been observed on Titan over the past two decades (Griffith et al. 1998, Rodriquez et al 2009, Brown et al. 2010), only a handful of clouds have been analyzed in detail (Griffith et al 2005, Brown et al 2009, Adamkovics et al 2010). In light of new data and better radiative transfer (RT) modelling, we present here a reexamination of one of these cloud systems observed in March 2007, formerly identified as ground fog (Brown et al 2009), using the Cassini VIMS instrument. Combining our analysis with RADAR observations we attempt to understand the connection and correlation between this low altitude atmospheric phenomenon and the local topography, suggesting instead, a topographically driven (orographic) cloud formation mechanism. This analysis would present the first links between cloud formation and topography on Titan, and has valuable implications in understanding additional cloud formation mechanisms, allowing for a better understanding of Titan's atmospheric dynamics.We will also present an update on an ongoing ground based observation campaign looking for clouds on Titan. This campaign, begun back in April 2014, has been (nearly) continuously monitoring Titan for ongoing cloud activity. Although a variety of telescope and instruments have been used in an effort to best capture the onset of cloud activity expected at Titan's North Pole, no cloud outbursts have yet been observed from the ground (though frequent observations have been made with Cassini ISS/VIMS). This is interesting because it further suggests a developing dichotomy between Titan's seasons, since clouds were observable from the ground during southern summer. Thus, monitoring the onset of large scale cloud activity at Titan's North Pole will be crucial to understanding Titan's hydrologic cycle on seasonal timescales.

  16. Effect of materials and manufacturing on the bending stiffness of vaulting poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. L.; Kukureka, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    The increase in the world record height achieved in pole vaulting can be related to the improved ability of the athletes, in terms of their fitness and technique, and to the change in materials used to construct the pole. For example in 1960 there was a change in vaulting pole construction from bamboo to glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. The lighter GFRP pole enabled the athletes to have a faster run-up, resulting in a greater take-off speed, giving them more kinetic energy to convert into potential energy and hence height. GFRP poles also have a much higher failure stress than bamboo, so the poles were engineered to bend under the load of the athlete, thereby storing elastic strain energy that can be released as the pole straightens, resulting in greater energy efficiency. The bending also allowed athletes to change their vaulting technique from a style that involved the body remaining almost upright during the vault to one where the athlete goes over the bar with their feet upwards. Modern vaulting poles can be made from GFRP and/or carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. The addition of carbon fibres maintains the mechanical properties of the pole, but allows a reduction in the weight. The number and arrangement of the fibres determines the mechanical properties, in particular the bending stiffness. Vaulting poles are also designed for an individual athlete to take into account each athlete’s ability and physical characteristics. The poles are rated by ‘weight’ to allow athletes to select an appropriate pole for their ability. This paper will review the development of vaulting poles and the requirements to maximize performance. The properties (bending stiffness and pre-bend) and microstructure (fibre volume fraction and lay-up) of typical vaulting poles will be discussed. Originally published as Davis C L and Kukureka S N (2004) Effect of materials and manufacturing on the bending stiffness of vaulting poles The Engineering of

  17. Retrograde upper-pole calyceal access for percutaneous nephrolithotripsy of stones in the lower-pole calyx

    PubMed Central

    Al-Otaibi, Khalid M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To present the results of upper calyceal access during percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PCNL) for stones in the lower calyx, as PCNL is considered the most effective minimally invasive surgery for managing lower calyceal stones, with percutaneous access either directly to the lower calyx or through an upper or middle calyx. Patients and methods The study included 76 patients with single (51) and multiple (25) stones in the lower calyx, and stones in the lower calyx plus renal pelvis (six) and associated pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction (PUJO, five). They were managed by PCNL using retrograde access through the upper-pole calyx in addition to laser endopyelotomy for the PUJO. Results The mean duration required for establishing the retrograde nephrostomy tract was 14.4 min, and for completing the procedure was 40 min. The mean fluoroscopy exposure time was 3.2 min. Access from the upper calyx allowed easy and rapid advancement of the nephroscope to the lower calyx. The stones varied in size, at 10–25 mm. Stones were cleared completely in 70 of the 76 patients (92%); the stone-free rate was 100%. The residual stone fragments (2–4 mm) in the remaining six patients (8%) were considered insignificant. Complications were minor in four patients (5%), and included pleural effusion in two, bleeding in one and an arteriovenous fistula in one. Conclusions Upper-pole calyceal access for PCNL provides easy and effective clearance of stones in the lower calyx. This access should be considered for PCNL of single or multiple stones in the lower calyx. PMID:26558049

  18. 49 CFR 234.243 - Wire on pole line and aerial cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.243 Wire on pole line and aerial cable. Wire... transmission line operating at voltage of 750 volts or more shall be placed not less than 4 feet above the... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wire on pole line and aerial cable....

  19. A possible pole problem in the formula for klystron gap fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G.

    1977-01-01

    In isolated cases a pole may be encountered in a previously published solution for the fields in a klystron gap. Formulas, permitting the critical combinations of parameters to be defined, are presented. It is noted that the region of inaccuracy surrounding the pole is sufficiently small and that a 0.1% change in the field changing parameter is enough to avoid it.

  20. Design of a mosquito trap support pole for use with CDC miniature light traps.

    PubMed

    Evans, Christopher L; Wozniak, Arthur; McKenna, Bruce; Vaughan, David R; Dowda, Michael C

    2005-03-01

    A mosquito trap support pole constructed from polyvinyl chloride and aluminum pipes was designed to hang a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention miniature light trap and dry ice container. Miniature light traps normally hang from tree branches. The trap support pole is designed to hang traps and dry ice bait in areas where no suitable trees exist. PMID:15825774

  1. 78 FR 15615 - Practice and Procedure; Pole Attachment Complaint Procedures; Allocation of Unusable Space Costs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... 63 FR 12026, March 12, 1998, has been approved by OMB and is effective March 12, 2013. SUPPLEMENTARY... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 1 Practice and Procedure; Pole Attachment Complaint Procedures; Allocation of Unusable... policies concerning a methodology for just and reasonable rates for pole attachments, conduits, and...

  2. A Simple Algorithm for Computing Partial Fraction Expansions with Multiple Poles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Man, Yiu-Kwong

    2007-01-01

    A simple algorithm for computing the partial fraction expansions of proper rational functions with multiple poles is presented. The main idea is to use the Heaviside's cover-up technique to determine the numerators of the partial fractions and polynomial divisions to reduce the multiplicities of the poles involved successively, without the use of…

  3. Risk Management in the Original Extreme Sporting Event: The Pole Vault

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bemiller, Jim; Hardin, Robin

    2010-01-01

    The pole vault was considered the ultimate test of physical ability and daring before the advent of modern extreme sports such as skateboarding, snowboarding, and mountain biking. The inherent risks of the pole vault have been well documented. The National Center for Catastrophic Sport Injury Research reported in 2007 that the catastrophic injury…

  4. 47 CFR 1.1420 - Timeline for access to utility poles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... poles. (a) The term “attachment” means any attachment by a cable television system or provider of... a cable operator or telecommunications carrier within 45 days of receipt of a complete application... poles. (d) Estimate. Where a request for access is not denied, a utility shall present to a...

  5. 47 CFR 1.1420 - Timeline for access to utility poles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... poles. (a) The term “attachment” means any attachment by a cable television system or provider of... a cable operator or telecommunications carrier within 45 days of receipt of a complete application... poles. (d) Estimate. Where a request for access is not denied, a utility shall present to a...

  6. Acrophobia Factor Scores As A Function Of Pole Height And Habituation.

    PubMed

    Royce, J R; Poley, W

    1976-04-01

    Thirty C57BL/ALB mice, fifteen male and fifteen female, were tested for "acrophobia" via the pole test. The animals were randomly distributed into three groups of 6, 12, or 24 inch (15.24, 30.48, or 60.96 cm) high poles:. Both factor scores and individual pole measures were analyzed by 2 x 3 x 5 ANOVA, with main effects for sex, pole height, and days of testing. The results provide experimental support for the interpretation of this factor as acrophobia-that is, the greater the pole height, the higher the factor score. The reduction of factor scores over days (habituation) is interpreted as an arousal-based response.

  7. Membrane recycling at the infranuclear pole of the outer hair cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harasztosi, Csaba; Harasztosi, Emese; Gummer, Anthony W.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid endocytic activity of outer hair cells (OHCs) in the guinea-pig cochlea has been already studied using the fluorescent membrane marker FM1-43. It was demonstrated that vesicles were endocytosed at the apical pole of OHCs and transcytosed to the basolateral membrane and through a central strand towards the nucleus. The significance of endocytic activity in the infranuclear region is still not clear. Therefore, in this study endocytic activity at the synaptic pole of OHCs was investigated. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to visualize dye uptake of OHCs isolated from the guinea-pig cochlea. Signal intensity changes were quantified in the apical and basal poles relative to the signal at the membrane. Data showed no significant difference in fluorescent signal intensity changes between the opposite poles of the OHC. These results suggest that endocytic activities in both the basal and the apical poles contribute equally to the membrane recycling of OHCs.

  8. On the Distribution of Orbital Poles of Milky Way Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, Christopher; Majewski, Steven R.; Johnston, Kathryn V.

    2002-01-01

    In numerous studies of the outer Galactic halo some evidence for accretion has been found. If the outer halo did form in part or wholly through merger events, we might expect to find coherent streams of stars and globular clusters following orbits similar to those of their parent objects, which are assumed to be present or former Milky Way dwarf satellite galaxies. We present a study of this phenomenon by assessing the likelihood of potential descendant ``dynamical families'' in the outer halo. We conduct two analyses: one that involves a statistical analysis of the spatial distribution of all known Galactic dwarf satellite galaxies (DSGs) and globular clusters, and a second, more specific analysis of those globular clusters and DSGs for which full phase space dynamical data exist. In both cases our methodology is appropriate only to members of descendant dynamical families that retain nearly aligned orbital poles today. Since the Sagittarius dwarf (Sgr) is considered a paradigm for the type of merger/tidal interaction event for which we are searching, we also undertake a case study of the Sgr system and identify several globular clusters that may be members of its extended dynamical family. In our first analysis, the distribution of possible orbital poles for the entire sample of outer (Rgc>8 kpc) halo globular clusters is tested for statistically significant associations among globular clusters and DSGs. Our methodology for identifying possible associations is similar to that used by Lynden-Bell & Lynden-Bell, but we put the associations on a more statistical foundation. Moreover, we study the degree of possible dynamical clustering among various interesting ensembles of globular clusters and satellite galaxies. Among the ensembles studied, we find the globular cluster subpopulation with the highest statistical likelihood of association with one or more of the Galactic DSGs to be the distant, outer halo (Rgc>25 kpc), second-parameter globular clusters. The

  9. Ulysses(*) reaches the South Pole of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-08-01

    One of the many investigations being carried out is a search for the Sun's south magnetic pole. As in the case of the Earth, the magnetic pole is offset from the rotation axis, and at some time in September it should sweep directly into line with Ulysses. Just as the polar regions of the Earth were the last to be explored, so it is with the Sun. For more than thirty years spacecraft have investigated the stream of electric particles know as the solar wind. Ulysses, developed by ESA, built by European Industry and flown in collaboration with NASA, is the first to fly through the solar wind coming from the poles. As Ulysses reaches its highest solar latitude of 80.2 degrees on 13 September, European and American researchers will gather at the ESA/ESTEC, the European Space Research and Technology Centre in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, for a scientific workshop at which they will assess the results from the nine experiments carried by the spacecraft. For the week of the workshop, the ESA/ESTEC conference centre will be transformed into a busy scientific laboratory. The large meeting rooms will be divided into 24 working areas, where the Ulysses experiment teams will take up temporary residence. Bringing a variety of computing equipment with them, the scientists will be able to retrieve the latest data from the spacecraft and perform detailed analyses. The emphasis will be on informality, with exchange of scientific ideas - and data - the key ingredient, leading ultimately to a better understanding of the fascinating information being gathered by Ulysses on its unique exploratory journey. Presentations to the media at ESA/ESTEC will start at 10h00 on 16 September. Media representatives wishing to attend are kindly requested to fill out the attached form and return it - preferably by fax (+33.1.42.73.76.90) - to : ESA Public Relations Division, 8/10, rue Mario Nikis - 75015-PARIS. Note to Television Editors : A video index, containing extensive background material on the

  10. Air Temperature Estimation over the Third Pole Using MODIS LST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Zhang, F.; Ye, M.; Che, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Third Pole is centered on the Tibetan Plateau (TP), which is the highest large plateau around the world with extremely complex terrain and climate conditions, resulting in very scarce meteorological stations especially in the vast west region. For these unobserved areas, the remotely sensed land surface temperature (LST) can greatly contribute to air temperature estimation. In our research we utilized the MODIS LST production from both TERRA and AQUA to estimate daily mean air temperature over the TP using multiple statistical models. Other variables used in the models include longitudes, latitudes, Julian day, solar zenith, NDVI and elevation. To select a relatively optimal model, we chose six popular and representative statistical models as candidate models including the multiple linear regression (MLR), the partial least squares regression (PLS), back propagate neural network (BPNN), support vector regression (SVR), random forests (RF) and Cubist regression (CR). The performances of the six models were compared for each possible combination of LSTs at four satellite pass times and two quality situations. Eventually a ranking table consisting of optimal models for each LST combination and quality situation was built up based on the validation results. By this means, the final production is generated providing daily mean air temperature with the least cloud blockage and acceptable accuracy. The average RMSEs of cross validation are mostly around 2℃. Stratified validations were also performed to test the expansibility to unobserved and high-altitude areas of the final models selected.

  11. Red beam generation based on aperiodically poled lithium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figen, Ziya Gürkan; Akın, Onur

    2014-04-01

    We propose a novel device with a simple architecture for high-power red beam generation. The device is an optical parametric generator based on an aperiodically poled LiNbO3 grating in which both the optical parametric amplification and sum frequency generation processes are simultaneously phase matched. The pump is a quasi-continuous-wave laser operating at 1064 nm. Aperiodic gratings which enable simultaneous phase matching of the two processes were designed using a method that gives the flexibility to adjust the relative strength of these two processes. A model that takes the diffraction of the beams into account was developed to characterize the red beam generation performance of the device depending on the parameters: the relative strength of these processes, the length of the crystal, the average pump power, and the pump beam waist radius. If one uses the 2-D Fourier transform in the solution of the coupled-mode equations, the computation power required for performing such a characterization on a personal computer is prohibitively large. Owing to the circular symmetry of the system, we employ the Hankel transform to overcome this bottleneck.

  12. Authentication Based on Pole-zero Models of Signature Velocity.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Saeid; Fallah, Ali; Towhidkhah, Farzad

    2013-10-01

    With the increase of communication and financial transaction through internet, on-line signature verification is an accepted biometric technology for access control and plays a significant role in authenticity and authorization in modernized society. Therefore, fast and precise algorithms for the signature verification are very attractive. The goal of this paper is modeling of velocity signal that pattern and properties is stable for persons. With using pole-zero models based on discrete cosine transform, precise method is proposed for modeling and then features is founded from strokes. With using linear, parzen window and support vector machine classifiers, the signature verification technique was tested with a large number of authentic and forgery signatures and has demonstrated the good potential of this technique. The signatures are collected from three different database include a proprietary database, the SVC2004 and the Sabanci University signature database benchmark databases. Experimental results based on Persian, SVC2004 and SUSIG databases show that our method achieves an equal error rate of 5.91%, 5.62% and 3.91% in the skilled forgeries, respectively. PMID:24696797

  13. The Yale Gas-Filled Split Pole Magnetic Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cata-Danil, G.; Beausang, C. W.; Casten, R. F.; Chen, A.; Chubrich, N.; Cooper, J. R.; Krücken, R.; Liu, B.; Novak, J. R.; Visser, D.; Zamfir, N. V.

    1998-10-01

    Design and construction of a gas-filled recoil separator is underway at the Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at Yale University. By filling the magnetic field region of the existing Enge Split-Pole magnet with N2 or He2 gases in the 1 to 15 mbar pressure range a gradual focussing of discrete charge states has been measured. The incident ions were ^16O and ^35,37Cl with 49 MeV and 95 MeV energies, respectively. The process is understood as a result of coalescing of trajectories of different charge states around a trajectory defined by the mean charge state (q¯) of the ion in gas. Because q¯ depends on the atomic number Z and is roughly proportional with the ion velocity, the average magnetic rigidity (B¯ρ=Av/q¯) is almost independent of the velocity distribution of the incident ions. The ion trajectories will be therefore be mainly determined by the mass number A and the atomic number Z of the ion. Monte Carlo simulations with the code RAYTRACE closely reproduce the experimental behavior. We plan to use the Yale Mass Separator (YaMS) for nuclear structure studies in conjunction with high efficency gamma detectors (clover detectors) for enhancing weak reaction channels and fission background reduction. Work supported by the US-DOE under contract numbers DE-FG02-91ER-40609 and DE-FG02-88ER-40417.

  14. The stellar population of the Rosat North Ecliptic Pole survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micela, G.; Affer, L.; Favata, F.; Henry, J. P.; Gioia, I.; Mullis, C. R.; Sanz Forcada, J.; Sciortino, S.

    2007-01-01

    Context: X-ray surveys are a very efficient mean of detecting young stars and therefore allow us to study the young stellar population in the solar neighborhood and the local star formation history in the last billion of years. Aims: We want to study the young stellar population in the solar neighborhood, to constrain its spatial density and scale height as well as the recent local star formation history. Methods: We analyze the stellar content of the ROSAT North Ecliptic Pole survey, and compare the observations with the predictions derived from stellar galactic model. Since the ROSAT NEP survey is sensitive at intermediate fluxes is able to sample both the youngest stars and the intermediate age stars (younger than 109 years), linking the shallow and deep flux surveys already published in the literature. Results: We confirm the existence of an excess of yellow stars in our neighborhood previously seen in shallow survey, which is likely due to a young star population not accounted for in the model. However the excellent agreement between observations and predictions of dM stars casts some doubt on the real nature of this active population.

  15. Optimal calibration of instrumented treadmills using an instrumented pole.

    PubMed

    Sloot, L H; Houdijk, H; van der Krogt, M M; Harlaar, J

    2016-08-01

    Calibration of instrumented treadmills is imperative for accurate measurement of ground reaction forces and center of pressure (COP). A protocol using an instrumented pole has been shown to considerably increase force and COP accuracy. This study examined how this protocol can be further optimized to maximize accuracy, by varying the measurement time and number of spots, using nonlinear approaches to calculate the calibration matrix and by correcting for potential inhomogeneity in the distribution of COP errors across the treadmill's surface. The accuracy increased with addition of spots and correction for the inhomogeneous distribution across the belt surface, decreased with reduction of measurement time, and did not improve by including nonlinear terms. Most of these methods improved the overall accuracy only to a limited extent, suggesting that the maximal accuracy is approached given the treadmill's inherent mechanical limitations. However, both correction for position dependence of the accuracy as well as its optimization within the walking area are found to be valuable additions to the standard calibration process. PMID:27180211

  16. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spindle Pole Body Is a Dynamic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Tennessee J.; Pearson, Chad G.; Bloom, Kerry; Davis, Trisha N.

    2003-01-01

    During spindle pole body (SPB) duplication, the new SPB is assembled at a distinct site adjacent to the old SPB. Using quantitative fluorescence methods, we studied the assembly and dynamics of the core structural SPB component Spc110p. The SPB core exhibits both exchange and growth in a cell cycle-dependent manner. During G1/S phase, the old SPB exchanges ∼50% of old Spc110p for new Spc110p. In G2 little Spc110p is exchangeable. Thus, Spc110p is dynamic during G1/S and becomes stable during G2. The SPB incorporates additional Spc110p in late G2 and M phases; this growth is followed by reduction in the next G1. Spc110p addition to the SPBs (growth) also occurs in response to G2 and mitotic arrests but not during a G1 arrest. Our results reveal several dynamic features of the SPB core: cell cycle-dependent growth and reduction, growth in response to cell cycle arrests, and exchange of Spc110p during SPB duplication. Moreover, rather than being considered a conservative or dispersive process, the assembly of Spc110p into the SPB is more readily considered in terms of growth and exchange. PMID:12925780

  17. Accretion rate of cosmic spherules measured at the South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Susan; Lever, James H.; Harvey, Ralph P.

    1998-04-01

    Micrometeorites are terrestrially collected, extraterrestrial particles smaller than about 1mm, which account for most of the mass being accreted to the Earth,. Compared with meteorites, micrometeorites more completely represent the Earth-crossing meteoroid complex, and should include fragments of asteroids, comets, Mars and our Moon, as well as pre-solar and interstellar grains,. Previous measurements of the flux of micrometeoroids that survive to the Earth's surface have large uncertainties owing to the destruction of particles by weathering, inefficiencies in magnetic collection or separation techniques, low particle counts,, poor age constraint,, or highly variable concentrating processes,. Here we describe an attempt to circumvent these problems through the collection of thousands of well preserved and dated micrometeorites from the bottom of the South Pole water well, which supplies drinking water for the Scott-Amundsen station. Using this collection, we have determined precise estimates of the flux and mass distribution for 50-700-µm cosmic spherules (melted micrometeorites). Allowing for the expected abundance of unmelted micrometeorites in the samples, our results indicate that about 90% of the incoming mass of submillimetre particles evaporates during atmospheric entry. Our data indicate the loss of glass-rich and small stony spherules from deep-sea deposits,, and they provide constraints for models describing the survival probability of micrometeoroids,.

  18. Regionalized Lunar South Pole Surface Navigation System Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan W.

    2008-01-01

    Apollo missions utilized Earth-based assets for navigation because the landings took place at lunar locations in constant view from the Earth. The new exploration campaign to the lunar south pole region will have limited Earth visibility, but the extent to which a navigation system comprised solely of Earth-based tracking stations will provide adequate navigation solutions in this region is unknown. This report presents a dilution-of-precision (DoP)-based, stationary surface navigation analysis of the performance of multiple lunar satellite constellations, Earth-based deep space network assets, and combinations thereof. Results show that kinematic and integrated solutions cannot be provided by the Earth-based deep space network stations. Also, the stationary surface navigation system needs to be operated either as a two-way navigation system or as a one-way navigation system with local terrain information, while the position solution is integrated over a short duration of time with navigation signals being provided by a lunar satellite constellation.

  19. The North Galactic Pole Rift and the Local Hot Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lallement, R.; Puspitarini, L.

    2015-01-01

    The North Galactic Pole Rift (NGPR) is one of the few distinct neutral hydrogen clouds at high Galactic latitudes that have well-defined distances. It is located at the edge of the Local Cavity (LC) and provides an important test case for understanding the Local Hot Bubble (LHB), the presumed location for the hot diffuse plasma responsible for much of the observed 1/4 keV emission originating in the solar neighborhood. Using data from the ROSAT All- Sky Survey and the Planck reddening map, we find the path length within the LC (LHB plus Complex of Local Interstellar Clouds) to be 98 plus or minus 27 pc, in excellent agreement with the distance to the NGPR of 98 +/- 6 pc. In addition, we examine another 14 directions that are distributed over the sky where the LC wall is apparently optically thick at 1/4 keV. We find that the data in these directions are also consistent with the LHB model and a uniform emissivity plasma filling most of the LC.

  20. A Southern Bald Eagle perches on a pole at KSC.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A Southern Bald Eagle perches on top of a utility pole at Kennedy Space Center. About a dozen bald eagles live in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald Eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nest in Florida. Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  1. A Southern Bald Eagle perches on a pole at KSC.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A Southern Bald Eagle perched on top of a utility pole searches the area. About a dozen bald eagles live in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald Eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nest in Florida. Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  2. Numerical Modeling of the South Pole-Aitkin Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, G. S.; Melosh, H. J.

    2004-01-01

    The South Pole-Aitkin (SPA) basin, on the far side of the Moon, is the largest and oldest impact structure still preserved in the solar system. The crater is about 2500 km in diameter and formed in the Pre-Nectarian era of lunar history, over 4 Gyr ago. At this time, the thermal state of the Moon was much hotter than it is today. Accretional energy from the rapidly forming Moon melted the outermost few hundred kilometers of the Moon. As this magma ocean differentiated and cooled a 60 100-km thick low-density crust formed at the surface; below this the residual melt, with a higher density, cooled to form the lunar mantle. The giant SPA impact event punctured the Moon some time during the cooling of the magma ocean and thus provides a unique window for studying the lunar interior and the early formative processes of the Moon. The impact excavated otherwise inaccessible samples of the deep crust and (possibly) upper mantle, which has inspired proposed sample return missions. Furthermore, the thermal and rheologic state of the early Moon played a role in shaping the final structure of the basin. To aid in site selection for future sample return missions to the SPA basin, and to investigate the effect of thermal state on final crater structure, we performed some numerical simulations of the SPA impact event.

  3. Bacterial diversity in snow on North Pole ice floes.

    PubMed

    Hauptmann, Aviaja L; Stibal, Marek; Bælum, Jacob; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Brunak, Søren; Bowman, Jeff S; Hansen, Lars H; Jacobsen, Carsten S; Blom, Nikolaj

    2014-11-01

    The microbial abundance and diversity in snow on ice floes at three sites near the North Pole was assessed using quantitative PCR and 454 pyrosequencing. Abundance of 16S rRNA genes in the samples ranged between 43 and 248 gene copies per millilitre of melted snow. A total of 291,331 sequences were obtained through 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, resulting in 984 OTUs at 97 % identity. Two sites were dominated by Cyanobacteria (72 and 61 %, respectively), including chloroplasts. The third site differed by consisting of 95 % Proteobacteria. Principal component analysis showed that the three sites clustered together when compared to the underlying environments of sea ice and ocean water. The Shannon indices ranged from 2.226 to 3.758, and the Chao1 indices showed species richness between 293 and 353 for the three samples. The relatively low abundances and diversity found in the samples indicate a lower rate of microbial input to this snow habitat compared to snow in the proximity of terrestrial and anthropogenic sources of microorganisms. The differences in species composition and diversity between the sites show that apparently similar snow habitats contain a large variation in biodiversity, although the differences were smaller than the differences to the underlying environment. The results support the idea that a globally distributed community exists in snow and that the global snow community can in part be attributed to microbial input from the atmosphere.

  4. Molecular Modeling of the Poling of Piezoelectric Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. A.; Farmer, B. L.; Hinkley, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    The computational method described in this paper allows the calculation of the dielectric relaxation strength of an amorphous polymer based solely upon its chemical structure. The 4,4' oxydiphthalic anhydride (ODPA) dianhydride and bis-aminophenoxybenzene (APB) diamine based polyimides, (beta-CN) APB-ODPA and APB-ODPA were studied. Amorphous cells were constructed and then poled using molecular dynamics. Dielectric relaxation strengths of Delta(epsilon) = 17.8 for (beta-CN) APB-ODPA and Delta(epsilon) = 7.7 for APB-ODPA were predicted. These values are in excellent agreement with the experimental values. It was found that both the pendant nitrile dipole and the backbone anhydride residue dipole make significant contributions to the polyimides dielectric response. Specifically, it was shown that the difference in the magnitude of the dielectric relaxations is directly attributable to the nitrile dipole. The size of the relaxations indicate an absence of cooperative dipolar motions, The model was used to explain these results in terms of the average orientation of the nitrile and anhydride dipoles to within 51 deg. and 63 deg., respectively, of the applied electric field.

  5. Lunar South Pole Topography Derived from Clementine Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosiek, M. R.; Kirk, R.; Howington-Kraus, A.

