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Sample records for polish adult leukemia

  1. Status of minimal residual disease after induction predicts outcome in both standard and high-risk Ph-negative adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. The Polish Adult Leukemia Group ALL 4-2002 MRD Study.

    PubMed

    Holowiecki, Jerzy; Krawczyk-Kulis, Malgorzata; Giebel, Sebastian; Jagoda, Krystyna; Stella-Holowiecka, Beata; Piatkowska-Jakubas, Beata; Paluszewska, Monika; Seferynska, Ilona; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Kielbinski, Marek; Czyz, Anna; Balana-Nowak, Agnieszka; Król, Maria; Skotnicki, Aleksander B; Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw W; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Lange, Andrzej; Hellmann, Andrzej

    2008-06-01

    The treatment of adults with Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) depends on the presence of risk factors including age, white blood cell count, immunophenotype and time to complete remission. In recent years, status of minimal residual disease (MRD) has been postulated as an additional risk criterion. This study prospectively evaluated the significance of MRD. Patients were treated with a uniform Polish Adult Leukemia Group (PALG) 4-2002 protocol. MRD status was assessed after induction and consolidation by multiparametric flow cytometry. Out of 132 patients included (age, 17-60 years), 116 patients were suitable for analysis. MRD level >/=0.1% of bone marrow cells after induction was found to be a strong and independent predictor for relapse in the whole study population (P < 0.0001), as well as in the standard risk (SR, P = 0.0003) and high-risk (P = 0.008) groups. The impact of MRD after consolidation on outcome was not significant. The combination of MRD status with conventional risk stratification system identified a subgroup of patients allocated to the SR group with MRD <0.1% after induction who had a very low risk of relapse of 9% at 3 years as opposed to 71% in the remaining subjects (P = 0.001). We conclude that MRD evaluation after induction should be considered with conventional risk criteria for treatment decisions in adult ALL.

  2. Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Faderl, Stefan; O’Brien, Susan; Pui, Ching-Hon; Stock, Wendy; Wetzler, Meir; Hoelzer, Dieter; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a clonal expansion of hematopoietic blasts, is a highly heterogeneous disease comprising many entities for which distinct treatment strategies are pursued. Although ALL is a success story in pediatric oncology, results in adults lag behind those in children. An expansion of new drugs, more reliable immunologic and molecular techniques for the assessment of minimal residual disease, and efforts at more precise risk stratification are generating new aspects of adult ALL therapy. For this review, the authors summarized pertinent and recent literature on ALL biology and therapy, and they discuss current strategies and potential implications of novel approaches to the management of adult ALL. PMID:20101737

  3. Addition of cladribine to the standard induction treatment improves outcomes in a subset of elderly acute myeloid leukemia patients. Results of a randomized Polish Adult Leukemia Group (PALG) phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Pluta, Agnieszka; Robak, Tadeusz; Wrzesien-Kus, Agata; Katarzyna Budziszewska, Bozena; Sulek, Kazimierz; Wawrzyniak, Ewa; Czemerska, Magdalena; Zwolinska, Malgorzata; Golos, Aleksandra; Holowiecka-Goral, Aleksandra; Kyrcz-Krzemien, Slawomira; Piszcz, Jaroslaw; Kloczko, Janusz; Mordak-Domagala, Monika; Lange, Andrzej; Razny, Małgorzata; Madry, Krzysztof; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw; Grosicki, Sebastian; Butrym, Aleksandra; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Holowiecki, Jerzy; Giebel, Sebastian; Szydlo, Richard; Wierzbowska, Agnieszka

    2017-04-01

    Intensive induction chemotherapy using anthracycline and cytarabine backbone is considered the most effective upfront therapy in physically fit older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, outcomes of the standard induction in elderly AML are inferior to those observed in younger patients, and they are still unsatisfactory. As addition of cladribine to the standard induction therapy is known to improve outcome in younger AML patients. The present randomized phase II study compares efficacy and toxicity of the DAC (daunorubicin plus cytarabine plus cladribine) regimen with the standard DA (daunorubicin plus cytarabine) regimen in the newly diagnosed AML patients over 60 years of age. A total of 171 patients were enrolled in the study (DA, 86; DAC, 85). A trend toward higher complete remission (CR) was observed in the DAC arm compared to the DA arm (44% vs. 34%; P = .19), which did not lead to improved median overall survival, which in the case of the DAC group was 8.6 months compared to in 9.1 months in the DA group (P = .64). However, DAC appeared to be superior in the group of patients aged 60-65 (CR rate: DAC 51% vs. DA 29%; P = .02). What is more, a subgroup of patients, with good and intermediate karyotypes, benefited from addition of cladribine also in terms of overall survival (P = .02). No differences in hematological and nonhematological toxicity between the DA and DAC regimens were observed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most frequent neoplastic disease in children, being a rare disease in adults. Many of the advances in pediatric ALL have been through modifications in the doses and schedules of available agents as opposed to the introduction of new compounds. In recent years some improvements in the outcome of ALL in adults have occurred. Application of pediatric regimens to young and middle-aged adults shows promise to improve outcome. Advances in the supportive care of patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), the use of alternative sources of hematopoietic stem cells and the use of reduced-intensity conditioning regimens will expand the number of patients who can benefit from this therapeutic modality. The evaluation of minimal residual disease will further stratify risk classification and redefine the role of therapeutic modalities such as SCT or biologic agents. New drugs such as thyrosin kinase inhibitors or monoclonal antibodies have led to incremental improvements in outcome. Advances in the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of the disease provide hope that targeted therapies can more effectively treat the disease with less toxicity. PMID:22053271

  5. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  7. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  8. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  9. Routine scale and polish for periodontal health in adults.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Helen V; Clarkson, Jan E; Bryan, Gemma; Beirne, Paul V

    2013-11-07

    Many dentists or hygienists provide scaling and polishing for patients at regular intervals, even if those patients are considered to be at low risk of developing periodontal disease. There is debate over the clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of 'routine scaling and polishing' and the 'optimal' frequency at which it should be provided for healthy adults.A 'routine scale and polish' treatment is defined as scaling or polishing or both of the crown and root surfaces of teeth to remove local irritational factors (plaque, calculus, debris and staining), that does not involve periodontal surgery or any form of adjunctive periodontal therapy such as the use of chemotherapeutic agents or root planing. The objectives were: 1) to determine the beneficial and harmful effects of routine scaling and polishing for periodontal health; 2) to determine the beneficial and harmful effects of providing routine scaling and polishing at different time intervals on periodontal health; 3) to compare the effects of routine scaling and polishing with or without oral hygiene instruction (OHI) on periodontal health; and 4) to compare the effects of routine scaling and polishing provided by a dentist or dental care professional (dental therapist or dental hygienist) on periodontal health. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 15 July 2013), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 6), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 15 July 2013) and EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 15 July 2013). We searched the metaRegister of Controlled Trials and the US National Institutes of Health Clinical Trials Register (clinicaltrials.gov) for ongoing and completed studies to July 2013. There were no restrictions regarding language or date of publication. Randomised controlled trials of routine scale and polish treatments (excluding split-mouth trials) with and without OHI in healthy dentate adults, without severe periodontitis. Two review authors screened

  10. Cytarabine With or Without SCH 900776 in Treating Adult Patients With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. The Prevalence of TMD in Polish Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Loster, Jolanta E; Osiewicz, Magdalena A; Groch, Magdalena; Ryniewicz, Wojciech; Wieczorek, Aneta

    2017-06-01

    The prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in the general Polish population has not yet been thoroughly investigated. The aim of this study was to determine how frequently Polish young adults demonstrated the signs and symptoms of TMD, and how often they were aware of these. The study involved 260 volunteers of approximately 18 years of age (and with an F:M ratio of 2.8), who had completed the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) questionnaire in its internationally accepted Polish version. The volunteers were students from three randomly selected high schools in Kraków, Poland. Following the clinical examinations, all participants received none or one or more of the RDC/TMD axis I diagnoses on one or both sides: muscle disorders (group I), disk displacements (group II), arthralgia, osteoarthritis, and osteoarthrosis (group III). Classification on RDC/TMD axis II involved pain-related impairment (Graded Chronic Pain Severity, from 0: no TMD pain in the prior 6 months, to IV: high disability-severely limiting), depression, and somatization levels (normal, moderate, severe). On the RDC/TMD axis I, 69 (26.5%) of the participants received one or more of the possible diagnoses. Awareness of TMD was present in 20 (7.7%) people from that group, in the form of self-complaints. The difference between females and males was statistically significant (p  = 0.0013). On the RDC/TMD axis II assessment, a diagnosis of pain, depression, or somatization was given in 38 (14.6%) cases from that group. Muscle disorders were most frequently diagnosed in the group of Polish young adults, and the prevalence of the disease did not differ across similar groups of young people. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. What's New in Adult Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) in Adults Research?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Adults About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) What’s New in Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? Researchers ... have the Philadelphia chromosome. Gene expression profiling This new lab technique is being studied to help identify ...

  13. Molecular Hallmarks of Adult T Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Makoto; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2012-01-01

    The molecular hallmarks of adult T cell leukemia (ATL) comprise outstanding deregulations of signaling pathways that control the cell cycle, resistance to apoptosis, and proliferation of leukemic cells, all of which have been identified by early excellent studies. Nevertheless, we are now confronted the therapeutic difficulties of ATL that is a most aggressive T cell leukemia/lymphoma. Using next-generation strategies, emerging molecular characteristics such as specific surface markers and an additional catalog of signals affecting the fate of leukemic cells have been added to the molecular hallmarks that constitute an organizing principle for rationalizing the complexities of ATL. Although human T cell leukemia virus type 1 is undoubtedly involved in ATL leukemogenesis, most leukemic cells do not express the viral protein Tax. Instead, cellular gene expression changes dominate homeostasis disorders of infected cells and characteristics of ATL. In this review, we summarize the state of the art of ATL molecular pathology, which supports the biological properties of leukemic cells. In addition, we discuss the recent discovery of two molecular hallmarks of potential generality; an abnormal microRNA pattern and epigenetic reprogramming, which strongly involve the imbalance of the molecular network of lymphocytes. Global analyses of ATL have revealed the functional impact of crosstalk between multifunctional pathways. Clinical and biological studies on signaling inhibitory agents have also revealed novel oncogenic drivers that can be targeted in future. ATL cells, by deregulation of such pathways and their interconnections, may become masters of their own destinies. Recognizing and understanding of the widespread molecular applicability of these concepts will increasingly affect the development of novel strategies for treating ATL. PMID:23060864

  14. CD19/CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Children or Young Adults With Recurrent or Refractory CD19 Positive B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-03

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; CD19 Positive; Minimal Residual Disease; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  15. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults in Finland.

    PubMed

    Usvasalo, Anu; Räty, Riikka; Knuutila, Sakari; Vettenranta, Kim; Harila-Saari, Arja; Jantunen, Esa; Kauppila, Marjut; Koistinen, Pirjo; Parto, Katriina; Riikonen, Pekka; Salmi, Toivo T; Silvennoinen, Raija; Elonen, Erkki; Saarinen-Pihkala, Ulla M

    2008-08-01

    Interest has recently been paid to adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, particularly because all reports so far published indicate that these patients have a better outcome when treated with pediatric rather than adult therapeutic protocols. There are different biological subtypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with distinct features and prognoses; the distribution of these subtypes is not well known among adolescents. We, therefore, studied acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults aged 10 to 25 years in Finland. This population-based study included 225 consecutive patients aged 10-25 years diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia during 1990-2004. One hundred and twenty-eight patients (10-16 years) were treated with pediatric Nordic (NOPHO) protocols, and 97 patients (17-25 years) with Finnish Leukemia Group National protocols. We characterized the biological subtypes, clinical features and outcome of these patients. For the whole cohort, the remission rate was 96%, 5-year event-free survival 62% and overall survival 72%. The 5-year event-free survival was 67% for the pediatric treatment group and 60% for the adult treatment group (p=n.s.). Patients with inferior outcome were those with a white blood cell count >or= 100 x 10(9)/L, the Philadelphia chromosome and MLL. Good prognostic features were TEL-AML1, hyperdiploidy, and pediatric intermediate risk stratification. Unlike all previous studies, we found that the outcome of adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with pediatric or adult therapeutic protocols was comparable. The success of the adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy emphasizes the benefit of central referral of patients to academic centers and adherence to research protocols.

  16. Cigarette smoking and adult leukemia. A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Brownson, R C; Novotny, T E; Perry, M C

    1993-02-22

    Increasing evidence suggests that certain forms of adult leukemia may be related to cigarette smoking. To evaluate the association between cigarette smoking and adult leukemia, we conducted a meta-analysis of available studies. Data were identified through an English-language MEDLINE search for the period 1970 through 1992 and through our knowledge of ongoing and unpublished studies. Among the studies identified, the meta-analysis included seven prospective studies and eight case-control studies. The US Surgeon General's criteria were used to assess the evidence for causality. A positive association between smoking and certain histologic types of leukemia was found in both prospective and case-control studies. The summary smoking-related risk derived from prospective studies (relative risk, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 1.4) was greater than that based on case-control data (relative risk, 1.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.0 to 1.2). Prospective data suggested an elevated risk of myeloid leukemia associated with cigarette smoking (relative risk, 1.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 1.6). Pooled case-control data showed increased smoking-associated risk for acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (relative risk, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 1.5). Risk of leukemia increased according to the number of cigarettes smoked per day. Population-attributable risk calculations suggested that approximately 14% of all US leukemia cases (including 17% of myeloid and 14% of acute nonlymphocytic leukemias) may be due to cigarette smoking. The consistency, temporality, and biologic plausibility of this relationship augment our findings, which support a causal relationship between cigarette smoking and certain forms of adult leukemia. Further studies are needed to examine risk among women, dose-response effects, and variation in risk by histologic type.

  17. [Problems in maintenance therapy in acute myeloid leukemias in adults].

    PubMed

    Gürtler, R; Raderecht, C

    1975-01-01

    Problems of maintaining therapy for acute myelocytic leukemias in adults are discussed. The analysis of the maintaining therapy in 22 patients affected with an acute myelocytic leukemia and living for more than 6 months revealed that the interval therapy with a high dosage of cytostatic combinations in the sense of the COAP scheme is preferable compared with the daily administration of 6-mercaptopurin, in addition methotrexate twice a week. Reasons for this are discussed.

  18. Umbilical cord blood transplantation in adult myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tse, W W; Zang, S L; Bunting, K D; Laughlin, M J

    2008-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is a life-saving procedure for hematopoietic malignancies, marrow failure syndromes and hereditary immunodeficiency disorders. However, wide application of this procedure is limited by availability of suitable human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-matched adult donors. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has been increasingly used as an alternative HSC source for patients lacking matched-HSC donors. The clinical experience of using UCB transplantation to treat pediatric acute leukemias has already shown that higher-level HLA-mismatched UCB can be equally as good as or even better than matched HSC. Recently, large registries and multiple single institutional studies conclusively demonstrated that UCB is an acceptable source of HSCs for adult acute leukemia patients who lack HLA-matched donors. These studies will impact the future clinical allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which is the most common acute leukemia in adults. UCB has unique advantages of easy procurement, absence of risk to donors, low risk of transmitting infections, immediate availability, greater tolerance of HLA disparity and lower-than-expected incidence of severe graft-versus-host disease. These features of UCB permit successful transplantation available to almost every patient who needs it. We anticipate that using UCB as a HSC source for allogeneic transplantation for adult AML will increase dramatically over the next 5 years, by expanding the available allogeneic donor pool. Clinical studies are needed with focus on disease-specific UCB transplantation outcomes, including AML, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and lymphoma.

  19. Providing personalized prognostic information for adult leukemia survivors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephanie J; Storer, Barry; Wang, Hailin; Lazarus, Hillard M; Waller, Edmund K; Isola, Luis M; Klumpp, Thomas R; Umejiego, John Bosco C; Savani, Bipin N; Loren, Alison W; Cairo, Mitchell S; Camitta, Bruce M; Cutler, Corey S; George, Biju; Jean Khoury, H; Marks, David I; Rizzieri, David A; Copelan, Edward A; Gupta, Vikas; Liesveld, Jane L; Litzow, Mark R; Miller, Alan M; Schouten, Harry C; Gale, Robert Peter; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2013-11-01

    Prediction of subsequent leukemia-free survival (LFS) and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in adults with acute leukemia who survived at least 1 year after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation is difficult. We analyzed 3339 patients with acute myeloid leukemia and 1434 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who received myeloablative conditioning and related or unrelated stem cells from 1990 to 2005. Most clinical factors predictive of LFS in 1-year survivors were no longer significant after 2 or more years. For acute myeloid leukemia, only disease status (beyond first complete remission) remained a significant adverse risk factor for LFS 2 or more years after transplantation. For lymphoblastic leukemia, only extensive chronic GVHD remained a significant adverse predictor of LFS in the second and subsequent years. For patients surviving for 1 year without disease relapse or extensive chronic GVHD, the risk of developing extensive chronic GVHD in the next year was 4% if no risk factors were present and higher if noncyclosporine-based GVHD prophylaxis, an HLA-mismatched donor, or peripheral blood stem cells were used. Estimates for subsequent LFS and extensive chronic GVHD can be derived for individual patients or populations using an online calculator (http://www.cibmtr.org/LeukemiaCalculators). This prognostic information is more relevant for survivors than estimates provided before transplantation. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a combination of genetic and environmental factors. How leukemia forms In general, leukemia is thought to occur ... causing the signs and symptoms of leukemia. How leukemia is classified Doctors classify leukemia based on its ...

  1. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Leukemia What Is Leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells. ... diagnosed with leukemia are over 50 years old. Leukemia Starts in Bone Marrow Click for more information ...

  2. Polish Adult Reading Test (PART) - construction of Polish test for estimating the level of premorbid intelligence in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Karakuła-Juchnowicz, Hanna; Stecka, Mariola

    2017-08-29

    In view of unavailability in Poland of the standardized methods to measure PIQ, the aim of the work was to develop a Polish test to assess the premorbid level of intelligence - PART(Polish AdultReading Test) and to measureits psychometric properties, such as validity, reliability as well as standardization in the group of schizophrenia patients. The principles of PART construction were based on the idea of popular worldwide National Adult Reading Test by Hazel Nelson. The research comprised a group of 122 subjects (65 schizophrenia patients and 57 healthy people), aged 18-60 years, matched for age and gender. PART appears to be a method with high internal consistency and reliability measured by test-retest, inter-rater reliability, and the method with acceptable diagnostic and prognostic validity. The standardized procedures of PART have been investigated and described. Considering the psychometric values of PART and a short time of its performance, the test may be a useful diagnostic instrument in the assessment of premorbid level of intelligence in a group of schizophrenic patients.

  3. Autologous stem cell transplantation for adult acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Norbert-Claude

    2002-03-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation using marrow or peripheral blood is routinely used to consolidate patients with acute myelocytic leukemia in complete remission. The situation is less clear for adult acute lymphocytic leukemia in which results achieved with all strategies are disappointing. In acute myelocytic leukemia, autografts should be done in patients with good and standard risk factors. Patients with high-risk acute myelocytic leukemia defined by poor cytogenetics or failure to achieve remission with the first induction course, should proceed to allogeneic stem cell transplantation with the best available human leukocyte antigen-identical donor (family or unrelated), and the nature of the conditioning regimen (myelo-ablative or non-myelo-ablative) should be decided in relation to age, and the patient's clinical condition. Results of autografting in acute myelocytic leukemia rely strongly on the quality of the graft. Higher doses of infused stem cells translate into lower relapse rates. Marrow purging with cyclophosphamide derivatives also diminishes the relapse incidence. Autologous stem cell transplantations using peripheral blood are presently preferred to marrow as the source of stem cells, but an aggressive prior in vivo purge (high-dose consolidation course(s) before cytaphereses) is then mandatory. In good-risk acute myelocytic leukemia, autografting is superior to high-dose ARA-C; in standard-risk acute myelocytic leukemia, both are supposedly equivalent. There is no prospective randomized study testing the two approaches in the good-standard-risk population. We presently test the combination of marrow and blood both purged by mafosfamide. In adult acute lymphocytic leukemia, good-risk patients get the best benefit from autografting over conventional chemotherapy. Maintenance chemotherapy after transplant is likely to bring benefit. Research in progress aims at facilitating access of the largest number of patients to autografting and at

  4. How I treat hematologic emergencies in adults with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Tsila; Ganzel, Chezi; Tallman, Martin S; Rowe, Jacob M

    2012-09-06

    Acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia remain devastating diseases. Only approximately 40% of younger and 10% of older adults are long-term survivors. Although curing the leukemia is always the most formidable challenge, complications from the disease itself and its treatment are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Such complications, discussed herein, include tumor lysis, hyperleukocytosis, cytarabine-induced cellebellar toxicity, acute promyelocytic leukemia differentiation syndrome, thrombohemorrhagic syndrome in acute promyelocytic leukemia, L-asparaginase-associated thrombosis, leukemic meningitis, neutropenic fever, neutropenic enterocolitis, and transfussion-associated GVHD. Whereas clinical trials form the backbone for the management of acute leukemia, emergent clinical situations, predictable or not, are common and do not readily lend themselves to clinical trial evaluation. Furthermore, practice guidelines are often lacking. Not only are prospective trials impractical because of the emergent nature of the issue at hand, but clinicians are often reluctant to randomize such patients. Extensive practical experience is crucial and, even if there is no consensus, management of such emergencies should be guided by an understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms.

  5. Human retrovirus in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sugamura, K; Hinuma, Y

    1985-03-01

    In this review Kazuo Sugamura and Yorio Hinuma summarize developments in studies on the human retrovirus associated with a unique human T-cell malignancy, adult T-cell leukemia; they also discuss the possible mechanisms of retrovirus-induced leukemogenesis. Copyright © 1985. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Myelogenous Leukemia in Adult Inbred MHC Defined Miniature Swine: a model for human myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Patricia S.; Teague, Alexander G.S.; Fishman, Brian; Fishman, Aaron S.; Hanekamp, John S.; Moran, Shannon G.; Wikiel, Krzysztof J.; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Lo, Diana P.; Duggan, Michael; Arn, J. Scott; Billiter, Bob; Horner, Ben; Houser, Stuart; Yeap, Beow Yong; Westmoreland, Susan V.; Spitzer, Thomas R.; McMorrow, Isabel M.; Sachs, David H.; Bronson, Roderick T; Huang, Christene A.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript reports on five cases of spontaneous myelogenous leukemia, similar to human disease, occurring within highly inbred, histocompatible sublines of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) MHC-defined miniature swine. In cases where a neoplasm was suspected based on clinical observations, samples were obtained for complete blood count, peripheral blood smear, and flow cytometric analysis. Animals confirmed to have neoplasms were euthanized and underwent necropsy. Histological samples were obtained from abnormal tissues and suspect lesions. The phenotype of the malignancies was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of processed peripheral blood mononuclear cells and affected tissues. Five cases of spontaneous myeloid leukemia were identified in adult animals older than 30 months of age. All animals presented with symptoms of weight loss, lethargy, and marked leukocytosis. At autopsy, all animals had systemic disease involvement and presented with severe hepatosplenomegaly. Three of the five myelogenous leukemias have successfully been expanded in vitro. The clustered incidence of disease in this closed herd suggests that genetic factors may be contributing to disease development. Myelogenous leukemia cell lines established from inbred sublines of MGH MHC-defined miniature swine have the potential to be utilized as a model to evaluate therapies of human leukemia. PMID:20079939

  7. Myelogenous leukemia in adult inbred MHC-defined miniature swine: a model for human myeloid leukemias.

    PubMed

    Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Cho, Patricia S; Teague, Alexander G S; Fishman, Brian; Fishman, Aaron S; Hanekamp, John S; Moran, Shannon G; Wikiel, Krzysztof J; Ferguson, Kelly K; Lo, Diana P; Duggan, Michael; Arn, J Scott; Billiter, Bob; Horner, Ben; Houser, Stuart; Yeap, Beow Yong; Westmoreland, Susan V; Spitzer, Thomas R; McMorrow, Isabel M; Sachs, David H; Bronson, Roderick T; Huang, Christene A

    2010-06-15

    This manuscript reports on five cases of spontaneous myelogenous leukemia, similar to human disease, occurring within highly inbred, histocompatible sublines of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) MHC-defined miniature swine. In cases where a neoplasm was suspected based on clinical observations, samples were obtained for complete blood count, peripheral blood smear, and flow cytometric analysis. Animals confirmed to have neoplasms were euthanized and underwent necropsy. Histological samples were obtained from abnormal tissues and suspect lesions. The phenotype of the malignancies was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of processed peripheral blood mononuclear cells and affected tissues. Five cases of spontaneous myeloid leukemia were identified in adult animals older than 30 months of age. All animals presented with symptoms of weight loss, lethargy, and marked leukocytosis. At autopsy, all animals had systemic disease involvement and presented with severe hepatosplenomegaly. Three of the five myelogenous leukemias have successfully been expanded in vitro. The clustered incidence of disease in this closed herd suggests that genetic factors may be contributing to disease development. Myelogenous leukemia cell lines established from inbred sublines of MGH MHC-defined miniature swine have the potential to be utilized as a model to evaluate therapies of human leukemia. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Outcome of refractory and relapsed acute myeloid leukemia in children treated during 2005–2011 – experience of the Polish Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group (PPLLSG)

    PubMed Central

    Wachowiak, Jacek; Skalska-Sadowska, Jolanta; Wachowiak, Jacek; Zając-Spychała, Olga; Niewiadomska-Wojnałowicz, Izabela; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta; Balwierz, Walentyna; Pawińska-Wąsikowska, Katarzyna; Goździk, Jolanta; Chybicka, Alicja; Potocka, Kinga; Krawczuk-Rybak, Maryna; Muszyńska-Rosłan, Katarzyna; Adamkiewicz-Drożyńska, Elżbieta; Maciejka-Kapuścińska, Lucyna; Karolczyk, Grażyna; Kowalczyk, Jerzy; Wójcik, Beata; Badowska, Wanda; Urasiński, Tomasz; Ociepa, Tomasz; Matysiak, Michał; Sikorska-Fic, Barbara; Szczepański, Tomasz; Tomaszewska, Renata; Sobol, Grażyna; Wieczorek, Maria; Karpińska-Derda, Irena

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study Recent studies showed relatively better outcome for children with refractory (refAML) and relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (relAML). Treatment of these patients has not been unified within Polish Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group (PPLLSG) so far. The goal of this study is to analyze the results of this therapy performed between 2005–2011. Material and methods The outcome data of 16 patients with refAML and 62 with relAML were analyzed retrospectively. Reinduction was usually based on idarubicine, fludarabine and cytarabine with allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (alloHSCT) in 5 refAML and 30 relAML children. Results Seventy seven percent relAML patients entered second complete remission (CR2). Five-year OS and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated at 16% and 30%. The outcome for patients after alloHSCT in CR2 (63%) was better than that of those not transplanted (36%) with 5-year OS of 34% vs. 2-year of 7% and 5-year DFS of 40% vs. 12.5%. Second complete remission achievement and alloHSCT were the most significant predictors of better prognosis (p = 0.000 and p = 0.024). The outcome of refAML children was significantly worse than relAML with first remission (CR1) rate of 33%, OS and DFS of 25% at 3 years and 53% at 2 years, respectively. All survivors of refAML were treated with alloHSCT after CR1. Conclusions The uniform reinduction regimen of the documented efficacy and subsequent alloHSCT in remission is needed to improve the outcome for ref/relAML children treated within PPLLSG. The focus should be on the future risk-directed both front and second line AML therapy. PMID:24876821

  10. Adult T-Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Olaso, Aedan Simon; Cohen, Seth; Kossev, Plamen

    2013-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) is an uncommon highly aggressive T-cell lymphoma associated with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. It is rarely encountered during pregnancy and is particularly challenging to treat due to its aggressive nature and because of the lack of robust data on optimal chemotherapy. We report a case of a Jamaican immigrant diagnosed with ATL during pregnancy. PMID:23840994

  11. Functional capacities of Polish adults of 60-87 years and risk of losing functional independence.

    PubMed

    Ignasiak, Zofia; Sławinska, Teresa; Skrzek, Anna; Rożek, Krystyna; Kozieł, Sławomir; Posłuszny, Pawel; Malina, Robert M

    2017-09-01

    To characterise the functional capacities of Polish men and women aged 60-87 years and evaluate their status relative to criteria for functional independence. Four hundred and thirty-one women and 125 men, aged 60-87 years, who were residents of Wrocław, southwestern Poland, were recruited. Height and weight were measured and BMI was calculated. The Fullerton Functional Fitness Test was administered to test upper and lower body strength, upper and lower body flexibility, agility-dynamic balance and aerobic endurance. The Paffenbarger physical activity questionnaire was completed. Characteristics of individuals classified by the number of tests which equalled or exceeded criterion-referenced standards for functional independence (excluding flexibility) were compared. Polish older adults compared favourably to American reference values. Percentages meeting the criteria for all four, for two or three and for one or no tests were, respectively, 21%, 54% and 25% in women and 37%, 45% and 18% in men. Adults meeting the criteria for all four tests were lighter, with a lower BMI and more physically active than those meeting the criteria on two or three tests and on one or no tests. The majority of Polish older adults were not at risk for loss of physical independence. The most functionally independent adults of both sexes had a lower BMI and less obesity, and were physically more active; the converse was true for those not meeting the criteria.

  12. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Ribera, Josep-Maria; Oriol, Albert

    2009-10-01

    Today, long-term survival is achieved in more than 80% of children 1 to 10 years old with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, cure rates for adults and adolescents and young adults (AYA) with ALL remain relatively low, at only 40% to 50%. Age is a continuous prognostic variable in ALL, with no single age at which prognosis deteriorates markedly. Within childhood ALL populations, older children have shown inferior outcomes, whereas younger adults have shown superior outcomes among adult ALL patients. The type of treatment (pediatric-based versus adult-based) for AYA has recently been a matter of debate. In this article the biology and treatment of ALL in AYA is reviewed.

  13. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) use among Polish adults with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Drzewoski, Jozef; Sawer-Szewczyk, Joanna; Stepień, Anna; Olszewski, Andrzej; Liniarski, Marek

    2005-09-01

    People with diabetes mellitus have higher risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality from thrombo-vascular complications than non-diabetics and it is recommended that they should use acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) as anitiplatelet agent regularly. The aim of this study was to examine current physician counseling about ASA therapy and the use of ASA by Polish patients with diabetes. The study involved 464 randomly selected Caucasian diabetic individuals, mainly with type 2 (>98%), who were asked to complete a questionnaire consisting of 16 questions while visiting out-patient medical centres for periodical examination or during hospitalization. We collected data on the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), frequency of risk factors among diabetic patients and on ASA physician counseling, and on the rate of regular ASA users among the patients. The most self-reported conditions were angina pectoris or prior myocardial infarction (63,6%). Current cigarette smoking was declared by 7,1% of the patients, elevated serum cholesterol levels by 58%, and hypertension by 62,9%. Majority of the patients were overweight, and family history of coronary artery disease (CAD) was reported by 30,2% of the patients. ASA was taken by 67,2% of all the patients and 72,1% of them had taken ASA regularly. The highest percentage (>80%) of regular ASA users was found among diabetic patients with CAD. A minority of the patients who reported stroke (43,9%) or claudication (15,8%) were taking ASA regularly. Number of the patients (32,8%) with CVD risk factor(s) but without diagnosed CVD did not use ASA at all. The majority of the patients (78%) were counseled by their physicians why they should use ASA regularly. the number of regular users of ASA among diabetic patients in Poland with CVD others than CAD or among patients with at least two CAD risk factors is still unsatisfactory. Therefore, while it seems that there is a remarkable growing of ASA therapy world-wide more effort is needed

  14. Optimizing Management of Patients with Adult T Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yared, Jean A.; Kimball, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma is a rare disease with a high mortality rate, and is challenging for the clinician. Early allogeneic stem cell transplant can confer durable remission. As novel therapeutic agents become available to treat T cell malignancies, it is increasingly important that medical oncologists, hematologists, and hematopathologists recognize and accurately diagnose adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma. There is no uniform standard of treatment of adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma, and clinical trials remain critical to improving outcomes. Here we present one management approach based on the recent advances in treatment for adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma patients. PMID:26610571

  15. Optimizing Management of Patients with Adult T Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yared, Jean A; Kimball, Amy S

    2015-11-25

    Adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma is a rare disease with a high mortality rate, and is challenging for the clinician. Early allogeneic stem cell transplant can confer durable remission. As novel therapeutic agents become available to treat T cell malignancies, it is increasingly important that medical oncologists, hematologists, and hematopathologists recognize and accurately diagnose adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma. There is no uniform standard of treatment of adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma, and clinical trials remain critical to improving outcomes. Here we present one management approach based on the recent advances in treatment for adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma patients.

  16. Skin picking in a non-clinical sample of young Polish adults. Prevalence and characteristics.

    PubMed

    Prochwicz, Katarzyna; Kałużna-Wielobób, Alina; Kłosowska, Joanna

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence and characteristics of skin picking behaviors in a sample of young Polish adults. Five hundred and thirty-four participants completed measurements of skin picking frequency and severity. They also retrospectively rated the intensity of affective states experienced before, during and after skin picking episodes. In total, 46.07% of the participants endorsed some forms of skin picking, and the prevalence of skin picking disorder (SPD) in the study sample amounted to 7.67%. The characteristics of skin picking episodes in young Polish adults were similar to those reported in previous studies conducted on different cultures. The results also showed that for the majority of individuals with skin picking, the intensity of particular emotions (i.e. fear, anxiety, guilt, shame, self-aversion, boredom, and sadness) decreased significantly in the period from before to after picking. Larger community studies are needed to assess the SPD prevalence in Polish general population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. What's New in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia (AML) About Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) What’s New in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment? Researchers ... benefit from current treatments. Researchers are studying many new chemo drugs for use in AML, including: Sapacitabine, ...

  18. [Diffuse interstitial lung disease revealing adult T-Cell leukemia/lymphoma (HTLV-1)].

    PubMed

    Bouanani, Nouama; Lamchahab, Mouna

    2016-01-01

    Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma is a tumoral proliferation of activated mature T lymphoid cells whose causative agent is a retrovirus known as Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1. This virus rarely causes inflammatory bronchioloalveolar disorders. We report the case of a patient hospitalized with diffuse interstitial lung disease and whose etiological assessment revealed adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (HTLV-1).

  19. Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Todd M; Ehrhardt, Matthew J; Ness, Kirsten K

    2016-04-01

    Treatment-related obesity and the metabolic syndrome in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Both conditions often begin during therapy. Preventive measures, including dietary counseling and tailored exercise, should be initiated early in the course of survivorship, with referral to specialists to optimize success. However, among adults who develop obesity or the metabolic syndrome and who do not respond to lifestyle therapy, medical intervention may be indicated to manage underlying pathology, such as growth hormone deficiency, or to mitigate risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Because no specific clinical trials have been done in this population to treat metabolic syndrome or its components, clinicians who follow adult survivors of childhood ALL should use the existing American Heart Association/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Scientific Statement to guide their approach.

  20. Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome among Adult Survivors of Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Todd M.; Ehrhardt, Matthew J.; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2016-01-01

    Opinion statement Treatment-related obesity and the metabolic syndrome in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Both conditions often begin during therapy. Preventive measures, including dietary counseling and tailored exercise should be initiated early in the course of survivorship, with referral to specialists to optimize success. However, among adults who develop obesity or the metabolic syndrome and who do not respond to lifestyle therapy, medical intervention may be indicated to manage underlying pathology, such as growth hormone deficiency, or to mitigate risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Because no specific clinical trials have been done in this population to treat metabolic syndrome or its components, clinicians who follow adult survivors of childhood ALL should use the existing American Heart Association/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Scientific Statement to guide their approach. PMID:26951206

  1. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Rytting, Michael E; Jabbour, Elias J; O'Brien, Susan M; Kantarjian, Hagop M

    2017-07-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population is a difficult clinical problem. The AYA population, generally regarded as patients aged 15 to 39 years, currently draws a good deal of attention, particularly in the area of therapy selection. The current trend is to treat this group of patients with leukemia regimens based on pediatric protocols, and results comparing pediatric approaches versus adult approaches to treatment are maturing. Results are pending from a large US trial in which pediatric-based treatment is given to AYA patients with ALL. In tandem with these new clinical trials, researchers have reported disease features in the AYA group that may explain some of the differences in response to treatment observed in the AYA population compared with the pediatric population. In addition, unique social factors in this age group add to the complexity of ALL therapy in the AYA population. AYA patients are developing independence and separating from their parents. They tend to be noncompliant. Young adults suffer from a lack of health care insurance and poor access to clinical trials, and have specific concerns regarding toxicities, in particular fertility. Cancer 2017;123:2398-403. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  2. [Nursing diagnosis in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Luccas Melo; Gorini, Maria Isabel Pinto Coelho

    2006-09-01

    This case study aimed at identifying Nursing Diagnosis (ND) in adult patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, with the purpose of contributing to the Systematization of Nurse Care. Interviews and observation were used for data collection, in addition to Nursing Process application. During the three months of data collection, other NDs were obtained by searching the files of the 6 patients. The 32 ND found in this study were grouped according to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Out of these 32 ND, 15 corresponded to changes in Physiological Needs, and 10 to changes in Protection and Safety Needs.

  3. Acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes in older adults.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D; Rao, Arati V; Pardee, Timothy S

    2014-08-20

    Treatment of older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging because of disease morbidity and associated treatments. Both diseases represent a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders primarily affecting older adults, with treatment strategies ranging from supportive care to hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Although selected older adults can benefit from intensive therapies, as a group they experience increased treatment-related morbidity, are more likely to relapse, and have decreased survival. Age-related outcome disparities are attributed to both tumor and patient characteristics, requiring an individualized approach to treatment decision making beyond consideration of chronologic age alone. Selection of therapy for any individual requires consideration of both disease-specific risk factors and estimates of treatment tolerance and life expectancy derived from evaluation of functional status and comorbidity. Although treatment options for older adults are expanding, clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and aging are needed to define standard-of-care treatments for both disease groups. In addition, trials should include outcomes addressing quality of life, maintenance of independence, and use of health care services to assist in patient-centered decision making. This review will highlight available evidence in treatment of older adults with AML or MDS and unanswered clinical questions for older adults with these diseases.

  4. Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Klepin, Heidi D.; Rao, Arati V.; Pardee, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging because of disease morbidity and associated treatments. Both diseases represent a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders primarily affecting older adults, with treatment strategies ranging from supportive care to hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Although selected older adults can benefit from intensive therapies, as a group they experience increased treatment-related morbidity, are more likely to relapse, and have decreased survival. Age-related outcome disparities are attributed to both tumor and patient characteristics, requiring an individualized approach to treatment decision making beyond consideration of chronologic age alone. Selection of therapy for any individual requires consideration of both disease-specific risk factors and estimates of treatment tolerance and life expectancy derived from evaluation of functional status and comorbidity. Although treatment options for older adults are expanding, clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and aging are needed to define standard-of-care treatments for both disease groups. In addition, trials should include outcomes addressing quality of life, maintenance of independence, and use of health care services to assist in patient-centered decision making. This review will highlight available evidence in treatment of older adults with AML or MDS and unanswered clinical questions for older adults with these diseases. PMID:25071138

  5. Adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stock, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, increasing attention has been paid to a unique group of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who lie at the crossroad of therapeutic care by pediatric and adult hematologists/oncologists. ALL is a disease that affects infants, children, adolescents, and adult patients. With current therapies, the vast majority of children with ALL are now long-term survivors; unfortunately, the same good results have not yet been obtained for adults with ALL. This review will describe current controversies surrounding the treatment of adolescents and young adults with ALL--a group who finds themselves in the transition from "pediatric" to "adult" treatment approaches. The review focuses on recent insights into disease biology, prognostic factors, and treatment outcomes that have led to a series of prospective clinical trials specifically designed for adolescents and younger adults (AYAs) with ALL. These trials have been designed to provide important new clinical, psychosocial, and biological insights, and to further improve the survival of this challenging and unique group of patients.

  6. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  7. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL): Comparison Between Children and Adults.

    PubMed

    Testi, Anna Maria; D'Angiò, Mariella; Locatelli, Franco; Pession, Andrea; Lo Coco, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of adults and children with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) has dramatically changed since the introduction of all trans retinoic acid (ATRA) therapy. Based on the results of several multicenter trials, the current recommendations for the treatment of patients with APL include ATRA and anthracycline-based chemotherapy for the remission induction and consolidation, and ATRA combined with low-dose chemotherapy for maintenance. This has improved the prognosis of APL by increasing the complete remission (CR) rate, actually > 90%, decreasing the induction deaths and by reducing the relapse rate, leading to cure rates nowadays exceeding 80% considering both adults and children.1-9 More recently the combination of ATRA and arsenic trioxide (ATO) as induction and consolidation therapy has been shown to be at least not inferior and possibly superior to ATRA plus chemotherapy in adult patients with APL conventionally defined as non-high risk (Sanz score).10 Childhood APL has customarily been treated on adult protocols. Data from several trials have shown that the overall outcome in pediatric APL appears similar to that reported for the adult population; however, some clinical and therapeutic aspects differ in the two cohorts which require some important considerations and treatment adjustments.

  8. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL): Comparison Between Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Testi, Anna Maria; D’Angiò, Mariella; Locatelli, Franco; Pession, Andrea; Lo Coco, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of adults and children with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) has dramatically changed since the introduction of all trans retinoic acid (ATRA) therapy. Based on the results of several multicenter trials, the current recommendations for the treatment of patients with APL include ATRA and anthracycline-based chemotherapy for the remission induction and consolidation, and ATRA combined with low-dose chemotherapy for maintenance. This has improved the prognosis of APL by increasing the complete remission (CR) rate, actually > 90%, decreasing the induction deaths and by reducing the relapse rate, leading to cure rates nowadays exceeding 80% considering both adults and children.1–9 More recently the combination of ATRA and arsenic trioxide (ATO) as induction and consolidation therapy has been shown to be at least not inferior and possibly superior to ATRA plus chemotherapy in adult patients with APL conventionally defined as non-high risk (Sanz score).10 Childhood APL has customarily been treated on adult protocols. Data from several trials have shown that the overall outcome in pediatric APL appears similar to that reported for the adult population; however, some clinical and therapeutic aspects differ in the two cohorts which require some important considerations and treatment adjustments. PMID:24804005

  9. Treatment of Adolescent and Young Adults with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ribera, Josep-Maria; Ribera, Jordi; Genescà, Eulàlia

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this review was to update and discuss the current concepts and the results of the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adolescents and young adults (AYA). After a brief consideration of the epidemiologic and clinicobiologic characteristics of ALL in the AYA population, the main retrospective comparative studies stating the superiority of pediatric over adult-based protocols were reviewed. The most important prospective studies in young adults using pediatric inspired or pediatric unmodified protocols were also reviewed emphasizing their feasibility at least up to the age of 40 yr and their promising results, with event-free survival rates of 60–65% or greater. Results of trials from pediatric groups have shown that the unfavourable prognosis of adolescents is no more adequate. The majority of the older adolescents with ALL can be cured with risk-adjusted and minimal residual disease-guided intensive chemotherapy, without stem cell transplantation. However, some specific subgroups, which are more frequent in adolescents than in children (e.g., early pre-T, iAMP21, and BCR-ABL-like), deserve particular attention. In summary, the advances in treatment of ALL in adolescents have been translated to young adults, and that explains the significant improvement in survival of these patients in recent years. PMID:25045460

  10. TP53 mutations in older adults with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yanada, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Yukiya; Iba, Sachiko; Okamoto, Akinao; Inaguma, Yoko; Tokuda, Masutaka; Morishima, Satoko; Kanie, Tadaharu; Mizuta, Shuichi; Akatsuka, Yoshiki; Okamoto, Masataka; Emi, Nobuhiko

    2016-04-01

    The net benefits of induction therapy for older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain controversial. Because AML in older adults is a heterogeneous disease, it is important to identify those who are unlikely to benefit from induction therapy based on information available at the initial assessment. We used next-generation sequencing to analyze TP53 mutation status in AML patients aged 60 years or older, and evaluated its effects on outcomes. TP53 mutations were detected in 12 of 77 patients (16 %), and there was a significant association between TP53 mutations and monosomal karyotype. Patients with TP53 mutations had significantly worse survival than those without (P = 0.009), and multivariate analysis identified TP53 mutation status as the most significant prognostic factor for survival. Neverthelsess, TP53-mutated patients had a 42 % chance of complete remission and a median survival of 8.0 months, which compares favorably with those who did not undergo induction therapy, even in the short term. These results suggest that screening for TP53 mutations at diagnosis is useful for identifying older adults with AML who are least likely to respond to chemotherapy, although the presence of this mutation alone does not seem to justify rejecting induction therapy.

  11. Flavopiridol and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or Refractory Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-01

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  13. Prognotic significance of pretreatment proliferative activity in adult acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hart, J S; George, S L; Frei, E; Bodey, G P; Nickerson, R C; Freireich, E J

    1977-04-01

    A statistical analysis of the prognostic significance of eight pretreatment variables was undertaken for 71 previously untreated adult patients with acute leukemia seen at M.D. Anderson Hospital over a 5 1/2-year period. None of the patients had received any prior therapy. Nearly all of the patients (68 of the 71) were treated with 4- or 5-day courses of arabinosyl-cytosine alone or in combination with cyclophosphamide, vincristine (oncovin) and prednisone (COAP). The pretreatment variables studied were age at diagnosis, the percent labeling index of the bone marrow leukemic cells, diagnosis, the highest temperature prior to start of treatment, the marrow clot section cellularity and smear differential percent of blasts, percent absolute marrow leukemic cell infiltrate and absolute number of blasts X 10(3)/mm3 in the peripheral blood. Fifty-one patients had acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) and 20 patients had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Using a statistical regression model approach, the only variables found to be of significant prognostic importance with respect to the probability of complete remission for AML patients were the pretreatment percent labeling index, the age of the patient and the highest temperature prior to start of treatment. Unlike AML, the initial percent labeling index did not appear to be of prognostic significance for ALL patients. AML patients with high labeling indices (larger than or equal to 9%) and young patients in general (especially those less than 40 years old) had the best remission rates. With respect to the length of complete remission and survival for all patients, the only important variables were the pretreatment percent labeling index and the age of the patient, respectively. Once in complete remission, an initially high labeling index was an unfavorable sign with respect to length of remission, regardless of the patient's diagnosis. The results of this study are supportive of studies in experimental systems

  14. Genetic architecture differences between pediatric and adult-onset inflammatory bowel diseases in the Polish population

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Jerzy; Paziewska, Agnieszka; Lazowska, Izabella; Ambrozkiewicz, Filip; Goryca, Krzysztof; Kulecka, Maria; Rawa, Tomasz; Karczmarski, Jakub; Dabrowska, Michalina; Zeber-Lubecka, Natalia; Tomecki, Roman; Kluska, Anna; Balabas, Aneta; Piatkowska, Magdalena; Paczkowska, Katarzyna; Kierkus, Jaroslaw; Socha, Piotr; Lodyga, Michal; Rydzewska, Grazyna; Klopocka, Maria; Mierzwa, Grazyna; Iwanczak, Barbara; Krzesiek, Elzbieta; Bak-Drabik, Katarzyna; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw; Klincewicz, Beata; Radwan, Piotr; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Landowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Agnieszka; Korczowski, Bartosz; Starzynska, Teresa; Albrecht, Piotr; Mikula, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Most inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are classic complex disorders represented by common alleles. Here we aimed to define the genetic architecture of pediatric and adult-onset IBDs for the Polish population. A total of 1495 patients were recruited, including 761 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD; 424 pediatric), 734 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC; 390 pediatric), and 934 healthy controls. Allelotyping employed a pooled-DNA genome-wide association study (GWAS) and was validated by individual genotyping. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed on 44 IBD patients diagnosed before 6 years of age, 45 patients diagnosed after 40 years of age, and 18 healthy controls. Altogether, out of 88 selected SNPs, 31 SNPs were replicated for association with IBD. A novel BRD2 (rs1049526) association reached significance of P = 5.2 × 10−11 and odds ratio (OR) = 2.43. Twenty SNPs were shared between pediatric and adult patients; 1 and 7 were unique to adult-onset and pediatric-onset IBD, respectively. WES identified numerous rare and potentially deleterious variants in IBD-associated or innate immunity-associated genes. Deleterious alleles in both groups were over-represented among rare variants in affected children. Our GWAS revealed differences in the polygenic architecture of pediatric- and adult-onset IBD. A significant accumulation of rare and deleterious variants in affected children suggests a contribution by yet unexplained genetic components. PMID:28008999

  15. Mouse xenograft modeling of human adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia provides mechanistic insights into adult LIC biology

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Aditi; Castleton, Anna Z.; Schwab, Claire; Samuel, Edward; Sivakumaran, Janani; Beaton, Brendan; Zareian, Nahid; Zhang, Christie Yu; Rai, Lena; Enver, Tariq; Moorman, Anthony V.; Fielding, Adele K.

    2014-01-01

    The distinct nature of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adults, evidenced by inferior treatment outcome and different genetic landscape, mandates specific studies of disease-initiating mechanisms. In this study, we used NOD/LtSz-scid IL2Rγ nullc (NSG) mouse xenotransplantation approaches to elucidate leukemia-initiating cell (LIC) biology in primary adult precursor B (pre-B) ALL to optimize disease modeling. In contrast with xenografting studies of pediatric ALL, we found that modification of the NSG host environment using preconditioning total body irradiation (TBI) was indispensable for efficient engraftment of adult non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL, whereas t(4;11) pre-B ALL was successfully reconstituted without this adaptation. Furthermore, TBI-based xenotransplantation of non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL enabled detection of a high frequency of LICs (<1:6900) and permitted frank leukemic engraftment from a remission sample containing drug-resistant minimal residual disease. Investigation of TBI-sensitive stromal-derived factor-1/chemokine receptor type 4 signaling revealed greater functional dependence of non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL on this niche-based interaction, providing a possible basis for the differential engraftment behavior. Thus, our studies establish the optimal conditions for experimental modeling of human adult pre-B ALL and demonstrate the critical protumorogenic role of microenvironment-derived SDF-1 in regulating adult pre-B LIC activity that may present a therapeutic opportunity. PMID:24825861

  16. Acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage in adults: molecular and clinical characterization.

    PubMed

    Heesch, Sandra; Neumann, Martin; Schwartz, Stefan; Bartram, Isabelle; Schlee, Cornelia; Burmeister, Thomas; Hänel, Matthias; Ganser, Arnold; Heuser, Michael; Wendtner, Clemens-Martin; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Gökbuget, Nicola; Hoelzer, Dieter; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Thiel, Eckhard; Baldus, Claudia D

    2013-06-01

    Acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage represent a heterogeneous group of rare, poorly characterized leukemias with adverse outcome. No larger studies have yet performed a combined approach of molecular and clinical characterization of acute undifferentiated leukemia (AUL) and biphenotypic acute leukemia (BAL) in adults. Here we describe 16 adults with AUL and 26 with BAL and performed mutational as well as expression studies of genes with prognostic impact in acute leukemia (BAALC, ERG, MN1, WT1, and IGFBP7). AUL showed overexpression of these genes compared to T-lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), B-precursor ALL, and to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Genotype alterations were not detectable in AUL. BAL samples were characterized by frequent WT1 mutations (18 %) and BCR-ABL translocations (30 %). ALL-based treatment protocols induced complete remissions in 40 % and AML-like therapies in 22 % of AUL/BAL patients. The outcome in both groups was very poor; a long-term survival was only observed in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Our findings indicate that AUL and BAL share important molecular and high-risk features of both myeloid and lymphoid leukemias. BAL patients exhibited genetic alterations, which can be targeted therapeutically. Importantly, ALL therapy might be more effective than AML protocols and AUL/BAL patients should be considered for allogeneic SCT.

  17. Tipifarnib and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-14

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  19. Molecular Pathology of Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a peripheral T-cell neoplasm of highly pleomorphic lymphoid cells. ATLL is usually widely disseminated, and it is caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). It is a disease with a long latency, and affected individuals are usually exposed to the virus very early in life. The cumulative incidence of ATLL is estimated to be 2.5% among HTLV-1 carriers. ATLL cells express CD2, CD3, CD5, CD4, and CD25, as well as CCR4 and FoxP3 of the regulatory T-cell marker. HTLV-1 is causally linked to ATLL, but infection alone is not sufficient to result in neoplastic transformation. A significant finding in this connection is that the Tax viral protein leads to transcriptional activation of many genes, while the HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor is thought to be important for T-cell proliferation and oncogenesis. Half of ATLL cases retain the ability to express HTLV-1 Tax, which is a target of HTLV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). An increase in HTLV-1-specific CTL responses is observed in some asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers. Although HTLV-1-specific CTL are also present in the peripheral blood of ATLL patients, they do not expand sufficiently. We investigated the clinicopathological features and analyzed the staining of Tax-specific CTL and FoxP3. Tax-specific CTL correlated inversely with FoxP3, an increase in the ratio of CD163+ tumor-associated macrophages was associated with worse clinical prognosis, and ATLL cell lines proliferated significantly following direct co-culture with M2 macrophages. Several clinical variants of ATLL have been identified: acute, lymphomatous, chronic, and smoldering. Oligo-array comparative genomic hybridization revealed that genomic loss of 9p21.3 was a significant characteristic of acute-type, but not of chronic-type ATLL. Furthermore, we found that genomic alteration of CD58, which is implicated in immune escape, is more frequently observed in acute than in chronic ATLL. Interestingly

  20. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Green tea consumption and glutathione S-transferases genetic polymorphisms on the risk of adult leukemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Zhang, Min; Xie, Xing; Jin, Jie; Holman, C D'Arcy J

    2017-03-01

    Green tea may have a beneficial role of inhibiting leukemia. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are known to detoxify certain carcinogens. We investigated the roles of green tea consumption and polymorphisms of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 on the risk of adult leukemia, and to determine whether the associations varied within GSTs genotypes. A multicenter case-control study was conducted in China, 2008-2013. It comprised 442 incident, hematologically confirmed adult leukemia cases and 442 outpatient controls, individually matched to cases by gender, birth quinquennium and study site. Data were collected by face-to-face interview using a validated questionnaire. Genetic polymorphisms were assayed by PCR. An inverse association between green tea consumption and adult leukemia risk was observed. Compared with non-tea drinkers, the adjusted odds ratios (95 % confidence intervals) were 0.50 (0.27-0.93), 0.31 (0.17-0.55) and 0.53 (0.29-0.99) for those who, respectively, consumed green tea >20 years, ≥2 cups daily and dried tea leaves >1000 g annually. In assessing the associations by GSTs genotypes, risk reduction associated with green tea consumption was stronger in individuals with the GSTT1-null genotype (OR 0.24; 95 % CI 0.11-0.53) than GSTT1-normal carriers (OR 0.67; 95 % CI 0.42-1.05; P interaction = 0.02). GSTM1 and GSTP1 did not significantly modify the inverse association of leukemia with green tea. The results suggest that regular daily green tea consumption may reduce leukemia risk in Chinese adults regardless of GSTM1 and GSTP1 polymorphic status. The association between green tea and adult leukemia risk varied with GSTT1 genotype and highlights further study.

