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Sample records for poliovirus vaccines

  1. Cessation of Trivalent Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and Introduction of Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine - Worldwide, 2016.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Lee M; Farrell, Margaret; Ramirez-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Menning, Lisa; Shendale, Stephanie; Lewis, Ian; Rubin, Jennifer; Garon, Julie; Harris, Jennifer; Hyde, Terri; Wassilak, Steven; Patel, Manish; Nandy, Robin; Chang-Blanc, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1988 World Health Assembly resolution to eradicate poliomyelitis, transmission of the three types of wild poliovirus (WPV) has been sharply reduced (1). WPV type 2 (WPV2) has not been detected since 1999 and was declared eradicated in September 2015. Because WPV type 3 has not been detected since November 2012, WPV type 1 (WPV1) is likely the only WPV that remains in circulation (1). This marked progress has been achieved through widespread use of oral poliovirus vaccines (OPVs), most commonly trivalent OPV (tOPV), which contains types 1, 2, and 3 live, attenuated polioviruses and has been a mainstay of efforts to prevent polio since the early 1960s. However, attenuated polioviruses in OPV can undergo genetic changes during replication, and in communities with low vaccination coverage, can result in vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) that can cause paralytic polio indistinguishable from the disease caused by WPVs (2). Among the 721 polio cases caused by circulating VDPVs (cVDPVs*) detected during January 2006-May 2016, type 2 cVDPVs (cVDPV2s) accounted for >94% (2). Eliminating the risk for polio caused by VDPVs will require stopping all OPV use. The first stage of OPV withdrawal involved a global, synchronized replacement of tOPV with bivalent OPV (bOPV) containing only types 1 and 3 attenuated polioviruses, planned for April 18-May 1, 2016, thereby withdrawing OPV type 2 from all immunization activities (3). Complementing the switch from tOPV to bOPV, introduction of at least 1 dose of injectable, trivalent inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) into childhood immunization schedules reduces risks from and facilitates responses to cVDPV2 outbreaks. All 155 countries and territories that were still using OPV in immunization schedules in 2015 have reported that they had ceased use of tOPV by mid-May 2016.(†) As of August 31, 2016, 173 (89%) of 194 World Health Organization (WHO) countries included IPV in their immunization schedules.(§) The cessation of

  2. A Mucosal Adjuvant for the Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Steil, Benjamin P.; Jorquera, Patricia; Westdijk, Janny; Bakker, Wilfried A.M.; Johnston, Robert E.; Barro, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The eradication of poliovirus from the majority of the world has been achieved through the use of two vaccines: the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) and the live-attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). Both vaccines are effective at preventing paralytic poliomyelitis, however, they also have significant differences. Most importantly for this work is the risk of revertant virus from OPV, the greater cost of IPV, and the low mucosal immunity induced by IPV. We and others have previously described the use of an alphavirus-based adjuvant that can induce a mucosal immune response to a co-administered antigen even when delivered at a non-mucosal site. In this report, we describe the use of an alphavirus-based adjuvant (GVI3000) with IPV. The IPV-GVI3000 vaccine significantly increased systemic IgG, mucosal IgG and mucosal IgA antibody responses to all three poliovirus serotypes in mice even when administered intramuscularly. Furthermore, GVI3000 significantly increased the potency of IPV in rat potency tests as measured by poliovirus neutralizing antibodies in serum. Thus, an IPV-GVI3000 vaccine would reduce the dose of IPV needed and provide significantly improved mucosal immunity. This vaccine could be an effective tool to use in the poliovirus eradication campaign without risking the re-introduction of revertant poliovirus derived from OPV. PMID:24333345

  3. Multiplex PCR Method for Identifying Recombinant Vaccine-Related Polioviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, David R.; Ching, Karen; Iber, Jane; Campagnoli, Ray; Freeman, Christopher J.; Mishrik, Nada; Liu, Hong-Mei; Pallansch, Mark A.; Kew, Olen M.

    2004-01-01

    The recent discovery of recombinant circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (recombinant cVDPV) has highlighted the need for enhanced global poliovirus surveillance to assure timely detection of any future cVDPV outbreaks. Six pairs of Sabin strain-specific recombinant primers were designed to permit rapid screening for VDPV recombinants by PCR. PMID:15365031

  4. Will containment of wild poliovirus in laboratories and inactivated poliovirus vaccine production sites be effective for global certification?

    PubMed

    Dowdle, Walter R; Wolff, Christopher; Sanders, Raymond; Lambert, Scott; Best, Maureen

    2004-01-01

    The absolute laboratory containment of any virus cannot be guaranteed, but a wealth of experience indicates that effective containment of wild poliovirus materials for global certification is technically and operationally feasible. Effective containment is based on the principles of minimal wild poliovirus infectious and potentially infectious materials in laboratories; minimal risks of operations in laboratories and inactivated poliovirus vaccine production facilities; minimal susceptibility of workers to wild poliovirus infection and shedding; and minimal susceptibility of populations to wild poliovirus spread. Each principle alone is imperfect, but collectively they greatly minimize the risks of transmitting wild poliovirus from the laboratory to the community.

  5. Will containment of wild poliovirus in laboratories and inactivated poliovirus vaccine production sites be effective for global certification?

    PubMed Central

    Dowdle, Walter R.; Wolff, Christopher; Sanders, Raymond; Lambert, Scott; Best, Maureen

    2004-01-01

    The absolute laboratory containment of any virus cannot be guaranteed, but a wealth of experience indicates that effective containment of wild poliovirus materials for global certification is technically and operationally feasible. Effective containment is based on the principles of minimal wild poliovirus infectious and potentially infectious materials in laboratories; minimal risks of operations in laboratories and inactivated poliovirus vaccine production facilities; minimal susceptibility of workers to wild poliovirus infection and shedding; and minimal susceptibility of populations to wild poliovirus spread. Each principle alone is imperfect, but collectively they greatly minimize the risks of transmitting wild poliovirus from the laboratory to the community. PMID:15106302

  6. Circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses: current state of knowledge.

    PubMed Central

    Kew, Olen M.; Wright, Peter F.; Agol, Vadim I.; Delpeyroux, Francis; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Nathanson, Neal; Pallansch, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    Within the past 4 years, poliomyelitis outbreaks associated with circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) have occurred in Hispaniola (2000-01), the Philippines (2001), and Madagascar (2001-02). Retrospective studies have also detected the circulation of endemic cVDPV in Egypt (1988-93) and the likely localized spread of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV)-derived virus in Belarus (1965-66). Gaps in OPV coverage and the previous eradication of the corresponding serotype of indigenous wild poliovirus were the critical risk factors for all cVDPV outbreaks. The cVDPV outbreaks were stopped by mass immunization campaigns using OPV. To increase sensitivity for detecting vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs), in 2001 the Global Polio Laboratory Network implemented additional testing requirements for all poliovirus isolates under investigation. This approach quickly led to the recognition of the Philippines and Madagascar cVDPV outbreaks, but of no other current outbreaks. The potential risk of cVDPV emergence has increased dramatically in recent years as wild poliovirus circulation has ceased in most of the world. The risk appears highest for the type 2 OPV strain because of its greater tendency to spread to contacts. The emergence of cVDPVs underscores the critical importance of eliminating the last pockets of wild poliovirus circulation, maintaining universally high levels of polio vaccine coverage, stopping OPV use as soon as it is safely possible to do so, and continuing sensitive poliovirus surveillance into the foreseeable future. Particular attention must be given to areas where the risks for wild poliovirus circulation have been highest, and where the highest rates of polio vaccine coverage must be maintained to suppress cVDPV emergence. PMID:15106296

  7. Environmental Isolation of Circulating Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus After Interruption of Wild Poliovirus Transmission - Nigeria, 2016.

    PubMed

    Etsano, Andrew; Damisa, Eunice; Shuaib, Faisal; Nganda, Gatei Wa; Enemaku, Ogu; Usman, Samuel; Adeniji, Adekunle; Jorba, Jaume; Iber, Jane; Ohuabunwo, Chima; Nnadi, Chimeremma; Wiesen, Eric

    2016-01-01

    In September 2015, more than 1 year after reporting its last wild poliovirus (WPV) case in July 2014 (1), Nigeria was removed from the list of countries with endemic poliovirus transmission,* leaving Afghanistan and Pakistan as the only remaining countries with endemic WPV. However, on April 29, 2016, a laboratory-confirmed, circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (cVDPV2) isolate was reported from an environmental sample collected in March from a sewage effluent site in Maiduguri Municipal Council, Borno State, a security-compromised area in northeastern Nigeria. VDPVs are genetic variants of the vaccine viruses with the potential to cause paralysis and can circulate in areas with low population immunity. The Nigeria National Polio Emergency Operations Center initiated emergency response activities, including administration of at least 2 doses of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) to all children aged <5 years through mass campaigns; retroactive searches for missed cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP), and enhanced environmental surveillance. Approximately 1 million children were vaccinated in the first OPV round. Thirteen previously unreported AFP cases were identified. Enhanced environmental surveillance has not resulted in detection of additional VDPV isolates. The detection of persistent circulation of VDPV2 in Borno State highlights the low population immunity, surveillance limitations, and risk for international spread of cVDPVs associated with insurgency-related insecurity. Increasing vaccination coverage with additional targeted supplemental immunization activities and reestablishment of effective routine immunization activities in newly secured and difficult-to-reach areas in Borno is urgently needed. PMID:27490081

  8. Stopping poliovirus vaccination after eradication: issues and challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, D. J.; Sutter, R. W.; Dowdle, W. R.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1988 reported polio cases worldwide have declined by about 85% and the number of known or suspected polioendemic countries has decreased from over 120 to less than 50. With eradication of poliomyelitis approaching, issues potentially affecting when and how vaccination against poliovirus can be stopped become extremely important. Because of the potential risks and benefits inherent in such a decision, the best available science, a risk-benefit analysis, contingency plans, a stock pile of poliovirus vaccines, and the endorsement by the global policy-making committees will all be needed before vaccination can be discontinued. The scientific basis for stopping polio immunization has been reviewed by WHO. This Round Table article summarizes the current state of knowledge, provides an update on the processes and timelines for certification, containment, and stopping vaccination, and highlights some of the unanswered scientific questions that will be addressed by further research. These include whether transmission of vaccine-derived poliovirus strains could be sustained so that poliomyelitis could re-emerge in a future unvaccinated population and whether prolonged excretion of vaccine-derived poliovirus from individuals with immune deficiencies could be a mechanism through which this could occur. PMID:10812731

  9. Immunization of newborn children with living oral trivalent poliovirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    CAMPILLO-SAINZ, C; ORNELAS HERNANDEZ, A; DE MUCHA MACIAS, J; NAVA, S E

    1962-09-01

    Campillo-Sainz, C. (Instituto Nacional de Virología de la S.S.A., México, D.F.), A. Ornelas Hernandez, J. de Mucha Macías, and S. E. Nava. Immunization of newborn children with living oral trivalent poliovirus vaccine. J. Bacteriol. 84:446-450. 1962.-The serological response to one dose of living oral trivalent polio-virus vaccine was compared in two groups of children, 49 vaccinated at birth and 44 vaccinated at the age of 4 months. Of those vaccinated at birth, 44 (90%) responded to the vaccine strains of type 1 and type 3 and 30 (61%) to the type 2 strain. Of those vaccinated at 4 months of age; 64% responded to type 1, 52% to type 2, and 82% to type 3. The difference between the responses of the two groups, which for type 1 is significant, may result from the interference of other enteric viruses in the 4-month-old children. A second dose of vaccine, administered to the children vaccinated at birth when they reached the age of 4 months, increased the over-all immunological response to 100% for types 1 and 3 and 96% for type 2, and showed that no immunological tolerance had been developed. The vaccine produced no undesirable effects in any of the children, and no paralytic poliomyelitis occurred among them. The observation of other investigators, that a high titer of maternal antibody inhibits immunological response to vaccination, was confirmed, but breast feeding apparently had no unfavorable effect on response.

  10. Development and introduction of inactivated poliovirus vaccines derived from Sabin strains in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    During the endgame of global polio eradication, the universal introduction of inactivated poliovirus vaccines is urgently required to reduce the risk of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis and polio outbreaks due to wild and vaccine-derived polioviruses. In particular, the development of inactivated poliovirus vaccines (IPVs) derived from the attenuated Sabin strains is considered to be a highly favorable option for the production of novel IPV that reduce the risk of facility-acquired transmission of poliovirus to the communities. In Japan, Sabin-derived IPVs (sIPVs) have been developed and introduced for routine immunization in November 2012. They are the first licensed sIPVs in the world. Consequently, trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine was used for polio control in Japan for more than half a century but has now been removed from the list of vaccines licensed for routine immunization. This paper reviews the development, introduction, characterization, and global status of IPV derived from attenuated Sabin strains.

  11. Impact of inactivated poliovirus vaccine on mucosal immunity: implications for the polio eradication endgame.

    PubMed

    Parker, Edward Pk; Molodecky, Natalie A; Pons-Salort, Margarita; O'Reilly, Kathleen M; Grassly, Nicholas C

    2015-01-01

    The polio eradication endgame aims to bring transmission of all polioviruses to a halt. To achieve this aim, it is essential to block viral replication in individuals via induction of a robust mucosal immune response. Although it has long been recognized that inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) is incapable of inducing a strong mucosal response on its own, it has recently become clear that IPV may boost immunity in the intestinal mucosa among individuals previously immunized with oral poliovirus vaccine. Indeed, mucosal protection appears to be stronger following a booster dose of IPV than oral poliovirus vaccine, especially in older children. Here, we review the available evidence regarding the impact of IPV on mucosal immunity, and consider the implications of this evidence for the polio eradication endgame. We conclude that the implementation of IPV in both routine and supplementary immunization activities has the potential to play a key role in halting poliovirus transmission, and thereby hasten the eradication of polio.

  12. Isolation and Characterization of Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses, Relevance for the Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenbo; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Stool specimens were collected from children with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) and their contacts, and viral isolation was performed according to standard procedures. If the specimens tested positive for poliovirus, then intratypic differentiation (ITD) methods were performed on the viral isolates to determine whether the poliovirus isolates were wild or of vaccine origin, these include a poliovirus diagnostic ITD real-time PCR method and a vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) screening real-time PCR method.Viral RNA was extracted from the poliovirus isolates by using the QIAamp Mini Viral RNA Extraction Kit (Qiagen) and was used for RT-PCR amplification by the standard method. The entire VP1 region of the poliovirus isolates was amplified by RT-PCR with primers that flanked the VP1-coding region. After purification of the PCR products by the QIAquick Gel Extraction Kit (Qiagen), the amplicons were bidirectionally sequenced with the ABI PRISM 3130 Genetic Analyzer (Applied Biosystems). A neurovirulence test of polioviruses isolates was carried out using PVR-Tg21 mice that expressed the human poliovirus receptor (CD155). And the temperature sensitivities of polioviruses isolates were assayed on monolayer RD cells in 24-well plates as described. PMID:26983736

  13. Oral and Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccines in the Newborn: A review

    PubMed Central

    Mateen, Farrah J.; Shinohara, Russell T.; Sutter, Roland W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) remains the vaccine-of-choice for routine immunization and supplemental immunization activities (SIAs) to eradicate poliomyelitis globally. Recent data from India suggested lowerthanexpected immunogenicity of an OPV birth dose, prompting a review of the immunogenicity of OPV or inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) when administered at birth. Methods We evaluated the seroconversion and reported adverse events among infants given a single birth dose (given ≤7 days of life) of OPV or IPV through a systematic review of published articles and conference abstracts from 1959-2011 in any language found on PubMed, Google Scholar, or reference lists of selected articles. Results 25 articles from 13 countries published between1959 and 2011 documented seroconversion rates in newborns following an OPV dose given within the first seven days of life. There were 10 studies that measured seroconversion rates between 4 and 8 weeks of a single birth dose of TOPV, using an umbilical cord blood draw at the time of birth to establish baseline antibody levels. The percentage of newborns who seroconverted at 8 weeks range 6-42% for poliovirus type 1, 2-63% for type 2, and 1-35% for type 3). For mOPV type 1, seroconversion ranged from 10-76%; mOPV type 3, the range was 12-58%; and for the one study reporting bOPV, it was 20% for type 1 and 7% for type 3. There were four studies of IPV in newborns with a seroconversion rate of 8-100% for serotype 1, 15-100% for serotype 2, and 15-94% for serotype 3, measured at 4-6 weeks of life. No serious adverse events related to newborn OPV or IPV dosing were reported, including no cases of acute flaccid paralysis. Conclusions There is great variability of the immunogenicity of a birth dose of OPV for reasons largely unknown. Our review confirms the utility of a birth dose of OPV, particularly in countries where early induction of polio immunity is imperative. IPV has higher seroconversion rates in newborns and

  14. Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses and Children with Primary Immunodeficiency, Iran, 1995-2014.

    PubMed

    Shaghaghi, Mohammadreza; Shahmahmoodi, Shohreh; Abolhassani, Hassan; Soleyman-Jahi, Saeed; Parvaneh, Leila; Mahmoudi, Sussan; Chavoshzadeh, Zahra; Yazdani, Reza; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Ebrahimi, Mohsen; Eslamian, Mohammad H; Tabatabaie, Hamideh; Yousefi, Maryam; Kandelousi, Yaghoob M; Oujaghlou, Aliasghar; Rezaei, Nima; Aghamohammadi, Asghar

    2016-10-01

    Widespread use of oral poliovirus vaccine has led to an ≈99.9% decrease in global incidence of poliomyelitis (from ≈350,000 cases in 1988 to 74 cases in 2015) and eradication of wild-type poliovirus serotypes 2 and 3. However, patients with primary immunodeficiency might shed vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) for an extended period, which could pose a major threat to polio eradication programs. Since 1995, sixteen VDPV populations have been isolated from 14 patients with immunodeficiency in Iran. For these patients, vaccine-associated paralysis, mostly in >1 extremity, was the first manifestation of primary immunodeficiency. Seven patients with humoral immunodeficiency cleared VDPV infection more frequently than did 6 patients with combined immunodeficiencies. Our results raise questions about manifestations of VDPVs in immunodeficient patients and the role of cellular immunity against enterovirus infections. On the basis of an association between VDPVs and immunodeficiency, we advocate screening of patients with primary immunodeficiency for shedding of polioviruses.

  15. Synthetic virus seeds for improved vaccine safety: Genetic reconstruction of poliovirus seeds for a PER.C6 cell based inactivated poliovirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Barbara P; Edo-Matas, Diana; Papic, Natasa; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Custers, Jerome H H V

    2015-10-13

    Safety of vaccines can be compromised by contamination with adventitious agents. One potential source of adventitious agents is a vaccine seed, typically derived from historic clinical isolates with poorly defined origins. Here we generated synthetic poliovirus seeds derived from chemically synthesized DNA plasmids encoding the sequence of wild-type poliovirus strains used in marketed inactivated poliovirus vaccines. The synthetic strains were phenotypically identical to wild-type polioviruses as shown by equivalent infectious titers in culture supernatant and antigenic content, even when infection cultures are scaled up to 10-25L bioreactors. Moreover, the synthetic seeds were genetically stable upon extended passaging on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. Use of synthetic seeds produced on the serum-free PER.C6 cell platform ensures a perfectly documented seed history and maximum control over starting materials. It provides an opportunity to maximize vaccine safety which increases the prospect of a vaccine end product that is free from adventitious agents.

  16. Preventing Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Emergence during the Polio Endgame

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Cara C.; Lyons, Hil; Blake, Isobel M.; Oberste, M. Steven; Kew, Olen M.; Grassly, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    Reversion and spread of vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) to cause outbreaks of poliomyelitis is a rare outcome resulting from immunisation with the live-attenuated oral poliovirus vaccines (OPVs). Global withdrawal of all three OPV serotypes is therefore a key objective of the polio endgame strategic plan, starting with serotype 2 (OPV2) in April 2016. Supplementary immunisation activities (SIAs) with trivalent OPV (tOPV) in advance of this date could mitigate the risks of OPV2 withdrawal by increasing serotype-2 immunity, but may also create new serotype-2 VDPV (VDPV2). Here, we examine the risk factors for VDPV2 emergence and implications for the strategy of tOPV SIAs prior to OPV2 withdrawal. We first developed mathematical models of VDPV2 emergence and spread. We found that in settings with low routine immunisation coverage, the implementation of a single SIA increases the risk of VDPV2 emergence. If routine coverage is 20%, at least 3 SIAs are needed to bring that risk close to zero, and if SIA coverage is low or there are persistently “missed” groups, the risk remains high despite the implementation of multiple SIAs. We then analysed data from Nigeria on the 29 VDPV2 emergences that occurred during 2004−2014. Districts reporting the first case of poliomyelitis associated with a VDPV2 emergence were compared to districts with no VDPV2 emergence in the same 6-month period using conditional logistic regression. In agreement with the model results, the odds of VDPV2 emergence decreased with higher routine immunisation coverage (odds ratio 0.67 for a 10% absolute increase in coverage [95% confidence interval 0.55−0.82]). We also found that the probability of a VDPV2 emergence resulting in poliomyelitis in >1 child was significantly higher in districts with low serotype-2 population immunity. Our results support a strategy of focused tOPV SIAs before OPV2 withdrawal in areas at risk of VDPV2 emergence and in sufficient number to raise population immunity

  17. Preventing Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Emergence during the Polio Endgame.

    PubMed

    Pons-Salort, Margarita; Burns, Cara C; Lyons, Hil; Blake, Isobel M; Jafari, Hamid; Oberste, M Steven; Kew, Olen M; Grassly, Nicholas C

    2016-07-01

    Reversion and spread of vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) to cause outbreaks of poliomyelitis is a rare outcome resulting from immunisation with the live-attenuated oral poliovirus vaccines (OPVs). Global withdrawal of all three OPV serotypes is therefore a key objective of the polio endgame strategic plan, starting with serotype 2 (OPV2) in April 2016. Supplementary immunisation activities (SIAs) with trivalent OPV (tOPV) in advance of this date could mitigate the risks of OPV2 withdrawal by increasing serotype-2 immunity, but may also create new serotype-2 VDPV (VDPV2). Here, we examine the risk factors for VDPV2 emergence and implications for the strategy of tOPV SIAs prior to OPV2 withdrawal. We first developed mathematical models of VDPV2 emergence and spread. We found that in settings with low routine immunisation coverage, the implementation of a single SIA increases the risk of VDPV2 emergence. If routine coverage is 20%, at least 3 SIAs are needed to bring that risk close to zero, and if SIA coverage is low or there are persistently "missed" groups, the risk remains high despite the implementation of multiple SIAs. We then analysed data from Nigeria on the 29 VDPV2 emergences that occurred during 2004-2014. Districts reporting the first case of poliomyelitis associated with a VDPV2 emergence were compared to districts with no VDPV2 emergence in the same 6-month period using conditional logistic regression. In agreement with the model results, the odds of VDPV2 emergence decreased with higher routine immunisation coverage (odds ratio 0.67 for a 10% absolute increase in coverage [95% confidence interval 0.55-0.82]). We also found that the probability of a VDPV2 emergence resulting in poliomyelitis in >1 child was significantly higher in districts with low serotype-2 population immunity. Our results support a strategy of focused tOPV SIAs before OPV2 withdrawal in areas at risk of VDPV2 emergence and in sufficient number to raise population immunity above the

  18. Fractional-Dose Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine Immunization Campaign - Telangana State, India, June 2016.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Sunil; Verma, Harish; Bhatnagar, Pankaj; Haldar, Pradeep; Satapathy, Asish; Kumar, K N Arun; Horton, Jennifer; Estivariz, Concepcion F; Anand, Abhijeet; Sutter, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Wild poliovirus type 2 was declared eradicated in September 2015 (1). In April 2016, India, switched from use of trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (tOPV; containing types 1, 2, and 3 polio vaccine viruses), to bivalent OPV (bOPV; containing types 1 and 3), as part of a globally synchronized initiative to withdraw Sabin poliovirus type 2 vaccine. Concurrently, inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) was introduced into India's routine immunization program to maintain an immunity base that would mitigate the number of paralytic cases in the event of epidemic transmission of poliovirus type 2 (2,3). After cessation of use of type 2 Sabin vaccine, any reported isolation of vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (VDPV2) would be treated as a public health emergency and might need outbreak response with monovalent type 2 oral vaccine, IPV, or both (4). In response to identification of a VDPV2 isolate from a sewage sample collected in the southern state of Telangana in May 2016, India conducted a mass vaccination campaign in June 2016 using an intradermal fractional dose (0.1 ml) of IPV (fIPV). Because of a global IPV supply shortage, fIPV, which uses one fifth of regular intramuscular (IM) dose administered intradermally, has been recommended as a response strategy for VDPV2 (5). Clinical trials have demonstrated that fIPV is highly immunogenic (6,7). During the 6-day campaign, 311,064 children aged 6 weeks-3 years were vaccinated, achieving an estimated coverage of 94%. With appropriate preparation, an emergency fIPV response can be promptly and successfully implemented. Lessons learned from this campaign can be applied to successful implementation of future outbreak responses using fIPV. PMID:27559683

  19. [Eradication of poliomyelitis and emergence of pathogenic vaccine-derived polioviruses: from Madagascar to Cameroon].

    PubMed

    Delpeyroux, Francis; Colbère-Garapin, Florence; Razafindratsimandresy, Richter; Sadeuh-Mba, Serge; Joffret, Marie-Line; Rousset, Dominique; Blondel, Bruno

    2013-11-01

    The oral poliovaccine, a live vaccine made of attenuated poliovirus strains, is the main tool of the vaccination campaigns organised for eradicating poliomyelitis. these campaigns had led to the decline and, thereafter, to the disappearance of wild poliovirus strains of the three serotypes (1-3) in most parts of the world. However, when the poliovaccine coverage becomes too low, vaccine polioviruses can circulate in insufficiently immunized populations and become then pathogenic by mutations and genetic recombination with other enteroviruses of the same species, in particular some coxsackievirus A. These mutated and recombinant vaccine strains have been implicated in several epidemics of paralytic poliomyelitis. Two polio outbreaks associated with these pathogenic circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV) occurred in 2001-2002 and 2005 in the South of Madagascar where vaccine coverage was low. These cVDPV, of serotype 2 or 3, were isolated from paralyzed children and some of their healthy contacts. Other cVDPV were isolated in the same region from healthy children in 2011, indicating that these viruses were circulating again. Vaccination campaigns could stop the outbreaks in 2002 and 2005, and most probably prevent another one in 2011. Therefore, the genetic plasticity of poliovaccine strains that threatens the benefit of vaccination campaigns is the target of an accurate surveillance and an important theme of studies in the virology laboratories of the Institut Pasteur international network.

  20. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Barbara P; de Los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H H V; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-03-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4-9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  1. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Barbara P.; de los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G.; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E.; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H. H. V.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4–9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  2. Seroimmunity to poliomyelitis in Sweden after the use of inactivated poliovirus vaccine for 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Böttiger, Margareta; Zetterberg, Bo; Salenstedt, Carl-Rune

    1972-01-01

    This study was undertaken in 1968 in collaboration with the World Health Organization as part of a co-operative evaluation of vaccination programmes. The situation in Sweden was of particular interest as only inactivated vaccines had been used for immunization against poliomyelitis. The WHO programme includes evaluation of both seroimmunity and resistance to poliovirus infection but the present report concerns only the serological studies. About 3 000 people, selected on a statistical basis as being a representative sample of the Swedish population, were sent questionnaires concerning their vaccinations against poliomyelitis. Answers were returned by 90% of the sample population and blood samples were collected from 2 294 persons. More than 95% of subjects under 30 years of age had received 2 or more injections, but the proportion of vaccinated individuals decreased slightly among people over 30 years of age. In the oldest age group questioned (60-70 years) only 20% had been vaccinated. Antibodies to the 3 types of poliovirus were present in more than 95% of the sera in all age groups except two. Samples seronegative to one or more types of virus were found in about 15% of people in the oldest age group and among children vaccinated during the first years of poliovirus vaccination (1957-61). PMID:4537478

  3. Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses and Children with Primary Immunodeficiency, Iran, 1995-2014.

    PubMed

    Shaghaghi, Mohammadreza; Shahmahmoodi, Shohreh; Abolhassani, Hassan; Soleyman-Jahi, Saeed; Parvaneh, Leila; Mahmoudi, Sussan; Chavoshzadeh, Zahra; Yazdani, Reza; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Ebrahimi, Mohsen; Eslamian, Mohammad H; Tabatabaie, Hamideh; Yousefi, Maryam; Kandelousi, Yaghoob M; Oujaghlou, Aliasghar; Rezaei, Nima; Aghamohammadi, Asghar

    2016-10-01

    Widespread use of oral poliovirus vaccine has led to an ≈99.9% decrease in global incidence of poliomyelitis (from ≈350,000 cases in 1988 to 74 cases in 2015) and eradication of wild-type poliovirus serotypes 2 and 3. However, patients with primary immunodeficiency might shed vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) for an extended period, which could pose a major threat to polio eradication programs. Since 1995, sixteen VDPV populations have been isolated from 14 patients with immunodeficiency in Iran. For these patients, vaccine-associated paralysis, mostly in >1 extremity, was the first manifestation of primary immunodeficiency. Seven patients with humoral immunodeficiency cleared VDPV infection more frequently than did 6 patients with combined immunodeficiencies. Our results raise questions about manifestations of VDPVs in immunodeficient patients and the role of cellular immunity against enterovirus infections. On the basis of an association between VDPVs and immunodeficiency, we advocate screening of patients with primary immunodeficiency for shedding of polioviruses. PMID:27648512

  4. Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses and Children with Primary Immunodeficiency, Iran, 1995–2014

    PubMed Central

    Shaghaghi, Mohammadreza; Shahmahmoodi, Shohreh; Abolhassani, Hassan; Soleyman-jahi, Saeed; Parvaneh, Leila; Mahmoudi, Sussan; Chavoshzadeh, Zahra; Yazdani, Reza; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Ebrahimi, Mohsen; Eslamian, Mohammad H.; Tabatabaie, Hamideh; Yousefi, Maryam; Kandelousi, Yaghoob M.; Oujaghlou, Aliasghar; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-01-01

    Widespread use of oral poliovirus vaccine has led to an ≈99.9% decrease in global incidence of poliomyelitis (from ≈350,000 cases in 1988 to 74 cases in 2015) and eradication of wild-type poliovirus serotypes 2 and 3. However, patients with primary immunodeficiency might shed vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) for an extended period, which could pose a major threat to polio eradication programs. Since 1995, sixteen VDPV populations have been isolated from 14 patients with immunodeficiency in Iran. For these patients, vaccine-associated paralysis, mostly in >1 extremity, was the first manifestation of primary immunodeficiency. Seven patients with humoral immunodeficiency cleared VDPV infection more frequently than did 6 patients with combined immunodeficiencies. Our results raise questions about manifestations of VDPVs in immunodeficient patients and the role of cellular immunity against enterovirus infections. On the basis of an association between VDPVs and immunodeficiency, we advocate screening of patients with primary immunodeficiency for shedding of polioviruses. PMID:27648512

  5. Simian virus 40, poliovirus vaccines, and human cancer: research progress versus media and public interests.

    PubMed Central

    Butel, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    From 1955 through early 1963, millions of people were inadvertently exposed to simian virus 40 (SV40) as a contaminant of poliovirus vaccines; the virus had been present in the monkey kidney cultures used to prepare the vaccines and had escaped detection. SV40 was discovered in 1960 and subsequently eliminated from poliovirus vaccines. This article reviews current knowledge about SV40 and considers public responses to reports in the media. SV40 is a potent tumour virus with broad tissue tropism that induces tumours in rodents and transforms cultured cells from many species. It is also an important laboratory model for basic studies of molecular processes in eukaryotic cells and mechanisms of neoplastic transformation. SV40 neutralizing antibodies have been detected in individuals not exposed to contaminated poliovirus vaccines. There have been many reports of detection of SV40 DNA in human tumours, especially mesotheliomas, brain tumours and osteosarcomas; and DNA sequence analyses have ruled out the possibility that the viral DNA in tumours was due to laboratory contamination or that the virus had been misidentified. However, additional studies are necessary to prove that SV40 is the cause of certain human cancers. A recently published review article evaluated the status of the field and received much media attention. The public response emphasized that there is great interest in the possibility of health risks today from vaccinations received in the past. PMID:10743284

  6. Simian virus 40, poliovirus vaccines, and human cancer: research progress versus media and public interests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butel, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    From 1955 through early 1963, millions of people were inadvertently exposed to simian virus 40 (SV40) as a contaminant of poliovirus vaccines; the virus had been present in the monkey kidney cultures used to prepare the vaccines and had escaped detection. SV40 was discovered in 1960 and subsequently eliminated from poliovirus vaccines. This article reviews current knowledge about SV40 and considers public responses to reports in the media. SV40 is a potent tumour virus with broad tissue tropism that induces tumours in rodents and transforms cultured cells from many species. It is also an important laboratory model for basic studies of molecular processes in eukaryotic cells and mechanisms of neoplastic transformation. SV40 neutralizing antibodies have been detected in individuals not exposed to contaminated poliovirus vaccines. There have been many reports of detection of SV40 DNA in human tumours, especially mesotheliomas, brain tumours and osteosarcomas; and DNA sequence analyses have ruled out the possibility that the viral DNA in tumours was due to laboratory contamination or that the virus had been misidentified. However, additional studies are necessary to prove that SV40 is the cause of certain human cancers. A recently published review article evaluated the status of the field and received much media attention. The public response emphasized that there is great interest in the possibility of health risks today from vaccinations received in the past.

  7. [Poliovirus immunology: vaccines, problems for the prevention/eradication and future interventions].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cruz Pérez, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Sainz, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Polio is a contagious disease that is caused by the poliovirus, an enterovirus in the family Picornaviridae. The virus enters through the oral mucosa and multiplies in epithelial cells of both the oropharynx as the gastrointestinal tract, releasing virus in oropharyngeal secretions and through the stool. The mode of transmission is fecal-oral and/or oral-oral. The virus preferentially infects children under 5 years. Most infections are asymptomatic and self-limiting gastrointestinal tract. Eventually it spreads to the central nervous system and affects the anterior horn motor neurons of the spinal cord causing paralysis and even death. We will describe host-virus interaction and the natural history of infection which depends on many factors, including the type of viral inoculum (serotypes VP1, 2 and 3) and host factors, such as nutritional status, concurrent infections and the ability to induce protective immune responses, such as, humoral anti-viral antibody responses with neutralizing antibodies, mucosal immunity and systemic adaptative immune responses. We will discuss the relevant aspects of the immuno-pathogenesis of the infection by poliovirus and the problems related to the host-virus interactions in the subjects vaccinated, with the latest advances in the strategies to develop optimal protection with the different poliovirus vaccines that could allow the development of a more effective immunization with induction of the effect or mechanisms that would prevent development of the disease, transmission of the virus, out-breaks and eventually the poliovirus eradication.

  8. Immunogenicity of oral poliovirus vaccine administered in mass campaigns versus routine immunization programmes.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, G.; Linkins, R. W.; Eames, M. A.; Wood, D. J.; Campbell, P. J.; Ankers, E.; Deniel, M.; Kabbaj, A.; Magrath, D. I.; Minor, P. D.

    1995-01-01

    Reported are the results of a study to investigate the immunogenicity of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) when administered in mass campaigns compared with that following routine immunization programmes. For this purpose, paired sera were collected from a cohort of children before and after a mass vaccination with OPV in Morocco in 1987. Serum samples and information on vaccination status and other confounding factors that could influence antibody responses to OPV were collected. Neutralizing antibody titres to poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 were determined using a standardized assay. OPV doses administered exclusively during the mass campaign were consistently associated with higher type-specific seroprevalence rates than the same number of doses administered in the routine programme. These findings could not be attributed to differences in confounding factors. Enhanced secondary spread of vaccine virus may have occurred but could not be demonstrated because of limitations in the study design. Mass campaigns appear to be highly effective in raising the dose-related poliovirus type-specific immunity of the population above that achieved by the routine immunization programme. Our findings support the continued use of mass campaigns as an adjunct to routine programmes in order to both enhance and catalyse current efforts to achieve the global eradication of poliomyelitis by the year 2000. PMID:8907770

  9. Oral iodine supplementation does not reduce neutralizing antibody responses to oral poliovirus vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Taffs, R. E.; Enterline, J. C.; Rusmil, K.; Muhilal; Suwardi, S. S.; Rustama, D.; Djatnika; Cobra, C.; Semba, R. D.; Cohen, N.; Asher, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    Iodine deficiency is a major cause of impaired mental development, goitre, and cretinism in many parts of the world. Because existing immunization programmes can be used to deliver oral iodized oil (OIO) to infants at risk, it was important to know whether OIO could adversely affect the antibody response to vaccines, such as trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in Subang, West Java, Indonesia, in which 617 eight-week-old infants received either OIO or a placebo (poppy-seed oil) during a routine visit for their first dose of OPV as part of the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). The infants received two boosters of OPV at 4-week intervals after the first dose, and were followed up when 6 months old. Neutralizing antibody titres to poliovirus serotypes 1, 2, and 3 were compared in serum samples that were taken from 478 of these infants just before the first dose of OPV and at 6 months. It was found that oral iodized oil did not reduce the antibody responses to any of the three serotypes of OPV. These results indicate that oral iodine may safely be delivered to infants at the same time as oral poliovirus vaccine according to current EPI immunization schedules. PMID:10427933

  10. A comparison of three methods for titration of poliovirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bey, E; Golombick, T

    1984-10-01

    Two methods for in vitro endpoint titration of poliovirus--the roller tube and the microtitration assay--were compared with each other and with the plaque assay, using secondary vervet monkey kidney cells and Vero cells as indicators. The roller tube method is the most reliable under difficult working conditions, but is otherwise cumbersome and expensive. The microtitre method is the most economical and the plaque assay the most sensitive. By suspending freshly trypsinized indicator cells with the virus dilutions before planting, it was possible to simplify the microtitre method considerably. The sensitivity of the plaque assay was improved for Vero cells by absorbing the virus onto freshly planted monolayers. The method was scaled down to a semi-micro level by using 24-well cell culture trays. The slower rate of plaque development under a low calcium overlay medium facilitated a more accurate plaque count.

  11. Effects of hydrostatic pressure on the stability and thermostability of poliovirus: a new method for vaccine preservation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Evanilce; Mendes, Ygara S; Silva, Jerson L; Galler, Ricardo; Oliveira, Andréa C; Freire, Marcos S; Gaspar, Luciane P

    2009-08-27

    Viruses are a structurally diverse group of infectious agents that differ widely in their sensitivities to high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). Studies on picornaviruses have demonstrated that these viruses are extremely resistant to HHP treatments, with poliovirus appearing to be the most resistant. Here, the three attenuated poliovirus serotypes were compared with regard to pressure and thermal resistance. We found that HHP does not inactivate any of the three serotypes studied (1-3). Rather, HHP treatment was found to stabilize poliovirus by increasing viral thermal resistance at 37 degrees C. Identification of new methods that stabilize poliovirus against heat inactivation would aid in the design of a more heat-stable vaccine, circumventing the problems associated with refrigeration during storage and transport of the vaccine prior to use. PMID:19616496

  12. The compatibility of inactivated-Enterovirus 71 vaccination with Coxsackievirus A16 and Poliovirus immunizations in humans and animals

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Qunying; Wang, Yiping; Shao, Jie; Ying, Zhifang; Gao, Fan; Yao, Xin; Li, Changgui; Ye, Qiang; Xu, Miao; Li, Rongcheng; Zhu, Fengcai; Liang, Zhenglun

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the key pathogen for Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFMD) and can result in severe neurological complications and death among young children. Three inactivated-EV71 vaccines have gone through phase III clinical trials and have demonstrated good safety and efficacy. These vaccines will benefit young children under the threat of severe HFMD. However, the potential immunization-related compatibility for different enterovirus vaccines remains unclear, making it hard to include the EV71 vaccine in Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI). Here, we measured the neutralizing antibodies (NTAbs) against EV71, Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) and Poliovirus from infants enrolled in those EV71 vaccine clinical trials. The results indicated that the levels of NTAb GMTs for EV71 increased significantly in all 3 vaccine groups (high, middle and low dosages, respectively) post-vaccination. Seroconversion ratios and Geometric mean fold increase were significantly higher in the vaccine groups (≥7/9 and 8.9~228.1) than in the placebo group (≤1/10 and 0.8~1.7, P < 0.05). But no similar NTAb response trends were found in CA16 and 3 types of Poliovirus. The decrease of 3 types of Poliovirus NTAb GMTs and an increase of CA16 GMTs post-EV71-vaccination were found in vaccine and placebo groups. Further animal study on CA16 and poliovirus vaccine co-immunization or pre-immunization with EV71 vaccine in mice indicated that there was no NTAb cross-activity between EV71 and CA16/Poliovirus. Our research showed that inactivated-EV71 vaccine has good specific-neutralizing capacity and can be included in EPI. PMID:25715318

  13. [Investigation of a Patient with Pre-vaccine-derived Poliovirus in Shandong Province, China].

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaojuan; Liu, Yao; Wang, Suting; Zhang Xiao; Song, Lizhi; Tao, Zexin; Ji, Feng; Xiong, Ping; Xu, Aiqiang

    2015-09-01

    To analyze the genetic characteristics of a polio-I highly variant vaccine recombinant virus in Shandong Province (China) in 2011 and to identify isolates from healthy contacts, two stool specimens from one patient with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) and 40 stool specimens from his contacts were collected for virus isolation. The complete genome of poliovirus and VP1 coding region of the non-polio enterovirus were sequenced. Homologous comparison and phylogenetic analyses based on VP1 sequences were undertaken among coxsackievirus (CV) B1, CV-B3 isolates, and those in GenBank. One poliovirus (P1/11186), CV-A4 and CV-A8 were isolated from the AFP patient; one CV-A2, Echovirus 3 (E-3), E-12 and E-14, ten CV-B1, and five CV-B3 strains were isolated from his contacts. These results led us to believe that there may be a human enterovirus epidemic in this area, and that surveillance must be enhanced. P1/11186 was a type-1 vaccine-related poliovirus; it combined with type-2 and type-3 polioviruses in 2A and 3A regions, respectively. There were 25 nucleotide mutations with 9 amino-acid alterations in the entire genome. There were 8 nucleotide mutations with 5 amino-acid alterations in the VP1 region compared with the corresponding Sabin strains. Homology analyses suggested that the ten CV-B1 isolates had 97.0%-100% nucleotide and 98.9%-100% amino-acid identities with each other, as well as 92.6%-100% nucleotide and 99.2%-100% amino-acid identities among the five CV-B3 isolates. Phylogenetic analyses on the complete sequences of VP1 among CV-B1 and CV-B3 isolates showed that Shandong strains, together with strains from other provinces in China, had a close relationship and belonged to the same group.

  14. Inactivated poliovirus type 2 vaccine delivered to rat skin via high density microprojection array elicits potent neutralising antibody responses

    PubMed Central

    Muller, David A.; Pearson, Frances E.; Fernando, Germain J.P.; Agyei-Yeboah, Christiana; Owens, Nick S.; Corrie, Simon R.; Crichton, Michael L.; Wei, Jonathan C.J.; Weldon, William C.; Oberste, M. Steven; Young, Paul R.; Kendall, Mark A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Polio eradication is progressing rapidly, and the live attenuated Sabin strains in the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) are being removed sequentially, starting with type 2 in April 2016. For risk mitigation, countries are introducing inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) into routine vaccination programs. After April 2016, monovalent type 2 OPV will be available for type 2 outbreak control. Because the current IPV is not suitable for house-to-house vaccination campaigns (the intramuscular injections require health professionals), we developed a high-density microprojection array, the Nanopatch, delivered monovalent type 2 IPV (IPV2) vaccine to the skin. To assess the immunogenicity of the Nanopatch, we performed a dose-matched study in rats, comparing the immunogenicity of IPV2 delivered by intramuscular injection or Nanopatch immunisation. A single dose of 0.2 D-antigen units of IPV2 elicited protective levels of poliovirus antibodies in 100% of animals. However, animals receiving IPV2 by IM required at least 3 immunisations to reach the same neutralising antibody titres. This level of dose reduction (1/40th of a full dose) is unprecedented for poliovirus vaccine delivery. The ease of administration coupled with the dose reduction observed in this study points to the Nanopatch as a potential tool for facilitating inexpensive IPV for mass vaccination campaigns. PMID:26911254

  15. Immunogenicity of poliovirus vaccines in chronically malnourished infants: a randomized controlled trial in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Ali Faisal; Mach, Ondrej; Quadri, Farheen; Khan, Asia; Bhatti, Zaid; Rehman, Najeeb Ur; Zaidi, Sohail; Weldon, William C; Oberste, Steven M; Salama, Maha; Sutter, Roland W; Zaidi, Anita K M

    2015-06-01

    Reaching high population immunity against polioviruses (PV) is essential to achieving global polio eradication. Efficacy of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) varies and is lower among children living in tropical areas with impoverished environments. Malnutrition found as a risk factor for lower serological protection against PV. We compared whether inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) can be used to rapidly close the immunity gap among chronically malnourished (stunted) infants in Pakistan who will not be eligible for the 14 week IPV dose in routine EPI schedule. A phase 3, multicenter 4-arm randomized controlled trial conducted at five Primary Health Care (PHC) centers in Karachi, Pakistan. Infants, 9-12 months were stratified by length for age Z score into chronically malnourished and normally nourished. Infants were randomized to receive one dose of either bivalent OPV (bOPV) alone or bOPV+IPV. Baseline seroprevalence of PV antibodies and serum immune response to study vaccine dose were assessed by neutralization assay. Vaccine PV shedding in stool was evaluated 7 days after a bOPV challenge dose. Sera and stool were analyzed from 852/928 (92%) enrolled children. At baseline, the seroprevalence was 85.6% (n=386), 73.6% (n=332), and 70.7% (n=319) in malnourished children against PV types 1, 2 and 3 respectively; and 94.1% (n=448), 87.0% (n=441) and 83.6% (n=397) in the normally nourished group (p<0.05). Children had previously received 9-10 doses of bOPV (80%) or tOPV (20%). One dose of IPV+bOPV given to malnourished children increased their serological protection (PV1, n=201, 97.6%; PV2, n=198, 96.1% and PV3, n=189, 91.7%) to parity with normally nourished children who had not received IPV (p=<0.001). Seroconversion and boosting for all three serotypes was significantly more frequent in children who received IPV+bOPV than in those with bOPV only (p<0.001) in both strata. Shedding of polioviruses in stool did not differ between study groups and ranged from 2.4% (n=5) to 7

  16. Sabin Vaccine Reversion in the Field: a Comprehensive Analysis of Sabin-Like Poliovirus Isolates in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Stewart; Iber, Jane; Zhao, Kun; Adeniji, Johnson A.; Bukbuk, David; Baba, Marycelin; Behrend, Matthew; Burns, Cara C.; Oberste, M. Steven

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To assess the dynamics of genetic reversion of live poliovirus vaccine in humans, we studied molecular evolution in Sabin-like poliovirus isolates from Nigerian acute flaccid paralysis cases obtained from routine surveillance. We employed a novel modeling approach to infer substitution and recombination rates from whole-genome sequences and information about poliovirus infection dynamics and the individual vaccination history. We confirmed observations from a recent vaccine trial that VP1 substitution rates are increased for Sabin-like isolates relative to the rate for the wild type due to increased nonsynonymous substitution rates. We also inferred substitution rates for attenuating nucleotides and confirmed that reversion can occur in days to weeks after vaccination. We combine our observations for Sabin-like virus evolution with the molecular clock for VP1 of circulating wild-type strains to infer that the mean time from the initiating vaccine dose to the earliest detection of circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV) is 300 days for Sabin-like virus type 1, 210 days for Sabin-like virus type 2, and 390 days for Sabin-like virus type 3. Phylogenetic relationships indicated transient local transmission of Sabin-like virus type 3 and, possibly, Sabin-like virus type 1 during periods of low wild polio incidence. Comparison of Sabin-like virus recombinants with known Nigerian vaccine-derived poliovirus recombinants shows that while recombination with non-Sabin enteroviruses is associated with cVDPV, the recombination rates are similar for Sabin isolate-Sabin isolate and Sabin isolate–non-Sabin enterovirus recombination after accounting for the time from dosing to the time of detection. Our study provides a comprehensive picture of the evolutionary dynamics of the oral polio vaccine in the field. IMPORTANCE The global polio eradication effort has completed its 26th year. Despite success in eliminating wild poliovirus from most of the world, polio

  17. Improved Genotyping Vaccine and Wild-Type Poliovirus Strains by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis: Clinical Diagnostic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulou, Amalia; Markoulatos, Panayotis; Spyrou, Niki; Vamvakopoulos, Nicholas C.

    2000-01-01

    The combination of preventive vaccination and diagnostic typing of viral isolates from patients with clinical poliomyelitis constitutes our main protective shield against polioviruses. The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) adaptation of the reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR methodology has advanced diagnostic genotyping of polioviruses, although further improvements are definitely needed. We report here on an improved RFLP procedure for the genotyping of polioviruses. A highly conserved segment within the 5′ noncoding region of polioviruses was selected for RT-PCR amplification by the UC53-UG52 primer pair with the hope that it would be most resistant to the inescapable genetic alteration-drift experienced by the other segments of the viral genome. Complete inter- and intratypic genotyping of polioviruses by the present RFLP method was accomplished with a minimum set of four restriction endonucleases (HaeIII, DdeI, NcoI, and AvaI). To compensate for potential genetic drift within the recognition sites of HaeIII, DdeI, or NcoI in atypical clinical samples, the RFLP patterns generated with HpaII and StyI as replacements were analyzed. The specificity of the method was also successfully assessed by RFLP analysis of 55 reference nonpoliovirus enterovirus controls. The concerted implementation of these conditional protocols for diagnostic inter- and intratypic genotyping of polioviruses was evaluated with 21 clinical samples with absolute success. PMID:11101561

  18. Multiple Independent Emergences of Type 2 Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses during a Large Outbreak in Northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jing; Jorba, Jaume; Bukbuk, David; Adu, Festus; Gumede, Nicksy; Pate, Muhammed Ali; Abanida, Emmanuel Ade; Gasasira, Alex; Iber, Jane; Chen, Qi; Vincent, Annelet; Chenoweth, Paul; Henderson, Elizabeth; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Naeem, Asif; Umami, Rifqiyah Nur; Nishimura, Yorihiro; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Baba, Marycelin; Adeniji, Adekunle; Williams, A. J.; Kilpatrick, David R.; Oberste, M. Steven; Wassilak, Steven G.; Tomori, Oyewale; Pallansch, Mark A.; Kew, Olen

    2013-01-01

    Since 2005, a large poliomyelitis outbreak associated with type 2 circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV2) has occurred in northern Nigeria, where immunization coverage with trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (tOPV) has been low. Phylogenetic analysis of P1/capsid region sequences of isolates from each of the 403 cases reported in 2005 to 2011 resolved the outbreak into 23 independent type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV2) emergences, at least 7 of which established circulating lineage groups. Virus from one emergence (lineage group 2005-8; 361 isolates) was estimated to have circulated for over 6 years. The population of the major cVDPV2 lineage group expanded rapidly in early 2009, fell sharply after two tOPV rounds in mid-2009, and gradually expanded again through 2011. The two major determinants of attenuation of the Sabin 2 oral poliovirus vaccine strain (A481 in the 5′-untranslated region [5′-UTR] and VP1-Ile143) had been replaced in all VDPV2 isolates; most A481 5′-UTR replacements occurred by recombination with other enteroviruses. cVDPV2 isolates representing different lineage groups had biological properties indistinguishable from those of wild polioviruses, including efficient growth in neuron-derived HEK293 cells, the capacity to cause paralytic disease in both humans and PVR-Tg21 transgenic mice, loss of the temperature-sensitive phenotype, and the capacity for sustained person-to-person transmission. We estimate from the poliomyelitis case count and the paralytic case-to-infection ratio for type 2 wild poliovirus infections that ∼700,000 cVDPV2 infections have occurred during the outbreak. The detection of multiple concurrent cVDPV2 outbreaks in northern Nigeria highlights the risks of cVDPV emergence accompanying tOPV use at low rates of coverage in developing countries. PMID:23408630

  19. Fecal IgA antibody responses after oral poliovirus vaccination in infants and elder children.

    PubMed

    Nishio, O; Sumi, J; Sakae, K; Ishihara, Y; Isomura, S; Inouye, S

    1990-01-01

    We investigated fecal IgA antibody responses after oral polyvalent poliovirus vaccination. Infants were given vaccines twice with an interval of 6 weeks. Specific IgA antibodies in the feces were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and viruses were isolated in tissue cultures. We found that, after the first vaccination, antibody responses seemed to be elicited only against the serotypes of isolated viruses. After the second vaccination, however, antibodies were detected to all three serotypes with higher titers, suggesting that the first vaccination induced the immunologic memory. The IgA antibodies had virus-neutralizing activity, and existed in the feces as both intact 11S and fragmented 4S molecules. Next, children were given the third vaccination 3 or 9 years later. Fecal IgA antibody responses were found to be poorer in elder children, while they responded with high serum neutralization titers. The secretory IgA memory seemed to last much shorter the serum IgG memory.

  20. Outbreak of Type 2 Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus in Nigeria: Emergence and Widespread Circulation in an Underimmunized Population

    PubMed Central

    Pate, Muhammad Ali; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Jenks, Julie; Burns, Cara; Chenoweth, Paul; Abanida, Emmanuel Ade; Adu, Festus; Baba, Marycelin; Gasasira, Alex; Iber, Jane; Mkanda, Pascal; Williams, A. J.; Shaw, Jing; Pallansch, Mark; Kew, Olen

    2011-01-01

    Wild poliovirus has remained endemic in northern Nigeria because of low coverage achieved in the routine immunization program and in supplementary immunization activities (SIAs). An outbreak of infection involving 315 cases of type 2 circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV2; >1% divergent from Sabin 2) occurred during July 2005–June 2010, a period when 23 of 34 SIAs used monovalent or bivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) lacking Sabin 2. In addition, 21 “pre-VDPV2” (0.5%–1.0% divergent) cases occurred during this period. Both cVDPV and pre-VDPV cases were clinically indistinguishable from cases due to wild poliovirus. The monthly incidence of cases increased sharply in early 2009, as more children aged without trivalent OPV SIAs. Cumulative state incidence of pre-VDPV2/cVDPV2 was correlated with low childhood immunization against poliovirus type 2 assessed by various means. Strengthened routine immunization programs in countries with suboptimal coverage and balanced use of OPV formulations in SIAs are necessary to minimize risks of VDPV emergence and circulation. PMID:21402542

  1. Persistence of poliovirus-neutralizing antibodies 2-16 years after immunization with live attenuated vaccine. A seroepidemiologic survey in the mainland of Venice.

    PubMed Central

    Trivello, R.; Renzulli, G.; Farisano, G.; Bonello, C.; Moschen, M.; Gasparini, V.; Benussi, G.

    1988-01-01

    A seroepidemiological survey was conducted on subjects who had received a full vaccination course with live attenuated poliovirus 2-16 years before. For strains 1 and 2 prevalence of seropositives and median values dropped gradually during the first 10 years; strain 3 showed a much earlier decline. Environmental displacement of wild poliovirus by the attenuated, less immunogenic strain might eventually induce a 'gap', should complacency hamper needed vaccination efforts. PMID:2850939

  2. Analysis of mutations in oral poliovirus vaccine by hybridization with generic oligonucleotide microchips.

    SciTech Connect

    Proudnikov, D.; Kirillov, E.; Chumakov, K.; Donion, J.; Rezapkin, G.; Mirzabekov, A.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes use of a new technology of hybridization with a micro-array of immobilized oligonucleotides for detection and quantification of neurovirulent mutants in Oral Poliovirus Vaccine (OPV). We used a micro-array consisting of three-dimensional gel-elements containing all possible hexamers (total of 4096 probes). Hybridization of fluorescently labelled viral cDNA samples with such microchips resulted in a pattern of spots that was registered and quantified by a computer-linked CCD camera, so that the sequence of the original cDNA could be deduced. The method could reliably identify single point mutations, since each of them affected fluorescence intensity of 12 micro-array elements. Micro-array hybridization of DNA mixtures with varying contents of point mutants demonstrated that the method can detect as little as 10% of revertants in a population of vaccine virus. This new technology should be useful for quality control of live viral vaccines, as well as for other applications requiring identification and quantification of point mutations.

  3. Poliovirus vaccine strains in sewage and river water in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, D N

    2006-08-01

    Since the initiation of the global poliomyelitis eradication program in 1988, the number of wild-type polio cases decreased from 350,000 to fewer than 500, and the number of polio endemic countries declined from more than 125 to 10. The last case of polio in South Africa caused by a wild-type poliovirus (PV) occurred in 1989. The live attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) has been effectively used in the reduction and control of poliomyelitis. However, as OPV strains are excreted in stools after vaccination, this vaccine could become a source of dissemination of PVs in the environment and the potential cause of poliomyelitis. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine the occurrence of OPV strains in selected sewage and river water samples. During the period between 2001 and 2003, 138 samples of river water and 213 samples of settled sewage were collected from selected areas of South Africa. A total of 860 plaques were analysed, which consisted of 703 plaques from the sewage and 157 plaques from the river water samples. Using a reverse transcriptase (RT)-multiplex PCR, 49 PVs were successfully distinguished from 176 non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs). The 176 NPEVs consisted of 50 coxsackie B2 viruses (CBV2), followed by 39 echoviruses 11 (ECV11), 25 CBV5, 21 CBV3, 15 CBV4, 14 coxsackie A6 viruses (CAV6), 7 CBV6, 2 CAV5, 2 CBV1, and 1 ECV19, which was in agreement with the prevalence of these EVs in other parts of the world. The Sabin-specific RT-triplex PCR revealed the presence of 29 Sabin PV type 1, 8 Sabin PV type 2, and 12 Sabin PV type 3 isolates. Buffalo green monkey kidney and primary liver carcinoma cell cultures allowed the amplification of a broad spectrum of EVs, whereas human epidermoid carcinoma cells were more selective for PVs. This study addressed some of the issues regarding the prevalence of OPV strains in the environment. The identification of 49 viable OPV isolates confirmed the presence and circulation of PV vaccine strains in sewage and

  4. Specific antibodies to poliovirus type I in breastmilk of unvaccinated mothers before and seven years after start of community-wide vaccination of their infants with live, oral poliovirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zaman, S; Carlsson, B; Jalil, F; Jeansson, S; Mellander, L; Hanson, L A

    1991-12-01

    Secretory IgA (SIgA) antibodies against poliovirus type 1 were determined using the ELISA method in breastmilk samples obtained each month from 100 young, healthy, unvaccinated mothers living in urban slum areas of Lahore, Pakistan. The study covered two different groups, one in 1980-1981 and the other in 1987, before and seven years after a nation-wide expanded programme of childhood immunization (EPI) had started. The SIgA titres did not change neither with duration of lactation nor with time after vaccination in the infants of the mothers studied. The seasonal breastmilk IgA antibody titres to poliovirus type 1 corresponded to the epidemiological conditions existing both before (1980-81) and after general vaccination coverage with live, oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) had reached 80% of the infant population (1987). Neutralization titres did not seem to correlate well with ELISA titres although colostrum samples had high levels of neutralizing antibodies. The wide variation between high (greater than 10,000) and low (less than 500) individual breastmilk IgA antibody titres observed during various seasons could be of consequence for the breast-fed baby. Colostrum, which was also found to have significant neutralization capacity, might interfere with the OPV now often given on the day of birth.

  5. Combined use of inactivated and oral poliovirus vaccines in refugee camps and surrounding communities - Kenya, December 2013.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Mohamed A; Makokha, Frederick; Hussein, Abdullahi M; Mohamed, Gedi; Mach, Ondrej; Humayun, Kabir; Okiror, Samuel; Abrar, Leila; Nasibov, Orkhan; Burton, John; Unshur, Ahmed; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Estivariz, Concepcion F

    2014-03-21

    Since the launch of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) in 1988, circulation of indigenous wild poliovirus (WPV) has continued without interruption in only three countries: Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Pakistan. During April-December 2013, a polio outbreak caused by WPV type 1 (WPV1) of Nigerian origin resulted in 217 cases in or near the Horn of Africa, including 194 cases in Somalia, 14 cases in Kenya, and nine cases in Ethiopia (all cases were reported as of March 10, 2014). During December 14-18, 2013, Kenya conducted the first-ever campaign providing inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) together with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) as part of its outbreak response. The campaign targeted 126,000 children aged ≤59 months who resided in Somali refugee camps and surrounding communities near the Kenya-Somalia border, where most WPV1 cases had been reported, with the aim of increasing population immunity levels to ensure interruption of any residual WPV transmission and prevent spread from potential new importations. A campaign evaluation and vaccination coverage survey demonstrated that combined administration of IPV and OPV in a mass campaign is feasible and can achieve coverage >90%, although combined IPV and OPV campaigns come at a higher cost than OPV-only campaigns and require particular attention to vaccinator training and supervision. Future operational studies could assess the impact on population immunity and the cost-effectiveness of combined IPV and OPV campaigns to accelerate interruption of poliovirus transmission during polio outbreaks and in certain areas in which WPV circulation is endemic.

  6. Combined use of inactivated and oral poliovirus vaccines in refugee camps and surrounding communities - Kenya, December 2013.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Mohamed A; Makokha, Frederick; Hussein, Abdullahi M; Mohamed, Gedi; Mach, Ondrej; Humayun, Kabir; Okiror, Samuel; Abrar, Leila; Nasibov, Orkhan; Burton, John; Unshur, Ahmed; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Estivariz, Concepcion F

    2014-03-21

    Since the launch of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) in 1988, circulation of indigenous wild poliovirus (WPV) has continued without interruption in only three countries: Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Pakistan. During April-December 2013, a polio outbreak caused by WPV type 1 (WPV1) of Nigerian origin resulted in 217 cases in or near the Horn of Africa, including 194 cases in Somalia, 14 cases in Kenya, and nine cases in Ethiopia (all cases were reported as of March 10, 2014). During December 14-18, 2013, Kenya conducted the first-ever campaign providing inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) together with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) as part of its outbreak response. The campaign targeted 126,000 children aged ≤59 months who resided in Somali refugee camps and surrounding communities near the Kenya-Somalia border, where most WPV1 cases had been reported, with the aim of increasing population immunity levels to ensure interruption of any residual WPV transmission and prevent spread from potential new importations. A campaign evaluation and vaccination coverage survey demonstrated that combined administration of IPV and OPV in a mass campaign is feasible and can achieve coverage >90%, although combined IPV and OPV campaigns come at a higher cost than OPV-only campaigns and require particular attention to vaccinator training and supervision. Future operational studies could assess the impact on population immunity and the cost-effectiveness of combined IPV and OPV campaigns to accelerate interruption of poliovirus transmission during polio outbreaks and in certain areas in which WPV circulation is endemic. PMID:24647400

  7. Sporadic isolation of sabin-like polioviruses and high-level detection of non-polio enteroviruses during sewage surveillance in seven Italian cities, after several years of inactivated poliovirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Battistone, A; Buttinelli, G; Fiore, S; Amato, C; Bonomo, P; Patti, A M; Vulcano, A; Barbi, M; Binda, S; Pellegrinelli, L; Tanzi, M L; Affanni, P; Castiglia, P; Germinario, C; Mercurio, P; Cicala, A; Triassi, M; Pennino, F; Fiore, L

    2014-08-01

    Sewage surveillance in seven Italian cities between 2005 and 2008, after the introduction of inactivated poliovirus vaccination (IPV) in 2002, showed rare polioviruses, none that were wild-type or circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV), and many other enteroviruses among 1,392 samples analyzed. Two of five polioviruses (PV) detected were Sabin-like PV2 and three PV3, based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and PCR results. Neurovirulence-related mutations were found in the 5'noncoding region (5'NCR) of all strains and, for a PV2, also in VP1 region 143 (Ile>Thr). Intertypic recombination in the 3D region was detected in a second PV2 (Sabin 2/Sabin 1) and a PV3 (Sabin 3/Sabin 2). The low mutation rate in VP1 for all PVs suggests limited interhuman virus passages, consistent with efficient polio immunization in Italy. Nonetheless, these findings highlight the risk of wild or Sabin poliovirus reintroduction from abroad. Non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs) were detected, 448 of which were coxsackievirus B (CVB) and 294 of which were echoviruses (Echo). Fifty-six NPEVs failing serological typing were characterized by sequencing the VP1 region (nucleotides [nt] 2628 to 2976). A total of 448 CVB and 294 Echo strains were identified; among those strains, CVB2, CVB5, and Echo 11 predominated. Environmental CVB5 and CVB2 strains from this study showed high sequence identity with GenBank global strains. The high similarity between environmental NPEVs and clinical strains from the same areas of Italy and the same periods indicates that environmental strains reflect the viruses circulating in the population and highlights the potential risk of inefficient wastewater treatments. This study confirmed that sewage surveillance can be more sensitive than acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance in monitoring silent poliovirus circulation in the population as well as the suitability of molecular approaches to enterovirus typing.

  8. Sporadic isolation of sabin-like polioviruses and high-level detection of non-polio enteroviruses during sewage surveillance in seven Italian cities, after several years of inactivated poliovirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Battistone, A; Buttinelli, G; Fiore, S; Amato, C; Bonomo, P; Patti, A M; Vulcano, A; Barbi, M; Binda, S; Pellegrinelli, L; Tanzi, M L; Affanni, P; Castiglia, P; Germinario, C; Mercurio, P; Cicala, A; Triassi, M; Pennino, F; Fiore, L

    2014-08-01

    Sewage surveillance in seven Italian cities between 2005 and 2008, after the introduction of inactivated poliovirus vaccination (IPV) in 2002, showed rare polioviruses, none that were wild-type or circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV), and many other enteroviruses among 1,392 samples analyzed. Two of five polioviruses (PV) detected were Sabin-like PV2 and three PV3, based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and PCR results. Neurovirulence-related mutations were found in the 5'noncoding region (5'NCR) of all strains and, for a PV2, also in VP1 region 143 (Ile>Thr). Intertypic recombination in the 3D region was detected in a second PV2 (Sabin 2/Sabin 1) and a PV3 (Sabin 3/Sabin 2). The low mutation rate in VP1 for all PVs suggests limited interhuman virus passages, consistent with efficient polio immunization in Italy. Nonetheless, these findings highlight the risk of wild or Sabin poliovirus reintroduction from abroad. Non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs) were detected, 448 of which were coxsackievirus B (CVB) and 294 of which were echoviruses (Echo). Fifty-six NPEVs failing serological typing were characterized by sequencing the VP1 region (nucleotides [nt] 2628 to 2976). A total of 448 CVB and 294 Echo strains were identified; among those strains, CVB2, CVB5, and Echo 11 predominated. Environmental CVB5 and CVB2 strains from this study showed high sequence identity with GenBank global strains. The high similarity between environmental NPEVs and clinical strains from the same areas of Italy and the same periods indicates that environmental strains reflect the viruses circulating in the population and highlights the potential risk of inefficient wastewater treatments. This study confirmed that sewage surveillance can be more sensitive than acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance in monitoring silent poliovirus circulation in the population as well as the suitability of molecular approaches to enterovirus typing. PMID:24814793

  9. Sporadic Isolation of Sabin-Like Polioviruses and High-Level Detection of Non-Polio Enteroviruses during Sewage Surveillance in Seven Italian Cities, after Several Years of Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Battistone, A.; Buttinelli, G.; Fiore, S.; Amato, C.; Bonomo, P.; Patti, A. M.; Vulcano, A.; Barbi, M.; Binda, S.; Pellegrinelli, L.; Tanzi, M. L.; Affanni, P.; Castiglia, P.; Germinario, C.; Mercurio, P.; Cicala, A.; Triassi, M.; Pennino, F.

