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Sample records for pollutant degrading soil

  1. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-03-04

    A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to innoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  2. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, Terry C.

    1994-01-01

    A method for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants comprising the steps of placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container, placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours, retrieving the container, collecting the contents of the container, and microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to inoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  3. Method of degrading pollutants in soil

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, Terry C.; Lopez-De-Victoria, Geralyne

    1994-01-01

    A method and system for enhancing the motility of microorganisms by placing an effective amount of chlorinated hydrocarbons, preferably chlorinated alkenes, and most preferably trichloroethylene in spaced relation to the microbes so that the surprisingly strong, monomodal, chemotactic response of the chlorinated hydrocarbon on subsurface microbes can draw the microbes away from or towards and into a substance, as desired. In remediation of groundwater pollution, for example, TCE can be injected into the plume to increase the population of microbes at the plume whereby the plume can be more quickly degraded. A TCE-degrading microbe, such as Welchia alkenophilia, can be used to degrade the TCE following the degradation of the original pollutant.

  4. Method of degrading pollutants in soil

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.; Lopez-De-Victoria, G.

    1994-07-05

    Disclosed are a method and system for enhancing the motility of microorganisms. This is accomplished by placing an effective amount of chlorinated hydrocarbons, preferably chlorinated alkenes, and most preferably trichloroethylene in spaced relation to the microbes so that the surprisingly strong, monomodal, chemotactic response of the chlorinated hydrocarbon on subsurface microbes can draw the microbes away from or towards and into a substance, as desired. In remediation of groundwater pollution, for example, TCE can be injected into the plume to increase the population of microbes at the plume whereby the plume can be more quickly degraded. A TCE-degrading microbe, such as Welchia alkenophilia, can be used to degrade the TCE following the degradation of the original pollutant. 5 figures.

  5. Impact of sources of environmental degradation on microbial community dynamics in non-polluted and metal-polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Epelde, Lur; Martín-Sánchez, Iker; González-Oreja, José A; Anza, Mikel; Gómez-Sagasti, María T; Garbisu, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Soils are currently being degraded at an alarming rate due to increasing pressure from different sources of environmental degradation. Consequently, we carried out a 4-month microcosm experiment to measure the impact of different sources of environmental degradation (biodiversity loss, nitrogen deposition and climate change) on soil health in a non-polluted (non-degraded) and a heavily metal-polluted (degraded) soil, and to compare their responses. To this aim, we determined a variety of soil microbial properties with potential as bioindicators of soil health: basal respiration; β-glucosaminidase and protease activities; abundance (Q-PCR) of bacterial, fungal and chitinase genes; richness (PCR-DGGE) of fungal and chitinase genes. Non-polluted and metal-polluted soils showed different response microbial dynamics when subjected to sources of environmental degradation. The non-polluted soil appeared resilient to "biodiversity loss" and "climate change" treatments. The metal-polluted soil was probably already too severely affected by the presence of high levels of toxic metals to respond to other sources of stress. Our data together suggests that soil microbial activity and biomass parameters are more sensitive to the applied sources of environmental degradation, showing immediate responses of greater magnitude, while soil microbial diversity parameters do not show such variations.

  6. Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) by Bacteria Isolated from Light Oil Polluted Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuma, T.; Suto, K.; Inoue, C.

    2007-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have polluted soil and groundwater widely and for long term because of their low solubility at normal temperature. Several microorganisms, such as Pseudomonas sp., Sphigomonas sp., a white-rot fungus and so on, being able to decompose PAHs, have been isolated and researched. This study reported to investigate biodegradation of low molecule PAH by isolated bacteria from light oil polluted soil. 12 isolates were obtained from a light oil polluted soil using naphthalene, fluorene and anthracene as sole carbon source, of which 4 isolates grew with naphthalene, 4 isolates did with fluorene and 4 isolates did with anthracene. Among them 3 isolates showed the ability to degrade phenanthrene additionally. These phenanthrene degradation and growth rates were almost same as that of S. yanoikuyae (DSM6900), which is the typical bacteria of PAHs degrader. Therefore, the isolate seemed to have an expectation for PAHs degradation.

  7. Microbial degradation of street dust polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in microcosms simulating diffuse pollution of urban soil.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Anders R; de Lipthay, Julia R; Sørensen, Søren J; Ekelund, Flemming; Christensen, Peter; Andersen, Ole; Karlson, Ulrich; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2006-03-01

    Diffuse pollution with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of topsoil in urban regions has caused increasing concerns in recent years. We simulated diffuse pollution of soil in microcosms by spiking sandy topsoil (A-horizon) and coarse, mineral subsoil (C-horizon) with street dust (PM63) isolated from municipal street sweepings from central Copenhagen. The microbial communities adapted to PAH degradation in microcosms spiked with street dust in both A-horizon and C-horizon soils, in spite of low PAH-concentrations. The increased potential for PAH degradation was demonstrated on several levels: by slowly diminishing PAH-concentrations, increased mineralization of 14C-PAHs, increasing numbers of PAH degraders and increased prevalence of nah and pdo1 PAH degradation genes, i.e. the microbial communities quickly adapted to PAH degradation. Three- and 4-ring PAHs from the street dust were biodegraded to some extent (10-20%), but 5- and 6-ring PAHs were not biodegraded in spite of frequent soil mixing and high PAH degradation potentials. In addition to biodegradation, leaching of 2-, 3- and 4-ring PAHs from the A-horizon to the C-horizon seems to reduce PAH-levels in surface soil. Over time, levels of 2-, 3- and 4-ring PAHs in surface soil may reach equilibrium between input and the combination of biodegradation and leaching. However, levels of the environmentally critical 5- and 6-ring PAHs will probably continue to rise. We presume that sorption to black carbon particles is responsible for the persistence and low bioaccessibility of 5- and 6-ring PAHs in diffusely polluted soil.

  8. Comparative assessment of bioremediation approaches to highly recalcitrant PAH degradation in a real industrial polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Lladó, S; Covino, S; Solanas, A M; Viñas, M; Petruccioli, M; D'annibale, A

    2013-03-15

    High recalcitrant characteristics and low bioavailability rates due to aging processes can hinder high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs) bioremediation in real industrial polluted soils. With the aim of reducing the residual fraction of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and (HMW-PAHs) in creosote-contaminated soil remaining after a 180-d treatment in a pilot-scale biopile, either biostimulation (BS) of indigenous microbial populations with a lignocellulosic substrate (LS) or fungal bioaugmentation with two strains of white-rot fungi (WRF) (i.e., Trametes versicolor and Lentinus tigrinus) were comparatively tested. The impact of bivalent manganese ions and two mobilizing agents (MAs) (i.e., Soybean Oil and Brij 30) on the degradation performances of biostimulated and bioaugmented microcosms was also compared. The results reveal soil colonization by both WRF strains was clearly hampered by an active native soil microbiota. In fact, a proper enhancement of native microbiota by means of LS amendment promoted the highest biodegradation of HMW-PAHs, even of those with five aromatic rings after 60 days of treatment, but HMW-PAH-degrading bacteria were specifically inhibited when non-ionic surfactant Brij 30 was amended. Effects of bioaugmentation and other additives such as non-ionic surfactants on the degrading capability of autochthonous soil microbiota should be evaluated in polluted soils before scaling up the remediation process at field scale.

  9. Comparative assessment of bioremediation approaches to highly recalcitrant PAH degradation in a real industrial polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Lladó, S; Covino, S; Solanas, A M; Viñas, M; Petruccioli, M; D'annibale, A

    2013-03-15

    High recalcitrant characteristics and low bioavailability rates due to aging processes can hinder high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs) bioremediation in real industrial polluted soils. With the aim of reducing the residual fraction of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and (HMW-PAHs) in creosote-contaminated soil remaining after a 180-d treatment in a pilot-scale biopile, either biostimulation (BS) of indigenous microbial populations with a lignocellulosic substrate (LS) or fungal bioaugmentation with two strains of white-rot fungi (WRF) (i.e., Trametes versicolor and Lentinus tigrinus) were comparatively tested. The impact of bivalent manganese ions and two mobilizing agents (MAs) (i.e., Soybean Oil and Brij 30) on the degradation performances of biostimulated and bioaugmented microcosms was also compared. The results reveal soil colonization by both WRF strains was clearly hampered by an active native soil microbiota. In fact, a proper enhancement of native microbiota by means of LS amendment promoted the highest biodegradation of HMW-PAHs, even of those with five aromatic rings after 60 days of treatment, but HMW-PAH-degrading bacteria were specifically inhibited when non-ionic surfactant Brij 30 was amended. Effects of bioaugmentation and other additives such as non-ionic surfactants on the degrading capability of autochthonous soil microbiota should be evaluated in polluted soils before scaling up the remediation process at field scale. PMID:23416485

  10. Strong Impact on the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH)-Degrading Community of a PAH-Polluted Soil but Marginal Effect on PAH Degradation when Priming with Bioremediated Soil Dominated by Mycobacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Anders R.; Schmidt, Stine; Hybholt, Trine K.; Henriksen, Sidsel; Jacobsen, Carsten S.; Andersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Bioaugmentation of soil polluted with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is often disappointing because of the low survival rate and low activity of the introduced degrader bacteria. We therefore investigated the possibility of priming PAH degradation in soil by adding 2% of bioremediated soil with a high capacity for PAH degradation. The culturable PAH-degrading community of the bioremediated primer soil was dominated by Mycobacterium spp. A microcosm containing pristine soil artificially polluted with PAHs and primed with bioremediated soil showed a fast, 100- to 1,000-fold increase in numbers of culturable phenanthrene-, pyrene-, and fluoranthene degraders and a 160-fold increase in copy numbers of the mycobacterial PAH dioxygenase gene pdo1. A nonpolluted microcosm primed with bioremediated soil showed a high rate of survival of the introduced degrader community during the 112 days of incubation. A nonprimed control microcosm containing pristine soil artificially polluted with PAHs showed only small increases in the numbers of culturable PAH degraders and no pdo1 genes. Initial PAH degradation rates were highest in the primed microcosm, but later, the degradation rates were comparable in primed and nonprimed soil. Thus, the proliferation and persistence of the introduced, soil-adapted degraders had only a marginal effect on PAH degradation. Given the small effect of priming with bioremediated soil and the likely presence of PAH degraders in almost all PAH-contaminated soils, it seems questionable to prime PAH-contaminated soil with bioremediated soil as a means of large-scale soil bioremediation. PMID:17209064

  11. Degradation of organic pollutants in Mediterranean forest soils amended with sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Francisca Gomez-Rico, M; Font, Rafael; Vera, Jose; Fuentes, David; Disante, Karen; Cortina, Jordi

    2008-05-01

    The degradation of two groups of organic pollutants in three different Mediterranean forest soils amended with sewage sludge was studied for nine months. The sewage sludge produced by a domestic water treatment plant was applied to soils developed from limestone, marl and sandstone, showing contrasting alkalinity and texture. The compounds analysed were: linear alkylbenzene sulphonates (LAS) with a 10-13 carbon alkylic chain, and nonylphenolic compounds, including nonylphenol (NP) and nonylphenol ethoxylates with one and two ethoxy groups (NP1EO+NP2EO). These compounds were studied because they frequently exceed the limits proposed for sludge application to land in Europe. After nine months, LAS decomposition was 86-96%, and NP+NP1EO+NP2EO decomposition was 61-84%, which can be considered high. Temporal trends in LAS and NP+NP1EO+NP2EO decomposition were similar, and the concentrations of both types of compounds were highly correlated. The decomposition rates were higher in the period of 6-9 months (summer period) than in the period 0-6 months (winter+spring period) for total LAS and NP+NP1EO+NP2EO. Differences in decay rates with regard to soil type were not significant. The average values of decay rates found are similar to those observed in agricultural soils. PMID:18329688

  12. Importance of soil organic matter for the diversity of microorganisms involved in the degradation of organic pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Dominik; Heuer, Anke; Hemkemeyer, Michael; Martens, Rainer; Tebbe, Christoph C

    2014-01-01

    Many organic pollutants are readily degradable by microorganisms in soil, but the importance of soil organic matter for their transformation by specific microbial taxa is unknown. In this study, sorption and microbial degradation of phenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) were characterized in three soil variants, generated by different long-term fertilization regimes. Compared with a non-fertilized control (NIL), a mineral-fertilized NPK variant showed 19% and a farmyard manure treated FYM variant 46% more soil organic carbon (SOC). Phenol sorption declined with overall increasing SOC because of altered affinities to the clay fraction (soil particles <2 mm in diameter). In contrast, DCP sorption correlated positively with particulate soil organic matter (present in the soil particle fractions of 63–2000 μm). Stable isotope probing identified Rhodococcus, Arthrobacter (both Actinobacteria) and Cryptococcus (Basidiomycota) as the main degraders of phenol. Rhodococcus and Cryptococcus were not affected by SOC, but the participation of Arthrobacter declined in NPK and even more in FYM. 14C-DCP was hardly metabolized in the NIL variant, more efficiently in FYM and most in NPK. In NPK, Burkholderia was the main degrader and in FYM Variovorax. This study demonstrates a strong effect of SOC on the partitioning of organic pollutants to soil particle size fractions and indicates the profound consequences that this process could have for the diversity of bacteria involved in their degradation. PMID:24430482

  13. Bioremediation of multi-polluted soil by spent mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) substrate: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degradation and Pb availability.

    PubMed

    García-Delgado, Carlos; Yunta, Felipe; Eymar, Enrique

    2015-12-30

    This study investigates the effect of three spent Agaricus bisporus substrate (SAS) application methods on bioremediation of soil multi-polluted with Pb and PAH from close to a shooting range with respect natural attenuation (SM). The remediation treatments involve (i) use of sterilized SAS to biostimulate the inherent soil microbiota (SSAS) and two bioaugmentation possibilities (ii) its use without previous treatment to inoculate A. bisporus and inherent microbiota (SAS) or (iii) SAS sterilization and further A. bisporus re-inoculation (Abisp). The efficiency of each bioremediation microcosm was evaluated by: fungal activity, heterotrophic and PAH-degrading bacterial population, PAH removal, Pb mobility and soil eco-toxicity. Biostimulation of the native soil microbiology (SSAS) achieved similar levels of PAH biodegradation as SM and poor soil detoxification. Bioaugmented microcosms produced higher PAH removal and eco-toxicity reduction via different routes. SAS increased the PAH-degrading bacterial population, but lowered fungal activity. Abisp was a good inoculum carrier for A. bisporus exhibiting high levels of ligninolytic activity, the total and PAH-degrading bacteria population increased with incubation time. The three SAS applications produced slight Pb mobilization (<0.3%). SAS sterilization and further A. bisporus re-inoculation (Abisp) proved the best application method to remove PAH, mainly BaP, and detoxify the multi-polluted soil.

  14. Coal mining activities change plant community structure due to air pollution and soil degradation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Bhanu; Agrawal, Madhoolika; Singh, Siddharth

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of coal mining activities on the community structures of woody and herbaceous plants. The response of individual plants of community to defilement caused by coal mining was also assessed. Air monitoring, soil physico-chemical and phytosociological analyses were carried around Jharia coalfield (JCF) and Raniganj coalfield. The importance value index of sensitive species minified and those of tolerant species enhanced with increasing pollution load and altered soil quality around coal mining areas. Although the species richness of woody and herbaceous plants decreased with higher pollution load, a large number of species acclimatized to the stress caused by the coal mining activities. Woody plant community at JCF was more affected by coal mining than herbaceous community. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that structure of herbaceous community was mainly driven by soil total organic carbon, soil nitrogen, whereas woody layer community was influenced by sulphur dioxide in ambient air, soil sulphate and soil phosphorus. The changes in species diversity observed at mining areas indicated an increase in the proportion of resistant herbs and grasses showing a tendency towards a definite selection strategy of ecosystem in response to air pollution and altered soil characteristics.

  15. Evident bacterial community changes but only slight degradation when polluted with pyrene in a red soil

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Gaidi; Ren, Wenjie; Teng, Ying; Li, Zhengao

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the potential for Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) degradation by indigenous microbiota and the influence of PAHs on native microbial communities is of great importance for bioremediation and ecological evaluation. Various studies have focused on the bacterial communities in the environment where obvious PAH degradation was observed, little is known about the microbiota in the soil where poor degradation was observed. Soil microcosms were constructed with a red soil by supplementation with a high-molecular-weight PAH (pyrene) at three dosages (5, 30, and 70 mg ⋅ kg-1). Real-time PCR was used to evaluate the changes in bacterial abundance and pyrene dioxygenase gene (nidA) quantity. Illumina sequencing was used to investigate changes in diversity, structure, and composition of bacterial communities. After 42 days of incubation, no evident degradation was observed. The poor degradation ability was associated with the stability or significant decrease of abundance of the nidA gene. Although the abundance of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene was not affected by pyrene, the bacterial richness and diversity were decreased with increasing dosage of pyrene and the community structure was changed. Phylotypes affected by pyrene were comprehensively surveyed: (1) at the high taxonomic level, seven of the abundant phyla/classes (relative abundance >1.0%) including Chloroflexi, AD3, WPS-2, GAL5, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Deltaproteobacteria and one rare phylum Crenarchaeota were significantly decreased by at least one dosage of pyrene, while three phyla/classes (Acidobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria) were significantly increased; and (2) at the lower taxonomic level, the relative abundances of twelve orders were significantly depressed, whereas those of nine orders were significantly increased. This work enhanced our understanding of the biodegradation potential of pyrene in red soil and the effect of pyrene on soil ecosystems

  16. Degradation and resilience of soils

    PubMed Central

    Lal, R.

    1997-01-01

    Debate on global soil degradation, its extent and agronomic impact, can only be resolved through understanding of the processes and factors leading to establishment of the cause-effect relationships for major soils, ecoregions, and land uses. Systematic evaluation through long-term experimentation is needed for establishing quantitative criteria of (i) soil quality in relation to specific functions; (ii) soil degradation in relation to critical limits of key soil properties and processes; and (iii) soil resilience in relation to the ease of restoration through judicious management and discriminate use of essential input. Quantitative assessment of soil degradation can be obtained by evaluating its impact on productivity for different land uses and management systems. Interdisciplinary research is needed to quantify soil degradation effects on decrease in productivity, reduction in biomass, and decline in environment quality throught pollution and eutrophication of natural waters and emission of radiatively-active gases from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere. Data from long-term field experiments in principal ecoregions are specifically needed to (i) establish relationships between soil quality versus soil degradation and soil quality versus soil resilience; (ii) identify indicators of soil quality and soil resilience; and (iii) establish critical limits of important properties for soil degradation and soil resilience. There is a need to develop and standardize techniques for measuring soil resilience.

  17. Impact of soil structure heterogeneity on the degradation of organic pollutants at the centimeter scale : 3D Modeling using graph based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair Yemini, Francis; Chenu, Claire; Monga, Olivier; Vieuble Gonond, Laure; Juarez, Sabrina; Pihneiro, Marc; otten, Wilfred; Garnier, Patricia

    2014-05-01

    Contaminant degradation by microorganisms is very variable in soils because of the very heterogeneous spatial relationship of contaminant/degraders. Repacked Soil columns were carried out to study the degradation of 2,4D pesticide labelled with C14 for different scenarios of microorganisms and pesticide initial location. Measurements of global C14-CO2 emission and C14 distribution in the soil column showed that the initial location play a crucial rule on the dissipation of the pollutant. Experiments were simulated using a 3D model able to model microbial degradation and substrate diffusion between aggregates by considering explicitly the 3D structure of soil from CT images. The initial version of the model (Monga et al., 2008) was improved in order to simulate diffusion in samples of large size. Partial differential equations were implemented using freefem++ solver. The model simulates properly the dynamics of 2,4D in the column for the different initial situations. CT images of the same soil but using undisturbed structure instead of repacked aggregates were also carried out. Significant differences of the simulated results were observed between the repacked and the undisturbed soil. The conclusion of our work is that the heterogeneity of the soil structure and location of pollutants and decomposers has a very strong influence on the dissipation of pollutants.

  18. Isolation, fingerprinting and genetic identification of indigenous PAHs degrading bacteria from oil-polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Alrumman, Sulaiman A; Hesham, Abd El-Latif; Alamri, Saad A

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, thirty five bacterial isolates were obtained from hydrocarbon-contaminated soil samples using an enrichment method. These isolates were tested to grow on mineral salt medium containing anthracene or phenanthrene as sole carbon source. Only five isolates showed the ability to degrade these compounds. RAPD-PCR fingerprinting was carried out for the five isolates, and the DNA patterns revealed that there was no similarity among the examined bacteria whenever the RFLP using four restriction enzymes HaeIII, Msp1, Hinf1 and Taq1 failed to differentiate among them. Five bacterial isolates were grown in high concentration of anthracene and phenanthrene (4% w/v). Two bacterial isolates were selected due to their high ability to grow in the presence of high concentrations of anthracene and phenanthrene. The isolates were identified as Bacillus flexus and Ochrobactrum anthropi, based on DNA sequencing of amplified 16S rRNA gene and phylogenetic analysis. Finally, the ability of these bacterial strains to tolerate and remove different PAHs looked promising for application in bioremediation technologies.

  19. Isolation, fingerprinting and genetic identification of indigenous PAHs degrading bacteria from oil-polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Alrumman, Sulaiman A; Hesham, Abd El-Latif; Alamri, Saad A

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, thirty five bacterial isolates were obtained from hydrocarbon-contaminated soil samples using an enrichment method. These isolates were tested to grow on mineral salt medium containing anthracene or phenanthrene as sole carbon source. Only five isolates showed the ability to degrade these compounds. RAPD-PCR fingerprinting was carried out for the five isolates, and the DNA patterns revealed that there was no similarity among the examined bacteria whenever the RFLP using four restriction enzymes HaeIII, Msp1, Hinf1 and Taq1 failed to differentiate among them. Five bacterial isolates were grown in high concentration of anthracene and phenanthrene (4% w/v). Two bacterial isolates were selected due to their high ability to grow in the presence of high concentrations of anthracene and phenanthrene. The isolates were identified as Bacillus flexus and Ochrobactrum anthropi, based on DNA sequencing of amplified 16S rRNA gene and phylogenetic analysis. Finally, the ability of these bacterial strains to tolerate and remove different PAHs looked promising for application in bioremediation technologies. PMID:26930863

  20. Degradation and remediation of soils polluted with oil-field wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbasova, I. M.; Suleymanov, R. R.; Garipov, T. T.

    2013-02-01

    The changes in the properties of gray forest soils and leached chernozems under the impact of contamination with highly saline oil-field wastewater were studied in a model experiment. It was shown that the soil contamination results in the development of technogenic salinization and alkalization leading to worsening of the major soil properties. The salinization of the soils with oil-field wastewater transformed the soil exchange complex: the cation exchange capacity decreased, and the exchangeable sodium percentage increased to up to 25% of the CEC upon the wastewater infiltration and up to 60% of the CEC upon the continuous soil saturation with the wastewater independently of the soil type. The content of exchangeable magnesium also increased due to the phenomenon of super-equivalent exchange. Despite the saturation of the soil adsorption complex with sodium, no development of the soil alkalization took place in the presence of the high concentration of soluble salts. However, the soil alkalization was observed upon the soil washing from soluble salts. The gypsum application to the washed soils lowered the exchangeable sodium concentration to acceptable values and normalized the soil reaction. The gypsum application without the preliminary washing of the soils from soluble salts was of low efficiency; even after six months, the content of exchangeable sodium remained very high. The subsequent soil washing resulted in the removal of the soluble salts but did not affect the degree of the soil alkalization.

  1. Reconstruction of metabolic networks in a fluoranthene-degrading enrichments from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian-Kang; Li, Xiao-Ming; Ai, Guo-Min; Deng, Ye; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Jiang, Cheng-Ying

    2016-11-15

    Microbial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is the primary process of removing PAHs from environments. The metabolic pathway of PAHs in pure cultures has been intensively studied, but cooperative metabolisms at community-level remained to be explored. In this study, we determined the dynamic composition of a microbial community and its metabolic intermediates during fluoranthene degradation using high-throughput metagenomics and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. Subsequently, a cooperative metabolic network for fluoranthene degradation was constructed. The network shows that Mycobacterium contributed the majority of ring-hydroxylating and -cleavage dioxygenases, while Diaphorobacter contributed most of the dehydrogenases. Hyphomicrobium, Agrobacterium, and Sphingopyxis contributed to genes encoding enzymes involved in downstream reactions of fluoranthene degradation. The contributions of various microbial groups were calculated with the PICRUSt program. The contributions of Hyphomicrobium to alcohol dehydrogenases were 62.4% in stage 1 (i.e., when fluoranthene was rapidly removed) and 76.8% in stage 3 (i.e., when fluoranthene was not detectable), respectively; the contribution of Pseudomonas were 6.6% in stage 1 and decreased to 1.2% in subsequent stages. To the best of the author's knowledge, this report describes the first cooperative metabolic network to predict the contributions of various microbial groups during PAH-degradation at community-level. PMID:27415596

  2. Earthworms and Soil Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Takeshi; Tamae, Kazuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Although the toxicity of metal contaminated soils has been assessed with various bioassays, more information is needed about the biochemical responses, which may help to elucidate the mechanisms involved in metal toxicity. We previously reported that the earthworm, Eisenia fetida, accumulates cadmium in its seminal vesicles. The bio-accumulative ability of earthworms is well known, and thus the earthworm could be a useful living organism for the bio-monitoring of soil pollution. In this short review, we describe recent studies concerning the relationship between earthworms and soil pollutants, and discuss the possibility of using the earthworm as a bio-monitoring organism for soil pollution. PMID:22247659

  3. Assessment of degradation potential of aliphatic hydrocarbons by autochthonous filamentous fungi from a historically polluted clay soil.

    PubMed

    Covino, Stefano; D'Annibale, Alessandro; Stazi, Silvia Rita; Cajthaml, Tomas; Čvančarová, Monika; Stella, Tatiana; Petruccioli, Maurizio

    2015-02-01

    The present work was aimed at isolating and identifying the main members of the mycobiota of a clay soil historically contaminated by mid- and long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbons (AH) and to subsequently assess their hydrocarbon-degrading ability. All the isolates were Ascomycetes and, among them, the most interesting was Pseudoallescheria sp. 18A, which displayed both the ability to use AH as the sole carbon source and to profusely colonize a wheat straw:poplar wood chip (70:30, w/w) lignocellulosic mixture (LM) selected as the amendment for subsequent soil remediation microcosms. After a 60 d mycoaugmentation with Pseudoallescheria sp. of the aforementioned soil, mixed with the sterile LM (5:1 mass ratio), a 79.7% AH reduction and a significant detoxification, inferred by a drop in mortality of Folsomia candida from 90 to 24%, were observed. However, similar degradation and detoxification outcomes were found in the non-inoculated incubation control soil that had been amended with the sterile LM. This was due to the biostimulation exerted by the amendment on the resident microbiota, fungi in particular, the activity and density of which were low, instead, in the non-amended incubation control soil.

  4. Molecular application for identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degrading bacteria (PAHD) species isolated from oil polluted soil in Dammam, Saud Arabia.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Al-Turki, Ameena; Al-Sewedi, Dona; Arif, Ibrahim A; El-Gaaly, Gehan A

    2015-09-01

    Soil contamination with petroleum hydrocarbon products such as diesel and engine oil is becoming one of the major environmental problems. This study describes hydrocarbons degrading bacteria (PHAD) isolated from long-standing petrol polluted soil from the eastern region, Dammam, Saudi Arabia. The isolated strains were firstly categorized by accessible shape detection, physiological and biochemistry tests. Thereafter, a technique established on the sequence analysis of a 16S rDNA gene was used. Isolation of DNA from the bacterial strains was performed, on which the PCR reaction was carried out. Strains were identified based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, As follows amplified samples were spontaneously sequenced automatically and the attained results were matched to open databases. Among the isolated bacterial strains, S1 was identified as Staphylococcus aureus and strain S1 as Corynebacterium amycolatum. PMID:26288572

  5. Molecular application for identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degrading bacteria (PAHD) species isolated from oil polluted soil in Dammam, Saud Arabia.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Al-Turki, Ameena; Al-Sewedi, Dona; Arif, Ibrahim A; El-Gaaly, Gehan A

    2015-09-01

    Soil contamination with petroleum hydrocarbon products such as diesel and engine oil is becoming one of the major environmental problems. This study describes hydrocarbons degrading bacteria (PHAD) isolated from long-standing petrol polluted soil from the eastern region, Dammam, Saudi Arabia. The isolated strains were firstly categorized by accessible shape detection, physiological and biochemistry tests. Thereafter, a technique established on the sequence analysis of a 16S rDNA gene was used. Isolation of DNA from the bacterial strains was performed, on which the PCR reaction was carried out. Strains were identified based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, As follows amplified samples were spontaneously sequenced automatically and the attained results were matched to open databases. Among the isolated bacterial strains, S1 was identified as Staphylococcus aureus and strain S1 as Corynebacterium amycolatum.

  6. Decontaminating soil organic pollutants with manufactured nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Organic pollutants in soils might threaten the environmental and human health. Manufactured nanoparticles are capable to reduce this risk efficiently due to their relatively large capacity of sorption and degradation of organic pollutants. Stability, mobility, and reactivity of nanoparticles are prerequisites for their efficacy in soil remediation. On the basis of a brief introduction of these issues, this review provides a comprehensive summary of the application and effectiveness of various types of manufactured nanoparticles for removing organic pollutants from soil. The main categories of nanoparticles include iron (oxides), titanium dioxide, carbonaceous, palladium, and amphiphilic polymeric nanoparticles. Their advantages (e.g., unique properties and high sorption capacity) and disadvantages (e.g., high cost and low recovery) for soil remediation are discussed with respect to the characteristics of organic pollutants. The factors that influence the decontamination effects, such as properties, surfactants, solution chemistry, and soil organic matter, are addressed.

  7. Decontaminating soil organic pollutants with manufactured nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Organic pollutants in soils might threaten the environmental and human health. Manufactured nanoparticles are capable to reduce this risk efficiently due to their relatively large capacity of sorption and degradation of organic pollutants. Stability, mobility, and reactivity of nanoparticles are prerequisites for their efficacy in soil remediation. On the basis of a brief introduction of these issues, this review provides a comprehensive summary of the application and effectiveness of various types of manufactured nanoparticles for removing organic pollutants from soil. The main categories of nanoparticles include iron (oxides), titanium dioxide, carbonaceous, palladium, and amphiphilic polymeric nanoparticles. Their advantages (e.g., unique properties and high sorption capacity) and disadvantages (e.g., high cost and low recovery) for soil remediation are discussed with respect to the characteristics of organic pollutants. The factors that influence the decontamination effects, such as properties, surfactants, solution chemistry, and soil organic matter, are addressed. PMID:26906002

  8. Soil Degradation: A North American perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil can be degraded through erosion and formation of undesirable physical, chemical, or biological properties due to industrialization or use of inappropriate farming practices that supersede natural regeneration. Soil degradation reflects unsustainable resource management that is global in scope a...

  9. Microbial abundance and degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.K.; Rao, P.R. )

    1993-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of highly lipophilic chemicals that are generally formed during combustion, pyrolysis and pyrosynthesis of organic matter and are present ubiquitously in the urban environment as pollutants in very small quantities. The objective of the present study was to determine the activity of indigenous microbial populations of hazardous waste sites, their degree of adaptation, their ability to degrade toxic PAHs, and to study the potentials of different indigenous microbes to degrade the following selected PAHs from the polluted soil environment. PAHs selected for the study were anthracene, phenanthrene, chrysene, pyrene and fluoranthene. In this study, the indigenous contaminated soil populations were effective in removing the hydrocarbons and returning the soil to productivity. The biodegradation of PAHs in the selected soil was due to PAH degrader present in the bacterial as well as fungal communities. 13 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Simulation research on the natural degradation process of PBDEs in soil polluted by e-waste under increased concentrations of atmospheric O(3).

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaojun; Liu, Chen; Song, Xiaofei

    2015-01-01

    There have been increased concerns regarding the effect of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) on the environment. These compounds are widely utilized by the electronics industry and also function as fire retardants. More data on the basic characteristics of PBDEs are needed to better understand and used to describe their environmental fate. The aim of this study was to investigate the degradation of BDE-209 with different degrees of bromination under changes in the atmospheric environment. BDE-209 was able to be removed quickly due to the strong oxidizing ability of ozone in the atmosphere environment. Less-brominated BDEs, ranging from BDE-28 to BDE-183, were formed progressively, and the reaction of ozone gradually occupied the main position along with an increase in ozone flow time. Degradation reaction rates of PBDEs increased with increasing ozone concentration but decreased with increasing soil depth. Under UV-irradiation, BDE-209 was quickly transformed into less-brominated BDEs and the photodegradation reactions were faster than solar irradiation. The conditions of high ground temperature in the summer and alkaline soil were both contributors to the degradation of PBDEs. These results could facilitate the improvement of waste treatment designs and lead to better predictions of the outcome of PBDEs in the environment.

  11. Simulation research on the natural degradation process of PBDEs in soil polluted by e-waste under increased concentrations of atmospheric O(3).

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaojun; Liu, Chen; Song, Xiaofei

    2015-01-01

    There have been increased concerns regarding the effect of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) on the environment. These compounds are widely utilized by the electronics industry and also function as fire retardants. More data on the basic characteristics of PBDEs are needed to better understand and used to describe their environmental fate. The aim of this study was to investigate the degradation of BDE-209 with different degrees of bromination under changes in the atmospheric environment. BDE-209 was able to be removed quickly due to the strong oxidizing ability of ozone in the atmosphere environment. Less-brominated BDEs, ranging from BDE-28 to BDE-183, were formed progressively, and the reaction of ozone gradually occupied the main position along with an increase in ozone flow time. Degradation reaction rates of PBDEs increased with increasing ozone concentration but decreased with increasing soil depth. Under UV-irradiation, BDE-209 was quickly transformed into less-brominated BDEs and the photodegradation reactions were faster than solar irradiation. The conditions of high ground temperature in the summer and alkaline soil were both contributors to the degradation of PBDEs. These results could facilitate the improvement of waste treatment designs and lead to better predictions of the outcome of PBDEs in the environment. PMID:25465956

  12. Degradation of PAHs in soil by indigenous and inoculated bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Aamand, J.; Bruntse, G.; Jepsen, M.; Joergensen, C.; Jensen, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    In soil heavily polluted by coal tar, the inherent mineralization of radio-labeled phenanthrene to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was relatively slow, and a stimulation of degradation was observed by inoculation with a mixed population of PAH-degrading bacteria. A much faster inherent mineralization of phenanthrene was observed in soil slightly polluted by coal tar, and inoculation of this soil had no effect. Several phenanthrene-degrading bacteria were isolated from different soils. Two strains were further characterized as an Arthrobacter sp. and a Pseudomonas sp. In an organic medium without phenanthrene, growth rates of 0.52 h{sup {minus}1} and 0.71 h{sup {minus}1} were measured for the Arthrobacter sp. and the Pseudomonas sp., respectively. Most isolates grown in the phenanthrene-free medium, including the Arthrobacter sp., rapidly adapted to phenanthrene degradation following transfer to a phenanthrene-containing medium. In contrast, the phenanthrene-degrading capability of other strains, including the Pseudomonas sp., was lost during growth in the phenanthrene-free medium. Growth in an organic medium without phenanthrene of strains that retain the ability to degrade phenanthrene could prove to be a useful technique for production of PAH-degrading bacteria on a larger scale for soil inoculation.

  13. Bioremediation via in situ microbial degradation of organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of soil and natural waters by organic pollutants is a global problem. The major organic pollutants of point sources are mineral oil, fuel components, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Research from the last two decades discovered that most of these compounds are biodegradable under anoxic conditions. This has led to the rise of bioremediation strategies based on the in situ biodegradation of pollutants. Monitored natural attenuation is a concept by which a contaminated site is remediated by natural biodegradation; to evaluate such processes, a combination of chemical and microbiological methods are usually used. Compound specific stable isotope analysis emerged as a key method for detecting and quantifying in situ biodegradation. Natural attenuation processes can be initiated or accelerated by manipulating the environmental conditions to become favorable for indigenous pollutant degrading microbial communities or by adding externally breeded specific pollutant degrading microorganisms; these techniques are referred to as enhanced natural attenuation. Xenobiotic micropollutants, such as pesticides or pharmaceuticals, contaminate diffusively large areas in low concentrations; the biodegradation pattern of such contaminations are not yet understood. PMID:24337042

  14. Monitoring of Gasoline-ethanol Degradation In Undisturbed Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Österreicher-Cunha, P.; Nunes, C. M. F.; Vargas, E. A.; Guimarães, J. R. D.; Costa, A.

    Environmental contamination problems are greatly emphasised nowadays because of the direct threat they represent for human health. Traditional remediation methods fre- quently present low efficiency and high costs; therefore, biological treatment is being considered as an accessible and efficient alternative for soil and water remediation. Bioventing, commonly used to remediate petroleum hydrocarbon spills, stimulates the degradation capacity of indigenous microorganisms by providing better subsur- face oxygenation. In Brazil, gasoline and ethanol are mixed (78:22 v/v); some authors indicate that despite gasoline high degradability, its degradation in subsurface is hin- dered by the presence of much more rapidly degrading ethanol. Contaminant distribu- tion and degradation in the subsurface can be monitored by several physical, chemical and microbiological methodologies. This study aims to evaluate and follow the degra- dation of a gasoline-ethanol mixture in a residual undisturbed tropical soil from Rio de Janeiro. Bioventing was used to enhance microbial degradation. Shifts in bacte- rial culturable populations due to contamination and treatment effects were followed by conventional microbiology methods. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) measure- ments, which consist of the emission of electro-magnetic waves into the soil, yield a visualisation of contaminant degradation because of changes in soil conductivity due to microbial action on the pollutants. Chemical analyses will measure contaminant residue in soil. Our results disclosed contamination impact as well as bioventing stim- ulation on soil culturable heterotrophic bacterial populations. This multidisciplinary approach allows for a wider evaluation of processes occurring in soil.

  15. Biocarrier composition for and method of degrading pollutants

    DOEpatents

    Fliermans, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to biocarrier compositions that attract and bond pollutant-degrading antigens that will degrade the pollutants. Biocarriers are known generally as a variety of inert or semi-inert compounds or structures having the ability to sequester (attract), hold and biomagnify (enhance) specific microorganisms within their structure. Glass or polystyrene beads are the most well known biocarriers. The biocarrier, which is preferably in the form of glass microspheres, is coated with an antibody or group of antibodies that attract and react specifically with certain pollutant-degrading antigens. The antibody, once bonded to the biocarrier, is used by the composition to attract and bond those pollutant-degrading antigens. Each antibody is specific for an antigen that is specific for a given pollutant. The resulting composition is subsequently exposed to an environment contaminated with pollutants for degradation. In the preferred use, the degrading composition is formed and then injected directly into or near a plume or source of contamination.

  16. Mobilization of Pollutant-Degrading Bacteria by Eukaryotic Zoospores.

    PubMed

    Sungthong, Rungroch; van West, Pieter; Heyman, Fredrik; Jensen, Dan Funck; Ortega-Calvo, Jose Julio

    2016-07-19

    The controlled mobilization of pollutant-degrading bacteria has been identified as a promising strategy for improving bioremediation performance. We tested the hypothesis whether the mobilization of bacterial degraders may be achieved by the action of eukaryotic zoospores. We evaluated zoospores that are produced by the soil oomycete Pythium aphanidermatum as a biological vector, and, respectively, the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading bacteria Mycobacterium gilvum VM552 and Pseudomonas putida G7, acting as representative nonflagellated and flagellated species. The mobilization assay was performed with a chemical-in-capillary method, in which zoospores mobilized bacterial cells only when they were exposed to a zoospore homing inducer (5% (v/v) ethanol), which caused the tactic response and settlement of zoospores. The mobilization was strongly linked to a lack of bacterial motility, because the nonflagellated cells from strain M. gilvum VM552 and slightly motile, stationary-phase cells from P. putida G7 were mobilized effectively, but the actively motile, exponentially grown cells of P. putida G7 were not mobilized. The computer-assisted analysis of cell motility in mixed suspensions showed that the swimming rate was enhanced by zoospores in stationary, but not in exponentially grown, cells of P. putida G7. It is hypothesized that the directional swimming of zoospores caused bacterial mobilization through the thrust force of their flagellar propulsion. Our results suggest that, by mobilizing pollutant-degrading bacteria, zoospores can act as ecological amplifiers for fungal and oomycete mycelial networks in soils, extending their potential in bioremediation scenarios. PMID:27286642

  17. Degradation of monomethylhydrazine by two soil bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, L.T.

    1988-12-01

    It has been reported that three heterotrophic soil bacteria had the capacity to degrade hydrazine. One of these organisms, Achromobacter sp., degraded hydrazine to N/sub 2/ gas. Furthermore, it was reported that monomethylhydrazine (MMH) in Arredondo fine sand was mineralized to CO/sub 2/, and that such degradation is microbial. However, microorganisms that degrade MMH have not been reported. MMH and hydrazine are chemically similar to one another. Therefore, this study was initiated to test the capacity of the two hydrazine-degrading bacteria, Achromobacter sp. and Pseudomonas sp., to degrade MMH.

  18. Environmental degradation of chlorpyrifos in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Cink, J.H.; Coats, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Dursban TC has become the most widely used insecticide for the control of termites since the banning of chlordane. Several laboratory studies have been conducted to investigate the degradation kinetics of chlorpyrifos applied to soil at termiticide rates. These have included a limited number of soil types and have utilized tightly regulated environmental conditions. A field study was established to investigate the degradation of chlorpyrifos in soil treated with a 1% solution via trench application and under natural environmental conditions. Once treated, soil samples were removed from the trench at scheduled intervals and extracted to determine the concentration chlorpyrifos remaining. In three of the soils studied, the concentration of chlorpyrifos decreased dramatically within the first three months. The remaining soils showed a steady decline in concentration over 12 months. After this initial phase of degradation, the slope of the degradation curve changed sharply. This may indicate that chlorpyrifos undergoes two phases of degradation in soil. Using both phases of the degradation curves may give a better estimate of the concentration of chlorpyrifos that may be present in a soil at any time period.

  19. Identification of soil bacteria able to degrade phenanthrene bound to a hydrophobic sorbent in situ.

    PubMed

    Regonne, Raïssa Kom; Martin, Florence; Mbawala, Augustin; Ngassoum, Martin Benoît; Jouanneau, Yves

    2013-09-01

    Efficient bioremediation of PAH-contaminated sites is limited by the hydrophobic character and poor bioavailability of pollutants. In this study, stable isotope probing (SIP) was implemented to track bacteria that can degrade PAHs adsorbed on hydrophobic sorbents. Temperate and tropical soils were incubated with (13)C-labeled phenanthrene, supplied by spiking or coated onto membranes. Phenanthrene mineralization was faster in microcosms with PAH-coated membranes than in microcosms containing spiked soil. Upon incubation with temperate soil, phenanthrene degraders found in the biofilms that formed on coated membranes were mainly identified as Sphingomonadaceae and Actinobacteria. In the tropical soil, uncultured Rhodocyclaceae dominated degraders bound to membranes. Accordingly, ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase sequences recovered from this soil matched PAH-specific dioxygenase genes recently found in Rhodocyclaceae. Hence, our SIP approach allowed the detection of novel degraders, mostly uncultured, which differ from those detected after soil spiking, but might play a key role in the bioremediation of PAH-polluted soils.

  20. Degradation of ¹³C-labeled pyrene in soil-compost mixtures and fertilized soil.

    PubMed

    Adam, Iris K U; Miltner, Anja; Kästner, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are toxic pollutants widely distributed in the environment due to natural and anthropogenic processes. In order to mitigate tar oil contaminations with PAH, research on improving bioremediation approaches, which are sometimes inefficient, is needed. However, the knowledge on the fate of PAH-derived carbon and the microbial degraders in particular in compost-supplemented soils is still limited. Here we show the PAH carbon turnover mass balance in microcosms with soil-compost mixtures or in farmyard fertilized soil using [(13)C6]-pyrene as a model PAH. Complete pyrene degradation of 100 mg/kg of soil was observed in all supplemented microcosms within 3 to 5 months, and the residual (13)C was mainly found as carbon converted to microbial biomass. Long-term fertilization of soil with farmyard manure resulted in pyrene removal efficiency similar to compost addition, although with a much longer lag phase, higher mineralization, and lower carbon incorporation into the biomass. Organic amendments either as long-term manure fertilization or as compost amendment thus play a key role in increasing the PAH-degrading potential of the soil microbial community. Phospholipid fatty acid stable isotope probing (PLFA-SIP) was used to trace the carbon within the microbial population and the amount of biomass formed from pyrene degradation. The results demonstrate that complex microbial degrader consortia rather than the expected single key players are responsible for PAH degradation in organic-amended soil.

  1. Degradation of ¹³C-labeled pyrene in soil-compost mixtures and fertilized soil.

    PubMed

    Adam, Iris K U; Miltner, Anja; Kästner, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are toxic pollutants widely distributed in the environment due to natural and anthropogenic processes. In order to mitigate tar oil contaminations with PAH, research on improving bioremediation approaches, which are sometimes inefficient, is needed. However, the knowledge on the fate of PAH-derived carbon and the microbial degraders in particular in compost-supplemented soils is still limited. Here we show the PAH carbon turnover mass balance in microcosms with soil-compost mixtures or in farmyard fertilized soil using [(13)C6]-pyrene as a model PAH. Complete pyrene degradation of 100 mg/kg of soil was observed in all supplemented microcosms within 3 to 5 months, and the residual (13)C was mainly found as carbon converted to microbial biomass. Long-term fertilization of soil with farmyard manure resulted in pyrene removal efficiency similar to compost addition, although with a much longer lag phase, higher mineralization, and lower carbon incorporation into the biomass. Organic amendments either as long-term manure fertilization or as compost amendment thus play a key role in increasing the PAH-degrading potential of the soil microbial community. Phospholipid fatty acid stable isotope probing (PLFA-SIP) was used to trace the carbon within the microbial population and the amount of biomass formed from pyrene degradation. The results demonstrate that complex microbial degrader consortia rather than the expected single key players are responsible for PAH degradation in organic-amended soil. PMID:26216241

  2. Diffuse PAH contamination of surface soils: environmental occurrence, bioavailability, and microbial degradation.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Anders R; Karlson, Ulrich

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to recognize the scientific and environmental importance of diffuse pollution with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Diffuse PAH pollution of surface soil is characterized by large area extents, low PAH concentrations, and the lack of point sources. Urban and pristine topsoils receive a continuous input of pyrogenic PAHs, which induces a microbial potential for PAH degradation. The significance of this potential in relation to black carbon particles, PAH bioaccessibility, microbial PAH degradation, and the fate of diffuse PAHs in soil is discussed. Finally, the state-of-the-art methods for future investigations of the microbial degradation of diffuse PAH pollution are reviewed. PMID:17594088

  3. Ex situ remediation of polluted soils by absorptive polymers, and a comparison of slurry and two-phase partitioning bioreactors for ultimate contaminant degradation.

    PubMed

    Tomei, M Concetta; Mosca Angelucci, Domenica; Annesini, M Cristina; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2013-11-15

    The present study has provided a comparison between a conventional ex situ method for the treatment of contaminated soil, a soil slurry bioreactor, with a novel technology in which a contaminant is rapidly and effectively removed from the soil by means of absorptive polymer beads, which are then added to a two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) for biodegradation of the target molecule. 4-nitrophenol (4NP) was selected as a model contaminant, being representative of a large class of xenobiotics, and the DuPont thermoplastic Hytrel™ 8206 was utilized for its extraction from soil over ranges of soil contamination level, soil moisture content, and polymer:soil ratios. Since the polymers were able to rapidly (up to 77% and 85% in 4 and 24h respectively) and selectively remove the contaminant, the soil retained its nutrient and microflora content, which is in contrast to soil washing which can remove these valuable soil resources. After 4h of reaction time, the TPPB system demonstrated removal efficiency four times higher (77% vs 20%) than the slurry system, with expected concomitant savings in time and energy. A volumetric removal rate of 75 mg4NPh(-1) L(-1) was obtained in the TPPB, significantly greater than the value of 1.7 obtained in the slurry bioreactor. The polymers were readily regenerated for subsequent reuse, demonstrating the versatility of the polymer-based soil treatment technology.

  4. Degradation of chlorpyrifos in tropical rice soils.

    PubMed

    Das, Subhasis; Adhya, Tapan K

    2015-04-01

    Chlorpyrifos [O,O-diethyl O-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol) phosphorothioate] is used worldwide as an agricultural insecticide against a broad spectrum of insect pests of economically important crops including rice, and soil application to control termites. The insecticide mostly undergoes hydrolysis to diethyl thiophosphoric acid (DETP) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP), and negligible amounts of other intermediate products. In a laboratory-cum-greenhouse study, chlorpyrifos, applied at a rate of 10 mg kg(-1) soil to five tropical rice soils of wide physico-chemical variability, degraded with a half-life ranging from 27.07 to 3.82 days. TCP was the major metabolite under both non-flooded and flooded conditions. Chlorpyrifos degradation had significant negative relationship with electrical conductivity (EC), cation exchange capacity (CEC), clay and sand contents of the soils under non-flooded conditions. Results indicate that degradation of chlorpyrifos was accelerated with increase in its application frequency, across the representative rice soils. Management regimes including moisture content and presence or absence of rice plants also influenced the process. Biotic factors also play an important role in the degradation of chlorpyrifos as demonstrated by its convincing degradation in mineral salts medium inoculated with non-sterile soil suspension. PMID:25617866

  5. Soil-ecological risks for soil degradation estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonova, Tatiana; Shirkin, Leonid; Kust, German; Andreeva, Olga

    2016-04-01

    Soil degradation includes the processes of soil properties and quality worsening, primarily from the point of view of their productivity and decrease of ecosystem services quality. Complete soil cover destruction and/or functioning termination of soil forms of organic life are considered as extreme stages of soil degradation, and for the fragile ecosystems they are normally considered in the network of their desertification, land degradation and droughts /DLDD/ concept. Block-model of ecotoxic effects, generating soil and ecosystem degradation, has been developed as a result of the long-term field and laboratory research of sod-podzol soils, contaminated with waste, containing heavy metals. The model highlights soil degradation mechanisms, caused by direct and indirect impact of ecotoxicants on "phytocenosis- soil" system and their combination, frequently causing synergistic effect. The sequence of occurring changes here can be formalized as a theory of change (succession of interrelated events). Several stages are distinguished here - from heavy metals leaching (releasing) in waste and their migration downward the soil profile to phytoproductivity decrease and certain phytocenosis composition changes. Phytoproductivity decrease leads to the reduction of cellulose content introduced into the soil. The described feedback mechanism acts as a factor of sod-podzolic soil self-purification and stability. It has been shown, that using phytomass productivity index, integrally reflecting the worsening of soil properties complex, it is possible to solve the problems dealing with the dose-reflecting reactions creation and determination of critical levels of load for phytocenosis and corresponding soil-ecological risks. Soil-ecological risk in "phytocenosis- soil" system means probable negative changes and the loss of some ecosystem functions during the transformation process of dead organic substance energy for the new biomass composition. Soil-ecological risks estimation is

  6. Microbial degradation of propoxur in turfgrass soil.

    PubMed

    Ou, L T; Nkedi-Kizza, P; Cisar, J L; Snyder, G H

    1992-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine the degradation rates in turfgrass soil over a 12-month period after a single field application of propoxur and to isolate microorganisms from the soil capable of degrading the insecticide. Soil samples were collected from a turfgrass experimental site near Fort Lauderdale, FL one week before the field application of propoxur, and over a 12-month period after the field application. Mineralization rates in surface (0-15 cm depth) and subsurface (15-30 cm depth) soil samples collected before the field application were low. Mineralization in surface and subsurface samples collected 1, 6 and 8 months after the field application was much higher than for corresponding samples collected before the field application. Mineralization in the subsurface samples collected 12 months after the field application had reverted back to the similar rate for the corresponding sample collected before field application. Half-life values (t1/2) for propoxur showed similar trends to the results of mineralization. After a single application of propoxur, degradation in turfgrass soil was enhanced. Such enhancement lasted less than 12 months for the subsurface, but more than 12 months for the surface. A strain of Arthrobacter sp. capable of degrading propoxur was isolated from the soil.

  7. ELECTROCHEMICAL DEGRADATION OF PERSISTANCE POLLUTANTS IN GROUNDWATER AND SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrochemical Degradation (ECD) utilizes redox potential at the anode and the cathode to oxidize and/or reduce organic contaminants. ECD of environmentally persistence pollutants such chlorinate solvents, PCBs, and PAHs, although theoretically possible, has not been experimenta...

  8. A method to detect soil carbon degradation during soil erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alewell, Christine; Conen, Franz; Schaub, Monika

    2010-05-01

    Soil erosion has been discussed intensively but controversial both as a significant source or a significant sink of atmospheric carbon possibly explaining the gap in the global carbon budget. One of the major points of discussion has been whether or not carbon is degraded and mineralized to CO2 during detachment, transport and deposition of soil material. By combining the caesium-137 (137Cs) approach (quantification of erosion rates) with stable carbon isotope signatures (process indicator of mixing versus degradation of carbon pools) we were able to show that degradation of carbon occurs during soil erosion processes at the investigated mountain grasslands in the central Swiss Alps (Urseren Valley, Canton Uri). Transects from upland (erosion source) to wetland soils (erosion sinks) of sites affected by sheet and land slide erosion were sampled. Analysis of 137Cs yielded an input of 2 and 4.6 tha-1 yr-1 of soil material into the wetlands sites. Assuming no degradation of soil organic carbon during detachment and transport, carbon isotope signature of soil organic carbon in the wetlands could only be explained with an assumed 500-600 and 350-400 years of erosion input into the wetlands Laui and Spissen, respectively. The latter is highly unlikely with alpine peat growth rates indicating that the upper horizons might have an age between 7 and 200 years. While we do not conclude from our data that eroded soil organic carbon is generally degraded during detachment and transport, we propose this method to gain more information on process dynamics during soil erosion from oxic upland to anoxic wetland soils, sediments or water bodies.

  9. A method to detect soil carbon degradation during soil erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alewell, C.; Schaub, M.; Conen, F.

    2009-06-01

    Soil erosion has been discussed intensively but controversial both as a significant source or a significant sink of atmospheric carbon possibly explaining the gap in the global carbon budget. One of the major points of discussion has been whether or not carbon is degraded and mineralized to CO2 during detachment, transport and deposition of soil material. By combining the caesium-137 (137Cs) approach (quantification of erosion rates) with stable carbon isotope signatures (process indicator of mixing versus degradation of carbon pools) we were able to show that degradation of carbon occurs during soil erosion processes at the investigated mountain grasslands in the central Swiss Alps (Urseren Valley, Canton Uri). Transects from upland (erosion source) to wetland soils (erosion sinks) of sites affected by sheet and land slide erosion were sampled. Analysis of 137Cs yielded an input of 2 and 2.6 t ha-1 yr-1 of soil material into the wetlands sites. Assuming no degradation of soil organic carbon during detachment and transport, carbon isotope signature of soil organic carbon in the wetlands could only be explained with an assumed 800 and 400 years of erosion input into the wetlands. The latter is highly unlikely with alpine peat growth rates indicating that the upper horizons might have an age between 7 and 200 years. While we do not conclude from our data that eroded soil organic carbon is generally degraded during detachment and transport, we propose this method to gain more information on process dynamics during soil erosion from oxic upland to anoxic wetland soils, sediments or water bodies.

  10. A method to detect soil carbon degradation during soil erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alewell, C.; Schaub, M.; Conen, F.

    2009-11-01

    Soil erosion has been discussed intensively but controversial both as a significant source or a significant sink of atmospheric carbon possibly explaining the gap in the global carbon budget. One of the major points of discussion has been whether or not carbon is degraded and mineralized to CO2 during detachment, transport and deposition of soil material. By combining the caesium-137 (137Cs) approach (quantification of erosion rates) with stable carbon isotope signatures (process indicator of mixing versus degradation of carbon pools) we were able to show that degradation of carbon occurs during soil erosion processes at the investigated mountain grasslands in the central Swiss Alps (Urseren Valley, Canton Uri). Transects from upland (erosion source) to wetland soils (erosion sinks) of sites affected by sheet and land slide erosion were sampled. Analysis of 137Cs yielded an input of 2 and 4.6 tha-1 yr-1 of soil material into the wetlands sites. Assuming no degradation of soil organic carbon during detachment and transport, carbon isotope signature of soil organic carbon in the wetlands could only be explained with an assumed 500-600 and 350-400 years of erosion input into the wetlands Laui and Spissen, respectively. The latter is highly unlikely with alpine peat growth rates indicating that the upper horizons might have an age between 7 and 200 years. While we do not conclude from our data that eroded soil organic carbon is generally degraded during detachment and transport, we propose this method to gain more information on process dynamics during soil erosion from oxic upland to anoxic wetland soils, sediments or water bodies.