    1999-01-01

    During the Clementine Mission both oblique and vertical multispectral images were collected. The oblique and vertical images from a single spectral band collected during the same orbit form a stereo pair that can be used to derive the topography. These stereo pairs are being used to derive the topography of an area (90 deg S to 650S latitude) surrounding the lunar south pole. Work on the lunar north pole topography will start after completion of the south pole topography. This report provides an update on the initial results for the lunar south pole topography. In 1994, the Clementine spacecraft acquired digital images of the Moon at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Onboard there were four camera systems and a laser altimeter. During the first pass, periapsis was at 30S and the highest resolution images were obtained in the southern hemisphere. Over the northern polar area, a series of oblique and vertical images were obtained with the ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) camera on each orbit. During the second pass, periapsis was at 30N and the image acquisition strategy was reversed. The UV-VIS camera image size was 384 x 288 pixels with five spectral bands and one broad band. The 750-nm-band stereo pairs are the primary image source for this study. The ground sample distances (GSD) for oblique images range from 300 to 400m. The GSD for the vertical images, acquired at the end of an orbit, are slightly larger and range from 325 to 450 m. Using the formula for stereo-height accuracy, an estimate of height accuracy is 180m. This formula is IFOVMAX)/(K*B/H with IFOVMAX defined as Maximum Instantaneous Field of View; B/H is the base-to-height ratio and K is an estimate of pixel measurement accuracy on the imagery. The Clementine laser altimeter (LIDAR) data were used previously to produce a global topographic model of the Moon . The model has a vertical accuracy of about 100 m and a spatial resolution of 2.5 deg. Altimetry data were collected between 79S and 810N

  6. Using airborne HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) to evaluate model and remote sensing estimates of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankenberg, Christian; Kulawik, Susan S.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Chevallier, Frédéric; Daube, Bruce; Kort, Eric A.; O'Dell, Christopher; Olsen, Edward T.; Osterman, Gregory

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, space-borne observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) have been increasingly used in global carbon-cycle studies. In order to obtain added value from space-borne measurements, they have to suffice stringent accuracy and precision requirements, with the latter being less crucial as it can be reduced by just enhanced sample size. Validation of CO2 column-averaged dry air mole fractions (XCO2) heavily relies on measurements of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). Owing to the sparseness of the network and the requirements imposed on space-based measurements, independent additional validation is highly valuable. Here, we use observations from the High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) flights from 01/2009 through 09/2011 to validate CO2 measurements from satellites (Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite - GOSAT, Thermal Emission Sounder - TES, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder - AIRS) and atmospheric inversion models (CarbonTracker CT2013B, Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) v13r1). We find that the atmospheric models capture the XCO2 variability observed in HIPPO flights very well, with correlation coefficients (r2) of 0.93 and 0.95 for CT2013B and MACC, respectively. Some larger discrepancies can be observed in profile comparisons at higher latitudes, in particular at 300 hPa during the peaks of either carbon uptake or release. These deviations can be up to 4 ppm and hint at misrepresentation of vertical transport. Comparisons with the GOSAT satellite are of comparable quality, with an r2 of 0.85, a mean bias μ of -0.06 ppm, and a standard deviation σ of 0.45 ppm. TES exhibits an r2 of 0.75, μ of 0.34 ppm, and σ of 1.13 ppm. For AIRS, we find an r2 of 0.37, μ of 1.11 ppm, and σ of 1.46 ppm, with latitude-dependent biases. For these comparisons at least 6, 20, and 50 atmospheric soundings have been averaged for GOSAT, TES, and AIRS

  7. Influence of Titan's climate-driven surface mass redistribution on spin pole precession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bills, B. G.; Nimmo, F.; Aharonson, O.

    2010-12-01

    The spin pole of Titan is very close to a classic Cassini state, or tidally damped configuration. However, the observed obliquity is larger than would be expected for a body with the moments of inertia inferred from the observed gravity field. This suggests that some agent is acting to excite the motion of the spin pole, and frustrate its approach to a steady state, in which the spin pole and orbit pole of Titan would be co-planar with Saturn’s spin pole. A possible excitation mechanism is climate driven mass transport Titan’s orbit plane lies very nearly in the equator plane of Saturn, and the main influence on the seasonal distribution of insolation comes from slow changes in the orbit of Saturn. Saturn’s current obliquity is 26.7 degrees and its orbital eccentricity is 0.054. The distribution of liquid methane lakes on Titan is notably asymmetric, with many more in the north than in the south. It is also true that the current insolation pattern is rather asymmetric, with higher peak values in the south than in the north. If the changing orbit of Saturn drives the liquid hydrocarbons from south to north and back again on the 45 kyr apsidal precession period, this will also influence the moments of inertia of Titan and thereby excite modes of spin pole precessional motion. The hypothesis we seek to test is that this climate-driven mass transport is adequate to excite the observed departure of Titan’s spin pole orientation from a Cassini state. The proposed mechanism for additional driving of Titan’s spin pole precession differs from the mode of excitation of obliquity variations on Earth and Mars, where the dominant effect is variation in the orientation of the orbit plane. What we envision here is instead a parametric excitation of the spin pole motion. In a damped, forced spin pole state, the changes in polar moment will mainly change the obliquity (angular separation of spin and orbit poles), while dissipation will rotate the spin pole out of the

  8. Fungi associated with decay in treated Douglas-fir transmission poles. [Poria carbonica and Poria placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Zabel, R.A.; Lombard, F.F.; Kenderes, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Decay was detected by cultural methods in 190 of 952 (approximately 20%) treated Douglas-fir transmission poles installed for up to 10 years in the north-eastern United States. Preservative systems and treatments for the poles sampled were penta in petroleum oil, penta in liquefied petroluem gas, chromated copper arsenate, and ammoniacal copper arsenate. Isolations were made from various radial positions on several incrememt cores selected from the groundline zone and deep check vicinity for each pole. The decay was in early stages, often localized, and in many cases, detectable only by cultural means. The decay fungi, representing 19 identified species, were isolated primarily from untreated inner pole sections and at the groundline. Poria carbonica, a decay fungus known primarily from the western United States, and Poria placenta were the two species isolated most frequently. Six of the nineteen species were in the monocaryon nuclear condition and identified by cross matching with known monocaryon isolates and subsequent formation of clamp connections. Decay frequency in the poles generally increased with check depth. The time of occurrence and location of the decay in many poles suggests that in some cases early decay may escape preservative treatment or becomes established shortly thereafter in the storage yard. Decay may also start shortly after installation and be associated with check development into untreated wood. The data suggest that pole preparation or treatment practices that would increase preservative penetration and reduce check development would minimize decay development. (Refs. 11).

  9. New Early Paleozoic Paleomagnetic Poles From NW Argentina: a Reappraisal of Tectonic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnuolo, C. M.; Rapalini, A. E.; Astini, R. A.

    2007-05-01

    A paleomagnetic study carried out on Early Ordovician volcanic units in the Famatina Ranges of NW Argentina yielded a pre-tectonic paleomagnetic pole at 32.7°S, 4.3°E, (5.6°/ 8.6°, N=14 sites) that is consistent with four previous Early Ordovician poles from the Famatina - Eastern Puna Eruptive Belt of NW Argentina. However, these five poles are rotated around 50° clockwise respect to the coeval reference pole of Gondwana. Our new results seem to confirm previous models of this belt as a paraauthocthonous rotated terrane on the southwestern margin of Gondwana. However, a recent paleomagnetic pole from the Late Cambrian Mesón Group, at the Eastern Cordillera of NW Argentina, corresponding to the Gondwana foreland (4.5°S, 359.0°E, dp=5.5°, dm=8.8°, n=26 samples) and preliminary paleopoles obtained from the same unit and the latest Cambrian - Early Ordovician Santa Victoria Group at other three localities in the same region, also indicate an anomalous pole position rotated some 40° clockwise respect to the reference pole for Gondwana. These results suggest that the postulated model of a rotated terrane for the Famatina-Eastern Puna belt must be reconsidered. Different alternative scenarios including the possibility of an Early Paleozoic displacement of the whole basement of the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas of Argentina ("Pampia") will be explored.

  10. Self-Poling of BiFeO3 Thick Films.

    PubMed

    Khomyakova, Evgeniya; Sadl, Matej; Ursic, Hana; Daniels, John; Malic, Barbara; Bencan, Andreja; Damjanovic, Dragan; Rojac, Tadej

    2016-08-01

    Bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) is difficult to pole because of the combination of its high coercive field and high electrical conductivity. This problem is particularly pronounced in thick films. The poling, however, must be performed to achieve a large macroscopic piezoelectric response. This study presents evidence of a prominent and reproducible self-poling effect in few-tens-of-micrometer-thick BiFeO3 films. Direct and converse piezoelectric measurements confirmed that the as-sintered BiFeO3 thick films yield d33 values of up to ∼20 pC/N. It was observed that a significant self-poling effect only appears in cases when the films are heated and cooled through the ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition (Curie temperature TC ∼ 820 °C). These self-poled films exhibit a microstructure with randomly oriented columnar grains. The presence of a compressive strain gradient across the film thickness cooled from above the TC was experimentally confirmed and is suggested to be responsible for the self-poling effect. Finally, the macroscopic d33 response of the self-poled BiFeO3 film was characterized as a function of the driving-field frequency and amplitude.

  11. The effect of dc poling duration on space charge relaxation in virgin XLPE cable peelings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzimas, Antonios; Rowland, Simon M.; Dissado, Leonard A.; Fu, Mingli; Nilsson, Ulf H.

    2010-06-01

    The effect of dc poling time upon the time-dependent decay of space charge in insulation peelings of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) cable that had not previously experienced either electrical or thermal stressing is investigated. Two dc poling durations were used, 2 h and 26 h at an electric field of 50 kV mm-1 and at ambient temperature. Space charge was measured in the two samples investigated both during space charge accumulation and throughout its subsequent decay. The results show that the length of dc poling plays an important role in the subsequent decay. Despite the fact that both samples have had the same amount of space charge by the end of both short and long poling durations the time dependence of the space charge decay is different. Most of the charge stored in the sample that had experienced the short time poling decays rapidly after voltage removal. On the other hand, the charge that is stored in the sample with the long dc poling duration decays slowly and its decay occurs in two stages. The data, which are analysed by means of the de-trapping theory of space charge decay, imply that the charge stored in the material has occupied energy states with different trap depth ranges. The two poling durations lead to different relative amounts of charge in each of the two trap depth ranges. Possible reasons for this are discussed.

  12. EVOLUTION OF THE FAR-INFRARED CLOUD AT TITAN’S SOUTH POLE

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Donald E.; Achterberg, R. K.; Cottini, V.; Anderson, C. M.; Flasar, F. M.; Nixon, C. A.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Kunde, V. G.; Carlson, R. C.; Guandique, E.; Kaelberer, M. S.; Tingley, J. S.; Albright, S. A.; Segura, M. E.; Kok, R. de; Coustenis, A.; Vinatier, S.; Bampasidis, G.; Teanby, N. A.; Calcutt, S.

    2015-05-10

    A condensate cloud on Titan identified by its 220 cm{sup −1} far-infrared signature continues to undergo seasonal changes at both the north and south poles. In the north, the cloud, which extends from 55 N to the pole, has been gradually decreasing in emission intensity since the beginning of the Cassini mission with a half-life of 3.8 years. The cloud in the south did not appear until 2012 but its intensity has increased rapidly, doubling every year. The shape of the cloud at the south pole is very different from that in the north. Mapping in 2013 December showed that the condensate emission was confined to a ring with a maximum at 80 S. The ring was centered 4° from Titan's pole. The pattern of emission from stratospheric trace gases like nitriles and complex hydrocarbons (mapped in 2014 January) was also offset by 4°, but had a central peak at the pole and a secondary maximum in a ring at about 70 S with a minimum at 80 S. The shape of the gas emission distribution can be explained by abundances that are high at the atmospheric pole and diminish toward the equator, combined with correspondingly increasing temperatures. We discuss possible causes for the condensate ring. The present rapid build up of the condensate cloud at the south pole is likely to transition to a gradual decline from 2015 to 2016.

  13. Self-Poling of BiFeO3 Thick Films.

    PubMed

    Khomyakova, Evgeniya; Sadl, Matej; Ursic, Hana; Daniels, John; Malic, Barbara; Bencan, Andreja; Damjanovic, Dragan; Rojac, Tadej

    2016-08-01

    Bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) is difficult to pole because of the combination of its high coercive field and high electrical conductivity. This problem is particularly pronounced in thick films. The poling, however, must be performed to achieve a large macroscopic piezoelectric response. This study presents evidence of a prominent and reproducible self-poling effect in few-tens-of-micrometer-thick BiFeO3 films. Direct and converse piezoelectric measurements confirmed that the as-sintered BiFeO3 thick films yield d33 values of up to ∼20 pC/N. It was observed that a significant self-poling effect only appears in cases when the films are heated and cooled through the ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition (Curie temperature TC ∼ 820 °C). These self-poled films exhibit a microstructure with randomly oriented columnar grains. The presence of a compressive strain gradient across the film thickness cooled from above the TC was experimentally confirmed and is suggested to be responsible for the self-poling effect. Finally, the macroscopic d33 response of the self-poled BiFeO3 film was characterized as a function of the driving-field frequency and amplitude. PMID:27388568

  14. Electrical Transfer Function and Poling Mechanisms for Nonlinear Optical Polymer Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael Dale

    2004-01-01

    Electro-Optic Polymers hold great promise in increased electro-optic coefficients as compared to their inorganic corollaries. Many researchers have focused on quantum chemistry to describe how the dipoles respond to temperature and electric fields. Much work has also been done for single layer films to confirm these results. For optical applications, waveguide structures are utilized to guide the optical waves in 3 layer stacks. Electrode poling is the only practical poling method for these structures. This research takes an electrical engineering approach to develop poling models and electrical and optical transfer functions of the waveguide structure. The key aspect of the poling model is the large boundary charge density deposited during the poling process. The boundary charge density also has a large effect on the electrical transfer function which is used to explain the transient response of the system. These models are experimentally verified. Exploratory experiment design is used to study poling parameters including time, temperature, and voltage. These studies verify the poling conditions for CLDX/APC and CLDZ/APEC guest host electro optic polymer films in waveguide stacks predicted by the theoretical developments.

  15. Standard, Random, and Optimum Array conversions from Two-Pole resistance data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rucker, D. F.; Glaser, Danney R.

    2014-09-01

    We present an array evaluation of standard and nonstandard arrays over a hydrogeological target. We develop the arrays by linearly combining data from the pole-pole (or 2-pole) array. The first test shows that reconstructed resistances for the standard Schlumberger and dipoledipole arrays are equivalent or superior to the measured arrays in terms of noise, especially at large geometric factors. The inverse models for the standard arrays also confirm what others have presented in terms of target resolvability, namely the dipole-dipole array has the highest resolution. In the second test, we reconstruct random electrode combinations from the 2-pole data segregated intomore » inner, outer, and overlapping dipoles. The resistance data and inverse models from these randomized arrays show those with inner dipoles to be superior in terms of noise and resolution and that overlapping dipoles can cause model instability and low resolution. Finally, we use the 2-pole data to create an optimized array that maximizes the model resolution matrix for a given electrode geometry. The optimized array produces the highest resolution and target detail. Thus, the tests demonstrate that high quality data and high model resolution can be achieved by acquiring field data from the pole-pole array.« less

  16. Standard, Random, and Optimum Array conversions from Two-Pole resistance data

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker, D. F.; Glaser, Danney R.

    2014-09-01

    We present an array evaluation of standard and nonstandard arrays over a hydrogeological target. We develop the arrays by linearly combining data from the pole-pole (or 2-pole) array. The first test shows that reconstructed resistances for the standard Schlumberger and dipoledipole arrays are equivalent or superior to the measured arrays in terms of noise, especially at large geometric factors. The inverse models for the standard arrays also confirm what others have presented in terms of target resolvability, namely the dipole-dipole array has the highest resolution. In the second test, we reconstruct random electrode combinations from the 2-pole data segregated into inner, outer, and overlapping dipoles. The resistance data and inverse models from these randomized arrays show those with inner dipoles to be superior in terms of noise and resolution and that overlapping dipoles can cause model instability and low resolution. Finally, we use the 2-pole data to create an optimized array that maximizes the model resolution matrix for a given electrode geometry. The optimized array produces the highest resolution and target detail. Thus, the tests demonstrate that high quality data and high model resolution can be achieved by acquiring field data from the pole-pole array.

  17. Evolution of the Far-Infrared Cloud at Titan's South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Achterberg, R. K.; Cottini, V.; Anderson, C. M.; Flasar, F. M.; Nixon, C. A.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Kunde, V. G.; Carlson, R. C.; Guandique, E.; Kaelberer, M. S.; Tingley, J. S.; Albright, S. A.; Segura, M. E.; de Kok, R.; Coustenis, A.; Vinatier, S.; Bampasidis, G.; Teanby, N. A.; Calcutt, S.

    2015-01-01

    A condensate cloud on Titan identified by its 220 cm (sup -1) far-infrared signature continues to undergo seasonal changes at both the north and south poles. In the north the cloud, which extends from 55 North to the pole, has been gradually decreasing in emission intensity since the beginning of the Cassini mission with a half-life of 3.8 years. The cloud in the south did not appear until 2012 but its intensity has increased rapidly, doubling every year. The shape of the cloud at the South Pole is very different from that in the north. Mapping in December 2013 showed that the condensate emission was confined to a ring with a maximum at 80 South. The ring was centered 4 degrees from Titan's pole. The pattern of emission from stratospheric trace gases like nitriles and complex hydrocarbons (mapped in January 2014) was also offset by 4 degrees, but had a central peak at the pole and a secondary maximum in a ring at about 70 South with a minimum at 80 South. The shape of the gas emissions distribution can be explained by abundances that are high at the atmospheric pole and diminish toward the equator, combined with correspondingly increasing temperatures. We discuss possible causes for the condensate ring. The present rapid build up of the condensate cloud at the South Pole is likely to transition to a gradual decline during 2015-16.

  18. Effect of treatment on strength and stiffness of Western Red Cedar utility poles

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuyan, G.S.; Chetwynd, D.S.

    1995-12-31

    Based on a survey of North American utilities, research organizations and manufacturers, the effect of preservative methods on strength and stiffness of new wood utility poles was found to be inconclusive. This is primarily due to the fact that no direct comparisons were made between the mechanical properties of the same poles before and after the treatment. Hence a systematic research program was carried out on thirty, forty-five foot long Western Red Cedar poles having different sizes. Two newly developed Nondestructive Evaluation instruments, based on ultrasonic principles, were used to grade and assure the quality of these poles, individually, at the green stage. Penetration resistances were quantified using an instrumented drill. The stiffness of the untreated poles were measured from full scale deflection tests. After these measurements, the poles were treated with chromate copper arsenate (CCA) wood preservatives. Change in strength, stiffness and penetration resistance due to the treatment was quantified for each pole using the above methods. This paper will summarize the results obtained from this research program.

  19. Energy expenditure and comfort during Nordic walking with different pole lengths.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ernst A; Smith, Gerald

    2009-07-01

    Energy expenditure and comfort for Nordic walking with self-selected and 7.5-cm shorter poles and ordinary walking were measured during uphill (12 degrees ), downhill (12 degrees ), and horizontally. Twelve (11 women and 1 man) Nordic walking practitioners participated (mean +/- SEM: 171.5 +/- 1.5 cm, 67.0 +/- 2.7 kg, 50.6 +/- 2.4 years, and maximal oxygen uptake of 43.4 +/- 2.8 mL x kg(-1) x min(-1)). Energy expenditure was calculated from oxygen uptake and comfort was self-rated. Differences in physiological responses between the 3 locomotion types at each slope were first analyzed by a 1-way analysis of variance. In case of significance, Student's paired samples 2-tailed t-test was applied twice to test for differences between the 2 pole lengths and between Nordic walking (with self-selected pole length) and ordinary walking. The corresponding differences in comfort were evaluated by a Wilcoxon matched pairs test. The relative exercise intensity during Nordic walking with self-selected pole length ranged between approximately 44 and 87% of the maximal oxygen uptake across the different slopes. For comparison, it ranged between approximately 29 and 80% during ordinary walking. Uphill Nordic walking with short poles compared with poles of self-selected length caused 3% greater energy expenditure. Notwithstanding, comfort was similar. Horizontally and downhill energy expenditure and comfort were similar between pole lengths. Compared with ordinary walking, Nordic walking required as much as 67% greater energy expenditure. Comfort was similar for ordinary and Nordic walking for each slope. In conclusion, shorter poles caused greater energy expenditure during uphill Nordic walking, whereas comfort was similar to poles of self-selected length. The substantially enhanced energy expenditure of Nordic walking compared with previous studies reflects the vigorous technique used here.

  20. Pole coordinates of the asteroid 511 Davida as determined via the amplitude-magnitude method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappala, V.; Knezevic, Z.

    1986-01-01

    The Amplitude-Magnitude method is used for the pole determination of the asteroid 511 Davida, using observations from six oppositions. The possible north poles are found to be λ1 = 92°±7°; β1 = 33°±6°, and λ2 = 303°±4°; β2 = 34°±5°, when scattering effect is not taken into account. When scattering is accounted for, solutions not significantly different from (λ1, β1) and (λ2, β2) are obtained. The moderately eccentric and inclined orbit of 511 Davida does not allow the authors to distinguish between the two pole solutions.

  1. Total ozone, ozone vertical distributions, and stratospheric temperatures at South Pole, Antarctica, in 1986 and 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komhyr, W. D.; Grass, R. D.; Reitelbach, P. J.; Franchois, P. R.; Kuester, S. E.

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-six electrochemical cell (ECC) ozonesondes were flown at South Pole, Antarctica, during 1987 in a continuing program to document year-round changes in Antarctica ozone that are dynamically and photochemically induced. Dobson spectrophotometer total ozone observations were also made. For the twilight months of March and September when Dobson instrument observations cannot be made at South Pole, total ozone amounts were deduced from the ECC ozonesonde soundings. ECC sonde total ozone data obtained during the polar night (April to August), supplemented the sparse total ozone data obtained from Dobson instrument moon observations. Similar ozone profile and total ozone observations were made at South Pole in 1986.

  2. Paleocene Paleomagnetic Pole for north America from alkalic intrusions, central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, D.; Beck, M.E. Jr.; Diehl, J.F.; Hearn, B.C. Jr.

    1980-07-01

    The apparent polar wandering path from Late Cretaceous through early Tertiary time is not well defined. We have collected 33 paleomagnetic sites from the Paleocena Moccasin, Judith, and Little Rocky Mountains and from these a North American Paleocene paleomagnetic pole position has been determined at 174.9 /sup 0/W long., 80.5 /sup 0/N lat., with a circle of 95% confidence of 3.6 /sup 0/. This pole location serves as a Paleocene reference pole and enhances the North America apparent polar wandering path for a critical period of its history.

  3. The self-consistent dynamic pole tide in non-global oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    The dynamic pole tide is determined by solving Laplace tide equations which take into account the presence of continents in oceans, oceanic self-gravitation and loading, and mantle elasticity. Dynamical effects are found to be only mild. It is shown that the dynamical pole tide contributes about one day more to the Chandler period than a static pole tide would, and dissipates wobble energy at a very weak rate. It is noted that, depending on the wobble period predicted for an oceanless elastic earth, mantle anelasticity at low frequencies may nevertheless contribute negligibly to the Chandler period.

  4. Seasonal variations of temperature and composition at the Titan poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, Athena; Jennings, Donald E.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Bampasidis, Georgios; Lavvas, Panayiotis; Nixon, Conor A.; Teanby, Nicholas A.; Cottini, Valeria; Anderson, Carrie M.; Flasar, F. Michael

    2015-11-01

    We present an analysis of spectra acquired by Cassini/CIRS at high resolution from October 2010 until September 2014 in nadir mode ([1] & refs therein). Since 2010 we have observed the appearance at Titan’s south pole of several trace species for the first time, such as HC3N and C6H6, observed only at high northern latitudes before equinox. We investigate here latitudes poleward of 50°S and 50°N from 2010 (after the Southern Autumnal Equinox) until 2014. For some of the most abundant and longest-lived hydrocarbons (C2H2, C2H6 and C3H8) and CO2, the evolution in the past 4 years at a given latitude is not significant within error bars until mid-2013. More recently, these molecules show a trend for increase in the south. This trend is dramatically more pronounced for the other trace species, especially in 2013-2014, and at 70°S relative to 50°S. These two regions then demonstrate that they are subject to different dynamical processes in and out of the polar vortex region. For most species, we find higher abundances at 50°N compared to 50°S, with the exception of C3H8, CO2, C6H6 and HC3N, which arrive at similar mixing ratios after mid-2013. While the 70°N data show generally no change except a small decrease for most species within 2014, the 70°S results indicate a strong enhancement in trace stratospheric gases after 2012. The 663 cm-1 HC3N and the C6H6 674 cm-1 emission bands appeared in late 2011/early 2012 in the south polar regions and have since then exhibited a dramatic increase in their abundances. At 70°S HC3N, HCN and C6H6 have increased by 3 orders of magnitude over the past 3-4 years while other molecules, including C2H4, C3H4 and C4H2, have increased less sharply (by 1-2 orders of magnitude). This is a strong indication of the rapid and sudden buildup of the gaseous inventory in the southern stratosphere during 2013-2014, as expected as the pole moves deeper into winter shadow. Subsiding gases that accumulate in the absence of ultraviolet

  5. Titan's temporal evolution in stratospheric trace gases near the poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, Athena; Jennings, Donald E.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Bampasidis, Georgios; Lavvas, Panayiotis; Nixon, Conor A.; Teanby, Nicholas A.; Anderson, Carrie M.; Cottini, Valeria; Flasar, F. Michael

    2016-05-01

    We analyze spectra acquired by the Cassini/Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) at high resolution from October 2010 until September 2014 in nadir mode. Up until mid 2012, Titan's Northern atmosphere exhibited the enriched chemical content found since the Voyager days (November 1980), with a peak around the Northern Spring Equinox (NSE) in 2009. Since then, we have observed the appearance at Titan's south pole of several trace species for the first time, such as HC3N and C6H6, observed only at high northern latitudes before equinox. We investigate here latitudes poleward of 50°S and 50°N from 2010 (after the Southern Autumnal Equinox) until 2014. For some of the most abundant and longest-lived hydrocarbons (C2H2, C2H6 and C3H8) and CO2, the evolution in the past 4 years at a given latitude is not very significant within error bars especially until mid-2013. In more recent dates, these molecules show a trend for increase in the south. This trend is dramatically more pronounced for the other trace species, especially in 2013-2014, and at 70°S relative to 50°S. These two regions then demonstrate that they are subject to different dynamical processes in and out of the polar vortex region. For most species, we find higher abundances at 50°N compared to 50°S, with the exception of C3H8, CO2, C6H6 and HC3N, which arrive at similar mixing ratios after mid-2013. While the 70°N data show generally no change with a trend rather to a small decrease for most species within 2014, the 70°S results indicate a strong enhancement in trace stratospheric gases after 2012. The 663 cm-1 HC3N and the C6H6 674 cm-1 emission bands appeared in late 2011/early 2012 in the south polar regions and have since then exhibited a dramatic increase in their abundances. At 70°S HC3N, HCN and C6H6 have increased by 3 orders of magnitude over the past 3-4 years while other molecules, including C2H4, C3H4 and C4H2, have increased less sharply (by 1-2 orders of magnitude). This is a strong

  6. Poles as the only true resonant-state signals extracted from a worldwide collection of partial-wave amplitudes using only one, well controlled pole-extraction method

    SciTech Connect

    Hadzimehmedovic, M.; Osmanovic, H.; Stahov, J.; Ceci, S.; Svarc, A.

    2011-09-15

    Each and every energy-dependent partial-wave analysis is parametrizing the pole positions in a procedure defined by the way the continuous energy dependence is implemented. These pole positions are, henceforth, inherently model dependent. To reduce this model dependence, we use only one, coupled-channel, unitary, fully analytic method based on the isobar approximation to extract the pole positions from each available member of the worldwide collection of partial-wave amplitudes, which are understood as nothing more but a good energy-dependent representation of genuine experimental numbers assembled in a form of partial-wave data. In that way, the model dependence related to the different assumptions on the analytic form of the partial-wave amplitudes is avoided, and the true confidence limit for the existence of a particular resonant state, at least in one model, is established. The way the method works and first results are demonstrated for the S{sub 11} partial wave.

  7. Sampling South Pole-Aitken Basin: The Moonrise Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolliff, B. L.; Shearer, C. K.; Cohen, B. A.

    2012-01-01

    The South Pole-Aitken basin (SPA) is the largest of the giant impact basins in the inner Solar System, and its location on Earth s Moon makes it the most accessible. Exploration of SPA through direct collection and analysis of representative materials addresses issues as fundamental as the characteristics of the chemical reservoir from which the Moon originated, early differentiation and production of crust and development of global asymmetry, relationships between magmatic activity and internal thermal evolution, and effects of giant impact events on the terrestrial planets. Owing to its great size and superposition relationships with other lunar impact basins, SPA is the oldest and as such anchors the lunar chronology. Moreover, numerous large impact craters and basins are contained within it such that materials (rocks) of the SPA basin contain a record of the early impact chronology, one less likely to have been affected by the large, late nearside basins (e.g., Imbrium). Understanding the early basin chronology is key to deciphering the sequence and effects of early giant impact bombardment of the inner Solar System. That record exists on the Moon, and materials of the SPA basin will allow us to read that record. Knowledge of the early bombardment history will test - and may reshape - a key paradigm relating to early Solar System evolution. Did the planets form with the alignment of today, or was there a major reorientation of the giant planets that led to destabilization of asteroid orbits, and a cataclysmic bombardment of the inner Solar System hundreds of millions of years after accretion of the planets? Implications include understanding environments for early life-supporting habitats on Earth and Mars, and relationships to new observations of extra-solar planetary systems.