    2014-01-01

    Sewage surveillance in seven Italian cities between 2005 and 2008, after the introduction of inactivated poliovirus vaccination (IPV) in 2002, showed rare polioviruses, none that were wild-type or circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV), and many other enteroviruses among 1,392 samples analyzed. Two of five polioviruses (PV) detected were Sabin-like PV2 and three PV3, based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and PCR results. Neurovirulence-related mutations were found in the 5′ noncoding region (5′NCR) of all strains and, for a PV2, also in VP1 region 143 (Ile > Thr). Intertypic recombination in the 3D region was detected in a second PV2 (Sabin 2/Sabin 1) and a PV3 (Sabin 3/Sabin 2). The low mutation rate in VP1 for all PVs suggests limited interhuman virus passages, consistent with efficient polio immunization in Italy. Nonetheless, these findings highlight the risk of wild or Sabin poliovirus reintroduction from abroad. Non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs) were detected, 448 of which were coxsackievirus B (CVB) and 294 of which were echoviruses (Echo). Fifty-six NPEVs failing serological typing were characterized by sequencing the VP1 region (nucleotides [nt] 2628 to 2976). A total of 448 CVB and 294 Echo strains were identified; among those strains, CVB2, CVB5, and Echo 11 predominated. Environmental CVB5 and CVB2 strains from this study showed high sequence identity with GenBank global strains. The high similarity between environmental NPEVs and clinical strains from the same areas of Italy and the same periods indicates that environmental strains reflect the viruses circulating in the population and highlights the potential risk of inefficient wastewater treatments. This study confirmed that sewage surveillance can be more sensitive than acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance in monitoring silent poliovirus circulation in the population as well as the suitability of molecular approaches to enterovirus typing. PMID:24814793

  10. Immunogenicity and safety of combined adsorbed low-dose diphtheria, tetanus and inactivated poliovirus vaccine (REVAXIS (®)) versus combined diphtheria, tetanus and inactivated poliovirus vaccine (DT Polio (®)) given as a booster dose at 6 years of age.

    PubMed

    Gajdos, Vincent; Soubeyrand, Benoit; Vidor, Emmanuel; Richard, Patrick; Boyer, Julie; Sadorge, Christine; Fiquet, Anne

    2011-05-01

    This randomized, comparative, phase-IIIb study conducted in France aimed to demonstrate whether seroprotection against diphtheria, tetanus and poliomyelitis 1 month after a single dose of REVAXIS (low-dose diphtheria) is non-inferior to seroprotection 1 month after a single dose of DT Polio (standard-dose diphtheria), both vaccines being given as a second booster to healthy children at 6 years of age. Children were randomly assigned to receive a single intramuscular dose of REVAXIS or DT Polio. Primary endpoints were the 1-month post-booster seroprotection rates for diphtheria, tetanus and poliovirus type-1, -2 and -3 antigens. Secondary endpoints were immunogenicity and safety observations. Of 788 children screened, 760 were randomized: REVAXIS group, 384 children; DT Polio group, 376 children. No relevant difference in demographic characteristics at baseline was observed between REVAXIS and DT Polio groups. Non-inferiority of REVAXIS compared with DT Polio for seroprotection was demonstrated against diphtheria (respectively 98.6% and 99.3%), tetanus (respectively 99.6% and 100%), and poliovirus antigens (100% for each types in both groups). No allergic reactions to REVAXIS were reported. A benefit/risk ratio in favor of REVAXIS was suggested by the trend towards a better tolerability of REVAXIS compared with DT Polio regarding the rate of severe solicited injection-site reactions. The results support the use of REVAXIS as a booster at 6 years of age in infants who previously received a three-dose primary series within the first 6 months of life and a first booster including diphtheria, tetanus and poliovirus vaccine(s) given before 2 years of age.

  11. Ala67Thr mutation in the poliovirus receptor CD155 is a potential risk factor for vaccine and wild-type paralytic poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Kindberg, Elin; Ax, Cecilia; Fiore, Lucia; Svensson, Lennart

    2009-05-01

    Poliovirus infections can be asymptomatic or cause severe paralysis. Why some individuals develop paralytic poliomyelitis is unknown, but a role for host genetic factors has been suggested. To investigate if a polymorphism, Ala67Thr, in the poliovirus receptor, which has been found to facilitate increased resistance against poliovirus-induced cell lysis and apoptosis, is associated with increased risk of paralytic poliomyelitis, poliovirus receptor genotyping was undertaken among Italian subjects with vaccine-associated (n = 9), or with wild-type paralytic poliomyelitis (n = 6), and control subjects (n = 71), using RFLP-PCR and pyrosequencing. Heterozygous poliovirus receptor Ala67Thr genotype was found in 13.3% of the patients with paresis and in 8.5% of the controls (Odds Ratio = 1.667). The frequency of Ala67Thr among the controls is in agreement with earlier published data. It is concluded that the Ala67Thr mutation in the poliovirus receptor is a possible risk factor for the development of vaccine-associated or paralytic poliomyelitis associated with wild-type virus.

  12. Rational design of genetically stable, live-attenuated poliovirus vaccines of all three serotypes: relevance to poliomyelitis eradication.

    PubMed

    Macadam, Andrew J; Ferguson, Geraldine; Stone, David M; Meredith, Janet; Knowlson, Sarah; Auda, Ghazi; Almond, Jeffrey W; Minor, Philip D

    2006-09-01

    The global eradication of poliomyelitis caused by wild-type virus is likely to be completed within the next few years, despite immense logistic and political difficulties, and may ultimately be followed by the cessation of vaccination. However, the existing live-attenuated vaccines have the potential to revert to virulence, causing occasional disease, and viruses can be shed by immunocompromised individuals for prolonged periods of time. Moreover, several outbreaks of poliomyelitis have been shown to be caused by viruses derived from the Sabin vaccine strains. The appearance of such strains depends on the prevailing circumstances but poses a severe obstacle to strategies for stopping vaccination. Vaccine strains that are incapable of reversion at a measurable rate would provide a possible solution. Here, we describe the constructions of strains of type 3 poliovirus that are stabilized by the introduction of four mutations in the 5' noncoding region compared to the present vaccine. The strains are genetically and phenotypically stable under conditions where the present vaccine loses the attenuating mutation in the 5' noncoding region completely. Type 1 and type 2 strains in which the entire 5' noncoding regions of Sabin 1 and Sabin 2 were replaced exactly with that of one of the type 3 strains were also constructed. The genetic stability of 5' noncoding regions of these viruses matched that of the type 3 strains, but significant phenotypic reversion occurred, illustrating the potential limitations of a rational approach to the genetic stabilization of live RNA virus vaccines.

  13. Risks associated with the use of live-attenuated vaccine poliovirus strains and the strategies for control and eradication of paralytic poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Pliaka, Vaia; Kyriakopoulou, Zaharoula; Markoulatos, Panayotis

    2012-05-01

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative was launched in 1988 with the aim to eliminate paralytic poliomyelitis. Two effective vaccines are available: inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) and oral polio vaccine (OPV). Since 1964, OPV has been used instead of IPV in most countries due to several economic and biological advantages. However, in rare cases, the live-attenuated Sabin strains of OPV revert to neurovirulence and cause vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis in vaccinees or lead to emergence of vaccine-derived poliovirus strains. Attenuating mutations and recombination events have been associated with the reversion of vaccine strains to neurovirulence. The substitution of OPV with an improved new-generation IPV and the availability of new specific drugs against polioviruses are considered as future strategies for outbreak control and the eradication of paralytic poliomyelitis worldwide.

  14. Shedding of Vaccine Viruses with Increased Antigenic and Genetic Divergence after Vaccination of Newborns with Monovalent Type 1 Oral Poliovirus Vaccine▿ †

    PubMed Central

    van der Sanden, Sabine; Pallansch, Mark A.; van de Kassteele, Jan; El-Sayed, Nasr; Sutter, Roland W.; Koopmans, Marion; van der Avoort, Harrie

    2009-01-01

    For the final stages in the eradication of poliovirus type 1 (P1), the World Health Organization advocates the selective use of monovalent type 1 oral poliovirus vaccine (mOPV1). To compare the immunogenicity of mOPV1 with that of trivalent OPV (tOPV) in infants, a study was performed in Egypt in 2005. Newborns were vaccinated with mOPV1 or tOPV immediately after birth and were challenged with mOPV1 after 1 month. Vaccination with mOPV1 at birth resulted in significantly higher seroconversion against P1 viruses and lower excretion of P1 viruses than vaccination with tOPV. Intratypic differentiation of the viruses shed by the newborns revealed the presence of remarkably high numbers of antigenically divergent (AD) P1 isolates, especially in the mOPV1 study group. The majority of these AD P1 isolates (71%) were mOPV1 challenge derived and were shed by newborns who did not seroconvert to P1 after the birth dose. Genetic characterization of the viruses revealed that amino acid 60 of the VP3 region was mutated in all AD P1 isolates. Isolates with substitution of residue 99 of the VP1 region had significantly higher numbers of nonsynonymous mutations in the VP1 region than isolates without this substitution and were preferentially shed in the mOPV1 study group. The widespread use of mOPV1 has proven to be a powerful tool for fighting poliovirus circulation in the remaining areas of endemicity. This study provides another justification for the need to achieve high vaccination coverage in order to prevent the circulation of AD strains. PMID:19515771

  15. Development of a multiplex RT-PCR assay for the identification of recombination types at different genomic regions of vaccine-derived polioviruses.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, T G; Kyriakopoulou, Z; Tsakogiannis, D; Fikatas, A; Gartzonika, C; Levidiotou-Stefanou, S; Markoulatos, P

    2016-08-01

    Polioviruses (PVs) are the causal agents of acute paralytic poliomyelitis. Since the 1960s, poliomyelitis has been effectively controlled by the use of two vaccines containing all three serotypes of PVs, the inactivated poliovirus vaccine and the live attenuated oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). Despite the success of OPV in polio eradication programme, a significant disadvantage was revealed: the emergence of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP). VAPP is the result of accumulated mutations and putative recombination events located at the genome of attenuated vaccine Sabin strains. In the present study, ten Sabin isolates derived from OPV vaccinees and environmental samples were studied in order to identify recombination types located from VP1 to 3D genomic regions of virus genome. The experimental procedure that was followed was virus RNA extraction, reverse transcription to convert the virus genome into cDNA, PCR and multiplex-PCR using specific designed primers able to localize and identify each recombination following agarose gel electrophoresis. This multiplex RT-PCR assay allows for the immediate detection and identification of multiple recombination types located at the viral genome of OPV derivatives. After the eradication of wild PVs, the remaining sources of poliovirus infection worldwide would be the OPV derivatives. As a consequence, the immediate detection and molecular characterization of recombinant derivatives are important to avoid epidemics due to the circulation of neurovirulent viral strains. PMID:27098645

  16. Intratypic Recombination among Lineages of Type 1 Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Emerging during Chronic Infection of an Immunodeficient Patient

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chen-Fu; Chen, Hour-Young; Jorba, Jaume; Sun, Hui-Chih; Yang, Su-Ju; Lee, Hsiang-Chi; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Chen, Pei-Jer; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Nishimura, Yorihiro; Utama, Andi; Pallansch, Mark; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Kew, Olen; Yang, Jyh-Yuan

    2005-01-01

    We determined the complete genomic sequences of nine type 1 immunodeficient vaccine-derived poliovirus (iVDPV) isolates obtained over a 337-day period from a poliomyelitis patient from Taiwan with common variable immunodeficiency. The iVDPV isolates differed from the Sabin type 1 oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) strain at 1.84% to 3.15% of total open reading frame positions and had diverged into at least five distinct lineages. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the chronic infection was initiated by the fifth and last OPV dose, given 567 days before onset of paralysis, and that divergence of major lineages began very early in the chronic infection. Key determinants of attenuation in Sabin 1 had reverted in the iVDPV isolates, and representative isolates of each lineage showed increased neurovirulence for PVR-Tg21 transgenic mice. None of the isolates had retained the temperature-sensitive phenotype of Sabin 1. All isolates were antigenic variants of Sabin 1, having multiple amino acid substitutions within or near neutralizing antigenic sites 1, 2, and 3a. Antigenic divergence of the iVDPV variants from Sabin 1 followed two major independent evolutionary pathways. The emergence of distinct coreplicating lineages suggests that iVDPVs can replicate for many months at separate sites in the gastrointestinal tract. Some isolates had mosaic genome structures indicative of recombination across and within lineages. iVDPV excretion apparently ceased after 30 to 35 months of chronic infection. The appearance of a chronic VDPV excretor in a tropical, developing country has important implications for the strategy to stop OPV immunization after eradication of wild polioviruses. PMID:16188964

  17. A severe case of co-infection with Enterovirus 71 and vaccine-derived Poliovirus type II.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shaohui; Du, Zengqing; Feng, Min; Che, Yanchun; Li, Qihan

    2015-11-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is often identified as the primary pathogen that directly leads to severe cases of HFMD, whereas the association between other enteroviruses and EV71 infection remains largely unclear. Here we report a rare case of a 5-year-old boy co-infected with EV71 and vaccine-derived Poliovirus (VDPV) type II, which were identified based on PCR and sequence analysis results and clinical symptoms and were characterized on CT. We determined that the EV71 strain belongs to the C4 subtype, and the VDPV II strain was closely genetically related to the reference Sabin type II strain. This report may improved our understanding of the clinical significance of the associations between clinical signs and the infectious properties of the involved pathogens.

  18. Evolution and circulation of type-2 vaccine-derived polioviruses in Nad Ali district of Southern Afghanistan during June 2009-February 2011.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Salmaan; Abbasi, Bilal Haider; Khurshid, Adnan; Alam, Muhammad Masroor; Shaukat, Shahzad; Angez, Mehar; Rana, Muhammad Suleman; Zaidi, Syed Sohail Zahoor

    2014-01-01

    Oral polio vaccine has been used successfully as a powerful tool to control the spread of wild polioviruses throughout the world; however, during replication in under immunized children, some vaccine viruses revert and acquire the neurovirulent phenotypic properties. In this study, we describe the evolution and circulation of Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses (VDPVs) in Helmand province of Afghanistan. We investigated 2646 AFP cases of Afghan children from June 2009-February 2011 and isolated 103 (04%) vaccine viruses, 45(1.7%) wild type polioviruses and six (0.22%) type 2 circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs). These cVDPVs showed 97.7%-98.2% nucleotide and 98%-98.7% amino acid homology in VP1 region on comparison with Sabin type 2 reference strain. All these cVDPVs had two signature mutations of neurovirulent phenotypes and 12 additional mutations in P1 capsid region that might also have contributed to increase neurovirulence and replication. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all these viruses were closely related and originated from previously reported Sabin like 2 virus from Pakistan which did not conform to the standard definition of VDPVs at that time. It was also observed that initial OPV dose was administered approximately 9 months prior to the collection of first stool specimen of index case. Our findings support that suboptimal surveillance and low routine immunization coverage have contributed to the emergence and spread of these viruses in Afghanistan. We therefore recommend high quality immunization campaigns not only in affected district Nad Ali but also in the bordering areas between Pakistan and Afghanistan to prevent the spread of cVDPVs.

  19. Combined immunization of infants with oral and inactivated poliovirus vaccines: results of a randomized trial in The Gambia, Oman, and Thailand. WHO Collaborative Study Group on Oral and Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    To assess an immunization schedule combining oral (OPV) and inactivated poliovirus vaccines (IPV), we conducted a clinical trial in the Gambia, Oman, and Thailand. Children were randomized to receive one of the following schedules: OPV at birth, 6, 10, and 14 weeks of age; OPV at birth followed by both OPV and IPV at 6, 10, and 14 weeks of age: or placebo at birth followed by IPV at 6, 10, and 14 weeks of age. A total of 1685 infants were enrolled; 24-week serum specimens were available for 1291 infants (77%). Across the study sites at 24 weeks of age, the proportion of seropositive children in the combined schedule group was 95-99% for type 1, 99-100% for type 2, and 97-100% for type 3. In the Gambia and Oman, the combined schedule performed significantly better than OPV for type 1 (95-97% versus 88-90%) and type 3 (97-99% versus 72-73%). In the Gambia and Oman, seroprevalences in the IPV group were lower for type 1 (significantly lower in the Gambia); significantly lower for type 2; and significantly higher for type 3, compared with the OPV group. In Thailand, the IPV group had significantly lower proportions of children who were seropositive for each of the three types, compared with the OPV group. The responses to OPV in the Gambia, Oman, and Thailand were consistent with previous studies from these countries. IPV given at 6, 10, and 14 weeks of age provided inadequate serological protection against poliovirus, especially type 1. The combined schedule provided the highest levels of serum antibody response, with mucosal immunity equivalent to that produced by OPV alone. PMID:8789924

  20. Vaccine-derived Mutation in Motif D of Poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase Lowers Nucleotide Incorporation Fidelity*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinran; Yang, Xiaorong; Lee, Cheri A.; Moustafa, Ibrahim M.; Smidansky, Eric D.; Lum, David; Arnold, Jamie J.; Cameron, Craig E.; Boehr, David D.

    2013-01-01

    All viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) have a conserved structural element termed motif D. Studies of the RdRp from poliovirus (PV) have shown that a conformational change of motif D leads to efficient and faithful nucleotide addition by bringing Lys-359 into the active site where it serves as a general acid. The RdRp of the Sabin I vaccine strain has Thr-362 changed to Ile. Such a drastic change so close to Lys-359 might alter RdRp function and contribute in some way to the attenuated phenotype of Sabin type I. Here we present our characterization of the T362I RdRp. We find that the T362I RdRp exhibits a mutator phenotype in biochemical experiments in vitro. Using NMR, we show that this change in nucleotide incorporation fidelity correlates with a change in the structural dynamics of motif D. A recombinant PV expressing the T362I RdRp exhibits normal growth properties in cell culture but expresses a mutator phenotype in cells. For example, the T362I-containing PV is more sensitive to the mutagenic activity of ribavirin than wild-type PV. Interestingly, the T362I change was sufficient to cause a statistically significant reduction in viral virulence. Collectively, these studies suggest that residues of motif D can be targeted when changes in nucleotide incorporation fidelity are desired. Given the observation that fidelity mutants can serve as vaccine candidates, it may be possible to use engineering of motif D for this purpose. PMID:24085299

  1. Licensure of a Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoids and Acellular Pertussis Adsorbed and Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine and Guidance for Use as a Booster Dose.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jennifer; Wallace, Greg; Mootrey, Gina

    2015-09-01

    On March 24, 2015, the Food and Drug Administration licensed an additional combined diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis adsorbed (DTaP) and inactivated poliovirus (IPV) vaccine (DTaP-IPV) (Quadracel, Sanofi Pasteur Inc.). Quadracel is the second DTaP-IPV vaccine to be licensed for use among children aged 4 through 6 years in the United States (1). Quadracel is approved for administration as a fifth dose in the DTaP series and as a fourth or fifth dose in the IPV series in children aged 4 through 6 years who have received 4 doses of DTaP-IPV-Hib (Pentacel, Sanofi Pasteur) and/or DTaP (Daptacel, Sanofi Pasteur) vaccine (2,3). This report summarizes the indications for Quadracel vaccine and provides guidance from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for its use.

  2. Transgenic mice as an alternative to monkeys for neurovirulence testing of live oral poliovirus vaccine: validation by a WHO collaborative study.

    PubMed Central

    Dragunsky, Eugenia; Nomura, Tatsuji; Karpinski, Kazimir; Furesz, John; Wood, David J.; Pervikov, Yuri; Abe, Shinobu; Kurata, Takeshi; Vanloocke, Olivier; Karganova, Galina; Taffs, Rolf; Heath, Alan; Ivshina, Anna; Levenbook, Inessa

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Extensive WHO collaborative studies were performed to evaluate the suitability of transgenic mice susceptible to poliovirus (TgPVR mice, strain 21, bred and provided by the Central Institute for Experimental Animals, Japan) as an alternative to monkeys in the neurovirulence test (NVT) of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). METHODS: Nine laboratories participated in the collaborative study on testing neurovirulence of 94 preparations of OPV and vaccine derivatives of all three serotypes in TgPVR21 mice. FINDINGS: Statistical analysis of the data demonstrated that the TgPVR21 mouse NVT was of comparable sensitivity and reproducibility to the conventional WHO NVT in simians. A statistical model for acceptance/rejection of OPV lots in the mouse test was developed, validated, and shown to be suitable for all three vaccine types. The assessment of the transgenic mouse NVT is based on clinical evaluation of paralysed mice. Unlike the monkey NVT, histological examination of central nervous system tissue of each mouse offered no advantage over careful and detailed clinical observation. CONCLUSIONS: Based on data from the collaborative studies the WHO Expert Committee for Biological Standardization approved the mouse NVT as an alternative to the monkey test for all three OPV types and defined a standard implementation process for laboratories that wish to use the test. This represents the first successful introduction of transgenic animals into control of biologicals. PMID:12764491

  3. Population Immunity against Serotype-2 Poliomyelitis Leading up to the Global Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine: Spatio-temporal Modelling of Surveillance Data

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Kathleen M.; Etsano, Andrew; Vaz, Rui Gama; Jafari, Hamid; Grassly, Nicholas C.; Blake, Isobel M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Global withdrawal of serotype-2 oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV2) took place in April 2016. This marked a milestone in global polio eradication and was a public health intervention of unprecedented scale, affecting 155 countries. Achieving high levels of serotype-2 population immunity before OPV2 withdrawal was critical to avoid subsequent outbreaks of serotype-2 vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPV2s). Methods and Findings In August 2015, we estimated vaccine-induced population immunity against serotype-2 poliomyelitis for 1 January 2004–30 June 2015 and produced forecasts for April 2016 by district in Nigeria and Pakistan. Population immunity was estimated from the vaccination histories of children <36 mo old identified with non-polio acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) reported through polio surveillance, information on immunisation activities with different oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) formulations, and serotype-specific estimates of the efficacy of these OPVs against poliomyelitis. District immunity estimates were spatio-temporally smoothed using a Bayesian hierarchical framework. Coverage estimates for immunisation activities were also obtained, allowing for heterogeneity within and among districts. Forward projections of immunity, based on these estimates and planned immunisation activities, were produced through to April 2016 using a cohort model. Estimated population immunity was negatively correlated with the probability of VDPV2 poliomyelitis being reported in a district. In Nigeria and Pakistan, declines in immunity during 2008–2009 and 2012–2013, respectively, were associated with outbreaks of VDPV2. Immunity has since improved in both countries as a result of increased use of trivalent OPV, and projections generally indicated sustained or improved immunity in April 2016, such that the majority of districts (99% [95% uncertainty interval 97%–100%] in Nigeria and 84% [95% uncertainty interval 77%–91%] in Pakistan) had >70% population immunity

  4. Poliovirus sampling by using sodium dodecyl sulfate/EDTA-pretreated chromatography paper strips.

    PubMed

    Maes, Piet; Van Doren, Els; Denys, Barbara; Thoelen, Inge; Rahman, Mustafizur; Vijgen, Leen; Van Ranst, Marc

    2004-12-17

    To achieve the goal of poliovirus eradication, surveillance of endemic areas is a crucial step in the poliovirus eradication program. Currently, six countries still have endemic poliovirus. We have tested a novel method which uses SDS/EDTA-treated chromatography paper strips to collect and transport poliovirus-containing stool samples. The SDS/EDTA-treated paper strips were soaked with different dilutions of poliovirus-containing feces and stored at different temperatures. After storing the SDS/EDTA paper strips for 5 months at 37 degrees C, poliovirus RNA could be successfully amplified using RT-PCR. Infectivity of wild-type poliovirus type 1, 2, and 3 was lost upon contact with the SDS/EDTA-treated strips. This easy, inexpensive, and biosafe chromatography paper strip method for the collection and transportation of poliovirus samples can be of use in poliovirus surveillance and polio vaccination programs.

  5. The preparation of specific immune sera against type 3 poliovirus D-antigen and C-antigen and the demonstration of two C-antigenic components in vaccine strain populations.

    PubMed

    Minor, P D; Schild, G C; Wood, J M; Dandawate, C N

    1980-11-01

    Animals were immunized with purified D-antigen or C-antigen of type 3 poliovirus to produce specific antisera which were used to analyse the antigenic characteristics of the progeny virus in harvests from poliovirus type 3-infected cells. An examination of the virus progeny present at 24 h p.i. of cells with Sabin type 3 vaccine strain virus revealed a large population of particles sedimenting at a slightly lower rate (130S) than infectious virus (155S) in addition to slowly sedimenting (80S) empty capsids. Such 130S particles were not detected in the progeny from cells infected with strains genetically unrelated to the Sabin vaccine strains. They were non-infectious, contained RNA in an RNase-resistant form unless heated, and lacked the virion protein VP4. They expressed C-antigen rather than the D-antigen of infectious virus, and, therefore, had the properties previously described for poliovirus particles eluted from cells. The amount of incorporation of radio-isotope into the proteins or nucleic acids of such particles varied from 15 to 20% to 300% of the amount incorporated into infectious virus depending on the cells and virus strains studied. Virus strains genetically related to Sabin type 3 vaccine virus which were isolated from cases of paralytic poliomyelitis produced the particles in either low or undetectable quantities.

  6. Post-eradication poliovirus facility-associated community risks.

    PubMed

    Dowdle, Walter R; Wolff, Chris

    2006-06-01

    Minimizing the risk of poliovirus transmission from the poliovirus facility to an increasingly susceptible community is crucial when global poliovirus transmission and OPV use stops. Community risks of exposure to wild poliovirus as well as Sabin strains are highest from facility personnel who are unknowingly contaminated or infected. Immunization with OPV or IPV prevents poliomyelitis, but neither vaccine fully inhibits silent infection of the gut. Facility environments maintained at low relative humidity (<50%) may reduce poliovirus survival and inhalation risk. Circulating antibodies reduce personnel infection risks from injection or virus entry through breaks in skin or mucous membranes. Community exposure risk through inhalation of contaminated air effluent is likely low in most modern facilities. Community risks through ingestion of liquid effluents are facility-specific and may range from high to low. This assessment of community risks, when combined with assessments of facility-specific hazards and the consequences of wild or Sabin poliovirus transmission, provides the foundation for effective risk management.

  7. Killed poliovirus antigen titration in humans.

    PubMed

    Salk, J; Cohen, H; Fillastre, C; Stoeckel, P; Rey, J L; Schlumberger, M; Nicolas, A; van Steenis, G; van Wezel, A L; Triau, R; Saliou, P; Barry, L F; Moreau, J P; Mérieux, C

    1978-01-01

    To establish the antigen content of a killed poliovirus vaccine sufficiently potent to induce immunity with one or two doses and to establish a reference standard vaccine which has been tested under field conditions, a titration was carried out in infants to determine the amount of each of the three antigenic types of poliovirus vaccine required to induce seroconversion with a single dose. It has been observed that over a critical range of antigen concentration there is an essentially linear relationship between antibody response and quantity of antigen administered. More than 90 percent of the groups studied had detectable antibody after receiving single injections of 80, 8 and 64 D-antigen units of Types I, II and III, respectively. Four-fold less antigen for each of the three types was less effective. The implications of these findings for an efficient immunization procedure are discussed.

  8. 100 years poliovirus: from discovery to eradication. A meeting report.

    PubMed

    Skern, Tim

    2010-09-01

    Just over hundred years ago, Karl Landsteiner and Erwin Popper identified a virus, later termed poliovirus, as the causative agent of poliomyelitis. This groundbreaking discovery simultaneously provided the basis for the measures that today prevent the outbreaks of the terrible epidemics caused by poliovirus. In 1988, the WHO started its eradication program to eliminate the virus from the planet. The symposium celebrated the discovery of poliovirus and discussed our current state of knowledge of poliovirus biology. Prospects for the eradication program were evaluated, with particular emphasis being placed on why certain countries still have not succeeding in interrupting wild-type transmission of poliovirus. Discussion also centred on the role of inactivated poliovirus vaccines in the eradication program and the maintenance of a poliovirus-free world, whenever this goal should be achieved.

  9. Importation and circulation of poliovirus in Bulgaria in 2001.

    PubMed Central

    Kojouharova, Mira; Zuber, Patrick L. F.; Gyurova, Snejana; Fiore, Lucia; Buttinelli, Gabriele; Kunchev, Angel; Vladimirova, Nadejda; Korsun, Neli; Filipova, Radosveta; Boneva, Roumiana; Gavrilin, Eugene; Deshpande, Jagadish M.; Oblapenko, George; Wassilak, Steven G.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the circumstances in which poliomyelitis occurred among three children in Bulgaria during 2001 and to describe the public health response. METHODS: Bulgarian authorities investigated the three cases of polio and their contacts, conducted faecal and serological screening of children from high-risk groups, implemented enhanced surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis, and conducted supplemental immunization activities. FINDINGS: The three cases of polio studied had not been vaccinated and lived in socioeconomically deprived areas of two cities. Four Roma children from the Bourgas district had antibody titres to serotype 1 poliovirus only, and wild type 1 virus was isolated from the faeces of two asymptomatic Roma children in the Bourgas and Sofia districts. Poliovirus isolates were related genetically and represented a single evolutionary lineage; genomic sequences were less than 90% identical to poliovirus strains isolated previously in Europe, but 98.3% similar to a strain isolated in India in 2000. No cases or wild virus isolates were found after supplemental immunization activities were launched in May 2001. CONCLUSIONS: In Bulgaria, an imported poliovirus was able to circulate for two to five months among minority populations. Surveillance data strongly suggest that wild poliovirus circulation ceased shortly after supplemental immunization activities with oral poliovirus vaccine were conducted. PMID:12973639

  10. Has Wild Poliovirus Been Eliminated from Nigeria?

    PubMed

    Famulare, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Wild poliovirus type 3 (WPV3) has not been seen anywhere since the last case of WPV3-associated paralysis in Nigeria in November 2012. At the time of writing, the most recent case of wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) in Nigeria occurred in July 2014, and WPV1 has not been seen in Africa since a case in Somalia in August 2014. No cases associated with circulating vaccine-derived type 2 poliovirus (cVDPV2) have been detected in Nigeria since November 2014. Has WPV1 been eliminated from Africa? Has WPV3 been eradicated globally? Has Nigeria interrupted cVDPV2 transmission? These questions are difficult because polio surveillance is based on paralysis and paralysis only occurs in a small fraction of infections. This report provides estimates for the probabilities of poliovirus elimination in Nigeria given available data as of March 31, 2015. It is based on a model of disease transmission that is built from historical polio incidence rates and is designed to represent the uncertainties in transmission dynamics and poliovirus detection that are fundamental to interpreting long time periods without cases. The model estimates that, as of March 31, 2015, the probability of WPV1 elimination in Nigeria is 84%, and that if WPV1 has not been eliminated, a new case will be detected with 99% probability by the end of 2015. The probability of WPV3 elimination (and thus global eradication) is > 99%. However, it is unlikely that the ongoing transmission of cVDPV2 has been interrupted; the probability of cVDPV2 elimination rises to 83% if no new cases are detected by April 2016. PMID:26317401

  11. Assessment of cell culture and polymerase chain reaction procedures for the detection of polioviruses in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Grabow, W O; Botma, K L; de Villiers, J C; Clay, C G; Erasmus, B

    1999-01-01

    WHO considers that environmental surveillance for wild-type polioviruses is potentially important for surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis as a means of confirming eradication of poliomyelitis. The present study investigated methods for detecting polioviruses in a variety of water environments in South Africa. Most polioviruses were isolated on L20B mouse cells, which, however, were not selective: 16 reoviruses and 8 enteroviruses, apparently animal strains, were also isolated on these cells. Vaccine strains of polioviruses were isolated from surface waters during and shortly after two rounds of mass vaccination of children in an informal settlement where there was no sewerage. The results demonstrated the feasibility of poliovirus surveillance in such settlements. It was also evident that neither poliovirus vaccine strains nor other viruses were likely to interfere significantly with the detection of wild-type polioviruses. Optimal isolation of polioviruses was accomplished by parallel inoculation of L20B mouse cells and at least the PLC/PRF/5 human liver and buffalo green monkey (BGM) kidney cell lines. Analysis of cell cultures using the polymerase chain reaction revealed that 319 test samples contained at least 263 human enteroviruses that failed to produce a cytopathogenic effect. This type of analysis thus significantly increased the sensitivity of enterovirus detection.

  12. Assessment of cell culture and polymerase chain reaction procedures for the detection of polioviruses in wastewater.

    PubMed Central

    Grabow, W. O.; Botma, K. L.; de Villiers, J. C.; Clay, C. G.; Erasmus, B.

    1999-01-01

    WHO considers that environmental surveillance for wild-type polioviruses is potentially important for surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis as a means of confirming eradication of poliomyelitis. The present study investigated methods for detecting polioviruses in a variety of water environments in South Africa. Most polioviruses were isolated on L20B mouse cells, which, however, were not selective: 16 reoviruses and 8 enteroviruses, apparently animal strains, were also isolated on these cells. Vaccine strains of polioviruses were isolated from surface waters during and shortly after two rounds of mass vaccination of children in an informal settlement where there was no sewerage. The results demonstrated the feasibility of poliovirus surveillance in such settlements. It was also evident that neither poliovirus vaccine strains nor other viruses were likely to interfere significantly with the detection of wild-type polioviruses. Optimal isolation of polioviruses was accomplished by parallel inoculation of L20B mouse cells and at least the PLC/PRF/5 human liver and buffalo green monkey (BGM) kidney cell lines. Analysis of cell cultures using the polymerase chain reaction revealed that 319 test samples contained at least 263 human enteroviruses that failed to produce a cytopathogenic effect. This type of analysis thus significantly increased the sensitivity of enterovirus detection. PMID:10680244

  13. [Vaccination against poliomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Cellesi, C; Rossolini, A

    1984-01-01

    The authors, after a review of some data about the actual poliomyelitis epidemiology in the world, point out the necessity of periodical checks for poliomyelitis vaccination. To this purpose, preliminary data of a research, undertaken in the province of Siena, into the effectiveness and innocuity of oral poliovirus vaccine, are reported. This evaluation has been made through isolation and identification of vaccinal polioviruses from stool after the first, second and then third dose of vaccine, and through titration of serum neutralizing antibodies. Results confirm the high effectiveness and innocuity of oral poliovirus vaccine, but suggest the opportuneness of some changes in the way of giving the oral vaccine.

  14. Seroepidemiology of polioviruses among university students in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Vincenzo; Baldovin, Tatjana; Cocchio, Silvia; Lazzari, Roberta; Saracino, Elena; Bertoncello, Chiara; Buja, Alessandra; Trevisan, Andrea

    2012-08-01

    The widespread use of poliovirus vaccination schemes has led to a marked decline in the incidence of paralytic poliomyelitis worldwide, but wild poliovirus is still endemic in some developing countries, and in 2009 a total of 23 countries reported at least 1 case of poliomyelitis caused by wild-strain polio viruses. A serological survey was thus conducted on the immunological status against polioviruses of 318 young adults, classified by their country of origin. Immunity to poliomyelitis was assessed by neutralizing antibody titration in tissues cultured on microplates. The rate of seronegativity (≤ 1:8) in the study population was 26.7% for poliovirus type 1, 7.2% for type 2, and 22.6% for type 3. In our sample of 318 individuals, 219 (68.9%) were Italian and 99 (31.1%) were from outside the European Union (EU). The proportion of cases found seropositive to polioviruses 1 and 3 decreased significantly with older age; this age-related decrease was more evident in the Italian group than among the non-EU subjects. Any risk of the wild virus recurring and causing paralytic poliomyelitis must be prevented, keeping Europe polio free by means of appropriate immunological protection, until polio has been conclusively eradicated all over the world. Judging from our findings, it may be worth considering administering a fifth dose of polio vaccine to adolescents.

  15. Human Circulating Antibody-Producing B Cell as a Predictive Measure of Mucosal Immunity to Poliovirus

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Harish; Sharma, Prashant; Yang, Jae Seung; Saletti, Giulietta; Ahmad, Mohammad; Bahl, Sunil K.; Wierzba, Thomas F.; Nandy, Ranjan K.; Deshpande, Jagadish M.; Sutter, Roland W.; Czerkinsky, Cecil

    2016-01-01

    Background The “gold standard” for assessing mucosal immunity after vaccination with poliovirus vaccines consists in measuring virus excretion in stool after challenge with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). This testing is time and resource intensive, and development of alternative methods is a priority for accelerating polio eradication. We therefore evaluated circulating antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) as a potential means to evaluate mucosal immunity to poliovirus vaccine. Methods 199 subjects, aged 10 years, and previously immunized repeatedly with OPV, were selected. Subjects were assigned to receive either a booster dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV), bivalent OPV (bOPV), or no vaccine. Using a micro-modified whole blood-based ELISPOT assay designed for field setting, circulating poliovirus type-specific IgA- and IgG-ASCs, including gut homing α4β7+ ASCs, were enumerated on days 0 and 7 after booster immunization. In addition, serum samples collected on days 0, 28 and 56 were tested for neutralizing antibody titers against poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3. Stool specimens were collected on day 28 (day of bOPV challenge), and on days 31, 35 and 42 and processed for poliovirus isolation. Results An IPV dose elicited blood IgA- and IgG-ASC responses in 84.8 to 94.9% of subjects, respectively. In comparison, a bOPV dose evoked corresponding blood ASC responses in 20.0 to 48.6% of subjects. A significant association was found between IgA- and IgG-ASC responses and serum neutralizing antibody titers for poliovirus type 1, 2, 3 (p<0.001). In the IPV group, α4β7+ ASCs accounted for a substantial proportion of IgA-ASCs and the proportion of subjects with a positive α4β7+ IgA-ASC response to poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 was 62.7%, 89.8% and 45.8%, respectively. A significant association was observed between virus excretion and α4β7+ IgA- and/or IgG-ASC responses to poliovirus type 3 among immunized children; however, only a weak association was found for

  16. Managing population immunity to reduce or eliminate the risks of circulation following the importation of polioviruses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Kalkowska, Dominika A; Duintjer Tebbens, Radboud J

    2015-03-24

    Poliovirus importations into polio-free countries represent a major concern during the final phases of global eradication of wild polioviruses (WPVs). We extend dynamic transmission models to demonstrate the dynamics of population immunity out through 2020 for three countries that only used inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) for routine immunization: the US, Israel, and The Netherlands. For each country, we explore the vulnerability to re-established transmission following an importation for each poliovirus serotype, including the impact of immunization choices following the serotype 1 WPV importation that occurred in 2013 in Israel. As population immunity declines below the threshold required to prevent transmission, countries become at risk for re-established transmission. Although importations represent stochastic events that countries cannot fully control because people cross borders and polioviruses mainly cause asymptomatic infections, countries can ensure that any importations die out. Our results suggest that the general US population will remain above the threshold for transmission through 2020. In contrast, Israel became vulnerable to re-established transmission of importations of live polioviruses by the late 2000s. In Israel, the recent WPV importation and outbreak response use of bivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (bOPV) eliminated the vulnerability to an importation of poliovirus serotypes 1 and 3 for several years, but not serotype 2. The Netherlands experienced a serotype 1 WPV outbreak in 1992-1993 and became vulnerable to re-established transmission in religious communities with low vaccine acceptance around the year 2000, although the general population remains well-protected from widespread transmission. All countries should invest in active management of population immunity to avoid the potential circulation of imported live polioviruses. IPV-using countries may wish to consider prevention opportunities and/or ensure preparedness for response

  17. Feasibility of quantitative environmental surveillance in poliovirus eradication strategies.

    PubMed

    Lodder, W J; Buisman, A M; Rutjes, S A; Heijne, J C; Teunis, P F; de Roda Husman, A M

    2012-06-01

    The progress of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative is monitored by acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance supplemented with environmental surveillance in selected areas. To assess the sensitivity of environmental surveillance, stools from (re)vaccinated elderly persons with a low seroprevalence and from wastewater were concurrently collected and analyzed in the Netherlands over a prolonged period of time. A total number of 228 healthy individuals with different levels of immunity were challenged with monovalent oral polio vaccine serotype 1 or 3. Poliovirus concentrations were determined by the titration of fecal suspensions on poliovirus-sensitive L20B cells and of sewage concentrates by L20B monolayer plaque assay. Almost half of the individuals (45%) shed poliovirus on day 3 after challenge, which peaked (57%) on day 8 with an average poliovirus excretion of 1.3 × 10(5) TCID(50) per g of feces and gradually decreased to less than 5% on day 42. The virus concentrations in sewage peaked on days 6 to 8 at approximately 100 PFU per liter, remained high until day 14, and subsequently decreased to less than 10 PFU per liter on day 29. The estimated poliovirus concentration in sewage approximated the measured initial virus excretion in feces, within 1 log(10) variation, resulting in a sensitivity of detection of 100 infected but mostly asymptomatic individuals in tens of thousands of individuals. An additional second peak observed in sewage may indicate secondary transmission missed by enterovirus or AFP surveillance in patients. This enables the detection of circulating poliovirus by environmental surveillance, supporting its feasibility as an early warning system.

  18. Contribution of Environmental Surveillance Toward Interruption of Poliovirus Transmission in Nigeria, 2012–2015

    PubMed Central

    Johnson Muluh, Ticha; Hamisu, Abdullahi Walla; Craig, Kehinde; Mkanda, Pascal; Andrew, Etsano; Adeniji, Johnson; Akande, Adefunke; Musa, Audu; Ayodeji, Isiaka; Nicksy, Gumede; Banda, Richard; Tegegne, Sisay G.; Nsubuga, Peter; Oyetunji, Ajiboye; Diop, Ousmane; Vaz, Rui G.; Muhammad, Ado J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cases of paralysis caused by poliovirus have decreased by >99% since the 1988 World Health Assembly's resolution to eradicate polio. The World Health Organization identified environmental surveillance (ES) of poliovirus in the poliomyelitis eradication strategic plan as an activity that can complement acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance. This article summarizes key public health interventions that followed the isolation of polioviruses from ES between 2012 and 2015. Methods. The grap method was used to collect 1.75 L of raw flowing sewage every 2–4 weeks. Once collected, samples were shipped at 4°C to a polio laboratory for concentration. ES data were then used to guide program implementation. Results. From 2012 to 2015, ES reported 97 circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPV2) and 14 wild polioviruses. In 2014 alone, 54 cVDPV type 2 cases and 1 WPV type 1 case were reported. In Sokoto State, 58 cases of AFP were found from a search of 9426 households. A total of 2 252 059 inactivated polio vaccine and 2 460 124 oral polio vaccine doses were administered to children aged <5 year in Borno and Yobe states. Conclusions. This article is among the first from Africa that relates ES findings to key public health interventions (mass immunization campaigns, inactivated polio vaccine introduction, and strengthening of AFP surveillance) that have contributed to the interruption of poliovirus transmission in Nigeria. PMID:26908747

  19. Combined hexavalent diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-hepatitis B-inactivated poliovirus-Haemophilus influenzae type B vaccine; Infanrix™ hexa: twelve years of experience in Italy.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Vincenzo; Bonanni, Paolo; Castro, Marcela; Gabutti, Giovanni; Franco, Elisabetta; Marchetti, Federico; Prato, Rosa; Vitale, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Infant vaccination using 2-dose priming at 3 and 5 mo of age with a booster at 11-12 mo of age was pioneered in Italy. The 3-5-11 schedule is now used in a growing number of European countries. Infanrix™ hexa (DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib, GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines) was first licensed for use in 2000 and has been the only pediatric hexavalent vaccine available since 2005. We reviewed available clinical trial data describing the immunogenicity of DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib when administered at 3, 5, and 11 mo of age, and conducted an analysis of safety using global and Italian post-marketing surveillance data. In Italy, DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib has a demonstrated safety record extending over a decade of use, it has been associated with record levels of vaccine coverage, and with sustained disease control in vaccinated cohorts. Hexavalent vaccines will continue to contribute to high vaccine coverage in Italy and across Europe.

  20. Combined hexavalent diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-hepatitis B-inactivated poliovirus-Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine; Infanrix™ hexa

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Vincenzo; Bonanni, Paolo; Castro, Marcela; Gabutti, Giovanni; Franco, Elisabetta; Marchetti, Federico; Prato, Rosa; Vitale, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Infant vaccination using 2-dose priming at 3 and 5 mo of age with a booster at 11–12 mo of age was pioneered in Italy. The 3-5-11 schedule is now used in a growing number of European countries. Infanrix™ hexa (DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib, GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines) was first licensed for use in 2000 and has been the only pediatric hexavalent vaccine available since 2005. We reviewed available clinical trial data describing the immunogenicity of DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib when administered at 3, 5, and 11 mo of age, and conducted an analysis of safety using global and Italian post-marketing surveillance data. In Italy, DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib has a demonstrated safety record extending over a decade of use, it has been associated with record levels of vaccine coverage, and with sustained disease control in vaccinated cohorts. Hexavalent vaccines will continue to contribute to high vaccine coverage in Italy and across Europe. PMID:24004825

  1. Framework for evaluating the risks of paralytic poliomyelitis after global interruption of wild poliovirus transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Aylward, R. Bruce; Cochi, Stephen L.

    2004-01-01

    With the interruption of wild poliovirus transmission globally, the need for new policies to deal with the post-certification era will rapidly arise. New policies will be required in four areas: detection and notification of circulating polioviruses; biocontainment of wild, vaccine-derived and attenuated strains of poliovirus; vaccine stockpiles and response mechanisms; and routine immunization against polioviruses. A common understanding of the potential risks of paralytic poliomyelitis in the post-certification period is essential to the development of these policies. Since 2000, there has been increasing international consensus that the risks of paralytic poliomyelitis in the post-certification era fall into two categories: those due to the continued use of the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) and those due to future improper handling of wild polioviruses. The specific risks within both categories have now been defined, and an understanding of the frequency and potential burden of disease associated with each is rapidly improving. This knowledge and clarity have provided a framework that is already proving valuable for identifying research priorities and discussing potential policy options with national authorities. However, this framework must be regarded as a dynamic tool, requiring regular updating as additional information on these risks becomes available through further scientific research, programmatic work, and policy decisions. PMID:15106299

  2. Inactivated polio vaccine development for technology transfer using attenuated Sabin poliovirus strains to shift from Salk-IPV to Sabin-IPV.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Wilfried A M; Thomassen, Yvonne E; van't Oever, Aart G; Westdijk, Janny; van Oijen, Monique G C T; Sundermann, Lars C; van't Veld, Peter; Sleeman, Eelco; van Nimwegen, Fred W; Hamidi, Ahd; Kersten, Gideon F A; van den Heuvel, Nico; Hendriks, Jan T; van der Pol, Leo A

    2011-09-22

    Industrial-scale inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) production dates back to the 1960s when at the Rijks Instituut voor de Volksgezondheid (RIV) in Bilthoven a process was developed based on micro-carrier technology and primary monkey kidney cells. This technology was freely shared with several pharmaceutical companies and institutes worldwide. In this contribution, the history of one of the first cell-culture based large-scale biological production processes is summarized. Also, recent developments and the anticipated upcoming shift from regular IPV to Sabin-IPV are presented. Responding to a call by the World Health Organization (WHO) for new polio vaccines, the development of Sabin-IPV was continued, after demonstrating proof of principle in the 1990s, at the Netherlands Vaccine Institute (NVI). Development of Sabin-IPV plays an important role in the WHO polio eradication strategy as biocontainment will be critical in the post-OPV cessation period. The use of attenuated Sabin strains instead of wild-type Salk polio strains will provide additional safety during vaccine production. Initially, the Sabin-IPV production process will be based on the scale-down model of the current, and well-established, Salk-IPV process. In parallel to clinical trial material production, process development, optimization and formulation research is being carried out to further optimize the process and reduce cost per dose. Also, results will be shown from large-scale (to prepare for future technology transfer) generation of Master- and Working virus seedlots, and clinical trial material (for phase I studies) production. Finally, the planned technology transfer to vaccine manufacturers in low and middle-income countries is discussed.

  3. World Health Organization Guidelines for Containment of Poliovirus Following Type-Specific Polio Eradication - Worldwide, 2015.

    PubMed

    Previsani, Nicoletta; Tangermann, Rudolph H; Tallis, Graham; Jafari, Hamid S

    2015-08-28

    In 1988, the World Health Assembly of the World Health Organization (WHO) resolved to eradicate polio worldwide. Among the three wild poliovirus (WPV) types (type 1, type 2, and type 3), WPV type 2 (WPV2) has been eliminated in the wild since 1999, and WPV type 3 (WPV3) has not been reported since 2012. In 2015, only Afghanistan and Pakistan have reported WPV transmission. On May 25, 2015, all WHO Member States endorsed World Health Assembly resolution 68.3 on full implementation of the Polio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan 2013-2018 (the Endgame Plan), and with it, the third Global Action Plan to minimize poliovirus facility-associated risk (GAPIII). All WHO Member States have committed to implementing appropriate containment of WPV2 in essential laboratory and vaccine production facilities* by the end of 2015 and of type 2 oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV2) within 3 months of global withdrawal of OPV2, which is planned for April 2016. This report summarizes critical steps for essential laboratory and vaccine production facilities that intend to retain materials confirmed to contain or potentially containing type-specific WPV, vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV), or OPV/Sabin viruses, and steps for nonessential facilities† that process specimens that contain or might contain polioviruses. National authorities will need to certify that the essential facilities they host meet the containment requirements described in GAPIII. After certification of WPV eradication, the use of all OPV will cease; final containment of all polioviruses after polio eradication and OPV cessation will minimize the risk for reintroduction of poliovirus into a polio-free world.

  4. Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Inactivated Poliovirus and N-Trimethyl Chitosan on pH-Sensitive Microneedles for Dermal Vaccination.

    PubMed

    van der Maaden, Koen; Sekerdag, Emine; Schipper, Pim; Kersten, Gideon; Jiskoot, Wim; Bouwstra, Joke

    2015-08-11

    The aim of this work was to coat pH-sensitive microneedle arrays with inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) particles and N-trimethyl chitosan chloride (TMC) via electrostatic interactions, and assess the immunogenicity of the vaccine after topical application of the coated microneedles in rats. The surface of 200 μm long microneedles was first chemically modified with pH-sensitive (pyridine) groups and then coated with negatively charged IPV and a positively charged polymer (TMC). To obtain a sufficient high antigen dose, 10 layers of IPV were alternately coated with TMC. The binding of IPV and TMC onto pH-sensitive microneedles was quantified and visualized by using fluorescently labeled TMC and IPV. The release of IPV and TMC from the microneedles was evaluated in ex vivo human skin by fluorescence and the immunogenicity of (unlabeled) IPV was assessed after topical application of the coated microneedles in rats. pH-sensitive microneedles were homogeneously coated with 10 layers of both IPV and TMC, resulting in 45 D antigen units IPV and 700 ng TMC per microneedle array. Fluorescence microscopy imaging revealed that both IPV and TMC were released into ex vivo human skin upon application of the coated microneedles. Finally, in vivo application of IPV-TMC-coated pH-sensitive microneedles in rats led to the induction of IPV specific antibody responses, illustrating that they are practically applicable. Topical administration of pH-sensitive microneedles coated with polyelectrolyte multinanolayers of antigens and oppositely charged polymers may be a useful approach for microneedle-based vaccination.

  5. Phylogenetic Analysis of Poliovirus Sequences.

    PubMed

    Jorba, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Comparative genomic sequencing is a major surveillance tool in the Polio Laboratory Network. Due to the rapid evolution of polioviruses (~1 % per year), pathways of virus transmission can be reconstructed from the pathways of genomic evolution. Here, we describe three main phylogenetic methods; estimation of genetic distances, reconstruction of a maximum-likelihood (ML) tree, and estimation of substitution rates using Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). The data set used consists of complete capsid sequences from a survey of poliovirus sequences available in GenBank. PMID:26983737

  6. Annual report of the Australian National Poliovirus Reference Laboratory, 2009.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jason A; Hobday, Linda; Polychronopoulos, Sophie; Ibrahim, Aishah; Thorley, Bruce R

    2010-09-01

    The Australian National Poliovirus Reference Laboratory (NPRL) is accredited by the World Health Organization (WHO) for the testing of faecal specimens from acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases and operates as a regional poliovirus reference laboratory for the Western Pacific Region. The NPRL, in collaboration with the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit, co-ordinates surveillance for cases of AFP in children in Australia, according to criteria recommended by the WHO. Specimens are referred from AFP cases in children and suspected cases of poliomyelitis in persons of any age. The WHO AFP surveillance performance indicator is 1 non-polio AFP case per 100,000 children less than 15 years of age. In 2009, the Polio Expert Committee classified 48 cases as non-polio AFP, a rate of 1.17 cases per 100,000 children less than 15 years of age. An additional WHO AFP surveillance performance indicator is that more than 80% of notified AFP cases have 2 faecal samples collected 24 hours apart and within 14 days of onset of paralysis. Adequate faecal samples were received from 16 (33.3%) of the 48 classified cases. A poliovirus was referred via the Enterovirus Reference Laboratory Network of Australia from a non-AFP case and was determined to be Sabin-like. This case most likely represents an importation event, the source of which was not identified, as Australia ceased using Sabin oral polio vaccine in 2005. The last report of a wild poliovirus importation in Australia was from Pakistan in 2007. In 2009, 1,604 wild poliovirus cases were reported in 23 countries with Afghanistan, India, Nigeria and Pakistan remaining endemic for poliomyelitis. PMID:21090182

  7. Immunogenicity and safety of a pentavalent acellular pertussis combined vaccine including diphtheria, tetanus, inactivated poliovirus and conjugated Haemophilus Influenzae type b polysaccharide for primary vaccination at 2, 3, 4 or 3, 4, 5 months of age in infants in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong Cheng; Li, Feng Xiang; Li, Yan Ping; Hou, Qi Ming; Li, Chang Gui; Li, Ya Nan; Chen, Fu Sheng; Hu, Xue Zhong; Su, Wen Bin; Zhang, Shu Min; Fang, Han Hua; Ye, Qiang; Zeng, Tian De; Liu, Tao Xuan; Li, Xiu Bi; Huang, Yun Neng; Deng, Man Ling; Zhang, Yan Ping; Ortiz, Esteban

    2011-02-24

    The aim was to demonstrate the immunogenicity and safety of a DTaP-IPV//PRP-T combined vaccine (Pentaxim(®)) compared to individual vaccines in infants in the People's Republic of China. Infants (N=792) were randomly assigned to receive DTaP-IPV//PRP-T at 2, 3 and 4 months of age (Group A) or 3, 4 and 5 months of age (Group B), or DTaP (Wuhan Institute of Biological Products), PRP-T (Act-Hib(®)) and IPV (Imovax(®) Polio) at 3, 4 and 5 months of age (Group C). Antibody titers were measured pre- and 1 month after the third vaccination; non-inferiority analyses were performed for seroprotection/seroconversion (SP/SC) rates. Safety was assessed 1 month after the primary series. SP/SC rates for the DTaP-IPV//PRP-T vaccine were high and non-inferior to the controls. Reactogenicity was low for each group and no hypotonic hyporesponsive episode or seizure was reported. In conclusion, the DTaP-IPV//PRP-T vaccine was highly immunogenic, non-inferior to the commercially available control vaccines and had a good safety profile for both primary administration schedules.

  8. Quantitative one-step RT-PCR assay for rapid and sensitive identification and titration of polioviruses in clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Laassri, Majid; Dipiazza, Anthony; Bidzhieva, Bella; Zagorodnyaya, Tatiana; Chumakov, Konstantin

    2013-04-01

    Rapid identification and quantitation of polioviruses in clinical specimens is important for surveillance and analysis of virus shedding by vaccine recipients, which could be used to assess the level of mucosal immunity. A quantitative one step RT-PCR was developed for identification and titration of all three poliovirus serotypes. The assay could be an alternative to the traditional procedure based on cell culture isolation and subsequent determination of poliovirus serotype and virus titration. The method is based on quantitative PCR performed with reverse transcription reaction in the same tube. The multiplex assay that quantifies all three serotypes of poliovirus was found to be highly specific, sensitive, and takes only one day to complete.

  9. Genetic relationships and epidemiological links between wild type 1 poliovirus isolates in Pakistan and Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim Efforts have been made to eliminate wild poliovirus transmission since 1988 when the World Health Organization began its global eradication campaign. Since then, the incidence of polio has decreased significantly. However, serotype 1 and serotype 3 still circulate endemically in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Both countries constitute a single epidemiologic block representing one of the three remaining major global reservoirs of poliovirus transmission. In this study we used genetic sequence data to investigate transmission links among viruses from diverse locations during 2005-2007. Methods In order to find the origins and routes of wild type 1 poliovirus circulation, polioviruses were isolated from faecal samples of Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) patients. We used viral cultures, two intratypic differentiation methods PCR, ELISA to characterize as vaccine or wild type 1 and nucleic acid sequencing of entire VP1 region of poliovirus genome to determine the genetic relatedness. Results One hundred eleven wild type 1 poliovirus isolates were subjected to nucleotide sequencing for genetic variation study. Considering the 15% divergence of the sequences from Sabin 1, Phylogenetic analysis by MEGA software revealed that active inter and intra country transmission of many genetically distinct strains of wild poliovirus type 1 belonged to genotype SOAS which is indigenous in this region. By grouping wild type 1 polioviruses according to nucleotide sequence homology, three distinct clusters A, B and C were obtained with multiple chains of transmission together with some silent circulations represented by orphan lineages. Conclusion Our results emphasize that there was a persistent transmission of wild type1 polioviruses in Pakistan and Afghanistan during 2005-2007. The epidemiologic information provided by the sequence data can contribute to the formulation of better strategies for poliomyelitis control to those critical areas, associated with high risk

  10. Poliomyelitis in the United States: A Historical Perspective and Current Vaccination Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farizo, Karen M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examines poliomyelitis in the United States by reviewing clinical manifestations and outcomes, history, recent epidemiologic characteristics, characteristics of currently available vaccines, controversies surrounding vaccination policy, current poliovirus vaccination recommendations, and prospects for worldwide eradication. Poliomyelitis remains…

  11. Twenty-Eight Years of Poliovirus Replication in an Immunodeficient Individual: Impact on the Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Glynis; Klapsa, Dimitra; Wilton, Thomas; Stone, Lindsay; Minor, Philip D; Martin, Javier

    2015-08-01

    There are currently huge efforts by the World Health Organization and partners to complete global polio eradication. With the significant decline in poliomyelitis cases due to wild poliovirus in recent years, rare cases related to the use of live-attenuated oral polio vaccine assume greater importance. Poliovirus strains in the oral vaccine are known to quickly revert to neurovirulent phenotype following replication in humans after immunisation. These strains can transmit from person to person leading to poliomyelitis outbreaks and can replicate for long periods of time in immunodeficient individuals leading to paralysis or chronic infection, with currently no effective treatment to stop excretion from these patients. Here, we describe an individual who has been excreting type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus for twenty eight years as estimated by the molecular clock established with VP1 capsid gene nucleotide sequences of serial isolates. This represents by far the longest period of excretion described from such a patient who is the only identified individual known to be excreting highly evolved vaccine-derived poliovirus at present. Using a range of in vivo and in vitro assays we show that the viruses are very virulent, antigenically drifted and excreted at high titre suggesting that such chronic excreters pose an obvious risk to the eradication programme. Our results in virus neutralization assays with human sera and immunisation-challenge experiments using transgenic mice expressing the human poliovirus receptor indicate that while maintaining high immunisation coverage will likely confer protection against paralytic disease caused by these viruses, significant changes in immunisation strategies might be required to effectively stop their occurrence and potential widespread transmission. Eventually, new stable live-attenuated polio vaccines with no risk of reversion might be required to respond to any poliovirus isolation in the post-eradication era.

  12. Twenty-Eight Years of Poliovirus Replication in an Immunodeficient Individual: Impact on the Global Polio Eradication Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Glynis; Klapsa, Dimitra; Wilton, Thomas; Stone, Lindsay; Minor, Philip D.; Martin, Javier

    2015-01-01

    There are currently huge efforts by the World Health Organization and partners to complete global polio eradication. With the significant decline in poliomyelitis cases due to wild poliovirus in recent years, rare cases related to the use of live-attenuated oral polio vaccine assume greater importance. Poliovirus strains in the oral vaccine are known to quickly revert to neurovirulent phenotype following replication in humans after immunisation. These strains can transmit from person to person leading to poliomyelitis outbreaks and can replicate for long periods of time in immunodeficient individuals leading to paralysis or chronic infection, with currently no effective treatment to stop excretion from these patients. Here, we describe an individual who has been excreting type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus for twenty eight years as estimated by the molecular clock established with VP1 capsid gene nucleotide sequences of serial isolates. This represents by far the longest period of excretion described from such a patient who is the only identified individual known to be excreting highly evolved vaccine-derived poliovirus at present. Using a range of in vivo and in vitro assays we show that the viruses are very virulent, antigenically drifted and excreted at high titre suggesting that such chronic excreters pose an obvious risk to the eradication programme. Our results in virus neutralization assays with human sera and immunisation-challenge experiments using transgenic mice expressing the human poliovirus receptor indicate that while maintaining high immunisation coverage will likely confer protection against paralytic disease caused by these viruses, significant changes in immunisation strategies might be required to effectively stop their occurrence and potential widespread transmission. Eventually, new stable live-attenuated polio vaccines with no risk of reversion might be required to respond to any poliovirus isolation in the post-eradication era. PMID:26313548

  13. Search for poliovirus carriers among people with primary immune deficiency diseases in the United States, Mexico, Brazil, and the United Kingdom.

    PubMed Central

    Halsey, Neal A.; Pinto, Jorge; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco; Faure-Fontenla, María A.; da Silva, Edson; Khan, Aamir J.; Webster, A. D.; Minor, Philip; Dunn, Glynis; Asturias, Edwin; Hussain, Hamidah; Pallansch, Mark A.; Kew, Olen M.; Winkelstein, Jerry; Sutter, Roland

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the rate of long-term poliovirus excretors in people known to have B-cell immune deficiency disorders. METHODS: An active search for chronic excretors was conducted among 306 persons known to have immunoglobulin G (IgG) deficiency in the United States, Mexico, Brazil, and the United Kingdom, and 40 people with IgA deficiency in the United States. Written informed consent or assent was obtained from the participants or their legal guardians, and the studies were formally approved. Stool samples were collected from participants and cultured for polioviruses. Calculation of the confidence interval for the proportion of participants with persistent poliovirus excretion was based on the binomial distribution. FINDINGS: No individuals with long-term excretion of polioviruses were identified. Most participants had received oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) and almost all had been exposed to household contacts who had received OPV. Polioviruses of recent vaccine origin were transiently found in four individuals in Mexico and Brazil, where OPV is recommended for all children. CONCLUSION: Although chronic poliovirus excretion can occur in immunodeficient persons, it appears to be rare. PMID:15106294

  14. Functional domains of the poliovirus receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Satoshi; Ise, Iku; Nomoto, Akio )

    1991-05-15

    A number of mutant cDNAs of the human poliovirus receptor were constructed to identify essential regions of the molecule as the receptor. All mutant cDNAs carrying the sequence coding for the entire N-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain (domain I) confer permissiveness for poliovirus to mouse L cells, but a mutant cDNA lacking the sequence for domain I does not. The transformants permissive for poliovirus were able to bind the virus and were also recognized by monoclonal antibody D171, which competes with poliovirus for the cellular receptor. These results strongly suggest that the poliovirus binding site resides in domain I of the receptor. Mutant cDNAs for the sequence encoding the intracellular peptide were also constructed and expressed in mouse L cells. Susceptibility of these cells to poliovirus revealed that the entire putative cytoplasmic domain is not essential for virus infection. Thus, the cytoplasmic domain of the molecule appears not to play a role in the penetration of poliovirus.

  15. Engineering Enhanced Vaccine Cell Lines To Eradicate Vaccine-Preventable Diseases: the Polio End Game

    PubMed Central

    van der Sanden, Sabine M. G.; Wu, Weilin; Dybdahl-Sissoko, Naomi; Weldon, William C.; Brooks, Paula; O'Donnell, Jason; Jones, Les P.; Brown, Cedric; Tompkins, S. Mark; Karpilow, Jon; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaccine manufacturing costs prevent a significant portion of the world's population from accessing protection from vaccine-preventable diseases. To enhance vaccine production at reduced costs, a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen was performed to identify gene knockdown events that enhanced poliovirus replication. Primary screen hits were validated in a Vero vaccine manufacturing cell line using attenuated and wild-type poliovirus strains. Multiple single and dual gene silencing events increased poliovirus titers >20-fold and >50-fold, respectively. Host gene knockdown events did not affect virus antigenicity, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9-mediated knockout of the top candidates dramatically improved viral vaccine strain production. Interestingly, silencing of several genes that enhanced poliovirus replication also enhanced replication of enterovirus 71, a clinically relevant virus to which vaccines are being targeted. The discovery that host gene modulation can markedly increase virus vaccine production dramatically alters mammalian cell-based vaccine manufacturing possibilities and should facilitate polio eradication using the inactivated poliovirus vaccine. IMPORTANCE Using a genome-wide RNAi screen, a collection of host virus resistance genes was identified that, upon silencing, increased poliovirus and enterovirus 71 production by from 10-fold to >50-fold in a Vero vaccine manufacturing cell line. This report provides novel insights into enterovirus-host interactions and describes an approach to developing the next generation of vaccine manufacturing through engineered vaccine cell lines. The results show that specific gene silencing and knockout events can enhance viral titers of both attenuated (Sabin strain) and wild-type polioviruses, a finding that should greatly facilitate global implementation of inactivated polio vaccine as well as further reduce costs for live-attenuated oral polio vaccines

  16. Environmental surveillance of poliovirus and non-polio enterovirus in urban sewage in Dakar, Senegal (2007-2013)

    PubMed Central

    Ndiaye, Abdou Kader; Diop, Pape Amadou Mbathio; Diop, Ousmane Madiagne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Global poliomyelitis eradication initiative relies on (i) laboratory based surveillance of acute flaccid surveillance (AFP) to monitor the circulation of wild poliovirus in a population, and (ii) vaccination to prevent its diffusion. However, as poliovirus can survive in the environment namely in sewage, environmental surveillance (ES) is of growing importance as the eradication target is close. This study aimed to assess polioviruses and non polio enteroviruses circulation in sewage drains covering a significant population of Dakar. Methods From April 2007 to May 2013, 271 specimens of raw sewage were collected using the grab method in 6 neighborhoods of Dakar. Samples were processed to extract and concentrate viruses using polyethylene glycol and Dextran (two-phase separation method). Isolation of enteroviruses was attempted in RD, L20B and Hep2 cell lines. Polioviruses were identified by RT-PCR and Elisa. Non Polio Enteroviruses (NPEVs) were identified by RT-PCR and microneutralisation tests. Results Polioviruses and NPEVs were respectively detected in 34,3% and 42,8% sewage samples. No wild poliovirus neither circulating vaccine-derived Poliovirus (cVDPV) was detected. Neutralization assays have identified 49 non polio enteroviruses that were subsequently classified in 13 serotypes belonging to HEV-A (22, 4%), HEV-B (12, 24%), HEV-C (26, 53%) and HEV-D (6, 12%) species. Conclusion This study is the first documentation of enteroviruses environmental detection in Senegal. It shows the usefulness of environmental surveillance for indirect monitoring of the circulation and distribution of enteroviruses in the community. PMID:25848458

  17. [Childhood immunization schedule 2001-2002. Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics].