  3. Polish Guidelines on Diagnosing Brain Death in Adults vs the International Perspective: Are We in Need of an Update?

    PubMed

    Nowak, E; Pfitzner, R; Przybyłowski, P

    2016-06-01

    The Polish definition of brain death originated from the original Harvard criteria and has been revised several times. Practitioners worldwide are required to regularly update their national guidelines on the definition of brain death to fit the latest international research concerning this topic. (1) Compare current Polish guidelines on diagnosing brain death in adults with the American, British, Australian, and New Zealand recommendations; and (2) evaluate existing differences for the purposes of updating the Polish guidelines. Current guidelines on diagnosing brain death published by The American Academy of Neurology (USA, 2010), the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges (United Kingdom, 2008), the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society (AU/NZ, 2013), and the Polish Ministry of Health (Poland, 2007). All guidelines outline similar recommendations regarding the need for a suitable observation period before clinical examination and for basic medical conditions and exclusions to be evaluated before testing, the obligatory role of clinical examination including brain stem reflexes and apnea testing, and the nonobligatory role of ancillary tests. There is no consensus regarding: the recommended time period of pretesting observation, the number, seniority, and specialty of clinicians performing the testing, the role of additional exclusion criteria, the repeatability of clinical tests, the methodology of apnea testing, and recommended confirmatory tests. Current Polish guidelines on diagnosing brain death in adults remain up-to-date in comparison to the guidelines analyzed, though additional recommendations concerning apnea testing, drug and toxin clearance, and medical exclusion criteria for potential brain dead patients might be considered an important point of interest in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Is subjective hyperhidrosis assessment sufficient enough? prevalence of hyperhidrosis among young Polish adults.

    PubMed

    Stefaniak, Tomasz; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Proczko-Markuszewska, Monika; Idestal, Anette; Royton, Anders; Abi-Khalil, Christian

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the prevalence of palmar and axillary hyperhidrosis among young Polish adults. Additionally, this work aimed at comparing the subjective and objective (gravimetric) method of hyperhidrosis assessment. Healthy medical students, volunteering to take part in this study, were included. The participants filled out a questionnaire assessing the occurrence and subjective intensity of hyperhidrosis in different areas of the body. Additionally, the students were subjected to gravimetric assessment in four localizations: the face, palms, axillae and abdomino-lumbar area. Two hundred and fifty-three students (102 males and 151 females, mean age 24.3 ± 3.21 years) were included in the study. Forty-two (16.7%) participants declared that they suffer from hyperhidrosis. Out of the 42 students declaring any type of hyperhidrosis, only 20 (47.6%) exceeded the gravimetric reference values. From among the students that exceeded the normative values for palmar hyperhidrosis, only 10 (55.6%) were aware of their hyperhidrosis. In the group of students that exceeded the normative values for axillary hyperhidrosis, 16 (39%) were aware of their hyperhidrosis. Subjectively declared hyperhidrosis incidence may significantly exceed the real-life occurrence of this disease. Basing studies solely on data gathered from questionnaires, may lead to false results. It is imperative, when assessing patients suffering from hyperhidrosis, to use both objective and subjective methods of evaluation.

  5. Adrenal incidentaloma in adults - management recommendations by the Polish Society of Endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Bolanowski, Marek; Sworczak, Krzysztof; Górnicka, Barbara; Cieszanowski, Andrzej; Otto, Maciej; Ambroziak, Urszula; Pachucki, Janusz; Kubicka, Eliza; Babińska, Anna; Koperski, Łukasz; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Górska, Maria; Jarząb, Barbara; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja; Glinicki, Piotr; Ruchała, Marek; Kasperlik-Załuska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    A wide use of imaging techniques results in more frequent diagnosis of adrenal incidenataloma. To analyse the current state of knowledge on adrenal incidentaloma in adults in order to prepare practical management recommendations. Following a discussion, the Polish Society of Endocrinology expert working group have analysed the available data and summarised the analysis results in the form of recommendations. Unenhanced adrenal computed tomography (CT) may be recommended as an initial assessment examination helpful in the differentiation between adenomas and "non-adenomatous" lesions. In the case of density > 10 Hounsfield units, CT with contrast medium washout assessment or MRI are recommended. However, in all patients with adrenal incidentaloma, hormonal assessment is recommended in order to exclude pheochromocytoma and hypercortisolism, notwithstanding the clinical picture or concomitant diseases. In addition, examination to exclude primary hyperaldosteronism is suggested in patients with diagnosed hypertension or hypokalaemia. Surgical treatment should be recommended in patients with adrenal incidentaloma, where imaging examinations suggest a malignant lesion (oncological indication) or with confirmed hormonal activity (endocrinological indication). The basis of the surgical treatment is laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Patients with suspected pheochromocytoma must be pharmacologically prepared prior to surgery. In patients not qualified for surgery, control examinations (imaging and laboratory tests) should be established individually, taking into consideration such features as the size, image, and growth dynamics of the tumour, clinical symptoms, hormonal tests results, and concomitant diseases.

  6. Recognition of adult and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Torelli, Giovanni F; Peragine, Nadia; Raponi, Sara; Pagliara, Daria; De Propris, Maria S; Vitale, Antonella; Bertaina, Alice; Barberi, Walter; Moretta, Lorenzo; Basso, Giuseppe; Santoni, Angela; Guarini, Anna; Locatelli, Franco; Foà, Robin

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the pathways of recognition of acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells and to verify whether differences in natural killer cell activating receptor ligand expression among groups defined by age of patients, or presence of cytogenetic/molecular aberrations correlate with the susceptibility to recognition and killing. We analyzed 103 newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: 46 adults and 57 children. Pediatric blasts showed a significantly higher expression of Nec-2 (P=0.03), ULBP-1 (P=0.01) and ULBP-3 (P=0.04) compared to adult cells. The differential expression of these ligands between adults and children was confined to B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia with no known molecular alterations. Within molecularly defined subgroups of patients, a high surface expression of NKG2D and DNAM1 ligands was found on BCR-ABL(+) blasts, regardless of patient age. Accordingly, BCR-ABL(+) blasts proved to be significantly more susceptible to natural killer-dependent lysis than B-lineage blasts without molecular aberrations (P=0.03). Cytotoxic tests performed in the presence of neutralizing antibodies indicated a pathway of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell recognition in the setting of the Nec-2/DNAM-1 interaction. These data provide a biological explanation of the different roles played by alloreactive natural killer cells in pediatric versus adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest that new natural killer-based strategies targeting specific subgroups of patients, particularly those BCR-ABL(+), are worth pursuing further.

  7. Association between rs9930506 polymorphism of the fat mass & obesity-associated (FTO) gene & onset of obesity in Polish adults.

    PubMed

    Wrzosek, Malgorzata; Zakrzewska, Anna; Ruczko, Lech; Jabłonowska-Lietz, Beata; Nowicka, Grażyna

    2016-03-01

    The fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene is known to be associated with obesity. However, no data are available on the relation between FTO rs9930506 polymorphism and obesity in Polish population. The aim of this study was to evaluate an association between rs9930506 variants of the FTO gene and obesity in Polish adults. The study group consisted of 442 adults, aged 33.9 ±12.7 yr, with mean BMI 27.2 ± 5.4 kg/m2. The following variables were determined for each subject: fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides. Real-time PCR was used to detect the A/G alleles of the rs9939506 polymorphism in the FTO gene. An association between the rs9930506 polymorphism and obesity was determined using codominant, dominant, and recessive models. The odds ratio (OR) was calculated to determine the risk of obesity associated with this polymorphism. It was observed that the presence of FTO rs9939506 G allele was associated with increased risk for obesity and this association was found significant in both recessive (OR = 1.72, P = 0.014) and co-dominant (OR = 1.36, P = 0.031) models of inheritance. The FTO rs9939506 GG homozygotes had a significantly higher BMI than those with other genotypes. This study shows that FTO rs9939506 GG genotype is related to higher BMI and is associated with obesity in Polish adults.

  8. Bacillus cereus bacteremia in an adult with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Funada, H; Uotani, C; Machi, T; Matsuda, T; Nonomura, A

    1988-03-01

    Bacillus cereus, which used to be considered non-pathogenic, was isolated from the blood of a patient with acute leukemia who was receiving intensive chemotherapy. Fatal bacteremia developed with a clinical syndrome of acute gastroenteritis, followed by both meningoencephalitis with subarachnoid hemorrhage and multiple liver abscesses probably caused by infective vasculitis. Surveillance stool cultures revealed colonization with the organism prior to the onset of diarrhea, and repetitive blood cultures were found to be positive. Thus, this case suggested some new important clinicopathologic features of true B. cereus bacteremia complicating acute leukemia.

  9. Environmental exposure to gasoline and leukemia in children and young adults--an ecology study.

    PubMed

    Nordlinder, R; Järvholm, B

    1997-01-01

    Benzene is an established cause of leukemia in adults, especially acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL). A few studies have indicated that exposure to gasoline is a cause of childhood leukemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate if environmental exposure to benzene from gasoline and car exhaust was associated with leukemia in children and young adults. The exposure to gasoline and car exhaust was estimated by the number of cars per area. In this ecology study, data on the incidence of cancer in each municipality of Sweden during an 11-year period (1975-1985) were compared with the number of cars per area. Data on the incidence of cancer for persons aged 0-24 years at diagnosis were collected from the National Swedish Cancer Register. The following diagnoses were studied: non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We found an association between AML and car density. In municipalities with more than 20 cars/km2 the incidence of AML was 5.5 [95% confidence interval (CI) 4.4-6.8, n = 89] as compared with 3.4 (95% CI 1.9-5.7, n = 15) cases per 1 million person-years in municipalities with less than 5 cars/km2 (P = 0.05). No association was found for the other sites of cancer studied. The association between AML in young adults and car density might be attributable to exposure to benzene from gasoline vapors and exhaust gases, but further investigations are necessary before any definite conclusion can be drawn.

  10. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Cellular Diagnosis, Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Incidence of thrombosis in adults with acute leukemia: a single center experience in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Uribe, Patricia; Rosas-López, Adriana; Zepeda-León, Jonathan; Crespo-Solís, Erick

    2013-01-01

    Acute leukemias are hematopoietic malignancies that may be accompanied by hemostatic abnormalities. In general, information on the frequency of thrombotic events, their clinical characteristics and survival in adult patients with acute leukemia is still scarce and controversial. To describe the frequency of thrombotic events, their clinical characteristics and survival of adult patients with acute leukemia at the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición, Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City. A patient cohort, diagnosed and treated between October 2003 and December 2009, was retrospectively analyzed in terms of thrombotic events, frequencies and survival curves. We analyzed 181 patients with a median age of 33 years, 80 were female (44.2%). Fifteen cases with thrombosis (8.3%) were documented and in 53.3% of cases, they were related to the use of a central venous catheter. The median time to development of thrombosis was 92 days; 33.3% of events occurred during the first 30 days after diagnosis. The incidence of thrombosis in patients receiving L-asparaginase was 15%. Of the 15 patients with thrombosis, 27% were alive and without evidence of disease at last follow-up, and 73% had died; disease progression was the most common cause of death (81.8%). None of the thrombotic events had an impact on mortality. Median overall survival (OS) was 349 days. The incidence of thrombosis in this adult acute leukemia population is comparable to that reported in the literature. Only a third of cases occurred during the first month after diagnosis; however, 93.3% of patients developed a thrombotic event during the first year after the diagnosis of acute leukemia. All cases were symptomatic and central venous catheter-related thrombosis was the most frequent presentation in this group. Survival curves comparing patients with and without thrombosis were similar. Prospective studies are necessary in order to assess the risk factors fostering thrombosis in adult patients with

  12. CpG island methylator phenotype and its relationship with prognosis in adult acute leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hai-Ying; Wu, Dan-Sen; Zhou, Hua-Rong; Shen, Jian-Zhen

    2014-09-01

    To investigated the relationship between CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) and prognosis in adults with acute leukemia. Bone marrow samples from 53 acute myeloid leukemia and 50 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients were collected. The methylation status of 18 tumor suppressor genes was determined using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Greater than 30% of acute leukemia patients had methylated p15, p16, CDH1, CDH13, RUNX3, sFRP1, ID4, and DLC-1 genes; methylation of ≥4 were defined as CIMP positive. Age, type of leukemia, white blood cell count, and CIMP status were significantly associated with recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) (P < 0.05). CIMP status was an independent prognostic factor for OS (hazard ratio: 2.07, 95% confidence interval: 1.03-4.15, P = 0.040). CIMP-negative patients had significantly improved RFS and OS (P < 0.05). p16 and DLC1 methylation was significantly associated with RFS and OS (P < 0.05). CIMP may serve as an independent risk factor for evaluating the prognosis of patients with acute leukemia.

  13. Prognostic value of quantitative analysis of WT1 gene transcripts in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chiusa, Luigi; Francia di Celle, Paola; Campisi, Paola; Ceretto, Cristina; Marmont, Filippo; Pich, Achille

    2006-02-01

    We quantified Wilm's tumor gene (WT1) using a real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 20 adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at presentation. A WT1 level greater than 906 (median value for the whole series) was a significant predictor of a poor disease-free and overall survival in uni- and multivariate analyses.

  14. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  15. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Adolescents and Young Adults Treated in Pediatric and Adult Departments in the Nordic Countries.

    PubMed

    Wennström, Lovisa; Edslev, Pernille Wendtland; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Fløisand, Yngvar; Forestier, Erik; Gustafsson, Göran; Heldrup, Jesper; Hovi, Liisa; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Jonsson, Olafur Gisli; Lausen, Birgitte; Palle, Josefine; Zeller, Bernward; Holmberg, Erik; Juliusson, Gunnar; Stockelberg, Dick; Hasle, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Studies on adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia suggest better results when using pediatric protocols for adult patients, while corresponding data for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are limited. We investigated disease characteristics and outcome for de novo AML patients 10-30 years old treated in pediatric or adult departments. We included 166 patients 10-18 years of age with AML treated according to the pediatric NOPHO-protocols (1993-2009) compared with 253 patients aged 15-30 years treated in hematology departments (1996-2009) in the Nordic countries. The incidence of AML was 4.9/million/year for the age group 10-14 years, 6.5 for 15-18 years, and 6.9 for 19-30 years. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) was more frequent in adults and in females of all ages. Pediatric patients with APL had similar overall survival as pediatric patients without APL. Overall survival at 5 years was 60% (52-68%) for pediatric patients compared to 65% (58-70%) for adult patients. Cytogenetics and presenting white blood cell count were the only independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Age was not an independent prognostic factor. No difference was found in outcome for AML patients age 10-30 years treated according to pediatric as compared to adult protocols. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Magnetic fields and leukemia--risk for adults living close to power lines.

    PubMed

    Verkasalo, P K

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the risk of leukemia from magnetic field exposure among Finnish adults living close to high-voltage power lines. The cohort study included 383700 Finnish people having lived in 1970-1989 within 500 m of overhead power lines of 110-400 kV in a magnetic field calculated to be > or = 0.01 microT. The nested case-cohort study was conducted to investigate dose-response and time-related factors in further detail. Data collection was based on several subsequent record linkages of nationwide registers. The subjects were followed for cancer in 1974-1990, providing over 2.5 million person-years. The outcome measures included standardized incidence ratios, incidence rate ratios, and odds ratios for several exposure indices. The total number of leukemia cases was 203. Magnetic fields were not associated with the overall occurrence of leukemia among adults. The risk estimates were adjusted for age, gender, and municipality; the other covariates had no effect on the risk estimates. However, an almost fivefold increase with statistical significance was observed for the risk of chronic lymphatic leukemia in relation to earlier, or long-lasting, exposure to magnetic fields of > or = 0.1 microT. This finding was based on very small numbers. No risk increases were observed for other types of leukemia. While the possibility of an increase in risk at higher magnetic field levels, or in relation to earlier exposures, cannot be excluded on the basis of this study, the results suggest that typical magnetic fields of high-voltage power lines are not an important cause of leukemia in adults.

  18. [Chronic myeloid leukemia in an adult with common variable immunodeficiency].

    PubMed

    O'Farrill-Romanillos, Patricia María; Galindo-Pacheco, Lucy Vania; Amaya-Mejía, Adela Sisy; Campos-Romero, Freya Helena; Mendoza-Reyna, Laura Dafne; Pérez-Rocha, Fernando; Segura-Méndez, Nora Hilda

    2014-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency is a primary immunodeficiency, in which from 70 to 80 % of patients have tumors and 25 % of cases are associated with autoimmune diseases. Common variable immunodeficiency patients have a higher incidence of neoplasms, with a risk 12-18 times higher than the general population. There are few cases of common variable immunodeficiency patients with leukemia. Female of 36 years old, with left upper quadrant pain, early satiety, weight loss of 8 kg in three months and splenomegaly. The complete blood count showed: leukocytosis 206 000/mL, with 8 % blasts, platelets 530 000/mL and hemoglobin 8 mg/dL. Abdominal ultrasound: 19??12 cm splenomegaly. Karyotype BCR/ABL IS 64.20 %, 100 % Philadelphia chromosome. The diagnosis was of chronic myeloid leukemia. Given the presence of recurrent respiratory tract infection, frequent diarrheas and reduced concentrations of IgG, IgM and IgA, common variable immunodeficiency was diagnosed and human immunoglobulin was used successfully. The association between chronic myeloid leukemia and common variable immunodefficiency is unusual. Given the high frequency of hematological neoplasm in common variable immunodeficiency patients, we suggest that hematological patients with repeated infections and decreased concentrations of immunoglobulin be referred to an immunological evaluation.

  19. Genomic Profiling of Adult and Pediatric B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Fang; Wang, Bai-Yan; Zhang, Wei-Na; Huang, Jin-Yan; Li, Ben-Shang; Zhang, Ming; Jiang, Lu; Li, Jian-Feng; Wang, Ming-Jie; Dai, Yu-Jun; Zhang, Zi-Guan; Wang, Qiang; Kong, Jie; Chen, Bing; Zhu, Yong-Mei; Weng, Xiang-Qin; Shen, Zhi-Xiang; Li, Jun-Min; Wang, Jin; Yan, Xiao-Jing; Li, Yan; Liang, Ying-Min; Liu, Li; Chen, Xie-Qun; Zhang, Wang-Gang; Yan, Jin-Song; Hu, Jian-Da; Shen, Shu-Hong; Chen, Jing; Gu, Long-Jun; Pei, Deqing; Li, Yongjin; Wu, Gang; Zhou, Xin; Ren, Rui-Bao; Cheng, Cheng; Yang, Jun J; Wang, Kan-Kan; Wang, Sheng-Yue; Zhang, Jinghui; Mi, Jian-Qing; Pui, Ching-Hon; Tang, Jing-Yan; Chen, Zhu; Chen, Sai-Juan

    2016-06-01

    Genomic landscapes of 92 adult and 111 pediatric patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) were investigated using next-generation sequencing and copy number alteration analysis. Recurrent gene mutations and fusions were tested in an additional 87 adult and 93 pediatric patients. Among the 29 newly identified in-frame gene fusions, those involving MEF2D and ZNF384 were clinically relevant and were demonstrated to perturb B-cell differentiation, with EP300-ZNF384 inducing leukemia in mice. Eight gene expression subgroups associated with characteristic genetic abnormalities were identified, including leukemia with MEF2D and ZNF384 fusions in two distinct clusters. In subgroup G4 which was characterized by ERG deletion, DUX4-IGH fusion was detected in most cases. This comprehensive dataset allowed us to compare the features of molecular pathogenesis between adult and pediatric B-ALL and to identify signatures possibly related to the inferior outcome of adults to that of children. We found that, besides the known discrepancies in frequencies of prognostic markers, adult patients had more cooperative mutations and greater enrichment for alterations of epigenetic modifiers and genes linked to B-cell development, suggesting difference in the target cells of transformation between adult and pediatric patients and may explain in part the disparity in their responses to treatment.

  20. A Phase II Study Of The Farnesyltransferase Inhibitor ZANESTRA (R115777, NSC #702818, IND #58,359) In Complete Remission Following Induction And/Or Consolidation Chemotherapy In Adults With Poor-Risk Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML) And High-Risk Myelodysplasia (MDS)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  1. [Transverse myelopathy in an adult with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: case report].

    PubMed

    Brito, J C; da Nóbrega, P V; Guedes Filho, G E; Santos, F J; Souto, M G

    2001-06-01

    We report a case of transverse myelopathy in a 31 year old white man with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, subtype L3 (ALL-L3). This is a severe form of leukemia that affects children more often than adults. Less than 1% of leukemic patients develop neurologic complication in the spinal cord. The symptomatology in the present case started with back pain, flaccid paraplegia, and loss of sensibility and vegetative functions below the lesion. The etiologic diagnostic was obtained through peripheral blood study, bone marrow cytology, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and magnetic resonance image of the dorsal cord. The antileukemic treatment with specific drugs had no influence on the fatal outcome of the disease.

  2. Endocrine sequelae and metabolic syndrome in adult long-term survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Blijdorp, Karin; van Waas, Marjolein; van der Lely, Aart-Jan; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry; Neggers, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    This study focuses on the effect of chemotherapy on endocrinopathies and the metabolic syndrome in adult survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Endocrine function and metabolic syndrome were evaluated in 12 AML survivors, treated with chemotherapy, and in 9 survivors of myeloid leukemias treated with stem cell transplantation (SCT), after a median follow-up time of 20 years (range 9-31). In survivors treated with chemotherapy, no endocrinopathies or metabolic syndrome were present, although AMH and Inhibin B levels tended to be lower than in controls. In SCT survivors, pituitary deficiencies and metabolic syndrome were more frequent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... is the same as for adults. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts in the ...

  6. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Treating Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia In recent years, new drugs that target specific ... Typical Treatment of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  7. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  8. Opposing effects of aspirin and acetaminophen use on risk of adult acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Joli R; Baker, Julie A; Baer, Maria R; Menezes, Ravi J; Nowell, Susan; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2006-02-01

    Regular use of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been hypothesized to be associated with reduced risk of hematologic cancer, although previous results have been inconsistent. The current study investigated the effects of aspirin or acetaminophen use on adult acute leukemia risk among 169 individuals with leukemia and 676 age and sex matched hospital controls with non-neoplastic conditions who completed a comprehensive epidemiologic questionnaire. Results indicate that regular aspirin use may be associated with a modest decrease in leukemia risk [adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 0.84; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.59-1.21]. In contrast, ever using acetaminophen was associated with elevated leukemia risk (aOR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.03-2.26). Results did not differ between men and women. Other studies have demonstrated that acetaminophen is associated with transient decreases in DNA repair, and lymphocytes may be particularly susceptible to DNA damage, suggesting a mechanism for the elevated acute leukemia risk observed among acetaminophen users.

  9. Azacitidine, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Poor-Prognosis Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Novel postremission strategies in adults with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lancet, Jeffrey E.; Karp, Judith E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Given the high rates of relapse in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there is tremendous opportunity for the development of new therapeutic strategies in the postremission state. Unfortunately, the currently available modalities for postremission therapy, namely chemotherapy, have proven largely ineffective in changing the natural history of AML. The challenges to overcome therapeutic failure in the minimal residual disease status may relate to an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms and cell populations that are directly related to disease relapse as well as suboptimal ability to identify patients at highest risk for relapse. Recent findings Being a heterogeneous disease, relapsed AML is unlikely to emanate from one predominant mechanism; instead, there are likely multiple biologic factors at play that allow for clinical relapse to occur. These factors likely include multidrug resistance proteins, aberrant signal transduction pathways, survival of leukemia stem cells, microenvironmental interactions, and immune tolerance. Many novel strategies are in development that target these mechanisms, ranging from chemotherapeutic modalities, to signal transduction inhibitors, to upregulation of antileukemic immune responses. Summary Understanding the underlying mechanisms of leukemic cell survival and resistance has spurred the development of novel therapeutic approaches to overcome these mechanisms in the hope of eradicating minimal residual disease and improving survival in AML. PMID:19468272

  11. An update of current treatments for adult acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) biology and its genetic landscape should ultimately lead to more subset-specific AML therapies, ideally tailored to each patient's disease. Although a growing number of distinct AML subsets have been increasingly characterized, patient management has remained disappointingly uniform. If one excludes acute promyelocytic leukemia, current AML management still relies largely on intensive chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), at least in younger patients who can tolerate such intensive treatments. Nevertheless, progress has been made, notably in terms of standard drug dose intensification and safer allogeneic HSCT procedures, allowing a larger proportion of patients to achieve durable remission. In addition, improved identification of patients at relatively low risk of relapse should limit their undue exposure to the risks of HSCT in first remission. The role of new effective agents, such as purine analogs or gemtuzumab ozogamicin, is still under investigation, whereas promising new targeted agents are under clinical development. In contrast, minimal advances have been made for patients unable to tolerate intensive treatment, mostly representing older patients. The availability of hypomethylating agents likely represents an encouraging first step for this latter population, and it is hoped will allow for more efficient combinations with novel agents. PMID:26660429

  12. Cigarette smoking and the risk of adult leukemia: results from the Three Mile Island cohort study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohui; Talbott, Evelyn O; Zborowski, Jeanne V; Rager, Judith R

    2007-01-01

    Smoking is an unconfirmed risk factor for the development of leukemia. The authors examined the potential link using data from the Three Mile Island cohort for the period 1979-1995. Eligible for analysis were 24,539 individuals aged 14 years or older who were followed up over 16 years from the Three Mile Island cohort. The authors identified all incident leukemia cases through the Pennsylvania Department of Health Cancer Registry. They used the Cox proportional hazards model to evaluate the relationships and observed 42 incident leukemia cases, including 15 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases, in the cohort. After controlling for other confounding factors, the authors found current smoking to be associated with an increased risk of adult AML (relative risk = 3.47; 95% confidence interval = 1.002-11.99). The authors also observed a marginally significant linear trend of risk of AML associated with the number of years smoked (p = .06). The results from this study suggested that cigarette smoking was associated with an increased risk of adult AML. Further investigation is required to confirm these findings.

  13. Diet and risk of adult leukemia: a multicenter case-control study in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Holman, C D'Arcy J; Jin, Jie; Zhang, Min

    2015-08-01

    Epidemiologic studies on diet and leukemia risk have shown inconsistent results. This study examined the associations between dietary factors and the risk of adult leukemia in Chinese populations. A multicenter case-control study was conducted in southeast and northeast China between 2008 and 2013. It included 442 incident cases with hematologically confirmed leukemia and 442 controls, individually match to cases by gender, birth quinquennium, and study site. Information on diet was sought from face-to-face interviews using a validated and reliable 103-item food frequency questionnaire. Odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Vegetables intake was associated with decreased risk of adult leukemia, with a significant dose-response relationship and adjusted OR of 0.30 (95 % CI 0.18-0.50) for the highest versus the lowest quartiles intake. Compared with non-consumers, the adjusted OR was 0.51 (95 % CI 0.29-0.93) for those who consumed milk at the highest tertile. Intakes of fruits, red meat, poultry, and fish were not associated with the risk. Dietary nutrients, including dietary fiber, carotenoids, vitamins B1, B2, and C, niacin, and folate, were significantly associated with reduced risks. Elevated risk was related to dietary intake animal fat and dietary habits with frequent intakes of fat, deep-fried, and smoked foods ( p for trend <0.05). Our findings suggest that diets rich in vegetables and adequate amount of milk reduce the risk of adult leukemia, whereas diets preferring fat, deep-fried, and smoked foods increase the risk in Chinese populations.

  14. Myths and lessons from the adult/pediatric interface in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sallan, Stephen E

    2006-01-01

    The development of effective therapy for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the great successes of clinical oncology, with long-term survival achieved in over 80% of patients. However, cure rates for adults with ALL remain relatively low, with only 40% of patients cured. With an age-unrestricted, biology-based approach, we anticipate a better understanding about why these outcome differences exist, and think that by extending successful pediatric clinical programs to include adult patients with ALL, we can directly compare uniformly treated adults and children in terms of response to therapy, toxicity and underlying biology.

  15. 8-Chloro-Adenosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-08

    Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsed Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myeloproliferative Disorder

  16. Cilengitide in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b)

  17. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  18. Idarubicin and Cytarabine With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  19. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of defective human T-cell leukemia virus type I proviral genomes in leukemic cells of patients with adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Korber, B; Okayama, A; Donnelly, R; Tachibana, N; Essex, M

    1991-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia, and the clonally derived leukemic cells all contain proviral genomes. Polymerase chain reaction with a variety of primers which span the HTLV-I genome was used to determine that a significant fraction of patients (at least 32%) carry deleted viral genomes in their leukemic cells. The pX region of the HTLV-I genome encoding the regulatory genes tax and rex was preferentially retained. The fact that the tax coding region was retained provides supporting evidence that the tax protein contributes to leukemogenesis in vivo. The reasonably high fraction of patients with adult T-cell leukemia carrying deleted genomes in their tumor cells suggests that the deletions have a role in leukemogenesis. Images PMID:1895396

  1. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Phase 1 Study of Terameprocol (EM-1421) in Patients With Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-20

    Leukemias; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL); Adult T Cell Leukemia (ATL); Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML-BP); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML)

  3. MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Exercise for Recently Treated Adults With Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Leak Bryant, Ashley; Walton, AnnMarie L; Pergolotti, Mackenzi; Phillips, Brett; Bailey, Charlotte; Mayer, Deborah K; Battaglini, Claudio

    2017-07-01

    To explore perceived exercise benefits and barriers in adults with acute leukemia who recently completed an inpatient exercise intervention during induction therapy.
. Descriptive, exploratory design using semistructured interviews.
. Inpatient hematology/oncology unit at North Carolina Cancer Hospital in Chapel Hill.
. 6 adults with acute leukemia aged 35-67 years.
. Content analyses of semistructured interviews that were conducted with each participant prior to hospital discharge.
. Most participants were not meeting the recommended physical activity levels of 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week before their diagnosis. Patients were highly pleased with the exercise intervention and the overall program. Common barriers to exercise were anxiety and aches and pains.
. Overall, participants experienced physical and psychological benefits with the exercise intervention with no adverse events from exercising regularly during induction chemotherapy. Referrals for cancer rehabilitation management will lead to prolonged recovery benefits.
. Findings inform the nurses' role in encouraging and supporting adults with acute leukemia to exercise and be physically active during their hospitalization. Nurses should also be responsible for assisting patients with physical function activities to increase mobility and enhance overall health-related quality of life.

  5. Psychological Predictors of Seeking Help from Mental Health Practitioners among a Large Sample of Polish Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Perenc, Lidia; Radochonski, Mieczyslaw

    2016-10-26

    Although the corresponding literature contains a substantial number of studies on the relationship between psychological factors and attitude towards seeking professional psychological help, the role of some determinants remains unexplored, especially among Polish young adults. The present study investigated diversity among a large cohort of Polish university students related to attitudes towards help-seeking and the regulative roles of gender, level of university education, health locus of control and sense of coherence. The total sample comprised 1706 participants who completed the following measures: Attitude Toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help Scale-SF, Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale, and Orientation to Life Questionnaire (SOC-29). They were recruited from various university faculties and courses by means of random selection. The findings revealed that, among socio-demographic variables, female gender moderately and graduate of university study strongly predict attitude towards seeking help. Internal locus of control and all domains of sense of coherence are significantly correlated with the scores related to the help-seeking attitude. Attitudes toward psychological help-seeking are significantly related to female gender, graduate university education, internal health locus of control and sense of coherence. Further research must be performed in Poland in order to validate these results in different age and social groups.

  6. Psychological Predictors of Seeking Help from Mental Health Practitioners among a Large Sample of Polish Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Perenc, Lidia; Radochonski, Mieczyslaw

    2016-01-01

    Although the corresponding literature contains a substantial number of studies on the relationship between psychological factors and attitude towards seeking professional psychological help, the role of some determinants remains unexplored, especially among Polish young adults. The present study investigated diversity among a large cohort of Polish university students related to attitudes towards help-seeking and the regulative roles of gender, level of university education, health locus of control and sense of coherence. The total sample comprised 1706 participants who completed the following measures: Attitude Toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help Scale-SF, Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale, and Orientation to Life Questionnaire (SOC-29). They were recruited from various university faculties and courses by means of random selection. The findings revealed that, among socio-demographic variables, female gender moderately and graduate of university study strongly predict attitude towards seeking help. Internal locus of control and all domains of sense of coherence are significantly correlated with the scores related to the help-seeking attitude. Attitudes toward psychological help-seeking are significantly related to female gender, graduate university education, internal health locus of control and sense of coherence. Further research must be performed in Poland in order to validate these results in different age and social groups. PMID:27792204

  7. Polymorphisms of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and thymidylate synthase, dietary folate intake, and the risk of leukemia in adults.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Zhang, Min; Xie, Xing; Jin, Jie; Holman, C D'Arcy J

    2016-03-01

    The 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and thymidylate synthase (TS) are critical enzymes in folate metabolism. Previous studies have reported conflicting results on the associations between MTHFR/TS polymorphisms and adult leukemia risk, which may due to the lack of information on folate intake. We investigated the risks of adult leukemia with genetic polymorphisms of folate metabolic enzymes (MTHFR C677T, A1298C, and TS) and evaluated if the associations varied by dietary folate intake from a multicenter case-control study conducted in Chinese. This study comprised 442 incident adult leukemia cases and 442 outpatient controls, individually matched to cases by gender, birth quinquennium, and study site. Genotypes were determined by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Dietary folate intake was assessed by face-to-face interviews using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. The MTHFR 677TT genotype conferred a significant higher risk of leukemia in males than in females and exhibited an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but a decreased risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The MTHFR 1298AC genotype appeared to decrease the risks of leukemia in both genders, in AML and ALL. Stratified analysis by dietary folate intake showed the increased risks of leukemia with the MTHFR 677TT and TS 2R3R/2R2R genotypes were only significant in individuals with low folate intake. A significant interaction between TS polymorphism and dietary folate intake was observed (P = 0.03). This study suggests that dietary folate intake and gender may modify the associations between MTHFR/TS polymorphisms and adult leukemia risk.

  8. huJCAR014 CAR-T Cells in Treating Adult Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-07

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; CD19 Positive; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  9. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Marks, David I; Alonso, Laura; Radia, Rohini

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the use of prognostic factors, patient and donor selection, choice of conditioning regimens, and timing of transplant. It also describes the management of Philadelphia-positive acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and central nervous system disease. All aggressively treated adults with ALL should be considered for allogeneic transplantation and tissue typed at diagnosis. We further suggest that eligible patients be entered into clinical trials (that incorporate transplantation); these unselected prospective outcome data are essential to evaluate the true value of allogeneic transplantation in adults with ALL.

  10. Remission induction and remission maintenance in adult acute nonlymphocytic leukemia employing a modified cytostatic (COAP) regimen.

    PubMed

    Gerecke, D; Hirschmann, W D; Voigtmann, R; Gross, R

    1979-07-01

    Thirty adult patients suffering from acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) were treated according to a modified COAP regimen. Vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone were given by push injection, while cytosine arabinoside was infused over periods of 8 h. Nineteen patients (63%) achieved complete remission. Remission maintenance therapy consisted of 6-mercaptopurine daily and methotrexate twice weekly. Later in the study, COAP consolidation and reinduction was added, which improved the median duration of complete remission from 7 to 24 months. Comparison of the results with the literature shows that the modified COAP regimen is one of the most effective treatment schedules for adult ANLL.

  11. Exposure to ambient air pollution in Canada and the risk of adult leukemia.

    PubMed

    Winters, Nicholas; Goldberg, Mark S; Hystad, Perry; Villeneuve, Paul J; Johnson, Kenneth C

    2015-09-01

    There is a paucity of studies investigating adult leukemia and air pollution. To address this gap, we analyzed data from a Canadian population-based case-control study conducted in 1994-1997. Cases were 1064 adults with incident leukemia and controls were 5039 healthy adults. We used data from satellites and fixed-site monitoring stations to estimate residential concentrations of NO2 and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) for the period prior to diagnosis, starting in 1975 and ending in 1994. We modeled the average annual exposure of each subject. Odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression, adjusted for age, gender, province, smoking, education, body mass index, income, and self-reported exposures to ionizing radiation and benzene. We found an 'n-shaped' response function between exposure to NO2 and all forms of leukemia: from the tenth percentile to the median (4.51 to 14.66 ppb), the OR was 1.20; 95% CI: 0.97-1.48 and from the 75th percentile to the 90th (22.75 to 29.7 ppb), the OR was 0.79; 95% CI 0.68-0.93. For PM2.5 we found a response function consistent with a linear model, with an OR per 10 μg/m(3) of 0.97 (95% CI 0.75-1.26). For chronic lymphocytic leukemia we found response functions that were consistent with a simple linear model, with an OR per 5 ppb of NO2 of 0.93 (95% CI 0.86-1.00) and an OR per 10 μg/m(3) of PM2.5 of 0.62 (95% CI 0.42-0.93). In summary, for chronic lymphocytic leukemia we found no evidence of an association with air pollution and with all forms of leukemia we found weak evidence of an association only at low concentrations of NO2. It is possible that these inconsistent results may have arisen because of unaccounted urban/rural differences or possibly from a selection effect, especially among controls. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  13. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  15. Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in family caregivers of adult patients with acute leukemia from a dyadic perspective.

    PubMed

    Jia, Mutian; Li, Jie; Chen, Chunyan; Cao, Fenglin

    2015-12-01

    Acute leukemia is a fatal disease in adults that not only affects the patients who suffer from it but also their family caregivers. No studies have investigated post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSS) in family caregivers of adult patients with acute leukemia using a matched sample. The current study examined PTSS in adult patients with acute leukemia and their family caregivers and investigated the factors associated with caregivers' PTSS. A total of 163 patient-caregiver dyads completed questionnaires assessing their PTSS, psychological resilience, and perceived social support. Hierarchical linear regression was used to explore the related factors of caregivers' PTSS. More caregivers than patients met caseness criteria for PTSS (36.8% vs. 18.4%, p < 0.001). Among caregivers, being more closely related to the patients (e.g., spouses and parents), having patients with higher PTSS and having lower psychological resilience were independently associated with more severe PTSS. Caregivers of acute leukemia patients had significantly more severe PTSS than did their patients. This study is the first to investigate PTSS among family caregivers of adult patients with acute leukemia and its related factors in a matched sample. More attention should be paid to the caregivers of patients with acute leukemia to minimize their PTSS and thus improve mental health of caregivers and reduce potential negative consequences for the patients themselves. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Novel gene targets detected by genomic profiling in a consecutive series of 126 adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Setareh; Hansson, Markus; Karlsson, Karin; Biloglav, Andrea; Johansson, Bertil; Paulsson, Kajsa

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children, adult cases of this disease are associated with a very poor prognosis. In order to ascertain whether the frequencies and patterns of submicroscopic changes, identifiable with single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, differ between childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we performed single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses of 126 adult cases, the largest series to date, including 18 paired diagnostic and relapse samples. Apart from identifying characteristic microdeletions of the CDKN2A, EBF1, ETV6, IKZF1, PAX5 and RB1 genes, the present study uncovered novel, focal deletions of the BCAT1, BTLA, NR3C1, PIK3AP1 and SERP2 genes in 2-6% of the adult cases. IKZF1 deletions were associated with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (P=0.036), BCR-ABL1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (P<0.001), and higher white blood cell counts (P=0.005). In addition, recurrent deletions of RASSF3 and TOX were seen in relapse samples. Comparing paired diagnostic/relapse samples revealed identical changes at diagnosis and relapse in 27%, clonal evolution in 22%, and relapses evolving from ancestral clones in 50%, akin to what has previously been reported in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and indicating that the mechanisms of relapse may be similar in adult and childhood cases. These findings provide novel insights into the leukemogenesis of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia, showing similarities to childhood disease in the pattern of deletions and the clonal relationship between diagnostic and relapse samples, but with the adult cases harboring additional aberrations that have not been described in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  17. Clinical use of blinatumomab for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kum Ja; Chow, Vivian; Weissman, Ashley; Tulpule, Sunil; Aldoss, Ibrahim; Akhtari, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have a dismal prognosis with a short median overall survival that can be measured in months. Because most patients will have chemotherapy-resistant disease, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only potentially curative treatment. Despite advances in current management, patients continue to have poor outcomes and lack of durable responses. Thus, new therapies with alternative modes of actions are currently being investigated. Blinatumomab is a novel bispecific T-cell engager that simultaneously binds CD3-positive cytotoxic T-cells and CD19-positive B-cells, resulting in selective lysis of tumor cells. It has shown promising results in patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia or those achieving hematologic response with persistent minimum residual disease. Future clinical trials will answer questions regarding its optimal place in the treatment paradigm. Dose-limiting toxicities include immunological toxicities and cytokine release syndrome. However, most patients tolerate the therapy relatively well. This review will focus on the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety of blinatumomab in the treatment of adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia while highlighting its unique drug warnings and toxicity management. PMID:27601914

  18. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Defining and Treating Older Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Ineligible for Intensive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, Kristen; Odenike, Olatoyosi

    2015-01-01

    Although acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is primarily a disease of older adults (age ≥60 years), the optimal treatment for older adults remains largely undefined. Intensive chemotherapy is rarely beneficial for frail older adults or those with poor-risk disease, but criteria that define fitness and/or appropriateness for intensive chemotherapy remain to be standardized. Evaluation of disease-related and patient-specific factors in the context of clinical decision making has therefore been largely subjective. A uniform approach to identify those patients most likely to benefit from intensive therapies is needed. Here, we review currently available objective measures to define older adults with AML who are ineligible for intensive chemotherapy, and discuss promising investigational approaches. PMID:26697412

  20. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. Eltrombopag Olamine in Improving Platelet Recovery in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-26

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Clofarabine in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-04

    Solid Tumors; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, Pediatric; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, Adult; Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute, Pediatric; Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute, Adult; Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Adult

  3. [Acute lymphoblastic leukemia of adults - a case of prolonged hip pain diagnostics with a surprising conclusion: case report].

    PubMed

    Hrabovský, Štěpán; Folber, František; Jurová, Barbora; Řehák, Zdeněk; Doubek, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Though acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common malignancy of childhood age, it is a rare diagnosis in adults. This disease often manifests with common and nonspecific symptoms, so it can easily escape an early diagnostics without a proper blood count examination. We present a case of an adult ALL patient suffering only from severe hips and thighs pain, without any significant blood count abnormities leading to the diagnostics. In the second part of the article, we summarize current highlights regarding this disease.Key words: acute lymphoblastic leukemia - adult - biological treatment - bone pain - CAR T-cells - osteolysis - symptoms.

  4. GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  9. SJG-136 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  10. Next-Generation Sequencing in Adult B Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients.

    PubMed

    Sala Torra, Olga; Othus, Megan; Williamson, David W; Wood, Brent; Kirsch, Ilan; Robins, Harlan; Beppu, Lan; O'Donnell, Margaret R; Forman, Stephen J; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Radich, Jerald P

    2017-04-01

    We used next-generation sequencing (NGS) of the immunoglobulin genes to evaluate residual disease in 153 specimens from 32 patients with adult B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia enrolled in a single multicenter study. The sequencing results were compared with multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) data in 66 specimens (25 patients) analyzed by both methods. There was a strong concordance (82%) between the methods in the qualitative determination of the presence of disease. However, in 17% of cases, leukemia was detected by sequencing but not by MFC. In 54 bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) paired specimens, the burden of leukemia detected by NGS was lower in PB than in BM, although it was still detectable in 68% of the 28 paired specimens with positive BM. Lastly, patients without disease detected by NGS or MFC had a 5-year relapse free survival of > 80%. The results suggest that residual disease detection by immunoglobulin gene sequencing is an extremely sensitive technique and may identify patients that might benefit from transplantation. Moreover, the increased sensitivity of the method may allow frequent peripheral blood testing to supplement marrow sampling to measure disease response.

  11. Rare case of intussusception in an adult with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Law, Man Fai; Wong, Cheuk Kei; Pang, Chun Yin; Chan, Hay Nun; Lai, Ho Kei; Ha, Chung Yin; Ng, Celia; Yeung, Yiu Ming; Yip, Sze Fai

    2015-01-01

    Intussusception is rarely reported in adult patients with acute leukemia. We report a case of intussusception in a 29-year-old woman with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). She developed right lower quadrant pain, fever, and vomiting on day 16 of induction chemotherapy. Physical examination showed tenderness and guarding at the right lower quadrant of the abdomen. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed distension of the cecum and ascending colon, which were filled with loops of small bowel, and herniation of the ileocecal valve into the cecum. We proceeded to laparotomy and revealed ileocecal intussusception with the ileocecal valve as the leading point. The terminal ileum was thickened and invaginated into the cecum, which showed gangrenous changes. Right hemicolectomy was performed and microscopic examination of the colonic tissue showed infiltration of leukemic cells. The patient recovered after the operation and was subsequently able to continue treatment for AML. This case demonstrates that the diagnosis of intussusception is difficult because the presenting symptoms can be non-specific, but abdominal CT can be informative for preoperative diagnosis. Resection of the involved bowel is recommended when malignancy is suspected or confirmed. Intussusception should be considered in any leukemia patients presenting with acute abdomen. A high index of clinical suspicion is important for early diagnosis. PMID:25593499

  12. Rare case of intussusception in an adult with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Law, Man Fai; Wong, Cheuk Kei; Pang, Chun Yin; Chan, Hay Nun; Lai, Ho Kei; Ha, Chung Yin; Ng, Celia; Yeung, Yiu Ming; Yip, Sze Fai

    2015-01-14

    Intussusception is rarely reported in adult patients with acute leukemia. We report a case of intussusception in a 29-year-old woman with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). She developed right lower quadrant pain, fever, and vomiting on day 16 of induction chemotherapy. Physical examination showed tenderness and guarding at the right lower quadrant of the abdomen. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed distension of the cecum and ascending colon, which were filled with loops of small bowel, and herniation of the ileocecal valve into the cecum. We proceeded to laparotomy and revealed ileocecal intussusception with the ileocecal valve as the leading point. The terminal ileum was thickened and invaginated into the cecum, which showed gangrenous changes. Right hemicolectomy was performed and microscopic examination of the colonic tissue showed infiltration of leukemic cells. The patient recovered after the operation and was subsequently able to continue treatment for AML. This case demonstrates that the diagnosis of intussusception is difficult because the presenting symptoms can be non-specific, but abdominal CT can be informative for preoperative diagnosis. Resection of the involved bowel is recommended when malignancy is suspected or confirmed. Intussusception should be considered in any leukemia patients presenting with acute abdomen. A high index of clinical suspicion is important for early diagnosis.

  13. Adult Learning--Providing Equal Opportunities or Widening Differences? The Polish Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocór, Marcin; Worek, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Educational activity among adults is not only a key factor of social development but also one of the most important priorities of public policies. Although large sums have been earmarked and numerous actions undertaken to encourage adult learning, many people remain educationally passive, a particularly acute problem in Poland. We point to the…

  14. Laboratory-Treated Donor Cord Blood Cell Infusion Following Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-29

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Long term follow-up of remission patients in adult acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gerecke, D; Kress, M; Hirschmann, W D

    1983-10-03

    31 adults suffering from acute leukemia were followed for a period of more than 5 years after achieving complete remission. Maintenance chemotherapy consisted of antimetabolite treatment (mercaptopurine + methotrexate) as well as COAP reinduction every 3 months. Chemotherapy was stopped if the first complete remission lasted for 3 years ("long term remission"). This was the case in 8 out of 31 remission patients (26%). Analysis of hematological parameters at diagnose for long term remission patients revealed that the initial leukocyte count was of prognostic significance.

  16. [Adult HTLV-I positive leukemia-lymphoma in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Gioseffi, O N; Nucifora, E; Fantl, D; Dufour, C; Milone, J; Di Paolo, H

    1995-10-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is associated with adult T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP/HAM) in endemic and non-endemic areas. Serological studies have shown that HTLV-I is prevalent in some Latin American countries such as Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Perú and Uruguay. We describe here the clinical and laboratory features of five cases of ATLL diagnosed in Argentina. All patients (4 males, 1 female; median age 48.2 years) were of caucasian origin; 4 born in Argentina and 1 in Chile. High risk factors for HTLV-I infection were not apparent in Argentina patients, whereas the Chilean resident, who was a promiscuous heterosexual, travelled through Chile frequently. Positive results for antibodies to HTLV-I were detected in all five cases and in some of their relatives. This report suggests that HTLV-I infection may be endemic in, Argentina where TSP has also been described.

  17. Comparison of Various Databases for Estimation of Dietary Polyphenol Intake in the Population of Polish Adults

    PubMed Central

    Witkowska, Anna M.; Zujko, Małgorzata E.; Waśkiewicz, Anna; Terlikowska, Katarzyna M.; Piotrowski, Walerian

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of the study was to estimate the consumption of polyphenols in a population of 6661 subjects aged between 20 and 74 years representing a cross-section of the Polish society, and the second objective was to compare the intakes of flavonoids calculated on the basis of the two commonly used databases. Daily food consumption data were collected in 2003–2005 using a single 24-hour dietary recall. Intake of total polyphenols was estimated using an online Phenol-Explorer database, and flavonoid intake was determined using following data sources: the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) database combined of flavonoid and isoflavone databases, and the Phenol-Explorer database. Total polyphenol intake, which was calculated with the Phenol-Explorer database, was 989 mg/day with the major contributions of phenolic acids 556 mg/day and flavonoids 403.5 mg/day. The flavonoid intake calculated on the basis of the USDA databases was 525 mg/day. This study found that tea is the primary source of polyphenols and flavonoids for the studied population, including mainly flavanols, while coffee is the most important contributor of phenolic acids, mostly hydroxycinnamic acids. Our study also demonstrated that flavonoid intakes estimated according to various databases may substantially differ. Further work should be undertaken to expand polyphenol databases to better reflect their food contents. PMID:26569297

  18. Comparison of Various Databases for Estimation of Dietary Polyphenol Intake in the Population of Polish Adults.

    PubMed

    Witkowska, Anna M; Zujko, Małgorzata E; Waśkiewicz, Anna; Terlikowska, Katarzyna M; Piotrowski, Walerian

    2015-11-11

    The primary aim of the study was to estimate the consumption of polyphenols in a population of 6661 subjects aged between 20 and 74 years representing a cross-section of the Polish society, and the second objective was to compare the intakes of flavonoids calculated on the basis of the two commonly used databases. Daily food consumption data were collected in 2003-2005 using a single 24-hour dietary recall. Intake of total polyphenols was estimated using an online Phenol-Explorer database, and flavonoid intake was determined using following data sources: the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) database combined of flavonoid and isoflavone databases, and the Phenol-Explorer database. Total polyphenol intake, which was calculated with the Phenol-Explorer database, was 989 mg/day with the major contributions of phenolic acids 556 mg/day and flavonoids 403.5 mg/day. The flavonoid intake calculated on the basis of the USDA databases was 525 mg/day. This study found that tea is the primary source of polyphenols and flavonoids for the studied population, including mainly flavanols, while coffee is the most important contributor of phenolic acids, mostly hydroxycinnamic acids. Our study also demonstrated that flavonoid intakes estimated according to various databases may substantially differ. Further work should be undertaken to expand polyphenol databases to better reflect their food contents.

  19. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. Incorporating Measurable (“Minimal”) Residual Disease-Directed Treatment Strategies to Optimize Outcomes in Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, Kristen; Stock, Wendy; Walter, Roland B.

    2016-01-01

    Curative-intent therapy leads to complete remissions in many adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but relapse remains common. Numerous studies have unequivocally demonstrated that the persistence of measurable (“minimal”) residual disease (MRD) at the submicroscopic level during morphologic remission identifies patients at high risk of disease recurrence and short survival. This association has provided the impetus to customize anti-leukemia therapy based on MRD data, a strategy that is now routinely pursued in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). While it is currently uncertain whether this approach will improve outcomes in AML other than APL, randomized studies have validated MRD-based risk-stratified treatment algorithms in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here, we review the available studies examining MRD-directed therapy in AML, appraise their strengths and limitations, and discuss avenues for future investigation. PMID:27269126

  1. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-09

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. [Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma in HTLV-1 infected patients: report of two cases in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Medina, Edwin Abraham; Orduz, Rocío; Morales, Olga Lucía; Martínez, Óscar; Baldión, Margarita; Isaza, Mario Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a malignant neoplasia of mature CD4+ T lymphocytes,resulting from infection with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), with several systemic and cutaneous manifestations. We present two cases of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, in patients from the Colombian Southwestern region, whose diagnoses were confirmed by histology, immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, ELISA and Western blot tests. We also discuss about the virus and how to make this diagnosis in countries like Colombia.

  3. [T-cell lymphoma-leukemia caused by HTLV-1 in adults: two lymphomatous forms].