  11. Rehabilitation of oil polluted soils by bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, Mihail; Parvan, Lavinia; Cioroianu, Mihai; Carmen, Sirbu; Constantin, Carolina

    2015-04-01

    In Romania about 50,000 ha are polluted with oil and/or brine. The main sources of pollution are the different activities using petroleum products: extraction, transport, treatment, refining and distribution. Taking into acoount the large areas and the cost per unit area, bioremediation was tested as a method of rehabilitation. To stimulate the performance of the bioremediation process for a polluted soil (luvisol) by 3% oil, different methods were tested: -application of a bacterial inoculum consisting of species of the Pseudomonas and Arthrobacter genera;- application of two types of absorbent materials, 16 t/ha peat and 16, respectively, 32 kg/ha Zeba (starch-based polymer, superabsorbent); -mineral fertilization with N200P200K200 and 5 different liquid fertilizer based on potassium humates extracted from lignite in a NPK matrix with micronutrients and added monosaccharides (4 and 8%). After 45 days from the treatment (60 days from pollution) the following observations have been noticed: • the application of only bacterial inoculum had no significant effect on the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons; • the use of 650 l/ha AH-SH fertilizer (potassium humate in a NPK matrix) led to a 47% decrease of TPH (total petroleum hydrocarbons); • the application of 16 t/ha peat, together with the bacterial inoculum and the AH-SG2 liquid fertilizer (containing humates of potassium in a NPK matrix with microelements and 8% monosaccharides, in which the nitrogen is amide form) led to a 50% decrease of the TPH content; • the application of 16 kg/ha Zeba absorbent together with bacterial inoculum and 650 l/ha AH-SG1 liquid fertilizer (containing humates of potassium in a NPK matrix with microelements and 4% monosaccharide in which the nitrogen is in amide form) led to a 57% decrease of the TPH content; • the application of 32 kg/ha Zeba absorbent, together with the AH-SG2 fertilizer, led to a 58% decrease of the TPH content.

  12. Biological degradation of TNT-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, J.F.; Boopathy, R.

    1995-12-31

    The concept of using biological slurry reactors to remediate soil contaminated with TNT has been investigated at the laboratory scale. Important parameters include an organic co-substrate and appropriate amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus added as nutrients. Normally, the degradation requires an organic co-substrate. The type of co-substrate can have a significant impact on the rate and extent of degradation. Succinate, malate, molasses, and glucose are all acceptable co-substrates. Molasses, or succinate with added yeast extract and/or peptone, provides superior rates of removal. Consortia of microorganisms isolated from various sites can also degrade TNT. To exploit the microbial system, laboratory scale soil slurry reactors have been operated, achieving reductions in TNT concentrations on the order of 90-99% from initial TNT concentrations of 7,000-10,000 mg/kg. Laboratory scale tests have shown that all of the intermediates can be removed by microbial degradation. Laboratory reactors operated with 15% volume replacement one, two, or three times a week achieved removal of 95-99% of the TNT in the feed soil. This system can reduce TNT concentrations to less than 20 mg/kg in treated soil. In particular, operation of the reactors in an aerobic-anoxic sequenced pattern promotes the conversion of TNT to CO{sub 2} and microbial biomass. Radiolabeling studies demonstrated that 50% of the TNT is mineralized, with 30% of the original labeled TNT being converted to microbial biomass. To take advantage of this technology, a field demonstration in which the soil slurry reactor is being used to degrade explosives-contaminated soil is currently being conducted.

  13. The role of waste thermal water in the soil degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balog, Kitti; Farsang, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    Thermal water exploitation is widespread, because it is considered to a "green" renewable energy source, the transporter of the Earth crust's heat. It is suitable for very diverse purposes: balneology, heating, mineral water, municipal hot water supply, technological water, etc. After usage, large amount of thermal water becomes sewage water with high concentrations of salts, heavy metals, ammonia, nitrate, and high temperature. Besides that, most of these waters have an unfavourable ion composition. Na+ (and in some cases Mg+) is predominant among cations. A common way of treatment is to let off the waste thermal water in unlined ground channels to leak into the soil. This can cause physical and chemical soil degradation. Continouos Na+ supply occurs, that occupies the place of Ca2+ on the ion exchange surfaces. Thus, adverse effects of Na+ can appear, like formation of extreme moisture regime, peptization, liquefaction. Beside Na+, Mg2+ also helps the formation of physical degradation in the soil. High water retain and unfavourable structure evolves. Not only the physical features of the soil are touched, fertility of production sites as well. Namely sorrounding the unlined ground channels, agricultural areas are seated, so it is important to protect productivity of the soil to maintain yield. Because of the seepage of high salt concentration waters, salt accumulation can be observed near to the channel lines. The investigated sample sites are located in the Great Hungarian Plane. We determined the main pollutants of the thermal waters, and the effects to the sorrounding soils. On two selected investigation areas (Cserkeszőlő, Tiszakécske) salt profiles and Na+ adsorption isotherms are presented to characterize soil degradation. Genetic soil types are differ on the investigated areas, so the aspect of impact is different, as well.

  14. Soil degradation: Will humankind ever learn?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil degradation is a global problem caused by many factors including excessive tillage, inappropriate crop rotations, excessive grazing or crop residue removal, deforestation, mining, construction and urban sprawl. To meet the needs of an expanding global population, it is essential for humankind t...

  15. Soiling and degradation analysis of solar mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delord, Christine; Blaise, Anthony; Fernandez-García, Aránzazu; Martínez-Arcos, Lucía; Sutter, Florian; Reche-Navarro, Tomás Jesús

    2016-05-01

    The degradation and the soiling of the mirrors are dependent of the solar field and the mirrors technologies, the local climate, the meteorological events, the O&M tasks and the human activities around the site. In the frame of the European project SFERA II, the SODAM project has been the opportunity to compare the soiling and the degradation mechanisms on a Fresnel solar field installed in the South of France and on a parabolic-through solar field installed in the South of Spain. The analysis of the soiling has shown equivalent maximum weekly reflectance loss due to soiling in both sites but a double mean weekly reflectance loss in Spain respect to France, as well as typical meteorological events to be taken into account to adapt the cleaning strategies. Among the meteorological parameters mainly influencing the soiling, the study has revealed the effect of the rain and of the DNI. In parallel, the analysis of the degradation mechanisms has highlighted a common chalking of the protective back paint layers due to the irradiation. This chalking being associated to a leaching of the paint layers in the site of Cadarache due to the high presence of liquid water. A difference in the speed of corrosion of the silver layer has been also noticed, leading to a difference in the mechanisms of delamination of the paints layers.

  16. 14C tebuconazole degradation in Colombian soils.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, C S; Martínez, M J; Guerrero, J A

    2010-01-01

    Tebuconazole is a fungicide used on onion crops (Allium Fistulosum L) in Colombia. Persistence of pesticides in soils is characterized by the half-life (DT50), which is influenced by their chemical structure, the physical and chemical properties of the soil and the previous soil history. Based on its structural and chemical properties, tebuconazole should be expected to be relatively persistent in soils. Laboratory incubation studies were conducted to evaluate persistence and bond residues of 14C tebuconazole in three soils, two inceptisol (I) and one histosol (H). Textural classifications were: loam (101), loamy sand (102) and loam (H03), respectively. Data obtained followed a first-order degradation kinetics (R2 > or = 0.899) with DT50 values between 158 and 198 days. The production of 14CO2 from the 14C-ring-labelled test chemicals was very low and increased slightly during 63 days in all cases. The methanol extractable 14C-residues were higher than aqueous ones and both decreased over incubation time for the three soils. The formation of bound 14C-residues increased with time and final values were 11.3; 5.55 and 7.87% for 101, 102 and H03 respectively. Soil 101 showed the lowest mineralization rate and the highest bound residues formation, which might be explained by the clay fraction content. In contrast, an inverse behavior was found for soils 102 and H03, these results might be explained by the higher soil organic carbon content. PMID:21542480

  17. 14C tebuconazole degradation in Colombian soils.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, C S; Martínez, M J; Guerrero, J A

    2010-01-01

    Tebuconazole is a fungicide used on onion crops (Allium Fistulosum L) in Colombia. Persistence of pesticides in soils is characterized by the half-life (DT50), which is influenced by their chemical structure, the physical and chemical properties of the soil and the previous soil history. Based on its structural and chemical properties, tebuconazole should be expected to be relatively persistent in soils. Laboratory incubation studies were conducted to evaluate persistence and bond residues of 14C tebuconazole in three soils, two inceptisol (I) and one histosol (H). Textural classifications were: loam (101), loamy sand (102) and loam (H03), respectively. Data obtained followed a first-order degradation kinetics (R2 > or = 0.899) with DT50 values between 158 and 198 days. The production of 14CO2 from the 14C-ring-labelled test chemicals was very low and increased slightly during 63 days in all cases. The methanol extractable 14C-residues were higher than aqueous ones and both decreased over incubation time for the three soils. The formation of bound 14C-residues increased with time and final values were 11.3; 5.55 and 7.87% for 101, 102 and H03 respectively. Soil 101 showed the lowest mineralization rate and the highest bound residues formation, which might be explained by the clay fraction content. In contrast, an inverse behavior was found for soils 102 and H03, these results might be explained by the higher soil organic carbon content.

  18. Thermal treatment of polluted soil

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, H.; Wells, S.K.

    1995-02-01

    Thermal treatment for the remediation soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons is described. It is recommended tat a thorough analysis be performed of the situation including well monitoring and contamination testing, records review, and sampling.

  19. Plant species influence on soil C after afforestation of Mediterranean degraded soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Maria T.; García-Vargas, Carlos; Madejón, Engracia; Marañón, Teodoro

    2015-04-01

    Increasing C sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems is one of the main current environmental challenges to mitigate climate change. Afforestation of degraded and contaminated lands is one of the key strategies to achieve an increase in C sequestration in ecosystems. Plant species differ in their mechanisms of C-fixation, C allocation into different plant organs, and interaction with soil microorganisms, all these factors influencing the dynamics of soil C following the afforestation of degraded soils. In this work we examine the influence of different woody plant species on soil C dynamics in degraded and afforested Mediterranean soils. The soils were former agricultural lands that were polluted by a mining accident and later afforested with different native plant species. We analysed the effect of four of these species (Olea europaea var. sylvestris Brot., Populus alba L., Pistacia lentiscus L. and Retama sphaerocarpa (L.) Boiss.) on different soil C fractions, soil nutrient availability, microbial activity (soil enzyme activities) and soil CO2 fluxes 15 years after the establishment of the plantations. Results suggest that the influence of the planted trees and shrubs is still limited, being more pronounced in the more acidic and nutrient-poor soils. Litter accumulation varied among species, with the highest C accumulated in the litter under the deciduous species (Populus alba L.). No differences were observed in the amount of total soil organic C among the studied species, or in the concentrations of phenols and sugars in the dissolved organic C (DOC), which might have indicated differences in the biodegradability of the DOC. Microbial biomass and activity was highly influenced by soil pH, and plant species had a significant influence on soil pH in the more acidic site. Soil CO2 fluxes were more influenced by the plant species than total soil C content. Our results suggest that changes in total soil C stocks after the afforestation of degraded Mediterranean

  20. Assimilation efficiency and toxicokinetics of 14C-lindane in the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus: the role of isopods in degradation of persistent soil pollutants.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Susana; Sousa, J P; Nogueira, A J A; Soares, A M V M

    2002-12-01

    An achievable way to evaluate the bioavailability of a certain toxic in the environment is to measure the concentration inside soil organisms. Non-target saprotrophic organisms like isopods are often exposed to agrochemicals or other kind of persistent chemicals. In this study the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus was exposed to a constant concentration of Lindane (gamma-HCH) via food. Using toxicokinetic models the bioaccumulation and fate of the pesticide by isopods was assessed and compared with previous studies, where an unexpected decrease in gamma-HCH concentration was observed. Animal body burdens showed higher values, and a lower assimilation rate constant, although the elimination rate constant was twice the value previously observed. It was also observed that a significant amount of gamma-HCH had an unknown fate. To discover its possible destiny, a factorial experiment was carried out using two types of CO2 traps and contaminated leaves in the presence and absence of isopods. It was concluded that isopod activity might have been responsible for a more rapid biotransformation of gamma-HCH in leaves, since the amount of the pesticide is reduced in their presence.

  1. [Changed soil properties after pollution by oilfield brine at the Tuimazy oilfield (Republic of Bashkortostan)].

    PubMed

    Suleĭmanov, R R

    2005-01-01

    Changes in the main soil properties under the influence of oilfield brines were studied at the Tuimazy Oilfield. High salinization was observed in the cinnamonic forest soil one year after pollution. Progressing alkalinization deteriorated the main soil properties. The chemical composition of the aqueous extract and the ionic composition of the soil absorption complex changed, the base exchange capacity decreased, the humus state deteriorated, and enzyme activity was suppressed. In the meadow calcareous chernozem polluted 12 years ago, desalinization processes increased alkalinization and thus further degraded the soil.

  2. [Changed soil properties after pollution by oilfield brine at the Tuimazy oilfield (Republic of Bashkortostan)].

    PubMed

    Suleĭmanov, R R

    2005-01-01

    Changes in the main soil properties under the influence of oilfield brines were studied at the Tuimazy Oilfield. High salinization was observed in the cinnamonic forest soil one year after pollution. Progressing alkalinization deteriorated the main soil properties. The chemical composition of the aqueous extract and the ionic composition of the soil absorption complex changed, the base exchange capacity decreased, the humus state deteriorated, and enzyme activity was suppressed. In the meadow calcareous chernozem polluted 12 years ago, desalinization processes increased alkalinization and thus further degraded the soil. PMID:16240760

  3. Soil pollution in the railway junction Niš (Serbia) and possibility of bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Larisa; Aleksic, Gorica; Radosavljevic, Milan; Onjia, Antonije

    2015-04-01

    Mineral oil leaking from vehicles or released during accidents is an important source of soil and ground water pollution. In the railway junction Niš (Serbia) total 90 soil samples polluted with mineral oil derivatives were investigated. Field work at the railway Niš sites included the opening of soil profiles and soil sampling. The aim of this work is the determination of petroleum hydrocarbons concentration in the soil samples and the investigation of the bioremediation technique for treatment heavily contaminated soil. For determination of petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil samples method of gas-chromatography was carried out. On the basis of measured concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in the soil it can be concluded that: Obtained concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in 60% of soil samples exceed the permissible values (5000 mg/kg). The heavily contaminated soils, according the Regulation on the program of systematic monitoring of soil quality indicators for assessing the risk of soil degradation and methodology for development of remediation programs, Annex 3 (Official Gazette of RS, No.88 / 2010), must be treated using some of remediation technologies. Between many types of phytoremediation of soil contaminated with mineral oils and their derivatives, the most suitable are phytovolatalisation and phytostimulation. During phytovolatalisation plants (poplar, willow, aspen, sorgum, and rye) absorb organic pollutants through the root, and then transported them to the leaves where the reduced pollutants are released into the atmosphere. In the case of phytostimulation plants (mulberry, apple, rye, Bermuda) secrete from the roots enzymes that stimulates the growth of bacteria in the soil. The increase in microbial activity in soil promotes the degradation of pollutants. Bioremediation is performed by composting the contaminated soil with addition of composting materials (straw, manure, sawdust, and shavings), moisture components, oligotrophs and

  4. Effect of toluene as gaseous cosubstrate in bioremediation of hydrocarbon-polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Irmene; Velasco, Antonio; Revah, Sergio

    2006-04-17

    The stimulation of the microbial population by a more bioavailable supplementary carbon source and by a surfactant pretreatment was studied in petroleum hydrocarbon-polluted soils bioremediation. Two types of soils were used, Soil A which had been recently polluted and the aged Soil B. They contained 52.4 and 50.4 g of total petroleum hydrocarbons per kg of dry soil, respectively. The effect of passing a continuous small stream of air containing a low concentration of gaseous toluene through packed 0.5 l (Ø=5.5 cm) columns was studied. For Soil A, after 62 days the THPs degradation was 28% higher in the toluene treated columns than in controls. In aged Soil B the effect of toluene was not significant, probably due to bioavailability limitations. With Soil B, the combined effect of toluene as cosubstrate and a surfactant pretreatment was studied and the hydrocarbons degradation was 29% higher in the toluene-amended columns than in the controls. Toluene removal was higher than 99% in all cases. Surfactant addition increased hydrocarbon degradation when toluene was also added suggesting that the biological reaction was the limiting process. The study shows the possibilities of using gaseous substrates, such as toluene, for the in situ or ex situ treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon-polluted soil in processes limited by the biological reaction. The main advantage of the treatment is that the compound can be easily and directly delivered to the polluted soil through the venting system. PMID:16239067

  5. The impact of soil degradation on soil functioning in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanarella, Luca

    2010-05-01

    The European Commission has presented in September 2006 its Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection.The Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection consists of a Communication from the Commission to the other European Institutions, a proposal for a framework Directive (a European law), and an Impact Assessment. The Communication (COM(2006) 231) sets the frame. It defines the relevant soil functions for Europe and identifies the major threats. It explains why further action is needed to ensure a high level of soil protection, sets the overall objective of the Strategy and explains what kind of measures must be taken. It establishes a ten-year work program for the European Commission. The proposal for a framework Directive (COM(2006) 232) sets out common principles for protecting soils across the EU. Within this common framework, the EU Member States will be in a position to decide how best to protect soil and how use it in a sustainable way on their own territory. The Impact Assessment (SEC (2006) 1165 and SEC(2006) 620) contains an analysis of the economic, social and environmental impacts of the different options that were considered in the preparatory phase of the strategy and of the measures finally retained by the Commission. Since 2006 a large amount of new evidence has allowed to further document the extensive negative impacts of soil degradation on soil functioning in Europe. Extensive soil erosion, combined with a constant loss of soil organic carbon, have raised attention to the important role soils are playing within the climate change related processes. Other important processes are related to the loss of soil biodiversity, extensive soil sealing by housing and infrastructure, local and diffuse contamination by agricultural and industrial sources, compaction due to unsustainable agricultural practices and salinization by unsustainable irrigation practices. The extended impact assessment by the European Commission has attempted to quantify in monetary terms the

  6. Plant treatment, pollutant load, and soil type effects in rhizosphere ecology of trace element polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Belén Hinojosa, M; Carreira, José A; García-Ruíz, Roberto; Rodríguez-Maroto, José M; Daniell, Tim J; Griffiths, Bryan S

    2010-07-01

    Re-vegetation of trace element contaminated soils can alter the pH and chelating capacity in the rhizosphere, increasing the mobility of pollutants, which, in turn, may impact on rhizosphere ecology. In this study a short-term pot experiment was carried out in order to investigate the multi-factorial effects of: buffering capacity (sandy-loam and loam soils); pollutant load (0%, 1.3%, and 4% of pyrite sludge), and the presence/absence of plant (Lolium perenne L. and Medicago sativa L.) on the mobility of trace elements, soil biochemical functionality (hydrolase activities), and biological diversity (bacterial and nematode communities). The experiment was carried out with representative soils from the Guadiamar basin (SW Spain), an area where the Aznalcóllar mining spill affected over 4000ha. Results indicated that the development of rhizospheres in polluted soils (coarse-textured) increases the mobilization of trace elements. In general the presence of roots has stimulatory effects on soil quality indicators such as hydrolase activities and both bacterial and nematode communities. However, the presence of high amount of metals interferes with these beneficial effects. This study provided evidence about the complexity of the impact of growing plants on trace element polluted soils. Trace element mobilization, hydrolase activities and bacterial and nematode communities in the rhizosphere are dependent on plant species, soil type, and pollution dose.

  7. [Arbuscular mycorrhizal bioremediation and its mechanisms of organic pollutants-contaminated soils].

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuling; Ling, Wanting; Gao, Yanzheng; Li, Fuchun; Xiong, Wei

    2006-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM), the symbiont of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and host plant root, has been proved to be able to improve soil structure and enhance the plant resistance to environmental stress. There are more than 170 kinds of AMF worldwide. Recently, the promoted degradation of organic pollutants in soils in the presence of AM was observed, and AM bioremediation (AMB) is becoming a promising and perspective remediation technique for organic pollutants-contaminated soils. This paper reviewed the research progress on the AMB of soils contaminated by typical organic pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAEs, petroleum, and pesticides. The mechanisms of AMB mainly include the metabolism of organic pollutants by AM fungi, the degradation of these pollutants by the enzymes derived from AM exudation and by the enhanced root exudation and rhizospheric microbial activity in the presence of AM, and the removal of the pollutants by plant uptake and accumulation. As a new approach for the remediation of contaminated soils, some aspects involved in AMB, e.g., the screening of high efficient AM fungi, efficacy of co-existing AM fungi, soil ageing, and plant uptake of organic pollutants from soils in the presence of AM, still need to be further investigated.

  8. Comparative metagenomic analysis of PAH degradation in soil by a mixed microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Zafra, German; Taylor, Todd D; Absalón, Angel E; Cortés-Espinosa, Diana V

    2016-11-15

    In this study, we used a taxonomic and functional metagenomic approach to analyze some of the effects (e.g. displacement, permanence, disappearance) produced between native microbiota and a previously constructed Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading microbial consortium during the bioremediation process of a soil polluted with PAHs. Bioaugmentation with a fungal-bacterial consortium and biostimulation of native microbiota using corn stover as texturizer produced appreciable changes in the microbial diversity of polluted soils, shifting native microbial communities in favor of degrading specific populations. Functional metagenomics showed changes in gene abundance suggesting a bias towards aromatic hydrocarbon and intermediary degradation pathways, which greatly favored PAH mineralization. In contrast, pathways favoring the formation of toxic intermediates such as cytochrome P450-mediated reactions were found to be significantly reduced in bioaugmented soils. PAH biodegradation in soil using the microbial consortium was faster and reached higher degradation values (84% after 30 d) as a result of an increased co-metabolic degradation when compared with other mixed microbial consortia. The main differences between inoculated and non-inoculated soils were observed in aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases, laccase, protocatechuate, salicylate and benzoate-degrading enzyme genes. Based on our results, we propose that several concurrent metabolic pathways are taking place in soils during PAH degradation. PMID:27484946

  9. Effects of biochar on the transformation and earthworm bioaccumulation of organic pollutants in soil.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jianqiang; Zhou, Wenqiang; Jiang, Bingqi; Wang, Lianhong; Ma, Yini; Guo, Hongyan; Schulin, Rainer; Ji, Rong; Evangelou, Michael W H

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about the effects of biochar on the fate and behavior of micropollutants in soil, especially in the presence of soil macrofauna. Using a 14C-tracer, we studied the fate of 2,4-dichlorophenol and phenanthrene, after 30 days in soil in the presence of a biochar (0-5%, dry weight) produced from China fir at 400 °C and/or the earthworm Metaphire guillelmi. Application of the biochar significantly reduced the degradation and mineralization of both pollutants and strongly increased the accumulation of their metabolites in soil. The earthworm had no significant effects on the degradation of parent molecules of the pollutants but it significantly reduced the mineralization of the pollutants independent of the presence of the biochar. Although at an application rate of <1% the biochar strongly sorbed both pollutants, it did not significantly decrease the bioaccumulation of free dichlorophenol and phenanthrene and their metabolites by the earthworm. Our results demonstrate the complex effects of biochar on the fate, transformation, and earthworm bioaccumulation of organic pollutants in soil. They show that biochar application may not be an appropriate strategy for treating soil contaminated with hydrophobic organic pollutants and underline the importance of soil-feeding earthworms in risk assessments of biochar effects on soil remediation.

  10. Effects of biochar on the transformation and earthworm bioaccumulation of organic pollutants in soil.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jianqiang; Zhou, Wenqiang; Jiang, Bingqi; Wang, Lianhong; Ma, Yini; Guo, Hongyan; Schulin, Rainer; Ji, Rong; Evangelou, Michael W H

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about the effects of biochar on the fate and behavior of micropollutants in soil, especially in the presence of soil macrofauna. Using a 14C-tracer, we studied the fate of 2,4-dichlorophenol and phenanthrene, after 30 days in soil in the presence of a biochar (0-5%, dry weight) produced from China fir at 400 °C and/or the earthworm Metaphire guillelmi. Application of the biochar significantly reduced the degradation and mineralization of both pollutants and strongly increased the accumulation of their metabolites in soil. The earthworm had no significant effects on the degradation of parent molecules of the pollutants but it significantly reduced the mineralization of the pollutants independent of the presence of the biochar. Although at an application rate of <1% the biochar strongly sorbed both pollutants, it did not significantly decrease the bioaccumulation of free dichlorophenol and phenanthrene and their metabolites by the earthworm. Our results demonstrate the complex effects of biochar on the fate, transformation, and earthworm bioaccumulation of organic pollutants in soil. They show that biochar application may not be an appropriate strategy for treating soil contaminated with hydrophobic organic pollutants and underline the importance of soil-feeding earthworms in risk assessments of biochar effects on soil remediation. PMID:26694792

  11. Cases Studies of Irrigated Soil Degradation and Progradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeyliger, Anatoly; Kust, German; Rozov, Sergey; Stoma, Galina

    2013-04-01

    Waterlogging and salination, along with interaction with other degradation processes, have not only caused the collapse of irrigation-based societies in the past, but are indeed threatening the viability of irrigation at present. The problem is global in scope. Decimation of natural ecosystems, deterioration of soil productivity depletion and pollution of water resources, and conflicts over dwindling supplies have become international problems closely linked with extension of irrigation development to large scale and associated impact to soil fertility and surrounding environment. Practical experience and scientific research done in the frame of FP6 DESIRE project provided an affirmative answer to the question - can irrigated agriculture be sustained for long time. In present contribution two case studies will be discussed and analysed in scope to compare different irrigation practises used for about 35 years and their impact to soil fertility. Investigated areas of both case studies are situated in the same Saratov Region of Russia at the left bank of middle part of Volga River with distance between about 100 km. First case study was developed during 2009-2010 by field trials at irrigated and surrounded areas of agricultural farms situated at Privolghskaya Irrigation System (Marksovsky District). Second case study was developed during summer of 2011 by field trial at experimental farm of research institute called VolgNIIGiM (Enghelsky District). During fields trail soil maps of both case studies were developed and compared with soil maps of the same areas done at 1970th before irrigation projects at both areas were started. Results of soil map comparison are showing that in the territory of first case study considerable soil degradation is taken place, but in the territory of the second case study a substantial soil progradation is taken place. Thus is supported by the time series of ground water monitoring at both irrigated areas. Obtained results will be

  12. Zinc oxide tetrapods as efficient photocatalysts for organic pollutant degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangzhou; Leung, Yu Hang; Djurisić, Aleksandra B.; Liao, Changzhong; Shih, Kaimin

    2014-03-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) and other organic pollutants from industrial wastewater have drawn increasing concern in the past decades regarding their environmental and biological risks, and hence developing strategies of effective degradation of BPA and other organic pollutants is imperative. Metal oxide nanostructures, in particular titanium oxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO), have been demonstrated to exhibit efficient photodegradation of various common organic dyes. ZnO tetrapods are of special interest due to their low density of native defects which consequently lead to lower recombination losses and higher photocatalytic efficiency. Tetrapods can be obtained by relatively simple and low-cost vapor phase deposition in large quantity; the micron-scale size would also be advantageous for catalyst recovery. In this study, the photodegradation of BPA with ZnO tetrapods and TiO2 nanostructures under UV illumination were compared. The concentration of BPA dissolved in DI water was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) at specified time intervals. It was observed that the photocatalytic efficiency of ZnO tetrapods eventually surpassed Degussa P25 in free-standing form, and more than 80% of BPA was degraded after 60 min. Photodegradation of other organic dye pollutants by tetrapods and P25 were also examined. The superior photocatalytic efficiency of ZnO tetrapods for degradation of BPA and other organic dye pollutants and its correlation with the material properties were discussed.

  13. Understanding plant-microbe interactions for phytoremediation of petroleum-polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Nie, Ming; Wang, Yijing; Yu, Jiayi; Xiao, Ming; Jiang, Lifen; Yang, Ji; Fang, Changming; Chen, Jiakuan; Li, Bo

    2011-03-18

    Plant-microbe interactions are considered to be important processes determining the efficiency of phytoremediation of petroleum pollution, however relatively little is known about how these interactions are influenced by petroleum pollution. In this experimental study using a microcosm approach, we examined how plant ecophysiological traits, soil nutrients and microbial activities were influenced by petroleum pollution in Phragmites australis, a phytoremediating species. Generally, petroleum pollution reduced plant performance, especially at early stages of plant growth. Petroleum had negative effects on the net accumulation of inorganic nitrogen from its organic forms (net nitrogen mineralization (NNM)) most likely by decreasing the inorganic nitrogen available to the plants in petroleum-polluted soils. However, abundant dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) was found in petroleum-polluted soil. In order to overcome initial deficiency of inorganic nitrogen, plants by dint of high colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi might absorb some DON for their growth in petroleum-polluted soils. In addition, through using a real-time polymerase chain reaction method, we quantified hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial traits based on their catabolic genes (i.e. alkB (alkane monooxygenase), nah (naphthalene dioxygenase) and tol (xylene monooxygenase) genes). This enumeration of target genes suggests that different hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria experienced different dynamic changes during phytoremediation and a greater abundance of alkB was detected during vegetative growth stages. Because phytoremediation of different components of petroleum is performed by different hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, plants' ability of phytoremediating different components might therefore vary during the plant life cycle. Phytoremediation might be most effective during the vegetative growth stages as greater abundances of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria containing alkB and tol genes were observed at

  14. Understanding plant-microbe interactions for phytoremediation of petroleum-polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Nie, Ming; Wang, Yijing; Yu, Jiayi; Xiao, Ming; Jiang, Lifen; Yang, Ji; Fang, Changming; Chen, Jiakuan; Li, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Plant-microbe interactions are considered to be important processes determining the efficiency of phytoremediation of petroleum pollution, however relatively little is known about how these interactions are influenced by petroleum pollution. In this experimental study using a microcosm approach, we examined how plant ecophysiological traits, soil nutrients and microbial activities were influenced by petroleum pollution in Phragmites australis, a phytoremediating species. Generally, petroleum pollution reduced plant performance, especially at early stages of plant growth. Petroleum had negative effects on the net accumulation of inorganic nitrogen from its organic forms (net nitrogen mineralization (NNM)) most likely by decreasing the inorganic nitrogen available to the plants in petroleum-polluted soils. However, abundant dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) was found in petroleum-polluted soil. In order to overcome initial deficiency of inorganic nitrogen, plants by dint of high colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi might absorb some DON for their growth in petroleum-polluted soils. In addition, through using a real-time polymerase chain reaction method, we quantified hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial traits based on their catabolic genes (i.e. alkB (alkane monooxygenase), nah (naphthalene dioxygenase) and tol (xylene monooxygenase) genes). This enumeration of target genes suggests that different hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria experienced different dynamic changes during phytoremediation and a greater abundance of alkB was detected during vegetative growth stages. Because phytoremediation of different components of petroleum is performed by different hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, plants' ability of phytoremediating different components might therefore vary during the plant life cycle. Phytoremediation might be most effective during the vegetative growth stages as greater abundances of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria containing alkB and tol genes were observed at

  15. National approaches to evaluation of the degree of soil degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, E. N.; Savin, I. Yu.; Yakovlev, A. S.; Bulgakov, D. S.; Makarov, O. A.

    2015-11-01

    Approaches to evaluation of the degree of soil degradation and the related normative documents applied by specialists from state institutes for land management of the former Soviet Union in the course of largeand medium-scale soil surveys in the 1960s-1990s are analyzed. It is shown that the types and rates of soil degradation were specified without proper consideration for the taxonomic position of particular soils. Reference (nondegraded) soils were not clearly defined, which made it difficult to judge the degree of soil degradation by means of a comparative analysis of degraded and nondegraded soils. Such reference soils are suggested for several types of soil degradation (dehumification, compaction, depletion of nutrients, etc.). Additional diagnostic criteria of the degree of soil degradation caused by wind and water erosion, waterlogging, swamping, and other adverse processes are specified. The study of qualitative and quantitative changes in the soil properties during the post-Soviet period is important for the development of land monitoring system and for the analysis of economic aspects of land degradation. To ensure reliability of data on changes in the soil properties and soil cover patterns, possible errors related to incorrect comparison of the data obtained by traditional and modern approaches should be taken into account.

  16. Enhanced Fenton degradation of hydrophobic organics by simultaneous iron and pollutant complexation with cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Michele E; Xu, Guoxiang; Lu, Jia; Tarr, Matthew A

    2003-05-20

    The effectiveness and selectivity of Fenton degradation of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) can be improved by simultaneous complexation of Fe(2+) and the organic compound with a cyclodextrin or derivatized cyclodextrin. Such selective complexation of a target substrate and a catalytic metal is a crude mimic of enzyme systems. Both beta-cyclodextrin and carboxymethyl-beta-cyclodextrin (CMCD) were able to simultaneously complex Fe(2+) and an aromatic hydrocarbon, such as phenol, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Degradation of compounds included in cyclodextrins was unaffected by hydroxyl radical scavengers, indicating that the radical was formed at the ternary complex (HOC-cyclodextrin-iron) and in close proximity to the included molecule. Without cyclodextrins, humic acid (HA) decreased degradation efficiency. However, in the presence of CMCD, HA did not inhibit degradation of the target compound. CMCD is capable of removing HOCs from HA binding sites while at the same time complexing Fe(2+). PCBs sorbed to glass were resistant to Fenton degradation, but were significantly degraded using a cyclodextrin modified Fenton system. In all of these systems, the ternary HOC-cyclodextrin-iron complexes effectively direct hydroxyl radical reaction toward the HOC, increasing the efficiency of Fenton degradation. One potential application of such targeted degradation systems is the in situ remediation of hydrophobic organic pollutants in contaminated soil and groundwater or in industrial waste streams.

  17. Correlations between PAH bioavailability, degrading bacteria, and soil characteristics during PAH biodegradation in five diffusely contaminated dissimilar soils.

    PubMed

    Crampon, M; Bureau, F; Akpa-Vinceslas, M; Bodilis, J; Machour, N; Le Derf, F; Portet-Koltalo, F

    2014-01-01

    The natural biodegradation of seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by native microorganisms was studied in five soils from Normandy (France) from diffusely polluted areas, which can also pose a problem in terms of surfaces and amounts of contaminated soils. Bioavailability tests using cyclodextrin-based extractions were performed. The natural degradation of low molecular weight (LMW) PAHs was not strongly correlated to their bioavailability due to their sorption to geosorbents. Conversely, the very low degradation of high molecular weight (HMW) PAHs was partly correlated to their poor availability, due to their sorption on complexes of organic matter and kaolinites or smectites. A principal component analysis allowed us to distinguish between the respective degradation behaviors of LMW and HMW PAHs. LMW PAHs were degraded in less than 2-3 months and were strongly influenced by the relative percentage of phenanthrene-degrading bacteria over total bacteria in soils. HMW PAHs were not significantly degraded, not only because they were less bioavailable but also because of a lack of degrading microorganisms. Benzo[a]pyrene stood apart since it was partly degraded in acidic soils, probably because of a catabolic cooperation between bacteria and fungi.

  18. An efficient PAH-degrading Lentinus (Panus) tigrinus strain: effect of inoculum formulation and pollutant bioavailability in solid matrices.

    PubMed

    Covino, Stefano; Cvancarová, Monika; Muzikár, Milan; Svobodová, Katerina; D'annibale, Alessandro; Petruccioli, Maurizio; Federici, Federico; Kresinová, Zdena; Cajthaml, Tomás

    2010-11-15

    This study comparatively investigated the PAH degradation ability of Lentinus tigrinus and Irpex lacteus in a historically polluted soil and creosote-impregnated shavings. With this regard, the effect of type of inoculum carrier (i.e., wheat straw, corn cobs and commercial pellets) and contaminant bioavailability was thoroughly determined. Although degradation performances of L. tigrinus were not significantly affected by the type of the support, they were invariably better than those of I. lacteus on both the polluted soil and the creosote-impregnated shavings. Although degradation efficiencies of all fungal microcosms were highly and significantly correlated with bioavailability, certain PAHs, such as chrysene and benzo[a]pyrene, were removed by L. tigrinus from the polluted soil at amounts that exceeded about 2.3-fold their respective bioavailabilities. Degradation of PAHs was negatively correlated with their organic carbon sorption coefficients (K(oc)) and hydrophobicity (logP). The strength of linear association with the latter parameter, however, was not affected by the type of contaminated matrix in L. tigrinus-based microcosms while it was significantly larger in the historically polluted soil than in the creosote-impregnated shavings in I. lacteus ones. PMID:20728989

  19. Monitoring the soil degradation by Metastatistical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleschko, K.; Gaona, C.; Tarquis, A.

    2009-04-01

    The effectiveness of fractal toolbox to capture the critical behavior of soil structural patterns during the chemical and physical degradation was documented by our numerous experiments (Oleschko et al., 2008 a; 2008 b). The spatio-temporal dynamics of these patterns was measured and mapped with high precision in terms of fractal descriptors. All tested fractal techniques were able to detect the statistically significant differences in structure between the perfect spongy and massive patterns of uncultivated and sodium-saline agricultural soils, respectively. For instance, the Hurst exponent, extracted from the Chernozeḿ micromorphological images and from the time series of its physical and mechanical properties measured in situ, detected the roughness decrease (and therefore the increase in H - from 0.17 to 0.30 for images) derived from the loss of original structure complexity. The combined use of different fractal descriptors brings statistical precision into the quantification of natural system degradation and provides a means for objective soil structure comparison (Oleschko et al., 2000). The ability of fractal parameters to capture critical behavior and phase transition was documented for different contrasting situations, including from Andosols deforestation and erosion, to Vertisols high fructuring and consolidation. The Hurst exponent is used to measure the type of persistence and degree of complexity of structure dynamics. We conclude that there is an urgent need to select and adopt a standardized toolbox for fractal analysis and complexity measures in Earth Sciences. We propose to use the second-order (meta-) statistics as subtle measures of complexity (Atmanspacher et al., 1997). The high degree of correlation was documented between the fractal and high-order statistical descriptors (four central moments of stochastic variable distribution) used to the system heterogeneity and variability analysis. We proposed to call this combined fractal

  20. Air pollutants degrade floral scents and increase insect foraging times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, Jose D.; Chamecki, Marcelo; Roulston, T.'ai; Chen, Bicheng; Pratt, Kenneth R.

    2016-09-01

    Flowers emit mixtures of scents that mediate plant-insect interactions such as attracting insect pollinators. Because of their volatile nature, however, floral scents readily react with ozone, nitrate radical, and hydroxyl radical. The result of such reactions is the degradation and the chemical modification of scent plumes downwind of floral sources. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) are developed to investigate dispersion and chemical degradation and modification of floral scents due to reactions with ozone, hydroxyl radical, and nitrate radical within the atmospheric surface layer. Impacts on foraging insects are investigated by utilizing a random walk model to simulate insect search behavior. Results indicate that even moderate air pollutant levels (e.g., ozone mixing ratios greater than 60 parts per billion on a per volume basis, ppbv) substantially degrade floral volatiles and alter the chemical composition of released floral scents. As a result, insect success rates of locating plumes of floral scents were reduced and foraging times increased in polluted air masses due to considerable degradation and changes in the composition of floral scents. Results also indicate that plant-pollinator interactions could be sensitive to changes in floral scent composition, especially if insects are unable to adapt to the modified scentscape. The increase in foraging time could have severe cascading and pernicious impacts on the fitness of foraging insects by reducing the time devoted to other necessary tasks.

  1. Degradation of roxarsone in a silt loam soil and its toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tengfang; Ke, Zhengchen; Chen, Qing; Liu, Li; Chen, Guowei

    2014-10-01

    The land application of poultry or swine litter, containing large amounts of roxarsone, causes serious arsenic pollution in soil. Understanding biotransformation process of roxarsone and its potential risks favors proper disposal of roxarsone-contaminated animal litter, yet remains not achieved. We report an experimental study of biotransformation process of roxarsone in a silt loam soil under various soil moisture and temperature conditions, and the toxicity of roxarsone and its products from degradation. Results showed that soil moisture and higher temperature promoted roxarsone degradation, associating with emergent pentavalent arsenic. Analysis of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis activity revealed that roxarsone does not exert acute toxic on soil microbes. With the release of inorganic arsenic, FDA hydrolysis activity was inhibited gradually, as evidenced by ecotoxicological assessment using Photobacterium leiognathi. The results shade new lights on the dynamic roxarsone biotransformation processes in soil, which is important for guiding appropriate disposal of poultry or swine litter in the environment.

  2. Does metal pollution matter with C retention by rice soil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Rongjun; Cheng, Kun; Zheng, Jufeng; Liu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yongzhuo; Li, Zhipeng; Li, Lianqing; Smith, Pete; Pan, Genxing; Crowley, David; Zheng, Jinwei; Zhang, Xuhui; Zhang, Liangyun; Hussain, Qaiser

    2015-08-01

    Soil respiration, resulting in decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC), emits CO2 to the atmosphere and increases under climate warming. However, the impact of heavy metal pollution on soil respiration in croplands is not well understood. Here we show significantly increased soil respiration and efflux of both CO2 and CH4 with a concomitant reduction in SOC storage from a metal polluted rice soil in China. This change is linked to a decline in soil aggregation, in microbial abundance and in fungal dominance. The carbon release is presumably driven by changes in carbon cycling occurring in the stressed soil microbial community with heavy metal pollution in the soil. The pollution-induced increase in soil respiration and loss of SOC storage will likely counteract efforts to increase SOC sequestration in rice paddies for climate change mitigation.

  3. Does metal pollution matter with C retention by rice soil?

    PubMed

    Bian, Rongjun; Cheng, Kun; Zheng, Jufeng; Liu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yongzhuo; Li, Zhipeng; Li, Lianqing; Smith, Pete; Pan, Genxing; Crowley, David; Zheng, Jinwei; Zhang, Xuhui; Zhang, Liangyun; Hussain, Qaiser

    2015-08-14

    Soil respiration, resulting in decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC), emits CO2 to the atmosphere and increases under climate warming. However, the impact of heavy metal pollution on soil respiration in croplands is not well understood. Here we show significantly increased soil respiration and efflux of both CO2 and CH4 with a concomitant reduction in SOC storage from a metal polluted rice soil in China. This change is linked to a decline in soil aggregation, in microbial abundance and in fungal dominance. The carbon release is presumably driven by changes in carbon cycling occurring in the stressed soil microbial community with heavy metal pollution in the soil. The pollution-induced increase in soil respiration and loss of SOC storage will likely counteract efforts to increase SOC sequestration in rice paddies for climate change mitigation.

  4. [Degradation and adsorption behavior of napropamide in soils].

    PubMed

    Guo, Hua; Zhu, Hong-mei; Yang, Hong

    2008-06-01

    Chromatography (HPLC and GC-MS) and spectroscopy (UV and FT-IR) methods were conducted to study the degradation and adsorption behavior of napropamide in soils. Influence factors of degradation, degradation products and adsorption mechanism were analyzed. The results showed that degradation rate of napropamide increased with enhancing temperature (15-35 degrees C) and organic matter content in soil was the most important factor which influenced the degradation half-life of napropamide in soil, and their relative coefficient (r) reached 0.9794. The degradation half-life of napropamide in sterilized soil was almost 3-fold of that in non-sterilized soil, and soil microorganisms were contributed to the degradation of napropamide. The probable degradation products were N-methyl-2-(1-naphthoxy)-propionamide and N-ethyl-2-(1-naphthoxy)-propionamide. The possible degradation pathways were dealkylation. Adsorption isoterms of napropamide on three soils such as Yellow-brown soil, Latersol and Black Soil could be described by Freundlich equation with the corresponding adsorption coefficient (Kf) of 1.29, 3.43 and 13.36, and the adsorption free energy (delta G) of napropamide on the three soils was less than 40 kJ x mol(-1) which largely resulted from the physical adsorption involving in hydrogen-bonding, hydrophobic bonding, coordination and van der waal force. Comparison to the FT-IR spectra of the three soils, the results certificated that the sorption capacity of three soils was Black Soil > Latersol > Yellow-brown Soil. PMID:18763531

  5. Enhanced microbial degradation of deethylatrazine in atrazine-history soils

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, E.L.; Chaplin, J.A.; Anderson, T.A.

    1995-12-01

    Persistence and degradation of deethylatrazine, the primary metabolite of atrazine, was measured in soil with atrazine history (15 consecutive years of atrazine application) and no atrazine history (no atrazine application for 15 consecutive years). Uniformly ring-labeled {sup 14}C-deethylatrazine was applied to surface and subsurface soils for metabolism studies. After 60 d of incubation, mineralization of deethylatrazine to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in the atrazine-history surface soil was twice that in the no-history surface soils (34% and 17% of the applied {sup 14}C, respectively). In surface soils, 25% of the applied {sup 14}C remained as deethylatrazine in the atrazine-history soil, compared with 35% in the no-history soil. Microbial plate counts indicated an increase in numbers of bacteria and fungi in soils incubated with deethylatrazine compared to control soils. Total microbial biomass of soils incubated with deethylatrazine, as determined by CO{sub 2} efflux using an infrared (IR) gas analyzer, showed no significant difference between atrazine-history, and no-history soil, but did show an increase above untreated control soils. Prior to treating soils with deethylatrazine, specific deethylatrazine degraders were quantified using a {sup 14}C-most-probable-number procedure. Deethylatrazine degraders were more numerous in atrazine-history surface soil compared to no-history surface soil. After incubation of soils with deethylatrazine, deethylatrazine degraders were more numerous in both history soils as compared to control soils. From these studies, it appears that deethylatrazine is degraded microbially to a greater extent in soils that have had long-term exposure to atrazine at field application rates compared to soils with no long-term exposure. Decreased persistence of this major metabolite of atrazine in atrazine-history soils is important in that there will be less available for movement in surface runoff and to groundwater.

  6. Degradation of metribuzin in two soil types of Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Randa; Coste, Camille M; Kawar, Nasri S

    2006-01-01

    The degradation of metribuzin [4-amino-6-tert-butyl-3-methylthio-1,2,4-triazin-5(4H)-one] as influenced by soil type, temperature, humidity, organic fertilizers, soil sterilization, and ultra-violet radiation was studied in two soil types of Lebanon under laboratory conditions. The two soil types were sandy loam and clay. Deamination of metribuzin in the sandy loam soil to its deaminometribuzin (DA) derivative was basically a result of biological activity. In the clay soil the first metabolite diketometribuzin (DK) was a result of oxidative desulfuration, while diketo-deaminometribuzin (DADK) was the product of reductive deamination. The two soils represented major differences in the pesticide transformation processes. Photodecomposition on the soil surface and in aqueous media was also an important process in the degradation of metribuzin. Furthermore, the increase in soil organic matter enhanced degradation. PMID:16893770

  7. Involvement of microorganisms in accelerated degradation of EPTC in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, A.; Rubin, B.; Katan, J. ); Aharonson, N. )

    1990-04-01

    Accelerated EPTC (S-ethyl dipropylcarbamothioate) degradation was confirmed in a mixed culture of microorganisms derived from a soil with enhanced degradation (history soil) by using {sup 14}C-labeled EPTC. The antibacterial agent chloramphenicol (D-({minus})-threo-2,2-dichloro-N-({beta}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(hydroxymethyl)-p-nitrophenethyl)acetamide) markedly suppressed {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolution while the antifungal agent cycloheximide (4-((2R)-2((1S,3S,5S)-3,5-dimethyl-2-oxocyclohexyl)-2-hydroxyethyl)glutarimide) did not, suggesting that soil bacteria play a significant role in enhanced EPTC degradation. A fast EPTC bacterial degrader (FD1) strain and a slower one (SD1), which were isolated by a soil enrichment technique from a history soil, were capable of utilizing EPTC as a sole carbon source. Vernolate (S-propyl dipropylcarbamothioate), butylate (S-ethyl bis(2-methylpropyl)carbamothioate), or cycloate (S-ethyl cyclohexylethylcarbamothioate) were also degraded by these bacteria in a pattern similar to that in a soil with enhanced degradation. Inoculation of nonhistory soil with FD1 strain induced accelerated degradation of the herbicide in the soil at rates similar to those in field soils exhibiting EPTC accelerated degradation.

  8. Interactions of earthworms with Atrazine-degrading bacteria in an agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Kersanté, Anne; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Soulas, Guy; Binet, Françoise

    2006-08-01

    In the last 10 years, accelerated mineralization of Atrazine (2-chloro-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) has been evidenced in agricultural soils repeatedly treated with this herbicide. Here, we report on the interaction between earthworms, considered as soil engineers, and the Atrazine-degrading community. The impact of earthworm macrofauna on Atrazine mineralization was assessed in representative soil microsites of earthworm activities (gut contents, casts, burrow linings). Soil with or without earthworms, namely the anecic species Lumbricus terrestris and the endogenic species Aporrectodea caliginosa, was either inoculated or not inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. ADP, an Atrazine-degrading strain, and was either treated or not treated with Atrazine. The structure of the bacterial community, the Atrazine-degrading activity and the abundance of atzA, B and C sequences in soil microsites were investigated. Atrazine mineralization was found to be reduced in representative soil microsites of earthworm activities. Earthworms significantly affected the structure of soil bacterial communities. They also reduced the size of the inoculated population of Pseudomonas sp. ADP, thereby contributing to the diminution of the Atrazine-degrading genetic potential in representative soil microsites of earthworm activities. This study illustrates the regulation produced by the earthworms on functional bacterial communities involved in the fate of organic pollutants in soils. PMID:16867138

  9. Interactions of earthworms with Atrazine-degrading bacteria in an agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Kersanté, Anne; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Soulas, Guy; Binet, Françoise

    2006-08-01

    In the last 10 years, accelerated mineralization of Atrazine (2-chloro-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) has been evidenced in agricultural soils repeatedly treated with this herbicide. Here, we report on the interaction between earthworms, considered as soil engineers, and the Atrazine-degrading community. The impact of earthworm macrofauna on Atrazine mineralization was assessed in representative soil microsites of earthworm activities (gut contents, casts, burrow linings). Soil with or without earthworms, namely the anecic species Lumbricus terrestris and the endogenic species Aporrectodea caliginosa, was either inoculated or not inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. ADP, an Atrazine-degrading strain, and was either treated or not treated with Atrazine. The structure of the bacterial community, the Atrazine-degrading activity and the abundance of atzA, B and C sequences in soil microsites were investigated. Atrazine mineralization was found to be reduced in representative soil microsites of earthworm activities. Earthworms significantly affected the structure of soil bacterial communities. They also reduced the size of the inoculated population of Pseudomonas sp. ADP, thereby contributing to the diminution of the Atrazine-degrading genetic potential in representative soil microsites of earthworm activities. This study illustrates the regulation produced by the earthworms on functional bacterial communities involved in the fate of organic pollutants in soils.

  10. Degradation of fuel oil in salt marsh soils affected by the Prestige oil spill.

    PubMed

    Vega, Flora A; Covelo, Emma F; Reigosa, Manuel J; Andrade, María Luisa

    2009-07-30

    We assessed natural degradation of fuel oil in three marshes from Galicia (Spain) affected by the Prestige oil spill (Baldaio, Barizo, and Muxía). Soil samples collected from polluted and unpolluted areas on four different dates were used to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon content and fuel-oil components. Natural degradation was monitored by analysing changes in the proportion of saturated hydrocarbons, aromatics, asphaltenes and resins in the soils, and also by evaluating the degree of depletion of saturated hydrocarbons on each sampling date. We additionally assessed the phytoremediation potential of Lolium perenne, L., Convolvulus arvensis L. and Raphanus raphanistrum L. All marsh soils exhibited natural degradation of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons to between 85 and 95% in most cases. In contrast, asphaltenes and resins were degraded to a lesser extent (viz. 64-76% in Barizo 1, Muxía and Traba; 39-44% in Baldaio; and only 12% in Barizo 2, where flooding by the river continues to introduce balls of fuel oil into the soil). Monitoring analyses revealed natural degradation to be dependent on the thickness of the pollutant layer. Field plots sown with L. perenne L. exhibited no significant differences in fuel-oil degradation from untreated plots.

  11. Potential of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterial Isolates to Contribute to Soil Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Chirima, George Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon- (PAH-) polluted sites is presently a major challenge in agroforestry. Consequently, microorganisms with PAH-degradation ability and soil fertility improvement attributes are sought after in order to achieve sustainable remediation of polluted sites. This study isolated PAH-degrading bacteria from enriched cultures of spent automobile engine-oil polluted soil. Isolates' partial 16S rRNA genes were sequenced and taxonomically classified. Isolates were further screened for their soil fertility attributes such as phosphate solubilization, atmospheric nitrogen fixation, and indoleacetic acid (IAA) production. A total of 44 isolates were obtained and belong to the genera Acinetobacter, Arthrobacter, Bacillus, Flavobacterium, Microbacterium, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Pseudoxanthomonas, Rhodococcus, and Stenotrophomonas. Data analysed by principal component analysis showed the Bacillus and Ochrobactrum isolates displayed outstanding IAA production. Generalized linear modelling statistical approaches were applied to evaluate the contribution of the four most represented genera (Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Arthrobacter, and Rhodococcus) to soil fertility. The Pseudomonas isolates were the most promising in all three soil fertility enhancement traits evaluated and all isolates showed potential for one or more of the attributes evaluated. These findings demonstrate a clear potential of the isolates to participate in restorative bioremediation of polluted soil, which will enhance sustainable agricultural production and environmental protection. PMID:27774456

  12. Utilization of microwave energy for decontamination of oil polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Iordache, Daniela; Niculae, Dumitru; Francisc, Ioan Hathazi

    2010-01-01

    Soil oil (petroleum) product pollution represents a great environmental threat as it may contaminate the neighboring soils and surface and underground water. Liquid fuel contamination may occur anywhere during oil (petroleum) product transportation, storing, handling and utilization. The polluted soil recovery represents a complex process due to the wide range of physical, chemical and biological properties of soils which should be analyzed in connection with the study of the contaminated soil behavior under the microwave field action. The soil, like any other non-metallic material, can be heated through microwave energy absorption due to the dielectric losses, expressed by its dielectric complex constant. Oil polluted soil behaves differently in a microwave field depending on the nature, structure and amount of the polluting fuel. Decontamination is performed through volatilization and retrieval of organic contaminant volatile components. After decontamination only a soil fixed residue remains, which cannot penetrate the underground anymore. In carrying out the soil recovery process by means of this technology we should also consider the soil characteristics such as: the soil type, temperature, moisture.The first part of the paper presents the theoretical aspects relating to the behavior of the polluted soil samples in the microwave field, as well as their relating experimental data. The experimental data resulting from the analysis of soils with a different level of pollution point out that the degree of pollutant recovery is high, contributing to changing the initial classification of soils from the point of view of pollution. The paper graphically presents the levels of microwave generated and absorbed power in soil samples, soil temperature during experimentations, specific processing parameters in a microwave field. It also presents the constructive solution of the microwave equipment designed for the contaminated soil in situ treatment.

  13. Degradation of plant cuticles in soils: impact on formation and sorptive ability of humin-mineral matrices.

    PubMed

    Olshansky, Yaniv; Polubesova, Tamara; Chefetz, Benny

    2015-05-01

    Plant cuticles are important precursors for soil organic matter, in particular for soil humin, which is considered an efficient sorbent for organic pollutants. In this study, we examined degradation and transformation of cuticles isolated from fruit and leaves in loamy sand and sandy clay loessial arid brown soils. We then studied sorption of phenanthrene and carbamazepine to humin-mineral matrices isolated from the incubated soils. Low degradation (22%) was observed for agave cuticle in a sandy clay soil system, whereas high degradation (68-78%) was obtained for agave cuticle in a loamy sand soil system and for loamy sand and sandy clay soils amended with tomato cuticle. During incubation, most of the residual organic matter was accumulated in the humin fraction. Sorption of phenanthrene was significantly higher for humin-mineral matrices obtained from soils incubated with plant cuticles as compared with soils without cuticle application. Sorption of carbamazepine to humin-mineral matrices was not affected by cuticle residues. Cooperative sorption of carbamazepine on humin-mineral matrices isolated from sandy clay soil is suggested. Sorption-desorption hysteresis of both phenanthrene and carbamazepine was lower for humin-mineral matrices obtained from soils incubated with plant cuticles as compared with nonamended soils. Our results show that cuticle composition significantly affects the rate and extent of cuticle degradation in soils and that plant cuticle application influences sorption and desorption of polar and nonpolar pollutants by humin-mineral matrices. PMID:26024265

  14. Soil organic matter degradability in four Japanese forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, K.; Koarashi, J.; Atarashi-Andoh, M.; Moriizumi, J.; Yamazawa, H.; Ishizuka, S.