  8. ULYSSES comes full circle, before revisiting the Sun's poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-04-01

    From its unique perspective, Ulysses has provided scientists with the very first all-round map of the heliosphere, the huge bubble in space filled by the Sun's wind. The Earth swims deep inside the heliosphere, and gusts and shocks in the solar wind can harm satellites, power supplies and ommunications. They may also affect our planet's weather. A better grasp of the solar weather in the heliosphere is therefore one of the major aims of ESA's science programme. In a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA, Ulysses was launched towards Jupiter in October 1990 by the US space shuttle Discovery. Arriving in February 1992, Ulysses stole energy from the giant planet in a slingshot manoeuvre and was propelled back towards the Sun in an elongated orbit almost at right angles to the ecliptic plane, where the Earth and other planets circle the Sun. "This month Ulysses returns to the point in space where its out-of-ecliptic journey began, but Jupiter isn't there," explains Richard Marsden, ESA's project scientist for Ulysses. "Following its own inexorable path around the Sun, Jupiter is far away on the opposite side of the Solar System. So Ulysses' course will not be changed a second time. The spacecraft is now in effect a man-made comet, forever bound into a 6-year polar orbit around the Sun." Ulysses now starts its second orbit. It will travel over the poles of the Sun in 2000-2001 just as the count of dark sunspots is expected to reach a maximum. With its operational life extended for the Ulysses Solar Maximum Mission, the spacecraft will find the heliosphere much stormier than during its first orbit. Discoveries so far Like its mythical namesake, Ulysses has already had an eventful voyage of discovery. Its unique trajectory has provided the scientific teams with a new perspective, from far out in space and especially in the previously unknown regions of the heliosphere over the Sun's poles. Passing within 9.8 degrees of the polar axis, the highly

  9. Extragalactic point source statistics measured with the South Pole Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Joaquin D.

    The South Pole Telescope (SPT) has surveyed hundreds of square degrees to milli-Jansky levels at 1.4 mm and 2.0 mm. We report here on sources of point- like emission detected in the 1.4 and 2.0 mm bands in an 87 deg 2 field, centered at R.A. 5 h 30 m , decl. -55°, and observed in 2008. Based on the ratio of flux in these two bands, we are able to separate the detected sources into two populations, one consistent with synchrotron emission from active galactic nuclei (AGN) and one consistent with thermal emission from dust. We present source counts for each population from 11 to 640 mJy at 1.4 mm and from 4.4 to 800 mJy at 2.0 mm. We detect 119 synchrotron-dominated sources and 49 dust-dominated sources at S/N > 4.5 in at least one band. All of the most significantly detected members of the synchrotron-dominated population are associated with sources in previously published radio catalogs and/or in our own long-wavelength follow-up observations. Some of the dust-dominated sources are associated with nearby ( z [Special characters omitted.] 1) galaxies whose dust emission is also detected by the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS). However, most of the bright, dust-dominated sources have no counterparts in any existing catalog. We argue that these sources represent the rarest, brightest, and possibly strongly-lensed members of the population commonly referred to as sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs). Because these sources are selected at longer wavelengths than in typical SMG surveys, they are expected to have a higher mean redshift distribution than objects currently in the literature, and may provide a new window on galaxy formation in the early universe.

  10. Vega: A rapidly rotating pole-on star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulliver, Austin F.; Hill, Graham; Adelman, Saul J.

    1994-01-01

    High-dispersion (2.4 A/mm), ultrahigh signal-to-noise ratio (3000:1) Reticon spectra of Vega revealed two distinct types of profiles. The strong lines exhibit classical rotational profiles with enhanced wings, but the weak lines have distinctly different, flat-bottomed profiles. Using ATLAS9 model atmopheres and SYNTHE synthetic spectra, Vega has been modeled as a rapidly rotating, pole-on star with a gradient in temperature and gravity over the photosphere. By fitting to the flat-bottomed line profiles of Fe 1 lambda 4528 and Ti 2 lambda 4529, we find least-squares fit values of V sin i = 21.8 plus or minus 0.2 km/sec polar T(sub eff) = 9695 plus or minus 25 K, polar log(base 10)g = 3.75 plus or minus 0.02 dex, V(sub eq) = 245 plus or minus 15 km/sec, and inclination 5 deg .1 plus or minus 0 deg .3. The variations in T(sub eff) and log(base 10)g over the photosphere total 390 K and 0.08 dex, respectively. Assuming V sin i = 21.8 km/sec, an independent fit to the observed continuous flux from 1200 to 10,500 A produced a similar set of values with polar T(sub eff) = 9595 plus or minus 20 K, polar log(base 10)g = 3.80 plus or minus 0.03 dex, and inclination 6 deg .0 plus or minus 0 deg .7.

  11. Mass wasting in craters near the south pole of Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Craters ranging in diameter from the limit of resolution, approximately 1.35 kilometers (0.82 miles), up to the remnants of a heavily degraded two-ringed basin (center of the image), approximately 90 kilometers (55 miles) in diameter, can be seen in this image of a region near Callisto's south pole. Craters in this image exhibit a wide variety of degradational (erosional) states, including what appear to be landslide or slump deposits, best seen in the southwestern part of the bright 21 kilometer crater Randver, just east of the center of the image. The relative youth of Randver is evidenced by its bright and easily identifiable ejecta blanket (the materials ejected during the formation of the crater). The northeast facing slopes in this region are typically the brightest portion of the crater rims. Craters in the south and southwestern portions of this image are the most highly modified and degraded, and are therefore considered to be the oldest craters in the area.

    North is to the top of the image which was taken by the Galileo spacecraft's solid state imaging (CCD) system during its eighth orbit around Jupiter on May 6, 1997. The center of the image is located 73.2 degrees south latitude, 54.4 degrees west longitude, and was taken when the spacecraft was approximately 35,464 kilometers (21,633 miles) from Callisto.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  12. Muscle use during double poling evaluated by positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Losnegard, Thomas; Kemppainen, Jukka; Viljanen, Tapio; Kalliokoski, Kari K; Hallén, Jostein

    2010-12-01

    Due to the complexity of movement in cross-country skiing (XCS), the muscle activation patterns are not well elucidated. Previous studies have applied surface electromyography (SEMG); however, recent gains in three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) have rendered an alternative approach to investigate muscle activation. The purpose of the present study was to examine muscle use during double poling (DP) at two work intensities by use of PET. Eight male subjects performed two 20-min DP bouts on separate days. Work intensity was ∼ 53 and 74% of peak oxygen uptake (Vo(2peak)), respectively. During exercise 188 ± 8 MBq of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG) was injected, and subsequent to exercise a full-body PET scan was conducted. Regions of interest (ROI) were defined within 15 relevant muscles, and a glucose uptake index (GUI) was determined for all ROIs. The muscles that span the shoulder and elbow joints, the abdominal muscles, and hip flexors displayed the greatest GUI during DP. Glucose uptake did not increase significantly from low to high intensity in most upper body muscles; however, an increased GUI (P < 0.05) was seen for the knee flexor (27%) and extensor muscles (16%), and for abdominal muscles (21%). The present data confirm previous findings that muscles of the upper limb are the primary working muscles in DP. The present data further suggest that when exercise intensity increases, the muscles that span the lumbar spine, hip, and knee joints contribute increasingly. Finally, PET provides a promising alternative or supplement to existing methods to assess muscle activation in complex human movements.

  13. On the pole content of coupled channels chiral approaches used for the K bar N system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplý, A.; Mai, M.; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Smejkal, J.

    2016-10-01

    Several theoretical groups describe the antikaon-nucleon interaction at low energies within approaches based on the chiral SU(3) dynamics and including next-to-leading order contributions. We present a comparative analysis of the pertinent models and discuss in detail their pole contents. It is demonstrated that the approaches lead to very different predictions for the K- p amplitude extrapolated to subthreshold energies as well as for the K- n amplitude. The origin of the poles generated by the models is traced to the so-called zero coupling limit, in which the inter-channel couplings are switched off. This provides new insights into the pole contents of the various approaches. In particular, different concepts of forming the Λ (1405) resonance are revealed and constraints related to the appearance of such poles in a given approach are discussed.

  14. A LINE POLE 77A, DETAIL OF HISTORIC REPLACEMENT PINTYPE INSULATORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A LINE POLE 77A, DETAIL OF HISTORIC REPLACEMENT PIN-TYPE INSULATORS MADE OF BROWN PORCELAIN. VIEW TO WEST-SOUTHWEST. - Mystic Lake Hydroelectric Facility, Electric Transmission A Line, Along West Rosebud Creek, Fishtail, Stillwater County, MT

  15. Renal transposition during minimally invasive partial nephrectomy: a safe technique for excision of upper pole tumors.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Joshua R; Chang, Peter; Percy, Andrew G; Wagner, Andrew A

    2013-09-01

    Minimally invasive partial nephrectomy (MIPN) for upper pole masses, particularly for those located posteriorly, is challenging because of difficult visualization during tumor resection and renorrhaphy. Complete renal transposition facilitates access to and excision of upper pole renal masses during MIPN. Sixteen patients with upper pole renal masses underwent laparoscopic or robot-assisted partial nephrectomy with renal transposition from October 2009 to March 2012 with a mean follow-up of 22 months. Mean operative time was 242.6 minutes, and mean warm ischemic time was 14.7 minutes. No patient needed an intraoperative or postoperative blood transfusion. Five (31%) patients had a postoperative complication (four Clavien grade I, one Clavien grade II). There were no delayed complications, positive surgical margins, or tumor recurrences. Mean postoperative eGFR change within 3 months was -9.4%. These results show that complete renal transposition can be safely used to facilitate excision of upper pole tumors. PMID:23750561

  16. Cassini Returns to Saturn's Poles: Seasonal Change in the Polar Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Orton, G. S.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Sinclair, J. A.; Hesman, B. E.; Hurley, J.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Simon-Miller, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    High inclination orbits during Cassini's solstice mission (2012) are providing us with our first observations of Saturn's high latitudes since the prime mission (2007). Since that time, the northern spring pole has emerged into sunlight and the southern autumn pole has disappeared into winter darkness, allowing us to study the seasonal changes occurring within the polar vortices in response to these dramatic insolation changes. Observations from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer] have revealed (i) the continued presence of small, cyclonic polar hotspots at both spring and autumn poles; and (ii) the emergence of an infrared-bright polar vortex at the north pole, consistent with the historical record of Saturn observations from the 1980s (previous northern spring).

  17. Combined mismatch repair and POLE/POLD1 defects explain unresolved suspected Lynch syndrome cancers.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Anne Ml; van Wezel, Tom; van den Akker, Brendy Ewm; Ventayol Garcia, Marina; Ruano, Dina; Tops, Carli Mj; Wagner, Anja; Letteboer, Tom Gw; Gómez-García, Encarna B; Devilee, Peter; Wijnen, Juul T; Hes, Frederik J; Morreau, Hans

    2016-07-01

    Many suspected Lynch Syndrome (sLS) patients who lack mismatch repair (MMR) germline gene variants and MLH1 or MSH2 hypermethylation are currently explained by somatic MMR gene variants or, occasionally, by germline POLE variants. To further investigate unexplained sLS patients, we analyzed leukocyte and tumor DNA of 62 sLS patients using gene panel sequencing including the POLE, POLD1 and MMR genes. Forty tumors showed either one, two or more somatic MMR variants predicted to affect function. Nine sLS tumors showed a likely ultramutated phenotype and were found to carry germline (n=2) or somatic variants (n=7) in the POLE/POLD1 exonuclease domain (EDM). Six of these POLE/POLD1-EDM mutated tumors also carried somatic MMR variants. Our findings suggest that faulty proofreading may result in loss of MMR and thereby in microsatellite instability.

  18. Optical fiber poling by induction: analysis by 2D numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    De Lucia, F; Huang, D; Corbari, C; Healy, N; Sazio, P J A

    2016-04-15

    Since their first demonstration some 25 years ago, thermally poled silica fibers have been used to realize device functions such as electro-optic modulation, switching, polarization-entangled photons, and optical frequency conversion with a number of advantages over bulk free-space components. We have recently developed an innovative induction poling technique that could allow for the development of complex microstructured fiber geometries for highly efficient χ(2)-based device applications. To systematically implement these more advanced poled fiber designs, we report here the development of comprehensive numerical models of the induction poling mechanism itself via two-dimensional (2D) simulations of ion migration and space-charge region formation using finite element analysis. PMID:27082323

  19. Pole positions and residues from pion photoproduction using the Laurent-Pietarinen expansion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švarc, Alfred; Hadžimehmedović, Mirza; Osmanović, Hedim; Stahov, Jugoslav; Tiator, Lothar; Workman, Ron L.

    2014-06-01

    We applied a new approach to determine the pole positions and residues from pion photoproduction multipoles. The method is based on a Laurent expansion of the partial-wave T matrices, with a Pietarinen series representing the regular part of energy-dependent and single-energy photoproduction solutions. The method is applied to multipole fits generated by the MAID and George Washington University SAID (GWU-SAID) groups. We show that the number and properties of poles extracted from photoproduction data correspond very well to results from πN elastic data and values cited by the Particle Data Group (PDG). The photoproduction residues provide new information for the electromagnetic current at the pole position, which are independent of background parametrizations, which is not the case for the Breit-Wigner representation. Finally, we present the photodecay amplitudes from the current MAID and SAID solutions at the pole for all four-star nucleon resonances below W =2 GeV.

  20. BLDG 2 FRONT ELEVATION W/POLE Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG 2 FRONT ELEVATION W/POLE - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Police Station, Kolekole Road & Constitution Street intersection, north side of main quad, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. 76 FR 4078 - Television Broadcasting Services; North Pole and Plattsburgh, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; North Pole and Plattsburgh, NY AGENCY: Federal... CFR Part 73 Television, Television broadcasting. For the reasons discussed in the preamble,...

  2. J SERIES MAGAZINE. J 107 SOUTH ELEVATION W/POLE. Naval ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    J SERIES MAGAZINE. J 107 SOUTH ELEVATION W/POLE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Inert Storehouse Type, Twelfth Street between Kwajulein & New Mexico Streets, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. Combined mismatch repair and POLE/POLD1 defects explain unresolved suspected Lynch syndrome cancers

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Anne ML; van Wezel, Tom; van den Akker, Brendy EWM; Ventayol Garcia, Marina; Ruano, Dina; Tops, Carli MJ; Wagner, Anja; Letteboer, Tom GW; Gómez-García, Encarna B; Devilee, Peter; Wijnen, Juul T; Hes, Frederik J; Morreau, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Many suspected Lynch Syndrome (sLS) patients who lack mismatch repair (MMR) germline gene variants and MLH1 or MSH2 hypermethylation are currently explained by somatic MMR gene variants or, occasionally, by germline POLE variants. To further investigate unexplained sLS patients, we analyzed leukocyte and tumor DNA of 62 sLS patients using gene panel sequencing including the POLE, POLD1 and MMR genes. Forty tumors showed either one, two or more somatic MMR variants predicted to affect function. Nine sLS tumors showed a likely ultramutated phenotype and were found to carry germline (n=2) or somatic variants (n=7) in the POLE/POLD1 exonuclease domain (EDM). Six of these POLE/POLD1-EDM mutated tumors also carried somatic MMR variants. Our findings suggest that faulty proofreading may result in loss of MMR and thereby in microsatellite instability. PMID:26648449

  4. Optimizing electrical poling for tetragonal, lead-free BZT-BCT piezoceramic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Binzhi; Ehmke, Matthias C.; Blendell, John E.; Bowman, Keith J.

    2014-02-13

    The piezoelectric properties of tetragonal BZT–BCT materials have been shown to be improved by using the field cooling poling method. It is shown that the piezoelectric coefficient of tetragonal BZT–BCT materials increases with higher poling temperature, and the optimum poling temperature lies near the Curie temperatures for a broad range of compositions. It is also observed from in situ X-ray diffraction measurements with an applied electric field that the magnitude of domain alignment is enhanced with electrical poling at higher electric fields, whereas the remnant ferroelastic domain texture is not affected. Furthermore, these results show a direct correlation between the development of internal bias field, which is induced by the accumulation of defect charge carriers, and the enhanced piezoelectric coefficient. These observations suggest an important role played by the alignment of defect charge carriers in achieving optimum piezoelectric coefficient in lead-free piezoelectric ceramics.

  5. Unfolding the Second Riemann sheet with Pade Approximants: hunting resonance poles

    SciTech Connect

    Masjuan, Pere

    2011-05-23

    Based on Pade Theory, a new procedure for extracting the pole mass and width of resonances is proposed. The method is systematic and provides a model-independent treatment for the prediction and the errors of the approximation.

  6. O1 DETACHED GARAGE FRONT ELEVATION W/POLE. Naval Magazine Lualualei, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    O-1 DETACHED GARAGE FRONT ELEVATION W/POLE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Garage for Building O, Sixty-sixth Street between Constitution & Amberjack Streets, behind Building O, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. The cos⁡2ϕ azimuthal asymmetry of unpolarized dilepton production at the Z pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhun; Schmidt, Ivan

    2011-11-01

    We calculate the Boer-Mulders effect contribution to the cos⁡2ϕ azimuthal asymmetry of unpolarized dilepton production near the Z-pole. Based on the tree-level expression in the transverse momentum dependent factorization framework, we show that the corresponding asymmetry near the Z-pole is negative, which is opposite to the asymmetry in the low Q2 region, dominated by the production via a virtual photon. We calculate the asymmetry generated by the Boer-Mulders effect near the Z-pole at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), with s=500GeV. We find that the magnitude of the asymmetry is several percent, and therefore it is measurable. The experimental confirmation of this sign change of the asymmetry from the low Q2 region to the Z-pole provides direct evidence of the chiral-odd structure of quarks inside an unpolarized nucleon.

  8. Management of lower pole renal calculi: shock wave lithotripsy versus percutaneous nephrolithotomy versus flexible ureteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Preminger, Glenn M

    2006-04-01

    Current ureteroscopic intracorporeal lithotripsy devices and stone retrieval technology allow for the treatment of calculi located throughout the intra-renal collecting system. Difficulty accessing lower pole calculi, especially when the holmium laser fiber is utilized, is often encountered. Herein we review our experience where lower pole renal calculi were ureteroscopically managed by holmium laser fragmentation, either in situ, or by first displacing the stone into a less dependent position with the aid of a nitinol stone retrieval device. Lower pole stones less than 20 mm can be primarily treated by ureteroscopic means in patients: that are obese; have a bleeding diathesis; with stones resistant to shockwave lithotripsy (SWL); with complicated intra-renal anatomy; or as a salvage procedure after failed SWL. Lower pole calculi are fragmented with a 200 microm holmium laser fiber via a 7.5 F flexible ureteroscope. For those patients where the laser fiber reduced ureteroscopic deflection, precluding re-entry into the lower pole calyx, a 1.9 F nitinol basket is used to displace the lower pole calculus into a more favorable position, thus allowing for easier fragmentation. A nitinol device passed into the lower pole, through the ureteroscope, for stone displacement cause only a minimal loss of deflection and no significant impact on irrigation. Eighty-five percent of patients were stone free by IVP or CT scan performed at 3 months. Ureteroscopic management of lower pole calculi is a reasonable alternative to SWL or percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) in patients with low volume stone disease. If the stone cannot be fragmented in situ, nitinol basket or grasper retrieval, through a fully deflected ureteroscope, allows for repositioning of the stone into a less dependant position, thus facilitating stone fragmentation.

  9. Germline variants in POLE are associated with early onset mismatch repair deficient colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, Fadwa A; Kets, C Marleen; Ruano, Dina; van den Akker, Brendy; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Schrumpf, Melanie; Nielsen, Maartje; Wijnen, Juul T; Tops, Carli M; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; Vasen, Hans FA; Hes, Frederik J; Morreau, Hans; van Wezel, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Germline variants affecting the exonuclease domains of POLE and POLD1 predispose to multiple colorectal adenomas and/or colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of previously described heterozygous germline variants POLE c.1270C>G, p.(Leu424Val) and POLD1 c.1433G>A, p.(Ser478Asn) in a Dutch series of unexplained familial, early onset CRC and polyposis index cases. We examined 1188 familial CRC and polyposis index patients for POLE p.(Leu424Val) and POLD1 p.(Ser478Asn) variants using competitive allele-specific PCR. In addition, protein expression of the POLE and DNA mismatch repair genes was studied by immunohistochemistry in tumours from POLE carriers. Somatic mutations were screened using semiconductor sequencing. We detected three index patients (0.25%) with a POLE p.(Leu424Val) variant. In one patient, the variant was found to be de-novo. Tumours from three patients from two families were microsatellite instable, and immunohistochemistry showed MSH6/MSH2 deficiency suggestive of Lynch syndrome. Somatic mutations but no germline MSH6 and MSH2 variants were subsequently found, and one tumour displayed a hypermutator phenotype. None of the 1188 patients carried the POLD1 p.(Ser478Asn) variant. POLE germline variant carriers are also associated with a microsatellite instable CRC. POLE DNA analysis now seems warranted in microsatellite instable CRC, especially in the absence of a causative DNA mismatch repair gene germline variant. PMID:25370038

  10. Characterizing the ear canal acoustic impedance and reflectance by pole-zero fitting.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sarah R; Nguyen, Cac T; Allen, Jont B

    2013-07-01

    This study characterizes middle ear complex acoustic reflectance (CAR) and impedance by fitting poles and zeros to real-ear measurements. The goal of this work is to establish a quantitative connection between pole-zero locations and the underlying physical properties of CAR data. Most previous studies have analyzed CAR magnitude; while the magnitude accounts for reflected power, it does not encode latency information. Thus, an analysis that studies the real and imaginary parts of the data together, being more general, should be more powerful. Pole-zero fitting of CAR data is examined using data compiled from various studies, dating back to Voss and Allen (1994). Recent CAR measurements were taken using the Mimosa Acoustics HearID system, which makes complex acoustic impedance and reflectance measurements in the ear canal over a 0.2-6.0 [kHz] frequency range. Pole-zero fits to measurements over this range are achieved with an average RMS relative error of less than 3% with 12 poles. Factoring the reflectance fit into its all-pass and minimum-phase components estimates the effect of the residual ear canal, allowing for comparison of the eardrum impedance and admittance across measurements. It was found that individual CAR magnitude variations for normal middle ears in the 1-4 [kHz] range often give rise to closely-placed pole-zero pairs, and that the locations of the poles and zeros in the s-plane may systematically differ between normal and pathological middle ears. This study establishes a methodology for examining the physical and mathematical properties of CAR using a concise parametric model. Pole-zero modeling accurately parameterizes CAR data, providing a foundation for detection and identification of middle ear pathologies. This article is part of a special issue entitled "MEMRO 2012".

  11. Poles of integrále tritronquée and anharmonic oscillators. A WKB approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoero, Davide

    2010-03-01

    Poles of solutions to the Painlevé-I equations are intimately related to the theory of the cubic anharmonic oscillator. In particular, poles of integrále tritronquée are in bijection with cubic oscillators that admit the simultaneous solutions of two quantization conditions. We analyze this pair of quantization conditions by means of a suitable version of the complex WKB method. Ai miei zii Ivan e Silvia.

  12. Pole expansion of the deuteron vertex function constrained by modern data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locher, M. P.; Švarc, A.

    1984-02-01

    Invariant multipole expansions for the dp n vertex function of the type introduced by Gourdin et al. are reexamined. Modern and precise values for all the static deuteron properties are imposed and the electric and magnetic form factors of the deuteron are fitted. A good fit of the data requires three poles for the S state and three poles for the D state with only four free parameters.

  13. POLE proofreading mutations elicit an anti-tumor immune response in endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Gool, Inge C; Eggink, Florine A; Freeman-Mills, Luke; Stelloo, Ellen; Marchi, Emanuele; de Bruyn, Marco; Palles, Claire; Nout, Remi A; de Kroon, Cor D; Osse, Elisabeth M; Klenerman, Paul; Creutzberg, Carien L; Tomlinson, Ian PM; Smit, Vincent THBM; Nijman, Hans W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have shown that 7-12% of endometrial cancers (ECs) are ultramutated due to somatic mutation in the proofreading exonuclease domain of the DNA replicase POLE. Interestingly, these tumors have an excellent prognosis. In view of the emerging data linking mutation burden, immune response and clinical outcome in cancer, we investigated whether POLE-mutant ECs showed evidence of increased immunogenicity. Experimental design We examined immune infiltration and activation according to tumor POLE proofreading mutation in a molecularly defined EC cohort including 47 POLE-mutant tumors. We sought to confirm our results by analysis of RNAseq data from the TCGA EC series and used the same series to examine whether differences in immune infiltration could be explained by an enrichment of immunogenic neoepitopes in POLE-mutant ECs. Results Compared to other ECs, POLE-mutants displayed an enhanced cytotoxic T cell response, evidenced by increased numbers of CD8+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and CD8A expression, enrichment for a tumor-infiltrating T cell gene signature, and strong upregulation of the T cell cytotoxic differentiation and effector markers T-bet, Eomes, IFNG, PRF and granzyme B. This was accompanied by upregulation of T cell exhaustion markers, consistent with chronic antigen exposure. In-silico analysis confirmed that POLE-mutant cancers are predicted to display more antigenic neo-epitopes than other ECs, providing a potential explanation for our findings. Conclusions Ultramutated POLE proofreading-mutant ECs are characterized by a robust intratumoral T cell response, which correlates with, and may be caused by an enrichment of antigenic neo-peptides. Our study provides a plausible mechanism for the excellent prognosis of these cancers. PMID:25878334

  14. Poling and characterization of a novel organic/polymer electro-optic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jinkun; Tang, Xianzhong; Lu, Rongguo; Tang, Xionggui; Li, Heping; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Liu, Yongzhi

    2010-10-01

    Electro-optic organic/polymer material is important for the fabrication of polymer integrated optic-electronic devices and organic sensors. Recently, a novel organic high μβ value chromophore FFC have been synthesized by molecular design. The absorption spectrum in 400-4000 cm-1 is measured for the material, and the measurement result shows that the absorption loss is negligibly small. An organic/polymer high electro-optic activity material FFC/PSU is obtained by dissolving guest FFC (wt. 20%) and a host polysulfone (PSU) in a solvent. The resolvability of cyclohexanone for the material is satisfactory by comparison with other solvents experimentally, and the preparation of FFC/PSU thin film is ease relatively. The materiel is poled by electric field-assisted contact poling, and the near optimum poling condition is determined by adjusting poling parameters as pre-curing duration, poling temperature and poling voltage etc. The electro-optic coefficient of the material is measured as high as 130pm/V by using the widely accepted simple reflection technique. The investigation indicates that the FFC/PSU has excellent characteristics, such as high electro-optic coefficient, low absorption loss, good thermal stability and capability for withstanding the subsequent process techniques, suitable for the fabrication of high-performance integrated optic-electronic devices and sensors.

  15. Piezoelectric and dielectric characterization of corona and contact poled PZT-epoxy-MWCNT bulk composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, S.; Cook-Chennault, K. A.; Du, W.; Sundar, U.; Halim, H.; Tang, A.

    2016-11-01

    Three-phase lead zirconate titanate (PZT, PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3)-epoxy-multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) bulk composites were prepared, where the volume fraction of PZT was held constant at 30%, while the volume fraction of the MWCNTs was varied from 1.0%–10%. The samples were poled using either a parallel plate contact or contactless (corona) poling technique. The piezoelectric strain coefficient (d 33), dielectric constant (ε), and dielectric loss tangent (tan δ) of the samples were measured at 110 Hz, and compared as a function of poling technique and volume fraction of MWCNTs. The highest values for dielectric constant and piezoelectric strain coefficients were 465.82 and 18.87 pC/N for MWCNT volume fractions of 10% and 6%, respectively. These values were obtained for samples that were poled using the corona contactless method. The impedance and dielectric spectra of the composites were recorded over a frequency range of 100 Hz–20 MHz. The impedance values observed for parallel-plate contact poled samples are higher than that of corona poled composites. The fractured surface morphology and distribution of the PZT particles and MWCNTs were observed with the aid of electron dispersion spectroscopy and a scanning electron microscope. The surface morphology of the MWCNTs was observed with the aid of a field emission transmission electron microscope.

  16. [Do histologic changes of the upper renal pole in double ectopic ureterocele justify a conservative approach?].

    PubMed

    Arena, F; Nicotina, P A; Cruccetti, A; Centonze, A; Arena, S; Romeo, G

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the histology of the upper pole segment in patients with duplex ectopic ureterocele to verify if a less aggressive surgery is justified in the prenatally diagnosed patients. We reviewed the histology of the upper pole segment of 15 consecutive patients with duplex system ectopic ureterocele treated between 1991 and 1999 at the Paediatric Surgery Unit of University Hospital of Messina. The diagnosis of duplex system ectopic ureterocele was made according to the criteria of the Section on Urology of the American Academy of Paediatrics. The histology specimens were assessed for dysplastic, inflammatory and obstructive changes. All 15 patients with duplex system ectopic ureterocele were surgically treated with heminephro-ureterectomy and the surgical specimens were histologically examined. Nine of the 15 patients were prenatally diagnosed. The histology of the upper pole segment of the 9 prenatally diagnosed showed in all patients segmental renal microcystic dysplasia, chondroid metaplasic islands and an inflammatory tubulo-interstitial nephropathy in 6 patients (66.6%) and in 2 (22.2%) nephroblastomatosis. The histology of six the postnatal postnatally diagnosed patients showed in all patients segmental multicystic renal dysplasia, inflammatory tubulo-interstitial nephropathy and segmental parenchymal scars. The upper pole histology of the patients with duplex ectopic ureterocele diagnosed prenatally did not show any evidence of reversible histological change. Considering the histology and the good outcome of patients treated with upper pole nephroureterectomy a less aggressive surgery with preservation of the upper pole does not seem justified.