    PubMed

    Gning, S B; Fall, F; Ba-Fall, K; Thiam, M; Ndoye, B; Gueye, P M; Mbaye, P S

    2003-01-01

    The adult T-cells lymphoma-leukemia is a serious complication by the HTLV-1 infection. It is a rarely described diseases in Africa, in spite of the frequency of the infection by this virus. We report two clinical observations of lymphomatous forms. The first observation concerned a 43 year old Senegalese woman, admitted for a deep alteration of her general status and peripheral polyadenopathies. The adenopathy biopsy set up the diagnosis of pleiomorph T lymphoma with great and medium cells. The HTLV-1 serology was positive. She had benefited of six polychemotherapy cures (cyclophosphamide, farmarubicine, oncovin, prednisone) within which she died in a cachectic presentation. The second observation concerned a 44 year old Senegalese man, admitted for peripheral polyadenopathies, ulcerated lesions of sole of the foot, and deep alteration of the general status. He presented a moderate hypercalcemia by 117 mg/l. The histological examination of a ganglionar biopsy concluded to a diffuse T lymphoma with great cells. The HTLV-1 serology was positive. The cutaneous lesions were due to a phaeohyphomycosis of Exophiala jeanselmei. The symptomatic therapeutic measures had been applied and he died within four weeks in a septicemic clinical manifestation. The adult T-cells lymphoma leukemia due to the HTLV-1 ought to be researched before any lymphomatous and leucemic manifestation by T-cells through a serological research. The prognostic stays very bad.

  4. Brain volume and cognitive function in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Michelle N; Krull, Kevin R

    2013-10-01

    The survival rate for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is greater than 80%. However, many of these survivors develop long-term chronic health conditions, with a relatively common late effect being neurocognitive dysfunction. Although neurocognitive impairments have decreased in frequency and severity as treatment has evolved, there is a subset of survivors in the current treatment era that are especially vulnerable to the neurotoxic effects of ALL and its treatment. Additionally, little is known about long-term brain development as survivors mature into adulthood. A recent study by Zeller et al. compared neurocognitive function and brain volume in 130 adult survivors of childhood ALL to 130 healthy adults matched on age and sex. They identified the caudate as particularly sensitive to the neurotoxic effects of chemotherapy. We discuss the implications and limitations of this study, including how their findings support the concept of individual vulnerability to ALL and its treatment.

  5. Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-01

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Eltrombopag Olamine in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-04

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. S0432 Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-14

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blastic Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  10. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from alternative sources in adults with high-risk acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Aversa, Franco; Reisner, Yair; Martelli, Massimo F

    2004-01-01

    Since 75% of patients with high-risk acute leukemia do not have a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling, alternative sources for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are matched unrelated donors (MUD), unrelated umbilical cord blood (UD-UCB) and one HLA haplotype mismatched family members (haploidentical). The chance of finding a suitable donor in the international voluntary donor registries is limited by frequency of the HLA phenotype and the time required to identify the right donor from a potential panel, to establish eligibility and to harvest the cells. In adult MUD recipients, event-free survival ranges up to 50% and refers only to patients who undergo transplant, without taking into account those who do not find a donor. Umbilical cord blood offers the advantages of easy procurement, the absence of risks to donors, the reduced risk of transmitting infections, immediate availability of cryopreserved samples and acceptance of mismatches at two of the six antigens. Although UD-UCB transplantation is a viable option for children, it is seldom considered for adults. The great divergency between body weight and the number of hematopoietic cells in a standard cord blood unit, particularly if associated with a two-antigen mismatch, increases the risk of graft failure and delays hematopoietic reconstitution. Work on full-haplotype mismatched transplants has been proceeding for over 20 years. Originally, outcome in leukemia patients was disappointing because of high incidence of severe graft-vs.-host disease in T-replete transplants and high rejection rates in T-cell-depleted transplants. The breakthrough came with the use of a megadose of T-cell-depleted progenitor cells after a high-intensity conditioning regimen. Treating end-stage patients inevitably confounded clinical outcome in the early pilot studies. Today, high-risk acute leukemia patients are treated at less advanced stages of disease, receive a reasonably well tolerated conditioning

  11. Survival improvements in adolescents and young adults after myeloablative allogeneic transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wood, William A; Lee, Stephanie J; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Ballen, Karen K; Buchbinder, David K; Dehn, Jason; Freytes, Cesar O; Lazarus, Hillard M; Lemaistre, Charles F; Mehta, Paulette; Szwajcer, David; Joffe, Steven; Majhail, Navneet S

    2014-06-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs, ages 15 to 40 years) with cancer have not experienced survival improvements to the same extent as younger and older patients. We compared changes in survival after myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) among children (n = 981), AYAs (n = 1218), and older adults (n = 469) who underwent transplantation over 3 time periods: 1990 to 1995, 1996 to 2001, and 2002 to 2007. Five-year survival varied inversely with age group. Survival improved over time in AYAs and paralleled that seen in children; however, overall survival did not change over time for older adults. Survival improvements were primarily related to lower rates of early treatment-related mortality in the most recent era. For all cohorts, relapse rates did not change over time. A subset of 222 AYAs between the ages of 15 and 25 at 46 pediatric or 49 adult centers were also analyzed to describe differences by center type. In this subgroup, there were differences in transplantation practices among pediatric and adult centers, although HCT outcomes did not differ by center type. Survival for AYAs undergoing myeloablative allogeneic HCT for ALL improved at a similar rate as survival for children.

  12. Advances in the management of acute myeloid leukemia in older adult patients.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Barbara B

    2010-05-01

    To update oncology nurses on new developments in the care of older adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Clinical trial data, published guidelines, review articles, and conference proceedings. Therapies for older adult patients with AML include cytarabine-based intensive-induction chemotherapy, investigational therapy, and supportive care. Nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may provide the best opportunity for cure following remission if a human leukocyte antigen-matched hematopoietic stem cell donor is available. Careful assessment of patient- and disease-related factors is critical in determining the appropriate treatment modality for individuals. Assessment tools and algorithms may identify patients likely to be intolerant of intensive therapies. Supportive care may improve treatment tolerance and quality of life. Survival outcomes have not improved significantly for older adult patients with AML. Novel therapies, coupled with better understanding of prognostic factors, may allow more highly individualized care. Performance status or comorbidity score may provide insights regarding outcome, particularly when combined with age, cytogenetic risk, or molecular markers. Efforts to improve transplantation safety may increase use in the older adult patient population. Nurses provide disease and treatment information, manage adverse effects, and offer emotional support. Knowledge of the key management issues for older adult patients with AML is critical in fulfilling this role.

  13. Characteristics of cognitive deficits and writing skills of Polish adults with developmental dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Bogdanowicz, Katarzyna Maria; Łockiewicz, Marta; Bogdanowicz, Marta; Pąchalska, Maria

    2014-07-01

    The present study was aimed at analysing cognitive deficits of dyslexic adults, and examining their written language skills in comparison with their peers. Our results confirm the presence of a certain profile of symptoms in adult dyslexics. We noticed deficits in: phonological (verbal) short-term memory, phonological awareness, rapid automatised naming (speed, self-corrections), visual perception and control, and visual-motor coordination. Moreover, the dyslexic participants, as compared with their nondyslexic peers, produced more word structure errors whilst writing an essay. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in the length of the essay, the number of linguistic and punctuation errors, the number of adjectives, and stylistic devices.

  14. Azacitidine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-08

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. S1312, Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-23

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma

  16. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Persistent risk of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma after neonatal HTLV-1 infection through exchange transfusion.

    PubMed

    Oksenhendler, Eric; Turpin, Jocelyn; Lhote, Raphael; Cassar, Olivier; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Fieschi, Claire; Galicier, Lionel; Meignin, Veronique; Bangham, Charles; Gessain, Antoine

    2017-06-01

    A 36-year-old Caucasian male presented with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). HTLV-1 contamination was attributed to a neonatal exchange transfusion. Remission was achieved but 11 years later he presented with symptoms suggesting ATL relapse. Molecular studies of T-cell clonality and virus integration sites revealed a clonal disease, distinct from the first tumor.

  18. WT1 overexpression affecting clinical outcome in non-hodgkin lymphomas and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ujj, Zsófia; Buglyó, Gergely; Udvardy, Miklós; Vargha, György; Biró, Sándor; Rejtő, László

    2014-07-01

    The Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) gene has a complex role as a transcriptional regulator, acting as tumor suppressor or oncogene in different malignancies. The prognostic role of its overexpression has been well-studied in leukemias, especially acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but not in lymphomas. For the first time to our knowledge, we present a study demonstrating the correlation of WT1 expression and survival in various non-Hodgkin lymphomas. We also studied the prognostic implications of WT1 overexpression in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In our sample of 53 patients--25 with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), 8 with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), 9 with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), 2 with Burkitt's lymphoma, 2 with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and 7 with B-cell ALL--, we measured WT1 mRNA from blood samples by quantitative RT-PCR, and divided the patients into subgroups based on the level of expression. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were drawn and compared using the logrank test. In the sample of DLBCL patients, the difference in overall and disease-free survival between WT1-positive and negative subgroups was significant (p = 0.0475 and p = 0.0004, respectively), and in a few observed cases, a sudden increase in WT1 expression signified a relapse soon followed by death. Disease-free survival curves in MCL and ALL were similarly suggestive of a potential role played by WT1. In PTCL, though WT1-positivity was detected in 4 out of 9 cases, it did not seem to affect survival. The few cases of MALT and Burkitt's lymphoma all proved to be WT1-negative.

  19. Entinostat and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-18

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  20. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-06

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. Know Your Laws. Polish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Joan Q.; Kopania, Margaret

    This Polish language version of "Know Your Laws" consists of 24 self-contained modules designed to acquaint the Florida adult student with laws she/he will meet in everyday life; fundamentals of local, state, and federal governments; and the criminal and juvenile justice systems. (The 130 objectives are categorized in the first three…

  2. Know Your Laws. Polish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Joan Q.; Kopania, Margaret

    This Polish language version of "Know Your Laws" consists of 24 self-contained modules designed to acquaint the Florida adult student with laws she/he will meet in everyday life; fundamentals of local, state, and federal governments; and the criminal and juvenile justice systems. (The 130 objectives are categorized in the first three…

  3. Symptomatic central nervous system involvement in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Alakel, Nael; Stölzel, Friedrich; Mohr, Brigitte; Kramer, Michael; Oelschlägel, Uta; Röllig, Christoph; Bornhäuser, Martin; Ehninger, Gerhard; Schaich, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) rarely involves the central nervous system (CNS). Little is known about the clinical course in adult AML patients since most studies examined pediatric patients. Therefore, this study analyzed the data of patients treated in three prospective trials of the "Study Alliance Leukemia" (SAL) study group for CNS involvement. In all, 3,261 AML patients included in the prospective AML96, AML2003, and AML60+ trials of the SAL study group were analyzed. Symptomatic patients underwent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) puncture and CNS involvement was diagnosed depending on morphology and/or flow cytometry of the CSF. Cytogenetic, molecular, clinical, and laboratory parameters were analyzed in order to identify risk factors. A total of 55 patients had proven symptomatic CNS involvement. Significantly more patients revealed CNS involvement at relapse (34 patients, 2.9%) compared with first diagnosis (21 patients, 0.6%), p<0.001. CNS involvement at initial diagnosis had a significantly higher frequency in patients with complex aberrant karyotypes, high serum lactate dehydrogenase activity, French-American-British M5 subtype, FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations alone, and co-occurrence of a FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutation. Furthermore, AML patients with CNS involvement at diagnosis had an inferior outcome compared with patients without CNS involvement even if treated with intrathecal chemotherapy with an overall survival of 11% versus 30% at 5 years, p=0.004. This study analyzed the largest data set of adult AML patients with proven CNS involvement reported so far. The data demonstrated very low prevalence of CNS involvement at initial diagnosis in adult patients with AML, and described new risk factors. In patients with risk factors, intense diagnostic and treatment strategies should be employed in the future.

  4. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Tipifarnib and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Omacetaxine Mepesuccinate, Cytarabine, and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Unique characteristics of adolescent and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia, breast cancer, and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Tricoli, James V; Seibel, Nita L; Blair, Donald G; Albritton, Karen; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon

    2011-04-20

    Each year in the United States, nearly 70 000 individuals between the ages of 15 and 40 years are diagnosed with cancer. Although overall cancer survival rates among pediatric and older adult patients have increased in recent decades, there has been little improvement in survival of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients since 1975 when collected data became adequate to evaluate this issue. In 2006, the AYA Oncology Progress Review Group made recommendations for addressing the needs of this population that were later implemented by the LIVESTRONG Young Adult Alliance. One of their overriding questions was whether the cancers seen in AYA patients were biologically different than the same cancers in adult and/or pediatric patients. On June 9-10, 2009, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Lance Armstrong Foundation (LAF) convened a workshop in Bethesda, MD, entitled "Unique Characteristics of AYA Cancers: Focus on Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL), Breast Cancer and Colon Cancer" that aimed to examine the current state of basic and translational research on these cancers and to discuss the next steps to improve their prognosis and treatment.

  9. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Role for protein geranylgeranylation in adult T-cell leukemia cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Nonaka, Mizuho; Uota, Shin; Saitoh, Yasunori; Takahashi, Mayumi; Sugimoto, Haruyo; Amet, Tohti; Arai, Ayako; Miura, Osamu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamaoka, Shoji

    2009-01-15

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is a fatal lymphoproliferative disease that develops in human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-infected individuals. Despite the accumulating knowledge of the molecular biology of HTLV-I-infected cells, effective therapeutic strategies remain to be established. Recent reports showed that the hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitor statins have anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on certain tumor cells through inhibition of protein prenylation. Here, we report that statins hinder the survival of ATL cells and induce apoptotic cell death. Inhibition of protein geranylgeranylation is responsible for these effects, since simultaneous treatment with isoprenoid precursors, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate or farnesyl pyrophosphate, but not a cholesterol precursor squalene, restored the viability of ATL cells. Simvastatin inhibited geranylgeranylation of small GTPases Rab5B and Rac1 in ATL cells, and a geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitor GGTI-298 reduced ATL cell viability more efficiently than a farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277. These results not only unveil an important role for protein geranylgeranylation in ATL cell survival, but also implicate therapeutic potentials of statins in the treatment of ATL.

  11. Abacavir, an anti-HIV-1 drug, targets TDP1-deficient adult T cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Takiuchi, Yoko; Iwai, Fumie; Sakamoto, Takashi; Nagata, Kayoko; Shinohara, Masanobu; Io, Katsuhiro; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Shindo, Keisuke; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Hirota, Kouji; Yamamoto, Junpei; Iwai, Shigenori; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Shunichi; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2015-04-01

    Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T cell malignancy caused by human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and has a poor prognosis. We analyzed the cytotoxic effects of various nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for HIV-1 on ATL cells and found that abacavir potently and selectively kills ATL cells. Although NRTIs have minimal genotoxicities on host cells, the therapeutic concentration of abacavir induced numerous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the chromosomal DNA of ATL cells. DSBs persisted over time in ATL cells but not in other cell lines, suggesting impaired DNA repair. We found that the reduced expression of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), a repair enzyme, is attributable to the cytotoxic effect of abacavir on ATL cells. We also showed that TDP1 removes abacavir from DNA ends in vitro. These results suggest a model in which ATL cells with reduced TDP1 expression are unable to excise abacavir incorporated into genomic DNA, leading to irreparable DSBs. On the basis of the above mechanism, we propose abacavir as a promising chemotherapeutic agent for ATL.

  12. Abacavir, an anti–HIV-1 drug, targets TDP1-deficient adult T cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Takiuchi, Yoko; Iwai, Fumie; Sakamoto, Takashi; Nagata, Kayoko; Shinohara, Masanobu; Io, Katsuhiro; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Shindo, Keisuke; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Hirota, Kouji; Yamamoto, Junpei; Iwai, Shigenori; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Shunichi; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2015-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T cell malignancy caused by human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and has a poor prognosis. We analyzed the cytotoxic effects of various nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for HIV-1 on ATL cells and found that abacavir potently and selectively kills ATL cells. Although NRTIs have minimal genotoxicities on host cells, the therapeutic concentration of abacavir induced numerous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the chromosomal DNA of ATL cells. DSBs persisted over time in ATL cells but not in other cell lines, suggesting impaired DNA repair. We found that the reduced expression of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), a repair enzyme, is attributable to the cytotoxic effect of abacavir on ATL cells. We also showed that TDP1 removes abacavir from DNA ends in vitro. These results suggest a model in which ATL cells with reduced TDP1 expression are unable to excise abacavir incorporated into genomic DNA, leading to irreparable DSBs. On the basis of the above mechanism, we propose abacavir as a promising chemotherapeutic agent for ATL. PMID:26601161

  13. Skin manifestations of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma: clinical, cytological and immunological features.

    PubMed

    Tokura, Yoshiki; Sawada, Yu; Shimauchi, Takatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a malignancy of mature T cells caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type I. The endemic areas include Japan, especially in Kyushu, the Caribbean, Papua New Guinea, South America and Africa. Approximately 50% of ATLL patients exhibit skin manifestations. Cytologically, ATLL tumor cells are characterized by CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T-cell phenotype, high expressions of CCR4, and programmed cell death (PD)-1 and PD-ligand 1. The skin eruptions are categorized into six types: patch, plaque, multipapular, nodulotumoral, erythrodermic and purpuric. The overall survival of the eruption-bearing patients was poorer than that of the non-eruption-bearing patients in acute, chronic and smoldering types, but the survival levels of both groups were comparable in lymphoma type. The prognosis was poor in the order of: erythrodermic, nodulotumoral, multipapular/purpuric, plaque, then patch. Multivariate analysis revealed that the eruption type is an independent prognostic factor for ATLL. Patients may have other skin manifestations, secondary and infective lesions. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  14. An animal model of adult T-cell leukemia: humanized mice with HTLV-1-specific immunity.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Kenta; Xun, Runze; Tei, Mami; Ueno, Takaharu; Tanaka, Masakazu; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Fujisawa, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-16

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is causally associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), an aggressive T-cell malignancy with a poor prognosis. To elucidate ATL pathogenesis in vivo, a variety of animal models have been established; however, the mechanisms driving this disorder remain poorly understood due to deficiencies in each of these animal models. Here, we report a novel HTLV-1-infected humanized mouse model generated by intra-bone marrow injection of human CD133(+) stem cells into NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγc null (NOG) mice (IBMI-huNOG mice). Upon infection, the number of CD4(+) human T cells in the periphery increased rapidly, and atypical lymphocytes with lobulated nuclei resembling ATL-specific flower cells were observed 4 to 5 months after infection. Proliferation was seen in both CD25(-) and CD25(+) CD4 T cells with identical proviral integration sites; however, a limited number of CD25(+)-infected T-cell clones eventually dominated, indicating an association between clonal selection of infected T cells and expression of CD25. Additionally, HTLV-1-specific adaptive immune responses were induced in infected mice and might be involved in the control of HTLV-1-infected cells. Thus, the HTLV-1-infected IBMI-huNOG mouse model successfully recapitulated the development of ATL and may serve as an important tool for investigating in vivo mechanisms of ATL leukemogenesis and evaluating anti-ATL drug and vaccine candidates.

  15. Efficiency of AUY922 in mice with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    ISHIKAWA, CHIE; SENBA, MASACHIKA; MORI, NAOKI

    2016-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an aggressive malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). ATLL is associated with poor prognosis mainly due to resistance to chemotherapy, which highlights the requirement for alternative therapies. The chaperone heat shock protein (HSP) 90 assist proteins involved in the onset and progression of ATLL. In the present study, the efficacy of a second generation HSP90 inhibitor termed AUY922 was investigated in ATLL. In vitro, AUY922 induced marked inhibition of cell viability in the HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines HUT-102 and MT-4. In immunodeficient mice bearing HUT-102 xenotransplants, AUY922 markedly retarded tumor growth, compared with the control group. Apoptosis was evident in hematoxylin and eosin stained- and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling-labeled tissue sections from AUY922-treated mice. In addition, AUY922 significantly reduced the serum levels of the surrogate tumor markers soluble interleukin-2 receptor and soluble cluster of differentiation 30. Overall, the present results demonstrate that AUY922 has potent anti-ATLL activity, thus providing a rationale for continuing the clinical development of HSP90 inhibitors in clinical trials for the treatment of patients with ATLL. PMID:27347156

  16. HTLV-1 and associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mahieux, Renaud; Gessain, Antoine

    2003-12-01

    Human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infects 15-20 millions individuals worldwide. This oncoretrovirus can be transmitted through 3 ways: horizontally, vertically (mother to child) and via blood transfusion. HTLV-1 causes 2 major diseases: adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy. Tax is a 40-kDa phosphoprotein that is encoded by the pX region of the virus. Several lines of evidence have demonstrated a central role for this protein in the immortalization or transformation of the HTLV-1 infected cells. Apart from its ability to drive transcription from the viral promoter, it also deregulates the cell cycle, inhibits apoptosis, has an effect on the maintenance of the genomic stability and induces the production of several cytokines. In addition, several arguments strongly suggest the existence of host genetic factors, that could be involved in the HTLV-1 infection as well as in the development of ATLL among HTLV-1 infected individuals. ATLL can be classified into 4 major subtypes: a smoldering type, a chronic type, a lymphoma type and a leukemic type. The demonstration by Southern blot analysis of the clonal integration of an HTLV-1 provirus in the tumoral cells represents the gold-standard to define biologically ATLL. The survival rate of ATLL patients, especially those who develop the acute leukemic or lymphomas forms, is very poor, and such clonal malignant CD4 expansion remains one of the most severe lymphoproliferations.

  17. The genomic landscape of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Mullighan, Charles G

    2014-12-05

    Our understanding of the genetic basis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been greatly advanced by genomic profiling and sequencing studies. These efforts have characterized the genetic basis of recently described and poorly understood subtypes of ALL, including early T-cell precursor ALL, Philadelphia chromosome-like (Ph-like) ALL, and ALL with intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21, and have identified several rational therapeutic targets in high-risk ALL, notably ABL1-class and JAK-STAT inhibitors in Ph-like ALL. Deep sequencing studies are also refining our understanding of the genetic basis of clonal heterogeneity and relapse. These studies have elucidated the nature of clonal evolution during disease progression and identified genetic changes that confer resistance to specific therapeutic agents, including CREBBP and NT5C2. Genomic profiling has also identified common and rare inherited genetic variants that influence the risk of developing leukemia. These efforts are now being extended to ALL in adolescents and adults with the goal of fully defining the genetic landscape of ALL to further improve treatment outcomes in high-risk populations.

  18. Unrelated donor transplants in adults with Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first complete remission

    PubMed Central

    Marks, David I.; Pérez, Waleska S.; He, Wensheng; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Bishop, Michael R.; Bolwell, Brian J.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Copelan, Edward A.; Gale, Robert Peter; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A.; Isola, Luis M.; Jakubowski, Ann A.; Keating, Armand; Klumpp, Thomas R.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Maziarz, Richard T.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Sabloff, Mitchell; Schiller, Gary; Sierra, Jorge; Tallman, Martin S.; Waller, Edmund K.; Wiernik, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    We report the retrospective outcomes of unrelated donor (URD) transplants in 169 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in first complete remission (CR1) who received transplants between 1995 and 2004. Median age was 33 years (range, 16-59 years). A total of 50% had a white blood cell count (WBC) more than 30 × 109/L, 18% extramedullary disease, 42% achieved CR more than 8 weeks from diagnosis, 25% had adverse cytogenetics, and 19% had T-cell leukemia. A total of 41% were HLA well-matched, 41% partially matched with their donors, and 18% were HLA-mismatched. At 54-month median follow-up, incidences of acute grade 2-IV, III to IV, and chronic graft-versus-host disease were 50%, 25%, and 43%, respectively. Five-year treatment-related mortality (TRM), relapse, and overall survival were 42%, 20%, and 39%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, TRM was significantly higher with HLA-mismatched donors and T-cell depletion. Relapse risk was higher if the diagnostic WBC was more than 100 × 109/L. Factors associated with poorer survival included WBC more than 100 × 109/L, more than 8 weeks to CR1, cytomegalovirus seropositivity, HLA mismatching, and T-cell depletion. Nearly 40% of adults with ALL in CR1 survive 5 years after URD transplantation. Relapse risks were modest; TRM is the major cause of treatment failure. Selecting closely HLA-matched URD and reducing TRM should improve results. PMID:18398065

  19. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children. In: Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: ... et al. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults. In: Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: ...

  20. Vorinostat and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  1. Disseminated Strongyloides stercoralis Infection in HTLV-1-Associated Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Donn M.; Ramanathan, Roshan; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Fedorko, Daniel P.; Janik, John E.; Morris, John C.

    2011-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1)-associated adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and a history of previously treated Strongyloides stercoralis infection received anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody therapy with alemtuzumab on a clinical trial. After an initial response, she developed ocular involvement by ATL. Alemtuzumab was stopped and high-dose corticosteroid therapy was started to palliate her ocular symptoms. Ten days later, the patient developed diarrhea, vomiting, fever, cough, skin rash, and a deteriorating mental status. She was diagnosed with disseminated S. stercoralis. Corticosteroids were discontinued and the patient received anthelmintic therapy with ivermectin and albendazole with complete clinical recovery. PMID:21474923

  2. Disseminated Strongyloides stercoralis infection in HTLV-1-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Donn M; Ramanathan, Roshan; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Fedorko, Daniel P; Janik, John E; Morris, John C

    2011-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1)-associated adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and a history of previously treated Strongyloides stercoralis infection received anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody therapy with alemtuzumab on a clinical trial. After an initial response, she developed ocular involvement by ATL. Alemtuzumab was stopped and high-dose corticosteroid therapy was started to palliate her ocular symptoms. Ten days later, the patient developed diarrhea, vomiting, fever, cough, skin rash, and a deteriorating mental status. She was diagnosed with disseminated S. stercoralis. Corticosteroids were discontinued and the patient received anthelmintic therapy with ivermectin and albendazole with complete clinical recovery. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Current views in HTLV-I-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nicot, Christophe

    2005-03-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that the relative percentage of malignant lymphoid proliferations varies widely according to geographical location and ethnic populations. HTLV-I is the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and is also associated with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). However, a definite role of HTLV-I in mycosis fungoides (MF) and/or Sezary syndrome (SS) remains controversial. While most HTLV-I-infected individuals remain asymptomatic carriers, 1-5% will develop ATLL, an invariably fatal expansion of virus-infected CD4+ T cells. This low incidence and the long latency period preceding occurrence of the disease suggest that additional factors are involved in development of ATLL. In this review, diagnosis, clinical features, and molecular pathogenesis of HTLV-I are discussed.

  4. Hierarchy in gene expression is predictive of risk, progression, and outcome in adult acute myeloid leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Shubham; Deem, Michael W.

    2015-02-01

    Cancer progresses with a change in the structure of the gene network in normal cells. We define a measure of organizational hierarchy in gene networks of affected cells in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. With a retrospective cohort analysis based on the gene expression profiles of 116 AML patients, we find that the likelihood of future cancer relapse and the level of clinical risk are directly correlated with the level of organization in the cancer related gene network. We also explore the variation of the level of organization in the gene network with cancer progression. We find that this variation is non-monotonic, which implies the fitness landscape in the evolution of AML cancer cells is non-trivial. We further find that the hierarchy in gene expression at the time of diagnosis may be a useful biomarker in AML prognosis.

  5. Does aberrant membrane transport contribute to poor outcome in adult acute myeloid leukemia?

    PubMed Central

    Chigaev, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia in adults is a highly heterogeneous disease. Gene expression profiling performed using unsupervised algorithms can be used to distinguish specific groups of patients within a large patient cohort. The identified gene expression signatures can offer insights into underlying physiological mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. Here, the analysis of several related gene expression clusters associated with poor outcome, worst overall survival and highest rates of resistant disease and obtained from the patients at the time of diagnosis or from previously untreated individuals is presented. Surprisingly, these gene clusters appear to be enriched for genes corresponding to proteins involved in transport across membranes (transporters, carriers and channels). Several ideas describing the possible relationship of membrane transport activity and leukemic cell biology, including the “Warburg effect,” the specific role of chloride ion transport, direct “import” of metabolic energy through uptake of creatine phosphate, and modification of the bone marrow niche microenvironment are discussed. PMID:26191006

  6. The prognostic importance of polypharmacy in older adults treated for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

    PubMed

    Elliot, Kathleen; Tooze, Janet A; Geller, Rachel; Powell, Bayard L; Pardee, Timothy S; Ritchie, Ellen; Kennedy, LeAnne; Callahan, Kathryn E; Klepin, Heidi D

    2014-10-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the prognostic significance of polypharmacy and inappropriate medication use among 150 patients >60 years of age receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). After adjustment for age and comorbidity, increased number of medications at diagnosis (≥ 4 versus ≤ 1) was associated with increased 30-day mortality (OR=9.98, 95% CI=1.18-84.13), lower odds of complete remission status (OR=0.20, 95% CI=0.06-0.65), and higher overall mortality (HR=2.13, 95% CI=1.15-3.92). Inappropriate medication use (classified according to Beers criteria) was not significantly associated with clinical outcomes. Polypharmacy warrants further study as a modifiable marker of vulnerability among older adults with AML.

  7. The prognostic importance of polypharmacy in older adults treated for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, Kathleen; Tooze, Janet A.; Geller, Rachel; Powell, Bayard L.; Pardee, Timothy S.; Ritchie, Ellen; Kennedy, LeAnne; Callahan, Kathryn E.; Klepin, Heidi D.

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the prognostic significance of polypharmacy and inappropriate medication use among 150 patients >60 years of age receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). After adjustment for age and comorbidity, increased number of medications at diagnosis (≥4 vs. ≤1) was associated with increased 30-day mortality (OR=9.98, 95% CI=1.18–84.13), lower odds of complete remission status (OR=0.20, 95% CI=0.06–0.65), and higher overall mortality (HR=2.13, 95% CI=1.15–3.92). Inappropriate medication use (classified according to Beers criteria) was not significantly associated with clinical outcomes. Polypharmacy warrants further study as a modifiable marker of vulnerability among older adults with AML. PMID:25127690

  8. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-17

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With HTLV-Associated T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-26

    Acute Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; CD3 Positive; CD4-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Chronic Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; HTLV-1 Infection; Hypercalcemia; Lymphomatous Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Smoldering Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  10. Trebananib With or Without Low-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-14

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Idarubicin Dose Escalation During Consolidation Therapy for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bradstock, Kenneth F; Link, Emma; Di Iulio, Juliana; Szer, Jeff; Marlton, Paula; Wei, Andrew H; Enno, Arno; Schwarer, Anthony; Lewis, Ian D; D'Rozario, James; Coyle, Luke; Cull, Gavin; Campbell, Phillip; Leahy, Michael F; Hahn, Uwe; Cannell, Paul; Tiley, Campbell; Lowenthal, Ray M; Moore, John; Cartwright, Kimberly; Cunningham, Ilona; Taper, John; Grigg, Andrew; Roberts, Andrew W; Benson, Warwick; Hertzberg, Mark; Deveridge, Sandra; Rowlings, Philip; Mills, Anthony K; Gill, Devinder; Bardy, Peter; Campbell, Lynda; Seymour, John F

    2017-05-20

    Purpose Higher doses of the anthracycline daunorubicin during induction therapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have been shown to improve remission rates and survival. We hypothesized that improvements in outcomes in adult AML may be further achieved by increased anthracycline dose during consolidation therapy. Patients and Methods Patients with AML in complete remission after induction therapy were randomly assigned to receive two cycles of consolidation therapy with cytarabine 100 mg/m(2) daily for 5 days, etoposide 75 mg/m(2) daily for 5 days, and idarubicin 9 mg/m(2) daily for either 2 or 3 days (standard and intensive arms, respectively). The primary end point was leukemia-free survival (LFS). Results Two hundred ninety-three patients 16 to 60 years of age, excluding those with core binding factor AML and acute promyelocytic leukemia, were randomly assigned to treatment groups (146 to the standard arm and 147 to the intensive arm). Both groups were balanced for age, karyotypic risk, and FLT3-internal tandem duplication and NPM1 gene mutations. One hundred twenty patients in the standard arm (82%) and 95 patients in the intensive arm (65%) completed planned consolidation ( P < .001). Durations of severe neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were prolonged in the intensive arm, but there were no differences in serious nonhematological toxicities. With a median follow-up of 5.3 years (range, 0.6 to 9.9 years), there was a statistically significant improvement in LFS in the intensive arm compared with the standard arm (3-year LFS, 47% [95% CI, 40% to 56%] v 35% [95% CI, 28% to 44%]; P = .045). At 5 years, the overall survival rate was 57% in the intensive arm and 47% in the standard arm ( P = .092). There was no evidence of selective benefit of intensive consolidation within the cytogenetic or FLT3-internal tandem duplication and NPM1 gene mutation subgroups. Conclusion An increased cumulative dose of idarubicin during consolidation therapy for adult AML resulted in

  12. Role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dhédin, Nathalie; Huynh, Anne; Maury, Sébastien; Tabrizi, Reza; Beldjord, Kheira; Asnafi, Vahid; Thomas, Xavier; Chevallier, Patrice; Nguyen, Stéphanie; Coiteux, Valérie; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Hichri, Yosr; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Reman, Oumedaly; Graux, Carlos; Chalandon, Yves; Blaise, Didier; Schanz, Urs; Lhéritier, Véronique; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-04-16

    Because a pediatric-inspired Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL) protocol yielded a markedly improved outcome in adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL, we aimed to reassess the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in patients treated in the GRAALL-2003 and GRAALL-2005 trials. In all, 522 patients age 15 to 55 years old and presenting with at least 1 conventional high-risk factor were candidates for SCT in first complete remission. Among these, 282 (54%) received a transplant in first complete remission. At 3 years, posttransplant cumulative incidences of relapse, nonrelapse mortality, and relapse-free survival (RFS) were estimated at 19.5%, 15.5%, and 64.7%, respectively. Time-dependent analysis did not reveal a significant difference in RFS between SCT and no-SCT cohorts. However, SCT was associated with longer RFS in patients with postinduction minimal residual disease (MRD) ≥10(-3) (hazard ratio, 0.40) but not in good MRD responders. In B-cell precursor ALL, SCT also benefitted patients with focal IKZF1 gene deletion (hazard ratio, 0.42). This article shows that poor early MRD response, in contrast to conventional ALL risk factors, is an excellent tool to identify patients who may benefit from allogeneic SCT in the context of intensified adult ALL therapy. Trial GRAALL-2003 was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00222027; GRAALL-2005 was registered as #NCT00327678.

  13. Best Practices in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Focus on Asparaginase.

    PubMed

    Boissel, Nicolas; Sender, Leonard S

    2015-09-01

    The inclusion of asparaginase in chemotherapy regimens to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has had a positive impact on survival in pediatric patients. Historically, asparaginase has been excluded from most treatment protocols for adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients because of perceived toxicity in this population, and this is believed to have contributed to poorer outcomes in these patients. However, retrospective analyses over the past 12 years have shown that 2-, 5-, and 7-year overall survival of AYA patients is significantly improved with pediatric versus adult protocols. The addition of asparaginase to adult protocols yielded high rates of first remission and improved survival. However, long-term survival remains lower compared with what has been seen in pediatrics. The notion that asparaginase is poorly tolerated by AYA patients has been challenged in multiple studies. In some, but not all, studies, the incidences of hepatic and pancreatic toxicities were higher in AYA patients, whereas the rates of hypersensitivity reactions did not appear to differ with age. There is an increased risk of venous thromboembolic events, and management with anti-coagulation therapy is recommended. Overall, the risk of therapy-related mortality is low. Together, this suggests that high-intensity pediatric protocols offer an effective and tolerable approach to treating ALL in the AYA population.

  14. Physical activity of Polish adolescents and young adults according to IPAQ: a population based study.

    PubMed

    Bergier, Józef; Kapka-Skrzypczak, Lucyna; Biliński, Przemysław; Paprzycki, Piotr; Wojtyła, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The alarming problem of a decline in physical activity among children and adolescents and its detrimental effects on public health has been well recognised worldwide. Low physical activity is responsible for 6% of deaths worldwide and 5-10% of deaths in the countries of the WHO European Region, according to country. Within the last decade, many initiatives have been launched to counteract this phenomenon. The objective of presented study was analysis of the level of physical activity among adolescents and young adults in Poland, according to the IPAQ questionnaire. The study group covered 7,716 adolescents: 5,086 children attending high school and secondary schools and 2,630 university students. Low physical activity was noted among 57% of schoolchildren and 20.84% of students. Analysis of the level of physical activity according to the IPAQ indicated that it was lower among girls, compared to boys. An additional analysis, with the consideration of the place of residence, showed that the highest percentage of the population with low physical activity was noted in the rural areas (29.30%), while among the urban inhabitants of cities with a population above 100,000 it was on the level of 23.69% and 20.57%. Median for weekly physical activity by respondents" gender was on the level of 1,554.00 MET*min. weekly among females, and 2,611.00 MET*min. weekly among males (p<0.000). The highest weekly physical activity expressed in MET*min. was observed among the inhabitants of towns with a population less than 100,000, whereas among the rural population and inhabitants of large cities with a population of over 100,000 the weekly physical activity was on a similar level (1,830.50 and 1,962.00 respectively). An extended analysis of respondents' physical activity showed that during the day students spend significantly more time in a sedentary position, compared to schoolchildren. The presented results of studies indicate the necessity to continue and intensify actions to

  15. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Selinexor and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-11

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Pravastatin Sodium in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. An early thymic precursor phenotype predicts outcome exclusively in HOXA-overexpressing adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a Group for Research in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia study

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Jonathan; Marchand, Tony; Touzart, Aurore; Cieslak, Agata; Trinquand, Amélie; Sutton, Laurent; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Ifrah, Norbert; Hamel, Jean-François; Asnafi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression studies have consistently identified a HOXA-overexpressing cluster of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, but it is unclear whether these constitute a homogeneous clinical entity, and the biological consequences of HOXA overexpression have not been systematically examined. We characterized the biology and outcome of 55 HOXA-positive cases among 209 patients with adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia uniformly treated during the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL)-2003 and -2005 studies. HOXA-positive patients had markedly higher rates of an early thymic precursor-like immunophenotype (40.8% versus 14.5%, P=0.0004), chemoresistance (59.3% versus 40.8%, P=0.026) and positivity for minimal residual disease (48.5% versus 23.5%, P=0.01) than the HOXA-negative group. These differences were due to particularly high frequencies of chemoresistant early thymic precursor-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia in HOXA-positive cases harboring fusion oncoproteins that transactivate HOXA. Strikingly, the presence of an early thymic precursor-like immunophenotype was associated with marked outcome differences within the HOXA-positive group (5-year overall survival 31.2% in HOXA-positive early thymic precursor versus 66.7% in HOXA-positive non-early thymic precursor, P=0.03), but not in HOXA-negative cases (5-year overall survival 74.2% in HOXA-negative early thymic precursor versus 57.2% in HOXA-negative non-early thymic precursor, P=0.44). Multivariate analysis further revealed that HOXA positivity independently affected event-free survival (P=0.053) and relapse risk (P=0.039) of chemoresistant T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. These results show that the underlying mechanism of HOXA deregulation dictates the clinico-biological phenotype, and that the negative prognosis of early thymic precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia is exclusive to HOXA-positive patients, suggesting that early treatment intensification is currently

  20. An early thymic precursor phenotype predicts outcome exclusively in HOXA-overexpressing adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a Group for Research in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia study.

    PubMed

    Bond, Jonathan; Marchand, Tony; Touzart, Aurore; Cieslak, Agata; Trinquand, Amélie; Sutton, Laurent; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Spicuglia, Salvatore; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Ifrah, Norbert; Hamel, Jean-François; Asnafi, Vahid

    2016-06-01

    Gene expression studies have consistently identified a HOXA-overexpressing cluster of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, but it is unclear whether these constitute a homogeneous clinical entity, and the biological consequences of HOXA overexpression have not been systematically examined. We characterized the biology and outcome of 55 HOXA-positive cases among 209 patients with adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia uniformly treated during the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL)-2003 and -2005 studies. HOXA-positive patients had markedly higher rates of an early thymic precursor-like immunophenotype (40.8% versus 14.5%, P=0.0004), chemoresistance (59.3% versus 40.8%, P=0.026) and positivity for minimal residual disease (48.5% versus 23.5%, P=0.01) than the HOXA-negative group. These differences were due to particularly high frequencies of chemoresistant early thymic precursor-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia in HOXA-positive cases harboring fusion oncoproteins that transactivate HOXA Strikingly, the presence of an early thymic precursor-like immunophenotype was associated with marked outcome differences within the HOXA-positive group (5-year overall survival 31.2% in HOXA-positive early thymic precursor versus 66.7% in HOXA-positive non-early thymic precursor, P=0.03), but not in HOXA-negative cases (5-year overall survival 74.2% in HOXA-negative early thymic precursor versus 57.2% in HOXA-negative non-early thymic precursor, P=0.44). Multivariate analysis further revealed that HOXA positivity independently affected event-free survival (P=0.053) and relapse risk (P=0.039) of chemoresistant T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. These results show that the underlying mechanism of HOXA deregulation dictates the clinico-biological phenotype, and that the negative prognosis of early thymic precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia is exclusive to HOXA-positive patients, suggesting that early treatment intensification is currently

  1. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. 5-Fluoro-2'-Deoxycytidine and Tetrahydrouridine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Unrelated umbilical cord blood transplant for adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first and second complete remission: a comparison with allografts from adult unrelated donors

    PubMed Central

    Marks, David I.; Woo, Kwang Ahn; Zhong, Xiaobo; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Bachanova, Veronika; Barker, Juliet N.; Brunstein, Claudio G.; Gibson, John; Kebriaei, Partow; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Olsson, Richard; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Pidala, Joseph; Savani, Bipin; Rocha, Vanderson; Eapen, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation has an established role in the treatment of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia whose survival when recipients of grafts from adult unrelated donors approaches that of recipients of grafts from sibling donors. Our aim was to determine the role of mismatched unrelated cord blood grafts in transplantation for 802 adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first or second complete remission. Using Cox regression we compared outcomes after 116 mismatched single or double cord blood transplants, 546 peripheral blood progenitor cell transplants and 140 bone marrow transplants. The characteristics of the recipients and their diseases were similar except cord blood recipients were younger, more likely to be non-Caucasians and more likely to have a low white blood cell count at diagnosis. There were differences in donor-recipient human leukocyte antigen-match depending on the source of the graft. Most adult donor transplants were matched at the allele-level considering human leukocyte antigens-A, -B, -C and –DRB1. In contrast, most cord blood transplants were mismatched and considered antigen-level matching; 57% were mismatched at two loci and 29% at one locus whereas only 29% of adult donor transplants were mismatched at one locus and none at two loci. There were no differences in the 3-year probabilities of survival between recipients of cord blood (44%), matched adult donor (44%) and mismatched adult donor (43%) transplants. Cord blood transplants engrafted slower and were associated with less grade 2–4 acute but similar chronic graft-versus-host disease, relapse, and transplant-related mortality. The survival of cord blood graft recipients was similar to that of recipients of matched or mismatched unrelated adult donor grafts and so cord blood should be considered a valid alternative source of stem cells for adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the absence of a matched unrelated adult donor. PMID:24056817

  5. Ph-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a high-risk subtype in adults.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nitin; Roberts, Kathryn G; Jabbour, Elias; Patel, Keyur; Eterovic, Agda Karina; Chen, Ken; Zweidler-McKay, Patrick; Lu, Xinyan; Fawcett, Gloria; Wang, Sa A; Konoplev, Sergej; Harvey, Richard C; Chen, I-Ming; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Valentine, Marcus; Thomas, Deborah; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Ravandi, Farhad; Cortes, Jorge; Kornblau, Steven; O'Brien, Susan; Pierce, Sherry; Jorgensen, Jeffrey; Shaw, Kenna R Mills; Willman, Cheryl L; Mullighan, Charles G; Kantarjian, Hagop; Konopleva, Marina

    2017-02-02

    Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a high-risk subtype of ALL in children. There are conflicting data on the incidence and prognosis of Ph-like ALL in adults. Patients with newly diagnosed B-cell ALL (B-ALL) who received frontline chemotherapy at MD Anderson Cancer Center underwent gene expression profiling of leukemic cells. Of 148 patients, 33.1% had Ph-like, 31.1% had Ph(+), and 35.8% had other B-ALL subtypes (B-other). Within the Ph-like ALL cohort, 61% had cytokine receptor-like factor 2 (CRLF2) overexpression. Patients with Ph-like ALL had significantly worse overall survival (OS), and event-free survival compared with B-other with a 5-year survival of 23% (vs 59% for B-other, P = .006). Sixty-eight percent of patients with Ph-like ALL were of Hispanic ethnicity. The following were associated with inferior OS on multivariable analysis: age (hazard ratio [HR], 3.299; P < .001), white blood cell count (HR, 1.910; P = .017), platelet count (HR, 7.437; P = .005), and Ph-like ALL (HR, 1.818; P = .03). Next-generation sequencing of the CRLF2(+) group identified mutations in the JAK-STAT and Ras pathway in 85% of patients, and 20% had a CRLF2 mutation. Within the CRLF2(+) group, JAK2 mutation was associated with inferior outcomes. Our findings show high frequency of Ph-like ALL in adults, an increased frequency of Ph-like ALL in adults of Hispanic ethnicity, significantly inferior outcomes of adult patients with Ph-like ALL, and significantly worse outcomes in the CRLF2(+) subset of Ph-like ALL. Novel strategies are needed to improve the outcome of these patients.

  6. The prognostic value of glucocorticoid receptors for adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    EL-Maghraby, Shereen M.; Kandil, Noha S.; El-Bendary, Waleed R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic protocols used in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are widely variable, and glucocorticoids (GCs) are essential components in ALL treatment. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the distribution of prominent glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene polymorphic variants among adult ALL patients. We also investigated the association between GR messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) isoform expressions and the response to chemotherapy. Methods Fifty-two newly diagnosed Philadelphia-negative adult ALL patients and 30 healthy control subjects were enrolled in this study. Genotyping was carried out using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. GR mRNA isoform expressions were assayed by quantitative real-time PCR. Results ALL patients in this study had a median age of 34 years (range, 18-75). GRα expression was associated with complete remission (P=0.03), while GRγ mRNA expression was significantly higher in GC resistant patients (P=0.032) and in non-responders (P=0.019). However, there were no significant associations with GC resistance. The BclI polymorphic variant of the GR gene was the most frequent in adult ALL patients and was not associated with the GC response. Both higher GRα expression and lower GRγ expression were associated with achievement of complete remission, while higher GRγ expression was associated with GC-resistance. Conclusion Our data suggest that the level of GR isoform expression may be useful in predicting GC response, achievement of complete remission, and better event-free survival in ALL patients. However, further evaluation with a larger cohort of patients is warranted. PMID:26770951

  7. Tretinoin, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride With or Without Arsenic Trioxide Followed by Tretinoin With or Without Mercaptopurine and Methotrexate in Treating Patients With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  8. Epigenetic deregulation of Ellis Van Creveld confers robust Hedgehog signaling in adult T-cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ryutaro; Yamagishi, Makoto; Nakano, Kazumi; Yamochi, Toshiko; Yamochi, Tadanori; Fujikawa, Dai; Nakashima, Makoto; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Utsunomiya, Atae; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer, global gene expression alteration, is closely associated with the development and malignant characteristics associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) as well as other cancers. Here, we show that aberrant overexpression of the Ellis Van Creveld (EVC) family is responsible for cellular Hedgehog (HH) activation, which provides the pro-survival ability of ATL cells. Using microarray, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry we have demonstrated that EVC is significantly upregulated in ATL and human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1)-infected cells. Epigenetic marks, including histone H3 acetylation and Lys4 trimethylation, are specifically accumulated at the EVC locus in ATL samples. The HTLV-1 Tax participates in the coordination of EVC expression in an epigenetic fashion. The treatment of shRNA targeting EVC, as well as the transcription factors for HH signaling, diminishes the HH activation and leads to apoptotic death in ATL cell lines. We also showed that a HH signaling inhibitor, GANT61, induces strong apoptosis in the established ATL cell lines and patient-derived primary ATL cells. Therefore, our data indicate that HH activation is involved in the regulation of leukemic cell survival. The epigenetically deregulated EVC appears to play an important role for HH activation. The possible use of EVC as a specific cell marker and a novel drug target for HTLV-1-infected T-cells is implicated by these findings. The HH inhibitors are suggested as drug candidates for ATL therapy. Our findings also suggest chromatin rearrangement associated with active histone markers in ATL. PMID:24996003

  9. Epigenetic deregulation of Ellis Van Creveld confers robust Hedgehog signaling in adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryutaro; Yamagishi, Makoto; Nakano, Kazumi; Yamochi, Toshiko; Yamochi, Tadanori; Fujikawa, Dai; Nakashima, Makoto; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Utsunomiya, Atae; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2014-09-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer, global gene expression alteration, is closely associated with the development and malignant characteristics associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) as well as other cancers. Here, we show that aberrant overexpression of the Ellis Van Creveld (EVC) family is responsible for cellular Hedgehog (HH) activation, which provides the pro-survival ability of ATL cells. Using microarray, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry we have demonstrated that EVC is significantly upregulated in ATL and human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1)-infected cells. Epigenetic marks, including histone H3 acetylation and Lys4 trimethylation, are specifically accumulated at the EVC locus in ATL samples. The HTLV-1 Tax participates in the coordination of EVC expression in an epigenetic fashion. The treatment of shRNA targeting EVC, as well as the transcription factors for HH signaling, diminishes the HH activation and leads to apoptotic death in ATL cell lines. We also showed that a HH signaling inhibitor, GANT61, induces strong apoptosis in the established ATL cell lines and patient-derived primary ATL cells. Therefore, our data indicate that HH activation is involved in the regulation of leukemic cell survival. The epigenetically deregulated EVC appears to play an important role for HH activation. The possible use of EVC as a specific cell marker and a novel drug target for HTLV-1-infected T-cells is implicated by these findings. The HH inhibitors are suggested as drug candidates for ATL therapy. Our findings also suggest chromatin rearrangement associated with active histone markers in ATL.

  10. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma in Jujuy, north-west Argentina.

    PubMed

    Marin, Oscar; Hasui, Kazuhisa; Remondegui, Carlos; Sato, Eiichi; Aye, Moe Moe; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Izumo, Shuji; Tajima, Kazuo

    2002-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is prevalent in native Americans living in the Andes. Some of their malignant lymphomas (ML) show a peculiar histology suggestive of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). To determine whether ML resembling ATLL are indeed ATLL, re-analysis of 34 cases occurring in Jujuy, a province of Argentina, was conducted, concentrating on immunological phenotype, integration of HTLV-1 proviral DNA, expression of HTLV-1 p40Tax and p27Rex, and infection of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The ML were 22 cases of mature peripheral T-cell and natural killer (NK)-cell neoplasm (mT/NKN), 11 B-cell malignant neoplasms and one Hodgkin's lymphoma. Polymerase chain reaction against the HTLV-1 proviral DNA, using DNA extracted from paraffin sections, indicated integration of the HTLV-1 proviral DNA in three cases of eight mT/NKN. Two other cases of mT/NKN were positive for anti-HTLV-1 antibodies. Expression of p40Tax and p27Rex was detected in all five of these mT/NKN cases associated with HTLV-1. As such, these five mT/NKN were rediagnosed as ATLL. In situ hybridization signals for EBV-encoded small nuclear early region-1 were detected in nine cases of mT/NKN, of which five cases of NK-cell lymphoma were found to have cytoplasmic CD3 expression, a CD56 phenotype and positivity of TIA1. According to the new World Health Organization classification, the mT/NKN class includes five cases of ATLL and five cases of NK-cell lymphomas. The five cases of ATLL were of native American extraction from an HTLV-1-endemic area around Jujuy, north-west Argentina.

  11. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  13. Physiologic and Psychological Symptoms Experienced by Adults With Acute Leukemia: An Integrative Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Tara A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To evaluate the current knowledge of symptoms experienced by adults with acute leukemia (AL) and provide evidence to inform practice and research. Data Sources Literature review using an electronic search supplemented by a hand search of current literature reporting the physiologic and/or psychological symptoms of patients with AL was conducted. Data Synthesis Because of the variability found in the methods and specific aims of the articles, a rating system was applied to score how strongly the findings contributed to meeting the aims of the research. This rating system was applied to assist the authors in analyzing the findings. Therefore, the articles that scored lower ultimately contributed less during the analysis phase. Conclusions Knowledge regarding the symptoms experienced by adults undergoing treatment is being slowly evaluated. However, to better understand and subsequently manage these symptoms, longitudinal research examining the symptom trajectories in this population is needed. Implications for Nursing Additional investigation into symptom characteristics will facilitate the development of tailored interventions to manage the temporal characteristics of symptoms for this population. PMID:24769593

  14. Physiologic and psychological symptoms experienced by adults with acute leukemia: an integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tara A

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the current knowledge of symptoms experienced by adults with acute leukemia (AL) and provide evidence to inform practice and research. Literature review using an electronic search supplemented by a hand search of current literature reporting the physiologic and/or psychological symptoms of patients with AL was conducted. Because of the variability found in the methods and specific aims of the articles, a rating system was applied to score how strongly the findings contributed to meeting the aims of the research. This rating system was applied to assist the authors in analyzing the findings. Therefore, the articles that scored lower ultimately contributed less during the analysis phase. Knowledge regarding the symptoms experienced by adults undergoing treatment is being slowly evaluated. However, to better understand and subsequently manage these symptoms, longitudinal research examining the symptom trajectories in this population is needed. Additional investigation into symptom characteristics will facilitate the development of tailored interventions to manage the temporal characteristics of symptoms for this population.

  15. Poor adherence to dietary guidelines among adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Robien, Kim; Ness, Kirsten K; Klesges, Lisa M; Baker, K Scott; Gurney, James G

    2008-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk of obesity and cardiovascular disease, conditions that healthy dietary patterns may help ameliorate or prevent. To evaluate the usual dietary intake of adult survivors of childhood ALL, food frequency questionnaire data were collected from 72 participants, and compared with the 2007 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) Cancer Prevention recommendations, the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, and the 2005 United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Guide. Mean daily energy intake was consistent with estimated requirements; however, mean body mass index was 27.1 kg/m2 (overweight). Dietary index scores averaged fewer than half the possible number of points on all 3 scales, indicating poor adherence to recommended guidelines. No study participant reported complete adherence to any set of guidelines. Although half the participants met minimal daily goals for 5 servings of fruits and vegetables (WCRF/AICR recommendations) and adult survivors of childhood ALL is not concordant with dietary recommendations that may help reduce their risk of obesity, cardiovascular disease, or other treatment-related late effects.