    2011-12-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the largest carbon reservoir in terrestrial ecosystems, and CO2 emission derived from SOC decomposition is considered to strongly influence atmospheric CO2 concentration. Therefore, it is important to understand what factors control the process of SOC decomposition. We studied the temperature sensitivity of SOC decomposition in forest surface soils by an incubation experiment at two temperatures. Soil samples were collected from the top 20 cm of mineral soils at four forest sites in Japan: AP (Appi: 40°00'N, 140°56'E), US (Ushiku: 35°57'N, 140°10'E), OG (Ogawa: 36°56'N, 140°35'E), and HO (Hitsujigaoka: 43°59'N, 141°23'E). The soil samples were sieved with a 4 mm-mesh and remaining roots in the samples were carefully removed by hand. Approximately a 75 g dry weight equivalent of the sample was adjusted to 50% of water holding capacity and put into a 1 L jar. Triplicate jars were enclosed after flushing their headspaces with CO2-free air and incubated at temperatures of 10°C and 20°C, respectively. We periodically collected 1 mL of headspace gas from the jars to measure CO2 concentration using a gas chromatograph. When the CO2 concentration in each jar reached 1.5% in volume, the headspace gas in the jar was collected to measure carbon isotope ratio of the CO2, and then the headspace of the jar was re-flushed and continued to incubate. The SOC decomposition rate at 20°C was consistently higher than that at 10°C, the order of which was AP ≤ US ≤ OG < HO. This order did not correspond to the orders of both mean annual temperature at the sites (AP < HO < OG < US), and total organic carbon content per dry soil weight (HO < US < AP < OG). Our result suggests that field temperature does not exert predominant control over SOC degradability in Japanese forest surface soils. Q10 values obtained for the AP, US, and OG soils was initially approximately 3 and increased up to 4 after one month of incubation. The increase in Q10 value

  15. Pyrethroid-Degrading Microorganisms and Their Potential for the Bioremediation of Contaminated Soils: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Cycoń, Mariusz; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides have been used to control pests in agriculture, forestry, horticulture, public health and for indoor home use for more than 20 years. Because pyrethroids were considered to be a safer alternative to organophosphate pesticides (OPs), their applications significantly increased when the use of OPs was banned or limited. Although, pyrethroids have agricultural benefits, their widespread and continuous use is a major problem as they pollute the terrestrial and aquatic environments and affect non-target organisms. Since pyrethroids are not degraded immediately after application and because their residues are detected in soils, there is an urgent need to remediate pyrethroid-polluted environments. Various remediation technologies have been developed for this purpose; however, bioremediation, which involves bioaugmentation and/or biostimulation and is a cost-effective and eco-friendly approach, has emerged as the most advantageous method for cleaning-up pesticide-contaminated soils. This review presents an overview of the microorganisms that have been isolated from pyrethroid-polluted sites, characterized and applied for the degradation of pyrethroids in liquid and soil media. The paper is focused on the microbial degradation of the pyrethroids that have been most commonly used for many years such as allethrin, bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, fenpropathrin, fenvalerate, and permethrin. Special attention is given to the bacterial strains from the genera Achromobacter, Acidomonas, Bacillus, Brevibacterium, Catellibacterium, Clostridium, Lysinibacillus, Micrococcus, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Serratia, Sphingobium, Streptomyces, and the fungal strains from the genera Aspergillus, Candida, Cladosporium, and Trichoderma, which are characterized by their ability to degrade various pyrethroids. Moreover, the current knowledge on the degradation pathways of pyrethroids, the enzymes that are involved in the cleavage of

  16. Pyrethroid-Degrading Microorganisms and Their Potential for the Bioremediation of Contaminated Soils: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Cycoń, Mariusz; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides have been used to control pests in agriculture, forestry, horticulture, public health and for indoor home use for more than 20 years. Because pyrethroids were considered to be a safer alternative to organophosphate pesticides (OPs), their applications significantly increased when the use of OPs was banned or limited. Although, pyrethroids have agricultural benefits, their widespread and continuous use is a major problem as they pollute the terrestrial and aquatic environments and affect non-target organisms. Since pyrethroids are not degraded immediately after application and because their residues are detected in soils, there is an urgent need to remediate pyrethroid-polluted environments. Various remediation technologies have been developed for this purpose; however, bioremediation, which involves bioaugmentation and/or biostimulation and is a cost-effective and eco-friendly approach, has emerged as the most advantageous method for cleaning-up pesticide-contaminated soils. This review presents an overview of the microorganisms that have been isolated from pyrethroid-polluted sites, characterized and applied for the degradation of pyrethroids in liquid and soil media. The paper is focused on the microbial degradation of the pyrethroids that have been most commonly used for many years such as allethrin, bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, cyhalothrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, fenpropathrin, fenvalerate, and permethrin. Special attention is given to the bacterial strains from the genera Achromobacter, Acidomonas, Bacillus, Brevibacterium, Catellibacterium, Clostridium, Lysinibacillus, Micrococcus, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Serratia, Sphingobium, Streptomyces, and the fungal strains from the genera Aspergillus, Candida, Cladosporium, and Trichoderma, which are characterized by their ability to degrade various pyrethroids. Moreover, the current knowledge on the degradation pathways of pyrethroids, the enzymes that are involved in the cleavage of

  17. Analyzing a priority pollutant in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Frederick, R.M.

    1996-04-01

    Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (2-EHP), a priority pollutant, is used extensively in plastic products as a plasticizer. Because of the wide-spread use of plastics, 2-EHP is found in almost all solid wastes. A rapid extraction and screening procedure for bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate from soil has been developed. In a recent exploratory study involving remediation of contaminated soil using an ultrasonic process, a large number of chemical analyses were required to monitor the effect of several process variables on the residual concentration of 2-EHP in the test soil. The analyses did not require a high degree of accuracy, but needed to be fairly rapid and reproducible. The conventional chromatographic procedures, if used for this study, would be both time-intensive and costly and would seriously restrict the amount of data obtained from this small-scale investigative effort. In this study, a large number of samples were being screened to determine the effectiveness of the ultrasonic process and identify critical process variables. Therefore, a rapid and reproducible analytical procedure for 2-EHP was needed. An alternative analytical procedure using methanol extraction and UV-visible spectroscopy was employed for the bulk of the samples. However, the conventional chromatographic procedure also was used to verify selected data points and provide a measure of comparability between the two techniques.

  18. [Tendencies of nematodes communities to recover after soil cover degradation].

    PubMed

    Gruzdeva, L I; Sushchuk, A A

    2010-01-01

    The way nematodes form communities on a new substrate after complete soil and plant cover degradation is studied on a model of industrial dumping. It is revealed that recovery of soil cover after degradation begins with invasion of mainly the upper soil horizon by nematodes. At the early stages, species that are resistant to unfavorable environmental conditions dominate (bacteriophages), next the abundances of carnivores and nematodes that are connected with plants increase, which indicates the process of biocenosis regeneration. PMID:21275095

  19. Isothermal titration calorimetry - a new method for the quantification of microbial degradation of trace pollutants.

    PubMed

    Mariana, F; Buchholz, F; Harms, H; Yong, Z; Yao, J; Maskow, T

    2010-07-01

    The environmental fate and, in particular, biodegradation rates of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOC) are of high interest due to the ubiquity, persistence, and potential health effects of these compounds. HOC tend to interact with bioreactor materials and sampling devices and are frequently volatile, so that conventionally derived degradation parameters are often biased. We report on the development and validation of a novel calorimetric approach that serves to gain real time information on the kinetics and the physiology of HOC bioconversion in aqueous systems while overcoming weaknesses of conventional biodegradation experiments. Soil bacteria Mycobacterium frederiksbergense LB501T, Rhodococcus erythropolis K2-3 and Pseudomonas putida G7 were exposed to pulsed titrations of dissolved anthracene, 4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)butyric acid or naphthalene, respectively, and the thermal responses were monitored. The combinations of strains and pollutants were selected as examples for complete and partial biodegradation and complete degradation with storage product formation, respectively. Heat production signals were interpreted thermodynamically and in terms of Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The half-saturation constant k(D) and the degradation rate r(D)(Max) were derived. Comparison with conventional methods shows the suitability to extract kinetic degradation parameters of organic trace pollutants from simple ITC experiments, while thermodynamic interpretation provided further information about the metabolic fate of HOC compounds.

  20. Loading of water and soil by pollutants in Shelby County

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavan, K. )

    1990-10-01

    Our environment is constantly being polluted by humans and animals. Pollution is increased by modern practices, such as the use of pesticides, herbicides and other chemicals. The number of household pets in the US is increasing and they add to the pollution. In a city, such as Memphis, where production of chemical compounds is relatively high, the pollution of the environment may grow worse unless concerted efforts are made to control it. This study was undertaken to indicate the possible extent of pollution of the surface soil in and near Memphis. Runoff contributes to the pollution of the waterways and their ultimate resting sites. So, water analyses are useful indicators of pollution.

  1. Hydrocarbon degradation in soils and methods for soil biotreatment.

    PubMed

    Morgan, P; Watkinson, R J

    1989-01-01

    The cleanup of soils and groundwater contaminated with hydrocarbons is of particular importance in minimizing the environmental impact of petroleum and petroleum products and in preventing contamination of potable water supplies. Consequently, there is a growing industry involved in the treatment of contaminated topsoils, subsoils, and groundwater. The biotreatment methodologies employed for decontamination are designed to enhance in situ degradation by the supply of oxygen, inorganic nutrients, and/or microbial inocula to the contaminated zone. This review considers the fate and effects of hydrocarbon contaminants in terrestrial environments, with particular reference to the factors that limit biodegradation rates. The potential efficiencies, advantages, and disadvantages of biotreatment techniques are discussed and the future research directions necessary for process development are considered.

  2. Degradation dynamics of flubendiamide in different types of soils.

    PubMed

    Paramasivam, M; Banerjee, Hemanta

    2012-04-01

    Residual dynamics of flubendiamide in three different types of soils were investigated under laboratory condition. Flubendiamide was applied at 5 and 10 μg g(-1) for each soil and samples drawn periodically were analyzed on HPLC. The results showed that the degradation of flubendiamide in soils were followed first-order kinetics and its average half-lives in three kinds of soils were ranged from 37.62 to 60.21 days. The persistence of flubendiamide in soils significantly increased in the order of coastal soil > red and lateritic soil > new alluvial.

  3. Soil solution sensitivity to low pollution load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbacheva, Tamara; Kikuchi, Ryunosuke

    2014-05-01

    Murmansk region (Russian Federation) is included in environmental hot spots list (2003 report of NEFCO and AMAP). Annual emissions of SO2 from stationary sources (largest is Kola Mining and Metallurgical Company) and autotransport decreased in XXI century and sustained (tons) as: 282942 (2000); 2002 - 249400 (2002); 240110 (2003); 225573 (2005); 217872 (2006); 215910 (2007); 206910 (2008); 211210 (2009); 21554 (2010); 199500 (2011); 194600 (2012). Kola Peninsula terrestrial ecosystems tolerance to atmospheric S deposition was assessed on the basis of the critical load concept: most sensitive ecosystems (critical sulfur load less 400 equiv per ha per year) occupy 58% of the total area; zones at risk of excess sulfur input into ecosystems cover more than 20% of the Kola Peninsula (Koptsik et al., 2008). We attempted to estimate soil solution sensitivity to long-term, but low pollution load by sulfur dioxide in southwest direction from Monchegorsk smelter: (1) - 260 km away, 66o50,45'N; 30o 12,34'E) and (2) - 100 km away, 67o22,837'N; 32o26,016'E). The investigations were carried out during 2003-2008 period on permanent monitoring plots of INEP equipped by deposition collectors and zero-tension lyzimeters. Monitoring plots are located in similar native conditions: Site altitude - 170 m (2) vrs. 132 m (1); Forest type - Piceetum empetroso-myrtillosum-hylocomiosa; Stand history- no thining, no fires; Silvicultural history - no. Soil properties are similar too: Soil type (FAO) - ferric podzol (both plots); organic layer thickness 0-16cm (2) vrs. 0-11cm (1), E horizon thickness 16-27cm (2) vrs. 11-22cm (1), B horizon 27-51cm (2) vrs. 22-47 cm (1); parent material - glacial till (both plots). Plots are differed by annual sulfate pollution load (estimated as snow plus rain): 0.09-0.26 gm-2 (1) vrs. 0.14-0.43 gm-2(2), but both plots are refered to background plots. So, background modelled data of S deposition in the Border Areas of Norway and Russia is 0.1 - 0.2 gm-2

  4. Carbaryl degradation by bacterial isolates from a soil ecosystem of the Gaza Strip.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Mazen; Matar, Ammar; Bashir, Abdallah

    2015-01-01

    Carbaryl is an important and widely used insecticide that pollutes soil and water systems. Bacteria from the local soil ecosystem of the Gaza Strip capable of utilizing carbaryl as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen were isolated and identified as belonging to Bacillus, Morganella, Pseudomonas, Aeromonas and Corynebacterium genera. Carbaryl biodegradation by Bacillus, Morganella and Corynebacterium isolates was analyzed in minimal liquid media supplemented with carbaryl as the only source of carbon and nitrogen. Bacillus and Morganella exhibited 94.6% and 87.3% carbaryl degradation, respectively, while Corynebacterium showed only moderate carbaryl degradation at 48.8%. These results indicate that bacterial isolates from a local soil ecosystem in the Gaza Strip are able to degrade carbaryl and can be used to decrease the risk of environmental contamination by this insecticide. PMID:26691466

  5. Carbaryl degradation by bacterial isolates from a soil ecosystem of the Gaza Strip

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Mazen; Matar, Ammar; Bashir, Abdallah

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Carbaryl is an important and widely used insecticide that pollutes soil and water systems. Bacteria from the local soil ecosystem of the Gaza Strip capable of utilizing carbaryl as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen were isolated and identified as belonging to Bacillus, Morganella, Pseudomonas, Aeromonas and Corynebacterium genera. Carbaryl biodegradation by Bacillus, Morganella and Corynebacterium isolates was analyzed in minimal liquid media supplemented with carbaryl as the only source of carbon and nitrogen. Bacillus and Morganella exhibited 94.6% and 87.3% carbaryl degradation, respectively, while Corynebacterium showed only moderate carbaryl degradation at 48.8%. These results indicate that bacterial isolates from a local soil ecosystem in the Gaza Strip are able to degrade carbaryl and can be used to decrease the risk of environmental contamination by this insecticide. PMID:26691466

  6. Nitroglycerin degradation mediated by soil organic carbon under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Geneviève; Martel, Richard; Bamba, Abraham N'Valoua; Blais, Jean-François; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia

    2014-10-01

    The presence of nitroglycerin (NG) has been reported in shallow soils and pore water of several military training ranges. In this context, NG concentrations can be reduced through various natural attenuation processes, but these have not been thoroughly documented. This study aimed at investigating the role of soil organic matter (SOM) in the natural attenuation of NG, under aerobic conditions typical of shallow soils. The role of SOM in NG degradation has already been documented under anoxic conditions, and was attributed to SOM-mediated electron transfer involving different reducing agents. However, unsaturated soils are usually well-oxygenated, and it was not clear whether SOM could participate in NG degradation under these conditions. Our results from batch- and column-type experiments clearly demonstrate that in presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) leached from a natural soil, partial NG degradation can be achieved. In presence of particulate organic matter (POM) from the same soil, complete NG degradation was achieved. Furthermore, POM caused rapid sorption of NG, which should result in NG retention in the organic matter-rich shallow horizons of the soil profile, thus promoting degradation. Based on degradation products, the reaction pathway appears to be reductive, in spite of the aerobic conditions. The relatively rapid reaction rates suggest that this process could significantly participate in the natural attenuation of NG, both on military training ranges and in contaminated soil at production facilities.

  7. Detection of explosives and their degradation products in soil environments.

    PubMed

    Halasz, A; Groom, C; Zhou, E; Paquet, L; Beaulieu, C; Deschamps, S; Corriveau, A; Thiboutot, S; Ampleman, G; Dubois, C; Hawari, Jalal

    2002-07-19

    Polynitro organic explosives [hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT)] are typical labile environmental pollutants that can biotransform with soil indigenous microorganisms, photodegrade by sunlight and migrate through subsurface soil to cause groundwater contamination. To be able to determine the type and concentration of explosives and their (bio)transformation products in different soil environments, a comprehensive analytical methodology of sample preparation, separation and detection is thus required. The present paper describes the use of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2), acetonitrile (MeCN) (US Environmental Protection Agency Method 8330) and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) for the extraction of explosives and their degradation products from various water, soil and plant tissue samples for subsequent analysis by either HPLC-UV, capillary electrophoresis (CE-UV) or GC-MS. Contaminated surface and subsurface soil and groundwater were collected from either a TNT manufacturing facility or an anti-tank firing range. Plant tissue samples were taken fromplants grown in anti-tank firing range soil in a greenhouse experiment. All tested soil and groundwater samples from the former TNT manufacturing plant were found to contain TNT and some of its amino reduced and partially denitrated products. Their concentrations as determined by SPME-GC-MS and LC-UV depended on the location of sampling at the site. In the case of plant tissues, SC-CO2 extraction followed by CE-UV analysis showed only the presence of HMX. The concentrations of HMX (<200 mg/kg) as determined by supercritical fluid extraction (SC-CO2)-CE-UV were comparable to those obtained by MeCN extraction, although the latter technique was found to be more efficient at higher concentrations (>300 mg/kg). Modifiers such as MeCN and water enhanced the SC-CO2 extractability of HMX from plant tissues.

  8. Degradation of the herbicide dichlobenil and its metabolite BAM in soils and subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Liselotte; Arildskov, Niels P; Larsen, Flemming; Aamand, Jens; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2007-01-30

    The worldwide used herbicide dichlobenil (2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile) has resulted in widespread presence of its metabolite 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) in surface water and groundwater. To evaluate the potential for natural attenuation of this BAM pollution in groundwater, we studied the degradation of BAM and dichlobenil in 16 samples of clayey till, unconsolidated sand and limestone, including sediments from both oxidized and reduced conditions. The degradation of dichlobenil occurred primarily in the upper few meters below surface, although dichlobenil was strongly sorbed to these sediments. However, the degradation of dichlobenil to BAM could not be correlated to either sorption, water chemistry, composition of soils or sediments. Degradation of dichlobenil to BAM was limited (<2% degraded) in the deeper unsaturated zones, and no degradation was observed in aquifer sediments. This illustrates, that dichlobenil transported to aquifers does not contribute to the BAM-contamination in aquifers. A small, but significant degradation of BAM was observed in the upper part of the unsaturated zones in sandy sediments, but no degradation was observed in the clayey till sediment or in the deeper unsaturated zones. The insignificant degradation of BAM in aquifer systems shows that BAM pollution detected in aquifers will appear for a long time; and consequently the potential for natural attenuation of BAM in aquifer systems is limited.

  9. Degradation rate of sodium fluoroacetate in three New Zealand soils.

    PubMed

    Northcott, Grant; Jensen, Dwayne; Ying, Lucia; Fisher, Penny

    2014-05-01

    The degradation rate of sodium fluoroacetate (SFA) was assessed in a laboratory microcosm study incorporating 3 New Zealand soil types under different temperature (5 °C, 10 °C, or 20 °C) and soil moisture (35% or 60% water holding capacity) conditions using guideline 307 from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. A combination of nonlabeled and radiolabeled (14) C-SFA was added to soil microcosms, with sampling and analysis protocols for soil, soil extracts, and evolved CO(2) established using liquid scintillation counting and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Degradation products of SFA and their rates of formation were similar in the 3 soil types. The major degradation pathway for SFA was through microbial degradation to the hydroxyl metabolite, hydroxyacetic acid, and microbial mineralization to CO(2), which constituted the major transformation product. Temperature, rather than soil type or moisture content, was the dominant factor affecting the rate of degradation. Soil treatments incubated at 20 °C displayed a more rapid loss of (14)C-SFA residues than lower temperature treatments. The transformation half-life (DT50) of SFA in the 3 soils increased with decreasing temperature, varying from 6 d to 8 d at 20 °C, 10 d to 21 d at 10 °C, and 22 d to 43 d at 5 °C.

  10. Bioremediation of crude oil polluted soil by the white rot fungus, Pleurotus tuberregium (Fr.) Sing.

    PubMed

    Isikhuemhen, Omoanghe S; Anoliefo, Geoffrey O; Oghale, Okelezo I

    2003-01-01

    Bioremediation has become an attractive alternative to physicochemical methods of remediation of polluted sites. White rot fungi (WRF) are increasingly being investigated and used in bioremediation, because of their ability to degrade an extremely diverse range of very persistent or toxic environmental pollutants. The white rot fungus, Pleurotus tuberregium, was examined for its ability to ameliorate crude oil polluted soil. This was inferred from the ability of the polluted soil to support seed germination and seedling growth in Vigna unguiculata, at 0, 7 and 14 days post treatment. Results obtained from the present study showed that bioremediation of soil contaminated with crude oil was possible, especially when the fungus had been allowed to establish and fully colonize the substrate mixed with the soil. There were significant improvements in % germination, plant height and root elongation values of test plants, when seeds were planted 14 days post soil treatment. At 1 to 5% crude oil pollution, % germination values were comparable with the values in control plants in the 14 days treatment, and significantly higher than values obtained in the day 0 treatment. Also, at the highest level of crude oil pollution (15%), there was about 25% improvement in % germination value over the 0 day treatment. This trend of improvement in values was also observed for plant height, root elongation and biomass accumulation as well as decreased total hydrocarbon content. PMID:12729043

  11. Degradation of 1,3-dichloropropene in aerobic soils

    SciTech Connect

    Batzer, F.; Balcer, J.L.; Wolt, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    The degradation of the soil fumigant, 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D), was investigated to determine its rate of degradation and the identify of metabolites in aerobic soils. Studies were conducted in the dark at 25{degrees}C with uniformly {sup 14}C-labeled 1,3-D at a concentration of approximately 100 ug/g on three soils: Wahiawa silty clay, Catlin silt loam and Fuquay loamy sand. Aerobic soil half-lives for 1,3-D were 1.8, 11.5 and 52.5 days on the Wahiawa silty clay, Catlin silt loam, and Fuquay loamy sand, respectively. Degradation of 1,3-D resulted in the formation of cis- and trans-3-chloroallyl alcohol, cis- and trans-3-chloroacrylic acid, numerous minor carboxylic acid metabolites, and carbon dioxide. In addition, there was also extensive incorporation of {sup 14}C labeled material into the soil organic matter of both soils.

  12. Influence of low- and high-frequency heating on biodegrading microorganisms in soil: microbial degradation.

    PubMed

    Roland, Ulf; Holzer, Frank; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    The influence of low-frequency (50 Hz) resistive and high-frequency (13.56 MHz, radio-frequency) dielectric heating in comparison to conventional heating on the microbial degradation of pollutants in soil was studied. The investigation of the biodegradation of model substances (benzoic acid, acetic acid, glucose, sodium acetate) added to a standard soil showed no significant influence of the electrical heating methods when compared with samples heated to the same temperature in a water bath. Therefore, a hindrance of the microbial degradation could be excluded as it was done for soil respiration in a previous study. This finding is especially relevant for the application of these electrical heating methods for thermally enhanced soil bioremediation as an option for making in situ or ex situ clean-up processes more efficient.

  13. Effect of biochar or activated carbon amendment on the volatilisation and biodegradation of organic soil pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, David; Meynet, Paola; Bushnaf, Khaled

    2013-04-01

    Biochar or activated carbon added to contaminated soil may temporarily reduce the volatilisation of organic pollutants by enhanced sorption. The long-term effect of sorbent amendments on the fate of volatile petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures (VPHs) will depend on the responses of the soil bacterial community members, especially those which may utilize VPHs as carbon substrates. We investigated the volatilisation and biodegradation of VPHs emanating from NAPL sources and migrating through one meter long columns containing unsaturated sandy soil with and without 2% biochar or activated carbon amendment. After 420 days, VPH volatilisation from AC amended soil was less than 10 percent of the cumulative VPH volatilisation flux from unamended soil. The cumulative CO2 volatilisation flux increased more slowly in AC amended soil, but was comparable to the untreated soil after 420 days. This indicated that the pollution attenuation over a 1 meter distance was improved by the AC amendment. Biochar was a weaker VPH sorbent than AC and had a lesser effect on the cumulative VPH and CO2 fluxes. We also investgated the predominant bacterial community responses in sandy soil to biochar and/or VPH addition with a factorially designed batch study, and by analyzing preserved soil samples. Biochar addition alone had only weak effects on soil bacterial communities, while VPH addition was a strong community structure shaping factor. The bacterial community effects of biochar-enhanced VPH sorption were moderated by the limited biomass carrying capacity of the sandy soil investigated which contained only low amounts of inorganic nitrogen. Several Pseudomonas spp., including Pseudomonas putida strains, became dominant in VPH polluted soil with and without biochar. The ability of these versatile VPH degraders to effectively regulate their metabolic pathways according to substrate availabilities may additionally have moderated bacterial community structure responses to the presence of biochar

  14. Impact of electrochemical treatment of soil washing solution on PAH degradation efficiency and soil respirometry.

    PubMed

    Mousset, Emmanuel; Huguenot, David; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Oturan, Nihal; Guibaud, Gilles; Esposito, Giovanni; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2016-04-01

    The remediation of a genuinely PAH-contaminated soil was performed, for the first time, through a new and complete investigation, including PAH extraction followed by advanced oxidation treatment of the washing solution and its recirculation, and an analysis of the impact of the PAH extraction on soil respirometry. The study has been performed on the remediation of genuine PAH-contaminated soil, in the following three steps: (i) PAH extraction with soil washing (SW) techniques, (ii) PAH degradation with an electro-Fenton (EF) process, and (iii) recirculation of the partially oxidized effluent for another SW cycle. The following criteria were monitored during the successive washing cycles: PAH extraction efficiency, PAH oxidation rates and yields, extracting agent recovery, soil microbial activity, and pH of soil. Two representative extracting agents were compared: hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) and a non-ionic surfactant, Tween(®) 80. Six PAH with different numbers of rings were monitored: acenaphthene (ACE), phenanthrene (PHE), fluoranthene (FLA), pyrene (PYR), benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), and benzo(g,h,i)perylene (BghiP). Tween(®) 80 showed much better PAH extraction efficiency (after several SW cycles) than HPCD, regardless of the number of washing cycles. Based on successive SW experiments, a new mathematical relation taking into account the soil/water partition coefficient (Kd*) was established, and could predict the amount of each PAH extracted by the surfactant with a good correlation with experimental results (R(2) > 0.975). More HPCD was recovered (89%) than Tween(®) 80 (79%), while the monitored pollutants were completely degraded (>99%) after 4 h and 8 h, respectively. Even after being washed with partially oxidized solutions, the Tween(®) 80 solutions extracted significantly more PAH than HPCD and promoted better soil microbial activity, with higher oxygen consumption rates. Moreover, neither the oxidation by-products nor the acidic media (p

  15. Impact of electrochemical treatment of soil washing solution on PAH degradation efficiency and soil respirometry.

    PubMed

    Mousset, Emmanuel; Huguenot, David; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Oturan, Nihal; Guibaud, Gilles; Esposito, Giovanni; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2016-04-01

    The remediation of a genuinely PAH-contaminated soil was performed, for the first time, through a new and complete investigation, including PAH extraction followed by advanced oxidation treatment of the washing solution and its recirculation, and an analysis of the impact of the PAH extraction on soil respirometry. The study has been performed on the remediation of genuine PAH-contaminated soil, in the following three steps: (i) PAH extraction with soil washing (SW) techniques, (ii) PAH degradation with an electro-Fenton (EF) process, and (iii) recirculation of the partially oxidized effluent for another SW cycle. The following criteria were monitored during the successive washing cycles: PAH extraction efficiency, PAH oxidation rates and yields, extracting agent recovery, soil microbial activity, and pH of soil. Two representative extracting agents were compared: hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) and a non-ionic surfactant, Tween(®) 80. Six PAH with different numbers of rings were monitored: acenaphthene (ACE), phenanthrene (PHE), fluoranthene (FLA), pyrene (PYR), benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), and benzo(g,h,i)perylene (BghiP). Tween(®) 80 showed much better PAH extraction efficiency (after several SW cycles) than HPCD, regardless of the number of washing cycles. Based on successive SW experiments, a new mathematical relation taking into account the soil/water partition coefficient (Kd*) was established, and could predict the amount of each PAH extracted by the surfactant with a good correlation with experimental results (R(2) > 0.975). More HPCD was recovered (89%) than Tween(®) 80 (79%), while the monitored pollutants were completely degraded (>99%) after 4 h and 8 h, respectively. Even after being washed with partially oxidized solutions, the Tween(®) 80 solutions extracted significantly more PAH than HPCD and promoted better soil microbial activity, with higher oxygen consumption rates. Moreover, neither the oxidation by-products nor the acidic media (p

  16. TREATMENT OF A PENTACHLOROPHENOL AND CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SOIL USING THE LIGNIN-DEGRADING FUNGUS PHANERO- CHAETE SORDIDA: A FIELD DEMONSTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of large-scale fungal bioaugmentation was evaluated by assessing the ability of the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete sordida to decrease the soil concentrations of pentachlorophenol (PCP) and 13 priority pollutant polynuclear aromatic (PNA) creosote component...

  17. Phytoremediation of petroleum-polluted soils: application of Polygonum aviculare and its root-associated (penetrated) fungal strains for bioremediation of petroleum-polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Mohsenzadeh, Fariba; Nasseri, Simin; Mesdaghinia, Alireza; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Zafari, Doustmorad; Khodakaramian, Gholam; Chehregani, Abdolkarim

    2010-05-01

    Petroleum-polluted soils are a common disaster in many countries. Bioremediation of oil contamination in soils is based on the stimulation of petroleum-hydrocarbon-degrading fungal and microbial communities. A field study was conducted in a petroleum-contaminated site to find petroleum-resistant plants and their root-associated fungal strains for use in bioremediation of petroleum-polluted soils. Results and observations showed that the amounts of petroleum pollution in nonvegetated soils were several times higher than in vegetated soils. Plants collected from petroleum-polluted areas were identified using morphological characters. Results indicated that seven plant species were growing on the contaminated sites: Alhaji cameleron L. (Fabaceae), Amaranthus retroflexus L. var. retroflexus (Amaranthaceae), Convolvulus arvensis L. (Convolvulaceae), Chrozophora hierosolymitana Spreg. (Euphorbiaceae), Noea mucronata L. (Boraginaceae), Poa sp. (Poaceae), and Polygonum aviculare L. (Polygonaceae). The root-associated fungi of each plant were determined and results showed the presence of 11 species that associated with and also penetrated the roots of plants growing in the polluted areas. Altenaria sp. was common to all of the plants and the others had species-specific distribution within the plants. The largest numbers of fungal species (six) were determined for P. aviculare and Poa sp. in polluted areas. However, the variation of fungal strains in the plants collected from petroleum-polluted areas was greater than for nonpolluted ones. Culture of fungi in oil-contaminated media showed that all the studied fungi were resistant to low petroleum pollution (1% v/v) and a few species, especially Fusarium species, showed resistance to higher petroleum pollution (10% v/v) and may be suitable for bioremediation in highly polluted areas. Bioremediation tests with P. aviculare, with and without fungal strains, showed that application of both the plant and its root-associated fungal

  18. Estimating the biodegradation of pesticide in soils by monitoring pesticide-degrading gene expression.

    PubMed

    Monard, Cécile; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Lima, Oscar; Devers-Lamrani, Marion; Binet, Françoise

    2013-04-01

    Assessing in situ microbial abilities of soils to degrade pesticides is of great interest giving insight in soil filtering capability, which is a key ecosystem function limiting pollution of groundwater. Quantification of pesticide-degrading gene expression by reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was tested as a suitable indicator to monitor pesticide biodegradation performances in soil. RNA extraction protocol was optimized to enhance the yield and quality of RNA recovered from soil samples to perform RT-qPCR assays. As a model, the activity of atrazine-degrading communities was monitored using RT-qPCRs to estimate the level of expression of atzD in five agricultural soils showing different atrazine mineralization abilities. Interestingly, the relative abundance of atzD mRNA copy numbers was positively correlated to the maximum rate and to the maximal amount of atrazine mineralized. Our findings indicate that the quantification of pesticide-degrading gene expression may be suitable to assess biodegradation performance in soil and monitor natural attenuation of pesticide.

  19. DEGRADATION AND MIGRATION OF VINCLOZOLIN IN SAND AND SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The migration of the dicarboximide fungicide vinclozolin and its principal degradation products through porous media was experimentally determined by simulating pesticide applications to a 23-30 mesh Ottawa sand and a North Carolina Piedmont, aquic hapludult soil in laboratory ...

  20. Comparison of electrodialytic removal of Cu from spiked kaolinite, spiked soil and industrially polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M; Lepkova, Katarina; Kubal, Martin

    2006-09-01

    Electrokinetic remediation methods for removal of heavy metals from polluted soils have been subjected for quite intense research during the past years since these methods are well suitable for fine-grained soils where other remediation methods fail. Electrodialytic remediation is an electrokinetic remediation method which is based on applying an electric dc field and the use of ion exchange membranes that ensures the main transport of heavy metals to be out of the pollutes soil. An experimental investigation was made with electrodialytic removal of Cu from spiked kaolinite, spiked soil and industrially polluted soil under the same operational conditions (constant current density 0.2 mA/cm(2) and duration 28 days). The results of the present paper show that caution must be taken when generalising results obtained in spiked kaolinite to remediation of industrially polluted soils, as it was shown that the removal rate was higher in kaolinite than in both spiked soil and industrial polluted soil. The duration of spiking was found to be an important factor too, when attempting to relate remediation of spiked soil or kaolinite to remediation of industrially polluted soils. Spiking for 2 days was too short. However, spiking for 30 days resulted in a pattern that was more similar to that of industrially polluted soils with similar compositions both regarding sequential extraction and electrodialytic remediation result, though the remediation still progressed slightly faster in the spiked soil. Generalisation of remediation results to a variety of soil types must on the other hand be done with caution since the remediation results of different industrially polluted soils were very different. In one soil a total of 76% Cu was removed and in another soil no Cu was removed only redistributed within the soil. The factor with the highest influence on removal success was soil pH, which must be low in order to mobilize Cu, and thus the buffering capacity against acidification was

  1. The Degradation of Organic Pollutants by Bubble Discharge in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Linan; Wang, Yongjun; Ren, Zhijun; Liu, Guifang; Kang, Kai

    2013-10-01

    Organic pollutants could be degraded by using bubble discharge in water with gas aeration in the discharge reactor and more plasma can be generated in the discharge process. When pulsed high voltage was applied between electrodes with gas aerated into the reactor, it showed that bubbles were broken, which meant that breakdown took place. It could also be observed that the removal rate of phenol increased with increasing discharge voltage or pulse frequency, and with reducing initial phenol concentration or solution electric conductivity. It could remove more amount of phenol by oxygen aeration. With increasing oxygen flow rate, the removal rate increased. There was little difference with air or nitrogen aeration for phenol removal. The solution temperature after discharge increased to a great extent. However, this part of energy consumption did not contribute to the reaction, which led to a reduction in the energy utilization efficiency.

  2. Nanoscale zerovalent iron-mediated degradation of DDT in soil.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuling; Shi, Nan; Wang, Huifang; Pan, Xiong; Fang, Hua; Yu, Yunlong

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI)-mediated degradation of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) was investigated in a spiked soil under different conditions (iron sources, iron dosage, soil moisture, temperature, and soil types) and DDT-contaminated field. The degradation efficiency of p,p'-DDT by nZVI and nZVI coated with sodium oleate (SO-nZVI) was much higher than that by nZVI coated with polyimide (PI-nZVI). The rapid degradation of p,p'-DDT by nZVI only occurred in flooded soil. The degradation half-life of p,p'-DDT decreased significantly from 58.3 to 27.6 h with nZVI dosage from 0.5 to 2.0% and from 46.5 to 32.0 h with temperature from 15 to 35 °C. The degradation efficiency of p,p'-DDT by nZVI differed in Jinhua (JH), Jiaxing (JX), Xiaoshan (XS), Huajiachi (HJC), and Heilongjiang (HLJ) soils. A good correlation was found between the degradation half-life of p,p'-DDT and multiple soil properties. The probable nZVI-mediated degradation pathway of p,p'-DDT in soil was proposed as DDT → DDD/DDE → DDNS → DDOH based on the metabolites identified by GC-MS. The in situ degradation efficiency of residual DDTs in a contaminated field was profoundly enhanced by the addition of nZVI as compared to the control. It is concluded that nZVI might be an efficient agent for the remediation of DDT-contaminated soil under anaerobic environment.

  3. Bioremediation trial on aged PCB-polluted soils--a bench study in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, Taru; Mikkonen, Anu; Sigfusson, Bergur; Ólafsdóttir, Kristín; Ragnarsdóttir, Kristín Vala; Guicharnaud, Rannveig

    2014-02-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) pose a threat to the environment due to their high adsorption capacity to soil organic matter, stability and low reactivity, low water solubility, toxicity and ability to bioaccumulate. With Icelandic soils, research on contamination issues has been very limited and no data has been reported either on PCB degradation potential or rate. The goals of this research were to assess the bioavailability of aged PCBs in the soils of the old North Atlantic Treaty Organization facility in Keflavík, Iceland and to find the best biostimulation method to decrease the pollution. The effectiveness of different biostimulation additives (N fertiliser, white clover and pine needles) at different temperatures (10 and 30 °C) and oxygen levels (aerobic and anaerobic) were tested. PCB bioavailability to soil fauna was assessed with earthworms (Eisenia foetida). PCBs were bioavailable to earthworms (bioaccumulation factor 0.89 and 0.82 for earthworms in 12.5 ppm PCB soil and in 25 ppm PCB soil, respectively), with less chlorinated congeners showing higher bioaccumulation factors than highly chlorinated congeners. Biostimulation with pine needles at 10 °C under aerobic conditions resulted in nearly 38 % degradation of total PCBs after 2 months of incubation. Detection of the aerobic PCB degrading bphA gene supports the indigenous capability of the soils to aerobically degrade PCBs. Further research on field scale biostimulation trials with pine needles in cold environments is recommended in order to optimise the method for onsite remediation.

  4. Degradation of methyl iodide in soil: effects of environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingxin; Gao, Suduan

    2009-01-01

    Methyl iodide (MeI) is a promising alternative to the phased-out fumigant methyl bromide (MeBr); however, there are concerns about its environmental fate following soil fumigation. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of various environmental factors on the rate of MeI degradation in soil. The chemical was added to soil at 48.6 mg kg(-1) and incubated under different conditions. The MeI degradation rate in soil was determined by extracting and measuring residual concentrations over a 15 d incubation period. In soil, MeI degradation followed availability-adjusted first-order kinetics. At 20 degrees C MeI had a calculated half-life of 32 d in a sandy loam containing 4.3 g kg(-1) of organic carbon. It degraded more rapidly as temperature increased, exhibiting a half-life of 23 d at 30 degrees C. Amendment with 10% cattle manure shortened the half-life to 4 d at 20 degrees C. In both unamended and manure-amended soils, the half-life of MeI greatly increased as the organic matter (OM) was removed and it only slightly increased in soils that were sterilized, indicating predominance of chemical reactions in MeI degradation. Soil texture, mineralogy, and moderate moisture content had little influence on MeI degradation. The degradation slowed as the chemical application rate increased. The results suggest that environmental factors, especially soil temperature and organic amendments, should be considered in combination with the minimum effective MeI application rate for achieving satisfactory pest-control efficacy, reducing atmospheric volatilization, and minimizing groundwater contamination.

  5. Relationship between bacterial diversity and function under biotic control: the soil pesticide degraders as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Monard, Cécile; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe; Le Bot, Barbara; Binet, Françoise

    2011-01-01

    In soil, the way biotic parameters impact the relationship between bacterial diversity and function is still unknown. To understand these interactions better, we used RNA-based stable-isotope probing to study the diversity of active atrazine-degrading bacteria in relation to atrazine degradation and to explore the impact of earthworm-soil engineering with respect to this relationship. Bulk soil, burrow linings and earthworm casts were incubated with 13C-atrazine. The pollutant degradation was quantified by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry for 8 days, whereas active atrazine degraders were identified at 2 and 8 days by sequencing the 16S ribosomal RNA in the 13C-RNA fractions from the three soil microsites. An original diversity of atrazine degraders was found. Earthworm soil engineering greatly modified the taxonomic composition of atrazine degraders with dominance of α-, β- and γ-proteobacteria in burrow linings and of Actinobacteria in casts. Earthworm soil bioturbation increased the γ-diversity of atrazine degraders over the soil microsites generated. Atrazine degradation was enhanced in burrow linings in which primary atrazine degraders, closely related to Pelomonas aquatica, were detected only 2 days after atrazine addition. Atrazine degradation efficiency was not linearly related to the species richness of degraders but likely relied on keystone species. By enhancing soil heterogeneity, earthworms sustained high phylogenetic bacterial diversity and exerted a biotic control on the bacterial diversity–function relationships. Our findings call for future investigations to assess the ecological significance of biotic controls on the relationships between diversity and function on ecosystem properties and services (for example, soil detoxification) at larger scales. PMID:21160539

  6. Relationship between bacterial diversity and function under biotic control: the soil pesticide degraders as a case study.

    PubMed

    Monard, Cécile; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe; Le Bot, Barbara; Binet, Françoise

    2011-06-01

    In soil, the way biotic parameters impact the relationship between bacterial diversity and function is still unknown. To understand these interactions better, we used RNA-based stable-isotope probing to study the diversity of active atrazine-degrading bacteria in relation to atrazine degradation and to explore the impact of earthworm-soil engineering with respect to this relationship. Bulk soil, burrow linings and earthworm casts were incubated with (13)C-atrazine. The pollutant degradation was quantified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for 8 days, whereas active atrazine degraders were identified at 2 and 8 days by sequencing the 16S ribosomal RNA in the (13)C-RNA fractions from the three soil microsites. An original diversity of atrazine degraders was found. Earthworm soil engineering greatly modified the taxonomic composition of atrazine degraders with dominance of α-, β- and γ-proteobacteria in burrow linings and of Actinobacteria in casts. Earthworm soil bioturbation increased the γ-diversity of atrazine degraders over the soil microsites generated. Atrazine degradation was enhanced in burrow linings in which primary atrazine degraders, closely related to Pelomonas aquatica, were detected only 2 days after atrazine addition. Atrazine degradation efficiency was not linearly related to the species richness of degraders but likely relied on keystone species. By enhancing soil heterogeneity, earthworms sustained high phylogenetic bacterial diversity and exerted a biotic control on the bacterial diversity-function relationships. Our findings call for future investigations to assess the ecological significance of biotic controls on the relationships between diversity and function on ecosystem properties and services (for example, soil detoxification) at larger scales.

  7. Optical thickness as related to pollutant episodes and the concentration of visibility degrading pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prospero, J. M.; Savoie, D.; Snowdon, T.; Ewbank, P.

    1983-01-01

    A network of six sun photometers was placed in the central and northeast United States during the months of July through October, 1931. The objective of the program was to obtain measurements of atmospheric turbidity which can be related to the concentration of visibility-degrading pollutants in the atmosphere. These measurements serve as ground truth for a program to develop remote sensing techniques for measuring the vertically integrated aerosol concentrations in pollution episodes. The sun photometers measure the direct solar radiation in four passbands: 380 nm, 500 nm, 875 nm and 940 nm. The first three passbands will be used for measuring the aerosol optical depth and the last for measuring precipitable water.

  8. [Phthalic acid esters (PAEs) pollution in farmland soils: a review].

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-Rong; Cui, Ming-Ming; Shi, Yan-Xi

    2013-09-01

    The environmental pollution and food safety problems caused by phthalic acid esters (PAEs) have been attracted 'extensive attention around the world. As a large PAEs producer and consumer, China is facing severe PAEs environmental pollution problems. This paper reviewed the present pollution status of six PAEs classified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as the priority pollutants in China farmland soils, analyzed the sources of these six PAEs in this country, and discussed the absorption and accumulation characteristics of the PAEs in different crops as well as the bio-toxic effects of PAEs pollutants. The PAEs concentrations in China farmland soils are significantly higher those in the farmland soils of the United States and European countries. The main sources of PAEs in China farmland soils are atmospheric deposition, agricultural films, sewage sludge application, and wastewater irrigation. There exist significant differences in the characteristics of PAEs absorption, accumulation, and distribution among different crops. PAEs not only have negative effects on soil quality, crop growth, and crop physiological and biochemical properties, but also possess bio-accumulative characteristics. The weaknesses in current researches were pointed out, and the suggestions for the further researches were given, e. g., to expand the scope of PAEs pollution survey, to explore the toxic mechanisms of PAEs on crops, and to develop the techniques for in situ remediation of PAEs-polluted soils.

  9. Management Practices to Improve Productivity of Degraded/Eroded Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Productivity of degraded/eroded soils can be restored by using organic amendment, such as manure, and improved soil management. A study is being conducted near Hays, KS, to investigate and compare restorative potential of two nitrogen (N) sources. Dried beef manure and urea fertilizer were each appl...

  10. Degradation of Methyl Iodide in Soil: Effects of Environmental Factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl iodide (MeI) is a promising alternative to the phased-out fumigant methyl bromide, and its environmental fate following soil fumigation is of great concern. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of various environmental factors on the degradation rate of MeI in soil. The chem...

  11. A review of soil heavy metal pollution from mines in China: pollution and health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiyuan; Ma, Zongwei; van der Kuijp, Tsering Jan; Yuan, Zengwei; Huang, Lei

    2014-01-15

    Heavy metal pollution has pervaded many parts of the world, especially developing countries such as China. This review summarizes available data in the literature (2005-2012) on heavy metal polluted soils originating from mining areas in China. Based on these obtained data, this paper then evaluates the soil pollution levels of these collected mines and quantifies the risks these pollutants pose to human health. To assess these potential threat levels, the geoaccumulation index was applied, along with the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) recommended method for health risk assessment. The results demonstrate not only the severity of heavy metal pollution from the examined mines, but also the high carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks that soil heavy metal pollution poses to the public, especially to children and those living in the vicinity of heavily polluted mining areas. In order to provide key management targets for relevant government agencies, based on the results of the pollution and health risk assessments, Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, Hg, As, and Ni are selected as the priority control heavy metals; tungsten, manganese, lead-zinc, and antimony mines are selected as the priority control mine categories; and southern provinces and Liaoning province are selected as the priority control provinces. This review, therefore, provides a comprehensive assessment of soil heavy metal pollution derived from mines in China, while identifying policy recommendations for pollution mitigation and environmental management of these mines.

  12. Carbazole degradation in the soil microcosm by tropical bacterial strains

    PubMed Central

    Salam, Lateef B.; Ilori, Matthew O.; Amund, Olukayode O.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, three bacterial strains isolated from tropical hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and phylogenetically identified as Achromobacter sp. strain SL1, Pseudomonas sp. strain SL4 and Microbacterium esteraromaticum strain SL6 displayed angular dioxygenation and mineralization of carbazole in batch cultures. In this study, the ability of these isolates to survive and enhance carbazole degradation in soil were tested in field-moist microcosms. Strain SL4 had the highest survival rate (1.8 x 107 cfu/g) after 30 days of incubation in sterilized soil, while there was a decrease in population density in native (unsterilized) soil when compared with the initial population. Gas chromatographic analysis after 30 days of incubation showed that in sterilized soil amended with carbazole (100 mg/kg), 66.96, 82.15 and 68.54% were degraded by strains SL1, SL4 and SL6, respectively, with rates of degradation of 0.093, 0.114 and 0.095 mg kg−1 h−1. The combination of the three isolates as inoculum in sterilized soil degraded 87.13% carbazole at a rate of 0.121 mg kg−1 h−1. In native soil amended with carbazole (100 mg/kg), 91.64, 87.29 and 89.13% were degraded by strains SL1, SL4 and SL6 after 30 days of incubation, with rates of degradation of 0.127, 0.121 and 0.124 mg kg−1 h−1, respectively. This study successfully established the survivability (> 106 cfu/g detected after 30 days) and carbazole-degrading ability of these bacterial strains in soil, and highlights the potential of these isolates as seed for the bioremediation of carbazole-impacted environments. PMID:26691461

  13. Carbazole degradation in the soil microcosm by tropical bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Salam, Lateef B; Ilori, Matthew O; Amund, Olukayode O

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, three bacterial strains isolated from tropical hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and phylogenetically identified as Achromobacter sp. strain SL1, Pseudomonas sp. strain SL4 and Microbacterium esteraromaticum strain SL6 displayed angular dioxygenation and mineralization of carbazole in batch cultures. In this study, the ability of these isolates to survive and enhance carbazole degradation in soil were tested in field-moist microcosms. Strain SL4 had the highest survival rate (1.8 x 107 cfu/g) after 30 days of incubation in sterilized soil, while there was a decrease in population density in native (unsterilized) soil when compared with the initial population. Gas chromatographic analysis after 30 days of incubation showed that in sterilized soil amended with carbazole (100 mg/kg), 66.96, 82.15 and 68.54% were degraded by strains SL1, SL4 and SL6, respectively, with rates of degradation of 0.093, 0.114 and 0.095 mg kg-1 h-1. The combination of the three isolates as inoculum in sterilized soil degraded 87.13% carbazole at a rate of 0.121 mg kg-1 h-1. In native soil amended with carbazole (100 mg/kg), 91.64, 87.29 and 89.13% were degraded by strains SL1, SL4 and SL6 after 30 days of incubation, with rates of degradation of 0.127, 0.121 and 0.124 mg kg-1 h-1, respectively. This study successfully established the survivability (> 106 cfu/g detected after 30 days) and carbazole-degrading ability of these bacterial strains in soil, and highlights the potential of these isolates as seed for the bioremediation of carbazole-impacted environments.

  14. Removal of PAHs and pesticides from polluted soils by enhanced electrokinetic-Fenton treatment.

    PubMed

    Bocos, Elvira; Fernández-Costas, Carmen; Pazos, Marta; Sanromán, M Ángeles

    2015-04-01

    In this study, electrokinetic-Fenton treatment was used to remediate a soil polluted with PAHs and the pesticide pyrimethanil. Recently, this treatment has emerged as an interesting alternative to conventional soil treatments due to its peculiar advantages, namely the capability of treating fine and low-permeability materials, as well as that of achieving a high yield in the removals of salt content and inorganic and organic pollutants. In a standard electrokinetic-Fenton treatment, the maximum degradation of the pollutant load achieved was 67%, due to the precipitation of the metals near the cathode chamber that reduces the electro-osmotic flow of the system and thus the efficiency of the treatment. To overcome this problem, different complexing agents and pH control in the cathode chamber were evaluated to increase the electro-osmotic flux as well as to render easier the solubilization of the metal species present in the soil. Four complexing agents (ascorbic acid, citric acid, oxalic acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) in the Fenton-like treatment were evaluated. Results revealed the citric acid as the most suitable complexing agent. Thereby its efficiency was tested as pH controller by flushing it in the cathode chamber (pH 2 and 5). For the latter treatments, near total degradation was achieved after 27 d. Finally, phytotoxicity tests for polluted and treated samples were carried out. The high germination levels of the soil treated under enhanced conditions concluded that nearly complete restoration was achieved. PMID:25577698

  15. Removal of PAHs and pesticides from polluted soils by enhanced electrokinetic-Fenton treatment.

    PubMed

    Bocos, Elvira; Fernández-Costas, Carmen; Pazos, Marta; Sanromán, M Ángeles

    2015-04-01

    In this study, electrokinetic-Fenton treatment was used to remediate a soil polluted with PAHs and the pesticide pyrimethanil. Recently, this treatment has emerged as an interesting alternative to conventional soil treatments due to its peculiar advantages, namely the capability of treating fine and low-permeability materials, as well as that of achieving a high yield in the removals of salt content and inorganic and organic pollutants. In a standard electrokinetic-Fenton treatment, the maximum degradation of the pollutant load achieved was 67%, due to the precipitation of the metals near the cathode chamber that reduces the electro-osmotic flow of the system and thus the efficiency of the treatment. To overcome this problem, different complexing agents and pH control in the cathode chamber were evaluated to increase the electro-osmotic flux as well as to render easier the solubilization of the metal species present in the soil. Four complexing agents (ascorbic acid, citric acid, oxalic acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) in the Fenton-like treatment were evaluated. Results revealed the citric acid as the most suitable complexing agent. Thereby its efficiency was tested as pH controller by flushing it in the cathode chamber (pH 2 and 5). For the latter treatments, near total degradation was achieved after 27 d. Finally, phytotoxicity tests for polluted and treated samples were carried out. The high germination levels of the soil treated under enhanced conditions concluded that nearly complete restoration was achieved.

  16. [Research advances in eco-toxicological diagnosis of soil pollution].

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Teng, Hong-Hui; Ren, Bai-Xiang; Shi, Shu-Yun

    2014-09-01

    Soil eco-toxicology provides a theoretical basis for ecological risk assessment of contaminated soils and soil pollution control. Research on eco-toxicological effects and molecular mechanisms of toxic substances in soil environment is the central content of the soil eco-toxicology. Eco-toxicological diagnosis not only gathers all the information of soil pollution, but also provides the overall toxic effects of soil. Therefore, research on the eco-toxicological diagnosis of soil pollution has important theoretical and practical significance. Based on the research of eco-toxicological diagnosis of soil pollution, this paper introduced some common toxicological methods and indicators, with the advantages and disadvantages of various methods discussed. However, conventional biomarkers can only indicate the class of stress, but fail to explain the molecular mechanism of damage or response happened. Biomarkers and molecular diagnostic techniques, which are used to evaluate toxicity of contaminated soil, can explore deeply detoxification mechanisms of organisms under exogenous stress. In this paper, these biomarkers and techniques were introduced systematically, and the future research trends were prospected.

  17. Response of autochthonous microbiota of diesel polluted soils to land-farming treatments.

    PubMed

    Silva-Castro, Gloria Andrea; Uad, Imane; Rodríguez-Calvo, Alfonso; González-López, Jesús; Calvo, Concepción

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the response of autochthonous microorganisms of diesel polluted soils to land-farming treatments. Inorganic NPK (nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium) fertilizer and Ivey surfactant were applied alone or in combination as biostimulating agents. The study was carried out in experimental separated land-farming plots performed with two soils: a sandy clay soil with low biological activity and a sandy clay soil with higher biological activity, contaminated with two concentrations of diesel: 10,000 and 20,000mgkg(-1). Bacterial growth, dehydrogenase activity and CO2 production were the biological parameters evaluated. Non-metric multidimensional scaling analysis proved that moisture content showed a tendency related to microbial growth and that heterotrophic and degrading microorganisms had the best relationship. Initial biological activity of soil influenced the response with 11.1% of variability attributed to this parameter. Soils with low activity had higher degree of response to nutrient addition. PMID:25486545

  18. Response of autochthonous microbiota of diesel polluted soils to land-farming treatments.

    PubMed

    Silva-Castro, Gloria Andrea; Uad, Imane; Rodríguez-Calvo, Alfonso; González-López, Jesús; Calvo, Concepción

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the response of autochthonous microorganisms of diesel polluted soils to land-farming treatments. Inorganic NPK (nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium) fertilizer and Ivey surfactant were applied alone or in combination as biostimulating agents. The study was carried out in experimental separated land-farming plots performed with two soils: a sandy clay soil with low biological activity and a sandy clay soil with higher biological activity, contaminated with two concentrations of diesel: 10,000 and 20,000mgkg(-1). Bacterial growth, dehydrogenase activity and CO2 production were the biological parameters evaluated. Non-metric multidimensional scaling analysis proved that moisture content showed a tendency related to microbial growth and that heterotrophic and degrading microorganisms had the best relationship. Initial biological activity of soil influenced the response with 11.1% of variability attributed to this parameter. Soils with low activity had higher degree of response to nutrient addition.