  17. Numerical analysis using 2D modeling of optical fiber poled by induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, D.; De Lucia, F.; Corbari, C.; Healy, N.; Sazio, P. J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Thermal poling, a technique to introduce effective second-order nonlinearities in silica optical fibers, has found widespread applications in frequency conversion, electro-optic modulation, switching and polarization-entangled photon pair generation. Since its first demonstration around 25 years ago, studies into thermal poling were primarily based on anode-cathode electrode configurations. However, more recently, superior electrode configurations have been investigated that allow for robust and reliable thermally poled fibers with excellent second order nonlinear properties [1, 2]. Very recently, we experimentally demonstrated an electrostatic induction poling technique that creates a stable second-order nonlinearity in a twin-hole fiber without any direct physical contact to internal fiber electrodes whatsoever [3]. This innovative technique lifts a number of restrictions on the use of complex microstructured optical fibers (MOF) for poling, as it is no longer necessary to individually contact internal electrodes and presents a general methodology for selective liquid electrode filling of complex MOF geometries. In order to systematically implement these more advanced device embodiments, it is first necessary to develop comprehensive numerical models of the induction poling mechanism itself. To this end, we have developed two-dimensional (2D) simulations of space-charge region formation using COMSOL finite element analysis, by building on current numerical models [4].

  18. Pole-Shaped Object Detection Using Mobile LIDAR Data in Rural Road Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, M.; Husain, A.; Singh, A. K.; Lohani, B.

    2015-08-01

    Pole-shaped objects (PSOs) located along a road play key role in road safety and planning. Automation is required for calculating the numbers of trees need to be removed and utility poles need to be relocated during rural road widening. Road-side poles are among the most frequently struck road-side objects during road-side accidents. An automatic method is therefore proposed for detecting PSOs using LiDAR point cloud captured along the roadway using Mobile LiDAR system. The proposed method is tested on the point cloud data of rural road environment in India. Dataset of study area having text file size of 1.22 GB is processed in 13 minutes resulting in completeness of 88.63 % and correctness of 95.12 % in identifying PSOs within 10m of the road boundary. In data of across road coverage of 5m of the road boundary, the completeness of 93.10 % and correctness of 100% are achieved. Poles attached with other objects, tilted poles and the poles occluded by tree branches and shrubs are detected by the proposed method.

  19. Aurora A kinase contributes to a pole-based error correction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Anna A.; Deretic, Jovana; Hoel, Christopher M.; Hinman, Albert W.; Cimini, Daniela; Welburn, Julie P.; Maresca, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chromosome biorientation, where sister kinetochores attach to microtubules (MTs) from opposing spindle poles, is the configuration that best ensures equal partitioning of the genome during cell division. Erroneous kinetochore-microtubule (kt-MT) attachments are commonplace but often corrected prior to anaphase [1, 2]. Error correction, thought to be mediated primarily by the centromere-enriched Aurora B kinase (ABK) [3-5], typically occurs near spindle poles [6]; albeit, the relevance of this locale is unclear. Furthermore, polar ejection forces (PEFs), highest near poles [7], can stabilize improper attachments by pushing mal-oriented chromosome arms away from spindle poles [8, 9]. Hence, a conundrum: erroneous kt-MT attachments are weakened where PEFs are most likely to strengthen them. Here, we report that Aurora A kinase (AAK) opposes the stabilizing effect of PEFs. AAK activity contributes to phosphorylation of kinetochore substrates near poles and its inhibition results in chromosome mis-alignment and an increased incidence of erroneous kt-MT attachments. Furthermore, AAK directly phosphorylates a site in the N-terminal tail of Ndc80/Hec1 that has been implicated in reducing the affinity of the Ndc80 complex for MTs when phosphorylated [10-12]. We propose that an AAK activity gradient contributes to correcting mal-oriented kt-MT attachments in the vicinity of spindle poles. PMID:26166783

  20. Resolution of the multichannel anomaly in the extraction of S-matrix resonance-pole parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Ceci, Sasa; Stahov, Jugoslav; Svarc, Alfred; Zauner, Branimir; Watson, Shon

    2008-06-01

    Within the framework of a mathematically well-defined coupled-channel T-matrix model we have improved the existing multichannel pole-extraction procedure based on the numerical analytic continuation of the channel propagator, and for the first time we present the full set of pole parameters for already published amplitudes. Standard single-channel pole-extraction method (speed plot) was then applied to those amplitudes and resulting sets of T-matrix poles were inspected. The anomaly has been established that in some partial waves the pole values extracted using the standard single-channel methods differ not only from the values obtained using the analytic continuation method, but also change from one reaction to another. Inspired by this peculiarity, we have developed a new single-channel pole-extraction method based solely on the assumption of the partial wave analyticity. Since the speed plot turns out to be the lowest order term of the proposed method, the anomaly is understood and resolved.

  1. Influence of kinematic parameters on pole vault result in top junior athletes.

    PubMed

    Zagorac, Nebojsa

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the research was to ascertain the level of correlation between some kinematic parameters and the result success in the pole vault, using the sample of the best European female junior athletes. A set of 11 kinematic parameters has been applied, according to the McGinnis model, representing a predictor assemblage of variables. The maximum height vaulted presented a criterion variable. The research was conducted at the European Junior Athletics Championships in 2009. The entities were represented by the vaults in the final part of the competition. A general hypothesis of achieving a positive correlation between the system of predictor variables and the criteria had been set, and later confirmed. The results of the pole vault regression analysis confirmed the multiple correlations between the two groups of variables. The greatest influences on the prediction of pole vault success, regarding all the analyzed kinematic parameters, were the following variables: maximum pole bend, last stride speed and time of pole bend. The results were as expected, and can be used in kinesiology practice, especially during the technique learning process in young pole vaulters, but also in development of motor abilities relevant for success in this track and field discipline.

  2. The effects of walking poles on shoulder function in breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Sprod, Lisa K; Drum, Scott N; Bentz, Ann T; Carter, Susan D; Schneider, Carole M

    2005-12-01

    Breast cancer treatment often results in impaired shoulder function, in particular, decrements in muscular endurance and range of motion, which may lead to decreased quality of life. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of walking pole use on shoulder function in female breast cancer survivors. Participants had previously been treated with 1 or a combination of the following: mastectomy, breast conservation therapy, axillary lymph node dissection, chemotherapy, or radiation. Participants were randomly placed in experimental (n = 6) and control (n = 6) groups and met with a cancer exercise specialist 2 times each week for 8 weeks. The experimental group used walking poles during the 20-minute aerobic portion of their workout, whereas the control group did not use walking poles but performed 20 minutes of aerobic exercise per workout session. Both groups participated in similar resistance training programs. Testing was done pre- and postexercise intervention to determine upper body muscular endurance and active range of motion at the glenohumeral joint. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significant improvements in muscular endurance as measured by the bench press (P = .046) and lat pull down (P = .013) in the walking pole group. No within-group improvements were found in the group that did not use walking poles. The data suggest that using a walking pole exercise routine for 8 weeks significantly improved muscular endurance of the upper body, which would clearly be beneficial in helping breast cancer survivors perform activities of daily living and regain an independent lifestyle.

  3. Automatic extraction of highway light poles and towers from mobile LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wai Yeung; Morsy, Salem; Shaker, Ahmed; Tulloch, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Mobile LiDAR has been recently demonstrated as a viable technique for pole-like object detection and classification. Despite that a desirable accuracy (around 80%) has been reported in the existing studies, majority of them were presented in the street level with relatively flat ground and very few of them addressed how to extract the entire pole structure from the ground or curb surface. Therefore, this paper attempts to fill the research gap by presenting a workflow for automatic extraction of light poles and towers from mobile LiDAR data point cloud, with a particular focus on municipal highway. The data processing workflow includes (1) an automatic ground filtering mechanism to separate aboveground and ground features, (2) an unsupervised clustering algorithm to cluster the aboveground data point cloud, (3) a set of decision rules to identify and classify potential light poles and towers, and (4) a least-squares circle fitting algorithm to fit the circular pole structure so as to remove the ground points. The workflow was tested with a set of mobile LiDAR data collected for a section of highway 401 located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The results showed that the proposed method can achieve an over 91% of detection rate for five types of light poles and towers along the study area.

  4. Environmental effects of supplemental wood preservative treatments of electric utility poles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, M.E.

    1995-12-01

    A field study and associated risk assessment was conducted to evaluate the potential ecological and human health impacts related to the standard application of five supplemental wood preservatives to 20 electric utility transmission poles. Post-application monitoring for chemical residuals and microbiological effects was conducted over a 17 month post-application period (June 6, 1990--November 7, 1991). The utility wood poles in the study were located in wetland sites of the New York State Adirondack Park. All poles were western red cedar and all had been treated with pentachlorophenol (PCP) prior to installation. At the time supplemental preservatives were applied, the poles had been in service for approximately 40 years. Groundwater, surface water, and soil around each treated pole were monitored for release of active ingredients, organic carriers and subsequent degradation products of the commercial wood preservatives. The analytes were as follows: chlorpyrifos, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, creosote, 2,4-dinitrophenol, fluoride, chromium, arsenic, copper, naphthenate, sodium methyl dithiocarbamate and methyl isothiocyanate. Ecological response to chemical exposure was estimated by means of measuring soil gases (carbon dioxide and methane), soil macroinvertebrate populations and soil microbial biomass. Results from near-pole post-treatment sampling were compared to pre-treatment samples and reference plots used to establish preapplication biological conditions and background levels of wood preservative constituents.

  5. Temperature retrieval at the southern pole of the Venusian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garate-Lopez, Itziar; Garcia-Munoz, A.; Hueso, R.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.

    2013-10-01

    Venus’ thermal radiation spectrum is punctuated by CO2 bands of various strengths probing into different atmospheric depths. It is thus possible to invert measured spectra of thermal radiation to infer atmospheric temperature profiles. VIRTIS-M observations of Venus in the 3-5 µm range allow us to study the night time thermal structure of the planet’s upper troposphere and lower mesosphere from 50 to 105 km [1, 2]. Building a forward radiative transfer model that solves the radiative transfer equation for the atmosphere on a line-by-line basis, we confirmed that aerosol scattering must be taken into account and we studied the impact of factors such as cloud opacity, and the size, composition and vertical distribution of aerosols [3]. The cloud top altitude and aerosol scale height have a notable impact on the spectrum. However, their weighting function matrices have similar structures contributing to the degeneracy of the temperature retrieval algorithm [2]. Our retrieval code is focused on the strong 4.3µm CO2 band, which enables the determination of the thermal profile above the cloud top, and based on the algorithm proposed by Grassi et al. (2008) in their equation (2). We present temperature maps for the south pole of Venus, where a highly variable vortex is observed. We aim to combine these maps with our previously measured velocity fields from the same VIRTIS-M infrared images [4], in order to infer the potential vorticity distribution for different vortex configurations and to improve the understanding of its unpredictable character and its role in the general atmospheric circulation. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the Spanish MICIIN projects AYA2009-10701 and AYA2012-36666 with FEDER funds, by Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-765-13 and by Universidad País Vasco UPV/EHU through program UFI11/55. IGL and AGM gratefully acknowledge ESA/RSSD for hospitality and access to ‘The Grid’ computing resources. References [1] Roos-Serote, M., et al

  6. Periods, poles, and shapes of Saturn's irregular moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denk, Tilmann; Mottola, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    We report rotational-lightcurve observations of irregular moons of Saturn based on disk-integrated observations with the Narrow-Angle Camera of the Cassini spacecraft. From 24 measured rotation periods, 20 are now known with an accuracy of ~2% or better. The numbers are as follows (in hours; an '*' marks the less reliable periods): Hati 5.42; Mundilfari 6.74; Loge 6.94*; Skoll 7.26; Kari 7.70; Suttungr 7.82*, Bergelmir 8.13; Phoebe 9.274; Siarnaq 10.188; Narvi 10.21; Tarvos 10.69; Skathi 11.30; Ymir 11.922; Hyrrokkin 12.76; Greip 12.79*; Ijiraq 13.03; Albiorix 13.32; Bestla 14.624; Bebhionn 16.40; Paaliaq 18.75; Kiviuq 21.96; Erriapus 28.15; Thrymr 35 or >45* Tarqeq 76.8.More recent data strengthen the notion that objects in orbits with an inclination supplemental angle i' > 27° have significantly slower spin rates than those at i' < 27° (i' = 180°-i for retrograde objects, and i' = i for prograde moons, with i being the orbit inclination). Actually, the fastest rotator with i' > 27°, Siarnaq, stands opposed to at least eight objects with faster spins and i' < 27°. A null hypothesis claiming that objects of the two inclination bins come from the same population is rejected at the 99% confidence level. The i' > 27° bin contains all nine known prograde moons and four retrograde objects.A total of 25 out of 38 known outer moons has been observed with Cassini, and there is no chance to observe the 13 missing objects until end-of-mission. However, all unobserved objects are part of the i' < 27° bin. This means that the periods of all known moons with i' > 27° are known, and none of them is a fast rotator, with no exception.Several objects were observed repeatedly to determine pole directions, sidereal periods, and convex shapes. A few lightcurves have been observed to show three maxima and three minima even at low phase angles, suggesting objects with a triangular equatorial cross-section. Some objects with 2 maxima/ 2 minima are probably quite elongated. One

  7. Movement of the Earth pole and the seismic activity in 2001-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Aleksey; Zabbarova, Regina; Lapaeva, Valentina; Nefedyev, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    The relationship between the parameters which characterize the movement of the Earth pole and seismic activity are considered. The correlation of the considered parameters is studied. The discussions about the relationship of poles movement and irregularity in speed of Earth rotation with seismic activity were actively performed in 60- 70th years of last century. Mainly, the influence of seismicity on pole movement was considered in this works. In particular, the question about excitation of a pole by earthquakes chandler's fluctuations was studied. An interest in the similar researches continues till now. The chandler's movements investigations and their relation with rotation of the Earth and seismicity were proceeded. The correlation between appearance of earthquakes and abnormal evasion of time and latitude for the observatories located near an epicenter was also discussed. What changes in position of the Earth pole do occur as a result of the strongest earthquakes? To answer on this question it is necessary to study variations of "an average pole", where the basic periodic components in movement of a pole having amplitude 0.1"-0.3" are accepted. To perform the analysis of the pole co-ordinates (X and Y) the International service of the Earth rotation for 1995-2012 have been considered. Linear Orlov-Saharov transformation has been applied to an exception of the periodic movement. On the basis of this positions changes of an average pole (aperiodicity displacement and long periodical variations of an axis of rotation in a Earth body) have been calculated with an interval of 0.1 years. Was found the changes of position of an average pole of the Earth was preceded the most considerable seismic events of the beginning of 21 century. As a whole, the increase of seismic activity has begun after 2002 only. For example, there were 2 strong earthquakes with magnitude 7 and more (Salvador, India) in 2001 , 2 earthquakes (Tajikistan, Taiwan) occurred in 2002, and 5

  8. Sample Return Mission to the South Pole Aitken Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, M. B.; Clark, B. C.; Gamber, T.; Lucey, P. G.; Ryder, G.; Taylor, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    The South Pole Aitken Basin (SPA) is the largest and oldest observed feature on the Moon. Compositional and topographic data from Galileo, Clementine, and Lunar Prospector have demonstrated that SPA represents a distinctive major lunar terrane, which has not been sampled either by sample return missions (Apollo, Luna) or by lunar meteorites. The floor of SPA is characterized by mafic compositions enriched in Fe, Ti, and Th in comparison to its surroundings. This composition may represent melt rocks from the SPA event, which would be mixtures of the preexisting crust and mantle rocks. However, the Fe content is higher than expected, and the large Apollo basin, within SPA, exposes deeper material with lower iron content. Some of the Fe enrichment may represent mare and cryptomare deposits. No model adequately accounts for all of the characteristics of the SPA and disagreements are fundamental. Is mantle material exposed or contained as fragments in melt rock and breccias? If impact melt is present, did the vast sheet differentiate? Was the initial mantle and crust compositionally different from other regions of the Moon? Was the impact event somehow peculiar, (e.g., a low-velocity impact)? The precise time of formation of the SPA is unknown, being limited only by the initial differentiation of the Moon and the age of the Imbrium event, believed to be 3.9 b.y. The questions raised by the SPA can be addressed only with detailed sample analysis. Analysis of the melt rocks, fragments in breccias, and basalts of SPA can address several highly significant problems for the Moon and the history of the solar system. The time of formation of SPA, based on analysis of melt rocks formed in the event. would put limits on the period of intense bombardment of the Moon, which has been inferred by some to include a "terminal cataclysm." If close to 3.9 Ga, the presumed age of the Imbrium Basin, the SPA date would confirm the lunar cataclysm. This episode, if it occurred, would have

  9. Springtime Dust Storm Swirls at Martian North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    previously either in ground-based or spacecraft observation. The snow line marking the edge of the cap receded northward by approximately 120 miles (200 kilometers), while the distance to the Red Planet narrowed to 170 million miles (275 million kilometers).

    Technical notes: To help compare locations and sizes of features, map projections (right of each disk) are centered on the geographic north pole. Maps are oriented with 0 degrees longitude at the top and show meridians every 45 degrees of longitude (longitude increases clockwise); latitude circles are also shown for 40, 60, and 80 degrees north latitude. The color images were assembled from separate exposures taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2.

    This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http:// oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  10. Topographic-Compositional Relationships within the South Pole Aitken Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucey, P. G.; Holtzmann, J.; Blewett, D. T.; Taylor, G. J.; Hawke, B. R.

    1999-01-01

    The South Pole Aitken (SPA) Basin is an immense structure that dominates the geology of much of the farside of the Moon. Its floor is composed mostly of impact deposits, though it also has numerous relatively small regions of mare basalt. The basin floor exhibits a lower albedo and higher mafic mineral abundance than the surrounding highlands [ I ]. The origin of this mafic anomaly is a major question in lunar geology. Hypotheses for the presence of the mafic anomaly were briefly reviewed in [2] and include mare deposits mixed and obscured by basin or crater ejecta (cryptomaria), a large impact melt sheet that may have differentiated, exposed lower crustal material, and a significant component of excavated mantle. A study of mineralogy as revealed in Clementine UV-VIS imagery for limited portions of the basin found a predominantly low-Capyroxene (noritic) character [2], ruling out cryptomaria as an important contributor to the mafic enhancement. A few small cryptomaria, revealed by dark-halo impact craters and light plains units with high-FeO contents, have been found in SPA; however, it appears that extensive cryptomaria are lacking in this basin. The uniformly noritic lithology within SPA led to favor exposed lower crust or a homogenized melt sheet as the explanation for the mafic anomaly. Models of basin formation predict that a basin the size of SPA should have excavated through the entire lunar crust (assuming nonoblique impact), potentially exposing or mixing a large component of material from the mantle. Comparison of SPA floor FeO and Ti02 (derived from Clementine UV-VIS observations) and also Th (from Lunar Prospector) with model-mantle chemistries appears to be consistent with a mixture of approximately equal proportions of lower-crust and mantle material. In the present study, we examine the relationship between the basin's topography and composition in order to provide further insight on the origin of the basin floor material. Data: Clementine UV

  11. Unfolding an Orocline Restores Australian Siluro-Devonian Poles to the Gondwana APWP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musgrave, R. J.; Cayley, R.

    2011-12-01

    Palaeozoic apparent polar wander for Gondwana has long been a source of controversy because of the reliance on Silurian to Late Carboniferous poles from the potentially mobile Lachlan Orogen, part of the late Neoproterozoic to Palaeozoic Tasmanides of eastern Australia. Despite the introduction of new poles and a series of reviews that have eliminated less reliable data, poles from the Molong-Monaro terrane, the eastern part of the Lachlan Orogen assembled around the Ordovician Macquarie Arc, remain stubbornly incompatible with the cratonic Gondwana path prior to about 400 Ma. Amalgamation of a mobile Molong-Monaro terrane with Gondwana at that time has been suggested, but a truly allochthonous origin for the terrane is precluded by sedimentological links with the rest of the Tasmanides. Recognition in aeromagnetic imagery of a megafold, obscured by sediments of the overlying Murray Basin, has prompted a new model for the Silurian to Early Devonian in the Lachlan Orogen, which explains apparent duplication of terrane elements in Victoria. Clockwise oroclinal rotation of the Molong-Monaro terrane through about 90 degrees is a corollary of the tectonic model. Silurian to Early Devonian poles from the Molong-Monaro terrane define a small circle around the pole of rotation of the orocline, supporting the tectonic model. Restoring the rotation brings these poles into agreement with the Gondwana APWP, and leaves the Macquarie Arc parallel to suspected arc structures in the Thomson Orogen, another element of the Tasmanides. The same rotation applied to Ordovician poles from the Molong-Monaro terrane displaces these away from the Gondwana APWP, requiring a still earlier phase of anticlockwise rotation of the formerly-unified Macquarie and "Thomson" arcs. This earlier rotation may be linked to a mid-Ordovician change in subduction polarity of the Macquarie Arc.

  12. Evolution of the Far-Infrared Cloud at Titan's South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Achterberg, R. K.; Cottini, V.; Anderson, C. M.; Flasar, F. M.; Nixon, C. A.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Kunde, V. G.; Carlson, R. C.; Guandique, E.; Kaelberer, M. S.; Tingley, J. S.; Albright, S. A.; Segura, M. E.; de Kok, R.; Coustenis, A.; Vinatier, S.; Bampasidis, G.; Teanby, N. A.; Calcutt, S.

    2015-01-01

    A condensate cloud on Titan identified by its 220 cm-1 far-infrared signature continues to undergo seasonal changes at both the north and south poles. In the north, the cloud, which extends from 55 N to the pole, has been gradually decreasing in emission intensity since the beginning of the Cassini mission with a half-life of 3.8 years. The cloud in the south did not appear until 2012 but its intensity has increased rapidly, doubling every year. The shape of the cloud at the south pole is very different from that in the north. Mapping in 2013 December showed that the condensate emission was confined to a ring with a maximum at 80 S. The ring was centered 4deg from Titan's pole. The pattern of emission from stratospheric trace gases like nitriles and complex hydrocarbons (mapped in 2014 January) was also offset by 4deg, but had a central peak at the pole and a secondary maximum in a ring at about 70 S with a minimum at 80 S. The shape of the gas emission distribution can be explained by abundances that are high at the atmospheric pole and diminish toward the equator, combined with correspondingly increasing temperatures. We discuss possible causes for the condensate ring. The present rapid build up of the condensate cloud at the south pole is likely to transition to a gradual decline from 2015 to 2016. Key words: molecular processes - planets and satellites: atmospheres - planets and satellites: composition - planets and satellites: individual (Titan) - radiation mechanisms: thermal

  13. Optimization of poling parameters of mechanically processed PLZT 8/60/40 ceramics based on dielectric and piezoelectric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajeet; Bhanu Prasad, V. V.; James Raju, K. C.; James, A. R.

    2015-11-01

    Ultra high strain (Pb0.92La0.08)(Zr0.60Ti0.40)O3 (PLZT 8/60/40) piezoelectric ceramics were synthesized by high energy ball milling method to study the relation between poling conditions (poling electric fields, times and temperatures) and electrical properties. The ceramics were structurally investigated and with the help of ferroelectric P- E hysteresis loop, coercive field was determined. This study deals with the identification of optimum poling conditions and their effect on the piezoelectric and dielectric properties mechanically synthesized PLZT 8/60/40 ceramics. Different combinations of poling parameters were used to measure the values of dielectric constant, dielectric loss, piezoelectric charge ( d 33) and electromechanical coupling coefficients ( k p). These values show that a ferroelectric material can be poled at ˜5 kV/cm (<0.5 E c ), contrary to common practice of poling far above the coercive field. The effect of aging on the electrical properties was also studied for ceramics poled at 0.6 E c and 3 E c . With the help of this study, poling electric field as well as another two important poling parameters, viz poling temperature and poling time, were optimized. Optimum poling temperature was found to be in the range of 75 °C to 125 °C with optimal poling time of 30 min. Additionally the effect of ceramic sample thickness on the said properties was also studied. The maximum d 33 and k p values for PLZT ceramics was found to be ˜715 pC/N and ˜77%, respectively.

  14. Electric utility pole yard training facility: Designing an effective learning environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, Robert P.

    The primary responsibility of electric utilities is to supply consistent, dependable, and affordable energy to private customers, businesses, and industries. As with many businesses, electric utilities are experiencing the effects of an aging workforce and expending considerable resources to train their current and replacement workers. Community colleges can partner with electric utilities to provide effective learning environments for these workers, and gain access to new sources of revenue and community support for the colleges. The purpose of this study was to describe the functions, features, and major design issues of an effective learning environment for training electric utility industry workers, the electric utility line-worker pole yard. Case studies of three "state of the art" line-worker pole yard training environments provide the basis for the study's findings and implications. The study was guided by the following research questions: (1) What is the function of a line-worker pole yard in supporting effective training? (2) What are the features of present day ("state of the art") line-worker pole yard learning environments? and (3) What are the major issues that need to be addressed in designing a line-worker pole yard learning environment for the future? The study participants included industry representatives, training coordinators, instructors, and students from the three selected "state of the art" line-worker pole yard sites. The overall findings from the study resulted in composites of the desired features of learning outcomes, learning process, and learning environment for a line-worker pole yard training program and major issues that are affecting the future design of these training programs. Composite findings of a pole-yard training environment included unique features associated with: (a) outdoor, (b) indoor, (c) underground, (d) classroom, (e) gathering places, and (f) work-based learning components. Composite findings with regard to major

  15. The 1500m South Pole Ice Core: Recovering a 40,000 year environmental record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, T.; Casey, K.; Fudge, T. J.; Steig, E. J.; Saltzman, E. S.; Aydin, M.; Twickler, M.; Souney, J. M., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    The stable-isotope, aerosol and atmospheric gas records in ice cores provide exceptional archives of past climate. Supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation, a new 1500 m, approximately 40,000 year old ice core will be recovered from South Pole during the current 2014-2015 austral summer season (to ~ 700 m) and next 2015-2016 austral summer season (~ 700 m to 1500 m) using the new U.S. Intermediate Depth Drill. The combination of low temperature, relatively high accumulation rate, and low impurity concentrations at South Pole will yield a detailed record of atmospheric trace gases. The South Pole ice core will also provide a record of the climate history of a unique area of the East Antarctic plateau that is partly influenced by weather systems that cross the West Antarctic ice sheet. The South Pole ice core site is at a flank site where the ice flows at approximately 10 m/yr. The ice core recovered originated as snow at progressively greater distances from the coring site. New ground-penetrating radar collected over the drill site location shows no anthropogenic influence over the past ~50 years or upper 15 m. In this submission, we describe the climate and glaciologic setting of the South Pole, and the details of the ultimate coring site.

  16. Lunar Pole Illumination and Communications Statistics Computed from GSSR Elevation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The Goldstone Solar System RADAR (GSSR) group at JPL produced a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the lunar south pole using data obtained in 2006. This model has 40-meter horizontal resolution and about 5-meter relative vertical accuracy. This paper uses that Digital Elevation Model to compute average solar illumination and Earth visibility near the lunar south pole. This data quantifies solar power and Earth communications resources at proposed lunar base locations. The elevation data were converted into local terrain horizon masks, then converted into selenographic latitude and longitude coordinates. The horizon masks were compared to latitude, longitude regions bounding the maximum Sun and Earth motions relative to the moon. Proposed lunar south pole base sites were examined in detail, with the best site showing multi-year averages of solar power availability of 92% and Direct-To-Earth (DTE) communication availability of about 50%. Results are compared with a theoretical model, and with actual sun and Earth visibility averaged over the years 2009 to 2028. Results for the lunar North pole were computed using the GSSR DEM of the lunar North pole produced in 1997. The paper also explores using a heliostat to reduce the photovoltaic power system mass and complexity.

  17. Permanent Magnet Machine And Method With Reluctance Poles For High Strength Undiffused Brushless Operation.

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S [Oak Ridge, TN

    2005-12-06

    A method and apparatus in which a rotor (11) and a stator (17) define a radial air gap (20) for receiving AC flux and at least one, and preferably two, DC excitation assemblies (23, 24) are positioned at opposite ends of the rotor (20) to define secondary air gaps (21, 22). Portions of PM material (14a, 14b) are provided as boundaries separating the rotor pole portions (12a, 12b) of opposite polarity from other portions of the rotor (11) and from each other to define PM poles (12a, 12b) for conveying the DC flux to or from the primary air gap (20) and for inhibiting flux from leaking from the pole portions prior to reaching the primary air gap (20). The portions of PM material (14a, 14b) are spaced from each other so as to include reluctance poles (15) of ferromagnetic material between the PM poles (12a, 12b) to interact with the AC flux in the primary-air gap (20).

  18. Paleomagnetism of Jurassic dolerites from Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica - Onset of rapid Jurassic pole shift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirscher, U.; Bachtadse, V.; Petersen, N.; Rolf, C.; Lemna, O. S.