    PubMed

    2001-07-01

    In 1994 the Spanish Association of Pediatrics founded the Advisory Committee on Vaccines with the aim of providing advice on matters related to childhood immunizations and of implementing vaccination schedules. The latest recommendations concern the immunization schedule for 2001-2002, in which indications for the inactivated poliovirus vaccine instead of the attenuated poliovirus vaccine are of prime importance. The advisability of including the vaccine against chicken pox in healthy children is stressed.

  18. Safety and reactogenicity of the combined diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-inactivated poliovirus-Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTPa-IPV/Hib) vaccine in healthy Vietnamese toddlers: An open-label, phase III study.

    PubMed

    Anh, Dang Duc; Van Der Meeren, Olivier; Karkada, Naveen; Assudani, Deepak; Yu, Ta-Wen; Han, Htay Htay

    2016-03-01

    The introduction of combination vaccines plays a significant role in increasing vaccine acceptance and widening vaccine coverage. Primary vaccination against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, poliomyelitis and Haemophilus influenza type b (Hib) diseases has been implemented in Vietnam. In this study we evaluated the safety and reactogenicity of combined diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-inactivated polio (DTPa-IPV)/Hib vaccine when administered as a booster dose in 300 healthy Vietnamese children <2 years of age (mean age: 15.8 months). During the 4-day follow-up period, pain (31.7%) and redness (27.3%) were the most frequent solicited local symptoms. Pain (2%) was also the most frequent grade 3 local symptom. One subject reported 2 serious adverse events that were not causally related to the study vaccine. DTPa-IPV/Hib conjugate vaccine was well tolerated as a booster dose in healthy Vietnamese children aged <2 years.

  19. Safety and reactogenicity of the combined diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-inactivated poliovirus-Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTPa-IPV/Hib) vaccine in healthy Vietnamese toddlers: An open-label, phase III study

    PubMed Central

    Anh, Dang Duc; Van Der Meeren, Olivier; Karkada, Naveen; Assudani, Deepak; Yu, Ta-Wen; Han, Htay Htay

    2016-01-01

    abstract The introduction of combination vaccines plays a significant role in increasing vaccine acceptance and widening vaccine coverage. Primary vaccination against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, poliomyelitis and Haemophilus influenza type b (Hib) diseases has been implemented in Vietnam. In this study we evaluated the safety and reactogenicity of combined diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-inactivated polio (DTPa-IPV)/Hib vaccine when administered as a booster dose in 300 healthy Vietnamese children <2 years of age (mean age: 15.8 months). During the 4-day follow-up period, pain (31.7%) and redness (27.3%) were the most frequent solicited local symptoms. Pain (2%) was also the most frequent grade 3 local symptom. One subject reported 2 serious adverse events that were not causally related to the study vaccine. DTPa-IPV/Hib conjugate vaccine was well tolerated as a booster dose in healthy Vietnamese children aged <2 years. PMID:26337197

  20. The probability of undetected wild poliovirus circulation: Can we do better?

    PubMed

    Houy, Nicolas

    2015-10-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis surveillance actively detects new paralytic infections caused by wild poliovirus (WPV). However, most WPV infections occur with no symptom. This complicates determining when WPV is eradicated in the context of stopping oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). Previous studies have used the time since the last paralytic infection as a variable of interest to construct this probability. In this study, we show that more freely available information can be used. In particular, we focus on enriching the computation of the probability of WPV silent circulation with the date of occurrence of the last paralytic infection. We show that this information can for at least one set of conditions have crucial importance for an accurate estimation of the risk of false positive when declaring WPV eradicated. We also look at the importance of this information for optimal dynamic vaccination strategies.

  1. Massive outbreak of poliomyelitis caused by type-3 wild poliovirus in Angola in 1999.

    PubMed Central

    Valente, F.; Otten, M.; Balbina, F.; Van de Weerdt, R.; Chezzi, C.; Eriki, P.; Van-Dúnnen, J.; Bele, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    The largest outbreak of poliomyelitis ever recorded in Africa (1093 cases) occurred from 1 March to 28 May 1999 in Luanda, Angola, and in surrounding areas. The outbreak was caused primarily by a type-3 wild poliovirus, although type-1 wild poliovirus was circulating in the outbreak area at the same time. Infected individuals ranged in age from 2 months to 22 years; 788 individuals (72%) were younger than 3 years. Of the 590 individuals whose vaccination status was known, 23% had received no vaccine and 54% had received fewer than three doses of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). The major factors that contributed to this outbreak were as follows: massive displacement of unvaccinated persons to urban settings; low routine OPV coverage; inaccessible populations during the previous three national immunization days (NIDs); and inadequate sanitation. This outbreak indicates the urgent need to improve accessibility to all children during NIDs and the dramatic impact that war can have by displacing persons and impeding access to routine immunizations. The period immediately after an outbreak provides an enhanced opportunity to eradicate poliomyelitis. If continuous access in all districts for acute flaccid paralysis surveillance and supplemental immunizations cannot be assured, the current war in Angola may threaten global poliomyelitis eradication. PMID:10812730

  2. Poliovirus Adsorption by 34 Minerals and Soils

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Rebecca S.; Taylor, Dene H.; Sturman, Lawrence S.; Reddy, Michael M.; Fuhs, G. Wolfgang

    1981-01-01

    The adsorption of radiolabeled infectious poliovirus type 2 by 34 well-defined soils and mineral substrates was analyzed in a synthetic freshwater medium containing 1 mM CaCl2 and 1.25 mM NaHCO3 at pH 7. In a model system, adsorption of poliovirus by Ottawa sand was rapid and reached equilibrium within 1 h at 4°C. Near saturation, the adsorption could be described by the Langmuir equation; the apparent surface saturation was 2.5 × 106 plaque-forming units of poliovirus per mg of Ottawa sand. At low surface coverage, adsorption was described by the Freundlich equation. The soils and minerals used ranged from acidic to basic and from high in organic content to organic free. The available negative surface charge on each substrate was measured by the adsorption of a cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride. Most of the substrates adsorbed more than 95% of the virus. In general, soils, in comparison with minerals, were weak adsorbents. Among the soils, muck and Genesee silt loam were the poorest adsorbents; among the minerals, montmorillonite, glauconite, and bituminous shale were the least effective. The most effective adsorbents were magnetite sand and hematite, which are predominantly oxides of iron. Correlation coefficients for substrate properties and virus adsorption revealed that the elemental composition of the adsorbents had little effect on poliovirus uptake. Substrate surface area and pH, by themselves, were not significantly correlated with poliovirus uptake. A strong negative correlation was found between poliovirus adsorption and both the contents of organic matter and the available negative surface charge on the substrates as determined by their capacities for adsorbing the cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride. PMID:6274259

  3. Five of Five VHHs Neutralizing Poliovirus Bind the Receptor-Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Mike; Schotte, Lise; Thys, Bert; Filman, David J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nanobodies, or VHHs, that recognize poliovirus type 1 have previously been selected and characterized as candidates for antiviral agents or reagents for standardization of vaccine quality control. In this study, we present high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of poliovirus with five neutralizing VHHs. All VHHs bind the capsid in the canyon at sites that extensively overlap the poliovirus receptor-binding site. In contrast, the interaction involves a unique (and surprisingly extensive) surface for each of the five VHHs. Five regions of the capsid were found to participate in binding with all five VHHs. Four of these five regions are known to alter during the expansion of the capsid associated with viral entry. Interestingly, binding of one of the VHHs, PVSS21E, resulted in significant changes of the capsid structure and thus seems to trap the virus in an early stage of expansion. IMPORTANCE We describe the cryo-electron microscopy structures of complexes of five neutralizing VHHs with the Mahoney strain of type 1 poliovirus at resolutions ranging from 3.8 to 6.3Å. All five VHHs bind deep in the virus canyon at similar sites that overlap extensively with the binding site for the receptor (CD155). The binding surfaces on the VHHs are surprisingly extensive, but despite the use of similar binding surfaces on the virus, the binding surface on the VHHs is unique for each VHH. In four of the five complexes, the virus remains essentially unchanged, but for the fifth there are significant changes reminiscent of but smaller in magnitude than the changes associated with cell entry, suggesting that this VHH traps the virus in a previously undescribed early intermediate state. The neutralizing mechanisms of the VHHs and their potential use as quality control agents for the end game of poliovirus eradication are discussed. PMID:26764003

  4. Vaccinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  5. Seroepidemiology of the poliovirus in Monrovia (Liberia).

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Burgos, A; Bada, J L; Fernandez-Calvo, J L; Artola, V M

    1977-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies against poliovirus have been studied in 265 persons in Monrovia (Liberia). 34% of the individuals studied possessed antibodies against the three polioviruses, 23% against two, 26% against one; the remaining 17% showed none. The three poliovirus antibodies were evenly distributed amongst the population, although there was an indication that antibodies to polio 2 occurred more commonly in females than in males. The distribution of the antibodies did not seem to be influenced by place of residence, source of drinking water or social class. Significant variations in the immunological state according to age were noted. The study of concordance and discordance of antibody titre in the blood of neonates and their mothers revealed that the lower percentage of titre concordance for polio 3 has no statistical value. The low titre in the neonates (an average for each poliovirus scarcely above 1:16) is a sign of insufficient titre in the adults. The need for a massive antipoliomyelitis campaign among infants and adult women is stressed.

  6. Oncolytic poliovirus therapy and immunization with poliovirus-infected cell lysate induces potent antitumor immunity against neuroblastoma in vivo.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Hidemi; Wimmer, Eckard; Cello, Jeronimo

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that neuroblastoma subcutaneously implanted in immuno-competent mice is eliminated by intratumoral administration of neuroattenuated poliovirus (PV). Our results also suggested that the in vivo destruction of neuroblastoma cells by virotherapy lead to a robust antitumor immune response. In this work, splenocytes harvested from neuroblastoma-bearing animals treated with neuroattenuated PV exhibited significantly higher lytic activity against tumor target cells than did those from splenocytes derived from control mice. In vitro T-cell depletion experiments indicated that CD8(+) T cells were essential for the cytotoxic antitumor activity of splenocytes. Moreover, adoptive transfer of splenocytes obtained from mice cured of neuroblastoma by PV virotherapy markedly delayed the tumor growth of previously established neuroblastomas in recipient naïve mice. These results confirmed that treatment with a neuroattenuated oncolytic PV strain induces antitumor immunity against neuroblastoma that is mainly mediated by cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. Immunocompetent mice, on the other hand, were immunized with PV-infected neuroblastoma cell lysate prior intravenous challenge with neuroblastoma cells. As a control, mice were vaccinated with either non-infected neuroblastoma cell lysate alone or mixed with PV, or with PBS prior tumor cell injection. Results showed that survival is significantly prolonged only in mice immunized with PV-infected tumor lysate. This finding clearly suggested that in vitro poliovirus infection of neuroblastoma cells turns these cells into a potent tumor immunogen. Further studies in oncolytic treatment of neuroblastoma using attenuated PV alone or in combination with immunotherapy with PV oncolysate should improve the probability for successful translation in the clinic.

  7. Development and consideration of global policies for managing the future risks of poliovirus outbreaks: insights and lessons learned through modeling.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Duintjer Tebbens, Radboud J; Pallansch, Mark A; Kew, Olen M; Sutter, Roland W; Aylward, R Bruce; Watkins, Margaret; Gary, Howard; Alexander, James P; Venczel, Linda; Johnson, Denise; Cáceres, Victor M; Sangrujee, Nalinee; Jafari, Hamid; Cochi, Stephen L

    2006-12-01

    The success of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative promises to bring large benefits, including sustained improvements in quality of life (i.e., cases of paralytic disease and deaths avoided) and costs saved from cessation of vaccination. Obtaining and maintaining these benefits requires that policymakers manage the transition from the current massive use of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) to a world without OPV and free of the risks of potential future reintroductions of live polioviruses. This article describes the analytical journey that began in 2001 with a retrospective case study on polio risk management and led to development of dynamic integrated risk, economic, and decision analysis tools to inform global policies for managing the risks of polio. This analytical journey has provided several key insights and lessons learned that will be useful to future analysts involved in similar complex decision-making processes. PMID:17184398

  8. Environmental Surveillance of Polioviruses in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in Support to the Activities of Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Pereira, Joseane Simone; da Silva, Lidiane Rodrigues; de Meireles Nunes, Amanda; de Souza Oliveira, Silas; da Costa, Eliane Veiga; da Silva, Edson Elias

    2016-03-01

    Wild polioviruses still remain endemic in three countries (Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Nigeria) and re-emergency of wild polio has been reported in previously polio-free countries. Environmental surveillance has been used as a supplementary tool in monitoring the circulation of wild poliovirus (PVs) and/or vaccine-derived PVs even in the absence of acute flaccid paralysis cases. This study aimed to monitor the presence of polioviruses in wastewater samples collected at one wastewater treatment plant located in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. From December 2011 to June 2012 and from September to December 2012, 31 samples were collected and processed. RD and L20B cell cultures were able to isolate PVs and non-polio enteroviruses in 27/31 samples. Polioviruses were isolated in eight samples (type 1 Sabin = 1, type 2 Sabin = 5, and type 3 Sabin = 2). Vaccine-derived polioviruses were not detected nor evidence of recombination with other PVs or non-polio enterovirus serotypes were observed among the isolates. The Sabin-related serotypes 2 and 3 presented nucleotide substitutions in positions associated with the neurovirulent phenotype at the 5'-UTR. Changes in important Amino acid residues at VP1 were also observed in the serotypes 2 and 3. Environmental surveillance has been used successfully in monitoring the circulation of PVs and non-polio enteroviruses and it is of crucial importance in the final stages of the WHO global polio eradication initiative. Our results show the continuous circulation of Sabin-like PVs and non-polio enteroviruses in the analyzed area during the study period. PMID:26538420

  9. Environmental Surveillance of Polioviruses in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in Support to the Activities of Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Pereira, Joseane Simone; da Silva, Lidiane Rodrigues; de Meireles Nunes, Amanda; de Souza Oliveira, Silas; da Costa, Eliane Veiga; da Silva, Edson Elias

    2016-03-01

    Wild polioviruses still remain endemic in three countries (Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Nigeria) and re-emergency of wild polio has been reported in previously polio-free countries. Environmental surveillance has been used as a supplementary tool in monitoring the circulation of wild poliovirus (PVs) and/or vaccine-derived PVs even in the absence of acute flaccid paralysis cases. This study aimed to monitor the presence of polioviruses in wastewater samples collected at one wastewater treatment plant located in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. From December 2011 to June 2012 and from September to December 2012, 31 samples were collected and processed. RD and L20B cell cultures were able to isolate PVs and non-polio enteroviruses in 27/31 samples. Polioviruses were isolated in eight samples (type 1 Sabin = 1, type 2 Sabin = 5, and type 3 Sabin = 2). Vaccine-derived polioviruses were not detected nor evidence of recombination with other PVs or non-polio enterovirus serotypes were observed among the isolates. The Sabin-related serotypes 2 and 3 presented nucleotide substitutions in positions associated with the neurovirulent phenotype at the 5'-UTR. Changes in important Amino acid residues at VP1 were also observed in the serotypes 2 and 3. Environmental surveillance has been used successfully in monitoring the circulation of PVs and non-polio enteroviruses and it is of crucial importance in the final stages of the WHO global polio eradication initiative. Our results show the continuous circulation of Sabin-like PVs and non-polio enteroviruses in the analyzed area during the study period.

  10. Sol-gel-based poliovirus-1 detector.

    PubMed

    Zolkov, Chen; Avnir, David; Armon, Robert

    2009-02-01

    Hybrid sol-gel films were used to grow Buffalo Green Monkey kidney cell tissues, which were used for poliovirus-1 detection. It is shown that the sol-gel approach allows cutting the standard EPA procedure from 48 to 24h of detection time; that better visualization of the plaques is obtained; that a variety of stains, including fluorescence, can be used; and that the shelf life of the resulting plaques system is well over a year.

  11. Standardization of poliovirus neutralizing antibody tests.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, P; van Steenis, G; van Wezel, A L; Salk, J

    1984-01-01

    Recently the Forum for Advancement of Immunization Research sponsored a Collaborative Study on Poliovirus Antibody Titration. Twenty laboratories from 12 countries participated. There were considerable differences in detail of test performance and test results among laboratories. The sensitivity of the tests varied over a 10-fold range (geometric mean titer from 21 to 288). The average coefficient of variation ranged from 4.5% to 13.5%. Tests performed at the Food and Drug Administration indicated that Hep-2 cells were more suitable than Vero cells for poliovirus titration by cytopathic effect end point or plaque assay. However, the cell lines were equally suitable for polio antibody titration by neutralization of cytopathic effect. A high degree of sensitivity and optimal reproducibility of antibody assay were observed in tests utilizing a medium to low dose of virus and serum-virus incubation overnight at 36 C. On the basis of current experience, a protocol is proposed for a test that provides high sensitivity and reproducibility and is practical for large-scale determinations of poliovirus antibody.

  12. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Vaccinations are injections of antigens into the body. Once the antigens enter the blood, they circulate along ... suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of an ...

  13. S2M: A Stochastic Simulation Model of Poliovirus Genetic State Transition

    PubMed Central

    Ecale Zhou, Carol L.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling the molecular mechanisms that govern genetic variation can be useful in understanding the dynamics that drive genetic state transition in quasispecies viruses. For example, there is considerable interest in understanding how the relatively benign vaccine strains of poliovirus eventually revert to forms that confer neurovirulence and cause disease (ie, vaccine-derived poliovirus). This report describes a stochastic simulation model, S2M, which can be used to generate hypothetical outcomes based on known mechanisms of genetic diversity. S2M begins with predefined genotypes based on the Sabin-1 and Mahoney wild-type sequences, constructs a set of independent cell-based populations, and performs in-cell replication and cell-to-cell infection cycles while quantifying genetic changes that track the transition from Sabin-1 toward Mahoney. Realism is incorporated into the model by assigning defaults for variables that constrain mechanisms of genetic variability based roughly on metrics reported in the literature, yet these values can be modified at the command line in order to generate hypothetical outcomes driven by these parameters. To demonstrate the utility of S2M, simulations were performed to examine the effects of the rates of replication error and recombination and the presence or absence of defective interfering particles, upon reaching the end states of Mahoney resemblance (semblance of a vaccine-derived state), neurovirulence, genome fitness, and cloud diversity. Simulations provide insight into how modeled biological features may drive hypothetical outcomes, independently or in combination, in ways that are not always intuitively obvious. PMID:27385911

  14. Global routine vaccination coverage, 2014.

    PubMed

    Subaiya, Saleena; Dumolard, Laure; Lydon, Patrick; Gacic-Dobo, Marta; Eggers, Rudolf; Conklin, Laura

    2015-11-13

    The year 2014 marked the 40th anniversary of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Expanded Program on Immunization, which was established to ensure equitable access to routine immunization services (1). Since 1974, global coverage with the four core vaccines (Bacille Calmette- Guérin vaccine [BCG; for protection against tuberculosis], diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis [DTP] vaccine, poliovirus vaccine, and measles vaccine) has increased from <5% to ≥85%, and additional vaccines have been added to the recommended schedule. Coverage with the 3rd dose of DTP vaccine (DTP3) by age 12 months is an indicator of immunization program performance because it reflects completion of the basic infant immunization schedule; coverage with other vaccines, including the 3rd dose of poliovirus vaccine (polio3); the 1st dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV1) is also assessed. Estimated global DTP3 coverage has remained at 84%–86% since 2009, with estimated 2014 coverage at 86%. Estimated global coverage for the 2nd routine dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV2) was 38% by age 24 months and 56% when older age groups were included, similar to levels reported in 2013 (36% and 55%, respectively). To reach and sustain high immunization coverage in all countries, adequate vaccine stock management and additional opportunities for immunization, such as through routine visits in the second year of life, are integral components to strengthening immunization programs and reducing morbidity and mortality from vaccine preventable diseases. PMID:26562454

  15. Quercetinase pirin makes poliovirus replication resistant to flavonoid quercetin.

    PubMed

    Neznanov, Nickolay; Kondratova, Anna; Chumakov, Konstantin M; Neznanova, Lubov; Kondratov, Roman; Banerjee, Amiya K; Gudkov, Andrei V

    2008-04-01

    Flavonoid quercetin and its derivative, methylquercetin, inhibit the replication of poliovirus in several cell lines. Here, we show that replication of poliovirus is inhibited by quercetin and that the extent of this inhibition depends on the intracellular content of pirin, a quercetinase. HeLa cells contain higher content of pirin protein than normal kidney human epithelial (NKE) or 293 cells do. Poliovirus replication in HeLa cells is significantly more resistant to quercetin than its replication in NKE and 293 cells. Overexpression of pirin reduced antiviral inhibitory effect of quercetin, while siRNA-induced suppression of pirin level made poliovirus replication more sensitive to the flavonoid. The results suggest that quercetinase activity of pirin determines the resistance of poliovirus infection to quercetin.

  16. Rapid detection of poliovirus by reverse transcription and polymerase chain amplification: application for differentiation between poliovirus and nonpoliovirus enteroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, R; Chonmaitree, T; McCombs, J; Prabhakar, B; Lo Verde, P T; Ogra, P L

    1993-01-01

    This report describes a rapid method of detection of poliovirus from viral isolates of clinical specimens using a single set of primers selected from the conserved 5' noncoding region of the poliovirus genome. Of the 144 clinical viral isolates examined, 81 were positive for polioviruses and 50 were positive for nonpoliovirus enteroviruses by tissue culture neutralization and infectivity. All 81 (100%) of the viral isolates identified as poliovirus by tissue culture infectivity were also positive by polymerase chain reaction. Of 50 nonpoliovirus enterovirus isolates found to be negative for poliovirus by tissue culture neutralization and infectivity, 48 were also negative by polymerase chain reaction. The high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (96%) of the primer set indicate that this assay has potential clinical applicability in the diagnosis of nonpoliovirus enterovirus infection. Images PMID:7679404

  17. [VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Bellver Capella, Vincente

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines are an extraordinary instrument of immunization of the population against infectious diseases. Around them there are many ethical issues. One of the most debated is what to do with certain groups opposition to vaccination of their children. States have managed in different ways the conflict between the duty of vaccination and the refusal to use vaccines: some impose the vaccination and others simply promote it. In this article we deal with which of these two approaches is the most suitable from an ethical and legal point of view. We stand up for the second option, which is the current one in Spain, and we propose some measures which should be kept in mind to improve immunization programs.

  18. [Role of the National Poliovirus Laboratory for the Program of eradication and poliomyelitis surveillance].

    PubMed

    Trallero, Gloria; Cabrerizo, María; Avellón, Ana

    2013-01-01

    The Spanish acute flaccid paralysis surveillance network is coordinated by the National Poliovirus Laboratory (NPL), which, since 1998, carries out polioviruses (PV) and other enteroviruses detected characterization by cell culture and molecular techniques. A total of 110,725 (70046+40679) samples were studied between 1998-2012 and enteroviruses were detected in 8% of these. Among these enteroviruses 241 PV were characterized as PV Sabin-like, except samples belong to an imported poliomyelitis case, all of which were characterised as vaccine derived PV type 2. The NPL has carried out the serotyping and the intratypic differentiation of all the isolated PV in Spain of any syndrome. It is shown that wild PV has not circulated in our country during the 15 years studied and that has led to the signing of the Act of the "eradication of poliomyelitis in Spain" by WHO in 2001, and the /"certification of the eradication of wild PV free for European countries" on 21 June 2002. Currently only 3 countries have endemic transmission of wild PV (Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria). Until a complete worldwide eradication, was achieved, Spain will actively continue to participate in the maintenance of the poliomyelitis eradication infrastructure by monitoring and vaccination as well as the wild PV containment plan to avoid the spread of wild PV.

  19. Ethnic disparities in routine immunization coverage: a reason for persistent poliovirus circulation in Karachi, Pakistan?

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Nida Tariq; Owais, Aatekah; Agha, Ajmal; Karim, Mehtab S; Zaidi, Anita K M

    2014-01-01

    Karachi is the only mega city in the world with persistent poliovirus transmission. We determined routine childhood immunization rates in Karachi and identified predictors of vaccine completion. A population-based cross-sectional survey was conducted in Karachi between August and September 2008. Data on demographics, socioeconomic, and DTP3 vaccination status in children 12 to 23 months old were collected. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of vaccination completion. Overall, 1401 participants were approached; 1391 consented to participate. Of these, 1038 (75%) were completely vaccinated. Punjabi families had the highest DTP3 coverage (82%), followed by Urdu-speaking families (79%). Pashtun (67%) and Bengali (48%) families had the lowest vaccine coverage. Children of mothers with ≥ 12 years of schooling (OR = 25.4; 95% CI = 5.7-113.1) were most likely to be vaccinated. A quarter of study participants were unvaccinated. Targeted strategies for boosting DTP3 rates in communities with low immunization coverage are essential for polio eradication in Karachi.

  20. Immunogenicity and antigenicity of a recombinant chimeric protein containing epitopes of poliovirus type 1.

    PubMed

    Pan, X-X; Wang, J; Xia, W-Y; Li, X-F; Yang, L-J; Huang, C; Chen, Y-D

    2016-01-01

    To design a vaccine that simultaneously prevents both rotavirus (RV) and poliovirus (PV), a PV type 1 (PV1) chimeric protein using RV VP6 as a vector (VP6F) was constructed, expressed in Escherichia coli expression system and characterized by SDS-PAGE, Western blot, immunofluorescence assay and neutralization test. The results showed that the chimeric protein reacted with anti-VP6F and anti-PV1 antibodies and elicited production of serum antibodies against the chimeric protein in guinea pigs. Antibodies against the chimeric protein neutralized RV Wa and PV1 infection in vitro. The results provided a relevant possibility of developing novel approaches in the rational design of vaccines effective against both RV and PV. PMID:27640433

  1. Serological survey on immunity status against polioviruses in children and adolescents living in a border region, Apulia (Southern Italy)

    PubMed Central

    Tafuri, Silvio; Prato, Rosa; Martinelli, Domenico; Calvario, Agata; Bozzi, Anna; Labianca, Michele; Patti, Annamaria; Lopalco, Pietro Luigi; Germinario, Cinzia

    2008-01-01

    Background In 1988 the World Health Assembly adopted the goal to eradicate poliomyelitis by routine immunization using Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV). On 21 June 2002 the WHO European Region was declared polio-free. In 2008 poliomyelitis is still endemic in 4 countries (Nigeria, India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan), where 1201 new cases were registered in 2007; 107 sporadic cases were also notified in countries where poliovirus is not endemic. The aim of this work was to verify the level of antipoliomyelitis immunity status in children and adolescents in the Apulia region (south of Italy), which may be considered a border region due to its position. Methods 704 blood specimens from a convenience sample were collected in six laboratories. The age of subjects enrolled was 0–15 years. The immunity against poliomyelitis was evaluated by neutralizing antibody titration in tissue culture microplates. Results Seropositivity (neutralising antibodies titre ≥ 8) for polioviruses 1, 2 and 3 was detected in 100%, 99.8% and 99.4% of collected sera. Antibody titres were not lower in subjects who received either four doses of inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) or a sequential schedule consisting of two doses of IPV and two of oral polio vaccine than in subjects who received four doses of OPV. Conclusion These results confirmed current data of vaccine coverage for poliomyelitis: during the last ten years in Apulia, the coverage in 24 months old children was more than 90%. The high level of immunization found confirms the effectiveness both of the sequential schedule IPV-OPV and of the schedule all-IPV. Apulia region has to face daily arrivals of refugees and remains subject to the risk of the importation of poliovirus from endemic areas. Surveys aimed at determining anti-polio immunity in subpopulations as well as in the general population should be carried out. PMID:18973678

  2. Poliovirus protease 3C(pro) kills cells by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Barco, A; Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    2000-01-20

    The tetracycline-based Tet-Off expression system has been used to analyze the effects of poliovirus protease 3C(pro) on human cells. Stable HeLa cell clones that express this poliovirus protease under the control of an inducible, tightly regulated promoter were obtained. Tetracycline removal induces synthesis of 3C protease, followed by drastic morphological alterations and cellular death. Degradation of cellular DNA in nucleosomes and generation of apoptotic bodies are observed from the second day after 3C(pro) induction. The cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, an enzyme involved in DNA repair, occurs after induction of 3C(pro), indicating caspase activation by this poliovirus protease. The 3C(pro)-induced apoptosis is blocked by the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Our findings suggest that the protease 3C is responsible for triggering apoptosis in poliovirus-infected cells by a mechanism that involves caspase activation.

  3. Poliovirus protein 2BC increases cytosolic free calcium concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Aldabe, R; Irurzun, A; Carrasco, L

    1997-01-01

    Poliovirus-infected cells undergo an increase in cytoplasmic calcium concentrations from the 4th h postinfection. The protein responsible for this effect was identified by the expression of different poliovirus nonstructural proteins in HeLa cells by using a recombinant vaccinia virus system. Synthesis of protein 2BC enhances cytoplasmic calcium concentrations in a manner similar to that observed in poliovirus-infected cells. To identify the regions in 2BC involved in modifying cytoplasmic calcium levels, several 2BC variants were generated. Regions present in both 2B and 2C are necessary to augment cellular free calcium levels. Therefore, in addition to inducing proliferation of membranous vesicles, poliovirus protein 2BC also alters cellular calcium homeostasis. PMID:9223520

  4. Poliovirus: Generation, Quantification, Propagation, Purification, and Storage

    PubMed Central

    Burrill, Cecily P.; Strings, Vanessa R.; Andino, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) is the prototypical picornavirus. It is a non-enveloped RNA virus with a small (~7.5 kb) genome of positive polarity. It has long served as a model to study RNA virus biology, pathogenesis, and evolution. cDNA clones of several strains are available, and infectious virus can be produced by the transfection of in vitro transcribed viral genomes into an appropriate host cell. PV infects many human and non-human primate cell lines including HeLa and HeLa S3 cells, and can grow to high titer in culture. Protocols for the production, propagation, quantification, and purification of PV are presented. A separate chapter concerning the generation and characterization of PV mutants will also be presented. PMID:23686830

  5. Exploring the fitness landscape of poliovirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Simone; Acevedo, Ashely; Andino, Raul; Tang, Chao

    2012-02-01

    RNA viruses are known to display extraordinary adaptation capabilities to different environments, due to high mutation rates. Their very dynamical evolution is captured by the quasispecies concept, according to which the viral population forms a swarm of genetic variants linked through mutation, which cooperatively interact at a functional level and collectively contribute to the characteristics of the population. The description of the viral fitness landscape becomes paramount towards a more thorough understanding of the virus evolution and spread. The high mutation rate, together with the cooperative nature of the quasispecies, makes it particularly challenging to explore its fitness landscape. I will present an investigation of the dynamical properties of poliovirus fitness landscape, through both the adoption of new experimental techniques and theoretical models.

  6. Plaque Development and Induction of Interferon Synthesis by RMC Poliovirus

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Terry C.; McLaren, Leroy C.

    1965-01-01

    Johnson, Terry C. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis), and Leroy C. McLaren. Plaque development and induction of interferon synthesis by RMC poliovirus. J. Bacteriol. 90:565–570. 1965.—Plaque development by RMC poliovirus on human amnion cell monolayers was investigated with regard to autointerference and to the effect of acid-agar overlay on plaquing efficiency. The virus was inhibited by acid-agar overlay, thereby exhibiting the d− marker typical of attenuated poliovirus strains. In addition, a lack of RMC poliovirus plaque development on HeLa cell monolayers was shown to be the result of an agar inhibitor which could be removed by NaCl extraction. By use of a simplified plaque reduction assay, it was shown that interferon production was responsible for the autointerference phenomenon. Interferon synthesis did not correlate with the ages in vitro of human amnion cell cultures. Fibroblasts originating from the chorionic membrane produced negligible amounts of the inhibitor. Interferon synthesis by human amnion cells infected with RMC poliovirus was inhibited by actinomycin D. The addition of guanidine hydrochloride to infected cultures immediately after RMC poliovirus adsorption markedly inhibited interferon synthesis, although after 2 hr (postadsorption) guanidine had no effect on interferon production. PMID:16562049

  7. Environmental surveillance for polioviruses in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Humayun; Diop, Ousmane M; Weldegebriel, Goitom; Malik, Farzana; Shetty, Sushmitha; El Bassioni, Laila; Akande, Adefunke O; Al Maamoun, Eman; Zaidi, Sohail; Adeniji, Adekunle J; Burns, Cara C; Deshpande, Jagadish; Oberste, M Steve; Lowther, Sara A

    2014-11-01

    This article summarizes the status of environmental surveillance (ES) used by the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, provides the rationale for ES, gives examples of ES methods and findings, and summarizes how these data are used to achieve poliovirus eradication. ES complements clinical acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance for possible polio cases. ES detects poliovirus circulation in environmental sewage and is used to monitor transmission in communities. If detected, the genetic sequences of polioviruses isolated from ES are compared with those of isolates from clinical cases to evaluate the relationships among viruses. To evaluate poliovirus transmission, ES programs must be developed in a manner that is sensitive, with sufficiently frequent sampling, appropriate isolation methods, and specifically targeted sampling sites in locations at highest risk for poliovirus transmission. After poliovirus ceased to be detected in human cases, ES documented the absence of endemic WPV transmission and detected imported WPV. ES provides valuable information, particularly in high-density populations where AFP surveillance is of poor quality, persistent virus circulation is suspected, or frequent virus reintroduction is perceived. Given the benefits of ES, GPEI plans to continue and expand ES as part of its strategic plan and as a supplement to AFP surveillance.

  8. [Polio vaccines, eradication and posterradication].

    PubMed

    Salmerón García, Francisco; Portela Moreira, Agustín; Soler Soneira, Marta; López Hernández, Susana; Chamorro Somoza Díaz-Sarmiento, María; Pérez González, Isabel; Rubio Gómez, María Isabel; Pérez González, Alicia; Sagredo Rodríguez, Ana; Ruiz Antúnez, Sol; Timón Jiménez, Marcos; Frutos Cabanillas, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination against polio generates herd immunity (both with the attenuated (OPV) and inactivated (IPV) vaccines) and this will allow the eradication of the disease. The OPV vaccine produces 2-4 polio cases per cohort of one million children and therefore IPV is used in countries that can afford its cost (about 15 times more expensive than OPV). In 1988 the World Health Assembly established the polio eradication goal as "interruption of wild poliovirus transmission". If the elimination of wild poliovirus were achieved, the use of OPV will produce annually between 250 and 500 cases of polio in the world. From 1999, it was clear that eradication would require ending of immunization with OPV. On the 25th of January, 2013 it is approved the plan for the eradication and containment of all polioviruses, wild or not, so that no child suffers paralytic poliomyelitis. The most important landmarks include the lack of wild polio cases after 2014, the introduction of at least one dose of IPV in all immunization programs and to cease the type 2 OPV vaccination by the end of 2016 and to stop the use of the oral bivalent vaccine in 2019. To achieve all this, a complex scientific work and economic solidarity will be required.

  9. Comparative study of antibody levels developed by vaccination against polio virus in population after vaccine type alteration.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Ágnes; Magyar, Nóra; Szomor, Katalin N; Takács, Mária

    2015-03-01

    During clinical trials, samples from Hungarian patients of different age groups were tested for antibodies against all 3 serotypes of poliovirus, a member of Picornaviridae family. During the virus neutralization serological test, blood samples were titrated using permanent virus concentration. Based on the cythopathic effect observed under a light microscope, the antibody level of the patient was assessed. The 100 people examined were classified into 5 groups based on age and type of original vaccine: I. Newborns, no vaccination given; II. Immunosuppressed patients; III. Born before 1986, received only OPV vaccine; IV. Born between 1992-2005, received a combination of OPV and IPV vaccines; V. Born after 2006, received only IPV vaccine. Results show that vaccination coverage meets all the criteria. None of the immunized persons was seronegative to all three polioviruses. Both IPV and OPV vaccines are effective against poliovirus. Blood samples from newborn babies with no immunization were also examined. Results show that most newborns have maternal antibodies in their blood. Results of group II show that immunosuppression does not have a negative influence on blood antibody levels against polioviruses. In spite of the low number of samples, our results show that seroconversion after immunization in the Hungarian population is adequate. For more accurate results about vaccination coverage in the population, further trials would be necessary.

  10. Annual report of the Australian National Poliovirus Reference Laboratory, 2008.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jason A; Grant, Kristina A; Yoon, Yeon Kyung; Polychronopoulos, Sophie; Ibrahim, Aishah; Thorley, Bruce R

    2009-09-01

    The Australian National Poliovirus Reference Laboratory (NPRL) is accredited by the World Health Organization (WHO) for the testing of stool specimens from cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP), a major clinical presentation of poliovirus infection. The NPRL, in collaboration with the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit, co-ordinates surveillance for cases of AFP in children in Australia, according to criteria recommended by the WHO. Clinical specimens are referred from AFP cases in children and suspected case of poliomyelitis in persons of any age. The WHO AFP surveillance performance indicator for a polio-free country such as Australia, is 1 non-polio AFP case per 100,000 children less than 15 years of age. In 2008, the Polio Expert Committee (PEC) classified 62 cases as non-polio AFP, or 1.51 non-polio AFP cases per 100,000 children aged less than 15 years. Poliovirus infection is confirmed by virus culture of stool specimens from AFP cases as other conditions that present with acute paralysis can mimic polio. While no poliovirus was reported in Australia from any source in 2008, the non-polio enteroviruses echovirus 25, coxsackievirus B2 and echovirus 11 were isolated from stool specimens of AFP cases. The last report of a wild poliovirus in Australia was due to an importation from Pakistan in 2007. With 4 countries remaining endemic for poliomyelitis--Afghanistan, India, Nigeria and Pakistan--and more than 1,600 confirmed cases of wild poliovirus infection in 18 countries in 2008, Australia continues to be at risk of further importation events. PMID:20043599

  11. Nonhomologous recombination between defective poliovirus and coxsackievirus genomes suggests a new model of genetic plasticity for picornaviruses.

    PubMed

    Holmblat, Barbara; Jégouic, Sophie; Muslin, Claire; Blondel, Bruno; Joffret, Marie-Line; Delpeyroux, Francis

    2014-08-05

    Most of the circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) implicated in poliomyelitis outbreaks in Madagascar have been shown to be recombinants between the type 2 poliovirus (PV) strain of the oral polio vaccine (Sabin 2) and another species C human enterovirus (HEV-C), such as type 17 coxsackie A virus (CA17) in particular. We studied intertypic genetic exchanges between PV and non-PV HEV-C by developing a recombination model, making it possible to rescue defective type 2 PV RNA genomes with a short deletion at the 3' end by the cotransfection of cells with defective or infectious CA17 RNAs. We isolated over 200 different PV/CA17 recombinants, using murine cells expressing the human PV receptor (PVR) and selecting viruses with PV capsids. We found some homologous (H) recombinants and, mostly, nonhomologous (NH) recombinants presenting duplications of parental sequences preferentially located in the regions encoding proteins 2A, 2B, and 3A. Short duplications appeared to be stable, whereas longer duplications were excised during passaging in cultured cells or after multiplication in PVR-transgenic mice, generating H recombinants with diverse sites of recombination. This suggests that NH recombination events may be a transient, intermediate step in the generation and selection of the fittest H recombinants. In addition to the classical copy-choice mechanism of recombination thought to generate mostly H recombinants, there may also be a modular mechanism of recombination, involving NH recombinant precursors, shaping the genomes of recombinant enteroviruses and other picornaviruses. Importance: The multiplication of circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) in poorly immunized human populations can render these viruses pathogenic, causing poliomyelitis outbreaks. Most cVDPVs are intertypic recombinants between a poliovirus (PV) strain and another human enterovirus, such as type 17 coxsackie A viruses (CA17). For further studies of the genetic exchanges

  12. Detection of poliovirus circulation by environmental surveillance in the absence of clinical cases in Israel and the Palestinian authority.

    PubMed

    Manor, Y; Handsher, R; Halmut, T; Neuman, M; Bobrov, A; Rudich, H; Vonsover, A; Shulman, L; Kew, O; Mendelson, E

    1999-06-01

    The global eradication of poliomyelitis, believed to be achievable around the year 2000, relies on strategies which include high routine immunization coverage and mass vaccination campaigns, along with continuous monitoring of wild-type virus circulation by using the laboratory-based acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance. Israel and the Palestinian Authority are located in a geographical region in which poliovirus is still endemic but have been free of poliomyelitis since 1988 as a result of intensive immunization programs and mass vaccination campaigns. To monitor the wild-type virus circulation, environmental surveillance of sewage samples collected monthly from 25 to 30 sites across the country was implemented in 1989 and AFP surveillance began in 1994. The sewage samples were processed in the laboratory with a double-selective tissue culture system, which enabled economical processing of large number of samples. Between 1989 and 1997, 2,294 samples were processed, and wild-type poliovirus was isolated from 17 of them in four clusters, termed "silent outbreaks," in September 1990 (type 3), between May and September 1991 (type 1), between October 1994 and June 1995 (type 1), and in December 1996 (type 1). Fifteen of the 17 positive samples were collected in the Gaza Strip, 1 was collected in the West Bank, and 1 was collected in the Israeli city of Ashdod, located close to the Gaza Strip. The AFP surveillance system failed to detect the circulating wild-type viruses. These findings further emphasize the important role that environmental surveillance can play in monitoring the eradication of polioviruses.

  13. Structural changes associated with poliovirus inactivation in soil.

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, J G; O'Brien, R T

    1979-01-01

    The loss of infectivity of poliovirus in moist and dried soils was a result of irreversible damage to the virus particles. The damage included (i) dissociation of viral genomes and capsids and (ii) degradation of viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) in the soil environment. Under drying conditions, capsid components could not be recovered from the soils. Further studies in sterile soils indicated that, under moist conditions, the viral RNA was probably damaged before dissociation from the capsid. However, in sterile, dried soil, RNA genomes were recovered largely intact from the soil. These results suggest that polioviruses are inactivated by different mechanisms in moist and drying soils. PMID:231938

  14. Modification of RNA polymerase IIO subspecies after poliovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, L M; Fernandez-Tomas, C; Dahmus, M E; Gariglio, P

    1987-01-01

    Infection of HeLa cells with poliovirus results in a shutdown of host transcription. In an effort to understand the mechanism(s) that underlies this process, we analyzed the distribution of RNA polymerase IIO before and after viral infection. Analysis of free and chromatin-bound enzyme indicated that there is a significant reduction in RNA polymerase IIO following infection. This observation, together with increasing evidence that transcription is catalyzed by RNA polymerase IIO, supports the hypothesis that poliovirus-induced inhibition of host transcription occurs at the level of RNA chain initiation and involves the direct modification of RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:3029396

  15. Defective Interfering Particles of Poliovirus I. Isolation and Physical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Charles N.; Smoler, Donna; Wimmer, Eckard; Baltimore, David

    1971-01-01

    A class of defective interfering (DI) poliovirus particles has been identified. The first was found as a contaminant of a viral stock; others have been isolated by serial passage at a high multiplicity of infection. The DI particles are less dense than standard virus and sediment more slowly. Their ribonucleic acid (RNA) sediments more slowly than standard RNA and has a higher electrophoretic mobility. Competition hybridization experiments with double-stranded viral RNA indicate that DI RNA is 80 to 90% of the length of standard RNA. The proteins of DI particles are indistinguishable from those of standard poliovirus. PMID:4329564

  16. Applying the Concept of Peptide Uniqueness to Anti-Polio Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Kanduc, Darja; Fasano, Candida; Capone, Giovanni; Pesce Delfino, Antonella; Calabrò, Michele; Polimeno, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although rare, adverse events may associate with anti-poliovirus vaccination thus possibly hampering global polio eradication worldwide. Objective. To design peptide-based anti-polio vaccines exempt from potential cross-reactivity risks and possibly able to reduce rare potential adverse events such as the postvaccine paralytic poliomyelitis due to the tendency of the poliovirus genome to mutate. Methods. Proteins from poliovirus type 1, strain Mahoney, were analyzed for amino acid sequence identity to the human proteome at the pentapeptide level, searching for sequences that (1) have zero percent of identity to human proteins, (2) are potentially endowed with an immunologic potential, and (3) are highly conserved among poliovirus strains. Results. Sequence analyses produced a set of consensus epitopic peptides potentially able to generate specific anti-polio immune responses exempt from cross-reactivity with the human host. Conclusion. Peptide sequences unique to poliovirus proteins and conserved among polio strains might help formulate a specific and universal anti-polio vaccine able to react with multiple viral strains and exempt from the burden of possible cross-reactions with human proteins. As an additional advantage, using a peptide-based vaccine instead of current anti-polio DNA vaccines would eliminate the rare post-polio poliomyelitis cases and other disabling symptoms that may appear following vaccination. PMID:26568962

  17. Imaging Poliovirus Entry in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lakadamyali, Melike; Rust, Michael J; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Hogle, James M

    2007-01-01

    Viruses initiate infection by transferring their genetic material across a cellular membrane and into the appropriate compartment of the cell. The mechanisms by which animal viruses, especially nonenveloped viruses, deliver their genomes are only poorly understood. This is due in part to technical difficulties involved in direct visualization of viral gene delivery and to uncertainties in distinguishing productive and nonproductive pathways caused by the high particle-to–plaque forming unit ratio of most animal viruses. Here, we combine an imaging assay that simultaneously tracks the viral capsid and genome in live cells with an infectivity-based assay for RNA release to characterize the early events in the poliovirus (PV) infection. Effects on RNA genome delivery from inhibitors of cell trafficking pathways were probed systematically by both methods. Surprisingly, we observe that genome release by PV is highly efficient and rapid, and thus does not limit the overall infectivity or the infection rate. The results define a pathway in which PV binds to receptors on the cell surface and enters the cell by a clathrin-, caveolin-, flotillin-, and microtubule-independent, but tyrosine kinase- and actin-dependent, endocytic mechanism. Immediately after the internalization of the virus particle, genome release takes place from vesicles or tightly sealed membrane invaginations located within 100–200 nm of the plasma membrane. These results settle a long-lasting debate of whether PV directly breaks the plasma membrane barrier or relies on endocytosis to deliver its genome into the cell. We expect this imaging assay to be broadly applicable to the investigation of entry mechanisms for nonenveloped viruses. PMID:17622193

  18. Multiple Poliovirus Proteins Repress Cytoplasmic RNA Granules

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Jonathan D.; Tsai, Wei-Chih; Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that poliovirus (PV) infection induces stress granule (SG) formation early in infection and then inhibits the formation of SG and disperses processing bodies (PBs) by the mid-phase of infection. Loss of SG was linked to cleavage of G3BP1 by viral 3C proteinase (3Cpro), however dispersal of PBs was not strongly linked to cleavage of specific factors by viral proteinases, suggesting other viral proteins may play roles in inhibition of SG or PB formation. Here we have screened all viral proteins for roles in inducing or inhibiting the formation of RNA granules by creating fusions with mCherry and expressing them individually in cells. Expression of viral proteins separately revealed that the capsid region P1, 2Apro, 3A, 3Cpro, the protease precursor 3CD and 3D polymerase all affect RNA granules to varying extents, whereas 2BC does not. 2Apro, which cleaves eIF4GI, induced SGs as expected, and entered novel foci containing the SG nucleating protein G3BP1. Of the two forms of G3BP, only G3BP1 is cleaved by a virus proteinase, 3Cpro, whereas G3BP2 is not cleaved by 3Cpro or 2Apro. Surprisingly, 3CD, which contains proteinase activity, differentially repressed PBs but not SGs. Further, both 2Apro and 3Cpro expression dispersed PBs, however molecular targets were different since PB dispersal due to 2Apro and heat shock protein (Hsp)90 inhibition but not 3Cpro, could be rescued by application of oxidative stress to cells. The data indicate that PV repression of SGs and PBs is multifactorial, though protease function is dominant. PMID:26610553

  19. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3405...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3405...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3405...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3405...

  3. Progress toward global interruption of wild poliovirus transmission, 2010-2013, and tackling the challenges to complete eradication.

    PubMed

    Wassilak, Steven G F; Oberste, M Steven; Tangermann, Rudolph H; Diop, Ousmane M; Jafari, Hamid S; Armstrong, Gregory L

    2014-11-01

    Despite substantial progress, global polio eradication has remained elusive. Indigenous wild poliovirus (WPV) transmission in 4 endemic countries (Afghanistan, India, Nigeria, and Pakistan) persisted into 2010 and outbreaks from imported WPV continued. By 2013, most outbreaks in the interim were promptly controlled. The number of polio-affected districts globally has declined by 74% (from 481 in 2009 to 126 in 2013), including a 79% decrease in the number of affected districts in endemic countries (from 304 to 63). India is now polio-free. The challenges to success in the remaining polio-endemic countries include (1) threats to the security of vaccinators in each country and a ban on polio vaccination in areas of Afghanistan and Pakistan; (2) a risk of decreased government commitment; and (3) remaining surveillance gaps. Coordinated efforts under the International Health Regulations and efforts to mitigate the challenges provide a clear opportunity to soon secure global eradication.

  4. Gliotoxin: inhibitor of poliovirus RNA synthesis that blocks the viral RNA polymerase 3Dpol.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, P L; Carrasco, L

    1992-01-01

    The mode of action of gliotoxin against poliovirus has been analyzed in detail. This fungal metabolite inhibits the appearance of poliovirus proteins when present from the beginning of infection but has no effect on viral translation when added at late times. In agreement with previous findings, this toxin potently inhibited the incorporation of [3H]uridine into poliovirus RNA soon after its addition to the culture medium. Analysis of the synthesis of poliovirus plus- or minus-stranded RNA in the presence of gliotoxin suggests that this compound effectively hampered both processes. This result contrasts with the mode of action of other inhibitors of poliovirus RNA synthesis, such as guanidine or flavones, that selectively block plus-stranded RNA synthesis and suggests that the target of gliotoxin differs from the target of guanidine, i.e., poliovirus protein 2C. Indeed, gliotoxin was found to be a potent inhibitor of poliovirus RNA synthesis in cell-free systems, using membranous crude replication complexes, a reaction that is not blocked by guanidine or Ro 09-0179. Moreover, in vitro activity of the purified poliovirus polymerase 3Dpol was efficiently inhibited by gliotoxin. These results indicate that this toxin acts on the poliovirus polymerase 3Dpol, providing the first description of an inhibitor of this viral enzyme. Images PMID:1372367

  5. Double-membraned Liposomes Sculpted by Poliovirus 3AB Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Ptacek, Jennifer B.; Kirkegaard, Karla; Bullitt, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Infection with many positive-strand RNA viruses dramatically remodels cellular membranes, resulting in the accumulation of double-membraned vesicles that resemble cellular autophagosomes. In this study, a single protein encoded by poliovirus, 3AB, is shown to be sufficient to induce the formation of double-membraned liposomes via the invagination of single-membraned liposomes. Poliovirus 3AB is a 109-amino acid protein with a natively unstructured N-terminal domain. HeLa cells transduced with 3AB protein displayed intracellular membrane disruption; specifically, the formation of cytoplasmic invaginations. The ability of a single viral protein to produce structures of similar topology to cellular autophagosomes should facilitate the understanding of both cellular and viral mechanisms for membrane remodeling. PMID:23908350

  6. Poliovirus Mutants Resistant to Neutralization with Soluble Cell Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Gerardo; Peters, David; Racaniello, Vincent R.

    1990-12-01

    Poliovirus mutants resistant to neutralization with soluble cellular receptor were isolated. Replication of soluble receptor-resistant (srr) mutants was blocked by a monoclonal antibody directed against the HeLa cell receptor for poliovirus, indicating that the mutants use this receptor to enter cells. The srr mutants showed reduced binding to HeLa cells and cell membranes. However, the reduced binding phenotype did not have a major impact on viral replication, as judged by plaque size and one-step growth curves. These results suggest that the use of soluble receptors as antiviral agents could lead to the selection of neutralization-resistant mutants that are able to bind cell surface receptors, replicate, and cause disease.

  7. Murine neurovirulence studies with a chimeric poliovirus: in vivo generation of a mutant base-paired stable attenuated poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Young, C

    1998-10-01

    We investigated the neurovirulence of a chimeric poliovirus consisting of the coding region of Lansing type 2 poliovirus and the 5'NCR of type 3 poliovirus. Specifically we carried out studies on the effects of stable base pairing, between nucleotides 472 and 537, on neurovirulence. Mice were injected intracranially with the attenuated chimeric virus MAS 27 plaque 1 having the following nucleotide base pair at 472-537, G-G. Mutants recovered from the CNS of inoculated mice were divided into three groups according to the nucleotide sequence of the 5'NCR; MAS 27C type viruses having a single base change (G-C) at the position 472, MAS 27G type mutants having a single base change (G-C) at the position 537, and MAS 27U type viruses having a single base change (G-U) at the position 537. The isolate MAS 27C had back-mutated to the wild type, and 100 000 fold more virulent than attenuated MAS 27G and MAS 27U. MAS 27C type mutants were predominant, suggesting that base C at position 472 is favoured to form a stable secondary structure with guanine at position 537. Attenuated MAS 27G, however, carries guanine and cytosine at nucleotides 472 and 537 respectively, and was a stable attenuated virus following passage in four serial generations of mice. Furthermore, attenuated MAS 27G poliovirus produced viral proteins less efficiently and had slower growth rates than the revertant MAS 27C. The stable attenuated base paired MAS 27G might provide the basis for a prototype for a live attenuated stable type 3 poliovaccine.

  8. Properties of poliovirus strains isolated over the period 1969-1978 from the main municipal sewerage system of the city of Prague.

    PubMed

    Matyásová, I; Koza, J

    1982-01-01

    Biological properties (rct marker and antigenic relatedness) were compared in vaccine prototype strains and in 62 poliovirus strains isolated during a period 1969-1978 from the main municipal sewerage system of the City of Prague. None of the strains isolated from the municipal sewerage showed biologic properties that would fully differ from those observed in vaccine-derived strains. The strains detected very late postvaccination (after about a year) showed a lesser extent of changes than strains isolated earlier after vaccination. The most frequent changes were recorded in type 2 strains, less frequent in type 3 strains and the least frequency of changes was found in type 1 strains. To facilitate comparisons of these changes in dependence on time of postvaccination virus excretion a supporting evaluation criterion has been developed to help express the dynamics of changes in the isolated poliovirus strains. The recorded degree of the dynamics of changes was highest in type 2 strains, lower in type 3 strains and lowest in type 1 strains. The dynamics of changes detected in strains of various types was not always constant in the course of years: in a given year (or in a period of several years) changes occurred always in strains of the same serologic type, whereas strains of the other two types changed only insignificantly during the respective period.

  9. Improved poliovirus D-antigen yields by application of different Vero cell cultivation methods.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Yvonne E; Rubingh, Olaf; Wijffels, René H; van der Pol, Leo A; Bakker, Wilfried A M

    2014-05-19

    Vero cells were grown adherent to microcarriers (Cytodex 1; 3 g L(-1)) using animal component free media in stirred-tank type bioreactors. Different strategies for media refreshment, daily media replacement (semi-batch), continuous media replacement (perfusion) and recirculation of media, were compared with batch cultivation. Cell densities increased using a feed strategy from 1×10(6) cells mL(-1) during batch cultivation to 1.8, 2.7 and 5.0×10(6) cells mL(-1) during semi-batch, perfusion and recirculation, respectively. The effects of these different cell culture strategies on subsequent poliovirus production were investigated. Increased cell densities allowed up to 3 times higher D-antigen levels when compared with that obtained from batch-wise Vero cell culture. However, the cell specific D-antigen production was lower when cells were infected at higher cell densities. This cell density effect is in good agreement with observations for different cell lines and virus types. From the evaluated alternative culture methods, application of a semi-batch mode of operations allowed the highest cell specific D-antigen production. The increased product yields that can easily be reached using these higher cell density cultivation methods, showed the possibility for better use of bioreactor capacity for the manufacturing of polio vaccines to ultimately reduce vaccine cost per dose. Further, the use of animal-component-free cell- and virus culture media shows opportunities for modernization of human viral vaccine manufacturing. PMID:24583004

  10. Automated microtransfer technique for the assay of poliovirus- and mumps virus-neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mayner, R E; McDorman, D J; Meyer, B C; Parkman, P D

    1974-12-01

    Use of an automated apparatus to quantitate mumps virus- and poliovirus-neutralizing antibody is described. The automated titration equipment affords savings in effort, time, and reagents in conducting large-scale surveys for the determination of mumps- and poliovirus-neutralizing antibodies. This technique has been found to be reproducible and gives results comparable to other antibody assay methods.

  11. Recombination between poliovirus and coxsackie A viruses of species C: a model of viral genetic plasticity and emergence.

    PubMed

    Combelas, Nicolas; Holmblat, Barbara; Joffret, Marie-Line; Colbère-Garapin, Florence; Delpeyroux, Francis

    2011-08-01

    Genetic recombination in RNA viruses was discovered many years ago for poliovirus (PV), an enterovirus of the Picornaviridae family, and studied using PV or other picornaviruses as models. Recently, recombination was shown to be a general phenomenon between different types of enteroviruses of the same species. In particular, the interest for this mechanism of genetic plasticity was renewed with the emergence of pathogenic recombinant circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs), which were implicated in poliomyelitis outbreaks in several regions of the world with insufficient vaccination coverage. Most of these cVDPVs had mosaic genomes constituted of mutated poliovaccine capsid sequences and part or all of the non-structural sequences from other human enteroviruses of species C (HEV-C), in particular coxsackie A viruses. A study in Madagascar showed that recombinant cVDPVs had been co-circulating in a small population of children with many different HEV-C types. This viral ecosystem showed a surprising and extensive biodiversity associated to several types and recombinant genotypes, indicating that intertypic genetic recombination was not only a mechanism of evolution for HEV-C, but an usual mode of genetic plasticity shaping viral diversity. Results suggested that recombination may be, in conjunction with mutations, implicated in the phenotypic diversity of enterovirus strains and in the emergence of new pathogenic strains. Nevertheless, little is known about the rules and mechanisms which govern genetic exchanges between HEV-C types, as well as about the importance of intertypic recombination in generating phenotypic variation. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the mechanisms of evolution of PV, in particular recombination events leading to the emergence of recombinant cVDPVs.

  12. Investigation et riposte à une épidémie de poliovirus sauvage à Kinshasa

    PubMed Central

    Nsambu, Muriel Nzazi; Bazira, Léodegal; Coulibaly, Tiekoura; Mbule, Albert; Wilmet, Michèle Dramaix; Likwela, Joris Losimba

    2013-01-01

    Introduction La République Démocratique du Congo a été considérée comme un pays à circulation rétablie de poliovirus sauvage (PVS). Cet article décrit l’épidémie de PVS qui a sévit dans la province de Kinshasa de 2010 à 2011. Méthodes Les analyses ont porté sur les cas de paralysie flasque aigüe (PFA) enregistrés de décembre 2010 à décembre 2011, les données de surveillance des PFA, les données de couverture vaccinale et celles du monitorage indépendant des activités de vaccination supplémentaires. Résultats Entre décembre 2010 à décembre 2011, 298 cas de PFA ont été enregistrés par les zones de santé parmi lesquels 34 cas de PVS confirmés. 58% des cas de PVS avaient plus de 15 ans avec plus d'hommes que de femmes. 10 passages d'activités de vaccination supplémentaires ont été mis en œuvre dont 4 avaient ciblé toute la population de Kinshasa. Il n'y a plus eu de cas de PVS après le 3e passage. Le monitorage des activités de vaccination a montré une proportion de sujets non vaccinés allant de 4 à 13%. La performance du système de surveillance était globalement bonne. Conclusion La prédominance des adultes parmi les cas notifiés traduit leur susceptibilité alors qu'ils ne sont généralement pas concernés lors des campagnes de vaccination supplémentaires. Ceci devrait engager les autorités sanitaires à envisager des activités vaccinales supplémentaires ciblant les adultes afin de casser plus rapidement la chaîne de transmission. Les faiblesses subsistant dans le système de surveillance pourraient être jugulées par le renforcement de la surveillance à base communautaire. PMID:24062866

  13. Synthesis of infectious poliovirus RNA by purified T7 RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    van der Werf, S; Bradley, J; Wimmer, E; Studier, F W; Dunn, J J

    1986-01-01

    Plasmids containing the entire cDNA sequence of poliovirus type 1 (Mahoney strain) under control of a promoter for T7 RNA polymerase have been constructed. Purified T7 RNA polymerase efficiently transcribes the entire poliovirus cDNA in either direction to produce full-length poliovirus RNA [(+)RNA] or its complement [(-)RNA]. The (+)RNA produced initially had 60 nucleotides on the 5' side of the poliovirus RNA sequence, including a string of 18 consecutive guanine residues generated in the original cloning and an additional 626 nucleotides of pBR322 sequence beyond the poly(A) tract at the 3' end. Such RNA, while much more infectious than the plasmid DNA, is only about 0.1% as infectious as RNA isolated from the virus. Subsequently, a T7 promoter was placed only 2 base pairs ahead of the poliovirus sequence, so that T7 RNA polymerase synthesizes poliovirus RNA with only 2 additional guanine residues at the 5' end and no more than seven nucleotides past the poly(A) tract at the 3' end. Such RNA has much higher specific infectivity, about 5% that of RNA isolated from the virus. The ability to make infectious poliovirus RNA efficiently from cloned DNA makes it possible to apply techniques of in vitro mutagenesis to the analysis of poliovirus functions and the construction of novel and perhaps useful derivatives of poliovirus. A source of variant RNAs should also allow detailed study of the synthesis and processing of poliovirus proteins in vitro. Images PMID:3010307

  14. Chloroquine induces empty capsid formation during poliovirus eclipse.

    PubMed Central

    Kronenberger, P; Vrijsen, R; Boeyé, A

    1991-01-01

    The poliovirus capsid (160S) is modified during eclipse in HeLa cells, which results in at least three types of particles having sedimentation coefficients of 135, 110, and 80S. The lysosomotropic agent chloroquine redirected the production of eclipse products from 135 and 110S particles (containing RNA) to 80S particles (without RNA). The effect started at 5 microM and was fully developed with 20 microM chloroquine. Viral protein synthesis and virion production remained unaffected. The results show that chloroquine can redirect the processing of input virions without interfering with productive uncoating. Images PMID:1658391

  15. Polio endgame: the global introduction of inactivated polio vaccine.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manish; Zipursky, Simona; Orenstein, Walt; Garon, Julie; Zaffran, Michel

    2015-05-01

    In 2013, the World Health Assembly endorsed a plan that calls for the ultimate withdrawal of oral polio vaccines (OPV) from all immunization programs globally. The withdrawal would begin in a phased manner with removal of the type 2 component of OPV in 2016 through a global switch from trivalent OPV to bivalent OPV (containing only types 1 and 3). To mitigate risks associated with immunity gaps after OPV type 2 withdrawal, the WHO Strategic Advisory Group of Experts has recommended that all 126 OPV-only using countries introduce at least one dose of inactivated polio vaccine into routine immunization programs by end-2015, before the trivalent OPV-bivalent OPV switch. The introduction of inactivated polio vaccine would reduce risks of reintroduction of type 2 poliovirus by providing some level of seroprotection, facilitating interruption of transmission if outbreaks occur, and accelerating eradication by boosting immunity to types 1 and 3 polioviruses.

  16. Synthesis and antiviral activity of beta-carboline derivatives bearing a substituted carbohydrazide at C-3 against poliovirus and herpes simplex virus (HSV-1).

    PubMed

    Nazari Formagio, Anelise S; Santos, Patricia R; Zanoli, Karine; Ueda-Nakamura, Tania; Düsman Tonin, Lilian T; Nakamura, Celso V; Sarragiotto, Maria Helena

    2009-11-01

    Several novel 1,3-disubstituted beta-carboline derivatives bearing a substituted carbohydrazide group at C-3 were synthesized and evaluated for their antiviral activity against vaccinal poliovirus (VP) and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). The cytotoxicity and selectivity index of the active compounds were also evaluated. Among the synthesized derivatives, compounds 10 and 11 displayed potent activity against both vaccinal poliovirus and HSV-1 virus. Compound 10 presented the highest selectivity index (SI=2446.8) against HSV-1 virus and low cytotoxicity (CC(50)=1150.0+/-67.3 microM). The virus yield inhibition assay showed that compound 10 was able to inhibit HSV-1 plaque formation before and during the virus adsorption. The characteristic small plaque pattern observed in compound-treated cells suggested that compound 10 inhibited viral dissemination to neighboring cells. A computational study for prediction of ADME properties of the novel synthesized beta-carbolines derivatives was performed by determination of lipophilicity, topological polar surface area (TPSA), absorption (% ABS) and simple molecular descriptors, using Lipinski's rule.

  17. Vaccine control of poliomyelitis in the 1980s.

    PubMed Central

    Sabin, A. B.

    1982-01-01

    The main challenge of vaccine control of poliomyelitis in the 1980s is in the subtropical and tropical regions of the world where "lameness" surveys in recent years have shown how very high the average annual incidence of paralytic poliomyelitis can be in both rural and urban areas in the absence of epidemics. The procedures by which oral polio vaccine (OPV) rapidly eliminated all or almost all paralytic disease caused by polioviruses from the economically developed temperate climate countries have been inadequate in tropical and subtropical countries, except in some small countries with good health services, largely because there is much more year-round circulation of "wild" polioviruses which continue to produce the disease in the unvaccinated and incompletely vaccinated children. Not even a cheap, hypothetically 100 percent effective, one-dose vaccine could eliminate poliomyelitis in the tropics if, for a variety of reasons, it would reach only a portion of the infant population. Paralytic disease caused by polioviruses has been quickly eliminated from both small and large tropical countries by OPV in well-organized programs of annual mass vaccinations of almost all children under a certain age. PMID:7180028

  18. [Poliomyelitis outbreak caused by vaccine-derived virus in Haiti and the Dominican Republic].