  16. Assessment of the nutritional status of adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia during induction chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Deluche, Elise; Girault, Stephane; Jesus, Pierre; Monzat, Sophie; Turlure, Pascal; Leobon, Sophie; Abraham, Julie; Daly, Nathalie; Dauriac, Olivia; Bordessoule, Dominique

    2017-09-01

    To the best of our knowledge, few studies have evaluated the nutritional status in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) during induction treatment. The aim of this retrospective study was to describe nutritional status of newly diagnosed adult patients with AML at admission and during induction chemotherapy. We included consecutive newly diagnosed adult patients with AML who were admitted to the Department of Hematology (Limoges University Hospital) from April 2010 to January 2014. Nutritional assessment included body mass index (BMI) and weight loss to diagnose undernutrition. Weekly laboratory tests were collected and total energy expenditure was calculated to adapt food intake. Of 95 patients, 14 (15%) presented with undernutrition at admission: low BMI values (P < 0.001) and weight loss >5% for 9.5% patients. After chemotherapy induction, 17 patients (18%) were undernutrition (P = 0.05). Patients without undernutrition had a significantly lower median weight, BMI, and serum albumin level at discharge compared with their admission values (P < 0.05); whereas their serum transthyretin levels were higher (P = 0.03). They also had shorter hospital stays than patients with undernutrition (31 versus 39 d; P = 0.03) and longer survival at 12 mo (89.9 versus 58.3%; P = 0.002). Patients with AML with good nutritional status undergoing induction chemotherapy have shorter hospital stays and longer survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Central Nervous System Involvement in Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Diagnostic Tools, Prophylaxis, and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Maurillo, Luca; Buccisano, Francesco; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Cefalo, Mariagiovanna; De Santis, Giovanna; Di Veroli, Ambra; Ditto, Concetta; Nasso, Daniela; Postorino, Massimiliano; Refrigeri, Marco; Attrotto, Cristina; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Amadori, Sergio; Venditti, Adriano

    2014-01-01

    In adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), Central Nervous System (CNS) involvement is associated with a very poor prognosis. The diagnostic assessment of this condition relies on the use of neuroradiology, conventional cytology (CC) and flow cytometry (FCM). Among these approaches, which is the gold standard it is still a matter of debate. Neuroradiology and CC have a limited sensitivity with a higher rate of false negative results. FCM demonstrated a superior sensitivity over CC, particularly when low levels of CNS infiltrating cells are present. Although prospective studies of a large series of patients are still awaited, a positive finding by FCM appears to anticipate an adverse outcome even if CC shows no infiltration. Current strategies for adult ALL CNS-directed prophylaxis or therapy involve systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy and radiation therapy. An early and frequent intrathecal injection of cytostatic combined with systemic chemotherapy is the most effective strategy to reduce the frequency of CNS involvement. In patients with CNS overt ALL, at diagnosis or upon relapse, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation might be considered. This review discusses risk factors, diagnostic techniques for identification of CNS infiltration and modalities of prophylaxis and therapy to manage it. PMID:25408861

  18. Child-rearing and adult leukemia: Epidemiologic evidence in support of competing hematopoietic stem cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Steven, R.G. ); Severson, R.K. . Japan-Hawaii Cancer Study); Heuser, L. )

    1988-05-01

    The hypothesis that lack of child-rearing increases the risk of acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) in adults was examined in a case-control study in western Washington State. Among 159 study subjects over age 50 in 1985, there were 76 cases of ANLL and 83 controls. The crude odds ratio associated with lack of child-rearing was 1.8, with a 95% confidence range of 0.7 to 5.0. The average total number of children ever living with cases was 2.6 and with controls was 3.1 (p = 0.06). The mean total number of years living with a child, or children, under age 18 was 17.6 in cases and 20.2 in controls (p = 0.05). These results were not materially altered after adjustment for age, smoking, race, income, and sex. The data provide evidence that cases of ANLL were less likely to ever have had children and that fewer years were spent rearing children than were spent by controls. The hypothesis was based on the competing stem cell'' theory of hematopoietic ontogeny. If valid, then exposure to children would increase exposure to infection, leading to increased lymphocytic stem cell turnover, and decreased non-lymphocytic stem cell turnover. This, in turn, may reduce risk of ANLL in adults. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. [Copy number alterations in adult patients with mature B acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with specific immunochemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Ribera, Jordi; Zamora, Lurdes; García, Olga; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús-María; Genescà, Eulàlia; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2016-12-02

    Unlike Burkitt lymphoma, molecular abnormalities other than C-MYC rearrangements have scarcely been studied in patients with mature B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency and prognostic significance of copy number alterations (CNA) in genes involved in lymphoid differentiation, cell cycle and tumor suppression in adult patients with B-ALL. We have analyzed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification the genetic material from bone marrow at diagnosis from 25 adult B-ALL patients treated with rituximab and specific chemotherapy. The most frequent CNA were alterations in the 14q32.33 region (11 cases, 44%) followed by alterations in the cell cycle regulator genes CDKN2A/B and RB1 (16%). No correlation between the presence of specific CNA and the clinical-biologic features or the response to therapy was found. The high frequency of CNA in the 14q32.33 region, CDKN2A/B and RB1 found in our study could contribute to the aggressiveness and invasiveness of mature B-ALL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Rheumatic manifestations preceding adult acute leukemia: characteristics and implication in course and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Gur, H; Koren, V; Ehrenfeld, M; Ben-Bassat, I; Sidi, Y

    1999-03-01

    The manifestations and outcome of adult patients with acute leukemia (AL) were examined to study the characteristics of the rheumatological prodrome of AL and to find whether it is a marker of a distinct clinical and laboratory course and whether it has any prognostic implication. During a 10-year period, 8/139 (5.8%) of AL patients presented with rheumatic manifestations. The average duration of the arthritis syndrome preceding the diagnosis of AL was 3.25 months. The most common pattern of presentation was a reactive arthritis-like syndrome involving the large joints asymmetrically and associated with low back pain. Distinctive features suggesting a paraneoplastic arthritis were severe pain disproportionate to physical findings, a poor response to conventional antirheumatic treatment, and early significant osteopenia or lytic bone lesions. The epidemiological, clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with or without rheumatic manifestations were comparable, except for fever on presentation, the presence of transient metabolic derangement following chemotherapy, and the initial average hemoglobin, hematocrit and serum uric acid values. Moreover, the initial outcome of the two groups was similar, as the early mortality rates were comparable (42.8% vs. 45% for patients with or without arthritis, respectively). In conclusion, rheumatic syndrome presentation of adult AL is uncommon, and apparently has no deleterious effects on initial prognosis. A timely diagnosis requires an increased awareness to distinctive features.

  1. Clinical features and prognostic implications of TCF3-PBX1 and ETV6-RUNX1 in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Burmeister, Thomas; Gökbuget, Nicola; Schwartz, Stefan; Fischer, Lars; Hubert, Daniela; Sindram, Annette; Hoelzer, Dieter; Thiel, Eckhard

    2010-01-01

    Background The t(9;22) and t(4;11) chromosomal translocations, which generate the BCR-ABL and MLL-AF4 fusion genes, define high-risk subtypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults. However, the prognostic impact of other rarer fusion genes is less well established in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia than in the childhood form. Design and Methods In the context of the German Multicenter Therapy Study Group for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GMALL) we used reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to investigate 441 cases of BCR-ABL- and MLL-AF4-negative B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia for the TCF3-PBX1 (E2A-PBX1) and ETV6-RUNX1 (TEL-AML1) fusion transcripts generated by the t(1;19)(q23;p13.3) and t(12;21)(p13;q22) translocations. Both are well-known molecular alterations in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia in which they have favorable prognostic implications. Results We identified 23 adult patients with TCF3-PBX1 and ten with ETV6-RUNX1. In contrast to previous reports we found no significant difference in overall survival between TCF3-PBX1-positive and -negative patients. At 2 years after diagnosis all the ETV6-RUNX1-positive patients were alive and in continuous complete remission, but their long-term outcome was negatively affected by late relapses. TCF3-PBX1-positive patients exhibited a characteristic CD34−/CD33− and mostly cyIg+ immunophenotype. ETV6-RUNX1 only occurred in patients under 35 years old and was associated with a significantly lower white blood count. Conclusions In contrast to previous suggestions, adult patients with TCF3-PBX1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia do not appear to have a worse outcome than their negative counterparts. ETV6-RUNX1-positive patients had a very favorable performance status during the first few years but their long-term survival was negatively affected by late relapses. Both groups of patients are characterized by distinct clinicobiological features which facilitate their

  2. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim Followed by Infusion of Non-HLA Matched Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitors in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. The Mediating Role of Romantic Desolation and Dating Anxiety in the Association Between Interpersonal Competence and Life Satisfaction Among Polish Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Katarzyna; Segrin, Chris

    This study investigates the role of romantic desolation on life satisfaction in young adulthood. Using data from a Polish sample of 330 (205 females and 125 males) young adults aged 20-30, who completed Polish versions of the Satisfaction With Life Scale, Dating Anxiety Scale, Interpersonal Competence Questionnaire-Revised, and Social and Emotional Loneliness Scale for Adults-Short Form, romantic desolation (romantic loneliness and lack of a romantic partner) and dating anxiety were tested as mediators of the association between interpersonal competence and life satisfaction. Results revealed that single individuals reported lower life satisfaction and higher romantic loneliness than did partnered individuals. At the same time, no differences emerged between single and partnered individuals in dating anxiety or interpersonal competence. Structural equation modeling results showed that low interpersonal competence has an indirect effect on romantic desolation through higher levels of dating anxiety. Also, dating anxiety had an indirect effect on lower life satisfaction through increased romantic desolation. These results highlight the important role of dating anxiety and romantic desolation for explaining why low interpersonal competence is associated with diminished life satisfaction in young adults.

  4. Bioelectrical Impedance Measurement for Predicting Treatment Outcome in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-14

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker telmisartan induces apoptosis and autophagy in adult T-cell leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Kozako, Tomohiro; Soeda, Shuhei; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Arima, Naomichi; Kuroki, Ayako; Hirata, Shinya; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Imakyure, Osamu; Tone, Nanako; Honda, Shin-Ichiro; Soeda, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), an aggressive T-cell malignancy that develops after long-term infection with human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1), requires new treatments. Drug repositioning, reuse of a drug previously approved for the treatment of another condition to treat ATL, offers the possibility of reduced time and risk. Among clinically available angiotensin II receptor blockers, telmisartan is well known for its unique ability to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, which plays various roles in lipid metabolism, cellular differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, telmisartan reduced cell viability and enhanced apoptotic cells via caspase activation in ex vivo peripheral blood monocytes from asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers (ACs) or via caspase-independent cell death in acute-type ATL, which has a poor prognosis. Telmisartan also induced significant growth inhibition and apoptosis in leukemia cell lines via caspase activation, whereas other angiotensin II receptor blockers did not induce cell death. Interestingly, telmisartan increased the LC3-II-enriched protein fraction, indicating autophagosome accumulation and autophagy. Thus, telmisartan simultaneously caused caspase activation and autophagy. A hypertension medication with antiproliferation effects on primary and leukemia cells is intriguing. Patients with an early diagnosis of ATL are generally monitored until the disease progresses; thus, suppression of progression from AC and indolent ATL to acute ATL is important. Our results suggest that telmisartan is highly effective against primary cells and leukemia cell lines in caspase-dependent and -independent manners, and its clinical use may suppress acute transformation and improve prognosis of patients with this mortal disease. This is the first report demonstrating a cell growth-inhibitory effect of telmisartan in fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leukemia patients.

  6. Comparative study of quality of life of adult survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia and Wilms’ tumor

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Clélia Marta Casellato; Cristofani, Lilian Maria; Cornacchioni, Ana Lucia Beltrati; Odone, Vicente; Kuczynski, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To analyze and compare the health-related quality of life of adult survivors of acute lymphocytic leukemia and Wilms’ tumor amongst themselves and in relation to healthy participants. Methods Ninety participants aged above 18 years were selected and divided into three groups, each comprising 30 individuals. The Control Group was composed of physically healthy subjects, with no cancer history; and there were two experimental groups: those diagnosed as acute lymphocytic leukemia, and those as Wilms’ Tumor. Quality of life was assessed over the telephone, using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. Results Male survivors presented with better results as compared to female survivors and controls in the Vitality domain, for acute lymphocytic leukemia (p=0.042) and Wilms’ tumor (p=0.013). For acute lymphocytic leukemia survivors, in Social aspects (p=0.031), Mental health (p=0.041), and Emotional aspects (p=0.040), the latter also for survivors of Wilms’ tumor (p=0.040). The best results related to the Functional capacity domain were recorded for the experimental group that had a late diagnosis of acute lymphocytic leukemia. There were significant differences between groups except for the Social and Emotional domains for self-perceived health, with positive responses that characterized their health as good, very good, and excellent. Conclusion Survivors of acute lymphocytic leukemia showed no evidence of relevant impairment of health-related quality of life. The Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (via telephone) can be a resource to access and evaluate survivors. PMID:26537509

  7. Structure-activity relationship of 9-methylstreptimidone, a compound that induces apoptosis selectively in adult T-cell leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Takeiri, Masatoshi; Ota, Eisuke; Nishiyama, Shigeru; Kiyota, Hiromasa; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that 9-methylstreptimidone, a piperidine compound isolated from a culture filtrate of Streptomyces, induces apoptosis selectively in adult T-cell leukemia cells. It was screened for a compound that inhibits LPS-induced NF-kappaB and NO production in mouse macrophages. However, 9-methystreptimidone is poorly obtained from the producing microorganism and difficult to synthesize. Therefore, in the present research, we studied the structure-activity relationship to look for new selective inhibitors. We found that the structure of the unsaturated hydrophobic portion of 9-methylstreptimidone was essential for the inhibition of LPS-induced NO production. Among the 9-methylstreptimidone-related compounds tested, (+/-)-4,alpha-diepi-streptovitacin A inhibited NO production in macrophage-like cells as potently as 9-methylstreptimidone and without cellular toxicity. Moreover, this compound selectively induced apoptosis in adult T-cell leukemia MT-1 cells.

  8. Absence of gain-of-function JAK1 and JAK3 mutations in adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kameda, T; Shide, K; Shimoda, H K; Hidaka, T; Kubuki, Y; Katayose, K; Taniguchi, Y; Sekine, M; Kamiunntenn, A; Maeda, K; Nagata, K; Matsunaga, T; Shimoda, K

    2010-09-01

    Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) and JAK3 plays a critical role in lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation. Somatic JAK1 mutations are found in 18% of adult precursor T acute lymphoblastic leukemias and somatic JAK3 mutations are found in 3.3% of cutaneous T cell lymphomas. Some of the mutations are confirmed as a gain-of-function mutation and are assumed to be involved in leukemogenesis. Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a type of T cell neoplasm, and activation of JAK/STAT pathways is sometimes observed in them. We investigated JAK1 and JAK3 mutations in 20 ATLL patients. No JAK1 mutations were found, and five types of single nucleotide polymorphisms were observed in 12 cases, whose frequencies almost match those in Asian populations. As for JAK3, a synonymous mutation was found in one case. JAK1 and JAK3 mutations are unlikely involved in the leukemogenesis of ATLL.

  9. Soy-derived isoflavones inhibit the growth of adult T-cell leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Masao; Fujita, Satoshi; Ishiyama, Erina; Mukai, Ayako; Madhyastha, Harishkumar; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Hatakeyama, Kinta; Nemoto, Takayuki; Morishita, Kazuhiro; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Nishiyama, Kazuo

    2007-11-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia occurs in human T-lymphotropic virus type I-infected individuals and is endemic to the south-western area of Kyushu in Japan. In this communication, we examined the effect of soy isoflavones on the growth of adult T-cell leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro study, daidzein and genistein but not glycitein significantly inhibited the proliferation of ED-40515 and Hut102 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Among the isoflavones studied, genistein had the highest growth-inhibitory effect; however, genistein did not exert an apparent growth-inhibitory effect on Jurkat and Molt-4 cells, which were non-adult T-cell leukemia cells. Genistein prevented the G(1)/S or G(2)/M transition at 3 and 10 or 30 microM, respectively. Genistein upregulated p21 protein expression together with p53 accumulation. In addition, treatment with 30 microM genistein strongly induced phosphorylation of checkpoint kinase (CHK) 2 and p53 at serines 15, 20 and 37. Caffeine, an inhibitor of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated protein kinase, alleviated the genistein-induced p53 and CHK2 phosphorylation, suggesting the involvement of DNA damage at 30 microM. However, marked phosphorylation of CHK2 and p53 could not be detected at 3 and 10 microM genistein. These data indicate that genistein has biphasic growth-inhibitory properties. The in vivo studies demonstrated that soy-derived isoflavones significantly inhibit ED-40515 cell growth and infiltration into various organs in non-obese diabetic severe combined-immunodeficiency common gamma-chain knockout mice. Taken together, it is evident that soy isoflavones might serve as a promising compound for the treatment of adult T-cell leukemia.

  10. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  11. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Ixazomib (MLN9708) in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. AKT Inhibitor MK-2206 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Valspodar in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Lenalidomide and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-12

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Bortezomib, Mitoxantrone, Etoposide, and Cytarabine in Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-12

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Vorinostat and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-30

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Oncogenetics and minimal residual disease are independent outcome predictors in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Beldjord, Kheira; Chevret, Sylvie; Asnafi, Vahid; Huguet, Françoise; Boulland, Marie-Laure; Leguay, Thibaut; Thomas, Xavier; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Grardel, Nathalie; Chalandon, Yves; Boissel, Nicolas; Schaefer, Beat; Delabesse, Eric; Cavé, Hélène; Chevallier, Patrice; Buzyn, Agnès; Fest, Thierry; Reman, Oumedaly; Vernant, Jean-Paul; Lhéritier, Véronique; Béné, Marie C; Lafage, Marina; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2014-06-12

    With intensified pediatric-like therapy and genetic disease dissection, the field of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has evolved recently. In this new context, we aimed to reassess the value of conventional risk factors with regard to new genetic alterations and early response to therapy, as assessed by immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor minimal residual disease (MRD) levels. The study was performed in 423 younger adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL in first remission (265 B-cell precursor [BCP] and 158 T-cell ALL), with cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) as the primary end point. In addition to conventional risk factors, the most frequent currently available genetic alterations were included in the analysis. A higher specific hazard of relapse was independently associated with postinduction MRD level ≥10(-4) and unfavorable genetic characteristics (ie, MLL gene rearrangement or focal IKZF1 gene deletion in BCP-ALL and no NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutation and/or N/K-RAS mutation and/or PTEN gene alteration in T-cell ALL). These 2 factors allowed definition of a new risk classification that is strongly associated with higher CIR and shorter relapse-free and overall survival. These results indicate that genetic abnormalities are important predictors of outcome in adult ALL not fully recapitulated by early response to therapy. Patients included in this study were treated in the multicenter GRAALL-2003 and GRAALL-2005 trials. Both trials were registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00222027 and #NCT00327678, respectively.

  20. Survival of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Germany and the United States.

    PubMed

    Pulte, Dianne; Jansen, Lina; Gondos, Adam; Katalinic, Alexander; Barnes, Benjamin; Ressing, Meike; Holleczek, Bernd; Eberle, Andrea; Brenner, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Adulthood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a rare disease. In contrast to childhood ALL, survival for adults with ALL is poor. Recently, new protocols, including use of pediatric protocols in young adults, have improved survival in clinical trials. Here, we examine population level survival in Germany and the United States (US) to gain insight into the extent to which changes in clinical trials have translated into better survival on the population level. Data were extracted from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database in the US and 11 cancer registries in Germany. Patients age 15-69 diagnosed with ALL were included. Period analysis was used to estimate 5-year relative survival (RS). Overall 5-year RS was estimated at 43.4% for Germany and 35.5% for the US (p = 0.004), with a decrease in survival with increasing age. Survival was higher in Germany than the US for men (43.6% versus 37.7%, p = 0.002) but not for women (42.4% versus 40.3%, p>0.1). Five-year RS estimates increased in Germany and the US between 2002 and 2006 by 11.8 and 7.3 percent units, respectively (p = 0.02 and 0.04, respectively). Survival for adults with ALL continues to be low compared with that for children, but a substantial increase in 5-year survival estimates was seen from 2002 to 2006 in both Germany and the US. The reasons for the survival differences between both countries require clarification.

  1. Racial disparities in the survival of American children, adolescents, and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, and Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Justine M; Keegan, Theresa H M; Tao, Li; Abrahão, Renata; Bleyer, Archie; Viny, Aaron D

    2016-09-01

    Race-based survival in children and adolescents with hematologic malignancies has been a national challenge for decades. Large-scale investigations of age- and race-based survival trends over time in these patients have not previously been reported. The objective of this study was to investigate whether race- and age-related differences in pediatric and adolescent and young adult (AYA) leukemia and lymphoma survival persist and to what extent these differences have changed over time. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, this study investigated the outcomes of black and white (1975-2012; n = 27,369) and white and Hispanic (1992-2012; n = 20,574) children (0-14 years old) and AYAs (15-39 years old) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Estimates of 5- and 10-year relative survival were compared over time. Trends showed a convergence of survival for white and black children with ALL but a divergence in survival for AYA patients. Hispanic children and AYAs both suffered inferior outcomes. Trends for AML revealed persistent survival differences between black and white children and suggested worsening disparities for AYAs. Survival trends in HL revealed sustained survival differences between black and white AYA patients, whereas no differences were found in Hispanic and white patient outcomes for AML or HL. Although survival for children and AYAs with ALL, AML, and HL has improved over the past 4 decades, differences persist between black, white, and Hispanic children and AYAs; survival disparities between black and white children with ALL have been nearly eliminated. Strategies aimed at identifying causality and reducing disparities are warranted. Cancer 2016. © 2016 American Cancer Society. Cancer 2016;122:2723-2730. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  2. Prognostic Significance of the European LeukemiaNet Standardized System for Reporting Cytogenetic and Molecular Alterations in Adults With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mrózek, Krzysztof; Marcucci, Guido; Nicolet, Deedra; Maharry, Kati S.; Becker, Heiko; Whitman, Susan P.; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Schwind, Sebastian; Wu, Yue-Zhong; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Pettenati, Mark J.; Heerema, Nyla A.; Block, AnneMarie W.; Patil, Shivanand R.; Baer, Maria R.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Moore, Joseph O.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Stone, Richard M.; Larson, Richard A.; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the prognostic significance of the international European LeukemiaNet (ELN) guidelines for reporting genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients and Methods We analyzed 1,550 adults with primary AML, treated on Cancer and Leukemia Group B first-line trials, who had pretreatment cytogenetics and, for cytogenetically normal patients, mutational status of NPM1, CEBPA, and FLT3 available. We compared complete remission (CR) rates, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) among patients classified into the four ELN genetic groups (favorable, intermediate-I, intermediate-II, adverse) separately for 818 younger (age < 60 years) and 732 older (age ≥ 60 years) patients. Results The percentages of younger versus older patients in the favorable (41% v 20%; P < .001), intermediate-II (19% v 30%; P < .001), and adverse (22% v 31%; P < .001) genetic groups differed. The favorable group had the best and the adverse group the worst CR rates, DFS, and OS in both age groups. Both intermediate groups had significantly worse outcomes than the favorable but better than the adverse group. Intermediate-I and intermediate-II groups in older patients had similar outcomes, whereas the intermediate-II group in younger patients had better OS but not better CR rates or DFS than the intermediate-I group. The prognostic significance of ELN classification was confirmed by multivariable analyses. For each ELN group, older patients had worse outcomes than younger patients. Conclusion The ELN classification clearly separates the genetic groups by outcome, supporting its use for risk stratification in clinical trials. Because they have different proportions of genetic alterations and outcomes, younger and older patients should be reported separately when using the ELN classification. PMID:22987078

  3. Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  4. WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775 With or Without Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Therapeutic Allogeneic Lymphocytes and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With High-Risk or Recurrent Myeloid Leukemia After Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Low-level ionizing radiation and human leukemia: Juvenile and adult dichotomy. Technical report, January 1984-April 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, E.J.; Zemel, B.S.; Hickey, R.J.; Allen, I.E.; Junker, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Human leukemia mortality rates for 43 urban populations (cities) of the United States, 1957-1964, were analyzed against several environmental variables using mean annual rates per 100,000 persons for all ages, and for two age subsets. One subset involves rates for persons <25 years; the other involves rates for persons >25 years. Among environmental variables examined were natural background levels of ionizing radiation (RA); mean atmospheric concentrations of several common air pollutant chemicals, and several socio-economic variables. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between RA level and leukemia mortality rate for those <25 years of age. In contrast, for those >25 years, the correlation was weak and negative. Comparably, the correlation between atmospheric vanadium levels and leukemia mortality rates for those <25 years was significantly negative, while the correlation with rates for those >25 years was significantly positive. Other such contrasts were found, as for atmospheric nickel and for sulfate, and for water hardness. Such results are compatible with findings of others, and support the hypothesis that the etiologies of juvenile and adult-onset leukemias are quite different. Possible foundations for these differences are considered.

  7. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  8. Bortezomib, Daunorubicin, and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Tipifarnib and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Early Discharge and Outpatients Care in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Previously Treated With Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Maintenance therapy with decitabine in younger adults with acute myeloid leukemia in first remission: a phase 2 Cancer and Leukemia Group B study (CALGB 10503)

    PubMed Central

    Blum, William; Sanford, Ben L.; Klisovic, Rebecca; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Uy, Geoffrey; Powell, Bayard L.; Stock, Wendy; Baer, Maria R.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Wang, Eunice S.; Hoke, Eva; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Geyer, Susan; Marcucci, Guido; Stone, Richard M.; Larson, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    In this prospective phase 2 clinical trial conducted by Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB, now the Alliance), we studied decitabine as maintenance therapy for younger adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who remained in first complete remission (CR1) following intensive induction and consolidation. Given that decitabine is clinically active in AML and with hypomethylating activity distinct from cytotoxic chemotherapy, we hypothesized that one year of maintenance therapy would improve disease-free survival (DFS) for AML patients <60 years who did not receive allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloHCT) in CR1. After blood count recovery from final consolidation, patients received decitabine at 20mg/m2 IV daily for 4–5 days, every 6 weeks for 8 cycles. One-hundred-thirty-four patients received decitabine, 85 (63%) had favorable risk AML. The median number of cycles received was 7 (range, 1–8), and the primary reason for discontinuation was relapse. DFS at 1-year and 3-years was 79% and 54%, respectively. These results are similar to the outcomes in the historical control comprised of similar patients treated on recent CALGB trials. Thus, maintenance with decitabine provided no benefit overall. Standard use of decitabine maintenance in younger AML patients in CR1 is not warranted. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00416598. PMID:27624549

  12. Maintenance therapy with decitabine in younger adults with acute myeloid leukemia in first remission: a phase 2 Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study (CALGB 10503).

    PubMed

    Blum, W; Sanford, B L; Klisovic, R; DeAngelo, D J; Uy, G; Powell, B L; Stock, W; Baer, M R; Kolitz, J E; Wang, E S; Hoke, E; Mrózek, K; Kohlschmidt, J; Bloomfield, C D; Geyer, S; Marcucci, G; Stone, R M; Larson, R A

    2017-01-01

    In this prospective phase 2 clinical trial conducted by Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB, now the Alliance), we studied decitabine as maintenance therapy for younger adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who remained in first complete remission (CR1) following intensive induction and consolidation. Given that decitabine is clinically active in AML and with hypomethylating activity distinct from cytotoxic chemotherapy, we hypothesized that 1 year of maintenance therapy would improve disease-free survival (DFS) for AML patients <60 years, who did not receive allogeneic stem cell transplantation in CR1. After blood count recovery from final consolidation, patients received decitabine at 20 mg/m(2) intravenously daily for 4-5 days, every 6 weeks for eight cycles. One hundred and thirty-four patients received decitabine and 85 (63%) had favorable risk AML. The median number of cycles received was 7 (range: 1-8) and the primary reason for discontinuation was relapse. DFS at 1 year and 3 years was 79% and 54%, respectively. These results are similar to the outcomes in the historical control comprising similar patients treated on recent CALGB trials. Thus, maintenance with decitabine provided no benefit overall. Standard use of decitabine maintenance in younger AML patients in CR1 is not warranted. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00416598.

  13. Clofarabine and Melphalan Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplasia, Acute Leukemia in Remission, or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-13

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Therapy-Related Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  14. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  15. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  16. Transition of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma clones during clinical progression.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Sakura; Firouzi, Sanaz; López, Yosvany; Yamochi, Tadanori; Nakano, Kazumi; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Utusnomiya, Atae; Iwanaga, Masako; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2016-09-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a peripheral T-cell neoplasm caused by the transformation of HTLV-1-infected T cells. ATLL, especially its aggressive form, is known for its poor prognosis, even with intensive chemotherapy. ATLL cells are considered to be monoclonal; however, multiclonal proliferation or emergence of a new clone over time has been reported based on Southern blot analysis, although direct molecular evidence remains elusive. Furthermore, it is thought that clonal change may be a cause of early drug resistance in ATLL. To directly analyze potential clonal changes in ATLL during its clinical course, we used inverse PCR to detect integration sites in combination with a newly developed method using next-generation sequencing, and compared ATLL cell clonality at different time points. The results of inverse PCR indicated that the major clone was altered in three of 19 patients. Together with results from five patients, using this new method, we found direct evidence of clonal change occurring during the clinical course or in response to chemotherapy in ATLL. These results also highlight the importance of clonality analysis for understanding the mechanisms of ATLL development and drug resistance.

  17. Defective epidermal innate immunity and resultant superficial dermatophytosis in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Yu; Nakamura, Motonobu; Kabashima-Kubo, Rieko; Shimauchi, Takatoshi; Kobayashi, Miwa; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2012-07-15

    Superficial dermatophytosis is quite commonly seen in patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), as approximately 50% of the patients develop cutaneous mycotic infections. Because superficially infected fungi in the stratum corneum of the epidermis cannot directly contact with T cells infiltrating in the upper dermis, some perturbation of epidermal innate immunity has been postulated. Interleukin (IL)-17-producing helper T cells (Th17) can induce the keratinocyte production of antimicrobial peptides such as human β defensin (HBD)-2 and LL-37, which play an essential role in cutaneous innate immunity. We investigated the frequency of circulating Th17 cells, serum levels of cytokines, and epidermal expression of HBD-1, 2, 3, and LL-37 in ATLL patients with or without superficial dermatophytosis. The frequency of peripheral Th17 cells and the serum level of IL-17 was significantly decreased in ATLL patients, whereas the serum IL-10 and TGF-β1 levels were increased as compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, ATLL patients with dermatophytosis had higher IL-10 and TGF-β1 levels and lower IL-17 levels than did those without dermatophytosis. Immunohistochemical study revealed that the epidermal expression of both HBD-2 and LL-37 were significantly lower in ATLL patients with dermatophytosis than in non-ATLL patients with dermatophytosis. Taken together, these results suggest that the keratinocyte production of antimicrobial peptides promoted by Th17 cells is reduced in ATLL patients, leading to the perturbed innate immunity and the frequent occurrence of superficial dermatophytosis.

  18. Blinatumomab vs historical standard therapy of adult relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gökbuget, N; Kelsh, M; Chia, V; Advani, A; Bassan, R; Dombret, H; Doubek, M; Fielding, A K; Giebel, S; Haddad, V; Hoelzer, D; Holland, C; Ifrah, N; Katz, A; Maniar, T; Martinelli, G; Morgades, M; O'Brien, S; Ribera, J-M; Rowe, J M; Stein, A; Topp, M; Wadleigh, M; Kantarjian, H

    2016-09-23

    We compared outcomes from a single-arm study of blinatumomab in adult patients with B-precursor Ph-negative relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (R/R ALL) with a historical data set from Europe and the United States. Estimates of complete remission (CR) and overall survival (OS) were weighted by the frequency distribution of prognostic factors in the blinatumomab trial. Outcomes were also compared between the trial and historical data using propensity score methods. The historical cohort included 694 patients with CR data and 1112 patients with OS data compared with 189 patients with CR and survival data in the blinatumomab trial. The weighted analysis revealed a CR rate of 24% (95% CI: 20-27%) and a median OS of 3.3 months (95% CI: 2.8-3.6) in the historical cohort compared with a CR/CRh rate of 43% (95% CI: 36-50%) and a median OS of 6.1 months (95% CI: 4.2-7.5) in the blinatumomab trial. Propensity score analysis estimated increased odds of CR/CRh (OR=2.68, 95% CI: 1.67-4.31) and improved OS (HR=0.536, 95% CI: 0.394-0.730) with blinatumomab. The analysis demonstrates the application of different study designs and statistical methods to compare novel therapies for R/R ALL with historical data.

  19. [Current indications of allogeneic stem cell transplant in adults with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Thomas, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is an increasingly important therapeutic option for the treatment of adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Here we review the current indications of SCT in this disease. While patients with favorable cytogenetics should receive consolidation chemotherapy, patients with unfavorable karyotype are prime candidates for SCT or new approaches to SCT (which should be done in first complete remission). Patients with intermediate prognoses should also receive SCT in first complete remission. In the absence of a suitable matched related donor, most patients will be able to find an alternative donor to proceed to a potentially curative allogeneic transplantation. The use of reduced-intensity conditioning regimens before SCT has allowed patients in the sixth or seventh decades of life to be routinely transplanted. Despite major differences among transplant centers in the intensity and composition of the conditioning regimen and immunosuppression, choice of graft source, postgraft immune-modulation, and supportive care, there has been a dramatic improvement in terms of tolerance. Although it is presumed to be a curative strategy, major complications of SCT remain graft-versus-host disease, delayed immune recovery, multiple comorbidities, and relapse after transplant.

  20. HTLV-I-associated peripheral neuropathy with smoldering-type adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hideaki; Udaka, Fukashi; Kubori, Tamotsu; Oda, Masaya; Nishinaka, Kazuto; Oka, Nobuyuki

    2006-03-01

    Peripheral neuropathy with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) has seldom been reported. A 69-year-old woman with smoldering-type ATLL presented with pain and muscle weakness of the bilateral upper and lower limbs and gait disturbance. Anti-human T lymphotropic virus type I antibody was positive in the serum but negative in the cerebrospinal fluid. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no abnormal signals in the spinal cord or brain. Nerve conduction studies disclosed severe peripheral neuropathy. Sural nerve biopsy disclosed both axonal degeneration and demyelinated fibers, and marked perivascular inflammatory infiltrates mainly consisting of T lymphocytes without malignant changes were seen. Steroid therapy was markedly effective, and the patient became able to walk without assistance. This is the first reported case of ATLL and peripheral neuropathy in which a nerve biopsy was performed. In our patient, the marked perivascular inflammatory infiltrates mainly consisting of T lymphocytes suggested either immune-mediated vasculitis or tumor invasion. Further studies are needed.

  1. Are we curing more older adults with acute myeloid leukemia with allogeneic transplantation in CR1?

    PubMed

    Finn, Laura E; Foran, James M

    2016-03-01

    Despite the fact that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is most common in older adults aged at least 60 years, curative therapy remains elusive in this population. Here we examine the data for predicting which patients are candidates for 'curative therapy', available therapeutic options, and the utilization of reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation in first remission. Incorporation of geriatric assessment tools to assess patient frailty, in addition to evaluation of comorbid conditions, improves patient selection for intense therapy. The majority of patients eligible for and treated with induction chemotherapy achieve complete remission, and overall survival in the older AML population is superior after allogeneic stem cell transplant. However, population-based studies continue to demonstrate the undertreatment or lack of treatment of older AML patients. New patient assessment tools, ability to offer more successful outcomes after induction chemotherapy, and improved survival after allogeneic transplantation has not yet translated to increased 'curative' treatment on a population level of older AML patients. It is critical that the tools and therapies available be put into practice while older patient enrollment in well designed therapeutic clinical trials which include the option of allogeneic transplantation is increased.

  2. The first report of familial adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Prates, V; Cobos, M; Bouzas, B; Napal, J; Bordone, J; Milone, J

    2000-03-01

    Here we describe two Caucasian brothers who developed adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), within a short period of time. These two patients have never left Argentina. Their parents are dead and according to the family history it is possible that the mother may have been affected by spastic paraparesis. The daughters reported that their mother had suffered from increasing difficulty in walking for many years which finally made it impossible for to her walk. There are no other data to support the presumptive diagnosis. One of the patients presented with acute disease while the other had a lymphoma type disorder. Both were positive for HTLV 1. The first patient died with disease progression ten months after diagnosis and the second is in partial remission 13 months after diagnosis. Immunophenotyping showed CD4+, CD5+, CD3+, CD2+, CD8 (-). Two asymptomatic brothers with positive HTLV 1 serology were detected. This is the first family case that has been reported in Argentina.

  3. Mogamulizumab for the treatment of relapsed or refractory adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Winsett, Frank T; Lewis, Daniel J; Duvic, Madeleine

    2017-09-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) is an aggressive variant of peripheral T-cell lymphoma of CD4+ T-malignant cells caused by human T-lymphotropic virus type-1. Despite aggressive treatment with multidrug combination chemotherapies, ATL confers a poor prognosis and commonly develops resistance to conventional treatments. Areas covered: Mogamulizumab is a humanized, defucosylated monoclonal antibody that acts by targeting the CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) on malignant cells of ATL. In phase I and II clinical trials, it has achieved overall response rates of 31-50% in CCR4+ malignancies. The most commonly observed hematologic and non-hematologic adverse events included lymphocytopenia, neutropenia, leukocytopenia, infusion reaction, rash, and pyrexia. Expert commentary: Mogamulizumab has shown significant efficacy in treating ATL with moderately high response rates and has been approved in Japan for use in ATL. It may serve as a bridge therapy to achieve disease control prior to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It also offers potential for use in combination with conventional chemotherapy. Determining the optimal combination of mogamulizumab with conventional and novel therapies remains an important strategy to improve the prognosis of patients with ATL.

  4. Genetic predisposition to myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia in children and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Babushok, Daria V.; Bessler, Monica; Olson, Timothy S.

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal blood disorder characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, cytopenias, dysplasia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). With the growing availability of clinical genetic testing, there is an increasing appreciation that a number of genetic predisposition syndromes may underlie apparent de novo presentations of MDS/AML, particularly in children and young adults. Recent findings of clonal hematopoiesis in acquired aplastic anemia add another facet to our understanding of the mechanisms of MDS/AML predisposition. As more predisposition syndromes are recognized, it is becoming increasingly important for hematologists and oncologists to have familiarity with the common as well as emerging syndromes, and to have a systematic approach to diagnosis and screening of at risk patient populations. Here, we provide a practical algorithm for approaching a patient with a suspected MDS/AML predisposition, and provide an in-depth review of the established and emerging familial MDS/AML syndromes caused by mutations in the ANKRD26, CEBPA, DDX41, ETV6, GATA2, RUNX1, SRP72 genes. Finally, we discuss recent data on the role of somatic mutations in malignant transformation in acquired aplastic anemia, and review the practical aspects of MDS/AML management in patients and families with predisposition syndromes. PMID:26693794

  5. Geriatric assessment predicts survival for older adults receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D; Geiger, Ann M; Tooze, Janet A; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Williamson, Jeff D; Pardee, Timothy S; Ellis, Leslie R; Powell, Bayard L

    2013-05-23

    We investigated the predictive value of geriatric assessment (GA) on overall survival (OS) for older adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Consecutive patients ≥ 60 years with newly diagnosed AML and planned intensive chemotherapy were enrolled at a single institution. Pretreatment GA included evaluation of cognition, depression, distress, physical function (PF) (self-reported and objectively measured), and comorbidity. Objective PF was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB, timed 4-m walk, chair stands, standing balance) and grip strength. Cox proportional hazards models were fit for each GA measure as a predictor of OS. Among 74 patients, the mean age was 70 years, and 78.4% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score ≤ 1. OS was significantly shorter for participants who screened positive for impairment in cognition and objectively measured PF. Adjusting for age, gender, ECOG score, cytogenetic risk group, myelodysplastic syndrome, and hemoglobin, impaired cognition (Modified Mini-Mental State Exam < 77) and impaired objective PF (SPPB < 9) were associated with worse OS. GA methods, with a focus on cognitive and PF, improve risk stratification and may inform interventions to improve outcomes for older AML patients.

  6. Geriatric assessment predicts survival for older adults receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Ann M.; Tooze, Janet A.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Pardee, Timothy S.; Ellis, Leslie R.; Powell, Bayard L.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the predictive value of geriatric assessment (GA) on overall survival (OS) for older adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Consecutive patients ≥ 60 years with newly diagnosed AML and planned intensive chemotherapy were enrolled at a single institution. Pretreatment GA included evaluation of cognition, depression, distress, physical function (PF) (self-reported and objectively measured), and comorbidity. Objective PF was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB, timed 4-m walk, chair stands, standing balance) and grip strength. Cox proportional hazards models were fit for each GA measure as a predictor of OS. Among 74 patients, the mean age was 70 years, and 78.4% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score ≤ 1. OS was significantly shorter for participants who screened positive for impairment in cognition and objectively measured PF. Adjusting for age, gender, ECOG score, cytogenetic risk group, myelodysplastic syndrome, and hemoglobin, impaired cognition (Modified Mini-Mental State Exam < 77) and impaired objective PF (SPPB < 9) were associated with worse OS. GA methods, with a focus on cognitive and PF, improve risk stratification and may inform interventions to improve outcomes for older AML patients. PMID:23550038

  7. HTLV-I infection and adult T-cell leukemia in Brazil: an overview.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, M do S; Hamerschlak, N; Chiattone, C; Loureiro, P

    1996-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic Virus Type I (HTLV-I) is the etiologic factor for adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). HTLV-I infection can also lead to other diseases, such as HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), uveitis, arthropathy and infectious dermatitis. Studies of the infectious mode of transmission of HTLV-I and risk factors for HTLV-I-related diseases have been conducted in several countries, and differences in the prevalence, age patterns, ethnic groups and clinical presentation of the related diseases have been described worldwide. Based on the geographical characteristics of Brazil and data from the literature, we have summarized the distribution of seroprevalence in blood donors in different states around the country, as well as the incidence of ATL in regards to the endemic foci. ATL in Brazil has the same characteristics as those described elsewhere, but is reported more frequently at a younger age. In order to better evaluate ATL in Brazil, a registry has been established at the several hematologic centers under the sponsorship of the instituto Nacional de Cancer and the Brazilian Society of Hematology and Hemotherapy, for the purpose of recording all cases originally diagnosed in Brazil.

  8. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-02

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Reduced cardiorespiratory fitness in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tonorezos, Emily S; Snell, Peter G; Moskowitz, Chaya S; Eshelman-Kent, Debra A; Liu, Jennifer E; Chou, Joanne F; Smith, Stephanie M; Dunn, Andrea L; Church, Timothy S; Oeffinger, Kevin C

    2013-08-01

    Adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased cardiovascular risk. Studies of factors including treatment exposures that may modify risk of low cardiorespiratory fitness in this population have been limited. To assess cardiorespiratory fitness, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) was measured in 115 ALL survivors (median age, 23.5 years; range 18-37). We compared VO2 max measurements for ALL survivors to those estimated from submaximal testing in a frequency-matched (age, gender, race/ethnicity) 2003-2004 National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) cohort. Multivariable linear regression models were constructed to evaluate the association between therapeutic exposures and outcomes of interest. Compared to NHANES participants, ALL survivors had a substantially lower VO2 max (mean 30.7 vs. 39.9 ml/kg/min; adjusted P < 0.0001). For any given percent total body fat, ALL survivors had an 8.9 ml/kg/min lower VO2 max than NHANES participants. For key treatment exposure groups (cranial radiotherapy [CRT], anthracycline chemotherapy, or neither), ALL survivors had substantially lower VO2 max compared with NHANES participants (all comparisons, P < 0.001). Almost two-thirds (66.7%) of ALL survivors were classified as low cardiorespiratory fitness compared with 26.3% of NHANES participants (adjusted P < 0.0001). In multivariable models including only ALL survivors, treatment exposures were modestly associated with VO2 max. Among females, CRT was associated with low VO2 max (P = 0.02), but anthracycline exposure was not (P = 0.58). In contrast, among males, anthracycline exposure ≥ 100 mg/m(2) was associated with low VO2 max (P = 0.03), but CRT was not (P = 0.54). Adult survivors of childhood ALL have substantially lower levels of cardiorespiratory fitness compared with a similarly aged non-cancer population. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Adult T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Betty Ky; Rybicki, Lisa; Abounader, Donna; Adekola, Kehinde; Advani, Anjali; Aldoss, Ibrahim; Bachanova, Veronika; Bashey, Asad; Brown, Stacey; DeLima, Marcos; Devine, Steven; Flowers, Christopher R; Ganguly, Siddharth; Jagasia, Madan; Kennedy, Vanessa E; Kim, Dennis Dong Hwan; McGuirk, Joseph; Pullarkat, Vinod; Romee, Rizwan; Sandhu, Karamjeet; Smith, Melody; Ueda, Masumi; Viswabandya, Auro; Vu, Khoan; Wall, Sarah; Zeichner, Simon B; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Majhail, Navneet S

    2017-07-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is recommended for patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) in second or later complete remission (CR) and high-risk patients in first CR. Given its relative rarity, data on outcomes of HCT for T-ALL are limited. We conducted a multicenter retrospective cohort study using data from 208 adult patients who underwent HCT between 2000 and 2014 to describe outcomes of allogeneic HCT for T-ALL in the contemporary era. The median age at HCT was 37 years, and the majority of patients underwent HCT in CR, using total body irradiation (TBI)-based myeloablative conditioning regimens. One-quarter of the patients underwent alternative donor HCT using a mismatched, umbilical cord blood, or haploidentical donor. With a median follow up of 38 months, overall survival at 5 years was 34%. The corresponding cumulative incidence of non-relapse mortality and relapse was 26% and 41%, respectively. In multivariable analysis, factors significantly associated with overall survival were the use of TBI (HR, 0.57; P = .021), age >35 years (HR, 1.55; P = .025), and disease status at HCT (HR, 1.98; P = .005 for relapsed/refractory disease compared with CR). Relapse was the most common cause of death (58% of patients). Allogeneic HCT remains a potentially curative option in selected patients with adult T-ALL, although relapse is a major cause of treatment failure. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Feasibility of Inpatient Geriatric Assessment for Older Adults Receiving Induction Chemotherapy for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Klepin, Heidi D.; Geiger, Ann M.; Tooze, Janet A.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Ellis, Leslie R.; Levitan, Denise; Pardee, Timothy S.; Isom, Scott; Powell, Bayard L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To test the feasibility and utility of a bedside geriatric assessment (GA) to detect impairment in multiple geriatric domains in older adults initiating chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). DESIGN Prospective observational cohort study. SETTING Single academic institution. PARTICIPANTS Individuals aged 60 and older with newly diagnosed AML and planned chemotherapy. MEASUREMENTS Bedside GA was performed during inpatient exmination for AML. GA measures included the modified Mini-Mental State Examination; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale; Distress Thermometer, Pepper Assessment Tool for Disability (includes self- reported activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental ADLs, and mobility questions); Short Physical Performance Battery (includes timed 4-m walk, chair stands, standing balance); grip strength, and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Comorbidity Index. RESULTS Of 54 participants (mean age 70.8 ± 6.4) eligible for this analysis, 92.6% completed the entire GA battery (mean time 44.0 ± 14 minutes). The following impairments were detected: cognitive impairment, 31.5%; depression, 38.9%; distress, 53.7%; impairment in ADLs, 48.2%; impaired physical performance, 53.7%; and comorbidity, 46.3%. Most were impaired in one (92.6%) or more (63%) functional domains. For the 38 participants rated as having good performance status according to standard oncologic assessment (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Performance Scale score ≤1), impairments in individual GA measures ranged from 23.7% to 50%. Significant variability in cognitive, emotional, and physical status was detected even after stratification according to tumor biology (cytogenetic risk group classification). CONCLUSION Inpatient GA was feasible and added new information to standard oncology assessment, which may be important for stratifying therapeutic risk in older adults with AML. PMID:22091497

  12. Ultrasonic Polishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmore, Randy

    1993-01-01

    The ultrasonic polishing process makes use of the high-frequency (ultrasonic) vibrations of an abradable tool which automatically conforms to the work piece and an abrasive slurry to finish surfaces and edges on complex, highly detailed, close tolerance cavities in materials from beryllium copper to carbide. Applications range from critical deburring of guidance system components to removing EDM recast layers from aircraft engine components to polishing molds for forming carbide cutting tool inserts or injection molding plastics. A variety of materials including tool steels, carbides, and even ceramics can be successfully processed. Since the abradable tool automatically conforms to the work piece geometry, the ultrasonic finishing method described offers a number of important benefits in finishing components with complex geometries.

  13. Phase I Trial of AZD1775 and Belinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myeloid Malignancies or Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-12

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-30

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  15. Vaccine Therapy and Basiliximab in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22)

  16. CPI-613, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Lenalidomide and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. CPX-351 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  20. Patient-reported symptoms and quality of life 
in adults with acute leukemia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Leak Bryant, Ashley; Lee Walton, AnnMarie; Shaw-Kokot, Julia; Mayer, Deborah K; Reeve, Bryce B

    2015-03-01

    Systematically summarize findings from research conducted on adult acute leukemia survivors as they relate to symptoms and quality of life (QOL). 
 Systematic review of the literature from 1990–2013 found in the PubMed, PsycINFO®, EMBASE, and CINAHL® databases, as well as manual searches. 
 The review identified 16 quantitative studies and 1 qualitative study published from 1990–2013 that used a self-reported QOL or symptom questionnaire. Fatigue was the most commonly assessed and reported symptom, followed by depression. 
 Acute leukemia and its treatment have a significant impact in all QOL domains. Future studies should include longitudinal research, more than one recruitment site, increased minority representation, and home-based exercise interventions as ways to improve all domains of QOL. 
 This review increases awareness of commonly reported symptoms faced by adults with acute leukemia. Oncology nurses are central in monitoring and reporting symptoms to the interdisciplinary team that may contribute to changes in function, with the overall goal of optimizing QOL over time. 


  1. The hematopoietic cell transplantation comorbidity index is a predictor of early death and survival in adult acute myeloid leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Savic, Aleksandar; Kvrgic, Vanja; Rajic, Nebojsa; Urosevic, Ivana; Kovacevic, Dragan; Percic, Ivanka; Popovic, Stevan

    2012-04-01

    The hematopoietic cell transplantation comorbidity index (HCT-CI) is predictive of early death and survival in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic role of the HCT-CI for early death and survival in adult AML patients. In the single-center retrospective study, we analyzed the outcome of 233 adult AML patients. The results indicated that the HCT-CI score is an independent predictor of early death in entire cohort of adult patients with AML. In subgroup analysis, HCT-CI is an independent predictor for early death in elderly patients but not in patients younger than 60 years. A high HCT-CI score predicts shorter survival in adult patients with AML. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Obesity but not overweight increases the incidence and mortality of leukemia in adults: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Jorge J; Reagan, John L; Ingham, Randall R; Furman, Michael; Dalia, Samir; Merhi, Basma; Nemr, Saed; Zarrabi, Ali; Mitri, Joanna

    2012-07-01

    The main objectives of the present meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies were to evaluate the role of obesity on the incidence and mortality of leukemia in adults. Obesity was associated with a relative risk (RR) of 1.26 (95% CI 1.17-1.37; p < 0.001) for leukemia incidence and 1.29 (95% CI 1.11-1.49; p = 0.001) for mortality. Obesity was also associated with an increased incidence of acute myeloid leukemia (RR 1.53, 95% CI 1.26-1.85; p<0.001), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (RR 1.17, 95% CI 1.08-1.27; p < 0.001), chronic myeloid leukemia (RR 1.16, 95% CI 1.04-1.30; p = 0.007) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (RR 1.62, 95% CI 1.12-2.32; p = 0.009). The risk of incidence and mortality of leukemia in adults was consistently higher in obese men. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Gene polymorphisms in folate metabolizing enzymes in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: effects on methotrexate-related toxicity and survival

    PubMed Central

    Ongaro, Alessia; De Mattei, Monica; Della Porta, Matteo Giovanni; Rigolin, GianMatteo; Ambrosio, Cristina; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Pellati, Agnese; Masieri, Federica Francesca; Caruso, Angelo; Catozzi, Linda; Gemmati, Donato

    2009-01-01

    Background The antifolate agent methotrexate is an important component of maintenance therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, although methotrexate-related toxicity is often a reason for interruption of chemotherapy. Prediction of toxicity is difficult because of inter-individual variability susceptibility to antileukemic agents. Methotrexate interferes with folate metabolism leading to depletion of reduced folates. Design and Methods The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of polymorphisms for folate metabolizing enzymes with respect to toxicity and survival in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with methotrexate maintenance therapy. To this purpose, we evaluated possible associations between genotype and hematologic and non-hematologic toxicity and effects on survival at 2 years of follow-up in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Results Polymorphisms in the genes encoding for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR 677C>T) and in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR 19 bp deletion) significantly increased the risk of hepatotoxicity in single (odds ratio 5.23, 95% confidence interval 1.13–21.95 and odds ratio 4.57, 95% confidence interval 1.01–20.77, respectively) and in combined analysis (odds ratio 6.82, 95% confidence interval 1.38–33.59). MTHFR 677C>T also increased the risk of leukopenia and gastrointestinal toxicity, whilst thymidylate synthase 28 bp repeat polymorphism increased the risk of anemia (odds ratio 8.48, 95% confidence interval 2.00–36.09). Finally, patients with MTHFR 677TT had a decreased overall survival rate (hazard ratio 2.37, 95% confidence interval 1.46–8.45). Conclusions Genotyping of folate polymorphisms might be useful in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia to optimize methotrexate therapy, reducing the associated toxicity with possible effects on survival. PMID:19648163

  5. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride or Cytarabine and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-03

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. IGH@ translocations, CRLF2 deregulation, and microdeletions in adolescents and adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Anthony V; Schwab, Claire; Ensor, Hannah M; Russell, Lisa J; Morrison, Heather; Jones, Lisa; Masic, Dino; Patel, Bella; Rowe, Jacob M; Tallman, Martin; Goldstone, Anthony H; Fielding, Adele K; Harrison, Christine J

    2012-09-01

    To determine the prevalence and prognostic impact of significant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) -related genes: CRLF2 deregulation (CRLF2-d), IGH@ translocations (IGH@-t), and deletions of CDKN2A/B, IKZF1, PAX5, ETV6, RB1, BTG1, and EBF1 in adolescents and adults. The cohort comprised 454 patients (age 15 to 60 years old) treated on the multicenter United Kingdom Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Trial XII/Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 2993 trial (UKALLXII/ECOG2993) with Philadelphia-negative B-cell precursor ALL. Fluorescent in situ hybridization and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification were used to detect these genetic alterations. Twenty patients (5%) had CRLF2-d (P2RY8-CRLF2, n = 7; IGH@-CRLF2, n = 13), and 36 patients (8%) harbored an IGH@-t with a different partner gene. There was little overlap between IGH@-t, CRLF2-d, and established chromosomal abnormalities. Deletions of CDKN2A/B, IKZF1, PAX5, ETV6, RB1, BTG1, or EBF1 were prevalent with 101 (33%) of 304 patients harboring one and 102 (33%) harboring two or more alterations, occurring with varying frequency in all cytogenetic subgroups. The 5-year event-free survival, relapse-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) rates for the whole cohort were 40%, 55%, and 43%, respectively. Patients with CRLF2-d, IGH@-t, and IKZF1 deletions were associated with an inferior outcome in univariate but not multivariate analysis. In particular, CRLF2-d patients had a lower RFS compared with other patients (30%), whereas those with IGH@-t or IKZF1 deletions had a lower OS (27% and 35%, respectively). CRLF2-d and IGH@-t represent distinct subtypes of adolescent and adult ALL. Deletions of key B-cell differentiation and cell cycle control genes are highly prevalent but vary in frequency by cytogenetic subgroup. CRLF2-d, IGH@-t, and IKZF1 deletions are associated with poor outcome in adolescent and adult ALL.