    2014-12-01

    Flood basalts (Kirkpatrick) and sills (Ferrar) of the Transantarctic mountains (183Ma) have been studied paleomagnetically in detail in the 60's to 90's of the 1900's yielding two groups of paleopole positions plotting at ~55°S (A) or at ~80°S (B). Group A poles have been interpreted to reflect the Early Jurassic Earth magnetic field but the significance of Group B poles is less clear. Here we report new data from the Kirkpatrick basalts at Gair Mesa (73.47°S; 162.87°E), where about 800 stratigraphic meters including 23 volcanic flows were sampled. After removal of a steep magnetic overprint straight linear segments trending toward the origin of the projection plane are identified in 151 samples from 22 sites. All characteristic directions are of normal polarity and interpreted to be carried by magnetite. The resulting mean pole plots at 66.4°S; 227.7°E, A95=6.2°, k = 25.7 similar to group B poles. Reflecting light microscopy suggests that the original magnetization has survived low temperature alteration. Since secular variation has been averaged (Sb=15.9°) we argue that the Gair Mesa basalts have recorded the time averaged geomagnetic field during early to mid Jurassic times. Hence, we conclude that both groups A and B are of primary origin and consequently speculate that group B paleopoles might reflect the onset of the recently postulated Jurassic pole shift.

  19. zic-1 Expression in Planarian Neoblasts after Injury Controls Anterior Pole Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez-Doorman, Constanza; Petersen, Christian P.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms that enable injury responses to prompt regenerative outgrowth are not well understood. Planarians can regenerate essentially any tissue removed by wounding, even after decapitation, due to robust regulation of adult pluripotent stem cells of the neoblast population. Formation of pole signaling centers involving Wnt inhibitors or Wnt ligands promotes head or tail regeneration, respectively, and this process requires the use of neoblasts early after injury. We used expression profiling of purified neoblasts to identify factors needed for anterior pole formation. Using this approach, we identified zic-1, a Zic-family transcription factor, as transcriptionally activated in a subpopulation of neoblasts near wound sites early in head regeneration. As head regeneration proceeds, the Wnt inhibitor notum becomes expressed in the newly forming anterior pole in zic-1-expressing cells descended from neoblasts. Inhibition of zic-1 by RNAi resulted in a failure to express notum at the anterior pole and to regenerate a head, but did not affect tail regeneration. Both injury and canonical Wnt signaling inhibition are required for zic-1 expression, and double-RNAi experiments suggest zic-1 inhibits Wnt signaling to allow head regeneration. Analysis of neoblast fate determinants revealed that zic-1 controls specification of notum-expressing cells from foxD-expressing neoblasts to form the anterior pole, which organizes subsequent outgrowth. Specialized differentiation programs may in general underlie injury-dependent formation of tissue organizing centers used for regenerative outgrowth. PMID:24992682

  20. Can histologic changes of the upper pole justify a conservative approach in neonatal duplex ectopic ureterocele?

    PubMed

    Arena, F; Nicotina, A; Cruccetti, A; Centonze, A; Arena, S; Romeo, G

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study was to review the histology of the upper-pole segment in patients with duplex-system ectopic ureterocele (DEU) to determine if less aggressive surgery is justified in prenatally-diagnosed cases. The study included 15 consecutive patients with DEU treated between 1991 and 1999. The diagnosis was made according to the criteria of the Section on Urology of the American Academy of Pediatrics. The histology specimens were assessed for dysplastic, inflammatory, and obstructive changes. All 15 patients were surgically treated by heminephro-ureterectomy and the surgical specimens were histologically examined. Nine cases were diagnosed prenatally; the histology of the upper-pole segment in these patients showed segmental renal microcystic dysplasia, chondroid metaplasic islands, and an inflammatory tubulointerstitial nephropathy in 6 (66.6%) and nephroblastomatosis in 2 (22.2%). The histology of the 6 postnatally-diagnosed patients showed segmental multicystic renal dysplasia, inflammatory tubulo-interstitial nephropathy, and segmental parenchymal scars. The upper-pole histology of the prenatally-diagnosed patients did not show any evidence of reversible histologic changes. Considering this findings and the good outcome of patients treated with upper-pole nephroureterectomy, less aggressive surgery with preservation of the upper pole does not seem justified.

  1. Integrating models and data to estimate the structural reliability of utility poles during hurricanes.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung-Ryong; Rosowsky, David; Guikema, Seth

    2014-06-01

    Utility systems such as power and communication systems regularly experience significant damage and loss of service during hurricanes. A primary damage mode for these systems is failure of wooden utility poles that support conductors and communication lines. In this article, we present an approach for combining structural reliability models for utility poles with observed data on pole performance during past hurricanes. This approach, based on Bayesian updating, starts from an imperfect but informative prior and updates this prior with observed performance data. We consider flexural and foundation failure mechanisms in the prior, acknowledging that these are an incomplete, but still informative, subset of the possible failure mechanisms for utility poles during hurricanes. We show how a model-based prior can be updated with observed failure data, using pole failure data from Hurricane Katrina as a case study. The results of this integration of model-based estimates and observed performance data then offer a more informative starting point for power system performance estimation for hurricane conditions. PMID:23952685

  2. Reanalysis of Clementine Bistatic Radar Data from the Lunar South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Richard A.; Tyler, G. Leonard

    1998-01-01

    On 9 April 1994 the Clementine spacecraft high-gain antenna was aimed toward the Moon's surface and the resulting 13-cm wavelength radio echoes were received on Earth. Using these data, we have found that the lunar surface generally follows a Lambertian bistatic scattering function sigma(sub 0) = K(sub D)cos(theta(sub i) with K(sub D) approx. 0.003 for the opposite (expected) sense of circular polarization and K(sub D) approx. 0.001 for the same (unexpected) sense. But there are important deviations-of up to 50% in some parts of the echo spectrum-from this simple form. Based on an earlier analysis of these same data, Nozette et al. claimed detection of an enhancement in echoes with right circular polarization from regions near the South Pole in a near-backscatter geometry. Such behavior would be consistent with presence of perhaps large quantities of water ice near the Pole. We have been unable to reproduce that result. Although we find weak suggestions of enhanced echoes at the time of South Pole backscatter, similar features are present at earlier and later times, adjacent frequencies, and in left circular polarization. If enhanced backscatter is present, it is not unique to the South Pole; if not unique to the Pole, then ice is less likely as an explanation for the enhancement.

  3. Poling study of electro-optic polymers in silicon slot waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szep, Attila; Chen, Antao; Shi, Shouyuan; Lin, Zhou; Abeysinghe, Don

    2011-03-01

    Silicon slot waveguide based Mach Zender interferometric modulators were built with electro-optic (EO) polymers in the slot as the modulated media. In order to enhance the macroscopic electro-optic effect in the polymers the molecules that provide the large polarizability need to be aligned prior to operation to match the direction of the applied modulating field. This aligning process, also called as poling process, is difficult in the slot waveguide modulators due to the unique structure and small dimensionality of the slots in the waveguides. While hybrid silicon-EO polymer modulators have been demonstrated with ultra low drive voltage, the polymer EO activity was low compared to thin film performances. We compared alternatives to enhance the poling field over the electro optic polymer and concluded that the well known surface states in silicon affect the conductivity of silicon significantly when thin silicon is used as poling electrode. A solution to this negative effect was attempted by passivating the surface with a 5 nm thin TiO2 conforming atomic layer deposition over the silicon prior to spin casting and poling the EO polymers. We achieved a factor of 2 enhancement in the polymer's electro optic activity after poling as a result and achieved a low 0.52 V*cm voltage length product in the MZ modulator we built with this technique.

  4. Chandra Image Reveals Auroral X-rays at Poles of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This Chandra image of Jupiter shows concentrations of aurora x-rays near the north and south poles due to a single `hot spot' that pulsates with a period of 45 minutes, similar to high-latitude radio pulsation previously detected by NASA's Galileo and Cassini spacecraft. Previous x-ray detections of Jupiter have been made with other x-ray telescopes, but did not reveal that the sources of the x-rays, energetic oxygen and sulfur ions, would be located so near the poles. Previous theories held that ions were mostly coming from Jupiter's moon, lo. Chandra's ability to pinpoint the source of the x-rays discards this theory since ions coming from near lo's orbit carnot reach the observed high latitudes. One possibility is that particles flowing out from the Sun are captured in the outer regions of Jupiter's magnetic field, then accelerated and directed toward its magnetic pole. Once captured, the ions would bounce back and forth in the magnetic field from Jupiter's north pole to the south pole in an oscillating motion that could explain the pulsation.

  5. Integrating models and data to estimate the structural reliability of utility poles during hurricanes.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung-Ryong; Rosowsky, David; Guikema, Seth

    2014-06-01

    Utility systems such as power and communication systems regularly experience significant damage and loss of service during hurricanes. A primary damage mode for these systems is failure of wooden utility poles that support conductors and communication lines. In this article, we present an approach for combining structural reliability models for utility poles with observed data on pole performance during past hurricanes. This approach, based on Bayesian updating, starts from an imperfect but informative prior and updates this prior with observed performance data. We consider flexural and foundation failure mechanisms in the prior, acknowledging that these are an incomplete, but still informative, subset of the possible failure mechanisms for utility poles during hurricanes. We show how a model-based prior can be updated with observed failure data, using pole failure data from Hurricane Katrina as a case study. The results of this integration of model-based estimates and observed performance data then offer a more informative starting point for power system performance estimation for hurricane conditions.

  6. Electrooptic light modulation and second-harmonic generation in novel diazo-dye-substituted poled polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuto, Yoshito; Amano, Michiyuki; Kaino, Toshikuni

    1991-11-01

    The nonlinear-optical susceptibilities, chi exp (2), of a diazo-dye-substituted polymer poled with high electric fields were determined experimentally and theoretically. The electrooptic modulation of He-Ne laser light in a traveling-wave channel-waveguide modulator using the diazo-dye-substituted poled polymer is reported, and the linear electrooptic coefficient of the poled polymer is estimated from a measured half-wave voltage. The polymer studied is a poly(methyl methacrylate) copolymerized with a methacrylate ester of the dicyanovinyl-terminated diazo dye derivative. This polymer is called 3RDCVXY. The corona-poled 3RDCVXY polymer exhibits a chi exp (2) value of 1 x 10 exp -6 esu at 1.06 micron. The thermal stability is excellent even at 80 C. The poled 3RDCVXY polymer film shows a linear electrooptic coefficient as high as 40 pm/V at 0.633 micron. An electrooptical light modulation in the channel 3RDCVXY polymer waveguides with a half-wave voltage as low as 5 V was obtained.

  7. Effect of the upper limbs muscles activity on the mechanical energy gain in pole vaulting.

    PubMed

    Frère, Julien; Göpfert, Beat; Slawinski, Jean; Tourny-chollet, Claire

    2012-04-01

    The shoulder muscles are highly solicited in pole vaulting and may afford energy gain. The objective of this study was to determine the bilateral muscle activity of the upper-limbs to explain the actions performed by the vaulter to bend the pole and store elastic energy. Seven experienced athletes performed 5-10 vaults which were recorded using two video cameras (50Hz). The mechanical energy of the centre of gravity (CG) was computed, while surface electromyographic (EMG) profiles were recorded from 5 muscles bilateral: deltoideus, infraspinatus, biceps brachii, triceps, and latissimus dorsi muscles. The level of intensity from EMG profile was retained in four sub phases between take-off (TO1) and complete pole straightening (PS). The athletes had a mean mechanical energy gain of 22% throughout the pole vault, while the intensities of deltoideus, biceps brachii, and latissimus dorsi muscles were sub phases-dependent (p<0.05). Stabilizing the glenohumeral joint (increase of deltoideus and biceps brachii activity) and applying a pole bending torque (increase of latissimus dorsi activity) required specific muscle activation. The gain in mechanical energy of the vaulter could be linked to an increase in muscle activation, especially from latissimusdorsi muscles.

  8. The 1500m South Pole Ice Core: Recovering a 40 Ka Environmental Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, Kimberly Ann; Neumann, Thomas Allen; Fudge, T. J.; Neumann, T. A.; Steig, E. J.; Cavitte, M. G. P.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2014-01-01

    Supported by the US National Science Foundation, a new 1500 m, approximately 40 ka old ice core will be recovered from South Pole during the 2014/15 and 2015/16 austral summer seasons using the new US Intermediate Depth Drill. The combination of low temperatures, relatively high accumulation rates and low impurity concentrations at South Pole will yield detailed records of ice chemistry and trace atmospheric gases. The South Pole ice core will provide a climate history record of a unique area of the East Antarctic plateau that is partly influenced by weather systems that cross the West Antarctic ice sheet. The ice at South Pole flows at approximately 10m a(exp-1) and the South Pole ice-core site is a significant distance from an ice divide. Therefore, ice recovered at depth originated progressively farther upstream of the coring site. New ground-penetrating radar collected over the drill site location shows no anthropogenic influence over the past approximately 50 years or upper 15 m. Depth-age scale modeling results show consistent and plausible annual-layer thicknesses and accumulation rate histories, indicating that no significant stratigraphic disturbances exist in the upper 1500m near the ice-core drill site.

  9. South-polar features on Venus similar to those near the north pole.

    PubMed

    Piccioni, G; Drossart, P; Sanchez-Lavega, A; Hueso, R; Taylor, F W; Wilson, C F; Grassi, D; Zasova, L; Moriconi, M; Adriani, A; Lebonnois, S; Coradini, A; Bézard, B; Angrilli, F; Arnold, G; Baines, K H; Bellucci, G; Benkhoff, J; Bibring, J P; Blanco, A; Blecka, M I; Carlson, R W; Di Lellis, A; Encrenaz, T; Erard, S; Fonti, S; Formisano, V; Fouchet, T; Garcia, R; Haus, R; Helbert, J; Ignatiev, N I; Irwin, P G J; Langevin, Y; Lopez-Valverde, M A; Luz, D; Marinangeli, L; Orofino, V; Rodin, A V; Roos-Serote, M C; Saggin, B; Stam, D M; Titov, D; Visconti, G; Zambelli, M; Ammannito, Eleonora; Barbis, Alessandra; Berlin, Rainer; Bettanini, Carlo; Boccaccini, Angelo; Bonnello, Guillaume; Bouye, Marc; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Moinelo, Alejandro Cardesin; Carraro, Francesco; Cherubini, Giovanni; Cosi, Massimo; Dami, Michele; De Nino, Maurizio; Del Vento, Davide; Di Giampietro, Marco; Donati, Alessandro; Dupuis, Olivier; Espinasse, Sylvie; Fabbri, Anna; Fave, Agnes; Veltroni, Iacopo Ficai; Filacchione, Gianrico; Garceran, Katia; Ghomchi, Yamina; Giustini, Maurizio; Gondet, Brigitte; Hello, Yann; Henry, Florence; Hofer, Stefan; Huntzinger, Gerard; Kachlicki, Juergen; Knoll, René; Driss, Kouach; Mazzoni, Alessandro; Melchiorri, Riccardo; Mondello, Giuseppe; Monti, Francesco; Neumann, Christian; Nuccilli, Fabrizio; Parisot, Jerome; Pasqui, Claudio; Perferi, Stefano; Peter, Gisbert; Piacentino, Alain; Pompei, Carlo; Reess, Jean-Michel; Rivet, Jean-Pierre; Romano, Antonio; Russ, Natalie; Santoni, Massimo; Scarpelli, Adelmo; Semery, Alain; Soufflot, Alain; Stefanovitch, Douchane; Suetta, Enrico; Tarchi, Fabio; Tonetti, Nazzareno; Tosi, Federico; Ulmer, Bernd

    2007-11-29

    Venus has no seasons, slow rotation and a very massive atmosphere, which is mainly carbon dioxide with clouds primarily of sulphuric acid droplets. Infrared observations by previous missions to Venus revealed a bright 'dipole' feature surrounded by a cold 'collar' at its north pole. The polar dipole is a 'double-eye' feature at the centre of a vast vortex that rotates around the pole, and is possibly associated with rapid downwelling. The polar cold collar is a wide, shallow river of cold air that circulates around the polar vortex. One outstanding question has been whether the global circulation was symmetric, such that a dipole feature existed at the south pole. Here we report observations of Venus' south-polar region, where we have seen clouds with morphology much like those around the north pole, but rotating somewhat faster than the northern dipole. The vortex may extend down to the lower cloud layers that lie at about 50 km height and perhaps deeper. The spectroscopic properties of the clouds around the south pole are compatible with a sulphuric acid composition.

  10. The 14 month wind stressed residual circulation (pole tide) in the North Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oconnor, W. P.

    1986-01-01

    From published research it is known that a quasi-periodic 14 month atmospheric pressure oscillation of a few tenths of a millibar exists in the region of the North and Baltic Seas. At some time in the cycle the associated wind stress has a westerly component that drives a circulation in the North Sea. The results of a dynamical model and comparisons with several North Sea residual circulation studies show that a large sea level gradient results along the Dutch coast. It is this feature that has been referred to as the enhanced pole tide. The dynamical similarity of this pole tide in the North and Baltic Seas to the annual and seasonal wind forced circulations is considered. It is inferred that the large deviations of the pole tide from equilibrium at coastal stations are the result of this sea level set up forces by the 14 month wind stress cycle.

  11. Polarization-entangled photon pairs from a periodically poled crystalline waveguide.

    PubMed

    Levine, Zachary H; Fan, Jingyun; Chen, Jun; Migdall, Alan L

    2011-03-28

    A proposal is made for the generation of polarization-entangled photon pairs from a periodically poled crystal allowing for high collection efficiency, high entanglement, and stable operation. The theory is formulated for colinear propagation for application to waveguides. The key feature of the theory is the use of type II phase matching using both the +1 and -1 diffraction orders of the poling structure. Although these conditions are fairly restrictive in terms of operating parameters, practical operating conditions can be found. For example, we find that a HeNe pump laser may be used for a periodically poled rubidium-doped potassium titanyl phosphate (Rb:KTP) waveguide to yield single mode polarization-entangled pairs. Fidelities of 0.98 are possible under practical conditions.

  12. Instrument for analysis of electric motors based on slip-poles component

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.; Casada, D.A.

    1996-11-26

    A new instrument is described for monitoring the condition and speed of an operating electric motor from a remote location. The slip-poles component is derived from a motor current signal. The magnitude of the slip-poles component provides the basis for a motor condition monitor, while the frequency of the slip-poles component provides the basis for a motor speed monitor. The result is a simple-to-understand motor health monitor in an easy-to-use package. Straightforward indications of motor speed, motor running current, motor condition (e.g., rotor bar condition) and synthesized motor sound (audible indication of motor condition) are provided. With the device, a relatively untrained worker can diagnose electric motors in the field without requiring the presence of a trained engineer or technician. 4 figs.

  13. Instrument for analysis of electric motors based on slip-poles component

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Howard D.; Ayers, Curtis W.; Casada, Donald A.

    1996-01-01

    A new instrument for monitoring the condition and speed of an operating electric motor from a remote location. The slip-poles component is derived from a motor current signal. The magnitude of the slip-poles component provides the basis for a motor condition monitor, while the frequency of the slip-poles component provides the basis for a motor speed monitor. The result is a simple-to-understand motor health monitor in an easy-to-use package. Straightforward indications of motor speed, motor running current, motor condition (e.g., rotor bar condition) and synthesized motor sound (audible indication of motor condition) are provided. With the device, a relatively untrained worker can diagnose electric motors in the field without requiring the presence of a trained engineer or technician.

  14. Approximation by simple partial fractions with constraints on the poles. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodin, P. A.

    2016-03-01

    It is shown that if a compact set K not separating the plane C lies in the union \\widehat{E}\\setminus E of the bounded components of the complement of another compact set E, then the simple partial fractions (the logarithmic derivatives of polynomials) with poles in E are dense in the space AC(K) of functions that are continuous on K and analytic in its interior. It is also shown that if a compact set K with connected complement lies in the complement C\\setminus\\overline{D} of the closure of a doubly connected domain D\\subset\\overline{ C} with bounded connected components of the boundary E^+ and E^-, then the differences r_1-r_2 of the simple partial fractions such that r_1 has its poles in E^+ and r_2 has its poles in E^- are dense in the space AC(K). Bibliography: 9 titles.

  15. Optimal management of lower pole stones: the direction of future travel

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sacha L.; Bres-Niewada, Ewa; Cook, Paul; Wells, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Kidney stone disease is increasing worldwide with its most common location being in the lower pole. A clear strategy for effective management of these stones is essential in the light of ever increasing choice, effectiveness, and complications of different treatment options. Material and methods This review identifies the latest and clinically relevant publications focused on optimal management of lower pole stones. Results We present an up-to-date European Association of Urology and American Urological Association algorithm for lower pole stones, risks and benefits of different treatments, and changing landscape with the miniaturization of percutaneous stone treatments. Conclusions Available literature seems to be deficient on quality of life, patient centered decision making, and cost analysis of optimal management with no defined standard of ‘stone free rate’, all of which are critical in any surgical consultation and outcome analysis. PMID:27729994

  16. Optical auroral conjugacy: Viking UV imager - South Pole station ground data

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, G.B.; McEwen, D.J. ); Eather, R.A. ); Berkey, F.T. ); Murphree, J.S. )

    1990-05-01

    High time resolution satellite UV images of the northern auroral oval are compared with South Pole station keogram camera and all-sky camera observations to determine the displacement of the South Pole conjugate point from its location calculated using the international geomagnetic reference field magnetic field model. The results presented extend the study of optical conjugacy to high magnetic latitudes in a solstice period, and to sunlit auroral events. Three high-latitude events were analyzed: a poleward expansion, an arc poleward of the midnight oval, and a substantial movement in the afternoon auroral oval. They were determined to occur on closed field lines. A range of displacement for the South Pole conjugate point of 5.3{degree} in latitude and 1.9 hours in MLT was measured.

  17. The occultation of 28 Sgr by Saturn - Saturn pole position and astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Porco, C. C.; Hunten, D. M.; Rieke, G. H.; Rieke, M. J.; Mccarthy, D. W.; Haemmerle, V.; Clark, R.; Turtle, E. P.; Haller, J.

    1993-01-01

    Saturn's ring plane-defined pole position is presently derived from the geometry of Saturn's July 3, 1989 occultation of 28 Sgr, as indicated by the timings of 12 circular edges in the Saturn C-ring as well as the edges of the Encke gap and the outer edge of the Keeler gap. The edge timings are used to solve for the position angle and opening angle of the apparent ring ellipses; the internal consistency of the data set and the redundancy of stations indicates an absolute error of the order of 5 km. The pole position thus obtained is consistent with the pole and ring radius scale derived from Voyager occultation observations.

  18. Characterization of coplanar poled electro optic polymer films for Si-photonic devices with multiphoton microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Himmelhuber, R. Mehravar, S. S.; Herrera, O. D.; Demir, V.; Kieu, K.; Norwood, R. A.; Peyghambarian, N.; Luo, J.; Jen, A. K.-Y.

    2014-04-21

    We imaged coplanar poled electro optic (EO) polymer films on transparent substrates with a multiple-photon microscope in reflection and correlated the second-harmonic light intensity with the results of Pockels coefficient (r{sub 33}) measurements. This allowed us to make quantitative measurements of poled polymer films on non-transparent substrates like silicon, which are not accessible with traditional Pockels coefficient measurement techniques. Phase modulators consisting of silicon waveguide devices with EO polymer claddings with a known Pockels coefficient (from V{sub π} measurements) were used to validate the correlation between the second-harmonic signal and r{sub 33}. This also allowed us to locally map the r{sub 33} coefficient in the poled area.

  19. Anomalous change in leakage and displacement currents after electrical poling on lead-free ferroelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkar, Hitesh; Tomar, M.; Gupta, Vinay; Scott, J. F.; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-09-01

    We report the polarization, displacement current, and leakage current behavior of a trivalent nonpolar cation (Al3+) substituted lead free ferroelectric (Na0.46Bi0.46-xAlxBa0.08)TiO3 (NBAT-BT) (x = 0, 0.05, 0.07 and 0.10) electroceramics with tetragonal phase and P4 mm space group symmetry. Almost, three orders of magnitude decrease in leakage current were observed under electrical poling, which significantly improves microstructure, polarization, and displacement current. Effective poling neutralizes the domain pinning, traps charges at grain boundaries and fills oxygen vacancies with free charge carriers in matrix, thus saturated macroscopic polarization in contrast to that in unpoled samples. E-poling changes "bananas" type polarization loops to real ferroelectric loops.

  20. Sub-milliarcsecond determination of pole position using Global Positioning System data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Thomas A.; Dong, Danan; King, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    The determination of pole-position variations from the analysis of 23 days of Global Positioning System (GPS) data continuously collected with a globally distributed, 21-station network is discussed. The comparison of the estimated pole positions from these data with results from 11 very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiments conducted during this same interval yields weighted root-mean-square differences about the mean differences of 0.5 mas for both X- and Y-pole position estimates from an analysis using single-day arcs, and 1.0 and 0.8 mas from an analysis using three weekly multiday arcs. These results are of sufficient quality that GPS could provide an alternative technique to VLBI and satellite laser ranging for regular monitoring of high-time-resolution variations in the position of the earth's rotation axis.

  1. Electric field poling 2G V/m to improve piezoelectricity of PVDF thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartono, Ambran; Darwin, Ramli, Satira, Suparno; Djamal, Mitra; Herman

    2016-03-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) is a polymer with unique characteristics i.e. piezoelectric and ferrroelectric properties. Piezoelectric propertiesof PVDF are determined by the fraction of β-phase structure. Several optimization methods have been developed to improve the piezoelectric properties of PVDF. One of our research efforts is to improve the piezoelectricity of PVDF by electric poling with high electric field 2G V/m. The application of high electric field performed on PVDF films with a thickness of 1 1m. Each sample was made with a deep coating method, with annealing temperature 70°C-110°C. Based on the XRD characterization, we have obtained value of β-fraction of samples after poling are: 56%, 61%, 77%, 81% and 83%, respectively. Therefore, high electric field poling has been able to improve the piezoelectric properties of PVDF films. The PVDF with good piezoelectric properties are potential can did a tes for piezoelectric sensors and actuators devices.

  2. Grooved multi-pole magnetic gratings for high-resolution positioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhi-Hao; Tseng, Bin-Hui; Chang, Ching; Wang, Sheng-Ching; Chin, Tsung-Shune; Sung, Cheng-Kuo

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic encoders are much advantageous for precision positioning specifically under harsh environments. The finer the magnetic pole-pitches of the magnetic scale in a magnetic encoder the higher the resolution of the encoder. In this paper, a grooved multi-pole magnetic grating (MPMG) is substituted for conventional non-structured magnetic scale. A MPMG with pole-pitch of 200 µm was prepared by photo-lithography and electro-deposition. Simulation was first done to attain the relationship among magnetic flux density, magnetic properties of electrodeposited alloy layers, magnetizing directions and the grating dimensions. The MPMG can be fully magnetized for use by just a single pulse in a solenoid coil. Magnetic properties were investigated in which CoNiP layers were electrodeposited under various current densities. Measured magnetic flux densities versus grating heights, magnetizing directions and detection gaps on magnetized MPMG validate the applicability of ultra-fine pitched MPMG.

  3. STRENGTH PROPERTIES OF POLED PZT SUBJECTED TO BIAXIAL FLEXURAL LOADING IN HIGH ELECTRIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Hua-Tay; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2010-01-01

    Failure of poled PZT has been experimentally studied using ball-on-ring (BoR) biaxial flexure strength tests with an electric field concurrently applied. The as-received and aged PZTs were tested in high electric fields of -3 to 4 times the coercive field. Both the sign and the magnitude of electric field had a significant effect on the strength of poled PZT. A surface flaw type with a depth of around 18 m was identified as the strength limiter and responsible for the failure of the tested PZT. With a value of 0.76 MPa m1/2 in the open circle condition, the fracture toughness of the poled PZT was affected by an applied electric field just as the strength was affected. These results and observations have the potential to serve probabilistic reliability analysis and design optimization of multilayer PZT piezo actuators.

  4. Functions of maternal mRNA as a cytoplasmic factor responsible for pole cell formation in Drosophila embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Togashi, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Okada, M.

    1986-12-01

    Injection of mRNA extracted from Drosophila cleavage embryos or mature oocytes restored pole cell-forming ability to embryos that had been deprived of this ability by uv irradiation. However, mRNA extracted from blastoderms did not show the restoration activity. Pole cells thus formed in uv-irradiated embryos bear similarities to normal pole cells both in their morphology and their ability to migrate to the gonadal rudiments. But this mRNA does not appear to be capable of rescuing uv-induced sterility, or inducing pole cells in the anterior polar region.

  5. Biomechanical characteristics and speed adaptation during kick double poling on roller skis in elite cross-country skiers.