    PubMed

    Landaverde, M; Venczel, L; de Quadros, C A

    2001-04-01

    In October 2000, the Ministries of Health of the Dominican Republic and Haiti notified two cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) in rural areas, one of them in a 9-month-old female, and the other in a 2-year-old female, respectively. Stool samples that were obtained from these cases, which occurred in July and August 2000, after a 9-year interruption of wild poliovirus circulation in the Western Hemisphere, revealed the presence of type 1 poliovirus. Genetic sequencing, which was later performed at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America, revealed an atypical descendant of the virus used in the manufacture of the oral polio vaccine (OPV), but with 3% genetic divergence with respect to the parent strain. Normally, viral isolates that derive from vaccine components show 99.5% genetic agreement with the parent strain; in wild polioviruses, on the other hand, this agreement is usually less than 82.0%. Thus, the 3% genetic divergence detected in this study suggests that, in areas with low vaccine coverage, the virus used in the vaccine remained in circulation for at least two years, during which it recovered the neurovirulence and communicability of wild poliovirus type 1. This report describes the characteristics and results of the active search for cases of AFP that was sparked by the detection of the two index cases. It also looks at the public health implications of this outbreak for the entire Region of the Americas.

  19. Modulation of Poliovirus Replicative Fitness in HeLa Cells by Deoptimization of Synonymous Codon Usage in the Capsid Region

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Cara Carthel; Shaw, Jing; Campagnoli, Ray; Jorba, Jaume; Vincent, Annelet; Quay, Jacqueline; Kew, Olen

    2006-01-01

    We replaced degenerate codons for nine amino acids within the capsid region of the Sabin type 2 oral poliovirus vaccine strain with corresponding nonpreferred synonymous codons. Codon replacements were introduced into four contiguous intervals spanning 97% of the capsid region. In the capsid region of the most highly modified virus construct, the effective number of codons used (NC) fell from 56.2 to 29.8, the number of CG dinucleotides rose from 97 to 302, and the G+C content increased from 48.4% to 56.4%. Replicative fitness in HeLa cells, measured by plaque areas and virus yields in single-step growth experiments, decreased in proportion to the number of replacement codons. Plaque areas decreased over an ∼10-fold range, and virus yields decreased over an ∼65-fold range. Perhaps unexpectedly, the synthesis and processing of viral proteins appeared to be largely unaltered by the restriction in codon usage. In contrast, total yields of viral RNA in infected cells were reduced ∼3-fold and specific infectivities of purified virions (measured by particle/PFU ratios) decreased ∼18-fold in the most highly modified virus. The replicative fitness of both codon replacement viruses and unmodified viruses increased with the passage number in HeLa cells. After 25 serial passages (∼50 replication cycles), most codon replacements were retained, and the relative fitness of the modified viruses remained well below that of the unmodified virus. The increased replicative fitness of high-passage modified virus was associated with the elimination of several CG dinucleotides. Potential applications for the systematic modulation of poliovirus replicative fitness by deoptimization of codon usage are discussed. PMID:16537593

  20. A monoclonal antibody that blocks poliovirus attachment recognizes the lymphocyte homing receptor CD44.

    PubMed Central

    Shepley, M P; Racaniello, V R

    1994-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, AF3, was previously shown to specifically inhibit poliovirus binding to HeLa cells and to detect a 100-kDa glycoprotein only in cell lines and tissues permissive for poliovirus infection. These results suggested that the 100-kDa protein may be involved in the pathogenesis of poliomyelitis and the cellular function of the poliovirus receptor site. To study further the role of the 100-kDa protein in poliovirus attachment, immunoaffinity purification, amino acid sequencing, and cDNA cloning were undertaken. The results demonstrate that antibody AF3 reacts with the lymphocyte homing receptor CD44, a multifunctional cell surface glycoprotein involved in the homing of circulating lymphocytes to lymph nodes and the modulation of lymphocyte adhesion and activation. Antibody AF3 reacts with a subset of CD44 molecules (AF3CD44H), which appears to be a small fraction of the heterogeneously glycosylated CD44 molecules expressed on hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. Anti-CD44 monoclonal antibodies, previously reported to induce CD44-mediated modulation of lymphocyte activation and adhesion, compete with 125I-AF3 in binding assays, demonstrating functional overlap among the epitopes. The anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody A3D8, which binds to a greater molecular weight range of CD44 than does AF3, inhibits poliovirus binding to a similar degree. CD44 does not act as a poliovirus receptor, since CD44-expressing mouse L-cell transformants did not bind poliovirus. The poliovirus receptor and AF3CD44H may be noncovalently associated, or they may interact through the cytoskeleton or signal transduction pathways. Images PMID:7508992

  1. Use of integrated cell culture-PCR to evaluate the effectiveness of poliovirus inactivation by chlorine.

    PubMed

    Blackmer, F; Reynolds, K A; Gerba, C P; Pepper, I L

    2000-05-01

    Current standards, based on cell culture assay, indicate that poliovirus is inactivated by 0.5 mg of free chlorine per liter after 2 min; however, integrated cell culture-PCR detected viruses for up to 8 min of exposure to the same chlorine concentration, requiring 10 min for complete inactivation. Thus, the contact time for chlorine disinfection of poliovirus is up to five times greater than previously thought.

  2. Thermal inactivation of poliovirus type 1 in water, milk and yoghurt.

    PubMed

    Strazynski, Marco; Krämer, Johannes; Becker, Barbara

    2002-03-25

    Loss of infectivity of poliovirus type 1, strain Sabin, during heating, freezing, and storage in water, milk and yoghurt was determined by plaque-titration in Vero cell cultures. The heating experiments simulated the conditions arising during the processing of milk and yoghurt, for example high-temperature heating (95 degrees C, 15 and 30 s), short-time pasteurization (72 degrees C, 15 and 30 s), long-time pasteurization (62 degrees C, 30 min), and yoghurt-fermentation (42 degrees C, 30 min and 180 min). Only high-temperature heating, long-time pasteurization and short-time pasteurization for 30 s proved to be reliable methods of inactivating polioviruses present in water, milk and yoghurt completely. Short-time pasteurization for 15 s and the conditions of yoghurt-fermentation failed to cause complete inactivation of polioviruses. Additionally, polioviruses mixed in milk or yoghurt withstood these procedures with significantly lower reductions of infectivity than in water. Heating at 55 degrees C for 30 min resulted in complete inactivation of polioviruses, regardless of the suspending medium. The infectivity of polioviruses is scarcely affected by freezing (-20 degrees C, 30 min) and storage (24 days) at low temperatures (4 degrees C) and high humidity (a(w) = 0.99).

  3. Can post-eradication laboratory containment of wild polioviruses be achieved?

    PubMed Central

    Dowdle, Walter R.; Gary, Howard E.; Sanders, Raymond; van Loon, Anton M.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of containment is to prevent reintroduction of wild polioviruses from laboratories into polio-free communities. In order to achieve global commitment to laboratory containment the rationale should be clear and compelling; the biosafety levels should be justified by the risks; and the objectives should be realistic. Absolute containment can never be assured. Questions of intentional or unintentional non-compliance can never be wholly eliminated. Effective laboratory containment is, however, a realistic goal. Prevention of virus transmission through contaminated laboratory materials is addressed by WHO standards for biosafety. The principal challenge is to prevent transmission through unrecognized infectious laboratory workers. Such transmission is possible only if the following conditions occur: infectious and potentially infectious materials carrying wild poliovirus are present in the laboratory concerned; a laboratory operation exposes a worker to poliovirus; a worker is susceptible to an infection that results in the shedding of poliovirus; and the community is susceptible to poliovirus infections. At present it is difficult to envisage the elimination of any of these conditions. However, the risks of the first three can be greatly reduced so as to create a formidable barrier against poliovirus transmission to the community. Final biosafety recommendations must await post-eradication immunization policies adopted by the international community. PMID:12075368

  4. Visualizing the dynamic behavior of poliovirus plus-strand RNA in living host cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zong-Qiang; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Xian-En; Wen, Ji-Kai; Zhou, Ya-Feng; Xie, Wei-Hong

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic analysis of viral nucleic acids in host cells is important for understanding virus-host interaction. By labeling endogenous RNA with molecular beacon, we have realized the direct visualization of viral nucleic acids in living host cells and have studied the dynamic behavior of poliovirus plus-strand RNA. Poliovirus plus-strand RNA was observed to display different distribution patterns in living Vero cells at different post-infection time points. Real-time imaging suggested that the translocation of poliovirus plus-strand RNA is a characteristic rearrangement process requiring intact microtubule network of host cells. Confocal-FRAP measurements showed that 49.4 +/- 3.2% of the poliovirus plus-strand RNA molecules diffused freely (with a D-value of 9.6 +/- 1.6 x 10(-10) cm2/s) within their distribution region, while the remaining (50.5 +/- 2.9%) were almost immobile and moved very slowly only with change of the RNA distribution region. Under the electron microscope, it was found that virus-induced membrane rearrangement is microtubule-associated in poliovirus-infected Vero cells. These results reveal an entrapment and diffusion mechanism for the movement of poliovirus plus-strand RNA in living mammalian cells, and demonstrate that the mechanism is mainly associated with microtubules and virus-induced membrane structures.

  5. Effects of humic and fulvic acids on poliovirus concentration from water by microporous filtration.

    PubMed Central

    Sobsey, M D; Hickey, A R

    1985-01-01

    Because naturally occurring organic matter is thought to interfere with virus adsorption to microporous filters, humic and fulvic acids isolated from a highly colored, soft surface water were used as model organics in studies on poliovirus adsorption to and recovery from electropositive Virosorb 1MDS and electronegative Filterite filters. Solutions of activated carbon-treated tap water containing 3, 10, and 30-mg/liter concentrations of humic or fulvic acid were seeded with known amounts of poliovirus and processed with Virosorb 1MDS filters at pH 7.5 or Filterite filters at pH 3.5 (with and without 5 mM MgCl2). Organic acids caused appreciable reductions in virus adsorption and recovery efficiencies with both types of filter. Fulvic acid caused greater reductions in poliovirus recovery with Virosorb 1MDS filters than with Filterite filters. Fulvic acid interference with poliovirus recovery by Filterite filters was overcome by the presence of 5 mM MgCl2. Although humic acid reduced poliovirus recoveries by both types of filter, its greatest effect was on virus elution and recovery from Filterite filters. Single-particle analyses demonstrated MgCl2 enhancement of poliovirus association with both organic acids at pH 3.5. The mechanisms by which each organic acid reduced virus adsorption and recovery appeared to be different for each type of filter. PMID:2984989

  6. Deaths following vaccination: What does the evidence show?

    PubMed

    Miller, Elaine R; Moro, Pedro L; Cano, Maria; Shimabukuro, Tom T

    2015-06-26

    poliovirus vaccine. However, making general assumptions and drawing conclusions about vaccinations causing deaths based on spontaneous reports to VAERS - some of which might be anecdotal or second-hand - or from case reports in the media, is not a scientifically valid practice. PMID:26004568

  7. Deaths following vaccination: What does the evidence show?

    PubMed

    Miller, Elaine R; Moro, Pedro L; Cano, Maria; Shimabukuro, Tom T

    2015-06-26

    poliovirus vaccine. However, making general assumptions and drawing conclusions about vaccinations causing deaths based on spontaneous reports to VAERS - some of which might be anecdotal or second-hand - or from case reports in the media, is not a scientifically valid practice.

  8. The recent outbreaks and reemergence of poliovirus in war and conflict-affected areas

    PubMed Central

    Akil, Luma; Ahmad, H. Anwar

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Poliomyelitis is a highly infectious disease caused by poliovirus, which becomes difficult to manage/eradicate in politically unstable areas. The objectives of this study were to determine the movement and management of such polio outbreaks in endemic countries and countries with reoccurring cases of polio and to determine the effect of political instability on polio eradication. Methods In this study, the extent of polio outbreaks was examined and modeled using statistical methodologies and mapped with GIS software. Data on polio cases and immunization were collected for countries with polio cases for the period 2011 to 2014. Weekly data from the Global Polio Eradication Initiative were collected for selected countries. The recent virus origin and current movement was mapped using GIS. Correlations between immunization rates, the Global Peace Index (GPI), and other indicators of a country’s political stability with polio outbreaks were determined. Data were analyzed using SAS 9.4 and ArcGIS 10. Results For several reasons, Pakistan remains highly vulnerable to new incidences of polio (306 cases in 2014). Overall immunization rates showed a steady decline over time in selected countries. Countries with polio cases were shown to have high rates of infant mortality, and their GPI ranked between 2.0 and 3.3; displaced populations, level of violent crime rating, and political instability also were ranked high for several countries. Conclusion Polio was shown to be high in areas with increased conflict and instability. Displaced populations living in hard-to-reach areas may lack access to proper vaccination and health care. Wars and conflict have also resulted in the reemergence of polio in otherwise polio-free countries. PMID:27237735

  9. Vaccine associated paralytic poliomyelitis cases from children presenting with acute flaccid paralysis in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Nanteza, Mary B; Kisakye, Annet; Ota, Martin O; Gumede, Nicksy; Bwogi, Josephine

    2015-12-01

    A retrospective study to identify VAPP cases from the entire Uganda was conducted between January 2003 and December 2011. Eleven of the 106 AFP cases were VAPPs. The VAPP rate ranged from 0 to 3.39 cases per 1,000,000 birth cohorts and the peak was in 2009 when there was scaling up of OPV immunization activities following an importation of wild poliovirus in the country. All the subsequent polio suspect cases since then have been vaccine-associated polio cases. Our data support the strategy to withdraw OPV and introduce IPV progressively in order to mitigate against the paralysis arising from Sabin polioviruses.

  10. [Poliomyelitis and vaccination strategy in Russian Federation in post-certification period].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, O E

    2011-01-01

    Immunization schedules implemented in various countries by using poliovirus vaccines are presented. Approaches to prevent development of vaccine associated paralytic poliomyelitis and risk groups for this infection are discussed. In recent years poliomyelitis morbidity situation in the European region has become more complex, with the example of poliomyelitis outbreak in Tajikistan in 2010. The resulting problem of protection of Russian against emergence and spread of poliomyelitis caused by wild type virus is discussed.

  11. Robustness against serum neutralization of a poliovirus type 1 from a lethal epidemic of poliomyelitis in the Republic of Congo in 2010.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Grard, Gilda; Lukashev, Alexander N; Kozlovskaya, Liubov I; Böttcher, Sindy; Uslu, Gökhan; Reimerink, Johan; Gmyl, Anatoly P; Taty-Taty, Raphaël; Lekana-Douki, Sonia Etenna; Nkoghe, Dieudonné; Eis-Hübinger, Anna M; Diedrich, Sabine; Koopmans, Marion; Leroy, Eric M; Drosten, Christian

    2014-09-01

    In 2010, a large outbreak of poliomyelitis with unusual 47% lethality occurred in Pointe Noire, Republic of Congo. Vaccine-mediated immunity against the outbreak virus was never investigated. A wild poliovirus 1 (WPV1) isolated from a fatal case (termed PV1-RC2010) showed a previously unknown combination of amino acid exchanges in critical antigenic site 2 (AgS2, VP1 capsid protein positions 221SAAL → 221PADL). These exchanges were also detected in an additional 11 WPV1 strains from fatal cases. PV1-RC2010 escaped neutralization by three different mAbs relevant for AgS2. Virus neutralization was tested in sera from fatal cases, who died before supplementary immunization (n = 24), Gabonese recipients of recent oral polio vaccination (n = 12), routinely vaccinated German medical students (n = 34), and German outpatients tested for antipoliovirus immunity (n = 17) on Vero, human rhabdomyosarcoma, and human epidermoid carcinoma 2 cells. Fatal poliomyelitis cases gave laboratory evidence of previous trivalent vaccination. Neutralizing antibody titers against PV1-RC2010 were significantly lower than those against the vaccine strain Sabin-1, two genetically distinct WPV1s isolated in 1965 and 2010 and two genetically distinct vaccine-derived PV strains. Of German vaccinees tested according to World Health Organization protocols, 15-29% were unprotected according to their neutralization titers (<1:8 serum dilution), even though all were protected against Sabin-1. Phylogenetic analysis of the WPV1 outbreak strains suggested a recent introduction of virus progenitors from Asia with formation of separate Angolan and Congolese lineages. Only the latter carried both critical AgS2 mutations. Antigenetically variant PVs may become relevant during the final phase of poliomyelitis eradication in populations with predominantly vaccine-derived immunity. Sustained vaccination coverage and clinical and environmental surveillance will be necessary.

  12. A Sabin 3-derived poliovirus recombinant contained a sequence homologous with indigenous human enterovirus species C in the viral polymerase coding region.

    PubMed

    Arita, Minetaro; Zhu, Shuang-Li; Yoshida, Hiromu; Yoneyama, Tetsuo; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2005-10-01

    Outbreaks of poliomyelitis caused by circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) have been reported in areas where indigenous wild polioviruses (PVs) were eliminated by vaccination. Most of these cVDPVs contained unidentified sequences in the nonstructural protein coding region which were considered to be derived from human enterovirus species C (HEV-C) by recombination. In this study, we report isolation of a Sabin 3-derived PV recombinant (Cambodia-02) from an acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) case in Cambodia in 2002. We attempted to identify the putative recombination counterpart of Cambodia-02 by sequence analysis of nonpolio enterovirus isolates from AFP cases in Cambodia from 1999 to 2003. Based on the previously estimated evolution rates of PVs, the recombination event resulting in Cambodia-02 was estimated to have occurred within 6 months after the administration of oral PV vaccine (99.3% nucleotide identity in VP1 region). The 2BC and the 3D(pol) coding regions of Cambodia-02 were grouped into the genetic cluster of indigenous coxsackie A virus type 17 (CAV17) (the highest [87.1%] nucleotide identity) and the cluster of indigenous CAV13-CAV18 (the highest [94.9%] nucleotide identity) by the phylogenic analysis of the HEV-C isolates in 2002, respectively. CAV13-CAV18 and CAV17 were the dominant HEV-C serotypes in 2002 but not in 2001 and in 2003. We found a putative recombination between CAV13-CAV18 and CAV17 in the 3CD(pro) coding region of a CAV17 isolate. These results suggested that a part of the 3D(pol) coding region of PV3(Cambodia-02) was derived from a HEV-C strain genetically related to indigenous CAV13-CAV18 strains in 2002 in Cambodia.

  13. Poliomyelitis outbreaks in Angola genetically linked to India: risk factors and implications for prevention of outbreaks due to wild poliovirus importations.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Sarah; Goodson, James L; Aramburu, Javier; Morais, Alda; Gaye, Abou; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Buffington, Joanna; Gerber, Sue; Wassilak, Steven; Uzicanin, Amra

    2011-05-12

    We conducted an investigation of two outbreaks of poliomyelitis in Angola during 2007-2008 due to wild poliovirus (WPV) genetically linked to India. A case-control study including 27 case-patients and 76 age- and neighborhood-matched control-subjects was conducted to assess risk factors associated with paralytic poliomyelitis, and epidemiologic links to India were explored through in-depth case-patient interviews. In multivariable analysis, case-patients were more likely than control-subjects to be undervaccinated with fewer than four routine doses of oral poliovirus vaccine (adjusted matched odds ratio [aMOR], 4.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-13.6) and have an adult household member who traveled outside the province of residence in the 2 months preceding onset of paralysis (aMOR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.2-8.6). No epidemiologic link with India was identified. These findings underscore the importance of routine immunization to prevent outbreaks following WPV importations and suggest a possible role of adults in sustaining WPV transmission.

  14. Immunogenicity and safety of a combined DTaP-IPV vaccine compared with separate DTaP and IPV vaccines when administered as pre-school booster doses with a second dose of MMR vaccine to healthy children aged 4-6 years.

    PubMed

    Black, Steven; Friedland, Leonard R; Schuind, Anne; Howe, Barbara

    2006-08-28

    Combination vaccines represent one solution to the problem of increased numbers of injections during single clinic visits. A combined DTaP-IPV (Infanrix-IPV) vaccine has been developed for use as a pre-school booster. Four hundred healthy children aged 4-6 years previously primed with 4 doses of DTaP vaccine (Infanrix), 3 doses of poliovirus vaccine and 1 dose of MMR vaccine were randomized to receive single doses of either the combined DTaP-IPV vaccine or separate DTaP and IPV vaccines in a Phase II trial (DTaP-IPV-047). All children also received a second dose of MMR vaccine. Immunogenicity was assessed in serum samples taken before and 1 month after booster administration. Safety was actively assessed for 42 days post-vaccination. Non-inferiority of the DTaP-IPV vaccine to separate DTaP and IPV vaccines was demonstrated for all DTaP antigen booster response rates and poliovirus geometric mean titers of antibody ratios. Post-vaccination, > or =99.4% of children in both groups had seroprotective levels of anti-diphtheria and anti-tetanus antibodies (> or =0.1IU/mL) and seroprotective anti-poliovirus antibody titers (> or =1:8). All children in both groups were seropositive for measles, mumps and rubella antibodies, with similar post-vaccination geometric mean concentrations/titers. No significant differences were observed in the incidence of solicited local or general symptoms, unsolicited symptoms and serious adverse events between the two groups. This combined DTaP-IPV appeared safe and immunogenic when given as a booster dose at 4-6 years of age. The DTaP-IPV vaccine had no negative effect on the response to co-administered MMR vaccine, making it well-suited for use as a pre-school booster.

  15. A developing country perspective on vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis.

    PubMed Central

    John, T. Jacob

    2004-01-01

    When the Expanded Programme on Immunization was established and oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) was introduced for developing countries to use exclusively, national leaders of public health had no opportunity to make an informed choice between OPV and the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV). Today, as progress is made towards the goal of global eradication of poliomyelitis attributable to wild polioviruses, all developing countries where OPV is used face the risk of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP). Until recently, awareness of VAPP has been poor and quantitative risk analysis scanty but it is now well known that the continued use of OPV perpetuates the risk of VAPP. Discontinuation or declining immunization coverage of OPV will increase the risk of emergence of circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPV) that re-acquire wild virus-like properties and may cause outbreaks of polio. To eliminate the risk of cVDPV, either very high immunization coverage must be maintained as long as OPV is in use, or IPV should replace OPV. Stopping OPV without first achieving high immunization coverage with IPV is unwise on account of the possibility of emergence of cVDPV. Increasing numbers of developed nations prefer IPV, and manufacturing capacities have not been scaled up, so its price remains prohibitively high and unaffordable by developing countries, where, in addition, large-scale field experience with IPV is lacking. Under these circumstances, a policy shift to increase the use of IPV in national immunization programmes in developing countries is a necessary first step; once IPV coverage reaches high levels (over 85%), the withdrawal of OPV may begin. PMID:15106301

  16. Vaccinations for Neuroinfectious Disease: A Global Health Priority.

    PubMed

    Leibovitch, Emily C; Jacobson, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Vaccines for neuroinfectious diseases are becoming an ever-increasing global health priority, as neurologic manifestations and sequelae from existing and emerging central nervous system infections account for significant worldwide morbidity and mortality. The prevention of neurotropic infections can be achieved through globally coordinated vaccination campaigns, which have successfully eradicated nonzoonotic agents such as the variola viruses and, hopefully soon, poliovirus. This review discusses vaccines that are currently available or under development for zoonotic flaviviruses and alphaviruses, including Japanese and tick-borne encephalitis, yellow fever, West Nile, dengue, Zika, encephalitic equine viruses, and chikungunya. Also discussed are nonzoonotic agents, including measles and human herpesviruses, as well as select bacterial, fungal, and protozoal pathogens. While therapeutic vaccines will be required to treat a multitude of ongoing infections of the nervous system, the ideal vaccination strategy is pre-exposure vaccination, with the ultimate goals of minimizing disease associated with zoonotic viruses and the total eradication of nonzoonotic agents. PMID:27365085

  17. Quadracel: Vaccination Against Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, and Poliomyelitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Mosley, Juan F.; Smith, Lillian L.; Parke, Crystal K.; Brown, Jamal A.; LaFrance, Justin M.; Clark, Patricia K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Vaccinations in school-aged children are required by state and local law to maintain high vaccination coverage rates, as well as low rates of vaccine-preventable diseases. Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis are childhood diseases that can be life threatening; poliomyelitis, another childhood disease, can be disabling. In turn, vaccinations were developed to provide protection against these diseases. Today, several vaccinations are recommended for children, including but not limited to diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP) and poliomyelitis (IPV). DTaP requires five doses, and IPV requires four. Quadracel (diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis adsorbed and inactivated poliovirus vaccine, Sanofi Pasteur Inc.) is a new vaccination developed to condense the last dose of both DTaP and IPV so they do not have to be given separately, thus reducing the total number of vaccinations required. Discussion: The Quadracel vaccine is an option for use in children who are completing the DTaP and IPV series. In a randomized, controlled, phase 3, pivotal trial, Quadracel proved to be as efficacious and safe as Daptacel (diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine adsorbed, Sanofi Pasteur Inc.) and IPOL (poliovirus vaccine inactivated, Sanofi Pasteur Inc.), given separately, to children between the ages of 4 and 6 years. Conclusion: Quadracel should be recommended to parents who have children between the ages of 4 and 6 years who meet the necessary administration criteria and need to finalize their DTaP and IPV series. Quadracel’s administration in the vaccination series replaces one additional injection, which may benefit children who are afraid of receiving shots and parents who need to schedule one less doctor’s appointment. PMID:27069343

  18. Entry of poliovirus into cells does not require a low-pH step.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, L; Carrasco, L

    1993-01-01

    The requirement of a low-pH step during poliovirus entry was investigated by using the macrolide antibiotic bafilomycin A1, which is a powerful and selective inhibitor of the vacuolar proton-ATPases. Thus, viruses such as Semliki Forest virus and vesicular stomatitis virus that enter cells through endosomes and need their acidification, are potently inhibited by bafilomycin A1, whereas poliovirus infection is not affected by the antibiotic. The presence of lysosomotropic agents such as chloroquine, amantadine, dansylcadaverine, and monensin during poliovirus entry did not inhibit infection, further supporting the idea that poliovirus does not depend on a low-pH step to enter the cytoplasm. The effect of bafilomycin A1 on other members of the Picornaviridae family was also assayed. Encephalomyocarditis virus entry into HeLa cells was not affected by the macrolide antibiotic, whereas rhinovirus was sensitive. Coentry of toxins, such as alpha-sarcin, with viral particles was potently inhibited by bafilomycin A1, indicating that an active vacuolar proton-ATPase is necessary for the early membrane permeabilization (coentry of alpha-sarcin) induced by poliovirus to take place. Images PMID:8392597

  19. [Comparative study on HAV and Poliovirus 2 inactivation cinetics with peracetic acid].

    PubMed

    Sansebastiano, G; Zoni, R; Bigliardi, L; Ghirardi, E; Losio, N

    2003-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus and Poliovirus 2 inactivation tests were carried out using three peracetic acid concentrations (160, 320 and 640 mg/l) at different pH condition and at +20 degrees C temperature. HAV HM-175 strain was grown in FRhK4 cells and titrated in PFU (plaque technique) and the Poliovirus 2 strain was grown in monkey kidney cells RC-37 and titred in TCID50. The viral titration reduction was determined in the space of an hour with the disinfectant contact at 10-15 minutes intervals. The results obtained with the hepatitis A virus have shown a good linear trend between viral titration and contact time at the highest concentrations without any particular pH influence. The complete viral activity absence was achieved after 30-60 minutes of contact at 640 mg/l concentration. As regards Poliovirus 2 a good linear trend was highlighted between titrations and times at all the concentrations in shorter times at pH acid. The complete viral activity absence was obtained with 640 mg/l concentration after 30 minutes at pH acid. The HAV seems to own a higher resistance than Poliovirus 2 and Poliovirus 1 too.

  20. Poliovirus surveillance by examining sewage specimens. Quantitative recovery of virus after introduction into sewerage at remote upstream location.

    PubMed

    Hovi, T; Stenvik, M; Partanen, H; Kangas, A

    2001-08-01

    In order to assess the feasibility of environmental poliovirus surveillance, known amounts of poliovirus type 1, strain Sabin, were flushed into the sewage network of Helsinki. Grab specimens collected at a remote downstream location and concentrated about a 100-fold revealed infectious poliovirus on four successive days in all three separate experiments. As for concentration, a simple two-phase separation method was found to be at least as useful as a several-fold more resource-demanding polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation method. Recovery of the introduced virus was remarkably high (more than 10%). Using the current system, it might be possible to detect poliovirus circulation in a population of 700,000 people by examining a single 400 ml sewage specimen, if 1 out of 10,000 inhabitants were excreting the virus. It is concluded that environmental surveillance is a sensitive approach to monitor silent poliovirus circulation in populations served by a sewage network.

  1. Stool screening of Syrian refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, 2013/2014: Identification of Sabin like polioviruses.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Sindy; Neubauer, Katrin; Baillot, Armin; Rieder, Gabriele; Adam, Maja; Diedrich, Sabine

    2015-10-01

    Germany is a partner of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative. Assurance of polio free status is based on enterovirus surveillance, which focuses on patients with signs of acute flaccid paralysis or aseptic meningitis/encephalitis, representing the key symptoms of poliovirus infection. In response to the wild poliovirus outbreak in Syria 2013 and high number of refugees coming from Syria to Germany, stool samples from 629 Syrian refugees/asylum seekers aged <3 years were screened for wild poliovirus between November 2013 and April 2014. Ninety-three samples (14.8%) were positive in an enterovirus specific PCR. Of these, 12 contained Sabin-like polioviruses. The remaining 81 samples were characterized as non-polio enteroviruses representing several members of groups A-C as well as rhinovirus. Wild-type poliovirus was not detected via stool screening involving molecular and virological methods, indicating a very low risk for the importation by Syrian refugees and asylum seekers at that time.

  2. Poliovirus surveillance by examining sewage specimens. Quantitative recovery of virus after introduction into sewerage at remote upstream location.

    PubMed Central

    Hovi, T.; Stenvik, M.; Partanen, H.; Kangas, A.

    2001-01-01

    In order to assess the feasibility of environmental poliovirus surveillance, known amounts of poliovirus type 1, strain Sabin, were flushed into the sewage network of Helsinki. Grab specimens collected at a remote downstream location and concentrated about a 100-fold revealed infectious poliovirus on four successive days in all three separate experiments. As for concentration, a simple two-phase separation method was found to be at least as useful as a several-fold more resource-demanding polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation method. Recovery of the introduced virus was remarkably high (more than 10%). Using the current system, it might be possible to detect poliovirus circulation in a population of 700,000 people by examining a single 400 ml sewage specimen, if 1 out of 10,000 inhabitants were excreting the virus. It is concluded that environmental surveillance is a sensitive approach to monitor silent poliovirus circulation in populations served by a sewage network. PMID:11561962

  3. [Post-vaccination anti-poliomyelitis seroprevalence in an urban setting in Abidjan].

    PubMed

    Akoua-Koffi, G; Thonnon, J; Kouassi-Renaud, M; Dosso, M; Ehouman, A

    1995-01-01

    In order to determine the antipoliomyelitis seroprevalence of children in Abidjan, we checked the presence of antipoliovirus antibodies in 48 children received in the South Abobo's vaccination center for vaccination against measles. According to the vaccination schedule and rules applied in Côte d'Ivoire: 12.5% of the children have received less than three doses or oral polio vaccine (OPV), 87.5% have received the three doses. Antibody titration results indicated that 78.6, 93 and 76.2% of the children have been immunized against Poliovirus type I, type II and type III, respectively; 71.4% of the children showed antibodies against the three poliovirus serotypes and 4.8% had no antipoliovirus antibodies at all. The children which showed an antibodies titer less than 1/8 were considered unprotected: the proportion of unprotected was 21.4, 7 and 23.8% against Poliovirus type I, type II and type III, respectively. Although these results showed that the level of protection against poliomyelitis in Abidjan is acceptable (> 75%), the efforts for vaccination program in Côte d'Ivoire need to be improved in order to eradicate poliomyelitis.

  4. Polio vaccination: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Ananda S; Garon, Julie; Seib, Katherine; Orenstein, Walter A

    2015-01-01

    Live attenuated oral polio vaccine (OPV) and inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) are the tools being used to achieve eradication of wild polio virus. Because OPV can rarely cause paralysis and generate revertant polio strains, IPV will have to replace OPV after eradication of wild polio virus is certified to sustain eradication of all polioviruses. However, uncertainties remain related to IPV's ability to induce intestinal immunity in populations where fecal-oral transmission is predominant. Although substantial effectiveness and safety data exist on the use and delivery of OPV and IPV, several new research initiatives are currently underway to fill specific knowledge gaps to inform future vaccination policies that would assure polio is eradicated and eradication is maintained.

  5. Hybrid proteins between Pseudomonas exotoxin A and poliovirus protease 2Apro.

    PubMed

    Novoa, I; Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1994-11-21

    Two hybrid proteins between Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (PE) and poliovirus protease 2Apro have been generated. One hybrid protein contains the poliovirus 2Apro sequence replacing the region of PE corresponding to amino acids 413-607. The other hybrid contains in addition the transforming growth factor sequence. The two hybrid proteins were efficiently synthesized in E. coli cells using the inducible pET vectors. Both hybrid toxins cleaved p220 (eIF-4 gamma) when the recombinant plasmids were transfected in COS cells infected with recombinant vaccinia virus bearing the T7 RNA polymerase gene.

  6. Septage treatments to reduce the numbers of bacteria and polioviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Stramer, S L; Cliver, D O

    1984-01-01

    Disposal of the pumped contents of septic tanks (septage) represents a possible means of dissemination of enteric pathogens including viruses, since persistence of enteroviruses in septic tank sludge for greater than 100 days has been demonstrated. The risk of exposure to potentially infectious agents can be reduced by disinfecting septages before their disposal. Of the septage disinfectants examined (technical and analytical grade glutaraldehyde, hydrogen peroxide, heat treatments, and a combination of heat and hydrogen peroxide), the treatment including hydrogen peroxide (5 mg, plus 0.33 mg of trichloroacetic acid, per ml of septage) and 55 degrees C killed virtually all the bacteria in septage within 1 h, whereas 55 degrees C alone inactivated inoculated polioviruses within 30 min. Virus was the most sensitive to heat, whereas fecal coliforms appeared to be the most sensitive to all chemical treatments. The responses of fecal streptococci and virus to both grades of glutaraldehyde (each at 1 mg/ml) were similar. Virus was more resistant than either fecal streptococci or total bacteria to low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (1 to 5 mg/ml); however, virus and fecal streptococci were more labile than total bacteria to the highest peroxide concentration (10 mg/ml) examined. It is possible that the treatment combining heat and hydrogen peroxide was the most effective in reducing the concentrations of all bacteria, because catalase and peroxidases as well as other enzymes were heat inactivated, although catalase seems the most likely cause of damage. However, this most effective treatment does not appear to be practical for on-site use as performed, so further work on septage disinfection is recommended. PMID:6093691

  7. Lethal Mutagenesis of Poliovirus Mediated by a Mutagenic Pyrimidine Analogue▿

    PubMed Central

    Graci, Jason D.; Harki, Daniel A.; Korneeva, Victoria S.; Edathil, Jocelyn P.; Too, Kathleen; Franco, David; Smidansky, Eric D.; Paul, Aniko V.; Peterson, Blake R.; Brown, Daniel M.; Loakes, David; Cameron, Craig E.

    2007-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis is the mechanism of action of ribavirin against poliovirus (PV) and numerous other RNA viruses. However, there is still considerable debate regarding the mechanism of action of ribavirin against a variety of RNA viruses. Here we show by using T7 RNA polymerase-mediated production of PV genomic RNA, PV polymerase-catalyzed primer extension, and cell-free PV synthesis that a pyrimidine ribonucleoside triphosphate analogue (rPTP) with ambiguous base-pairing capacity is an efficient mutagen of the PV genome. The in vitro incorporation properties of rPTP are superior to ribavirin triphosphate. We observed a log-linear relationship between virus titer reduction and the number of rPMP molecules incorporated. A PV genome encoding a high-fidelity polymerase was more sensitive to rPMP incorporation, consistent with diminished mutational robustness of high-fidelity PV. The nucleoside (rP) did not exhibit antiviral activity in cell culture, owing to the inability of rP to be converted to rPMP by cellular nucleotide kinases. rP was also a poor substrate for herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase. The block to nucleoside phosphorylation could be bypassed by treatment with the P nucleobase, which exhibited both antiviral activity and mutagenesis, presumably a reflection of rP nucleotide formation by a nucleotide salvage pathway. These studies provide additional support for lethal mutagenesis as an antiviral strategy, suggest that rPMP prodrugs may be highly efficacious antiviral agents, and provide a new tool to determine the sensitivity of RNA virus genomes to mutagenesis as well as interrogation of the impact of mutational load on the population dynamics of these viruses. PMID:17686844

  8. Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers Network: doing good by making high-quality vaccines affordable for all.

    PubMed

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Leite, Luciana C C; Datla, Mahima; Makhoana, Morena; Gao, Yongzhong; Suhardono, Mahendra; Jadhav, Suresh; Harshavardhan, Gutla V J A; Homma, Akira

    2013-04-18

    The Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers Network (DCVMN) is a unique model of a public and private international alliance. It assembles governmental and private organizations to work toward a common goal of manufacturing and supplying high-quality vaccines at affordable prices to protect people around the world from known and emerging infectious diseases. Together, this group of manufacturers has decades of experience in manufacturing vaccines, with technologies, know-how, and capacity to produce more than 40 vaccines types. These manufacturers have already contributed more than 30 vaccines in various presentations that have been prequalified by the World Health Organization for use by global immunization programmes. Furthermore, more than 45 vaccines are in the pipeline. Recent areas of focus include vaccines to protect against rotavirus, human papillomavirus (HPV), Japanese encephalitis, meningitis, hepatitis E, poliovirus, influenza, and pertussis, as well as combined pentavalent vaccines for children. The network has a growing number of manufacturers that produce a growing number of products to supply the growing demand for vaccines in developing countries.

  9. Interaction of poliovirus polypeptide 3CDpro with the 5' and 3' termini of the poliovirus genome. Identification of viral and cellular cofactors needed for efficient binding.

    PubMed

    Harris, K S; Xiang, W; Alexander, L; Lane, W S; Paul, A V; Wimmer, E

    1994-10-28

    Poliovirus proteinase 3CDpro by itself is not an RNA-binding protein. Two cellular proteins have been purified from HeLa cells (p50 and p36) which interact with purified 3CDpro but only p36-3CDpro bind to the 5'-terminal 110 nucleotides of polioviral RNA genome, an RNA segment whose secondary structure resembles a cloverleaf. The identity of these factors was determined by microsequencing tryptic digests of the purified proteins. Host protein p50 is the eukaryotic elongation factor EF-1 alpha, and p36 an N-terminal fragment thereof. p36, referred to as host factor, did not appear to interact with purified 3Cpro or 3Dpol. Significantly, the formation of a 3CDpro-cloverleaf complex was also observed in the presence of purified poliovirus polypeptide 3AB, the precursor of VPg. 3AB by itself does not stably bind to the cloverleaf. Competition experiments have demonstrated that the RNA-protein interactions are specific for the full-length cloverleaf. UV cross-linking studies were employed to examine the protein components of the cloverleaf ribonucleoproteins. RNA footprinting was used to determine the site on the cloverleaf where the viral and cellular factors bind. Finally, we have discovered that 3AB-3CDpro also interacts with the 3'-terminal sequence of poliovirus RNA. In contrast to the 5'-terminal cloverleaf, the 3'-terminal RNA can bind 3AB in the absence of other proteins. A model for initiation of poliovirus RNA synthesis is presented. PMID:7929441

  10. HPV vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gardasil; Cervarix; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer; Genital warts - HPV vaccine; Cervical dysplasia - HPV vaccine; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine; Cancer of the cervix - HPV vaccine; ...

  11. Vaccine hesitancy as self-determination: an Israeli perspective.

    PubMed

    Velan, Baruch

    2016-01-01

    Vaccine hesitancy can be portrayed as a broad spectrum of phenomena, ranging from a genuine call for help to complete defiance of authorities. The emphasis here is made on mid-spectrum hesitancy; hesitancy as an act of personal exploration and deliberation whether to get vaccinated or not. This form of vaccine hesitancy can be identified in the attitude of the Israeli public towards routine childhood vaccination programs, seasonal flu vaccination, newly introduced vaccines, such as human papilloma virus vaccine, as well as towards the emergency vaccination programs against poliovirus and H1N1 pandemic influenza. Vaccine hesitancy in Israel appears to be a process where individuals exercise self-determination and self-empowerment and make their own decisions based on assessment, reflection, choosing between various options and dealing with considerable complexities. Addressing this form of vaccine hesitancy could be challenging, but ultimately fruitful. This would require change of attitudes on the part of policymakers. The first steps should involve the realization that deliberative hesitancy is here to stay, and that hesitant individuals should be respected. This could pave the way for designing appropriate intervention strategies for convincing the hesitant public about the advantages of vaccination. PMID:27051517

  12. Inhibition of proteolytic activity of poliovirus and rhinovirus 2A proteinases by elastase-specific inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Molla, A; Hellen, C U; Wimmer, E

    1993-01-01

    A polyprotein cleavage assay has been developed to assay the proteolytic activities in vitro of the 2A proteinases encoded by poliovirus and human rhinovirus 14, which are representative members of the Enterovirus and Rhinovirus genera of picornaviruses, respectively. The elastase-specific substrate-based inhibitors elastatinal and methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-chloromethylketone (MPCMK) inhibited both 2A proteinases in vitro. The electrophoretic mobilities of both 2A proteinases were reduced upon incubation with elastatinal, whereas the mobility of a Cys-109-->Ala poliovirus 2Apro mutant was unchanged, an observation suggesting that this inhibitor may have formed a covalent bond with the active-site Cys-109 nucleophile. Iodoacetamide, calpain inhibitor 1, and antipain inhibited poliovirus 2Apro. MPCMK caused a reduction in the yields of the enteroviruses poliovirus type 1 and coxsackievirus A21 and of human rhinovirus 2 in infected HeLa cells but did not affect the growth of encephalomyocarditis virus, a picornavirus of the Cardiovirus genus. MPCMK abrogated the shutoff of host cell protein synthesis that is induced by enterovirus and rhinovirus infection and reduced the synthesis of virus-encoded polypeptides in infected cells. These results indicate that the determinants of substrate recognition by 2A proteinases resemble those of pancreatic and leukocyte elastases. These results may be relevant to the development of broad-range chemotherapeutic agents against entero- and rhinoviruses. Images PMID:8392608

  13. Alternative splicing, a new target to block cellular gene expression by poliovirus 2A protease

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Enrique; Castello, Alfredo; Carrasco, Luis; Izquierdo, Jose M.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Novel role for poliovirus 2A protease as splicing modulator. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease inhibits the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease blocks the second catalytic step of splicing. -- Abstract: Viruses have developed multiple strategies to interfere with the gene expression of host cells at different stages to ensure their own survival. Here we report a new role for poliovirus 2A{sup pro} modulating the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Expression of 2A{sup pro} potently inhibits splicing of reporter genes in HeLa cells. Low amounts of 2A{sup pro} abrogate Fas exon 6 skipping, whereas higher levels of protease fully abolish Fas and FGFR2 splicing. In vitro splicing of MINX mRNA using nuclear extracts is also strongly inhibited by 2A{sup pro}, leading to accumulation of the first exon and the lariat product containing the unspliced second exon. These findings reveal that the mechanism of action of 2A{sup pro} on splicing is to selectively block the second catalytic step.

  14. Purification and partial characterization of poliovirus protease 2A by means of a functional assay.

    PubMed Central

    König, H; Rosenwirth, B

    1988-01-01

    The purification of poliovirus protease 2A from infected cells by a functional assay is described. A small synthetic peptide was cleaved specifically by an esterase present in poliovirus-infected cells. Since the enzyme proved extremely unstable in crude extracts a rapid and efficient purification procedure had to be developed. By treatment with different detergents followed by high-speed centrifugation, the esterase activity was separated from inactivating cellular enzymes and was solubilized. Purification to more than 90% homogeneity could be achieved by a single chromatography step, namely, by gel filtration through Superose 12 under fast-protein liquid chromatography conditions. The esterase activity was associated with a protein of 17,000 daltons and copurified with poliovirus protein 2A. Furthermore, antibodies to 2A specifically precipitated the esterase activity. Thus, the esterase was identified as poliovirus protease 2A. Inhibition studies with known protease inhibitors revealed that 2A is probably a sulfhydryl protease. Of the metal ions tested, only zinc exerted significant inhibitory effects. The esterase activity was optimal near neutral pH and had an extremely short half-life at physiological temperatures. Images PMID:2831385

  15. Next generation inactivated polio vaccine manufacturing to support post polio-eradication biosafety goals.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Yvonne E; van 't Oever, Aart G; van Oijen, Monique G C T; Wijffels, René H; van der Pol, Leo A; Bakker, Wilfried A M

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide efforts to eradicate polio caused a tipping point in polio vaccination strategies. A switch from the oral polio vaccine, which can cause circulating and virulent vaccine derived polioviruses, to inactivated polio vaccines (IPV) is scheduled. Moreover, a manufacturing process, using attenuated virus strains instead of wild-type polioviruses, is demanded to enhance worldwide production of IPV, especially in low- and middle income countries. Therefore, development of an IPV from attenuated (Sabin) poliovirus strains (sIPV) was pursued. Starting from the current IPV production process based on wild type Salk strains, adaptations, such as lower virus cultivation temperature, were implemented. sIPV was produced at industrial scale followed by formulation of both plain and aluminium adjuvanted sIPV. The final products met the quality criteria, were immunogenic in rats, showed no toxicity in rabbits and could be released for testing in the clinic. Concluding, sIPV was developed to manufacturing scale. The technology can be transferred worldwide to support post polio-eradication biosafety goals.

  16. A poliovirus 2A(pro) mutant unable to cleave 3CD shows inefficient viral protein synthesis and transactivation defects.

    PubMed Central

    Ventoso, I; Carrasco, L

    1995-01-01

    Four poliovirus mutants with modifications of tyrosine 88 in 2A(pro) were generated and introduced into the cloned poliovirus genome. Mutants Y88P and Y88L were nonviable, mutant Y88F showed a wild-type (WT) phenotype, and mutant Y88S showed a delayed cytopathic effect and formed small plaques in HeLa cells. Growth of Y88S in HeLa cells was restricted, giving rise to about 20% of the PFU production of the WT poliovirus. The 2A (Y88S) mutant synthesized significantly lower levels of viral proteins in HeLa cells than did the WT poliovirus, while the kinetics of p220 cleavage were identical for both viruses. Strikingly, the 2A (Y88S) mutant was unable to cleave 3CD, as shown by analysis of poliovirus proteins labeled with [35S]methionine or immunoblotted with a specific anti-3C serum. The ability of the Y88S mutant to form infectious virus and cleave 3CD can be complemented by the WT poliovirus. Synthesis of viral RNA was diminished in the Y88S mutant but less than the inhibition of translation of viral RNA. Experiments in which guanidine was used to inhibit poliovirus RNA synthesis suggest that the primary defect of the Y88S mutant virus is at the level of poliovirus RNA translation, while viral genome replication is much less affected. Transfection of HeLa cells infected with the WT poliovirus with a luciferase mRNA containing the poliovirus 5' untranslated sequence gives rise to a severalfold increase in luciferase activity. This enhanced translation of leader-luc mRNA was not observed when the transfected cells were infected with the 2A (Y88S) mutant. Moreover, cotransfection with mRNA encoding WT poliovirus 2A(pro) enhanced translation of leader-luc mRNA. This enhancement was much lower upon transfection with mRNA encoding 2A(Y88S), 2A(Y88L), or 2A(Y88P). These findings support the view that 2A(pro) itself, rather than the 3C' and/or 3D' products, is necessary for efficient translation of poliovirus RNA in HeLa cells. PMID:7666528

  17. Effects of poliovirus 2A(pro) on vaccinia virus gene expression.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Aldabe, R; Novoa, I; Carrasco, L

    1995-12-15

    The effects of transient expression of poliovirus 2A(pro) on p220 cleavage in COS cells have been analyzed. When 2A(pro) was cloned in plasmid pTM1 and transiently expressed in COS cells, efficient cleavage of p220 occurred after infection of these cells with a recombinant vaccinia virus bearing phage T7 RNA polymerase. High numbers of COS cells were transfected with pTM1-2A, as judged by p220 cleavage, thereby allowing an analysis of the effects of poliovirus 2A(pro) on vaccinia virus gene expression. A 40-50% cleavage of p220 by transfected poliovirus 2A(pro) was observed ten hours post infection and cleavage was almost complete (80-90%) 20-25 hours post infection with vaccinia virus. Profound inhibition of vaccinia virus protein synthesis was detectable ten hours post infection and was maximal 20-25 hours post infection. This inhibition resulted from neither a blockade of transcription of vaccinia virus nor a lack of translatability of the mRNAs present in cells that synthesize poliovirus 2A(pro). Addition of ara-C inhibited the replication of vaccinia virus and allowed the continued synthesis of cellular proteins. Under these conditions, 2A(pro) is expressed and blocks cellular translation. Finally, p220 cleavage by 2A(pro) did not inhibit the translation of a mRNA encoding poliovirus protein 2C, as directed by the 5' leader sequences of encephalomiocarditis virus. Therefore, these findings show a correlation between p220 cleavage and inhibition of translation from newly made mRNAs. Our results are discussed in the light of present knowledge of p220 function, and new approaches are considered that might provide further insights into the function(s) of initiation factor eIF-4F.

  18. Evaluating associations between vaccine response and malnutrition, gut function, and enteric infections in the MAL-ED cohort study: methods and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hoest, Christel; Seidman, Jessica C; Pan, William; Ambikapathi, Ramya; Kang, Gagandeep; Kosek, Margaret; Knobler, Stacey; Mason, Carl J; Miller, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Most vaccine assessments have occurred in well-nourished populations of higher socioeconomic status. However, vaccines are often used in populations with high incidences of malnutrition and infections, in whom the effectiveness of some vaccines is inferior for unknown reasons. The degree and extent of vaccine underperformance have not been systematically studied for most vaccines across differing epidemiologic settings. This paper outlines the methods used and challenges associated with measuring immunological responses to oral vaccines against poliovirus and rotavirus, and parenteral vaccines against pertussis, tetanus, and measles in an observational study that monitored daily illness, monthly growth, intestinal inflammation and permeability, pathogen burden, dietary intake, and micronutrient status in children in 8 countries. This evaluation of vaccine response in the context of low- and middle-income countries is intended to address the gaps in knowledge of the heterogeneity in vaccine response in diverse epidemiological settings and the interplay between infections, nutrition, and immune response. PMID:25305297

  19. Nectin-Like Interactions between Poliovirus and Its Receptor Trigger Conformational Changes Associated with Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Mike; Filman, David J.; Belnap, David M.; Cheng, Naiqian; Noel, Roane T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poliovirus infection is initiated by attachment to a receptor on the cell surface called Pvr or CD155. At physiological temperatures, the receptor catalyzes an irreversible expansion of the virus to form an expanded form of the capsid called the 135S particle. This expansion results in the externalization of the myristoylated capsid protein VP4 and the N-terminal extension of the capsid protein VP1, both of which become inserted into the cell membrane. Structures of the expanded forms of poliovirus and of several related viruses have recently been reported. However, until now, it has been unclear how receptor binding triggers viral expansion at physiological temperature. Here, we report poliovirus in complex with an enzymatically partially deglycosylated form of the 3-domain ectodomain of Pvr at a 4-Å resolution, as determined by cryo-electron microscopy. The interaction of the receptor with the virus in this structure is reminiscent of the interactions of Pvr with its natural ligands. At a low temperature, the receptor induces very few changes in the structure of the virus, with the largest changes occurring within the footprint of the receptor, and in a loop of the internal protein VP4. Changes in the vicinity of the receptor include the displacement of a natural lipid ligand (called “pocket factor”), demonstrating that the loss of this ligand, alone, is not sufficient to induce particle expansion. Finally, analogies with naturally occurring ligand binding in the nectin family suggest which specific structural rearrangements in the virus-receptor complex could help to trigger the irreversible expansion of the capsid. IMPORTANCE The cell-surface receptor (Pvr) catalyzes a large structural change in the virus that exposes membrane-binding protein chains. We fitted known atomic models of the virus and Pvr into three-dimensional experimental maps of the receptor-virus complex. The molecular interactions we see between poliovirus and its receptor are

  20. Polio Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... inactive polio vaccine OPV=oral polio vaccine Polio Vaccination Pronounced [PO-lee-oh] Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... handling and storage Related Pages Global Vaccines and Immunization Global Polio Also Known As & Abbreviations Polio=poliomyelitis ...

  1. Combined cell culture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for quantification of poliovirus neutralization- relevant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wahby, A F

    2000-11-01

    A combined cell culture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CCC-ELISA) was developed for measuring the neutralizing antipoliovirus antibodies in human sera. The binding of different concentrations of each of the three poliovirus types to BGM cells in the presence and absence of a constant dilution from each test and reference serum was measured in the CCC-ELISA. The titers of the viruses neutralized by each serum were measured with the titration curves and used for interpretation of neutralizing titers to the three poliovirus types. Analysis of human sera revealed that the sensitivity and specificity of the CCC-ELISA and the microneutralization assay were comparable. The CCC-ELISA is nonsubjective, rapid, and highly reproducible. Furthermore, the CCC-ELISA could potentially be used as a seroepidemiologic tool for assessment of the humoral response to the cell culture infectious viruses.

  2. Characteristics of districts in Pakistan with persistent transmission of wild poliovirus, 2000-2001.

    PubMed

    Lowther, S A; Mir, T; Bile, M K; Abdul Hafiz, R; Mounts, A W

    2004-01-01

    We sought to identify factors associated with being a reservoir district for wild poliovirus in Pakistan. Differences between reservoir and non-reservoir districts were identified using acute flaccid paralysis surveillance data, population census statistics and data from a survey of district health officials (DHOs). Of the 11 poliovirus reservoir districts identified, population density was significantly higher (median 550 persons/km2) than the non-reservoirs (median 175 persons/km2). DHOs from reservoir districts more often reported that planning was affected by refugees and they had more frequent DHO transfers compared with non-reservoir districts. Multivariate analysis confirmed that reservoirs more often had high population density and frequent DHO transfers. Assessment of district-level and management characteristics can supplement surveillance methods to further improve health programmes.

  3. Characteristics of districts in Pakistan with persistent transmission of wild poliovirus, 2000-2001.

    PubMed

    Lowther, S A; Mir, T; Bile, M K; Abdul Hafiz, R; Mounts, A W

    2004-01-01

    We sought to identify factors associated with being a reservoir district for wild poliovirus in Pakistan. Differences between reservoir and non-reservoir districts were identified using acute flaccid paralysis surveillance data, population census statistics and data from a survey of district health officials (DHOs). Of the 11 poliovirus reservoir districts identified, population density was significantly higher (median 550 persons/km2) than the non-reservoirs (median 175 persons/km2). DHOs from reservoir districts more often reported that planning was affected by refugees and they had more frequent DHO transfers compared with non-reservoir districts. Multivariate analysis confirmed that reservoirs more often had high population density and frequent DHO transfers. Assessment of district-level and management characteristics can supplement surveillance methods to further improve health programmes. PMID:16335650

  4. A micrometabolic inhibition test for the estimation of poliovirus neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kyriazopoulou, V G; Bell, E J

    1972-01-01

    A modified micrometabolic inhibition test for the titration of poliovirus neutralizing antibodies is described. The effects of varying both the duration and the temperature of incubation of the serum-virus mixtures were examined. Overnight incubation resulted in a 2-3-fold increase in the titre of the hyperimmune sera tested. The method is simple and economical and appears to be suitable for antibody surveys.

  5. Poliovirus type 1 infection of murine PRNP-knockout neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Baj, Andreina; Bettaccini, Alessia; Nishimura, Takuya; Onodera, Takashi; Toniolo, Antonio

    2005-07-01

    Transfection of the prion protein gene (Prnp) into prion-deficient mouse cells was shown to reduce the replication of coxsackievirus B3, an enterovirus. Because mice can be susceptible to poliovirus infection by parenteral routes, the authors tested the susceptibility to poliovirus-1 (PV-1) of a panel of murine neuronal cell lines differing in their ability to express Prnp. The investigated cell lines (prionless HpL3.4 cells, HpL3.4 cells transfected with a Prnp vector, HpL3.4 cells transfected with a void vector, wild-type Hw3.5 Prnp(+/+) cells) expressed the murine homologue (Tage4) of human poliovirus receptor (CD155/hPVR). PV-1 infection of Prnp(-/-) HpL3.4 cells resulted in the production of high viral titers, though viral antigens could be detected in only 0.5% to 2% of cells. Wild-type Prnp(+/+) cells and prionless cells transfected with the Prnp gene were not permissive to PV-1. Results of viral titration and immunofluorescence were confirmed by conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and quantitative real-time PCR. Exposure to PV-1 had no influence on the gene expression profile of Prnp(+/+) cells. In contrast, PV-1 infection was associated with upregulation of several genes in permissive Prnp(-/-) cell cultures: type I interferon (IFN) genes, IFN-related developmental regulator 1 (IFNRD1), tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 13b (TNFSF13b), interleukin (IL) - 7, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor-A, transforming growth factors beta1 and beta3 (TGFb1, TGFb3), as well as a variety of bone morphogenetic proteins endowed with neuroprotective activity. Distinction of permissive from nonpermissive neuronal cells on the basis of Prnp expression suggests that prion-deficient mice could represent an extraordinarily sensitive animal model for poliovirus infection.

  6. RNA nuclear export is blocked by poliovirus 2A protease and is concomitant with nucleoporin cleavage.

    PubMed

    Castelló, Alfredo; Izquierdo, José M; Welnowska, Ewelina; Carrasco, Luis

    2009-10-15

    Cytopathic viruses have developed successful strategies to block or, at least, to attenuate host interference with their replication. Here, we have analyzed the effects of poliovirus 2A protease on RNA nuclear export. 2A protease interferes with trafficking of mRNAs, rRNAs and U snRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, without any apparent effect on tRNA transport. Traffic of newly produced mRNAs is more strongly affected than traffic of other mRNAs over-represented in the cytoplasm, such as mRNA encoding beta-actin. Inhibition of RNA nuclear export in HeLa cells expressing 2A protease is concomitant with the cleavage of Nup98, Nup153, Nup62 and their subsequent subcellular redistribution. The expression of an inactive 2A protease failed to interfere with RNA nuclear export. In addition, other related proteases, such as poliovirus 3C or foot and mouth disease virus L(pro) did not affect mRNA distribution or Nup98 integrity. Treatment of HeLa cells with interferon (IFN)-gamma increased the relative amount of Nup98. Under such conditions, the cleavage of Nup98 induced by 2A protease is partial, and thus IFN-gamma prevents the inhibition of RNA nuclear export. Taken together, these results are consistent with a specific proteolysis of Nup98 by 2A protease to prevent de novo mRNA traffic in poliovirus-infected cells.

  7. Recovery of poliovirus from cut surface of stored fresh papaya fruit.

    PubMed

    Lee, A S; Yap, K L

    1999-06-01

    Poliovirus kept on the cut surfaces of fully ripe papaya cubes placed in an ice box showed a sharp and significant reduction in the recovery of infectious virus about 15 minutes after exposure. Thereafter, a very gradual decrease ensued and infectious residual virus was detected up to the end of the 6-hour exposure period. Papaya cubes washed or kept overnight before virus inoculation, and from less ripe fruits produced a similar survival pattern. A very small proportion of the inoculum was recovered from the mashed content of the inoculated papaya cubes thus suggesting that most of the non-recovered virus particles were inactivated. The results suggest that the importance of poliovirus-contaminated cut papayas as a transmission vehicle for the virus is greatly reduced by the rapid decline in the infectivity of a large proportion of the virus soon after contamination. Nevertheless, the potential to transmit remains as a small residual pool of infectious poliovirus is able to survive for a relatively long period. PMID:10774695

  8. Long-term survival of hepatitis A virus and poliovirus type 1 in mineral water.

    PubMed

    Biziagos, E; Passagot, J; Crance, J M; Deloince, R

    1988-11-01

    The survival in mineral water of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and poliovirus type 1 was compared, under controlled experimental conditions, at 4 degrees C and room temperature. Viral infectivity titers were determined by cell culture titration, while HAV antigenicity was monitored by radioimmunoassay-endpoint titration. Both viruses persisted longest at 4 degrees C. At this temperature, after 1 year of exposure, the inactivation of either HAV or poliovirus type 1 was not important. At room temperature, poliovirus type 1 was not detected after 300 days, whereas HAV was still infectious. For both temperatures, the computed regression coefficients of best-fit lines for inactivation rates for the two viruses were significantly different. The survival of HAV was also studied at 4 degrees C and room temperature in mineral water with 5- and 50-micrograms/ml protein concentrations (i.e., purity of the virus suspension) for 120 days. As shown by a comparison of the regression coefficients for the inactivation rates, the stability of HAV in mineral water depends on protein concentration and temperature. Radioimmunoassay-endpoint titration results showed inactivation patterns similar to those of cell culture titration, with the most significant reduction in HAV antigenicity at room temperature. At the two temperatures, the infectivity of HAV declined at a faster rate than the antigenicity.

  9. The efficacy of simulated solar disinfection (SODIS) against coxsackievirus, poliovirus and hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed

    Heaselgrave, Wayne; Kilvington, Simon

    2012-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of simulated solar disinfection (SODIS) against enteric waterborne viruses including coxsackievirus-B5, poliovirus-2 and hepatitis A virus was investigated in this study. Assays were conducted in transparent 12-well polystyrene microtitre plates containing the appropriate viral test suspension. Plates were exposed to simulated sunlight at an optical irradiance of 550 Wm(-2) (watts per square metre) delivered from a SUNTEST™ CPS+ solar simulator for 6 hours. Aliquots of the viral test suspensions were taken at set time points and the level of inactivation of the viruses was determined by either culture on a HeLa cell monolayer for coxsackievirus-B5 and poliovirus-2 or by utilising a chromogenic antibody-based approach for hepatitis A virus. With coxsackievirus-B5, poliovirus-2 and hepatitis A virus, exposure to SODIS at an optical irradiance of 550 Wm(-2) for 1-2 hours resulted in complete inactivation of each virus. The findings from this study suggest that under appropriate conditions SODIS may be an effective technique for the inactivation of enteric viruses in drinking water. However, further verification studies need to be performed using natural sunlight in the region where the SODIS technology is to be employed to validate our results.

  10. Expression of poliovirus 2Apro in mammalian cells: effects on translation.

    PubMed

    Aldabe, R; Feduchi, E; Novoa, I; Carrasco, L

    1995-12-11

    Poliovirus protease 2Apro has been efficiently expressed in HeLa and COS cells upon transfection with vector pTM1-2A and infection with the recombinant vaccinia virus bearing the T7 RNA polymerase. The expressed poliovirus protease localizes to the cytoplasm of the transfected cells, both in the endoplasmic reticulum and in vesicles scattered in the cytoplasm. Cleavage of p220, a component of initiation factor eIF-4F, selectively occurs from 5 h post-infection in transfected cells infected with the recombinant virus. This cleavage correlates in time with the profound inhibition observed in the synthesis of vaccinia virus proteins. A similar blockade of vesicular stomatitis virus translation takes place upon 2Apro expression. Finally, the synthesis of poliovirus protein 2C from a recombinant vaccinia virus that expresses this protein under the EMC untranslated leader region is not affected by the synthesis of 2Apro. These findings lend support to the idea that translation of capped mRNAs requires the integrity of p220, while this requirement is not observed when translation of a mRNA bearing a picornavirus leader region is assayed.

  11. Vaccine hesitancy

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Eve; Laberge, Caroline; Guay, Maryse; Bramadat, Paul; Roy, Réal; Bettinger, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite being recognized as one of the most successful public health measures, vaccination is perceived as unsafe and unnecessary by a growing number of individuals. Lack of confidence in vaccines is now considered a threat to the success of vaccination programs. Vaccine hesitancy is believed to be responsible for decreasing vaccine coverage and an increasing risk of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and epidemics. This review provides an overview of the phenomenon of vaccine hesitancy. First, we will characterize vaccine hesitancy and suggest the possible causes of the apparent increase in vaccine hesitancy in the developed world. Then we will look at determinants of individual decision-making about vaccination. PMID:23584253

  12. A Stable HeLa Cell Line That Inducibly Expresses Poliovirus 2Apro: Effects on Cellular and Viral Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Barco, Angel; Feduchi, Elena; Carrasco, Luis

    2000-01-01

    A HeLa cell clone (2A7d) that inducibly expresses the gene for poliovirus protease 2A (2Apro) under the control of tetracycline has been obtained. Synthesis of 2Apro induces severe morphological changes in 2A7d cells. One day after tetracycline removal, cells round up and a few hours later die. Poliovirus 2Apro cleaves both forms of initiation factor eIF4G, causing extensive inhibition of capped-mRNA translation a few hours after protease induction. Methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-chloromethylketone, a selective inhibitor of 2Apro, prevents both eIF4G cleavage and inhibition of translation but not cellular death. Expression of 2Apro still allows both the replication of poliovirus and the translation of mRNAs containing a picornavirus leader sequence, while vaccinia virus replication is drastically inhibited. Translation of transfected capped mRNA is blocked in 2A7d-On cells, while luciferase synthesis from a mRNA bearing a picornavirus internal ribosome entry site (IRES) sequence is enhanced by the presence of 2Apro. Moreover, synthesis of 2Apro in 2A7d cells complements the translational defect of a poliovirus 2Apro-defective variant. These results show that poliovirus 2Apro expression mimics some phenotypical characteristics of poliovirus-infected cells, such as cell rounding, inhibition of protein synthesis and enhancement of IRES-driven translation. This cell line constitutes a useful tool to further analyze 2Apro functions, to complement poliovirus 2Apro mutants, and to test antiviral compounds. PMID:10666269

  13. Recent Progress towards Novel EV71 Anti-Therapeutics and Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ng, Qingyong; He, Fang; Kwang, Jimmy

    2015-12-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a group of viruses that belongs to the Picornaviridae family, which also includes viruses such as polioviruses. EV71, together with coxsackieviruses, is widely known for its association with Hand Foot Mouth Disease (HFMD), which generally affects children age five and below. Besides HFMD, EV71 can also trigger more severe and life-threatening neurological conditions such as encephalitis. Considering the lack of a vaccine and antiviral drug against EV71, together with the increasing spread of these viruses, the development of such drugs and vaccines becomes the top priority in protecting our younger generations. This article, hence, reviews some of the recent progress in the formulations of anti-therapeutics and vaccine generation for EV71, covering (i) inactivated vaccines; (ii) baculovirus-expressed vaccines against EV71; (iii) human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatment; and (iv) the use of monoclonal antibody therapy as a prevention and treatment for EV71 infections.