  7. Lithium Carbonate and Tretinoin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-25

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Intensive Induction Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Comparing Three Different Combination Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-02

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Sirolimus, Idarubicin, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-10

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Persistent/Recurrent Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

  12. Psychometric properties of the Polish version of the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale in hypertensive adults

    PubMed Central

    Jankowska-Polanska, Beata; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Chudiak, Anna; Dudek, Krzysztof; Morisky, Donald E; Szymanska-Chabowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Low adherence to pharmacological treatment is often associated with poor blood pressure control, but identification of nonadherent patients in outpatient settings is difficult. The aim of the study was to translate and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Polish version of the structured self-report eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) among patients with hypertension. The study was conducted in a family doctor practice between January and July 2015. After a standard “forward–backward” procedure to translate MMAS-8 into Polish, the questionnaire was administered to 160 patients with hypertension. Reliability was tested using a measure of internal consistency (Cronbach’s α) and test–retest reliability. Validity was confirmed using known group validity. Three levels of adherence were considered based on the following scores: 0 to <6 (low); 6 to <8 (medium); and 8 (high). Complete questionnaires were returned by 110 respondents (mean age: 60.7 years ±12.6; 54.6% were female). The mean number of pills taken daily was 3.61±4.31. The mean adherence score was 6.42± 2.0. Moderate internal consistency was found (Cronbach’s α=0.81), and test–retest reliability was satisfactory (r=0.461–0.905; P<0.001). Reproducibility expressed by Cohen’s κ coefficient =0.61 was good. In high-adherent patients, the percentage of well-controlled blood pressure was higher than in low-adherent patients (33.3% vs 19.1%, χ2=0.87, P=0.648). Psychometric evaluation of the Polish version of the MMAS-8 indicates that it is a reliable and valid measure tool to detect nonadherent patients. The MMAS-8 may be routinely used to support communication about the medication-taking behavior in hypertensive patients. PMID:27672314

  13. Psychometric properties of the Polish version of the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale in hypertensive adults.

    PubMed

    Jankowska-Polanska, Beata; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Chudiak, Anna; Dudek, Krzysztof; Morisky, Donald E; Szymanska-Chabowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Low adherence to pharmacological treatment is often associated with poor blood pressure control, but identification of nonadherent patients in outpatient settings is difficult. The aim of the study was to translate and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Polish version of the structured self-report eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) among patients with hypertension. The study was conducted in a family doctor practice between January and July 2015. After a standard "forward-backward" procedure to translate MMAS-8 into Polish, the questionnaire was administered to 160 patients with hypertension. Reliability was tested using a measure of internal consistency (Cronbach's α) and test-retest reliability. Validity was confirmed using known group validity. Three levels of adherence were considered based on the following scores: 0 to <6 (low); 6 to <8 (medium); and 8 (high). Complete questionnaires were returned by 110 respondents (mean age: 60.7 years ±12.6; 54.6% were female). The mean number of pills taken daily was 3.61±4.31. The mean adherence score was 6.42± 2.0. Moderate internal consistency was found (Cronbach's α=0.81), and test-retest reliability was satisfactory (r=0.461-0.905; P<0.001). Reproducibility expressed by Cohen's κ coefficient =0.61 was good. In high-adherent patients, the percentage of well-controlled blood pressure was higher than in low-adherent patients (33.3% vs 19.1%, χ (2)=0.87, P=0.648). Psychometric evaluation of the Polish version of the MMAS-8 indicates that it is a reliable and valid measure tool to detect nonadherent patients. The MMAS-8 may be routinely used to support communication about the medication-taking behavior in hypertensive patients.

  14. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-17

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  15. Variegated RHOA mutations in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Yasunobu; Kontani, Kenji; Enami, Terukazu; Kataoka, Keisuke; Ishii, Ryohei; Totoki, Yasushi; Kataoka, Tatsuki R.; Hirata, Masahiro; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Nakano, Kazumi; Kitanaka, Akira; Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Egami, Sachiko; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Yoshizato, Tetsuichi; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Kon, Ayana; Yoshida, Kenichi; Sato, Yusuke; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Sanada, Masashi; Munakata, Wataru; Nakamura, Hiromi; Hama, Natsuko; Miyano, Satoru; Nureki, Osamu; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Haga, Hironori; Shimoda, Kazuya; Katada, Toshiaki; Chiba, Shigeru; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a distinct form of peripheral T-cell lymphoma with poor prognosis, which is caused by the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). In contrast to the unequivocal importance of HTLV-1 infection in the pathogenesis of ATLL, the role of acquired mutations in HTLV-1 infected T cells has not been fully elucidated, with a handful of genes known to be recurrently mutated. In this study, we identified unique RHOA mutations in ATLL through whole genome sequencing of an index case, followed by deep sequencing of 203 ATLL samples. RHOA mutations showed distinct distribution and function from those found in other cancers. Involving 15% (30/203) of ATLL cases, RHOA mutations were widely distributed across the entire coding sequence but almost invariably located at the guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding pocket, with Cys16Arg being most frequently observed. Unexpectedly, depending on mutation types and positions, these RHOA mutants showed different or even opposite functional consequences in terms of GTP/guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-binding kinetics, regulation of actin fibers, and transcriptional activation. The Gly17Val mutant did not bind GTP/GDP and act as a dominant negative molecule, whereas other mutants (Cys16Arg and Ala161Pro) showed fast GTP/GDP cycling with enhanced transcriptional activation. These findings suggest that both loss- and gain-of-RHOA functions could be involved in ATLL leukemogenesis. In summary, our study not only provides a novel insight into the molecular pathogenesis of ATLL but also highlights a unique role of variegation of heterologous RHOA mutations in human cancers. PMID:26574607

  16. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma: a case report of primary cutaneous tumoral type

    PubMed Central

    Lyra-da-Silva, Julia Ocampo; de Mello Gonzaga, Yung Bruno; de Melo Espíndola, Otávio; de Andrada-Serpa, Maria José; Dib, Cassio; Jeunon, Thiago

    2012-01-01

    Background: Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a distinctive peripheral T- lymphocytic malignancy associated with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). It may closely resemble other skin lymphomas, particularly mycosis fungoides (MF). Case report: A 38-year-old woman presented some ellipsoid scaling patches lasting 18 months and developed a large tumoral lesion in the abdomen, which were previously diagnosed as MF. Although histopathologic and immunohistochemistry findings were in consonance with this diagnosis, the fast progression of the disease raised the suspicion that it could represent another type of T-cell lymphoma. The work-up revealed a positive anti-HTLV-1 serology and molecular studies confirmed the monoclonal integration of HTLV-1 provirus into neoplastic cells of the skin, but not into circulating lymphocytes. Extensive investigations were unable to demonstrate any systemic involvement. The final diagnosis was of primary cutaneous type of ATLL. The patient was submitted to a chemotherapy regimen with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone, later to conjugated dexamethasone and surgical cytoreduction and then to a second line treatment with gemcitabine, resulting in partial response. A bone marrow heterologous transplantation was performed, but failed to achieve a sustained remission. Discussion: ATLL is a rare lymphoid malignancy in non-endemic HTLV-1 areas, the diagnosis of which could be missed if not highly suspected. In addition to the four subtypes of Shimoyama classification (acute, lymphomatous, chronic and smoldering), a fifth one denominated primary cutaneous and characterized by presence of lesions only in the skin had been proposed and is herein exemplified. PMID:23785591

  17. Establishment and characterization of 10 cell lines derived from patients with adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, H; Esumi, H; Miwa, M; Shimoyama, M; Minato, K; Tobinai, K; Hirose, M; Watanabe, S; Inada, N; Kinoshita, K; Kamihira, S; Ichimaru, M; Sugimura, T

    1983-01-01

    By using human T-cell growth factor (TCGF), 10 cell lines were established from tissue samples of 10 patients with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Three cell lines were adapted to growth in medium lacking TCGF. The surface markers of all cell lines were characteristic of inducer/helper T cells, i.e., OKT3+, OKT4+, OKT6-, OKT8-, OKIa1+, and human Lyt2+ and Lyt3+, except that one cell line was OKT3-. The expression of the viral antigen was examined during establishment of 8 of the 10 cell lines. The viral antigen was not expressed in leukemic cells before cultivation. In 5 lines, the viral antigen was detected by immunofluorescent staining after a short period of cultivation. However, 3 cell lines, ATL-6A, ATL-9Y, and ATL-1K did not express the viral antigen during short-term culture: the ATL-6A and ATL-9Y cell lines became positive for the viral antigen after 5 and 2 months of cultivation, respectively; the ATL-1K cell line remained antigen-negative throughout a culture period of 13 months. Southern blot hybridization assay showed that all of the cell lines, including the viral antigen-negative ATL-1K cell line, contained the viral genome. Thus, the retrovirus was associated with all 10 cell lines established from ATL patients, but there was a heterogeneity in the expression time of the retroviral antigen in leukemic cells maintained in vitro. Our findings suggested that the expression of the viral antigen was not required for maintenance of the leukemic state in vivo and for growth of leukemic cells in vitro. Images PMID:6193528

  18. Association of Muscle Strength and Bone Mineral Density in Adult Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Emily D.; Nolan, Vikki G.; Ness, Kirsten K.; Ferry, Robert J.; Robison, Leslie L.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Hudson, Melissa M.; Kaste, Sue C.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between bone mineral density (BMD) and muscle strength in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a population at increased risk for both decreased BMD and muscle strength from cancer and its treatment. Design Cohort data from the St Jude Lifetime Cohort (SJLIFE) study. Setting Department of Cancer Control at St Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Participants Subjects were adults enrolled in St Jude Lifetime Cohort study and treated for childhood ALL between 1962 and 1999. As part of a comprehensive evaluation, participants had dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans and muscle strength testing. The participants consisted of 261 women and 232 men who were 20.4 to 49.8 years old (median, 35.7y), and 12.7 to 46.5 years from diagnosis of childhood ALL (median, 27.2y). Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures BMD was determined by DEXA scan. Muscle strength of upper and lower extremities was assessed with physical performance testing. Results After adjusting for covariates, we found significant (P < 0.005) associations between BMD and muscle strength in lower extremities (R2 range, 0.33–0.40) and strong, significant associations in upper extremities (left-side R2 = 0.558; right-side R2 = 0.560). Conclusions Muscle strength was associated with BMD in the extremities of long-term survivors of childhood ALL, a finding suggesting that muscle strengthening interventions may improve bone health in them. PMID:21621662

  19. Health Care Use by Older Adults With Acute Myeloid Leukemia at the End of Life.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Zeidan, Amer M; Halene, Stephanie; Xu, Xiao; Davidoff, Amy J; Huntington, Scott F; Podoltsev, Nikolai A; Gross, Cary P; Gore, Steven D; Ma, Xiaomei

    2017-08-07

    Purpose Little is known about the patterns and predictors of the use of end-of-life health care among patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). End-of-life care is particularly relevant for older adults with AML because of their poor prognosis. Methods We performed a population-based, retrospective cohort study of patients with AML who were ≥ 66 years of age at diagnosis and diagnosed during the period from 1999 to 2011 and died before December 31, 2012. Medicare claims were used to assess patterns of hospice care and use of aggressive treatment. Predictors of these end points were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression analyses. Results In the overall cohort (N = 13,156), hospice care after AML diagnosis increased from 31.3% in 1999 to 56.4% in 2012, but the increase was primarily driven by late hospice enrollment that occurred in the last 7 days of life. Among the 5,847 patients who enrolled in hospice, 47.4% and 28.8% started their first hospice enrollment in the last 7 and 3 days of life, respectively. Among patients who transferred in and out of hospice care, 62% received transfusions outside hospice. Additionally, the use of chemotherapy within the last 14 days of life increased from 7.7% in 1999 to 18.8% in 2012. Patients who were male and nonwhite were less likely to enroll in hospice and more likely to receive chemotherapy or be admitted to intensive care units at the end of life. Conversely, older patients were less likely to receive chemotherapy or have intensive care unit admission at the end of life, and were more likely to enroll in hospice. Conclusion End-of-life care for older patients with AML is suboptimal. Additional research is warranted to identify reasons for their low use of hospice services and strategies to enhance end-of-life care for these patients.

  20. Acute myeloid leukemia in adults: a case-control study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, R A; Darwin, C; McKinney, P A; Roberts, B; Richards, I D; Bird, C C

    1988-10-01

    This paper reports the results of a case-control analysis of 161 cases of acute myeloid leukemia and 310 matched hospital controls. The patients were interviewed between 1982 and 1986. The study shows a weak association for cases with previous malignant disease. Furnace workers show excess risks. Urticaria and vertigo are in excess, as well as some aspects of family medical histories, including multiple sclerosis and cases of leukemia/lymphoma in blood relations.

  1. Cytogenetic and environmental factors in the etiology of the acute leukemias in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Sandler, D.P.; Collman, G.W.

    1987-12-01

    This review focuses on familial and cytogenetic factors and on environmental exposures that play a role in the etiology of the leukemias. Differential prognosis and treatment responses as well as new cytogenetic assays suggest that acute lymphocytic and acute nonlymphocytic leukemias are each comprised of different diseases with similar appearance. Risk factors, including exposure to ionizing radiations, benzene,cigarette smokes, electric currents, antineoplastic agents, petroleum products and pesticides are discussed. 149 references.

  2. Decitabine and Valproic Acid in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Clofarabine or Daunorubicin Hydrochloride and Cytarabine Followed By Decitabine or Observation in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Reduced Intensity Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With De Novo or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-25

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Lymphocytic or Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Phase I Combination of Midostaurin, Bortezomib, and Chemo in Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. MEK Inhibitor MEK162, Idarubicin, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-26

    Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Cyclosporine, Pravastatin Sodium, Etoposide, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-27

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Azacitidine and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Efficacy of Compound Kushen Injection in Combination with Induction Chemotherapy for Treating Adult Patients Newly Diagnosed with Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Honglei; Lei, Bo; Meng, Shan; Liu, Hailing; Wei, Yongchang; He, Aili; Zhang, Wanggang

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the clinical effectiveness and safety of CKI (compound Kushen injection) plus standard induction chemotherapy for treating adult acute leukemia (AL). We randomly assigned 332 patients with newly diagnosed AL to control (n = 165, receiving DA (daunorubicin and cytarabine) or hyper-CVAD (fractionated cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and dexamethasone)) or treatment (n = 167, receiving CKI and DA or hyper-CVAD) groups. Posttreatment, treatment group CD3+, CD4+, CD4+/CD8+, natural killer (NK) cell, and immunoglobulin (IgG, IgA, and IgM) levels were significantly higher than those of the control group (p < 0.05), and CD8+ levels were lower in the treatment group than in the control group (p < 0.05). Treatment group interleukin- (IL-) 4 and IL-10 levels were significantly higher compared to the control posttreatment (both p < 0.05) as were complete remission, overall response, and quality of life (QoL) improvement rates (p < 0.05). The control group had more incidences of grade 3/4 hematologic and nonhematologic toxicity (p < 0.05). Responses to induction chemotherapy, QoL improvement, and adverse events incidence between control group patients with acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia were not significantly different. CKI plus standard induction chemotherapy is effective and safe for treating AL, possibly by increasing immunologic function. PMID:27738441

  12. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for adult patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia: results of a matched-pair analysis.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroaki; Saitoh, Takayuki; Machida, Shinichiro; Kako, Shinichi; Doki, Noriko; Mori, Takehiko; Sakura, Toru; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Kanamori, Heiwa; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Okamoto, Shinichiro

    2015-11-01

    Adult patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) have a poor prognosis, and the therapeutic role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) for MPAL remains to be elucidated. Thus, we retrospectively assessed the efficacy of allo-SCT for MPAL. Eighteen patients with MPAL were identified from the transplant outcome database of Kanto Study Group for Cell Therapy (KSGCT). We also selected 215 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) as control cohorts using an optimal matching method. The 5-yr overall survival (OS) rate of patients with MPAL was 48.1%, and patients in remission at the time of transplant showed significantly better survival than those not in remission (5-yr OS: 71.8% vs. 0%, P = 0.001). No significant differences were seen in OS when stratifying patients according to immunophenotype, cytogenetic abnormalities, or the type of induction therapy. The 5-yr OS rate of patients with MPAL was not significantly different compared with AML control patients (48.1% vs. 48.1%; P = 0.855) or ALL control patients (48.1% vs. 37.8%; P = 0.426). These results suggested that allo-SCT is an effective treatment for MPAL, especially early in the disease course, and innovative transplant approaches are warranted to improve the transplant outcome of patients with MPAL who are not in remission. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Adult-onset acute leukemia and employment in the meat industry: a New Zealand case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bethwaite, P; McLean, D; Kennedy, J; Pearce, N

    2001-09-01

    To assess the risks for adult-onset acute leukemia associated with employment in the New Zealand meat industry. A total of 110 incident leukemia cases identified from referrals to one of six treatment centers between 1989 and 1991 were compared with 199 general population controls. Detailed occupational exposure histories were obtained by interview. There was an elevated risk associated with ever having worked in an abattoir (OR = 2.3, 95% CI 1.0-5.2), which appeared confined to those with over 2 years exposure (OR = 4.9, 95% CI 1.5-15.6). The excess risk was confined to abattoir workers having direct contact with animals or animal products (OR = 5.2 95% CI 1.2-22.2). Ever having worked as a butcher was associated with elevated risk (OR = 2.9, 95% CI 1.1-7.2), confined to those individuals who worked as a butcher in an abattoir (OR = 4.8) or who butchered livestock on farms (OR = 8.2). No increased risk was found for work as a retail/wholesale butcher or meatpacker (OR = 1.2). This study found increased leukemia risks associated with employment in the meat industry. These were confined to abattoir workers with over 2 years employment in the industry, and to persons whose jobs involved contact with animals or animal tissue, implying that biological exposures may be responsible.

  14. Cost-effectiveness and clinical outcomes of double versus single cord blood transplantation in adults with acute leukemia in France.

    PubMed

    Labopin, Myriam; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Gorin, Norbert Claude; Gluckman, Eliane; Blaise, Didier; Mannone, Lionel; Milpied, Noel; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Deconinck, Eric; Michallet, Mauricette; Fegueux, Nathalie; Socié, Gerard; Nguyen, Stephanie; Cahn, Jean Yves; de Revel, Thierry; Garnier, Federico; Faucher, Catherine; Taright, Namik; Kenzey, Chantal; Volt, Fernanda; Bertrand, Dominique; Mohty, Mohamad; Rocha, Vanderson

    2014-03-01

    Double cord blood transplantation extends the use of cord blood to adults for whom a single unit is not available, but the procedure is limited by its cost. To evaluate outcomes and cost-effectiveness of double compared to single cord blood transplantation, we analyzed 134 transplants in adults with acute leukemia in first remission. Transplants were performed in France with reduced intensity or myeloablative conditioning regimens. Costs were estimated from donor search to 1 year after transplantation. A Markov decision analysis model was used to calculate quality-adjusted life-years and cost-effectiveness ratio within 4 years. The overall survival at 2 years after single and double cord blood transplants was 42% versus 62%, respectively (P=0.03), while the leukemia-free-survival was 33% versus 53%, respectively (P=0.03). The relapse rate was 21% after double transplants and 42% after a single transplant (P=0.006). No difference was observed for non-relapse mortality or chronic graft-versus-host-disease. The estimated costs up to 1 year after reduced intensity conditioning for single and double cord blood transplantation were € 165,253 and €191,827, respectively. The corresponding costs after myeloablative conditioning were € 192,566 and € 213,050, respectively. Compared to single transplants, double cord blood transplantation was associated with supplementary costs of € 21,302 and € 32,420 up to 4 years, but with increases in quality-adjusted life-years of 0.616 and 0.484, respectively, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of € 34,581 and €66,983 in the myeloablative and reduced intensity conditioning settings, respectively. Our results showed that for adults with acute leukemia in first complete remission in France, double cord transplantation is more cost-effective than single cord blood transplantation, with better outcomes, including quality-adjusted life-years.

  15. Cost-effectiveness and clinical outcomes of double versus single cord blood transplantation in adults with acute leukemia in France

    PubMed Central

    Labopin, Myriam; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Gorin, Norbert Claude; Gluckman, Eliane; Blaise, Didier; Mannone, Lionel; Milpied, Noel; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Deconinck, Eric; Michallet, Mauricette; Fegueux, Nathalie; Socié, Gerard; Nguyen, Stephanie; Cahn, Jean Yves; de Revel, Thierry; Garnier, Federico; Faucher, Catherine; Taright, Namik; Kenzey, Chantal; Volt, Fernanda; Bertrand, Dominique; Mohty, Mohamad; Rocha, Vanderson

    2014-01-01

    Double cord blood transplantation extends the use of cord blood to adults for whom a single unit is not available, but the procedure is limited by its cost. To evaluate outcomes and cost-effectiveness of double compared to single cord blood transplantation, we analyzed 134 transplants in adults with acute leukemia in first remission. Transplants were performed in France with reduced intensity or myeloablative conditioning regimens. Costs were estimated from donor search to 1 year after transplantation. A Markov decision analysis model was used to calculate quality-adjusted life-years and cost-effectiveness ratio within 4 years. The overall survival at 2 years after single and double cord blood transplants was 42% versus 62%, respectively (P=0.03), while the leukemia-free-survival was 33% versus 53%, respectively (P=0.03). The relapse rate was 21% after double transplants and 42% after a single transplant (P=0.006). No difference was observed for non-relapse mortality or chronic graft-versus-host-disease. The estimated costs up to 1 year after reduced intensity conditioning for single and double cord blood transplantation were € 165,253 and €191,827, respectively. The corresponding costs after myeloablative conditioning were € 192,566 and € 213,050, respectively. Compared to single transplants, double cord blood transplantation was associated with supplementary costs of € 21,302 and € 32,420 up to 4 years, but with increases in quality-adjusted life-years of 0.616 and 0.484, respectively, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of € 34,581 and €66,983 in the myeloablative and reduced intensity conditioning settings, respectively. Our results showed that for adults with acute leukemia in first complete remission in France, double cord transplantation is more cost-effective than single cord blood transplantation, with better outcomes, including quality-adjusted life-years. PMID:24143000

  16. Effects of intrabone marrow-bone marrow transplantation plus adult thymus transplantation on survival of mice bearing leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuming; Hosaka, Naoki; Cui, Yunze; Shi, Ming; Li, Ming; Li, Qing; Ikehara, Susumu

    2012-06-10

    We recently found that allogeneic intrabone marrow-bone marrow transplantation (IBM-BMT) plus adult thymus transplantation (ATT) from the same donor is effective in mice bearing solid tumors. In the current study, we examined the effects of this strategy on the survival of mice with leukemia. One week after intravenous injection of 1×10(6) leukemic cells (EL-4, H-2(b)) into 8-week-old B6 (H-2(b)) mice, the mice were 8 Gy irradiated and transplanted with 1×10(7) bone marrow cells (BMCs) from 8-week-old BALB/c mice (H-2(d)) by IBM-BMT with or without donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) or ATT. All the mice without treatment died within 70 days after injection of EL-4. About 40% of those treated with IBM-BMT alone died within 100 days due to tumor relapse. In contrast, those treated with IBM-BMT+DLI or ATT showed the longest survival rate without relapse of leukemia. In addition, the former showed less graft versus host disease (GVHD) than the latter. The mice treated with IBM-BMT+ATT also showed an intermediate percentage of effector memory (EM) and central memory (CM) cells between those treated with BMT alone and those treated with IBM-BMT+DLI. The numbers and functions of T cells increased in those treated with IBM-BMT+ATT with interleukin-2 and interferon-γ production. These results suggest that IBM-BMT+ATT is effective in the treatment of leukemia with strong graft versus leukemia without increased risk of GVHD.

  17. Aggressive adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma: the tip of the iceberg of the hidden human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 infection burden in nonendemic countries.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Lerma, Ingrid; Caballero, Estrella; Palacio, Carlos; Garcia-Patos, Vicente

    2013-04-01

    Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma has only rarely been reported in Europe. We aimed to determine the clinical characteristics and outcome of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma patients in a nonendemic country. Cases of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma managed at Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain were reviewed. Information on the foreign population living in Spain, according to country of origin, was obtained using official published data from the National Statistics Institute. Three patients were diagnosed with adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma between 2003 and 2010. Two cases were of the acute subtype and one case of the lymphoma subtype. Two patients were female and the mean age at presentation was 41.3 years. Patients originated from three different countries. The characteristics of the attended patients include widespread enlargement of the lymph nodes, a variety of multiple extranodal involvements, bone marrow infiltration, and a high incidence of infections including latent parasitic infections. Prototypic adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma presenting with high white cell counts, flower cells, and hypercalcemia was not observed. Regarding therapy, one patient received chemotherapy alone and two subjects combined first-line therapy including antiviral drugs. Of the three patients, two are dead (mean survival time 6 months) and one has been lost to follow-up. We estimate that at least 15,000 people living in Spain are infected with human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma is a heterogeneous disease that often presents without distinguishing or prototypical features. A high index of clinical suspicion is essential for diagnosis. Several epidemiological differences have been observed in different countries. Today, HTLV-1 infection is highly underdiagnosed.

  18. Vorinostat, Cytarabine, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  19. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Relapsed Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-17

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  20. MS-275 and GM-CSF in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome and/or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-20

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. The prognosis of CALM-AF10-positive adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias depends on the stage of maturation arrest.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdelali, Raouf; Asnafi, Vahid; Petit, Arnaud; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Callens, Céline; Villarese, Patrick; Delabesse, Eric; Reman, Oumedaly; Lepretre, Stephane; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Guillerm, Gaelle; Berthon, Céline; Gardin, Claude; Corront, Bernadette; Leguay, Thibaut; Béné, Marie-Christine; Ifrah, Norbert; Leverger, Guy; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth

    2013-11-01

    CALM-AF10 (also known as PICALM-MLLT10) is the commonest fusion protein in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, but its prognostic impact remains unclear. Molecular screening at diagnosis identified CALM-AF10 in 30/431 (7%) patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia aged 16 years and over and in 15/234 (6%) of those aged up to 15 years. Adult CALM-AF10-positive patients were predominantly (72%) negative for surface (s)CD3/T-cell receptor, whereas children were predominantly (67%) positive for T-cell receptor. Among 22 adult CALM-AF10-positive patients treated according to the LALA94/GRAALL03-05 protocols, the poor prognosis for event-free survival (P=0.0017) and overall survival (P=0.0014) was restricted to the 15 T-cell receptor-negative cases. Among CALM-AF10-positive, T-cell receptor-negative patients, 82% had an early T-cell precursor phenotype, reported to be of poor prognosis in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia corresponded to 22% of adult LALA94/GRAALL03-05 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, but had no prognostic impact per se. CALM-AF10 fusion within early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (21%) did, however, identify a group with a poor prognosis with regards to event-free survival (P=0.04). CALM-AF10 therefore identifies a poor prognostic group within sCD3/T-cell receptor negative adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias and is over-represented within early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemias, in which it identifies patients in whom treatment is likely to fail. Its prognosis and overlap with early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia merits analysis. The clinical trial GRAALL was registered at Clinical Trials.gov number NCT00327678.

  2. Prognostic and biologic significance of long non-coding RNA profiling in younger adults with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Dimitrios; Nicolet, Deedra; Volinia, Stefano; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Yan, Pearlly; Bundschuh, Ralf; Carroll, Andrew J; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Blum, William; Powell, Bayard L; Uy, Geoffrey L; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Wang, Eunice S; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Orwick, Shelley J; Lucas, David M; Caligiuri, Michael A; Stone, Richard M; Byrd, John C; Garzon, Ramiro; Bloomfield, Clara D

    2017-08-01

    Long non-coding ribonucleic acids (RNAs) are a novel class of RNA molecules, which are increasingly recognized as important molecular players in solid and hematologic malignancies. Herein we investigated whether long non-coding RNA expression is associated with clinical and molecular features, as well as outcome of younger adults (aged <60 years) with de novo cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia. Whole transcriptome profiling was performed in a training (n=263) and a validation set (n=114). Using the training set, we identified 24 long non-coding RNAs associated with event-free survival. Linear combination of the weighted expression values of these transcripts yielded a prognostic score. In the validation set, patients with high scores had shorter disease-free (P<0.001), overall (P=0.002) and event-free survival (P<0.001) than patients with low scores. In multivariable analyses, long non-coding RNA score status was an independent prognostic marker for disease-free (P=0.01) and event-free survival (P=0.002), and showed a trend for overall survival (P=0.06). Among multiple molecular alterations tested, which are prognostic in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia, only double CEBPA mutations, NPM1 mutations and FLT3-ITD associated with distinct long non-coding RNA signatures. Correlation of the long non-coding RNA scores with messenger RNA and microRNA expression identified enrichment of genes involved in lymphocyte/leukocyte activation, inflammation and apoptosis in patients with high scores. We conclude that long non-coding RNA profiling provides meaningful prognostic information in younger adults with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia. In addition, expression of prognostic long non-coding RNAs associates with oncogenic molecular pathways in this disease. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: 00048958 (CALGB-8461), 00899223 (CALGB-9665), and 00900224 (CALGB-20202). Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  3. Prognostic and biologic significance of long non-coding RNA profiling in younger adults with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Dimitrios; Nicolet, Deedra; Volinia, Stefano; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Yan, Pearlly; Bundschuh, Ralf; Carroll, Andrew J.; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Blum, William; Powell, Bayard L.; Uy, Geoffrey L.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Wang, Eunice S.; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Orwick, Shelley J.; Lucas, David M.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Stone, Richard M.; Byrd, John C.; Garzon, Ramiro; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding ribonucleic acids (RNAs) are a novel class of RNA molecules, which are increasingly recognized as important molecular players in solid and hematologic malignancies. Herein we investigated whether long non-coding RNA expression is associated with clinical and molecular features, as well as outcome of younger adults (aged <60 years) with de novo cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia. Whole transcriptome profiling was performed in a training (n=263) and a validation set (n=114). Using the training set, we identified 24 long non-coding RNAs associated with event-free survival. Linear combination of the weighted expression values of these transcripts yielded a prognostic score. In the validation set, patients with high scores had shorter disease-free (P<0.001), overall (P=0.002) and event-free survival (P<0.001) than patients with low scores. In multivariable analyses, long non-coding RNA score status was an independent prognostic marker for disease-free (P=0.01) and event-free survival (P=0.002), and showed a trend for overall survival (P=0.06). Among multiple molecular alterations tested, which are prognostic in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia, only double CEBPA mutations, NPM1 mutations and FLT3-ITD associated with distinct long non-coding RNA signatures. Correlation of the long non-coding RNA scores with messenger RNA and microRNA expression identified enrichment of genes involved in lymphocyte/leukocyte activation, inflammation and apoptosis in patients with high scores. We conclude that long non-coding RNA profiling provides meaningful prognostic information in younger adults with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia. In addition, expression of prognostic long non-coding RNAs associates with oncogenic molecular pathways in this disease. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: 00048958 (CALGB-8461), 00899223 (CALGB-9665), and 00900224 (CALGB-20202). PMID:28473620

  4. Safety, efficacy, and clinical utility of asparaginase in the treatment of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Koprivnikar, Jamie; McCloskey, James; Faderl, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are known to have inferior outcomes compared to the pediatric population. Although the reasons for this are likely manyfold, the agents utilized and the increased intensity of pediatric treatments compared to adult treatments are likely significant contributing factors. Asparaginase, an enzyme that converts asparagine to aspartic acid, forms the backbone of almost all pediatric regimens and works by depleting extracellular asparagine, which ALL cells are unable to synthesize. Asparaginase toxicities, which include hypersensitivity reactions, pancreatitis, liver dysfunction, and thrombosis, have hindered its widespread use in the adult population. Here, we review the toxicity and efficacy of asparaginase in adult patients with ALL. With the proper precautions, it is a safe and effective agent in the treatment of younger adults with ALL with response rates in the frontline setting ranging from 78% to 96%, compared to most trials showing a 4-year overall survival of 50% or better. The age cutoff for consideration of treatment with pediatric-inspired regimens is not clear, but recent studies show promise particularly in the adolescent and young adult population. New formulations of asparaginase are actively in development, including erythrocyte-encapsulated asparaginase, which is designed to minimize the toxicity and improve the delivery of the drug. PMID:28331334

  5. Safety, efficacy, and clinical utility of asparaginase in the treatment of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Koprivnikar, Jamie; McCloskey, James; Faderl, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are known to have inferior outcomes compared to the pediatric population. Although the reasons for this are likely manyfold, the agents utilized and the increased intensity of pediatric treatments compared to adult treatments are likely significant contributing factors. Asparaginase, an enzyme that converts asparagine to aspartic acid, forms the backbone of almost all pediatric regimens and works by depleting extracellular asparagine, which ALL cells are unable to synthesize. Asparaginase toxicities, which include hypersensitivity reactions, pancreatitis, liver dysfunction, and thrombosis, have hindered its widespread use in the adult population. Here, we review the toxicity and efficacy of asparaginase in adult patients with ALL. With the proper precautions, it is a safe and effective agent in the treatment of younger adults with ALL with response rates in the frontline setting ranging from 78% to 96%, compared to most trials showing a 4-year overall survival of 50% or better. The age cutoff for consideration of treatment with pediatric-inspired regimens is not clear, but recent studies show promise particularly in the adolescent and young adult population. New formulations of asparaginase are actively in development, including erythrocyte-encapsulated asparaginase, which is designed to minimize the toxicity and improve the delivery of the drug.

  6. Epidemiology of adult acute myeloid leukemia: Impact of exposures on clinical phenotypes and outcomes after therapy.

    PubMed

    Finn, Laura; Sproat, Lisa; Heckman, Michael G; Jiang, Liuyan; Diehl, Nancy N; Ketterling, Rhett; Tibes, Raoul; Valdez, Ricardo; Foran, James

    2015-12-01

    An increased risk of adult myeloid leukemia (AML) has recently been associated with lifestyle and environmental exposures, including obesity, smoking, some over the counter medications, and rural/farm habitats in case control studies. The association of these exposures with AML cytogenetic categories, outcomes after therapy, and overall survival is unknown. Relevant exposures were evaluated in a cohort of 295 consecutive AML patients diagnosed and treated at Mayo Clinic in Florida and Arizona. Standard cytogenetic risk categories were applied and reviewed in a central cytogenetic laboratory. The association of epidemiologic exposures with cytogenetic risk, complete remission after therapy, and overall survival was evaluated using logistic and Cox regression models. A significant association between obesity and intermediate-abnormal cytogenetics was identified (OR: 1.94, P=0.025). Similarly, those with secondary AML were more likely to have poor risk (OR: 2.55, P<0.001) and less likely to have intermediate normal (OR: 0.48, P=0.003) cytogenetics. In multivariate analysis, overall survival was improved for patients ≥ 60 years receiving intensive (RR: 0.21, P<0.001) and non-intensive therapy (RR: 0.40, P<0.001 compared to no treatment, and was lower for users of tobacco (RR 1.39, P=0.032), and those with poor risk cytogenetics (RR: 3.96, P=0.002) or poor performance status (RR: 1.69, P<0.001). Furthermore, an association between statin use at the time of diagnosis (OR: 2.89, P=0.016) and increased complete remission after intensive chemotherapy was identified, while prior solid organ transplantation was associated with significantly lower complete remission rate after therapy (OR: 0.10, P=0.035). Our results provide evidence that specific epidemiologic exposures, including obesity, are significantly associated with unique AML cytogenetic risk categories and response to therapy. This supports a link between patient lifestyles, clinical exposures, and leukemogenesis

  7. A Multicenter Retrospective Study of Mogamulizumab Efficacy in Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Iyama, Satoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Ohnishi, Hirofumi; Kanisawa, Yuji; Ohta, Shuichi; Kondo, Takeshi; Mori, Akio; Tsutsumi, Yutaka; Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Kakinoki, Yasutaka; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Takahashi, Tohru; Shindo, Motohiro; Torimoto, Yoshihiro; Sato, Kazuya; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Haseyama, Yoshihito; Kohda, Kyuhei; Nagamachi, Yasuhiro; Hirayama, Yasuo; Sakai, Hajime; Hirata, Yasuji; Fukuhara, Takashi; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji; Kurosawa, Mitsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Mogamulizumab, a defucosylated humanized monoclonal antibody targeting C-C chemokine receptor 4, recently became available for the treatment of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). We conducted a multicenter retrospective study of the efficacy of mogamulizumab in ATL treatment in patients on Hokkaido Island, Japan. A total of 125 patients with ATL treated from January 2010 to December 2014 in 20 hospitals affiliated with the Hokkaido Hematology Study Group were enrolled in the present retrospective study. Of the 125 ATL patients, 62 (46.6%) presented with the acute type, 51 (38.3%) with the lymphoma type, and 12 (9.0%) with the chronic type; the latter group included 7 unfavorable chronic cases. The median age at diagnosis was 68 years (range, 35-86 years). The median survival for those with acute, lymphoma, and unfavorable chronic types was 302, 279, and 921 days, respectively. Advanced age, high lactate dehydrogenase level, poor performance status (3-4), and the existence of B symptoms were unfavorable prognostic factors for overall survival (OS). Survival rate calculated from the day of diagnosis was significantly higher in patients treated with mogamulizumab. The OS of individuals receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) was superior to that of the non-HSCT group. The median interval between the last mogamulizumab dose and allogeneic HSCT was 38 days (range, 21-53 days). Of the 22 HSCT recipients who were not treated with mogamulizumab, overall acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) and grade III-IV aGVHD occurred in 12 (54.5%) and 3 (13.6%) patients, respectively. However, overall aGVHD and grade III-IV aGVHD developed in 8 (88.9%) and 3 (33.3%) of the 9 HSCT recipients treated with mogamulizumab, respectively. Mogamulizumab improves OS in patients with ATL, although its use in HSCT patients might trigger severe GVHD. Determining the optimal pre-HSCT mogamulizumab treatment regimen is thus a priority. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All

  8. Central nervous system involvement in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia at diagnosis and/or at first relapse: results from the GET-LALA group.

    PubMed

    Reman, Oumedaly; Pigneux, Arnaud; Huguet, Françoise; Vey, Norbert; Delannoy, André; Fegueux, Nathalie; de Botton, Stéphane; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Tournilhac, Olivier; Buzyn, Agnès; Charrin, Christiane; Boucheix, Claude; Gabert, Jean; Lhéritier, Véronique; Vernant, Jean-Paul; Fière, Denis; Dombret, Hervé; Thomas, Xavier

    2008-11-01

    Outcome of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with central nervous system (CNS) involvement is not clearly defined. We studied 104 patients presenting with CNS involvement at diagnosis among 1493 patients (7%) included into the LALA trials, and 109 patients presenting CNS disease at the time of first relapse among the 709 relapsing patients (15%). Eighty-seven patients (84%) with CNS leukemia at diagnosis achieved complete remission (CR). Fifty-three patients underwent stem cell transplantation (SCT): 25 allogeneic SCT, 28 autologous SCT, while 34 continued with chemotherapy alone. Seven-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 34% and 35%, respectively. There were no significant differences in terms of CR, OS and DFS among patients with CNS involvement at diagnosis and those without CNS disease. There were also no differences among the two groups regarding T lineage ALL, B lineage ALL, and among those who underwent SCT. After a first relapse, 38 patients with CNS recurrence (35%) achieved a second CR. The median OS was 6.3 months. Outcome was similar to that of relapsing patients without CNS disease. CNS leukemia in adult ALL is uncommon at diagnosis as well as at the time of first relapse. With intensification therapy, patients with CNS leukemia at diagnosis have a similar outcome than those who did not present with CNS involvement. CNS leukemia at first relapse remains of similar poor prognosis than all other adult ALL in first relapse.

  9. Adult mortality from leukemia, brain cancer, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and magnetic fields from power lines: a case-control study in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Marcilio, Izabel; Gouveia, Nelson; Pereira Filho, Mário Leite; Kheifets, Leeka

    2011-12-01

    Recent publications renewed interest in assessing potential health risks for subjects living close to transmission lines. This study aimed at evaluating the association of both distance of home address to the nearest overhead transmission line and of the calculated magnetic fields from the power lines and mortality from leukemia, brain cancer, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We carried out a death certificate based case-control study accessing adult mortality in the Metropolitan Region of São Paulo, in Brazil. Analysis included 1,857 cases of leukemia, 2,357 of brain cancer, 367 of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and 4,706 as controls. An increased risk for mortality from leukemia among adults living at closer distances to transmission lines compared to those living further then 400 m was found. Risk was higher for subjects that lived within 50 m from power lines (OR=1.47; 95% CI=0.99-2.18). Similarly, a small increase in leukemia mortality was observed among adults living in houses with higher calculated magnetic fields (OR=1.61; 95% CI=0.91-2.86 for those exposed to magnetic fields >0.3 µT). No increase was seen for brain tumours or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Our findings are suggestive of a higher risk for leukemia among subjects living closer to transmission lines, and for those living at homes with higher calculated magnetic fields, although the risk was limited to lower voltage lines.

  10. Xenotransplantation elicits salient tumorigenicity of adult T-cell leukemia-derived cells via aberrant AKT activation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Takanashi, Tomoka; Nasu, Kentaro; Tamai, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Mai; Satoh, Ikuro; Ine, Shoji; Sasaki, Osamu; Satoh, Kennichi; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Harigae, Hideo; Sugamura, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    The transplantation of human cancer cells into immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc(null) (NOG) mice often causes highly malignant cell populations like cancer stem cells to emerge. Here, by serial transplantation in NOG mice, we established two highly tumorigenic adult T-cell leukemia-derived cell lines, ST1-N6 and TL-Om1-N8. When transplanted s.c., these cells formed tumors significantly earlier and from fewer initial cells than their parental lines ST1 and TL-Om1. We found that protein kinase B (AKT) signaling was upregulated in ST1-N6 and TL-Om1-N8 cells, and that this upregulation was due to the decreased expression of a negative regulator, INPP5D. Furthermore, the introduction of a constitutively active AKT mutant expression vector into ST1 cells augmented the tumorigenicity of the cells, whereas treatment with the AKT inhibitor MK-2206 attenuated the progression of tumors induced by ST1-N6 cells. Collectively, our results reveal that the AKT signaling pathway plays a critical role in the malignancy of adult T-cell leukemia-derived cells.

  11. 211^At-BC8-B10 Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-13

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; CD45-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  12. Effective asparagine depletion with pegylated asparaginase results in improved outcomes in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study 9511.

    PubMed

    Wetzler, Meir; Sanford, Ben L; Kurtzberg, Joanne; DeOliveira, Divino; Frankel, Stanley R; Powell, Bayard L; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Bloomfield, Clara D; Larson, Richard A

    2007-05-15

    CALGB 9511 used pegaspargase (PEG-ASP) in lieu of the native enzyme. The aim was to compare differences in overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) between patients who did and did not achieve asparagine depletion, defined by enzyme levels greater than 0.03 U/mL plasma for 14 consecutive days after at least 1 of 4 planned PEG-ASP administrations. Samples were available from 85 eligible patients. On univariate analyses, the 22 patients who did not achieve asparagine depletion had inferior OS (P = .002; hazard ratio [HR] = 2.37; 95% CI = 1.38-4.09) and DFS (P = .012; HR = 2.21; 95% CI = 1.19-4.13). After adjusting for age, performance status, leukocyte count, and karyotype in a proportional hazards model, both the OS and DFS HRs decreased to 1.8 (P = .056; 95% CI = 1.0-3.2 and P = .084; 95% CI = 0.9-3.6, respectively). We conclude that effective asparagine depletion with PEG-ASP is feasible as part of an intensive multiagent therapeutic regimen in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia and appears associated with improved outcomes.

  13. Independent confirmation of a prognostic gene-expression signature in adult acute myeloid leukemia with a normal karyotype: a Cancer and Leukemia Group B study

    PubMed Central

    Radmacher, Michael D.; Marcucci, Guido; Ruppert, Amy S.; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Whitman, Susan P.; Vardiman, James W.; Paschka, Peter; Vukosavljevic, Tamara; Baldus, Claudia D.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Larson, Richard A.; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2006-01-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and normal karyotype are classified in an intermediate-risk group, albeit this subset is heterogeneous for clinical outcome. A recent complementary DNA microarray study identified a gene-expression signature that—when used to cluster normal karyotype patients—separated them into 2 prognostically relevant subgroups. We sought the first independent validation of the prognostic value of this signature. Using oligonucleotide microarrays to measure gene expression in samples from uniformly treated adults with karyotypically normal AML, we performed cluster analysis based on the previously identified signature. We also developed a well-defined classification rule using the signature to predict outcome for individual patients. Cluster analysis confirmed the prognostic utility of the signature: patient clusters differed in overall (P = .001) and disease-free (P = .001) survival. The signature-based classifier identified groups with differences in overall (P = .02) and disease-free (P = .05) survival. A strong association of the outcome classifier with the prognostically adverse FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3 ITD) potentially explained the prognostic significance of the signature. However, in the subgroup of patients without FLT3 ITD there was a moderate difference in survival for the classifier-derived groups. Our analysis confirms the applicability of the gene-expression profiling strategy for outcome prediction in cytogenetically normal AML. PMID:16670265

  14. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma associated with HTLV-1 infection in a Brazilian adolescent.

    PubMed

    do Valle, A C; Galhardo, M C; Leite, A C; Araújo, A Q; Cuzzi-Maya, T; Maceira, J P; de Ameida Dobbin, J

    2001-01-01

    We present the case of a 15-year-old patient infected with HTLV-1 who developed a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, confirmed by histopathological and immunohistochemical examination, as well as clinically and hematologically confirmed leukemia. The patient died 3 months after initial presentation of the disease. The rarity of the disease in this age group justifies the present report.

  15. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).

  16. Busulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-25

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Adoption of pediatric-inspired acute lymphoblastic leukemia regimens by adult oncologists treating adolescents and young adults: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Muffly, Lori; Lichtensztajn, Daphne; Shiraz, Parveen; Abrahão, Renata; McNeer, Jennifer; Stock, Wendy; Keegan, Theresa; Gomez, Scarlett Lin

    2017-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated superior outcomes for adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who are treated using pediatric versus adult therapeutic regimens. To the best of our knowledge, whether adult oncologists in the United States have adopted this approach to ALL in AYA patients is currently unknown. The objective of the current study was to provide a population-based description of ALL treatment patterns in AYA individuals over the past decade. Data regarding AYA patients aged 15 to 39 years and diagnosed with ALL between 2004 and 2014 while living in the Greater Bay Area were obtained from the Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry (GBACR). Treating facilities were designated as pediatric or adult centers; induction treatment regimens were abstracted from registry text data fields. Of 304 patients diagnosed in the GBACR catchment region, complete treatment data were available for 229 (75%). The location of care was identified for 296 patients (97%) treated at 31 unique centers. Approximately 70% of AYA patients received induction therapy at an adult treatment center. All AYA patients who were treated at pediatric centers received pediatric ALL regimens. Among AYA patients treated by adult oncologists with complete treatment data, none received a pediatric regimen before 2008. Between 2008 and 2012, while the US Adult Intergroup C10403 pediatric-inspired ALL protocol was open to accrual, 31% of AYA patients treated by adult oncologists received pediatric regimens. This rate fell to 21% from 2013 through 2014. Adult facilities treating ≥ 2 AYA patients with ALL per year captured in the GBACR were more likely to administer pediatric regimens than lower volume centers (P = .03). As of 2014, only a minority of AYA patients with ALL received pediatric ALL regimens at adult cancer centers. Cancer 2017;122-130. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  18. Adolescents and Young Adults with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Impact of Care at Specialized Cancer Centers on Survival Outcome.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Julie; Sun, Can-Lan; Wyatt, Laura; Stock, Wendy; Bhatia, Smita

    2017-03-01

    Background: Adolescents and young adults (AYA; 15-39 years) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) experience inferior survival when compared with children. Impact of care at NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers (CCC) or Children's Oncology Group sites (COG) on survival disparities remains unstudied.Methods: Using the Los Angeles cancer registry, we identified 1,870 ALL or AML patients between 1 and 39 years at diagnosis. Cox regression analyses assessed risk of mortality; younger age + CCC/COG served as the referent group. Logistic regression was used to determine odds of care at CCC/COG, adjusting for variables above.Results: ALL outcome: AYAs at non-CCC/COG experienced inferior survival (15-21 years: HR = 1.9, P = 0.005; 22-29 years: HR = 2.6, P < 0.001; 30-39 years: HR = 3.0, P < 0.001). Outcome at CCC/COG was comparable between children and young AYAs (15-21 years: HR = 1.3, P = 0.3; 22-29 years: HR = 1.2, P = 0.2) but was inferior for 30- to 39-year-olds (HR = 3.4, P < 0.001). AML outcome: AYAs at non-CCC/COG experienced inferior outcome (15-21 years: HR = 1.8, P = 0.02; 22-39 years: HR = 1.4, P = 0.06). Outcome at CCC/COG was comparable between children and 15- to 21-year-olds (HR = 1.3, P = 0.4) but was inferior for 22- to 39-year-olds (HR = 1.7, P = 0.05). Access: 15- to 21-year-olds were less likely to use CCC/COG than children (P < 0.001). In 22- to 39-year-olds, public/uninsured (ALL: P = 0.004; AML<0.001), African American/Hispanics (ALL: P = 0.03), and 30- to 39-year-olds (ALL: P = 0.03) were less likely to use CCC/COG.Conclusions: Poor survival in AYAs with ALL and AML is mitigated by care at CCC/COG. Barriers to CCC/COG care include public/uninsured, and African American/Hispanic race/ethnicity.Impact: Care at CCC/COG explains, in part, inferior outcomes in AYAs with ALL and AML. Key sociodemographic factors serve as barriers to care at specialized centers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 312-20.

  19. Wilms’ Tumor 1 Gene Mutations Independently Predict Poor Outcome in Adults With Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study

    PubMed Central

    Paschka, Peter; Marcucci, Guido; Ruppert, Amy S.; Whitman, Susan P.; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Maharry, Kati; Langer, Christian; Baldus, Claudia D.; Zhao, Weiqiang; Powell, Bayard L.; Baer, Maria R.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Larson, Richard A.; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the prognostic impact of Wilms’ tumor 1 (WT1) gene mutations in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML). Patients and Methods We studied 196 adults younger than 60 years with newly diagnosed primary CN-AML, who were treated similarly on Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) protocols 9621 and 19808, for WT1 mutations in exons 7 and 9. The patients also were assessed for the presence of FLT3 internal tandem duplications (FLT3-ITD), FLT3 tyrosine kinase domain mutations (FLT3-TKD), MLL partial tandem duplications (MLL-PTD), NPM1 and CEBPA mutations, and for the expression levels of ERG and BAALC. Results Twenty-one patients (10.7%) harbored WT1 mutations. Complete remission rates were not significantly different between patients with WT1 mutations and those with unmutated WT1 (P = .36; 76% v 84%). Patients with WT1 mutations had worse disease-free survival (DFS; P < .001; 3-year rates, 13% v 50%) and overall survival (OS; P < .001; 3-year rates, 10% v 56%) than patients with unmutated WT1. In multivariable analyses, WT1 mutations independently predicted worse DFS (P = .009; hazard ratio [HR] = 2.7) when controlling for CEBPA mutational status, ERG expression level, and FLT3-ITD/NPM1 molecular-risk group (ie, FLT3-ITDnegative/NPM1mutated as low risk v FLT3-ITDpositive and/or NPM1wild-type as high risk). WT1 mutations also independently predicted worse OS (P < .001; HR = 3.2) when controlling for CEBPA mutational status, FLT3-ITD/NPM1 molecular-risk group, and white blood cell count. Conclusion We report the first evidence that WT1 mutations independently predict extremely poor outcome in intensively treated, younger patients with CN-AML. Future trials should include testing for WT1 mutations as part of molecularly based risk assessment and risk-adapted treatment stratification of patients with CN-AML. PMID:18559874

  20. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  2. Leukemia - B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Hairy Cell Leukemia: Introduction Request Permissions Leukemia - B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia: Introduction ... t k e P Types of Cancer Leukemia - B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia Guide ...