  19. Butachlor degradation in tropical soils: effect of application rate, biotic-abiotic interactions and soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Pal, R; Das, P; Chakrabarti, K; Chakraborty, A; Chowdhury, A

    2006-01-01

    The degradative characteristics of butachlor (N-Butoxymethyl-2-chloro-2',6'-diethyla- cetanilide) were studied under controlled laboratory conditions in clay loam alluvial (AL) soil (Typic udifluvent) and coastal saline (CS) soil (Typic endoaquept) from rice cultivated fields. The application rates included field rate (FR), 2-times FR (2FR) and 10-times FR (10FR). The incubation study was carried out at 30 degrees C with and without decomposed cow manure (DCM) at 60% of maximum water holding capacity (WHC) and waterlogged soil condition. The half-life values depended on the soil types and initial concentrations of butachlor. Butachlor degraded faster in AL soil and in soil amended with DCM under waterlogged condition. Microbial degradation is the major avenue of butachlor degradation from soils.

  20. Benefits of the Use of Sewage Sludge over EDTA to Remediate Soils Polluted with Heavy Metals.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Ana J; Gutiérrez-Ginés, María J; Pastor, Jesús

    2015-09-01

    Sewage sludges from urban wastewater treatment plants are often used to remediate degraded soils. However, the benefits of their use in metal-polluted soils remain unclear and need to be assessed in terms of factors besides soil fertility. This study examines the use of thermal-dried sewage sludge (TDS) as an amendment for heavy metal-polluted soil in terms of its effects on soil chemical properties, leachate composition, and the growth of native plant communities. To assess the response of the soil and its plant community to an increase in metal mobilization, the effects of TDS amendment were compared with those of the addition of a chelating agent (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid [EDTA]). The experimental design was based on a real-case scenario in which soils from of an abandoned mine site were used in a greenhouse bioassay. Two doses of TDS and EDTA were applied to a soil containing high Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cd levels (4925, 5675, 404, and 25 mg kg, respectively). Soil pH was 6.4, and its organic matter content was 5.53%. The factors examined after soil amendment were soil fertility and heavy metal contents, leachate element losses, the plant community arising from the seed bank (plant cover, species richness and biodiversity, above/below ground biomass), and phytotoxic effects (chemical contents of abundant species). Thermal-dried sewage sludge emerged as a good phytostabilizer of Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cd given its capacity to reduce the plant uptake of metals and achieve rapid plant cover. This amendment also enhanced the retention of other elements in the plant root system and overall showed a better capacity to remediate soils polluted with several heavy metals. The addition of EDTA led to plant productivity losses and nutritional imbalances because it increased the mobility of several elements in the soil and its leachates.

  1. Benefits of the Use of Sewage Sludge over EDTA to Remediate Soils Polluted with Heavy Metals.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Ana J; Gutiérrez-Ginés, María J; Pastor, Jesús

    2015-09-01

    Sewage sludges from urban wastewater treatment plants are often used to remediate degraded soils. However, the benefits of their use in metal-polluted soils remain unclear and need to be assessed in terms of factors besides soil fertility. This study examines the use of thermal-dried sewage sludge (TDS) as an amendment for heavy metal-polluted soil in terms of its effects on soil chemical properties, leachate composition, and the growth of native plant communities. To assess the response of the soil and its plant community to an increase in metal mobilization, the effects of TDS amendment were compared with those of the addition of a chelating agent (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid [EDTA]). The experimental design was based on a real-case scenario in which soils from of an abandoned mine site were used in a greenhouse bioassay. Two doses of TDS and EDTA were applied to a soil containing high Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cd levels (4925, 5675, 404, and 25 mg kg, respectively). Soil pH was 6.4, and its organic matter content was 5.53%. The factors examined after soil amendment were soil fertility and heavy metal contents, leachate element losses, the plant community arising from the seed bank (plant cover, species richness and biodiversity, above/below ground biomass), and phytotoxic effects (chemical contents of abundant species). Thermal-dried sewage sludge emerged as a good phytostabilizer of Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cd given its capacity to reduce the plant uptake of metals and achieve rapid plant cover. This amendment also enhanced the retention of other elements in the plant root system and overall showed a better capacity to remediate soils polluted with several heavy metals. The addition of EDTA led to plant productivity losses and nutritional imbalances because it increased the mobility of several elements in the soil and its leachates. PMID:26436275

  2. Rapid degradation of butachlor in wheat rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y L; Chen, Y X; Luo, Y M; Pan, X D; He, Y F; Wong, M H

    2003-02-01

    The degradative characteristics of butachlor in non-rhizosphere, wheat rhizosphere, and inoculated rhizosphere soils were measured. The rate constants for the degradation of butachlor in non-rhizosphere, rhizosphere, and inoculated rhizosphere soils were measured to be 0.0385, 0.0902, 0.1091 at 1 mg/kg, 0.0348, 0.0629, 0.2355 at 10 mg/kg, and 0.0299, 0.0386, 0.0642 at 100 mg/kg, respectively. The corresponding half-lives for butachlor in the soils were calculated to be 18.0, 7.7, 6.3 days at 1 mg/kg, 19.9, 11.0, 2.9 days at 10 mg/kg, and 23.2, 18.0, 10.8 days at 100 mg/kg, respectively. The experimental results show that the degradation of butachlor can be enhanced greatly in wheat rhizosphere, and especially in the rhizosphere inoculated with the bacterial community designated HD which is capable of degrading butachlor. It could be concluded that rhizosphere soil inoculated with microorganisms-degrading target herbicides is a useful pathway to achieve rapid degradation of the herbicides in soil.

  3. Degradation of 4,5-dichloroguaiacol by soil microorganisms.

    PubMed

    González, B; Brezny, R; Herrera, M; Joyce, T W

    1995-09-01

    No microorganisms could be isolated from chemostats or from a soil column fed with 4,5-dichloroguaiacol as the only carbon source. If guaiacol was added to chemostats with 4,5-dichloroguaiacol, either soil microbial consortia or guaiacol-degrading bacteria could dechlorinate the 4,5-dichloroguaiacol provided it was <0.2MM. A microbial consortium from farm soil removed 4,5-dichloroguaiacol under aerobic or anoxic conditions, with or without chlorolignin. Dichlorocatechol was the only 4,5-dichloroguaiacol-derived metabolite detected. In aerobic incubations, 4,5-dichlorocatechol was further degraded whereas under anoxic conditions it accumulated. PMID:24414909

  4. Effect of urea on degradation of terbuthylazine in soil.

    PubMed

    Caracciolo, Anna Barra; Giuliano, Giuseppe; Grenni, Paola; Cremisini, Carlo; Ciccoli, Roberto; Ubaldi, Carla

    2005-05-01

    Pesticide and nitrate contamination of soil and groundwater from agriculture is an environmental and public health concern worldwide. The herbicide terbuthylazine (CBET) has replaced atrazine in Italy and in many other countries because the use of the latter has been banned because of its adverse environmental impacts. Unlike atrazine, knowledge about the fate of CBET in soil is still not extensive, especially regarding its transformation products, but recent monitoring data show its occurrence and that of its main metabolite, desethyl-terbuthylazine (CBAT), in groundwater above the limit of 0.1 microg/L established by European Union Directive and Italian legislation. The objective of this work was to investigate if the presence of the fertilizer urea affects CBET degradation in the soil. Laboratory CBET degradation experiments in the presence/absence of urea were performed with microbiologically active soil and sterilized soil. Terbuthylazine degradation rates under the different experimental conditions were assessed, and the formation, degradation, and transformation of the metabolite CBAT were also studied. Terbuthylazine degradation was affected by the presence of urea, in terms both of a higher disappearance time of 50% of the initial concentration and of a lower amount of CBAT formed. These findings have practical implications for the real-life assessment of the environmental fate of triazine herbicides in agricultural areas since these herbicides are frequently applied to soils receiving ureic fertilizers.

  5. The Chemophytostabilisation Process of Heavy Metal Polluted Soil.

    PubMed

    Grobelak, Anna; Napora, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Industrial areas are characterised by soil degradation processes that are related primarily to the deposition of heavy metals. Areas contaminated with metals are a serious source of risk due to secondary pollutant emissions and metal leaching and migration in the soil profile and into the groundwater. Consequently, the optimal solution for these areas is to apply methods of remediation that create conditions for the restoration of plant cover and ensure the protection of groundwater against pollution. Remediation activities that are applied to large-scale areas contaminated with heavy metals should mainly focus on decreasing the degree of metal mobility in the soil profile and metal bioavailability to levels that are not phytotoxic. Chemophytostabilisation is a process in which soil amendments and plants are used to immobilise metals. The main objective of this research was to investigate the effects of different doses of organic amendments (after aerobic sewage sludge digestion in the food industry) and inorganic amendments (lime, superphosphate, and potassium phosphate) on changes in the metals fractions in soils contaminated with Cd, Pb and Zn during phytostabilisation. In this study, the contaminated soil was amended with sewage sludge and inorganic amendments and seeded with grass (tall fescue) to increase the degree of immobilisation of the studied metals. The contaminated soil was collected from the area surrounding a zinc smelter in the Silesia region of Poland (pH 5.5, Cd 12 mg kg-1, Pb 1100 mg kg-1, Zn 700 mg kg-1). A plant growth experiment was conducted in a growth chamber for 5 months. Before and after plant growth, soil subsamples were subjected to chemical and physical analyses. To determine the fractions of the elements, a sequential extraction method was used according to Zeien and Brümmer. Research confirmed that the most important impacts on the Zn, Cd and Pb fractions included the combined application of sewage sludge from the food industry and

  6. The Chemophytostabilisation Process of Heavy Metal Polluted Soil

    PubMed Central

    Grobelak, Anna; Napora, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Industrial areas are characterised by soil degradation processes that are related primarily to the deposition of heavy metals. Areas contaminated with metals are a serious source of risk due to secondary pollutant emissions and metal leaching and migration in the soil profile and into the groundwater. Consequently, the optimal solution for these areas is to apply methods of remediation that create conditions for the restoration of plant cover and ensure the protection of groundwater against pollution. Remediation activities that are applied to large-scale areas contaminated with heavy metals should mainly focus on decreasing the degree of metal mobility in the soil profile and metal bioavailability to levels that are not phytotoxic. Chemophytostabilisation is a process in which soil amendments and plants are used to immobilise metals. The main objective of this research was to investigate the effects of different doses of organic amendments (after aerobic sewage sludge digestion in the food industry) and inorganic amendments (lime, superphosphate, and potassium phosphate) on changes in the metals fractions in soils contaminated with Cd, Pb and Zn during phytostabilisation. In this study, the contaminated soil was amended with sewage sludge and inorganic amendments and seeded with grass (tall fescue) to increase the degree of immobilisation of the studied metals. The contaminated soil was collected from the area surrounding a zinc smelter in the Silesia region of Poland (pH 5.5, Cd 12 mg kg-1, Pb 1100 mg kg-1, Zn 700 mg kg-1). A plant growth experiment was conducted in a growth chamber for 5 months. Before and after plant growth, soil subsamples were subjected to chemical and physical analyses. To determine the fractions of the elements, a sequential extraction method was used according to Zeien and Brümmer. Research confirmed that the most important impacts on the Zn, Cd and Pb fractions included the combined application of sewage sludge from the food industry and

  7. The Chemophytostabilisation Process of Heavy Metal Polluted Soil.

    PubMed

    Grobelak, Anna; Napora, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Industrial areas are characterised by soil degradation processes that are related primarily to the deposition of heavy metals. Areas contaminated with metals are a serious source of risk due to secondary pollutant emissions and metal leaching and migration in the soil profile and into the groundwater. Consequently, the optimal solution for these areas is to apply methods of remediation that create conditions for the restoration of plant cover and ensure the protection of groundwater against pollution. Remediation activities that are applied to large-scale areas contaminated with heavy metals should mainly focus on decreasing the degree of metal mobility in the soil profile and metal bioavailability to levels that are not phytotoxic. Chemophytostabilisation is a process in which soil amendments and plants are used to immobilise metals. The main objective of this research was to investigate the effects of different doses of organic amendments (after aerobic sewage sludge digestion in the food industry) and inorganic amendments (lime, superphosphate, and potassium phosphate) on changes in the metals fractions in soils contaminated with Cd, Pb and Zn during phytostabilisation. In this study, the contaminated soil was amended with sewage sludge and inorganic amendments and seeded with grass (tall fescue) to increase the degree of immobilisation of the studied metals. The contaminated soil was collected from the area surrounding a zinc smelter in the Silesia region of Poland (pH 5.5, Cd 12 mg kg-1, Pb 1100 mg kg-1, Zn 700 mg kg-1). A plant growth experiment was conducted in a growth chamber for 5 months. Before and after plant growth, soil subsamples were subjected to chemical and physical analyses. To determine the fractions of the elements, a sequential extraction method was used according to Zeien and Brümmer. Research confirmed that the most important impacts on the Zn, Cd and Pb fractions included the combined application of sewage sludge from the food industry and

  8. Soil degradation and amendment effects on soil properties, microbial communities, and plant growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, M.; Fehmi, J. S.; Rasmussen, C.; Gallery, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Human activities that disrupt soil properties are fundamentally changing ecosystems. Soil degradation, caused by anthropogenic disturbance can decrease microbial abundance and activity, leading to changes in nutrient availability, soil organic matter, and plant establishment. The addition of amendments to disturbed soils have the potential ameliorate these negative consequences. We studied the effects of soil degradation, via an autoclave heat shock method, and the addition of amendments (biochar and woodchips) on microbial activity, soil carbon and nitrogen availability, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen content, and plant growth of ten plant species native to the semi-arid southwestern US. Relative to non-degraded soils, microbial activity, measured via extracellular enzyme assays, was significantly lower for all seven substrates assayed. These soils also had significantly lower amounts of carbon assimilated into microbial biomass but no change in microbial biomass nitrogen. Soil degradation had no effect on plant biomass. Amendments caused changes in microbial activity: biochar-amended soils had significant increases in potential activity with five of the seven substrates measured; woodchip amended soils had significant increases with two. Soil carbon increased with both amendments but this was not reflected in a significant change in microbial biomass carbon. Biochar-amended soils had increases in soil nitrogen availability but neither amendment caused changes in microbial biomass nitrogen. Biochar amendments had no significant effect on above- or belowground plant biomass while woodchips significantly decreased aboveground plant biomass. Results show that soil degradation decreases microbial activity and changes nutrient dynamics, but these are not reflected in changes in plant growth. Amendments provide nutrient sources and change soil pore space, which cause microbial activities to fluctuate and may, in the case of woodchips, increase plant drought

  9. Understanding and enhancing soil health: the solution for reversing soil degradation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This special issue of Sustainability documents both the magnitude and global prevalence of soil degradation and helps illustrate (1) various factors contributing to the problem, (2) its past and current impacts, and (3) projected consequences to humankind if degradation of our fragile soil resource...

  10. Soil degradation in wooded rangelands of southwest Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, S.; Lavado Contador, J. F.; Gómez Gutiérrez, Á.

    2009-04-01

    The paper presents a review on soil degradation studies carried out since 1990 in wooded rangelands in Extremadura. In the semiarid and subhumid parts of the south-western Iberian Peninsula open evergreen woodlands dominated by Quercus species are widespread (dehesas and montados). They are composed of grasslands with a varying degree of tree cover, ranging from treeless to more than 80 individuals per hectare. In some areas shrubs form a third component of the vegetation. Dehesas are subject to a complex exploitation system with agro-silvo-pastoral land use. The dominant soil degradation phenomena include different forms of water erosion and physical and biological degradation. Regarding soil erosion and surface hydrology, research has been carried out at different spatial scales. Sheetwash and overland flow were investigated along hillslopes and in microplots, whereas gully erosion and runoff production were monitored in small experimental catchments. Recently, physical and biological degradation has been studied in a large number of farms, representing the most important types of rangelands in the region of Extremadura. This included a rapid appraisal of degradation features, the determination of soil properties and a study on the distribution and activity of gullies. Soil degradation varies strongly with regard to the natural factors, but also with respect to land use and management. Sheetwash (interrill erosion) is the dominant process on hillslopes, with a mean soil loss rate of 0.63 t ha-1. However rainfall variation and land management, especially livestock density, produce changes in soil cover. With low to moderate livestock densities and during prolonged periods with low rainfall (droughts), the vegetation cover may be strongly reduced, provoking high soil losses, whereas during normal or humid periods interrill erosion is low. Excessive stocking rates may exacerbate sheetwash, producing severe soil degradation, regardless of rainfall conditions. In

  11. Assessment of imidacloprid degradation by soil-isolated Bacillus alkalinitrilicus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Smriti; Singh, Balwinder; Gupta, V K

    2014-11-01

    Imidacloprid is extensively used on a broad range of crops worldwide as seed dressing, soil treatment, and foliar application. Hence, the degradation potential of bacterial strains from sugarcane-growing soils was studied in liquid medium for subsequent use in bioremediation of contaminated soils. The microbe cultures degrading imidacloprid were isolated and enriched on Dorn's broth containing imidacloprid as sole carbon source maintained at 28 °C and Bacillus alkalinitrilicus showed maximum potential to degrade imidacloprid. Clay loam soil samples were fortified with imidacloprid at 50, 100, and 150 mg kg(-1) along with 45 × 10(7) microbe cells under two opposing sets of conditions, viz., autoclaved and unautoclaved. To study degradation and metabolism of imidacloprid under these two conditions, samples were drawn at regular intervals of 7, 14, 28, 35, 42, 49, and 56 days. Among metabolites, three metabolites were detected, viz., 6-chloronicotinic acid, nitrosimine followed by imidacloprid-NTG under both the conditions. Total imidacloprid residues were not found to follow the first-order kinetics in both types of conditions. This paper reports for the first time the potential use of pure cultures of soil-isolated native bacterium B. alkalinitrilicus and also its use along with natural soil microflora for remediation of imidacloprid-contaminated soils. PMID:25052329

  12. Multidimensional evaluation of soil pollution from railway tracks.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Bemowska-Kałabun, Olga; Gworek, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Railway transport is a source of pollution to soils and living organisms by e.g. PAHs, PCBs, oil-derived products, pesticides and heavy metals. Soil toxicity evaluation requires chemical analyses, indicating the type and content of particular pollutants, as well as biological analyses, which allow assessing the reaction of organisms to these pollutants. This paper is focused on a multi-aspect evaluation of the degree of toxicity and pollution of soil in selected railway areas from north-eastern Poland by application of numerous biotests and chemical analyses. The soils were sampled on railway tracks from the following railway stations: Białystok Fabryczny, Siemianówka, Hajnówka, Iława Główna and Waliły. The most toxic soils occur on the railway tracks at Białystok Fabryczny and Siemianówka. They had a significant toxic effect on test organisms from various trophic levels. The contents of PAHs, PCBs, heavy metals, oil-derived hydrocarbons and pesticide residues were determined in the examined soils. In all cases the detected pollutants did not exceed the admissible levels. The highest content of oil-derived substances was noted in soils from Białystok Fabryczny and concentrations were moderate in soils from Siemianówka. Although the pollutants determined in soils from railway tracks did not exceed the admissible values, they had a toxic effect on numerous test organisms from different trophic levels. This suggests a synergistic effect of low concentrations (within the admissible levels) of several pollutants together, which resulted in a toxic effect on the organisms. Thus, there is a strong need of not only chemical, but also ecotoxicological analyses during the evaluation of environmental conditions. Based on data obtained from biological and chemical analyses, we concluded that railway transport may pose a hazard to the natural environment to a larger extent that hitherto expected. PMID:25762102

  13. Multidimensional evaluation of soil pollution from railway tracks.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Bemowska-Kałabun, Olga; Gworek, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Railway transport is a source of pollution to soils and living organisms by e.g. PAHs, PCBs, oil-derived products, pesticides and heavy metals. Soil toxicity evaluation requires chemical analyses, indicating the type and content of particular pollutants, as well as biological analyses, which allow assessing the reaction of organisms to these pollutants. This paper is focused on a multi-aspect evaluation of the degree of toxicity and pollution of soil in selected railway areas from north-eastern Poland by application of numerous biotests and chemical analyses. The soils were sampled on railway tracks from the following railway stations: Białystok Fabryczny, Siemianówka, Hajnówka, Iława Główna and Waliły. The most toxic soils occur on the railway tracks at Białystok Fabryczny and Siemianówka. They had a significant toxic effect on test organisms from various trophic levels. The contents of PAHs, PCBs, heavy metals, oil-derived hydrocarbons and pesticide residues were determined in the examined soils. In all cases the detected pollutants did not exceed the admissible levels. The highest content of oil-derived substances was noted in soils from Białystok Fabryczny and concentrations were moderate in soils from Siemianówka. Although the pollutants determined in soils from railway tracks did not exceed the admissible values, they had a toxic effect on numerous test organisms from different trophic levels. This suggests a synergistic effect of low concentrations (within the admissible levels) of several pollutants together, which resulted in a toxic effect on the organisms. Thus, there is a strong need of not only chemical, but also ecotoxicological analyses during the evaluation of environmental conditions. Based on data obtained from biological and chemical analyses, we concluded that railway transport may pose a hazard to the natural environment to a larger extent that hitherto expected.

  14. Degradation of trinitrotoluene in contaminated soils as affected by its initial concentrations and its binding to soil organic matter fractions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neera; Hennecke, Dieter; Hoerner, Jennifer; Koerdel, Werner; Schaeffer, Andreas

    2008-03-01

    Trinitrotoluene (TNT), a nitroaromatics, is a major pollutant in explosive contaminated soils. Present study reports the effect of initial concentration of TNT on its degradation kinetics in soils. Soils from two contaminated sites viz. Clausthal and Elsnig, Germany, were mixed with an uncontaminated reference soil to get different initial concentrations (mg/kg) viz Clausthal-1 (54.29), Clausthal-2 (30.86), Clausthal-3 (7.05) Elsnig-1 (879.67), Elsnig-2 (86.43); Elsnig-3 (8.16) and Elsnig-4 (0.99) and were spiked with ring UL-(14)C-TNT (100KBq/50g soil). Except Elsnig-1 and Elsnig-2 soils, TNT degraded at same rate in all the soils. Higher persistence of TNT in Elsnig-1 and Elsnig-2 soils appears to be due to higher initial concentrations of nitroaromatics which may be toxic to soil microorganisms. 2-Amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2-ADNT) and 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4-ADNT) were recovered as major metabolites of TNT. Distribution of bound (14)C-activity in different soil organic matter (SOM) fractions (humic acid, fulvic acid and humin) was assayed by alkali extraction of solvent extracted Clausthal-1 and Elsnig-1 soils. Results indicate that humic acid accounted for maximum bound activity followed by fulvic acid and humin fractions. Expressing (14)C-activity bound/unit weight of organic carbon content of SOM fractions showed that 3 times more (14)C-activity was bound to Elsnig humic acid than Clausthal humic acid. Similarly, activity associated with Elsnig fulvic acid was 7 times higher than that of Clausthal fulvic acid suggesting that chemical nature of SOM fractions plays a significant role in binding of contaminants.

  15. Assessing pollutions of soil and plant by municipal waste dump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changli; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Feng'e.; Zhang, Sheng; Yin, Miying; Ye, Hao; Hou, Hongbing; Dong, Hua; Zhang, Ming; Jiang, Jianmei; Pei, Lixin

    2007-04-01

    Research is few in the literature regarding the investigation and assessment of pollutions of soil and plant by municipal waste dumps. Based upon previous work in seven waste dumping sites (nonsanitary landfills) in Beijing, Shanghai and Shijiazhuang, this study expounds the investigation and assessment method and report major pollutants. Using relative background values, this study assesses soil pollution degree in the seven dumping sites. Preliminary conclusions are: (1) pollution degrees are moderate or heavy; (2) pollution distance by domestic waste that is dumped on a plane ground is 85 m; (3) the horizontal transport distance of pollutants might be up to 120 m if waste leachates are directly connected with water in saturated soils; (4) vertical transport depth is about 3 m in unsaturated silty clayey soils. Furthermore, using relative background values and hygiene standards of food and vegetable this study assesses the pollutions of different parts of reed, sorghum, watermelon and sweet-melon. It is found: (1) in comparison with the relative background values in a large distance to the waste dumping sites, domestic wastes have polluted the roots and stems of reed and sorghum, whereas fine coal ash has polluted the leaves, rattans and fruits of watermelon and sweet-melon; (2) domestic wastes and fine coal ash have heavily polluted the edible parts of sorghum, water melon and sweet-melon. As, Hg, Pb and F have far exceeded standard values, e.g., Hg has exceeded the standard value by up to 650 1,700 times and Cd by 120 275 times, and the comprehensive pollution index is up to 192.9 369.7; (3) the polluted sorghum, watermelon and sweet-melon are inedible.

  16. Soil pollution in Central district of Saint-Petersburg (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhina, Natalia; Ufimtseva, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of soil samples of upper horizon for the content of chemical elements (Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni, Cr, Co, Cd, Ba, Sr) was carried out by atomic emission with inductively coupled plasma. A relative indicator of soil contamination degree is a concentration coefficient, representing the ratio of metal content in tested soil samples to the local background value of the corresponding element. Total pollution index is calculated by the concentration coefficients, which are greater than 1, taking into account the hazard class of metals (1 class - Zn, Pb ,Cd; 2 - class Cr, Ni, Cu ,Со; 3 class - Fe, Mn, Sr, Ba). Analysis of trace element of urban soils demonstrated mosaic patterns of pollution for Central district. The method of correlation sets constructing and factor analysis revealed three groups of chemical elements having a strong and significant association with each other: Pb-Cu-Cd-Zn-Ba, Ni-Cr-Co, Fe-Mn. Elements of the first group are characterized by high values of concentration coefficient and are the main pollutants - their average content is 3-11 times higher than background values. Strontium does not have strong correlation with the other elements, and its lowest concentration coefficient indicates that the element can not be regarded as a pollutant. The spatial distribution of the total pollution index identified several sources of pollution, the origin of which may be different. The main reason is probably the impact of vehicle emissions, although local pollution of soil is possible (the soils, contaminated during reconstruction of lawns, dumping of construction materials, etc.). Differentiated assessment of database shows that 48% of samples refer to dangerous pollution category, 37% - to moderately dangerous category, 15% - to allowable category. Thus, almost half of the district is characterized as dangerous in terms of soil contamination. Solution of the problem of soil contamination is recommended in three ways: reducing the intensity of

  17. Desertification, Land Degradation and the restoration of soil functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imeson, A.

    2012-04-01

    Soil science and soil scientists have and are playing different roles in desertification. Research has shown that the main drivers of land degradation are unsustainable preactices of agricultre and indusrty or of forest clearanc. If we look at soil conservation and soil protection, this is mainly in the service of agriculture and development. The LEDDRA project is looking at different paradigms of land degradation that could be used to identify emergent benefits and constraints that could lead to people adopting and favouring activitis that lead to the restoration of land and soil functions. The second part of the paper will discuss how soil process knowledge can be applied to restore the hydrological function of soils and produce economic benefits by reduced flooding and soil loss. The third part of the paper will introduce the Agriscape strategy which aims to improve the productivity of soils in differeent environments and setting by improving their moisture and temperature conditions. Finally, the opportunities for large scale geoengineering approaches will be proposed that include things such as altering the evaporative losses and restoring groundwater levels in arid areas. A global programme of soil and forest restoration could be undertaken restoring and creating terraces creating agricultural land and water, which has additional benefits too crops. The loss of the supporting functions of the earth could be impaired if there is no global governance of the land and water.

  18. Spatial distribution of soil lead pollution in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkmann, R.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial distribution of lead pollution in soils of Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, was investigated to find the patterns and extent of health-threatening contamination. Samples were collected within three distinct land-use types: (i) lawns and gardens, (ii) major east-west arterials, and (iii) private properties at site-specific locations. Three-hundred and sixty-four soil samples were collected from lawns and gardens throughout the county; a total of 263 soil samples were collected along College Avenue, Oklahoma Avenue, Greenfield Avenue, Wisconsin Avenue, North Avenue, Capitol Drive, and Brown Deer Road, and a total of 55 soil samples were collected from three private properties. Several distinct patterns emerged from the mapped data. Broadly, soil lead pollution in lawns and gardens was highest in the central city and decreased north, south, and west toward the county lines and suburban fringe. Also, soil lead pollution along major arterials decreased away from busy intersections and was generally eliminated east of 42nd Street. At the three locations of intense sampling for site-specific examination, soil lead was concentrated within one meter of painted structures. Peripheral to the one meter zone, background levels of lead were found except in the central city where elevated soil lead levels were found in lawns. Health-threatening lead levels (>500 ppm) were found in soils collected using all three approaches: 24% of 11 soils collected from lawns and gardens; 43% of soils collected from major east-west arterials; and 27% of the soils collected from all three intensely examined properties. The sources of lead pollution in soil were more clearly suggested in intense sampling within small private properties. Lead-based paint caused contamination within one meter of painted structures and airborne lead from automobile exhaust outside that zone.

  19. Soil erosion and land degradation in the Highlands of Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khresat, Saeb

    2013-04-01

    The Highlands of Jordan has a Mediterranean type of climate characterized by hot dry summers and cold wet winters. Unsustainable land use practices, recurrent droughts and climate change are the main causes of land degradation in the Highlands area of Jordan. Unsustainable land use practices include improper plowing, inappropriate rotations, inadequate or inexistent management of plant residues, overgrazing of natural vegetation, forest cutting, land fragmentation and over-pumping of groundwater. In addition, Jordan's rapid population growth (2.8% per year) is exerting considerable pressure upon its limited arable land through uncontrolled and random urbanization activities. Water erosion is the most widespread Land degradation type in the country. It greatly increases on slopes where the vegetation cover is (seasonally) reduced. It is further aggravated by a loss of soil structure and reduced infiltration rates. Wind erosion occurs most frequently in the arid and semi-arid portions of the southern Highlands, especially in areas with sandy or loamy soils. Rangeland degradation is the second most widespread land degradation type that is driven by overgrazing. The impact of overgrazing on the vegetation is evident from the excessive uprooting of the green matter (grass and bushes), leading to reduced seeding, reduced regeneration, and the consequent loss of plant cover which make the soil more susceptible to water and wind erosion. It is estimated that about 41 percent of Jordan's total land area is characterized as degraded of which 22 percent of the total land mass is classified as moderately degraded and agricultural productivity is greatly reduced. Observed aspects of land degradation include the recession of forest areas, high rate of erosion by water (formation of rills and gullies), expansion of urbanized area, reduction in soil organic matter and soil structure deterioration. Implementation of soil erosion control measures such as contour cultivation

  20. Catalytic degradation of the soil fumigant 1,3-dichloropropene in aqueous biochar slurry.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jiaolong; Cheng, Yuxiao; Sun, Mingxing; Yan, Lili; Shen, Guoqing

    2016-11-01

    Biochar has been explored as a cost-effective sorbent of contaminants, such as soil fumigant. However, contaminant-loaded biochar probably becomes a source of secondary air pollution. In this study, biochars developed from cow manure and rice husk at 300°C or 700°C were used to investigate the catalytic degradation of the soil fumigant 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) in aqueous biochar slurry. Results showed that the adsorption of 1,3-D on the biochars was influenced by Langmuir surface monolayer adsorption. The maximum adsorption capacity of cow manure was greater than that of rice husk at the same pyrolysis temperature. Batch experiments revealed that 1,3-D degradation was improved in aqueous biochar slurry. The most rapid 1,3-D degradation occurred on cow manure-derived biochar produced at 300°C (C-300), with t1/2=3.47days. The degradation efficiency of 1,3-D on C-300 was 95.52%. Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) in biochars were detected via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) and hydroxyl radical (·OH) in biochars were detected by using a fluorescence spectrophotometer coupled with a terephthalic acid trapping method. The improvement of 1,3-D degradation efficiency may be attributed to EPFRs and DOM in aqueous biochar slurry. Our results may pose implications in the development of effective reduction strategies for soil fumigant emission with biochar.

  1. Catalytic degradation of the soil fumigant 1,3-dichloropropene in aqueous biochar slurry.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jiaolong; Cheng, Yuxiao; Sun, Mingxing; Yan, Lili; Shen, Guoqing

    2016-11-01

    Biochar has been explored as a cost-effective sorbent of contaminants, such as soil fumigant. However, contaminant-loaded biochar probably becomes a source of secondary air pollution. In this study, biochars developed from cow manure and rice husk at 300°C or 700°C were used to investigate the catalytic degradation of the soil fumigant 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) in aqueous biochar slurry. Results showed that the adsorption of 1,3-D on the biochars was influenced by Langmuir surface monolayer adsorption. The maximum adsorption capacity of cow manure was greater than that of rice husk at the same pyrolysis temperature. Batch experiments revealed that 1,3-D degradation was improved in aqueous biochar slurry. The most rapid 1,3-D degradation occurred on cow manure-derived biochar produced at 300°C (C-300), with t1/2=3.47days. The degradation efficiency of 1,3-D on C-300 was 95.52%. Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) in biochars were detected via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) and hydroxyl radical (·OH) in biochars were detected by using a fluorescence spectrophotometer coupled with a terephthalic acid trapping method. The improvement of 1,3-D degradation efficiency may be attributed to EPFRs and DOM in aqueous biochar slurry. Our results may pose implications in the development of effective reduction strategies for soil fumigant emission with biochar. PMID:27323331

  2. Use of phytoremediation and biochar to remediate heavy metal polluted soils: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Ferreiro, J.; Lu, H.; Fu, S.; Méndez, A.; Gascó, G.

    2014-02-01

    Anthropogenic activities are resulting in an increase of the use and extraction of heavy metals. Heavy metals cannot be degraded and hence accumulate in the environment, having the potential to contaminate the food chain. This pollution threatens soil quality, plant survival and human health. The remediation of heavy metals deserves attention, but it is impaired by the cost of these processes. Phytoremediation and biochar are two sound environmental technologies which could be at the forefront to mitigate soil pollution. This review provides an overview of the state of the art of the scientific research on phytoremediation and biochar application to remediate heavy-metal-contaminated soils. Research to date has attempted only in a limited number of occasions to combine both techniques, however we discuss the potential advantages of combining both, and the potential mechanisms involved in the interaction between phytoremediators and biochar. We identified specific research needs to ensure a sustainable use of phytoremediation and biochar as remediation tools.

  3. Biodegradation of petroleum sludge and petroleum polluted soil by a bacterial consortium: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Gojgic-Cvijovic, G D; Milic, J S; Solevic, T M; Beskoski, V P; Ilic, M V; Djokic, L S; Narancic, T M; Vrvic, M M

    2012-02-01

    This article presents a study of the efficiency and degradation pattern of samples of petroleum sludge and polluted sandy soil from an oil refinery. A bacterial consortium, consisting of strains from the genera Pseudomonas, Achromobacter, Bacillus and Micromonospora, was isolated from a petroleum sludge sample and characterized. The addition of nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients and a chemical surfactant to both the samples and bioaugmentation to the soil sample were applied under laboratory conditions. The extent of biodegradation was monitored by the gravimetric method and analysis of the residual oil by gas chromatography. Over a 12-week experiment, the achieved degree of TPH (total petroleum hydrocarbon) degradation amounted to 82-88% in the petroleum sludge and 86-91% in the polluted soil. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was utilized to determine the biodegradability and degradation rates of n-alkanes, isoprenoids, steranes, diasteranes and terpanes. Complete degradation of the n-alkanes and isoprenoids fractions occurred in both the samples. In addition, the intensities of the peaks corresponding to tricyclic terpenes and homohopanes were decreased, while significant changes were also observed in the distribution of diasteranes and steranes.

  4. Crop residue stabilization and application to agricultural and degraded soils: A review.

    PubMed

    Medina, Jorge; Monreal, Carlos; Barea, José Miguel; Arriagada, César; Borie, Fernando; Cornejo, Pablo

    2015-08-01

    Agricultural activities produce vast amounts of organic residues including straw, unmarketable or culled fruit and vegetables, post-harvest or post-processing wastes, clippings and residuals from forestry or pruning operations, and animal manure. Improper disposal of these materials may produce undesirable environmental (e.g. odors or insect refuges) and health impacts. On the other hand, agricultural residues are of interest to various industries and sectors of the economy due to their energy content (i.e., for combustion), their potential use as feedstock to produce biofuels and/or fine chemicals, or as a soil amendments for polluted or degraded soils when composted. Our objective is review new biotechnologies that could be used to manage these residues for land application and remediation of contaminated and eroded soils. Bibliographic information is complemented through a comprehensive review of the physico-chemical fundamental mechanisms involved in the transformation and stabilization of organic matter by biotic and abiotic soil components. PMID:25936555

  5. Crop residue stabilization and application to agricultural and degraded soils: A review.

    PubMed

    Medina, Jorge; Monreal, Carlos; Barea, José Miguel; Arriagada, César; Borie, Fernando; Cornejo, Pablo

    2015-08-01

    Agricultural activities produce vast amounts of organic residues including straw, unmarketable or culled fruit and vegetables, post-harvest or post-processing wastes, clippings and residuals from forestry or pruning operations, and animal manure. Improper disposal of these materials may produce undesirable environmental (e.g. odors or insect refuges) and health impacts. On the other hand, agricultural residues are of interest to various industries and sectors of the economy due to their energy content (i.e., for combustion), their potential use as feedstock to produce biofuels and/or fine chemicals, or as a soil amendments for polluted or degraded soils when composted. Our objective is review new biotechnologies that could be used to manage these residues for land application and remediation of contaminated and eroded soils. Bibliographic information is complemented through a comprehensive review of the physico-chemical fundamental mechanisms involved in the transformation and stabilization of organic matter by biotic and abiotic soil components.

  6. Microbial removal of toxic metals from a heavily polluted soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolova, Marina; Spasova, Irena; Georgiev, Plamen; Groudev, Stoyan

    2015-04-01

    Samples of a leached cinnamonic forest soil heavily polluted with uranium and some toxic heavy metals (mainly copper, zinc and cadmium) were subjected to cleaning by means of bioleaching with acidophilic chemolithotrophic bacteria. The treatment was carried out in a green house in which several plots containing 150 kg of soil each were constructed. The effect of some essential environmental factors such as pH, humidity, temperature and contents of nutrients on the cleaning process was studied. It was found that under optimal conditions the content of pollutants were decreased below the relevant permissible levels within a period of 170 days. The soil cleaned in this way was characterized by a much higher production of biomass of different plants (alfalfa, clover, red fescue, vetch) than the untreated polluted soil.

  7. The Effects of Organic Pollutants in Soil on Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Lynn

    2013-04-01

    The soil has always been depository of the organic chemicals produced naturally or anthropogenically. Soil contamination is a serious human and environmental problem. A large body of evidence has shown the risks of adverse health effects with the exposure to contaminated soil due to the large quantities of organic chemicals used in agriculture and urban areas that have a legacy of environmental pollution linked to industrial activities, coal burning, motor vehicle emissions, waste incineration and waste dumping. In agricultural areas, because of the effort to provide adequate quantities of agricultural products, farmers have been using an increasing amount of organic chemicals, but the resulting pollution has enormous potential for environmental damage. The types of organic pollutants commonly found in soils are polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides, herbicides and organic fuels, especially gasoline and diesel. Another source of soil pollution is the complex mixture of organic chemicals, metals and microorganisms in the effluent from septic systems, animal wastes and other sources of biowaste. The soils of the world are a vast mixture of chemicals and although conditions are such that an individual is rarely exposed to a single compound, the great majority of people are exposed to a vast chemical mixture of organics, their metabolites, and other compounds at low concentrations Human exposure to organic pollutants in the soil is an area of toxicology that is very difficult to study due to the low concentration of the pollutants. The toxicological studies of single organic pollutants found in soils are limited and research on the metabolites and of chemical mixtures is very limited. The majority of toxicological studies are conducted at relatively high doses and for short periods of exposure. This makes the application of this data to exposure

  8. [Petroleum pollution and the microbial community structure in the soil of Shengli Oilfield].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Song, Xue-Ying; Sun, Rui-Lian; Xie, Fu-Ju; Wang, Ren-Qing; Wang, Wen-Xing

    2014-03-01

    Soils around a new oil well (2011- ) and an old oil well (1966-2003) were sampled to investigate the characteristics of petroleum pollution in the oilfield. The structure of soil microbial community was analyzed by PCR-DGGE and clone sequencing techniques. Results showed that the soils around the two oil wells were generally contaminated with petroleum, and the concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons mostly exceeded the threshold of the environmental quality standards of soil (500 mg x kg(-1)). The total petroleum hydrocarbons concentration of the polluted soil was significantly positively correlated with the contents of organic carbon, total nitrogen and available potassium, respectively. The microbial diversity index in the soil around the old oil well decreased with the increasing total petroleum hydrocarbons concentration, however, it was reversed for the soil around the new oil well. Sequence analysis of the prominent bands in DGGE profiles showed that some dominant species existed in the petroleum-contaminated soils around the oil wells and mostly were oil-associated and hydrocarbon degrading bacteria, including Microbacterium, Streptomyces, Dietzia, Flavobacterium, alpha-Proteobacteria, and gamma-Proteobacteria.

  9. [Bio-indicating function of soil protozoa to environmental pollution].

    PubMed

    Song, Xueying; Song, Yufang; Sun, Tieheng; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Qixing

    2004-10-01

    Due to the abundant species and huge biomass, soil protozoa play an important role in soil ecosystem. As a bio-indicator, soil protozoa have many advantages over other soil animals. Studies on the community structures, quantities, and dynamic variations of biodiversity of soil protozoa could provide powerful means to evaluate natural environmental changes and to monitor the environmental pollution brought by anthropic activities. Based on the current study at home and abroad, this paper gave a review on the function of soil protozoa in ecosystems, their advantages as bio-indicator, and their responses to environmental factors, soil contaminants and the change of atmospheric CO2. The application prospect of soil protozoa in eco-toxicity diagnosis was also discussed.

  10. The Soil Degradation Subsystem of the Hungarian Environmental Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, József; Pirkó, Béla; Szabóné Kele, Gabriella; Dombos, Miklós; László, Péter; Koós, Sándor; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Laborczi, Annamária; Pásztor, László

    2013-04-01

    Regular data collection on the state of agricultural soils has not been in operation in Hungary for more than two decades. In the meantime, mainly thanks to the Hungarian Soil Strategy and the planned Soil Framework Directive, the demand for the information on state of Hungarian soils and the follow up of the harmful changes in their conditions and functioning has greatly increased. In 2010 the establishment of a new national soil monitoring system was supported by the Environment and Energy Operational Programme for Informatics Development. The aim of the project was to collect, manage, analyse and publish soil data related to the state of soils and the environmental stresses attributed to the pressures due to agriculture; setting up an appropriate information system in order to fulfil the directives of the Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection. Further objective was the web-based publication of soil data as well as information to support the related public service mission and to inform publicity. The developed information system operates as the Soil Degradation Subsystem of the National Environmental Information System being compatible with its other elements. A suitable representative sampling method was elaborated. The representativity is meant for soil associations, landuse, agricultural practices and typical degradation processes. Soil data were collected on county levels led by regional representatives but altogether they are representative for the whole territory of Hungary. During the project, about 700,000 elementary data were generated, close to 2,000 parcels of 285 farms were surveyed resulting more than 9,000 analysis, 7,000 samples and 28,000 pictures. The overall number of the recorded parcels is 4500, with a total area of about 250,000 hectares. The effect of agricultural land use on soils manifests in rapid changes -related to natural processes- in qualitative and quantitative soil parameters. In intensively used agricultural areas, particularly

  11. Adsorption and degradation of five selected antibiotics in agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Pan, Min; Chu, L M

    2016-03-01

    Large quantities of antibiotics are being added to agricultural fields worldwide through the application of wastewater, manures and biosolids, resulting in antibiotic contamination and elevated environmental risks in terrestrial environments. Most studies on the environmental fate of antibiotics focus on aquatic environments or wastewater treatment plants. Little is known about the behavior of antibiotics at environmentally relevant concentrations in agricultural soil. In this study we evaluated the adsorption and degradation of five different antibiotics (tetracycline, sulfamethazine, norfloxacin, erythromycin, and chloramphenicol) in sterilized and non-sterilized agricultural soils under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Adsorption was highest for tetracycline (Kd, 1093 L/kg), while that for sulfamethazine was negligible (Kd, 1.365 L/kg). All five antibiotics were susceptible to microbial degradation under aerobic conditions, with half-lives ranging from 2.9 to 43.3 d in non-sterilized soil and 40.8 to 86.6 d in sterilized soil. Degradation occurred at a higher rate under aerobic conditions but was relatively persistent under anaerobic conditions. For all the antibiotics, a higher initial concentration was found to slow down degradation and prolong persistence in soil. The degradation behavior of the antibiotics varied in relation to their physicochemical properties as well as the microbial activities and aeration of the recipient soil. The poor adsorption and relative persistence of sulfamethazine under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions suggest that it may pose a higher risk to groundwater quality. An equation was proposed to predict the fate of antibiotics in soil under different field conditions, and assess their risks to the environment.

  12. Veterinary Antibiotic Effects on Atrazine Degradation and Soil Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Nordenholt, Rebecca M; Goyne, Keith W; Kremer, Robert J; Lin, Chung-Ho; Lerch, Robert N; Veum, Kristen S

    2016-03-01

    Veterinary antibiotics (VAs) in manure applied to agricultural lands may change agrichemical degradation by altering soil microbial community structure or function. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of two VAs, sulfamethazine (SMZ) and oxytetracycline (OTC), on atrazine (ATZ) degradation, soil microbial enzymatic activity, and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) markers. Sandy loam soil with and without 5% swine manure (w/w) was amended with 0 or 500 μg kgC radiolabeled ATZ and with 0, 100, or 1000 μg kg SMZ or OTC and incubated at 25°C in the dark for 96 d. The half-life of ATZ was not significantly affected by VA treatment in the presence or absence of manure; however, the VAs significantly ( < 0.05) inhibited ATZ mineralization in soil without manure (25-50% reduction). Manure amendment decreased ATZ degradation by 22%, reduced ATZ mineralization by 50%, and increased the half-life of ATZ by >10 d. The VAs had limited adverse effects on the microbial enzymes β-glucosidase and dehydrogenase in soils with and without manure. In contrast, manure application stimulated dehydrogenase activity and altered chlorinated ATZ metabolite profiles. Concentrations of PLFA markers were reduced by additions of ATZ, manure, OTC, and SMZ; adverse additive effects of combined treatments were noted for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and actinobacteria. In this work, the VAs did not influence persistence of the ATZ parent compound or chlorinated ATZ metabolite formation and degradation. However, reduced CO evolved from VA-treated soil suggests an inhibition to the degradation of other ATZ metabolites due to an altered soil microbial community structure. PMID:27065404

  13. Adsorption and degradation of five selected antibiotics in agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Pan, Min; Chu, L M

    2016-03-01

    Large quantities of antibiotics are being added to agricultural fields worldwide through the application of wastewater, manures and biosolids, resulting in antibiotic contamination and elevated environmental risks in terrestrial environments. Most studies on the environmental fate of antibiotics focus on aquatic environments or wastewater treatment plants. Little is known about the behavior of antibiotics at environmentally relevant concentrations in agricultural soil. In this study we evaluated the adsorption and degradation of five different antibiotics (tetracycline, sulfamethazine, norfloxacin, erythromycin, and chloramphenicol) in sterilized and non-sterilized agricultural soils under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Adsorption was highest for tetracycline (Kd, 1093 L/kg), while that for sulfamethazine was negligible (Kd, 1.365 L/kg). All five antibiotics were susceptible to microbial degradation under aerobic conditions, with half-lives ranging from 2.9 to 43.3 d in non-sterilized soil and 40.8 to 86.6 d in sterilized soil. Degradation occurred at a higher rate under aerobic conditions but was relatively persistent under anaerobic conditions. For all the antibiotics, a higher initial concentration was found to slow down degradation and prolong persistence in soil. The degradation behavior of the antibiotics varied in relation to their physicochemical properties as well as the microbial activities and aeration of the recipient soil. The poor adsorption and relative persistence of sulfamethazine under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions suggest that it may pose a higher risk to groundwater quality. An equation was proposed to predict the fate of antibiotics in soil under different field conditions, and assess their risks to the environment. PMID:26745292

  14. Elevated mobility of persistent organic pollutants in the soil of a tropical rainforest.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qian; Nizzetto, Luca; Liu, Xiang; Borgå, Katrine; Starrfelt, Jostein; Li, Jun; Jiang, Yishan; Liu, Xin; Jones, Kevin C; Zhang, Gan

    2015-04-01

    Semivolatile persistent organic pollutants (POP) are bioaccumulative and toxic contaminants. Their global distribution depends on source distribution, atmospheric transport, degradation, and the exchange with ocean and land surfaces. Forests are crucial terrestrial reservoirs due to the commonly envisaged high capacity of their surface soils to store and immobilize airborne contaminants bound to soil organic matter. Our results show that POPs can be unexpectedly mobile in the soil of a tropical rainforest due to fast litter turnover (leading to rapid POP transfer to the subsoil) and leaching rates exceeding degradation rates especially for more hydrophobic congeners. Co-transport in association with leaching fine particulate and dissolved organic matter appears as a relevant driver of this PCB export. A markedly different distribution pattern is displayed in this soil in comparison to soils of colder environments with lower overall storage capacity. These findings show that biogeochemistry of organic matter degradation and weathering can influence POP soil fate. Because tropical forests represent 60% of the global terrestrial productivity, the highlighted dynamics might have an implication for the general distribution of these contaminants.

  15. Thermal properties of degraded lowland peat-moorsh soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnatowski, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Soil thermal properties, i.e.: specific heat capacity (c), thermal conductivity (K), volumetric heat capacity (C) govern the thermal environment and heat transport through the soil. Hence the precise knowledge and accurate predictions of these properties for peaty soils with high amount of organic matter are especially important for the proper forecasting of soil temperature and thus it may lead to a better assessment of the greenhouse gas emissions created by microbiological activity of the peatlands. The objective of the study was to develop the predictive models of the selected thermal parameters of peat-moorsh soils in terms of their potential applicability for forecasting changes of soil temperature in degraded ecosystems of the Middle Biebrza River Valley area. Evaluation of the soil thermal properties was conducted for the parameters: specific heat capacity (c), volumetric heat capacities of the dry and saturated soil (Cdry, Csat) and thermal conductivities of the dry and saturated soil (Kdry, Ksat). The thermal parameters were measured using the dual-needle probe (KD2-Pro) on soil samples collected from seven peaty soils, representing total 24 horizons. The surface layers were characterized by different degrees of advancement of soil degradation dependent on intensiveness of the cultivation practises (peaty and humic moorsh). The underlying soil layers contain peat deposits of different botanical composition (peat-moss, sedge-reed, reed and alder) and varying degrees of decomposition of the organic matter, from H1 to H7 (von Post scale). Based on the research results it has been shown that the specific heat capacity of the soils differs depending on the type of soil (type of moorsh and type of peat). The range of changes varied from 1276 J.kg-1.K-1 in the humic moorsh soil to 1944 J.kg-1.K-1 in the low decomposed sedge-moss peat. It has also been stated that in degraded peat soils with the increasing of the ash content in the soil the value of specific heat

  16. Thermal properties of degraded lowland peat-moorsh soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnatowski, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    Soil thermal properties, i.e.: specific heat capacity (c), thermal conductivity (K), volumetric heat capacity (C) govern the thermal environment and heat transport through the soil. Hence the precise knowledge and accurate predictions of these properties for peaty soils with high amount of organic matter are especially important for the proper forecasting of soil temperature and thus it may lead to a better assessment of the greenhouse gas emissions created by microbiological activity of the peatlands. The objective of the study was to develop the predictive models of the selected thermal parameters of peat-moorsh soils in terms of their potential applicability for forecasting changes of soil temperature in degraded ecosystems of the Middle Biebrza River Valley area. Evaluation of the soil thermal properties was conducted for the parameters: specific heat capacity (c), volumetric heat capacities of the dry and saturated soil (Cdry, Csat) and thermal conductivities of the dry and saturated soil (Kdry, Ksat). The thermal parameters were measured using the dual-needle probe (KD2-Pro) on soil samples collected from seven peaty soils, representing total 24 horizons. The surface layers were characterized by different degrees of advancement of soil degradation dependent on intensiveness of the cultivation practises (peaty and humic moorsh). The underlying soil layers contain peat deposits of different botanical composition (peat-moss, sedge-reed, reed and alder) and varying degrees of decomposition of the organic matter, from H1 to H7 (von Post scale). Based on the research results it has been shown that the specific heat capacity of the soils differs depending on the type of soil (type of moorsh and type of peat). The range of changes varied from 1276 J.kg‑1.K‑1 in the humic moorsh soil to 1944 J.kg‑1.K‑1 in the low decomposed sedge-moss peat. It has also been stated that in degraded peat soils with the increasing of the ash content in the soil the value of

  17. Impact of repeated chlorotoluron application on its degradation in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocarek, Martin; Kodesova, Radka; Drabek, Ondrej; Kozak, Josef

    2010-05-01

    The effect of repeated chlorotoluron application on its degradation was studied under the field condition in Haplic Chernozem. Chlorotoluron was applied repeatedly (dose of 0.025 mg.m-2) on the top of the soil profile in years 2006, 2008 and 2009. Climatic data as a daily minimal and maximal temperature and daily rainfall were collected during the experiment. Pressure heads at 4 depths (10, 25, 50, 80 cm) were measured using tensiometers. Soil-water contents and temperatures at 5 depths (5, 10, 25, 50, 80 cm) were monitored using the ECH20 EC-TE sensors. The suction cups were used to take soil-water samples at various depths (5, 10, 25, 50 cm) to indentify presence of the herbicide during 140 days period. In addition, soil samples were taken from layers 2 cm thick (to the depth of 50 cm) 35, 50 and 140 day after the herbicide application to measure a total content of the applied herbicide in each layer within the soil profile. Herbicide concentrations in soil extracts and soil water samples were analyzed using the HPLC technology. The total chlorotoluron content within the monitored soil profile was evaluated, and the herbicide field degradation rate and half-life were calculated. Chlorotoluron was not detected below the depth of 32 cm during the entire experimental periods. Chlorotoluron field half-lives estimated in this study were 28.4, 33.4 and 32.3 days in 2006, 2008 and 2009, respectively. The herbicide half-lives were also measured in the laboratory under the controlled soil-water content and temperature conditions: 20.6 days (28 C, 40% soil-water content per mass), 33.16 days (28 C, 20% soil-water content per mass); 27.76 days (20 C, 40% soil-water content per mass); 39.85 days (20 C, 20% soil-water content per mass); 32.27 days (10 C, 40% soil-water content per mass); 45.7 days (10 C, 20% soil-water content per mass). The field herbicide half-lives (obtained under the similar average temperature and soil-water content conditions) corresponded to half

  18. Facilitating the afforestation of Mediterranean polluted soils by nurse shrubs.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, María T; Pérez-Ramos, Ignacio M; Murillo, José M; Marañón, Teodoro

    2015-09-15

    The revegetation of polluted sites and abandoned agricultural soils is critical to reduce soil losses and to control the spread of soil pollution in the Mediterranean region, which is currently exposed to the greatest soil erosion risk in Europe. However, events of massive plant mortality usually occur during the first years after planting, mainly due to the adverse conditions of high irradiance and drought stress. Here, we evaluated the usefulness of considering the positive plant-plant interactions (facilitation effect) in the afforestation of polluted agricultural sites, using pre-existing shrubs as nurse plants. We used nurse shrubs as planting microsites for acorns of Quercus ilex (Holm oak) along a gradient of soil pollution in southwestern Spain, and monitored seedling growth, survival, and chemical composition during three consecutive years. Seedling survival greatly increased (from 20% to more than 50%) when acorns were sown under shrub, in comparison to the open, unprotected matrix. Facilitation of seedling growth by shrubs increased along the gradient of soil pollution, in agreement with the stress gradient hypothesis that predicts higher intensity of the facilitation effects with increasing abiotic stress. Although the accumulation of trace elements in seedling leaves was higher underneath shrub, the shading conditions provided by the shrub canopy allowed seedlings to cope with the toxicity provoked by the concurrence of low pH and high trace element concentrations in the most polluted sites. Our results show that the use of shrubs as nurse plants is a promising tool for the cost-effective afforestation of polluted lands under Mediterranean conditions.