  14. Recent Progress towards Novel EV71 Anti-Therapeutics and Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Qingyong; He, Fang; Kwang, Jimmy

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a group of viruses that belongs to the Picornaviridae family, which also includes viruses such as polioviruses. EV71, together with coxsackieviruses, is widely known for its association with Hand Foot Mouth Disease (HFMD), which generally affects children age five and below. Besides HFMD, EV71 can also trigger more severe and life-threatening neurological conditions such as encephalitis. Considering the lack of a vaccine and antiviral drug against EV71, together with the increasing spread of these viruses, the development of such drugs and vaccines becomes the top priority in protecting our younger generations. This article, hence, reviews some of the recent progress in the formulations of anti-therapeutics and vaccine generation for EV71, covering (i) inactivated vaccines; (ii) baculovirus-expressed vaccines against EV71; (iii) human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatment; and (iv) the use of monoclonal antibody therapy as a prevention and treatment for EV71 infections. PMID:26670245

  15. Similar interactions of the poliovirus and rhinovirus 3D polymerases with the 3' untranslated region of rhinovirus 14.

    PubMed

    Meredith, J M; Rohll, J B; Almond, J W; Evans, D J

    1999-12-01

    We showed previously that a human rhinovirus 14 (HRV14) 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) on a poliovirus genome was able to replicate with nearly wild-type kinetics (J. B. Rohll, D. H. Moon, D. J. Evans, and J. W. Almond, J. Virol 69:7835-7844, 1995). This enabled the HRV14 single 3' UTR stem-loop structure to be studied in combination with a sensitive reporter system, poliovirus FLC/REP, in which the capsid coding region is replaced by an in-frame chloramphemicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. Using such a construct, we identified a mutant (designated mut4), in which the structure and stability of the stem were predicted to be maintained, that replicated very poorly as determined by its level of CAT activity. The effect of this mutant 3' UTR on replication has been further investigated by transferring it onto the full-length cDNAs of both poliovirus type 3 (PV3) and HRV14. Virus was recovered with a parental plaque phenotype at a low frequency, indicating the acquisition of compensating changes, which sequence analysis revealed were, in both poliovirus- and rhinovirus-derived viruses, located in the active-site cleft of 3D polymerase and involved the substitution of Asn18 for Tyr. These results provide further evidence of a specific interaction between the 3' UTR of picornaviruses and the viral polymerase and also indicate similar interactions of the 3' UTR of rhinovirus with both poliovirus and rhinovirus polymerases.

  16. Attenuation of neurovirulence, biodistribution, and shedding of a poliovirus:rhinovirus chimera after intrathalamic inoculation in Macaca fascicularis.

    PubMed

    Dobrikova, Elena Y; Goetz, Christian; Walters, Robert W; Lawson, Sarah K; Peggins, James O; Muszynski, Karen; Ruppel, Sheryl; Poole, Karyol; Giardina, Steven L; Vela, Eric M; Estep, James E; Gromeier, Matthias

    2012-03-01

    A dependence of poliovirus on an unorthodox translation initiation mode can be targeted selectively to drive viral protein synthesis and cytotoxicity in malignant cells. Transformed cells are naturally susceptible to poliovirus, due to widespread ectopic upregulation of the poliovirus receptor, Necl-5, in ectodermal/neuroectodermal cancers. Viral tumor cell killing and the host immunologic response it engenders produce potent, lasting antineoplastic effects in animal tumor models. Clinical application of this principle depends on unequivocal demonstration of safety in primate models for paralytic poliomyelitis. We conducted extensive dose-range-finding, toxicity, biodistribution, shedding, and neutralizing antibody studies of the prototype oncolytic poliovirus recombinant, PVS-RIPO, after intrathalamic inoculation in Macaca fascicularis. These studies suggest that intracerebral PVS-RIPO inoculation does not lead to viral propagation in the central nervous system (CNS), does not cause histopathological CNS lesions or neurological symptoms that can be attributed to the virus, is not associated with extraneural virus dissemination or replication and does not induce shedding of virus with stool. Intrathalamic PVS-RIPO inoculation induced neutralizing antibody responses against poliovirus serotype 1 in all animals studied.

  17. Stool screening of Syrian refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, 2013/2014: Identification of Sabin like polioviruses.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Sindy; Neubauer, Katrin; Baillot, Armin; Rieder, Gabriele; Adam, Maja; Diedrich, Sabine

    2015-10-01

    Germany is a partner of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative. Assurance of polio free status is based on enterovirus surveillance, which focuses on patients with signs of acute flaccid paralysis or aseptic meningitis/encephalitis, representing the key symptoms of poliovirus infection. In response to the wild poliovirus outbreak in Syria 2013 and high number of refugees coming from Syria to Germany, stool samples from 629 Syrian refugees/asylum seekers aged <3 years were screened for wild poliovirus between November 2013 and April 2014. Ninety-three samples (14.8%) were positive in an enterovirus specific PCR. Of these, 12 contained Sabin-like polioviruses. The remaining 81 samples were characterized as non-polio enteroviruses representing several members of groups A-C as well as rhinovirus. Wild-type poliovirus was not detected via stool screening involving molecular and virological methods, indicating a very low risk for the importation by Syrian refugees and asylum seekers at that time. PMID:26321005

  18. Neonatal BCG vaccination is associated with enhanced T-helper 1 immune responses to heterologous infant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Libraty, Daniel H; Zhang, Lei; Woda, Marcia; Acosta, Luz P; Obcena, Anamae; Brion, Job D; Capeding, Rosario Z

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) vaccination has been reported to have beneficial effects beyond preventing infantile tuberculous meningitis and miliary disease. We hypothesized that BCG vaccine given at birth would enhance T-helper 1 (Th1) immune responses to the first vaccines given later in infancy. We conducted a nested case-control study of neonatal BCG vaccination and its heterologous Th1 immune effects in 2-3 months old infants. BCG vaccination at birth was associated with an increased frequency of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) producing spot-forming cells (SFC) to tetanus toxoid 2-3 months later. The frequency of IFN-γ producing SFC to polioviruses 1-3 also trended higher among infants who received BCG vaccination at birth. The frequency of IFN-γ+/tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)+CD45RO+CD4+ T-cells upon stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)/Ionomycin was higher in 2-3 months old infants who received BCG vaccination at birth compared to those who did not. The circulating frequency of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)+ CD45RO+ regulatory CD4+ T-cells also trended lower in these infants. Neonatal BCG vaccination is associated with heterologous Th1 immune effects 2-3 months later. PMID:24611083

  19. Vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis in India during 1999: decreased risk despite massive use of oral polio vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Kathryn A.; Banerjee, Kaushik; Gary Hlady, W.; Andrus, Jon K.; Sutter, Roland W.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) is a rare but serious consequence of the administration of oral polio vaccine (OPV). Intensified OPV administration has reduced wild poliovirus transmission in India but VAPP is becoming a matter of concern. METHODS: We analysed acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance data in order to estimate the VAPP risk in this country. VAPP was defined as occurring in AFP cases with onset of paralysis in 1999, residual weakness 60 days after onset, and isolation of vaccine-related poliovirus. Recipient VAPP cases were a subset with onset of paralysis between 4 and 40 days after receipt of OPV. FINDINGS: A total of 181 AFP cases met the case definition. The following estimates of VAPP risk were made: overall risk, 1 case per 4.1 to 4.6 million OPV doses administered; recipient risk,1 case per 12.2 million; first-dose recipient risk, 1 case per 2.8 million; and subsequent-dose recipient risk, 1 case per 13.9 million. CONCLUSION: On the basis of data from a highly sensitive surveillance system the estimated VAPP risk in India is evidently lower than that in other countries, notwithstanding the administration of multiple OPV doses to children in mass immunization campaigns. PMID:11984607

  20. Vaccine Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... During Pregnancy Frequently Asked Questions about Vaccine Recalls Historical Vaccine Safety Concerns FAQs about GBS and Menactra ... CISA Resources for Healthcare Professionals Evaluation Current Studies Historical Background 2001-12 Publications Technical Reports Vaccine Safety ...

  1. Smallpox Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters Events Also Known As Smallpox = Vaccinia Smallpox Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The smallpox ... like many other vaccines. For that reason, the vaccination site must be cared for carefully to prevent ...

  2. Hybrid proteins between Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A and poliovirus 2Apro cleave p220 in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Novoa, I; Cotten, M; Carrasco, L

    1996-01-01

    Cleavage of p220, a component of the initiation factor eIF-4F, has been correlated with the inhibition of host translation during poliovirus infection. To obtain p220 cleavage in the absence of any other poliovirus gene products, hybrid proteins containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A and poliovirus protease 2Apro have been constructed. The addition of the hybrid molecules to cultured cells did not lead to substantial p220 cleavage. However, the simultaneous presence of the hybrid toxin with replicationally inactive chicken adenovirus particles results in efficient cleavage of p220 in the intact cells. Under these conditions, cellular translation continues unabated for several hours, arguing against a direct requirement for intact p220 in each round of the initiation of translation of cellular mRNAs. PMID:8627818

  3. Efficient cleavage of p220 by poliovirus 2Apro expression in mammalian cells: effects on vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Aldabe, R; Feduchi, E; Novoa, I; Carrasco, L

    1995-10-24

    Poliovirus protease 2A cleaves p220, a component of initiation factor eIF-4F. Polyclonal antibodies that recognize p220 and the cleaved products from different species have been raised. Transfection of several cell lines with poliovirus 2Apro cloned in different plasmids leads to efficient cleavage of p220 upon infection with VT7, a recombinant vaccinia virus that expresses the T7 RNA polymerase. Under these conditions vaccinia virus protein synthesis is severely inhibited, while expression of poliovirus protein 2C from a similar plasmid has no effect. These results show by the first time the effects of p220 cleavage on vaccinia virus translation in the infected cells.

  4. Enterovirus survey before and after poliomyelitis vaccination in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tan, D S; Lam, S K

    1978-09-01

    Stool samples from healthy children mainly of the low income group aged 0 to 7 years of age from five Maternal and Child Health Centres in Kuala Lumpur were obtained for isolation of enteroviruses. The specimens were collected before and after the mass vaccination given in the face of polio type 1 epidemic which started in October, 1971. The prevelance rate of enteroviruses was 11.9% (3.0% polioviruses, 8.9% non-polio enteroviruses) before the vaccination and essentially the same after. Coxsackie A viruses predominated over the other enteroviruses in the pre- and post-vaccination phases. The highest isolation rate of enteroviruses was observed in children 0 to 2 years age. No significant differences in distribution by sex, race and month were noted. A sharp fall in the prevalence rates of total enteroviruses and polioviruses was noted shortly after the mass vaccination campaign However, the rates reverted to the pre-vaccination state during the next successive years.

  5. Vaccine Hesitancy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2015-11-01

    Vaccine refusal received a lot of press with the 2015 Disneyland measles outbreak, but vaccine refusal is only a fraction of a much larger problem of vaccine delay and hesitancy. Opposition to vaccination dates back to the 1800 s, Edward Jenner, and the first vaccine ever. It has never gone away despite the public's growing scientific sophistication. A variety of factors contribute to modern vaccine hesitancy, including the layperson's heuristic thinking when it comes to balancing risks and benefits as well as a number of other features of vaccination, including falling victim to its own success. Vaccine hesitancy is pervasive, affecting a quarter to a third of US parents. Clinicians report that they routinely receive requests to delay vaccines and that they routinely acquiesce. Vaccine rates vary by state and locale and by specific vaccine, and vaccine hesitancy results in personal risk and in the failure to achieve or sustain herd immunity to protect others who have contraindications to the vaccine or fail to generate immunity to the vaccine. Clinicians should adopt a variety of practices to combat vaccine hesitancy, including a variety of population health management approaches that go beyond the usual call to educate patients, clinicians, and the public. Strategies include using every visit to vaccinate, the creation of standing orders or nursing protocols to provide vaccination without clinical encounters, and adopting the practice of stating clear recommendations. Up-to-date, trusted resources exist to support clinicians' efforts in adopting these approaches to reduce vaccine hesitancy and its impact. PMID:26541249

  6. [Vaccination perspectives].

    PubMed

    Saliou, P; Plotkin, S

    1994-01-01

    The aim of vaccinology is to improve the available vaccines and to develop new ones in the light of progress in immunology, molecular biology and biotechnologies. But it must go beyond this, and aim to protect all populations and control diseases, even eradicate them where possible. New vaccine strategies must be developed taking into account the epidemiology of diseases and the inherent logistic problems of implementing these strategies under local conditions. There are three major thrusts to the progress of the discipline. The improvement of the vaccines available. One of the drives of vaccinology is not only to deliver vaccines of increasing safety (replacement of the current vaccine for whooping cough with an acellular vaccine for example), but also to improve vaccine efficacy and immunogenicity (in particular for flu, tuberculosis, cholera and rabies vaccines). The optimisation of vaccination programmes and strategies for vaccinations. The ideal is to protect against the greatest possible number of diseases with the smallest number of vaccinations. The development of combinations of vaccines is central to this goal. The objective for the year 2000 is a hexavalent vaccine DTPP Hib HB. The development of new vaccines. Classic techniques continue to be successfully used (inactivated hepatitis A vaccine; attenuated live vaccines for chicken pox and dengue fever; conjugated polyosidic bacterial vaccines for meningococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae). However, it will become possible to prepare vaccines against most transmissible diseases using genetic engineering techniques.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Vaccine Hesitancy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2015-11-01

    Vaccine refusal received a lot of press with the 2015 Disneyland measles outbreak, but vaccine refusal is only a fraction of a much larger problem of vaccine delay and hesitancy. Opposition to vaccination dates back to the 1800 s, Edward Jenner, and the first vaccine ever. It has never gone away despite the public's growing scientific sophistication. A variety of factors contribute to modern vaccine hesitancy, including the layperson's heuristic thinking when it comes to balancing risks and benefits as well as a number of other features of vaccination, including falling victim to its own success. Vaccine hesitancy is pervasive, affecting a quarter to a third of US parents. Clinicians report that they routinely receive requests to delay vaccines and that they routinely acquiesce. Vaccine rates vary by state and locale and by specific vaccine, and vaccine hesitancy results in personal risk and in the failure to achieve or sustain herd immunity to protect others who have contraindications to the vaccine or fail to generate immunity to the vaccine. Clinicians should adopt a variety of practices to combat vaccine hesitancy, including a variety of population health management approaches that go beyond the usual call to educate patients, clinicians, and the public. Strategies include using every visit to vaccinate, the creation of standing orders or nursing protocols to provide vaccination without clinical encounters, and adopting the practice of stating clear recommendations. Up-to-date, trusted resources exist to support clinicians' efforts in adopting these approaches to reduce vaccine hesitancy and its impact.

  8. Identification of a cis-acting replication element within the poliovirus coding region.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, I; Chaudhry, Y; Richardson, A; Meredith, J; Almond, J W; Barclay, W; Evans, D J

    2000-05-01

    The replication of poliovirus, a positive-stranded RNA virus, requires translation of the infecting genome followed by virus-encoded VPg and 3D polymerase-primed synthesis of a negative-stranded template. RNA sequences involved in the latter process are poorly defined. Since many sequences involved in picornavirus replication form RNA structures, we searched the genome, other than the untranslated regions, for predicted local secondary structural elements and identified a 61-nucleotide (nt) stem-loop in the region encoding the 2C protein. Covariance analysis suggested the structure was well conserved in the Enterovirus genus of the Picornaviridae. Site-directed mutagenesis, disrupting the structure without affecting the 2C product, destroyed genome viability and suggested that the structure was required in the positive sense for function. Recovery of revertant viruses suggested that integrity of the structure was critical for function, and analysis of replication demonstrated that nonviable mutants did not synthesize negative strands. Our conclusion, that this RNA secondary structure constitutes a novel poliovirus cis-acting replication element (CRE), is supported by the demonstration that subgenomic replicons bearing lethal mutations in the native structure can be restored to replication competence by the addition of a second copy of the 61-nt wild-type sequence at another location within the genome. This poliovirus CRE functionally resembles an element identified in rhinovirus type 14 (K. L. McKnight and S. M. Lemon, RNA 4:1569-1584, 1998) and the cardioviruses (P. E. Lobert, N. Escriou, J. Ruelle, and T. Michiels, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96:11560-11565, 1999) but differs in sequence, structure, and location. The functional role and evolutionary significance of CREs in the replication of positive-sense RNA viruses is discussed.

  9. Mutational analysis of poliovirus 2Apro. Distinct inhibitory functions of 2apro on translation and transcription.

    PubMed

    Ventoso, I; Barco, A; Carrasco, L

    1998-10-23

    Transient expression of poliovirus 2Apro in mammalian cells by means of the recombinant vaccinia virus vT7 expression system leads to drastic inhibition of both cellular and vaccinia virus gene expression (Aldabe, R., Feduchi, E., Novoa, I., and Carrasco, L. (1995) FEBS Lett. 377, 1-5; Aldabe, R., Feduchi, E., Novoa, I., and Carrasco, L. (1995) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 215, 928-936). To obtain further insights into the molecular basis of this inhibition, a number of 2Apro variants were generated and expressed in COS-1 cells. The effect of these variants on cellular translation, on vaccinia virus-specific translation, and on transcription of the reporter gene luciferase was analyzed. The ability of the different 2Apro variants to block cellular translation depends on their capacities to cleave eIF-4G. The blockade exerted by 2Apro on transcription of the luciferase gene reinforces the notion that this protease is a potent inhibitor of RNA polymerase II-mediated transcription. Some of the 2Apro variants tested failed to block luciferase transcription, despite the fact that eIF-4G cleavage and inhibition of translation were observed. Two reconstituted polioviruses mutated in 2Apro were defective in inhibiting luciferase transcription, yet were still able to cleave eIF-4G and block translation. These findings indicate that 2Apro interferes with cellular gene expression at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Moreover, these two effects probably reflect the inactivation of different host proteins by poliovirus 2Apro.

  10. Conditional poliovirus mutants made by random deletion mutagenesis of infectious cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkegaard, K; Nelsen, B

    1990-01-01

    Small deletions were introduced into DNA plasmids bearing cDNA copies of Mahoney type 1 poliovirus RNA. The procedure used was similar to that of P. Hearing and T. Shenk (J. Mol. Biol. 167:809-822, 1983), with modifications designed to introduce only one lesion randomly into each DNA molecule. Methods to map small deletions in either large DNA or RNA molecules were employed. Two poliovirus mutants, VP1-101 and VP1-102, were selected from mutagenized populations on the basis of their host range phenotype, showing a large reduction in the relative numbers of plaques on CV1 and HeLa cells compared with wild-type virus. The deletions borne by the mutant genomes were mapped to the region encoding the amino terminus of VP1. That these lesions were responsible for the mutant phenotypes was substantiated by reintroduction of the sequenced lesions into a wild-type poliovirus cDNA by deoxyoligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. The deletion of nucleotides encoding amino acids 8 and 9 of VP1 was responsible for the VP1-101 phenotype; the VP1-102 defect was caused by the deletion of the sequences encoding the first four amino acids of VP1. The peptide sequence at the VP1-VP3 proteolytic cleavage site was altered from glutamine-glycine to glutamine-methionine in VP1-102; this apparently did not alter the proteolytic cleavage pattern. The biochemical defects resulting from these mutations are discussed in the accompanying report. Images PMID:2152811

  11. In Vitro Synthesis of Poliovirus Ribonucleic Acid: Role of the Replicative Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Marc

    1969-01-01

    Poliovirus ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase crude extracts could be stored frozen in liquid nitrogen without loss of activity or specificity. The major in vitro product of these extracts was viral single-stranded RNA. However, after short periods of incubation with radioactive nucleoside triphosphates, most of the incorporated label was found in replicative intermediate. When excess unlabeled nucleoside triphosphate was added, the label was displaced from the replicative intermediate and accumulated as viral RNA. It is concluded from this experiment that the replicative intermediate is the precursor to viral RNA. In addition, some of the label was chased into double-stranded RNA. The implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:4306193

  12. Poliovirus and polio antibody assay in HEp-2 and Vero cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, P; Enterline, J C; Boone, E J; Klutch, M J

    1983-04-01

    HEp-2 cell cultures were about three to 30 times more sensitive for poliovirus titration than Vero cells. Attenuated strains induced a complete cytopathic effect in HEp-2 but not in Vero cells. For polio antibody titration, HEp-2 and Vero cells were equally suitable. A high degree of sensitivity and reproducibility of virus neutralization was achieved in tests utilizing a low virus dose and serum-virus incubation overnight at 36 degrees C. Staining of infected trays with crystal violet obviated reading of viral CPE under the microscope and expedited the evaluation of larger-scale tests.

  13. Using the social structure of markets as a framework for analyzing vaccination debates: The case of emergency polio vaccination.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Yaron; Ziv, Arnona; Goren, Uri; Tal, Orna; Kaplan, Giora; Velan, Baruch

    2016-07-01

    The framework of the social structure of markets was used to analyze an online debate revolving around an emergency poliovirus vaccination campaign in Israel. Examination of a representative sample of 200 discussions revealed the activity of three parties: authoritative agents promoting vaccinations, alternative agents promoting anti-vaccination, both representing sellers, and the impartial agents, representing the customers-the general public deliberating whether to comply with vaccination or not. Both sellers interacted with consumers using mechanisms of luring and convincing. The authoritative agents conveyed their message by exhibiting professionalism, building trust and offering to share information. The alternative agents spread doubts and evoked negative emotions of distrust and fear. Among themselves, the alternative agents strived to discredit the authoritative agents, while the latter preferred to ignore the former. Content analysis of discussions conducted by the general public reveal reiteration of the messages conveyed by the sellers, implying that the transaction of pro and anti-vaccination ideas indeed took place. We suggest that the framework of the market as a social structure can be applied to the analysis of other vaccination debates, and thereby provide additional insights into vaccination polemics.

  14. [Vaccinations 1979].

    PubMed

    Herzog, C; Just, M

    1980-05-17

    On the basis of the Federal Health Department's "Swiss Vaccination Scheme" of 1976, some up to data additions and alterations are proposed mainly with regard to combined measles-mumps-rubella vaccination during the second year of life together with the first tetanus, diphtheria and poliomyelitis booster. Oral vaccination against poliomyelitis is not contraindicated during pregnancy. Among the inoculations not considered in the official vaccination scheme, regular influenza vaccination is only indicated for certain chronically ill people. Whether this is also true of the pneumococcal vaccine newly licensed in Switzerland remains uncertain. The (likewise new) meningococcal vaccine is only effective against type A and C and not against the type B meningococci prevalent in Switzerland. In view of its safety, only HDC vaccine produced with human tissue cultures should be used for anti-rabies vaccination. For counselling prior to travel abroad, a simple vaccination scheme is provided and the importance of other prophylactic measures is emphasized. PMID:7394495

  15. Site size of cooperative single-stranded RNA binding by poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Beckman, M T; Kirkegaard, K

    1998-03-20

    The poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase binds cooperatively to single-stranded RNA. We have determined the minimal RNA-binding site size of the poliovirus polymerase using binding titration with oligonucleotides of increasing length. A dramatic increase in affinity was observed when the length of the oligo(U) increased from 8 to 10 nucleotides (nt), arguing that the minimal size of RNA for polymerase binding is 10 nt. Another increase in affinity seen as the oligo(U) reached 24 nt suggests that a 24-nucleotide RNA can be occupied by two polymerase molecules. Direct binding of wild-type polymerase to oligo(U)12 and oligo(U)24 RNAs showed differences in affinity and cooperativity consistent with this model. The increase in binding affinity seen for oligo(U)10 suggests either that the RNA-binding determinants are widely spaced on the polymerase structure or that a substantial conformational change in the polymerase occurs upon the filling of its RNA-binding site.

  16. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Okazaki, S.; Fujimoto, K.; Nakagawa, A.; Nomoto, A.

    2014-10-28

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 10{sup 6} all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  17. Development of a novel bag-mediated filtration system for environmental recovery of poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Fagnant, Christine Susan; Beck, Nicola Koren; Yang, Ming-Fong; Barnes, Kilala Sayisha; Boyle, David S; Meschke, John Scott

    2014-12-01

    Poliovirus (PV) is on the verge of global eradication. Due to asymptomatic shedding, eradication certification requires environmental and clinical surveillance. Current environmental surveillance methods involve collection and processing of 400-mL to 1-L grab samples by a two-phase separation method, where sample volume limits detection sensitivity. Filtration of larger sample volumes facilitates increased detection sensitivity. This study describes development of a pumpless in-field filtration system for poliovirus recovery from environmental waters. Recovery of PV types 1, 2, and 3 were compared for glass wool, ViroCap, and NanoCeram (PV1 only) filters. Seeded experiments were performed using 10(5) plaque forming units of PV inoculated into 10-L volumes of secondary effluent, surface water, or a 50:50 mixture of each at pH 7.0. Filter eluates were plated onto buffalo green monkey kidney cells for virus enumeration by plaque assay. Across all water types, recovery from glass wool filters for PV1, PV2, and PV3 averaged 17%, 28%, and 6%, respectively. Recovery from ViroCaps for PV1, PV2, and PV3 averaged 44%, 70%, and 81%, respectively. 10-L samples of moderate turbidity water were processed through ViroCap filters in less than 30 minutes using a pumpless, bag-mediated filtration system. Bag-mediated filtration offers a simple, compact, and efficient method for enhanced environmental PV surveillance. PMID:25473984

  18. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Fujimoto, K.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Nakagawa, A.; Nomoto, A.; Okazaki, S.

    2014-10-01

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 106 all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  19. Modification of an adenovirus major late promoter-binding factor during poliovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Lazard, D; Fernández-Tomás, C; Gariglio, P; Weinmann, R

    1989-01-01

    To further characterize the mechanism involved in poliovirus-induced inhibition of HeLa cells mRNA synthesis, in vitro formation of DNA-protein complexes between nuclear upstream stimulatory transcription factor (USF) and the adenovirus type 2 major late promoter upstream promoter element (UPE; located between -45 and -65 base pairs) was studied. Using the gel shift assay, we found differences between the UPE-protein complex formed with partially purified nuclear extracts from poliovirus-infected HeLa cells and that obtained in the presence of mock-infected extracts. Formation of the modified UPE-USF complex coincided with virus-induced inhibition of host cell RNA synthesis in vivo and with a less efficient in vitro transcriptional activity of the nuclear extracts from infected cells. Furthermore, using a cross-linking protocol, we found that the host 46-kilodalton UPE-binding USF factor was severely diminished and that a virus-induced or -modified 50-kilodalton polypeptide appeared to be specifically bound to the UPE template. Images PMID:2474675

  20. Development of a novel bag-mediated filtration system for environmental recovery of poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Fagnant, Christine Susan; Beck, Nicola Koren; Yang, Ming-Fong; Barnes, Kilala Sayisha; Boyle, David S; Meschke, John Scott

    2014-12-01

    Poliovirus (PV) is on the verge of global eradication. Due to asymptomatic shedding, eradication certification requires environmental and clinical surveillance. Current environmental surveillance methods involve collection and processing of 400-mL to 1-L grab samples by a two-phase separation method, where sample volume limits detection sensitivity. Filtration of larger sample volumes facilitates increased detection sensitivity. This study describes development of a pumpless in-field filtration system for poliovirus recovery from environmental waters. Recovery of PV types 1, 2, and 3 were compared for glass wool, ViroCap, and NanoCeram (PV1 only) filters. Seeded experiments were performed using 10(5) plaque forming units of PV inoculated into 10-L volumes of secondary effluent, surface water, or a 50:50 mixture of each at pH 7.0. Filter eluates were plated onto buffalo green monkey kidney cells for virus enumeration by plaque assay. Across all water types, recovery from glass wool filters for PV1, PV2, and PV3 averaged 17%, 28%, and 6%, respectively. Recovery from ViroCaps for PV1, PV2, and PV3 averaged 44%, 70%, and 81%, respectively. 10-L samples of moderate turbidity water were processed through ViroCap filters in less than 30 minutes using a pumpless, bag-mediated filtration system. Bag-mediated filtration offers a simple, compact, and efficient method for enhanced environmental PV surveillance.

  1. Reduction of racial/ethnic disparities in vaccination coverage, 1995-2011.

    PubMed

    Walker, Allison T; Smith, Philip J; Kolasa, Maureen

    2014-04-18

    The Presidential Childhood Immunization Initiative was developed in 1993 to address major gaps in childhood vaccination coverage in the United States. Eliminating the cost of vaccines as a barrier to vaccination was one strategy of the Childhood Immunization Initiative; it led to Congressional legislation that authorized creation of the Vaccines for Children program (VFC) in 1994. CDC analyzed National Immunization Survey data for 1995-2011 to evaluate trends in disparities in vaccination coverage rates between non-Hispanic white children and children of other racial/ethnic groups. VFC has been effective in ireducing disparities in vaccination coverage among U.S. children. CDC's Office of Minority Health and Health Equity selected the intervention analysis and discussion that follows to provide an example of a program that has been effective in reducing childhood vaccination coverage-related disparities in the United States. At its inception in 1994, VFC was implemented in 78 Immunization Action Plan areas that covered the entire United States; within each area, concerted efforts were made to improve childhood vaccination coverage. The findings in this report demonstrate that there have been no racial/ethnic disparities in vaccine coverage for measles-mumps-rubella and poliovirus in the United States since 2005. Disparities in coverage for the diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis/diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine were absent, declining, or inconsistent during this period, depending on the racial/ethnic group examined. The results in this report highlight the effectiveness of VFC. PMID:24743661

  2. Pioneering figures in medicine: Albert Bruce Sabin--inventor of the oral polio vaccine.

    PubMed

    Smith, Derek R; Leggat, Peter A

    2005-01-01

    Over ten years after his death, the Sabin oral vaccine continues its profound influence on public health throughout the world. The annual incidence of polio has fallen dramatically since its introduction, with more than 300,000 lives being spared each year and an annual global saving in excess of 1 billion US dollars. In many ways, the development of an effective oral vaccine and its subsequent regulation by the World Health Organization can serve as a model for medical researchers. Our review describes the contribution of Albert Sabin as a medical researcher, and how his vaccine had a profound impact on the global reduction of polio infections. As many different factors influenced health-care last century, we describe Sabin's involvement with respect to prevailing scientific paradigms and public health issues of the time. Our paper also outlines the basic epidemiology of poliovirus and the historical development of an effective vaccine, both with and without Albert Sabin. PMID:16422178

  3. Radiometric cytolysis inhibition assay, a new rapid test for neutralizing antibodies to intact and trypsin-cleaved poliovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Hovi, T.; Roivainen, M.

    1989-04-01

    We have developed a new rapid test, the radiometric cytolysis inhibition assay (RACINA), for the determination of neutralizing poliovirus antibodies. HeLa cells prelabeled with /sup 51/Cr, (/sup 3/H)leucine, or, preferentially, with (/sup 3/H)uridine are used as sensitive quantitative indicators of residual infectious virus. Both suspensions and monolayer cultures of the indicator cells can be used. Neutralization of a fraction of a high-titer virus preparation can be scored after the first replication cycle at 8 to 10 h. By lowering the incubation temperature to 30/degree/C, the completion of the cytolysis due to the first replication cycle of poliovirus was delayed beyond 21 h. This makes it possible to use the RACINA, unlike the standard microneutralization assay, for measuring antibodies to trypsin-cleaved polioviruses. The RACINA was found to be as sensitive as and more reproducible than the standard microneutralization assay in the measurement of neutralizing poliovirus antibodies. The RACINA is a rapid and reliable test for neutralizing antibodies and in principle it may be applicable for quantitation of neutralizing antibodies to other cytolytic agents as well.

  4. Viral precursor protein P3 and its processed products perform discrete and essential functions in the poliovirus RNA replication complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The differential use of protein precursors and their products is a key strategy used during poliovirus replication. To characterize the role of protein precursors during replication, we examined the complementation profiles of mutants that inhibited 3D polymerase or 3C-RNA binding activity. We showe...

  5. The Role of Electron Microscopy in Studying the Continuum of Changes in Membranous Structures during Poliovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Evan D.; Yang, Jie E.; Bullitt, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Replication of the poliovirus genome is localized to cytoplasmic replication factories that are fashioned out of a mixture of viral proteins, scavenged cellular components, and new components that are synthesized within the cell due to viral manipulation/up-regulation of protein and phospholipid synthesis. These membranous replication factories are quite complex, and include markers from multiple cytoplasmic cellular organelles. This review focuses on the role of electron microscopy in advancing our understanding of poliovirus RNA replication factories. Structural data from the literature provide the basis for interpreting a wide range of biochemical studies that have been published on virus-induced lipid biosynthesis. In combination, structural and biochemical experiments elucidate the dramatic membrane remodeling that is a hallmark of poliovirus infection. Temporal and spatial membrane modifications throughout the infection cycle are discussed. Early electron microscopy studies of morphological changes following viral infection are re-considered in light of more recent data on viral manipulation of lipid and protein biosynthesis. These data suggest the existence of distinct subcellular vesicle populations, each of which serves specialized roles in poliovirus replication processes. PMID:26473912

  6. Combined immunodeficiency presenting with vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis: a case report and narrative review of literature.

    PubMed

    Shaghaghi, Mohammadreza; Parvaneh, Nima; Ostad-Rahimi, Pouya; Fathi, Seyed Mohammad; Shahmahmoodi, Shohreh; Abolhassani, Hassan; Aghamohammadi, Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Neurologic abnormalities compatible with vaccine-related poliovirus infection (VAPP) may be a first presentation of some primary immunodeficient patients. The risk of VAPP rises from 1 case per 750 000 in normal population to 1 per 7000 times higher, particularly for persons with agammaglobulinemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. However, there is no appropriate estimation for VAPP occurrence in patients with cellular immunity defects. Herein we report a case of combined immunodeficiency with paralytic complication due to oral polio vaccine and we present a literature review on this topic.

  7. Paralytic poliomyelitis associated with Sabin monovalent and bivalent oral polio vaccines in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Estívariz, Concepción F; Molnár, Zsuzsanna; Venczel, Linda; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Zingeser, James A; Lipskaya, Galina Y; Kew, Olen M; Berencsi, György; Csohán, Agnes

    2011-08-01

    Historical records of patients with vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) in Hungary during 1961-1981 were reviewed to assess the risk of VAPP after oral polio vaccine (OPV) administration. A confirmed VAPP case was defined as a diagnosis of paralytic poliomyelitis and residual paralysis at 60 days in a patient with an epidemiologic link to the vaccine. Archived poliovirus isolates were retested using polymerase chain reaction and sequencing of the viral protein 1 capsid region. This review confirmed 46 of 47 cases previously reported as VAPP. Three cases originally linked to monovalent OPV (mOPV) 3 and one case linked to mOPV1 presented after administration of bivalent OPV 1 + 3 (bOPV). The adjusted VAPP risk per million doses administered was 0.18 for mOPV1 (2 cases/11.13 million doses), 2.96 for mOPV3 (32 cases/10.81 million doses), and 12.82 for bOPV (5 cases/390,000 doses). Absence of protection from immunization with inactivated poliovirus vaccine or exposure to OPV virus from routine immunization and recent injections could explain the higher relative risk of VAPP in Hungarian children. In polio-endemic areas in which mOPV3 and bOPV are needed to achieve eradication, the higher risk of VAPP would be offset by the high risk of paralysis due to wild poliovirus and higher per-dose efficacy of mOPV3 and bOPV compared with trivalent OPV.

  8. Mothers and vaccination: knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour in Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Angelillo, I. F.; Ricciardi, G.; Rossi, P.; Pantisano, P.; Langiano, E.; Pavia, M.

    1999-01-01

    The study evaluates knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour of mothers regarding the immunization of 841 infants who attended public kindergarten in Cassino and Crotone, Italy. Overall, 57.8% of mothers were aware about all four mandatory vaccinations for infants (poliomyelitis, tetanus, diphtheria, hepatitis B). The results of a multiple logistic regression analysis showed that this knowledge was significantly greater among mothers with a higher education level and among those who were older at the time of the child's birth. Respondents' attitudes towards the utility of vaccinations for preventing infectious diseases were very favourable. Almost all children (94.4%) were vaccinated with all three doses of diphtheria-tetanus (DT), oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV), and hepatitis B. The proportion of children vaccinated who received all three doses of OPV, DT or diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP), and hepatitis B vaccines within 1 month of becoming age-eligible ranged from 56.6% for the third dose of hepatitis B to 95.7% for the first dose of OPV. Results of the regression analysis performed on the responses of mothers who had adhered to the schedule for all mandatory vaccinations indicated that birth order significantly predicted vaccination nonadherence, since children who had at least one older sibling in the household were significantly less likely to be age-appropriately vaccinated. The coverage for the optional vaccines was only 22.5% and 31% for measles-mumps-rubella and for all three doses against pertussis, respectively. Education programmes promoting paediatric immunization, accessibility, and follow-up should be targeted to the entire population. PMID:10212512

  9. [Dengue vaccines].

    PubMed

    Morita, Kouichi

    2008-10-01

    Dengue is the most important mosquito borne virus infection in the tropics. Based on the effects of global warming, it is expected that dengue epidemic areas will further expand in the next decades unless effective and affordable vaccines are made available soon. At the moment, several vaccine developers have utilized live-attenuated live tetravalent vaccines and two of them have already completed phase two trials. However, the risk of antibody-dependent enhancement infection is not well elucidated and thus further and careful evaluation of the safety on proposed candidate vaccines are essential. At the moment, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation strongly support the vaccine development through the Pediatric Dengue Vaccine Initiative.

  10. Host range of poliovirus is restricted to simians because of a rapid sequence change of the poliovirus receptor gene during evolution.

    PubMed

    Ida-Hosonuma, M; Sasaki, Y; Toyoda, H; Nomoto, A; Gotoh, O; Yonekawa, H; Koike, S

    2003-01-01

    The host range of most poliovirus (PV) strains is restricted to simians. This host range specificity is believed to be determined by the interaction between PV and its receptor molecule. To elucidate the molecular basis of this species-specific infection of PV, we cloned orthologs of the PV receptor (PVR) gene ( pvr) as well as those of PV receptor-related genes 1 and 2 ( prr1 and prr2) from various mammalian species. These three genes are widely present in mammalian genomes including those of non-susceptible species. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of PVR orthologs revealed that the NH(2)-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain (domain 1), which is the virus binding site in the human PVR, is highly variable among species, whereas that of PRR1 is highly conserved. Domain 1 of the PVR orthologs for the ring-tailed lemur and rabbit, which are not susceptible to PV, show only 51 and 61% amino acid sequence identity to that of human PVR, respectively. Chimeric PVR proteins that have the domain 1 of the ring-tailed lemur and rabbit PVRs failed to serve as receptors for PV. These results suggest that rapid changes in the domain 1 sequence during mammalian evolution determined the host range restriction of PV. PMID:12536294

  11. Vaccines (immunizations) - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine and the varicella (chickenpox) vaccine are examples. Killed (inactivated) vaccines are made from ... countries. Some countries require this record. COMMON VACCINES ... DTaP immunization (vaccine) Hepatitis A vaccine Hepatitis B ...

  12. Diphtheria Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... and adults - Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular Pertussis vaccine Diphtheria Vaccination Pronounced (dif-THEER-ee-a) Recommend on Facebook ... Related Pages Pertussis Tetanus Feature Story: Adults Need Immunizations, Too Abbreviations DTaP=Pediatric - Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis ...

  13. Comparison of ozone inactivation, in flowing water, of hepatitis A virus, poliovirus 1, and indicator organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Herbold, K.; Flehmig, B.; Botzenhart, K. )

    1989-11-01

    In steadily flowing water at 20 degrees C and pH 7, five organisms had the following order of resistance to ozone (at constant levels of ozone): poliovirus 1 (PV1) less than Escherichia coli less than hepatitis A virus (HAV) less than Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6 less than Bacillus subtilis spores. The tests were repeated at 10 degrees C with HAV, PV1, and E. coli. Ozone inactivation of HAV and E. coli was faster at 10 degrees C than at 20 degrees C. At 20 degrees C, 0.25 to 0.38 mg of O3 per liter was required for complete inactivation of HAV but only 0.13 mg of O3 per liter was required for complete inactivation of PV1.

  14. Comparison of ozone inactivation, in flowing water, of hepatitis A virus, poliovirus 1, and indicator organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Herbold, K; Flehmig, B; Botzenhart, K

    1989-01-01

    In steadily flowing water at 20 degrees C and pH 7, five organisms had the following order of resistance to ozone (at constant levels of ozone): poliovirus 1 (PV1) less than Escherichia coli less than hepatitis A virus (HAV) less than Legionella pneumophila serogroup 6 less than Bacillus subtilis spores. The tests were repeated at 10 degrees C with HAV, PV1, and E. coli. Ozone inactivation of HAV and E. coli was faster at 10 degrees C than at 20 degrees C. At 20 degrees C, 0.25 to 0.38 mg of O3 per liter was required for complete inactivation of HAV but only 0.13 mg of O3 per liter was required for complete inactivation of PV1. PMID:2560362

  15. 5' termini of poliovirus RNA: difference between virion and nonencapsidated 35S RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Muñoz, R; Lavi, U

    1977-01-01

    Poliovirus cytoplasmic, nonencapsidated 35S RNA yields approximately one pUp per molecule upon T2 RNase digestion, indicating that this RNA has the same 5' end as the polyribosome-associated viral RNA fraction. Double-stranded, replicative form RNA after the same treatment yielded approximately four pNp structures per molecule, 65% of which was pUp. In contrast, the 35S RNA from mature virions contained no detectable pNp, indicating that the 5' end of the virion RNA is different from that of the nonencapsidated RNA. None of the above molecules contained pppNp, ppNp, or GpppNp structures present in host mRNA. The virion RNA molecules, as we have shown previously for thenonencapsidated 35S viral RNA (Fernandez-Muñoz and Darnell, 1976), is not labeled with [methyl-3H]methionine. PMID:189096

  16. Spatial Dynamics and High Risk Transmission Pathways of Poliovirus in Nigeria 2001-2013

    PubMed Central

    Mangal, Tara D.; Aylward, R. Bruce; Shuaib, Faisal; Mwanza, Michael; Pate, Muhammed A.; Abanida, Emmanuel; Grassly, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    The polio eradication programme in Nigeria has been successful in reducing incidence to just six confirmed cases in 2014 and zero to date in 2015, but prediction and management of future outbreaks remains a concern. A Poisson mixed effects model was used to describe poliovirus spread between January 2001 and November 2013, incorporating the strength of connectivity between districts (local government areas, LGAs) as estimated by three models of human mobility: simple distance, gravity and radiation models. Potential explanatory variables associated with the case numbers in each LGA were investigated and the model fit was tested by simulation. Spatial connectivity, the number of non-immune children under five years old, and season were associated with the incidence of poliomyelitis in an LGA (all P < 0.001). The best-fitting spatial model was the radiation model, outperforming the simple distance and gravity models (likelihood ratio test P < 0.05), under which the number of people estimated to move from an infected LGA to an uninfected LGA was strongly associated with the incidence of poliomyelitis in that LGA. We inferred transmission networks between LGAs based on this model and found these to be highly local, largely restricted to neighbouring LGAs (e.g. 67.7% of secondary spread from Kano was expected to occur within 10 km). The remaining secondary spread occurred along routes of high population movement. Poliovirus transmission in Nigeria is predominantly localised, occurring between spatially contiguous areas. Outbreak response should be guided by knowledge of high-probability pathways to ensure vulnerable children are protected. PMID:27668435

  17. Antiviral Activity of Trichilia catigua Bark Extracts for Herpesvirus and Poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Espada, Samantha F; Faccin-Galhardi, Ligia C; Rincao, Vinicius P; Bernardi, Ana L S; Lopes, Nayara; Longhini, Renata; de Mello, Joao C P; Linhares, Rosa E C; Nozawa, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Herpesvirus and poliovirus are responsible for important diseases in human and animal. Trichilia catigua a Brazilian native plant known as catiguá has several medicinal properties among them antimicrobial for bacteria and protozoa, however, no antiviral activity has been reported yet. This study evaluated the antiviral activity of the crude extract (CE) and aqueous and ethyl acetate fractions (AF, EAF) obtained from T. catigua in the replication of the Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1), bovine herpesvirus (BoHV-1) and poliovirus (PV-1). The cytotoxicity was analyzed by MTT assay and the antiviral effect was determined by the addition of extracts (0.25 to 100.0 μg/ml), before (-2h and -1h), during (Oh) and after (1h and 2h) the viral infection, by plaque reduction assay, in HEp-2 cell culture. The virucidal activity and inhibition of viral adsorption were also evaluated. In addition, the combination index (CI) with Acyclovir (ACV - reference drug) was determined for HSV-1. CE, AF and EAF showed a low toxicity (CC(50) >400 µg/ml) and low inhibitory concentration (IC50), ranging from 2.44-34.25 µg/ml for herpesvirus and 0.67 to 1.8 µg/ml for PV-1, associated with high selectivity index. The tested compounds showed high virucidal effect and high ability to inhibit viral adsorption, for all virus. The CI demonstrated a synergic effect (CI<1) for AF and EAF comparatively to acyclovir (ACV). Our study demonstrated that the extract and fractions of T. catigua is promising for future antiviral drug design with economically feasible production. PMID:25941883

  18. Immunogenicity, safety, and antibody persistence at 3, 5, and 10 years postvaccination in adolescents randomized to booster immunization with a combined tetanus, diphtheria, 5-component acellular pertussis, and inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine administered with a hepatitis B virus vaccine concurrently or 1 month apart.

    PubMed

    Embree, Joanne; Law, Barbara; Voloshen, Tim; Tomovici, Antigona

    2015-03-01

    An understanding of the antibody persistence elicited by a combined tetanus, diphtheria, 5-component acellular pertussis, and inactivated poliovirus vaccine (Tdap-IPV) after adolescent vaccination is important to optimize booster dosing intervals. Our objectives were to compare the safety and immunogenicity of Tdap-IPV coadministered with hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) and sequential administration and evaluate humoral immunity at 3, 5, and 10 years after Tdap-IPV vaccination in adolescents. This phase II randomized, controlled, and open-label study enrolled 280 11- to 14-year-old adolescents with up to 10 years postvaccination follow-up. Group 1 (n = 145) received Tdap-IPV, followed by a HepB dose 1 month later, and group 2 (n = 135) received both vaccines simultaneously. No consistent increases in solicited reactions or unsolicited adverse events occurred with coadministration. All vaccinees attained seroprotective antibody levels at ≥0.01 IU/ml for diphtheria and tetanus, at a ≥1:8 dilution for poliovirus (serotypes 1, 2, and 3), and ≥10 mIU/ml for hepatitis B at 1 month postvaccination. Clinically relevant immunologic interactions did not occur with coadministration. For pertussis, all participants achieved seropositivity levels (at or above the lower limit of quantitation), and 72.7% to 95.8% had 4-fold increases in pertussis antibodies at 1 month postvaccination. At 10 years postvaccination, the remaining participants (62.8% of the original cohort) maintained seroprotective levels of ≥0.01 IU/ml for diphtheria and tetanus, a ≥1:8 dilution for all 3 poliovirus serotypes, and 74.1% to 98.2% maintained pertussis seropositivity levels depending on the antigen tested. There were no differences between the groups. These results support the coadministration of Tdap-IPV and HepB to adolescents and suggest that vaccination with Tdap-IPV can offer protection for 10 years after an adolescent booster vaccination.

  19. Who Needs Chickenpox Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Not Get Chickenpox Vaccine Types of Chickenpox Vaccine Child and Adult Immunization Schedules Possible Side Effects of Chickenpox Vaccine Childcare and School Vaccine Requirements Also Known As & Abbreviations ...

  20. The novel adjuvant dmLT promotes dose sparing, mucosal immunity and longevity of antibody responses to the inactivated polio vaccine in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Norton, Elizabeth B; Bauer, David L; Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Lawson, Louise B; Clements, John D

    2015-04-15

    One option for achieving global polio eradication is to replace the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV), which has the risk of reversion to wild-type virulence, with the inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) vaccine. Adjuvants and alternate routes of immunization are promising options that may reduce antigen dose in IPV vaccinations, potentially allowing dose sparing and cost savings. Use of adjuvants and alternate routes of immunization could also help promote mucosal immunity, potentially mimicking the protection against intestinal virus shedding seen with OPV. In the current study, we examined the impact of combining the novel adjuvant dmLT with trivalent IPV for dose sparing, induction of mucosal immunity and increasing longevity of anti-poliovirus (PV) responses in a mouse model following either intradermal (ID) or intramuscular (IM) delivery. We found that non-adjuvanted ID delivery was not superior to IM delivery for fractional dose sparing, but was associated with development of mucosal immunity. Vaccination with IPV+dmLT promoted serum anti-PV neutralizing antibodies with fractional IPV doses by either IM or ID delivery, achieving at least five-fold dose sparing above non-adjuvanted fractional doses. These responses were most noticeable with the PV1 component of the trivalent vaccine. dmLT also promoted germinal center formation and longevity of serum anti-PV neutralizing titers. Lastly, dmLT enhanced mucosal immunity, as defined by fecal and intestinal anti-PV IgA secretion, when included in IPV immunization by ID or IM delivery. These studies demonstrate that dmLT is an effective adjuvant for either IM or ID delivery of IPV. Inclusion of dmLT in IPV immunizations allows antigen dose sparing and enhances mucosal immunity and longevity of anti-PV responses.

  1. Use of a Novel Real-Time PCR Assay To Detect Oral Polio Vaccine Shedding and Reversion in Stool and Sewage Samples after a Mexican National Immunization Day▿

    PubMed Central

    Troy, Stephanie B.; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Huang, ChunHong; Mahmud, Nadim; Lee, Yu-Jin; Canizales-Quintero, Sergio; Flaster, Harry; Báez-Saldaña, Renata; García-García, Lourdes; Maldonado, Yvonne

    2011-01-01

    During replication, oral polio vaccine (OPV) can revert to neurovirulence and cause paralytic poliomyelitis. In individual vaccinees, it can acquire specific revertant point mutations, leading to vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP). With longer replication, OPV can mutate into vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV), which causes poliomyelitis outbreaks similar to those caused by wild poliovirus. After wild poliovirus eradication, safely phasing out vaccination will likely require global use of inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) until cessation of OPV circulation. Mexico, where children receive routine IPV but where OPV is given biannually during national immunization days (NIDs), provides a natural setting to study the duration of OPV circulation in a population primarily vaccinated with IPV. We developed a real-time PCR assay to detect and distinguish revertant and nonrevertant OPV serotype 1 (OPV-1), OPV-2, and OPV-3 from RNA extracted directly from stool and sewage. Stool samples from 124 children and 8 1-liter sewage samples from Orizaba, Veracruz, Mexico, collected 6 to 13 weeks after a NID were analyzed. Revertant OPV-1 was found in stool at 7 and 9 weeks, and nonrevertant OPV-2 and OPV-3 were found in stool from two children 10 weeks after the NID. Revertant OPV-1 and nonrevertant OPV-2 and -3 were detected in sewage at 6 and 13 weeks after the NID. Our real-time PCR assay was able to detect small amounts of OPV in both stool and sewage and to distinguish nonrevertant and revertant serotypes and demonstrated that OPV continues to circulate at least 13 weeks after a NID in a Mexican population routinely immunized with IPV. PMID:21411577

  2. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  3. Enzymatic activity of poliovirus RNA polymerase mutants with single amino acid changes in the conserved YGDD amino acid motif.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, S A; Luo, M; Morrow, C D

    1991-09-01

    RNA-dependent RNA polymerases contain a highly conserved region of amino acids with a core segment composed of the amino acids YGDD which have been hypothesized to be at or near the catalytic active site of the molecule. Six mutations in this conserved YGDD region of the poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase were made by using oligonucleotide site-directed DNA mutagenesis of the poliovirus cDNA to substitute A, C, M, P, S, or V for the amino acid G. The mutant polymerase genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified RNA polymerases were tested for in vitro enzyme activity. Two of the mutant RNA polymerases (those in which the glycine residue was replaced with alanine or serine) exhibited in vitro enzymatic activity ranging from 5 to 20% of wild-type activity, while the remaining mutant RNA polymerases were inactive. Alterations in the in vitro reaction conditions by modification of temperature, metal ion concentration, or pH resulted in no significant differences in the activities of the mutant RNA polymerases relative to that of the wild-type enzyme. An antipeptide antibody directed against the wild-type core amino acid segment containing the YGDD region of the poliovirus polymerase reacted with the wild-type recombinant RNA polymerase and to a limited extent with the two enzymatically active mutant polymerases; the antipeptide antibody did not react with the mutant RNA polymerases which did not have in vitro enzyme activity. These results are discussed in the context of secondary-structure predictions for the core segment containing the conserved YGDD amino acids in the poliovirus RNA polymerase. PMID:1651402

  4. Hepatitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  5. Vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis in the postelimination era in Latin America and the Caribbean, 1992-2011.

    PubMed

    Landaverde, J Mauricio; Trumbo, Silas Pierson; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina; Cochi, Shea E; Gandhi, Raghunathan; Ruiz-Matus, Cuauhtémoc

    2014-05-01

    The Americas interrupted the transmission of poliovirus in 1991; most Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries rely on the oral polio vaccine (OPV) to maintain elimination. We estimated the risk of vaccine-associated paralytic polio (VAPP) in LAC for 1992-2011. VAPP cases were identified using LAC's acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance system. VAPP was defined as any AFP case with residual paralysis 60 days following onset that did not have a clear alternative etiology and with isolation of vaccine-strain poliovirus. Recipient VAPP cases were defined as those with paralysis onset 4-40 days following OPV; cases meeting these criteria but with unknown residual paralysis were added. Nonrecipient VAPP cases were defined as those in individuals with an unknown vaccination status, those in individuals who received 0 doses, or those with paralysis onset outside the 4-40-day interval. Of 40 926 AFP cases reported in LAC from 1992-2011, we identified 72 recipient and 119 nonrecipient VAPP cases. The estimated risk of recipient VAPP was 1 case per 3.15 million newborns (95% confidence interval [CI], 1 case per 2.56-4.10 million newborns), and the estimated overall risk was 1 case per 1.19 million newborns (95% CI, 1 case per 1.04-1.39 million newborns). In this multicountry VAPP analysis in a postelimination period, we found that the risk of VAPP in LAC was lower than previously estimated.

  6. Nuclear assortment of eIF4E coincides with shut-off of host protein synthesis upon poliovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Sukarieh, R; Sonenberg, N; Pelletier, J

    2010-05-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E is a subunit of the cap-binding protein complex, eIF4F, which recognizes the cap structure of cellular mRNAs to facilitate translation initiation. eIF4E is assembled into the eIF4F complex via its interaction with eIF4G, an event that is under Akt/mTOR regulation. The eIF4E-eIF4G interaction is regulated by the eIF4E binding partners, eIF4E-binding proteins and eIF4E-transporter. Cleavage of eIF4G occurs upon poliovirus infection and is responsible for the shut-off of host-cell protein synthesis observed early in infection. Here, we document that relocalization of eIF4E to the nucleus occurs concomitantly with cleavage of eIF4G upon poliovirus infection. This event is not dependent upon virus replication, but is dependent on eIF4G cleavage. We postulate that eIF4E nuclear relocalization may contribute to the shut-off of host protein synthesis that is a hallmark of poliovirus infection by perturbing the circular status of actively translating mRNAs.

  7. Persistence of poliovirus 1 in soil and on vegetables grown in soil previously flooded with inoculated sewage sludge or effluent.

    PubMed

    Tierney, J T; Sullivan, R; Larkin, E P

    1977-01-01

    Land disposal of sewage sludge and effluent is becoming a common practice in the United States. The fertilizer content and humus value of such wastes are useful for agricultural purposes, and the recycling of sewage onto the land eliminates many of our stream pollution problems. The potential exists for crops grown in such irrigated soil to be contaminated by viruses that may be present in the sewage. Studies were initiated to determine viral persistence in soil and on crops grown under natural conditions in field plots that had been flooded to a depth of 1 inch (2.54 cm) with poliovirus 1-inoculated sewage wastes. Lettuce and radishes were planted in sludge- or effluent-flooded soil. In one study, the vegetables were planted 1 day before flooding, and in another they were planted 3 days after the plots were flooded. Survival of poliovirus 1 in soil irrigated with inoculated sewage sludge and effluent was determined during two summer growing seasons and one winter period. The longest period of survival was during the winter, when virus was detected after 96 days. During the summer, the longest survival period was 11 days. Poliovirus 1 was recovered from the mature vegetables 23 days after flooding of the plots had ceased. Lettuce and radishes are usually harvested 3 to 4 weeks after planting. PMID:189685

  8. The challenge of changing the inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine in Latin America: declaration of the Latin American Society of Pediatric Infectious Diseases (SLIPE).

    PubMed

    Falleiros-Arlant, Luiza Helena; Avila-Agüero, María Luisa; Brea del Castillo, José; Mariño, Cristina

    2014-10-01

    Even though we have already covered 99% of the path to eradicate poliomyelitis from the world, this disease is still causing paralysis in children. Its eradication means not only the end of wild poliovirus circulation, but vaccine-derived poliovirus circulation as well. Taking into account different factors such as: current epidemiological data, adverse events of the attenuated oral poliomyelitis vaccine (OPV), the availability of an injectable inactivated vaccine (IPV) without the potential of causing the severe adverse events of the oral vaccine (OPV), the efficacy and effectiveness of the IPV in several countries of the world where it has been used for several years, the rationale of changing the vaccination schedule in different Latin American countries; the Latin American Society of Pediatric Infectious Diseases (SLIPE) announces its recommendation of switching to IPV in Latin America, by this Declaration, with an Action Plan for 2014-2015 period as regards vaccination against polio policies in Latin America. 1. The optimal proposed schedule consists of four IPV doses (three doses in the primary schedule plus a booster dose), whether IPV is combined or not with other indicated vaccines in the immunization program of the country. During the OPV to IPV transition phase, an alternative schedule is acceptable; 2. Countries should set optimal strategies in order to maintain and improve vaccination coverage, and implement a nominal immunization registry; 3. Improving the Epidemiological Surveillance of Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) and setting up an environmental surveillance program; 4. Setting up strategies for introducing IPV in National Immunization Programs, such as communicating properly with the population, among others; 5. Bringing scientific societies closer to decision makers; 6. Ensuring optimal supply and prices for IPV introduction; 7. Training vaccination teams; 8. Enhancing the distribution and storing logistics of vaccines. In addition to the

  9. The challenge of changing the inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine in Latin America: declaration of the Latin American Society of Pediatric Infectious Diseases (SLIPE).

    PubMed

    Falleiros-Arlant, Luiza Helena; Avila-Agüero, María Luisa; Brea del Castillo, José; Mariño, Cristina

    2014-10-01

    Even though we have already covered 99% of the path to eradicate poliomyelitis from the world, this disease is still causing paralysis in children. Its eradication means not only the end of wild poliovirus circulation, but vaccine-derived poliovirus circulation as well. Taking into account different factors such as: current epidemiological data, adverse events of the attenuated oral poliomyelitis vaccine (OPV), the availability of an injectable inactivated vaccine (IPV) without the potential of causing the severe adverse events of the oral vaccine (OPV), the efficacy and effectiveness of the IPV in several countries of the world where it has been used for several years, the rationale of changing the vaccination schedule in different Latin American countries; the Latin American Society of Pediatric Infectious Diseases (SLIPE) announces its recommendation of switching to IPV in Latin America, by this Declaration, with an Action Plan for 2014-2015 period as regards vaccination against polio policies in Latin America. 1. The optimal proposed schedule consists of four IPV doses (three doses in the primary schedule plus a booster dose), whether IPV is combined or not with other indicated vaccines in the immunization program of the country. During the OPV to IPV transition phase, an alternative schedule is acceptable; 2. Countries should set optimal strategies in order to maintain and improve vaccination coverage, and implement a nominal immunization registry; 3. Improving the Epidemiological Surveillance of Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) and setting up an environmental surveillance program; 4. Setting up strategies for introducing IPV in National Immunization Programs, such as communicating properly with the population, among others; 5. Bringing scientific societies closer to decision makers; 6. Ensuring optimal supply and prices for IPV introduction; 7. Training vaccination teams; 8. Enhancing the distribution and storing logistics of vaccines. In addition to the

  10. A stable HeLa cell line that inducibly expresses poliovirus 2A(pro): effects on cellular and viral gene expression.

    PubMed

    Barco, A; Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    2000-03-01

    A HeLa cell clone (2A7d) that inducibly expresses the gene for poliovirus protease 2A (2A(pro)) under the control of tetracycline has been obtained. Synthesis of 2A(pro) induces severe morphological changes in 2A7d cells. One day after tetracycline removal, cells round up and a few hours later die. Poliovirus 2A(pro) cleaves both forms of initiation factor eIF4G, causing extensive inhibition of capped-mRNA translation a few hours after protease induction. Methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-chloromethylketone, a selective inhibitor of 2A(pro), prevents both eIF4G cleavage and inhibition of translation but not cellular death. Expression of 2A(pro) still allows both the replication of poliovirus and the translation of mRNAs containing a picornavirus leader sequence, while vaccinia virus replication is drastically inhibited. Translation of transfected capped mRNA is blocked in 2A7d-On cells, while luciferase synthesis from a mRNA bearing a picornavirus internal ribosome entry site (IRES) sequence is enhanced by the presence of 2A(pro). Moreover, synthesis of 2A(pro) in 2A7d cells complements the translational defect of a poliovirus 2A(pro)-defective variant. These results show that poliovirus 2A(pro) expression mimics some phenotypical characteristics of poliovirus-infected cells, such as cell rounding, inhibition of protein synthesis and enhancement of IRES-driven translation. This cell line constitutes a useful tool to further analyze 2A(pro) functions, to complement poliovirus 2A(pro) mutants, and to test antiviral compounds.

  11. Meningococcal Vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy; Sullivan, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Neisseria meningitidis, a gram-negative diplococcal bacterium, is a common asymptomatic nasopharyngeal colonizer that may infrequently lead to invasive disease in the form of meningitis or bacteremia. Six serogroups (A, B, C, W, X and Y) are responsible for the majority of invasive infections. Increased risk of disease occurs in specific population groups including infants, adolescents, those with asplenia or complement deficiencies, and those residing in crowded living conditions such as in college dormitories. The incidence of invasive meningococcal disease varies geographically with some countries (e.g., in the African meningitis belt) having both high endemic disease rates and ongoing epidemics, with annual rates reaching 1000 cases per 100,000 persons. Given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with meningococcal disease, it remains a major global health threat best prevented by vaccination. Several countries have implemented vaccination programs with the selection of specific vaccine(s) based on locally prevalent serogroup(s) of N. meningitidis and targeting population groups at highest risk. Polysaccharide meningococcal vaccines became available over 40 years ago, but are limited by their inability to produce immunologic memory responses, poor immunogenicity in infants/children, hyporesponsiveness after repeated doses, and lack of efficacy against nasopharyngeal carriage. In 1999, the first meningococcal conjugate vaccines were introduced and have been successful in overcoming many of the shortcomings of polysaccharide vaccines. The implementation of meningococcal conjugate vaccination programs in many areas of the world (including the massive campaign in sub-Saharan Africa using a serogroup A conjugate vaccine) has led to dramatic reductions in the incidence of meningococcal disease by both individual and population protection. Progressive advances in vaccinology have led to the recent licensure of two effective vaccines against serogroup B

  12. Varicella (Chickenpox) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... product containing Measles Vaccine, Mumps Vaccine, Rubella Vaccine, Varicella Vaccine) ... Why get vaccinated?Chickenpox (also called varicella) is a common childhood disease. It is usually mild, but it can be serious, especially in ...

  13. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  14. [HPV vaccination].

    PubMed

    Stronski Huwiler, Susanne; Spaar, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Human Papilloma Viruses are associated with genital carcinoma (of the cervix, anus, vulva, vagina and the penis) as well as with non-genital carcinoma (oropharyngeal carcinoma) and genital warts. In Switzerland two highly efficient and safe vaccines are available. The safety of these vaccines has been repeatedly subject of controversial discussions, however so far post marketing surveillance has always been able to confirm the safety. In Switzerland girls and young women have been offered the HPV vaccination within cantonal programmes since 2008. 2015 the recommendation for the HPV-vaccination for boys and young men was issued, and starting July 1, 2016 they as well will be offered vaccination free of charge within the cantonal programmes. This article discusses the burden of disease, efficacy and safety of the vaccines and presents facts which are important for vaccinating these young people. Specifically, aspects of the decisional capacity of adolescents to consent to the vaccination are presented. Finally, the future perspective with a focus on a new vaccine with an enlarged spectrum of HPV-types is discussed. PMID:27268446

  15. Designer adjuvants for enhancing the efficacy of infectious disease and cancer vaccines based on suppression of regulatory T cell induction.

    PubMed

    Mills, Kingston H G

    2009-02-21

    Live attenuated or inactivated bacteria and viruses have formed the basis of many successful vaccines, including those that have eliminated smallpox and have almost eliminated poliovirus. The whole virus or bacteria approach remains the most effective means of generating protective immunity by vaccination. However, these vaccines can be associated with mild to severe side effects, such as that observed with the whole cell pertussis vaccine. Furthermore, rare cases of vaccine-associated disease can result from reversion of an attenuated virus to the virulent form, such as that reported with the oral polio vaccine. Advances in genomics, molecular biology and immunology have now facilitated the identification, recombinant expression and immunological characterization of protective antigens from infectious organisms, permitting a more rational approach to vaccine design. Purified native or recombinant proteins or polysaccharides (linked to carrier proteins) now provide a much cleaner, safer and more immunologically defined alternative to live or killed whole cell vaccines. However, these subunit vaccines lack the danger signals required to activate innate immune responses and must therefore be delivered with potent adjuvants or delivery systems in order to generate protective adaptive immune responses.

  16. Genetically engineered viral vaccines--prospects for the future.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, R F

    1982-12-01

    Genetic engineering (recombinant DNA technology)--the revolution in molecular biology--has enabled us to isolate any genes from any source in a pure form, and to move them from one cell to another. It has become possible to program bacterial or yeast cells with foreign genes and force the new host to produce commercially valuable proteins (e.g. hormones, enzymes, diagnostic reagents). It is now also possible to produce viral and bacterial antigens in various types of cells. We hope that this will soon enable us to manufacture vaccines cheaply. The production of a foot-and-mouth-disease virus vaccine--the first promising example of a genetically engineered effective vaccine--has recently been reported. Expression of hepatitis B surface antigen, influenza virus haemagglutinin and polio-virus proteins from the cloned genes have also been reported, and many more viral genes have been cloned although not yet expressed in bacteria. Despite the extremely rapid development, there are a number of problems, both technical and immunological, which have to be extensively studied and eventually solved, before we can hope to obtain effective and safe genetically engineered viral vaccines for clinical use.

  17. Biologic Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    ADAMS, KATHERINE T.

    2009-01-01

    The threat of new disease pandemics has spurred the development of biologic vaccines, which promise tremendous improvements in global and local health. Several lend themselves to the prevention or treatment of chronic diseases. But the uncertainties of whom to vaccinate raise the question of whether the health care system can make these promising products viable. PMID:22478749

  18. [Pretravel vaccination].

    PubMed

    Koch, Claus

    2005-10-17

    Vaccination is a simple and effective way to protect against certain infectious diseases and is nearly always to be recommended when one is travelling to countries with lesser hygienic standards. This report provides guidance on immunization concerns and describes the individual vaccines most commonly used in travel medicine.