  3. Busulfan and Etoposide Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Low-Dose Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. T-cell-replete haploidentical transplantation versus autologous stem cell transplantation in adult acute leukemia: a matched pair analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Labopin, Myriam; Piemontese, Simona; Arcese, William; Santarone, Stella; Huang, He; Meloni, Giovanna; Ferrara, Felicetto; Beelen, Dietrich; Sanz, Miguel; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Ciceri, Fabio; Mailhol, Audrey; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Adult patients with acute leukemia in need of a transplant but without a genoidentical donor are usually considered upfront for transplantation with stem cells from any other allogeneic source, rather than autologous stem cell transplantation. We used data from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and performed a matched pair analysis on 188 T-cell-replete haploidentical and 356 autologous transplants done from January 2007 to December 2012, using age, diagnosis, disease status, cytogenetics, and interval from diagnosis to transplant as matching factors. “Haploidentical expert” centers were defined as having reported more than five haploidentical transplants for acute leukemia (median value for the study period). The median follow-up was 28 months. Multivariate analyses, including type of transplant categorized into three classes (“haploidentical regular”, “haploidentical expert” and autologous), conditioning intensity (reduced intensity versus myeloablative conditioning) and the random effect taking into account associations related to matching, showed that non-relapse mortality was higher following haploidentical transplants in expert (HR: 4.7; P=0.00004) and regular (HR: 8.98; P<10−5) centers. Relapse incidence for haploidentical transplants was lower in expert centers (HR:0.39; P=0.0003) but in regular centers was similar to that for autologous transplants. Leukemia-free survival and overall survival rates were higher following autologous transplantation than haploidentical transplants in regular centers (HR: 1.63; P=0.008 and HR: 2.31; P=0.0002 respectively) but similar to those following haploidentical transplants in expert centers. We conclude that autologous stem cell transplantation should presently be considered as a possible alternative to haploidentical transplantation in regular centers that have not developed a specific expert program. PMID:25637051

  5. Sex disparity in childhood and young adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival: Evidence from US population data.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Jobayer; Xie, Li

    2015-12-01

    Sex variation has been persistently investigated in studies concerning acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival outcomes but has not been fully explored among pediatric and young adult AML patients. We detected sex difference in the survival of AML patients diagnosed at ages 0-24 years and explored distinct effects of sex across subgroups of age at diagnosis, race-ethnicity and AML subtypes utilizing the United States Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) population based dataset of 4865 patients diagnosed with AML between 1973 and 2012. Kaplan-Meier survival function, propensity scores and stratified Cox proportional hazards regression were used for data analyses. After controlling for other prognostic factors, females showed a significant survival advantage over their male counterparts, adjusted hazard ratio (aHR, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09, 1.00-1.18). Compared to females, male patients had substantially increased risk of mortality in the following subgroups of: ages 20-24 years at diagnosis (aHR1.30), Caucasian (1.14), acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) (1.35), acute erythroid leukemia (AEL) (1.39), AML with inv(16)(p13.1q22) (2.57), AML with minimum differentiation (1.47); and had substantially decreased aHR in AML t(9;11)(p22;q23) (0.57) and AML with maturation (0.82). Overall, females demonstrated increased survival over males and this disparity was considerably large in patients ages 20-24 years at diagnosis, Caucasians, and in AML subtypes of AML inv(16), APL and AEL. In contrast, males with AML t(9;11)(p22;q23), AML with maturation and age at diagnosis of 10-14 years showed survival benefit. Further investigations are needed to detect the biological processes influencing the mechanisms of these interactions.

  6. T-cell-replete haploidentical transplantation versus autologous stem cell transplantation in adult acute leukemia: a matched pair analysis.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Labopin, Myriam; Piemontese, Simona; Arcese, William; Santarone, Stella; Huang, He; Meloni, Giovanna; Ferrara, Felicetto; Beelen, Dietrich; Sanz, Miguel; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Ciceri, Fabio; Mailhol, Audrey; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-04-01

    Adult patients with acute leukemia in need of a transplant but without a genoidentical donor are usually considered upfront for transplantation with stem cells from any other allogeneic source, rather than autologous stem cell transplantation. We used data from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and performed a matched pair analysis on 188 T-cell-replete haploidentical and 356 autologous transplants done from January 2007 to December 2012, using age, diagnosis, disease status, cytogenetics, and interval from diagnosis to transplant as matching factors. "Haploidentical expert" centers were defined as having reported more than five haploidentical transplants for acute leukemia (median value for the study period). The median follow-up was 28 months. Multivariate analyses, including type of transplant categorized into three classes ("haploidentical regular", "haploidentical expert" and autologous), conditioning intensity (reduced intensity versus myeloablative conditioning) and the random effect taking into account associations related to matching, showed that non-relapse mortality was higher following haploidentical transplants in expert (HR: 4.7; P=0.00004) and regular (HR: 8.98; P<10(-5)) centers. Relapse incidence for haploidentical transplants was lower in expert centers (HR:0.39; P=0.0003) but in regular centers was similar to that for autologous transplants. Leukemia-free survival and overall survival rates were higher following autologous transplantation than haploidentical transplants in regular centers (HR: 1.63; P=0.008 and HR: 2.31; P=0.0002 respectively) but similar to those following haploidentical transplants in expert centers. We conclude that autologous stem cell transplantation should presently be considered as a possible alternative to haploidentical transplantation in regular centers that have not developed a specific expert program.

  7. High-Dose Vincristine Sulfate Liposome Injection for Advanced, Relapsed, and Refractory Adult Philadelphia Chromosome–Negative Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Susan; Schiller, Gary; Lister, John; Damon, Lloyd; Goldberg, Stuart; Aulitzky, Walter; Ben-Yehuda, Dina; Stock, Wendy; Coutre, Steven; Douer, Dan; Heffner, Leonard T.; Larson, Melissa; Seiter, Karen; Smith, Scott; Assouline, Sarit; Kuriakose, Philip; Maness, Lori; Nagler, Arnon; Rowe, Jacob; Schaich, Markus; Shpilberg, Ofer; Yee, Karen; Schmieder, Guenter; Silverman, Jeffrey A.; Thomas, Deborah; Deitcher, Steven R.; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Relapsed adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is associated with high reinduction mortality, chemotherapy resistance, and rapid progression leading to death. Vincristine sulfate liposome injection (VSLI), sphingomyelin and cholesterol nanoparticle vincristine (VCR), facilitates VCR dose-intensification and densification plus enhances target tissue delivery. We evaluated high-dose VSLI monotherapy in adults with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) –negative ALL that was multiply relapsed, relapsed and refractory to reinduction, and/or relapsed after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Patients and Methods Sixty-five adults with Ph-negative ALL in second or greater relapse or whose disease had progressed following two or more leukemia therapies were treated in this pivotal phase II, multinational trial. Intravenous VSLI 2.25 mg/m2, without dose capping, was administered once per week until response, progression, toxicity, or pursuit of HCT. The primary end point was achievement of complete response (CR) or CR with incomplete hematologic recovery (CRi). Results The CR/CRi rate was 20% and overall response rate was 35%. VSLI monotherapy was effective as third-, fourth-, and fifth-line therapy and in patients refractory to other single- and multiagent reinduction therapies. Median CR/CRi duration was 23 weeks (range, 5 to 66 weeks); 12 patients bridged to a post-VSLI HCT, and five patients were long-term survivors. VSLI was generally well tolerated and associated with a low 30-day mortality rate (12%). Conclusion High-dose VSLI monotherapy resulted in meaningful clinical outcomes including durable responses and bridging to HCT in advanced ALL settings. The toxicity profile of VSLI was predictable, manageable, and comparable to standard VCR despite the delivery of large, normally unachievable, individual and cumulative doses of VCR. PMID:23169518

  8. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Results from a Single Center, 1993-2011

    PubMed Central

    Yonal-Hindilerden, Ipek; Kalayoglu-Besisik, Sevgi; Gurses-Koc, Nuray; Hindilerden, Fehmi; Sargin, Deniz

    2017-01-01

    Background: For adult ALL patients, the indications and appropriate timing of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) continue to be debated. The primary aim of this single-institution study was to compare the results of our adult ALL patients that had been allografted with those reported in the current literature. Subjects and Methods: This study included 53 consecutive adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) with myeloablative (92%) and reduced-intensity (8%) conditioning between 1993 and 2011. Results: Mean patient age was 27 years (SD:8.62) and donor age was 33.7 years (SD:9.47). Fourteen patients were in first remission; 21 in ≥2nd remission, 15 in relapse and 3 had primary refractory leukemia. Thirty-four, 15 and 4 patients received busulfan plus cyclophosphamide, cyclophosphamide/total body irradiation and fludarabine-based regimens, respectively. For graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis, cyclosporine plus methotrexate were used. Forty-six donors were related and 7 were unrelated. Thirty patients received granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilized peripheral blood and 23 received bone marrow as stem cell source. Twenty-six patients relapsed at a mean duration of 11.3 months (SD:19.1). Forty-four patients succumbed to their disease after a mean follow-up of 13.6 months (SD:19.5). The cause of mortality was relapse (n=24; 54.5%) and transplant-related etiologies (n=20; 45.5%). The estimated five year probabilities of overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 37% and 12%, respectively. Conclusion: By multivariate analyses, transplantation in first remission was the most important predictor of transplant success. PMID:28286617

  9. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-30

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Contents of bioelements and toxic metals in the Polish population determined by hair analysis. Part III. Adults aged 20 to 40 years.

    PubMed

    Dunicz-Sokolowska, Aldona; Długaszek, Maria; Radomska, Krystyna; Wlaźlak, Edyta; Surkont, Grzegorz; Graczyk, Alfreda

    2007-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to define referential values of 5 basic bioelements (Ca, Mg, Zn, Cu, Fe) and 2 toxic metals (Pb and Cd) in the hair of Polish adults aged 20 to 40 years, based on the research conducted from 1991 to 2006 on a group of 5733 formally healthy subjects of both sexes. The results of our biochemical tests were subjected to statistical analysis and they can be treated as referential norms for the concentrations of analyzed bioelements in the hair of the Polish population. Our analyses confirm significant differences in accumulations of certain elements in women's and men's hair. We established that women's hair Ca, Mg, Zn (p = 0.000000) and hair Cu (p = 0.0001) concentrations are higher than they are in men. A lower mean of hair Fe concentrations in women were confirmed by some tests. Men have significantly higher (p = 0.0000) concentrations of toxic metals (hair Pb and Cd), which keep increasing with age. Analyses of correlations confirm significance (for the assumed level of significance alpha = 0.05) of synergistic interactions between bioelements: Ca-Mg (r = +0.70), Ca-Zn (r = +0.39), Ca-Cu (r = +0.14), Mg-Zn (r = +0.31), Mg-Cu (r = +0.10), Zn-Cu (r = +0.11), Zn-Fe (r = +0.07). Significance (a < 0.05) of antagonistic interactions with toxic metals: Ca-Pb (r = -0.13), Zn-Pb (r = -0.15), Mg-Pb (r = -0.15), Zn-Cd (r =-0.02) was confirmed. Significance (alpha < 0.05) of synergistic effects with toxic metals: Pb-Cd (r = +0.35), Fe-Pb (r = +0.16), Fe-Cd (r = +0.08) was also confirmed. Adults in whose hair bioelements and hair toxic metals concentrations have shown values outlying from reference and who have too many toxic elements and too few bioelements should undergo further diagnostic tests since the results could be a sign of disturbances that could lead to various diseases.

  11. Conventional karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization: an effective utilization strategy in diagnostic adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    He, Rong; Wiktor, Anne E; Hanson, Curtis A; Ketterling, Rhett P; Kurtin, Paul J; Van Dyke, Daniel L; Litzow, Mark R; Howard, Matthew T; Howard, Matthew H; Reichard, Kaaren K

    2015-06-01

    Cytogenetics defines disease entities and predicts prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Conventional karyotyping provides a comprehensive view of the genome, while fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) detects targeted abnormalities. The aim of this study was to compare the utility of karyotyping and FISH in adult AML. We studied 250 adult AML cases with concurrent karyotyping and FISH testing. Karyotyping was considered adequate when 20 or more metaphases were analyzed. In total, 220 cases had adequate karyotyping and were classified as normal karyotype/normal FISH (n = 92), normal karyotype/abnormal FISH (n = 4), abnormal karyotype/normal FISH (n = 8), and abnormal karyotype/abnormal FISH (n = 116). The overall karyotype/FISH concordance rate was 97.7% with five discordant cases identified, four from the normal karyotype/abnormal FISH group and one from the abnormal karyotype/abnormal FISH group. No karyotype/FISH discordance was seen in the abnormal karyotype/normal FISH group for the FISH probes evaluated. FISH lent prognostic information in one (0.5%) of 220 cases with normal karyotype/abnormal FISH: CBFB-MYH11 fusion, indicating favorable prognosis. In adult AML, FISH rarely provides additional information when karyotyping is adequate. We therefore propose an evidence-based, cost-effective algorithmic approach for routine conventional karyotype and FISH testing in adult AML workup. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  12. Outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia harboring trisomy 8.

    PubMed

    Konuma, Takaaki; Kondo, Tadakazu; Yamashita, Takuya; Uchida, Naoyuki; Fukuda, Takahiro; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Kato, Chiaki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Kanamori, Heiwa; Eto, Tetsuya; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Kohno, Akio; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Takami, Akiyoshi; Yano, Shingo

    2017-03-01

    Trisomy 8 (+8) is one of the most common cytogenetic abnormalities in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in adult patients with AML harboring +8 remains unclear. To evaluate, the outcome and prognostic factors in patients with AML harboring +8 as the only chromosomal abnormality or in association with other abnormalities, we retrospectively analyzed the Japanese registration data of 631 adult patients with AML harboring +8 treated with allogeneic HSCT between 1990 and 2013. In total, 388 (61%) patients were not in remission at the time of HSCT. With a median follow-up of 38.5 months, the probability of overall survival and the cumulative incidence of relapse at 3 years were 40 and 34%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, two or more additional cytogenetic abnormalities and not being in remission at the time of HSCT were significantly associated with a higher overall mortality and relapse. Nevertheless, no significant impact on the outcome was observed in cases with one cytogenetic abnormality in addition to +8. Although more than 60% of the patients received HSCT when not in remission, allogeneic HSCT offered a curative option for adult patients with AML harboring +8.

  13. Small PARP inhibitor PJ-34 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of adult T-cell leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue Tao; Moles, Ramona; Chaib-Mezrag, Hassiba; Nicot, Christophe

    2015-10-23

    HTLV-I is associated with the development of an aggressive form of lymphocytic leukemia known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). A major obstacle for effective treatment of ATLL resides in the genetic diversity of tumor cells and their ability to acquire resistance to chemotherapy regimens. As a result, most patients relapse and current therapeutic approaches still have limited long-term survival benefits. Hence, the development of novel approaches is greatly needed. In this study, we found that a small molecule inhibitor of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), PJ-34, is very effective in activating S/G2M cell cycle checkpoints, resulting in permanent cell cycle arrest and reactivation of p53 transcription functions and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis of HTLV-I-transformed and patient-derived ATLL tumor cells. We also found that HTLV-I-transformed MT-2 cells are resistant to PJ-34 therapy associated with reduced cleaved caspase-3 activation and increased expression of RelA/p65. Since PJ-34 has been tested in clinical trials for the treatment of solid tumors, our results suggest that some ATLL patients may be good candidates to benefit from PJ-34 therapy.

  14. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma in South and Central America and the Caribbean: systematic search and review.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro D; de Carvalho, Rebeca F; Bittencourt, Achiléa L

    2017-03-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is caused by the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) which is endemic in countries of Caribbean and Central and South America. We performed a systematic search and review to identify publications on ATL in these countries to verify if this disease was getting recognition in these regions as well as the characteristics of the observed cases. The median age of 49.4 years was lower than that referred to in Japan. According to our findings in most Brazilian states and in some other countries, ATL is not being recognized and should be strongly considered in the differential diagnosis of T-cell leukemias/lymphomas. Failure to identify these cases may be due to the unsystematic realization of serology for HTLV-1 and phenotypic identification of non-Hodgkin lymphomas that may result from lack of resources. Detection of ATL cases has been more feasible with cooperation from foreign research centers. A huge effort should be made to improve the surveillance system for ATL diagnosis in most of the South- and Central-American and Caribbean countries, and this attitude should be embraced by public organs to support health professionals in this important task.

  15. Low depressive symptom and mental distress scores in adult long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Harila, Marika J; Niinivirta, Tomi I T; Winqvist, Satu; Harila-Saari, Arja H

    2011-04-01

    Childhood cancer survivors are thought to be at risk of psychological difficulties. We examined the prevalence of depressive symptoms and mental well-being in adult long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at a mean age of 20 years after the cessation of therapy. Depressive symptoms were assessed with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-21) and mental distress with General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) among 73 ALL survivors and 146 healthy controls. The ALL survivors obtained significantly lower BDI scores (P=0.046) compared with the controls, indicating less depressive symptoms among the ALL survivors. BDI scores indicated a significantly less frequent moderate or severe depression in the ALL survivors compared with the controls (P=0.039). BDI scores indicated no depression in 80.8% of the ALL survivors and 73.3% of the control group. The female ALL survivors obtained lower BDI scores than did the female controls (P=0.005). No difference was found in GHQ-12 scores between the survivors and the controls. Survivors of ALL reported fewer depressive symptoms and equal mental well-being compared with healthy controls. Our findings support the idea that childhood leukemia survivors' subjective experience of well-being is possibly affected by repressive adaptive style.

  16. Comorbidity between HTLV-1-associated adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia and verrucous carcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL) is classified as a peripheral CD4+ T-cell neoplasm caused by the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). Typical symptoms are associated with leukemic infiltration; however, atypical and exaggerated manifestations of verrucous carcinoma have also been described. Case report: We present here the case of a patient with multiple skin lesions, ischemic necrosis in the hallux and lymphadenopathies. Biopsies were taken, which showed verrucous epidermal carcinoma and cutaneous lymphoma. Splenomegaly and adenopathy in mesentery, retro peritoneum and lymph node chains in the limbs were observed. Bone marrow examination showed findings compatible with T-cell leukemia/lymphoma; and it was ELISA positive for HTLV-1/2. Treatment and outcome: The patient had a good initial response to a CHOP scheme (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) with filgrastim. However, the patient had a relapse and died before the second cycle. Clinical relevance: Comorbidity could lead to the associated risk factors model. According to this model, secondary immunodeficiency caused by HTLV-1 may induce the development of verrucous carcinomas; alternatively, the disease could be due to a correlation between HTLV-1 and the human papillomavirus (HPV). PMID:28559645

  17. Comorbidity between HTLV-1-associated adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia and verrucous carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Miller; Moreno, Luis

    2017-03-30

    Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL) is classified as a peripheral CD4+ T-cell neoplasm caused by the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). Typical symptoms are associated with leukemic infiltration; however, atypical and exaggerated manifestations of verrucous carcinoma have also been described. We present here the case of a patient with multiple skin lesions, ischemic necrosis in the hallux and lymphadenopathies. Biopsies were taken, which showed verrucous epidermal carcinoma and cutaneous lymphoma. Splenomegaly and adenopathy in mesentery, retro peritoneum and lymph node chains in the limbs were observed. Bone marrow examination showed findings compatible with T-cell leukemia/lymphoma; and it was ELISA positive for HTLV-1/2. The patient had a good initial response to a CHOP scheme (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) with filgrastim. However, the patient had a relapse and died before the second cycle. Comorbidity could lead to the associated risk factors model. According to this model, secondary immunodeficiency caused by HTLV-1 may induce the development of verrucous carcinomas; alternatively, the disease could be due to a correlation between HTLV-1 and the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  18. Radiation therapy for the management of patients with HTLV-1-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B; Morris, John C; Stewart, Donn M; Urquhart, Nicole E; Janik, John E; Kreitman, Robert J; Lita, Elena; Conlon, Kevin; Wharfe, Gilian; Waldmann, Thomas A; Kaushal, Aradhana

    2012-08-30

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) typically has survivals measured in months with chemotherapy. One prior published series (1983-1991) assessed local radiotherapy for ATL. Ten consecutive patients with pathologically confirmed ATL treated with radiotherapy were reviewed. Subtypes included acute (n = 7), smoldering (n = 2), and lymphomatous (n = 1). Patients received an average of 2.5 systemic therapy regimens before radiotherapy. Twenty lesions (cutaneous = 10, nodal = 8, extranodal = 2) were treated to a mean of 35.4 Gy/2-3 Gy (range, 12-60 Gy). At 9.0-month mean follow-up (range, 0.1-42.0 months), all lesions symptomatically and radiographically responded, with in-field complete responses in 40.0% (nodal 37.5% vs. cutaneous 50.0%; P = .62). No patient experienced in-field progression. Nine patients developed new/progressive out-of-field disease. Median survival was 17.0 months (3-year survival, 30.0%). No Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute grade ≥ 3 or any late toxicity was noted. This report is the first to use modern radiotherapy techniques and finds effective local control across ATL subtypes. Radiotherapy should be considered for symptomatic local progression of ATL.

  19. Cancer/testis antigens are novel targets of immunotherapy for adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Maeda, Yuka; Ishida, Takashi; Gnjatic, Sacha; Sato, Eiichi; Mori, Fumiko; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Ito, Asahi; Fukumori, Yasuo; Utsunomiya, Atae; Inagaki, Hiroshi; Old, Lloyd J; Ueda, Ryuzo; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2012-03-29

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an intractable hematologic malignancy caused by human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), which infects approximately 20 million people worldwide. Here, we have explored the possible expression of cancer/testis (CT) antigens by ATLL cells, as CT antigens are widely recognized as ideal targets of cancer immunotherapy against solid tumors. A high percentage (87.7%) of ATLL cases (n = 57) expressed CT antigens at the mRNA level: NY-ESO-1 (61.4%), MAGE-A3 (31.6%), and MAGE-A4 (61.4%). CT antigen expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. This contrasts with other types of lymphoma or leukemia, which scarcely express these CT antigens. Humoral immune responses, particularly against NY-ESO-1, were detected in 11.6% (5 of 43) and NY-ESO-1-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses were observed in 55.6% (5 of 9) of ATLL patients. NY-ESO-1-specific CD8(+) T cells recognized autologous ATLL cells and produced effector cytokines. Thus, ATLL cells characteristically express CT antigens and therefore vaccination with CT antigens can be an effective immunotherapy of ATLL.

  20. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Molecular landscape of acute myeloid leukemia in younger adults and its clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Grimwade, David; Ivey, Adam; Huntly, Brian J P

    2016-01-07

    Recent major advances in understanding the molecular basis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) provide a double-edged sword. Although defining the topology and key features of the molecular landscape are fundamental to development of novel treatment approaches and provide opportunities for greater individualization of therapy, confirmation of the genetic complexity presents a huge challenge to successful translation into routine clinical practice. It is now clear that many genes are recurrently mutated in AML; moreover, individual leukemias harbor multiple mutations and are potentially composed of subclones with differing mutational composition, rendering each patient's AML genetically unique. In order to make sense of the overwhelming mutational data and capitalize on this clinically, it is important to identify (1) critical AML-defining molecular abnormalities that distinguish biological disease entities; (2) mutations, typically arising in subclones, that may influence prognosis but are unlikely to be ideal therapeutic targets; (3) mutations associated with preleukemic clones; and (4) mutations that have been robustly shown to confer independent prognostic information or are therapeutically relevant. The reward of identifying AML-defining molecular lesions present in all leukemic populations (including subclones) has been exemplified by acute promyelocytic leukemia, where successful targeting of the underlying PML-RARα oncoprotein has eliminated the need for chemotherapy for disease cure. Despite the molecular heterogeneity and recognizing that treatment options for other forms of AML are limited, this review will consider the scope for using novel molecular information to improve diagnosis, identify subsets of patients eligible for targeted therapies, refine outcome prediction, and track treatment response.

  2. Blinatumomab and Combination Chemotherapy or Dasatinib, Prednisone, and Blinatumomab in Treating Older Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-10

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Philadelphia Chromosome Negative; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. T Cell Receptor Vβ Staining Identifies the Malignant Clone in Adult T cell Leukemia and Reveals Killing of Leukemia Cells by Autologous CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Aileen G; Witkover, Aviva; Melamed, Anat; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Cook, Lucy B M; Fields, Paul; Taylor, Graham P; Bangham, Charles R M

    2016-11-01

    There is growing evidence that CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses can contribute to long-term remission of many malignancies. The etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1), contains highly immunogenic CTL epitopes, but ATL patients typically have low frequencies of cytokine-producing HTLV-1-specific CD8+ cells in the circulation. It remains unclear whether patients with ATL possess CTLs that can kill the malignant HTLV-1 infected clone. Here we used flow cytometric staining of TCRVβ and cell adhesion molecule-1 (CADM1) to identify monoclonal populations of HTLV-1-infected T cells in the peripheral blood of patients with ATL. Thus, we quantified the rate of CD8+-mediated killing of the putative malignant clone in ex vivo blood samples. We observed that CD8+ cells from ATL patients were unable to lyse autologous ATL clones when tested directly ex vivo. However, short in vitro culture restored the ability of CD8+ cells to kill ex vivo ATL clones in some donors. The capacity of CD8+ cells to lyse HTLV-1 infected cells which expressed the viral sense strand gene products was significantly enhanced after in vitro culture, and donors with an ATL clone that expressed the HTLV-1 Tax gene were most likely to make a detectable lytic CD8+ response to the ATL cells. We conclude that some patients with ATL possess functional tumour-specific CTLs which could be exploited to contribute to control of the disease.

  4. T Cell Receptor Vβ Staining Identifies the Malignant Clone in Adult T cell Leukemia and Reveals Killing of Leukemia Cells by Autologous CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Witkover, Aviva; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fields, Paul; Bangham, Charles R. M.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses can contribute to long-term remission of many malignancies. The etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1), contains highly immunogenic CTL epitopes, but ATL patients typically have low frequencies of cytokine-producing HTLV-1-specific CD8+ cells in the circulation. It remains unclear whether patients with ATL possess CTLs that can kill the malignant HTLV-1 infected clone. Here we used flow cytometric staining of TCRVβ and cell adhesion molecule-1 (CADM1) to identify monoclonal populations of HTLV-1-infected T cells in the peripheral blood of patients with ATL. Thus, we quantified the rate of CD8+-mediated killing of the putative malignant clone in ex vivo blood samples. We observed that CD8+ cells from ATL patients were unable to lyse autologous ATL clones when tested directly ex vivo. However, short in vitro culture restored the ability of CD8+ cells to kill ex vivo ATL clones in some donors. The capacity of CD8+ cells to lyse HTLV-1 infected cells which expressed the viral sense strand gene products was significantly enhanced after in vitro culture, and donors with an ATL clone that expressed the HTLV-1 Tax gene were most likely to make a detectable lytic CD8+ response to the ATL cells. We conclude that some patients with ATL possess functional tumour-specific CTLs which could be exploited to contribute to control of the disease. PMID:27893842

  5. Trends in management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Influence of insurance based healthcare and treatment compliance on the outcome of adolescents and adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Arigela, Ravi Sankar; Gundeti, Sadashivudu; Ganta, Ranga Raman; Nasaka, Srividhya; Linga, Vijay Gandhi; Maddali, Lakshmi Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Aim: In this study, we attempted to analyze the impact of insurance based health care system and treatment compliance on the outcome of adolescent and adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Materials and Methods: Patients who underwent treatment for ALL during the period 2003-2011 were enrolled into this retrospective study. Patients on supportive or palliative care only and patients with age <10 years were excluded. The hospital records and tumor registry records were studied. Patients were stratified into two groups, Group A (prior to the introduction of state health insurance [SHI], 2003-2007) and Group B (after the introduction of SHI, 2008-2011). Overall survival (OS) was calculated using Kaplan–Meier method. Results: A total of 420 patients with suspected or confirmed ALL visited our center during the study period and 179 patients (87 in Group A and 92 in Group B) were considered for inclusion. The median age in years (range) was 18 (10-57) and 18 (10-58) respectively in Groups A and B with males more than females. Median OS (95% CI) was 9 (6.7-11.2) and 12 (7.3-16.7) months in the Groups A and B respectively (P = 0.265). Poor treatment compliance in both groups was high (36% in Group A and 41% in Group B, [P = 0.107]) with lower default rates in Group B (P = 0.019). Patients with good compliance in the total study population and the individual study groups had significantly better OS. Conclusions: Insurance based health care has improved outcomes in the present study but not compliance to treatment. Significantly better OS was observed in patients with good compliance. PMID:27051155

  6. Crusted scabies in an adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma patient successfully treated with oral ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Yonekura, Kentaro; Kanekura, Takuro; Kanzaki, Tamotsu; Utsunomiya, Atae

    2006-02-01

    We report an adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) patient whose crusted scabies was successfully treated with oral ivermectin. This 63-year-old man had previously been treated with oral prednisolone, sobuzoxane and etoposide for approximately 1 year. When he developed crusted scabies, he received two doses of oral ivermectin (200 microg/kg) 10 days apart and the concomitant topical application of crotamiton containing 30% benzyl benzoate. This produced remarkable results, suggesting that oral ivermectin should be considered for the treatment of crusted scabies even in immunocompromised patients. While ivermectin may be useful for treating intractable scabies, attention must be paid to the possible appearance of ivermectin-resistant mites.

  7. A study of intermittent alternating drug program reinduction therapy on the frequency and duration of response in adult acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    McCredie, K B; Freireich, E J; Bodey, G P; Burgess, M A; Whitecar, J P; Smith, T L

    1976-01-01

    Of 41 adults with a diagnosis of acute leukemia that were randomized for induction therapy in combination with methotrexate, 6-MP, vincristine and prednisone (POMP) versus a combination of cytosine arabinoside, cytoxan, vincristine and prednisone (COAP), 23 (56%) patients achieved a complete remission. During remission, patients received consolidation therapy with the three courses of remission induction regimen that they had not received initially. They then received daunomycin (three courses) and L-asparaginase and were then maintained for two years with their induction therapy. The median duration of survival for all patients was 40 weeks; the median duration of survival of those patients that responded to chemotherapy was 80 weeks. There was no significant difference between the two induction regimens with regard to complete remission more than four and one half years from diagnosis and two and one half years from discontinuation of all therapy.

  8. [Induction and maintenance treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia in adults by sequential use of combination chemotherapy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fülle, H H

    1977-04-15

    The therapeutic regimens for acute myelogenous leukemia in 2 different periods of time will be described with comparison of their results. A. 28 adults were treated with cytosine arabinoside and 6-thioguanine only. Thereby, 28% complete and 16% partial remissions were achieved. The mean duration of the complete remissions was 23 weeks. The mean survival time of the patients with complete remission amounted to 53 weeks B. 46% complete and 12% partial remissions were obtained in 37 patients treated with cytosine arabinoside and 6-thioguanine doubling the dosage of the above mentioned regimen followed by 3 cycles of TRAP (and COAP). Using a maintenance therapy with modified TRAP, COAP, and POMP cycles the complete remissions lasted 47 weeks at an average. The mean survival time of patients with complete remission was 87 weeks after start of treatment.

  9. Deletion and deletion/insertion mutations in the juxtamembrane domain of the FLT3 gene in adult acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, Kristin K.; Smonskey, Matthew T.; DeFedericis, HanChun; Deeb, George; Sait, Sheila N.J.; Wetzler, Meir; Wang, Eunice S.; Starostik, Petr

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to FLT3 ITD mutations, in-frame deletions in the FLT3 gene have rarely been described in adult acute leukemia. We report two cases of AML with uncommon in-frame mutations in the juxtamembrane domain of the FLT3 gene: a 3-bp (c.1770_1774delCTACGinsGT; p.F590_V592delinsLF) deletion/insertion and a 12-bp (c.1780_1791delTTCAGAGAATAT; p.F594_Y597del) deletion. We verified by sequencing that the reading frame of the FLT3 gene was preserved and by cDNA analysis that the mRNA of the mutant allele was expressed in both cases. Given the recent development of FLT3 inhibitors, our findings may be of therapeutic value for AML patients harboring similar FLT3 mutations. PMID:25379410

  10. Epidermodysplasia-verruciformis-like eruption associated with gamma-papillomavirus infection in a patient with adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kazuhiro; Egawa, Nagayasu; Kiyono, Tohru; Kanekura, Takuro

    2009-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a genodermatosis characterized by widespread and persistent cutaneous lesions caused by beta-papillomaviruses. Rare cases of acquired EV-like eruption associated with beta-papillomavirus infection have been reported in immunosuppressed patients. We report a case of acquired EV-like eruption in an immunosuppressed patient with adult T-cell leukemia. The cutaneous lesions clinically resembled pityriasis versicolor and exhibited the typical histological features of EV, but in some areas of the same biopsy specimen characteristic homogeneous intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were observed. Although beta-papillomavirus was not detected by highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction, a putative novel type of gamma-papillomavirus was identified. This is the first documentation of an association between EV-like eruption and gamma-papillomavirus infection.

  11. Granulocytic Sarcoma of the Orbit Presenting as a Fulminant Orbitopathy in an Adult With Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, John P; Harrison, Andrew R; Cameron, J Douglas; Mokhtarzadeh, Ali

    A 64-year-old woman with relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) undergoing salvage chemotherapy developed rapid onset of right-sided ophthalmoplegia, proptosis, optic neuropathy, and vision loss from 20/30 to hand motions over a 3-hour period on day 4 of her treatment. CT scan of her orbits revealed a superolateral orbital mass and periocular edema. She underwent immediate canthotomy and cantholysis, and lateral orbitotomy with debulking of the mass later the same day. The histopathology was consistent with aggregates of myeloid blasts. Her vision recovered to 20/20 on postoperative day 1. Orbital granulocytic sarcoma is a rare condition often concurrent with AML, typically in the pediatric population and rarely in adults. Presentation as a fulminant orbitopathy with rapidly progressive optic neuropathy and vision loss over several hours has not been previously reported.

  12. Trends in mortality of adult patients diagnosed with myeloid leukemia from 1994 to 2011 in southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Callera, Fernando; Callera, Alexandra Fernandes; Rosa, Evandro Secchi

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate trends in mortality among adults with myeloid leukemia in the Vale do Paraíba, State of São Paulo. Data from the Brazilian National Health Service database DATASUS provided the number of deaths caused by myeloid leukemia and the number of inhabitants per year in the Regional Health Division XVII from 1994 to 2011. Registries were categorized according to gender into four age ranges (over 20 years, 20-49, 50-69 and over 70 years) for an estimation of the annual percent change for age-adjusted mortality rates. The percent changes were calculated using the Joinpoint regression analysis model. Overall, a significant decline per year was demonstrated for the entire sample (over 20 years) across the 18-year period studied (annual percent change: -5.59%; 95% CI: -8.5 to -2.5% for males; p-value<0.05 and -7.02%; 95% CI -11.2 to -2.8% for females; p-value<0.05) with no significant difference between genders. In an analysis using two Joinpoints, significant drops were observed from 1994 to 2001 (annual percent change: -21.22%; 95% confidence interval: -27.9 to -13.9%; p-value<0.05) and from 1994 to 2003 (annual percent change: -12.86%; 95% confidence interval -22.2 to -2.5%; p-value<0.05) for men and women, respectively. The declining trends were greatest for patients aged over 70 years with the age-adjusted mortality rates in younger groups declining non-significantly except for males aged 50-69 years old. Our data suggest a significant decline per year in age-adjusted mortality rates of adult patients diagnosed with myeloid leukemia from 1994 to 2011 in the Vale do Paraíba, State of São Paulo. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Hematologia, Hemoterapia e Terapia Celular. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Outcome after relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adult patients included in four consecutive risk-adapted trials by the PETHEMA Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Oriol, Albert; Vives, Susana; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús-María; Tormo, Mar; Heras, Inmaculada; Rivas, Concepción; Bethencourt, Concepción; Moscardó, Federico; Bueno, Javier; Grande, Carlos; del Potro, Eloy; Guardia, Ramon; Brunet, Salut; Bergua, Juan; Bernal, Teresa; Moreno, Maria-José; Calvo, Carlota; Bastida, Pilar; Feliu, Evarist; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Background About one half of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are not cured of the disease and ultimately die. The objective of this study was to explore the factors influencing the outcome of adult patients with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Design and Methods We analyzed the characteristics, the outcome and the prognostic factors for survival after first relapse in a series of 263 adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (excluding those with mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia) prospectively enrolled in four consecutive risk-adapted PETHEMA trials. Results The median overall survival after relapse was 4.5 months (95% CI, 4–5 months) with a 5-year overall survival of 10% (95% CI, 8%–12%); 45% of patients receiving intensive second-line treatment achieved a second complete remission and 22% (95% CI, 14%–30%) of them remained disease free at 5 years. Factors predicting a good outcome after rescue therapy were age less than 30 years (2-year overall survival of 21% versus 10% for those over 30 years old; P<0.022) and a first remission lasting more than 2 years (2-year overall survival of 36% versus 17% among those with a shorter first remission; P<0.001). Patients under 30 years old whose first complete remission lasted longer than 2 years had a 5-year overall survival of 38% (95% CI, 23%–53%) and a 5-year disease-free survival of 53% (95% CI, 34%–72%). Conclusions The prognosis of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse is poor. Those aged less than 30 years with a first complete remission lasting longer than 2 years have reasonable possibilities of becoming long-term survivors while patients over this age or those who relapse early cannot be successfully rescued using the therapies currently available. PMID:20145276

  14. High curability via intensive reinduction chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation in young adults with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Sweden 2003–2007

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, Piotr; Åström, Maria; Ahlberg, Lucia; Bernell, Per; Hulegårdh, Erik; Hägglund, Hans; Karlsson, Karin; Markuszewska-Kuczymska, Alicja; Tomaszewska-Toporska, Beata; Smedmyr, Bengt; Hallböök, Helene

    2012-01-01

    Background A minority of patients with adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse are rescued. The aim of this population-based study was to assess the results of reinduction treatment and allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients in second complete remission. Design and Methods Between 2003–2007, 76 adults (<66 years) with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Burkitt’s leukemia excluded) were prospectively reported to The Swedish Adult Acute Leukemia Registry and later evaluated. Results Reinduction with: (i) mitoxantrone, etoposide, and cytarabine (MEA); (ii) fludarabine, cytarabine, pegylated-asparaginase plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (FLAG-Asp); and (iii) cytarabine, betamethasone, cyclophosphamide, daunorubicin, and vincristine (ABCDV) resulted in complete remission in 6/9 (67%), 10/16 (63%) and 9/21 (43%) of the patients, respectively. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation was performed during second complete remission in 29 patients. Multivariate analysis regarding overall survival after relapse revealed that age over 35 years at diagnosis and relapse within 18 months were negative prognostic factors. Overall survival rates at 3 and 5 years were 22% (95% CI: 13–32) and 15% (95% CI: 7–24). Of 19 patients less than 35 years at diagnosis who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation in second remission, ten (53%) are still alive at a median of 5.5 years (range, 4.2–8.3) after relapse, whereas all patients over 35 years old at diagnosis have died. Conclusions Allogeneic stem cell transplantation remains the treatment of choice for young adults with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Both (i) mitoxantrone, etoposide, and cytarabine and (ii) fludarabine, cytarabine, pegylated-asparaginase plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor seem effective as reinduction treatments and should be further evaluated. New salvage strategies are needed, especially for patients over 35 years old at diagnosis. PMID:22511497

  15. Outcome after relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adult patients included in four consecutive risk-adapted trials by the PETHEMA Study Group.

    PubMed

    Oriol, Albert; Vives, Susana; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús-María; Tormo, Mar; Heras, Inmaculada; Rivas, Concepción; Bethencourt, Concepción; Moscardó, Federico; Bueno, Javier; Grande, Carlos; del Potro, Eloy; Guardia, Ramon; Brunet, Salut; Bergua, Juan; Bernal, Teresa; Moreno, Maria-José; Calvo, Carlota; Bastida, Pilar; Feliu, Evarist; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2010-04-01

    About one half of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are not cured of the disease and ultimately die. The objective of this study was to explore the factors influencing the outcome of adult patients with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We analyzed the characteristics, the outcome and the prognostic factors for survival after first relapse in a series of 263 adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (excluding those with mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia) prospectively enrolled in four consecutive risk-adapted PETHEMA trials. The median overall survival after relapse was 4.5 months (95% CI, 4-5 months) with a 5-year overall survival of 10% (95% CI, 8%-12%); 45% of patients receiving intensive second-line treatment achieved a second complete remission and 22% (95% CI, 14%-30%) of them remained disease free at 5 years. Factors predicting a good outcome after rescue therapy were age less than 30 years (2-year overall survival of 21% versus 10% for those over 30 years old; P<0.022) and a first remission lasting more than 2 years (2-year overall survival of 36% versus 17% among those with a shorter first remission; P<0.001). Patients under 30 years old whose first complete remission lasted longer than 2 years had a 5-year overall survival of 38% (95% CI, 23%-53%) and a 5-year disease-free survival of 53% (95% CI, 34%-72%). The prognosis of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse is poor. Those aged less than 30 years with a first complete remission lasting longer than 2 years have reasonable possibilities of becoming long-term survivors while patients over this age or those who relapse early cannot be successfully rescued using the therapies currently available.

  16. Williamson Polishing & Plating Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Williamson Polishing & Plating Co. Inc. was a plating shop located in the Martindale-Brightwood neighborhood of Indianapolis. The facility conducted job shop polishing and electroplating services. The vacant site contains a 14,651-square-foot building.

  17. Microdeletions are a general feature of adult and adolescent acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Unexpected similarities with pediatric disease

    PubMed Central

    Paulsson, Kajsa; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; MacDougall, Finlay; Stevens, Jane; Stasevich, Irina; Vrcelj, Nikoletta; Chaplin, Tracy; Lillington, Debra M.; Lister, T. Andrew; Young, Bryan D.

    2008-01-01

    We present here a genome-wide map of abnormalities found in diagnostic samples from 45 adults and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A 500K SNP array analysis uncovered frequent genetic abnormalities, with cryptic deletions constituting half of the detected changes, implying that microdeletions are a characteristic feature of this malignancy. Importantly, the pattern of deletions resembled that recently reported in pediatric ALL, suggesting that adult, adolescent, and childhood cases may be more similar on the genetic level than previously thought. Thus, 70% of the cases displayed deletion of one or more of the CDKN2A, PAX5, IKZF1, ETV6, RB1, and EBF1 genes. Furthermore, several genes not previously implicated in the pathogenesis of ALL were identified as possible recurrent targets of deletion. In total, the SNP array analysis identified 367 genetic abnormalities not corresponding to known copy number polymorphisms, with all but two cases (96%) displaying at least one cryptic change. The resolution level of this SNP array study is the highest used to date to investigate a malignant hematologic disorder. Our findings provide insights into the leukemogenic process and may be clinically important in adult and adolescent ALL. Most importantly, we report that microdeletions of key genes appear to be a common, characteristic feature of ALL that is shared among different clinical, morphological, and cytogenetic subgroups. PMID:18458336

  18. Outcome of treatment after first relapse in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia initially treated by the LALA-94 trial.

    PubMed

    Tavernier, E; Boiron, J-M; Huguet, F; Bradstock, K; Vey, N; Kovacsovics, T; Delannoy, A; Fegueux, N; Fenaux, P; Stamatoullas, A; Tournilhac, O; Buzyn, A; Reman, O; Charrin, C; Boucheix, C; Gabert, J; Lhéritier, V; Vernant, J-P; Dombret, H; Thomas, X

    2007-09-01

    Fifty-four percent of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who entered the LALA-94 trial experienced a first relapse. We examined the outcome of these 421 adult patients. One hundred and eighty-seven patients (44%) achieved a second complete remission (CR). The median disease-free survival (DFS) was 5.2 months with a 5-year DFS at 12%. Factors predicting a better outcome after relapse were any transplant performed in second CR (P<0.0001), a first CR duration >1 year (P=0.04) and platelet level >100 x 10(9)/l at relapse (P=0.04). Risk groups defined at diagnosis and treatment received in first CR did not influence the outcome after relapse. The best results were obtained in a subset of patients who were eligible for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Geno-identical allogeneic SCT was performed in 55 patients, and 3 patients received donor lymphocyte infusions. Forty-four transplantations were performed from an unrelated donor (of which four were cord blood). We conclude that most adult patients with recurring ALL could not be rescued using current available therapies, although allogeneic SCT remains the best therapeutic option.

  19. Radiolabeled BC8 Antibody, Busulfan, Cyclophosphamide Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in First Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-28

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22)

  20. TcRαβ-depleted haploidentical transplantation results in adult acute leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Kaynar, Leylagul; Demir, Koray; Turak, Esra Ermiş; Öztürk, Çiğdem Pala; Zararsız, Gökmen; Gönen, Zeynep Burçin; Gökahmetoğlu, Selma; Şıvgın, Serdar; Eser, Bülent; Köker, Yavuz; Solmaz, Musa; Ünal, Ali; Çetin, Mustafa

    2017-04-01

    The use of αβ+ T-cell-depleted grafts is a novel approach to prevent graft failure, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and non-relapse mortality (NRM) in patients undergoing haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Thirty-four patients with acute leukemia and lacking a match donor were treated with αβ T-cell-depleted allografts from haploidentical family donors. A total of 24 patients had acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 10 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia. 84.4% of patients were in the high-risk group, and 55.9% were not in remission. The preparative regimen included thiotepa, melphalan, fludarabine, and anti-thymocyte globulin-Fresenius. Grafts were peripheral blood stem cells engineered by TcR-alpha/beta depletion. Neutrophil and platelet engraftment was achieved on days +12 (range, 10.5-15) and +11 (range, 10-12). All but three patients were engrafted with full donor chimerism. Grade III-IV acute GVHD occurred in two (5.9%) patients and chronic GVHD in two (6.1%). Disease-free survival and overall survival were 42 and 54% at 1 year, respectively. AML as disease type (HR: 4.87, 95% CI: 1.50-15.87) and mother as donor (HR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.00-1.11) were found to be independent risk factors on patient survival. Mortality and NRM in the first 100 days were 5 of 34 (14.7%) and 4 of 34 (11.7%). Relapse was the main cause of death (56.3%). T-cell reconstitution appears to be faster than that reported in published data with CD3/CD19-depleted grafts. αβ T-cell-depleted haploidentical transplantation may be a good alternative for high-risk patients if there are no human leukocyte antigen matched donors.

  1. Molecular landscape of acute myeloid leukemia in younger adults and its clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Ivey, Adam; Huntly, Brian J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Recent major advances in understanding the molecular basis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) provide a double-edged sword. Although defining the topology and key features of the molecular landscape are fundamental to development of novel treatment approaches and provide opportunities for greater individualization of therapy, confirmation of the genetic complexity presents a huge challenge to successful translation into routine clinical practice. It is now clear that many genes are recurrently mutated in AML; moreover, individual leukemias harbor multiple mutations and are potentially composed of subclones with differing mutational composition, rendering each patient’s AML genetically unique. In order to make sense of the overwhelming mutational data and capitalize on this clinically, it is important to identify (1) critical AML-defining molecular abnormalities that distinguish biological disease entities; (2) mutations, typically arising in subclones, that may influence prognosis but are unlikely to be ideal therapeutic targets; (3) mutations associated with preleukemic clones; and (4) mutations that have been robustly shown to confer independent prognostic information or are therapeutically relevant. The reward of identifying AML-defining molecular lesions present in all leukemic populations (including subclones) has been exemplified by acute promyelocytic leukemia, where successful targeting of the underlying PML-RARα oncoprotein has eliminated the need for chemotherapy for disease cure. Despite the molecular heterogeneity and recognizing that treatment options for other forms of AML are limited, this review will consider the scope for using novel molecular information to improve diagnosis, identify subsets of patients eligible for targeted therapies, refine outcome prediction, and track treatment response. PMID:26660431

  2. Self-esteem, coping styles, and quality of life in polish adolescents and young adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Pisula, Ewa; Lukowska, Ewa; Fudalej, Piotr S

    2014-05-01

    Objectives : To evaluate self-esteem, coping styles, and health-related quality of life and their relationships in Polish adolescents and young adults with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate and related sex differences. Design and Participants : Self-report questionnaires measuring self-esteem (Multidimensional Self-Esteem Inventory), coping styles (Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations), and health-related quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF) were completed by 48 participants with cleft lip and palate (age, 16 to 23 years; 31 males, 17 females) and 48 controls without cleft lip and palate (age, 16 to 23 years; 28 males, 20 females) matched for age, place of residence, and socioeconomic status. Results : Regarding self-esteem, individuals with cleft lip and palate scored higher on body functioning (P < .01) and defensive self-enhancement (P < .05). Self-control showed an interaction effect: Females with cleft lip and palate scored higher than controls, but males did not differ between groups (P < .05). Males with cleft lip and palate scored lower than controls in personal power but higher in body functioning (P < .05); females showed no differences between groups. The groups did not differ with regard to coping styles or quality of life, but several correlations were found between self-esteem and coping styles, and quality of life (P < .01). Conclusions : Late adolescents and young adults with and without cleft lip and palate differed little in terms of psychological adjustment measures. The higher scores in defensive self-enhancement of individuals with cleft lip and palate suggest the need for instruments measuring social approval in psychosocial adjustment research involving this group.

  3. Low-dose cranial boost in high-risk adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients undergoing bone marrow transplant.

    PubMed

    Su, William; Thompson, Marcher; Sheu, Ren-Dih; Steinberg, Amir; Isola, Luis; Stock, Richard; Bakst, Richard L

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has a predilection for CNS involvement. Patients with high-risk ALL are often managed with transplant using a radiation-based conditioning regimen. Historically, a high-dose prophylactic cranial boost (CB) of ≥12 Gy was given to reduce risk of central nervous system (CNS) recurrence. However, the use of CB has fallen out of favor because of toxicity concerns. In high-risk adults undergoing transplant at our institution, we have used a low-dose 6 Gy CB to reduce toxicity while conditioning adults with fully developed brains. The safety, efficacy, and utility of a low-dose CB in adults are poorly studied; herein, we report their outcomes and toxicity. We identified all high-risk ALL patients undergoing total body irradiation as part of their conditioning regimen. Those who received 6 Gy CB or no CB were included (55 total). Their charts were reviewed and statistical analyses were completed with R, version 2.15.2. In patients undergoing CB, 3-year CNS disease-free survival and overall survival were 94.7% and 62.7%. In those not undergoing CBs, survivals were 81.8% and 51.5%. Notably, within the CB cohort, patients without prior CNS involvement had no CNS failures. In contrast, in the non-CB cohort, there were 2 CNS failures in patients with no history of CNS involvement. In the CB cohort, the only notable acute toxicity was parotitis (2.8%). Late toxicity in the CB cohort included 1 instance of cataracts (2.8%) without any evidence of cognitive impairment or potential radiation induced secondary malignancy. A dose of 6 Gy CB is well-tolerated in the adult ALL population as part of a radiation-based conditioning regimen. Low-dose CB may be considered in adult patients with high-risk ALL without prior CNS involvement to reduce the likelihood of recurrence. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Markedly improved outcomes and acceptable toxicity in adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia following treatment with a pediatric protocol: a phase II study by the Japan Adult Leukemia Study Group.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, F; Sakura, T; Yujiri, T; Kondo, E; Fujimaki, K; Sasaki, O; Miyatake, J; Handa, H; Ueda, Y; Aoyama, Y; Takada, S; Tanaka, Y; Usui, N; Miyawaki, S; Suenobu, S; Horibe, K; Kiyoi, H; Ohnishi, K; Miyazaki, Y; Ohtake, S; Kobayashi, Y; Matsuo, K; Naoe, T

    2014-10-17

    The superiority of the pediatric protocol for adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has already been demonstrated, however, its efficacy in young adults remains unclear. The ALL202-U protocol was conducted to examine the efficacy and feasibility of a pediatric protocol in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with BCR-ABL-negative ALL. Patients aged 15-24 years (n=139) were treated with the same protocol used for pediatric B-ALL. The primary objective of this study was to assess the disease-free survival (DFS) rate and its secondary aims were to assess toxicity, the complete remission (CR) rate and the overall survival (OS) rate. The CR rate was 94%. The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 67% (95% confidence interval (CI) 58-75%) and 73% (95% CI 64-80%), respectively. Severe adverse events were observed at a frequency that was similar to or lower than that in children treated with the same protocol. Only insufficient maintenance therapy significantly worsened the DFS (hazard ratio 5.60, P<0.001). These results indicate that this protocol may be a feasible and highly effective treatment for AYA with BCR-ABL-negative ALL.

  6. Prognostic nomogram for previously untreated adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhuojun; Li, Xiaodong; Zhu, Yuandong; Gu, Weiying; Xie, Xiaobao; Jiang, Jingting

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to perform an acceptable prognostic nomogram for acute myeloid leukemia. The clinical data from 311 patients from our institution and 165 patients generated with Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network were reviewed. A prognostic nomogram was designed according to the Cox's proportional hazard model to predict overall survival (OS). To compare the capacity of the nomogram with that of the current prognostic system, the concordance index (C-index) was used to validate the accuracy as well as the calibration curve. The nomogram included 6 valuable variables: age, risk stratifications based on cytogenetic abnormalities, status of FLT3-ITD mutation, status of NPM1 mutation, expression of CD34, and expression of HLA-DR. The C-indexes were 0.71 and 0.68 in the primary and validation cohort respectively, which were superior to the predictive capacity of the current prognostic systems in both cohorts. The nomogram allowed both patients with acute myeloid leukemia and physicians to make prediction of OS individually prior to treatment. PMID:27689396

  7. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for adults with acute myeloid leukemia: myths, controversies, and unknowns.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vikas; Tallman, Martin S; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2011-02-24

    Progress in the last decade has improved the understanding of leukemia biology. Molecular markers in combinations with cytogenetics have improved the risk stratification of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and informed decision-making. In parallel, several important advances in the transplant field, such as better supportive care, improved transplant technology, increased availability of alternative donors, and reduced-intensity conditioning have improved the safety as well as access of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for a larger number of patients. In this review, the positioning of HCT in the management of patients with AML is evaluated in view of changing risk/benefit ratios associated with both conventional treatments and transplantation, and some of the controversies are addressed in light of emerging data. Increasing data demonstrate outcomes of alternative donor transplantation approaching HLA-identical sibling donors in high-risk AML supporting the inclusion of alternative donors in trials of prospective studies evaluating post remission strategies for high-risk AML. The use of reduced-intensity conditioning has expanded the eligibility of HCT to older patients with AML, and outcome data are encouraging. Continued study of HCT versus alternative therapies is required to optimize patients' outcomes in AML.