    PubMed

    Göpfert, Caroline; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Stöggl, Thomas; Müller, Erich; Lindinger, Stefan Josef

    2013-06-01

    Recent developments in cross-country ski racing should promote the use of kick double poling. This technique, however, has not been the focus in athletes' training and has barely been investigated. The aims of the present study were to develop a function-based phase definition and to analyse speed adaptation mechanisms for kick double poling in elite cross-country skiers. Joint kinematics and pole/plantar forces were recorded in 10 athletes while performing kick double poling at three submaximal roller skiing speeds. A speed increase was associated with increases in cycle length and rate, while absolute poling and leg push-off durations shortened. Despite maintained impulses of force, the peak and average pole/leg forces increased. During double poling and leg push-off, ranges of motion of elbow flexion and extension increased (p < 0.05) and were maintained for hip/knee flexion and extension. Cycle length increase was correlated to increases in average poling force (r = 0.71) and arm swing time (r = 0.88; both p < 0.05). The main speed adaptation was achieved by changes in double poling technique; however, leg push-off showed high variability among elite skiers, thus illustrating important aspects for technique training.

  6. A novel POLE mutation associated with cancers of colon, pancreas, ovaries and small intestine.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Maren F; Johansen, Jostein; Bjørnevoll, Inga; Sylvander, Anna E; Steinsbekk, Kristin S; Sætrom, Pål; Sandvik, Arne K; Drabløs, Finn; Sjursen, Wenche

    2015-09-01

    In some families there is an increased risk for colorectal cancer, caused by heritable, but often unidentified genetic mutations predisposing to the disease. We have identified the likely genetic cause for disease predisposition in a large family with high burden of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, in addition to extra-colonic cancers. This family had previously been tested for known cancer susceptibility genes, with negative results. Exome sequencing was used to identify a novel mutation, c.1373A>T (p.Tyr458Phe), in the gene for DNA polymerase epsilon catalytic subunit (POLE). This mutation is located in the active site of the exonuclease domain of the enzyme, and affects a residue that has previously been shown to be important for exonuclease activity. The first predisposing mutation identified in POLE (c.1270C>G, p.Leu424Val) was associated with colorectal cancer only, but another mutation with a broader tumour spectrum (c.1089C>A, p.Asn363Lys) has recently been reported. In the family described in the present study, carriers generally have multiple colorectal adenomas and cancer of colon, pancreas, ovaries and small intestine which represents an important broadening of the tumour spectrum of POLE mutation carriers. We also observe a large phenotypic variation among the POLE mutation carriers in this family, most likely explained by modifying variants in other genes. One POLE mutation carrier has a novel variant in EXO1 (c.458C>T, p.Ala153Val), which may contribute to a more severe phenotype. The findings in this study will have important implications for risk assessment and surveillance of POLE mutation carriers.

  7. Atmospheric iridium at the South Pole as a measure of the meteoritic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncel, G.; Zoller, W. H.

    1987-10-01

    A determination of the average particle-borne Ir concentration in the South Pole atmosphere is presented. The average values of (7.3 + or - 3.1) x 10 to the -17th g/cu m suggests that the concentration of extraterrestrial material in the South Pole atmosphere is not large enough to explain the enrichments of anomalously enriched elements; however, meteoritic material contributes significantly to the observed concentrations of Co, Fe, and Mn. An accretion rate for background extraterrestrial material of 11,000 tons annually is estimated.

  8. The south pole region of the moon as seen by Clementine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoemaker, E.M.; Robinson, M.S.; Eliason, E.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Clementine mission has provided the first comprehensive set of high-resolution images of the south pole region of the moon. Within 5?? of latitude of the pole, an area of an estimated 30,000 square kilometers remained in shadow during a full lunar rotation and is a promising target for future exploration for ice deposits. The Schrodinger Basin (320 kilometers in diameter), centered at 75??S, is one of the two youngest, least modified, great multiring impact basins on the moon. A large maar-type volcano localized along a graben within the Schrodinger Basin probably erupted between 1 and 2 billion years ago.

  9. Exertion During Uphill, Level and Downhill Walking With and Without Hiking Poles

    PubMed Central

    Perrey, Stephane; Fabre, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effects of poles when walking on the rate of perceived exertion (RPE), physiological and kinematics parameters, and upon the mean ratio between locomotor and respiratory rhythms. Twelve healthy male and female volunteers, aged 22 to 49 years old, completed on a motorized treadmill in a counterbalanced randomized order 12 walking trials for 10 min at an individually preferred walking speed, with three grades (horizontal level, uphill or downhill with a slope of 15%), with and without hiking poles and a load carriage of 15% of body mass. During all testing sessions, heart rate (HR), oxygen consumption (VO2), ventilation (VE), tidal volume (VT), breathing frequency (Bf), and stride frequency were recorded continuously during the last 5-min of each trial. At the end of each trial, subjects were asked to give RPE. Energy cost (EC) and VE increased significantly with the grade (-15% < 0% < +15%) and with the carrying load. VT was significantly less important with hiking poles, while Bf was significantly more elevated. VO2 and EC increased (p < 0.05) with the use of the hiking poles only during the downhill trials. No significant effect of poles was observed on HR, RPE, and preferred walking speed. The average ratio between the locomotor and respiratory frequencies was significantly influenced by the three experimental factors tested. There was a significant relationship between average ratio of leg movement per breath and EC of walking among all conditions (r = 0.83, n = 12). These results suggest that the use of the hiking poles had a significant influence on the respiratory and energetic responses only during downhill walking. Key pointsEnergetic cost, respiratory responses, stride rate, respiratory to cycle rate ratio were significantly influenced by the use of hiking poles according to the grade at self-selected walking speed.Hiking poles induced an increase in respiratory frequency, VE and energetic cost during downhill, while little changes

  10. Simulation study of poled low-water ionomers with different architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahyarov, Elshad; Taylor, Philip L.; Löwen, Hartmut

    2011-11-01

    The role of the ionomer architecture in the formation of ordered structures in poled membranes is investigated by molecular dynamics computer simulations. It is shown that the length of the sidechain Ls controls both the areal density of cylindrical aggregates Nc and the diameter of these cylinders in the poled membrane. The backbone segment length Lb tunes the average diameter Ds of cylindrical clusters and the average number of sulfonates Ns in each cluster. A simple empirical formula is noted for the dependence of the number density of induced rod-like aggregates on the sidechain length Ls within the parameter range considered in this study.

  11. Exertion during uphill, level and downhill walking with and without hiking poles.

    PubMed

    Perrey, Stephane; Fabre, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effects of poles when walking on the rate of perceived exertion (RPE), physiological and kinematics parameters, and upon the mean ratio between locomotor and respiratory rhythms. Twelve healthy male and female volunteers, aged 22 to 49 years old, completed on a motorized treadmill in a counterbalanced randomized order 12 walking trials for 10 min at an individually preferred walking speed, with three grades (horizontal level, uphill or downhill with a slope of 15%), with and without hiking poles and a load carriage of 15% of body mass. During all testing sessions, heart rate (HR), oxygen consumption (VO2), ventilation (VE), tidal volume (VT), breathing frequency (Bf), and stride frequency were recorded continuously during the last 5-min of each trial. At the end of each trial, subjects were asked to give RPE. Energy cost (EC) and VE increased significantly with the grade (-15% < 0% < +15%) and with the carrying load. VT was significantly less important with hiking poles, while Bf was significantly more elevated. VO2 and EC increased (p < 0.05) with the use of the hiking poles only during the downhill trials. No significant effect of poles was observed on HR, RPE, and preferred walking speed. The average ratio between the locomotor and respiratory frequencies was significantly influenced by the three experimental factors tested. There was a significant relationship between average ratio of leg movement per breath and EC of walking among all conditions (r = 0.83, n = 12). These results suggest that the use of the hiking poles had a significant influence on the respiratory and energetic responses only during downhill walking. Key pointsEnergetic cost, respiratory responses, stride rate, respiratory to cycle rate ratio were significantly influenced by the use of hiking poles according to the grade at self-selected walking speed.Hiking poles induced an increase in respiratory frequency, VE and energetic cost during downhill, while little changes

  12. Interference effect of edge radiation at three-pole wiggler section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Shigeru; Takabayashi, Yuichi

    2016-09-01

    Radiation from a three-pole wiggler section is not simply treated as typical synchrotron radiation in a long-wavelength region. The interference effect between edge radiations from upstream and downstream straight subsections of the wiggler is considered to contribute significantly to the radiation. Our simple model roughly reproduced spectral and spatial distributions of the radiation. Under the maximum interference condition, the peak radiation intensity is four times larger than the edge radiation from a single straight section. Moreover, the longitudinal periodic alignment of three-pole wigglers, which satisfies the maximum interference condition, generates radiation of higher intensity proportional to the square of the periodic number.

  13. THE ORBITS OF THE NEPTUNIAN SATELLITES AND THE ORIENTATION OF THE POLE OF NEPTUNE

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, R. A.

    2009-05-15

    This paper reports on an update to the orientation of Neptune's pole and to the orbits of the Neptunian satellites, Triton, Nereid, and Proteus. We determined the new pole and orbits in the International Celestial Reference Frame by fitting them to all available observations through the opposition of 2008. The new data in the fit are high-quality modern astrometry and constitute a 19 year extension of the previous data arc. We assess the accuracy of the orbits and compare them with our earlier orbits. We also provide mean elements as a geometrical description for the orbits.

  14. Improved and enhanced thermal stable second harmonic generation of poled polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhanjia; Liu, Liying; Liu, Haibo; Xu, Lei; Wang, Wencheng; Li, Fuming; Ye, Mingxin

    2000-11-01

    Melamine formaldehyde resin films with good optical quality could be fabricated easily by controlling the initial molecular weight. It was used as a matrix of nonlinear molecules. The optical properties of nonlinear molecules guest-host and covalent-bonded type of poled polymer systems were investigated. The optical propagation losses are around 1 dB/cm at 1072 nm for two kinds of films studied. The in situ corona poling second harmonic generation method and UV- visible absorption measurement were used. The experiment results showed that the materials we fabricated have improved second-order susceptibilities and higher thermal stability.

  15. Trajectories of S-matrix poles in a new finite-range potential

    SciTech Connect

    Racz, A.; Salamon, P.; Vertse, T.

    2011-09-15

    The trajectories of S-matrix poles are calculated in the finite-range phenomenological potential introduced recently by Salamon and Vertse [Phys. Rev. C 77, 037302 (2008)] (SV). The potential is similar to a Woods-Saxon (WS) interaction, but it is exactly zero beyond a radius, without any cutoff. The trajectories of the resonance poles in this SV potential are compared to the corresponding trajectories in a cutoff WS potential for l>0. The dependence on the cutoff radius is demonstrated. The starting points of the trajectories turn out to be related to the average ranges of the two terms in the SV potential.

  16. A comparative study on the calibration of pole caps for a Faraday vacuum microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rais, A.; Yousif, A. A.

    1999-08-01

    Calibration curves for standard 177 mm diameter Henry profile pole caps of an electromagnet coupled to a Faraday vacuum microbalance are obtained from absolute magnetic susceptibility measurements. The pole caps are at gaps of 4.0 cm, 4.5 cm and 5.0 cm for maximum magnetic field strengths ranging from 173 kA m-1 to 549 kA m-1. Typical results on a few standard substances are compared with reported values. An error of less than 3% can be achieved for samples of limited size that are sufficiently free from ferromagnetic impurities.

  17. Creating second-order nonlinearity in pure synthetic silica optical fibers by thermal poling.

    PubMed

    An, Honglin; Fleming, Simon

    2007-04-01

    A twin-hole optical fiber with pure synthetic silicate glass between the two electrode holes was thermally poled. The induced second-order nonlinearity (SON) was located at the core-cladding interface sections that were nearly parallel to the poling electric field. The polarization dependence of the induced SON suggests that nonlinearity was due to the presence of a space-charge field, which was probably formed by electron migration among the defects located at the core-cladding interface. The magnitude of the induced SON was measured to be approximately 0.06 pm /V.

  18. Reflection measurement technique of electro-optic coefficients in lithium niobate crystals and poled polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuto, Yoshito; Amano, Michiyuki

    1995-05-01

    An experimental arrangement for linear electro-optic (EO) measurements at wavelength 1.31 micron was described, the principle of which was the comparative determination of the phase-modulation indices by a reflection method. This method was used to measure the r(sub 33) values of both lithium niobate crystal and diazo-dye substituted poled polymers. Second harmonic generation (SHG) and EO effects were both depicted by a second-order susceptibility tensor. Finally, a comparison between the SHG and EO coefficients of the diazo-dye-substituted poled polymer films was presented.

  19. Submillimeter Atmospheric Transparency at Maunakea, at the South Pole, and at Chajnantor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radford, Simon J. E.; Peterson, Jeffery B.

    2016-07-01

    For a systematic assessment of submillimeter observing conditions at different sites, we constructed tipping radiometers to measure the broad band atmospheric transparency in the window around 350 μm wavelength. The tippers were deployed on Maunakea, Hawaii, at the South Pole, and in the vicinity of Cerro Chajnantor in northern Chile. Identical instruments permit direct comparison of these sites. Observing conditions at the South Pole and in the Chajnantor area are better than on Maunakea. Simultaneous measurements with two tippers demonstrate conditions at the summit of Cerro Chajnantor are significantly better than on the Chajnantor plateau.

  20. A comparative study of the coordinates of the Earth's pole from 1900 to 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbasova, G. S.; Korsun', A. A.; Rykhlova, L. V.; Rybalova, M. N.; Shlikar', G. N.

    1999-01-01

    Three series of coordinates for the Earth's pole covering the period from 1900 to 1990 are compared. The two most uniform and prolonged series (the `Kiev series' in the frame of the mean pole at the observation epoch and the series obtained by Yumi and Yokoyama in the CIO frame) are compared with polar coordinate data processed using a new global determination of the Earth orientation parameters. Periodogram and two-channel autoregression analyses did not reveal any significant discrepancies in the main periodic components in the coordinate series compared (the Chandler and annual components). The relative positions of the coordinate-frame origins were calculated before and after eliminating trends.

  1. 2 Pallas - 1982 and 1983 lightcurves and a new pole solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binzel, R. P.

    1984-09-01

    Photoelectric lightcurves of the asteroid 2 Pallas obtained in March 1982 and May 1983 display amplitudes of 0.04 and 0.10 mag respectively. The latter lightcurve shows that Pallas was at V(1.0) mag of 4.51 + or -0.02 when it occulted 1 Vulpeculae on May 29, 1983. A least-squares best fit to an amplitude-aspect relation for all available lightcurve observations of Pallas between 1951 and 1983 yields two solutions for its pole position: lambda = 200, beta = 40 and lambda = 220, beta = 15, where the uncertainty regions correspond to an overall error estimate of + or -10 deg. Use of phase angle bisector coordinates give lower residuals than geocentric coordinates. The (220, 15) pole position is favored since it is in very good agreement with an independent pole solution obtained by photometric astrometry. This pole position implies that the latitude of the sub-earth point at the time of occultation was 22 deg.

  2. Spatial regulation of kinetochore microtubule attachments by destabilization at spindle poles in meiosis I

    PubMed Central

    Chmátal, Lukáš; Yang, Karren; Schultz, Richard M.; Lampson, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary To ensure accurate chromosome segregation in cell division, erroneous kinetochore-microtubule (MT) attachments are recognized and destabilized [1]. Improper attachments typically lack tension between kinetochores and are positioned off-center on the spindle. Low tension is a widely accepted mechanism for recognizing errors [2], but whether chromosome position regulates MT attachments has been difficult to test. We exploited a meiotic system in which kinetochores attached to opposite spindle poles differ in their interactions with microtubules, and therefore position and tension can be uncoupled. In this system homologous chromosomes are positioned off-center on the spindle in oocytes in meiosis I, while under normal tension, as a result of crossing mouse strains with different centromere strengths, manifested by unequal kinetochore protein levels [3]. We show that proximity to spindle poles destabilizes kinetochore-MTs, and that stable attachments are restored by inhibiting Aurora A kinase at spindle poles. During the correction of attachment errors, kinetochore MTs detach near spindle poles to allow formation of correct attachments. We propose that chromosome position on the spindle provides spatial cues for the fidelity of cell division. PMID:26166779

  3. Teaching American Indian Geography and History with New Perspectives: The Lodge Pole River Project Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurt, Douglas A.; Wallace, Michael L.

    2005-01-01

    A three-year institute called "The Lodge Pole River Project" was designed to change educator perceptions of American Indian historical geography and encourage the creation of balanced and culturally sensitive American Indian K-12 curriculum. This project offered unique opportunities to assess a geography institute's impact upon teacher knowledge…

  4. 47 CFR 1.1420 - Timeline for access to utility poles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... poles. (a) The term “attachment” means any attachment by a cable television system or provider of... operator or telecommunications carrier an estimate of charges to perform all necessary make-ready work...) A utility may withdraw an outstanding estimate of charges to perform make-ready work beginning...

  5. Dominant pole and eigenstructure assignment for positive systems with state feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhao; Lam, James

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the dominant pole assignment problem, the dominant eigenstructure assignment problem and the robust dominant pole assignment problem for linear time-invariant positive systems with state feedback are considered. The dominant pole assignment problem is formulated as a linear programming problem, and the dominant eigenstructure problem is formulated as a quasiconvex optimisation problem with linear constraints. The robust dominant pole assignment problem is formulated as a non-convex optimisation problem with non-linear constraints which is solved using particle swarm optimisation (PSO) with an efficient scheme which employs the dominant eigenstructure assignment technique to accelerate the convergence of the PSO procedure. Each of the three problems can be further constrained by requiring that the controller has a pre-specified structure, or the gain matrix have both elementwise upper and lower bounds. These constraints can be incorporated into the proposed scheme without increasing the complexity of the algorithms. Both the continuous-time case and the discrete-time case are treated in the paper.

  6. The effects of CO and HCN on pole-jump avoidance-escape behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winslow, W.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of carbon monoxide and mixtures of carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide at different concentrations and times of exposure were studied in a pole-jump apparatus. The time to loose the avoidance and escape response for mice exposed to these atmospheres was obtained. Correlations to predict the loss as a function of dosage are presented.

  7. A paleomagnetic pole position for the Franklin Mountains Precambrian sequence, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Whitelaw, M.J. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    The Franklin Mountains, West Texas, contain a well preserved sequence of Proterozoic rocks that were probably formed on the southern margin of the Proterozoic North American continent. This sequence includes, in ascending order, the Castner Marble, the basaltic Mundy Breccia, quartzites and hornfels of the Lanoria Formation, and meta-sedimentary and meta-volcanic units of the Thunderbird Group. The lower part of this sequence is intruded by several phases of the 1.1 Ga Red Bluff Granite complex. Oriented paleomagnetic core samples were collected from the Castner Marble, the Mundy Breccia, and a quartz syenite phase of the Red Bluff Granite complex, in order to determine pole positions for each individual unit. Intensive demagnetization studies revealed that primary magnetic directions of both the Castner Marble and the Mundy Breccia have been totally overprinted by the Red Bluff intrusive event. Therefore, the following 1.1 Ga paleopole is based on combined tilt corrected data from the Castner Marble, Mundy Breccia and the Red Bluff Granite quartz syenite phase: Dec. = 288.8, Inc. = 52.7 (N = 87, R= 78.42, a[sub 95] = 5.05[degree], k = 10.02) Pole long. = 174.4[degree] W, Pole lat. = 31.3[degree] N (dp = 4.8, dm = 7.0). This pole is indistinguishable from 1.1 Ga Keweenawan Rift paleopoles.

  8. Thermally induced dephasing in periodically poled KTiOPO4 nonlinear crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Pennington, D M; Jovanovic, I; Liao, Z M; Payne, S A; Drobshoff, A D; Ebbers, C A; Taylor, L R

    2004-03-18

    Experimental data that exhibits a continuous-wave, second-harmonic intensity threshold (15 kW/cm{sup 2}) that causes two-photon nonlinear absorption which leads to time-dependent photochromic damage in periodically poled KTiOPO{sub 4} is presented and verified through a thermal dephasing model.

  9. Astronaut Jack Lousma participates in EVA to deploy twin pole solar shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Skylab 3 pilot, participates in the August 6, 1973 extravehicular activity (EVA) during which he and Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, science pilot, deployed the twin pole solar shield to help shade the Orbital Workshop (OWS). Note the striking reflection of the Earth in Lousma's helmet visor.

  10. Astronaut Jack Lousma participates in EVA to deploy twin pole solar shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Skylab 3 pilot, participates in the August 6, 1973 extravehicular activity (EVA) during which he and Astronauts Owen K. Garriott, science pilot, deployed the twin pole solar shield to help shade the Orbital Workshop (OWS). Note the reflection of the Apollo Telescope Mount and the Earth in Lousma's helmet visor.

  11. Paleomagnetism of the Ishikoshi Andesite: a Middle Miocene paleomagnetic pole for northeastern Japan and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Hiroyuki; Teranishi, Yuki

    2007-07-01

    To determine a Middle Miocene paleomagnetic pole for northeastern Japan and discuss its tectonic implications, we obtained new paleomagnetic results from Middle Miocene (about 14 Ma) dacite and andesite flows of the Ishikoshi Andesite. Characteristic remanent magnetizations were isolated from 12 lava sites by means of detailed alternating field and thermal demagnetizations. Analysis of demagnetization results and rock magnetic experiments indicated that magnetite or Ti-poor titanomagnetite is the main magnetic carrier. We obtained a formation mean direction ( D = 9.2°, I = 65.9°, α95 = 7.3°, k = 40.5, N = 11) and compared it with published paleomagnetic results from other areas of northeastern Japan to discuss tectonic rotation. This comparison provided a mean paleomagnetic pole (85.9°N, 236.6°E, A 95 = 6.2°, K = 115.9, N = 6) that we consider represents the Middle Miocene pole for northeastern Japan. It is statistically indistinguishable from coeval poles for southwestern Japan, South Korea, and northern China, and we therefore conclude that northeastern Japan as a whole has not been subjected to tectonic rotation since the Middle Miocene. A reassessment of geologic and paleomagnetic data suggests that a previous model of the Late Miocene or later counterclockwise rotation of northeastern Japan is based on tilt-uncorrected paleomagnetic directions from tilted rock units.

  12. Lunar Pole Illumination and Communications Maps Computed from GSSR Elevation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Scott

    2009-01-01

    A Digital Elevation Model of the lunar south pole was produced using Goldstone Solar System RADAR (GSSR) data obtained in 2006.12 This model has 40-meter horizontal resolution and about 5-meter relative vertical accuracy. This Digital Elevation Model was used to compute average solar illumination and Earth visibility with 100 kilometers of the lunar south pole. The elevation data were converted into local terrain horizon masks, then converted into lunar-centric latitude and longitude coordinates. The horizon masks were compared to latitude, longitude regions bounding the maximum Sun and Earth motions relative to the moon. Estimates of Earth visibility were computed by integrating the area of the region bounding the Earth's motion that was below the horizon mask. Solar illumination and other metrics were computed similarly. Proposed lunar south pole base sites were examined in detail, with the best site showing yearly solar power availability of 92 percent and Direct-To-Earth (DTE) communication availability of about 50 percent. Similar analysis of the lunar south pole used an older GSSR Digital Elevation Model with 600-meter horizontal resolution. The paper also explores using a heliostat to reduce the photovoltaic power system mass and complexity.

  13. GUARD/WATCH TOWER #S84 WITH RANGE POLE Naval Magazine Lualualei, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GUARD/WATCH TOWER #S84 WITH RANGE POLE - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Waikele Branch, Guard-Watch Tower Type, On ridge above Tunnel CE-1, on Prime Road on ridge above Tunnel B-11, & on ridge above Tunnel C-17, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. Building Peace Poles: Inexpensive Woodworking Project Great for Middle and High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roccanova, John

    2013-01-01

    The World Peace Prayer Society (WPPS) has at its core the message: "May peace prevail on Earth." This axiom appears on the roughly 200,000 Peace Poles that are planted at private residences, schools, in parks, and at other public places worldwide including at the Pentagon, the Pyramids in Egypt, and on Mt. Kilimanjaro, the highest free-standing…

  15. 47 CFR 1.1420 - Timeline for access to utility poles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...” means any attachment by a cable television system or provider of telecommunications service to a pole... to § 1.4. (c) Survey. A utility shall respond as described in § 1.1403(b) to a cable operator or... access is not denied, a utility shall present to a cable operator or telecommunications carrier...

  16. Application of ring lasers to determine the directions to the poles of Earth's rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Golyaev, Yu D; Kolbas, Yu Yu

    2012-10-31

    Application of a ring laser to determine the directions to the poles of Earth's rotation is considered. The maximum accuracy of determining the directions is calculated, physical and technical mechanisms that limit the accuracy are analysed, and the instrumental errors are estimated by the example of ring He - Ne lasers with Zeeman biasing. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  17. F-actin marks the rhizoid pole in living Pelvetia compressa zygotes.

    PubMed

    Alessa, L; Kropf, D L

    1999-01-01

    Spatial and temporal changes in F-actin during polarity establishment in Pelvetia compressa zygotes were investigated using vital staining with rhodamine phalloidin (RP). F-actin was localized to a patch in the cortex of young zygotes. When unilateral light was applied to induce a growth axis (photopolarization) in a population of zygotes, the cortical F-actin patches localized at the shaded pole (rhizoid pole of growth axis). Treatments that prevented photopolarization prevented localization of F-actin patches to the shaded pole. When the direction of the light treatment was reversed, the previous growth axis was abandoned and a new axis was established in the opposite direction. The F-actin patch repositioned to the new rhizoid pole within minutes of light reversal, indicating that F-actin was an immediate marker of the nascent growth axis. Repositioning probably occurred by disassembly of the initial patch and reassembly of a new one. The patch grew in size as zygotes developed, eventually becoming a ring just prior to rhizoid outgrowth. The rhizoid emerged at the site of the F-actin ring and, following germination, the ring was located in the subapical zone of the elongating tip.

  18. Direct localization of poles of a meromorphic function from measurements on an incomplete boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Takaaki; Ando, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes an algebraic method to reconstruct the positions of multiple poles in a meromorphic function field from measurements on an arbitrary simple arc in it. A novel issue is the exactness of the algorithm depending on whether the arc is open or closed, and whether it encloses or does not enclose the poles. We first obtain a differential equation that can equivalently determine the meromorphic function field. From it, we derive linear equations that relate the elementary symmetric polynomials of the pole positions to weighted integrals of the field along the simple arc and end-point terms of the arc when it is an open one. Eliminating the end-point terms based on an appropriate choice of weighting functions and a combination of the linear equations, we obtain a simple system of linear equations for solving the elementary symmetric polynomials. We also show that our algorithm can be applied to a 2D electric impedance tomography problem. The effects of the proximity of the poles, the number of measurements and noise on the localization accuracy are numerically examined.

  19. The Learning of Visually Guided Action: An Information-Space Analysis of Pole Balancing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, David M.; Vaz, Daniela V.; Michaels, Claire F.

    2012-01-01

    In cart-pole balancing, one moves a cart in 1 dimension so as to balance an attached inverted pendulum. We approached perception-action and learning in this task from an ecological perspective. This entailed identifying a space of informational variables that balancers use as they perform the task and demonstrating that they improve by traversing…

  20. The Importance of Ice Flow at the North Pole of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sori, M. M.; Byrne, S.; Hamilton, C. W.; Landis, M. E.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the importance of ice flow at the north pole of Mars for features only recently discovered by HiRISE. We use a combination of image analysis and finite element modeling to quantify flow and discuss implications for NPLD evolution.

  1. Effect of fatigue on double pole kinematics in sprint cross-country skiing.

    PubMed

    Zory, Raphael; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Pellegrini, Barbara; Schena, Federico; Rouard, Annie

    2009-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of fatigue (physiological, mechanical, and muscular parameters) induced by a sprint simulation on kinematic parameters (cycle, phases, and joints angles) of the double pole technique. Eight elite skiers were tested for knee extensor strength and upper body power both before and after a three-bout simulation of sprint racing. They were video analyzed during the final part of the test track of bouts 1 and 3 using a digital camera. Results showed that skiers were in a fatigue state (decrease of the knee extensors voluntary force (-10.4+/-10.4%) and upper body power output (-11.1+/-8.7%) at the end of the sprint. During bout 3, the final spurt and cycle velocities decreased significantly (-7.5+/-12.3%; -13.2+/-9.5%; both p<.05). Angular patterns were only slightly modified between bouts 1 and 3 with trunk, hip, and pole angles being significantly greater for the third bout. The decrease of hip and trunk flexion and the lower inclination of the pole during the poling phase suggested a reduced effectiveness of the force application which could lead to a decrease in the cycle velocity.

  2. Smarandache curves according to Sabban frame of fixed pole curve belonging to the Bertrand curves pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şenyurt, Süleyman; Altun, Yasin; Cevahir, Ceyda

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the Smarandache curves according to Sabban frame of fixed pole curve which drawn by the unit Darboux vector of the Bertrand partner curve. Some results have been obtained. These results were expressed as the depends Bertrand curve.

  3. Accuracy check of TOSCA using a sectoral magnet with saturated iron poles

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, M.; Tomeoku, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Maki, N. ); Nakata, J. )

    1990-03-01

    The calculation accuracy of TOSCA was examined using a 180{degrees} sectoral H-Shaped magnet with a maximum field of 2.3T and strongly saturated iron poles. Results of the magnetic field measurements and 3-dimensional field calculations by TOSCA are summarized.