  19. HPV Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... can cause problems like genital warts and some kinds of cancer, a vaccine is an important step in preventing infection and protecting against the spread of HPV. That's why doctors recommend that all girls and guys get the vaccine at these ages: ...

  20. Rotavirus Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Why get vaccinated?Rotavirus is a virus that causes diarrhea, mostly in babies and young children. The diarrhea can be severe, and lead ... and fever are also common in babies with rotavirus.Before rotavirus vaccine, rotavirus disease was a common ...

  1. Typhoid Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... should be given at least 2 weeks before travel to allow the vaccine time to work. A booster dose is needed every ... should be given at least 1 week before travel to allow the vaccine time to work. Swallow each dose about an hour ...

  2. Dengue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Simasathien, Sriluck; Watanaveeradej, Veerachai

    2005-11-01

    Dengue is an expanding health problem. About two-fifths of the world population are at risk for acquiring dengue with 50-100 million cases of acute febrile illness yearly including about 500,000 cases of DHF/DSS. No antiviral drugs active against the flavivirus exist. Attempts to control mosquito vector has been largely unsuccessful. Vaccination remains the most hopeful preventive measure. Dengue vaccine has been in development for more than 30 years, yet none has been licensed. The fact that enhancing antibody from previous infection and high level of T cell activation during secondary infection contribute to immunopathology of DHF, the vaccine must be able to induce protective response to four dengue serotypes simultaneously. Inactivated vaccine is safe but needs a repeated booster thus, development is delayed. Tetravalent live attenuated vaccine and chimeric vaccine using yellow fever or dengue viruses as a backbone are being carried out in human trials. DNA vaccine and subunit vaccine are being carried out in animal trials.

  3. Cellular COPII Proteins Are Involved in Production of the Vesicles That Form the Poliovirus Replication Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rust, René C.; Landmann, Lukas; Gosert, Rainer; Tang, Bor Luen; Hong, Wanjin; Hauri, Hans-Peter; Egger, Denise; Bienz, Kurt

    2001-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) replicates its genome in association with membranous vesicles in the cytoplasm of infected cells. To elucidate the origin and mode of formation of PV vesicles, immunofluorescence labeling with antibodies against the viral vesicle marker proteins 2B and 2BC, as well as cellular markers of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), anterograde transport vesicles, and the Golgi complex, was performed in BT7-H cells. Optical sections obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy were subjected to a deconvolution process to enhance resolution and signal-to-noise ratio and to allow for a three-dimensional representation of labeled membrane structures. The mode of formation of the PV vesicles was, on morphological grounds, similar to the formation of anterograde membrane traffic vesicles in uninfected cells. ER-resident membrane markers were excluded from both types of vesicles, and the COPII components Sec13 and Sec31 were both found to be colocalized on the vesicular surface, indicating the presence of a functional COPII coat. PV vesicle formation during early time points of infection did not involve the Golgi complex. The expression of PV protein 2BC or the entire P2 and P3 genomic region led to the production of vesicles carrying a COPII coat and showing the same mode of formation as vesicles produced after PV infection. These results indicate that PV vesicles are formed at the ER by the cellular COPII budding mechanism and thus are homologous to the vesicles of the anterograde membrane transport pathway. PMID:11559814

  4. MS-2 and poliovirus transport in porous media: Hydrophobic effects and chemical perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bales, Roger C.; Li, Shimin; Maguire, Kimberly M.; Yahya, Moyasar T.; Gerba, Charles P.

    1993-04-01

    In a series of pH 7 continuous-flow column experiments, removal of the bacteriophage MS-2 by attachment to silica beads had a strong, systematic dependence on the amount of hydrophobic surface present on the beads. With no hydrophobic surface, removal of phage at pH 5 was much greater than at pH 7. Release of attached phage at both pH values did occur, but was slow; breakthrough curves exhibited tailing. Poliovirus attached to silica beads at pH 5.5 much more than at pH 7.0, and attachment was also slowly reversible. Time scales for phage and poliovinis attachment were of the order of hours. The sticking efficiency factor (α), reflecting microscaie physicochemical influences on virus attachment, was in the range of 0.0007-0.02. Phage release was small but measurable under steady state conditions. Release was enhanced by lowering ionic strength and by introducing beef extract, a high-ionic-strength protein solution. Results show that viruses experience reversible attachment/detachment (sometimes termed sorption), that large chemical perturbations are needed to induce rapid virus detachment, and that viruses should be quite mobile in sandy porous media. Even small amounts of hydrophobic organic material in the porous media (≥0.001%) can retard virus transport.

  5. Glycyl-tRNA synthetase specifically binds to the poliovirus IRES to activate translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Dmitri E.; Hirnet, Juliane; Terenin, Ilya M.; Dmitriev, Sergey E.; Niepmann, Michael; Shatsky, Ivan N.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to the host cell environment to efficiently take-over the host cell's machinery is crucial in particular for small RNA viruses like picornaviruses that come with only small RNA genomes and replicate exclusively in the cytosol. Their Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) elements are specific RNA structures that facilitate the 5′ end-independent internal initiation of translation both under normal conditions and when the cap-dependent host protein synthesis is shut-down in infected cells. A longstanding issue is which host factors play a major role in this internal initiation. Here, we show that the functionally most important domain V of the poliovirus IRES uses tRNAGly anticodon stem–loop mimicry to recruit glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) to the apical part of domain V, adjacent to the binding site of the key initiation factor eIF4G. The binding of GARS promotes the accommodation of the initiation region of the IRES in the mRNA binding site of the ribosome, thereby greatly enhancing the activity of the IRES at the step of the 48S initiation complex formation. Moonlighting functions of GARS that may be additionally needed for other events of the virus–host cell interaction are discussed. PMID:22373920

  6. Antiviral Activity of Sulfated Polysaccharide of Adenanthera pavonina against Poliovirus in HEp-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Godoi, Ananda Marques; Faccin-Galhardi, Lígia Carla; Lopes, Nayara; de Almeida, Raimundo Rafael; Ricardo, Nágila Maria Pontes Silva; Nozawa, Carlos; Linhares, Rosa Elisa Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Adenanthera pavonina, popularly known as red-bead tree, carolina, pigeon's eye, and dragon's eye, is a plant traditionally used in Brazil for the treatment of several diseases. The present study aimed at evaluating the activity of sulfated polysaccharide from the Adenanthera pavonina (SPLSAp) seeds against poliovirus type 1 (PV-1) in HEp-2 cell cultures. The SPLSAp presented a cytotoxic concentration (CC50) of 500 μg/mL in HEp-2 cell cultures, evaluated by the dimethylthiazolyl-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method (MTT). The SPLSAp exhibited a significant antiviral activity, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 1.18 µg/mL, determined by plaque reduction assay and a high selectivity index (SI) of 423. The maximum inhibition (100%) of PV replication was found when the SPLSAp treatment was concomitant with viral infection (time 0 h), at all tested concentrations. The maximal inhibition was also found when the SPLSAp was used 1 h and 2 h postinfection, albeit at 50 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL. Therefore, we demonstrated that the SPLSAp inhibited PV growth. We also suggested that SPLSAp inhibited PV in more than one step of the replication, as the mechanism of antiviral action. We, therefore, selected the compound as a potential candidate for further development towards the control of the infection. PMID:25221609

  7. Host cell proteins binding to domain IV of the 5' noncoding region of poliovirus RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Blyn, L B; Chen, R; Semler, B L; Ehrenfeld, E

    1995-01-01

    Translation of poliovirus RNA occurs by the binding of ribosomes to an internal segment of RNA sequence within the 5' untranslated region of the viral RNA. This region is predicted to consist of six domains (I to VI) that possess complex secondary and tertiary structures. Domain IV is a large region in which alterations in the sequence or structure markedly reduce translational efficiency. In this study, we employed RNA mobility shift assays to demonstrate that a protein(s) from uninfected HeLa cell extracts, as well as from neuroblastoma extracts, interacts with the domain IV structure. A mutation in domain IV caused reduced binding of HeLa cell proteins and reduced translation both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that the binding of at least one of these proteins plays a role in the mechanism of viral translation. UV cross-linking indicated that a protein(s) with a size of approximately 40 kDa interacted directly with the RNA. Using streptavidin beads to capture biotinylated RNA bound to proteins, we were able to visualize a number of HeLa and neuroblastoma cell proteins that interact with domain IV. These proteins have molecular masses of approximately 39, approximately 40, and approximately 42 kDa. PMID:7769700

  8. Crystal structure of CD155 and electron microscopic studies of its complexes with polioviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ping; Mueller, Steffen; Morais, Marc C.; Bator, Carol M.; Bowman, Valorie D.; Hafenstein, Susan; Wimmer, Eckard; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-11-02

    When poliovirus (PV) recognizes its receptor, CD155, the virus changes from a 160S to a 135S particle before releasing its genome into the cytoplasm. CD155 is a transmembrane protein with 3 Ig-like extracellular domains, D1-D3, where D1 is recognized by the virus. The crystal structure of D1D2 has been determined to 3.5-{angstrom} resolution and fitted into {approx}8.5-{angstrom} resolution cryoelectron microscopy reconstructions of the virus-receptor complexes for the 3 PV serotypes. These structures show that, compared with human rhinoviruses, the virus-receptor interactions for PVs have a greater dependence on hydrophobic interactions, as might be required for a virus that can inhabit environments of different pH. The pocket factor was shown to remain in the virus during the first recognition stage. The present structures, when combined with earlier mutational investigations, show that in the subsequent entry stage the receptor moves further into the canyon when at a physiological temperature, thereby expelling the pocket factor and separating the viral subunits to form 135S particles. These results provide a detailed analysis of how a nonenveloped virus can enter its host cell.

  9. Molecular tectonic model of virus structural transitions: the putative cell entry states of poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Belnap, D M; Filman, D J; Trus, B L; Cheng, N; Booy, F P; Conway, J F; Curry, S; Hiremath, C N; Tsang, S K; Steven, A C; Hogle, J M

    2000-02-01

    Upon interacting with its receptor, poliovirus undergoes conformational changes that are implicated in cell entry, including the externalization of the viral protein VP4 and the N terminus of VP1. We have determined the structures of native virions and of two putative cell entry intermediates, the 135S and 80S particles, at approximately 22-A resolution by cryo-electron microscopy. The 135S and 80S particles are both approximately 4% larger than the virion. Pseudoatomic models were constructed by adjusting the beta-barrel domains of the three capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 from their known positions in the virion to fit the 135S and 80S reconstructions. Domain movements of up to 9 A were detected, analogous to the shifting of tectonic plates. These movements create gaps between adjacent subunits. The gaps at the sites where VP1, VP2, and VP3 subunits meet are plausible candidates for the emergence of VP4 and the N terminus of VP1. The implications of these observations are discussed for models in which the externalized components form a transmembrane pore through which viral RNA enters the infected cell. PMID:10627545

  10. Poliovirus receptor (CD155) regulates a step in transendothelial migration between PECAM and CD99.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, David P; Seidman, Michael A; Muller, William A

    2013-03-01

    The movement of leukocytes across endothelium [referred to as diapedesis or transendothelial migration (TEM)] is a critical step in the inflammatory process. Recently, it was demonstrated that treatment of endothelial cells and monocytes with antibodies against poliovirus receptor (PVR; CD155) and DNAX-associated molecule-1 (DNAM-1; CD226) arrested monocytes over endothelial junctions and prevented TEM, suggesting that these molecules are involved in diapedesis. However, nothing was known about the mechanism by which PVR and DNAM-1 work in TEM. Herein, we show that, similar to endothelial PECAM interacting with leukocyte PECAM, activation of endothelial PVR with anti-PVR antibodies or interaction with its ligand, DNAM-1, results in recruitment of the tyrosine phosphatase Shp-2, and this process is dependent on Src kinases. Furthermore, differential and sequential treatment with blocking antibodies directed against PVR, DNAM-1, PECAM, and CD99 showed that endothelial PVR and monocyte DNAM-1 interact at and regulate a step between those regulated by PECAM and CD99. Further studies demonstrate that PVR resides in the recently identified lateral border recycling compartment, similar to PECAM and CD99. These findings suggest that the localization of adhesion/signaling molecules to the lateral border recycling compartment and the recruitment of Shp-2 may be common mechanisms for the regulation of TEM by endothelial cells. PMID:23333754

  11. [VACCINE-ASSOCIATED PARALYTIC POLIOMYELITIS IN RUSSIAN FEDERATION DURING THE PERIOD OF CHANGES IN VACCINATION SCHEDULE (2006-2013 yy.)].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, O E; Eremeeva, T P; Morozova, N S; Shakaryan, A K; Gmyl, A P; Yakovenko, M L; Korotkova, E A; Chernjavskaja, O P; Baykova, O Yu; Silenova, O V; Krasota, A Yu; Krasnoproshina, L I; Mustafina, A N; Kozlovskaja, L I

    2016-01-01

    The results of virologic testing of clinical materials and epidemiological analysis of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) cases obtained in 2006-2013 during AFP surveillance are presented. Among the 2976 cases of AFP 30 cases were VAPP. 15 cases were observed in OPV recipients, whereas 15 cases were observed in non-vaccinated contacts. The age of the patients varied from 4 months to 5.5 years (13.6 ± 12.4 months old). Children younger than 1 year constituted 63.3% of the group; boys were dominant (73.3%); 53.3% of children were vaccinated with OPV; the time period between receipt of OPV and onset of palsy was from 2 to 32 days (18.7 ± 8.2). Lower paraparesis was documented in 48.3% of patients; lower monoparesis in 37.9%; upper monoparesis, in 6.9%; tetraparesis with bulbar syndrome, in 6%. The majority of the patients (85.7%) had an unfavorable premorbid status. The violations of the humoral immunity were found in 73.9% cases: CVID (52.9%), hypogammaglobulinemia (41.2%); selective lgA deflciency (5.9%). In 70.6% cases damage to humoral immunity was combined with poor premorbid status. The most frequently observed (76%, p < 0.05) represented the single type of poliovirus--type 2 (44%) and type 3 (32%). All strains were of the vaccine origin, the divergence from the homotypic Sabin strains fell within the region of the gene encoding VPI protein, which did not exceed 0.5% of nucleotide substitutions except vaccine derived poliovirus type 2--multiple recombinant (type 2/type 3/ type 2/type 1) with the degree of the divergence of 1.44% isolated from 6-month old unvaccinated child (RUS08063034001). The frequency of the VAPP cases was a total of 1 case per 3.4 million doses of distributed OPV in 2006-2013; 2.2 cases per 1 million of newborns were observed. This frequency decreased after the introduction of the sequential scheme of vaccination (IPV, OPV) in 2008-2013 as compared with the period of exclusive use of OPV in 2006-2007: 1 case per 4.9 million

  12. Combination Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Skibinski, David AG; Baudner, Barbara C; Singh, Manmohan; O’Hagan, Derek T

    2011-01-01

    The combination of diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccines into a single product has been central to the protection of the pediatric population over the past 50 years. The addition of inactivated polio, Haemophilus influenzae, and hepatitis B vaccines into the combination has facilitated the introduction of these vaccines into recommended immunization schedules by reducing the number of injections required and has therefore increased immunization compliance. However, the development of these combinations encountered numerous challenges, including the reduced response to Haemophilus influenzae vaccine when given in combination; the need to consolidate the differences in the immunization schedule (hepatitis B); and the need to improve the safety profile of the diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis combination. Here, we review these challenges and also discuss future prospects for combination vaccines. PMID:21572611

  13. Reduction of Antibody Response to an 11-Valent Pneumococcal Vaccine Coadministered with a Vaccine Containing Acellular Pertussis Components

    PubMed Central

    Dagan, Ron; Goldblatt, David; Maleckar, James R.; Yaïch, Mansour; Eskola, Juhani

    2004-01-01

    In pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs), polysaccharide antigens are often conjugated to protein carriers related to other common vaccines. It is therefore important to test PCV interaction with other pediatric vaccines when administered simultaneously. We assessed the immune response to an 11-valent PCV conjugated to diphtheria and tetanus carriers (PncD/T11), administered concomitantly, but in separate sites, with a combined vaccine containing epitopes related antigenically to the carriers: polyribosylribitol phosphate-tetanus tox oid (PRP-T), diphtheria toxoid (DT), and tetanus toxoid (TT). In addition, these combinations contained inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) and either whole-cell pertussis (wP) or acellular pertussis (aP) components. After coadministration of PncD/T11 with the combined vaccine containing wP (DTwP/IPV/PRP-T), the responses to all polysaccharides in the PncD/T11 were satisfactory. In contrast, when coadministered with an aP-containing combination (DTaP/IPV/PRP-T), the response to all seven pneumococcal conjugates to TT was significantly reduced after primary and booster immunization. The pneumococcal conjugates to DT were not significantly reduced after the primary series, but were somewhat reduced after booster. It is likely that some suppression of the tetanus-mediated response occurred even when the PncD/T11 was coadministered with wP, but this suppression was masked by the adjuvant effect of wP. By replacing wP with aP, this adjuvant effect was removed, unmasking the suppression of the tetanus-mediated response. With the increasing use of multiple aP-containing vaccines in infancy, novel approaches to adjuvants and carrier protein technology are likely to be required. PMID:15322036

  14. National, State, and Selected Local Area Vaccination Coverage Among Children Aged 19-35 Months - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Hill, Holly A; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Yankey, David; Singleton, James A; Kolasa, Maureen

    2015-08-28

    The reduction in morbidity and mortality associated with vaccine-preventable diseases in the United States has been described as one of the 10 greatest public health achievements of the first decade of the 21st century. A recent analysis concluded that routine childhood vaccination will prevent 322 million cases of disease and about 732,000 early deaths among children born during 1994-2013, for a net societal cost savings of $1.38 trillion. The National Immunization Survey (NIS) has monitored vaccination coverage among U.S. children aged 19-35 months since 1994. This report presents national, regional, state, and selected local area vaccination coverage estimates for children born from January 2011 through May 2013, based on data from the 2014 NIS. For most vaccinations, there was no significant change in coverage between 2013 and 2014. The exception was hepatitis A vaccine (HepA), for which increases were observed in coverage with both ≥1 and ≥2 doses. As in previous years, <1% of children received no vaccinations. National coverage estimates indicate that the Healthy People 2020 target* of 90% was met for ≥3 doses of poliovirus vaccine (93.3%), ≥1 dose of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR) (91.5%), ≥3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) (91.6%), and ≥1 dose of varicella vaccine (91.0%). Coverage was below target for ≥4 doses of diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP), the full series of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine, hepatitis B (HepB) birth dose,† ≥4 doses pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), ≥2 doses of HepA, the full series of rotavirus vaccine, and the combined vaccine series.§ Examination of coverage by child's race/ethnicity revealed lower estimated coverage among non-Hispanic black children compared with non-Hispanic white children for several vaccinations, including DTaP, the full series of Hib, PCV, rotavirus vaccine, and the combined series. Children from households classified as below the

  15. National, State, and Selected Local Area Vaccination Coverage Among Children Aged 19-35 Months - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Hill, Holly A; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Yankey, David; Singleton, James A; Kolasa, Maureen

    2015-08-28

    The reduction in morbidity and mortality associated with vaccine-preventable diseases in the United States has been described as one of the 10 greatest public health achievements of the first decade of the 21st century. A recent analysis concluded that routine childhood vaccination will prevent 322 million cases of disease and about 732,000 early deaths among children born during 1994-2013, for a net societal cost savings of $1.38 trillion. The National Immunization Survey (NIS) has monitored vaccination coverage among U.S. children aged 19-35 months since 1994. This report presents national, regional, state, and selected local area vaccination coverage estimates for children born from January 2011 through May 2013, based on data from the 2014 NIS. For most vaccinations, there was no significant change in coverage between 2013 and 2014. The exception was hepatitis A vaccine (HepA), for which increases were observed in coverage with both ≥1 and ≥2 doses. As in previous years, <1% of children received no vaccinations. National coverage estimates indicate that the Healthy People 2020 target* of 90% was met for ≥3 doses of poliovirus vaccine (93.3%), ≥1 dose of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR) (91.5%), ≥3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) (91.6%), and ≥1 dose of varicella vaccine (91.0%). Coverage was below target for ≥4 doses of diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP), the full series of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine, hepatitis B (HepB) birth dose,† ≥4 doses pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), ≥2 doses of HepA, the full series of rotavirus vaccine, and the combined vaccine series.§ Examination of coverage by child's race/ethnicity revealed lower estimated coverage among non-Hispanic black children compared with non-Hispanic white children for several vaccinations, including DTaP, the full series of Hib, PCV, rotavirus vaccine, and the combined series. Children from households classified as below the

  16. Rotavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Barnes, G

    1998-01-01

    Encouraging results have been reported from several large trials of tetravalent rhesus rotavirus vaccine, with efficacy of 70-80% against severe disease. A recent Venezuelan study showed similar results to trials in USA and Europe. The vaccine may soon be licensed in USA. It provides the exciting prospect of a strategy to prevent one of the world's major child killers. Other candidate vaccines are under development including human-bovine reassortants, neonatal strains, non-replicating rotaviruses, vector vaccines and other genetically engineered products. Second and third generation rotavirus vaccines are on the horizon. The need for a rotavirus vaccine is well accepted by paediatricians, but public health authorities need to be lobbied. Other issues which need to be addressed include relative importance of non-group A rotaviruses, possible administration with OPV, the influence of breast feeding, and most importantly, cost. It is essential that rotavirus vaccine is somehow made available to all of the world's children, not just those in developed countries. PMID:9553287

  17. Meningococcal Vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy; Sullivan, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Neisseria meningitidis, a gram-negative diplococcal bacterium, is a common asymptomatic nasopharyngeal colonizer that may infrequently lead to invasive disease in the form of meningitis or bacteremia. Six serogroups (A, B, C, W, X and Y) are responsible for the majority of invasive infections. Increased risk of disease occurs in specific population groups including infants, adolescents, those with asplenia or complement deficiencies, and those residing in crowded living conditions such as in college dormitories. The incidence of invasive meningococcal disease varies geographically with some countries (e.g., in the African meningitis belt) having both high endemic disease rates and ongoing epidemics, with annual rates reaching 1000 cases per 100,000 persons. Given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with meningococcal disease, it remains a major global health threat best prevented by vaccination. Several countries have implemented vaccination programs with the selection of specific vaccine(s) based on locally prevalent serogroup(s) of N. meningitidis and targeting population groups at highest risk. Polysaccharide meningococcal vaccines became available over 40 years ago, but are limited by their inability to produce immunologic memory responses, poor immunogenicity in infants/children, hyporesponsiveness after repeated doses, and lack of efficacy against nasopharyngeal carriage. In 1999, the first meningococcal conjugate vaccines were introduced and have been successful in overcoming many of the shortcomings of polysaccharide vaccines. The implementation of meningococcal conjugate vaccination programs in many areas of the world (including the massive campaign in sub-Saharan Africa using a serogroup A conjugate vaccine) has led to dramatic reductions in the incidence of meningococcal disease by both individual and population protection. Progressive advances in vaccinology have led to the recent licensure of two effective vaccines against serogroup B

  18. [Rabbies vaccination].

    PubMed

    Jelinek, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    With very few exceptions, rabies is occurring around the globe. The clinical course of this mammal-transmitted infection is almost universally fatal. Thus, the disease is causing more human deaths than any other zoonosis. Due to the lack of effective therapeutic options, pre- or post-exposure vaccination remains the only effective means to avoid development of fatal disease. Save and highly effective cell culture vaccines which have been available for decades provide long-lasting protection. Various vaccination schedules have been tested and are being recommended. PMID:27268449

  19. mRNAs containing the unstructured 5' leader sequence of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 4 translate inefficiently in lysates from poliovirus-infected HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hann, L E; Gehrke, L

    1995-01-01

    Poliovirus infection is accompanied by translational control that precludes translation of 5'-capped mRNAs and facilitates translation of the uncapped poliovirus RNA by an internal initiation mechanism. Previous reports have suggested that the capped alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein mRNA (AIMV CP RNA), which contains an unstructured 5' leader sequence, is unusual in being functionally active in extracts prepared from poliovirus-infected HeLa cells (PI-extracts). To identify the cis-acting nucleotide elements permitting selective AIMV CP expression, we tested capped mRNAs containing structured or unstructured 5' leader sequences in addition to an mRNA containing the poliovirus internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Translations were performed with PI-extracts and extracts prepared from mock-infected HeLa cells (MI-extracts). A number of control criteria demonstrated that the HeLa cells were infected by poliovirus and that the extracts were translationally active. The data strongly indicate that translation of RNAs lacking an internal ribosome entry site, including AIMV CP RNA, was severely compromised in PI-extracts, and we find no evidence that the unstructured AIMV CP RNA 5' leader sequence acts in cis to bypass the poliovirus translational control. Nevertheless, cotranslation assays in the MI-extracts demonstrate that mRNAs containing the unstructured AIMV CP RNA 5' untranslated region have a competitive advantage over those containing the rabbit alpha-globin 5' leader. Previous reports of AIMV CP RNA translation in PI-extracts likely describe inefficient expression that can be explained by residual cap-dependent initiation events, where AIMV CP RNA translation is competitive because of a diminished quantitative requirement for initiation factors. PMID:7609069

  20. Co-administration of a novel Haemophilus influenzae type b and Neisseria meningitidis serogroups C and Y-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine does not interfere with the immune response to antigens contained in infant vaccines routinely used in the United States.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Gary S; Marchant, Colin D; Blatter, Mark; Friedland, Leonard R; Aris, Emmanuel; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2011-02-01

    An investigational combined Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Neisseria meningitidis serogroups C and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (HibMenCY-TT) has been developed to protect infants from invasive disease caused by Hib and these meningococcal serogroups without adding injections to the immunization schedule. Incorporation of this novel vaccine into the US vaccination schedule will require demonstration of a lack of immunologic interference with other routine pediatric vaccines. This study assessed the immune response to 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) and combined diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-hepatitis B-inactivated poliovirus vaccine (DTaP-HepB-IPV) when separately co-administered with HibMenCY-TT as compared to a US-licensed H. influenzae type b tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (Hib-TT) at 2, 4, 6 (N=606) and 12-15 months of age (N=366). HibMenCY-TT was non-inferior to Hib-TT in terms of antibody responses to all Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes contained in PCV7 and the diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B and poliovirus antigens contained in DTaP-HepB-IPV one month after the third vaccine dose, and the anti-tetanus geometric mean antibody concentration (GMC) was significantly higher in the HibMenCY-TT group than in the Hib-TT group. In an exploratory analysis, no significant differences in the proportion of subjects with anti-pneumococcal antibody concentrations ≥0.2 µg/ml or anti-pneumococcal GMC were seen between the two groups after the fourth vaccine dose. A schedule of HibMenCY-TT given concomitantly with PCV7 and DTaP-HepB-IPV would be expected to protect infants against all of the targeted diseases.

  1. Malaria vaccine.

    PubMed

    Khurana, S K; Talib, V H

    1996-12-01

    Recently it has become evident that he same candidate antigen can be shared by several of the parasite stages, and thus the concept of a multistage vaccine is becoming more and more attractive. A TDR Task Force evaluated the promise and stage of development of some 20 existing asexual blood stage candidate antigens and prepared a strategy for their development leading to clinical testing and field trials, Amongst these are merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1), Serine Rich Antigen (SERA), Apical Membrane Antigen (AMA-1), and Erythrocyte Binding Antigen (EBA). A field study conducted in Tanzanian children showed that the SPf66 Colombian vaccine was safe, induced antibodies, and reduced the risk of developing clinical malaria by around 30%. This study, confirmed the potential of the vaccine to confer partial protection in areas of high as well as low intensity of transmission. Pfs25 is a leading candidate antigen for a transmission blocking vaccine. It is found in the ookinete stage of the parasite in the mosquito midgut. Gramme amounts of GMP-grade material have been produced and a vaccine based on the Pfs25 antigen formulated with alum should have gone into phase I and II clinical trials in the USA and Africa during 1995. Because the first malaria prototype vaccine to be tried out in people on a large scale has been the polymerized synthetic peptide developed by patarroye on the basis of the SPf66 antigen of P. faliciparum, the results are with much interest. It is still premature to predict the effectiveness of this vaccine globally, but its development will encourage further progress in a fields that has repeatedly been characterized by raised and then dashed drops. These various vaccines are based on the classical approach to vaccination, which is to raise host immunity against the parasite so as to reduce parasite densities or to sterilize an infection. A newer approach is development of antidisease vaccines which aim to alleviate morbidity by suppressing

  2. Degradation of the interferon-induced 68,000-M(r) protein kinase by poliovirus requires RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Black, T L; Barber, G N; Katze, M G

    1993-01-01

    Control of the interferon-induced double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) activated protein kinase (referred to as P68 because of its M(r) of 68,000 in human cells) by animal viruses is essential to avoid decreases in protein synthetic rates during infection. We have previously demonstrated that poliovirus establishes a unique way of regulating the protein kinase, namely by inducing the specific degradation of P68 during infection (T. L. Black, B. Safer, A. Hovanessian, and M. G. Katze, J. Virol. 63:2244-2251, 1989). In the present study we investigated the mechanisms by which P68 degradation occurred. To do this we used an in vitro degradation assay which faithfully reproduced the in vivo events. Although viral gene expression was required for P68 degradation, the major poliovirus proteases, 2A and 3C, were found not to be directly involved with P68 proteolysis. However, the protease responsible for P68 degradation required divalent cations for maximal activity and probably has both an RNA and a protein component since trypsin and ribonuclease abrogated the activity. Despite this requirement for divalent cations and RNA, activation of the kinase was not required for proteolysis since a catalytically inactive P68 was still degraded. Mapping of P68 protease-sensitive sites by using in vitro translated truncation and deletion mutants revealed that sites required for degradation resided in the amino terminus and colocalized to dsRNA-binding domains. Finally, we found that preincubation of cell extracts with the synthetic dsRNA poly(I-C) largely prevented P68 proteolysis, providing additional evidence for the critical role of RNA. On the basis of these data, we present a hypothetical model depicting possible mechanisms of P68 degradation in poliovirus-infected cells. Images PMID:7678306

  3. A liquid phase affinity capture assay using magnetic beads to study protein-protein interaction: the poliovirus-nanobody example.

    PubMed

    Schotte, Lise; Rombaut, Bart; Thys, Bert

    2012-05-29

    In this article, a simple, quantitative, liquid phase affinity capture assay is presented. Provided that one protein can be tagged and another protein labeled, this method can be implemented for the investigation of protein-protein interactions. It is based on one hand on the recognition of the tagged protein by cobalt coated magnetic beads and on the other hand on the interaction between the tagged protein and a second specific protein that is labeled. First, the labeled and tagged proteins are mixed and incubated at room temperature. The magnetic beads, that recognize the tag, are added and the bound fraction of labeled protein is separated from the unbound fraction using magnets. The amount of labeled protein that is captured can be determined in an indirect way by measuring the signal of the labeled protein remained in the unbound fraction. The described liquid phase affinity assay is extremely useful when conformational conversion sensitive proteins are assayed. The development and application of the assay is demonstrated for the interaction between poliovirus and poliovirus recognizing nanobodies(1). Since poliovirus is sensitive to conformational conversion(2) when attached to a solid surface (unpublished results), the use of ELISA is limited and a liquid phase based system should therefore be preferred. An example of a liquid phase based system often used in polioresearch(3,4) is the micro protein A-immunoprecipitation test(5). Even though this test has proven its applicability, it requires an Fc-structure, which is absent in the nanobodies(6,7). However, as another opportunity, these interesting and stable single-domain antibodies(8) can be easily engineered with different tags. The widely used (His)(6)-tag shows affinity for bivalent ions such as nickel or cobalt, which can on their turn be easily coated on magnetic beads. We therefore developed this simple quantitative affinity capture assay based on cobalt coated magnetic beads. Poliovirus was labeled

  4. Typhoid Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious disease. It is caused by bacteria called Salmonella Typhi. Typhoid causes a high fever, fatigue, weakness, ... a typhoid carrier. • Laboratory workers who work with Salmonella Typhi bacteria. Inactivated typhoid vaccine (shot) • One dose ...

  5. A C-terminal, cysteine-rich site in poliovirus 2CATPase is required for morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunling; Ma, Hsin-Chieh; Wimmer, Eckard; Paul, Aniko V.

    2014-01-01

    The morphogenesis of viruses belonging to the genus Enterovirus in the family Picornaviridae is still poorly understood despite decades-long investigations. However, we recently provided evidence that 2CATPase gives specificity to poliovirus encapsidation through an interaction with capsid protein VP3. The polypeptide 2CATPase is a highly conserved non-structural protein of enteroviruses with important roles in RNA replication, encapsidation and uncoating. We have identified a site (K279/R280) near the C terminus of the polypeptide that is required for morphogenesis. The aim of the current project was to search for additional functional sites near the C terminus of the 2CATPase polypeptide, with particular interest in those that are required for encapsidation. We selected for analysis a cysteine-rich site of the polypeptide and constructed four mutants in which cysteines or a histidine was changed to an alanine. The RNA transcripts were transfected into HeLa cells yielding two lethal, one temperature-sensitive and one quasi-infectious mutants. All four mutants exhibited normal protein translation in vitro and three of them possessed severe RNA replication defects. The quasi-infectious mutant (C286A) yielded variants with a pseudo-reversion at the original site (A286D), but some also contained one additional mutation: A138V or M293V. The temperature-sensitive mutant (C272A/H273A) exhibited an encapsidation and possibly also an uncoating defect at 37 °C. Variants of this mutant revealed suppressor mutations at three different sites in the 2CATPase polypeptide: A138V, M293V and K295R. We concluded that the cysteine-rich site near the C terminus of 2CATPase is involved in encapsidation, possibly through an interaction with an upstream segment located between boxes A and B of the nucleotide-binding domain. PMID:24558221

  6. Rational use of stacking principles for signal enhancement in capillary electrophoretic separations of poliovirus samples.

    PubMed

    Oita, Iuliana; Halewyck, Hadewych; Pieters, Sigrid; Dejaegher, Bieke; Thys, Bert; Rombaut, Bart; Vander Heyden, Yvan

    2011-04-28

    The use of an earlier developed capillary electrophoresis (CE) method, either to investigate poliovirus (PV) samples with a low viral-purity level or to study the less abundant sub-viral particles, revealed the necessity for an intra-column signal enhancement strategy. Although intra-column signal enhancement is a very popular approach to assay small molecules, it is less straightforward for the analysis of biological macromolecules or particles. A reason could be that, for a proper signal enhancement approach, these samples have to be thoroughly studied to understand the factors affecting the separation process. For the investigated PV samples, a screening design revealed that injecting larger sample plugs significantly enhanced the analytical signal, but also significantly decreased the separation efficiency. A subsequently executed central composite design determined the largest sample plug that can be injected without compromising the separation. Finally, the sample dilution and the length of the injected plug were used for tuning the intensity of the analytical response. Two combinations of sample dilution and injected plug size, at extreme values, were investigated in detail to define the best procedure for PV analysis using CE. In both situations, PV was effectively separated and quantified in rather complex samples, showing a good repeatability, an acceptable linearity for the PV particles and a decreased limit of detection in comparison with the existing method. In conclusion, intra-column signal enhancement can be successfully applied for viral suspensions, extending the applicability of CE methods to samples with lower virus concentrations, and/or allowing a significant reduction in the minimum required volume of sample. For PV samples, 5μl of sample is necessary instead of the previous 20μl, while the analytical signal was enhanced up to 14 times. The results of this study can provide a basis for the development of routine CE methods for viral

  7. What you don't know about vaccines can hurt you.

    PubMed

    Pace, Victor M

    2015-01-01

    As physicians, we've all learned in detail about the science behind vaccinations, but I suspect few of us have been taught about the history of vaccinations. Sure, we all know that Dr. Jonas Salk developed the poliovirus vaccine, but I wasn't aware that he inoculated himself, his wife, and his three children with his then experimental vaccine. When our editorial committee decided to focus on vaccinations as our theme for this month's Greene County Medical Society's Journal, I perused the internet for interesting topics. I came across a fascinating website, historyofvaccines.org; this website is a project of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, touted as being the oldest professional medical organization in the United States. I credit the majority of the information in this article to the above website and the rest to the National Institutes of Health (nih.gov) website; I trust that the information is valid and true, based on the agencies behind these websites. Below are some interesting tidbits about vaccine preventable diseases that I found noteworthy to pass on to our readers.

  8. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News ... or may need reinsertion over time. What about vaccines? A vaccine is a preparation administered to stimulate ...

  9. Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index SMALLPOX FACT SHEET The Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine The vaccinia virus is the "live virus" used ... cannot cause smallpox. What is a "live virus" vaccine? A "live virus" vaccine is a vaccine that ...

  10. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular Pertussis vaccine Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Vaccination Pronounced (per-TUS-iss) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... The best way to prevent it is through vaccinations. The childhood vaccine is called DTaP. The whooping ...

  11. Influenza Vaccine, Live Intranasal

    MedlinePlus

    ... the recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should NOT ... to your doctor or pharmacist about the best flu vaccine option for you or your family.

  12. Increased poliovirus-specific intestinal antibody response coincides with promotion of Bifidobacterium longum-infantis and Bifidobacterium breve in infants: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mullié, Catherine; Yazourh, Asmae; Thibault, Hélène; Odou, Marie-Françoise; Singer, Elisabeth; Kalach, Nicolas; Kremp, Odile; Romond, Marie-Bénédicte

    2004-11-01

    To determine whether the size of the intestinal bifidobacterial population can influence the immune response to poliovirus vaccination in infants, we set up a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. From birth to 4 mo, infants were given a fermented infant formula (FIF) or a standard formula (placebo). Bifidobacteria were quantified monthly in infant stools. Antipoliovirus IgA response to Pentacoq was assessed before and 1 mo after the second vaccine injection. Thirty infants were randomized, and 20 completed the study (nine in the placebo group and 11 in the FIF group). Fecal bifidobacterial level was significantly higher with the FIF group at 4 mo of age (p=0.0498). Furthermore, B. longum/B. infantis carriage was higher at 4 mo in the FIF group (p=0.0399). Antipoliovirus IgA titers increased after Pentacoq challenge (p <0.001), and the rise was significantly higher in the FIF group (p <0.02). Antibody titers correlated with bifidobacteria, especially with B. longum/B. infantis and B. breve levels (p <0.002). Infants who harbored B. longum/B. infantis also exhibited higher levels of antipoliovirus IgAs (p <0.002). In conclusion, the present results indicate that antipoliovirus response can be triggered with a fermented formula that is able to favor intestinal bifidobacteria. Whether this effect on the immune system is achieved through the bifidogenic effect of the formula (mainly through B. longum/B. infantis and B. breve stimulation) or directly linked to compounds (i.e. peptides) produced by milk fermentation remains to be investigated.

  13. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics: News

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term effectiveness shown for Merck’s chickenpox vaccine Again—no link between vaccines and autism Experimental ovarian cancer vaccine successful in phase 1 Sinovac’s HFMD vaccine meets phase 3 study goal A vaccine for long-suffering cat allergy patients Vaccines are key to breaking infectious disease-malnutrition cycle Cancer vaccine failures due to the adjuvant IFA? Novartis’ typhoid vaccine make good progress

  14. Cell surface display of poliovirus receptor on Escherichia coli, a novel method for concentrating viral particles in water.

    PubMed

    Abbaszadegan, Morteza; Alum, Absar; Abbaszadegan, Hamed; Stout, Valerie

    2011-08-01

    The lack of efficient methods for concentrating viruses in water samples leads to underreporting of viral contamination in source water. A novel strategy for viral concentration was developed using the expression of target virus receptors on bacterial cells. Poliovirus type 1, the most studied enterovirus, was used as a surrogate for enteric viruses. The human poliovirus receptor (hPVR) gene was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli cells by using the ice nucleation protein (INP) gene. The hPVR gene was ligated to the 3' end of the INP gene after the removal of the stop codon. The resulting open reading frame (ORF) was used for the projection of hPVR onto the outer membrane of E. coli. Gene expression was tested by SDS-PAGE, Western blot, and dot blot analyses, and virion capture ability was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The application of engineered E. coli cells for capturing viruses in 1-liter samples of source and drinking water resulted in 75 to 99% procedural recovery efficiency. Cell surface display of viral receptors on bacterial cells opens a new prospect for an efficient and inexpensive alternative tool for capturing and concentrating waterborne viruses in water samples.

  15. Generation of Recombinant Polioviruses Harboring RNA Affinity Tags in the 5′ and 3′ Noncoding Regions of Genomic RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Flather, Dylan; Cathcart, Andrea L.; Cruz, Casey; Baggs, Eric; Ngo, Tuan; Gershon, Paul D.; Semler, Bert L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite being intensely studied for more than 50 years, a complete understanding of the enterovirus replication cycle remains elusive. Specifically, only a handful of cellular proteins have been shown to be involved in the RNA replication cycle of these viruses. In an effort to isolate and identify additional cellular proteins that function in enteroviral RNA replication, we have generated multiple recombinant polioviruses containing RNA affinity tags within the 3′ or 5′ noncoding region of the genome. These recombinant viruses retained RNA affinity sequences within the genome while remaining viable and infectious over multiple passages in cell culture. Further characterization of these viruses demonstrated that viral protein production and growth kinetics were unchanged or only slightly altered relative to wild type poliovirus. However, attempts to isolate these genetically-tagged viral genomes from infected cells have been hindered by high levels of co-purification of nonspecific proteins and the limited matrix-binding efficiency of RNA affinity sequences. Regardless, these recombinant viruses represent a step toward more thorough characterization of enterovirus ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in RNA replication. PMID:26861382

  16. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Tat-Activated Expression of Poliovirus Protein 2A Inhibits mRNA Translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Hong; Baltimore, David

    1989-04-01

    To study the effect of poliovirus protein 2A on cellular RNA translation, the tat control system of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was used. Protein 2A was expressed from a plasmid construct (pHIV/2A) incorporating the HIV long terminal repeat. Protein synthesis was measured by using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase as a reporter gene driven by the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat. When HIV/2A was contransfected with the reporter, addition of a tat-producing plasmid caused at least a 50-fold drop in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase synthesis. A HeLa cell line carrying HIV/2A was established. In it, tat expression caused more than a 10-fold drop in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase synthesis from the reporter plasmid. Furthermore, 2A induction by tat caused cleavage of the cellular translation factor P220, a part of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F. Thus protein 2A can, by itself, carry out the inhibition of cellular protein synthesis characteristic of a poliovirus infection. Also, the HIV tat activation provides a very effective method to control gene expression in mammalian cells.

  17. Isolation of enteroviruses from water, suspended solids, and sediments from Galveston Bay: survival of poliovirus and rotavirus adsorbed to sediments.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V C; Seidel, K M; Goyal, S M; Metcalf, T G; Melnick, J L

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and quantitation of enteroviruses among water, suspended solids, and compact sediments in a polluted estuary are described. Samples were collected sequentially from water, suspended solids, fluffy sediments (uppermost layer of bottom sediments), and compact sediment. A total of 103 samples were examined of which 27 (26%) were positive for virus. Polioviruses were recovered most often, followed by coxsackie B viruses and echoviruses 7 and 29. Virus was found most often attached to suspended solids: 72% of these samples were positive, whereas only 14% of water samples without solids yielded virus. Fluffy sediments yielded virus in 47% of the samples, whereas only 5% of compact bottom-sediment samples were positive. When associated with solids, poliovirus and rotavirus retained their infectious quality for 19 days. The same viruses remained infectious for only 9 days when freely suspended in seawater. Collection of suspended solids at ambient water pH appears to be very useful for the detection of virus; it has advantages over collecting and processing large volumes of water, with accompanying pH adjustment and salt addition for processing. PMID:6091548

  18. Comparative inactivation of poliovirus type 3 and MS2 coliphage in demand-free phosphate buffer by using ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Finch, G R; Fairbairn, N

    1991-01-01

    MS2 coliphage (ATCC 15597-B1) has been proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as a surrogate for enteric viruses to determine the engineering requirements of chemical disinfection systems on the basis of previous experience with chlorine. The objective of this study was to determine whether MS2 coliphage was a suitable indicator for the inactivation of enteric viruses when ozone disinfection systems were used. Bench-scale experiments were conducted in 2-liter-batch shrinking reactors containing ozone demand-free 0.05 M phosphate buffer (pH 6.9) at 22 degrees C. Ozone was added as a side stream from a concentrated stock solution. It was found that an ozone residual of less than 40 micrograms/liter at the end of 20 s inactivated greater than 99.99% of MS2 coliphage in the demand-free buffer. When MS2 was compared directly with poliovirus type 3 in paired experiments, 1.6 log units more inactivation was observed with MS2 coliphage than with poliovirus type 3. It was concluded that the use of MS2 coliphage as a surrogate organism for studies of enteric virus with ozone disinfection systems overestimated the inactivation of enteric viruses. It is recommended that the regulatory agencies evaluate their recommendations for using MS2 coliphage as an indicator of enteric viruses. PMID:1664198

  19. Evaluation of the establishment of herd immunity in the population by means of serological surveys and vaccination coverage.

    PubMed

    Plans-Rubió, Pedro

    2012-02-01

    The necessary herd immunity blocking the transmission of an infectious agent in the population is established when the prevalence of protected individuals is higher than a critical value, called the herd immunity threshold. The establishment of herd immunity in the population can be determined using the vaccination coverage and seroepidemiological surveys. The vaccination coverage associated with herd immunity (V(c)) can be determined from the herd immunity threshold and vaccine effectiveness. This method requires a vaccine-specific effectiveness evaluation, and it can be used only for the herd immunity assessment of vaccinated communities in which the infectious agent is not circulating. The prevalence of positive serological results associated with herd immunity can be determined from the herd immunity threshold, in terms of prevalence of antibodies (p(c)) and serological test performance. The herd immunity is established when the prevalence of antibodies is higher than pc. This method can be used to assess the establishment of herd immunity in different population groups, both when the infectious agent is circulating and when it is not possible to assess vaccine effectiveness. The herd immunity assessment in Catalonia, Spain, showed that the additional vaccination coverage required to establish herd immunity was 3-6% for measles, mump and varicella and 11% poliovirus type III in school children, 17-59% for diphtheria in youth and adults and 25-46% for persussis in school children, youth and adults.

  20. Nanoparticle vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Seth, Arjun; Wibowo, Nani; Zhao, Chun-Xia; Mitter, Neena; Yu, Chengzhong; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology increasingly plays a significant role in vaccine development. As vaccine development orientates toward less immunogenic "minimalist" compositions, formulations that boost antigen effectiveness are increasingly needed. The use of nanoparticles in vaccine formulations allows not only improved antigen stability and immunogenicity, but also targeted delivery and slow release. A number of nanoparticle vaccines varying in composition, size, shape, and surface properties have been approved for human use and the number of candidates is increasing. However, challenges remain due to a lack of fundamental understanding regarding the in vivo behavior of nanoparticles, which can operate as either a delivery system to enhance antigen processing and/or as an immunostimulant adjuvant to activate or enhance immunity. This review provides a broad overview of recent advances in prophylactic nanovaccinology. Types of nanoparticles used are outlined and their interaction with immune cells and the biosystem are discussed. Increased knowledge and fundamental understanding of nanoparticle mechanism of action in both immunostimulatory and delivery modes, and better understanding of in vivo biodistribution and fate, are urgently required, and will accelerate the rational design of nanoparticle-containing vaccines. PMID:24295808

  1. Cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H

    2015-04-22

    Cancer vaccines are designed to promote tumor specific immune responses, particularly cytotoxic CD8 positive T cells that are specific to tumor antigens. The earliest vaccines, which were developed in 1994-95, tested non-mutated, shared tumor associated antigens that had been shown to be immunogenic and capable of inducing clinical responses in a minority of people with late stage cancer. Technological developments in the past few years have enabled the investigation of vaccines that target mutated antigens that are patient specific. Several platforms for cancer vaccination are being tested, including peptides, proteins, antigen presenting cells, tumor cells, and viral vectors. Standard of care treatments, such as surgery and ablation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, can also induce antitumor immunity, thereby having cancer vaccine effects. The monitoring of patients' immune responses at baseline and after standard of care treatment is shedding light on immune biomarkers. Combination therapies are being tested in clinical trials and are likely to be the best approach to improving patient outcomes.

  2. National, state, and selected local area vaccination coverage among children aged 19-35 months - United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Yankey, David; Singleton, James A; Kolasa, Maureen

    2014-08-29

    In the United States, among children born during 1994-2013, vaccination will prevent an estimated 322 million illnesses, 21 million hospitalizations, and 732,000 deaths during their lifetimes. Since 1994, the National Immunization Survey (NIS) has monitored vaccination coverage among children aged 19-35 months in the United States. This report describes national, regional, state, and selected local area vaccination coverage estimates for children born January 2010-May 2012, based on results from the 2013 NIS. In 2013, vaccination coverage achieved the 90% national Healthy People 2020 target for ≥ 1 dose of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR) (91.9%); ≥ 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) (90.8%); ≥ 3 doses of poliovirus vaccine (92.7%); and ≥ 1 dose of varicella vaccine (91.2%). Coverage was below the Healthy People 2020 targets for ≥ 4 doses of diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccine (DTaP) (83.1%; target 90%); ≥ 4 doses of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) (82.0%; target 90%); the full series of Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine (Hib) (82.0%; target 90%); ≥ 2 doses of hepatitis A vaccine (HepA) (54.7%; target 85%); rotavirus vaccine (72.6%; target 80%); and the HepB birth dose (74.2%; target 85%). Coverage remained stable relative to 2012 for all of the vaccinations with Healthy People 2020 objectives except for increases in the HepB birth dose (by 2.6 percentage points) and rotavirus vaccination (by 4.0 percentage points). The percentage of children who received no vaccinations remained below 1.0% (0.7%). Children living below the federal poverty level had lower vaccination coverage compared with children living at or above the poverty level for many vaccines, with the largest disparities for ≥ 4 doses of DTaP (by 8.2 percentage points), full series of Hib (by 9.5 percentage points), ≥ 4 doses of PCV (by 11.6 percentage points), and rotavirus (by 12.6 percentage points). MMR coverage was below 90% for 17 states. Reaching and

  3. Valuing vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Bärnighausen, Till; Bloom, David E.; Cafiero-Fonseca, Elizabeth T.; O’Brien, Jennifer Carroll

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination has led to remarkable health gains over the last century. However, large coverage gaps remain, which will require significant financial resources and political will to address. In recent years, a compelling line of inquiry has established the economic benefits of health, at both the individual and aggregate levels. Most existing economic evaluations of particular health interventions fail to account for this new research, leading to potentially sizable undervaluation of those interventions. In line with this new research, we set forth a framework for conceptualizing the full benefits of vaccination, including avoided medical care costs, outcome-related productivity gains, behavior-related productivity gains, community health externalities, community economic externalities, and the value of risk reduction and pure health gains. We also review literature highlighting the magnitude of these sources of benefit for different vaccinations. Finally, we outline the steps that need to be taken to implement a broad-approach economic evaluation and discuss the implications of this work for research, policy, and resource allocation for vaccine development and delivery. PMID:25136129

  4. Replicating vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early work on fish immunology and disease resistance demonstrated fish (like animals and humans) that survived infection were typically resistant to re-infection with the same pathogen. The concepts of resistance upon reinfection lead to the research and development of replicating (live) vaccines in...

  5. Vexing Vaccines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    Schools play a key role in ensuring that children are being immunized against diseases, but conflicting research is making enforcement difficult. This article discusses a growing trend of vaccine avoidance and the endless supply of conflicting information and research about immunization safety. Despite the controversy, many people appear to accept…

  6. Malaria vaccine.

    PubMed

    1994-05-01

    Some have argued that the vaccine against malaria developed by Manuel Pattaroyo, a Colombian scientist, is being tested prematurely in humans and that it is unlikely to be successful. While the Pattaroyo vaccine has been shown to confer protection against the relatively mild malaria found in Colombia, doubts exist over whether it will be effective in Africa. Encouraging first results, however, are emerging from field tests in Tanzania. The vaccine triggered a strong new immune response, even in individuals previously exposed to malaria. Additional steps must be taken to establish its impact upon mortality and morbidity. Five major trials are underway around the world. The creator estimates that the first ever effective malaria vaccine could be available for widespread use within five years and he has no intention of securing a patent for the discovery. In another development, malaria specialists from 35 African countries convened at an international workshop in Zimbabwe to compare notes. Participants disparaged financial outlays for the fight against malaria equivalent to 2% of total AIDS funding as insufficient; noted intercountry differences in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment; and found information exchange between anglophone and francophone doctors to be generally poor. PMID:12287671

  7. Genetic and biochemical studies of poliovirus cis-acting replication element cre in relation to VPg uridylylation.

    PubMed

    Rieder, E; Paul, A V; Kim, D W; van Boom, J H; Wimmer, E

    2000-11-01

    In addition to highly conserved stem-loop structures located in the 5'- and 3'-nontranslated regions, genome replication of picornaviruses requires cis-acting RNA elements located in the coding region (termed cre) (K. L. McKnight and S. M. Lemon, J. Virol. 70:1941-1952, 1996; P. E. Lobert, N. Escriou, J. Ruelle, and T. Michiels, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96:11560-11565, 1999; I. Goodfellow, Y. Chaudhry, A. Richardson, J. Meredith, J. W. Almond, W. Barclay, and D. J. Evans, J. Virol. 74:4590-4600, 2000). cre elements appear to be essential for minus-strand RNA synthesis by an as-yet-unknown mechanism. We have discovered that the cre element of poliovirus (mapping to the 2C coding region of poliovirus type 1; nucleotides 4444 to 4505 in 2C), which is homologous to the cre element of poliovirus type 3, is preferentially used as a template for the in vitro uridylylation of VPg catalyzed by 3D(pol) in a reaction that is greatly stimulated by 3CD(pro) (A. V. Paul, E. Rieder, D. W. Kim, J. H. van Boom, and E. Wimmer, J. Virol. 74:10359-10370, 2000). Here we report a direct correlation between mutations that eliminate, or severely reduce, the in vitro VPg-uridylylation reaction and produce replication phenotypes in vivo. None of the genetic changes significantly influenced translation or polyprotein processing. A substitution mapping to the first A (A4472C) of a conserved AAACA sequence in the loop of PV-cre(2C) eliminated the ability of the cre RNA to serve as template for VPg uridylylation and abolished RNA infectivity. Mutagenesis of the second A (A4473C; AAACA) severely reduced the yield of VPgpUpU and RNA infectivity was restored only after reversion to the wild-type sequence. The effect of substitution of the third A (A4474G; AAACA) was less severe but reduced both VPg uridylylation and virus yield. Disruption of base pairing within the upper stem region of PV-cre(2C) also affected uridylylation of VPg. Virus derived from transcripts containing mutations in the stem

  8. Intradermal fractional booster dose of inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine with a jet injector in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Soonawala, Darius; Verdijk, Pauline; Wijmenga-Monsuur, Alienke J; Boog, Claire J; Koedam, Patrick; Visser, Leo G; Rots, Nynke Y

    2013-08-12

    For global eradication of poliomyelitis, inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) needs to become available in all countries. Using fractional-doses (reduced-doses) may impact affordability and optimize the utilization of the production capacity. Intradermal administration has the potential to lower the dose without reducing immunogenicity. A needle-free jet injector may be a reliable way to administer vaccines intradermally. The primary objective of this randomized controlled trial was to compare the immunogenicity and tolerability of fractional-dose intradermal IPV (Netherlands Vaccine Institute, NVI) booster vaccination administered with a jet injector (PharmaJet) to full-dose and fractional-dose intramuscular vaccination with a needle and syringe. Immunogenicity was assessed by comparing the differences in the post-vaccination log2 geometric mean concentrations of neutralizing antibodies (GMC) between the study groups. A total of 125 Dutch adult volunteers with a well-documented vaccination history were randomized to one of four groups: full-dose intramuscular needle (IM-NS-0.5), full-dose intramuscular jet injector (IM-JI-0.5), 1/5th dose intramuscular needle (IM-NS-0.1), 1/5th dose intradermal jet injector (ID-JI-0.1). Vaccination with the JI was less painful (87% no pain) than vaccination with a NS (60% no pain), but caused more transient erythema (JI 85%, NS 24%) and swelling (JI 50%, NS 5%). Intradermal vaccination caused less vaccination site soreness (ID 16%, IM 52%). At baseline all subjects had seroprotective antibody concentrations. After 28 days, GMC were slightly lower in the ID-JI-0.1 group than in the reference group (IM-NS-0.5). The differences were not statistically significant, but the stringent non-inferiority criterion (i.e. a difference of 1 serum dilution in the microneutralization assay) was not met. After one year, differences in GMC were no longer apparent. In contrast, intramuscular vaccination with a fractional dose administered with a

  9. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in Poliovirus Nonstructural Protein 2CATPase Causes Conditional Defects in Encapsidation and Uncoating

    PubMed Central

    Asare, Emmanuel; Mugavero, JoAnn; Jiang, Ping; Paul, Aniko V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The specificity of encapsidation of C-cluster enteroviruses depends on an interaction between capsid proteins and nonstructural protein 2CATPase. In particular, residue N252 of poliovirus 2CATPase interacts with VP3 of coxsackievirus A20, in the context of a chimeric virus. Poliovirus 2CATPase has important roles both in RNA replication and encapsidation. In this study, we searched for additional sites in 2CATPase, near N252, that are required for encapsidation. Accordingly, segments adjacent to N252 were analyzed by combining triple and single alanine mutations to identify residues required for function. Two triple alanine mutants exhibited defects in RNA replication. The remaining two mutations, located in secondary structures in a predicted three-dimensional model of 2CATPase, caused lethal growth phenotypes. Most single alanine mutants, derived from the lethal variants, were either quasi-infectious and yielded variants with wild-type (wt) or temperature-sensitive (ts) growth phenotypes or had a lethal growth phenotype due to defective RNA replication. The K259A mutation, mapping to an α helix in the predicted structure of 2CATPase, resulted in a cold-sensitive virus. In vivo protein synthesis and virus production were strikingly delayed at 33°C relative to the wt, suggesting a defect in uncoating. Studies with a reporter virus indicated that this mutant is also defective in encapsidation at 33°C. Cell imaging confirmed a much-reduced production of K259A mature virus at 33°C relative to the wt. In conclusion, we have for the first time linked a cold-sensitive encapsidation defect in 2CATPase (K259A) to a subsequent delay in uncoating of the virus particle at 33°C during the next cycle of infection. IMPORTANCE Enterovirus morphogenesis, which involves the encapsidation of newly made virion RNA, is a process still poorly understood. Elucidation of this process is important for future drug development for a large variety of diseases caused by these

  10. Vaccine-Preventable Disease Photos

    MedlinePlus

    ... About | A-Z | Contact | Follow Vaccine Information You Need VACCINE BASICS Evaluating Online Health Information FAQs How Vaccines Work Importance of Vaccines Paying for Vaccines State Immunization Programs Tips for Finding Vaccine Records Trusted Sources of Vaccine ... PRETEENS Vaccines You Need ...

  11. Encapsidation of poliovirus replicons encoding the complete human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag gene by using a complementation system which provides the P1 capsid protein in trans.

    PubMed

    Porter, D C; Ansardi, D C; Morrow, C D

    1995-03-01

    Poliovirus genomes which contain small regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gag, pol, and env genes substituted in frame for the P1 capsid region replicate and express HIV-1 proteins as fusion proteins with the P1 capsid precursor protein upon transfection into cells (W. S. Choi, R. Pal-Ghosh, and C. D. Morrow, J. Virol. 65:2875-2883, 1991). Since these genomes, referred to as replicons, do not express capsid proteins, a complementation system was developed to encapsidate the genomes by providing P1 capsid proteins in trans from a recombinant vaccinia virus, VV-P1. Virus stocks of encapsidated replicons were generated after serial passage of the replicon genomes into cells previously infected with VV-P1 (D. C. Porter, D. C. Ansardi, W. S. Choi, and C. D. Morrow, J. Virol. 67:3712-3719, 1993). Using this system, we have further defined the role of the P1 region in viral protein expression and RNA encapsidation. In the present study, we constructed poliovirus replicons which contain the complete 1,492-bp gag gene of HIV-1 substituted for the entire P1 region of poliovirus. To investigate whether the VP4 coding region was required for the replication and encapsidation of poliovirus RNA, a second replicon in which the complete gag gene was substituted for the VP2, VP3, and VP1 capsid sequences was constructed. Transfection of replicon RNA with and without the VP4 coding region into cells resulted in similar levels of expression of the HIV-1 Gag protein and poliovirus 3CD protein, as indicated by immunoprecipitation using specific antibodies. Northern (RNA) blot analysis of RNA from transfected cells demonstrated comparable levels of RNA replication for each replicon. Transfection of the replicon genomes into cells infected with VV-P1 resulted in the encapsidation of the genomes; serial passage in the presence of VV-P1 resulted in the generation of virus stocks of encapsidated replicons. Analysis of the levels of protein expression and encapsidated

  12. Vaccines and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnancy, please see the MotherToBaby fact sheet Seasonal Influenza Vaccine (Flu Shot) during Pregnancy ( http: / / mothertobaby. org/ fact- sheets/ seasonal- influenza- vaccine- flu- shot- pregnancy/ pdf/ ). Nasal spray flu vaccines ...

  13. Vaccinations and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Do not measure your viral load within 4 weeks of any vaccination. Flu shots have been studied ... live” vaccination in the past 2 or 3 weeks. Still, the “MMR” vaccine against measles, mumps and ...

  14. Your Baby's First Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Barcodes Related Link Vaccines & Immunizations Your Child's First Vaccines Format: Select one PDF [335 KB] RTF [260 ... child will get one or more of these vaccines today: DTaP Hib Hepatitis B Polio PCV13 Why ...

  15. Vaccines Stop Illness

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... meningitis won't infect, cripple, or kill children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  16. Rotavirus Vaccine -- Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... to these vaccines. The infant's immune response to influenza vaccine administered at the same time as rotavirus vaccine ... previously that an inactivated vaccine (e.g., inactivated influenza vaccine) may be administered either simultaneously or at any ...

  17. Subviral Particle as Vaccine and Vaccine Platform

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ming; Jiang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subvirual particles retain similar antigenic features of their authentic viral capsids and thus have been applied as nonreplicating subunit vaccines against viral infection and illness. Additionally, the self-assembled, polyvalent subviral particles are excellent platforms to display foreign antigens for immune enhancement for vaccine development. These subviral particle-based vaccines are noninfectious and thus safer than the conventional live attenuated and inactivated vaccines. While several VLP vaccines are available in the markets, numerous others, including dual vaccines against more than one pathogen, are under clinical or preclinical development. This article provides an update of these efforts. PMID:24662314

  18. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2014-01-01

    Measles vaccination: Targeted and non-targeted benefits CDC reports: 2-dose regimen of chickenpox vaccine is a success Positive preliminary results from the CAPiTA study Seasonal flu vaccine associate with reduced stroke risk HPV vaccine shown to halve cervical abnormalities Global prize for mobile mast vaccine storage project Developmental pathway of potent HIV-neutralizing antibodies Burkholderia vaccine: US Dep of Defense collaborates with Bavarian Nordic

  19. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M.

    2012-01-01

    Two therapeutic HPV vaccine candidates successful in phase 1 Flu shot may prevent heart attacks and stroke CDX-1401 combined with TLR agonist: Positive phase 1 results Three MRSA vaccines in early clincial trials Ovarian cancer vaccine candidate DPX-Survivac: Positive interim results from phase 1 Chinese biotech partnership brings first hepatitis E vaccine to the market Therapeutic vaccine for treatment of genital herpes enters phase 2 Visionary concept: Printable vaccines PMID:23817319

  20. Engineered human vaccines

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, J.S. . Div. of Immunology and Neurobiology)

    1994-01-01

    The limitations of human vaccines in use at present and the design requirements for a new generation of human vaccines are discussed. The progress in engineering of human vaccines for bacteria, viruses, parasites, and cancer is reviewed, and the data from human studies with the engineered vaccines are discussed, especially for cancer and AIDS vaccines. The final section of the review deals with the possible future developments in the field of engineered human vaccines and the requirement for effective new human adjuvants.

  1. Vaccines.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting Vaccinated More Info Glossary Our Partners Related Websites AIDS.gov Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) CDC Vaccines Countermeasures Injury Compensation Program ...

  2. A New Method for Estimating the Coverage of Mass Vaccination Campaigns Against Poliomyelitis From Surveillance Data

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, K. M.; Cori, A.; Durry, E.; Wadood, M. Z.; Bosan, A.; Aylward, R. B.; Grassly, N. C.

    2015-01-01

    Mass vaccination campaigns with the oral poliovirus vaccine targeting children aged <5 years are a critical component of the global poliomyelitis eradication effort. Monitoring the coverage of these campaigns is essential to allow corrective action, but current approaches are limited by their cross-sectional nature, nonrandom sampling, reporting biases, and accessibility issues. We describe a new Bayesian framework using data augmentation and Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to estimate variation in vaccination coverage from children's vaccination histories investigated during surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis. We tested the method using simulated data with at least 200 cases and were able to detect undervaccinated groups if they exceeded 10% of all children and temporal changes in coverage of ±10% with greater than 90% sensitivity. Application of the method to data from Pakistan for 2010–2011 identified undervaccinated groups within the Balochistan/Federally Administered Tribal Areas and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa regions, as well as temporal changes in coverage. The sizes of these groups are consistent with the multiple challenges faced by the program in these regions as a result of conflict and insecurity. Application of this new method to routinely collected data can be a useful tool for identifying poorly performing areas and assisting in eradication efforts. PMID:26568569

  3. A New Method for Estimating the Coverage of Mass Vaccination Campaigns Against Poliomyelitis From Surveillance Data.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, K M; Cori, A; Durry, E; Wadood, M Z; Bosan, A; Aylward, R B; Grassly, N C

    2015-12-01

    Mass vaccination campaigns with the oral poliovirus vaccine targeting children aged <5 years are a critical component of the global poliomyelitis eradication effort. Monitoring the coverage of these campaigns is essential to allow corrective action, but current approaches are limited by their cross-sectional nature, nonrandom sampling, reporting biases, and accessibility issues. We describe a new Bayesian framework using data augmentation and Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to estimate variation in vaccination coverage from children's vaccination histories investigated during surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis. We tested the method using simulated data with at least 200 cases and were able to detect undervaccinated groups if they exceeded 10% of all children and temporal changes in coverage of ±10% with greater than 90% sensitivity. Application of the method to data from Pakistan for 2010-2011 identified undervaccinated groups within the Balochistan/Federally Administered Tribal Areas and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa regions, as well as temporal changes in coverage. The sizes of these groups are consistent with the multiple challenges faced by the program in these regions as a result of conflict and insecurity. Application of this new method to routinely collected data can be a useful tool for identifying poorly performing areas and assisting in eradication efforts.