  19. Soil microbial response to photo-degraded C60 fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Berry, Timothy D; Clavijo, Andrea P; Zhao, Yingcan; Jafvert, Chad T; Turco, Ronald F; Filley, Timothy R

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that while unfunctionalized carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) exhibit very low decomposition rates in soils, even minor surface functionalization (e.g., as a result of photochemical weathering) may accelerate microbial decay. We present results from a C60 fullerene-soil incubation study designed to investigate the potential links between photochemical and microbial degradation of photo-irradiated C60. Irradiating aqueous (13)C-labeled C60 with solar-wavelength light resulted in a complex mixture of intermediate products with decreased aromaticity. Although addition of irradiated C60 to soil microcosms had little effect on net soil respiration, excess (13)C in the respired CO2 demonstrates that photo-irradiating C60 enhanced its degradation in soil, with ∼ 0.78% of 60 day photo-irradiated C60 mineralized. Community analysis by DGGE found that soil microbial community structure was altered and depended on the photo-treatment duration. These findings demonstrate how abiotic and biotic transformation processes can couple to influence degradation of CNMs in the natural environment.

  20. Bacterial inoculants of forage grasses that enhance degradation of 2-chlorobenzoic acid in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Siciliano, S.D.; Germida, J.J.

    1997-06-01

    Biological remediation of contaminated soil is an effective method of reducing risk to human and ecosystem health. Bacteria and plants might be used to enhance remediation of soil pollutants in situ. This study assessed the potential of bacteria, plants, and plant-bacteria associations to remediate 2-chlorobenzoic acid (2CBA) contaminated soil. Initially, grass viability was assessed in 2CBA-contaminated soil. Soil was contaminated with 2CBA, forage grasses were grown under growth chamber conditions for 42 or 60 d, and the 2CBA concentration in soil was determined by gas chromatography. Only five of 16 forage grasses grew in 2CBA-treated soil. Growth of Bromus inermis had no effect on 2CBA concentration, whereas Agropyron intermedium, B. biebersteinii, A. riparum, and Elymus dauricus decreased 2CBA relative to nonplanted control soil by 32 to 42%. The 12 bacteria isolates were screened for their ability to promote the germination of the five grasses in 2CBA-contaminated soil. Inoculation of A. riparum with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain R75, a proven plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium, increased seed germination by 80% and disappearance of 2CBA by 20% relative to noninoculated plants. Inoculation of E. dauricus with a mixture of P. savastanoi strain CB35, a 2CBA-degrading bacterium, and P. aeruginosa strain R75 increased disappearance of 2CBA by 112% relative to noninoculated plants. No clear relationship between enhanced 2CBA disappearance and increased plant biomass was found. These results suggest that specific plant-microbial systems can be developed to enhance remediation of pollutants in soil.

  1. Simulation of the migration and transformation of petroleum pollutants in the soils of the Loess plateau: a case study in the Maling oil field of northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Ma, Jinzhu; Wang, Yunquan; Zhang, Yali; Chen, Lihua; Edmunds, W Mike

    2013-10-01

    We developed a coupled water-oil simulation model to simulate the migration and transformation of petroleum-derived contaminants in the soil of the Xifeng oil field. To do so, we used the HYDRUS-2D model, which simulates the diffusion, adsorption or desorption, and microbial degradation of petroleum-derived hydrocarbons in the soil-water system. The saturated soil hydraulic conductivity of petroleum-derived pollutants was 0.05 cm day(-1), which is about 1 to 2 % of the soil moisture permeability coefficient. Our numerical simulation results show that spilled crude oil was mainly concentrated in the surface horizons of the soil. The organic pollutant concentration tended to be highest nearest to the pollution source. The pollutant migration was generally concentrated within the top 20 to 30 cm of the soil, with the maximum concentration in the top 5 cm of the soil. With passing time, the pollutant accumulation increased and the adsorption and degradation functions reached a dynamic balance with the input rate at depths greater than 30 cm below the soil surface. The oil-derived pollutants totaled 50 to 100 mg kg(-1) under the dynamic balance condition, which occurred after 20 to 30 years. The petroleum-derived pollutant concentration in the loess soil was inversely correlated with the horizontal distance from the oil well, and the concentration decreased greatly at a distance greater than 40 m from the well.

  2. Management practices influence productivity of degraded or eroded soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management practices influence the productivity of eroded or degraded soil. This study investigates the influence of beef manure amendment compared with commercial fertil¬izer (urea) applied at two rates (60 and 120 lb N/a) with two tillage practices (conven¬tional tillage, CT, and no-tillage, NT). ...

  3. Soil degradation in India: Challenges and potential solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil degradation in India is estimated to occur on 147 Mha of land, including 94 Mha from water erosion, 16 Mha from acidification, 14 Mha from flooding, 9 Mha from wind erosion, 6 Mha from salinity, and 7 Mha from a combination of factors. India supports 18% of the world’s human population and 15%...

  4. DEGRADATION OF METHYL IODIDE IN SOIL: EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methyl iodide (MeI) is a promising alternative to the phased-out fumigant methyl bromide; however, there are concerns about its environmental fate following soil fumigation. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of various environmental factors on the degradation rate of ...

  5. Veterinary antibiotic effects on atrazine degradation and soil microorganisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Veterinary antibiotics (VAs) in manure applied to agricultural lands may change agrichemical degradation by altering soil microbial community structure or function. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of two VAs, sulfamethazine (SMZ) and oxytetracycline (OTC), on atrazine ...

  6. Sorption and degradation of estrogen conjugates in agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural estrogenic hormone, 17'-estradiol (E2), can disrupt the endocrine system of some aquatic species at ng/L concentrations. Laboratory studies have shown low potentials for E2 persistence and mobility in the environment due to high degradation and soil retention. However, field studies have...

  7. TNT and RDX degradation and extraction from contaminated soil using subcritical water.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Nazrul; Shin, Moon-Su; Jo, Young-Tae; Park, Jeong-Hun

    2015-01-01

    The use of explosives either for industrial or military operations have resulted in the environmental pollution, poses ecological and health hazard. In this work, a subcritical water extraction (SCWE) process at laboratory scale was used at varying water temperature (100-175 °C) and flow rate (0.5-1.5 mL min(-1)), to treat 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) contaminated soil, to reveal information with respect to the explosives removal (based on the analyses of soil residue after extraction), and degradation performance (based on the analyses of water extracts) of this process. Continuous flow subcritical water has been considered on removal of explosives to avoid the repartitioning of non-degraded compounds to the soil upon cooling which usually occurs in the batch system. In the SCWE experiments, near complete degradation of both TNT and RDX was observed at 175 °C based on analysis of water extracts and soil. Test results also indicated that TNT removal of >99% and a complete RDX removal were achieved by this process, when the operating conditions were 1 mL min(-1), and treatment time of 20 min, after the temperature reached 175 °C. HPLC-UV and ion chromatography analysis confirmed that the explosives underwent for degradation. The low concentration of explosives found in the process wastewater indicates that water recycling may be viable, to treat additional soil. Our results have shown in the remediation of explosives contaminated soil, the effectiveness of the continuous flow SCWE process.

  8. Salinity and Conductivity Amendment of Soil Enhanced the Bioelectrochemical Degradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yueyong; Zhao, Qian; Yu, Binbin; Li, Yongtao; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-01-01

    The extreme salinity and high internal resistance of saline-alkali soil contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons were two key limitations for using the bioelectrochemical remediation. In order to solve two problems, we simply rinsed soil, added carbon fiber to polluted soil. The charge output was enhanced by 110% with increase of the maximum current densities from 81 to 304 mA·m(-2) while hydrocarbons degradation rate enhanced by 484%, especially the high molecular weight fractions (C28-C36 of n-alkanes and 4-6 rings of PAHs). These effects were possibly due to the selective enrichment of species belonged to δ-Proteobacteria (Proteobacteria), Flavobacteriia (Bacteroidetes) or Clostridia (Firmicutes), the activities of biological electron transfer and enzymes. As we know, oxygenase gene that directly decided the process of degradation, was surveyed for the first time in soil bioelectrochemical remediation system. The results confirmed that the bio-current stimulated the activities of naphthalene dioxygenase and xylene monooxygenase and thus the hydrocarbons degradation and the electricity generation. Given that electricity generation and the remediation performance are governed by multiple factors, understanding of microbial community and enzyme gene is crucial to promote the power yield and the bioelectrochemical remediation applicability. PMID:27597387

  9. Salinity and Conductivity Amendment of Soil Enhanced the Bioelectrochemical Degradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yueyong; Zhao, Qian; Yu, Binbin; Li, Yongtao; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-01-01

    The extreme salinity and high internal resistance of saline-alkali soil contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons were two key limitations for using the bioelectrochemical remediation. In order to solve two problems, we simply rinsed soil, added carbon fiber to polluted soil. The charge output was enhanced by 110% with increase of the maximum current densities from 81 to 304 mA·m−2 while hydrocarbons degradation rate enhanced by 484%, especially the high molecular weight fractions (C28–C36 of n-alkanes and 4–6 rings of PAHs). These effects were possibly due to the selective enrichment of species belonged to δ-Proteobacteria (Proteobacteria), Flavobacteriia (Bacteroidetes) or Clostridia (Firmicutes), the activities of biological electron transfer and enzymes. As we know, oxygenase gene that directly decided the process of degradation, was surveyed for the first time in soil bioelectrochemical remediation system. The results confirmed that the bio-current stimulated the activities of naphthalene dioxygenase and xylene monooxygenase and thus the hydrocarbons degradation and the electricity generation. Given that electricity generation and the remediation performance are governed by multiple factors, understanding of microbial community and enzyme gene is crucial to promote the power yield and the bioelectrochemical remediation applicability. PMID:27597387

  10. Salinity and Conductivity Amendment of Soil Enhanced the Bioelectrochemical Degradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yueyong; Zhao, Qian; Yu, Binbin; Li, Yongtao; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-09-01

    The extreme salinity and high internal resistance of saline-alkali soil contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons were two key limitations for using the bioelectrochemical remediation. In order to solve two problems, we simply rinsed soil, added carbon fiber to polluted soil. The charge output was enhanced by 110% with increase of the maximum current densities from 81 to 304 mA·m‑2 while hydrocarbons degradation rate enhanced by 484%, especially the high molecular weight fractions (C28–C36 of n-alkanes and 4–6 rings of PAHs). These effects were possibly due to the selective enrichment of species belonged to δ-Proteobacteria (Proteobacteria), Flavobacteriia (Bacteroidetes) or Clostridia (Firmicutes), the activities of biological electron transfer and enzymes. As we know, oxygenase gene that directly decided the process of degradation, was surveyed for the first time in soil bioelectrochemical remediation system. The results confirmed that the bio-current stimulated the activities of naphthalene dioxygenase and xylene monooxygenase and thus the hydrocarbons degradation and the electricity generation. Given that electricity generation and the remediation performance are governed by multiple factors, understanding of microbial community and enzyme gene is crucial to promote the power yield and the bioelectrochemical remediation applicability.

  11. Salinity and Conductivity Amendment of Soil Enhanced the Bioelectrochemical Degradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yueyong; Zhao, Qian; Yu, Binbin; Li, Yongtao; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-01-01

    The extreme salinity and high internal resistance of saline-alkali soil contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons were two key limitations for using the bioelectrochemical remediation. In order to solve two problems, we simply rinsed soil, added carbon fiber to polluted soil. The charge output was enhanced by 110% with increase of the maximum current densities from 81 to 304 mA·m(-2) while hydrocarbons degradation rate enhanced by 484%, especially the high molecular weight fractions (C28-C36 of n-alkanes and 4-6 rings of PAHs). These effects were possibly due to the selective enrichment of species belonged to δ-Proteobacteria (Proteobacteria), Flavobacteriia (Bacteroidetes) or Clostridia (Firmicutes), the activities of biological electron transfer and enzymes. As we know, oxygenase gene that directly decided the process of degradation, was surveyed for the first time in soil bioelectrochemical remediation system. The results confirmed that the bio-current stimulated the activities of naphthalene dioxygenase and xylene monooxygenase and thus the hydrocarbons degradation and the electricity generation. Given that electricity generation and the remediation performance are governed by multiple factors, understanding of microbial community and enzyme gene is crucial to promote the power yield and the bioelectrochemical remediation applicability.

  12. Degradation of oil products in a soil from a Russian Barents hot-spot during electrodialytic remediation.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Kristine B; Lejon, Tore; Jensen, Pernille E; Ottosen, Lisbeth M

    2016-01-01

    A highly oil-polluted soil from Krasnoe in North-West Russia was used to investigate the degradation of organic pollutants during electrodialytic remediation. Removal efficiencies were up to 70 % for total hydrocarbons (THC) and up to 65 % for polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Relatively more of the lighter PAH compounds and THC fractions were degraded. A principal component analysis (PCA) revealed a difference in the distribution of PAH compounds after the remediation. The observed clustering of experiments in the PCA scores plot was assessed to be related to the stirring rate. Multivariate analysis of the experimental settings and final concentrations in the 12 experiments revealed that the stirring rate of the soil suspension was by far the most important parameter for the remediation for both THC and PAH. Light was the second most important variable for PAH and seems to influence degradation. The experimental variables current density and remediation time did not significantly influence the degradation of the organic pollutants. Despite current density not influencing the remediation, there is potential for degrading organic pollutants during electrodialytic removal of heavy metals, as long as a stirred set-up is applied. Depending on remediation objectives, further optimisation may be needed in order to develop efficient remediation strategies.

  13. Degradation of oil products in a soil from a Russian Barents hot-spot during electrodialytic remediation.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Kristine B; Lejon, Tore; Jensen, Pernille E; Ottosen, Lisbeth M

    2016-01-01

    A highly oil-polluted soil from Krasnoe in North-West Russia was used to investigate the degradation of organic pollutants during electrodialytic remediation. Removal efficiencies were up to 70 % for total hydrocarbons (THC) and up to 65 % for polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Relatively more of the lighter PAH compounds and THC fractions were degraded. A principal component analysis (PCA) revealed a difference in the distribution of PAH compounds after the remediation. The observed clustering of experiments in the PCA scores plot was assessed to be related to the stirring rate. Multivariate analysis of the experimental settings and final concentrations in the 12 experiments revealed that the stirring rate of the soil suspension was by far the most important parameter for the remediation for both THC and PAH. Light was the second most important variable for PAH and seems to influence degradation. The experimental variables current density and remediation time did not significantly influence the degradation of the organic pollutants. Despite current density not influencing the remediation, there is potential for degrading organic pollutants during electrodialytic removal of heavy metals, as long as a stirred set-up is applied. Depending on remediation objectives, further optimisation may be needed in order to develop efficient remediation strategies. PMID:27026865

  14. Degradation kinetics and metabolites of carbamazepine in soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Juying; Dodgen, Laurel; Ye, Qingfu; Gan, Jay

    2013-04-16

    The antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) is one of the most frequently detected human pharmaceuticals in wastewater effluents and biosolids. Soil is a primary environmental compartment receiving CBZ through wastewater irrigation and biosolid application. In this study, we explored the transformation of CBZ to biologically active intermediates in soil. Both (14)C labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) were used to track transformation kinetics and identify major degradation intermediates. Through 120 days of incubation under aerobic conditions, mineralization of CBZ did not exceed 2% of the spiked rate in different soils. Amendment of biosolids further suppressed mineralization. The fraction of non-extractable (i.e., bound) residue also remained negligible (<5%). On the other hand, CBZ was transformed to a range of degradation intermediates, including 10,11-dihydro-10-hydroxycarbamazepine, carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide, acridone-N-carbaldehyde, 4-aldehyde-9-acridone, and acridine, of which acridone-N-carbaldehyde was formed in a large fraction and appeared to be recalcitrant to further degradation. Electrocyclization, ring cleavage, hydrogen shift, carbonylation, and decarbonylation contributed to CBZ transformative reactions in soil, producing biologically active products. The persistence of the parent compound and formation of incomplete intermediates suggest that CBZ has a high risk for off-site transport from soil, such as accumulation into plants and contamination of groundwater.

  15. Diffuse pollution of soil and water: Long term trends at large scales?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grathwohl, P.

    2012-04-01

    Industrialization and urbanization, which consequently increased pressure on the environment to cause degradation of soil and water quality over more than a century, is still ongoing. The number of potential environmental contaminants detected in surface and groundwater is continuously increasing; from classical industrial and agricultural chemicals, to flame retardants, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products. While point sources of pollution can be managed in principle, diffuse pollution is only reversible at very long time scales if at all. Compounds which were phased out many decades ago such as PCBs or DDT are still abundant in soils, sediments and biota. How diffuse pollution is processed at large scales in space (e.g. catchments) and time (centuries) is unknown. The relevance to the field of processes well investigated at the laboratory scale (e.g. sorption/desorption and (bio)degradation kinetics) is not clear. Transport of compounds is often coupled to the water cycle and in order to assess trends in diffuse pollution, detailed knowledge about the hydrology and the solute fluxes at the catchment scale is required (e.g. input/output fluxes, transformation rates at the field scale). This is also a prerequisite in assessing management options for reversal of adverse trends.

  16. Remediation of polluted soil by a two-stage treatment system: desorption of phenanthrene in soil and electrochemical treatment to recover the extraction agent.

    PubMed

    Gómez, J; Alcántara, M T; Pazos, M; Sanromán, M A

    2010-01-15

    In this study, the feasibility of a two-stage treatment process for the remediation of soil contaminated with phenanthrene as a model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) has been assessed at laboratory scale. The initial stage of the process involved contacting contaminated soil with a solution of Tween 80 to enhance the desorption of phenanthrene from soil. In order to simulate a flushing process this initial stage was carried out in a washing packed-bed soil column. At the optimised conditions the total phenanthrene removal attained a value of almost 65% after 3 days. The second stage of the suggested treatment involved regeneration of the washing solution via phenanthrene degradation. The use of an electrochemical treatment was proposed for surfactant recovery and degradation of contaminants present in the solution collected. This oxidation was accomplished via an electrochemical cell by using graphite as electrode material. The phenanthrene was almost totally degraded in 3 days, reaching a degradation of about 96%. In addition, a test in which this regenerated solution was employed in the washing process was carried out in shake flask and washing column. The results demonstrate that selective degradation of pollutants by electrochemical treatment is potentially effective in reusing surfactant in another polluted soil treatment. PMID:19758751

  17. Degradation of PAHs in soil by Lasiodiplodia theobromae and enhanced benzo[a]pyrene degradation by the addition of Tween-80.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Haibin; Li, Jing; Sun, Hongwen

    2014-09-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a five-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), which has carcinogenic potency, is highly recalcitrant and resistant to microbial degradation. A novel fungus, Lasiodiplodia theobromae (L. theobromae), which can degrade BaP as a sole carbon source in liquid, was isolated in our laboratory. To prompt the further application of L. theobromae in remediation of sites polluted by BaP and other PAHs, the present study was targeted toward the removal of BaP and PAHs from soil by L. theobromae. The degradation of BaP by L. theobromae was studied using a soil spiked with 50 mg/kg BaP. L. theobromae could remove 32.1 % of the BaP after 35 days of cultivation. Phenanthrene (PHE) inhibited BaP degradation as a competitive substrate. The tested surfactants enhanced BaP degradation in soil by different extents, and a removal rate of 92.1 % was achieved at a Tween-80 (TW-80) concentration of 5 g/kg. It was revealed that TW-80 could not only enhance BaP bioavailability by increasing its aqueous solubility and decreasing the size of its colloid particles but also increase enzyme secretion from L. theobromae and the population of L. theobromae. Moreover, ergosterol content together with the biomass C indicated the increase in L. theobromae biomass during the BaP biodegradation process in soils. Finally, a soil from a historically PAH-contaminated field at Beijing Coking Plant in China was tested to assess the feasibility of applying L. theobromae in the remediation of polluted sites. The total removal rate of PAHs by L. theobromae was 53.3 %, which is 13.1 % higher than that by Phanerochaete chrysosporium (P. chrysosporium), an effective PAH degrader. The addition of TW-80 to the field soil further enhanced PAH degradation to 73.2 %. Hence, L. theobromae is a promising novel strain to be implemented in the remediation of soil polluted by PAHs. PMID:24878554

  18. Magnetic structure of polluted soil profiles from Eastern Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeleńska, Maria; Hasso-Agopsowicz, Agata; Kądziałko-Hofmokl, Magdalena; Kopcewicz, Barbara; Sukhorada, Anatoliy; Bondar, Ksenija; Matviishina, Zhanna

    2008-12-01

    Our study concerned magnetic properties of soil profiles taken from polluted regions of Eastern Ukraine around the industrial centres Krivyj Rig, Mariupol and Komsomolsk. Soils represent chernozem and podzoluvisol. The low-field magnetic susceptibility shows enhancement in the topsoil caused by contamination by coarse-grain magnetite connected with industrial pollution. Magnetic mineralogy was determined by means of thermal demagnetisation of SIRM, monitoring of susceptibility changes during warming from -196°C to room temperature and heating to 700°C, and Mössbauer analysis. Granulometry of magnetic particles was investigated by determination of hysteresis parameters, susceptibility, M s, SIRM and ARM ratios and frequency dependence of susceptibility. The chemical parameters, namely pH, organic carbon and iron content in different pedogenic and lithogenic minerals, measured for particular horizons determined pedogenic characteristic of soil profiles. Our study showed that differences in magnetic parameters of non-polluted and polluted soil profiles are not limited to the topsoil, but reach deep layers of the parent material. Industrial pollution promotes formation of the so-called "pedogenic" SP and SD particles in these layers.

  19. Organic Matter as an Indicator of Soil Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero Diaz, Asuncion; Damian Ruiz Sinoga, Jose

    2010-05-01

    Numerous and expensive physical-chemical tests are often carried out to determine the level of soil degration. This study was to find one property, as Organic Matter, which is usually analyzed for determine the soil degradation status. To do this 19 areas in the south and southeast of the Iberian Peninsula (provinces of Málaga, Granada, Almería y Murcia) were selected and a wide sampling process was carried out. Sampling points were spread over a wide pluviometric gradient (from 1100 mm/yr to 232 mm/yr) covering the range from Mediterranean wet to dry. 554 soil surface samples were taken from soil (0-10 cm) and the following properties were analyzed: Texture, Organic Matter (OM), Electric Conductivity (EC), Aggregate Stability (AE) y Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC). These properties were intercorrelated and also with rainfall and the K factor of soil erosion, calculated for each sampling point. Los results obtained by applying the Pearson correlation coefficient to the database shows how as rainfall increases so does OM content (0,97) and la CEC (0,89), but K factor (-0,80) reacts inversely. The content of OM in the soil is related to its biological activity and this in turn is the result of available wáter within the system and, consequently, rainfall. This is specially important in fragile and complex ecogeomorphological systems as is the case of the Mediterranean, where greater or lesser rainfall is similarly reflected in the levels of increase or decrease of soil organic matter. This affirmation is reinforced by linking the organic matter of the soil with other indicative properties such as CEC and erosion, as has been shown by various authors (Imeson y Vis, 1984; De Ploey & Poesen, 1985; Le Bissonnais, 1996; Boix-Fayos et al., 2001; Cammeraat y Imeson, 1998; Cerdá, 1998). As has been stated, there is a direct relationship between rainfall, organic matter content, cation exchange capacity, structural stability, and the resistence to soil erosion factor

  20. Field evaluation of the lignin-degrading fungus 'phanerochaete sordida' to treat creosote-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.W.; Glaser, J.A.; Evans, J.W.; Lamar, R.T.

    1993-01-01

    A field study to determine the ability of selected lignin-degrading fungi to remediate soil contaminated with pentachlorophenol and creosote was performed at a wood treating facility in south central Mississippi in the Autumn of 1991. The study was designed to evaluate 7 fungal treatments and appropriate control treatments. Soil concentrations of 14 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) components of creosote were measured over time to determine treatment efficacies. Fungal treatments involved mixing fungal inocula and aspen chips into the contaminated soil and maintaining moisture by irrigation and aeration by tillage. PAHs of more than 4 rings persisted at their original concentrations during the 8 wk course of the study for all treatments and controls.

  1. [Assessment of Soil Fluorine Pollution in Jinhua Fluorite Ore Areas].

    PubMed

    Ye, Qun-feng; Zhou, Xiao-ling

    2015-07-01

    The contents of. soil total fluorine (TF) and water-soluble fluorine (WF) were measured in fluorite ore areas located in Jinhua City. The single factor index, geoaccumulation index and health risk assessment were used to evaluate fluorine pollution in soil in four fluorite ore areas and one non-ore area, respectively. The results showed that the TF contents in soils were 28. 36-56 052. 39 mg.kg-1 with an arithmetic mean value of 8 325.90 mg.kg-1, a geometric mean of 1 555. 94 mg.kg-1, and a median of 812. 98 mg.kg-1. The variation coefficient of TF was 172. 07% . The soil WF contents ranged from 0. 83 to 74. 63 mg.kg-1 with an arithmetic mean value of 16. 94 mg.kg-1, a geometric mean of 10. 59 mg.kg-1, and a median of 10. 17 mg.kg-1. The variation coefficient of WF was 100. 10%. The soil TF and WF contents were far higher than the national average level of the local fluorine epidemic occurrence area. The fluoride pollution in soil was significantly affected by human factors. Soil fluorine pollution in Yangjia, Lengshuikeng and Huajie fluorite ore areas was the most serious, followed by Daren fluorite ore area, and in non-ore area there was almost no fluorine pollution. Oral ingestion of soils was the main exposure route. Sensitivity analysis of model parameters showed that children's weight exerted the largest influence over hazard quotient. Furthermore, a significant positive correlation was found among the three kinds of evaluation methods.

  2. Enhanced degradation in soil of the herbicide EPTC and determination of its degradative pathway by an isolated soil microorganism

    SciTech Connect

    Ankumah, R.O.

    1988-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to examine the ability of Ohio soils to develop enhanced degradation of the herbicide EPTC (s-ethyl N,N-dipropyl carbamothiaote) and to determine its metabolism by an isolated soil microorganism. Three soils selected to obtain an range in pH, texture, and organic carbon were treated with EPTC for 4 consecutive applications (6 weeks between applications). EPTC concentrations as measured by gas chromatography, decreased 80% or more one week after the second application in all three soils. Metabolism of unlabelled and labelled EPTC by an isolated soil microbe was followed by GC/MS and TLC/LSC analysis, respectively. Rapid decrease in 14-C activity in the organic fraction corresponded with rapid {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolution and transient increase in 14-C activity in the aqueous fraction. Four metabolites were observed in the TLC analysis. Two were identified as EPTC-sulfoxide and N-depropyl EPTC with N-depropyl EPTC being confirmed by GC/MS analysis. The availability of different pathways for EPTC metabolism by soil microbes after repeated applications to the soil results in its very rapid degradation and loss of efficacy.

  3. Measurement of Bioaccessibility of Organic Pollutants in Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, Laura; Semple, Kirk T.

    The quantification of organic contaminant bioaccessibility in soils and sediments is essential for the risk assessment and remediation of contaminated land. Within this framework, practitioners require standardised protocols. Cyclodextrins are a group of macrocyclic compounds that can form inclusion complexes with organic xenobiotics. This occurrence can be exploited to measure the labile/rapidly desorbable compound fraction, which correlates with microbial degradation. We present a rapid and easily reproducible HPCD shake extraction technique that has been experimentally demonstrated to directly predict microbial availability and degradation in soil. This method can provide practitioners with both an indication of bioremediation end-points and may be valuable in the risk assessment of contaminated land.

  4. A new model for polluted soil risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andretta, M.; Villani, M.; Serra, R.

    2003-04-01

    In the last years, the problem of the evaluation of the risk related to soil pollution has became more and more important, all over the world. The increasing number of polluted soils in all the industrialised counties has required the formalisation of well defined methodologies for defining the technical and economical limits of soil remediation. Mainly, these limits are defined in terms of general threshold values that, in some cases, can not be reached even with the so called Best Available Technology (B.A.T.) due for example to the characteristics of the pollutants or of the affected soil, or on the extremely high cost or duration of the remedial intervention. For these reasons, both in the North American Countries and in the European ones, many alternative methodologies based on systematic and scientifically well founded approaches have been developed, in order to determine the real effects of the pollution on the receptor targets. Typically, these methodologies are organised into different levels of detail, the so called "TIERS". Tier 1 is based on a conservative estimation of the risk for the targets, that comes from very general and "worst case" general situations. Tier 2 is based on a more detailed and site specific estimation of the hazard, evaluated by the use of semi-empirical, analytical formulas for the source characterisation, the transport of the pollutant, the target exposition evaluation. Tier 3 is the more detailed and site specific level of application of the risk assessment methodologies and requires the use of numerical methods with many detailed information on the site and on the receptors (e.g.: chemical/physical parameters of the pollutants, hydro-geological data, exposition data, etc.) In this paper, we describe the most important theoretical aspects of the polluted soil risk assessment methodologies and the relevant role played, in this kind of analysis, by the pollutant transport models. In particular, we describe a new and innovative

  5. A quantitative PCR approach for quantification of functional genes involved in the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soils

    PubMed Central

    Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Aburto-Medina, Arturo; Taha, Mohamed; Ball, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are major pollutants globally and due to their carcinogenic and mutagenic properties their clean-up is paramount. Bioremediation or using PAH degrading microorganisms (mainly bacteria) to degrade the pollutants represents cheap, effective methods. These PAH degraders harbor functional genes which help microorganisms use PAHs as source of food and energy. Most probable number (MPN) and plate counting methods are widely used for counting PAHs degraders; however, as culture based methods only count a small fraction (<1%) of microorganisms capable of carrying out PAH degradation, the use of culture-independent methodologies is desirable.•This protocol presents a robust, rapid and sensitive qPCR method for the quantification of the functional genes involved in the degradation of PAHs in soil samples.•This protocol enables us to screen a vast number of PAH contaminated soil samples in few hours.•This protocol provides valuable information about the natural attenuation potential of contaminated soil and can be used to monitor the bioremediation process. PMID:27054096

  6. Bioelectrochemical stimulation of petroleum hydrocarbon degradation in saline soil using U-tube microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Cai, Zhang; Zhou, Qixing; Zhang, Zhineng; Chen, Cuihong

    2012-02-01

    Bioremediation is a cost-effective and eco-friendly approach to decontaminate soils polluted by petroleum hydrocarbons. However, this technique usually requires a long time due to the slow degradation rate by bacteria. By applying U-tube microbial fuel cells (MFCs) designed here, the degradation rate of petroleum hydrocarbons close to the anode (<1 cm) was enhanced by 120% from 6.9 ± 2.5% to 15.2 ± 0.6% with simultaneous 125 ± 7 C of charge output (0.85 ± 0.05 mW/m(2) , 1 kΩ) in the tested period (25 days). Hydrocarbon fingerprint analysis showed that the degradation rate of both alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was accelerated. The decrease of initial water content from 33% to 28% and 23% resulted in a decrease on charge output and hydrocarbon degradation rate, which could be attributed to the increase of internal resistance. A salt accumulation was observed in each reactor due to the evaporation of water from the air-cathode, possibly inhibited the activity of exoelectrogenic bacteria (EB) and resulted in the elimination of the current at the end of the tested period. The number of hydrocarbon degradation bacteria (HDB) in soil close to the anode increased by nearly two orders of magnitude in the MFC assisted system (373 ± 56 × 10(3)  CFU/g-soil) than that in the disconnected control (8 ± 2 × 10(3)  CFU/g-soil), providing a solid evidence for in situ biostimulation of HDB growth by colonization of EB in the same system.

  7. Bioelectrochemical stimulation of petroleum hydrocarbon degradation in saline soil using U-tube microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Cai, Zhang; Zhou, Qixing; Zhang, Zhineng; Chen, Cuihong

    2012-02-01

    Bioremediation is a cost-effective and eco-friendly approach to decontaminate soils polluted by petroleum hydrocarbons. However, this technique usually requires a long time due to the slow degradation rate by bacteria. By applying U-tube microbial fuel cells (MFCs) designed here, the degradation rate of petroleum hydrocarbons close to the anode (<1 cm) was enhanced by 120% from 6.9 ± 2.5% to 15.2 ± 0.6% with simultaneous 125 ± 7 C of charge output (0.85 ± 0.05 mW/m(2) , 1 kΩ) in the tested period (25 days). Hydrocarbon fingerprint analysis showed that the degradation rate of both alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was accelerated. The decrease of initial water content from 33% to 28% and 23% resulted in a decrease on charge output and hydrocarbon degradation rate, which could be attributed to the increase of internal resistance. A salt accumulation was observed in each reactor due to the evaporation of water from the air-cathode, possibly inhibited the activity of exoelectrogenic bacteria (EB) and resulted in the elimination of the current at the end of the tested period. The number of hydrocarbon degradation bacteria (HDB) in soil close to the anode increased by nearly two orders of magnitude in the MFC assisted system (373 ± 56 × 10(3)  CFU/g-soil) than that in the disconnected control (8 ± 2 × 10(3)  CFU/g-soil), providing a solid evidence for in situ biostimulation of HDB growth by colonization of EB in the same system. PMID:22006588

  8. Fate of Acrylamide in Soil and Groundwater Systems: Microbial Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labahn, S.; Moser, D.; Arrowood, T.; Young, M.; Robleto, E.

    2007-12-01

    Acrylamide monomer (AMD), a suspected human neurotoxin and carcinogen, is present as a contaminant (up to 0.05%) in commercial preparations of polyacrylamide (PAM). PAM is currently being evaluated for wide-spread use as a temporary water-delivery canal sealant across the western United States. To better constrain potential risks associated with PAM applications, we examined the capacity of natural canal microorganisms to degrade AMD in laboratory and field experiments. Dilution cultivation and enrichment approaches were employed to determine the abundance of culturable microorganisms in several canal habitats which can utilize AMD as a sole nitrogen source (typically 104-106/mL) and a collection of isolates was developed. AMD-degrading microorganisms in our collection fell within a limited diversity of genera including Arthrobacter, Xanthomonas, and Pseudomonas; with the latter demonstrating highest capacity for degrading AMD under laboratory conditions. One strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens, isolated from Klamath Irrigation District (Klamath Falls, OR) canal sediment, was chosen for further study in part because this species is well-studied and ubiquitous. The potential for microbial AMD degradation was tested under laboratory conditions using this strain in repacked short (15 cm) column tests with two relevant soil types (sand and loam). Subsequently, the capacity of mixed natural microbial populations to degrade AMD was examined using soil cores collected from the Highline Canal (Rocky Ford, CO), and canal water/sediment slurries with spiked (5 ppm AMD) in situ bottle tests. Degradation of the monomer in the repacked column experiments was evaluated using a step input of 5 ppm AMD and the canal columns were tested with a range of AMD concentrations (1-5 ppm) followed by quantification with an HPLC. The repacked soil columns inoculated with P. fluorescens demonstrated 80-100% AMD degradation within 12 hours. Natural microbial communities in fresh canal sediment

  9. Degradation of soil fertility can cancel pollination benefits in sunflower.

    PubMed

    Tamburini, Giovanni; Berti, Antonio; Morari, Francesco; Marini, Lorenzo

    2016-02-01

    Pollination and soil fertility are important ecosystem services to agriculture but their relative roles and potential interactions are poorly understood. We explored the combined effects of pollination and soil fertility in sunflower using soils from a trial characterized by different long-term input management in order to recreate plausible levels of soil fertility. Pollinator exclusion was used as a proxy for a highly eroded pollination service. Pollination benefits to yield depended on soil fertility, i.e., insect pollination enhanced seed set and yield only under higher soil fertility indicating that limited nutrient availability may constrain pollination benefits. Our study provides evidence for interactions between above- and belowground ecosystem services, highlighting the crucial role of soil fertility in supporting agricultural production not only directly, but also indirectly through pollination. Management strategies aimed at enhancing pollination services might fail in increasing yield in landscapes characterized by high soil service degradation. Comprehensive knowledge about service interactions is therefore essential for the correct management of ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes. PMID:26527463

  10. Degradation of soil fertility can cancel pollination benefits in sunflower.

    PubMed

    Tamburini, Giovanni; Berti, Antonio; Morari, Francesco; Marini, Lorenzo

    2016-02-01

    Pollination and soil fertility are important ecosystem services to agriculture but their relative roles and potential interactions are poorly understood. We explored the combined effects of pollination and soil fertility in sunflower using soils from a trial characterized by different long-term input management in order to recreate plausible levels of soil fertility. Pollinator exclusion was used as a proxy for a highly eroded pollination service. Pollination benefits to yield depended on soil fertility, i.e., insect pollination enhanced seed set and yield only under higher soil fertility indicating that limited nutrient availability may constrain pollination benefits. Our study provides evidence for interactions between above- and belowground ecosystem services, highlighting the crucial role of soil fertility in supporting agricultural production not only directly, but also indirectly through pollination. Management strategies aimed at enhancing pollination services might fail in increasing yield in landscapes characterized by high soil service degradation. Comprehensive knowledge about service interactions is therefore essential for the correct management of ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes.

  11. Degradation of metaflumizone in soil: impact of varying moisture, light, temperature, atmospheric CO2 level, soil type and soil sterilization.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Niladri Sekhar; Gupta, Suman; Varghese, Eldho

    2013-01-01

    Soil is a major sink for the bulk of globally used pesticides. Hence, fate of pesticides in soil under the influence of various biotic and abiotic factors becomes important for evaluation of stability and safety. This paper presents the impact of varying moisture, light, temperature, atmospheric CO(2) level, soil type and soil sterilization on degradation of metaflumizone, a newly registered insecticide in India. Degradation of metaflumizone in soil followed the first order reaction kinetics and its half life values varied from ~20 to 150 d. Under anaerobic condition, degradation of metaflumizone was faster (t(½) 33.4 d) compared to aerobic condition (t(½) 50.1 d) and dry soil (t(½) 150.4 d). Under different light exposures, degradation was the fastest under UV light (t(½) 27.3 d) followed by Xenon light (t(½) 43 d) and dark condition (t(½) 50.1 d). Degradation rate of metaflumizone increased with temperature and its half life values ranged from 30.1 to 100.3d. Elevated atmospheric CO(2) level increased the degradation in soil (t(½) 20.1-50.1 d). However, overall degradation rate was the fastest at 550 ppm atmospheric CO(2) level, followed by 750 ppm and ambient level (375 ppm). Degradation of metaflumizone was faster in Oxisol (pH 5.2, Total Organic Carbon 1.2%) compared to Inceptisol (pH 8.15, TOC 0.36%). In sterile soil, only 5% dissipation of initial concentration was observed after 90 d of sampling. Under various conditions, 4-cyanobenzoic acid (0.22-1.86 mg kg(-1)) and 4-trifluoromethoxy aniline (0.21-1.23 mg kg(-1)) were detected as major degradation products.

  12. Ecological effects of combined pollution associated with e-waste recycling on the composition and diversity of soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; He, Xiao-Xin; Lin, Xue-Rui; Chen, Wen-Ce; Zhou, Qi-Xing; Shu, Wen-Sheng; Huang, Li-Nan

    2015-06-01

    The crude processing of electronic waste (e-waste) has led to serious contamination in soils. While microorganisms may play a key role in remediation of the contaminated soils, the ecological effects of combined pollution (heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers) on the composition and diversity of microbial communities remain unknown. In this study, a suite of e-waste contaminated soils were collected from Guiyu, China, and the indigenous microbial assemblages were profiled by 16S rRNA high-throughput sequencing and clone library analysis. Our data revealed significant differences in microbial taxonomic composition between the contaminated and the reference soils, with Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes dominating the e-waste-affected communities. Genera previously identified as organic pollutants-degrading bacteria, such as Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Alcanivorax, were frequently detected. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that approximately 70% of the observed variation in microbial assemblages in the contaminated soils was explained by eight environmental variables (including soil physiochemical parameters and organic pollutants) together, among which moisture content, decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209), and copper were the major factors. These results provide the first detailed phylogenetic look at the microbial communities in e-waste contaminated soils, demonstrating that the complex combined pollution resulting from improper e-waste recycling may significantly alter soil microbiota.

  13. Travel of pollution, and purification en route, in sandy soils

    PubMed Central

    Baars, J. K.

    1957-01-01

    The travel of pollution in sandy soils, and the extent to which purification takes place en route, are discussed, with special reference to the possible contamination of ground water—a problem which is of particular importance in the Netherlands, where the water-supply for many of the large towns is drawn from the water underneath the dunes. Specifically, two types of soil pollution are considered: (a) severe pollution of the surface layers with matter concentrated in a small volume of water (e.g., faecal matter from pit privies at camping-sites); and (b) moderate pollution of the surface layers with matter contained in large quantities of water (e.g., organic matter and bacteria in river water used for the artificial recharge of ground water). It is shown that in both these types of pollution the self-purification is sufficient to prevent contamination of the ground water, provided that the soil is very fine and—in the case of the first type—dry and well aerated, and provided that the ground-water level is not too high or the rate of infiltration too great. PMID:13472428

  14. TRANSFORMATION OF CHIRAL POLLUTANTS IN SOIL AND SEDIMENT MICROCOSMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transformation rates and enantiomeric ratios of several chiral pollutants were determined in laboratory microcosms (25oC). Aerobic and anaerobic agricultural soil slurries were separately dosed with the following chiral pesticides: o,p'-DDT, o,p'-methoxychlor, cis-chlordane, ...

  15. Grassland Degradation Alters Soil Carbon Turnover through Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamer, C.; Prober, S. M.; Chappell, A.; Farrell, M.; Baldock, J.

    2015-12-01

    Ecosystem degradation is widespread and changes in aboveground plant communities alter belowground soil processes. In Australia, grassy eucalyptus woodlands dominated by kangaroo grasses (Themeda trianda) were widely cleared during European settlement for agriculture, with only fragments remaining of this now threatened ecosystem. As remnant grassland fragments are used for livestock grazing, Themeda transitions through states of degradation, starting with red grasses (Bothriochloa spp) and then proceeding to less productive, increasingly degraded states dominated by either annual exotic weeds or native wallaby grasses (Rytidosperma spp) and spear grasses (Austrastipa spp). The aim of our experiment was to determine how soil organic matter dynamics (including erosion, root biomass, C storage and turnover) have been altered by the transition from deeply-rooted Themeda grass systems to more shallowly-rooted annual exotic weeds and wallaby/spear grass states. We sampled soils in five depth-based increments (0-5, 5-15, 15-30, 30-60, 60-100 cm) across this ecosystem transition at five sites across New South Wales, Australia. Caseium-137 analysis indicated erosion rates were similar among all ecosystems and were consistent with levels for grasslands in the region. Compared to the remnant Themeda grass systems, the degraded states had lower root biomass, lower carbon stocks and C:N ratios in the coarse fraction (> 50 μm), lower fungal : bacterial ratios, higher available phosphate, higher alkyl : O-alkyl C ratios, and faster mineralization of synthetic root-exudate carbon. All these metrics indicate the surprising finding of more microbially processed OM and faster turnover of newly added C in the degraded sites. Compared to one another, the two degraded sites differed in both C and N turnover, with the exotic weeds having higher dissolved organic N, inorganic N, and coarse fraction N, higher fine fraction C stocks, and greater microbial biomass. These differences likely

  16. Degradation and ecotoxicity of the biomedical drug artemisinin in soil.

    PubMed

    Jessing, Karina K; Cedergreen, Nina; Jensen, John; Hansen, Hans C B

    2009-04-01

    The plant Artemisia annua L. is cropped in many countries for production of the antimalarial drug artemisinin. Artemisinin is phytotoxic and has insecticidal activity. Large-scale cultivation of A. annua may cause transfer of artemisinin to soil and, hence, may affect both soil organisms and the aquatic environment if the compound is leachable. In the present study, a new method for extraction of artemisinin from soil was developed, and field concentrations and degradation kinetics of artemisinin in sandy and loamy soils were measured. The soil concentrations in a Danish A. annua field were up to 11.7 mg/kg. The degradation kinetics could be modeled as the sum of two first-order reactions, a fast initial degradation followed by a reaction that was 11- to 25-fold slower. It took at least 35 d before artemisinin could not be detected (<0.36 mg/kg) at 20 degrees C, classifying artemisinin as being relatively persistent in the environment. Combined with its water solubility of 49.7 +/- 3.7 mg/L, this makes it potentially leachable. In soil, artemisinin repelled the earthworm (Eisenia fetida; the 10 and 50% effect concentrations [EC10s and EC50s, respectively] were 5.24 +/- 2.64 and 21.57 +/- 4.73 mg/kg, respectively) and inhibited growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.; EC50, 2.48 mg/kg). Springtails (Folsomia candida) were not affected in the tested concentration range of 1 to 100 mg/kg. Artemisinin had toxicity to the freshwater algae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata; EC50, 0.24 +/- 0.01 mg/L) and duckweed (Lemna minor; EC50, 0.19 +/- 0.03 mg/L) similar to that of the commercial herbicide atrazine. Based on the presented data, the risks of adverse environmental effects because of cultivation of A. annua are high and comparable to those when using commercial pesticides. PMID:19391681

  17. Degradation and ecotoxicity of the biomedical drug artemisinin in soil.

    PubMed

    Jessing, Karina K; Cedergreen, Nina; Jensen, John; Hansen, Hans C B

    2009-04-01

    The plant Artemisia annua L. is cropped in many countries for production of the antimalarial drug artemisinin. Artemisinin is phytotoxic and has insecticidal activity. Large-scale cultivation of A. annua may cause transfer of artemisinin to soil and, hence, may affect both soil organisms and the aquatic environment if the compound is leachable. In the present study, a new method for extraction of artemisinin from soil was developed, and field concentrations and degradation kinetics of artemisinin in sandy and loamy soils were measured. The soil concentrations in a Danish A. annua field were up to 11.7 mg/kg. The degradation kinetics could be modeled as the sum of two first-order reactions, a fast initial degradation followed by a reaction that was 11- to 25-fold slower. It took at least 35 d before artemisinin could not be detected (<0.36 mg/kg) at 20 degrees C, classifying artemisinin as being relatively persistent in the environment. Combined with its water solubility of 49.7 +/- 3.7 mg/L, this makes it potentially leachable. In soil, artemisinin repelled the earthworm (Eisenia fetida; the 10 and 50% effect concentrations [EC10s and EC50s, respectively] were 5.24 +/- 2.64 and 21.57 +/- 4.73 mg/kg, respectively) and inhibited growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.; EC50, 2.48 mg/kg). Springtails (Folsomia candida) were not affected in the tested concentration range of 1 to 100 mg/kg. Artemisinin had toxicity to the freshwater algae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata; EC50, 0.24 +/- 0.01 mg/L) and duckweed (Lemna minor; EC50, 0.19 +/- 0.03 mg/L) similar to that of the commercial herbicide atrazine. Based on the presented data, the risks of adverse environmental effects because of cultivation of A. annua are high and comparable to those when using commercial pesticides.

  18. [Immobilization of introduced bacteria and degradation of pyrene and benzo(alpha) pyrene in soil by immobilized bacteria].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Li, Peijun; Song, Shouzhi; Zhong, Yong; Zhang, Hui; Verkhozina, E V

    2006-11-01

    In this study, introduced bacteria were applied in the bioremediation of pyrene and benzo (alpha) pyrene in organic pollutants-contaminated soils, aimed to test whether it was feasible to introduce bacteria to environmental engineering. Three introduced bacteria were immobilized separately or together to degrade the pyrene and benzo (alpha) pyrene in soil, taking dissociated bacteria as the control, and comparing with three indigenous bacteria. The results showed that immobilized introduced bacteria, either single or mixed, had higher degradation efficiency than dissociated bacteria. Compared with indigenous bacteria, some introduced bacteria had predominance to some degree. The introduced bacteria-mixture had better degradation efficiency after being immobilized. The degradation rate of pyrene and benzo(alpha) pyrene after treated with immobilized bacteria-( B61-B67)-mixture for 96 hours was 43.49% and 38.55%, respectively.

  19. Implications of soil pollution with heavy metals for public health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juozulynas, Algirdas; Jurgelėnas, Antanas; Butkienė, Birutė; Greičiūtė, Kristina; Savičiūtė, Rasa

    2008-01-01

    Soil of military grounds is often polluted with heavy metals. Their concentrations may be dosens of times higher in polluted regions. The affected soils are permeable, so the pollutions can get into water and spread to the environment. Into human and animal organisms they can get with food and water. Heavy metals are very dangerous for people's health, and we must know their accumulation places, intensity of scatter and integral risk for health. The purpose of this work was to establish links between zones polluted with heavy metals and morbidity caused by pollution with heavy metals. The morbidity caused by heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Zn, Ca and other) in the polluted regions is 1.4-1.5 times higher for adults and teenagers and 1.5-3.9 times higher for children aged under 14 years than the mean morbidity of the same diseases in Lithuania. Hypothetically, it is possible to prognosticate that this problem will grow in future because the ratio of the newly registered and the existing cases of morbidity for children aged under 14 years is 1.3-1.5 times higher than for adults.

  20. Heavy Metal Pollution in Urban Soils of Sopron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Adrienn; Bidló, András

    2014-05-01

    Keywords: anthropogenic effects, land use types, heavy metal content, polluted urban soils, GIS methods Our aim was to identify the main feedback effects between the town and its environment. In the course of our investigation we have analysed the heavy metal contents of urban soil in Sopron town in Hungary. We collected 208 samples on 104 points from 0 to 10 and from 10 to 20 cm depth in a standard network and also at industrial territories. We have been represented our results in a GIS system. We analysed the soils with Lakanen-Erviö method and we measured 24 elements but we have been focused on Co, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn. Using the data we observed the relationship between these elements in both layers. In the downtown the acidity of soils were alkaline by the greatest number of point, therefore the pollution of these soils is not leach in deeper layers yet. The lead was very high (> 100 mg Pb/kg) in both layers on the whole area of the town. Urban soils with high copper content (among 611 mg and 1221 mg Cu/kg) have been collected from garden and viticulture areas by us. Cadmium contents were the highest (6.14 mg Cd/kg) in traffic zones, where these values could be more than 3 mg Cd/kg according to the literature. The cobalt and zinc results were under the limits. According to our measurements we founded the highest average values in the soils of parks. This could be contamination of the lead from traffic, which bind in the soil of urban green spaces. Now we could continue our examinations with the investigations of these polluted green areas, which can effect to human health.

  1. [Comparison of efficiencies of oil-oxidizing Dietzia maris strain and stimulation of natural microbial communities in remediation of polluted soil].

    PubMed

    Pleshakova, E V; Dubrovskaia, E V; Turkovskaia, O V

    2008-01-01

    Two approaches to bioremediation of oil-polluted soils are compared: use of active degrader strain Dietzia maris AM3 and stimulation of natural microflora. Introduction of D. maris AM3 to soil freshly polluted with oil accelerated its remediation twofold within the first month in comparison with the stimulation. After three months, the purification degrees were approximately equal. By the end of bioremediation, the soil with the introduced strain had higher dehydrogenase and catalase activities. In soil with multiyear pollution, introduced strain D. maris AM3 did not affect the rate of oil product degradation, and no significant differences between the two bioremediation methods were detected in purification degree and biological activity of soil after three months.

  2. Toxicity testing of heavy-metal-polluted soils with algae Selenastrum capricornutum: a soil suspension assay.

    PubMed

    Aruoja, Villem; Kurvet, Imbi; Dubourguier, Henri-Charles; Kahru, Anne

    2004-08-01

    A small-scale Selenastrum capricornutum (Rhapidocelis subcapitata) growth inhibition assay was applied to the toxicity testing of suspensions of heavy-metal-polluted soils. The OECD 201 standard test procedure was followed, and algal biomass was measured by the fluorescence of extracted chlorophyll. The soils, which contained up to (per kilogram) 1390 mg of Zn, 20 mg of Cd, and 1050 mg of Pb were sampled around lead and zinc smelters in northern France. The water extractability of the metals in suspensions (1 part soil/99 parts water w/v) was not proportional to the pollution level, as extractability was lower for soil samples that were more polluted. Thus, the same amount of metals could be leached out of soils of different levels of pollution, showing that total concentrations of heavy metals in soil (currently used for risk assessment purposes) are poor predictors of the real environmental risk via the soil-water path. Despite high concentrations of water-extracted zinc (0.6-1.4 mg/L of Zn in the test), exceeding by approximately 10-fold the EC(50) value for S. capricornutum (0.1 mg Zn/L), 72-h algal growth in the soil extracts was comparable or better than growth in the standard control OECD mineral medium. The soil suspension stimulated the growth of algae up to eightfold greater than growth using the OECD control medium. Growth stimulation of algae was observed even when soil suspensions contained up to 12.5 mg Zn/L and could not be explained by supplementary nitrogen, phosphorous, and carbonate leached from the soil. However, if the growth of algae in suspensions of clean and polluted soils was compared, a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of metals on algal growth was demonstrated. Thus, as soil contains nutrients/supplements that mask the adverse effect of heavy metals, a clean soil that has properties similar to the polluted soils should be used instead of mineral salt solution as a control for analysis of the ecotoxicity of soils. PMID:15269912

  3. Can biochar in combination with compost improve degraded soils?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesl-Hanl, Wolfgang; Zehetner, Franz; Dunst, Gerald; Wagner, Mario; Puschenreiter, Markus; Karer, Jasmin; Soja, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    As global demand for agricultural commodities is growing, the use and improvement of degraded land could at least partly meet this demand. Based on the Renewable Energy Directive 2009/28/EC (RED) which endorses the use of degraded land for biomass production on the one hand, and the emerging conflict of the 4 F's (food, feed, fiber and fuel production) on the other hand, the application of biochar to ameliorate degraded land could be a strategy to improve the productivity of soils on marginal agricultural land. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of biochar/compost mixtures (w/w; 50/50) on two agricultural soils low in organic matter - one sandy, the other clayey. The suitability of the biochar/compost-amended (BC) soils for renewable biomass production using maize or Miscanthus was tested in the field. We conducted two field experiments with different treatments based on the results of previous pot experiments with the same soils. The following treatments were applied: • Co … Control (no BC but fertilized with (NH4)2SO4 corresponding to T3) • T1 … 1 % BC • T2 … 0.5 % BC + 175 kg N ha-1 • T3 … 1 % BC + 350 kg N ha-1 The treatments influenced water holding capacity (WHC), organic carbon content (Corg) in soil and biomass productivity (BM). WHC increased significantly upon 3 % BC addition in the previous pot experiment, but not significantly upon 1 % addition in the field (T1, T3). Due to heterogeneity in the field Corg did not show significant differences between treatments. The two test soils responded differently for BM productivity. Miscanthus (perennial) grown on sandy Eschenau soil was not influenced by the treatments in 2013 but showed a positive reaction trend in 2014. Miscanthus will need at least one further growing season to show its full yield potential. Maize (annual) grown on clayey Kaindorf soil increased BM significantly 2013 upon T3 but not in 2014 due to erosion events on sloping terrain. Keywords: Soil quality

  4. Photocatalytic degradation of pollutants from Elcogas IGCC power station effluents.

    PubMed

    Durán, A; Monteagudo, J M; San Martín, I; García-Peña, F; Coca, P

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this work is to improve the quality of water effluents coming from Elcogas IGCC power station (Puertollano, Spain) with the purpose of fulfilling future more demanding normative, using heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation processes (UV/H(2)O(2)/TiO(2) or ZnO). The efficiency of photocatalytic degradation for the different catalysts (TiO(2) and ZnO) was determined from the analysis of the following parameters: cyanides, formates and ammonia content. In a first stage, the influence of two parameters (initial concentration of H(2)O(2) and amount of catalyst) on the degradation kinetics of cyanides and formates was studied based on a factorial experimental design. pH was always kept in a value >9.5 to avoid gaseous HCN formation. The degradation of cyanides and formates was found to follow pseudo-first order kinetics. Experimental kinetic constants were fitted using neural networks (NNs). The mathematical model reproduces experimental data within 90% of confidence and allows the simulation of the process for any value of parameters in the experimental range studied. Moreover, a measure of the saliency of the input variables was made based upon the connection weights of the neural networks, allowing the analysis of the relative relevance of each variable with respect to the others. Results showed that the photocatalytic process was effective, being the degradation rate of cyanides about five times higher when compared to removal of formates. Finally, the effect of lowering pH on the degradation of formates was evaluated after complete cyanides destruction was reached (10 min of reaction). Under the optimum conditions (pH 5.2, [H(2)O(2)]=40 g/l; [TiO(2)]=2g/l), 100% of cyanides and 92% of initial NH(3) concentration are degraded after 10 min, whereas 35 min are needed to degrade 98% of formates. PMID:17118539

  5. Restoration of Degraded/Eroded Soil under Different Management Practices in the Central Great Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farmlands in the Central Great Plains Region (CGPR) have lost topsoil through wind and water erosion induced by tillage and poor soil management. These soils are now degraded with low soil quality and productivity. Productivity and quality of degraded/eroded soils can be restored using manure and i...