  4. Same view as photograph OR1224, without range pole; 1"long stalactites ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Same view as photograph OR-122-4, without range pole; 1"-long stalactites begin on portion of ceiling just beyond the area visible in this view - Steamboat Mine, Southeast slope of Steamboat Mountain, west of the junction of Forest Service Roads 1000300 and 1000365, Jacksonville, Jackson County, OR

  5. PolyPole-1: An accurate numerical algorithm for intra-granular fission gas release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzocri, D.; Rabiti, C.; Luzzi, L.; Barani, T.; Van Uffelen, P.; Pastore, G.

    2016-09-01

    The transport of fission gas from within the fuel grains to the grain boundaries (intra-granular fission gas release) is a fundamental controlling mechanism of fission gas release and gaseous swelling in nuclear fuel. Hence, accurate numerical solution of the corresponding mathematical problem needs to be included in fission gas behaviour models used in fuel performance codes. Under the assumption of equilibrium between trapping and resolution, the process can be described mathematically by a single diffusion equation for the gas atom concentration in a grain. In this paper, we propose a new numerical algorithm (PolyPole-1) to efficiently solve the fission gas diffusion equation in time-varying conditions. The PolyPole-1 algorithm is based on the analytic modal solution of the diffusion equation for constant conditions, combined with polynomial corrective terms that embody the information on the deviation from constant conditions. The new algorithm is verified by comparing the results to a finite difference solution over a large number of randomly generated operation histories. Furthermore, comparison to state-of-the-art algorithms used in fuel performance codes demonstrates that the accuracy of PolyPole-1 is superior to other algorithms, with similar computational effort. Finally, the concept of PolyPole-1 may be extended to the solution of the general problem of intra-granular fission gas diffusion during non-equilibrium trapping and resolution, which will be the subject of future work.

  6. A New Late Middle Cambrian Paleomagnetic Pole for the Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Randall; Curtis; Millar

    2000-07-01

    A paleomagnetic study of the late Middle to possibly early Late Cambrian Liberty Hills Formation in the Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica, reveals a stable magnetization with positive fold and reversal tests. The paleopole is based on 16 sites from volcanic and sedimentary rocks and lies at lat 7.3 degrees N and long 326.3 degrees E (A95=6.0&j0;). The new paleomagnetic data support the view that the Ellsworth Mountains are part of a microplate-the Ellsworth-Whitmore Mountains crustal block-that rotated independently of the main Gondwana continental blocks during breakup. The Liberty Hills pole differs from both previous poles recovered from Cambrian rocks in the Ellsworth Mountains and from the available Gondwana reference pole data. Our pole indicates a more northerly prebreakup position for the Ellsworth Mountains than previously suggested, contradicting the overwhelming geologic evidence for a prebreakup position close to southern Africa. The reasons for this are uncertain, but we suggest that problems with the Gondwana apparent polar wander path may be important. More well constrained, early Paleozoic paleomagnetic data are required from the Ellsworth Mountains and the Gondwana continents if the data are to constrain further the Middle-Late Cambrian location of the Ellsworth-Whitmore Mountains block.

  7. A New Late Middle Cambrian Paleomagnetic Pole for the Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Randall; Curtis; Millar

    2000-07-01

    A paleomagnetic study of the late Middle to possibly early Late Cambrian Liberty Hills Formation in the Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica, reveals a stable magnetization with positive fold and reversal tests. The paleopole is based on 16 sites from volcanic and sedimentary rocks and lies at lat 7.3 degrees N and long 326.3 degrees E (A95=6.0&j0;). The new paleomagnetic data support the view that the Ellsworth Mountains are part of a microplate-the Ellsworth-Whitmore Mountains crustal block-that rotated independently of the main Gondwana continental blocks during breakup. The Liberty Hills pole differs from both previous poles recovered from Cambrian rocks in the Ellsworth Mountains and from the available Gondwana reference pole data. Our pole indicates a more northerly prebreakup position for the Ellsworth Mountains than previously suggested, contradicting the overwhelming geologic evidence for a prebreakup position close to southern Africa. The reasons for this are uncertain, but we suggest that problems with the Gondwana apparent polar wander path may be important. More well constrained, early Paleozoic paleomagnetic data are required from the Ellsworth Mountains and the Gondwana continents if the data are to constrain further the Middle-Late Cambrian location of the Ellsworth-Whitmore Mountains block. PMID:10856012

  8. Improved treating processes and materials for new utility poles: Volume 1, Overview: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, A.F.; McKaig, P.A.; Walcheski, P.J.; Williams, A.D.

    1987-03-01

    This study was initiated by the Electric Power Research Institute to develop new, environmentally acceptable wood preservatives for use by the utility industry. The research program ranged from fundamental studies in wood biodeterioration processes, through empirical screening of commercially available biocides, to the full-scale treatment of poles and crossarms.

  9. Patella fracture in a boy with bilateral inferior pole bipartite patellae.

    PubMed

    Peek, A C; Barry, M

    2012-10-01

    We present the case of a 12 year old boy who had bilateral inferior pole fragment (Saupe type 1) bipartite patellae, and who sustained a traumatic separation through the right patella while playing basket ball, the left remaining asymptomatic. We have reviewed and discussed the previously published literature and case reports.

  10. Cross-ratio identities and higher-order poles of CHY-integrand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Carlos; Feng, Bo; Gomez, Humberto; Huang, Rijun

    2016-09-01

    The evaluation of generic Cachazo-He-Yuan(CHY)-integrands is a big challenge and efficient computational methods are in demand for practical evaluation. In this paper, we propose a systematic decomposition algorithm by using cross-ratio identities, which provides an analytic and easy to implement method for the evaluation of any CHY-integrand. This algorithm aims to decompose a given CHY-integrand containing higher-order poles as a linear combination of CHY-integrands with only simple poles in a finite number of steps, which ultimately can be trivially evaluated by integration rules of simple poles. To make the method even more efficient for CHY-integrands with large number of particles and complicated higher-order pole structures, we combine the Λ-algorithm and the cross-ratio identities, and as a by-product it provides us a way to deal with CHY-integrands where the Λ-algorithm was not applicable in its original formulation.

  11. Higher-order poles and mass-shell singularities in electron-hydrogen scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucher, J.

    2002-10-01

    The forward scattering amplitude for electron-hydrogen scattering is expected to be an analytic function of the energy. However, when calculated within the framework of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics and the Born approximation, the exchange part has double and triple left-hand poles. From the viewpoint of field theory, such higher-order singularities are unexpected: One normally encounters only simple poles and branch points. A simple nonrelativistic model, which interpolates between binding by short-range and long-range forces, is used to show that these singularities are a direct consequence of the fact that the target system is bound by Coulomb forces: If the binding is by short-range forces there is only a simple pole. The double and triple poles emerge from a coalescence of simple poles and logarithmic branch points, in the limit of long-range binding. In the same framework, the direct amplitude has both simple and double poles, regarded as a function of the squared momentum transfer. Now even the simple pole is unexpected because the H atom is neutral. Again, the existence of these singularities is shown to be a consequence of Coulomb binding. The singularities are then studied within the framework of field theory. I show that if the H atom is treated as if it were an elementary particle, described by a field φH coupled to electron and proton fields φe and φp by a Lagrangian density LI=- G0(φeφp)†φH+H.c., the location of the singularity of the exchange amplitude is immediately obtained from a tree diagram, without the need to carry out any integrations. However, the nature of the singularity found does not agree with the nonrelativistic theory: There is no free lunch. Further analysis indicates that in full-fledged quantum electrodynamics, the vertex function Γ which describes the virtual decomposition of the H atom into its constituents must itself be singular when all particles are on the mass shell.

  12. Periodically poled vapor transport equilibrated lithium niobate for visible light generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussev, Rostislav V.; Route, Roger; Schaar, Joseph; Urbanek, Karel; Fejer, Martin M.; Jundt, Dieter; Kajiyama, Claudia

    2006-02-01

    The ability to achieve high quality periodic poling in lithium niobate (LN) has allowed quasi-phase-matching to be used for second-order nonlinear optics, leading to experimental demonstration of efficient optical frequency generation throughout its wide transparency range (0.35-4.5 microns). Applications of congruent lithium niobate involving visible or ultraviolet wavelengths are limited to low power or high temperature operation due to the effects of photorefractive damage (PRD) and green-induced infrared absorption (GRIIRA). The standard methods of suppressing PRD include doping with 5 mol-% MgO or ZnO and varying crystal stoichiometry. More recent methods employ a combination of lower doping level and near-stoichiometric composition. We use vapor transport equilibration (VTE) and significantly lower MgO doping (<0.5% in the melt) to obtain near-stoichiometric PRD-resistant crystals with improved parameters for periodic poling compared to the commercially available 5% MgO-doped congruent crystals. An efficient process for periodic poling at room temperature using baked photoresist as a patterned dielectric on one crystal surface with LiCl-solution electrodes was developed for periods as short as 8.3 microns for 0.5% and 7 microns for 0.3% MgO-doped VTE:LN. The quality of periodic poling improves as the MgO concentration is lowered. Stable second harmonic generation of 1.3-W continuous-wave 532-nm radiation was observed near room temperature (43 degrees Celsius, as determined by the phase matching condition) with no sign of degradation in a 1.5-cm long crystal of 0.3-% MgO-doped VTE:LN periodically poled with a period of 7.06 microns.

  13. Assays to Study Mitotic Centrosome and Spindle Pole Assembly and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Joukov, Vladimir; Walter, Johannes C; De Nicolo, Arcangela

    2016-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation during cell division requires proper bipolar spindle assembly and critically depends on spindle pole integrity. In most animal cells, spindle poles form as the result of the concerted action of various factors operating in two independent pathways of microtubule assembly mediated by chromatin/RanGTP and by centrosomes. Mutation or deregulation of a number of spindle pole-organizing proteins has been linked to human diseases, including cancer and microcephaly. Our knowledge on how the spindle pole-organizing factors function at the molecular level and cooperate with one another is still quite limited. As the list of these factors expands, so does the need for the development of experimental approaches to study their function. Cell-free extracts from Xenopus laevis eggs have played an instrumental role in the dissection of the mechanisms of bipolar spindle assembly and have recently allowed the reconstitution of the key steps of the centrosome-driven microtubule nucleation pathway (Joukov et al., Mol Cell 55:578-591, 2014). Here we describe assays to study both centrosome-dependent and centrosome-independent spindle pole formation in Xenopus egg extracts. We also provide experimental procedures for the use of artificial centrosomes, such as microbeads coated with an anti-Aurora A antibody or a recombinant fragment of the Cep192 protein, to model and study centrosome maturation in egg extract. In addition, we detail the protocol for a microtubule regrowth assay that allows assessment of the centrosome-driven spindle microtubule assembly in mammalian cells. PMID:27193852

  14. Thermal stability of internal liquid water reservoir at Enceladus' South pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobie, G.; Behounkova, M.; Besserer, J.; Cadek, O.; Choblet, G.

    2010-12-01

    The total heat power released at Enceladus' South pole is about 50 times larger than the available radiogenic power, implying that an additional source of energy exists. Tidal dissipation is the most likely candidate, but the observed power and its particular location at the south pole can be reproduced only if a liquid layer exists at depth (Tobie et al. Icarus 2008). Moreover, this liquid reservoir should spread over at least half of the southern hemisphere to induce sufficient tidal deformation at the pole. In order to determine the stability of this internal liquid reservoir and its effects on the dynamics of the overlying ice shell, we have developed a new tool that solves simultaneously mantle convection and tidal dissipation in 3D spherical geometry (Behounkova et al. JGR, in press, 2010). Using this new 3D technique, we demonstrate that the tidal strain rates are strongly enhanced in hot upwellings when compared with classical methods of tidal dissipation computation, and therefore that lateral variations of viscosity must be explicitly taken into account to correctly describe the dissipation field. Moreover, our 3D simulations show that tidal dissipation in Enceladus tends to focus hot upwellings at the South pole and cold downwellings in the equatorial region, and that the heat flux at the base of the ice shell is strongly reduced at the pole, thus favoring the preservation of a liquid reservoir at depth. By systematically varying the orbital and internal parameters, we investigate the conditions under which a liquid reservoir can be thermally stable in Enceladus' interior and what is its possible extension at equilibrium.

  15. Tectonic implications of paleomagnetic poles from Lower Tertiary Volcanic Rocks, south central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillhouse, John W.; Grommé, C. Sherman; Csejtey, Bela, Jr.

    1985-12-01

    We have determined the paleolatitude of lower Tertiary volcanic rocks in southern Alaska to measure possible poleward translation of the Wrangellia and the Peninsular terranes after 50 m.y. ago. Previous paleomagnetic studies have shown that in Triassic and Jurassic time these terranes were located near the equator and have moved at least 3000 km poleward relative to the North American craton. Our sample localities are in the northern Talkeetna Mountains in mildly deformed andesite and dacite flows (50.4, 51.3, 53.9, and 56.3 m.y. by K-Ar) that overlap Lower Cretaceous flysch, Lower Permian volcanic rocks of Wrangellia, and Upper Triassic pillow basalt of the Susitna terrane. Results from 26 cooling units (23 of reversed polarity and 3 of normal polarity) give a mean paleomagnetic pole at 69.5°N, 179.6°E, α95 = 12.2°. Stratigraphic sections from opposite limbs of a syncline yield directional paths that pass the fold test, satisfying a necessary condition for primary origin of the magnetization. The corresponding mean paleolatitude (76°N) of the northern Talkeetna Mountains is 8°±10° higher than the latitude predicted from the Eocene reference pole for North America. Therefore, northward drift of the Talkeetna superterrane, which is the amalgamation of the Wrangellia and Peninsular terranes during and after Middle Jurassic time, was probably complete by 50 m.y. ago. Our results are consistent with paleomagnetic poles from uppermost Cretaceous and Paleocene volcanic sequences in Denali National Park, the Lake Clark region, northern Bristol Bay region, and near McGrath. These poles generally lie south of the cratonic poles, suggesting that the region between the Kaltag, Bruin Bay, and Castle Mountain faults has rotated counterclockwise relative to North America since the early Eocene.

  16. Correlation of Beam Transport Characteristics and Mass Resolving Power to Analyzing Magnet Pole Piece Wear in Axcelis HE Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ron; Schuur, John; Tysinger, Randy

    2008-11-01

    An investigation into odd analyzing magnet tuning behavior on an Axcelis HE ion implanter revealed a correlation to excessive wear on the analyzer magnet pole pieces. Though the lifetime is generally quite good, the pole pieces are internal to the beamline design and are exposed to and sputtered by the ion beam during mass analysis. This erosion of the pole piece surfaces affects beam focus and transport, especially for lower current ion beams. Eventually, automatic beam set-up fails altogether as the system is unable to locate the correct amu peak. It is important to understand and correct any deficiencies in pole piece condition as long-term neglect will eventually lead to process errors. Data is presented to illustrate good and bad pole piece condition and a method is suggested for non-invasive testing.

  17. The Evaluation of Vertical Pole Configuration and Location on Assisting the Sit-to-Stand Movement in Older Adults with Mobility Limitations.

    PubMed

    Vena, Daniel; Novak, Alison C; King, Emily C; Dutta, Tilak; Fernie, Geoff R

    2015-01-01

    Grab-bars and transfer poles are common sit-to-stand aids for mobility limited older adults. This study investigated differences in kinetics and kinematics to characterize the lower-limb strength and dynamic balance requirements across different pole configurations and positions in nine mobility limited older adults. Poles were varied by location (near and far) and configuration (single vertical pole, double vertical poles, vertical pole with a horizontal bar). Results indicated that the far pole condition resulted in increased trunk (p < 0.001) and hip flexion (p < 0.01 and < 0.0001 for contralateral and ipsilateral sides, respectively), and a reduced peak vertical force applied to the pole (p < 0.001). Peak extension moments at the hip and knee were unchanged, and, therefore, pole position had no effect on task demands. Placing the pole unilaterally introduced a small kinetic asymmetry, which significantly increased peak knee extension moments on the ipsilateral side (p < 0.05). Finally, dynamic balance was relatively unchanged across pole conditions. These findings offer novel insight into pole use and the effect of varying pole location and configuration in a sample of older adults with mobility impairment, and provide the basis for future work.

  18. Building on IPY Data, Collaborations and Infrastructure to Understand the Changing Poles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, R. E.; Krupnik, I.; Hik, D.; Alverson, K. D.; Drinkwater, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    In contrast to previous IPY programs that were driven by a central organizing group, the 2007-9 IPY emerged from more than 1000 ideas provided by the global science community. This global IPY planning process produced six major themes that framed the IPY programs. Three themes focused on change at the poles, one focused on probing the frontiers of the polar science, one targeted on using the polar regions as vantage points to look beyond into space and a sixth theme targeted integrated studies of polar cultural, historical and social processes. The results of the IPY 2007-9 are just beginning to emerge. Benchmark data sets were acquired such as coordinated imaging of the poles from space, systematic ocean measurements and a census of marine life. IPY programs have documented how ongoing polar change from permafrost to ecosystems varies regionally depending on local conditions. Analysis of past change in ecosystems, sediment cores and numeric models indicate that during periods with elevated temperatures and atmospheric CO2, the West Antarctic ice sheet can collapse repeatedly. Studies of the polar oceans have confirmed a strong connection between the mid-latitudes and polar processes. The efforts to explore the poles have revealed explosive volcanism beneath the Arctic Ocean, strong genetic similarities between microbes at the two poles and dynamic processes at the base of the East Antarctic ice sheet. IPY programs looking beyond the poles imaged new galaxies and identified new linkages between solar output and weather. The early insights from IPY 2007-9 are remarkable. Building on these will be a challenge for the science community and science agencies over the next decade. The IPY data must be archived and made available to the broad science community to ensure it is preserved as a vital benchmark. The collaborations between scientists, agencies, Arctic residents and institutions initiated by the IPY structure must be fostered and continued. Successful scientific

  19. Nest-building behavior of Monk Parakeets and insights into potential mechanisms for reducing damage to utility poles

    PubMed Central

    Rubega, Margaret A.; Sustaita, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The Monk Parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus) commonly uses utility poles as a substrate for building large, bulky nests. These nests often cause fires and electric power outages, creating public safety risks and increasing liability and maintenance costs for electric companies. Previous research has focused on lethal methods and chemical contraception to prevent nesting on utility poles and electrical substations. However, implementation of lethal methods has led to public protests and lawsuits, while chemical contraception may affect other than the targeted species, and must be continually reapplied for effectiveness. One non-lethal alternative, nest removal, is costly and may not be a sustainable measure if Monk Parakeet populations continue to grow. In order to identify cost-effective non-lethal solutions to problems caused by Monk Parakeet nesting, we studied their behavior as they built nests on utility poles. Monk Parakeets initiate nests by attaching sticks at the intersection of the pole and electric lines. We found that parakeets use the electric lines exclusively to gain access to the intersection of lines and pole during nest initiation, and continue to use the lines intensively throughout construction. Monk Parakeets also have more difficulty attaching sticks during the early stages of nest construction than when the nest is nearing completion. These findings suggest that intervention during the earlier stages of nest building, by excluding Monk Parakeets from electric lines adjacent to poles, may be an effective, non-lethal method of reducing or eliminating parakeets nesting on, and damaging, utility poles. PMID:25289186

  20. Nest-building behavior of Monk Parakeets and insights into potential mechanisms for reducing damage to utility poles.

    PubMed

    Burgio, Kevin R; Rubega, Margaret A; Sustaita, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The Monk Parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus) commonly uses utility poles as a substrate for building large, bulky nests. These nests often cause fires and electric power outages, creating public safety risks and increasing liability and maintenance costs for electric companies. Previous research has focused on lethal methods and chemical contraception to prevent nesting on utility poles and electrical substations. However, implementation of lethal methods has led to public protests and lawsuits, while chemical contraception may affect other than the targeted species, and must be continually reapplied for effectiveness. One non-lethal alternative, nest removal, is costly and may not be a sustainable measure if Monk Parakeet populations continue to grow. In order to identify cost-effective non-lethal solutions to problems caused by Monk Parakeet nesting, we studied their behavior as they built nests on utility poles. Monk Parakeets initiate nests by attaching sticks at the intersection of the pole and electric lines. We found that parakeets use the electric lines exclusively to gain access to the intersection of lines and pole during nest initiation, and continue to use the lines intensively throughout construction. Monk Parakeets also have more difficulty attaching sticks during the early stages of nest construction than when the nest is nearing completion. These findings suggest that intervention during the earlier stages of nest building, by excluding Monk Parakeets from electric lines adjacent to poles, may be an effective, non-lethal method of reducing or eliminating parakeets nesting on, and damaging, utility poles.

  1. Maloriented bivalents have metaphase positions at the spindle equator with more kinetochore microtubules to one pole than to the other.

    PubMed

    LaFountain, James R; Oldenbourg, Rudolf

    2004-12-01

    To test the "traction fiber" model for metaphase positioning of bivalents during meiosis, kinetochore fibers of maloriented bivalents, induced during recovery from cold arrest, were analyzed with a liquid crystal polarizing microscope. The measured birefringence retardation of kinetochore fibers is proportional to the number of microtubules in a fiber. Five of the 11 maloriented bivalents analyzed exhibited bipolar malorientations that had at least four times more kinetochore microtubules to one pole than to the other pole, and two had microtubules directed to only one pole. Yet all maloriented bivalents had positions at or near the spindle equator. The traction fiber model predicts such maloriented bivalents should be positioned closer to the pole with more kinetochore microtubules. A metaphase position at the spindle equator, according to the model, requires equal numbers of kinetochore microtubules to both poles. Data from polarizing microscope images were not in accord with those predictions, leading to the conclusion that other factors, in addition to traction forces, must be involved in metaphase positioning in crane-fly spermatocytes. Although the identity of additional factors has not been established, one possibility is that polar ejection forces operate to exert away-from-the-pole forces that could counteract pole-directed traction forces. Another is that kinetochores are "smart," meaning they embody a position-sensitive mechanism that controls their activity.

  2. The Effects of Walking or Walking-with-Poles Training on Tissue Oxygenation in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Eileen G.; McBurney, Conor; Butler, Jolene; Jelinek, Christine; O'Connell, Susan; Fritschi, Cynthia; Reda, Domenic

    2012-01-01

    This randomized trial proposed to determine if there were differences in calf muscle StO2 parameters in patients before and after 12 weeks of a traditional walking or walking-with-poles exercise program. Data were collected on 85 patients who were randomized to a traditional walking program (n = 40) or walking-with-poles program (n = 45) of exercise training. Patients walked for 3 times weekly for 12 weeks. Seventy-one patients completed both the baseline and the 12-week follow-up progressive treadmill tests (n = 36 traditional walking and n = 35 walking-with-poles). Using the near-infrared spectroscopy measures, StO2 was measured prior to, during, and after exercise. At baseline, calf muscle oxygenation decreased from 56 ± 17% prior to the treadmill test to 16 ± 18% at peak exercise. The time elapsed prior to reaching nadir StO2 values increased more in the traditional walking group when compared to the walking-with-poles group. Likewise, absolute walking time increased more in the traditional walking group than in the walking-with-poles group. Tissue oxygenation decline during treadmill testing was less for patients assigned to a 12-week traditional walking program when compared to those assigned to a 12-week walking-with-poles program. In conclusion, the 12-week traditional walking program was superior to walking-with-poles in improving tissue deoxygenation in patients with PAD. PMID:23050152

  3. Phase-matched second-harmonic generation in poled polymers by the use of birefringence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, X. T.; Watanabe, T.; Zou, D. C.; Ukuda, H.; Miyata, S.

    1995-09-01

    Green light has been observed for the first time to the authors' knowledge by bulk phase-matched second-harmonic generation from a stretched main chain polyurea. The polyurea was synthesized from 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate and 4,4'-methylene bis(cyclohexylamine). The spin-coated film has an initial positive birefringence. Drawing further increased the birefringence, and the film can be used for phase matching just as in biaxial single crystals. The drawn and poled polymer films belong to the 2mm point group. Three independent nonlinear-optic coefficients were determined. The type I phase-matching characteristics were calculated and confirmed by experiments. We demonstrate that a highly effective second-harmonic-generation device with a long optical path length can be obtained by use of bulk phase-matchable poled polymer.

  4. The South pole region of the moon as seen by clementine.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, E M; Robinson, M S; Eliason, E M

    1994-12-16

    The Clementine mission has provided the first comprehensive set of high-resolution images of the south pole region of the moon. Within 5 degrees of latitude of the pole, an area of an estimated 30,000 square kilometers remained in shadow during a full lunar rotation and is a promising target for future exploration for ice deposits. The Schrödinger Basin (320 kilometers in diameter), centered at 75 degrees S, is one of the two youngest, least modified, great multiring impact basins on the moon. A large maar-type volcano localized along a graben within the Schrödinger Basin probably erupted between 1 and 2 billion years ago.

  5. Simulation study of poled low-water ionomers with different architectures.

    PubMed

    Allahyarov, Elshad; Taylor, Philip L; Löwen, Hartmut

    2011-11-16

    The role of the ionomer architecture in the formation of ordered structures in poled membranes is investigated by molecular dynamics computer simulations. It is shown that the length of the sidechain L(s) controls both the areal density of cylindrical aggregates N(c) and the diameter of these cylinders in the poled membrane. The backbone segment length L(b) tunes the average diameter D(s) of cylindrical clusters and the average number of sulfonates N(s) in each cluster. A simple empirical formula is noted for the dependence of the number density of induced rod-like aggregates on the sidechain length L(s) within the parameter range considered in this study.

  6. Observations of thermal emission from the south pole of Enceladus in August 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, J. R.; Howett, C. J. A.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Hurford, T. A.; Segura, M. E.; Pearl, J. C.

    2011-10-01

    The Cassini CIRS instrument continues its observations of the thermal emission from the active "tiger stripe" fractures at the south pole of Enceladus. On August 13th 2010, on orbit 136, the "E11" Enceladus encounter provided a particularly favorable geometry for remote sensing of the south pole, and yielded some of the most detailed observations of tiger stripe thermal emission of the entire mission. Maps of 6.7 - 16.7 !m thermal emission from one of the brightest regions of Damascus Sulcus reveal large variations in brightness along the length of the fracture with a peak near the source of Plume 2 [7]. The emission from the brightest region is close to a blackbody, with best-fit temperatures in the range 167 - 185 K, depending on the exact wavelength range and spatial subset of the data that is fitted. Lower-temperature radiation is also seen from the flanks of the sulcus.

  7. Orbital angular momentum entanglement via fork-poling nonlinear photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Lu, L L; Xu, P; Zhong, M L; Bai, Y F; Zhu, S N

    2015-01-26

    We report a compact scheme for the generation and manipulation of photon pairs entangled in the orbital angular momentum (OAM) from the fork-poling quadratic nonlinear crystal. The χ(2)-modulation in this crystal is designed for fulfilling a tilted quasi-phase-matching geometry to ensure the efficient generation of entangled photons as well as for transferring of topological charge of the crystal to the photon pairs. Numerical results show that the OAM of photon pair is anti-correlated and the degree of OAM entanglement can be enhanced by modulating the topological charge of crystal, which indicates a feasible extension to high-dimensional OAM entanglement. These studies suggest that the fork-poling nonlinear photonic crystal a unique platform for compact generation and manipulation of high-dimensional and high-order OAM entanglement, which may have potential applications in quantum communication, quantum cryptography and quantum remote sensing.

  8. Effects of plasmon pole models on the G0W0 electronic structure of various oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miglio, A.; Waroquiers, D.; Antonius, G.; Giantomassi, M.; Stankovski, M.; Côté, M.; Gonze, X.; Rignanese, G.-M.

    2012-09-01

    The electronic properties of three different oxides (ZnO, SnO2 and SiO2) are investigated within many-body perturbation theory in the G 0 W 0 approximation. The frequency dependence of the dielectric function is either approximated using two different well-established plasmon-pole models (one of which enforces the fulfillment of the f-sum rule) or treated explicitly by means of the contour-deformation approach. Comparing these results, it is found that the plasmon-pole model enforcing the f-sum rule gives less accurate results for all three oxides. The calculated electronic properties are also compared with the available experimental data and previous ab initio results, focusing on the d state binding energies. The G 0 W 0 approach leads to significantly improved band gaps with respect to calculations based on the density functional theory in the local density approximation.

  9. Demonstration of Launch Vehicle Slosh Instability on Pole-Cart Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pei, Jing; Rothhaar, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Liquid propellant makes up a significant portion of the total weight for large launch vehicles such as Saturn V, Space Shuttle, and the Space Launch System (SLS). Careful attention must be given to the influence of fuel slosh motion on the stability of the vehicle. A well-documented slosh danger zone occurs when the slosh mass is between the vehicle center of mass and the center of percussion. Passive damping via slosh baffle is generally required when the slosh mass is within this region. The pole-cart hardware system, typically used for academic purposes, has similar dynamic characteristics as an unstable launch vehicle. This setup offers a simple and inexpensive way of analyzing slosh dynamics and its impact on flight control design. In this paper, experimental and numerical results from the pole-cart system will be shown and direct analogies to launch vehicle slosh dynamics will be made.