  4. A New Method for Estimating the Coverage of Mass Vaccination Campaigns Against Poliomyelitis From Surveillance Data.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, K M; Cori, A; Durry, E; Wadood, M Z; Bosan, A; Aylward, R B; Grassly, N C

    2015-12-01

    Mass vaccination campaigns with the oral poliovirus vaccine targeting children aged <5 years are a critical component of the global poliomyelitis eradication effort. Monitoring the coverage of these campaigns is essential to allow corrective action, but current approaches are limited by their cross-sectional nature, nonrandom sampling, reporting biases, and accessibility issues. We describe a new Bayesian framework using data augmentation and Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to estimate variation in vaccination coverage from children's vaccination histories investigated during surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis. We tested the method using simulated data with at least 200 cases and were able to detect undervaccinated groups if they exceeded 10% of all children and temporal changes in coverage of ±10% with greater than 90% sensitivity. Application of the method to data from Pakistan for 2010-2011 identified undervaccinated groups within the Balochistan/Federally Administered Tribal Areas and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa regions, as well as temporal changes in coverage. The sizes of these groups are consistent with the multiple challenges faced by the program in these regions as a result of conflict and insecurity. Application of this new method to routinely collected data can be a useful tool for identifying poorly performing areas and assisting in eradication efforts. PMID:26568569

  5. [Vaccination in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Kwetkat, A; Pletz, M W

    2013-10-01

    The aging immune system, so-called immunosenescence, is well documented as the cause of increased infection rates and severe, often complicated course of infections in the elderly with increased morbidity and mortality rates. Furthermore, it can lead to decreased efficacy of vaccination. The administration of more immunogenic vaccines can be beneficial in the elderly. Implementing vaccination recommendations for the elderly by STIKO can reduce burden of infectious diseases by prevention of infection or reduction of severity of infection. The following vaccinations are recommended by STIKO for all persons aged 60 and above: annual influenza vaccination (additionally all nursing home residents independently of age), once only pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination, completion of tetanus and diphtheria (Td) vaccination as well as regular revaccination. All adults should be vaccinated against pertussis with Tdap vaccine once. Meanwhile, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is allowed for administration in adults but is not recommended by STIKO yet. A lifelong course of vaccination may help to attenuate the effect of immunosenescence.

  6. Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of the human rotavirus vaccine, RIX4414 oral suspension, when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong-Cheng; Huang, Teng; Li, Yanping; Wang, Lao-Hong; Tao, Junhui; Fu, Botao; Si, Guoai; Nong, Yi; Mo, Zhaojun; Liao, XueYan; Luan, Ivy; Tang, Haiwen; Rathi, Niraj; Karkada, Naveen; Han, Htay Htay

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the immunogenicity of the human rotavirus (RV) vaccine (RIX4414) when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants (NCT01171963). Healthy infants aged 6-16 weeks received 2 doses of either RIX4414 or placebo according to a 0, 1-month schedule. Infants received routine diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTPa) and oral poliovirus (OPV) vaccines either separately from or concomitantly with RIX4414/placebo (separate and co-administration cohorts, respectively). Anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates (one month post-dose-2) and seropositivity rates (at one year of age) were measured using ELISA. Immune responses against the DTPa and OPV antigens were measured one month post-DTPa dose-3 in the co-administration cohort. Solicited local and general symptoms were recorded for 8-days post-vaccination (total cohort). The according-to-protocol immunogenicity population included 511 infants in the separate cohort and 275 in the co-administration cohort. One month post-RIX4414 dose-2, anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates were 74.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 68.9-79.9) and 64.2% (95% CI: 55.4-72.3) in the separate and co-administration cohorts; seropositivity rates at one year of age were 71.5% (95% CI: 65.5-77.1) and 50.0% (95% CI: 40.9-59.1), respectively. One month post-DTPa dose-3, all infants in the co-administration cohort were seroprotected against diphtheria and tetanus, and seropositive for pertussis toxoid, pertactin and filamentous haemaglutinin. Two months post-OPV dose-3, seroprotection rates against anti-poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 were >99% in the co-administration cohort. Reactogenicity profiles were similar in both cohorts. RIX4414 was immunogenic and well-tolerated in Chinese infants and did not appear to interfere with the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of co-administered routine childhood vaccines. PMID:27149266

  7. Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of the human rotavirus vaccine, RIX4414 oral suspension, when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rong-cheng; Huang, Teng; Li, Yanping; Wang, Lao-Hong; Tao, Junhui; Fu, Botao; Si, Guoai; Nong, Yi; Mo, Zhaojun; Liao, XueYan; Luan, Ivy; Tang, Haiwen; Rathi, Niraj; Karkada, Naveen; Han, Htay Htay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the immunogenicity of the human rotavirus (RV) vaccine (RIX4414) when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants (NCT01171963). Healthy infants aged 6–16 weeks received 2 doses of either RIX4414 or placebo according to a 0, 1-month schedule. Infants received routine diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTPa) and oral poliovirus (OPV) vaccines either separately from or concomitantly with RIX4414/placebo (separate and co-administration cohorts, respectively). Anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates (one month post-dose-2) and seropositivity rates (at one year of age) were measured using ELISA. Immune responses against the DTPa and OPV antigens were measured one month post-DTPa dose-3 in the co-administration cohort. Solicited local and general symptoms were recorded for 8-days post-vaccination (total cohort). The according-to-protocol immunogenicity population included 511 infants in the separate cohort and 275 in the co-administration cohort. One month post-RIX4414 dose-2, anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates were 74.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 68.9–79.9) and 64.2% (95% CI: 55.4–72.3) in the separate and co-administration cohorts; seropositivity rates at one year of age were 71.5% (95% CI: 65.5–77.1) and 50.0% (95% CI: 40.9–59.1), respectively. One month post-DTPa dose-3, all infants in the co-administration cohort were seroprotected against diphtheria and tetanus, and seropositive for pertussis toxoid, pertactin and filamentous haemaglutinin. Two months post-OPV dose-3, seroprotection rates against anti-poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 were >99% in the co-administration cohort. Reactogenicity profiles were similar in both cohorts. RIX4414 was immunogenic and well-tolerated in Chinese infants and did not appear to interfere with the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of co-administered routine childhood vaccines. PMID:27149266

  8. The threat of vaccine associated poliomyelitis in India: medicolegal issues involved.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Meena; Sharma, Luv

    2010-12-01

    India is among the world's large reservoirs of wild poliovirus (WPV) with 559 confirmed cases of poliomyelitis (wild virus) being reported in 2008. The World Health Organization's program for the eradication of poliomyelitis in third world countries like India is associated with major ethical and medico-legal implications. Two vaccines are available in India for poliomyelitis i.e. oral polio vaccine (OPV) and inactivated polio vaccine (IPV), of which OPV is used in the eradication campaign, the case count for 2009 being 36 out of a total of 384 reported cases globally, the case count for mid 2010 being 19 cases out of 84 reported globally. There are widespread reports of vaccine derived poliomyelitis as well as vaccine associated poliomyelitis (VAP) from different parts of the country, which can be linked to resurgence of polio in several states or to the failure of the polio drive (Polio Sundays). Though an extended comprehensive polio campaign is on and both money and manpower are being dumped for achieving the goal of polio eradication, the ground reality is entirely different. The argument that wild polio strains have surfaced to hamper the drive cannot account for all post vaccination cases. The Indian Academy of Paediatrics has forcefully suggested replacement of OPV by IPV, as the effectiveness of IPV far exceeds the cost benefit of OPV. IPV has by and large replaced OPV in many parts of the world. The second issue is the threat of litigation on the health department once the post vaccination cases rise even further. There are certain other socio-ethical issues discussed in this paper on a subject which has an important bearing on the health statistics of this country.

  9. Adverse events following vaccination in the French armed forces: An overview of surveillance conducted from 2002 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Mayet, A; Haus-Cheymol, R; Bouaiti, E A; Decam, C; Simon, F; Mérens, A; Spiegel, A; Meynard, J B; Deparis, X; Migliani, R

    2012-06-14

    French military personnel are subject to a compulsory vaccination schedule. The aim of this study was to describe vaccine adverse events (VAE) reported from 2002 to 2010 in armed forces. VAE are routinely surveyed by the military Centre for epidemiology and public health. For each case, military practitioners fill a notification form, providing patient characteristics, clinical information and vaccines administered. For this study, VAE following influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination were excluded. Among the 473 cases retained, 442 (93%) corresponded to non-severe VAE,including local, regional and systemic events, while 31 corresponded to severe VAE, with two leading to significant disability. The global VAE reporting rate (RR) was 14.0 per 100,000 injections. While stationary from 2002 to 2008, the RR increased from 2009. The most important observations were a marked increase of VAE attributed to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine from 2005 to 2008, a high RR observed with the inactivated diphtheria-tetanus (toxoids)-poliovirus vaccine combined with acellular pertussis vaccine (dTap-IPV) from 2008 and an increase in RR for seasonal influenza vaccine VAE in 2009. Our RR for severe VAE (1.1 VAEper 100,000) appears comparable with rates observed among United States civilians and military personnel. The increase observed from 2009 could be partly explained by the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic which increased practitioner awareness towards VAE. In conclusion, the tolerance of the vaccines used in French armed forces appears acceptable.

  10. An experimental study on the epidemiology of enteroviruses: water and soap washing of poliovirus 1--contaminated hands, its effectiveness and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, W; Eggers, H J

    1985-01-01

    As enteroviruses are mainly transmitted by the fecal-oral route, this study was initiated to investigate the nature of the binding of enteroviruses to human skin. Using poliovirus 1, Mahoney, we investigated the overall effectiveness of soap and water hand-washing of 1 and 5 min duration. The virus-skin interaction was studied by kinetic analysis of repeated serial washings. The following results were obtained: (1) Soap and water washing for 5 min reduced the number of infective particles on hands by 2-4 logs of ten. (2) Poliovirus binding to skin was essentially reversible. (3) Removal of virus followed a triexponential decline curve, suggesting loose, intermediate, and strong binding. (4) Washing agents more effective than soap were sand, aluminum hydroxide powder, and buffer alone, suggesting that friction was more important than emulsification. The results demonstrate the tenacity of poliovirus on skin, and offer a rationale for the epidemiology of enteroviruses on experimental grounds. From a practical point of view these results stress the need for an effective chemical hand disinfectant, particularly in hospitals.

  11. Quality of the Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) antibody response induced by diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis/Hib combination vaccines.

    PubMed

    Denoël, Philippe A; Goldblatt, David; de Vleeschauwer, Isabel; Jacquet, Jeanne-Marie; Pichichero, Michael E; Poolman, Jan T

    2007-10-01

    It has been repeatedly observed that mixing Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccines with acellular pertussis-containing vaccines (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis [DTPa]) resulted in a reduced magnitude of the anti-polyriboseribitolphosphate antibody response compared to that obtained when Hib vaccines were administered separately and not mixed. Nevertheless, the quality and functionality of the immune responses have been shown to be the same. With the purpose of investigating the quality of the anti-Hib immune responses that are elicited under different vaccination regimens, we report here four primary and booster-based pediatric clinical trials in which Hib vaccine was either mixed with DTPa or diphtheria-tetanus-whole-cell pertussis (DTPw)-based vaccines or was coadministered. Our results show that avidity maturation of the antibodies was lower when primary vaccination involved DTPa mixed with Hib compared to when DTPa and Hib were coadministered. No such difference was observed between mixed and separately administered Hib when associated with DTPa-hepatitis B virus-inactivated poliovirus or DTPw-based vaccines. All different combinations and regimens elicited the same opsonophagocytic and bactericidal activity as well as the same ability to protect in a passive infant rat protection assay. The functional activity of mixed DTPa-based and Hib vaccines was similar to that of mixed DTPw-based/Hib combinations. In conclusion, in vitro and in vivo data as well as postmarketing vaccine effectiveness data attest to the ability of DTPa-based/Hib combination vaccines to effectively prevent Hib-induced disease in children.

  12. History of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Plotkin, Stanley

    2014-08-26

    Vaccines have a history that started late in the 18th century. From the late 19th century, vaccines could be developed in the laboratory. However, in the 20th century, it became possible to develop vaccines based on immunologic markers. In the 21st century, molecular biology permits vaccine development that was not possible before.

  13. Hepatitis B Vaccination Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... The hepatitis B vaccination is a non-infectious, vaccine prepared from recombinant yeast cultures, rather than human blood or plasma. There is no risk of contamination from other bloodborne pathogens nor is there any ... from the vaccine. The vaccine must be administered according to the ...

  14. Vaccine adverse events.

    PubMed

    Follows, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Millions of adults are vaccinated annually against the seasonal influenza virus. An undetermined number of individuals will develop adverse events to the influenza vaccination. Those who suffer substantiated vaccine injuries, disabilities, and aggravated conditions may file a timely, no-fault and no-cost petition for financial compensation under the National Vaccine Act in the Vaccine Court. The elements of a successful vaccine injury claim are described in the context of a claim showing the seasonal influenza vaccination was the cause of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  15. Countering Vaccine Hesitancy.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Kathryn M; Hackell, Jesse M

    2016-09-01

    Immunizations have led to a significant decrease in rates of vaccine-preventable diseases and have made a significant impact on the health of children. However, some parents express concerns about vaccine safety and the necessity of vaccines. The concerns of parents range from hesitancy about some immunizations to refusal of all vaccines. This clinical report provides information about addressing parental concerns about vaccination. PMID:27573088

  16. Existing antiviral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ravanfar, Parisa; Satyaprakash, Anita; Creed, Rosella; Mendoza, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    The innovation of vaccines has allowed for one of the greatest advancements in the history of public health. The first of the vaccines have been the antiviral vaccines, in particular the smallpox vaccine that was first developed by Edward Jenner in 1796. This article will review vaccination for the following viral diseases: measles, mumps, rubella, polio, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, influenza, rotavirus, rabies, monkeypox, smallpox, Japanese encephalitis, and yellow fever. PMID:19335723

  17. Vaccine-Associated Uveitis.

    PubMed

    Benage, Matthew; Fraunfelder, Frederick W

    2016-01-01

    All of the widely administered vaccines have been reported to cause uveitis. The ocular inflammation is usually temporary and resolves with topical ocular steroids. During a 26-year period, a total of 289 cases of vaccine-associated uveitis were reported to three adverse reaction reporting databases. Hepatitis B vaccine, either alone or administered with other vaccines, appears to be the leading offender. Clinicians are encouraged to report cases of vaccine- or drug-associated ocular adverse reactions to www.eyedrugregistry.com.

  18. Meningococcal groups C and Y and haemophilus B tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (HibMenCY-TT; MenHibrix(®)): a review.

    PubMed

    Perry, Caroline M

    2013-05-01

    The meningococcal groups C and Y and Haemophilus b (Hib) tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (HibMenCY-TT) contains Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C and Y capsular polysaccharide antigens, and Hib capsular polysaccharide [polyribosyl-ribitol-phosphate (PRP)]. The HibMenCY-TT vaccine is available in the USA for use as active immunization to prevent invasive disease caused by N. meningitidis serogroups C (MenC) and Y (MenY), and Hib in children 6 weeks-18 months of age. HibMenCY-TT is the first meningococcal vaccine available for use in the USA that can be administered to infants as young as 6 weeks of age. In a randomized, controlled, phase III clinical trial, the HibMenCY-TT vaccine, administered to infants at 2, 4, 6 and 12-15 months of age, was immunogenic against MenC and MenY, and met the prespecified criteria for immunogenicity. Anti-PRP antibodies, which have been shown to correlate with protection against Hib invasive disease, were also induced in the infants who received the HibMenCY-TT vaccine, with induced levels of this antibody noninferior to those occurring in the control group of infants who received a Hib tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine at 2, 4, and 6 months and a single dose of Hib conjugated to N. meningitidis outer membrane protein at 12-15 months. In several randomized, controlled clinical trials, HibMenCY-TT was coadministered with vaccines that are routinely administered to infants and toddlers in the USA. These vaccines included: diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis adsorbed, hepatitis B (recombinant) and inactivated poliovirus vaccine combined; 7-valent Streptococcus pneumoniae polysaccharide conjugate vaccine; measles, mumps and rubella vaccine; and varicella vaccine. Coadministration of these vaccines did not interfere with the immunogenicity of the HibMenCY-TT vaccine. Similarly, immune responses to the coadministered vaccines were not affected by the HibMenCY-TT vaccine. The tolerability profile of the Hib

  19. Vaccines against malaria.

    PubMed

    Hill, Adrian V S

    2011-10-12

    There is no licenced vaccine against any human parasitic disease and Plasmodium falciparum malaria, a major cause of infectious mortality, presents a great challenge to vaccine developers. This has led to the assessment of a wide variety of approaches to malaria vaccine design and development, assisted by the availability of a safe challenge model for small-scale efficacy testing of vaccine candidates. Malaria vaccine development has been at the forefront of assessing many new vaccine technologies including novel adjuvants, vectored prime-boost regimes and the concept of community vaccination to block malaria transmission. Most current vaccine candidates target a single stage of the parasite's life cycle and vaccines against the early pre-erythrocytic stages have shown most success. A protein in adjuvant vaccine, working through antibodies against sporozoites, and viral vector vaccines targeting the intracellular liver-stage parasite with cellular immunity show partial efficacy in humans, and the anti-sporozoite vaccine is currently in phase III trials. However, a more effective malaria vaccine suitable for widespread cost-effective deployment is likely to require a multi-component vaccine targeting more than one life cycle stage. The most attractive near-term approach to develop such a product is to combine existing partially effective pre-erythrocytic vaccine candidates. PMID:21893544

  20. Obesity vaccines.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Mariana P

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is one of the largest and fastest growing public health problems in the world. Last century social changes have set an obesogenic milieu that calls for micro and macro environment interventions for disease prevention, while treatment is mandatory for individuals already obese. The cornerstone of overweight and obesity treatment is diet and physical exercise. However, many patients find lifestyle modifications difficult to comply and prone to failure in the long-term; therefore many patients consider anti-obesity drugs an important adjuvant if not a better alternative to behavioral approach or obesity surgery. Since the pharmacological options for obesity treatment remain quite limited, this is an exciting research area, with new treatment targets and strategies on the horizon. This review discusses the development of innovative therapeutic agents, focusing in energy homeostasis regulation and the use of molecular vaccines, targeting hormones such as somatostatin, GIP and ghrelin, to reduce body weight.

  1. Typhoid fever vaccination strategies.

    PubMed

    Date, Kashmira A; Bentsi-Enchill, Adwoa; Marks, Florian; Fox, Kimberley

    2015-06-19

    Typhoid vaccination is an important component of typhoid fever prevention and control, and is recommended for public health programmatic use in both endemic and outbreak settings. We reviewed experiences with various vaccination strategies using the currently available typhoid vaccines (injectable Vi polysaccharide vaccine [ViPS], oral Ty21a vaccine, and injectable typhoid conjugate vaccine [TCV]). We assessed the rationale, acceptability, effectiveness, impact and implementation lessons of these strategies to inform effective typhoid vaccination strategies for the future. Vaccination strategies were categorized by vaccine disease control strategy (preemptive use for endemic disease or to prevent an outbreak, and reactive use for outbreak control) and vaccine delivery strategy (community-based routine, community-based campaign and school-based). Almost all public health typhoid vaccination programs used ViPS vaccine and have been in countries of Asia, with one example in the Pacific and one experience using the Ty21a vaccine in South America. All vaccination strategies were found to be acceptable, feasible and effective in the settings evaluated; evidence of impact, where available, was strongest in endemic settings and in the short- to medium-term. Vaccination was cost-effective in high-incidence but not low-incidence settings. Experience in disaster and outbreak settings remains limited. TCVs have recently become available and none are WHO-prequalified yet; no program experience with TCVs was found in published literature. Despite the demonstrated success of several typhoid vaccination strategies, typhoid vaccines remain underused. Implementation lessons should be applied to design optimal vaccination strategies using TCVs which have several anticipated advantages, such as potential for use in infant immunization programs and longer duration of protection, over the ViPS and Ty21a vaccines for typhoid prevention and control.

  2. Escape from transcriptional shutoff during poliovirus infection: NF-κB-responsive genes IκBa and A20.

    PubMed

    Doukas, Tammy; Sarnow, Peter

    2011-10-01

    It has been known for a long time that infection of cultured cells with poliovirus results in the overall inhibition of transcription of most host genes. We examined whether selected host genes can escape transcriptional inhibition by thiouridine marking newly synthesized host mRNAs during viral infection. Using cDNA microarrays hybridized to cDNAs made from thiolated mRNAs, a small set of host transcripts was identified and their expression verified by quantitative PCR and Northern and Western blot analyses. These transcripts were synthesized from genes that displayed enrichment for NF-κB binding sites in their promoter regions, suggesting that some NF-κB-regulated promoters can escape the virus-induced inhibition of transcription. In particular, two negative regulators of NF-κB, IκBa and A20, were upregulated during viral infection. Depletion of A20 enhanced viral RNA abundance and viral yield, arguing that cells respond to virus infection by counteracting NF-κB-induced proviral effects.

  3. Cryo-Electron Microscopy Reconstruction Shows Poliovirus 135S Particles Poised for Membrane Interaction and RNA Release

    PubMed Central

    Butan, Carmen; Filman, David J.

    2014-01-01

    During infection, binding of mature poliovirus to cell surface receptors induces an irreversible expansion of the capsid, to form an infectious cell-entry intermediate particle that sediments at 135S. In these expanded virions, the major capsid proteins (VP1 to VP3) adopt an altered icosahedral arrangement to open holes in the capsid at 2-fold and quasi-3-fold axes, and internal polypeptides VP4 and the N terminus of VP1, which can bind membranes, become externalized. Cryo-electron microscopy images for 117,330 particles were collected using Leginon and reconstructed using FREALIGN. Improved rigid-body positioning of major capsid proteins established reliably which polypeptide segments become disordered or rearranged. The virus-to-135S transition includes expansion of 4%, rearrangements of the GH loops of VP3 and VP1, and disordering of C-terminal extensions of VP1 and VP2. The N terminus of VP1 rearranges to become externalized near its quasi-3-fold exit, binds to rearranged GH loops of VP3 and VP1, and attaches to the top surface of VP2. These details improve our understanding of subsequent stages of infection, including endocytosis and RNA transfer into the cytoplasm. PMID:24257617

  4. Contribution of Contact Sampling in Increasing Sensitivity of Poliovirus Detection During A Polio Outbreak-Somalia, 2013.

    PubMed

    Moturi, Edna; Mahmud, Abdirahman; Kamadjeu, Raoul; Mbaeyi, Chukwuma; Farag, Noha; Mulugeta, Abraham; Gary, Howard; Ehrhardt, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Background.  In May 2013, a wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) outbreak reported in Somalia provided an opportunity to examine the contribution of testing contacts to WPV detection. Methods.  We reviewed acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) case-patients and linked contacts reported in the Somalia Surveillance Database from May 9 to December 31, 2013. We restricted our analysis to AFP case-patients that had ≥3 contacts and calculated the contribution of each contact to case detection. Results.  Among 546 AFP cases identified, 328 AFP cases had ≥3 contacts. Among the 328 AFP cases with ≥3 contacts, 93 WPV1 cases were detected: 58 cases (62%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 52%-72%) were detected through testing stool specimens from AFP case-patients; and 35 cases (38%; 95% CI, 28%-48%) were detected through testing stool specimens from contacts, including 19 cases (20%; 95% CI, 14%-30%) from the first contact, 11 cases (12%; 95% CI, 7%-20%) from the second contact, and 5 cases (5%; 95% CI, 2%-12%) from the third contact. Among the 103 AFP cases with ≥4 contacts, 3 (6%; 95% CI, 2%-16%) of 52 WPV1 cases were detected by testing the fourth contact. No additional WPV1 cases were detected by testing >4 contacts. Conclusions.  Stool specimens from 3 to 4 contacts of persons with AFP during polio outbreaks are needed to maximize detection of WPV cases.

  5. Contribution of Contact Sampling in Increasing Sensitivity of Poliovirus Detection During A Polio Outbreak-Somalia, 2013.

    PubMed

    Moturi, Edna; Mahmud, Abdirahman; Kamadjeu, Raoul; Mbaeyi, Chukwuma; Farag, Noha; Mulugeta, Abraham; Gary, Howard; Ehrhardt, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Background.  In May 2013, a wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) outbreak reported in Somalia provided an opportunity to examine the contribution of testing contacts to WPV detection. Methods.  We reviewed acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) case-patients and linked contacts reported in the Somalia Surveillance Database from May 9 to December 31, 2013. We restricted our analysis to AFP case-patients that had ≥3 contacts and calculated the contribution of each contact to case detection. Results.  Among 546 AFP cases identified, 328 AFP cases had ≥3 contacts. Among the 328 AFP cases with ≥3 contacts, 93 WPV1 cases were detected: 58 cases (62%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 52%-72%) were detected through testing stool specimens from AFP case-patients; and 35 cases (38%; 95% CI, 28%-48%) were detected through testing stool specimens from contacts, including 19 cases (20%; 95% CI, 14%-30%) from the first contact, 11 cases (12%; 95% CI, 7%-20%) from the second contact, and 5 cases (5%; 95% CI, 2%-12%) from the third contact. Among the 103 AFP cases with ≥4 contacts, 3 (6%; 95% CI, 2%-16%) of 52 WPV1 cases were detected by testing the fourth contact. No additional WPV1 cases were detected by testing >4 contacts. Conclusions.  Stool specimens from 3 to 4 contacts of persons with AFP during polio outbreaks are needed to maximize detection of WPV cases. PMID:27419182

  6. Contribution of Contact Sampling in Increasing Sensitivity of Poliovirus Detection During A Polio Outbreak—Somalia, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Moturi, Edna; Mahmud, Abdirahman; Kamadjeu, Raoul; Mbaeyi, Chukwuma; Farag, Noha; Mulugeta, Abraham; Gary, Howard; Ehrhardt, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Background. In May 2013, a wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) outbreak reported in Somalia provided an opportunity to examine the contribution of testing contacts to WPV detection. Methods. We reviewed acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) case-patients and linked contacts reported in the Somalia Surveillance Database from May 9 to December 31, 2013. We restricted our analysis to AFP case-patients that had ≥3 contacts and calculated the contribution of each contact to case detection. Results. Among 546 AFP cases identified, 328 AFP cases had ≥3 contacts. Among the 328 AFP cases with ≥3 contacts, 93 WPV1 cases were detected: 58 cases (62%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 52%–72%) were detected through testing stool specimens from AFP case-patients; and 35 cases (38%; 95% CI, 28%–48%) were detected through testing stool specimens from contacts, including 19 cases (20%; 95% CI, 14%–30%) from the first contact, 11 cases (12%; 95% CI, 7%–20%) from the second contact, and 5 cases (5%; 95% CI, 2%–12%) from the third contact. Among the 103 AFP cases with ≥4 contacts, 3 (6%; 95% CI, 2%–16%) of 52 WPV1 cases were detected by testing the fourth contact. No additional WPV1 cases were detected by testing >4 contacts. Conclusions. Stool specimens from 3 to 4 contacts of persons with AFP during polio outbreaks are needed to maximize detection of WPV cases. PMID:27419182

  7. [Developments in HPV vaccination].

    PubMed

    de Melker, Hester; Kenter, Gemma; van Rossum, Tekla; Conyn-van Spaendonck, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination against the human papilloma virus (HPV) has been included in the national Vaccination Programme of the Netherlands for 12-year-old girls since 2010. Vaccination coverage for the birth cohort of 1997 was 56.; there is a gradual increase in uptake. Continuous safety monitoring brought no new unknown serious side effects to light; many girls suffered from transient symptoms such as painful arm, fatigue and headache. After the current vaccines that protect against HPV types 2 and 4 types, respectively and induce some cross protection, vaccines are being developed that can induce broader protection. HPV vaccination of 12-year-old girls is cost-effective, even for relatively low vaccination coverage. The potential protection of HPV vaccination extends beyond prevention of cervical cancer by preventing other oncological manifestations of HPV infection in women as well as men and genital warts. The preventive HPV vaccines do not appear to be effective in treating existing abnormalities. PMID:23171565

  8. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination.

  9. Mumps - Vaccine Q and A

    MedlinePlus

    ... containing vaccine, given as combination measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine, separated by at least 28 days, are routinely ... been vaccinated should also receive 1 dose of MMR vaccine, but adults who work in healthcare, a school/ ...

  10. Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes The table below shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  11. Side Effects of Smallpox Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index SMALLPOX FACT SHEET Side Effects of Smallpox Vaccination The smallpox vaccine prevents smallpox. For most people, ... go away without treatment: The arm receiving the vaccination may be sore and red where the vaccine ...

  12. Vaccination: An Act of Love

    MedlinePlus

    ... benefits of vaccines. For this reason, we created Vaccination Week in the Americas to get vaccines to ... and no one gets left behind. Help the vaccination teams when they come to your town, your ...

  13. Vaccines against poverty.

    PubMed

    MacLennan, Calman A; Saul, Allan

    2014-08-26

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vaccines for neglected infectious diseases. However, the majority of this went to three diseases: HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and not neglected diseases. Much of it went to basic research rather than development, with an ongoing decline in funding for product development partnerships. Further investment in vaccines against diarrheal diseases, hepatitis C, and group A Streptococcus could lead to a major health impact in LMICs, along with vaccines to prevent sepsis, particularly among mothers and neonates. The Advanced Market Commitment strategy of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI) Alliance is helping to implement vaccines against rotavirus and pneumococcus in LMICs, and the roll out of the MenAfriVac meningococcal A vaccine in the African Meningitis Belt represents a paradigm shift in vaccines against poverty: the development of a vaccine primarily targeted at LMICs. Global health vaccine institutes and increasing capacity of vaccine manufacturers in emerging economies are helping drive forward new vaccines for LMICs. Above all, partnership is needed between those developing and manufacturing LMIC vaccines and the scientists, health care professionals, and policy makers in LMICs where such vaccines will be implemented.

  14. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  15. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  16. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  17. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  18. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  19. Vaccines and Immunization Practice.

    PubMed

    Hogue, Michael D; Meador, Anna E

    2016-03-01

    Vaccines are among most cost-effective public health strategies. Despite effective vaccines for many bacterial and viral illnesses, tens of thousands of adults and hundreds of children die each year in the United States from vaccine-preventable diseases. Underutilization of vaccines requires rethinking the approach to incorporating vaccines into practice. Arguably, immunizations could be a part all health care encounters. Shared responsibility is paramount if deaths are to be reduced. This article reviews the available vaccines in the US market, as well as practice recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

  20. New Strains Intended for the Production of Inactivated Polio Vaccine at Low-Containment After Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Knowlson, Sarah; Burlison, John; Giles, Elaine; Fox, Helen; Macadam, Andrew J.; Minor, Philip D.

    2015-01-01

    Poliomyelitis has nearly been eradicated through the efforts of the World Health Organization’s Global Eradication Initiative raising questions on containment of the virus after it has been eliminated in the wild. Most manufacture of inactivated polio vaccines currently requires the growth of large amounts of highly virulent poliovirus, and release from a production facility after eradication could be disastrous; WHO have therefore recommended the use of the attenuated Sabin strains for production as a safer option although it is recognised that they can revert to a transmissible paralytic form. We have exploited the understanding of the molecular virology of the Sabin vaccine strains to design viruses that are extremely genetically stable and hyperattenuated. The viruses are based on the type 3 Sabin vaccine strain and have been genetically modified in domain V of the 5’ non-coding region by changing base pairs to produce a cassette into which capsid regions of other serotypes have been introduced. The viruses give satisfactory yields of antigenically and immunogenically correct viruses in culture, are without measurable neurovirulence and fail to infect non-human primates under conditions where the Sabin strains will do so. PMID:26720150

  1. New Strains Intended for the Production of Inactivated Polio Vaccine at Low-Containment After Eradication.

    PubMed

    Knowlson, Sarah; Burlison, John; Giles, Elaine; Fox, Helen; Macadam, Andrew J; Minor, Philip D

    2015-12-01

    Poliomyelitis has nearly been eradicated through the efforts of the World Health Organization's Global Eradication Initiative raising questions on containment of the virus after it has been eliminated in the wild. Most manufacture of inactivated polio vaccines currently requires the growth of large amounts of highly virulent poliovirus, and release from a production facility after eradication could be disastrous; WHO have therefore recommended the use of the attenuated Sabin strains for production as a safer option although it is recognised that they can revert to a transmissible paralytic form. We have exploited the understanding of the molecular virology of the Sabin vaccine strains to design viruses that are extremely genetically stable and hyperattenuated. The viruses are based on the type 3 Sabin vaccine strain and have been genetically modified in domain V of the 5' non-coding region by changing base pairs to produce a cassette into which capsid regions of other serotypes have been introduced. The viruses give satisfactory yields of antigenically and immunogenically correct viruses in culture, are without measurable neurovirulence and fail to infect non-human primates under conditions where the Sabin strains will do so.

  2. HIV/AIDS and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Research : Vaccines Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Vaccines What Are Vaccines and What Do They Do? A vaccine—also ... immune response against the disease. Is There a Vaccine for HIV? No. There is currently no vaccine ...

  3. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis B?Hepatitis B is a serious infection that affects the liver. It is caused by the hepatitis B virus. ...

  4. The HPV Vaccination Crisis

    Cancer.gov

    Following the release of a consensus statement from the NCI-Designated Cancer Centers urging HPV vaccination in the United States, Dr. Noel Brewer discusses the country’s low vaccination rates and how clinicians can help to improve them.

  5. Vaccine Safety Datalink

    Cancer.gov

    The Vaccine Safety Datalink is part of the National Immunization Program within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and was started in recognition of gaps in the scientific knowledge of rare vaccine side effects.

  6. Ethics of vaccination programs.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jason L; Caplan, Arthur L

    2011-10-01

    Ethical issues are present at each stage in the vaccine product life cycle, the period extending from the earliest stages of research through the eventual design and implementation of global vaccination programs. Recent developments highlight fundamental principles of vaccine ethics and raise unique issues for ongoing vaccination activities worldwide. These include the 2009-10 H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination campaign, renewed attention to the potential global eradication of polio, and the ongoing evaluation of vaccine risk controversies, most notably the alleged link between childhood vaccines and autism. These cases present ethical challenges for public health policy-makers, scientists, physicians, and other stakeholders in their efforts to improve the health of individuals, communities, and nations through vaccination. PMID:22440783

  7. Smallpox Vaccine Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... complications from the vaccinia virus can be severe. Benefit of Vaccine Following Exposure Vaccination within 3 days ... Policies About CDC.gov Link to Us All Languages Contact CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ...

  8. Shingles (Zoster) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... who has had chickenpox, or rarely, has gotten chickenpox vaccine, can get shingles. The virus stays in your ... a person who has never had chickenpox (or chickenpox vaccine) could get chickenpox from someone with shingles. This ...

  9. Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Know About Zika & Pregnancy Your Child's Immunizations: Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV) KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations: ... or HIV infection); or cochlear implants. Why the Vaccines Are Recommended Children younger than 2 years old, ...

  10. Screening Tests and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Text size | Print | Screening Tests and Vaccines This information in Spanish ( en español ) Getting important screening tests and vaccines can save your life. Check this section of ...

  11. Clinical vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is regarded as one of the biggest triumphs in the history of medicine. We are living in the most successful period of vaccine development. The accumulation of multidisciplinary knowledge and the investment of massive funding have enabled the development of vaccines against many infectious diseases as well as other diseases including malignant tumors. The paradigm of clinical vaccine evaluation and licensure has also been modernized based on scientific improvements and historical experience. However, there remain a number of hurdles to overcome. Continuous efforts are focused on increasing the efficacy and reducing the risks related to vaccine use. Cutting-edge knowledge about immunology and microbiology is being rapidly translated to vaccine development. Thus, physicians and others involved in the clinical development of vaccines should have sufficient understanding of the recent developmental trends in vaccination and the diseases of interest. PMID:25648742

  12. Tetanus (Lockjaw) Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults - Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular Pertussis vaccine Tetanus (Lockjaw) Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Tetanus (lockjaw) ... Related Pages Diphtheria Pertussis Feature Story: Adults Need Immunizations, Too Also Known As & Abbreviations Tetanus = Lockjaw DTaP = ...

  13. Meningococcal Vaccine (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Your Child's Immunizations: Meningococcal Vaccines KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations: ... are at increased risk of developing meningococcal disease. Immunization Schedule Vaccination with MCV4 is recommended: when kids ...

  14. Vaccines in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Eric M L; Chahin, Salim; Berger, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    Vaccinations help prevent communicable disease. To be valuable, a vaccine's ability to prevent disease must exceed the risk of adverse effects from administration. Many vaccines present no risk of infection as they are comprised of killed or non-infectious components while other vaccines consist of live attenuated microorganisms which carry a potential risk of infection-particularly, in patients with compromised immunity. There are several unique considerations with respect to vaccination in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population. First, there has been concern that vaccination may trigger or aggravate the disease. Second, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) employed in the treatment of MS may increase the risk of infectious complications from vaccines or alter their efficacy. Lastly, in some cases, vaccination strategies may be part of the treatment paradigm in attempts to avoid complications of therapy. PMID:26922172

  15. Vaccine Reaction Images

    MedlinePlus

    ... Training Materials Q fever Info & Guidance for Clinicians Salmonella Shigella Smallpox Smallpox Basics Vaccine Basics Clinicians Vaccination ... Metals Nerve Agents Pulmonary Agents Riot Control Agents Toxic Alcohols Vesicants Chemical-Specific Fact Sheets Toxicology FAQs ...

  16. Ethics of vaccination programs.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jason L; Caplan, Arthur L

    2011-10-01

    Ethical issues are present at each stage in the vaccine product life cycle, the period extending from the earliest stages of research through the eventual design and implementation of global vaccination programs. Recent developments highlight fundamental principles of vaccine ethics and raise unique issues for ongoing vaccination activities worldwide. These include the 2009-10 H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination campaign, renewed attention to the potential global eradication of polio, and the ongoing evaluation of vaccine risk controversies, most notably the alleged link between childhood vaccines and autism. These cases present ethical challenges for public health policy-makers, scientists, physicians, and other stakeholders in their efforts to improve the health of individuals, communities, and nations through vaccination.

  17. Vaccines in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Eric M L; Chahin, Salim; Berger, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    Vaccinations help prevent communicable disease. To be valuable, a vaccine's ability to prevent disease must exceed the risk of adverse effects from administration. Many vaccines present no risk of infection as they are comprised of killed or non-infectious components while other vaccines consist of live attenuated microorganisms which carry a potential risk of infection-particularly, in patients with compromised immunity. There are several unique considerations with respect to vaccination in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population. First, there has been concern that vaccination may trigger or aggravate the disease. Second, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) employed in the treatment of MS may increase the risk of infectious complications from vaccines or alter their efficacy. Lastly, in some cases, vaccination strategies may be part of the treatment paradigm in attempts to avoid complications of therapy.

  18. Measles, polio and tetanus toxoid antibody levels in Gambian children aged 3 to 4 years following routine vaccination.

    PubMed

    Fortuin, M; Maine, N; Mendy, M; Hall, A; George, M; Whittle, H

    1995-01-01

    A nation-wide cross-sectional survey of 816 children 3-4 years old was carried out in The Gambia between September 1990 and July 1991 to assess the seroprevalence of antibodies against 3 diseases included in the expanded programme on immunization: measles, poliomyelitis and tetanus. Among 689 children whose records were available, 94.5% were fully immunized. Measles vaccine was administered to 97% of the children and 91% of these had detectable antibodies at the time of the survey. Antibodies against type 1 and type 3 polioviruses, after up to 6 doses of oral polio vaccine, were present in 88.1% and 89.3% of the children respectively. Ninety-seven percent of the children who had received 4 doses of diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus vaccine (DPT) and 91% of those who received 3 doses had detectable tetanus toxoid antibodies at the age of 3-4 years. This study shows that serological responses to EPI vaccines given in infancy persist at very satisfactory levels throughout early childhood.

  19. Human Vaccines: News

    PubMed Central

    Riedmann, Eva M.

    2012-01-01

    High safety marks for Merck’s Gardasil Cuba tests prostate cancer vaccine HIV’s weak spot: V2 Unique anti-cancer agent ColoAd1 enters the clinic Broadly neutralizing antibodies against influenza A and B discovered Clinical trials initiated: Nexvax2 therapeutic vaccine for celiac disease The 20 top-selling vaccines in the first half of 2012 Influenza vaccine safe for pregnant women PMID:23151443

  20. Estimating the costs of the vaccine supply chain and service delivery for selected districts in Kenya and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mvundura, Mercy; Lorenson, Kristina; Chweya, Amos; Kigadye, Rosemary; Bartholomew, Kathryn; Makame, Mohammed; Lennon, T Patrick; Mwangi, Steven; Kirika, Lydia; Kamau, Peter; Otieno, Abner; Murunga, Peninah; Omurwa, Tom; Dafrossa, Lyimo; Kristensen, Debra

    2015-05-28

    Having data on the costs of the immunization system can provide decision-makers with information to benchmark the costs when evaluating the impact of new technologies or programmatic innovations. This paper estimated the supply chain and immunization service delivery costs and cost per dose in selected districts in Kenya and Tanzania. We also present operational data describing the supply chain and service delivery points (SDPs). To estimate the supply chain costs, we collected resource-use data for the cold chain, distribution system, and health worker time and per diems paid. We also estimated the service delivery costs, which included the time cost of health workers to provide immunization services, and per diems and transport costs for outreach sessions. Data on the annual quantities of vaccines distributed to each facility, and the occurrence and duration of stockouts were collected from stock registers. These data were collected from the national store, 2 regional and 4 district stores, and 12 SDPs in each country for 2012. Cost per dose for the supply chain and immunization service delivery were estimated. The average annual costs per dose at the SDPs were $0.34 (standard deviation (s.d.) $0.18) for Kenya when including only the vaccine supply chain costs, and $1.33 (s.d. $0.82) when including immunization service delivery costs. In Tanzania, these costs were $0.67 (s.d. $0.35) and $2.82 (s.d. $1.64), respectively. Both countries experienced vaccine stockouts in 2012, bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine being more likely to be stocked out in Kenya, and oral poliovirus vaccine in Tanzania. When stockouts happened, they usually lasted for at least one month. Tanzania made investments in 2011 in preparation for planned vaccine introductions, and their supply chain cost per dose is expected to decline with the new vaccine introductions. Immunization service delivery costs are a significant portion of the total costs at the SDPs. PMID:25865467

  1. Estimating the costs of the vaccine supply chain and service delivery for selected districts in Kenya and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mvundura, Mercy; Lorenson, Kristina; Chweya, Amos; Kigadye, Rosemary; Bartholomew, Kathryn; Makame, Mohammed; Lennon, T Patrick; Mwangi, Steven; Kirika, Lydia; Kamau, Peter; Otieno, Abner; Murunga, Peninah; Omurwa, Tom; Dafrossa, Lyimo; Kristensen, Debra

    2015-05-28

    Having data on the costs of the immunization system can provide decision-makers with information to benchmark the costs when evaluating the impact of new technologies or programmatic innovations. This paper estimated the supply chain and immunization service delivery costs and cost per dose in selected districts in Kenya and Tanzania. We also present operational data describing the supply chain and service delivery points (SDPs). To estimate the supply chain costs, we collected resource-use data for the cold chain, distribution system, and health worker time and per diems paid. We also estimated the service delivery costs, which included the time cost of health workers to provide immunization services, and per diems and transport costs for outreach sessions. Data on the annual quantities of vaccines distributed to each facility, and the occurrence and duration of stockouts were collected from stock registers. These data were collected from the national store, 2 regional and 4 district stores, and 12 SDPs in each country for 2012. Cost per dose for the supply chain and immunization service delivery were estimated. The average annual costs per dose at the SDPs were $0.34 (standard deviation (s.d.) $0.18) for Kenya when including only the vaccine supply chain costs, and $1.33 (s.d. $0.82) when including immunization service delivery costs. In Tanzania, these costs were $0.67 (s.d. $0.35) and $2.82 (s.d. $1.64), respectively. Both countries experienced vaccine stockouts in 2012, bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine being more likely to be stocked out in Kenya, and oral poliovirus vaccine in Tanzania. When stockouts happened, they usually lasted for at least one month. Tanzania made investments in 2011 in preparation for planned vaccine introductions, and their supply chain cost per dose is expected to decline with the new vaccine introductions. Immunization service delivery costs are a significant portion of the total costs at the SDPs.

  2. A Dengue Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Anna P

    2016-06-30

    Denvaxia is the first licensed vaccine for the prevention of dengue. It is a live vaccine developed using recombinant DNA technology. The vaccine is given as three doses over the course of a year and has the potential to prevent hundreds of thousands of hospitalizations each year. PMID:27368091

  3. Vaccines in dermatological diseases.

    PubMed

    Magel, G D; Mendoza, N; Digiorgio, C M; Haitz, K A; Lapolla, W J; Tyring, S K

    2011-06-01

    Vaccines have been a cornerstone in medicine and public health since their inception in the 18th century by Edward Jenner. Today, greater than 20 vaccines are used worldwide for the prevention of both viral and bacterial diseases. This article will review the vaccines used for the following dermatological diseases: smallpox, measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox, shingles, and human papillomavirus.

  4. Vaccines in dermatological diseases.

    PubMed

    Magel, G D; Mendoza, N; Digiorgio, C M; Haitz, K A; Lapolla, W J; Tyring, S K

    2011-06-01

    Vaccines have been a cornerstone in medicine and public health since their inception in the 18th century by Edward Jenner. Today, greater than 20 vaccines are used worldwide for the prevention of both viral and bacterial diseases. This article will review the vaccines used for the following dermatological diseases: smallpox, measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox, shingles, and human papillomavirus. PMID:21566552

  5. Vaccines in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mitali M; Shah, Aishani C; Mahajan, Rashmi S; Bilimoria, Freny E

    2015-01-01

    A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a specific disease. More than two centuries have passed since the first successful vaccine for smallpox was developed. We’ve come a long way since. Today's vaccines are among the 21st century's most successful and cost-effective public health tools for preventing diseases. PMID:26120155

  6. A rabies vaccine adjuvanted with saponins from leaves of the soap tree (Quillaja brasiliensis) induces specific immune responses and protects against lethal challenge.

    PubMed

    Yendo, Anna Carolina A; de Costa, Fernanda; Cibulski, Samuel P; Teixeira, Thais F; Colling, Luana C; Mastrogiovanni, Mauricio; Soulé, Silvia; Roehe, Paulo M; Gosmann, Grace; Ferreira, Fernando A; Fett-Neto, Arthur G

    2016-04-29

    Quillaja brasiliensis (Quillajaceae) is a saponin producing species native from southern Brazil and Uruguay. Its saponins are remarkably similar to those of Q. saponaria, which provides most of the saponins used as immunoadjuvants in vaccines. The immunostimulating capacities of aqueous extract (AE) and purified saponin fraction (QB-90) obtained from leaves of Q. brasiliensis were favorably comparable to those of a commercial saponin-based adjuvant preparation (Quil-A) in experimental vaccines against bovine herpesvirus type 1 and 5, poliovirus and bovine viral diarrhea virus in mice model. Herein, the immunogenicity and protection efficacy of rabies vaccines adjuvanted with Q. brasiliensis AE and its saponin fractions were compared with vaccines adjuvanted with either commercial Quil-A or Alum. Mice were vaccinated with one or two doses (on days 0 and 14) of one of the different vaccines and serum levels of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a were quantified over time. A challenge experiment with a lethal dose of rabies virus was carried out with the formulations. Viral RNA detection in the brain of mice was performed by qPCR, and RNA copy-numbers were quantified using a standard curve of in vitro transcribed RNA. All Q. brasiliensis saponin-adjuvanted vaccines significantly enhanced levels of specific IgG isotypes when compared with the no adjuvant group (P ≤ 0.05). Overall, one or two doses of saponin-based vaccine were efficient to protect against the lethal rabies exposure. Both AE and saponin fractions from Q. brasiliensis leaves proved potent immunological adjuvants in vaccines against a lethal challenge with a major livestock pathogen, hence confirming their value as competitive or complementary sustainable alternatives to saponins of Q. saponaria.

  7. A rabies vaccine adjuvanted with saponins from leaves of the soap tree (Quillaja brasiliensis) induces specific immune responses and protects against lethal challenge.

    PubMed

    Yendo, Anna Carolina A; de Costa, Fernanda; Cibulski, Samuel P; Teixeira, Thais F; Colling, Luana C; Mastrogiovanni, Mauricio; Soulé, Silvia; Roehe, Paulo M; Gosmann, Grace; Ferreira, Fernando A; Fett-Neto, Arthur G

    2016-04-29

    Quillaja brasiliensis (Quillajaceae) is a saponin producing species native from southern Brazil and Uruguay. Its saponins are remarkably similar to those of Q. saponaria, which provides most of the saponins used as immunoadjuvants in vaccines. The immunostimulating capacities of aqueous extract (AE) and purified saponin fraction (QB-90) obtained from leaves of Q. brasiliensis were favorably comparable to those of a commercial saponin-based adjuvant preparation (Quil-A) in experimental vaccines against bovine herpesvirus type 1 and 5, poliovirus and bovine viral diarrhea virus in mice model. Herein, the immunogenicity and protection efficacy of rabies vaccines adjuvanted with Q. brasiliensis AE and its saponin fractions were compared with vaccines adjuvanted with either commercial Quil-A or Alum. Mice were vaccinated with one or two doses (on days 0 and 14) of one of the different vaccines and serum levels of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a were quantified over time. A challenge experiment with a lethal dose of rabies virus was carried out with the formulations. Viral RNA detection in the brain of mice was performed by qPCR, and RNA copy-numbers were quantified using a standard curve of in vitro transcribed RNA. All Q. brasiliensis saponin-adjuvanted vaccines significantly enhanced levels of specific IgG isotypes when compared with the no adjuvant group (P ≤ 0.05). Overall, one or two doses of saponin-based vaccine were efficient to protect against the lethal rabies exposure. Both AE and saponin fractions from Q. brasiliensis leaves proved potent immunological adjuvants in vaccines against a lethal challenge with a major livestock pathogen, hence confirming their value as competitive or complementary sustainable alternatives to saponins of Q. saponaria. PMID:27032516

  8. Comparative reduction of Norwalk virus, poliovirus type 1, F+ RNA coliphage MS2 and Escherichia coli in miniature soil columns.

    PubMed

    Meschke, J S; Sobsey, M D

    2003-01-01

    Norwalk-like viruses (NLVs) are important agents of waterborne illness and have been linked to several groundwater-related outbreaks. The presence of human enteric viruses, in particular the presence of NLVs, is difficult to detect in the environment. Consequently, surrogate organisms are typically used as indicators of viruses from faecal contamination. Whether traditional bacterial indicators are reliable indicators for viral pathogens remains uncertain. Few studies have directly compared mobility and reduction of bacterial indicators (e.g. coliforms, Escherichia coli) and other surrogate indicators (coliphages) with pathogenic human viruses in soil systems. In this study the mobility and comparative reduction of the prototype NLV, Norwalk Virus (NV), was compared to poliovirus 1 (PV1), a bacterial indicator (E coli, EC) and a viral indicator (coliphage MS2) through miniature soil columns. Replicate, 10 cm deep, miniature columns were prepared using three soils representing a range of soil textures (sand, organic muck, and clay). Columns were initially conditioned, then incubated at 10-14 degrees C, dosed twice weekly for 8 weeks with one column pore volume of virus-seeded groundwater per dose, followed by 8 weeks of dosing with one column pore volume per dose of unseeded, simulated rainwater. Columns were allowed to drain after each dosing until an effluent volume equivalent to an applied dose was collected. Column effluents and doses were assayed for all viruses and EC. Rapid mobility with minimal reduction was observed for all organisms in the sand. Similar reductions were observed in organic muck for most organisms but NV showed a greater reduction. No organisms were shown to pass through the clay columns. Elution of viruses, in particular PV1, from the columns was gradual. After cessation of microbe dosing, E. coli was less detectable than viruses in column effluents and, therefore, unreliable as a virus indicator.

  9. Detection of infective poliovirus by a simple, rapid, and sensitive flow cytometry method based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer technology.

    PubMed

    Cantera, Jason L; Chen, Wilfred; Yates, Marylynn V

    2010-01-01

    The rapid and effective detection of virus infection is critical for clinical management and prevention of disease spread during an outbreak. Several methods have been developed for this purpose, of which classical serological and viral nucleic acid detection are the most common. We describe an alternative approach that utilizes engineered cells expressing fluorescent proteins undergoing fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) upon cleavage by the viral 2A protease (2A(pro)) as an indication of infection. Quantification of the infectious-virus titers was resolved by using flow cytometry, and utility was demonstrated for the detection of poliovirus 1 (PV1) infection. Engineered buffalo green monkey kidney (BGMK) cells expressing the cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) substrate linked by a cleavage recognition site for PV1 2A(pro) were infected with different titers of PV1. After incubation at various time points, cells were harvested, washed, and subjected to flow cytometry analysis. The number of infected cells was determined by counting the number of cells with an increased CFP-to-YFP ratio. As early as 5 h postinfection, a significant number of infected cells (3%) was detected by flow cytometry, and cells infected with only 1 PFU were detected after 12 h postinfection. When applied to an environmental water sample spiked with PV1, the flow cytometry-based assay provided a level of sensitivity similar to that of the plaque assay for detecting and quantifying infectious virus particles. This approach, therefore, is more rapid than plaque assays and can be used to detect other viruses that frequently do not form clear plaques on cell cultures.

  10. 75 FR 7281 - Pediatric Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... (rotavirus vaccine, live, oral), Kinrix (Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoids and Acellular Pertussis Adsorbed and Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine), Pentacel [Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoids and Acellular Pertussis Adsorbed, Inactivated Poliovirus and Haemophilus b Conjugate (Tetanus Toxoid Conjugate) Vaccine], and...

  11. Economics of animal vaccination.

    PubMed

    McLeod, A; Rushton, J

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes the steps that might be used in assessing the economic justification for using vaccination to control animal disease, and the way that vaccination is financed and administered. It describes decisions that have been taken with respect to preserving international trade, and issues related to protection of livelihoods. Regardless of the motivation for vaccination, its costs can usually be shared between the public and private sectors. Cost-effective vaccination requires methods of delivery to be adapted to livestock production systems. The paper concludes by suggesting questions around the use of vaccination that would merit further economic analysis.

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Goepfert, Paul; Bansal, Anju

    2014-12-01

    Although some success was achieved in recent years in HIV prevention, an effective vaccine remains the means with the most potential of curtailing HIV-1 infections worldwide. Despite multiple failed attempts, a recent HIV vaccine regimen demonstrated modest protection from infection. Although the protective efficacy in this trial was not sufficient to warrant licensure, it spurred renewed optimism in the field and has provided valuable insights for improving future vaccine designs. This review summarizes the pertinent details of vaccine development and discusses ways the field is moving forward to develop a vaccine to prevent HIV infection and disease progression.

  13. Routine vaccination against chickenpox?

    PubMed

    2012-04-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes both varicella and herpes zoster. In 1995 a varicella vaccine was licensed in the USA and was incorporated into the routine vaccination programme for children; a decline of varicella among children and adults, and a reduction in associated hospitalisation, complications and mortality, has resulted. In the UK, a policy of targeted vaccination of at-risk groups has been in place since the vaccine was introduced. Here we review the evidence for the different approaches to VZV vaccination policy.

  14. Vaccination for Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehen, Stephan; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant virus vaccines that express a limited number of epitopes are currently being developed to prevent disease by changing the relative balance between viral spread and the immune response. Some circumstances, however, were found in infections with a noncytopathic virus in which vaccination caused disease; sensitive parameters included the genetic background of the host, the time or dose of infection, and the constituents of the vaccine. Thus, immunopathologic damage by T cells may be an unwanted consequence of vaccination with the new types of peptide or recombinant vaccines that are being investigated for the human immunodeficiency viruses and other pathogens.

  15. [Development of HIV vaccines].

    PubMed

    Shibata, Riri

    2002-04-01

    An effective prophylactic vaccine should reduce frequency of new HIV infections in the target population and delay onset of immunodeficiency among those who become infected after vaccination. A variety of vaccine candidates have been developed, which induce neutralizing antibodies and/or cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. While many of those vaccine candidates exhibited some efficacy in primate model systems, their efficacy against natural HIV-1 infection can only be determined in large-scale phase III clinical trials. In this article, difficulties in HIV vaccine development will be discussed from scientific, technical, and business point of views. PMID:11968790

  16. Environmental Enteropathy, Oral Vaccine Failure and Growth Faltering in Infants in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Caitlin; Lu, Miao; Haque, Rashidul; Mondal, Dinesh; Buonomo, Erica; Nayak, Uma; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Kirkpatrick, Beth; Colgate, Ross; Carmolli, Marya; Dickson, Dorothy; van der Klis, Fiona; Weldon, William; Steven Oberste, M.; Ma, Jennie Z.; Petri, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Environmental enteropathy (EE) is a subclinical enteric condition found in low-income countries that is characterized by intestinal inflammation, reduced intestinal absorption, and gut barrier dysfunction. We aimed to assess if EE impairs the success of oral polio and rotavirus vaccines in infants in Bangladesh. Methods We conducted a prospective observational study of 700 infants from an urban slum of Dhaka, Bangladesh from May 2011 to November 2014. Infants were enrolled in the first week of life and followed to age one year through biweekly home visits with EPI vaccines administered and growth monitored. EE was operationally defied as enteric inflammation measured by any one of the fecal biomarkers reg1B, alpha-1-antitrypsin, MPO, calprotectin, or neopterin. Oral polio vaccine success was evaluated by immunogenicity, and rotavirus vaccine response was evaluated by immunogenicity and protection from disease. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01375647. Findings EE was present in greater than 80% of infants by 12 weeks of age. Oral poliovirus and rotavirus vaccines failed in 20.2% and 68.5% of the infants respectively, and 28.6% were malnourished (HAZ < − 2) at one year of age. In contrast, 0%, 9.0%, 7.9% and 3.8% of infants lacked protective levels of antibody from tetanus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, diphtheria and measles vaccines respectively. EE was negatively associated with oral polio and rotavirus response but not parenteral vaccine immunogenicity. Biomarkers of systemic inflammation and measures of maternal health were additionally predictive of both oral vaccine failure and malnutrition. The selected biomarkers from multivariable analysis accounted for 46.3% variation in delta HAZ. 24% of Rotarix® IgA positive individuals can be attributed to the selected biomarkers. Interpretation EE as well as systemic inflammation and poor maternal health were associated with oral but not parenteral vaccine

  17. Vaccinations for pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Geeta K; Heine, R Phillips

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, eradication and reduction of vaccine-preventable diseases through immunization has directly increased life expectancy by reducing mortality. Although immunization is a public priority, vaccine coverage among adult Americans is inadequate. The Institute of Medicine, the Community Preventive Services Task Force, and other public health entities have called for the development of innovative programs to incorporate adult vaccination into routine clinical practice. Obstetrician-gynecologists are well suited to serve as vaccinators of women in general and more specifically pregnant women. Pregnant women are at risk for vaccine-preventable disease-related morbidity and mortality and adverse pregnancy outcomes, including congenital anomalies, spontaneous abortion, preterm birth, and low birth weight. In addition to providing direct maternal benefit, vaccination during pregnancy likely provides direct fetal and neonatal benefit through passive immunity (transplacental transfer of maternal vaccine-induced antibodies). This article reviews: 1) types of vaccines; 2) vaccines specifically recommended during pregnancy and postpartum; 3) vaccines recommended during pregnancy and postpartum based on risk factors and special circumstances; 4) vaccines currently under research and development for licensure for maternal-fetal immunization; and 5) barriers to maternal immunization and available patient and health care provider resources. PMID:25560127

  18. [Vaccinations for international travelers].

    PubMed

    Berens-Riha, N; Alberer, M; Löscher, T

    2014-03-01

    Vaccinations are a prominent part of health preparations before international travel. They can avoid or significantly reduce the risk of numerous infectious diseases. Until recently, vaccination against yellow fever was the only obligatory vaccination. However, according to updated international health regulations, other vaccinations and prophylactic measures may be required at entry from certain countries. For all routine vaccinations as recommended in Germany, necessary revaccination and catch-up of missed vaccinations should be administered before travel. At most destinations the risk of infection is higher than in Germany. Hepatitis A vaccine is generally recommended for travelers to areas of increased risk, polio vaccine for all destinations where eradication is not yet confirmed (Asia and Africa). The indications for other travel vaccines must take into consideration travel destination and itinerary, type and duration of travel, individual risk of exposure as well as the epidemiology of the disease to be prevented. Several vaccines of potential interest for travel medicine, e.g., new vaccines against malaria and dengue fever, are under development.

  19. Emerging Vaccine Informatics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yongqun; Rappuoli, Rino; De Groot, Anne S.; Chen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Vaccine informatics is an emerging research area that focuses on development and applications of bioinformatics methods that can be used to facilitate every aspect of the preclinical, clinical, and postlicensure vaccine enterprises. Many immunoinformatics algorithms and resources have been developed to predict T- and B-cell immune epitopes for epitope vaccine development and protective immunity analysis. Vaccine protein candidates are predictable in silico from genome sequences using reverse vaccinology. Systematic transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression analyses facilitate rational vaccine design and identification of gene responses that are correlates of protection in vivo. Mathematical simulations have been used to model host-pathogen interactions and improve vaccine production and vaccination protocols. Computational methods have also been used for development of immunization registries or immunization information systems, assessment of vaccine safety and efficacy, and immunization modeling. Computational literature mining and databases effectively process, mine, and store large amounts of vaccine literature and data. Vaccine Ontology (VO) has been initiated to integrate various vaccine data and support automated reasoning. PMID:21772787

  20. Vaccinations for Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Geeta K.; Heine, R. Phillips

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, eradication and reduction of vaccine-preventable diseases through immunization has directly increased life expectancy by reducing mortality. Although immunization is a public priority, vaccine coverage among adult Americans is inadequate. The Institute of Medicine, the Community Preventive Services Task Force, and other public health entities have called for the development of innovative programs to incorporate adult vaccination into routine clinical practice. Obstetrician–gynecologists are well-suited to serve as vaccinators of women in general and more specifically pregnant women. Pregnant women are at risk for vaccine-preventable disease–related morbidity and mortality and adverse pregnancy outcomes, including congenital anomalies, spontaneous abortion, preterm birth, and low birth weight. In addition to providing direct maternal benefit, vaccination during pregnancy likely provides direct fetal and infant benefit through passive immunity (transplacental transfer of maternal vaccine-induced antibodies). This article reviews: 1) types of vaccines; 2) vaccines specifically recommended during pregnancy and postpartum; 3) vaccines recommended during pregnancy and postpartum based on risk factors and special circumstances; 4) vaccines currently under research and development for licensure for maternal-fetal immunization; and 5) barriers to maternal immunization and available patient and provider resources. PMID:25560127

  1. Vaccine epidemiology: A review

    PubMed Central

    Lahariya, Chandrakant

    2016-01-01

    This review article outlines the key concepts in vaccine epidemiology, such as basic reproductive numbers, force of infection, vaccine efficacy and effectiveness, vaccine failure, herd immunity, herd effect, epidemiological shift, disease modeling, and describes the application of this knowledge both at program levels and in the practice by family physicians, epidemiologists, and pediatricians. A case has been made for increased knowledge and understanding of vaccine epidemiology among key stakeholders including policy makers, immunization program managers, public health experts, pediatricians, family physicians, and other experts/individuals involved in immunization service delivery. It has been argued that knowledge of vaccine epidemiology which is likely to benefit the society through contributions to the informed decision-making and improving vaccination coverage in the low and middle income countries (LMICs). The article ends with suggestions for the provision of systematic training and learning platforms in vaccine epidemiology to save millions of preventable deaths and improve health outcomes through life-course. PMID:27453836

  2. Vaccines for allergy.

    PubMed

    Linhart, Birgit; Valenta, Rudolf

    2012-06-01

    Vaccines aim to establish or strengthen immune responses but are also effective for the treatment of allergy. The latter is surprising because allergy represents a hyper-immune response based on immunoglobulin E production against harmless environmental antigens, i.e., allergens. Nevertheless, vaccination with allergens, termed allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only disease-modifying therapy of allergy with long-lasting effects. New forms of allergy diagnosis and allergy vaccines based on recombinant allergen-derivatives, peptides and allergen genes have emerged through molecular allergen characterization. The molecular allergy vaccines allow sophisticated targeting of the immune system and may eliminate side effects which so far have limited the use of traditional allergen extract-based vaccines. Successful clinical trials performed with the new vaccines indicate that broad allergy vaccination is on the horizon and may help to control the allergy pandemic.

  3. Vaccine epidemiology: A review.

    PubMed

    Lahariya, Chandrakant

    2016-01-01

    This review article outlines the key concepts in vaccine epidemiology, such as basic reproductive numbers, force of infection, vaccine efficacy and effectiveness, vaccine failure, herd immunity, herd effect, epidemiological shift, disease modeling, and describes the application of this knowledge both at program levels and in the practice by family physicians, epidemiologists, and pediatricians. A case has been made for increased knowledge and understanding of vaccine epidemiology among key stakeholders including policy makers, immunization program managers, public health experts, pediatricians, family physicians, and other experts/individuals involved in immunization service delivery. It has been argued that knowledge of vaccine epidemiology which is likely to benefit the society through contributions to the informed decision-making and improving vaccination coverage in the low and middle income countries (LMICs). The article ends with suggestions for the provision of systematic training and learning platforms in vaccine epidemiology to save millions of preventable deaths and improve health outcomes through life-course. PMID:27453836

  4. Immunology of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Beverley, P C L

    2002-01-01

    An ideal vaccine is relatively easy to define, but few real vaccines approach the ideal and no vaccines exist for many organisms, for which a vaccine is the only realistic protective strategy in the foreseeable future. Many difficulties account for the failure to produce these vaccines. All micro-organisms deploy evasion mechanisms that interfere with effective immune responses and, for many organisms, it is not clear which immune responses provide effective protection. However, recent advances in methods for studying immune response to pathogens have provided a better understanding of immune mechanisms, including immunological memory, and led to the realisation that the initiation of immune responses is a key event requiring triggering through 'danger' signals. Based on these findings, the development of novel adjuvants, vectors and vaccine formulations allowing stimulation of optimal and prolonged protective immunity should lead to the introduction of vaccines for previously resistant organisms. PMID:12176847

  5. Principles of Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Zepp, Fred

    2016-01-01

    While many of the currently available vaccines have been developed empirically, with limited understanding on how they activate the immune system and elicit protective immunity, the recent progress in basic sciences like immunology, microbiology, genetics, and molecular biology has fostered our understanding on the interaction of microorganisms with the human immune system. In consequence, modern vaccine development strongly builds on the precise knowledge of the biology of microbial pathogens, their interaction with the human immune system, as well as their capacity to counteract and evade innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Strategies engaged by pathogens strongly determine how a vaccine should be formulated to evoke potent and efficient protective immune responses. The improved knowledge of immune response mechanisms has facilitated the development of new vaccines with the capacity to defend against challenging pathogens and can help to protect individuals particular at risk like immunocompromised and elderly populations. Modern vaccine development technologies include the production of highly purified antigens that provide a lower reactogenicity and higher safety profile than the traditional empirically developed vaccines. Attempts to improve vaccine antigen purity, however, may result in impaired vaccine immunogenicity. Some of such disadvantages related to highly purified and/or genetically engineered vaccines yet can be overcome by innovative technologies, such as live vector vaccines, and DNA or RNA vaccines. Moreover, recent years have witnessed the development of novel adjuvant formulations that specifically focus on the augmentation and/or control of the interplay between innate and adaptive immune systems as well as the function of antigen-presenting cells. Finally, vaccine design has become more tailored, and in turn has opened up the potential of extending its application to hitherto not accessible complex microbial pathogens plus providing new

  6. Conformational Ensemble of the Poliovirus 3CD Precursor Observed by MD Simulations and Confirmed by SAXS: A Strategy to Expand the Viral Proteome?