  8. Topotecan Hydrochloride and Carboplatin With or Without Veliparib in Treating Advanced Myeloproliferative Disorders and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-21

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Myelofibrosis; Polycythemia Vera; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Economic evaluation of rituximab in addition to standard of care chemotherapy for adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nam, Julian; Milenkovski, Robert; Yunger, Simon; Geirnaert, Marc; Paulson, Kristjan; Seftel, Matthew

    2017-09-18

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is an aggressive form of leukemia with a poor prognosis in adult patients. The addition of the monoclonal antibody rituximab to standard chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival in adults with ALL. However, it is unknown whether the addition of rituximab is cost-effective. The objective was to determine the economic impact of rituximab in addition to standard of care (SOC) chemotherapy vs SOC alone in newly-diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-negative, CD20-positive, B-cell precursor ALL. A decision analytic model was constructed, based upon the Canadian healthcare system. It included the following health states over a lifetime horizon (max ≈60 years): event-free survival (EFS), relapsed/resistant disease, cure, and death. SOC was either hyper-CVAD or the Dana Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) ALL consortium. EFS, overall survival, and serious adverse event (SAE) rates were derived from a large randomized controlled trial. Costs of the model included: first-line treatment and administration, disease management, second-line and third-line treatment and administration, palliative care, and SAE-related treatments. Inputs were sourced from provincial and national public data, the literature, and cancer agency input. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) increased by 2.20 QALYs with rituximab in addition to SOC. The resulting mean Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) was C$21,828/QALY. At a willingness-to-pay threshold of C$100,000/QALY, the probability of being cost-effective was 98%. Decision outcomes were robust to the probabilistic and deterministic sensitivity analyses, including the SOC backbone as either hyper-CVAD or DFCI. The results of this analysis are limited by generalizability of the chemotherapy backbone to Canadian practice. For adults with ALL, rituximab in addition to SOC was found to be a cost-effective intervention, compared to SOC alone. The addition of rituximab is associated with increased life years and

  10. Adult T-cell leukemia: molecular basis for clonal expansion and transformation of HTLV-1–infected T cells

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) that develops through a multistep carcinogenesis process involving 5 or more genetic events. We provide a comprehensive overview of recently uncovered information on the molecular basis of leukemogenesis in ATL. Broadly, the landscape of genetic abnormalities in ATL that include alterations highly enriched in genes for T-cell receptor–NF-κB signaling such as PLCG1, PRKCB, and CARD11 and gain-of function mutations in CCR4 and CCR7. Conversely, the epigenetic landscape of ATL can be summarized as polycomb repressive complex 2 hyperactivation with genome-wide H3K27 me3 accumulation as the basis of the unique transcriptome of ATL cells. Expression of H3K27 methyltransferase enhancer of zeste 2 was shown to be induced by HTLV-1 Tax and NF-κB. Furthermore, provirus integration site analysis with high-throughput sequencing enabled the analysis of clonal composition and cell number of each clone in vivo, whereas multicolor flow cytometric analysis with CD7 and cell adhesion molecule 1 enabled the identification of HTLV-1–infected CD4+ T cells in vivo. Sorted immortalized but untransformed cells displayed epigenetic changes closely overlapping those observed in terminally transformed ATL cells, suggesting that epigenetic abnormalities are likely earlier events in leukemogenesis. These new findings broaden the scope of conceptualization of the molecular mechanisms of leukemogenesis, dissecting them into immortalization and clonal progression. These recent findings also open a new direction of drug development for ATL prevention and treatment because epigenetic marks can be reprogrammed. Mechanisms underlying initial immortalization and progressive accumulation of these abnormalities remain to be elucidated. PMID:28115366

  11. Adult T-cell leukemia: molecular basis for clonal expansion and transformation of HTLV-1-infected T cells.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshiki

    2017-03-02

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) that develops through a multistep carcinogenesis process involving 5 or more genetic events. We provide a comprehensive overview of recently uncovered information on the molecular basis of leukemogenesis in ATL. Broadly, the landscape of genetic abnormalities in ATL that include alterations highly enriched in genes for T-cell receptor-NF-κB signaling such as PLCG1, PRKCB, and CARD11 and gain-of function mutations in CCR4 and CCR7 Conversely, the epigenetic landscape of ATL can be summarized as polycomb repressive complex 2 hyperactivation with genome-wide H3K27 me3 accumulation as the basis of the unique transcriptome of ATL cells. Expression of H3K27 methyltransferase enhancer of zeste 2 was shown to be induced by HTLV-1 Tax and NF-κB. Furthermore, provirus integration site analysis with high-throughput sequencing enabled the analysis of clonal composition and cell number of each clone in vivo, whereas multicolor flow cytometric analysis with CD7 and cell adhesion molecule 1 enabled the identification of HTLV-1-infected CD4(+) T cells in vivo. Sorted immortalized but untransformed cells displayed epigenetic changes closely overlapping those observed in terminally transformed ATL cells, suggesting that epigenetic abnormalities are likely earlier events in leukemogenesis. These new findings broaden the scope of conceptualization of the molecular mechanisms of leukemogenesis, dissecting them into immortalization and clonal progression. These recent findings also open a new direction of drug development for ATL prevention and treatment because epigenetic marks can be reprogrammed. Mechanisms underlying initial immortalization and progressive accumulation of these abnormalities remain to be elucidated.

  12. High CRLF2 expression associates with IKZF1 dysfunction in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia without CRLF2 rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Zheng; Gu, Yan; Zhao, Gang; Li, Jianyong; Chen, Baoan; Han, Qi; Guo, Xing; Liu, Juan; Li, Hui; Yu, Michael D.; Olson, Justin; Steffens, Sadie; Payne, Kimberly J.; Song, Chunhua; Dovat, Sinisa

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of cytokine receptor-like factor 2 (CRLF2) due to chromosomal rearrangement has been observed in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and reported to contribute to oncogenesis and unfavorable outcome in ALL. We studied B-ALL and T-ALL patients without CRLF2 rearrangement and observed that CRLF2 is significantly increased in a subset of these patients. Our study shows that high CRLF2expression correlates with high-risk ALL markers, as well as poor survival. We found that the IKZF1-encoded protein, Ikaros, directly binds to the CRLF2 promoter and regulates CRLF2 expression in leukemia cells. CK2 inhibitor, which can increase Ikaros activity, significantly increases Ikaros binding in ALL cells and suppresses CRLF2 expression in an Ikaros-dependent manner. CRLF2 expression is significantly higher in patients with IKZF1 deletion as compared to patients without IKZF1 deletion. Treatment with CK2 inhibitor also results in an increase in IKZF1 binding to the CRLF2 promoter and suppression of CRLF2 expression in primary ALL cells. We further observed that CK2 inhibitor induces increased H3K9me3 histone modifications in the CRLF2 promoter in ALL cell lines and primary cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that high expression of CRLF2 correlates with high-risk ALL and short survival in patients without CRLF2 rearrangement. Our results are the first to demonstrate that the IKZF1-encoded Ikaros protein directly suppresses CRLF2 expression through enrichment of H3K9me3 in its promoter region. Our data also suggest that high CRLF2 expression works with the IKZF1 deletion to drive oncogenesis of ALL and has significance in an integrated prognostic model for adult high-risk ALL. PMID:27391346

  13. Honokiol induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via inhibition of survival signals in adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Chie; Arbiser, Jack L; Mori, Naoki

    2012-07-01

    Honokiol, a naturally occurring biphenyl, possesses anti-neoplastic properties. We investigated activities of honokiol against adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) associated with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). Cell viability was assessed using colorimetric assay. Propidium iodide staining was performed to determine cell cycle phase. Apoptotic effects were evaluated by 7A6 detection and caspases activity. Expressions of cell cycle- and apoptosis-associated proteins were analyzed by Western blot. We investigated the efficacy of honokiol in mice harboring tumors of HTLV-1-infected T-cell origin. Honokiol exhibited cytotoxic activity against HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines and ATL cells. We identified two different effects of honokiol on HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines: cell cycle inhibition and induction of apoptosis. Honokiol induced G1 cell cycle arrest by reducing the expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6 and c-Myc, while apoptosis was induced via reduced expression of cIAP-2, XIAP and survivin. The induced apoptosis was also associated with activation of caspases-3 and -9. In addition, honokiol suppressed the phosphorylation of IκBα, IKKα, IKKβ, STAT3, STAT5 and Akt, down-regulated JunB and JunD, and inhibited DNA binding of NF-κB, AP-1, STAT3 and STAT5. These effects resulted in the inactivation of survival signals including NF-κB, AP-1, STATs and Akt. Honokiol was highly effective against ATL in mice Our data suggested that honokiol is a systemically available, non-toxic inhibitor of ATL cell growth that should be examined for potential clinical application. Our findings provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of honokiol for the management of ATL. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional and Structural Differences in the Hippocampus Associated with Memory Deficits in Adult Survivors of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Monje, Michelle; Thomason, Moriah E.; Rigolo, Laura; Wang, Yalin; Waber, Deborah P.; Sallan, Stephen E.; Golby, Alexandra J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiation and chemotherapy targeted to the central nervous system can cause cognitive impairment, including impaired memory. These memory impairments may be referable to damage to hippocampal structures resulting from central nervous system (CNS) treatment. Procedure In the present study, we explored episodic memory and its neuroimaging correlates in 10 adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with cranial radiation therapy and both systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy and 10 controls matched for age and sex, using a subsequent memory paradigm after episodic encoding of visual scenes. Results We report behavioral, structural and functional changes in the brains of the adult survivors. They demonstrated poorer recognition memory, hippocampal atrophy and altered blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal in the hippocampus. Whole brain statistical map analysis revealed increased BOLD signal/activation in several brain regions during unsuccessful encoding in ALL survivors, potentially reflecting ineffective neural recruitment. Individual differences in memory performance in ALL participants were related to magnitude of BOLD response in regions associated with successful encoding. Conclusions Taken together, these findings describe long term neuroimaging correlates of childhood exposure to CNS-targeted cancer therapies, suggesting enduring damage to episodic memory systems. PMID:22887801

  15. [Progress of study on drug therapy in adults patients with acute myeloid leukemia (non APL) after remission].

    PubMed

    Lan, Feng-Mei; Li, Hui-Min

    2014-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (non APL) is a group of highly heterogeneous hematologic malignancy.In recent years, after the standard "3+7" regimen, the complete remission rate of adult patients with AML (non-APL) can be as high as 70%-80%. However, due to the existence of minimal residual disease after remission, the recurrence of the disease still inevitable, only approximately 20% to 30% of the patients enjoy longterm disease-free survival. Currently only allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is one of the most effective treatment ways for AML. The number of transplant patients is limited, because of various reasons, such as the physical condition of patients, donor sources or economic reason. After transplantation, patients also have the possibility of recurrence, therefore, drug treatment is still important after AML remission. At present, NCCN (National Comprehensive Cancer Network) recommended high-dose cytarabine as first-line postremission therapy for patients of good prognosis group and as second-line therapy for intermediate risk group. In recent years, researchers have explored other drugs, such as the nucleoside analogues, methyltransferase inhibitors and protease inhibitors or other drugs for the treatment of adult AML patients who is in remission.In this article, the treatment of conventional medicine for the treatment of AML after complete remission is summarized.

  16. Leukemia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    The following organizations provide information on the different types of leukemia : Cancer Care -- www.cancercare.org/diagnosis/leukemia National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/types/leukemia The ...

  17. Self-reported versus measured body height and weight in Polish adult men: the risk of underestimating obesity rates.

    PubMed

    Łopuszańska, Monika; Lipowicz, Anna; Kołodziej, Halina; Szklarska, Alicja; Bielicki, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Background: In some epidemiological studies, self-reported height and weight are often used to save time and money. Self-reported height and weight are commonly used to assess the prevalence of obesity. The aim of this study was to assess the differences between self-reported and measured height and weight in adult men, and to determine how the accuracy of self-reported data depended on age and education. The prevalence of obesity was also calculated based both on self-reported and measured data. Material and methods: Data were collected during two population studies carried out in Wroclaw in 2010. One study included 1,194 19-year-old males who reported for the health examination mandated by the National Conscription Board (younger group). The other group included 355 men between 35 and 80 years old who reported for a ten-year follow-up (older group). Data were analyzed separately for both age groups. Results: Both younger and older subjects overestimated their height by 1.4 cm and 1.0 cm (1.4 cm, 95   %CI: 1.26, 1.51, and 1.0 cm, 95   %CI: 0.85, 1.26, respectively). On average, younger subjects overestimated their weight by 0.7 kilograms (95   %CI: 0.55, 0.92), whereas older subjects underestimated their weight by 0.9 kilograms (95   %CI: –1.15, –0.48). The lower the level of education, the more the subjects overestimated their height. Conclusions: Adult men systematically overestimate their height and underestimate their weight. The magnitude of the inaccuracy depends on level of education. When self-reported data are used, the prevalence of obesity is generally underestimated. Using self-reported data to calculate BMI can lead to a substantial underestimation of the proportion of underweight and obese individuals in a population. Finally, using self-reported values for height in studies on social inequality may lead to false conclusions.

  18. [Molecular targeted therapy in lymphoid leukemias].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Kensuke; Ando, Toshihiko; Kimura, Shinya

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of lymphoid leukemias have incorporated molecular targeted drugs (CD20-targeting rituximab and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors) into the traditional chemotherapeutic agents. This article reviews novel molecular targeted therapies for patients with lymphoid leukemias including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, hairly cell leukemia and HTLV-I-related adult T-cell leukemia. Investigational agents that will be discussed in this review include inotuzumab, blinatumomab, alemtuzumab, ofatumumab, ibrutinib, idelalisib, bafetinib, lenalidomide, ABT-199 and mogamulizumab. Novel approaches warrant continued research to improve outcomes for patients with lymphoid leukemias.

  19. Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia of Adults: Determination, Prognostic Impact and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Buccisano, Francesco; Maurillo, Luca; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Cefalo, Mariagiovanna; Consalvo, Maria Irno; Sarlo, Chiara; Conti, Consuelo; De Santis, Giovanna; De Bellis, Eleonora; Di Veroli, Ambra; Palomba, Patrizia; Attrotto, Cristina; Zizzari, Annagiulia; Paterno, Giovangiacinto; Voso, Maria Teresa; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Arcese, William; Amadori, Sergio; Venditti, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Pretreatment assessment of cytogenetic/genetic signature of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been consistently shown to play a major prognostic role but also to fail at predicting outcome on individual basis, even in low-risk AML. Therefore, we are in need of further accurate methods to refine the patients' risk allocation process, distinguishing more adequately those who are likely to recur from those who are not. In this view, there is now evidence that the submicroscopic amounts of leukemic cells (called minimal residual disease, MRD), measured during the course of treatment, indicate the quality of response to therapy. Therefore, MRD might serve as an independent, additional biomarker to help to identify patients at higher risk of relapse. Detection of MRD requires the use of highly sensitive ancillary techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multiparametric flow cytometry(MPFC). In the present manuscript, we will review the current approaches to investigate MRD and its clinical applications in AML management.

  20. Beyond diagnosis: subjective theories of illness in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Michael; Koehler, Katharina; Koenigsmann, Michael; Kreutzmann, Nicole; Fischer, Thomas; Frommer, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    Every acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient asks: why me? But from the patients' perspective, there are no objective medical causes and no clear picture of AML. However, based on these missing medical answers, patients develop their own ideas about illness and treatment. These subjective theories of illness (STOI) are defined as the cognitive constructions ill people make regarding: (1) the nature of their disease; (2) its source; and (3) its treatment. STOI present a challenge for the physician-patient relationship. After the first interim staging, 12 patients with AML were interviewed. Case analyses were assigned to interindividual comparisons representing the predefined subject areas of STOI. Patients' vague subjective conceptions about the personalized etiology of AML resulted not only from health literacy deficits but also from their avoiding medical information to protect themselves from negative emotions. Through STOI, patients significantly co-determine the selection of (un-)conscious coping strategies with consequences for physician-patient communication.

  1. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-06

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-1; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-2; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. The Prognosis of Adult Burkitt’s Cell Leukemia in Real-Life Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Malkan, Ümit Yavuz; Güneş, Gürsel; Göker, Hakan; Haznedaroğlu, İbrahim C.; Acar, Kadir; Eliaçık, Eylem; Etgül, Sezgin; Aslan, Tuncay; Balaban, Seda; Demiroğlu, Haluk; Özcebe, Osman İ.; Sayınalp, Nilgün; Aksu, Salih; Büyükaşık, Yahya

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Many studies reported an improved prognosis in patients with Burkitt’s lymphoma obviating the need of stem cell transplantation. However, prognosis of the advanced disease [i.e. Burkitt’s cell leukemia (BCL)] has not been reported with current treatment modalities except for a few prospective trials. The aim of this study is to compare the prognoses of BCL patients with similarly treated and nontransplanted patients with other types of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and with ALL patients that underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in their first remissions. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective analysis, BCL patients aged between 16 and 63 who were admitted between 2000 and 2014 to the hospitals of Hacettepe or Gazi University and were treated with intensive therapies aimed at cure were included. All ALL patients who were treated with a similar protocol not including transplantation during the same period (NT-ALL group) and all ALL patients who underwent ASCT in the first complete remission during the same period (T-ALL group) served as control groups. Results: The central nervous system or extramedullary involvement rates, lactate dehydrogenase levels, and white blood cell counts at diagnosis were higher in the BCL group than the NT-ALL group and these differences were significant. BCL patients had disease-free survival (DFS) durations comparable with the T-ALL cohort but NT-ALL patients had significantly shorter DFS durations. Both cumulative relapse incidence and cumulative nonrelapse mortality were higher in NT-ALL patients compared to the T-ALL group and BCL patients. Conclusion: DFS in BCL patients treated with a widely accepted modern regimen, R-HyperCVAD, is comparable to results in other ALL patients receiving allogeneic transplantation. Our results are in agreement with a few prospective noncomparative studies suggesting no further need for stem cell transplantation in BCL. PMID:27094615

  3. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Types How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed? Certain signs and symptoms can suggest that ... described below. Tests used to diagnose and classify ALL If your doctor thinks you have leukemia, he ...

  4. Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors improve long-term outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for adult patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Brissot, Eolia; Labopin, Myriam; Beckers, Marielle M.; Socié, Gérard; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Volin, Liisa; Finke, Jürgen; Lenhoff, Stig; Kröger, Nicolaus; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Craddock, Charles F.; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Gürman, Günhan; Russell, Nigel H.; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Potter, Michael N.; Nagler, Armon; Ottmann, Oliver; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Esteve, Jordi; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the impact of tyrosine kinase inhibitors given pre- and post-allogeneic stem cell transplantation on long-term outcome of patients allografted for Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This retrospective analysis from the EBMT Acute Leukemia Working Party included 473 de novo Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients in first complete remission who underwent an allogeneic stem cell transplantation using a human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling or human leukocyte antigen-matched unrelated donor between 2000 and 2010. Three hundred and ninety patients received tyrosine kinase inhibitors before transplant, 329 at induction and 274 at consolidation. Kaplan-Meier estimates of leukemia-free survival, overall survival, cumulative incidences of relapse incidence, and non-relapse mortality at five years were 38%, 46%, 36% and 26%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, tyrosine-kinase inhibitors given before allogeneic stem cell transplantation was associated with a better overall survival (HR=0.68; P=0.04) and was associated with lower relapse incidence (HR=0.5; P=0.01). In the post-transplant period, multivariate analysis identified prophylactic tyrosine-kinase inhibitor administration to be a significant factor for improved leukemia-free survival (HR=0.44; P=0.002) and overall survival (HR=0.42; P=0.004), and a lower relapse incidence (HR=0.40; P=0.01). Over the past decade, administration of tyrosine kinase inhibitors before allogeneic stem cell transplantation has significantly improved the long-term allogeneic stem cell transplantation outcome of adult Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Prospective studies will be of great interest to further confirm the potential benefit of the prophylactic use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the post-transplant setting. PMID:25527562

  6. Decitabine, Vorinostat, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. GTI-2040 and High-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  9. Combination Chemotherapy and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. A meta-analysis of body mass index of adolescent and adult survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nam, Gina E; Kaul, Sapna; Wu, Yelena P; Nelson, Richard E; Wright, Jennifer; Fluchel, Mark N; Hacking, Claire C; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2015-09-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of existing studies to examine body mass index (BMI) of adolescent and adult survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) compared to individuals without cancer. Studies were identified and reviewed using specific inclusion criteria. The effect size was odds ratio (OR) of the prevalence of overweight/obese BMI (≥ 25 kg/m(2)) in ALL survivors versus comparison groups. Study data were coded and validated. Fixed-effects (FE) and random-effects (RE) estimates of the effect size were estimated. A total of 9 studies met our inclusion criteria. Survivors were more likely to be overweight/obese compared to comparison groups (FE OR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.06-1.18 and RE OR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.07-1.53). When limited to studies from North American samples, female survivors were overweight/obese more often than the comparison groups (FE OR = 1.30, 95% CI 1.19-1.43). Adolescent and adult survivors of pediatric ALL, especially female survivors, may be at a higher risk of being overweight/obese compared to individuals without cancer. However, few studies provided detailed information on patient and treatment factors (e.g., cranial radiation) that can impact BMI. Standardized reporting of study content is vital for providing robust information on the risk of developing late effects among cancer survivors. Adolescent and adult survivors of pediatric ALL require additional weight management resources such as targeted counseling for physical activity and dietician support both early in treatment and after the end of their therapy. Female survivors may need additional guidance to develop healthy eating practices and to participate in exercise programs.

  11. Randomized study of reduced-intensity chemotherapy combined with imatinib in adults with Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chalandon, Yves; Thomas, Xavier; Hayette, Sandrine; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Abbal, Claire; Huguet, Françoise; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Leguay, Thibaut; Rousselot, Philippe; Lepretre, Stéphane; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Maury, Sébastien; Berthon, Céline; Tavernier, Emmanuelle; Lambert, Jean-François; Lafage-Pochitaloff, Marina; Lhéritier, Véronique; Chevret, Sylvie; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2015-06-11

    In this study, we randomly compared high doses of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib combined with reduced-intensity chemotherapy (arm A) to standard imatinib/hyperCVAD (cyclophosphamide/vincristine/doxorubicin/dexamethasone) therapy (arm B) in 268 adults (median age, 47 years) with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The primary objective was the major molecular response (MMolR) rate after cycle 2, patients being then eligible for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) if they had a donor, or autologous SCT if in MMolR and no donor. With fewer induction deaths, the complete remission (CR) rate was higher in arm A than in arm B (98% vs 91%; P = .006), whereas the MMolR rate was similar in both arms (66% vs 64%). With a median follow-up of 4.8 years, 5-year event-free survival and overall survival (OS) rates were estimated at 37.1% and 45.6%, respectively, without difference between the arms. Allogeneic transplantation was associated with a significant benefit in relapse-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.69; P = .036) and OS (HR, 0.64; P = .02), with initial white blood cell count being the only factor significantly interacting with this SCT effect. In patients achieving MMolR, outcome was similar after autologous and allogeneic transplantation. This study validates an induction regimen combining reduced-intensity chemotherapy and imatinib in Ph+ ALL adult patients and suggests that SCT in first CR is still a good option for Ph+ ALL adult patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00327678.

  12. Can prognostic scoring systems for chronic myeloid leukemia as established in adults be applied to pediatric patients?

    PubMed

    Gurrea Salas, David; Glauche, Ingmar; Tauer, Josephine T; Thiede, Christian; Suttorp, Meinolf

    2015-08-01

    In contrast to adult medicine, specific scoring systems predicting the treatment response for an individual pediatric patient (pt) with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) have not yet been defined. We evaluated to what extend prognostic scores as described for adults (e.g., Sokal, Hasford, EUTOS score) resulted in comparable risk group categorizations in a pediatric cohort. Parameters for score calculation were extracted from a data set of 90 patients enrolled into trial CML-PAED-II and treated by a standard dose of imatinib. At month 3 and at month 6, treatment response was analyzed based on the transcript ratio BCR-ABL1/ABL1. By the EUTOS, Hasford, and Sokal scores 81, 59, and 62 % of the patients were categorized as low risk, respectively; 19, 14, and 16 % of the patients as high risk, respectively; and by Hasford and Sokal scores 27 and 22 % of the patients, respectively, as intermediate risk. Twenty-seven out of 72 patients analyzable (38 %) exhibited a transcript ratio >10 % at month 3. We show that only the EUTOS score, but not the Sokal and Hasford score, correlates with this early outcome (p = 0.008). Analyzing the EUTOS score separately, we can demonstrate that lowering the cutoff from 87 to 48 points for categorization in low- and high-risk individuals increases the odds ratio from 2.4 (95 % CI 0.6 to 10.4) to 3.6 (95 % CI 1.3 to 10.9). Data are provided on the distribution of risk categories and resulting discrepancies when adult scores are applied on children and adolescents with CML at diagnosis. A larger number of patients and longer follow-up are still needed to develop a prognostic score specifically adapted to the pediatric and adolescent age cohorts.

  13. Obesity in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    PubMed

    Oeffinger, Kevin C; Mertens, Ann C; Sklar, Charles A; Yasui, Yutaka; Fears, Thomas; Stovall, Marilyn; Vik, Terry A; Inskip, Peter D; Robison, Leslie L

    2003-04-01

    To determine whether adult survivors (>or= 18 years of age) of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk for obesity and to assess patient and treatment variables that influence risk. A retrospective cohort of participants of the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study was used to compare 1,765 adult survivors of childhood ALL to 2,565 adult siblings of childhood cancer survivors. Body-mass index (BMI; kilograms per square meter), calculated from self-reported heights and weights, was used to determine the prevalence of being overweight (BMI, 25-29.9) or obese (BMI >or= 30.0). Polytomous logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for being overweight or obese among ALL survivors relative to the sibling control group. The age- and race-adjusted OR for being obese in survivors treated with cranial radiation doses >or= 20 Gy in comparison with siblings was 2.59 for females (95% CI, 1.88 to 3.55; P <.001) and 1.86 for males (95% CI, 1.33 to 2.57; P <.001). The OR for obesity was greatest among females diagnosed at 0 to 4 years of age and treated with radiation doses >or= 20 Gy (OR, 3.81; 95% CI, 2.34 to 5.99; P <.001). Obesity was not associated with treatment consisting of chemotherapy only or with cranial radiation doses of 10 to 19 Gy. Cranial radiotherapy >or= 20 Gy is associated with an increased prevalence of obesity, especially in females treated at a young age. It is imperative that healthcare professionals recognize this risk and develop strategies to enhance weight control and encourage longitudinal follow-up.

  14. Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Asparaginase in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Refractory T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  15. Midostaurin and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and FLT3 Mutation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Gene Mutations; FLT3 Tyrosine Kinase Domain Point Mutation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Retargeting Oncolytic Vesicular Stomatitis Virus to Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1-Associated Adult T-Cell Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Dillon; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Barber, Glen N

    2015-12-01

    Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is an aggressive cancer of CD4/CD25(+) T lymphocytes, the etiological agent of which is human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). ATL is highly refractory to current therapies, making the development of new treatments a high priority. Oncolytic viruses such as vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) are being considered as anticancer agents since they readily infect transformed cells compared to normal cells, the former appearing to exhibit defective innate immune responses. Here, we have evaluated the efficacy and safety of a recombinant VSV that has been retargeted to specifically infect and replicate in transformed CD4(+) cells. This was achieved by replacing the single VSV glycoprotein (G) with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp160 to create a hybrid fusion protein, gp160G. The resultant virus, VSV-gp160G, was found to only target cells expressing CD4 and retained robust oncolytic activity against HTLV-1 actuated ATL cells. VSV-gp160G was further noted to be highly attenuated and did not replicate efficiently in or induce significant cell death of primary CD4(+) T cells. Accordingly, VSV-gp160G did not elicit any evidence of neurotoxicity even in severely immunocompromised animals such as NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγ-c-null (NSG) mice. Importantly, VSV-gp160G effectively exerted potent oncolytic activity in patient-derived ATL transplanted into NSG mice and facilitated a significant survival benefit. Our data indicate that VSV-gp160G exerts potent oncolytic efficacy against CD4(+) malignant cells and either alone or in conjunction with established therapies may provide an effective treatment in patients displaying ATL. Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is a serious form of cancer with a high mortality rate. HTLV-1 infection is the etiological agent of ATL and, unfortunately, most patients succumb to the disease within a few years. Current treatment options have failed to significantly improve survival rate. In this study, we

  17. Retargeting Oncolytic Vesicular Stomatitis Virus to Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1-Associated Adult T-Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Dillon; Ramos, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is an aggressive cancer of CD4/CD25+ T lymphocytes, the etiological agent of which is human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). ATL is highly refractory to current therapies, making the development of new treatments a high priority. Oncolytic viruses such as vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) are being considered as anticancer agents since they readily infect transformed cells compared to normal cells, the former appearing to exhibit defective innate immune responses. Here, we have evaluated the efficacy and safety of a recombinant VSV that has been retargeted to specifically infect and replicate in transformed CD4+ cells. This was achieved by replacing the single VSV glycoprotein (G) with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp160 to create a hybrid fusion protein, gp160G. The resultant virus, VSV-gp160G, was found to only target cells expressing CD4 and retained robust oncolytic activity against HTLV-1 actuated ATL cells. VSV-gp160G was further noted to be highly attenuated and did not replicate efficiently in or induce significant cell death of primary CD4+ T cells. Accordingly, VSV-gp160G did not elicit any evidence of neurotoxicity even in severely immunocompromised animals such as NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγ-c-null (NSG) mice. Importantly, VSV-gp160G effectively exerted potent oncolytic activity in patient-derived ATL transplanted into NSG mice and facilitated a significant survival benefit. Our data indicate that VSV-gp160G exerts potent oncolytic efficacy against CD4+ malignant cells and either alone or in conjunction with established therapies may provide an effective treatment in patients displaying ATL. IMPORTANCE Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is a serious form of cancer with a high mortality rate. HTLV-1 infection is the etiological agent of ATL and, unfortunately, most patients succumb to the disease within a few years. Current treatment options have failed to significantly improve survival rate. In

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of primary myelodysplastic syndromes in adults: recommendations from the European LeukemiaNet

    PubMed Central

    Malcovati, Luca; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Bowen, David; Adès, Lionel; Cermak, Jaroslav; del Cañizo, Consuelo; Della Porta, Matteo G.; Fenaux, Pierre; Gattermann, Norbert; Germing, Ulrich; Jansen, Joop H.; Mittelman, Moshe; Mufti, Ghulam; Platzbecker, Uwe; Sanz, Guillermo F.; Selleslag, Dominik; Skov-Holm, Mette; Stauder, Reinhard; Symeonidis, Argiris; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.

    2013-01-01

    Within the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) work package of the European LeukemiaNet, an Expert Panel was selected according to the framework elements of the National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Program. A systematic review of the literature was performed that included indexed original papers, indexed reviews and educational papers, and abstracts of conference proceedings. Guidelines were developed on the basis of a list of patient- and therapy-oriented questions, and recommendations were formulated and ranked according to the supporting level of evidence. MDSs should be classified according to the 2008 World Health Organization criteria. An accurate risk assessment requires the evaluation of not only disease-related factors but also of those related to extrahematologic comorbidity. The assessment of individual risk enables the identification of fit patients with a poor prognosis who are candidates for up-front intensive treatments, primarily allogeneic stem cell transplantation. A high proportion of MDS patients are not eligible for potentially curative treatment because of advanced age and/or clinically relevant comorbidities and poor performance status. In these patients, the therapeutic intervention is aimed at preventing cytopenia-related morbidity and preserving quality of life. A number of new agents are being developed for which the available evidence is not sufficient to recommend routine use. The inclusion of patients into prospective clinical trials is strongly recommended. PMID:23980065

  19. Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia of Adults: Determination, Prognostic Impact and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Buccisano, Francesco; Maurillo, Luca; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Cefalo, Mariagiovanna; Consalvo, Maria Irno; Sarlo, Chiara; Conti, Consuelo; De Santis, Giovanna; De Bellis, Eleonora; Di Veroli, Ambra; Palomba, Patrizia; Attrotto, Cristina; Zizzari, Annagiulia; Paterno, Giovangiacinto; Voso, Maria Teresa; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Arcese, William; Amadori, Sergio; Venditti, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Pretreatment assessment of cytogenetic/genetic signature of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been consistently shown to play a major prognostic role but also to fail at predicting outcome on individual basis, even in low-risk AML. Therefore, we are in need of further accurate methods to refine the patients’ risk allocation process, distinguishing more adequately those who are likely to recur from those who are not. In this view, there is now evidence that the submicroscopic amounts of leukemic cells (called minimal residual disease, MRD), measured during the course of treatment, indicate the quality of response to therapy. Therefore, MRD might serve as an independent, additional biomarker to help to identify patients at higher risk of relapse. Detection of MRD requires the use of highly sensitive ancillary techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multiparametric flow cytometry(MPFC). In the present manuscript, we will review the current approaches to investigate MRD and its clinical applications in AML management. PMID:27872732

  20. Bcl-2 in combination to myeloid antigen expression in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia and prognostic outcome.

    PubMed

    Amirghofran, Zahra; Daneshbod, Yahya; Gholijani, Naser

    2009-01-01

    The present study was performed to find the importance of two myeloid (CD13 and CD33) antigens aberrantly expressed on the blasts of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients and Bcl-2 expression in relation to clinical and biological features and treatment outcome. Bone marrow or peripheral blood samples of 50 patients were assessed for the expression of markers by immunostaining methods. Twenty-one patients (42%) showed more than 20% positivity for Bcl-2. Aberrant expression of myeloid antigens was found in 14% of cases. The expression of Bcl-2 was associated with shorter survival (p = 0.009). A significant correlation between expression of myeloid antigens (MY) and survival and complete remission duration was found. The mean survival was 656 + 301 days for MY+ cases and 1009 +/- 230 days for MY- patients (p < 0.0001). Expression of Bcl-2 in combination to myeloid antigens was associated with a poorer outcome. Survival of MY+ patients expressing Bcl-2 was shorter than MY- Bcl-2+ and MY+ Bcl-2- ALL cases (p = 0.038). In conclusion, results of this study indicated the prognostic value of Bcl-2 and myeloid antigen expression in ALL patients. Presence of these markers together on the leukemic cells was associated with a poorer response to therapy and may implicate modified therapeutic strategies in the patients.

  1. Co-existence of PHF6 and NOTCH1 mutations in adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    LI, MIN; XIAO, LICHAN; XU, JINGYAN; ZHANG, RUN; GUO, JINGJING; OLSON, JUSTIN; WU, YUJIE; LI, JIANYONG; SONG, CHUNHUA; GE, ZHENG

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) results from the collaboration of multiple genetic abnormalities in the transformation of T-cell progenitors. Plant homeodomain finger protein 6 (PHF6) has recently been established as a key tumor suppressor, which is mutated in T-ALL; however, the clinical significance of PHF6 mutations has not been fully determined in adult T-ALL. In the present study, amplification of the PHF6 exons was performed, followed by DNA sequencing to identify the genomic mutations and examine the expression of PHF6 in adult patients with T-ALL. The correlation between PHF6 mutations and clinical features was also analyzed using a χ2 test, and between PHF6 mutations and survival curve using the Kaplan-Meier methods. PHF6 mutations were detected in 27.1% of the Chinese adults with T-ALL (16/59), 10 of which were found to be novel mutations. A significantly lower expression level of PHF6 was observed in T-ALL patients with PHF6 mutations compared with those without mutations. Of the observed mutations in PHF6, 6/16 were frame-shift mutations, indicating a PHF6 dysfunction in those patients. Of note, PHF6 mutations were found to be significantly associated with older age, lower hemoglobin levels, higher frequency of CD13 positivity and higher incidence of splenomegaly or lymphadenopathy. Furthermore, PHF6 mutations were found to be significantly correlated with Notch homolog 1, translocation-associated (Drosophila) (NOTCH1) mutations. The patients with T-ALL with co-existence of the two mutations had a significantly shorter event-free survival and a poor prognosis. The present results indicated that PHF6 is inactivated in adult T-ALL, due to its low expression and mutations. The present data indicated the synergistic effect of PHF6 and NOTCH1 mutations, as well as their co-existence, on the oncogenesis of adult T-ALL, and their potential as a prognostic marker for the disease. PMID:27347093

  2. Co-existence of PHF6 and NOTCH1 mutations in adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Xiao, Lichan; Xu, Jingyan; Zhang, Run; Guo, Jingjing; Olson, Justin; Wu, Yujie; Li, Jianyong; Song, Chunhua; Ge, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) results from the collaboration of multiple genetic abnormalities in the transformation of T-cell progenitors. Plant homeodomain finger protein 6 (PHF6) has recently been established as a key tumor suppressor, which is mutated in T-ALL; however, the clinical significance of PHF6 mutations has not been fully determined in adult T-ALL. In the present study, amplification of the PHF6 exons was performed, followed by DNA sequencing to identify the genomic mutations and examine the expression of PHF6 in adult patients with T-ALL. The correlation between PHF6 mutations and clinical features was also analyzed using a χ(2) test, and between PHF6 mutations and survival curve using the Kaplan-Meier methods. PHF6 mutations were detected in 27.1% of the Chinese adults with T-ALL (16/59), 10 of which were found to be novel mutations. A significantly lower expression level of PHF6 was observed in T-ALL patients with PHF6 mutations compared with those without mutations. Of the observed mutations in PHF6, 6/16 were frame-shift mutations, indicating a PHF6 dysfunction in those patients. Of note, PHF6 mutations were found to be significantly associated with older age, lower hemoglobin levels, higher frequency of CD13 positivity and higher incidence of splenomegaly or lymphadenopathy. Furthermore, PHF6 mutations were found to be significantly correlated with Notch homolog 1, translocation-associated (Drosophila) (NOTCH1) mutations. The patients with T-ALL with co-existence of the two mutations had a significantly shorter event-free survival and a poor prognosis. The present results indicated that PHF6 is inactivated in adult T-ALL, due to its low expression and mutations. The present data indicated the synergistic effect of PHF6 and NOTCH1 mutations, as well as their co-existence, on the oncogenesis of adult T-ALL, and their potential as a prognostic marker for the disease.

  3. The Effects of Exercise on Patient-Reported Outcomes and Performance-Based Physical Function in Adults With Acute Leukemia Undergoing Induction Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Ashley Leak; Deal, Allison M; Battaglini, Claudio L; Phillips, Brett; Pergolotti, Mackenzi; Coffman, Erin; Foster, Matthew C; Wood, William A; Bailey, Charlotte; Hackney, Anthony C; Mayer, Deborah K; Muss, Hyman B; Reeve, Bryce B

    2017-03-01

    Fatigue is a distressing symptom for adults with acute leukemia, often impeding their ability to exercise. 1) Examine effects of a 4-week mixed-modality supervised exercise program (4 times a week, twice a day) on fatigue in adults with acute leukemia undergoing induction chemotherapy. 2) Evaluate effects of exercise program on cognition, anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbance. 3) Evaluate effect of intervention on adherence to exercise. 17 adults (8 intervention, 9 control), aged 28-69 years, newly diagnosed with acute leukemia were recruited within 4 days of admission for induction treatment. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) (fatigue, cognition, anxiety, depression, sleep disturbance, mental health, and physical health) and fitness performance-based measures (Timed Up and Go [TUG], Karnofsky Performance Status, and composite strength scoring) were assessed at baseline and at discharge. Changes in PRO and performance-based physical function measures from baseline to time of discharge were compared between groups using Wilcoxon Rank Sum tests. With PROMIS (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System) Fatigue, we found a median change in fatigue (-5.95) for the intervention group, which achieved a minimally important difference that is considered clinically relevant. Intervention group reduced their TUG performance by 1.73 seconds, whereas the control group remained fairly stable. A concerning finding was that cognition decreased for both groups during their hospitalization. 80% adherence of visits completed with a mean of 6 sessions attended per week. Our study provides information on the impact of exercise on symptomatology, with focus on fatigue and other psychosocial variables in acute leukemia.

  4. EPRI condensate polisher guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, B.A.; Webb, L.C.; Sawochka, S.G.; Crits, G.J.; Pocock, F.J.; Wirth, L.

    1995-01-01

    Cycle chemistry is one of the most important contributors to the loss of availability of generating units. Condensate polishing can significantly improve cycle chemistry by improving cycle water quality and minimizing the transport of contaminants in the power cycle. The EPRI-funded project described in this paper developed comprehensive guidelines for condensate polishing based upon information gathered from utility surveys, equipment vendors, and resin suppliers. Existing literature was also surveyed for pertinent input. Comprehensive guidelines which outline guidance for design, operation, maintenance, surveillance, management, and retrofitting of condensate polishing systems were developed. Economics of condensate polishing were evaluated and a roadmap for economic evaluation for utilities to follow was produced.

  5. Detection of HTLV-1 by polymerase chain reaction in situ hybridization in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Setoyama, M; Kerdel, F A; Elgart, G; Kanzaki, T; Byrnes, J J

    1998-03-01

    A method for nonradioactive polymerase chain reaction in situ hybridization was developed and used to determine the distribution of human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) proviral DNA in paraffin-embedded surgical specimens of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). As controls, we used biopsy samples of five cases of mycosis fungoides, cells of an HTLV-I-infected cell line (MT2), as well as HTLV-1-negative cells (YAS). We successfully detected the amplicon of the HTLV-1 tax sequence in the nuclei of the cutaneous infiltrating lymphoid cells in 90% (9/10) of ATLL cases. Studies also revealed the existence of HTLV-1 provirus DNA in nuclei of sweat gland epithelial cells and vascular endothelial cells as well as lymphoid cells in ATLL patients. Mycosis fungoides and YAS cells were negative for the HTLV-I tax sequence, but MT2 cells were strongly positive. The results indicated that this technique was more sensitive in detecting intracellular amplicons than was the previous in situ hybridization method. Through its use, we were able to easily determine the distribution of HTLV-I-positive cells among the various cells and tissues of paraffin-embedded archival materials.

  6. Quantitative PCR for HTLV-1 provirus in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma using paraffin tumor sections.

    PubMed

    Kato, Junki; Masaki, Ayako; Fujii, Keiichiro; Takino, Hisashi; Murase, Takayuki; Yonekura, Kentaro; Utsunomiya, Atae; Ishida, Takashi; Iida, Shinsuke; Inagaki, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Detection of HTLV-1 provirus using paraffin tumor sections may assist the diagnosis of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). For the detection, non-quantitative PCR assay has been reported, but its usefulness and limitations remain unclear. To our knowledge, quantitative PCR assay using paraffin tumor sections has not been reported. Using paraffin sections from ATLLs and non-ATLL T-cell lymphomas, we first performed non-quantitative PCR for HTLV-1 provirus. Next, we determined tumor ratios and carried out quantitative PCR to obtain provirus copy numbers. The results were analyzed with a simple regression model and a novel criterion, cut-off using 95 % rejection limits. Our quantitative PCR assay showed an excellent association between tumor ratios and the copy numbers (r = 0.89, P < 0.0001). The 95 % rejection limits provided a statistical basis for the range for the determination of HTLV-1 involvement. Its application suggested that results of non-quantitative PCR assay should be interpreted very carefully and that our quantitative PCR assay is useful to estimate the status of HTLV-1 involvement in the tumor cases. In conclusion, our quantitative PCR assay using paraffin tumor sections may be useful for the screening of ATLL cases, especially in HTLV-1 non-endemic areas where easy access to serological testing for HTLV-1 infection is limited. © 2016 Japanese Society of Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Mouse Models of Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type-1–Associated Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, B.; Niewiesk, S.; Lairmore, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus discovered, is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and a number of lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory conditions including HTLV-1–associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Development of animal models to study the pathogenesis of HTLV-1–associated diseases has been problematic. Mechanisms of early infection and cell-to-cell transmission can be studied in rabbits and nonhuman primates, but lesion development and reagents are limited in these species. The mouse provides a cost-effective, highly reproducible model in which to study factors related to lymphoma development and the preclinical efficacy of potential therapies against ATL. The ability to manipulate transgenic mice has provided important insight into viral genes responsible for lymphocyte transformation. Expansion of various strains of immunodeficient mice has accelerated the testing of drugs and targeted therapy against ATL. This review compares various mouse models to illustrate recent advances in the understanding of HTLV-1–associated ATL development and how improvements in these models are critical to the future development of targeted therapies against this aggressive T-cell lymphoma. PMID:20442421

  8. High-dose, continuous-infusion cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, vincristine, and prednisone for remission induction in refractory adult acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, T H

    1987-04-01

    Fifteen consecutive patients with refractory adult acute leukemia (RAAL) were treated with a combination of high-dose, continuous-infusion cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, vincristine, and prednisone (Hi-COAP). The initial nine patients received cyclophosphamide 350 mg/m2 as a 24-hour intravenous (IV) infusion over 5 days; cytarabine, 100 mg/m2 IV bolus every 12 hours for ten doses; vincristine, 2.0 mg IV bolus on day 1; and prednisone, 100 mg orally for 7 days. The last six patients had the cyclophosphamide infusion lengthened to 7 days, and the cytarabine increased to 14 doses. All patients were evaluable for toxicity and response. Seven patients (47%) obtained a complete remission and six patients (40%) a partial remission. Median duration of all remissions has been 7.0 months with a range of 1 to 32 months. Toxicity has been limited to primarily myelosuppression with no hemorrhagic cystitis, central nervous system (CNS), hepatic, or pulmonary toxicity noted. Gastrointestinal toxicity was mild, with no effect on nutritional status noted. Median duration of complete responders was 8.5 months. Thus, Hi-COAP demonstrates promising efficacy with minimal toxicity in RAAL and warrants further exploration in multiinstitutional trials.

  9. Increase in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) associated with minimal residual disease (MRD) detection in adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Li, Yi; Zhang, Zhi-fen; Ju, Ying; Li, Li; Zhang, Bing-chang; Liu, Bin

    2015-11-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are thought to help provide a cellular microenvironments in many solid tumors, in which transformed cells proliferate, acquire new mutations, and evade host immunosurveillance. In the present study, we found that MDSCs (CD33 + CD11b + HLA-DR(low/neg)) in bone marrow were significantly increased in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. MDSCs levels in newly diagnosed AML patients correlated well with extramedullary infiltration and plasma D-dimer levels. Remission rates in the MDSCs > 1500 group and MDSCs < 1500 group were 72.73 and 81.25 %, respectively. No significant differences were found between the two groups. MDSC levels in the complete remission group were significantly decreased after chemotherapy, while in the partial remission and non-remission groups, there were no significant differences. The level of MDSCs in the high minimal residual disease (MRD) group was significantly higher than that in the middle and low MRD groups. High levels of Wilms' Tumor-1 (WT-1) protein were strongly correlated with higher bone marrow MDSC levels. In conclusion, we report here a population of immunosuppressive monocytes in the bone marrow of patients with AML characterized by the CD33(high)CD11b + HLA-DR(low/neg) phenotype. These cells appear to impact the clinical course and prognosis of AML. This data may provide potentially important targets for novel therapies.

  10. HTLV-1-associated adult T cell leukemia is highly susceptible to Navitoclax due to enhanced Bax expression.

    PubMed

    Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Giaisi, Marco; Köhler, Rebecca; Krammer, Peter H; Li-Weber, Min

    2016-01-15

    Over-expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-w is frequently associated with cancer resistance to chemotherapy. Navitoclax (ABT-263), an orally bio-available small-molecule mimetic of the Bcl-2 homology domain 3, specifically inhibits Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-w. Despite promising results obtained from the clinical trials, the use of Navitoclax in patients is dose-limited due to induction of death of platelets via inhibition of Bcl-xL and subsequent thrombocytopenia. This side effect limits the use of Navitoclax in low doses and to very sensitive tumors. In this study, we show that HTLV-1-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) cells, which over-express Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-w, show a 10- to 20-fold higher sensitivity (EC50 = ∼ 25-50 nM) to Navitoclax compared to non-HTLV-1-associated leukemic cells (EC50 = ∼ 1 μM). Investigation of the molecular mechanisms revealed that the HTLV-1 oncogenic protein Tax up-regulates expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax which enhances the therapeutic efficacy of Navitoclax. In addition, we show that agents that inhibit the transcription elongation or translation initiation such as Wogonin and Roc-A can further decrease the effective dose of Navitoclax. Our study suggests that HTLV-1 ATL may be a good candidate disease for low dose Navitoclax therapy and probably with less risk of thrombocytopenia.

  11. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with HTLV-I infection: clinical overlap with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, F H; Colleoni, G W B; Teixeira, S P; Yamamoto, M; Michalany, N S; Almeida, F A; Chiba, A K; Petri, V; Fernandes, M A; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S

    2006-04-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a malignant proliferation of mature helper T lymphocytes,(1) and is caused by human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I);(2) an HTLV-I infection endemic in the Caribbean, south-western Japan, South America and Africa.(3,4) Seroepidemiological studies suggest that it is also endemic in Brazil.(5) Although carriers of HTLV-I show polyclonal integration of virus in T lymphocytes, only patients with ATLL of various subtypes show monoclonal integration of HTLV-I in tumor cells.(6,7) Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) are a group of primary cutaneous lymphoproliferative diseases(8) with unknown etiology.(9) The two most common presentations of CTCL are mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS).(10-13) However, both CTCL categories can easily resemble ATLL. Therefore, in HTLV-I endemic areas, differentiation between ATLL and CTCL must be performed, as they have different prognoses and treatment approaches.(14).

  12. Adult T-cell leukemia cells are characterized by abnormalities of Helios expression that promote T cell growth.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Satomi; Yamagishi, Makoto; Kawanami, Katsuaki; Nakano, Kazumi; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Muto, Satsuki; Sanada, Masashi; Yamochi, Tadanori; Kobayashi, Seiichiro; Utsunomiya, Atae; Iwanaga, Masako; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Ogawa, Seishi; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2013-08-01

    Molecular abnormalities involved in the multistep leukemogenesis of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) remain to be clarified. Based on our integrated database, we focused on the expression patterns and levels of Ikaros family genes, Ikaros, Helios, and Aiolos, in ATL patients and HTLV-1 carriers. The results revealed profound deregulation of Helios expression, a pivotal regulator in the control of T-cell differentiation and activation. The majority of ATL samples (32/37 cases) showed abnormal splicing of Helios expression, and four cases did not express Helios. In addition, novel genomic loss in Helios locus was observed in 17/168 cases. We identified four ATL-specific short Helios isoforms and revealed their dominant-negative function. Ectopic expression of ATL-type Helios isoform as well as knockdown of normal Helios or Ikaros promoted T-cell growth. Global mRNA profiling and pathway analysis showed activation of several signaling pathways important for lymphocyte proliferation and survival. These data provide new insights into the molecular involvement of Helios function in the leukemogenesis and phenotype of ATL cells, indicating that Helios deregulation is one of the novel molecular hallmarks of ATL.

  13. TIM-3 expression in lymphoma cells predicts chemoresistance in patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Horlad, Hasita; Ohnishi, Koji; Ma, Chaoya; Fujiwara, Yukio; Niino, Daisuke; Ohshima, Koichi; Jinushi, Masahisa; Matsuoka, Masao; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro

    2016-08-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), an aggressive type of malignant lymphoma, is highly resistant to chemotherapy. However, the detailed mechanisms of the chemoresistance of ATLL have never been elucidated. We previously demonstrated that direct cell-cell interaction between macrophages and lymphoma cells was significantly associated with lymphoma progression in patients with ATLL. The present study aimed to further analyze the effects of cell-cell interaction between macrophages and ATLL cells by means of cell culture studies and immunohistochemical analysis using human ATLL samples. It was found that direct co-culture with macrophages induced chemoresistance in the ATLL ATN-1 cell line, but not in other cell lines, including TL-Mor, ED and ATL-2S. It was also found that expression of the T cell Ig and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (TIM-3) was induced in ATN-1 cells by their long-term co-culture with macrophages. TIM-3 gene transfection induced chemoresistance in the ATN-1 cells. Immunostaining of ATLL tissues showed TIM-3 expression in 25 out of 58 ATLL cases. Although TIM-3 expression was not associated with overall survival or T classification, it was associated with resistance to chemotherapy. TIM-3 expression is therefore considered to be a marker for predicting the efficacy of chemotherapy, and TIM-3-associated signals may be a therapeutic target for patients with ATLL.

  14. CLINICAL ACTIVITY OF SEQUENTIAL FLAVOPIRIDOL, CYTOSINE ARABINOSIDE, AND MITOXANTRONE FOR ADULTS WITH NEWLY DIAGNOSED, POOR RISK ACUTE MYELOGENOUS LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Judith E.; Blackford, Amanda; Smith, B. Douglas; Alino, Katrina; Seung, Amy Hatfield; Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Greer, Jacqueline M.; Carraway, Hetty E.; Gore, Steven D.; Jones, Richard J.; Levis, Mark J.; McDevitt, Michael A.; Doyle, L. Austin; Wright, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Flavopiridol, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, is cytotoxic to leukemic blasts. In a Phase II study, flavopiridol 50 mg/m2 was given by 1-hour infusion daily × 3 beginning Day 1 followed by 2 gm/m2/72 hr ara-C beginning Day 6 and 40 mg/m2 mitoxantrone on Day 9 (FLAM) to 45 adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) with multiple poor risk features. Thirty patients (67%) achieved complete remission (CR) and 4 (9%) died. Twelve (40%) received myeloablative allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) in first CR. Median OS and DFS are not reached (67% alive 12.5–31 months, 58% in CR 11.4–30 months), with median follow-up 22 months. Sixteen received FLAM in CR, with median OS and DFS 9 and 13.1 months, and 36% alive at 21–31 months. Short OS and DFS correlated with adverse cytogenetics, regardless of age or treatment in CR. The addition of allogeneic BMT in CR translates into long OS and DFS in the majority of eligible patients. PMID:19962759

  15. Formation of Segmental Rounded Nodules During Infiltration of Adult T-Cell Leukemia Cells Into the Ocular Mucous Membrane.