  10. Orbital angular momentum entanglement via fork-poling nonlinear photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Lu, L L; Xu, P; Zhong, M L; Bai, Y F; Zhu, S N

    2015-01-26

    We report a compact scheme for the generation and manipulation of photon pairs entangled in the orbital angular momentum (OAM) from the fork-poling quadratic nonlinear crystal. The χ(2)-modulation in this crystal is designed for fulfilling a tilted quasi-phase-matching geometry to ensure the efficient generation of entangled photons as well as for transferring of topological charge of the crystal to the photon pairs. Numerical results show that the OAM of photon pair is anti-correlated and the degree of OAM entanglement can be enhanced by modulating the topological charge of crystal, which indicates a feasible extension to high-dimensional OAM entanglement. These studies suggest that the fork-poling nonlinear photonic crystal a unique platform for compact generation and manipulation of high-dimensional and high-order OAM entanglement, which may have potential applications in quantum communication, quantum cryptography and quantum remote sensing. PMID:25835879

  11. Levitation Performance of Two Opposed Permanent Magnet Pole-Pair Separated Conical Bearingless Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Peter; Jansen, Ralph; Dever, Timothy; Nagorny, Aleksandr; Loparo, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    In standard motor applications, rotor suspension with traditional mechanical bearings represents the most economical solution. However, in certain high performance applications, rotor suspension without contacting bearings is either required or highly beneficial. Examples include applications requiring very high speed or extreme environment operation, or with limited access for maintenance. This paper expands upon a novel bearingless motor concept, in which two motors with opposing conical air-gaps are used to achieve full five-axis levitation and rotation of the rotor. Force in this motor is created by deliberately leaving the motor s pole-pairs unconnected, which allows the creation of different d-axis flux in each pole pair. This flux imbalance is used to create lateral force. This approach is different than previous bearingless motor designs, which require separate windings for levitation and rotation. This paper examines the predicted and achieved suspension performance of a fully levitated prototype bearingless system.

  12. Quantitative analysis of piezoelectricity in simultaneously stretched and corona poled polyvinyl chloride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, Vivek; Nath, R.

    1997-10-01

    Piezoelectric activity in cyclohexane-treated polyvinyl chloride films has been found to increase when processed under simultaneously stretched and corona poled (SSCP) conditions. The piezoelectric coefficient d31=7.2±1.1 pC/N was obtained in these films under optimum poling conditions. The main contributor to the improved piezoelectricity has been the increased dipolar polarization. Crystallinity and compliance have contributed marginally to the former. Thermally stimulated current (TSC) experiments show that maximum oriented dipole density has been achieved during the SSCP. Dipolar polarization ≈10-2C/m2 has been obtained. The TSC and the shrinkage effect involving molecular rotation and/or chain motion are closely related. An application of the extended Mopsik and Broadhurst theory shows that 56% of the measured d31 is due to the dimensional effect and 44% due to the local field effect.

  13. Second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities in nonelectrically poled guest-host polymers with tricyanofuran chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kazuma; Sato, Yasuaki; Takasu, Ryosuke; Mase, Nobuyuki; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Tasaka, Shigeru; Sugita, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    In this manuscript, we describe the current manuscript describes the second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility of guest-host polymers possessing chromophores with strongly electron-accepting tricyanofuran (TCF). Chromophores substituted with different numbers of hydroxyl groups were prepared. Our experimental results demonstrated that the guest-host polymers exhibited nonlinear optical susceptibilities simply upon annealing at temperatures higher than the glass transition point of the host polymers even in the absence of applied external DC electric fields. Nonelectrical poling behaviors were only available for the materials possessing hydroxyl-group-functionalized chromophores. The results indicate that chemisorption of the hydroxyl groups on the substrate led to the orientation order of the guest chromophores. The orientation order of the chromophores was reproduced well by the model of poled polymers in previous studies.

  14. Test of Lorentz Invariance at the Amundsen - Scott South Pole Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiciklas, Marc; Vernaza, Andrew; Romalis, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Tests of Lorentz and CPT symmetry provide one of the few ways to experimentally access Planck-scale physics. Currently the most sensitive Lorentz symmetry tests for fermions are performed with atomic spin co-magnetometers. Earth rotation represents a large background for such experiments due to gyroscopic spin interaction. To improve the limits on vector and tensor Lorentz-violating interactions we have installed a 21Ne-Rb co-magnetometer at the Amundsen - Scott South Pole Station. The experiment is mounted on a precision air-bearing rotating platform aligned to the local vertical to eliminate most Earth-bound sources of systematic errors. We plan to collect data over the austral winter. We will describe the experience of operating the experiment at the South Pole and present the latest results. Supported by NSF ANT-1142032.

  15. Status and recent results of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karg, Timo; IceCube Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been deployed to study the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection in Antarctic ice around the South Pole. An array of four strings equipped with acoustic receivers and transmitters, permanently installed in the upper 500 m of boreholes drilled for the IceCube neutrino observatory, and a retrievable transmitter that can be used in the water filled holes before the installation of the IceCube optical strings are used to measure the ice acoustic properties. These include the sound speed and its depth dependence, the attenuation length, the noise level, and the rate and nature of transient background sources in the relevant frequency range from 10 to 100 kHz. SPATS is operating successfully since January 2007 and has been able to either measure or constrain all parameters. We present the latest results of SPATS and discuss their implications for future acoustic neutrino detection activities in Antarctica.

  16. Simultaneous observations of auroras from the South Pole Station and of precipitating electrons by Isis 1.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winningham, J. D.; Heikkila, W. J.; Akasofu, S.-I.; Yasuhara, F.

    1973-01-01

    On the basis of the simultaneous observations of auroras from the South Pole and of precipitating electrons by the Isis 1 satellite it is shown that (1) a midday auroral arc (photographed on black and white film) occurs within the cleft (cusp) region projected to the appropriate auroral height along the geomagnetic field; (2) in the evening sector an aurora, observed by Isis 1 and the South Pole all-sky camera, extended for at least 5 hours of local geomagnetic time in the expected position of the auroral oval; and (3) during a period of extreme magnetic quiet, cleftlike electrons were observed just poleward of a narrow region of intense precipitation in the midnight sector. An earth-sun oriented arc was seen at the projected location of the intense electron flux.

  17. Influence analysis of time delay to active mass damper control system using pole assignment method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, J.; Xing, H. B.; Lu, W.; Li, Z. H.; Chen, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    To reduce the influence of time delay on the Active Mass Damper (AMD) control systems, influence analysis of time delay on system poles and stability is applied in the paper. A formula of the maximum time delay for ensuring system stability is established, by which the influence analysis of control gains on system stability is further arisen. In addition, the compensation controller is designed based on the given analysis results and pole assignment. A numerical example and an experiment are illustrated to verify that the performance of time-delay system. The result is consistent to that of the long-time delay control system, as well as to proof the better effectiveness of the new method proposed in this article.

  18. Cohesin subunit SMC1 associates with mitotic microtubules at the spindle pole

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Richard W.; Blobel, Günter

    2008-01-01

    Accurate mitotic chromosome segregation depends on the formation of a microtubule-based bipolar spindle apparatus. We report that the cohesin subunit structural maintenance of chromosomes subunit 1 (SMC1) is recruited to microtubule-bound RNA export factor 1 (Rae1) at the mitotic spindle pole. We locate the Rae1-binding site to a 21-residue-long region, SMC1947-967 and provide several lines of evidence that phosphorylation of Ser957 and Ser966 of SMC1 stimulates binding to Rae1. Imbalances in these assembly pathways caused formation of multipolar spindles. Our data suggest that cohesin's known bundling function for chromatids in mitotic and interphase cells extends to microtubules at the spindle pole. PMID:18832153

  19. Trans-Scaphoid Perilunate Dislocation: Union of an Extruded Scaphoid Proximal Pole Fragment.

    PubMed

    Goon, Pky; Vaghela, K R; Chojnowski, A J

    2015-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a closed perilunate dorsal-dislocation of the carpus, with an associated scaphoid fracture. In this extreme case, the proximal scaphoid pole was extruded volarly and proximally. After closed manipulation, the proximal pole of the scaphoid was further dislocated dorsally, a phenomenon not previously described in the literature. At open reduction this fragment was noted to have no soft tissue attachment but after reduction, distal radius bone graft and compression screw fixation the scaphoid went on to unite with a good functional result. This case highlights a rare but serious injury to the wrist with an unusual dislocation pattern not previously described. It demonstrates that early surgical intervention to fix such fractures with an avascular fragment can still achieve fracture union, despite the severity.

  20. BICEP2/SPUD: Searching for Inflation with Degree Scale Polarimetry from the South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hien Trong; Kovac, John; Adec, Peter; Aikin, Randol; Benton, Steve; Bock, Jamie; Brevik, Justus; Carlstrom, John; Dowell, Darren; Duband, Lionel; Golwala, Sunil; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Irwin, Kent; Jones, William; Kaufman, Jonathan; Keating, Brian; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Lange, Andrew; Matsumura, Tomotake; Netterfield, Barth; Pryke, Clem; Ruhl, John; Sheehy, Chris; Sudiwala, Rashmi

    2008-01-01

    BICEP2/SPUD is the new powerful upgrade of the existing BICEP1 experiment, a bolometric receiver to study the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation, which has been in operation at the South Pole since January 2006. BICEP2 will provide an improvement up to 10 times mapping speed at 150 GHz compared to BICEP1, using the same BICEP telescope mount. SPUD, a series of compact, mechanically-cooled receivers deployed on the DASI mount at the Pole, will provide similar mapping speed in to BICEP2 in three bands, 100, 150, and 220 GHz. The new system will use large TES focal plane arrays to provide unprecedented sensitivity and excellent control of foreground contamination.

  1. Predictions of three-body-decays of mesons from pole-dominated dispersion relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thews, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The investigation shows that the method of finite dispersion relations (FDR) as developed by Aviv and Nussinov (1970) is consistent with a wide range of three-body meson decays. The specific results vary with each reaction. For each possibility a definite form for the t-channel Regge-pole terms is selected. The results of the investigation indicate the basic reliability of an approach based on the FDR method and the finite-energy sum rules.

  2. Second harmonic generation in periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide using femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuanggen; Yao, Jianghong; Fan, Yaxian; Liu, Weiwei; Liu, Yange; Shi, Qing; Huang, Zhangchao; Lu, Fuyun

    2008-11-01

    We present in this paper the fabrication and characterization of thermally stable double line waveguides in Z-cut periodically poled Lithium Niobate crystals. The waveguides were fabricated by using a femto-second laser, and utilized for second-harmonic generation. Our experiments have shown that a quasi-phase matching wavelength of 1548.2 nm, a tuning bandwidth of 2 nm, and a tuning temperature range of 150.4+/-1.6°C can be achieved.

  3. Short timescale variation in the ENA flux emanating from the heliospheric poles: IBEX observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisenfeld, Daniel; Abell, T. R.; Allegrini, F.; Bzowski, M.; Crew, G. B.; Demajistre, R.; Frisch, P. C.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S. A.; Janzen, P. H.; Kubiak, M.; Kucharek, H.; McComas, D. J.; Roelof, E.; Schwadron, N. A.

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) completes a full sweep of the sky once every six months; thus in general, if we seek evidence for temporal variation in the heliospheric ENA flux, we must wait six months before revisiting the same part of the sky. However, due to the constant sun-pointing orientation of the IBEX spin axis, two points on the sky, the ecliptic poles, are observed continuously. Therefore, we can examine if the outer heliosphere is changing on timescales shorter than six months at the poles, by tracking the evolution of ENA flux emanating from these regions. Our preliminary findings suggest that on timescales > 50 days, temporal variations at the poles may be present; however, the statistical certainty is low. Due to time dispersion within the IBEX energy passbands, this is at the limit of achievable time resolution. The separate energy passbands also leads to a time dispersion in ENAs arriving from the heliosheath of ˜1 year for ENAs between 500 eV and 6 keV. IBEX has recently completed its first year of observations, thus we are now able to time-correlate observations from the different passbands. We correct the data using a ENA survival model that accounts for ENA loss between the outer heliosphere and IBEX. The time variation analysis is complicated by the fact that the magnitude of the variations we observe is comparable in scale to background rates. Correcting for these non-heliospheric sources is ongoing. We note that the presence of time variability at the poles would be sur-prising, since solar variability is presumably the main driver of fluctuations at the interstellar boundary, and solar activity has been nearly absent over the current extended solar minimum.

  4. Low drive voltage electro-optic Bragg deflector using a periodically poled lithium niobate planar waveguide.

    PubMed

    Mhaouech, I; Coda, V; Montemezzani, G; Chauvet, M; Guilbert, L

    2016-09-15

    An electro-optic Bragg light deflector is demonstrated in a thinned, periodically poled lithium niobate planar waveguide confined between two silica layers on a silicon substrate. More than 97% of diffraction efficiency is obtained with an operating wavelength of 633 nm for the two orthogonal light polarizations with a drive voltage of about 5 V. The temporal electric drift and the response time of the component are also studied.

  5. Technological and economical analysis of salient pole and permanent magnet synchronous machines designed for wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gündoğdu, Tayfun; Kömürgöz, Güven

    2012-08-01

    Chinese export restrictions already reduced the planning reliability for investments in permanent magnet wind turbines. Today the production of permanent magnets consumes the largest proportion of rare earth elements, with 40% of the rare earth-based magnets used for generators and other electrical machines. The cost and availability of NdFeB magnets will likely determine the production rate of permanent magnet generators. The high volatility of rare earth metals makes it very difficult to quote a price. Prices may also vary from supplier to supplier to an extent of up to 50% for the same size, shape and quantity with a minor difference in quality. The paper presents the analysis and the comparison of salient pole with field winding and of peripheral winding synchronous electrical machines, presenting important advantages. A neodymium alloy magnet rotor structure has been considered and compared to the salient rotor case. The Salient Pole Synchronous Machine and the Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machine were designed so that the plate values remain constant. The Eddy current effect on the windings is taken into account during the design, and the efficiency, output power and the air-gap flux density obtained after the simulation were compared. The analysis results clearly indicate that Salient Pole Synchronous Machine designs would be attractive to wind power companies. Furthermore, the importance of the design of electrical machines and the determination of criteria are emphasized. This paper will be a helpful resource in terms of examination and comparison of the basic structure and magnetic features of the Salient Pole Synchronous Machine and Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machine. Furthermore, an economic analysis of the designed machines was conducted.

  6. Imaging the South Pole-Aitken basin in backscattered neutral hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorburger, A.; Wurz, P.; Barabash, S.; Wieser, M.; Futaana, Y.; Bhardwaj, A.; Asamura, K.

    2015-09-01

    The lunar surface is very efficient in reflecting impinging solar wind ions as energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). A global analysis of lunar hydrogen ENAs showed that on average 16% of the solar wind protons are reflected, and that the reflected fraction can range from less than 8% to more than 24%, depending on location. It is established that magnetic anomalies reduce the flux of backscattered hydrogen ENAs by screening-off a fraction of the impinging solar wind. The effects of the surface properties, such as porosity, roughness, chemical composition, and extent of weathering, were not known. In this paper, we conduct an in-depth analysis of ENA observations of the South Pole-Aitken basin to determine which of the surface properties might be responsible for the observed variation in the integral ENA flux. The South Pole-Aitken basin with its highly variable surface properties is an ideal object for such studies. It is very deep, possesses strikingly elevated concentrations in iron and thorium, has a low albedo and coincides with a cluster of strong magnetic anomalies located on the northern rim of the basin. Our analysis shows that whereas, as expected, the magnetic anomalies can account well for the observed ENA depletion at the South Pole-Aitken basin, none of the other surface properties seem to influence the ENA reflection efficiency. Therefore, the integral flux of backscattered hydrogen ENAs is mainly determined by the impinging plasma flux and ENA imaging of backscattered hydrogen captures the electrodynamics of the plasma at the surface. We cannot exclude minor effects by surface features. We create two maps of surface reflected ENAs at the South Pole-Aitken basin. We compare these ENA maps to elevation, albedo, composition and magnetic field maps. The ENA maps only significantly correlate with the magnetic field map. ENA imaging captures solely the electrodynamics of the plasma at the surface.

  7. Searching for the Remnants of Southern Seas: Cassini Observations of the South Pole of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stofan, Ellen R.; Aharonson, O.; Hayes, A. G.; Kirk, R.; Lopes, R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Lucas, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Malaska, M.; Radebaugh, J.; Stiles, B. W.; Turtle, E. P.; Wall, S. D.; Wood, C. A.; Cassini Radar Team

    2012-10-01

    The north polar region of Titan is home to three large seas along with hundreds of smaller lakes, while the south pole apparently has only two partially filled basins of liquid hydrocarbons. Aharonson et al. [2009] has suggested that cycles analogous to Croll-Milankovich cycles on Earth cause long-term cyclic transfer of hydrocarbons from pole to pole, with the north pole now containing the bulk of the liquids. Less than 50,000 years ago, the cycle would have been reversed, suggesting that the south polar region should contain remnants of southern seas. To identify such seas, we search for features enclosed by an apparent remnant shoreline, with an interior region of smooth (radar-dark) plains. Two such features can be readily identified, each with areal extents of over 100,000 km2, along with several other possible candidate remnant seas or large lakes. One of the possible seas now contains Ontario Lacus. Analysis of the morphologic and topographic characteristics of the two candidate remnant seas can help constrain the possible depth and basin characteristics of the northern seas, as well as possible rates of surface modification in the time since the seas have (largely) dried up. In addition, analysis of the radar characteristics of the remnant sea basins may help us to determine if such processes also acted at equatorial regions where evidence of rainfall [Turtle et al., 2011] and a possible lake has recently been presented [Griffith et al., 2012], and at the more homogeneous mid-latitudes on Titan. References: Aharonson, O. et al., Nature Geoscience 2, 851-854; Griffith, C. et al., Nature 486, 237-239; Turtle, E.P. et al., Science 331, 1414-1417.

  8. The elusive half-pole in the frequency domain transfer function of Peltier thermoelectric devices.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, Andrea; Giaretto, Valter

    2011-03-01

    A half-pole can be expected in the transfer function of a Peltier device because proportionality between the diffusion length and the square root of the diffusion time is intrinsic in the diffusion equation. The resulting -1∕2 bilogarithmic slope (10 dB∕dec) is, however, easily masked by the thermal time constant of the load, which makes it elusive. The goal of this work is to identify the arrangements which can reveal and make usable the half-pole, because the latter can be instrumental in a servo control to increase the open-loop gain without risking instability. The diffusion equation was solved in a sine wave regime for a one-dimensional model of a Peltier device. The Laplace transform method was used, and the periodic solution was obtained using Cauchy's theorem and the method of residues. The -1∕2 slope of the half-pole appeared observable in a frequency range which can be several decades wide, depending on details of device configuration and considered position within. Amplitude and phase of temperature and heat flux in various spots are discussed with emphasis on the physical meaning, and a comparison is provided with solutions yielded by the lumped model, which cannot show the half-pole. An experimental check of the theoretical approach and analysis was made taking into account the deviations from one-dimensionality occurring in a real Peltier device. Given a constant amplitude sine wave injected current, the quadrature component of the Seebeck voltage across the whole series of junctions was identified as the most easily measurable quantity related to the thermal response of the device. Experimental results for the latter turned out in good agreement with analytical solutions.

  9. Low drive voltage electro-optic Bragg deflector using a periodically poled lithium niobate planar waveguide.

    PubMed

    Mhaouech, I; Coda, V; Montemezzani, G; Chauvet, M; Guilbert, L

    2016-09-15

    An electro-optic Bragg light deflector is demonstrated in a thinned, periodically poled lithium niobate planar waveguide confined between two silica layers on a silicon substrate. More than 97% of diffraction efficiency is obtained with an operating wavelength of 633 nm for the two orthogonal light polarizations with a drive voltage of about 5 V. The temporal electric drift and the response time of the component are also studied. PMID:27628350

  10. Periodically poled LiNbO3 ridge waveguides on silicon for second-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvet, Mathieu; Henrot, Fabien; Gauthier-Manuel, Ludovic; Devaux, Fabrice; Pêcheur, Vincent; Maillotte, Hervé; Bassignot, Florent; Dahmani, Brahim

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear periodically poled ridge LiNbO3 waveguides have been fabricated on silicon substrates. Components are micromachined with a precision dicing machine and/or by grinding or polishing steps. They show efficient second harmonic generation at telecommunication wavelengths with normalized conversion reaching 600%/W in a 20mm long device. Influence of geometrical non uniformities of waveguides due to fabrication process is asserted. Components characteristics are studied notably their robustness and tunability versus temperature.

  11. Management of lower pole renal stones: the devil is in the details

    PubMed Central

    Issi, Yasar; Onem, Kadir; Germiyanoglu, Cankon

    2016-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) and minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy (MIP) are highly effective treatment options for lower pole stones up to 2 cm. Selecting the best treatment modality represents a controversial area in urology, because each treatment methods have their own advantages and disadvantages. Donaldson and co-workers have recently published a very comprehensive review and meta-analysis to compare the benefits and harms of SWL, RIRS and PNL techniques. PMID:27047957

  12. Astronaut Jack Lousma During EVA to Deploy Twin Pole Sun Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Skylab-3 was the second marned mission in the skylab project. The crew spent 59 days in orbit. In this photo, Astronaut Jack Lousma deploys the Twin Pole Sun Shield created by Marshall Space Flight Center team members to replace the micrometeoroid shield, a thin protective cylinder surrounding the workshop protecting it from tiny space particles and the sun's scorching heat. The shield was damaged during the Skylab-2 mission.

  13. On the Aharonov-Bohm Operators with Varying Poles: The Boundary Behavior of Eigenvalues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noris, Benedetta; Nys, Manon; Terracini, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    We consider a magnetic Schrödinger operator with magnetic field concentrated at one point (the pole) of a domain and half integer circulation, and we focus on the behavior of Dirichlet eigenvalues as functions of the pole. Although the magnetic field vanishes almost everywhere, it is well known that it affects the operator at the spectral level (the Aharonov-Bohm effect, Phys Rev (2) 115:485-491, 1959). Moreover, the numerical computations performed in (Bonnaillie-Noël et al., Anal PDE 7(6):1365-1395, 2014; Noris and Terracini, Indiana Univ Math J 59(4):1361-1403, 2010) show a rather complex behavior of the eigenvalues as the pole varies in a planar domain. In this paper, in continuation of the analysis started in (Bonnaillie-Noël et al., Anal PDE 7(6):1365-1395, 2014; Noris and Terracini, Indiana Univ Math J 59(4):1361-1403, 2010), we analyze the relation between the variation of the eigenvalue and the nodal structure of the associated eigenfunctions. We deal with planar domains with Dirichlet boundary conditions and we focus on the case when the singular pole approaches the boundary of the domain: then, the operator loses its singular character and the k-th magnetic eigenvalue converges to that of the standard Laplacian. We can predict both the rate of convergence and whether the convergence happens from above or from below, in relation with the number of nodal lines of the k-th eigenfunction of the Laplacian. The proof relies on the variational characterization of eigenvalues, together with a detailed asymptotic analysis of the eigenfunctions, based on an Almgren-type frequency formula for magnetic eigenfunctions and on the blow-up technique.

  14. Efficient second-harmonic generation in poled polymer waveguides using copropagating geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jager, Matthias Lothar

    1997-12-01

    The field of efficient second-harmonic generation (SHG) is recently getting renewed attention due to the emerging field of cascading of second-order nonlinearities. Cascading allows all-optical switching, spatial solitary waves, etc., which can be used for all-optical information routing and processing. These applications require operation at the telecommunication wavelengths in the near infrared, where organic materials, such as poled polymers, are promising candidates due to their superior nonlinear optical coefficients. Polymers are also cheap, can be easily processed, and allow integration with semiconductor technology. This dissertation includes the linear and nonlinear optical material characterization of the polymeric materials, the fabrication of various polymeric SHG devices and the study of the device performance. In particular, the two nonlinear optical (NLO) side-chain polymers based on the chromophores 4-dimethylamino- 4'-nitrostilbene (DANS) and Disperse Red 1 are studied. Cascading as well as SHG applications require high conversion efficiencies that are preferentially achieved in optical waveguides, where the fundamental and second- harmonic waves travel in the same direction (copropagating geometry). These guided-wave devices allow a tight optical confinement, a long interaction length, and access to the diagonal elements of the nonlinear susceptibility tensor chi(2) simultaneously. This dissertation investigates the two most promising phase matching techniques, quasi-phase matching (QPM) and modal dispersion phase matching (MDPM). It was found that QPM is technologically challenging for poled polymers and typically introduces an excess propagation loss. MDPM is more compatible with polymer fabrication and was successfully demonstrated over a phase matching distance of up to 7 mm. Multilayer spincoating and inverse poling of polymers have also allowed the optimization of the overlap integral. SHG figures of merit comparable to those of

  15. Coded excitation of broadband terahertz using optical rectification in poled lithium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buma, T.; Norris, T. B.

    2005-12-01

    We demonstrate coded excitation of broadband terahertz for imaging applications. The encoded transmitter uses optical rectification of femtosecond laser pulses in poled lithium niobate patterned with a 53-bit binary phase code. The terahertz wave forms are detected by electro-optic sampling in zinc telluride. A digital pulse compression filter decodes the binary wave forms, producing broadband pulses at 1.0THz. A two-dimensional imaging experiment shows comparable performance between the encoded transmitter and a zinc telluride emitter.

  16. A 6-pole filter for improving the readability of muscle contaminated EEGs.

    PubMed

    Ives, J R; Schomer, D L

    1988-05-01

    A multi-channel switched-capacitor 6-pole filter for significantly reducing the EMG artifact present during seizures recorded by long-term monitoring procedures has been implemented for routine use. This permits repeated replay of the seizures with different filter settings. All of the channels can be simultaneously dialed to any cut-off frequency (3 dB down) between 8 Hz and 70 Hz and the event replayed for filtering and write-out onto any standard EEG machine. The advantage of the 6-pole switched-capacitor filter is that it does not require a complex design with high precision RC components. The cut-off frequency is determined by the frequency of a simple clock that is used to select the same cut-off point for all 16 channels. By changing the clock frequency, the operator moves the cut-off point linearly. The dramatic improvement obtained by off-line digital filtering that was recently reported (Gotman et al. 1981) indicates that more efficient filtering of EMG contaminated seizures is diagnostically significant in selected cases. This approach is limited by the availability and expense of not only the computer's hardware but also the dedicated software. Specially designed 4-pole analog filters (Barlow 1984) are less expensive than digital filtering, but are difficult to design even at specific frequencies and do not allow for a range of frequencies. The switched-capacitor 6-pole filters have all the advantages of the above but are even more efficient in reducing EMG artifact. They also do not have any of the above disadvantages and cost only a few dollars per channel.

  17. Management of lower pole renal stones: the devil is in the details.

    PubMed

    Resorlu, Berkan; Issi, Yasar; Onem, Kadir; Germiyanoglu, Cankon

    2016-03-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) and minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy (MIP) are highly effective treatment options for lower pole stones up to 2 cm. Selecting the best treatment modality represents a controversial area in urology, because each treatment methods have their own advantages and disadvantages. Donaldson and co-workers have recently published a very comprehensive review and meta-analysis to compare the benefits and harms of SWL, RIRS and PNL techniques. PMID:27047957

  18. Right Renal Vein Aplasia Associated With Diverted Renal Venous Drainage Through Lower Pole

    SciTech Connect

    Bozlar, Ugur; Ugurel, Mehmet Sahin; Bedir, Selahattin; Ors, Fatih; Coskun, Unsal; Aydur, Emin

    2008-07-15

    We report a unique anomalous renal venous drainage on a 25-year-old man who had congenital absence of the right renal vein and an aberrant venous drainage through the lower pole of the kidney into the inferior vena cava. To our knowledge, this anomaly has not been previously reported in the peer-reviewed literature. State-of-the-art imaging findings are presented.

  19. Hall effect sensors embedded within two-pole toothless stator assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denk, Joseph (Inventor); Grant, Richard J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A two-pole toothless PM machine employs Hall effect sensors to indicate the position of the machine's rotor relative to power windings in the machine's stator. The Hall effect sensors are located in the main magnetic air gap underneath the power windings. The main magnetic air gap is defined by an outer magnetic surface of the rotor and an inner surface of the stator's flux collector ring.

  20. Effect of three-pion unitarity on resonance poles from heavy meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Satoshi X. Nakamura

    2011-10-01

    We study the final state interaction in 3-pion decay of meson resonances at the Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC) of JLab. We apply the dynamical coupled-channels formulation which has been extensively used by EBAC to extract N* information. The formulation satisfies the 3-pion unitarity condition which has been missed in the existing works with the isobar models. We report the effect of the 3-pion unitarity on the meson resonance pole positions and Dalitz plot.