  6. A study of tannic acid degradation by soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ilori, Matthew O; Adebusoye, Sunday A; Amund, Olukayode O; Oyetoran, Bodunde O

    2007-09-15

    A tannin-degrading strain of Bacillus sp. AB1 was isolated from a garden soil by enrichment. This organism was able to utilize 1% (w/v) tannic acid-a gallotannin at 30 degrees C and pH below 4.5 in a defined mineral medium where the acid was the sole source of carbon and energy under 96 h. Growth resulted in increase in OD concomitant with gradual decrease in pH of the culture medium. Analysis of the culture fluid by paper chromatography revealed glucose and gallic acid as major metabolites of tannic acid degradative pathway. Mineralization of tannic acid was informed when none of the metabolites was recovered after 96 h of incubation. The degradation potential of this isolate could be exploited for the production of tannase, improvement of livestock production and also detoxification of tannery effluents at extreme acidic conditions.

  7. Layer of organic pine forest soil on top of chlorophenol-contaminated mineral soil enhances contaminant degradation.

    PubMed

    Sinkkonen, Aki; Kauppi, Sari; Simpanen, Suvi; Rantalainen, Anna-Lea; Strömmer, Rauni; Romantschuk, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Chlorophenols, like many other synthetic compounds, are persistent problem in industrial areas. These compounds are easily degraded in certain natural environments where the top soil is organic. Some studies suggest that mineral soil contaminated with organic compounds is rapidly remediated if it is mixed with organic soil. We hypothesized that organic soil with a high degradation capacity even on top of the contaminated mineral soil enhances degradation of recalcitrant chlorophenols in the mineral soil below. We first compared chlorophenol degradation in different soils by spiking pristine and pentachlorophenol-contaminated soils with 2,4,6-trichlorophenol in 10-L buckets. In other experiments, we covered contaminated mineral soil with organic pine forest soil. We also monitored in situ degradation on an old sawmill site where mineral soil was either left intact or covered with organic pine forest soil. 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol was rapidly degraded in organic pine forest soil, but the degradation was slower in other soils. If a thin layer of the pine forest humus was added on top of mineral sawmill soil, the original chlorophenol concentrations (high, ca. 70 μg g(-1), or moderate, ca. 20 μg g(-1)) in sawmill soil decreased by >40 % in 24 days. No degradation was noticed if the mineral soil was kept bare or if the covering humus soil layer was sterilized beforehand. Our results suggest that covering mineral soil with an organic soil layer is an efficient way to remediate recalcitrant chlorophenol contamination in mineral soils. The results of the field experiment are promising.

  8. Visible and infrared spectroscopy to evaluate soil quality in degraded sites: an applicative study in southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona, Valeria; Matarrese, Raffaella; Salvatori, Rosamaria; Salzano, Roberto; Regano, Simona; Calabrese, Angelantonio; Campanale, Claudia; Felice Uricchio, Vito

    2014-05-01

    Land degradation processes like organic matter impoverishment and contamination are growing increasingly all over the world due to a non-rational and often sustainable spread of human activities on the territory. Consequently the need to characterize and monitor degraded sites is becoming very important, with the aim to hinder such main threats, which could compromise drastically, soil quality. Visible and infrared spectroscopy is a well-known technique/tool to study soil properties. Vis-NIR spectral reflectance, in fact, can be used to characterize spatial and temporal variation in soil constituents (Brown et al., 2006; Viscarra Rossel et al., 2006), and potentially its surface structure (Chappell et al., 2006, 2007). It is a rapid, non-destructive, reproducible and cost-effective analytical method to analyse soil properties and therefore, it can be a useful method to study land degradation phenomena. In this work, we present the results of proximal sensing investigations of three degraded sites (one affected by organic and inorganic contamination and two affected by soil organic matter decline) situated southern Italy close to Taranto city (in Apulia Region). A portable spectroradiometer (ASD-FieldSpec) was used to measure the reflectance properties in the spectral range between 350-2500 nm of the soil, in the selected sites, before and after a recovery treatment by using compost (organic fertilizer). For each measurement point the soil was sampled in order to perform chemical analyses to evaluate soil quality status. Three in-situ campaigns have been carried out (September 2012, June 2013, and September 2013), collecting about 20 soil samples for each site and for each campaign. Chemical and spectral analyses have been focused on investigating soil organic carbon, carbonate content, texture and, in the case of polluted site, heavy metals and organic toxic compounds. Statistical analyses have been carried out to test a prediction model of different soil quality

  9. Bacterial degradation of naproxen--undisclosed pollutant in the environment.

    PubMed

    Wojcieszyńska, Danuta; Domaradzka, Dorota; Hupert-Kocurek, Katarzyna; Guzik, Urszula

    2014-12-01

    The presence of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the environment is an emerging problem due to their potential influence on human health and biocenosis. This is the first report on the biotransformation of naproxen, a polycyclic NSAID, by a bacterial strain. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia KB2 transformed naproxen within 35 days with about 28% degradation efficiency. Under cometabolic conditions with glucose or phenol as a carbon source degradation efficiency was 78% and 40%, respectively. Moreover, in the presence of naproxen phenol monooxygenase, naphthalene dioxygenase, hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase and gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase were induced. This suggests that degradation of naproxen occurs by its hydroxylation to 5,7,8-trihydroxynaproxen, an intermediate that can be cleaved by hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase. The cleavage product is probably further oxidatively cleaved by gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase. The obtained results provide the basis for the use of cometabolic systems in the bioremediation of polycyclic NSAID-contaminated environments.

  10. Activity of soil dehydrogenases, urease, and acid and alkaline phosphatases in soil polluted with petroleum.

    PubMed

    Wyszkowska, Jadwiga; Wyszkowski, Mirosław

    2010-01-01

    This study was undertaken to (1) determine the effects of petroleum pollution on changes in the biochemical properties of soil and (2) demonstrate whether the application of compost, bentonite, and calcium oxide is likely to restore biological balance. Petroleum soil pollution at a dose ranging from 2.5 to 10 cm(3)/kg disturbed the biochemical balance as evidenced by inhibition of the activities of soil dehydrogenases (SDH), urease (URE), and acid phosphatase (ACP). The greatest change was noted in the activity of SDH, whereas the least change occurred in URE. Petroleum significantly increased the activity of soil alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in soil used for spring rape, whereas in soil used for oat harvest there was decreased ALP activity. The application of compost, bentonite, and calcium oxide to soil proved effective in mitigating the adverse effects of petroleum on the activities of soil enzymes. Soil enrichment with compost, bentonite, and calcium oxide was found to stimulate the activities of URE and ALP and inhibit the activity of ACP. The influence of bentonite and calcium oxide was greater than that of compost. Calcium oxide and, to a lesser extent, compost were found to increase the activity of SDH, whereas bentonite exerted the opposite effect, especially in the case of the main crop, spring rape. The activities of SDH, URE, and ACP were higher in soil used for rape than that for oats. In contrast the activity of ALP was higher in soil used for oats. Data thus indicate that compost and especially bentonite and calcium oxide exerted a positive effect on activities of some enzymes in soil polluted with petroleum. Application of neutralizing additives to soil restored soil biological balance by counteracting the negative influence of petroleum on activities of URE and ALP. PMID:20706945

  11. Hycrest crested wheatgrass accelerates the degradation of pentachlorophenol in soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferro, A. M.; Sims, R. C.; Bugbee, B.

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the effects of vegetation on the fate of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in soil using a novel high-flow sealed test system. Pentachlorophenol has been widely used as a wood preservative, and this highly toxic biocide contaminates soil and ground water at many sites. Although plants are known to accelerate the rates of degradation of certain soil contaminants, this approach has not been thoroughly investigated for PCP. The fate of [14C]PCP, added to soil at a concentration of 100 mg/kg, was compared in three unplanted and three planted systems. The plant used was Hycrest, a perennial, drought-tolerant cultivar of crested wheatgrass [Agropyron desertorum (Fischer ex Link) Schultes]. The flow-through test system allowed us to maintain a budget for 14C-label as well as monitor mineralization (breakdown to 14CO2) and volatilization of the test compound in a 155-d trial. In the unplanted systems, an average of 88% of the total radiolabel remained in the soil and leachate and only 6% was mineralized. In the planted system, 33% of the radiolabel remained in the soil plus leachate, 22% was mineralized, and 36% was associated with plant tissue (21% with the root fraction and 15% with shoots). Mineralization rates were 23.1 mg PCP mineralized kg-1 soil in 20 wk in the planted system, and for the unplanted system 6.6 mg PCP kg-1 soil for the same time period. Similar amounts of volatile organic material were generated in the two systems (1.5%). Results indicated that establishing crested wheatgrass on PCP-contaminated surface soils may accelerate the removal of the contaminant.

  12. Removal of organic pollutants and heavy metals in soils by electrokinetic remediation.

    PubMed

    Ricart, M T; Pazos, M; Gouveia, S; Cameselle, C; Sanroman, M A

    2008-07-01

    In this work, the feasibility of electrokinetic remediation for the restoration of polluted soil with organic and inorganic compounds had been development and evaluated using a model soil sample. The model soil was prepared with kaolinite clay artificially polluted in the laboratory with chromium and an azo dye: Reactive Black 5 (RB5). The electromigration of Cr in a spiked kaolinite sample was studied in alkaline conditions. Despite of the high pH registered in the kaolinite sample (around pH 9.5), Cr migrated towards the cathode and it was accumulated in the cathode chamber forming a white precipitate. The removal was not complete, and 23% of the initial Cr was retained into the kaolinite sample close to the cathode side. The azo dye RB5 could be effectively removed from kaolinite by electrokinetics and the complete cleanup of the kaolinite could be achieved in alkaline environment. In this condition, RB5 formed an anion that migrated towards the anode where it was accumulated and quickly degraded upon the electrode surface. The electrokinetic treatment of a kaolinite sample polluted with both Cr and RB5 yielded very good results. The removal of Cr was improved compared to the experiment where Cr was the only pollutant, and RB5 reached a removal as high as 95%. RB5 was removed by electromigration towards the anode, where the dye was degraded upon the surface of the electrode by electrochemical oxidation. Cr was transported towards the cathode by electromigration and electroosmosis. It is supposed that the interaction among RB5 and Cr into the kaolinite sample prevented premature precipitation and allow Cr to migrate and concentrate in the cathode chamber. PMID:18569297

  13. A new model for polluted soil risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andretta, M.; Serra, R.; Villani, M.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, we discuss the most important theoretical aspects of polluted soil Risk Assessment Methodologies, which have been developed in order to evaluate the risk, for the exposed people, connected with the residual contaminant concentration in polluted soil, and we make a short presentation of the major different kinds of risk assessment methodologies. We also underline the relevant role played, in this kind of analysis, by the pollutant transport models. We also describe a new and innovative model, based on the general framework of the so-called Cellular Automata (CA), initially developed in the UE-Esprit Project COLOMBO for the simulation of bioremediation processes. These kinds of models, for their intrinsic "finite and discrete" characteristics, seem to be very well suited for a detailed analysis of the shape of the pollutant sources, the contaminant fates and the evaluation of target in the risk assessment evaluation. In particular, we will describe the future research activities we are going to develop in the area of a strict integration between pollutant fate and transport models and Risk Analysis Methodologies.

  14. Degradation of atrazine in soil through induced photocatalytic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Pelizzetti, E. ); Carlin, V.; Maurino, V.; Minero, C.; Dolci, M. ); Marchesini, A. )

    1990-08-01

    The authors observed photocatalytic degradation of atrazine in the presence of semiconductor metal oxide particulates (TiO{sub 2}, ZnO) suspended in aqueous solution under simulated sunlight irradiation. The half-life for the process is ca. 5 and 80 min for TiO{sub 2} and ZnO, respectively (at an initial atrazine concentration of 25 mg/liter with 0.5 g of semiconductor per liter and with a photon flux of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} einstein/min, and over a cell cross section of 4 cm{sup 2}). The authors investigated the catalytic activity of different soils. The weak photocatalytic activity of the soils (2 g/liter) is dramatically increased by the addition of 0.5 g of the semiconductor per liter. Half-lives are 10 to 40 minutes, depending on the nature of the soil.

  15. Response of bacterial pdo1, nah, and C12O genes to aged soil PAH pollution in a coke factory area.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue-Mei; Liu, Yu-Rong; Zheng, Yuan-Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Xia; He, Ji-Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Soil pollution caused by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is threatening human health and environmental safety. Investigating the relative prevalence of different PAH-degrading genes in PAH-polluted soils and searching for potential bioindicators reflecting the impact of PAH pollution on microbial communities are useful for microbial monitoring, risk evaluation, and potential bioremediation of soils polluted by PAHs. In this study, three functional genes, pdo1, nah, and C12O, which might be involved in the degradation of PAHs from a coke factory, were investigated by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and clone library approaches. The results showed that the pdo1 and C12O genes were more abundant than the nah gene in the soils. There was a significantly positive relationship between the nah or pdo1 gene abundances and PAH content, while there was no correlation between C12O gene abundance and PAH content. Analyses of clone libraries showed that all the pdo1 sequences were grouped into Mycobacterium, while all the nah sequences were classified into three groups: Pseudomonas, Comamonas, and Polaromonas. These results indicated that the abundances of nah and pdo1 genes were positively influenced by levels of PAHs in soil and could be potential microbial indicators reflecting the impact of soil PAH pollution and that Mycobacteria were one of the most prevalent PAHs degraders in these PAH-polluted soils. Principal component analysis (PCA) and correlation analyses between microbial parameters and environmental factors revealed that total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) had positive effects on the abundances of all PAH-degrading genes. It suggests that increasing TC, TN, and DOC inputs could be a useful way to remediate PAH-polluted soils. PMID:24777329

  16. Response of bacterial pdo1, nah, and C12O genes to aged soil PAH pollution in a coke factory area.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue-Mei; Liu, Yu-Rong; Zheng, Yuan-Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Xia; He, Ji-Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Soil pollution caused by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is threatening human health and environmental safety. Investigating the relative prevalence of different PAH-degrading genes in PAH-polluted soils and searching for potential bioindicators reflecting the impact of PAH pollution on microbial communities are useful for microbial monitoring, risk evaluation, and potential bioremediation of soils polluted by PAHs. In this study, three functional genes, pdo1, nah, and C12O, which might be involved in the degradation of PAHs from a coke factory, were investigated by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and clone library approaches. The results showed that the pdo1 and C12O genes were more abundant than the nah gene in the soils. There was a significantly positive relationship between the nah or pdo1 gene abundances and PAH content, while there was no correlation between C12O gene abundance and PAH content. Analyses of clone libraries showed that all the pdo1 sequences were grouped into Mycobacterium, while all the nah sequences were classified into three groups: Pseudomonas, Comamonas, and Polaromonas. These results indicated that the abundances of nah and pdo1 genes were positively influenced by levels of PAHs in soil and could be potential microbial indicators reflecting the impact of soil PAH pollution and that Mycobacteria were one of the most prevalent PAHs degraders in these PAH-polluted soils. Principal component analysis (PCA) and correlation analyses between microbial parameters and environmental factors revealed that total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) had positive effects on the abundances of all PAH-degrading genes. It suggests that increasing TC, TN, and DOC inputs could be a useful way to remediate PAH-polluted soils.

  17. The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenroth, Sabine; Huber, Stefan; Schöler, H. F.

    2010-05-01

    The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to volatile organic compounds was studied intensely over the last years (Keppler et al., 2000; Huber et al., 2009). It was shown that soil organic matter is oxidised due to the presence of iron (III), hydrogen peroxide and chloride and thereby produces diverse alkyl halides, which are emitted into the atmosphere. The formation of polar halogenated compounds like chlorinated acetic acids which are relevant toxic environmental substances was also found in soils and sediments (Kilian et al., 2002). The investigation of the formation of other polar halogenated and non-halogenated compounds like diverse mono- and dicarboxylic acids is going to attain more and more importance. Due to its high acidity oxalic acid might have impacts on the environment e.g., nutrient leaching, plant diseases and negative influence on microbial growth. In this study, the abiotic formation of oxalic acid in soil is examined. For a better understanding of natural degradation processes mechanistic studies were conducted using the model compound catechol as representative for structural elements of the humic substances and its reaction with iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide. Iron is one of the most abundant elements on earth and hydrogen peroxide is produced by bacteria or through incomplete reduction of oxygen. To find suitable parameters for an optimal reaction and a qualitative and quantitative analysis method the following reaction parameters are varied: concentration of iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide, time dependence, pH-value and influence of chloride. Analysis of oxalic acid was performed employing an ion chromatograph equipped with a conductivity detector. The time dependent reaction shows a relatively fast formation of oxalic acid, the optimum yield is achieved after 60 minutes. Compared to the concentration of catechol an excess of hydrogen peroxide as well as a low concentration of iron (III) are required. In absence of chloride the

  18. Mobile arsenic species in unpolluted and polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jen-How; Matzner, Egbert

    2007-05-15

    The fate and behaviour of total arsenic (As) and of As species in soils is of concern for the quality of drinking water. To estimate the relevance of organic As species and the mobility of different As species, we evaluated the vertical distribution of organic and inorganic As species in two uncontaminated and two contaminated upland soils. Dimethylarsinic acid (up to 6 ng As g(-1)), trimethylarsine oxide (up to 1.5 ng As g(-1)), 4 unidentified organic As species (up to 3 ng As g(-1)) and arsenobetaine (up to 15 ng As g(-1)), were detected in the forest soils. Arsenobetaine was the dominant organic As species in both unpolluted and polluted forest soils. No organic As species were detected in the contaminated grassland soil. The organic As species may account for up to 30% of the mobile fraction in the unpolluted forest floor, but never exceed 9% in the unpolluted mineral soil. Highest concentrations of organic As species were found in the forest floors. The concentrations of extractable arsenite were highest in the surface horizons of all soils and may represent up to 36% of total extractable As. The concentrations of extractable arsenate were also highest in the Oa layers in the forest soils and decreased steeply in the mineral soil. In conclusion, the investigated forest soils contain a number of organic As species. The organic As species in forest soils seem to result from throughfall and litterfall and are retained mostly in the forest floor. The relative high concentrations of extractable arsenite, one of the most toxic As species, and arsenate in the forest floor point to the risk of their transfer to surface water by superficial flow under heavy rain events.

  19. Impact of pollution caused by uranium production on soil macrofauna.

    PubMed

    Gongalsky, Konstantin B

    2003-12-01

    Thirty years of mining and milling activities of the Priargunsky Mining-Chemical Production Company (South-Eastern Siberia, Russia) have resulted in an enrichment of uranium in adjacent steppe soils by a factor of up to 600. A number of attendant pollutants (thorium, arsenic and heavy metals) also have high concentrations in the soil. To estimate the effects of this pollution on soil-living macroinvertebrates, pitfall trapping and core sampling were applied. The element composition of four beetle species was analysed. Soil macroinvertebrates had 3-37 times lower abundance and biodiversity at the contaminated sites compared with the control. Ground beetle communities at the contaminated sites were reduced compared to the control site. The concentrations of uranium and arsenic in beetles collected at the contaminated sites were 2-41 and 2-26 times higher, respectively, than at the control site. There is strong evidence that the contamination caused by uranium production has severe negative biological effects on important groups of the soil food web.

  20. Experimental assessment of the microbocenosis stability in chemically polluted soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, N. D.; Grodnitskaya, I. D.; Shapchenkova, O. A.; Evgrafova, S. Yu.

    2009-06-01

    Water solutions of fluorine and sulfur-containing salts of sodium—NaF, Na2SO3, and NaF + Na2SO3 (30, 150, and 300 MPC, respectively)—and salts of heavy metals—(Cu(NO3)2 · 3H2O, NiSO4, and Pb(NO3)2 (10, 25, and 50 MPC, respectively)—were applied as pollutants to dark gray forest soils of experimental plots (1 m2) in Siberian larch ( Larix sibirica Ledeb.) plantations once per growing period. The soil samples for the determination of the microbial biomass, respiration, and enzymatic activity (urease, protease, invertase, and catalase) were taken from the mineral soil layer (0-5 cm) at the beginning of the growing seasons before the application of the pollutants then in 14- to 18-day intervals every month. The fluorine and sulfur-containing compounds applied activated the respiration, lowered the enzymatic activity of the microorganisms, and decreased the microbial biomass by 1.3-2.2 times in the soils of the test plots as compared to the control one. The single application of Cu, Ni, and Pb increased the microbial biomass, while the changes in the basal respiration were compatible with its natural variability. Two months after the beginning of the experiment, all the parameters characterizing the functioning of the soil microbocenoses were restored.

  1. Application of organic amendments to restore degraded soil: effects on soil microbial properties.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Jennifer; Saxena, Jyotisna; Basta, Nicholas; Hundal, Lakhwinder; Busalacchi, Dawn; Dick, Richard P

    2015-03-01

    Topsoil removal, compaction, and other practices in urban and industrial landscapes can degrade soil and soil ecosystem services. There is growing interest to remediate these for recreational and residential purposes, and urban waste materials offers potential to improve degraded soils. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the effects of urban waste products on microbial properties of a degraded industrial soil. The soil amendments were vegetative yard waste compost (VC), biosolids (BioS), and a designer mix (DM) containing BioS, biochar (BC), and drinking water treatment residual (WTR). The experiment had a completely randomized design with following treatments initiated in 2009: control soil, VC, BioS-1 (202 Mg ha(-1)), BioS-2 (403 Mg ha(-1)), and DM (202 Mg BioS ha(-1) plus BC and WTR). Soils (0-15-cm depth) were sampled in 2009, 2010, and 2011 and analyzed for enzyme activities (arylsulfatase, β-glucosaminidase, β-glucosidase, acid phosphatase, fluorescein diacetate, and urease) and soil microbial community structure using phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA). In general, all organic amendments increased enzyme activities in 2009 with BioS treatments having the highest activity. However, this was followed by a decline in enzyme activities by 2011 that were still significantly higher than control. The fungal PLFA biomarkers were highest in the BioS treatments, whereas the control soil had the highest levels of the PLFA stress markers (P < 0.10). In conclusion, one-time addition of VC or BioS was most effective on enzyme activities; the BioS treatment significantly increased fungal biomass over the other treatments; addition of BioS to soils decreased microbial stress levels; and microbial measures showed no statistical differences between BioS and VC treatments after 3 years of treatment. PMID:25673270

  2. Degradation of environment pollutant dyes using phytosynthesized metal nanocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MeenaKumari, M.; Philip, Daizy

    2015-01-01

    We present for the first time biogenic reduction and stabilization of gold and silver ions at room temperature using fruit juice of Punica granatum. The formation, morphology and crystalline structure of the synthesized nanoparticles are determined using UV-Visible, XRD and TEM. An attempt to reveal the partial role of phenolic hydroxyls in the reduction of Au3+ and Ag+ is done through FTIR analysis. The synthesized nanoparticles are used as potential catalysts in the degradation of a cationic phenothiazine dye, an anionic mono azo dye and a cationic fluorescent dye. The calculated values of percentage removal of dyes and the rate constants from pseudo first order kinetic data fit give a comparative study on degradation of organic dyes in presence of prepared gold and silver nanoparticles.

  3. Degradation of environment pollutant dyes using phytosynthesized metal nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    MeenaKumari, M; Philip, Daizy

    2015-01-25

    We present for the first time biogenic reduction and stabilization of gold and silver ions at room temperature using fruit juice of Punica granatum. The formation, morphology and crystalline structure of the synthesized nanoparticles are determined using UV-Visible, XRD and TEM. An attempt to reveal the partial role of phenolic hydroxyls in the reduction of Au(3+) and Ag(+) is done through FTIR analysis. The synthesized nanoparticles are used as potential catalysts in the degradation of a cationic phenothiazine dye, an anionic mono azo dye and a cationic fluorescent dye. The calculated values of percentage removal of dyes and the rate constants from pseudo first order kinetic data fit give a comparative study on degradation of organic dyes in presence of prepared gold and silver nanoparticles.

  4. [Effects of multiple environmental factors on triflulsulfuron-methyl degradation in soils].

    PubMed

    Song, Ning-Hui; Shan, Zheng-Jun; Shi, Li-Li; Guo, Min; Xu, Jing; Kong, De-Yang

    2012-12-01

    Triflulsulfuron-methyl, a widely used sulfonylurea herbicide, has done harm to the soil and crop. Its environment fate was affected by many factors such as physicochemical or biological factors. In order to understand the effects of different environmental factors on the degradation of triflulsulfuron-methyl in soil, simulated indoor incubation experiments were carried out to explore the effects of soil microbe, soil type, dissolved organic matter (DOM), temperature, and soil moisture on triflulsulfuron-methyl degradation in soils. The results showed that different environmental factors such as temperature, soil moisture, soil microorganisms and soil type influenced triflulsulfuron-methyl degradation in different degrees. The increased soil microbial biomass, soil organic matters and DOM were beneficial to the soil degradation of triflulsulfuron-methyl, meanwhile, the decrease in soil pH could accelerate its degradation in soils. The results showed that soil microorganisms were the main factor effecting the degradation of triflulsulfuron-methyl in soil. Our results provided initial data for the conclusion that a set of biological and physiochemical factors coordinately regulate the decay of triflulsulfuron-methyl in soils.

  5. Impact of alpine meadow degradation on soil hydraulic properties over the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chen; Zhang, Fan

    2015-04-01

    Alpine meadow is one of widespread vegetation types of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. It is undergoing degradation under the background of global climate change, human activities and overgrazing. Soil moisture is important to alpine meadow ecology for its water and energy transfer processes, therefore soil hydraulic properties become key parameters for local eco-hydrological processes studies. However, little research focus on the changes and it's mechanisms of soil hydraulic properties during the degradation processes. In this study, soil basic and hydraulic properties at 0-10 cm and 40-50 cm soil layer depths under different degraded alpine meadow were analyzed. Pearson correlations were adopted to study the relationships among the investigated factors and principal component analysis was performed to identify the dominant factor. Results show that with increasing degree of degradation, soil sand content increased while soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) as well as soil clay content, soil porosity decreased in the 0-10 cm soil layers, and organic matter and root gravimetric density decreased in both the 0-10 cm and 40-50 cm soil layers. For soil unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, it reduced more slowly with decreasing pressure head under degraded conditions than non-degraded conditions. However, soil moisture showed no significant changes with increasing degradation. Soil Ks was significantly correlated (P = 0.01) with bulk density, soil porosity, soil organic matter and root gravimetric density. Among these, soil porosity is the dominant factor explaining about 90% of the variability in total infiltration flow. Under non-degraded conditions, the infiltration flow principally depended on the presence of macropores. With increasing degree of degradation, soil macropores quickly changed to mesopores or micropores. The proportion of total infiltration flow through macropores and mesopores significantly decreased with the most substantial decrease observed for

  6. Bacterial degradation of naproxen--undisclosed pollutant in the environment.

    PubMed

    Wojcieszyńska, Danuta; Domaradzka, Dorota; Hupert-Kocurek, Katarzyna; Guzik, Urszula

    2014-12-01

    The presence of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the environment is an emerging problem due to their potential influence on human health and biocenosis. This is the first report on the biotransformation of naproxen, a polycyclic NSAID, by a bacterial strain. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia KB2 transformed naproxen within 35 days with about 28% degradation efficiency. Under cometabolic conditions with glucose or phenol as a carbon source degradation efficiency was 78% and 40%, respectively. Moreover, in the presence of naproxen phenol monooxygenase, naphthalene dioxygenase, hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase and gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase were induced. This suggests that degradation of naproxen occurs by its hydroxylation to 5,7,8-trihydroxynaproxen, an intermediate that can be cleaved by hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase. The cleavage product is probably further oxidatively cleaved by gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase. The obtained results provide the basis for the use of cometabolic systems in the bioremediation of polycyclic NSAID-contaminated environments. PMID:25026371

  7. Overview of SWC techniques to mitigate soil degradation following wildfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, A. J. D.; Prats-Alegre, S.; Coelho, C. O. A.; Ferreira, C. S. S.; Bento, C.; Shakesby, R. A.; Stoof, C. R.; Ritsema, C. J.

    2012-04-01

    Forest fires are the main deleterious process in Mediterranean sub-humid regions. The increasing frequency of wildfires, with increasingly reduced return periods, as a result of global change (i.e. climatic and management practices changes) leads to severe soil degradation processes, widely spread throughout the landscape. Several strategies have been developed in an attempt to prevent the occurrence of forest fires and reduce its magnitudes when they happen, as point out by the authors in several other works. Nevertheless, when they occur, several techniques can be applied to mitigate the degradation processes in burned areas. This paper presents an analysis of the effectiveness of the various techniques used to reduce the degradation processes, based on the literature and in field trials. In addition to the implementation costs and the effectiveness in reducing soil erosion processes, the paper addresses the questions of feasibility and ecological relevance. Since the costs may be prohibitive, specially if wide areas are burned, we propose strategic guidelines to target sensitive interventions in burned areas to attain the maximum conservation impacts with the least costs.

  8. Solarization and biosolarization using organic wastes for the bioremediation of soil polluted with terbuthylazine and linuron residues.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, José; Hellín, Pilar; Flores, Pilar; Lacasa, Alfredo; Navarro, Simón

    2014-10-01

    Strategies for remediation of polluted soils are needed to accelerate the degradation and natural attenuation of pesticides. This study was conducted to assess the effect of solarization (S) and biosolarization (BS) during the summer season using organic wastes (composted sheep manure and sugar beet vinasse) for the bioremediation of soil containing residues of terbuthylazine and linuron. The results showed that both S and BS enhanced herbicide dissipation rates compared with the non-disinfected control, an effect which was attributed to the increased soil temperature and organic matter. Linuron showed similar behavior under S and BS conditions. However, terbuthylazine was degraded to a greater extent in the biosolarization experiment using sugar beet vinasse than in the both the solarization and biosolarization experiments using composted sheep manure treatments. The main organic intermediates detected during the degradation of terbuthylazine and linuron were identified, enabling the main steps of degradation to be proposed. The results confirm that both S and BS techniques can be considered as a remediation tools for polluted soils containing these herbicides. PMID:24905640

  9. Solarization and biosolarization using organic wastes for the bioremediation of soil polluted with terbuthylazine and linuron residues.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, José; Hellín, Pilar; Flores, Pilar; Lacasa, Alfredo; Navarro, Simón

    2014-10-01

    Strategies for remediation of polluted soils are needed to accelerate the degradation and natural attenuation of pesticides. This study was conducted to assess the effect of solarization (S) and biosolarization (BS) during the summer season using organic wastes (composted sheep manure and sugar beet vinasse) for the bioremediation of soil containing residues of terbuthylazine and linuron. The results showed that both S and BS enhanced herbicide dissipation rates compared with the non-disinfected control, an effect which was attributed to the increased soil temperature and organic matter. Linuron showed similar behavior under S and BS conditions. However, terbuthylazine was degraded to a greater extent in the biosolarization experiment using sugar beet vinasse than in the both the solarization and biosolarization experiments using composted sheep manure treatments. The main organic intermediates detected during the degradation of terbuthylazine and linuron were identified, enabling the main steps of degradation to be proposed. The results confirm that both S and BS techniques can be considered as a remediation tools for polluted soils containing these herbicides.

  10. Urban soil pollution and the playfields of small children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jartun, M.; Ottesen, R. T.; Steinnes, E.

    2003-05-01

    The chemical composition of urban surface soil in Tromsø, northern Norway has been mapped to describe the environmental load of toxic elements in different parts of the city. Surface soil samples were collected from 275 locations throughout the city center and nearby suburban areas. Natural background concentrations were determined in samples of the local bedrock. Surface soil in younger, suburban parts of the city shows low concentrations of heavy metals, reflecting the local geochemistry. The inner and older parts of the city are generally polluted with lead (Pb), zinc (Zn) and tin (Sn). The most important sources of this urban soil pollution are probably city fires, industrial and domestic waste, traffic, and shipyards. In this paper two different approaches have been used. First, as a result of the general mapping, 852 soil and sand samples from kindergartens and playgrounds were analyzed. In this study concentrations of arsenic (As) up to 1800ppm were found, most likely due to the extensive use of CCA (copper, chromium, arsenic) impregnated wood in sandboxes and other playground equipment. This may represent a significant health risk especially to children having a high oral intake of contaminated sand and soil. Secondly a pattern of tin (Sn) concentrations was found in Tromsøcity with especially high values near shipyards. Further investigation indicated that this pattern most probably reflected the use of the highty toxic tributyltin (TBT). Thus détermination of total Sn in surface soils could be a cost-effective way to localize sources of TBT contamination in the environment.

  11. Microbial monitoring and most-probable number of microbes in soils capable of degrading aircraft deicing fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biró, B.; Horváth, N.; Domonkos, M.; French, H. K.

    2012-04-01

    Intensive use of propylene glycol (PG) and potassium formate-(PF) based aircraft de-icing fluids (ADF) are sources of pollution in Northern airports for soil and groundwater. When the contaminated snow melts in the spring, the de-icing chemicals can infiltrate the sandy soil rapidly. The pollutants are known to be degradable by soil microbes, biodegradation however might vary temporally and spatially. Non-invasive monitoring tools are mainly used to outline areas affected by contaminants and to monitor the flow and transport processes. Field sampling and laboratory measurements are required to examine microbial differences in soils, and the activity of PG degraders. The objective of our work was to map this variability using techniques, such as the countable, colony-forming (CFU) aerobic and anaerobic microbial components (bacteria and fungi) in soils and their catabolic enzymatic activity, measured by fluorescein-diacetate (FDA) analysis. Ratio of potential PG degraders was studied by the most probable number (MPN) method. Soil samples from the Gardermoen Airport (Oslo, Norway) were collected during spring 2010, vertically at 0-110 cm below ground level, and horizontally at about 0-154 cm distance from the runway in 5 steps each. A 10-fold soil solution was done in basal medium at 10.000 ppm ADF, added to 96-wells microplates. Growth was tested after incubation at 22 °C for 2 and 4 weeks by iodonitrotetrazolium violet (INT). Cochran table was applied to calculate the MPN values of PG degraders. There were an increasing abundance and activity of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and fungi found further away from the highly contaminated runway, indicating toxic effects in this area. Also, below the 40cm soil layer a reduced microbial activity could be seen. The most probable number of microbes capable to degrade ADF correlates well with the CFU numbers and the measured FDA enzymatic activity of the soils. Near the most contaminated runway, 3% of the total

  12. Electrokinetic delivery of persulfate to remediate PCBs polluted soils: Effect of different activation methods.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guangping; Cang, Long; Gomes, Helena I; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-02-01

    Persulfate-based in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) for the remediation of organic polluted soils has gained much interest in last decade. However, the transportation of persulfate in low-permeability soil is very low, which limits its efficiency in degrading soil pollutants. Additionally, the oxidation-reduction process of persulfate with organic contaminants takes place slowly, while, the reaction will be greatly accelerated by the production of more powerful radicals once it is activated. Electrokinetic remediation (EK) is a good way for transporting persulfate in low-permeability soil. In this study, different activation methods, using zero-valent iron, citric acid chelated Fe(2+), iron electrode, alkaline pH and peroxide, were evaluated to enhance the activity of persulfate delivered by EK. All the activators and the persulfate were added in the anolyte. The results indicated that zero-valent iron, alkaline, and peroxide enhanced the transportation of persulfate at the first stage of EK test, and the longest delivery distance reached sections S4 or S5 (near the cathode) on the 6th day. The addition of activators accelerated decomposition of persulfate, which resulted in the decreasing soil pH. The mass of persulfate delivered into the soil declined with the continuous decomposition of persulfate by activation. The removal efficiency of PCBs in soil followed the order of alkaline activation > peroxide activation > citric acid chelated Fe(2+) activation > zero-valent iron activation > without activation > iron electrode activation, and the values were 40.5%, 35.6%, 34.1%, 32.4%, 30.8% and 30.5%, respectively. The activation effect was highly dependent on the ratio of activator and persulfate.

  13. Electrokinetic delivery of persulfate to remediate PCBs polluted soils: Effect of different activation methods.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guangping; Cang, Long; Gomes, Helena I; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-02-01

    Persulfate-based in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) for the remediation of organic polluted soils has gained much interest in last decade. However, the transportation of persulfate in low-permeability soil is very low, which limits its efficiency in degrading soil pollutants. Additionally, the oxidation-reduction process of persulfate with organic contaminants takes place slowly, while, the reaction will be greatly accelerated by the production of more powerful radicals once it is activated. Electrokinetic remediation (EK) is a good way for transporting persulfate in low-permeability soil. In this study, different activation methods, using zero-valent iron, citric acid chelated Fe(2+), iron electrode, alkaline pH and peroxide, were evaluated to enhance the activity of persulfate delivered by EK. All the activators and the persulfate were added in the anolyte. The results indicated that zero-valent iron, alkaline, and peroxide enhanced the transportation of persulfate at the first stage of EK test, and the longest delivery distance reached sections S4 or S5 (near the cathode) on the 6th day. The addition of activators accelerated decomposition of persulfate, which resulted in the decreasing soil pH. The mass of persulfate delivered into the soil declined with the continuous decomposition of persulfate by activation. The removal efficiency of PCBs in soil followed the order of alkaline activation > peroxide activation > citric acid chelated Fe(2+) activation > zero-valent iron activation > without activation > iron electrode activation, and the values were 40.5%, 35.6%, 34.1%, 32.4%, 30.8% and 30.5%, respectively. The activation effect was highly dependent on the ratio of activator and persulfate. PMID:26347936

  14. Analysis of chlorothalonil and three degradates in sediment and soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hladik, M.L.; Kuivila, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    A method has been developed for the simultaneous extraction of chlorothalonil and three of its degradates (4-hydroxy-2,5,6- trichloroisophthalonitrile, 1-carbamoyl-3-cyano-4-hydroxy-2,5,6- trichlorobenzene, and 1,3-dicarbamoyl-2,4,5,6-tetrachlorobenzene) from soils and sediments; the compounds were extracted using sonication with acetone and isolation of the parent compound and matrix interferences from the degradates by solid phase extraction (SPE). The chlorothalonil fraction underwent further coextracted matrix interference removal with Florisil. The degradates were derivatized with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) and chlorotrimethylsilane (TMCS). All compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Recoveries on a spiked (20 and 200 ??g kg-1) sediment ranged from 80% to 91% with calculated limits of detection of 1-5 ??g kg-1 dry weight sediment. An additional 20 sediment samples were collected in watersheds from the Southeastern United States where chlorothalonil is used widely on peanuts and other crops. None of the target compounds were detected. Laboratory fortified recoveries of chlorothalonil and its degradates in these environmental sediment samples ranged from 75% to 89%.

  15. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degradative soil Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Fuenmayor, S L; Rodriguez Lemoine, V

    1992-01-01

    Nine Pseudomonas strains, able to degrade polycycle aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were isolated from enriched cultures with naphthalene, as carbon source, and soil samples from a land farming process applied on oil sludge, as inocula. Degradative tests showed that all the strains were capable to catabolize naphthalene (Nah) and phenanthrene (Phn). U2 strain transferred the selected function (Nah) to P. aeruginosa T1 (Hgr Oct+), however some of the transconjugants lost the Oct character, suggesting that it is of plasmidic nature. T1 derivatives as well the wild strains U28 and U31 transferred Nah function to P. putida AC165. All of the examined transconjugants also catabolized phenanthrene, suggesting that Nah and Phn functions in U2, U28, and U31 strains are linked and probably encoded by transferable plasmids.

  16. Responses of butachlor degradation and microbial properties in a riparian soil to the cultivation of three different plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Changming; Wang, Mengmeng; Chen, Haiyan; Li, Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the biodegradation dynamics and related microbial ecophysiological responses to butachlor addition in a riparian soil planted with different plants such as Phragmites australis, Zizania aquatica, and Acorus calamus. The results showed that there were significant differences in microbial degradation dynamics of butachlor in the rhizosphere soils among the three riparian plants. A. calamus displays a significantly higher degradation efficiency of butachlor in the rhizosphere soils, as compared with Z. aquatica and P. australis. Half-life time of butachlor degradation in the rhizospheric soils of P. australis, Z. aquatica, and A. calamus were 7.5, 9.8 and 5.4 days, respectively. Residual butachlor concentration in A. calamus rhizosphere soil was 35.2% and 21.7% lower than that in Z. aquatica and P. australis rhizosphere soils, respectively, indicating that A. calamus showed a greater improvement effect on biodegradation of butachlor in rhizosphere soils than the other two riparian plant. In general, microbial biomass and biochemical activities in rhizosphere soils were depressed by butachlor addition, despite the riparian plant types. However, rhizospheric soil microbial ecophysiological responses to butachlor addition significantly (P < 0.05) differed between riparian plant species. Compared to Z. aquatica and P. australis, A. calamus showed significantly larger microbial number, higher enzyme activities and soil respiration rates in the rhizosphere soils. The results indicated that A. calamus have a better alleviative effect on inhibition of microbial growth due to butachlor addition and can be used as a suitable riparian plant for detoxifying and remediating butachlor contamination from agricultural nonpoint pollution.

  17. Radiation Induced Degradation of Organic Pollutants in Waters and Wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Wojnárovits, László; Takács, Erzsébet

    2016-08-01

    In water treatment by ionizing radiation, and also in other advanced oxidation processes, the main goal is to destroy, or at least to deactivate harmful water contaminants: pharmaceutical compounds, pesticides, surfactants, health-care products, etc. The chemical transformations are mainly initiated by hydroxyl radicals, and the reactions of the formed carbon centered radicals with dissolved oxygen basically determine the rate of oxidation. The concentration of the target compounds is generally very low as compared to the concentration of such natural 'impurities' as chloride and carbonate/bicarbonate ions or the dissolved humic substances (generally referred to as dissolved organic carbon), which consume the majority of the hydroxyl radicals. The different constituents compete for reacting with radicals initiating the degradation. This manuscript discusses the radiation chemistry of this complex system. It includes the reactions of the primary water radiolysis intermediates (hydroxyl radical, hydrated electron/hydrogen atom), the reactions of radicals that form in radical transfer reactions (dichloride-, carbonate- and sulfate radical anions) and also the contribution to the degradation of organic compounds of such additives as hydrogen peroxide, ozone or persulfate. PMID:27573402

  18. Catalytical degradation of relevant pollutants from waters using magnetic nanocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadejde, C.; Neamtu, M.; Schneider, R. J.; Hodoroaba, V.-D.; Ababei, G.; Panne, U.

    2015-10-01

    The catalytic efficiency of two magnetically responsive nanocatalysts was evaluated for the degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84) azo dyes using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant under very mild conditions (atmospheric pressure, room temperature). In order to obtain the nanocatalysts, the surface of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles, prepared by a co-precipitation method, was further modified with ferrous oxalate, a highly sensitive non-hazardous reducing agent. The sensitized nanomaterials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry, and used in the catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation (CWHPO) of RB5 and RY84, in laboratory-scale experiments. The effect of important variables such as catalyst dosage, H2O2 concentration, and contact time was studied in the dye degradation kinetics. The results showed that it was possible to remove up to 99.7% dye in the presence of 20 mM H2O2 after 240 min of oxidation for a catalyst concentration of 10 g L-1 at 25 °C and initial pH value of 9.0. CWHPO of reactive dyes using sensitized magnetic nanocatalysts can be a suitable pre-treatment method for complete decolorization of effluents from textile dyeing and finishing processes, once the optimum operating conditions are established.

  19. Effect of soil pollution on water for mixing of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, M. Cecilia Soto; Tapia Alvarez, Carolina; Decinti Weiss, Alejandra; Zamorano Vargas, Macarena; Corail Sanchez, Camila; Hurtado Nuñez, Camilo; Guzman Hermosilla, Matías; Pardo Fabregat, Francisco; Vidal, Manuel Miguel Jordan; Borras, Jaume Bech; Roca, Nuria

    2016-04-01

    ISO 12439, in addition to chemical and physical requirements, establishes maximum levels for harmful substances that may be present in the mixing water of concrete, when they come from natural sources from contaminated soils. These harmful substances considered in the ISO are sugars, phosphates (P2O5), nitrate (NO3-), lead (P2+) and zinc (Zn2+). As an alternative to the maximum values, ISO verifies the effect of these substances in water from contaminated soils. This measurement is made on the effect on the mechanical strength of the concrete (compression at 7 and 28 days) and the setting times (start and end setting). This paper presents the results obtained on samples of concrete made with smaller, similar and more content to the maximum levels set by ISO 12439 are presented. The results establish that in the case of nitrate, a substance present in many contaminated soils margins resistance variation or setting times allowed by ISO 12439 are not met. Finally, it is concluded that in case of presence of these pollutants should be performed strength tests and setting times before authorizing the use of water. Keywords: Harmful substances, contaminated soils, water pollution.

  20. Soil residue analysis and degradation of saflufenacil as affected by moisture content and soil characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate saflufenacil degradation and persistence in soils from rice regions under field capacity (non-flooded) and saturated (flooded) conditions. Saflufenacil dissolved in acetonitrile was added into pre-incubated samples at the rate of 2000 g ha-1. The amount of...

  1. Stabilization of microbial biomass in soils: Implications for SOM formation and xenobiotics degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miltner, A.; Kindler, R.; Achtenhagen, J.; Nowak, K.; Girardi, C.; Kästner, M.

    2012-04-01

    specific molecular architecture controls carbon mineralization and balance. The process is also involved in the fate of environmental contaminants in soil. This has been demonstrated by studies on the biodegradation of isotope labeled 2,4-D, MCPA and ibuprofen in soil where we quantified the contribution of microbial biomass residues to nonextractable residues (NER) in soil. The high amount of label found in biomolecules (fatty acids, amino acids) indicated that virtually all of the NER was made up by microbial biomass residues. We therefore conclude that stabilization of cell wall residues plays an important role in both SOM formation and pollutant degradation in soil.

  2. Effect of elevated CO2 on chlorpyriphos degradation and soil microbial activities in tropical rice soil.

    PubMed

    Adak, Totan; Munda, Sushmita; Kumar, Upendra; Berliner, J; Pokhare, Somnath S; Jambhulkar, N N; Jena, M

    2016-02-01

    Impact of elevated CO2 on chlorpyriphos degradation, microbial biomass carbon, and enzymatic activities in rice soil was investigated. Rice (variety Naveen, Indica type) was grown under four conditions, namely, chambered control, elevated CO2 (550 ppm), elevated CO2 (700 ppm) in open-top chambers and open field. Chlorpyriphos was sprayed at 500 g a.i. ha(-1) at maximum tillering stage. Chlorpyriphos degraded rapidly from rice soils, and 88.4% of initially applied chlorpyriphos was lost from the rice soil maintained under elevated CO2 (700 ppm) by day 5 of spray, whereas the loss was 80.7% from open field rice soil. Half-life values of chlorpyriphos under different conditions ranged from 2.4 to 1.7 days with minimum half-life recorded with two elevated CO2 treatments. Increased CO2 concentration led to increase in temperature (1.2 to 1.8 °C) that played a critical role in chlorpyriphos persistence. Microbial biomass carbon and soil enzymatic activities specifically, dehydrogenase, fluorescien diacetate hydrolase, urease, acid phosphatase, and alkaline phosphatase responded positively to elevated CO2 concentrations. Generally, the enzyme activities were highly correlated with each other. Irrespective of the level of CO2, short-term negative influence of chlorpyriphos was observed on soil enzymes till day 7 of spray. Knowledge obtained from this study highlights that the elevated CO2 may negatively influence persistence of pesticide but will have positive effects on soil enzyme activities. PMID:26790432

  3. Effect of elevated CO2 on chlorpyriphos degradation and soil microbial activities in tropical rice soil.

    PubMed

    Adak, Totan; Munda, Sushmita; Kumar, Upendra; Berliner, J; Pokhare, Somnath S; Jambhulkar, N N; Jena, M

    2016-02-01

    Impact of elevated CO2 on chlorpyriphos degradation, microbial biomass carbon, and enzymatic activities in rice soil was investigated. Rice (variety Naveen, Indica type) was grown under four conditions, namely, chambered control, elevated CO2 (550 ppm), elevated CO2 (700 ppm) in open-top chambers and open field. Chlorpyriphos was sprayed at 500 g a.i. ha(-1) at maximum tillering stage. Chlorpyriphos degraded rapidly from rice soils, and 88.4% of initially applied chlorpyriphos was lost from the rice soil maintained under elevated CO2 (700 ppm) by day 5 of spray, whereas the loss was 80.7% from open field rice soil. Half-life values of chlorpyriphos under different conditions ranged from 2.4 to 1.7 days with minimum half-life recorded with two elevated CO2 treatments. Increased CO2 concentration led to increase in temperature (1.2 to 1.8 °C) that played a critical role in chlorpyriphos persistence. Microbial biomass carbon and soil enzymatic activities specifically, dehydrogenase, fluorescien diacetate hydrolase, urease, acid phosphatase, and alkaline phosphatase responded positively to elevated CO2 concentrations. Generally, the enzyme activities were highly correlated with each other. Irrespective of the level of CO2, short-term negative influence of chlorpyriphos was observed on soil enzymes till day 7 of spray. Knowledge obtained from this study highlights that the elevated CO2 may negatively influence persistence of pesticide but will have positive effects on soil enzyme activities.

  4. Bioremediation and detoxification of hydrocarbon pollutants in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiao Ping.

    1991-01-01

    As a cleanup alterative, the bioremediation potential of soil, contaminated by spills of three medium petroleum distillates, jet fuel heating oil (No. 2 fuel oil) and diesel fuel was evaluated in controlled-temperature laboratory soil columns and in outdoor lysimeters. Solvent extraction followed by gas chromatography (GC) was used routinely for analysis of fuel residues. Occasionally, class separation and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were also used in residue characterization. The decrease in toxic residues was evaluated by Microtox and Ames tests. Seed germination and plant growth bioassays were also performed. Persistence and toxicity of the fuels increased in the order of jet fuel [lt] heating oil [lt] diesel fuel. Bioremediation consisting of liming, fertilization and tilling decreased the half-lives of the pollutants in soil by a factor of 2-3. Biodegradation was faster at 27C than at 17 or 37C, but hydrocarbon concentration and soil quality had only modest influence on biodegradation rates and did not preclude successful bioremediation of these contaminated soils within one growing season. Microbial activity measurements by the fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis assay confirmed that microbial activity was the principal force in hydrocarbon elimination. Bioremediation was highly effective in eliminating also the polycyclic aromatic components of diesel fuel. The bioremediation and detoxification of fuel-contaminated soil was corroborated by Microtox, Ames and plant growth bioassays.

  5. Soil quality degradation processes along a deforestation chronosequence in the Ziwuling Area, China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accelerated erosion caused by deforestation and soil degradation has become the primary factor limiting sustainable utilization of soil resources on the Loess Plateau of Northwestern China. We studied the physical, chemical, and microbiological processes of soil degradation along a chronosequence o...

  6. Hg soil pollution around the Flix chlor-alkali plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esbrí, José Maria; López-Berdoces, Miguel Angel; Martínez-Coronado, Alba; Fernández-Calderon, Sergio; Díez, Sergi; León Higueras, Pablo

    2014-05-01

    Main mercury consumer in industrialized countries is the chlor-alkali industry. In Spain, this industry declares 2.54 tons of mercury emissions to the atmosphere per year, but the losses of mercury in this industrial process seem to be higher than this. In the next 15 years, these industries are going to make a technology change to a free mercury based technology. This study has been applied to the Flix (Tarragona, NE Spain) plant, located very near the Ebro River. Local industrial activity started in the late 18th Century, being the first Spanish industrial precinct in activity. Technology used in this plant is obsolete, and produces important emissions to the atmosphere. Besides, it has also produced an important pollution problem in the Ebro River. The aim of this work is the characterization of mercury soil pollution around the oldest chlor-alkali plant (CAP), actually in process of decommissioning. For this porpoises, we provided data of mercury in soils and in olive oil leaves, in order to assess the extent of this pollution, and the consequences in terms of transferring to local agricultural biota. We present data from two soils geochemistry surveys, one centered in the general area, and a second one centered in an anomalous area identified by the first survey, at the Ebro margins downstream the town area. A total of 126 surface soil samples were taken and analyzed for total mercury by means of a Lumex RA-915+ device with RP- 91C pyrolysis attachment. Soil-plant transfer was studied based on mercury contents in olive leaves, the most ubiquitous plant species in the area; these biological samples were thoroughly clean and freeze-dried before its total mercury analysis in a Lumex RA-915+ device with its RP-91c pyrolysis attachment. Mercury contents in soils reach maximum levels in the vicinity of CAP (495 mg kg-1), much higher than baseline levels found in the area (0.18 mg kg-1, in average). These polluted soils are located near CAP and the riverbanks of Ebro

  7. Monitoring Anaerobic TCE Degradation by Evanite Cultre in Column Packed with TCE-Contaminated Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, J.; Han, K.; Ahn, G.; Park, S.; Kim, N.; Ahn, H.; Kim, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a long-term common groundwater pollutant because the compound with high density is slowly released into groundwater. Physical and chemical remediation processes have been used to clean-up the contaminant, but novel remediation technology is required to overcome a low efficiency of the traditional treatment process. Many researchers focused on biological process using an anaerobic TCE degrading culture, dehalococcoides spp., but it still needs to evaluate whether the process can be applied into field scale under aerobic condition. Therefore, in this work we examined two different types (i.e., Natural attenuation and bioaugmentation) of biological remediation process in anaerobic column packed with TCE-contaminated soil. A TCE degradation by indigenous microorganisms was confirmed by monitoring TCE and the metabolites (c-DCE, VC, ETH). However, TCE was transformed and stoichiometry amount of c-DCE was produced, and VC and ETH was not detected. To test bioaugmentation of Evanite culture containing dehalococcoides spp., Evanite culture was injected into the column and TCE degradation to c-DCE, VC, ETH was monitored. We are evaluating the transport of the Evanite culture in the column by measuring TCE and VC reductases. In the result, the TCE was completely degraded to ETH using hydrogen as electron donor generate by hydrogen-production fermentation from formate.

  8. Determination of degradation rates of organic substances in the unsaturated soil zone depending on the grain size fractions of various soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Thomas; Stefan, Catalin; Goersmeyer, Nora

    2015-04-01

    Rate and extent of the biological degradation of organic substances during transport through the unsaturated soil zone is decisively influenced by the chemical and physical properties of the pollutants such as water solubility, toxicity and molecular structure. Furthermore microbial degradation processes are also influenced by soil-specific properties. An important parameter is the soil grain size distribution on which the pore volume and the pore size depends. Changes lead to changes in air and water circulation as well as preferred flow paths. Transport capacity of water inclusive nutrients is lower in existing bad-drainable fine pores in soils with small grain size fractions than in well-drainable coarse pores in a soil with bigger grain size fractions. Because fine pores are saturated with water for a longer time than the coarse pores and oxygen diffusion in water is ten thousand times slower than in air, oxygen is replenished much slower in soils with small grain size fractions. As a result life and growth conditions of the microorganisms are negatively affected. This leads to less biological activity, restricted degradation/mineralization of pollutants or altered microbial processes. The aim of conducted laboratory column experiments was to study the correlation between the grain size fractions respectively pore sizes, the oxygen content and the biodegradation rate of infiltrated organic substances. Therefore two columns (active + sterile control) were filled with different grain size fractions (0,063-0,125 mm, 0,2-0,63 mm and 1-2 mm) of soils. The sterile soil was inoculated with a defined amount of a special bacteria culture (sphingobium yanoikuae). A solution with organic substances glucose, oxalic acid, sinaphylic alcohol and nutrients was infiltrated from the top in intervals. The degradation of organic substances was controlled by the measurement of dissolved organic carbon in the in- and outflow of the column. The control of different pore volumes

  9. Distribution of Heavy Metal Pollution in Surface Soil Samples in China: A Graphical Review.

    PubMed

    Duan, Qiannan; Lee, Jianchao; Liu, Yansong; Chen, Han; Hu, Huanyu

    2016-09-01

    Soil pollution in China is one of most wide and severe in the world. Although environmental researchers are well aware of the acuteness of soil pollution in China, a precise and comprehensive mapping system of soil pollution has never been released. By compiling, integrating and processing nearly a decade of soil pollution data, we have created cornerstone maps that illustrate the distribution and concentration of cadmium, lead, zinc, arsenic, copper and chromium in surficial soil across the nation. These summarized maps and the integrated data provide precise geographic coordinates and heavy metal concentrations; they are also the first ones to provide such thorough and comprehensive details about heavy metal soil pollution in China. In this study, we focus on some of the most polluted areas to illustrate the severity of this pressing environmental problem and demonstrate that most developed and populous areas have been subjected to heavy metal pollution.