    PubMed

    Kamoi, Koju; Nagata, Yoichi; Mochizuki, Manabu; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Ohno, Nobuhiro; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Tojo, Arinobu; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    To document a case of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cell infiltration into the ocular mucous membrane that presented with rounded nodule formation. Observational case report. A 36-year-old woman presented with bilateral conjunctival hyperemia and small papules on the legs and face. After complaining of significant fatigue at 6 months, she was diagnosed with high-risk chronic-type ATL. Ophthalmic examination revealed the formation of bilateral segmental rounded nodules, which were located both at the bulbar conjunctiva around the corneal limbus and at the palpebral conjunctiva around each lacrimal punctum. Although cellular infiltrations were also seen at the corneal subepithelium and stroma, no cellular infiltrations were observed in the anterior chamber, vitreous, or retina. Biopsy was performed of the bulbar and palpebral conjunctiva, and the polymerase chain reaction detected HTLV-1 proviral DNA and monoclonal T-cell receptor γ-chain gene rearrangement in both samples. Pathological evaluations identified atypical lymphoid cells that were consistent with ATL cells. These analyses confirmed that the rounded nodules were formed in conjunction with the infiltration of ATL cells. The formation of multiple rounded nodules during ATL cell infiltration into the ocular mucous membrane, especially at the palpebral conjunctiva around the lacrimal punctum, may be a distinguishing feature of ATL.

  16. Prolonged lymphocytosis as the first manifestation of Hodgkin-like adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Achiléa L; Andrade, Agnes Carvalho; Requião, Cristiane; Arruda, Maria da Gloria Bomfim; Araújo, Iguaracyra

    Hodgkin-like ATLL is a rare variant of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), a disease caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1). At admission, a 46-year-old female presented with lymphadenomegaly, lymphocytosis, slight elevation of LDH blood level, and acid-alcohol resistant bacilli in sputum and was being treated for pulmonary tuberculosis (Tb). She had lymphocytosis in the previous 20 months. Serology for HTLV-1 was positive. Lymph node was infiltrated by medium-sized lymphocytes with scattered Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg-like cells CD30+, CS1-4+, and CD79a+. Background cells were CD4+ and CD25+. A clinical diagnosis of favorable chronic ATLL was given. She was treated with chemotherapy but later progressed to acute ATLL and ultimately died. Hodgkin-like ATLL should be considered in the histological differential diagnosis with Hodgkin lymphoma since treatment and prognosis of these diseases are distinct. It is also important to search for HTLV-1 infection in patients with unexplained prolonged lymphocytosis. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Generation and Characterization of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor-Dependent Equine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Adult Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Sun, Jane; Fortuna, Patrick R.J.; Wolvetang, Ernst J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have reprogrammed dermal fibroblasts from an adult female horse into equine induced pluripotent stem cells (equiPSCs). These equiPSCs are dependent only on leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), placing them in striking contrast to previously derived equiPSCs that have been shown to be co-dependent on both LIF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). These equiPSCs have a normal karyotype and have been maintained beyond 60 passages. They possess alkaline phosphatase activity and express eqNANOG, eqOCT4, and eqTERT mRNA. Immunocytochemistry confirmed that they produce NANOG, REX1, SSEA4, TRA1-60, and TRA1-81. While our equiPSCs are LIF dependent, bFGF co-stimulates their proliferation via the PI3K/AKT pathway. EquiPSCs lack expression of eqXIST and immunostaining for H3K27me3, suggesting that during reprogramming the inactive X chromosome has likely been reactivated to generate cells that have two active X chromosomes. EquiPSCs form embryoid bodies and in vitro teratomas that contain derivatives of all three germ layers. These LIF-dependent equiPSCs likely reflect a more naive state of pluripotency than equiPSCs that are co-dependent on both LIF and bFGF and so provide a novel resource for understanding pluripotency in the horse. PMID:24555755

  18. TIM-3 expression in lymphoma cells predicts chemoresistance in patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Horlad, Hasita; Ohnishi, Koji; Ma, Chaoya; Fujiwara, Yukio; Niino, Daisuke; Ohshima, Koichi; Jinushi, Masahisa; Matsuoka, Masao; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), an aggressive type of malignant lymphoma, is highly resistant to chemotherapy. However, the detailed mechanisms of the chemoresistance of ATLL have never been elucidated. We previously demonstrated that direct cell-cell interaction between macrophages and lymphoma cells was significantly associated with lymphoma progression in patients with ATLL. The present study aimed to further analyze the effects of cell-cell interaction between macrophages and ATLL cells by means of cell culture studies and immunohistochemical analysis using human ATLL samples. It was found that direct co-culture with macrophages induced chemoresistance in the ATLL ATN-1 cell line, but not in other cell lines, including TL-Mor, ED and ATL-2S. It was also found that expression of the T cell Ig and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (TIM-3) was induced in ATN-1 cells by their long-term co-culture with macrophages. TIM-3 gene transfection induced chemoresistance in the ATN-1 cells. Immunostaining of ATLL tissues showed TIM-3 expression in 25 out of 58 ATLL cases. Although TIM-3 expression was not associated with overall survival or T classification, it was associated with resistance to chemotherapy. TIM-3 expression is therefore considered to be a marker for predicting the efficacy of chemotherapy, and TIM-3-associated signals may be a therapeutic target for patients with ATLL. PMID:27446463

  19. A genome-wide association study of susceptibility to acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Perez-Andreu, Virginia; Roberts, Kathryn G; Xu, Heng; Smith, Colton; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Wenjian; Harvey, Richard C; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Devidas, Meenakshi; Cheng, I-Ming; Carroll, William L; Heerema, Nyla A; Carroll, Andrew J; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Marcucci, Guido; Bloomfield, Clara D; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Stock, Wendy; Kornblau, Steven M; Konopleva, Marina; Paietta, Elisabeth; Rowe, Jacob M; Luger, Selina M; Tallman, Martin S; Dean, Michael; Burchard, Esteban G; Torgerson, Dara G; Yue, Feng; Wang, Yanli; Pui, Ching-Hon; Jeha, Sima; Relling, Mary V; Evans, William E; Gerhard, Daniela S; Loh, Mignon L; Willman, Cheryl L; Hunger, Stephen P; Mullighan, Charles G; Yang, Jun J

    2015-01-22

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adolescents and young adults (AYA) is characterized by distinct presenting features and inferior prognosis compared with pediatric ALL. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to comprehensively identify inherited genetic variants associated with susceptibility to AYA ALL. In the discovery GWAS, we compared genotype frequency at 635 297 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 308 AYA ALL cases and 6,661 non-ALL controls by using a logistic regression model with genetic ancestry as a covariate. SNPs that reached P ≤ 5 × 10(-8) in GWAS were tested in an independent cohort of 162 AYA ALL cases and 5,755 non-ALL controls. We identified a single genome-wide significant susceptibility locus in GATA3: rs3824662, odds ratio (OR), 1.77 (P = 2.8 × 10(-10)) and rs3781093, OR, 1.73 (P = 3.2 × 10(-9)). These findings were validated in the replication cohort. The risk allele at rs3824662 was most frequent in Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-like ALL but also conferred susceptibility to non-Ph-like ALL in AYAs. In 1,827 non-selected ALL cases, the risk allele frequency at this SNP was positively correlated with age at diagnosis (P = 6.29 × 10(-11)). Our results from this first GWAS of AYA ALL susceptibility point to unique biology underlying leukemogenesis and potentially distinct disease etiology by age group.

  20. Phase 1 Multicenter Study of Vincristine Sulfate Liposomes Injection and Dexamethasone in Adults With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Deborah A.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Stock, Wendy; Heffner, Leonard T.; Faderl, Stefan; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Wierda, William; Pierce, Sherry; Lu, Biao; Deitcher, Steven R.; O’Brien, Susan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dose intensification of chemotherapy has improved outcome for younger adults with de novo acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Novel formulations of standard chemotherapy agents may further reduce the incidence of disease recurrence after frontline chemotherapy. Vincristine (VCR) sulfate liposomes injection (VSLI) is a sphingomyelin/cholesterol nanoparticle encapsulated VCR formulation that improves the pharmacokinetic profile of VCR without augmenting neurotoxicity. METHODS A phase 1 trial of weekly, intravenous VSLI at 1.5 mg/m2, 1.825 mg/m2, 2.0 mg/m2, 2.25 mg/m2, or 2.4 mg/m2 was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) using a standard, 3 + 3 dose-escalation design. Dexamethasone (40 mg) was given on Days 1 through 4 and on Days 11 through 14 of each 4-week cycle. RESULTS Thirty-six adults with relapsed/refractory ALL, all previously treated with conventional VCR, received at least 1 dose of VSLI. The MTD of VSLI was 2.25 mg/m2 based on dose-limiting toxicities of grade 3 motor neuropathy, grade 4 seizure, and grade 4 hepatotoxicity in 1 patient each at the 2.4 mg/m2 dose level. The most common toxicities attributed to VSLI included peripheral neuropathy (55%) and constipation (53%). A complete response (CR) was achieved in 7 of 36 patients (19%) based on an intent-to-treat analysis; the CR rate was 29% for the 14 patients who underwent therapy as their first salvage attempt. Four of 7 patients who achieved a CR underwent subsequent allogeneic stem cell transplantation in remission. CONCLUSIONS In this study, VSLI plus dexamethasone appeared to be an effective salvage therapy option for relapsed/refractory ALL. A phase 2, international, multicenter clinical trial assessing the efficacy of single-agent VSLI as second salvage therapy for patients with previously treated ALL is underway. PMID:19708032

  1. Impact of leukapheresis on early death rate in adult acute myeloid leukemia presenting with hyperleukocytosis.

    PubMed

    Bug, Gesine; Anargyrou, Konstantinos; Tonn, Torsten; Bialleck, Heike; Seifried, Erhard; Hoelzer, Dieter; Ottmann, Oliver G

    2007-10-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with hyperleukocytosis of at least 100 x 10(9) per L are at high risk of early death due to pulmonary or cerebral leukostasis. Although the efficacy of leukapheresis in terms of prompt cytoreduction is generally accepted, published data regarding the clinical value of immediate therapeutic leukapheresis are limited and conflicting. To determine whether leukapheresis has a favorable impact on early mortality, the clinical course of 53 newly diagnosed patients with AML and hyperleukocytosis admitted between 1995 and 2005 was analyzed retrospectively. Before August 2001, 28 patients received chemotherapy without leukoreduction (Cohort A). Thereafter, all AML patients with hyperleukocytosis were scheduled to receive leukapheresis, which was performed in 25 patients (Cohort B). There were no procedure-related adverse events. By Day 21 of therapy, 13 of 53 patients had died, resulting in an overall early death rate of 25 percent. In a multivariate logistic regression model, patients in Cohort B had a significantly lower risk of early death than patients in Cohort A (16% vs. 32%, respectively; p = 0.015). Dyspnea (p = 0.005), elevated creatinine (p = 0.028), and higher lactate dehydrogenase serum levels (p = 0.021) were independent risk factors for early death. With a median follow-up of 24.2 months, the overall survival was similar in both cohorts (Cohort A, 7.5; Cohort B, 6.5 months). Thus, leukapheresis had no impact on patients' long-term survivals. Our experience suggests that AML patients with hyperleukocytosis receiving leukapheresis had a significantly lower risk for early death by Day 21 than patients treated without leukapheresis. We therefore have adopted leukapheresis as a standard procedure in our department.

  2. Energy balance and fitness in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    DeLany, James P.; Kaste, Sue C.; Mulrooney, Daniel A.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Karlage, Robyn E.; Lanctot, Jennifer Q.; Howell, Carrie R.; Lu, Lu; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Robison, Leslie L.; Hudson, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    There is limited information on body composition, energy balance, and fitness among survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), especially those treated without cranial radiation therapy (CRT). This analysis compares these metrics among 365 ALL survivors with a mean age of 28.6 ± 5.9 years (149 treated with and 216 without CRT) and 365 age-, sex-, and race-matched peers. We also report risk factors for outcomes among survivors treated without CRT. Male survivors not exposed to CRT had abnormal body composition when compared with peers (% body fat, 26.2 ± 8.2 vs 22.7 ± 7.1). Survivors without CRT had similar energy balance but had significantly impaired quadriceps strength (−21.9 ± 6.0 Newton-meters [Nm]/kg, 60°/s) and endurance (−11.4 ± 4.6 Nm/kg, 300°/s), exercise capacity (−2.0 ± 2.1 ml/kg per minute), low-back and hamstring flexibility (−4.7 ± 1.6 cm), and dorsiflexion range of motion (−3.1 ± 0.9°) and higher modified total neuropathy scores (+1.6 ± 1.1) than peers. Cumulative asparaginase dose ≥120 000 IU/m2 was associated with impaired flexibility, vincristine dose ≥39 mg/m2 with peripheral neuropathy, glucocorticoid (prednisone equivalent) dose ≥8000 mg/m2 with hand weakness, and intrathecal methotrexate dose ≥225 mg with dorsiflexion weakness. Physical inactivity was associated with hand weakness and decreased exercise capacity. Smoking was associated with peripheral neuropathy. Elimination of CRT from ALL therapy has improved, but not eliminated, body-composition outcomes. Survivors remain at risk for impaired fitness. PMID:25814529

  3. Statewide geographic variation in outcomes for adults with acute myeloid leukemia in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Ashley T; Meyer, Anne-Marie; Smitherman, Andrew B; Zhou, Lei; Basch, Ethan M; Shea, Thomas C; Wood, William A

    2016-10-01

    Population-based studies have demonstrated survival disparities related to socioeconomic factors for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The objective of the current study was to determine whether the local health care infrastructure, represented by Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) region, or treating center experience, represented by National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center (NCICCC) designation, were associated with outcomes among patients with AML in North Carolina. Patients who were diagnosed with AML from 2003 to 2009 were identified using the University of North Carolina Lineberger Integrated Cancer Information and Surveillance System, a database linking insurance claims to the North Carolina Cancer Registry. A Cox proportional-hazards model was used to explore survival based on AHEC region. A subset of patients who received inpatient chemotherapy was examined to evaluate the impact of treatment at an NCICCC. Nine hundred patients were identified in the study period, 553 of whom received inpatient chemotherapy therapy within 30 days of diagnosis. Almost one-half of these patients (n = 294) received chemotherapy at a non-NCICCC. Among the patients who received intensive inpatient therapy, residence in 3 of 9 AHEC regions was associated with a higher risk of mortality (hazard ratio: range, 1.97-4.03; P < .01) at 1 year in multivariate analysis. Treatment at a non-NCICCC was not associated with an increased risk of mortality at 1 year (hazard ratio, 1.25; 95% confidence interval, 0.95-1.65). Survival among patients with AML in North Carolina varies according to geographic region. Further examination of local practice and referral patterns may inform strategies to improve AML outcomes across the state. Cancer 2016;122:3041-3050. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  4. Current treatment options for adult patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stock, Wendy

    2010-02-01

    The clinical management of patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been challenging primarily due to the aggressive nature of the disease and limited effective treatment options. The outcome for patients who receive conventional chemotherapy alone is poor, with remission duration of around 12 months and disease-free survival (DFS) rates of not more than 10%. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) has been the only known curative treatment option, but is limited by the availability of a matched donor and the risk of treatment-related mortality. Given the role of BCR-ABL in the leukemogenesis of Ph+ ALL, current treatments have focused on inhibition of this oncogenic tyrosine kinase. Early studies demonstrate that the use of the BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), imatinib, before alloSCT results in improved response rates and DFS when combined with standard chemotherapy regimens. Remission duration also is improved when combination chemotherapy and imatinib are administered intensively, even in the absence of allogeneic stem cell transplant. However, resistant disease remains an important problem, and the mechanisms underlying resistance in Ph+ ALL are multifactorial. Novel TKIs are currently under development and are effective in some patients with imatinib-resistant disease. The dual BCR-ABL/SRC family kinase inhibitor, dasatinib, has shown promising activity in the treatment of Ph+ ALL after imatinib failure and has recently been approved in this indication. Other TKI-based therapies are also showing potential in imatinib-resistant disease. This article reviews current and emerging treatments in Ph+ ALL.

  5. Infections increase the risk of central venous catheter-related thrombosis in adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Buccisano, Francesco; Maurillo, Luca; Venditti, Daniela; Cefalo, Mariagiovanna; Sarlo, Chiara; Di Caprio, Luigi; Di Veroli, Ambra; Nasso, Daniela; Ceresoli, Eleonora; Postorino, Massimiliano; Di Piazza, Fabio; Colandrea, Giulio; Conti, Fabio; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Amadori, Sergio; Venditti, Adriano

    2013-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) related thrombosis (CRT) represents a well known complication in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) receiving intensive chemotherapy but the efficacy of antithrombotic prophylaxis still remains controversial. We analyzed 71 consecutive AML patients whose CVC was inserted before each chemotherapy cycle for an overall number of 106 CVC placements. In 47/106 insertions, a prophylaxis with 100 IU/kg/day low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) was administered for 7 days after CVC insertion and additional 7 after CVC removal. This unconventional dose of LMWH, although higher than usual, appeared adequate for a short-course approach. LMWH was delivered regardless of the platelet (PLT) count once provided that it should have been maintained above 20 x 10(9)/L by transfusions. Of 106 insertions, we observed 19 (18%) episodes of CRT, 58 (54%) of sepsis and 50 (47%) infections of CVC-exit site with no difference between LMWH and no-LMWH group. Occurrence of CRT was significantly associated with CVC-exit site infections (14/19, p=0.01) and sepsis (16/19, p=0.005) with no difference between LMWH and no-LMWH group. In multivariate analysis, both CVC-exit site infections and sepsis were confirmed to be independent risk factors for CRT development. Our retrospective study, although based on a small sample size, suggests that the occurrence of CVC-exit site infections and neutropenic sepsis following chemotherapy significantly increases the risk of CRT in AML, independently from the use of LMWH prophylaxis. © 2013.

  6. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-24

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Blastic Phase; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase of Disease; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Disease

  7. [Experiences with polychemotherapy of acute leukemias in adults with special reference to the COAP combination].

    PubMed

    Gürtler, R; Raderecht, C

    1975-01-01

    The authors give a report on their experiences with polychemotherapy in 77 acute leukaemias in adults. On this occasion the COAP combination was identified to be well effective and to be an enrichment of therapy because of its low side effects.

  8. Factor V Leiden 1691G/A and prothrombin gene 20210G/A polymorphisms as prothrombotic markers in adult Egyptian acute leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    El Sissy, Azza Hamdy; El Sissy, Maha H; Elmoamly, Shereef

    2014-11-01

    Factor V Leiden 1691G/A and prothrombin gene 20210G/A mutations are the most common genetic defects leading to thrombosis. This work aimed to study the FV Leiden and the prothrombin gene polymorphism in adult Egyptian patients with acute leukemia and their importance in thrombophilia screening. The study included 76 patients with acute leukemia and 100 healthy controls. Genotyping was done by real-time polymerase chain reaction technique. For factor V Leiden, the frequency of G/A mutation conferred more than 2.5-fold of increased risk of (OR 2.639 95 % CI 1.045-6.669). The frequency of factor V Leiden combined (G/A + A/A) genotypes conferred 2.83-fold of increased risk (OR 2.828, CI 1.13-7.075), The A allele conferred almost threefold increased risk (OR 2.824, 95 % CI 1.175-6.785). Despite higher frequency in patients compared to controls, there was no risk of association between prothrombin gene mutation and acute leukemia in adult Egyptians nor was there between combined genotypes of prothrombin gene mutation and factor V Leiden.

  9. Frequency of p190 and p210 BCR-ABL rearrangements and survival in Brazilian adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    de França Azevedo, Ilana; da Silva Júnior, Rui Milton Patrício; de Vasconcelos, Audrey Violeta Martins; das Neves, Washington Batista; de Barros Correia Melo, Fárida Coeli; Melo, Raul Antônio Morais

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the occurrence of the p190 and p210 breakpoint cluster region-Abelson (BCR-ABL) rearrangements in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and possible associations with clinical and laboratory characteristics and survival. Methods Forty-one over 18-year-old patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia of both genders followed-up between January 2008 and May 2012 were included in this study. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical charts of the patients. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using specific primers was employed to identify molecular rearrangements. Results At diagnosis, the median age was 33 years, and there was a predominance of males (61%). The most common immunophenotype was B lineage (76%). BCR-ABL rearrangements was detected in 14 (34%) patients with the following distribution: p190 (28%), p210 (50%) and double positive (22%). Overall survival of patients with a mean/median of 331/246 days of follow up was 39%, respectively, negative BCR-ABL (44%) and positive BCR-ABL (28%). Conclusion These results confirm the high frequency of BCR-ABL rearrangements and the low survival rate of adult Brazilian patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:25305168

  10. Leukemia cutis with lymphoglandular bodies: a clue to acute lymphoblastic leukemia cutis.

    PubMed

    Obiozor, Cynthia; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Fraga, Garth R

    2015-08-15

    Leukemia cutis describes cutaneous lesions produced by infiltrates of leukemic cells. It usually manifests contemporaneously with the initial diagnosis of systemic leukemia, but may also precede or follow systemic leukemia. Most cases are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. Adult B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia cutis is very rare. We report a 59-year-old woman with a history of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapsed with aleukemic lymphoblastic leukemia cutis. Lymphoglandular bodies were conspicuous on biopsy and may serve as a morphologic clue to lymphocytic differentiation while molecular and immunophenotypic studies are pending. The patient was successfully treated with local radiation therapy and oral ponatinib.

  11. Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-28

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Bilineal T lymphoblastic and myeloid blast transformation in chronic myeloid leukemia with TP53 mutation—an uncommon presentation in adults

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, S.; Sabai, K.; Chuah, C.; Tan, S.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Bilineal blast transformation of myeloid and T lymphoid type is a rare event in chronic myeloid leukemia. Here, we report a case in which an adult presented with high white cell counts and lymphadenopathy. Bone marrow studies confirmed the presence of 9 and 22 chromosomal translocation, and a diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase was made. Examination of a lymph node showed both myeloid and T lymphoblastoid blast crisis. Molecular studies demonstrated the presence of BCR-ABL fusion transcripts in both the myeloid and the T lymphoblastic component, indicating that the myeloid and T lymphoid blast crisis components shared common progenitors. TP53 deletion was demonstrated by fluorescence in situ hybridization. PMID:24523612

  13. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  14. Polish Literature in Exile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zielinska, Marie F.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a brief historical overview of the development of Polish literature in exile with emphasis on publishing. The upheaval of World War II left many Poles outside their native land. They have created a flourishing press and literature, with 21 Polish houses outside of Poland and other active presses. (SLD)

  15. Communicating in Polish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penny, Bernard; Malinowska, Krystyna T.

    This Polish textbook consists of a series of narrations and dialogs based on photographs depicting typical activities in the daily lives of Polish citizens. Two sets of questions follow each selection; the first set is intended to stimulate communication on what has been seen and heard, while the second set asks the students to compare what they…

  16. Clinical significance of high c-MYC and low MYCBP2 expression and their association with Ikaros dysfunction in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zheng; Guo, Xing; Li, Jianyong; Hartman, Melanie; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Dovat, Sinisa; Song, Chunhua

    2015-12-08

    Increased expression of c-MYC is observed in both Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) and T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T-ALL). MYC binding protein 2 (MYCBP2) is a probable E3 ubiquitin ligase and its function in leukemia is unknown. IKZF1 deletion is associated with the development and poor outcome of ALL. Here, we observed significant high c-MYC expression and low MYCBP2 expression in adult ALL patients. Patients with high c-MYC expression and/or low MYCBP2 expression had higher WBC counts and a higher percentage of CD34+ or CD33+ cells, as well as splenomegaly, liver infiltration, higher BM blasts, and lower CR rate. Ikaros bound to the regulatory regions of c-MYC and MYCBP2, suppressed c-MYC and increased MYCBP2 expression in ALL cells. Expression of c-MYC mRNA was significantly higher in patients with IKZF1 deletion; conversely MYCBP2 mRNA expression was significantly lower in those patients. A CK2 inhibitor, which acts as an Ikaros activator, also suppressed c-MYC and increased MYCBP2 expression in an Ikaros (IKZF1) dependent manner in the ALL cells. In summary, our data indicated the correlation of high c-MYC expression, low MYCBP2 expression and high c-MYC plus low MYCBP2 expression with high-risk factors and proliferation markers in adult ALL patients. Our data also revealed an oncogenic role for an Ikaros/MYCBP2/c-MYC axis in adult ALL, providing a mechanism of target therapies that activate Ikaros in adult ALL.

  17. Clinical significance of high c-MYC and low MYCBP2 expression and their association with Ikaros dysfunction in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Zheng; Guo, Xing; Li, Jianyong; Hartman, Melanie; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Dovat, Sinisa; Song, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    Increased expression of c-MYC is observed in both Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) and T- cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T-ALL). MYC binding protein 2 (MYCBP2) is a probable E3 ubiquitin ligase and its function in leukemia is unknown. IKZF1 deletion is associated with the development and poor outcome of ALL. Here, we observed significant high c-MYC expression and low MYCBP2 expression in adult ALL patients. Patients with high c-MYC expression and/or low MYCBP2 expression had higher WBC counts and a higher percentage of CD34+ or CD33+ cells, as well as splenomegaly, liver infiltration, higher BM blasts, and lower CR rate. Ikaros bound to the regulatory regions of c-MYC and MYCBP2, suppressed c-MYC and increased MYCBP2 expression in ALL cells. Expression of c-MYC mRNA was significantly higher in patients with IKZF1 deletion; conversely MYCBP2 mRNA expression was significantly lower in those patients. A CK2 inhibitor, which acts as an Ikaros activator, also suppressed c-MYC and increased MYCBP2 expression in an Ikaros (IKZF1) dependent manner in the ALL cells. In summary, our data indicated the correlation of high c-MYC expression, low MYCBP2 expression and high c-MYC plus low MYCBP2 expression with high-risk factors and proliferation markers in adult ALL patients. Our data also revealed an oncogenic role for an Ikaros/MYCBP2/c-MYC axis in adult ALL, providing a mechanism of target therapies that activate Ikaros in adult ALL. PMID:26517351

  18. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed High-Risk B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Ph-Like TKI Sensitive Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-02

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Bone Necrosis; Central Nervous System Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Ph-Like Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Testicular Leukemia; Therapy-Related Toxicity; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  19. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or T-cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-12

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Stage II Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. Irreversible Paraplegia Following One Time Prophylactic Intrathecal Chemotherapy in an Adult Patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hea Yong; Im, Sung-il; Kang, Myoung-Hee; Kim, Kwang Min; Kim, Seok Hyun; Kim, Hun-Gu; Kang, Jung Hun

    2008-01-01

    We present an adult female patient who developed irreversible paraplegia and areflexia four days post intrathecal chemotherapy with methotrexate, cytosine arabinoside and hydrocortisone. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine, diffuse gadolinium enhancement of the anterior spinal nerve roots (ventral roots) was detected. Methylprednisolone was intravenously administered at a daily dose of 30mg/kg for three days. Despite this treatment, flaccid weakness in the lower extremities and urinary retention persisted. Following consolidation chemotherapy, no improvement in neurologic status was noted. Six months later, a follow-up MRI revealed severe atrophy of the thoracic spinal cord. PMID:18306482

  1. Reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for adult acute myeloid leukemia in complete remission - a review from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT

    PubMed Central

    Sengsayadeth, Salyka; Savani, Bipin N.; Blaise, Didier; Malard, Florent; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is the most common indication for an allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant. The introduction of reduced intensity conditioning has expanded the recipient pool for transplantation, which has importantly made transplant an option for the more commonly affected older age groups. Reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic transplantation is currently the standard of care for patients with intermediate or high-risk acute myeloid leukemia and is now most often employed in older patients and those with medical comorbidities. Despite being curative for a significant proportion of patients, post-transplant relapse remains a challenge in the reduced intensity conditioning setting. Herein we discuss the studies that demonstrate the feasibility of reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic transplants, compare the outcomes of reduced intensity conditioning versus chemotherapy and conventional myeloablative conditioning regimens, describe the optimal donor and stem cell source, and consider the impact of post-remission consolidation, comorbidities, center experience, and more intensive (reduced toxicity conditioning) regimens on outcomes. Additionally, we discuss the need for further prospective studies to optimize transplant outcomes. PMID:26130513

  2. Central review of cytogenetics is necessary for cooperative group correlative and clinical studies of adult acute leukemia: The Cancer and Leukemia Group B experience

    PubMed Central

    Mrózek, Krzysztof; Carroll, Andrew J.; Maharry, Kati; Rao, Kathleen W.; Patil, Shivanand R.; Pettenati, Mark J.; Watson, Michael S.; Arthur, Diane C.; Tantravahi, Ramana; Heerema, Nyla A.; Koduru, Prasad R. K.; Block, AnneMarie W.; Qumsiyeh, Mazin B.; Edwards, Colin G.; Sterling, Lisa J.; Holland, Kelsi B.; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2009-01-01

    The Cancer and Leukemia Group B has performed central review of karyotypes submitted by institutional cytogenetics laboratories from patients with acute myeloid (AML) and acute lymphoblastic (ALL) leukemia since 1986. We assessed the role of central karyotype review in maintaining accurate, high quality cytogenetic data for clinical and translational studies using two criteria: the proportion of karyotypes rejected (i.e. inadequate), and, among accepted (i.e. adequate) cases, the proportion of karyotypes whose interpretation was changed on central karyotype review. We compared the first four years during which central karyotype review was performed with a recent four-year period and found that the proportion of rejected samples decreased significantly for both AML and ALL. However, during the latter period, central karyotype reviews still found 8% of AML and 16% of ALL karyotypes inadequate. Among adequate cases, the karyotype was revised in 26% of both AML and ALL samples. Some revisions resulted in changing the patients’ assignment to particular World Health Organization diagnostic categories and/or moving patients from one prognostic group to another. Overall, when both data on rejection rates and data on karyotype revisions made in accepted cases were considered together, 32% of AML and 38% of ALL samples submitted were either rejected or revised on central karyotype review during the recent 4-year period. These data underscore the necessity of continued central karyotype review in multi-institutional cooperative group studies. PMID:18636143

  3. Leukemia cutis in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia presenting as bilateral helical nodules

    PubMed Central

    Raufi, Ali; Alsharedi, Mohamed; Khelfa, Yousef; Griswold, Doreen C; Lebowicz, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the most common adult leukemia worldwide, is considered an indolent but incurable non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Leukemia cutis is an uncommon manifestation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. We present a case of an adult patient who presented with skin lesion of bilateral ears, which led to the diagnosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. We also reviewed the cases of auricular involvement in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients reported in the literature. Local treatment is indicated in case of leukemia cutis; however, systemic treatment is recommended when there are systemic signs and symptoms. Better awareness of disease evolution and prompt diagnosis of this leukemia cutis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia will improve the effectiveness and outcome of its management. PMID:28228955

  4. HTLV-1 Infection and Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma—A Tale of Two Proteins: Tax and HBZ

    PubMed Central

    Giam, Chou-Zen; Semmes, Oliver John

    2016-01-01

    HTLV-1 (Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1) is a complex human delta retrovirus that currently infects 10–20 million people worldwide. While HTLV-1 infection is generally asymptomatic, 3%–5% of infected individuals develop a highly malignant and intractable T-cell neoplasm known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) decades after infection. How HTLV-1 infection progresses to ATL is not well understood. Two viral regulatory proteins, Tax and HTLV-1 basic zipper protein (HBZ), encoded by the sense and antisense viral transcripts, respectively, are thought to play indispensable roles in the oncogenic process of ATL. This review focuses on the roles of Tax and HBZ in viral replication, persistence, and oncogenesis. Special emphasis is directed towards recent literature on the mechanisms of action of these two proteins and the roles of Tax and HBZ in influencing the outcomes of HTLV-1 infection including senescence induction, viral latency and persistence, genome instability, cell proliferation, and ATL development. Attempts are made to integrate results from cell-based studies of HTLV-1 infection and studies of HTLV-1 proviral integration site preference, clonality, and clonal expansion based on high throughput DNA sequencing. Recent data showing that Tax hijacks key mediators of DNA double-strand break repair signaling—the ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8) and the ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme (UBC13)—to activate the canonical nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-κB) and other signaling pathways will be discussed. A perspective on how the Tax-RNF8 signaling axis might impact genomic instability and how Tax may collaborate with HBZ to drive oncogenesis is provided. PMID:27322308

  5. HTLV-1 Infection and Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma-A Tale of Two Proteins: Tax and HBZ.

    PubMed

    Giam, Chou-Zen; Semmes, Oliver John

    2016-06-16

    HTLV-1 (Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1) is a complex human delta retrovirus that currently infects 10-20 million people worldwide. While HTLV-1 infection is generally asymptomatic, 3%-5% of infected individuals develop a highly malignant and intractable T-cell neoplasm known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) decades after infection. How HTLV-1 infection progresses to ATL is not well understood. Two viral regulatory proteins, Tax and HTLV-1 basic zipper protein (HBZ), encoded by the sense and antisense viral transcripts, respectively, are thought to play indispensable roles in the oncogenic process of ATL. This review focuses on the roles of Tax and HBZ in viral replication, persistence, and oncogenesis. Special emphasis is directed towards recent literature on the mechanisms of action of these two proteins and the roles of Tax and HBZ in influencing the outcomes of HTLV-1 infection including senescence induction, viral latency and persistence, genome instability, cell proliferation, and ATL development. Attempts are made to integrate results from cell-based studies of HTLV-1 infection and studies of HTLV-1 proviral integration site preference, clonality, and clonal expansion based on high throughput DNA sequencing. Recent data showing that Tax hijacks key mediators of DNA double-strand break repair signaling-the ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8) and the ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme (UBC13)-to activate the canonical nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-κB) and other signaling pathways will be discussed. A perspective on how the Tax-RNF8 signaling axis might impact genomic instability and how Tax may collaborate with HBZ to drive oncogenesis is provided.

  6. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children and young adults with secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia after aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Ayami; Strahm, Brigitte; Baumann, Irith; Furlan, Ingrid; Schwarz, Stephan; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Walther, Joachim-Ulrich; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Göhring, Gudrun; Nöllke, Peter; Führer, Monika; Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2014-03-01

    Secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia (sMDS/sAML) are the most serious secondary events occurring after immunosuppressive therapy in patients with aplastic anemia. Here we evaluate the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 17 children and young adults with sMDS/sAML after childhood aplastic anemia. The median interval between the diagnosis of aplastic anemia and the development of sMDS/sAML was 2.9 years (range, 1.2 to 13.0 years). At a median age of 13.1 years (range, 4.4 to 26.7 years), patients underwent HSCT with bone marrow (n = 6) or peripheral blood stem cell (n = 11) grafts from HLA-matched sibling donors (n = 2), mismatched family donors (n = 2), or unrelated donors (n = 13). Monosomy 7 was detected in 13 patients. The preparative regimen consisted of busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and melphalan in 11 patients and other agents in 6 patients. All patients achieved neutrophil engraftment. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 47%, and that of chronic GVHD was 70%. Relapse occurred in 1 patient. The major cause of death was transplant-related complication (n = 9). Overall survival and event-free survival at 5 years after HSCT were both 41%. In summary, this study indicates that HSCT is a curative therapy for some patients with sMDS/sAML after aplastic anemia. Future efforts should focus on reducing transplantation-related mortality.

  7. Prevention of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 infection and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yoshimitsu, Makoto; White, Yohann; Arima, Naomichi

    2014-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a highly aggressive peripheral T-cell malignancy that develops after long-term chronic infection with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1). Despite the recent advances in chemotherapy, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT), and supportive care, the prognosis for patients with ATL is one of the poorest among hematological malignancies; overall survival (OS) at 3 years is only 24 % in the more aggressive subtypes of ATLL. HTLV-1 is a human retrovirus infecting approximately 10-20 million people worldwide, particularly in southern and southeastern Japan, the Caribbean, highlands of South America, Melanesia, and Equatorial Africa. Despite this high frequency of human infection, only 2-5 % of HTLV-1-infected individuals develop ATLL. Three major routes of viral transmission have been established: (1) mother-to-child transmission through breast-feeding; (2) sexual transmission, predominantly from men to women; and (3) cellular blood components. Multiple factors (e.g., virus, host cell, and immune factors) have been implicated in the development of ATLL, although the underlying mechanisms of leukemogenesis have not been fully elucidated. No preventive vaccine against HTLV-1 is currently available, and interrupting the well-recognized primary modes of HTLV-1 transmission is the mainstay of ATLL prevention. Prevention of mother-to-child transmission through the replacement of breast-feeding has been shown to have the most significant impact on the incidence of HTLV-1 infection, and public health policies should consider the risk of malnutrition, especially in developing countries where malnutrition is the significant cause of infant mortality.

  8. Evaluation of Memory Impairment in Aging Adult Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treated With Cranial Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cranial radiotherapy (CRT) is a known risk factor for neurocognitive impairment in survivors of childhood cancer and may increase risk for mild cognitive impairment and dementia in adulthood. Methods We performed a cross-sectional evaluation of survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with 18 Gy (n = 127) or 24 Gy (n = 138) CRT. Impairment (age-adjusted score >1 standard deviation below expected mean, two-sided exact binomial test) on the Wechsler Memory Scale IV (WMS-IV) was measured. A subset of survivors (n = 85) completed structural and functional neuroimaging. Results Survivors who received 24 Gy, but not 18 Gy, CRT had impairment in immediate (impairment rate = 33.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 25.9% to 42.4%; P < .001) and delayed memory (impairment rate = 30.2%, 95% CI = 22.6% to 38.6%; P < .001). The mean score for long-term narrative memory among survivors who received 24 Gy CRT was equivalent to that for individuals older than 69 years. Impaired immediate memory was associated with smaller right (P = .02) and left (P = .008) temporal lobe volumes, and impaired delayed memory was associated with thinner parietal and frontal cortices. Lower hippocampal volumes and increased functional magnetic resonance imaging activation were observed with memory impairment. Reduced cognitive status (Brief Cognitive Status Exam from the WMS-IV) was identified after 24 Gy (18.5%, 95% CI = 12.4% to 26.1%; P < .001), but not 18 Gy (8.7%, 95% CI = 4.4% to 15.0%; P = .11), CRT, suggesting a dose–response effect. Employment rates were equivalent (63.8% for 24 Gy CRT and 63.0% for 18 Gy CRT). Conclusions Adult survivors who received 24 Gy CRT had reduced cognitive status and memory, with reduced integrity in neuroanatomical regions essential in memory formation, consistent with early onset mild cognitive impairment. PMID:23584394

  9. Insulin Resistance and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Victor, Ronald G.; Church, Timothy S.; Snell, Peter G.; Dunn, Andrea L.; Eshelman-Kent, Debra A.; Ross, Robert; Janiszewski, Peter M.; Turoff, Alicia J.; Brooks, Sandra; Vega, Gloria Lena

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence of insulin resistance and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in young adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional evaluation of 118 survivors of childhood ALL (median age, 23.0 years; range, 18 to 37 years), insulin resistance was estimated using the homeostasis model for assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Sex-specific comparisons were made with a cohort of 30- to 37-year-old individuals from the same region participating in the Dallas Heart Study (DHS, N = 782). ALL survivors were stratified by treatment with and without cranial radiotherapy (CRT). Results Female ALL survivors had a significantly higher HOMA-IR (CRT, mean 4.6, 95% CI, 3.6 to 5.7; no CRT, mean 3.3, 95% CI, 2.8 to 3.8) in comparison with DHS women (mean 2.4, 95% CI, 2.2 to 2.7). Eighty percent of women treated with CRT had at least three of six CVD risk factors, and they were significantly more likely to have three or more risk factors compared with DHS women (odds ratio [OR], 5.96; 95% CI, 2.15 to 16.47). Male ALL survivors had a significantly higher HOMA-IR (CRT, mean 4.0, 95% CI, 2.8 to 5.6; no CRT, mean 3.4, 95% CI, 2.9 to 3.9) in comparison with DHS men (mean 2.3, 95% CI, 2.1 to 2.6), but were not more likely to have multiple CVD risk factors. Conclusion ALL survivors had an increased prevalence of insulin resistance in comparison with a cohort of older individuals from the same community. Importantly, women treated with CRT seem to have an increased prevalence of multiple CVD risk factors, warranting close monitoring and risk-reducing strategies. PMID:19564534

  10. Anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for adult Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yang-min; Wu, Zhao; Tan, You-ping; Du, Yuan-yuan; Liu, Zhi; Ou, Rui-ming; Liu, Shuang; Pu, Cheng-fei; Jiang, Jing; Wang, Jin-ping; Xiao, Lei; Zhang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: The presence of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been associated with a high risk of disease relapse and a poor prognosis. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an established treatment for adults with Ph-positive ALL, but relapse remains the primary cause of treatment failure, and is associated with an extremely poor prognosis. The emergence of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) poses a challenge for patients with disease relapses after initial treatment with TKI-containing regimens. Patient concerns: Two patients with TKI-resistant recurrent Ph-positive ALL. Diagnoses: Ph-positive ALL. Interventions: Anti-CD19 CAR T-cell infusion. Outcomes: One patient's bone marrow blasts decreased significantly, and the other reached negative minimal residual disease (MRD). However, we first recorded the development of new-onset acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) after anti-CD19 CAR T-cell infusion in a patient who received allogeneic HSCT. Our 2 case reports also demonstrate the efficacy of anti-CD19 CAR T-cell therapy in the treatment of TKI-resistant Ph-positive ALL. Lessons: Our report suggests that anti-CD19 CAR T-cell therapy may be a promising option for the treatment of relapsed Ph-positive ALL after conventional chemotherapy or allogeneic HSCT. However, caution is due given the possibility of the adverse effects of cytokine release syndrome (CRS)-induced aGVHD for patients receiving allogeneic HSCT. PMID:28002337

  11. Microsatellite alterations are also present in the less aggressive types of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Marcelo; Oliveira, Pedro D; Bittencourt, Achiléa L; Farre, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is a mature T-cell neoplasia etiologically linked to HTLV-1. Manifestations of ATL are diverse and different clinical types with different tissue involvement and aggressiveness have been described. The mechanisms that lead to the development of ATL clinical types have not yet been clarified. Considering that in ATL patients HTLV-1 infection generally occurs in childhood, a multistep carcinogenesis model has been proposed. Microsatellite alterations are important genetic events in cancer development and these alterations have been reported in the aggressive types of ATL. Little is known about oncogenesis of the less aggressive types. In this study we investigated the role of the microsatellite alterations in the pathogenesis mediated by HTLV-1 in the different types of ATL. We examined the presence of microsatellite instability (MSI) and loss of heterozigosity (LOH) in matched pair samples (tumoral and normal) of 24 patients with less aggressive types (smoldering and chronic) and in aggressive types (acute and lymphoma) of ATL. Four microsatellite markers D10S190, D10S191, D1391 and DCC were analyzed. MSI was found in four patients, three smoldering and one chronic, and LOH in four patients, three smoldering and one acute. None of the smoldering patients with microsatellite alterations progressed to aggressive ATL. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the presence of MSI and LOH in the less aggressive types of ATL. These results indicate that microsatellite alterations may participate in the development of the less aggressive types of ATL.

  12. Clinical usefulness of FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of various types of adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nakachi, Sawako; Okada, Masahiro; Morishima, Satoko; Agarie, Yurika; Kitamura, Sakiko; Uchibori, Sachie; Tomori, Shouhei; Hanashiro, Taeko; Shimabukuro, Natsuki; Tamaki, Keita; Tedokon, Iori; Morichika, Kazuho; Nishi, Yukiko; Tomoyose, Takeaki; Karube, Kennosuke; Fukushima, Takuya; Murayama, Sadayuki; Masuzaki, Hiroaki

    2017-10-01

    The aim was to explore undefined useful indices for clinically grading adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) using [(18)F] 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) - positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). A total of 28 patients with ATL (indolent, 9; aggressive, 19) were enrolled; all patients with aggressive ATL underwent FDG-PET/CT before chemotherapy. Patients with indolent ATL underwent FDG-PET/CT at the time of suspected disease progression and/or transformation; some received lymph node biopsy. The quantitative parameters maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax), and mean and peak SUV, metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and volume-based total lesion glycolysis were calculated with the margin threshold as 25%, and 50% of the SUVmax for all lesions. All parameters except for MTV-25% showed significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) in differentiating the aggressive type from the indolent type of ATL. Areas under the curve for receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis regarding the series of parameters investigated ranged from 0.75 to 0.92; this indicated relatively high accuracy in distinguishing the aggressive type from the indolent type. No malignant findings were detected in lymph node biopsies in indolent ATL patients with lymphadenopathy. We performed evaluation of a line of parameters of FDG-PET, thereby demonstrating their significantly high accuracy for grading malignancy in ATL patients. In particular, low accumulation of FDG in indolent ATL patients with lymphadenopathy might predict that it is not a sign of disease transformation, but rather a reactive manifestation. FDG-PET/CT findings could be useful for clinically grading ATL.

  13. Screening of promising chemotherapeutic candidates from plants against human adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (III).

    PubMed

    Nakano, Daisuke; Ishitsuka, Kenji; Kamikawa, Mio; Matsuda, Michika; Tsuchihashi, Ryota; Okawa, Masafumi; Okabe, Hikaru; Tamura, Kazuo; Kinjo, Junei

    2013-10-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is a malignancy of mature peripheral T lymphocytes caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). In our previous paper, 214 extracts from 162 plants were screened to elucidate the anti-proliferative principles against HTLV-I-infected T-cell lines. In this study, 245 extracts from 182 plants belonging to 61 families were further tested against two HTLV-I-infected T-cell lines (MT-1 and MT-2). Potent anti-proliferative effects were exhibited against MT-1 and MT-2 cells by 52 and 60 of the 245 extracts tested, respectively. Of these, two extracts showed strong inhibitory activity (EC₅₀ values 0.1-1 μg/mL; +++) against both cells, 7 extracts showed moderate inhibitory activity (EC5₅₀ values 1-10 μg/mL; ++), and 43 extracts showed weak inhibitory activity (EC₅₀ values 10-100 μg/mL; +), whereas the remaining extracts did not show any activity (EC₅₀ values >100 μg/mL; -) against MT-1 cells. On the other hand, 10 extracts showed moderate inhibitory activit and, 48 extracts showed weak inhibitory activity, whereas the remaining extracts did not show any activity against MT-2 cells. Extracts from the aerial parts of Annona reticulata and A. squamosa showed the most potent inhibitory activity and three aporphine alkaloids were isolated from their extracts as the active principles by activity-guided fractionation.

  14. CD19-targeted T cells rapidly induce molecular remissions in adults with chemotherapy-refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Brentjens, Renier; Davila, Marco L; Riviere, Isabelle; Park, Jae; Wang, Xiuyan; Cowell, Lindsay G; Bartido, Shirley; Stefanski, Jolanta; Taylor, Clare; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Borquez-Ojeda, Oriana; Qu, Jinrong; Wasielewska, Teresa; He, Qing; Bernal, Yvette; Rijo, Ivelise V; Hedvat, Cyrus; Kobos, Rachel; Curran, Kevin; Steinherz, Peter; Jurcic, Joseph; Rosenblat, Todd; Maslak, Peter; Frattini, Mark; Sadelain, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Adults with relapsed B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have a dismal prognosis. Only those patients able to achieve a second remission with no minimal residual disease (MRD−) have a hope for long-term survival in the context of a subsequent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). We have treated 5 relapsed B-ALL subjects with autologous T cells expressing a CD19-specific CD28/CD3ζ second generation dual-signaling chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) termed 19-28z. All patients with persistent morphological disease or MRD+ disease upon T cell infusion demonstrated rapid tumor eradication and achieved MRD-negative complete remissions as assessed by deep sequencing PCR. Therapy was well tolerated although significant cytokine elevations, specifically observed in those patients with morphologic evidence of disease at the time of treatment, required lymphotoxic steroid therapy to ameliorate cytokine-mediated toxicities. Significantly, cytokine elevations directly correlated to tumor burden at the time of CAR modified T cell infusions. Tumor cells from one patient with relapsed disease after CAR modified T cell therapy, ineligible for additional allo-HSCT therapy, exhibited persistent expression of CD19 and sensitivity to autologous 19-28z T cell mediated cytotoxicity suggesting potential clinical benefit of additional CAR modified T cell infusions. These results demonstrate the marked anti-tumor efficacy of 19-28z CAR modified T cells in patients with relapsed/refractory B-ALL and the reliability of this novel therapy to induce profound molecular remissions, an ideal bridge to potentially curative therapy with subsequent allo-HSCT. PMID:23515080

  15. Augmented Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster Therapy in Adolescents and Young Adults (AYA) with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

    PubMed Central

    Rytting, Michael E; Thomas, Deborah A; O'Brien, Susan M; Ravandi-Kashani, Farhad; Jabbour, Elias J; Franklin, Anna R; Kadia, Tapan M; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Daver, Naval G.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Konopleva, Marina Y; Cortes, Jorge E; Borthakur, Gautham; Garris, Rebecca; Cardenas-Turanzas, Maria; Schroeder, Kurt; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; Kornblau, Steven M; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Various trials report improved outcomes for adolescents and young adults (AYA) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with pediatric- based regimens. This prompted the investigation of the pediatric Augmented Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (ABFM) regimen in AYA patients. Results were compared with the hyper–fractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, Adriamycin and dexamethasone (hyper-CVAD) regimen in a similar population. Methods Eighty-five patients age 12 to 40 years with Philadelphia chromosome- (Ph) negative ALL were treated with ABFM from 10/2006 through 4/2012. Their outcome was compared to 71 historical AYA patients treated with hyper-CVAD from our institution. Patient and disease characteristics, as well as status of minimal residual disease (MRD), were analyzed for their impact on outcomes. Results The complete remission (CR) rate with ABFM was 94%. The 3-year complete remission duration (CRD) and overall survival (OS) rates were 70% and 74%, respectively. The 3-year CRD and OS were 72% and 85%, respectively, with age ≤ 21 years, and 69% and 60%, respectively, with age 21-40 years. Initial white blood cell count was an independent predictive factor of OS and CRD. The MRD status on Day 29 and Day 84 of therapy were also predictive of long-term outcomes. Severe regimen toxicities included transient hepatotoxicity in 35-39%, pancreatitis in 11%, osteonecrosis in 11%, and thrombosis in 22%. The 3-year OS rate was 74% with ABFM versus 71% with hyper-CVAD; the 3-year CRD rate was 70% with ABFM versus 66% with hyper-CVAD. Conclusion ABFM was tolerable in AYA patients with ALL but was not associated with significant improvements in CRD and OS compared with hyper-CVAD. PMID:25042398

  16. Crucial role of carbonic anhydrase IX in tumorigenicity of xenotransplanted adult T-cell leukemia-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Takanashi, Tomoka; Tamai, Keiichi; Sato, Ikuro; Ine, Shoji; Sasaki, Osamu; Satoh, Kennichi; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fukushima, Takuya; Harigae, Hideo; Sugamura, Kazuo

    2017-03-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9) is a membrane-associated carbonic anhydrase that regulates cellular pH, is upregulated in various solid tumors, and is considered to be a therapeutic target. Here, we describe the essential role of CA9 in the tumorigenicity of cells derived from human adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). We previously established the highly tumorigenic ST1-N6 subline from the ATL-derived ST1 cell line by serial xenotransplantation in NOG mice. In the present study, we first show that CA9 expression is strongly enhanced in ST1-N6 cells. We then sorted ST1 cells by high or low CA9 expression and established ST1-CA9(high) and ST1-CA9(low) sublines. ST1-CA9(high) cells, like ST1-N6 cells, were more strongly tumorigenic than ST1-CA9(low) or parental ST1 cells when injected into NOG mice. Knockdown of CA9 with shRNAs suppressed the ability of ST1-CA9(high) cells to initiate tumors, and the tumorigenicity of ST1 cells was significantly enhanced by introducing wild-type CA9 or a CA9 mutant with deletion of an intracytoplasmic domain. However, a CA9 with point mutations in the catalytic site did not increase the tumorigenicity of ST1 cells. Furthermore, we detected a small population of CA9(+) CD25(+) cells in lymph nodes of ATL patients. These findings suggest that CA9, and particularly its carbonic anhydrase activity, promotes the tumorigenicity of ATL-derived cells and may be involved in malignant development of lymphoma-type ATL. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  17. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes That Have Relapsed or Not Responded to Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Improving results of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first complete remission: an analysis from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Giebel, Sebastian; Labopin, Myriam; Socié, Gerard; Beelen, Dietrich; Browne, Paul; Volin, Liisa; Kyrcz-Krzemien, Slawomira; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Wu, Depei; Michallet, Mauricette; Arnold, Renate; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2017-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation is widely used to treat adults with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The aim of this study was to analyze whether the results changed over time and to identify prognostic factors. Adult patients treated between 1993 and 2012 with myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation from HLA matched sibling (n=2681) or unrelated (n=2178) donors in first complete remission were included. For transplantations from sibling donors performed between 2008 and 2012, 2-year probabilities of overall survival were: 76% (18–25 years old), 69% (26–35 and 36–45 years old) and 60% (46–55 years old). Among recipients of transplantations from unrelated donors, the respective survival rates were 66%, 70%, 61%, and 62%. In comparison with the 1993–2007 period, significant improvements were observed for all age groups except for the 26–35-year old patients. In a multivariate model, transplantations performed between 2008 and 2012, when compared to 1993–2007, were associated with significantly reduced risks of non-relapse mortality (Hazard Ratio 0.77, P=0.00006), relapse (Hazard Ratio 0.85, P=0.007), treatment failure (Hazard Ratio 0.81, P<0.00001), and overall mortality (Hazard Ratio 0.79, P<0.00001). In the analysis restricted to transplantations performed between 2008 and 2012, the use of total body irradiation-based conditioning was associated with reduced risk of relapse (Hazard Ratio 0.48, P=0.004) and treatment failure (Hazard Ratio 0.63, P=0.02). We conclude that results of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia improved significantly over time. Total body irradiation should be considered as the preferable type of myeloablative conditioning. PMID:27686376

  19. Secondary Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia: a Review of Our Evolving Understanding of a Complex Disease Process.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Simon B; Arellano, Martha L

    2015-08-01

    Secondary AML (s-AML) encompasses AML evolving from myelodysplasia (AML-MDS) and treatment-related AML (t-AML) after exposure to chemotherapy, radiation, or environmental toxins. S-AML has traditionally