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ibrahim M; Gohara, David W; Uchida, Akira; Yennawar, Neela; Cameron, Craig E

    2015-11-23

    The genomes of RNA viruses are relatively small. To overcome the small-size limitation, RNA viruses assign distinct functions to the processed viral proteins and their precursors. This is exemplified by poliovirus 3CD protein. 3C protein is a protease and RNA-binding protein. 3D protein is an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). 3CD exhibits unique protease and RNA-binding activities relative to 3C and is devoid of RdRp activity. The origin of these differences is unclear, since crystal structure of 3CD revealed "beads-on-a-string" structure with no significant structural differences compared to the fully processed proteins. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on 3CD to investigate its conformational dynamics. A compact conformation of 3CD was observed that was substantially different from that shown crystallographically. This new conformation explained the unique properties of 3CD relative to the individual proteins. Interestingly, simulations of mutant 3CD showed altered interface. Additionally, accelerated MD simulations uncovered a conformational ensemble of 3CD. When we elucidated the 3CD conformations in solution using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments a range of conformations from extended to compact was revealed, validating the MD simulations. The existence of conformational ensemble of 3CD could be viewed as a way to expand the poliovirus proteome, an observation that may extend to other viruses.

  7. Development and validation of an integrated cell culture-qRTPCR assay for simultaneous quantification of coxsackieviruses, echoviruses, and polioviruses in disinfection studies.

    PubMed

    Mayer, B K; Ryu, H; Gerrity, D; Abbaszadegan, M

    2010-01-01

    This study demonstrated the applicability of integrated cell culture-quantitative RTPCR (ICC-qRTPCR) for the simultaneous quantification of coxsackievirus, echovirus, and poliovirus in disinfection studies. Buffalo green monkey cells were inoculated with a 10-fold dilution series of mixed enteroviruses and incubated prior to qRTPCR quantification. Optimal assay conditions included three post infection washes and a 24-hour post infection incubation period based on successful differentiation between infectious and noninfectious viruses and significant and consistent viral replication rates. Ultraviolet disinfection studies were performed to validate the ICC-qRTPCR assay. Using the optimized assay, three-log microbial inactivation was achieved at UV doses of 30-44, 28-42, and 28-29 mJ/cm(2) for coxsackievirus B6, echovirus 12, and poliovirus 1, respectively. These results compare favorably to side-by-side assessments using conventional cultural techniques and values previously reported in the literature. This indicates that ICC-qRTPCR is a practical alternative for the simultaneous quantification of enteroviruses in disinfection studies.

  8. Vaccines for emerging infections.

    PubMed

    Marano, N; Rupprecht, C; Regnery, R

    2007-04-01

    Emerging infectious diseases represent a grave threat to animal and human populations in terms of their impact on global health, agriculture and the economy. Vaccines developed for emerging infections in animals can protect animal health and prevent transmission of zoonotic diseases to humans. Examples in this paper illustrate how industry and public health can collaborate to develop a vaccine to prevent an emerging disease in horses (West Nile virus vaccine), how poultry vaccination can protect animals and prevent transmission to people (avian influenza vaccine), how regulatory changes can pave the way for vaccines that will control the carrier state in animals and thus prevent infection in humans (Bartonella henselae vaccine in cats) and how novel technologies could be applied to vaccinate wildlife reservoir species for rabies. Stemming from the realisation that zoonotic diseases are the predominant source of human emerging infectious diseases, it behoves academic, public health, and animal health agencies to consider creative constructive approaches to combat serious public health challenges. Vaccination of vector/reservoir species, when efficacious vaccines are available, offers significant advantages to combating zoonotic human disease. PMID:17633303

  9. The Meningitis Vaccine Project.

    PubMed

    LaForce, F Marc; Konde, Kader; Viviani, Simonetta; Préziosi, Marie-Pierre

    2007-09-01

    Epidemic meningococcal meningitis is an important public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. Current control measures rely on reactive immunizations with polysaccharide (PS) vaccines that do not induce herd immunity and are of limited effectiveness in those under 2 years of age. Conversely, polysaccharide conjugate vaccines are effective in infants and have consistently shown an important effect on decreasing carriage, two characteristics that facilitate disease control. In 2001 the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) was created as a partnership between PATH and the World Health Organization (WHO) with the goal of eliminating meningococcal epidemics in Africa through the development, licensure, introduction, and widespread use of conjugate meningococcal vaccines. Since group A Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis) is the dominant pathogen causing epidemic meningitis in Africa MVP is developing an affordable (US$ 0.40 per dose) meningococcal A (Men A) conjugate vaccine through an innovative international partnership that saw transfer of a conjugation and fermentation technology to a developing country vaccine manufacturer. A Phase 1 study of the vaccine in India has shown that the product is safe and immunogenic. Phase 2 studies have begun in Africa, and a large demonstration study of the conjugate vaccine is envisioned for 2008-2009. After extensive consultations with African public health officials a vaccine introduction plan has been developed that includes introduction of the Men A conjugate vaccine into standard Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) schedules but also emphasizes mass vaccination of 1-29 years old to induce herd immunity, a strategy that has been shown to be highly effective when the meningococcal C (Men C) conjugate vaccine was introduced in several European countries. The MVP model is a clear example of the usefulness of a "push mechanism" to finance the development of a needed vaccine for the developing world. PMID:17521780

  10. A Cross-Sectional Survey of Healthcare Workers on the Knowledge and Attitudes towards Polio Vaccination in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Umair; Ahmad, Akram; Aqeel, Talieha; Akbar, Naila; Salman, Saad; Idress, Jawaria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pakistan accounts for 85.2% of the total polio cases reported worldwide. Healthcare workers (HCWs) are an integral part of immunization campaigns and source of education for the general public. This study aimed to assess the knowledge and attitudes towards polio vaccination among HCWs providing immunisation and education to general public in Quetta and Peshawar divisions of Pakistan. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 490 HCWs was conducted in two major referral public teaching hospitals of Quetta and Peshawar divisions. During February to April, 2015, a random sample of 490 HCWs was invited to participate in this study. Knowledge and attitudes were assessed by using self-administered, anonymous and pretested questionnaire. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were used to express the results. Results A total of 468 participants responded to the questionnaire, giving a response rate of 95.5%. Overall, participants demonstrated good knowledge and positive attitudes towards polio vaccination. The mean knowledge score of HCWs about polio was 13.42±2.39 (based on 18 knowledge questions) while the mean attitude score was 28.75±5.5 (based on 9 attitudes statements). Knowledge gaps were identified about the incubation period of poliovirus (19.5%), management issues (31.9%), use of polio vaccine in mild illnesses (34.7%) and the consequences of the polio virus (36.9%). The majority of participants agreed that all children should be vaccinated for polio (95.1%), while reservations were noted about the need of a booster (38.9%), and sterility issues associated with polio vaccines (43.6%). Internet (n = 167, 37%) and Posters (n = 158, 35%) were the main sources used by HCWs to educate themselves about polio. Conclusion Participants in this study had good knowledge and positive attitudes towards polio vaccination. Although the data are indicative of gaps in the knowledge of HCWs, the findings may not be generalized to other hospitals in Pakistan. PMID

  11. Vaccine herd effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyong; Johnstone, Jennie; Loeb, Mark

    2011-09-01

    Vaccination ideally protects susceptible populations at high risk for complications of the infection. However, vaccines for these subgroups do not always provide sufficient effectiveness. The herd effect or herd immunity is an attractive way to extend vaccine benefits beyond the directly targeted population. It refers to the indirect protection of unvaccinated persons, whereby an increase in the prevalence of immunity by the vaccine prevents circulation of infectious agents in susceptible populations. The herd effect has had a major impact in the eradication of smallpox, has reduced transmission of pertussis, and protects against influenza and pneumococcal disease. A high uptake of vaccines is generally needed for success. In this paper we aim to provide an update review on the herd effect, focusing on the clinical benefit, by reviewing data for specific vaccines.

  12. Chikungunya vaccines in development

    PubMed Central

    Schwameis, Michael; Buchtele, Nina; Wadowski, Patricia Pia; Schoergenhofer, Christian; Jilma, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chikungunya virus has become a global health threat, spreading to the industrial world of Europe and the Americas; no treatment or prophylactic vaccine is available. Since the late 1960s much effort has been put into the development of a vaccine, and several heterogeneous strategies have already been explored. Only two candidates have recently qualified to enter clinical phase II trials, a chikungunya virus-like particle-based vaccine and a recombinant live attenuated measles virus-vectored vaccine. This review focuses on the current status of vaccine development against chikungunya virus in humans and discusses the diversity of immunization strategies, results of recent human trials and promising vaccine candidates. PMID:26554522

  13. Therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Melief, Cornelis J M; van Hall, Thorbald; Arens, Ramon; Ossendorp, Ferry; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2015-09-01

    The clinical benefit of therapeutic cancer vaccines has been established. Whereas regression of lesions was shown for premalignant lesions caused by HPV, clinical benefit in cancer patients was mostly noted as prolonged survival. Suboptimal vaccine design and an immunosuppressive cancer microenvironment are the root causes of the lack of cancer eradication. Effective cancer vaccines deliver concentrated antigen to both HLA class I and II molecules of DCs, promoting both CD4 and CD8 T cell responses. Optimal vaccine platforms include DNA and RNA vaccines and synthetic long peptides. Antigens of choice include mutant sequences, selected cancer testis antigens, and viral antigens. Drugs or physical treatments can mitigate the immunosuppressive cancer microenvironment and include chemotherapeutics, radiation, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitors, inhibitors of T cell checkpoints, agonists of selected TNF receptor family members, and inhibitors of undesirable cytokines. The specificity of therapeutic vaccination combined with such immunomodulation offers an attractive avenue for the development of future cancer therapies.

  14. Systems immunogenetics of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Michael; McWeeney, Shannon; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre

    2013-04-01

    Vaccines are the most cost effective public health measure for preventing viral infection and limiting epidemic spread within susceptible populations. However, the efficacy of current protective vaccines is highly variable, particularly in aging populations. In addition, there have been a number of challenges in the development of new vaccines due to a lack of detailed understanding of the immune correlates of protection. To identify the mechanisms underlying the variability of the immune response to vaccines, system-level tools need to be developed that will further our understanding of virus-host interactions and correlates of vaccine efficacy. This will provide critical information for rational vaccine design and allow the development of an analog to the "precision medicine" framework (already acknowledged as a powerful approach in medicine and therapeutics) to be applied to vaccinology.

  15. [Vaccination for international travelers].

    PubMed

    Arrazola, M Pilar; Serrano, Almudena; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2016-05-01

    Traveler's vaccination is one of the key strategies for the prevention of infectious diseases during international travel. The risk of acquiring an infectious disease is determined in each case by the characteristics of the traveler and the travel, so the pre-departure medical advice of the traveler must be individualized. The World Health Organization classifies travelerś vaccines into three groups. - Vaccines for routine use in national immunization programs: Haemophilus influenzae type b, hepatitis B, polio, measles-mumps-rubella, tetanus-diphtheria-whooping a cough, and chickenpox. - Vaccinations required by law in certain countries before to enter them: yellow fever, meningococcal disease and poliomyelitis. - Vaccines recommended depending on the circumstances: cholera, japanese encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis, meningococcal disease, typhoid fever, influenza, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, rabies and BCG. This review is intended to introduce the reader to the field of international vaccination.

  16. Vaccines against leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Adler, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines against leptospirosis followed within a year of the first isolation of Leptospira, with the first use of a killed whole cell bacterin vaccine in guinea pigs published in 1916. Since then, bacterin vaccines have been used in humans, cattle, swine, and dogs and remain the only vaccines licensed at the present time. The immunity elicited is restricted to serovars with related lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigen. Likewise, vaccines based on LPS antigens have clearly demonstrated protection in animal models, which is also at best serogroup specific. The advent of leptospiral genome sequences has allowed a reverse vaccinology approach for vaccine development. However, the use of inadequate challenge doses and inappropriate statistical analysis invalidates many of the claims of protection with recombinant proteins. PMID:25388138

  17. [Vaccination for international travelers].

    PubMed

    Arrazola, M Pilar; Serrano, Almudena; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2016-05-01

    Traveler's vaccination is one of the key strategies for the prevention of infectious diseases during international travel. The risk of acquiring an infectious disease is determined in each case by the characteristics of the traveler and the travel, so the pre-departure medical advice of the traveler must be individualized. The World Health Organization classifies travelerś vaccines into three groups. - Vaccines for routine use in national immunization programs: Haemophilus influenzae type b, hepatitis B, polio, measles-mumps-rubella, tetanus-diphtheria-whooping a cough, and chickenpox. - Vaccinations required by law in certain countries before to enter them: yellow fever, meningococcal disease and poliomyelitis. - Vaccines recommended depending on the circumstances: cholera, japanese encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis, meningococcal disease, typhoid fever, influenza, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, rabies and BCG. This review is intended to introduce the reader to the field of international vaccination. PMID:26920587

  18. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Preventing and treating prostate cancer spread to bones Vaccine treatment for prostate cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  19. What Vaccines Do You Need?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Adolescent and Adult Vaccine Quiz Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Españ ... adolescentes y adultos Did you know that certain vaccines are recommended for adults and adolescents?* Take this ...

  20. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  1. Diphtheria Vaccination: Who Needs It?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and adults - Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular Pertussis vaccine Diphtheria Vaccination: Who Needs It? Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... need this vaccine? Yes, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends 5 doses of diphtheria and ...

  2. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  3. HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... percentage is less than 15%. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  4. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    MedlinePlus

    ... die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.Flu vaccine can:keep you from getting flu, make flu ... inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months ...

  5. [Does vaccination cause disease?].

    PubMed

    Zingg, W

    2005-10-01

    Not many inventions in medical history have influenced our society as much as vaccination. The concept is old and simple. When Edward Jenner published his work on cowpox, "variolation" was quite common. In this procedure, pus of patients with mild smallpox was transferred to healthy individuals. Meanwhile smallpox has been eradicated worldwide. Diseases such as poliomyelitis, diphtheria or tetanus almost disappeared in industrialized countries. The same happened with epiglottitis and meningitis due to Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) after vaccination against Hib was introduced in Switzerland in 1990. This success was possible because of routine vaccination. Immunization is a save procedure and adverse events are much lower than complications in the natural course of the prevented diseases. However vaccinations were accused to cause diseases themselves such as asthma, multiple sclerosis, diabetes mellitus, chronic arthritis or autism. Hitherto no large cohort study or case-control-study was able to proof responsibility of vaccines in any of these diseases. Public media are eager to publish early data from surveillance reports or case reports which are descriptive and never a principle of cause and effect. In large controlled trials there was no proof that vaccination causes asthma, hepatitis-B-vaccination causes multiple sclerosis or macrophagic myofasciitis, Hib-vaccination causes diabetes mellitus, rubella-vaccination causes chronic arthritis, measles-mumps-rubella-vaccination causes gait disturbance or thiomersal causes autism. These results are rarely published in newspapers or television. Thus, many caring parents are left with negative ideas about immunization. Looking for the best for their children they withhold vaccination and give way to resurgence of preventable diseases in our communities. This must be prevented. There is more evidence than expected that vaccination is safe and this can and must be told to parents. PMID:16277033

  6. Vaccines for Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Orson, Frank M.; Kosten, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Current medications for drug abuse have had only limited success. Anti-addiction vaccines to elicit antibodies that block the pharmacological effects of drugs have great potential for treating drug abuse. We review the status for two vaccines that are undergoing clinical trials (cocaine and nicotine) and two that are still in pre-clinical development (methamphetamine and heroin). We also outline the challenges and ethical concerns for anti-addiction vaccine development and their use as future therapeutics. PMID:22130115

  7. Emerging Vaccine Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, Rebecca J.; Johnson, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination has proven to be an invaluable means of preventing infectious diseases by reducing both incidence of disease and mortality. However, vaccines have not been effectively developed for many diseases including HIV-1, hepatitis C virus (HCV), tuberculosis and malaria, among others. The emergence of new technologies with a growing understanding of host-pathogen interactions and immunity may lead to efficacious vaccines against pathogens, previously thought impossible. PMID:26343196

  8. Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics: News

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Two studies on optimal timing for measles vaccination Chinese scientists develop bird flu vaccine Influenza vaccination reduces risk of heart attack and stroke Two-dose vaccination program shows positive impact on varicella incidence WHO prequalifies Chinese-produced Japanese encephalitis vaccine Phase 3: RTS,S almost halves malaria cases in young children Herd immunity protects babies against whooping cough New developments in nanoparticle-based vaccination

  9. Rotavirus vaccines: an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Midthun, K; Kapikian, A Z

    1996-01-01

    Rotavirus vaccine development has focused on the delivery of live attenuated rotavirus strains by the oral route. The initial "Jennerian" approach involving bovine (RIT4237, WC3) or rhesus (RRV) rotavirus vaccine candidates showed that these vaccines were safe, well tolerated, and immunogenic but induced highly variable rates of protection against rotavirus diarrhea. The goal of a rotavirus vaccine is to prevent severe illness that can lead to dehydration in infants and young children in both developed and developing countries. These studies led to the concept that a multivalent vaccine that represented each of the four epidemiologically important VP7 serotypes might be necessary to induce protection in young infants, the target population for vaccination. Human-animal rotavirus reassortants whose gene encoding VP7 was derived from their human rotavirus parent but whose remaining genes were derived from the animal rotavirus parent were developed as vaccine candidates. The greatest experience with a multivalent vaccine to date has been gained with the quadrivalent preparation containing RRV (VP7 serotype 3) and human-RRV reassortants of VP7 serotype 1, 2, and 4 specificity. Preliminary efficacy trial results in the United States have been promising, whereas a study in Peru has shown only limited protection. Human-bovine reassortant vaccines, including a candidate that contains the VP4 gene of a human rotavirus (VP4 serotype 1A), are also being studied. PMID:8809469

  10. Viral vaccines: selected topics.

    PubMed

    Kańtoch, M

    1996-01-01

    Significant role of viruses in pathology, their dominating position in etiology of infectious diseases point at the special position of active prophylactic procedures based on vaccination. The real role and value of viral vaccines of classic and modern generations, the limitation of immune potency in suppression of defence mechanisms, some problems of immunization against virus vertical transmission are presented in the paper. The reader may find tables which cumulate selected but significant patterns of viral vaccines and vaccinations, and selected papers devoted to topics discussed. PMID:9017153

  11. Vaccines and global health.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Brian; Salisbury, David; Hill, Adrian V S

    2011-10-12

    Vaccines have made a major contribution to global health in recent decades but they could do much more. In November 2011, a Royal Society discussion meeting, 'New vaccines for global health', was held in London to discuss the past contribution of vaccines to global health and to consider what more could be expected in the future. Papers presented at the meeting reviewed recent successes in the deployment of vaccines against major infections of childhood and the challenges faced in developing vaccines against some of the world's remaining major infectious diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malaria and tuberculosis. The important contribution that development of more effective veterinary vaccines could make to global health was also addressed. Some of the social and financial challenges to the development and deployment of new vaccines were reviewed. The latter issues were also discussed at a subsequent satellite meeting, 'Accelerating vaccine development', held at the Kavli Royal Society International Centre. Delegates at this meeting considered challenges to the more rapid development and deployment of both human and veterinary vaccines and how these might be addressed. Papers based on presentations at the discussion meeting and a summary of the main conclusions of the satellite meeting are included in this issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

  12. Vaccine delivery using nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Anthony E.; Titball, Richard; Williamson, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination has had a major impact on the control of infectious diseases. However, there are still many infectious diseases for which the development of an effective vaccine has been elusive. In many cases the failure to devise vaccines is a consequence of the inability of vaccine candidates to evoke appropriate immune responses. This is especially true where cellular immunity is required for protective immunity and this problem is compounded by the move toward devising sub-unit vaccines. Over the past decade nanoscale size (<1000 nm) materials such as virus-like particles, liposomes, ISCOMs, polymeric, and non-degradable nanospheres have received attention as potential delivery vehicles for vaccine antigens which can both stabilize vaccine antigens and act as adjuvants. Importantly, some of these nanoparticles (NPs) are able to enter antigen-presenting cells by different pathways, thereby modulating the immune response to the antigen. This may be critical for the induction of protective Th1-type immune responses to intracellular pathogens. Their properties also make them suitable for the delivery of antigens at mucosal surfaces and for intradermal administration. In this review we compare the utilities of different NP systems for the delivery of sub-unit vaccines and evaluate the potential of these delivery systems for the development of new vaccines against a range of pathogens. PMID:23532930

  13. Cochlear-Meningitis Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... and otolaryngologists) and families should review the vaccination records of current and prospective cochlear implant recipients to ensure that all ... of Use Join Donate ENTConnect Contact Us ...

  14. Vaccines, our shared responsibility.

    PubMed

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Jain, Rishabh; Suri, Rajinder Kumar

    2015-05-01

    The Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers' Network (DCVMN) held its fifteenth annual meeting from October 27-29, 2014, New Delhi, India. The DCVMN, together with the co-organizing institution Panacea Biotec, welcomed over 240 delegates representing high-profile governmental and nongovernmental global health organizations from 36 countries. Over the three-day meeting, attendees exchanged information about their efforts to achieve their shared goal of preventing death and disability from known and emerging infectious diseases. Special praise was extended to all stakeholders involved in the success of polio eradication in South East Asia and highlighted challenges in vaccine supply for measles-rubella immunization over the coming decades. Innovative vaccines and vaccine delivery technologies indicated creative solutions for achieving global immunization goals. Discussions were focused on three major themes including regulatory challenges for developing countries that may be overcome with better communication; global collaborations and partnerships for leveraging investments and enable uninterrupted supply of affordable and suitable vaccines; and leading innovation in vaccines difficult to develop, such as dengue, Chikungunya, typhoid-conjugated and EV71, and needle-free technologies that may speed up vaccine delivery. Moving further into the Decade of Vaccines, participants renewed their commitment to shared responsibility toward a world free of vaccine-preventable diseases. PMID:25749248

  15. Vaccines, our shared responsibility.

    PubMed

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Jain, Rishabh; Suri, Rajinder Kumar

    2015-05-01

    The Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers' Network (DCVMN) held its fifteenth annual meeting from October 27-29, 2014, New Delhi, India. The DCVMN, together with the co-organizing institution Panacea Biotec, welcomed over 240 delegates representing high-profile governmental and nongovernmental global health organizations from 36 countries. Over the three-day meeting, attendees exchanged information about their efforts to achieve their shared goal of preventing death and disability from known and emerging infectious diseases. Special praise was extended to all stakeholders involved in the success of polio eradication in South East Asia and highlighted challenges in vaccine supply for measles-rubella immunization over the coming decades. Innovative vaccines and vaccine delivery technologies indicated creative solutions for achieving global immunization goals. Discussions were focused on three major themes including regulatory challenges for developing countries that may be overcome with better communication; global collaborations and partnerships for leveraging investments and enable uninterrupted supply of affordable and suitable vaccines; and leading innovation in vaccines difficult to develop, such as dengue, Chikungunya, typhoid-conjugated and EV71, and needle-free technologies that may speed up vaccine delivery. Moving further into the Decade of Vaccines, participants renewed their commitment to shared responsibility toward a world free of vaccine-preventable diseases.

  16. Dengue virus vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Yauch, Lauren E; Shresta, Sujan

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in tropical and subtropical regions, causing hundreds of millions of infections each year. Infections range from asymptomatic to a self-limited febrile illness, dengue fever (DF), to the life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). The expanding of the habitat of DENV-transmitting mosquitoes has resulted in dramatic increases in the number of cases over the past 50 years, and recent outbreaks have occurred in the United States. Developing a dengue vaccine is a global health priority. DENV vaccine development is challenging due to the existence of four serotypes of the virus (DENV1-4), which a vaccine must protect against. Additionally, the adaptive immune response to DENV may be both protective and pathogenic upon subsequent infection, and the precise features of protective versus pathogenic immune responses to DENV are unknown, complicating vaccine development. Numerous vaccine candidates, including live attenuated, inactivated, recombinant subunit, DNA, and viral vectored vaccines, are in various stages of clinical development, from preclinical to phase 3. This review will discuss the adaptive immune response to DENV, dengue vaccine challenges, animal models used to test dengue vaccine candidates, and historical and current dengue vaccine approaches.

  17. Acellular pertussis vaccines in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lichan; Lei, Dianliang; Zhang, Shumin

    2012-11-26

    In China, whole-cell pertussis (Pw) vaccines were produced in the early 1960s and acellular pertussis (Pa) vaccines were introduced in 1995. Pa vaccines have now almost completely replaced Pw vaccines in the national immunization program. To strengthen the regulation of vaccines used in China, a vaccine lot release system was established in 2001 and Pa vaccines have been included in the system since 2006. This paper mainly described the current status of production and the quality control measures in place for Pa vaccines; and analyses quality control test data accumulated between 2006 and 2010.

  18. Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (Tdap) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Adacel® (as a combination product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids, Acellular Pertussis Vaccine) ... Boostrix® (as a combination product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids, Acellular Pertussis Vaccine)

  19. [Lack of conviction about vaccination in certain Quebec vaccinators].

    PubMed

    Dionne, M; Boulianne, N; Duval, B; Lavoie, F; Laflamme, N; Carsley, J; Valiquette, L; Gagnon, S; Rochette, L; De Serres, G

    2001-01-01

    A questionnaire was mailed to all vaccinators in Quebec in 1998. The objective of this survey was to document vaccinators' attitudes, knowledge, and practices related to vaccination. Vaccinators generally believe in the security, efficacy and usefulness of vaccines given to young children. However, 41% of nurses do not fully agree with these opinions. More than 94% of pediatricians completely disagree that "certain practices (homeopathy, good eating habits and a healthy lifestyle) can eliminate the need for vaccination", compared with 85% of general practitioners and only 60% of nurses. Less than 25% of doctors recall children who are late in getting their immunizations; approximately 45% of vaccinators are in complete agreement with simultaneous injections of two vaccines; many circumstances are incorrectly seen as contra indications for vaccination. Public health authorities should target systematic interventions towards vaccinators to improve this situation and to increase nurses' conviction regarding the benefits of vaccination.

  20. Universal influenza vaccines: Shifting to better vaccines.

    PubMed

    Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Tsvetnitsky, Vadim; Donnelly, John J

    2016-06-01

    Influenza virus causes acute upper and lower respiratory infections and is the most likely, among known pathogens, to cause a large epidemic in humans. Influenza virus mutates rapidly, enabling it to evade natural and vaccine-induced immunity. Furthermore, influenza viruses can cross from animals to humans, generating novel, potentially pandemic strains. Currently available influenza vaccines induce a strain specific response and may be ineffective against new influenza viruses. The difficulty in predicting circulating strains has frequently resulted in mismatch between the annual vaccine and circulating viruses. Low-resource countries remain mostly unprotected against seasonal influenza and are particularly vulnerable to future pandemics, in part, because investments in vaccine manufacturing and stockpiling are concentrated in high-resource countries. Antibodies that target conserved sites in the hemagglutinin stalk have been isolated from humans and shown to confer protection in animal models, suggesting that broadly protective immunity may be possible. Several innovative influenza vaccine candidates are currently in preclinical or early clinical development. New technologies include adjuvants, synthetic peptides, virus-like particles (VLPs), DNA vectors, messenger RNA, viral vectors, and attenuated or inactivated influenza viruses. Other approaches target the conserved exposed epitope of the surface exposed membrane matrix protein M2e. Well-conserved influenza proteins, such as nucleoprotein and matrix protein, are mainly targeted for developing strong cross-protective T cell responses. With multiple vaccine candidates moving along the testing and development pipeline, the field is steadily moving toward a product that is more potent, durable, and broadly protective than previously licensed vaccines.

  1. [HPV prophylactic vaccines].

    PubMed

    Konopnicki, D

    2014-09-01

    Since 2007, two prophylactic vaccines against Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV. induced lesions (both precancerous dysplasia and cancer) have been registered in Belgium. In multicentre randomized trials including more than 64,000 patients, these vaccines were shown to be highly efficient against the occurrence of condyloma and of dysplastic lesion in the cervix, vagina and vulva in females and in the anus in males. These vaccines display an excellent tolerance and safety profile, the most common adverse event being minor and transient side effects at the injection site. The protection given by these vaccines is more important in subjects that have not been in contact with HPV previously ; moreover the title of neutralizing antibodies against HPV are significantly higher in children vaccinated before 15 years-old age compared to young person vaccinated after this age. For these two reasons, it is recommended to vaccinate before the first sexual relationships. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that vaccination by two doses given at 0 and 6 months in children before 15 years-old was equivalent to the three doses scheme that should be given at 0, 1 or 2 and 6 months in subjects aged 15 years or more. In the countries that have achieved a high vaccine coverage among their young female population, the prevalence of HPV infection and the incidence of high grade cervical dysplasia have significantly decreased while condyloma has almost disappeared four years after the implementation of HPV vaccination. In HIV-positive subjects who are particularly susceptible to infection and lesions induced by HPV, vaccination brings levels of antibody comparable to what is found in the general population with similar safety. PMID:25675641

  2. Clinical development of Ebola vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Saranya

    2015-09-01

    The ongoing outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa highlighted the lack of a licensed drug or vaccine to combat the disease and has renewed the urgency to develop a pipeline of Ebola vaccines. A number of different vaccine platforms are being developed by assessing preclinical efficacy in animal models and expediting clinical development. Over 15 different vaccines are in preclinical development and 8 vaccines are now in different stages of clinical evaluation. These vaccines include DNA vaccines, virus-like particles and viral vectors such as live replicating vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV), human and chimpanzee adenovirus, and vaccinia virus. Recently, in preliminary results reported from the first phase III trial of an Ebola vaccine, the rVSV-vectored vaccine showed promising efficacy. This review charts this rapidly advancing area of research focusing on vaccines in clinical development and discusses the future opportunities and challenges faced in the licensure and deployment of Ebola vaccines.

  3. Clinical development of Ebola vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Saranya

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa highlighted the lack of a licensed drug or vaccine to combat the disease and has renewed the urgency to develop a pipeline of Ebola vaccines. A number of different vaccine platforms are being developed by assessing preclinical efficacy in animal models and expediting clinical development. Over 15 different vaccines are in preclinical development and 8 vaccines are now in different stages of clinical evaluation. These vaccines include DNA vaccines, virus-like particles and viral vectors such as live replicating vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV), human and chimpanzee adenovirus, and vaccinia virus. Recently, in preliminary results reported from the first phase III trial of an Ebola vaccine, the rVSV-vectored vaccine showed promising efficacy. This review charts this rapidly advancing area of research focusing on vaccines in clinical development and discusses the future opportunities and challenges faced in the licensure and deployment of Ebola vaccines. PMID:26668751

  4. Vaccines for lymphomas: idiotype vaccines and beyond.

    PubMed

    Houot, Roch; Levy, Ronald

    2009-05-01

    Therapeutic vaccines for lymphomas have been developed to induce active and long-lasting immune responses against lymphoma capable of eradicating the tumor. Most of these vaccines use the tumor B cell idiotype (the unique variable region of the surface immunoglobulin) as a tumor-specific antigen. The first human clinical trial for lymphoma vaccine was initiated 20 years ago. Along with several other phase I/II trials, it showed encouraging results which supported the initiation of three phase III trials. The results of these trials have recently been released (although not published yet) which failed to demonstrate a prolongation in progression-free survival following chemotherapy. Despite this disappointing result, a number of observations have accumulated over the years that suggest some clinical efficacy of lymphoma vaccines. Several strategies are being developed to improve these results that include optimization of antigen delivery and presentation as well as enhancement of anti-tumor T cell function. This review describes the clinical development of lymphoma vaccines and delineates advances, problems and prospects towards integration of this strategy in the therapeutic armamentarium for lymphoma. PMID:18951668

  5. Advances in influenza vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Reperant, Leslie A.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus infections yearly cause high morbidity and mortality burdens in humans, and the development of a new influenza pandemic continues to threaten mankind as a Damoclean sword. Influenza vaccines have been produced by using egg-based virus growth and passaging techniques that were developed more than 60 years ago, following the identification of influenza A virus as an etiological agent of seasonal influenza. These vaccines aimed mainly at eliciting neutralizing antibodies targeting antigenically variable regions of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, which requires regular updates to match circulating seasonal influenza A and B virus strains. Given the relatively limited protection induced by current seasonal influenza vaccines, a more universal influenza vaccine that would protect against more—if not all—influenza viruses is among the largest unmet medical needs of the 21st century. New insights into correlates of protection from influenza and into broad B- and T-cell protective anti-influenza immune responses offer promising avenues for innovative vaccine development as well as manufacturing strategies or platforms, leading to the development of a new generation of vaccines. These aim at the rapid and massive production of influenza vaccines that provide broad protective and long-lasting immunity. Recent advances in influenza vaccine research demonstrate the feasibility of a wide range of approaches and call for the initiation of preclinical proof-of-principle studies followed by clinical trials in humans. PMID:24991424

  6. The Human Hookworm Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hotez, Peter J; Diemert, David; Bacon, Kristina M; Beaumier, Coreen; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Brooker, Simon; Couto, Artur Roberto; Freire, Marcos da Silva; Homma, Akira; Lee, Bruce Y; Loukas, Alex; Loblack, Marva; Morel, Carlos Medicis; Oliveira, Rodrigo Correa; Russell, Philip K

    2013-04-18

    Hookworm infection is one of the world's most common neglected tropical diseases and a leading cause of iron deficiency anemia in low- and middle-income countries. A Human Hookworm Vaccine is currently being developed by the Sabin Vaccine Institute and is in phase 1 clinical testing. The candidate vaccine is comprised of two recombinant antigens known as Na-GST-1 and Na-APR-1, each of which is an important parasite enzyme required for hookworms to successfully utilize host blood as a source of energy. The recombinant proteins are formulated on Alhydrogel(®) and are being tested in combination with a synthetic Toll-like receptor 4 agonist. The aim of the vaccine is to induce anti-enzyme antibodies that will reduce both host blood loss and the number of hookworms attached to the gut. Transfer of the manufacturing technology to the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ)/Bio-Manguinhos (a Brazilian public sector developing country vaccine manufacturer) is planned, with a clinical development plan that could lead to registration of the vaccine in Brazil. The vaccine would also need to be introduced in the poorest regions of Africa and Asia, where hookworm infection is highly endemic. Ultimately, the vaccine could become an essential tool for achieving hookworm control and elimination, a key target in the 2012 London Declaration on Neglected Tropical Diseases.

  7. Vaccines and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Paz, Ziv; Israeli, Eitan; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2009-11-01

    Vaccines have been used for over 200 years and are the most effective way of preventing the morbidity and mortality associated with infections. Like other drugs, vaccines can cause adverse events, but unlike conventional medicines, which are prescribed to people who are ill, vaccines are administered to healthy individuals, thus increasing the concern over adverse reactions. Most side effects attributed to vaccines are mild, acute and transient; however, rare reactions such as hypersensitivity, induction of infection, and autoimmunity do occur and can be severe and even fatal. The rarity and subacute presentation of post-vaccination autoimmune phenomena means that ascertaining causality between these events can be difficult. Moreover, the latency period between vaccination and autoimmunity ranges from days to years. In this article, on the basis of published evidence and our own experience, we discuss the various aspects of the causal and temporal interactions between vaccines and autoimmune phenomena, as well as the possible mechanisms by which different components of vaccines might induce autoimmunity.

  8. Vaccination to Prevent Cancer.

    PubMed

    Clements, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines stimulate the immune system, mimicking infectious attacks and thereby promoting the development of protective antibodies and/or cellular immunity so that the body is immune to infection when live native infections attack. Some of these infections are associated with cancer-causing changes in the body; thus some vaccines may help prevent cancer. PMID:27621345

  9. [Influenza vaccine and adjuvant].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant is originated from the Latin word "adjuvare" which means "help" in English to enhance the immunological responses when given together with antigens. The beginning of adjuvant was mineral oil which enhanced the immune response when it was given with inactivated Salmonella typhimurium. Aluminium salt was used to precipitate diphtheria toxoid and increased level of antibody response was demonstrated when administered with alum-precipitated antigens. Since 1930, aluminium salt has been used as DTaP (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine) adjuvant. Many candidates were tested for adjuvant activity but only aluminum salt is allowed to use for human vaccines. New adjuvant MF59, oil-in-water emulsion type, was developed for influenza vaccine for elderly (Fluad) and series of AS adjuvant are used for hepatitis B, pandemic flue, and human papiloma virus vaccines. Oil-adjuvanted influenza pandemic vaccines induced higher antibody response than alum-adjuvanted vaccine with higher incidence of adverse events, especially for local reactions. Alum-adjuvanted whole virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine was developed in Japan, and it induced relatively well immune responses in adults. When it applied for children, febrile reaction was noted in approximately 60% of the subjects, with higher antibodies. Recent investigation on innate immunity demonstrates that adjuvant activity is initiated from the stimulation on innate immunity and/or inflammasome, resulting in cytokine induction and antigen uptake by monocytes and macrophages. The probable reason for high incidence of febrile reaction should be investigated to develop a safe and effective influenza vaccine.

  10. Vaccines and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    De Martino, M; Chiappini, E; Galli, L

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines have eradicated or controlled many infectious diseases, saving each year millions of lives and quality of life of many other millions of people. In spite of the success of vaccines over the last two centuries, parents (and also some health care workers) gloss over the devastating consequences of diseases, which are now avoided thanks to vaccines, and direct their attention to possible negative effects of immunization. Three immunological objections are raised: vaccines cause antigenic overload, natural immunity is safer and better than vaccine-induced immunity, and vaccines induce autoimmunity. The last point is examined in this review. Theoretically, vaccines could trigger autoimmunity by means of cytokine production, anti-idiotypic network, expression of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens, modification of surface antigens and induction of novel antigens, molecular mimicry, bystander activation, epitope spreading, and polyclonal activation of B cells. There is strong evidence that none of these mechanisms is really effective in causing autoimmune diseases. Vaccines are not a source of autoimmune diseases. By contrast, absolute evidence exists that infectious agents can trigger autoimmune mechanisms and that they do cause autoimmune diseases.

  11. Therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Acres, Bruce; Paul, Stephane; Haegel-Kronenberger, Helene; Calmels, Bastien; Squiban, Patrick

    2004-02-01

    Therapeutic vaccination against cancer-associated antigens represents an attractive option for cancer therapy in view of the comparatively low toxicity and, so far, excellent safety profile of this treatment. Nevertheless, it is now recognized that the vaccination strategies used for prophylactic vaccinations against infectious diseases cannot necessarily be used for therapeutic cancer vaccination. Cancer patients are usually immunosuppressed, and most cancer-associated antigens are self antigens. Therefore, various immunostimulation techniques are under investigation in an effort to bolster immune systems and to overcome immune tolerance to self antigens. Various strategies to stimulate antigen presentation, T-cell reactivity and innate immune activity are under investigation. Similarly, strategies to produce an immunological 'danger signal' at the site of the tumor itself are under evaluation, as it is recognized that while tumor-specific T-cells can be activated at the site of vaccination, they require appropriate signals to be attracted to a tumor. The detection, evaluation and quantification of specific immune responses generated by vaccination with cancer-associated antigens is another important area of therapeutic cancer vaccine evaluation receiving much attention and novel strategies. Multiple clinical trials have been undertaken to evaluate therapeutic vaccines in patients. Aggressive protocols such as those combining specific stimulation of T-cells and chemotherapy or strategies to block immune regulation are having some success. PMID:15011780

  12. Pricing of new vaccines

    PubMed Central

    McGlone, Sarah M

    2010-01-01

    New vaccine pricing is a complicated process that could have substantial long-standing scientific, medical and public health ramifications. Pricing can have a considerable impact on new vaccine adoption and, thereby, either culminate or thwart years of research and development and public health efforts. Typically, pricing strategy consists of the following eleven components: (1) Conduct a target population analysis; (2) Map potential competitors and alternatives; (3) Construct a vaccine target product profile (TPP) and compare it to projected or actual TPPs of competing vaccines; (4) Quantify the incremental value of the new vaccine's characteristics; (5) Determine vaccine positioning in the marketplace; (6) Estimate the vaccine price-demand curve; (7) Calculate vaccine costs (including those of manufacturing, distribution, and research and development); (8) Account for various legal, regulatory, third party payer and competitor factors; (9) Consider the overall product portfolio; (10) Set pricing objectives; (11) Select pricing and pricing structure. While the biomedical literature contains some studies that have addressed these components, there is still considerable room for more extensive evaluation of this important area. PMID:20861678

  13. Acceptability of BCG vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mande, R

    1977-01-01

    The acceptability of BCG vaccination varies a great deal according to the country and to the period when the vaccine is given. The incidence of complications has not always a direct influence on this acceptability, which depends, for a very large part, on the risk of tuberculosis in a given country at a given time.

  14. Chimeric Pestivirus Experimental Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Ilona; Blome, Sandra; Beer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric pestiviruses have shown great potential as marker vaccine candidates against pestiviral infections. Exemplarily, we describe here the construction and testing of the most promising classical swine fever vaccine candidate "CP7_E2alf" in detail. The description is focused on classical cloning technologies in combination with reverse genetics. PMID:26458840

  15. Developing new smallpox vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, S. R.; Merchlinsky, M.; Kleppinger, C.; Goldenthal, K. L.

    2001-01-01

    New stockpiles of smallpox vaccine are required as a contingency for protecting civilian and military personnel against deliberate dissemination of smallpox virus by terrorists or unfriendly governments. The smallpox vaccine in the current stockpile consists of a live animal poxvirus (Vaccinia virus [VACV]) that was grown on the skin of calves. Because of potential issues with controlling this earlier manufacturing process, which included scraping VACV lesions from calfskin, new vaccines are being developed and manufactured by using viral propagation on well-characterized cell substrates. We describe, from a regulatory perspective, the various strains of VACV, the adverse events associated with calf lymph-propagated smallpox vaccine, the issues regarding selection and use of cell substrates for vaccine production, and the issues involved in demonstrating evidence of safety and efficacy. PMID:11747717

  16. Neisseria meningitidis B vaccines.

    PubMed

    Panatto, Donatella; Amicizia, Daniela; Lai, Piero Luigi; Gasparini, Roberto

    2011-09-01

    Invasive infections caused by Neisseria meningitidis are a serious public health problem worldwide and have a heavy economic impact. The incidence of invasive disease due to Neisseria meningitidis is highly variable according to geographical area and serogroup distribution. Since the introduction of vaccination programs with conjugated vaccine C in children and adolescents, most cases of invasive meningococcal disease in developed countries have been caused by meningococcus B. It is important to underline that invasive meningococcal disease will not be controlled until safe and effective vaccines for meningococcal B are available and widely used. The aims of this article are to describe the most recent developments in meningococcal B vaccines and to discuss how these vaccines can contribute to containing meningococcal disease.

  17. Against vaccine assay secrecy.

    PubMed

    Herder, Matthew; Hatchette, Todd F; Halperin, Scott A; Langley, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the transparency of the evidence base behind health interventions such as pharmaceuticals, biologics, and medical devices, has become a major point of critique, conflict, and policy focus in recent years. Yet the lack of publicly available information regarding the immunogenicity assays upon which many important, widely used vaccines are based has received no attention to date. In this paper we draw attention to this critical public health problem by reporting on our efforts to secure vaccine assay information in respect of 10 vaccines through Canada's access to information law. We argue, under Canadian law, that the public health interest in having access to the methods for these laboratory procedures should override claims by vaccine manufacturers and regulators that this information is proprietary; and, we call upon several actors to take steps to ensure greater transparency with respect to vaccine assays, including regulators, private firms, researchers, research institutions, research funders, and journal editors.

  18. [What vaccination has brought].

    PubMed

    Bégué, Pierre

    2004-03-15

    The vaccines have improved obviously and constantly the struggle against infectious diseases. When the immunisations have been well applied some diseases fell down dramatically: i.e. diphtheria, poliomyelitis and smallpox which was eradicated. Actually some efficacious vaccines as measles or rubella vaccines could eliminate the diseases. Nevertheless in many developed countries the immunisation coverage is not properly reached and the diseases are always circulating, with a shift of age towards adults, with more severe diseases or new epidemiology (i.e. pertussis). However measles have been eliminated from some countries as Finland, Sweden, United States. The adverse events of vaccines are nowadays enhanced and discourage immunisation among some doctors or patients. The benefit-risk ratio has to be made very clear to avoid a lack or a denial of immunisation after false fears about risk of some vaccines. An improvement of surveillance and of correct information is highly required.

  19. Vaccination against cestode parasites.

    PubMed

    Lightowlers, M W; Rickard, M D

    1993-10-01

    Cestodes are tapeworm parasites. Infection in the intermediate host with larval (metacestode) parasites causes medically and economically important diseases known as hydatidosis and cysticercosis. Immunization against experimental infection with metacestode parasites has been highly successful, in marked contrast with the relative ineffectiveness of vaccines against infection with most parasitic organisms. High levels of immunity against a challenge infection with taeniid cestode eggs can be stimulated by immunization with extracts of the parasites, particularly with extracts of the oncosphere life-cycle stage. This led to the production of a recombinant antigen vaccine against infection in sheep with the parasite Taenia ovis, the first highly effective, non-living vaccine against a parasitic infection in animals or humans. This paper reviews immunity to the adult and metacestode life-cycle stages of cestode parasites, development and application of the T. ovis vaccine, and prospects for vaccines against other cestode infections.

  20. DNA vaccines: a review.

    PubMed

    Liu, M A

    2003-04-01

    The DNA vaccines are simple rings of DNA containing a gene encoding an antigen, and a promoter/terminator to make the gene express in mammalian cells. They are a promising new approach for generating all types of desired immunity: cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL), T helper cells and antibodies, whilst being a technology that has the potential for global usage in terms of manufacturing ease, broad population administration and safety. This review gives an overview of the mechanisms, preclinical and clinical efficacy of DNA vaccines, and point out the limitations of the first generation of such vaccines, and some of the promising second-generation developments. This technology is also being utilized in the field of proteomics as a tool to elucidate the function of genes. The breadth of applications for DNA vaccines thus ranges from prophylactic vaccines to immunotherapy for infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune and allergic diseases. PMID:12653868

  1. Next generation vaccines.

    PubMed

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2011-07-01

    In February this year, about 100 delegates gathered for three days in Vienna (Austria) for the Next Generation Vaccines conference. The meeting held in the Vienna Hilton Hotel from 23rd-25th February 2011 had a strong focus on biotech and industry. The conference organizer Jacob Fleming managed to put together a versatile program ranging from the future generation of vaccines to manufacturing, vaccine distribution and delivery, to regulatory and public health issues. Carefully selected top industry experts presented first-hand experience and shared solutions for overcoming the latest challenges in the field of vaccinology. The program also included several case study presentations on novel vaccine candidates in different stages of development. An interactive pre-conference workshop as well as interactive panel discussions during the meeting allowed all delegates to gain new knowledge and become involved in lively discussions on timely, interesting and sometimes controversial topics related to vaccines. PMID:22002157

  2. Vaccines for military use.

    PubMed

    Artenstein, Andrew W

    2009-11-01

    Vaccines have long been used by military forces in order to prevent communicable diseases and thereby preserve the fighting force. A tradition that began with the mass vaccination of the Continental Army against smallpox during the War of the American Revolution in the late 18th century continues today with routine and deployment-based vaccination of military forces against potential pathogens of nature and biological weapon threats. As their role has expanded in recent years to include humanitarian and peacekeeping missions, the military's use of vaccines against infectious diseases has concomitantly broadened to include civilian populations worldwide. The emergence of new threats and the recognition of additional global challenges will continue to compel the development and promotion of vaccines to combat infectious diseases of military significance. PMID:19837279

  3. Diagnostic and vaccine chapter.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, J H; Kokanov, S K; Verkhovsky, O A

    2010-10-01

    The first report in this chapter describes the development of a killed composite vaccine. This killed vaccine is non-infectious to humans, other animals, and the environment. The vaccine has low reactivity, is non-abortive, and does not induce pathomorphological alterations to the organs of vaccinated animals. The second report of this chapter describes the diagnostic value of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting Brucella-specific antibodies and its ability to discriminate vaccinated cattle from infected cattle. The results indicated that the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is more sensitive than traditional tests for detecting antibodies to Brucella abortus in naturally and experimentally infected cattle. PMID:20850688

  4. Against vaccine assay secrecy

    PubMed Central

    Herder, Matthew; Hatchette, Todd F; Halperin, Scott A; Langley, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the transparency of the evidence base behind health interventions such as pharmaceuticals, biologics, and medical devices, has become a major point of critique, conflict, and policy focus in recent years. Yet the lack of publicly available information regarding the immunogenicity assays upon which many important, widely used vaccines are based has received no attention to date. In this paper we draw attention to this critical public health problem by reporting on our efforts to secure vaccine assay information in respect of 10 vaccines through Canada's access to information law. We argue, under Canadian law, that the public health interest in having access to the methods for these laboratory procedures should override claims by vaccine manufacturers and regulators that this information is proprietary; and, we call upon several actors to take steps to ensure greater transparency with respect to vaccine assays, including regulators, private firms, researchers, research institutions, research funders, and journal editors. PMID:25826194

  5. Vaccine safety--vaccine benefits: science and the public's perception.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C B; Marcuse, E K

    2001-11-01

    The development of cowpox vaccination by Jenner led to the development of immunology as a scientific discipline. The subsequent eradication of smallpox and the remarkable effects of other vaccines are among the most important contributions of biomedical science to human health. Today, the need for new vaccines has never been greater. However, in developed countries, the public's fear of vaccine-preventable diseases has waned, and awareness of potential adverse effects has increased, which is threatening vaccine acceptance. To further the control of disease by vaccination, we must develop safe and effective new vaccines to combat infectious diseases, and address the public's concerns.

  6. Vaccination coverage among adults, excluding influenza vaccination - United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Williams, Walter W; Lu, Peng-Jun; O'Halloran, Alissa; Bridges, Carolyn B; Kim, David K; Pilishvili, Tamara; Hales, Craig M; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2015-02-01

    Vaccinations are recommended throughout life to prevent vaccine-preventable diseases and their sequelae. Adult vaccination coverage, however, remains low for most routinely recommended vaccines and below Healthy People 2020 targets. In October 2014, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved the adult immunization schedule for 2015. With the exception of influenza vaccination, which is recommended for all adults each year, other adult vaccinations are recommended for specific populations based on a person's age, health conditions, behavioral risk factors (e.g., injection drug use), occupation, travel, and other indications. To assess vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥19 years for selected vaccines, CDC analyzed data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). This report highlights results of that analysis for pneumococcal, tetanus toxoid-containing (tetanus and diphtheria vaccine [Td] or tetanus and diphtheria with acellular pertussis vaccine [Tdap]), hepatitis A, hepatitis B, herpes zoster (shingles), and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines by selected characteristics (age, race/ethnicity,† and vaccination indication). Influenza vaccination coverage estimates for the 2013-14 influenza season have been published separately. Compared with 2012, only modest increases occurred in Tdap vaccination among adults aged ≥19 years (a 2.9 percentage point increase to 17.2%), herpes zoster vaccination among adults aged ≥60 years (a 4.1 percentage point increase to 24.2%), and HPV vaccination among males aged 19-26 years (a 3.6 percentage point increase to 5.9%); coverage among adults in the United States for the other vaccines did not improve. Racial/ethnic disparities in coverage persisted for all six vaccines and widened for Tdap and herpes zoster vaccination. Increases in vaccination coverage are needed to reduce the occurrence of vaccine-preventable diseases among adults. Awareness of the need for vaccines for adults is low

  7. Vaccines against nicotine.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Erich H; Cerny, Thomas

    2009-04-01

    Medications against any dependence-inducing drug face a dilemma: if they are efficient, they will induce withdrawal symptoms and the patient is likely to stop taking his medication. Anti drug vaccines are irreversible, provide protection over years and need booster injections far beyond the critical phase of acute withdrawal symptoms. Interacting rather with the drug in the blood than with a receptor in the brain, the vaccines are, in addition, free of side effects due to central interaction. For drugs like nicotine interacting with different types of receptors in many organs, this is a further advantage. There are three reasons that anti drug vaccines have first been developed against nicotine. Firstly, in most parts of the world 20 to 50% of the adult population smoke and any smoking cessation treatment will have an important impact on public health and be commercially a very attractive product. The second reason are the smokers themselves, who would like to quit in significant numbers and who have shown good compliance for any form of treatment. Thirdly, the quantities of cocaine or heroine taken by dependant persons are higher than the quantity of nicotine per cigarette, which makes an anti nicotine vaccine the easier vaccine project. Three anti nicotine vaccines are today in an advanced stage of clinical evaluation. We report here how those vaccines work, on the progress of the trials and future developments to expect. Results show that the efficiency of the vaccines is directly related to the antibody levels of the probates, a fact which will help to optimize further the vaccine effect. We expect the vaccines to appear on the market during a time window between 2009 and 2011. PMID:19276649

  8. Laser vaccine adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Brauns, Timothy; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Poznansky, Mark C

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic adjuvants are essential for current vaccines to maximize their efficacy. Unfortunately, few have been found to be sufficiently effective and safe for regulatory authorities to permit their use in vaccines for humans and none have been approved for use with intradermal vaccines. The development of new adjuvants with the potential to be both efficacious and safe constitutes a significant need in modern vaccine practice. The use of non-damaging laser light represents a markedly different approach to enhancing immune responses to a vaccine antigen, particularly with intradermal vaccination. This approach, which was initially explored in Russia and further developed in the US, appears to significantly improve responses to both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines administered to the laser-exposed tissue, particularly the skin. Although different types of lasers have been used for this purpose and the precise molecular mechanism(s) of action remain unknown, several approaches appear to modulate dendritic cell trafficking and/or activation at the irradiation site via the release of specific signaling molecules from epithelial cells. The most recent study, performed by the authors of this review, utilized a continuous wave near-infrared laser that may open the path for the development of a safe, effective, low-cost, simple-to-use laser vaccine adjuvant that could be used in lieu of conventional adjuvants, particularly with intradermal vaccines. In this review, we summarize the initial Russian studies that have given rise to this approach and comment upon recent advances in the use of non-tissue damaging lasers as novel physical adjuvants for vaccines. PMID:25424797

  9. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is the third most important vector-borne disease worldwide. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe and frequently lethal protozoan disease of increasing incidence and severity due to infected human and dog migration, new geographical distribution of the insect due to global warming, coinfection with immunosuppressive diseases, and poverty. The disease is an anthroponosis in India and Central Africa and a canid zoonosis (ZVL) in the Americas, the Middle East, Central Asia, China, and the Mediterranean. The ZVL epidemic has been controlled by one or more measures including the culling of infected dogs, treatment of human cases, and insecticidal treatment of homes and dogs. However, the use of vaccines is considered the most cost–effective control tool for human and canine disease. Since the severity of the disease is related to the generation of T-cell immunosuppression, effective vaccines should be capable of sustaining or enhancing the T-cell immunity. In this review we summarize the clinical and parasitological characteristics of ZVL with special focus on the cellular and humoral canine immune response and review state-of-the-art vaccine development against human and canine VL. Experimental vaccination against leishmaniasis has evolved from the practice of leishmanization with living parasites to vaccination with crude lysates, native parasite extracts to recombinant and DNA vaccination. Although more than 30 defined vaccines have been studied in laboratory models no human formulation has been licensed so far; however three second-generation canine vaccines have already been registered. As expected for a zoonotic disease, the recent preventive vaccination of dogs in Brazil has led to a reduction in the incidence of canine and human disease. The recent identification of several Leishmania proteins with T-cell epitopes anticipates development of a multiprotein vaccine that will be capable of protecting both humans and dogs against VL. PMID:22566950

  10. West Nile virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Monath, T P; Arroyo, J; Miller, C; Guirakhoo, F

    2001-05-01

    Within the past 5 years, West Nile encephalitis has emerged as an important disease of humans and horses in Europe. In 1999, the disease appeared for the first time in the northeastern United States. West Nile virus (a mosquito-borne flavivirus) has flourished in the North American ecosystem and is expected to expand its geographic range. In this review, the rationale for a human and veterinary vaccine is presented and a novel approach for rapid development of a molecularly-defined, live, attenuated vaccine is described. The technology (ChimeriVax) is applicable to the development of vaccines against all flaviviruses, and products against Japanese encephalitis (a close relative of West Nile) and dengue are in or are nearing clinical trials, respectively. ChimeriVax vaccines utilize the safe and effective vaccine against the prototype flavivirus -yellow fever 17D- as a live vector. Infectious clone technology is used to replace the genes encoding the pre-membrane (prM) and envelope (E) protein of yellow fever 17D vaccine with the corresponding genes of the target virus (e.g., West Nile). The resulting chimeric virus contains the antigens responsible for protection against West Nile but retains the replication efficiency of yellow fever 17D. The ChimeriVax technology is well-suited to the rapid development of a West Nile vaccine, and clinical trials could begin as early as mid-2002. Other approaches to vaccine development are briefly reviewed. The aim of this brief review is to describe the features of West Nile encephalitis, a newly introduced infectious disease affecting humans, horses and wildlife in the United States; the rationale for rapid development of vaccines; and approaches to the development of vaccines against the disease.

  11. Cleavage of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4G by Exogenously Added Hybrid Proteins Containing Poliovirus 2Apro in HeLa Cells: Effects on Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Novoa, Isabel; Carrasco, Luis

    1999-01-01

    Efficient cleavage of both forms of eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G-1 and eIF4G-2) has been achieved in HeLa cells by incubation with hybrid proteins containing poliovirus 2Apro. Entry of these proteins into cells is promoted by adenovirus particles. Substantial levels of ongoing translation on preexisting cellular mRNAs still continue for several hours after eIF4G degradation. Treatment of control HeLa cells with hypertonic medium causes an inhibition of translation that is reversed upon restoration of cells to normal medium. Protein synthesis is not restored in cells lacking intact eIF4G after hypertonic treatment. Notably, induction of synthesis of heat shock proteins still occurs in cells pretreated with poliovirus 2Apro, suggesting that transcription and translation of these mRNAs takes place even in the presence of cleaved eIF4G. Finally, the synthesis of luciferase was examined in a HeLa cell line bearing the luciferase gene under control of a tetracycline-regulated promoter. Transcription of the luciferase gene and transport of the mRNA to the cytoplasm occurs at control levels in eIF4G-deficient cells. However, luciferase synthesis is strongly inhibited in these cells. These findings indicate that intact eIF4G is necessary for the translation of mRNAs not engaged in translation with the exception of heat shock mRNAs but is not necessary for the translation of mRNAs that are being translated. PMID:10082510

  12. The Vaccine Safety Datalink: successes and challenges monitoring vaccine safety.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Michael M; Gee, Julianne; Weintraub, Eric S; Belongia, Edward A; Lee, Grace M; Glanz, Jason M; Nordin, James D; Klein, Nicola P; Baxter, Roger; Naleway, Allison L; Jackson, Lisa A; Omer, Saad B; Jacobsen, Steven J; DeStefano, Frank

    2014-09-22

    The Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) is a collaborative project between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and 9 health care organizations. Established in 1990, VSD is a vital resource informing policy makers and the public about the safety of vaccines used in the United States. Large linked databases are used to identify and evaluate adverse events in over 9 million individuals annually. VSD generates rapid, important safety assessments for both routine vaccinations and emergency vaccination campaigns. VSD monitors safety of seasonal influenza vaccines in near-real time, and provided essential information on the safety of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine during the recent pandemic. VSD investigators have published important studies demonstrating that childhood vaccines are not associated with autism or other developmental disabilities. VSD prioritizes evaluation of new vaccines; searches for possible unusual health events after vaccination; monitors vaccine safety in pregnant women; and has pioneered development of biostatistical research methods. PMID:25108215

  13. The Vaccine Safety Datalink: successes and challenges monitoring vaccine safety.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Michael M; Gee, Julianne; Weintraub, Eric S; Belongia, Edward A; Lee, Grace M; Glanz, Jason M; Nordin, James D; Klein, Nicola P; Baxter, Roger; Naleway, Allison L; Jackson, Lisa A; Omer, Saad B; Jacobsen, Steven J; DeStefano, Frank

    2014-09-22

    The Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) is a collaborative project between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and 9 health care organizations. Established in 1990, VSD is a vital resource informing policy makers and the public about the safety of vaccines used in the United States. Large linked databases are used to identify and evaluate adverse events in over 9 million individuals annually. VSD generates rapid, important safety assessments for both routine vaccinations and emergency vaccination campaigns. VSD monitors safety of seasonal influenza vaccines in near-real time, and provided essential information on the safety of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine during the recent pandemic. VSD investigators have published important studies demonstrating that childhood vaccines are not associated with autism or other developmental disabilities. VSD prioritizes evaluation of new vaccines; searches for possible unusual health events after vaccination; monitors vaccine safety in pregnant women; and has pioneered development of biostatistical research methods.

  14. Wild Poliovirus Cases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Polio campaign monitoring reports Polio eradication targets Immunization coverage Reported estimates of polio immunization coverage The Global Polio Eradication Initiative © Copyright 2010 Site ...

  15. Bioinformatics analysis of Brucella vaccines and vaccine targets using VIOLIN

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Brucella spp. are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis, one of the commonest zoonotic diseases found worldwide in humans and a variety of animal species. While several animal vaccines are available, there is no effective and safe vaccine for prevention of brucellosis in humans. VIOLIN (http://www.violinet.org) is a web-based vaccine database and analysis system that curates, stores, and analyzes published data of commercialized vaccines, and vaccines in clinical trials or in research. VIOLIN contains information for 454 vaccines or vaccine candidates for 73 pathogens. VIOLIN also contains many bioinformatics tools for vaccine data analysis, data integration, and vaccine target prediction. To demonstrate the applicability of VIOLIN for vaccine research, VIOLIN was used for bioinformatics analysis of existing Brucella vaccines and prediction of new Brucella vaccine targets. Results VIOLIN contains many literature mining programs (e.g., Vaxmesh) that provide in-depth analysis of Brucella vaccine literature. As a result of manual literature curation, VIOLIN contains information for 38 Brucella vaccines or vaccine candidates, 14 protective Brucella antigens, and 68 host response studies to Brucella vaccines from 97 peer-reviewed articles. These Brucella vaccines are classified in the Vaccine Ontology (VO) system and used for different ontological applications. The web-based VIOLIN vaccine target prediction program Vaxign was used to predict new Brucella vaccine targets. Vaxign identified 14 outer membrane proteins that are conserved in six virulent strains from B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis that are pathogenic in humans. Of the 14 membrane proteins, two proteins (Omp2b and Omp31-1) are not present in B. ovis, a Brucella species that is not pathogenic in humans. Brucella vaccine data stored in VIOLIN were compared and analyzed using the VIOLIN query system. Conclusions Bioinformatics curation and ontological

  16. Technical transformation of biodefense vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2009-11-01

    Biodefense vaccines are developed against a diverse group of pathogens. Vaccines were developed for some of these pathogens a long time ago but they are facing new challenges to move beyond the old manufacturing technologies. New vaccines to be developed against other pathogens have to determine whether to follow traditional vaccination strategies or to seek new approaches. Advances in basic immunology and recombinant DNA technology have fundamentally transformed the process of formulating a vaccine concept, optimizing protective antigens, and selecting the most effective vaccine delivery approach for candidate biodefense vaccines. PMID:19837293

  17. Vaccinations for the Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Gnanasekaran, Gowrishankar; Biedenbender, Rex; Davidson, Harley Edward; Gravenstein, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Vaccine response declines with age, but currently recommended vaccines are safe and effective in reducing, if not preventing, disease altogether. Over the last decade, advancements in vaccine immunogenicity, either by increasing dose or conjugating vaccines to protein, have resulted in more immunogenic vaccines that also seem more effective in reducing clinical disease both for influenza and pneumococcus. Meanwhile, there is a resurgence in incident pertussis, exceeding prevalence from five decades ago, adding older adults to a recommended target vaccination group. This article discusses currently available vaccines, in the context of current epidemiology and recommendations, for older adults. PMID:27394026

  18. The need for new vaccines.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kate; Nguyen, Aurélia; Stéphenne, Jean

    2009-12-30

    Advances in biotechnology and immunology are yielding exciting progress in the development of new biologics and vaccines. Yet in both the developed and developing world, we see a backlog of new vaccines that are licensed but not yet used, an "innovation pile-up", which may prevent individuals and societies from benefiting from protection against preventable infectious diseases. What is the "need for new vaccines"? Reviewing the vaccines environment and the place of vaccination in public health, we present our business model that we use to sustainably deliver the benefits of vaccination and review potential solutions to accelerating the introduction and adoption of under-utilised and future vaccines.

  19. [Present status of vaccines in 1989].

    PubMed

    Roussey, M; Dabadie, A

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe 2 new vaccines now available in France: one is the GenHevac, an hepatitis B vaccine, the first virus recombinant vaccine; the other one is the Typhim Vi, a polysaccharide typhoid vaccine. Three other vaccines are currently used in foreign countries and will be soon available: the Hemophilus influenzae vaccine, the acellular pertussis vaccine and the varicella vaccine. Rotavirus and Cytomegalovirus vaccines are studied for their clinical efficacy.

  20. Vaccine beliefs of parents who oppose compulsory vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Allison M.; Brown, Cedric J.; Gust, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Our objectives were the following: (1) to describe the sociodemographic factors, vaccine beliefs, and behaviors that are associated with parental opposition to compulsory vaccination, and (2) to determine if the availability of a philosophical exemption in a parent's state of residence is associated with parental opposition to compulsory vaccination. METHODS: Data from the 2002 HealthStyles survey were analyzed. Chi-square analysis was used to identify significant associations between belief and behavior questions and opposition to compulsory vaccination for school entry. Multivariate logistic regression was conducted using significant variables from the bivariate analysis to identify independent predictors of opposition to compulsory vaccination among surveyed parents. RESULTS: Of respondents with at least one child aged < or = 18 years living in the household (n=1,527), 12% were opposed to compulsory vaccination. Survey results indicate that a parent's belief regarding compulsory vaccination for school entry is significantly associated with beliefs in the safety and utility of vaccines, as well as intention to have the youngest child fully vaccinated. Residence in a state that permits philosophical exemption to vaccination also was significantly associated with a parent's opposition to compulsory vaccination for school entry. CONCLUSIONS: Providing basic information to parents regarding vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases may help reduce opposition to compulsory vaccination by reinforcing the safety and importance of routine childhood vaccinations. PMID:16134564