  10. Distribution of Heavy Metal Pollution in Surface Soil Samples in China: A Graphical Review.

    PubMed

    Duan, Qiannan; Lee, Jianchao; Liu, Yansong; Chen, Han; Hu, Huanyu

    2016-09-01

    Soil pollution in China is one of most wide and severe in the world. Although environmental researchers are well aware of the acuteness of soil pollution in China, a precise and comprehensive mapping system of soil pollution has never been released. By compiling, integrating and processing nearly a decade of soil pollution data, we have created cornerstone maps that illustrate the distribution and concentration of cadmium, lead, zinc, arsenic, copper and chromium in surficial soil across the nation. These summarized maps and the integrated data provide precise geographic coordinates and heavy metal concentrations; they are also the first ones to provide such thorough and comprehensive details about heavy metal soil pollution in China. In this study, we focus on some of the most polluted areas to illustrate the severity of this pressing environmental problem and demonstrate that most developed and populous areas have been subjected to heavy metal pollution. PMID:27342589

  11. Arsenite oxidation-enhanced photocatalytic degradation of phenolic pollutants on platinized TiO2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaesung; Kim, Jungwon

    2014-11-18

    The effect of As(III) on the photocatalytic degradation of phenolic pollutants such as 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) and bisphenol A (BPA) in a suspension of platinized TiO2 (Pt/TiO2) was investigated. In the presence of As(III), the photocatalytic degradation of 4-CP and BPA was significantly enhanced, and the simultaneous oxidation of As(III) to As(V) was also achieved. This positive effect of As(III) on the degradation of phenolic pollutants is attributed to the adsorption of As(V) (generated from As(III) oxidation) on the surface of Pt/TiO2, which facilitates the production of free OH radicals ((•)OHf) that are more reactive than surface-bound OH radicals ((•)OHs) toward phenolic pollutants. The generation of (•)OHf was indirectly verified by using coumarin as an OH radical trapper and comparing the yields of coumarin--OH adduct (i.e., 7-hydroxycoumarin) formed in the absence and presence of As(V). In repeated cycles of 4-CP degradation, the degradation efficiency of 4-CP gradually decreased in the absence of As(III), whereas it was mostly maintained in the presence of As(III), which was either initially present or repeatedly injected at the beginning of each cycle. The positive effect of As(III) on 4-CP degradation was observed over a wide range of As(III) concentrations (up to mM levels) with Pt/TiO2. However, a high concentration of As(III) (hundreds of μM) inhibited the degradation of 4-CP with bare TiO2. Therefore, Pt/TiO2 can be proposed as a practical photocatalyst for the simultaneous oxidation of phenolic pollutants and As(III) in industrial wastewaters.

  12. Reclamation of DPK hydrocarbon polluted agricultural soil using a selected bulking agent.

    PubMed

    Nwankwegu, Amechi S; Onwosi, Chukwudi O; Orji, Michael U; Anaukwu, Chika G; Okafor, Uchenna C; Azi, Fidelis; Martins, Paul E

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, laboratory scale bioremediation of dual purpose kerosene (DPK) hydrocarbon polluted soil using bulking agent (saw dust) was carried out. The effect of different parameters such as total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH), dehydrogenase activity (DHase) and pH on bioremediation performance were evaluated. Studied parameters such as microbial dynamics, percentage degradation (95.20%), DHase (8.20 ± 0.43) were found to be higher in saw dust amended system and significantly differed with control at p < 0.05. Experimental data adequately fitted the first order kinetic thus, generated r(2) values (0.966), first order degradation constant (0.659 d(-1)), and degradation half-life t1/2 = ln2/k (1.05 d). Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus sp., Rhizopus arrhizus and Aspergillus sp. were isolated from the study. The use of saw dust as bulking agent greatly increased biodegradation rate and resulted in effective DPK hydrocarbon clean up. Therefore, saw dust could serve as an effective biostimulant towards improved bioremediation of hydrocarbon polluted environment. PMID:26934642

  13. Reclamation of DPK hydrocarbon polluted agricultural soil using a selected bulking agent.

    PubMed

    Nwankwegu, Amechi S; Onwosi, Chukwudi O; Orji, Michael U; Anaukwu, Chika G; Okafor, Uchenna C; Azi, Fidelis; Martins, Paul E

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, laboratory scale bioremediation of dual purpose kerosene (DPK) hydrocarbon polluted soil using bulking agent (saw dust) was carried out. The effect of different parameters such as total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH), dehydrogenase activity (DHase) and pH on bioremediation performance were evaluated. Studied parameters such as microbial dynamics, percentage degradation (95.20%), DHase (8.20 ± 0.43) were found to be higher in saw dust amended system and significantly differed with control at p < 0.05. Experimental data adequately fitted the first order kinetic thus, generated r(2) values (0.966), first order degradation constant (0.659 d(-1)), and degradation half-life t1/2 = ln2/k (1.05 d). Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus sp., Rhizopus arrhizus and Aspergillus sp. were isolated from the study. The use of saw dust as bulking agent greatly increased biodegradation rate and resulted in effective DPK hydrocarbon clean up. Therefore, saw dust could serve as an effective biostimulant towards improved bioremediation of hydrocarbon polluted environment.

  14. Temporal changes in soil bacterial diversity and humic substances degradation in subarctic tundra soil.

    PubMed

    Park, Ha Ju; Chae, Namyi; Sul, Woo Jun; Lee, Bang Yong; Lee, Yoo Kyung; Kim, Dockyu

    2015-04-01

    Humic substances (HS), primarily humic acids (HA) and fulvic acids (FA), are the largest constituent of soil organic matter. In microcosm systems with subarctic HS-rich tundra soil (site AK 1-75; approximately 5.6 °C during the thawing period) from Council, Alaska, the HA content significantly decreased to 48% after a 99-day incubation at 5 °C as part of a biologically mediated process. Accordingly, levels of FA, a putative byproduct of HA degradation, consistently increased to 172% during an identical incubation process. Culture-independent microbial community analysis showed that during the microcosm experiments, the relative abundance of phyla Proteobacteria (bacteria) and Euryarchaeota (archaea) largely increased, indicating their involvement in HS degradation. When the indigenous bacteria in AK 1-75 were enriched in an artificial mineral medium spiked with HA, the changes in relative abundance were most conspicuous in Proteobacteria (from 60.2 to 79.0%), specifically Betaproteobacteria-related bacteria. One hundred twenty-two HA-degrading bacterial strains, primarily from the genera Paenibacillus (phylum Firmicutes) and Pseudomonas (class Gammaproteobacteria), were cultivated from AK 1-75 and nearby sites. Through culture-dependent analysis with these bacterial isolates, we observed increasing HS-degradation rates in parallel with rising temperatures in a range of 0 °C to 20 °C, with the most notable increase occurring at 8 °C compared to 6 °C. Our results indicate that, although microbial-mediated HS degradation occurs at temperature as low as 5 °C in tundra ecosystems, increasing soil temperature caused by global climate change could enhance HS degradation rates. Extending the thawing period could also increase degradation activity, thereby directly affecting nearby microbial communities and rhizosphere environments.

  15. Saccharin and other artificial sweeteners in soils: estimated inputs from agriculture and households, degradation, and leaching to groundwater.

    PubMed

    Buerge, Ignaz J; Keller, Martina; Buser, Hans-Rudolf; Müller, Markus D; Poiger, Thomas

    2011-01-15

    Artificial sweeteners are consumed in substantial quantities as sugar substitutes and were previously shown to be ubiquitously present in the aquatic environment. The sweetener saccharin is also registered as additive in piglet feed. Saccharin fed to piglets was largely excreted and, consequently, found in liquid manure at concentrations up to 12 mg/L, where it was stable during 2 months of storage. Saccharin may thus end up in soils in considerable quantities with manure. Furthermore, other studies showed that saccharin is a soil metabolite of certain sulfonylurea herbicides. Sweeteners may also get into soils via irrigation with wastewater-polluted surface water, fertilization with sewage sludge (1-43 μg/L), or through leaky sewers. In soil incubation experiments, cyclamate, saccharin, acesulfame, and sucralose were degraded with half-lives of 0.4-6 d, 3-12 d, 3-49 d, and 8-124 d, respectively. The relative importance of entry pathways to soils was compared and degradation and leaching to groundwater were evaluated with computer simulations. The data suggest that detection of saccharin in groundwater (observed concentrations, up to 0.26 μg/L) is most likely due to application of manure. However, elevated concentrations of acesulfame in groundwater (up to 5 μg/L) may result primarily from infiltration of wastewater-polluted surface water through stream beds.

  16. Tracing source pollution in soils using cadmium and lead isotopes.

    PubMed

    Cloquet, C; Carignan, J; Libourel, G; Sterckeman, T; Perdrix, E

    2006-04-15

    Tracing the source of heavy metals in the environment is of key importance for our understanding of their pollution and natural cycles in the surface Earth reservoirs. Up to now, most exclusively Pb isotopes were used to effectively trace metal pollution sources in the environment. Here we report systematic variations of Cd isotope ratios measured in polluted topsoils surrounding a Pb-Zn refinery plant in northern France. Fractionated Cd was measured in soil samples surrounding the refinery, and this fractionation can be attributed to the refining processes. Despite the Cd isotopic ratios being precisely measured, the obtained uncertainties are still large compared to the total isotopic variation. Nevertheless, for the first time, Cd isotopically fractionated by industrial processes may be traced in the environment. On the same samples, Pb isotope systematics suggested that materials actually used by the refinery were not the major source of Pb in soils, probably because refined ore origins changed over the 100 years of operation. On the other hand, Cd isotopes and concentrations measured in topsoils allowed identification of three main origins (industrial dust and slag and agriculture), assuming that all Cd ores are not fractionated, as suggested by terrestrial rocks so far analyzed, and calculation of their relative contributions for each sampling point. Understanding that this refinery context was an ideal situation for such a study, our results lead to the possibility of tracing sources of anthropogenic Cd and better constrain mixing processes, fluxes, transport, and phasing out of industrial input in nature.

  17. Effect of elevated CO2 on degradation of azoxystrobin and soil microbial activity in rice soil.

    PubMed

    Manna, Suman; Singh, Neera; Singh, V P

    2013-04-01

    An experiment was conducted in open-top chambers (OTC) to study the effect of elevated CO2 (580 ± 20 μmol mol(-1)) on azoxystrobin degradation and soil microbial activities. Results indicated that elevated CO2 did not have any significant effect on the persistence of azoxystrobin in rice-planted soil. The half-life values for the azoxystrobin in rice soils were 20.3 days in control (rice grown at ambient CO2 outdoors), 19.3 days in rice grown under ambient CO2 atmosphere in OTC, and 17.5 days in rice grown under elevated CO2 atmosphere in OTC. Azoxystrobin acid was recovered as the only metabolite of azoxystrobin, but it did not accumulate in the soil/water and was further metabolized. Elevated CO2 enhanced soil microbial biomass (MBC) and alkaline phosphatase activity of soil. Compared with rice grown at ambient CO2 (both outdoors and in OTC), the soil MBC at elevated CO2 increased by twofold. Elevated CO2 did not affect dehydrogenase, fluorescein diacetate, and acid phosphatase activity. Azoxystrobin application to soils, both ambient and elevated CO2, inhibited alkaline phosphates activity, while no effect was observed on other enzymes. Slight increase (1.8-2 °C) in temperature inside OTC did not affect microbial parameters, as similar activities were recorded in rice grown outdoors and in OTC at ambient CO2. Higher MBC in soil at elevated CO2 could be attributed to increased carbon availability in the rhizosphere via plant metabolism and root secretion; however, it did not significantly increase azoxystrobin degradation, suggesting that pesticide degradation was not the result of soil MBC alone. Study suggested that increased CO2 levels following global warming might not adversely affect azoxystrobin degradation. However, global warming is a continuous and cumulative process, therefore, long-term studies are necessary to get more realistic assessment of global warming on fate of pesticide. PMID:22773147

  18. Microbial Degradation of Acetamiprid by Ochrobactrum sp. D-12 Isolated from Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangli; Chen, Xiao; Yue, Wenlong; Zhang, Hui; Li, Feng; Xiong, Minghua

    2013-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are one of the most important commercial insecticides used worldwide. The potential toxicity of the residues present in environment to humans has received considerable attention. In this study, a novel Ochrobactrum sp. strain D-12 capable of using acetamiprid as the sole carbon source as well as energy, nitrogen source for growth was isolated and identified from polluted agricultural soil. Strain D-12 was able to completely degrade acetamiprid with initial concentrations of 0–3000 mg·L−1 within 48 h. Haldane inhibition model was used to fit the special degradation rate at different initial concentrations, and the parameters qmax, Ks and Ki were determined to be 0.6394 (6 h)−1, 50.96 mg·L−1 and 1879 mg·L−1, respectively. The strain was found highly effective in degrading acetamiprid over a wide range of temperatures (25–35°C) and pH (6–8). The effects of co-substrates on the degradation efficiency of acetamiprid were investigated. The results indicated that exogenously supplied glucose and ammonium chloride could slightly enhance the biodegradation efficiency, but even more addition of glucose or ammonium chloride delayed the biodegradation. In addition, one metabolic intermediate identified as N-methyl-(6-chloro-3-pyridyl)methylamine formed during the degradation of acetamiprid mediated by strain D-12 was captured by LC-MS, allowing a degradation pathway for acetamiprid to be proposed. This study suggests the bacterium could be a promising candidate for remediation of environments affected by acetamiprid. PMID:24386105

  19. Natural polymers supported copper nanoparticles for pollutants degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Sajjad; Kamal, Tahseen; Khan, Sher Bahadar; Omer, Muhammad; Haider, Adnan; Khan, Farman Ullah; Asiri, Abdullah M.

    2016-11-01

    In this report, chitosan (CS) was adhered on cellulose microfiber mat (CMM) to prepare CS-CMM. This was used as host for copper (Cu) nanoparticles preparation. After adsorption of Cu2+ ions from an aqueous solution of CuSO4, the metal ions entrapped in CS coating layer was treated with sodium borohydride (NaBH4) to prepare Cu nanoparticles loaded CS-CMM (Cu/CS-CMM). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction confirmed the formation of Cu/CS-CMM hybrid. Scanning electron microscopy analysis was performed to reveal the morphology of the prepared catalyst. The prepared Cu/CS-CMM was employed as a catalyst for the degradation of nitro-aromatic compounds of 2-nitrophenol (2NP) and 4-nitrophenol (4NP) as well as an organic cresyl blue (CB) dye. Remarkably, the turnover frequency in the case of 2NP and 4NP using Cu/CS-CMM reaches 103.3 and 88.6 h-1, outperforming previously reported Cu nanoparticles immobilized in hydrogel-based catalytic systems. The rate constants for 2NP, 4NP and CB were 1.2 × 10-3 s-1, 2.1 × 10-3 s-1 and, 1.3 × 10-3 s-1, respectively. Besides, we discussed the separation of the catalyst from the reaction mixture and its re-usability.

  20. Soil microbial communities as suitable bioindicators of trace metal pollution in agricultural volcanic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parelho, Carolina; dos Santos Rodrigues, Armindo; do Carmo Barreto, Maria; Gonçalo Ferreira, Nuno; Garcia, Patrícia

    2015-04-01

    Summary: The biological, chemical and physical properties of soil confer unique characteristics that enhance or influence its overall biodiversity. The adaptive character of soil microbial communities (SMCs) to metal pollution allows discriminating soil health, since changes in microbial populations and activities may function as excellent indicators of soil pollutants. Volcanic soils are unique naturally fertile resources, extensively used for agricultural purposes and with particular physicochemical properties that may result in accumulation of toxic substances, such as trace metals (TM). In our previous works, we identified priority TM affecting agricultural Andosols under different agricultural land uses. Within this particular context, the objectives of this study were to (i) assess the effect of soil TM pollution in different agricultural systems (conventional, traditional and organic) on the following soil properties: microbial biomass carbon, basal soil respiration, metabolic quotient, enzymatic activities (β-glucosidase, acid phosphatase and dehydrogenase) and RNA to DNA ratio; and (ii) evaluate the impact of TM in the soil ecosystem using the integrated biomarker response (IBR) based on a set of biochemical responses of SMCs. This multi-biomarker approach will support the development of the "Trace Metal Footprint" for different agricultural land uses in volcanic soils. Methods: The study was conducted in S. Miguel Island (Azores, Portugal). Microbial biomass carbon was measured by chloroform-fumigation-incubation-assay (Vance et al., 1987). Basal respiration was determined by the Jenkinson & Powlson (1976) technique. Metabolic quotient was calculated as the ratio of basal respiration to microbial biomass C (Sparkling & West, 1988). The enzymatic activities of β-glucosidase and acid phosphatase were determined by the Dick et al. (1996) method and dehydrogenase activity by the Rossel et al. (1997) method. The RNA and DNA were co-extracted from the same

  1. Modeling spatial variation in microbial degradation of pesticides in soil.

    PubMed

    Ghafoor, Abdul; Moeys, Julien; Stenström, John; Tranter, Grant; Jarvis, Nicholas J

    2011-08-01

    Currently, no general guidance is available on suitable approaches for dealing with spatial variation in the first-order pesticide degradation rate constant k even though it is a very sensitive parameter and often highly variable at the field, catchment, and regional scales. Supported by some mechanistic reasoning, we propose a simple general modeling approach to predict k from the sorption constant, which reflects bioavailability, and easily measurable surrogate variables for microbial biomass/activity (organic carbon and clay contents). The soil depth was also explicitly included as an additional predictor variable. This approach was tested in a meta-analysis of available literature data using bootstrapped partial least-squares regression. It explained 73% of the variation in k for the 19 pesticide-study combinations (n = 212) in the database. When 4 of the 19 pesticide-study combinations were excluded (n = 169), the approach explained 80% of the variation in the degradation rate constant. We conclude that the approach shows promise as an effective way to account for the effects of bioavailability and microbial activity on microbial pesticide degradation in large-scale model applications. PMID:21682283

  2. New Photocatalysis for Effective Degradation of Organic Pollutants in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarei Chaleshtori, M.; Saupe, G. B.; Masoud, S.

    2009-12-01

    The presence of harmful compounds in water supplies and in the discharge of wastewater from chemical industries, power plants, and agricultural sources is a topic of global concern. The processes and technologies available at the present time for the treatment of polluted water are varied that include traditional water treatment processes such as biological, thermal and chemical treatment. All these water treatment processes, have limitations of their own and none is cost effective. Advanced oxidation processes have been proposed as an alternative for the treatment of this kind of wastewater. Heterogeneous photocatalysis has recently emerged as an efficient method for purifying water. TiO2 has generally been demonstrated to be the most active semiconductor material for decontamination water. One significant factor is the cost of separation TiO2, which is generally a powder having a very small particle size from the water after treatment by either sedimentation or ultrafiltration. The new photocatalyst, HTiNbO5, has been tested to determine whether its photocatalytic efficiency is good enough for use in photocatalytic water purification since it has high surface area and relatively large particle size. The larger particle sizes of the porous materials facilitate catalyst removal from a solution, after purification has taken place. It can be separated from water easily than TiO2, a significant technical improvement that might eliminate the tedious final filtration necessary with a slurry. These materials are characterized and tested as water decontamination photocatalysts. The new catalyst exhibited excellent catalytic activity, but with a strong pH dependence on the photo efficiency. These results suggest that elimination of the ion exchange character of the catalyst may greatly improve its performance at various pHs. This new research proposes to study the effects of a topotactic dehydration reaction on these new porous material catalysts.

  3. Design and field-scale implementation of an "on site" bioremediation treatment in PAH-polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Pelaez, A I; Lores, I; Sotres, A; Mendez-Garcia, C; Fernandez-Velarde, C; Santos, J A; Gallego, J L R; Sanchez, J

    2013-10-01

    An "on site" bioremediation program was designed and implemented in soil polluted with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), especially naphthalene. We began by characterizing the soil's physical and chemical properties. A microbiological screening corroborated the presence of microorganisms capable of metabolizing PAHs. We then analyzed the viability of bioremediation by developing laboratory microcosms and pilot scale studies, to optimize the costs and time associated with remediation. The treatment assays were based on different types of biostimulants, such as a slow or fast-release fertilizer, combined with commercial surfactants. Once the feasibility of the biostimulation was confirmed, a real-scale bioremediation program was undertaken in 900 m(3) of contaminated soil. The three-step design reduced PAH contamination by 94.4% at the end of treatment (161 days). The decrease in pollutants was concomitant with the selection of autochthonous bacteria capable of degrading PAHs, with Bacillus and Pseudomonas the most abundant genera.

  4. Use of phytoremediation and biochar to remediate heavy metal polluted soils: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Ferreiro, J.; Lu, H.; Fu, S.; Méndez, A.; Gascó, G.

    2013-11-01

    Anthropogenic activities are resulting in an increase on the use and extraction of heavy metals. Heavy metals cannot be degraded and hence accumulate in the environment having the potential to contaminate the food chain. This pollution threatens soil quality, plant survival and human health. The remediation of heavy metals deserves attention, but it is impaired by the cost of these processes. Phytoremediation and biochar are two sound environmental technologies which could be at the forefront to mitigate soil pollution. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge phytoremediation and biochar application to remediate heavy metal contaminated soils, discussing the advantages and disadvantages of both individual approaches. Research to date has attempted only in a limited number of occasions to combine both techniques, however we discuss the potential advantages of combining both remediation techniques and the potential mechanisms involved in the interaction between phytoremediators and biochar. We identified specific research needs to ensure a sustainable use of phytoremediation and biochar as remediation tools.

  5. Evaluation of Ricinus communis L. for the Phytoremediation of Polluted Soil with Organochlorine Pesticides.

    PubMed

    Rissato, Sandra Regina; Galhiane, Mário Sergio; Fernandes, João Roberto; Gerenutti, Marli; Gomes, Homero Marques; Ribeiro, Renata; de Almeida, Marcos Vinícius

    2015-01-01

    Phytoremediation is an attractive alternative to conventional treatments of soil due to advantages such as low cost, large application areas, and the possibility of in situ treatment. This study presents the assessment of phytoremediation processes conducted under controlled experimental conditions to evaluate the ability of Ricinus communis L., tropical plant species, to promote the degradation of 15 persistent organic pollutants (POPs), in a 66-day period. The contaminants tested were hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), DDT, heptachlor, aldrin, and others. Measurements made in rhizosphere soil indicate that the roots of the studied species reduce the concentration of pesticides. Results obtained during this study indicated that the higher the hydrophobicity of the organic compound and its molecular interaction with soil or root matrix the greater its tendency to concentrate in root tissues and the research showed the following trend: HCHs < diclofop-methyl < chlorpyrifos < methoxychlor < heptachlor epoxide < endrin < o,p'-DDE < heptachlor < dieldrin < aldrin < o,p'-DDT < p,p'-DDT by increasing order of log K ow values. The experimental results confirm the importance of vegetation in removing pollutants, obtaining remediation from 25% to 70%, and demonstrated that Ricinus communis L. can be used for the phytoremediation of such compounds.

  6. Evaluation of Ricinus communis L. for the Phytoremediation of Polluted Soil with Organochlorine Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Rissato, Sandra Regina; Galhiane, Mário Sergio; Fernandes, João Roberto; Gerenutti, Marli; Gomes, Homero Marques; Ribeiro, Renata; de Almeida, Marcos Vinícius

    2015-01-01

    Phytoremediation is an attractive alternative to conventional treatments of soil due to advantages such as low cost, large application areas, and the possibility of in situ treatment. This study presents the assessment of phytoremediation processes conducted under controlled experimental conditions to evaluate the ability of Ricinus communis L., tropical plant species, to promote the degradation of 15 persistent organic pollutants (POPs), in a 66-day period. The contaminants tested were hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), DDT, heptachlor, aldrin, and others. Measurements made in rhizosphere soil indicate that the roots of the studied species reduce the concentration of pesticides. Results obtained during this study indicated that the higher the hydrophobicity of the organic compound and its molecular interaction with soil or root matrix the greater its tendency to concentrate in root tissues and the research showed the following trend: HCHs < diclofop-methyl < chlorpyrifos < methoxychlor < heptachlor epoxide < endrin < o,p′-DDE < heptachlor < dieldrin < aldrin < o,p′-DDT < p,p′-DDT by increasing order of log Kow values. The experimental results confirm the importance of vegetation in removing pollutants, obtaining remediation from 25% to 70%, and demonstrated that Ricinus communis L. can be used for the phytoremediation of such compounds. PMID:26301249

  7. Methyl tert-butyl ether biodegradation by microbial consortia obtained from soil samples of gasoline-polluted sites in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Morales, Marcia; Velázquez, Elia; Jan, Janet; Revah, Sergio; González, Uriel; Razo-Flores, Elías

    2004-02-01

    Microbial consortia obtained from soil samples of gasoline-polluted sites were individually enriched with pentane, hexane, isooctane and toluene. Cometabolism with methyl tert-butyl ether, (MTBE), gave maximum degradation rates of 49, 12, 32 and 0 mg g(-1)protein h(-1), respectively. MTBE was fully degraded even when pentane was completely depleted with a cometabolic coefficient of 1 mgMTBE mg(-1)pentane. The analysis of 16S rDNA from isolated microorganisms in the pentane-adapted consortia showed that microorganisms could be assigned to Pseudomonas. This is the first work reporting the cometabolic mineralization of MTBE by consortium of this genus.

  8. Electrochemically enhanced oxidation reactions in sandy soil polluted with mercury

    PubMed

    Thoming; Kliem; Ottosen

    2000-10-16

    For remediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals, the electrodialytic remediation (EDR) method is a highly relevant method, see e.g. Hansen et al. (Hansen HK, Ottosen LM, Kliem BK, Villumsen A. Electrodialytic remediation of soils polluted with Cu, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Zn. J Chem Tech Biotechnol 1997;70:67-73). During the process the heavy metals are transferred to the pore water in dissolved form or attached to colloids and move within the applied electric field. The method is found to be useful in many soil types, but has its strength in fine-grained soils. It is exactly in such soils that other remediation methods fail. Four cell experiments were made in order to investigate how relevant the method is for a more sandy soil and if it is suitable for non-ionic heavy metals such as elemental mercury. The duration was 27 days for two of the experiments and two experiments lasted 54 days, and the mercury within the soil was initially 1200-1900 mg kg(-1), of which 84% was elemental Hg. To monitor the process the pseudo-total mercury concentration was distinguished between elemental mercury and non-metallic mercury species by thermodesorption. During the electrodialytic treatment an increase of the content of non-metallic mercury occurred and a corresponding decrease of the content of elemental mercury which indicates a transformation of the latter species into any other non-metallic species. Generally, oxidation of Hg by dissolved oxygen in a solution is kinetically inhibited and thus quite slow. The redistribution of Hg was closely connected to a decrease of soil pH during the experiments. This corresponds very well to the thermodynamic calculations from which it was found that a decrease in the pH of the soil will result in an increase in the oxidation rate of elemental Hg. Results from this investigation show that the electrodialytic remediation method alone is not efficient in situations with sandy soils containing elemental mercury. As a solution for this

  9. Estimations of soil fertility in physically degraded agricultural soils through selective accounting of fine earth and gravel fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraja, Mavinakoppa S.; Bhardwaj, Ajay Kumar; Prabhakara Reddy, G. V.; Srinivasamurthy, Chilakunda A.; Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-06-01

    Soil fertility and organic carbon (C) stock estimations are crucial to soil management, especially that of degraded soils, for productive agricultural use and in soil C sequestration studies. Currently, estimations based on generalized soil mass (hectare furrow basis) or bulk density are used which may be suitable for normal agricultural soils, but not for degraded soils. In this study, soil organic C, available nitrogen (N), available phosphorus (P2O5) and available potassium (K2O), and their stocks were estimated using three methods: (i) generalized soil mass (GSM, 2 million kg ha-1 furrow soil), (ii) bulk-density-based soil mass (BDSM) and (iii) the proportion of fine earth volume (FEV) method, for soils sampled from physically degraded lands in the eastern dry zone of Karnataka State in India. Comparative analyses using these methods revealed that the soil organic C, N, P2O and K2O stocks determined by using BDSM were higher than those determined by the GSM method. The soil organic C values were the lowest in the FEV method. The GSM method overestimated soil organic C, N, P2O and K2O by 9.3-72.1, 9.5-72.3, 7.1-66.6 and 9.2-72.3 %, respectively, compared to FEV-based estimations for physically degraded soils. The differences among the three methods of estimation were lower in soils with low gravel content and increased with an increase in gravel volume. There was overestimation of soil organic C and soil fertility with GSM and BDSM methods. A reassessment of methods of estimation was, therefore, attempted to provide fair estimates for land development projects in degraded lands.

  10. Contribution of soil fauna to soil functioning in degraded environments: a multidisciplinary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargiulo, Laura; Mele, Giacomo; Moradi, Jabbar; Kukla, Jaroslav; Jandová, Kateřina; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The restoration of the soil functions is essential for the recovery of highly degraded sites and, consequently, the study of the soil fauna role in the soil development in such environments has great potential from a practical point of view. The soils of the post-mining sites represent unique models for the study of the natural ecological succession because mining creates similar environments characterized by the same substrate, but by different ages according to the year of closure of mines. The aim of this work was to assess the contribution of different species of macrofauna on the evolution of soil structure and on the composition and activity of the microbial community in soil samples subjected to ecological restoration or characterized by spontaneous ecological succession. For this purpose, an experimental test was carried out in two sites characterized by different post-mining conditions: 1) natural succession, 2) reclamation with planting trees. These sites are located in the post-mining area of Sokolov (Czech Republic). For the experimental test repacked soil cores were prepared in laboratory with sieved soil sampled from the two sites. The soil cores were prepared maintaining the sequence of soil horizons present in the field. These samples were inoculated separately with two genera of earthworms (Lumbricus and Aporrectodea) and two of centipedes (Julida and Polydesmus). In particular, based on their body size, were inoculated for each cylinder 2 individuals of millipedes, 1 individual of Lumbricus and 4 individuals of Aporrectodea. For each treatment and for control samples 5 replicates were prepared and all samples were incubated in field for 1 month in the two original sampling sites. After the incubation the samples were removed from the field and transported in laboratory in order to perform the analysis of microbial respiration, of PLFA (phospholipid-derived fatty acids) and ergosterol contents and finally for the characterization of soil structure

  11. Response of soil microbial activity and biodiversity in soils polluted with different concentrations of cypermethrin insecticide.

    PubMed

    Tejada, Manuel; García, Carlos; Hernández, Teresa; Gómez, Isidoro

    2015-07-01

    We performed a laboratory study into the effect of cypermethrin insecticide applied to different concentrations on biological properties in two soils [Typic Xerofluvent (soil A) and Xerollic Calciorthid (soil B)]. Two kg of each soil were polluted with cypermethrin at a rate of 60, 300, 600, and 1,200 g ha(-1) (C1, C2, C3, and C4 treatments). A nonpolluted soil was used as a control (C0 treatment). For all treatments and each experimental soil, soil dehydrogenase, urease, β-glucosidase, phosphatase, and arylsulphatase activities and soil microbial community were analysed by phospholipid fatty acids, which were measured at six incubation times (3, 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days). The behavior of the enzymatic activities and microbial population were dependent on the dose of insecticide applied to the soil. Compared with the C0 treatment, in soil A, the maximum inhibition of the enzymatic activities was at 15, 30, 45, and 90 days for the C1, C2, C3, and C4 treatments, respectively. However, in soil B, the maximum inhibition occurred at 7, 15, 30, and 45 days for the C1, C2, C3, and C4 treatments, respectively. These results suggest that the cypermethrin insecticide caused a negative effect on soil enzymatic activities and microbial diversity. This negative impact was greater when a greater dose of insecticide was used; this impact was also greater in soil with lower organic matter content. For both soils, and from these respective days onward, the enzymatic activities and microbial populations progressively increased by the end of the experimental period. This is possibly due to the fact that the insecticide or its breakdown products and killed microbial cells, subsequently killed by the insecticide, are being used as a source of energy or as a carbon source for the surviving microorganisms for cell proliferation.

  12. Abundance and diversity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation bacteria in urban roadside soils in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Zheng, Yanling; Li, Ye; Lin, Xianbiao

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the impact of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on soil environments is of increasingly important concern. Therefore, the microbial degradation of PAHs in soils has drawn considerable attention, but little is known about the PAH degradation genes in urban soils. In this study, we examined the diversity and abundance of the PAH degradation bacteria and evaluated whether the specific bacteria can reflect PAH contents in the soils from urban roadsides directly receiving traffic emission. The results of phylogenetic analysis indicated that low PAH degradation bacterial diversity occurred in the urban roadside soils, only including Mycobacterium sp., Terrabacter sp., and one novel cluster. The community composition diversity of PAH degradation bacteria did not show a significant difference across the sampling sites. The abundance of PAH degradation genes ranged from 5.70 × 10(6) to 6.44 × 10(7) gene copies g(-1) dry soil, with an average abundance of 1.43 × 10(7) gene copies g(-1) dry soil, and their spatial variations were related significantly to PAH contents in the soils. The Mycobacterium sp. was the most widely detected and estimated to occupy 65.9-100 % of the total PAH degradation bacteria at most of the soil samples, implying that the Mycobacterium sp. might play a primary role in degrading PAHs in the contaminated urban soil environments.

  13. [Effects of ryegrass (Lolium perenne) root exudates dose on pyrene degradation and soil microbes in pyrene-contaminated soil].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-mei; Liao, Min; Yang, Jing

    2011-10-01

    By simulating a gradually decreasing concentration of root exudates with the distance away from root surface in rhizosphere, this paper studied the effects of ryegrass (Lolium perenne) root exudates dose on the pyrene degradation and microbial ecological characteristics in a pyrene-contaminated soil. It was observed that with the increasing dose of ryegrass root exudates, the residual amount of soil pyrene changed nonlinearly, i. e. , increased after an initial decrease. When the root exudates dose was 32.75 mg kg(-1) of total organic carbon, the residual pyrene was the minimum, indicating that the root exudates at this dose stimulated pyrene degradation significantly. In the meantime, soil microbial biomass carbon and microbial quotient had an opposite trend, suggesting the close relationship between pyrene degradation and soil microbes. In the test soil, microbial community was dominated by bacteria, and the bacteria had the same variation trend as the pyrene degradation, which indicated that the pyrene was degraded mainly by bacteria, and the effects of root exudates on pyrene degradation were mainly carried out through the effects on bacterial population. There was a similar variation trend between the activity of soil dehydrogenase, a microbial endoenzyme catalyzing the dehydrogenation of organic matter, and the soil microbes, which further demonstrated that the variations of soil microbes and their biochemical characteristics were the ecological mechanisms affecting the pyrene degradation in the pyrene-contaminated soil when the ryegrass root exudates dose increased. PMID:22263480

  14. Isolation and characterisation of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degrading fungi from a historically contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    Tigini, Valeria; Prigione, Valeria; Di Toro, Sara; Fava, Fabio; Varese, Giovanna C

    2009-01-01

    Background Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are widespread toxic pollutants. Bioremediation might be an effective, cost competitive and environment-friendly solution for remediating environmental matrices contaminated by PCBs but it is still unsatisfactory, mostly for the limited biodegradation potential of bacteria involved in the processes. Very little is known about mitosporic fungi potential in PCB bioremediation and their occurrence in actual site historically contaminated soils. In the present study, we characterised the native mycoflora of an aged dump site soil contaminated by about 0.9 g kg-1 of Aroclor 1260 PCBs and its changing after aerobic biotreatment with a commercial complex source of bacteria and fungi. Fungi isolated from the soil resulting from 120 days of treatment were screened for their ability to adsorb or metabolise 3 target PCBs. Results The original contaminated soil contained low loads of few fungal species mostly belonging to the Scedosporium, Penicillium and Aspergillus genera. The fungal load and biodiversity generally decreased throughout the aerobic treatment. None of the 21 strains isolated from the treated soil were able to grow on biphenyl (200 mg L-1) or a mixture of 2-chlorobiphenyl, 4,4'-dichlorobiphenyl and 2,2',5,5'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (20 mg L-1 each) as sole carbon sources. However, 16 of them grew in a mineral medium containing the same PCBs mixture and glucose (10 g L-1). Five of the 6 isolates, which displayed the faster and more extensive growth under the latter conditions, were found to degrade the 3 PCBs apparently without the involvement of ligninolytic enzymes; they were identified as Penicillium chrysogenum, Scedosporium apiospermum, Penicillium digitatum and Fusarium solani. They are the first PCB degrading strains of such species reported so far in the literature. Conclusion The native mycoflora of the actual site aged heavily contaminated soil was mainly constituted by genera often reported as able to biodegrade

  15. Quantitative response relationships between degradation rates and functional genes during the degradation of beta-cypermethrin in soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Hua; Ji, Guo-Dong

    2015-12-15

    In the present study, the degradation mechanisms of beta-cypermethrin and its metabolites in soil were explored through the quantitative response relationships between the degradation rates and related functional genes. We found that the degradation rate of beta-cypermethrin was rapid in unsterilized soil but not in sterilized soil, which indicated that the degradation process is microbially based. Moreover, three metabolites (3-phenoxybenzoic acid, phenol and protocatechuic acid) were detected during the degradation process and used to identify the degradation pathway and functional genes related to the degradation process. The key rate-limiting functional genes were pytH and pobA, and the relative contributions of these genes to the degradation process were examined with a path analysis. The path analysis revealed that the genes pobA and pytH had the greatest direct effects on the degradation of beta-cypermethrin (pobA), alpha-cypermethrin (pobA), theta-cypermethrin (pytH) and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (pytH).

  16. Air pollution: Household soiling and consumer welfare losses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, W.D.; Jaksch, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper uses demand and supply functions for cleanliness to estimate household benefits from reduced particulate matter soiling. A demand curve for household cleanliness is estimated, based upon the assumption that households prefer more cleanliness to less. Empirical coefficients, related to particulate pollution levels, for shifting the cleanliness supply curve, are taken from available studies. Consumer welfare gains, aggregated across 123 SMSAs, from achieving the Federal primary particulate standard, are estimated to range from $0.9 to $3.2 million per year (1971 dollars). ?? 1982.

  17. Characteristics of current roadside pollution of soils in Upper Silesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawer, M.; Szuszkiewicz, M.; Magiera, T.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the study was qualitative recognition of contemporary roadside pollutants deposited on topsoils in areas located in close vicinity to roads with high traffic volume (main roads, ring roads). So far, the determination of pollutant content in soil samples has shown only the amount of pollutants deposited on soils over long time period, without the possibility to assess the quality changes in type of deposition and to determine the present structure of roadside pollution. Moreover, in many cases, it is difficult to distinguish roadside pollution from other industrial sources. In order to avoid this issue and recognize currently emergent threats of road traffic origin, three monitoring plots filled with quartz sand had been installed in Zabrze, Gliwice and Opole (Poland) close to arteries with high traffic volume. For installation of monitoring plots 7 cm of topsoil had been removed and replaced by boxes filled with clean quartz sand with known chemical composition and neutral magnetic properties (diamagnetic). This sand was treated as neutral matrix for the accumulation of traffic pollution. Results of chemical analyses of heavy metal contents and magnetic susceptibility measurements of removed topsoils have shown that the highest content of Fe, Mn, Zn, Pb, Cu, Cr and Ni were observed in Zabrze. Amount of Zn and Pb exceeded threshold values. Magnetic susceptibility values were also the highest in Zabrze. In all investigated areas magnetic susceptibility values and heavy metal contents decreased with the distance from the road. Measurements of sand from monitoring plots which were executed after 3, 6 and 12 months of exposure have shown that values of magnetic susceptibility have increased during these time periods. It is visible especially in surface layer of sand. Initially magnetic susceptibility value of quartz sand which was used as matrix after first year of exposure increased from 0,25 - 10-8 m3kg-1 to 300 in Zabrze, 50 in Gliwice and 30- 10-8 m3kg-1

  18. Approaches to the Assessment of the Efficiency of Remediation of Oil-Polluted Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchugova, E. M.; Melekhina, E. N.; Markarova, M. Yu.; Shchemelinina, T. N.

    2016-02-01

    Indices characterizing the enzymatic activity of soils and the contents of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons have been applied for estimating the efficiency of remediation of oil-polluted soils in the north of European Russia. Oil-polluted test plots treated with the Universal and Roder biopreparations and subjected to the agrochemical reclamation have been examined. The suggested indices can be used to diagnose and monitor the oil-polluted soils and to assess the efficiency of their remediation.

  19. Can control of soil erosion mitigate water pollution by sediments?

    PubMed

    Rickson, R J

    2014-01-15

    The detrimental impact of sediment and associated pollutants on water quality is widely acknowledged, with many watercourses in the UK failing to meet the standard of 'good ecological status'. Catchment sediment budgets show that hill slope erosion processes can be significant sources of waterborne sediment, with rates of erosion likely to increase given predicted future weather patterns. However, linking on-site erosion rates with off-site impacts is complicated because of the limited data on soil erosion rates in the UK and the dynamic nature of the source-pathway-receptor continuum over space and time. Even so, soil erosion control measures are designed to reduce sediment production (source) and mobilisation/transport (pathway) on hill slopes, with consequent mitigation of pollution incidents in watercourses (receptors). The purpose of this paper is to review the scientific evidence of the effectiveness of erosion control measures used in the UK to reduce sediment loads of hill slope origin in watercourses. Although over 73 soil erosion mitigation measures have been identified from the literature, empirical data on erosion control effectiveness are limited. Baseline comparisons for the 18 measures where data do exist reveal erosion control effectiveness is highly variable over time and between study locations. Given the limitations of the evidence base in terms of geographical coverage and duration of monitoring, performance of the different measures cannot be extrapolated to other areas. This uncertainty in effectiveness has implications for implementing erosion/sediment risk reduction policies, where quantified targets are stipulated, as is the case in the EU Freshwater Fish and draft Soil Framework Directives. Also, demonstrating technical effectiveness of erosion control measures alone will not encourage uptake by land managers: quantifying the costs and benefits of adopting erosion mitigation is equally important, but these are uncertain and difficult to

  20. Can control of soil erosion mitigate water pollution by sediments?

    PubMed

    Rickson, R J

    2014-01-15

    The detrimental impact of sediment and associated pollutants on water quality is widely acknowledged, with many watercourses in the UK failing to meet the standard of 'good ecological status'. Catchment sediment budgets show that hill slope erosion processes can be significant sources of waterborne sediment, with rates of erosion likely to increase given predicted future weather patterns. However, linking on-site erosion rates with off-site impacts is complicated because of the limited data on soil erosion rates in the UK and the dynamic nature of the source-pathway-receptor continuum over space and time. Even so, soil erosion control measures are designed to reduce sediment production (source) and mobilisation/transport (pathway) on hill slopes, with consequent mitigation of pollution incidents in watercourses (receptors). The purpose of this paper is to review the scientific evidence of the effectiveness of erosion control measures used in the UK to reduce sediment loads of hill slope origin in watercourses. Although over 73 soil erosion mitigation measures have been identified from the literature, empirical data on erosion control effectiveness are limited. Baseline comparisons for the 18 measures where data do exist reveal erosion control effectiveness is highly variable over time and between study locations. Given the limitations of the evidence base in terms of geographical coverage and duration of monitoring, performance of the different measures cannot be extrapolated to other areas. This uncertainty in effectiveness has implications for implementing erosion/sediment risk reduction policies, where quantified targets are stipulated, as is the case in the EU Freshwater Fish and draft Soil Framework Directives. Also, demonstrating technical effectiveness of erosion control measures alone will not encourage uptake by land managers: quantifying the costs and benefits of adopting erosion mitigation is equally important, but these are uncertain and difficult to

  1. Soil depth and temperature effects on microbial degradation of 2,4-D

    SciTech Connect

    Veeh, R.H.; Camper, A.K.; Inskeep, W.P.

    1996-01-01

    Numerous soil factors and climatic conditions affect the degradation rate of pesticides in soils. A major soil factor influencing herbicide degradation is the composition and abundance of the microbiota, which has been shown to vary considerably with soil depth. Another important variable affecting microbial growth and degradation kinetics is temperature. Soil samples from 0- to 30-, 30- to 60-, and 60- to 120-cm depths of two Montana soils were placed in reaction flasks and treated with {sup 14}C-labeled 2,4-D at representative field use rates at temperatures of 10, 17, and 24{degrees}C. A carrier gas was used to continuously evacuate evolved {sup 14}CO{sub 2} into NaOH traps as a measure of 2,4-D degradation. Comparisons of the effects of soil depth and temperature were made by fitting experimental data to both first-order and logistic kinetic models. Degradation rates of 2,4-D decreased significantly with increasing soil depth and were positively correlated with bacterial plate counts. Effects of temperature on degradation rate constants were adequately described using the Arrhenius equation. Degradation rates of 2,4-D and bacterial enumerations were positively correlated with changes in soil organic C as a function of soil depth. These results support the idea that changes in organic C with soil depth could be used as a parameter for estimating changes in degradation rate as a function of soil depth. Efforts to model the transport of 2,4-D in soils should account for variation in degradation rate as a function of soil depth and temperature. 46 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Microwaves and their coupling to advanced oxidation processes: enhanced performance in pollutants degradation.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Ulisses M; Azevedo, Eduardo B

    2013-01-01

    This review assesses microwaves (MW) coupled to advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) for pollutants degradation, as well as the basic theory and mechanisms of MW dielectric heating. We addressed the following couplings: MW/H2O2, MW/UV/H2O2, MW/Fenton, MW/US, and MW/UV/TiO2, as well as few studies that tested alternative oxidants and catalysts. Microwave Discharge Electrodeless Lamps (MDELs) are being extensively used with great advantages over ballasts. In their degradation studies, researchers generally employed domestic ovens with minor adaptations. Non-thermal effects and synergies between UV and MW radiation play an important role in the processes. Published papers so far report degradation enhancements between 30 and 1,300%. Unfortunately, how microwaves enhance pollutants is still obscure and real wastewaters scarcely studied. Based on the results surveyed in the literature, MW/AOPs are promising alternatives for treating/remediating environmental pollutants, whenever one considers high degradation yields, short reaction times, and small costs.

  3. Peach leaf responses to soil and cement dust pollution.

    PubMed

    Maletsika, Persefoni A; Nanos, George D; Stavroulakis, George G

    2015-10-01

    Dust pollution can negatively affect plant productivity in hot, dry and with high irradiance areas during summer. Soil or cement dust were applied on peach trees growing in a Mediterranean area with the above climatic characteristics. Soil and cement dust accumulation onto the leaves decreased the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) available to the leaves without causing any shade effect. Soil and mainly cement dust deposition onto the leaves decreased stomatal conductance, photosynthetic and transpiration rates, and water use efficiency due possibly to stomatal blockage and other leaf cellular effects. In early autumn, rain events removed soil dust and leaf functions partly recovered, while cement dust created a crust partially remaining onto the leaves and causing more permanent stress. Leaf characteristics were differentially affected by the two dusts studied due to their different hydraulic properties. Leaf total chlorophyll decreased and total phenol content increased with dust accumulation late in the summer compared to control leaves due to intense oxidative stress. The two dusts did not cause serious metal imbalances to the leaves, except of lower leaf K content.

  4. Anaerobic 2-propanol degradation in anoxic paddy soil and the possible role of methanogens in its degradation.

    PubMed

    Tonouchi, Akio

    2004-08-01

    The anaerobic degradation of 2-propanol in anoxic paddy soil was studied with soil cultures and a 2-propanol-utilizing methanogen. Acetone was the first and the major intermediate involved in the methanogenic degradation of 2-propanol. Analyses with a methanogenesis inhibitor, bacteria antibiotics, and the addition of H2 to the gas phase revealed that 2-propanol oxidation to acetone directly occurred using 2-propanol-utilizing methanogens, but not with H2-producing syntrophic bacteria, for which the removal of acetone is required for complete 2-propanol oxidation. The 2-propanol-utilizing strain IIE1, which is phylogenetically closely related to Methanoculleus palmolei, was isolated from paddy soil, and the potential role of the strain in 2-propanol degradation was investigated. 2-Propanol is one of the representative fermentation intermediates in anaerobic environments. This is the first report on the anaerobic 2-propanol degradation process. PMID:15297909

  5. DDT degradation efficiency and ecotoxicological effects of two types of nano-sized zero-valent iron (nZVI) in water and soil.

    PubMed

    El-Temsah, Yehia S; Sevcu, Alena; Bobcikova, Katerina; Cernik, Miroslav; Joner, Erik J

    2016-02-01

    Nano-scale zero-valent iron (nZVI) has been conceived for cost-efficient degradation of chlorinated pollutants in soil as an alternative to e.g permeable reactive barriers or excavation. Little is however known about its efficiency in degradation of the ubiquitous environmental pollutant DDT and its secondary effects on organisms. Here, two types of nZVI (type B made using precipitation with borohydride, and type T produced by gas phase reduction of iron oxides under H2) were compared for efficiency in degradation of DDT in water and in a historically (>45 years) contaminated soil (24 mg kg(-1) DDT). Further, the ecotoxicity of soil and water was tested on plants (barley and flax), earthworms (Eisenia fetida), ostracods (Heterocypris incongruens), and bacteria (Escherichia coli). Both types of nZVI effectively degraded DDT in water, but showed lower degradation of aged DDT in soil. Both types of nZVI had negative impact on the tested organisms, with nZVI-T giving least adverse effects. Negative effects were mostly due to oxidation of nZVI, resulting in O2 consumption and excess Fe(II) in water and soil.

  6. DDT degradation efficiency and ecotoxicological effects of two types of nano-sized zero-valent iron (nZVI) in water and soil.

    PubMed

    El-Temsah, Yehia S; Sevcu, Alena; Bobcikova, Katerina; Cernik, Miroslav; Joner, Erik J

    2016-02-01

    Nano-scale zero-valent iron (nZVI) has been conceived for cost-efficient degradation of chlorinated pollutants in soil as an alternative to e.g permeable reactive barriers or excavation. Little is however known about its efficiency in degradation of the ubiquitous environmental pollutant DDT and its secondary effects on organisms. Here, two types of nZVI (type B made using precipitation with borohydride, and type T produced by gas phase reduction of iron oxides under H2) were compared for efficiency in degradation of DDT in water and in a historically (>45 years) contaminated soil (24 mg kg(-1) DDT). Further, the ecotoxicity of soil and water was tested on plants (barley and flax), earthworms (Eisenia fetida), ostracods (Heterocypris incongruens), and bacteria (Escherichia coli). Both types of nZVI effectively degraded DDT in water, but showed lower degradation of aged DDT in soil. Both types of nZVI had negative impact on the tested organisms, with nZVI-T giving least adverse effects. Negative effects were mostly due to oxidation of nZVI, resulting in O2 consumption and excess Fe(II) in water and soil. PMID:26598990

  7. Characterizing Soil Organic Matter Degradation Levels in Permafrost-affected Soils using Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matamala, R.; Jastrow, J. D.; Calderon, F.; Liang, C.; Miller, R. M.; Ping, C. L.; Michaelson, G. J.; Hofmann, S.

    2014-12-01

    Diffuse-reflectance Fourier-transform mid-infrared spectroscopy (MidIR) was used to (1) investigate soil quality along a latitudinal gradient of Alaskan soils, and in combination with soil incubations, (2) to assess the relative lability of soil organic matter in the active layer and upper permafrost for some of those soils. Twenty nine sites were sampled along a latitudinal gradient (78.79 N to 55.35 N deg). The sites included 8 different vegetation types (moss/lichen, non-acidic and acidic tundra, shrub areas, deciduous forests, mixed forests, coniferous forests, and grassland). At each site, soils were separated by soil horizons and analyzed for pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), organic and inorganic C, and total N. Samples were also scanned to obtain MidIR spectra, and ratios of characteristic bands previously suggested as indicators of organic matter quality or degradation level were calculated. Principal component analysis showed that axis 1 explained 70% of the variation and was correlated with the general Organic:Mineral ratio, soil organic C, total N, and CEC, but not with vegetation type. Axis 2 explained 25% of the variation and was correlated with most of the band ratios, with negative values for the condensation index (ratio of aromatic to aliphatic organic matter) and positive values for all humification ratios (HU1: ratio of aliphatic to polysaccharides; HU2: ratio of aromatics to polysaccharides; and HU3 ratio of lignin/phenols to polysaccharides) suggesting that axis 2 variations were related to differences in level of soil organic matter degradation. Active organic, active mineral and permafrost layers from selected tundra sites were incubated for two months at -1, 1, 4, 8 and 16 ⁰C. The same band ratios were correlated with total CO2 mineralized during the incubations. Data from 4⁰C showed that the cumulative respired CO2 from the active organic layer across all sites was negatively correlated with the HU1 humification ratio, suggesting

  8. Influence of soil frost on the character and degradability of dissolved organic carbon in boreal forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panneer Selvam, B.; Laudon, H.; Guillemette, F.; Berggren, M.

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that increases in extent and duration of winter soil frost increases dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in boreal riparian soils and connected aquatic systems during the subsequent spring and summer. However, little is known about the impact of frost on DOC character and its degradability. We applied three experimental treatments to riparian soils in northern Sweden—shallow soil frost (insulated), deep soil frost (snow removed) and control plots—to test the effect of different soil frost regimes on the chemical characteristics and degradability of soil DOC. Soil pore water samples were analyzed using excitation-emission fluorescence (parallel factor analysis) combined with biological and photochemical degradation experiments. We found that the absolute bacterial metabolic rates were significantly lower in samples from the shallow soil frost treatments, compared with the other treatments. Explorative multivariate analyses indicate that increasing soil frost is contributing to increased protein-like fluorescence and to increased biological degradability of the DOC. Our study shows that decreases in riparian soil frost due to climate warming may not only contribute to decreased riparian DOC concentrations but also lead to shifts in the DOC composition, resulting in decreased biodegradability (yet similar photodegradability) of the DOC that is exported from riparian soils to streams.

  9. Enhancing phenanthrene biomineralization in a polluted soil using gaseous toluene as a cosubstrate.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Irmene; Auria, Richard; Sigoillot, Jean-Claude; Revah, Sergio

    2003-02-15

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to study the potential of adding gaseous toluene, as a readily degradable carbon source, to enhance phenanthrene mineralization in polluted soil (1,000 mg/kg(dry soil)) aged for 400 days. Experiments were conducted in 0.5-L column reactors packed with a mixture of (80:20 w(wet)/w(wet)) spiked soil and vermiculite and fed with 1 g m(-3)reactor h(-1) toluene load in air. Removal efficiencies of 100% for toluene and greater than 95% for phenanthrene were obtained in 190 h. Evolved CO2 showed that phenanthrene mineralization increased from 39% to 86% in columns treated with gaseous toluene. Phthalic acid was identified as the principal soluble intermediate, which accumulated when no toluene was added. Increased phenanthrene uptake and mineralization with toluene can be attributed to increased biomass and the induction of enzymes involved in the intermediate mineralization. In microcosm experiments, phthalic acid mineralization increased from 19% to 81% within 50 h in the presence of toluene. Experiments with 14C-labeled phenanthrene confirmed the enhancement of phenanthrene mineralization from 45% to 83% in 385 h with toluene as a second carbon source. The results indicate thatthe addition of an appropriate gaseous cosubstrate could be an adequate strategy to enhance mineralization of PAHs in soil. PMID:12636283

  10. The use of acute and chronic bioassays to determine the ecological risk and bioremediation efficiency of oil-polluted soils.

    PubMed

    van Gestel, C A; van der Waarde, J J; Derksen, J G; van der Hoek, E E; Veul, M F; Bouwens, S; Rusch, B; Kronenburg, R; Stokman, G N

    2001-07-01

    To compare the effectiveness of acute and chronic bioassays for the ecological risk assessment of polluted soils, soil samples from a site with an historical mineral oil contamination (< 50-3,300 mg oil/kg dry soil) at the Petroleum Harbour in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, were screened for ecological effects using acute and chronic bioassays. A two-step 0.001 M Ca(NO3)2 extraction at a final solution-to-soil ratio of 1:1 was used to prepare extracts for the acute bioassays. Acute bioassays (< or = 5 d) applied to the 0.001 M Ca(NO3)2 extracts from the polluted and reference soils included growth tests with bacteria (Bacillus sp.), algae (Raphidocelis subcapitata), and plants (Lactuca sativa), immobility tests with nematodes (Plectus acuminatus), springtails (Folsomia candida), and cladocerans (Daphnia magna), and the Microtox test (Vibrio fischeri). Chronic bioassays (four weeks) performed on the same soil samples included tests with L. sativa, F. candida, and earthworms (Eisenia fetida) and the bait-lamina test (substrate consumption). The acute bioassays on Microtox showed a response that corresponded with the level of oil pollution. All other acute bioassays did not show such a consistent response, probably because pollutant levels were too low to cause acute effects. All chronic bioassays showed sublethal responses according to the contaminant levels (oil and in some soils also metals). This shows that chronic bioassays on soil samples are more sensitive in assessing the toxicity of mineral oil contamination in soil than acute bioassays on soil extracts. A pilot scale bioremediation study on soils taken from the two most polluted sites and a control site showed a rapid decline of oil concentrations to reach a stable level within eight weeks. Acute bioassays applied to the soils, using Microtox, algae, and D. magna, and chronic bioassays, using plants, Collembola, earthworms, and bait-lamina consumption, in all cases showed a rapid reduction of toxicity, which

  11. [Environmental geochemical baseline of heavy metals in soils of the Ili river basin and pollution evaluation].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin-Ru; Nasier, Telajin; Cheng, Yong-Yi; Zhan, Jiang-Yu; Yang, Jian-Hong

    2014-06-01

    Environmental geochemical baseline models of Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Hg were established by standardized method in the ehernozem, chestnut soil, sierozem and saline soil from the Ili river valley region. The theoretical baseline values were calculated. Baseline factor pollution index evaluation method, environmental background value evaluation method and heavy metal cleanliness evaluation method were used to compare soil pollution degrees. The baseline factor pollution index evaluation showed that As pollution was the most prominent among the four typical types of soils within the river basin, with 7.14%, 9.76%, 7.50% of sampling points in chernozem, chestnut soil and sierozem reached the heavy pollution, respectively. 7.32% of sampling points of chestnut soil reached the permitted heavy metal Pb pollution index in the chestnut soil. The variation extent of As and Pb was the largest, indicating large human disturbance. Environmental background value evaluation showed that As was the main pollution element, followed by Cu, Zn and Pb. Heavy metal cleanliness evaluation showed that Cu, Zn and Pb were better than cleanliness level 2 and Hg was the of cleanliness level 1 in all four types of soils. As showed moderate pollution in sierozem, and it was of cleanliness level 2 or better in chernozem, chestnut soil and saline-alkali soil. Comparing the three evaluation systems, the baseline factor pollution index evaluation more comprehensively reflected the geochemical migration characteristics of elements and the soil formation processes, and the pollution assessment could be specific to the sampling points. The environmental background value evaluation neglected the natural migration of heavy metals and the deposition process in the soil since it was established on the regional background values. The main purpose of the heavy metal cleanliness evaluation was to evaluate the safety degree of soil environment.

  12. Effects of bacterial inoculation and nonionic surfactants on degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, T.; Kristensen, P.

    1997-04-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of introduced bacteria and nonionic surfactants on the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil. Mineralization experiments were conducted with freshly added [{sup 14}C]phenanthrene or [{sup 14}]pyrene, whereas other experiments focused on the degradation of selected PAHs present in a coal tar-contaminated soil. Inoculation of soil samples with phenanthrene-utilizing bacteria stimulated the mineralization of [{sup 14}]phenanthrene. This effect, however, was most notable in soil with a low indigenous potential for PAH degradation, and a large inoculum was apparently required to establish phenanthrene mineralization in the soil. Addition of alcohol ethoxylate and glycoside surfactants to soil samples enhanced the mineralization of [{sup 14}]phenanthrene and [{sup 14}]pyrene. The nonionic surfactants also enhanced the degradation of contaminant PAHs that were present in the soil coal tar. As an example, pyrene, benzo[b,j,k]fluoranthene, and benzo[a]pyrene were resistant to degradation in the absence of surfactants, whereas significant degradation of these PAHs was observed when surfactants were added. The surfactant-related enhancement of the degradation of PAH contaminants was less convincing when a rapidly degradable glycoside surfactant was used. This suggests that surfactants that are mineralized at moderate rates may be more applicable for increasing the availability of PAHs in soil.

  13. Mangrove soils in removing pollutants from municipal wastewater of different salinities

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, N.F.Y.; Wong, Y.S.

    1999-03-01

    Soil leaching experiments were conducted to assess the capacity of mangrove soils in purifying synthetic wastewater containing pollutant concentrations four times of that found in local municipal sewage and of two salinities (fresh vs. saline water). Results on leachate nutrient and heavy metal concentrations reveal that the mangrove soils were capable of removing certain amount of pollutants from wastewater, and the removal efficiency varied between pollutants. The soils were most effective in retaining heavy metals such as Cu but were less effective for Mn and Zn. Similarly, the wastewater-borne NH{sub 4}{sup +} was more easily leached than P. The soil data show that most pollutants were accumulated in the top layer of the soil tray, with little downward migration. Differences between treated and control soil nutrient and heavy metal concentrations were not found in the soil masses below the surface 1.5 cm. In the surface layer, the mangrove soils treated with wastewater had significantly higher concentrations of NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N, total and extractable P, total and extractable Cu, Cd, Zn and Mn. On the other hand, there was no significant elevation in total nitrogen content in mangrove soils treated with wastewater when compared with the control. Soils receiving wastewater prepared in deionized water (fresh) had slightly higher pollutant concentrations, and larger enrichment factors than that treated with saline wastewater. These results suggest that mangrove soils could retain pollutants from wastewater but its efficiency would slightly be affected by salinity.

  14. Combined use of alkane-degrading and plant growth-promoting bacteria enhanced phytoremediation of diesel contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Tara, Nain; Afzal, Muhammad; Ansari, Tariq M; Tahseen, Razia; Iqbal, Samina; Khan, Qaiser M

    2014-01-01

    Inoculation of plants with pollutant-degrading and plant growth-promoting microorganisms is a simple strategy to enhance phytoremediation activity. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of inoculation of different bacterial strains, possessing alkane-degradation and 1-amino-cyclopropane-1 -carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase activity, on plant growth and phytoremediation activity. Carpet grass (Axonopus affinis) was planted in soil spiked with diesel (1% w/w) for 90 days and inoculated with different bacterial strains, Pseudomonas sp. ITRH25, Pantoea sp. BTRH79 and Burkholderia sp. PsJN, individually and in combination. Generally, bacterial application increased total numbers of culturable hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the rhizosphere ofcarpet grass, plant biomass production, hydrocarbon degradation and reduced genotoxicity. Bacterial strains possessing different beneficial traits affect plant growth and phytoremediation activity in different ways. Maximum bacterial population, plant biomass production and hydrocarbon degradation were achieved when carpet grass was inoculated with a consortium of three strains. Enhanced plant biomass production and hydrocarbon degradation were associated with increased numbers of culturable hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the rhizosphere of carpet grass. The present study revealed that the combined use of different bacterial strains, exhibiting different beneficial traits, is a highly effective strategy to improve plant growth and phytoremediation activity.

  15. Biodegradation Ability and Catabolic Genes of Petroleum-Degrading Sphingomonas koreensis Strain ASU-06 Isolated from Egyptian Oily Soil

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, Yasser M.; Shoreit, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are serious pollutants and health hazards. In this study, 15 PAHs-degrading bacteria were isolated from Egyptian oily soil. Among them, one Gram-negative strain (ASU-06) was selected and biodegradation ability and initial catabolic genes of petroleum compounds were investigated. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain ASU-06 to published sequences in GenBank database as well as phylogenetic analysis identified ASU-06 as Sphingomonas koreensis. Strain ASU-06 degraded 100, 99, 98, and 92.7% of 100 mg/L naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, and pyrene within 15 days, respectively. When these PAHs present in a mixed form, the enhancement phenomenon appeared, particularly in the degradation of pyrene, whereas the degradation rate was 98.6% within the period. This is the first report showing the degradation of different PAHs by this species. PCR experiments with specific primers for catabolic genes alkB, alkB1, nahAc, C12O, and C23O suggested that ASU-06 might possess genes for aliphatic and PAHs degradation, while PAH-RHDαGP gene was not detected. Production of biosurfactants and increasing cell-surface hydrophobicity were investigated. GC/MS analysis of intermediate metabolites of studied PAHs concluded that this strain utilized these compounds via two main pathways, and phthalate was the major constant product that appeared in each day of the degradation period. PMID:25177681

  16. COP-compost: a software to study the degradation of organic pollutants in composts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Lashermes, G; Houot, S; Zhu, Y-G; Barriuso, E; Garnier, P

    2014-02-01

    Composting has been demonstrated to be effective in degrading organic pollutants (OP) whose behaviour depends on the composting conditions, the microbial populations activated and interactions with organic matters. The fate of OP during composting involves complex mechanisms and models can be helpful tools for educational and scientific purposes, as well as for industrialists who want to optimise the composting process for OP elimination. A COP-Compost model, which couples an organic carbon (OC) module and an organic pollutant (OP) module and which simulates the changes of organic matter, organic pollutants and the microbial activities during the composting process, has been proposed and calibrated for a first set of OP in a previous study. The objectives of the present work were (1) to introduce the COP-Compost model from its convenient interface to a potential panel of users, (2) to show the variety of OP that could be simulated, including the possibility of choosing between degradation through co-metabolism or specific metabolism and (3) to show the effect of the initial characteristics of organic matter quality and its microbial biomass on the simulated results of the OP dynamic. In the model, we assumed that the pollutants can be adsorbed on organic matter according to the biochemical quality of the OC and that the microorganisms can degrade the pollutants at the same time as they degrade OC (by co-metabolism). A composting experiment describing two different (14)C-labelled organic pollutants, simazine and pyrene, were chosen from the literature because the four OP fractions simulated in the model were measured during the study (the mineralised, soluble, sorbed and non-extractable fractions). Except for the mineralised fraction of simazine, a good agreement was achieved between the simulated and experimental results describing the evolution of the different organic fractions. For simazine, a specific biomass had to be added. To assess the relative importance

  17. Uncertainty in degradation rates for organic micro-pollutants during full-scale sewage sludge composting.

    PubMed

    Sadef, Yumna; Poulsen, Tjalfe G; Habib, Kashif; Iqbal, Tariq; Nizami, Abdul Sattar

    2016-10-01

    Composting can potentially remove organic pollutants in sewage sludge. When estimating pollutant removal efficiency, knowledge of estimate uncertainty is important for understanding estimate reliability. In this study the uncertainty (coefficient of variation, CV) in pollutant degradation rate (K1) and relative concentration at 35days of composting (C35/C0) was evaluated. This was done based on recently presented pollutant concentration data, measured under full-scale composting conditions using two different sampling methods for a range of organic pollutants commonly found in sewage sludge. Non-parametric statistical procedures were used to estimate CV values for K1 and C35/C0 for individual pollutants. These were then used to compare the two sampling methods with respect to CV and to determine confidence intervals for average CV. Results showed that sampling method is crucial for reducing uncertainty. The results further indicated that it is possible to achieve CV values for both K1 and C35/C0 of about 15%. PMID:27342191

  18. [Variation of soil physicochemical and microbial properties in degraded steppes in Hulunbeir of China].

    PubMed

    Lin, Lu; Wu, Yun-Na; Kenji, Tamura; Huo, Guang-Wei; Luo, Wen-Tao; Lü, Jian-Zhou

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the influence of degradation on grassland, we sampled soil and plants at three sites respectively under light, moderate and severe degradation in Hulunbeir Grassland in northern China and analyzed the differences and relationships among soil physicochemical characters, enzyme activity, soil microorganism quantity and aboveground biomass. The results showed that species richness of the moderately degraded site was highest while the aboveground biomass at the lightly degraded site was significantly higher than at the severely degraded site. Soil moisture content, nutrients (organic matter and total nitrogen) concentrations, soil microorganism quantity and enzyme activity were all decreased significantly in the degraded sites, whereas both the soil hardness and bulk density showed an opposite trend. The soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen contents ranged from 128 to 185 g x kg(-1) and from 5.6 to 13.6 g x kg(-1), respectively. The soil dehydrogenase and urease activities negatively correlated with soil bulk density but positively correlated with total nitrogen, organic matter, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen. The aboveground biomass showed significantly positive correlation with the number of soil bacteria and fungi.

  19. Impact of repeated single-metal and multi-metal pollution events on soil quality.

    PubMed

    Burges, Aritz; Epelde, Lur; Garbisu, Carlos

    2015-02-01

    Most frequently, soil metal pollution results from the occurrence of repeated single-metal and, above all, multi-metal pollution events, with concomitant adverse consequences for soil quality. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the impact of repeated single-metal and multi-metal (Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn) pollution events on soil quality, as reflected by the values of a variety of soil microbial parameters with potential as bioindicators of soil functioning. Specifically, parameters of microbial activity (potentially mineralizable nitrogen, β-glucosidase and acid phosphatase activity) and biomass (fungal and bacterial gene abundance by RT-qPCR) were determined, in the artificially metal-polluted soil samples, at regular intervals over a period of 26 weeks. Similarly, we studied the evolution over time of CaCl2-extractable metal fractions, in order to estimate metal bioavailability in soil. Different metals showed different values of bioavailability and relative bioavailability ([metal]bio/[metal]tot) in soil throughout the experiment, under both repeated single-metal and multi-metal pollution events. Both repeated Zn-pollution and multi-metal pollution events led to a significant reduction in the values of acid phosphatase activity, and bacterial and fungal gene abundance, reflecting the negative impact of these repeated events on soil microbial activity and biomass, and, hence, soil quality.

  20. Impact of alpine meadow degradation on soil hydraulic properties over the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chen; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Quanjiu; Chen, Yingying; Joswiak, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    SummaryAlpine meadow soil is an important ecosystem component of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. However, the alpine meadow soil is undergoing serious degradation mainly due to global climate change, overgrazing, human activities and rodents. In this paper, spatial sequencing was chosen over time succession sequencing to study the changes of soil hydraulic properties under different degrees of alpine meadow degradation. Soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) and Gardner α both at the surface and at 40-50 cm depth were investigated in the field using tension infiltrometers. Soil physical and chemical properties, together with the root index at 0-10 cm and 40-50 cm soil layer depths were also analyzed. Pearson correlations were adopted to study the relationships among the investigated factors and principal component analysis was performed to identify the dominant factor. Results show that with increasing degree of degradation, soil sand content increased while soil Ks and Gardner α as well as soil clay content, soil porosity decreased in the 0-10 cm soil layers, and organic matter and root gravimetric density decreased in both the 0-10 cm and 40-50 cm soil layers. However, soil moisture showed no significant changes with increasing degradation. With decreasing pressure head, soil unsaturated hydraulic conductivity reduced more slowly under degraded conditions than non-degraded conditions. Soil Ks and Gardner α were significantly correlated (P = 0.01) with bulk density, soil porosity, soil organic matter and root gravimetric density. Among these, soil porosity is the dominant factor explaining about 90% of the variability in total infiltration flow. Under non-degraded conditions, the infiltration flow principally depended on the presence of macropores. With increasing degree of degradation, soil macropores quickly changed to mesopores or micropores. The proportion of total infiltration flow through macropores and mesopores significantly decreased with the most

  1. Strains of the soil fungus Mortierella show different degradation potentials for the phenylurea herbicide diuron.

    PubMed

    Ellegaard-Jensen, Lea; Aamand, Jens; Kragelund, Birthe B; Johnsen, Anders H; Rosendahl, Søren

    2013-11-01

    Microbial pesticide degradation studies have until now mainly focused on bacteria, although fungi have also been shown to degrade pesticides. In this study we clarify the background for the ability of the common soil fungus Mortierella to degrade the phenylurea herbicide diuron. Diuron degradation potentials of five Mortierella strains were compared, and the role of carbon and nitrogen for the degradation process was investigated. Results showed that the ability to degrade diuron varied greatly among the Mortierella strains tested, and the strains able to degrade diuron were closely related. Degradation of diuron was fastest in carbon and nitrogen rich media while suboptimal nutrient levels restricted degradation, making it unlikely that Mortierella utilize diuron as carbon or nitrogen sources. Degradation kinetics showed that diuron degradation was followed by formation of the metabolites 1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-methylurea, 1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)urea and an hitherto unknown metabolite suggested to be 1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-methylideneurea.

  2. Degradation of vanillin in soil-clay mixtures treated with simulated acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Bewley, R.J.F.; Stotzky, G.

    1984-06-01

    Significant vanillin degradation occurred only in soil amended with 9% montmorillonite and not in soil amended with 9% kaolinite or in soil without addition of clay minerals. Progressively decreasing amounts of vanillin were mineralized in the montmorillonite-amended soil with increasing acidification with H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and complete inhibition of mineralization occurred at a soil pH of 1.6. 16 references, 1 table.

  3. Microbial degradation of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (CHCl2F and CHCl2CF3) in soils and sediments.

    PubMed Central

    Oremland, R S; Lonergan, D J; Culbertson, C W; Lovley, D R

    1996-01-01

    The ability of microorganisms to degrade trace levels of the hydrochlorofluorocarbons HCFC-21 and HCFC-123 was investigated. Methanotroph-linked oxidation of HCFC-21 was observed in aerobic soils, and anaerobic degradation of HCFC-21 occurred in freshwater and salt marsh sediments. Microbial degradation of HCFC-123 was observed in anoxic freshwater and salt marsh sediments, and the recovery of 1,1,1-trifluoro-2-chloroethane indicated the involvement of reductive dechlorination. No degradation of HCFC-123 was observed in aerobic soils. In some experiments, HCFCs were degraded at low (parts per billion) concentrations, raising the possibility that bacteria in nature remove HCFCs from the atmosphere. PMID:8633881

  4. Degradation of the potato glycoalkaloid alpha-solanine in three agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Pia H; Pedersen, Rasmus B; Svensmark, Bo; Strobel, Bjarne W; Jacobsen, Ole Stig; Hansen, Hans Christian B

    2009-08-01

    The toxic glycoalkaloids produced by the potato plant (Solanum tuberosum L.) have previously been found in upper soil from a potato field during several months. Further insight into the fate of the glycoalkaloids is needed, as only little information about their degradation in soil is available. Degradation of the glycoalkaloid, alpha-solanine, has been followed for 42d in three agricultural soils with common texture and carbon contents. A similar degradation pattern was found in all soils, and the kinetics was well described by a sum of two first-order equations. Overall, degradation rates for the initial first reaction were in the range 0.22-1.64d(-1). Estimated half-lives were in the range 1.8-4.1d for the three top soils at 15 degrees C; the fastest degradation was observed in the sandy soil. The major proportion of alpha-solanine in the sandy soil was degraded by the fast process, while the proportion was lower for the two other soils. Fast degradation appeared to be related to the presence of low amount of sorbents. Additionally, degradation was followed at 5 degrees C in A- and C-horizon soil from the sandy location, and for both horizons the half-lives were of similar length (4.7-8.7d). For the slow process, degradation rates were in the range 0.000-0.123d(-1), and residuals were still present in all soils and all temperatures at the end of the experiment (d 42). Overall, fast degradation was found in both top- and subsoil even at low temperatures, and the risk for alpha-solanine leaching to the groundwater appears to be low.

  5. Sensitivity of desert cryptograms to air pollutants: soil crusts and rock lichens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, J.

    1991-01-01

    Parks throughout the West are being faced with increasing air pollution threats from current or proposed industries near their boundaries. For this reason, it is important to understand the effects these industries may have on desert ecosystems. Rock lichens can be excellent biomonitors, acting as early warning systems of impending damage to other components of the desert ecosystem. Cryptogamic crusts, consisting mostly of cyanobacteria and lichens, may not only be excellent bioindicators, but also are an essential part of the desert ecosystem. Their presence is critical for soil stability as well as for the contribution of nitrogen to the ecosystem in a form available to higher plants. Air pollutants, such as emissions from coal-fired power plants, may threaten the healthy functioning of these non-vascular plants. The purpose of this study is to determine if, in fact, air pollutants do have an impact on the physiological functioning of cryptogamic crusts or rock lichens in desert systems and, if so, to what extent. Some results have already been obtained. Both rock lichens and cryptogamic crusts exhibit physiological damage in the vicinity of the Navajo Generating Station in Page, Arizona. Increased electrolyte leakage and chlorophyll degradation, along with reduced nitrogen fixation, have been found. Preliminary studies comparing sensitivity between substrates indicate that crusts on limestone and sandstone substrates may be more sensitive than those on gypsum.

  6. The use of the model species Arabidopsis halleri towards phytoextraction of cadmium polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Claire-Lise, Meyer; Nathalie, Verbruggen

    2012-11-15

    Phytoremediation consists in treating environmental pollutions through the use of plants and their associated microbes. Phytoremediation can be used for pollutant stabilization, extraction, degradation or volatilization. Cadmium is one of the most toxic trace metallic elements for living organisms and its accumulation in the environment is recognized as a worldwide concern. Plants suitable for efficient pollutant extraction from the soil should combine different characteristics like fast growth, high biomass, high tolerance and high accumulation capacities in harvestable parts. A rare class of plants called hyperaccumulators combines extremely high tolerance degrees and foliar accumulation of trace elements. With regard to cadmium, none of the Cd hyperaccumulators identified has met the criteria for efficient phytoextraction so far. By virtue of genetic engineering it is possible to transfer genes involved in Cd tolerance or accumulation in high biomass plants. Nevertheless, the genetic determinants of Cd hyperaccumulation are far from being understood. It is thus indispensable to acquire more knowledge about these processes. Among Cd hyperaccumulators, Arabidopsis halleri (some populations can hyperaccumulate Cd) is considered as a model species for the study of metal homeostasis and detoxification. This review will summarize our knowledge about Cd tolerance and accumulation acquired in A. halleri and how this knowledge may be used in phytoextraction.

  7. Estimating the pollution risk of cadmium in soil using a composite soil environmental quality standard.

    PubMed

    Qu, Mingkai; Li, Weidong; Zhang, Chuanrong; Huang, Biao; Zhao, Yongcun

    2014-01-01

    Estimating standard-exceeding probabilities of toxic metals in soil is crucial for environmental evaluation. Because soil pH and land use types have strong effects on the bioavailability of trace metals in soil, they were taken into account by some environmental protection agencies in making composite soil environmental quality standards (SEQSs) that contain multiple metal thresholds under different pH and land use conditions. This study proposed a method for estimating the standard-exceeding probability map of soil cadmium using a composite SEQS. The spatial variability and uncertainty of soil pH and site-specific land use type were incorporated through simulated realizations by sequential Gaussian simulation. A case study was conducted using a sample data set from a 150 km(2) area in Wuhan City and the composite SEQS for cadmium, recently set by the State Environmental Protection Administration of China. The method may be useful for evaluating the pollution risks of trace metals in soil with composite SEQSs.

  8. Estimating the Pollution Risk of Cadmium in Soil Using a Composite Soil Environmental Quality Standard

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Biao; Zhao, Yongcun

    2014-01-01

    Estimating standard-exceeding probabilities of toxic metals in soil is crucial for environmental evaluation. Because soil pH and land use types have strong effects on the bioavailability of trace metals in soil, they were taken into account by some environmental protection agencies in making composite soil environmental quality standards (SEQSs) that contain multiple metal thresholds under different pH and land use conditions. This study proposed a method for estimating the standard-exceeding probability map of soil cadmium using a composite SEQS. The spatial variability and uncertainty of soil pH and site-specific land use type were incorporated through simulated realizations by sequential Gaussian simulation. A case study was conducted using a sample data set from a 150 km2 area in Wuhan City and the composite SEQS for cadmium, recently set by the State Environmental Protection Administration of China. The method may be useful for evaluating the pollution risks of trace metals in soil with composite SEQSs. PMID:24672364

  9. Electrokinetic delivery of persulfate to remediate PCBs polluted soils: effect of injection spot.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guangping; Cang, Long; Fang, Guodong; Qin, Wenxiu; Ge, Liqiang; Zhou, Dongmei

    2014-12-01

    Persulfate-based in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a promising technique for the remediation of organic compounds contaminated soils. Electrokinetics (EK) provides an alternative method to deliver oxidants into the target zones especially in low permeable-soil. In this study, the flexibility of delivering persulfate by EK to remediate polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) polluted soil was investigated. 20% (w/w) of persulfate was injected at the anode, cathode and both electrodes to examine its transport behaviors under electrical field, and the effect of field inversion process was also evaluated. The results showed that high dosage of persulfate could be delivered into S4 section (near cathode) by electroosmosis when persulfate was injected from anode, 30.8% of PCBs was removed from the soil, and the formed hydroxyl precipitation near the cathode during EK process impeded the transportation of persulfate. In contrast, only 18.9% of PCBs was removed with the injection of persulfate from cathode, although the breakthrough of persulfate into the anode reservoir was observed. These results indicated that the electroosmotic flow is more effective for the transportation of persulfate into soil. The addition of persulfate from both electrodes did not significantly facilitate the PCBs oxidation as well as the treatment of electrical field reversion, the reinforced negative depolarization function occurring in the cathode at high current consumed most of the oxidant. Furthermore, it was found that strong acid condition near the anode favored the oxidation of PCBs by persulfate and the degradation of PCBs was in consistent with the oxidation of Soil TOC in EK/persulfate system.

  10. Electrokinetic delivery of persulfate to remediate PCBs polluted soils: effect of injection spot.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guangping; Cang, Long; Fang, Guodong; Qin, Wenxiu; Ge, Liqiang; Zhou, Dongmei

    2014-12-01

    Persulfate-based in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a promising technique for the remediation of organic compounds contaminated soils. Electrokinetics (EK) provides an alternative method to deliver oxidants into the target zones especially in low permeable-soil. In this study, the flexibility of delivering persulfate by EK to remediate polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) polluted soil was investigated. 20% (w/w) of persulfate was injected at the anode, cathode and both electrodes to examine its transport behaviors under electrical field, and the effect of field inversion process was also evaluated. The results showed that high dosage of persulfate could be delivered into S4 section (near cathode) by electroosmosis when persulfate was injected from anode, 30.8% of PCBs was removed from the soil, and the formed hydroxyl precipitation near the cathode during EK process impeded the transportation of persulfate. In contrast, only 18.9% of PCBs was removed with the injection of persulfate from cathode, although the breakthrough of persulfate into the anode reservoir was observed. These results indicated that the electroosmotic flow is more effective for the transportation of persulfate into soil. The addition of persulfate from both electrodes did not significantly facilitate the PCBs oxidation as well as the treatment of electrical field reversion, the reinforced negative depolarization function occurring in the cathode at high current consumed most of the oxidant. Furthermore, it was found that strong acid condition near the anode favored the oxidation of PCBs by persulfate and the degradation of PCBs was in consistent with the oxidation of Soil TOC in EK/persulfate system. PMID:25193794

  11. Theoretical investigation of the process of cleaning oil-polluted soil in hydrocyclone apparatuses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvienko, O. V.; Evtyushkin, E. V.

    2007-05-01

    On the basis of the Reynolds equations, a numerical investigation of the flow and separation of oil-polluted soil particles in a hydrocyclone has been conducted. It has been shown that as a result of the hydrocycloning it is possible to concentrate the pollutant in a negligible quantity of soil (of the order of a few percent), which permits reducing its cleaning costs.

  12. Bacteria and fungi can contribute to nutrients bioavailability and aggregate formation in degraded soils.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Muhammad Imtiaz; Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; Shahzad, Tanvir; Almeelbi, Talal; Ismail, Iqbal M I; Oves, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Intensive agricultural practices and cultivation of exhaustive crops has deteriorated soil fertility and its quality in agroecosystems. According to an estimate, such practices will convert 30% of the total world cultivated soil into degraded land by 2020. Soil structure and fertility loss are one of the main causes of soil degradation. They are also considered as a major threat to crop production and food security for future generations. Implementing safe and environmental friendly technology would be viable solution for achieving sustainable restoration of degraded soils. Bacterial and fungal inocula have a potential to reinstate the fertility of degraded land through various processes. These microorganisms increase the nutrient bioavailability through nitrogen fixation and mobilization of key nutrients (phosphorus, potassium and iron) to the crop plants while remediate soil structure by improving its aggregation and stability. Success rate of such inocula under field conditions depends on their antagonistic or synergistic interaction with indigenous microbes or their inoculation with organic fertilizers. Co-inoculation of bacteria and fungi with or without organic fertilizer are more beneficial for reinstating the soil fertility and organic matter content than single inoculum. Such factors are of great importance when considering bacteria and fungi inocula for restoration of degraded soils. The overview of presented mechanisms and interactions will help agriculturists in planning sustainable management strategy for reinstating the fertility of degraded soil and assist them in reducing the negative impact of artificial fertilizers on our environment.

  13. Bacteria and fungi can contribute to nutrients bioavailability and aggregate formation in degraded soils.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Muhammad Imtiaz; Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; Shahzad, Tanvir; Almeelbi, Talal; Ismail, Iqbal M I; Oves, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Intensive agricultural practices and cultivation of exhaustive crops has deteriorated soil fertility and its quality in agroecosystems. According to an estimate, such practices will convert 30% of the total world cultivated soil into degraded land by 2020. Soil structure and fertility loss are one of the main causes of soil degradation. They are also considered as a major threat to crop production and food security for future generations. Implementing safe and environmental friendly technology would be viable solution for achieving sustainable restoration of degraded soils. Bacterial and fungal inocula have a potential to reinstate the fertility of degraded land through various processes. These microorganisms increase the nutrient bioavailability through nitrogen fixation and mobilization of key nutrients (phosphorus, potassium and iron) to the crop plants while remediate soil structure by improving its aggregation and stability. Success rate of such inocula under field conditions depends on their antagonistic or synergistic interaction with indigenous microbes or their inoculation with organic fertilizers. Co-inoculation of bacteria and fungi with or without organic fertilizer are more beneficial for reinstating the soil fertility and organic matter content than single inoculum. Such factors are of great importance when considering bacteria and fungi inocula for restoration of degraded soils. The overview of presented mechanisms and interactions will help agriculturists in planning sustainable management strategy for reinstating the fertility of degraded soil and assist them in reducing the negative impact of artificial fertilizers on our environment. PMID:26805616

  14. Heavy Metals Phytoextraction from the Polluted Soils of Zakamensk (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubugunov, V.; Dorzhonova, V.; Ubugunov, L.

    2012-04-01

    the landscape - Modonkul river flood plain, were transferred by its waters and redeposited in an estuary, forming a cone of carrying out with capacity of up to 2 meters or more. The presence of large number of private houses with garden plots, in which the population grew potatoes, vegetables and fruit-berry trees cultures for food purposes, is the feature of many Siberian towns, including Zakamensk. The biogeochemical assessment of the town territory current status has shown a high level of contamination of soils and plants by heavy metals that poses a threat to the health of townsmen. In this connection search of effective ways of clearing up of the polluted soils by phytoextraction and selection of plants, capable to extract high quantities of heavy metals from soil in concrete ecological conditions, is actual. For this purpose we had been made experiments with 8 species of plants. Modeling of various conditions of pollution carried out by addition of following quantities of TS (%): 0; 25; 33; 50; 67; 75 and 100. In the report results of the experiments and the recommendations on using of plants as extractors on soils polluted by technogenic sand will be presented.

  15. Biodegradability of HCH in agricultural soils from Guadeloupe (French West Indies): identification of the lin genes involved in the HCH degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Laquitaine, L; Durimel, A; de Alencastro, L F; Jean-Marius, C; Gros, O; Gaspard, S

    2016-01-01

    Banana has been a main agricultural product in the French West Indies (Guadeloupe and Martinique) since the 1960s. This crop requires the intensive use of pesticides to prevent attacks by insect pests. Chlorinated pesticides, such as hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), chlordecone and dieldrin, were used until the beginning of the 1990s, resulting in a generalized diffuse contamination of the soil and water in the areas of banana production, hence the need to develop solutions for cleanup of the polluted sites. The aims of this work were (i) to assess lindane degradation in soil slurry microcosms treated with lindane at 10 mg/L and (ii) to detect the catabolic genes involved in the HCH degradation pathway. The soil slurry microcosm system showed a 40% lindane degradation efficiency at the end of a 30-day experiment. Lower lindane removal was also detected in the abiotic controls, probably caused by pesticide adsorption to soil particles. Indeed, the lindane concentration decreased from 6000 to 1330 ng/mL and from 800 to 340 ng/mL for the biotic and abiotic soils, respectively. Nevertheless, some of the genes involved in the HCH degradation pathway were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from crude deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from the Guadeloupe agricultural soil, suggesting that HCH degradation is probably mediated by bacteria closely related to the family Sphingomonadaceae.

  16. Remediation/Restoration of Degraded Soil to Improve Productivity In The Central Great Plains Region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The quality and productivity of some farmlands in the central Great Plains Region (CGPR) have been lost through wind and water erosion induced by tillage and poor soil management. Productivity of degraded/eroded soils can be restored using organic amendments such as manure and improved crop and soil...

  17. Broiler litter application and tillage effects on restoration of degraded soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An experiment was initiated in 2005 at Plant Material Center, NRCS, in Coffeeville Mississippi, on a degraded Loring silt loam (fine-silty, mixed, thermic, Glossic Fragiudalf) soil to determine restorative potential of broiler litter, soil and crop management on selected soil physical, chemical, and...

  18. ASSESSING DETOXIFICATION AND DEGRADATION OF WOOD PRESERVING AND PETROLEUM WASTES IN CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was undertaken to evaluate in-situ soil bioremediation processes, including degradation and detoxification, for two types of wood preserving wastes and two types of petroleum refining wastes at high concentrations in an unacclimated soil. The soil solid phase, water so...

  19. [Impact of Cu and Zn pollution on rape growth and soil enzyme activity].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong-Fei; Yan, Mi; Yao, Jing; Wang, You-Bao; Liu, Deng-Yi

    2007-07-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the impact of Cu and Zn pollution on soil enzyme activities and rape seedlings growth. The results showed that Cu had a stronger inhibitory effect than Zn on soil urease activity, while Zn had more obvious impact on soil calatase activity. The damage on the growth and dry mass of rape was more serious under Cu than under Zn pollution. The inhibition of rape seedlings growth was mainly due to the inhibition of root growth and its material accumulation. Factor analysis indicated that root dry mass was more sensitive than other indices, which could be adopted to monitor soil Cu and Zn pollution.

  20. Soil pollution under the effect of treated municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kalavrouziotis, Ioannis K; Koukoulakis, Prodromos H

    2012-10-01

    Soil heavy metal pollution due to wastewater reuse was assessed by means of the concentration factor (CF) and/or pollution load index (PLI).In this respect, a greenhouse pot experiment was conducted, using a completely randomized block design, including five treatments of treated municipal wastewater (0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%), in four replications. Brassica oleracea var. Capitata was used as a test crop. The optimum CFs were expressed as a function of maximum dry matter of cabbage plant parts yield, and the values obtained per plant part were as follows: stems-Zn-CF 2.96, Co-CF 0.85, Ni-CF 0.92; whole plant-Cu-CF 3.90, Ni-CF 0.87, and Pb-CF 11.52; and leaves-Pb-CF 11.78. The PLI was calculated as the geometric mean of the CF of each metal, and was related to the maximum dry mater yield of cabbage stems and heads. The optimum values found were: stems PLI 1.99-2.55 and heads 2.25.

  1. Degradation of Herbicide Mesotrione in Three Soils with Differing Physicochemical Properties from China.

    PubMed

    Quan, Guixiang; Yin, Chuntao; Chen, Tianming; Yan, Jinlong

    2015-09-01

    The movement and fate of herbicides in soils under various environmental factors are important in evaluating their mobility and ecological impact. The effects of sterilization, solarization, and soil physicochemical properties on the degradation of herbicide mesotrione in three soils from China were evaluated using laboratory incubation method, and the degradation kinetics were also simulated using pseudo first-order reaction model. The calculated half-lives () of mesotrione were found to be 3.78- to 5.24-fold increased in sterilized soils than nonsterilized soils, which indicated that the degradation of mesotrione was strongly affected by soil microbial activity. A certain role of promoting degradation effect of natural light was found, and the values appeared to be only 7.90, 15.89, and 25.29 d in the surface of paddy soil, sandy loess, and silt clay loam, respectively. Correlation analysis between the observed first-order reaction rate constant () values and the selected soil properties revealed that the degradation of mesotrione was highly dependent on soil pH value ( > 0.992) and organic matter content ( > 0.932), but less related with clay content (<0.02 mm) with < 0.761 and nonrelated with cation exchange capacity (CEC) ( < 0.164). Data obtained in this study are helpful for further research on the prediction of the movement and fate of mesotrione in soils in limiting its environmental impact. PMID:26436279

  2. Soil bacterial diversity in degraded and restored lands of Northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Ademir Sérgio Ferreira; Borges, Clovis Daniel; Tsai, Siu Mui; Cesarz, Simone; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2014-11-01

    Land degradation deteriorates biological productivity and affects environmental, social, and economic sustainability, particularly so in the semi-arid region of Northeast Brazil. Although some studies exist reporting gross measures of soil microbial parameters and processes, limited information is available on how land degradation and restoration strategies influence the diversity and composition of soil microbial communities. In this study we compare the structure and diversity of bacterial communities in degraded and restored lands in Northeast Brazil and determine the soil biological and chemical properties influencing bacterial communities. We found that land degradation decreased the diversity of soil bacteria as indicated by both reduced operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness and Shannon index. Soils under native vegetation and restoration had significantly higher bacterial richness and diversity than degraded soils. Redundancy analysis revealed that low soil bacterial diversity correlated with a high respiratory quotient, indicating stressed microbial communities. By contrast, soil bacterial communities in restored land positively correlated with high soil P levels. Importantly, however, we found significant differences in the soil bacterial community composition under native vegetation and in restored land, which may indicate differences in their functioning despite equal levels of bacterial diversity.

  3. Contribution to the study of pollution of soil and water in Oued El Maleh area (Mohammedia, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El hajjaji, Souad; Dahchour, Abdelmalek; Belhsaien, Kamal; Zouahri, Abdelmjid; Moussadek, Rachid; Douaik, Ahmed

    2016-04-01

    In Morocco, diffuse ground and surface water pollution in irrigated areas has caused an increase in the risk of water and soil quality deterioration. This has generated a health and environmental risks. The present study was carried out in the Oued El Maleh region located 65 Km to the south of Rabat on the Moroccan Atlantic coast. It covers a surface area of 310 km2 where agriculture constitutes the main activity of the population. This region is considered as a very important agricultural area, known nationally for its high potential for market gardening. This intensification has been accompanied by an excessive use of agrochemical inputs and poor control of irrigation and drainage. Consequently, salinization phenomena and deterioration of soil structure as well as water are about to create an alarming situation. In order to assess the state of pollution of waters and soil in the region, our study focuses on the determination of physicochemical parameters for the quality of water and soil. The obtained results from sampled wells and surface water show relatively higher values of nitrate and conductivity exceeding Moroccan national standards and revealing net degradation of water quality; therefore the water can be considered not suitable for human consumption and can induce a degradation of soil. The results of the studied soil show that the pH of these soils is weakly to moderately basic; they are usually non-saline with organic matter content moderately filled. Moreover, very high concentrations of nutrients (potassium, phosphorus and nitrogen) were recorded, highlighting poor management fertilizing vegetable crops in the region of Oued El Maleh.

  4. Effect of long-term zinc pollution on soil microbial community resistance to repeated contamination.

    PubMed

    Klimek, Beata

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effects of stress (contamination trials) on the microorganisms in zinc-polluted soil (5,018 mg Zn kg(-1) soil dry weight) and unpolluted soil (141 mg Zn kg(-1) soil dw), measured as soil respiration rate. In the laboratory, soils were subjected to copper contamination (0, 500, 1,500 and 4,500 mg kg(-1) soil dw), and then a bactericide (oxytetracycline) combined with a fungicide (captan) along with glucose (10 mg g(-1) soil dw each) were added. There was a highly significant effect of soil type, copper treatment and oxytetracycline/captan treatment. The initial respiration rate of chronically zinc-polluted soil was higher than that of unpolluted soil, but in the copper treatment it showed a greater decline. Microorganisms in copper-treated soil were more susceptible to oxytetracycline/captan contamination. After the successive soil contamination trials the decline of soil respiration was greater in zinc-polluted soil than in unpolluted soil.

  5. Soil pollution by a pyrite mine spill in Spain: evolution in time.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, J; Dorronsoro, C; Fernández, E; Fernández, J; García, I; Martín, F; Simón, M

    2004-12-01

    Soil pollution was studied after the spill of the Aznalcóllar pyrite mine between 1998 and 2001, analyzing As, Zn, Cd, Cu and Pb both in total concentrations as well as in soluble and bioavailable forms. The main remediation measures were: clean-up of the tailings and polluted soils, plus application of amendment materials (liming). The results indicate that, after three years, 50-70% of the acidic soils and 25-30% of the basic soils are still highly polluted in total arsenic. The limit of 0.04 mg kg(-1) for water-soluble arsenic is exceeded in 15-20% of all soils. The EDTA-extractable arsenic (bioavailable) exceeds the limit of 2 mg kg(-1) only in the acidic sectors. After clean-up, the homogenization of the upper 20-25 cm of the soils appears to be the most recommended measure in the reduction of pollution.

  6. Magnetic properties of the profiles of polluted and non-polluted soils. A case study from Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeleńska, Maria; Hasso-Agopsowicz, Agata; Kopcewicz, Barbara; Sukhorada, Anatoliy; Tyamina, Ksenija; Kadziałko-Hofmokl, Magdalena; Matviishina, Zhanna

    2004-10-01

    This report deals with the preliminary study of the magnetic properties of the chernozem depth profiles from polluted and non-polluted areas situated in the Volnovaha-Mariupol agro-soil region in southeast Ukraine. The profiles of soil for study were taken from the chernozem virgin land of the Homutovski steppe and from the nearby polluted area of Mariupol belonging to the Dniprovsko-Donetskij industrial region. The magnetic mineralogy and magnetic properties were examined along the profiles to determine the vertical structure of the non-polluted soil and to find differences caused by pollution. The soil from the non-polluted area is characterized by maghemite and haematite content. Magnetite is present in the topsoil of profiles from the polluted area of Mariupol. Blocking temperatures increase with depth in all profiles, becoming close to the temperature characteristic for haematite. Hysteresis parameters show that the deep soil is characterized by higher coercivity and coercivity of remanence values and lower saturation isothermal remanent magnetization and saturation magnetization values than the respective parameters in the topsoil. The grain size of magnetic minerals also changes with depth, becoming larger for deeper horizons. The surface values of susceptibility, saturation magnetization, saturation isothermal remanent magnetization and anhysteretic remanent magnetization for the polluted profiles from Mariupol show enhancement in relation to the values for the Homutowski steppe as a result of contamination by magnetite and haematite. However, starting from a depth of approximately 80-100 cm, the magnetic parameters approach the same values. This suggests that in deep horizons a lithogenic contribution prevails, similar for both areas.

  7. Simultaneous degradation of toxic refractory organic pesticide and bioelectricity generation using a soil microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xian; Song, Hai-liang; Yu, Chun-yan; Li, Xian-ning

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the soil microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were constructed in the topsoil contaminated with toxic refractory organic pesticide, hexachlorobenzene (HCB). The performance of electricity generation and HCB degradation in the soil-MFCs were investigated. The HCB degradation pathway was analyzed based on the determination of degradation products and intermediates. Experimental results showed that the HCB removal efficiencies in the three groups (soil MFCs group, open circuit control group and no adding anaerobic sludge blank group) were 71.15%, 52.49% and 38.92%, respectively. The highest detected power density was 77.5 mW/m(2) at the external resistance of 1000 Ω. HCB was degraded via the reductive dechlorination pathway in the soil MFC under anaerobic condition. The existence of the anode promoted electrogenic bacteria to provide more electrons to increase the metabolic reactions rates of anaerobic bacteria was the main way which could promote the removal efficiencies of HCB in soil MFC.

  8. Impacts of soil and water pollution on food safety and health risks in China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yonglong; Song, Shuai; Wang, Ruoshi; Liu, Zhaoyang; Meng, Jing; Sweetman, Andrew J; Jenkins, Alan; Ferrier, Robert C; Li, Hong; Luo, Wei; Wang, Tieyu

    2015-04-01

    Environmental pollution and food safety are two of the most important issues of our time. Soil and water pollution, in particular, have historically impacted on food safety which represents an important threat to human health. Nowhere has that situation been more complex and challenging than in China, where a combination of pollution and an increasing food safety risk have affected a large part of the population. Water scarcity, pesticide over-application, and chemical pollutants are considered to be the most important factors impacting on food safety in China. Inadequate quantity and quality of surface water resources in China have led to the long-term use of waste-water irrigation to fulfill the water requirements for agricultural production. In some regions this has caused serious agricultural land and food pollution, especially for heavy metals. It is important, therefore, that issues threatening food safety such as combined pesticide residues and heavy metal pollution are addressed to reduce risks to human health. The increasing negative effects on food safety from water and soil pollution have put more people at risk of carcinogenic diseases, potentially contributing to 'cancer villages' which appear to correlate strongly with the main food producing areas. Currently in China, food safety policies are not integrated with soil and water pollution management policies. Here, a comprehensive map of both soil and water pollution threats to food safety in China is presented and integrated policies addressing soil and water pollution for achieving food safety are suggested to provide a holistic approach. PMID:25603422

  9. Impacts of soil and water pollution on food safety and health risks in China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yonglong; Song, Shuai; Wang, Ruoshi; Liu, Zhaoyang; Meng, Jing; Sweetman, Andrew J; Jenkins, Alan; Ferrier, Robert C; Li, Hong; Luo, Wei; Wang, Tieyu

    2015-04-01

    Environmental pollution and food safety are two of the most important issues of our time. Soil and water pollution, in particular, have historically impacted on food safety which represents an important threat to human health. Nowhere has that situation been more complex and challenging than in China, where a combination of pollution and an increasing food safety risk have affected a large part of the population. Water scarcity, pesticide over-application, and chemical pollutants are considered to be the most important factors impacting on food safety in China. Inadequate quantity and quality of surface water resources in China have led to the long-term use of waste-water irrigation to fulfill the water requirements for agricultural production. In some regions this has caused serious agricultural land and food pollution, especially for heavy metals. It is important, therefore, that issues threatening food safety such as combined pesticide residues and heavy metal pollution are addressed to reduce risks to human health. The increasing negative effects on food safety from water and soil pollution have put more people at risk of carcinogenic diseases, potentially contributing to 'cancer villages' which appear to correlate strongly with the main food producing areas. Currently in China, food safety policies are not integrated with soil and water pollution management policies. Here, a comprehensive map of both soil and water pollution threats to food safety in China is presented and integrated policies addressing soil and water pollution for achieving food safety are suggested to provide a holistic approach.

  10. Degradation of 14C-glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in three agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Al-Rajab, Abdul Jabbar; Schiavon, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl glycine) is the most used herbicide worldwide. The degradation of 14C-labeled glyphosate was studied under controlled laboratory conditions in three different agricultural soils: a silt clay loam, a clay loam and a sandy loam soil. The kinetic and intensity of glyphosate degradation varied considerably over time within the same soil and among different types of soil. Our results demonstrated that the mineralization rate of glyphosate was high at the beginning of incubation and then decreased with time until the end of the experiment. The same kinetic was observed for the water extractable residues. The degradation of glyphosate was rapid in the soil with low adsorption capacity (clay loam soil) with a short half-life of 4 days. However, the persistence of glyphosate in high adsorption capacity, soils increased, with half-live of 19 days for silt clay loam soil and 14.5 days for sandy loam soil. HPLC analyses showed that the main metabolite of glyphosate, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) was detected after three days of incubation in the extracts of all three soils. Our results suggested that the possibility of contamination of groundwater by glyphosate was high on a long-term period in soils with high adsorption capacity and low degrading activities and/or acid similar to sandy loam soil. This risk might be faster but less sustainable in soil with low adsorption capacity and high degrading activity like the clay loam soil. However, the release of non-extractable residues may increase the risk of contamination of groundwater regardless of the type of soil.

  11. Bioremediation of polluted soil through the combined application of plants, earthworms and organic matter.

    PubMed

    Macci, Cristina; Doni, Serena; Peruzzi, Eleonora; Ceccanti, Brunello; Masciandaro, Grazia

    2012-10-26

    Two plant species (Paulownia tomentosa and Cytisus scoparius), earthworms (Eisenia fetida), and organic matter (horse manure) were used as an ecological approach to bioremediate a soil historically contaminated by heavy metals and hydrocarbons. The experiment was carried out for six months at a mesoscale level using pots containing 90 kg of polluted soil. Three different treatments were performed for each plant: (i) untreated planted soil as a control (C); (ii) planted soil + horse manure (20:1 w/w) (M); (iii) planted soil + horse manure + 15 earthworms (ME). Both the plant species were able to grow in the polluted soil and to improve the soil's bio-chemical conditions, especially when organic matter and earthworms were applied. By comparing the two plant species, few significant differences were observed in the soil characteristics; Cytisus scoparius improved soil nutrient content more than Paulownia tomentosa, which instead stimulated more soil microbial metabolism. Regarding the pollutants, Paulownia tomentosa was more efficient in reducing the heavy metal (Pb, Cr, Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni) content, while earthworms were particularly able to stimulate the processes involved in the decontamination of organic pollutants (hydrocarbons). This ecological approach, validated at a mesoscale level, has recently been transferred to a real scale situation to carry out the bioremediation of polluted soil in San Giuliano Terme Municipality (Pisa, Italy). PMID:22911348

  12. Bioremediation of polluted soil through the combined application of plants, earthworms and organic matter.

    PubMed

    Macci, Cristina; Doni, Serena; Peruzzi, Eleonora; Ceccanti, Brunello; Masciandaro, Grazia

    2012-10-26

    Two plant species (Paulownia tomentosa and Cytisus scoparius), earthworms (Eisenia fetida), and organic matter (horse manure) were used as an ecological approach to bioremediate a soil historically contaminated by heavy metals and hydrocarbons. The experiment was carried out for six months at a mesoscale level using pots containing 90 kg of polluted soil. Three different treatments were performed for each plant: (i) untreated planted soil as a control (C); (ii) planted soil + horse manure (20:1 w/w) (M); (iii) planted soil + horse manure + 15 earthworms (ME). Both the plant species were able to grow in the polluted soil and to improve the soil's bio-chemical conditions, especially when organic matter and earthworms were applied. By comparing the two plant species, few significant differences were observed in the soil characteristics; Cytisus scoparius improved soil nutrient content more than Paulownia tomentosa, which instead stimulated more soil microbial metabolism. Regarding the pollutants, Paulownia tomentosa was more efficient in reducing the heavy metal (Pb, Cr, Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni) content, while earthworms were particularly able to stimulate the processes involved in the decontamination of organic pollutants (hydrocarbons). This ecological approach, validated at a mesoscale level, has recently been transferred to a real scale situation to carry out the bioremediation of polluted soil in San Giuliano Terme Municipality (Pisa, Italy).

  13. Impact of redox conditions on metolachlor and metribuzin degradation in Mississippi flood plain soils.

    PubMed

    Mulbach, C K; Porthouse, J D; Jugsujinda, A; DeLaune, R D; Johnson, A B

    2000-11-01

    The effect of soil redox conditions on the degradation of metolachlor and metribuzin in two Mississippi soils (Forrestdale silty clay loam and Loring silt loam) were examined in the laboratory. Herbicides were added to soil in microcosms and incubated either under oxidized (aerobic) or reduced (anaerobic) conditions. Metolachlor and metribuzin degradation under aerobic condition in the Forrestdale soil proceeded at rates of 8.83 ngd(-1) and 25 ngd(-1), respectively. Anaerobic degradation rates for the two herbicides in the Forestdale soil were 8.44 ngd(-1) and 32.5 ngd(-1), respectively. Degradation rates for the Loring soil under aerobic condition were 24.8 ngd(-1) and 12.0 ngd(-1) for metolachlor and metribuzin, respectively. Metolachlor and metribuzin degradation rates under anaerobic conditions in the Loring soil were 20.9 ngd(-1) and 5.35 ngd(-1). Metribuzin degraded faster (12.0 ngd(-1)) in the Loring soil under aerobic conditions as compared to anaerobic conditions (5.35 ngd(-1)).

  14. Accelerated metolachlor degradation in soil by zerovalent iron and compost amendments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Chul; Yang, Jae E; Ok, Yong Sik; Skousen, Jeff; Kim, Dong-Guk; Joo, Jin-Ho

    2010-04-01

    Soil incubation and germination tests were conducted to assess zerovalent iron (ZVI), organic compost, moisture and their combinations on metolachlor degradation in soil. The ZVI alone degraded 91% of metolachlor in soil within 40 days following bi-phasic kinetics. Organic amendment alone facilitated metolachlor degradation in soil up to 60% after 40 days depending on the amendment rate. However, the combination of ZVI with compost amendment at 30 ton ha(-1) and 30% moisture content accelerated metolachlor degradation to 90% after 3 days and 98% after 40 days. The half life (t (1/2)) of metolachlor degradation with ZVI, compost at 30 ton ha(-1), and 30% moisture was about 1 day, which was faster than ZVI treatment alone and 98% faster than controls. Germination and growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis L. Scop.) were severely inhibited in unamended metolachlor-contaminated soils but when these soils were amended with ZVI, germination and growth was comparable to controls (metolachlor free soil). Metolachlor degradation was greatest when ZVI, compost and moisture were used together, suggesting that these treatments will maximize in situ remediation of metolachlor-contaminated soils in the field.

  15. Decision support tool for soil sampling of heterogeneous pesticide (chlordecone) pollution.

    PubMed

    Clostre, Florence; Lesueur-Jannoyer, Magalie; Achard, Raphaël; Letourmy, Philippe; Cabidoche, Yves-Marie; Cattan, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    When field pollution is heterogeneous due to localized pesticide application, as is the case of chlordecone (CLD), the mean level of pollution is difficult to assess. Our objective was to design a decision support tool to optimize soil sampling. We analyzed the CLD heterogeneity of soil content at 0-30- and 30-60-cm depth. This was done within and between nine plots (0.4 to 1.8 ha) on andosol and ferralsol. We determined that 20 pooled subsamples per plot were a satisfactory compromise with respect to both cost and accuracy. Globally, CLD content was greater for andosols and the upper soil horizon (0-30 cm). Soil organic carbon cannot account for CLD intra-field variability. Cropping systems and tillage practices influence the CLD content and distribution; that is CLD pollution was higher under intensive banana cropping systems and, while upper soil horizon was more polluted than the lower one with shallow tillage (<40 cm), deeper tillage led to a homogenization and a dilution of the pollution in the soil profile. The decision tool we proposed compiles and organizes these results to better assess CLD soil pollution in terms of sampling depth, distance, and unit at field scale. It accounts for sampling objectives, farming practices (cropping system, tillage), type of soil, and topographical characteristics (slope) to design a relevant sampling plan. This decision support tool is also adaptable to other types of heterogeneous agricultural pollution at field level.

  16. Behavior of pollutant-degrading microorganisms in aquifers: Predictions for genetically engineered organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krumme, M.L.; Smith, R.L.; Egestorff, J.; Thiem, S.M.; Tiedje, J.M.; Timmis, K.N.; Dwyer, D.F.

    1994-01-01

    Bioremediation via environmental introductions of degradative microorganisms requires that the microbes survive in substantial numbers and effect an increase in the rate and extent of pollutant removal. Combined field and microcosm studies were used to assess these abilities for laboratory-grown bacteria. Following introduction into a contaminated aquifer, viable cells of Pseudomonas sp. B13 were present in the contaminant plume for 447 days; die-off was rapid in pristine areas. In aquifer microcosms, survival of B13 and FR120, a genetically engineered derivative of B13 having enhanced catabolic capabilities for substituted aromatics, was comparable to B13 field results; both bacteria degraded target pollutants in microcosms made with aquifer samples from the aerobic zone of the pollutant plume. Results suggest that field studies with nonrecombinant microorganisms may be coupled to laboratory studies with derivative strains to estimate their bioremediative efficacy. Furthermore, laboratory strains of bacteria can survive for extended periods of time in nature and thus may have important bioremediative applications. ?? 1994 American Chemical Society.

  17. Activation of peroxymonosulfate by graphitic carbon nitride loaded on activated carbon for organic pollutants degradation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Mingyu; Gao, Long; Li, Jun; Fang, Jia; Cai, Wenxuan; Li, Xiaoxia; Xu, Aihua

    2016-10-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride supported on activated carbon (g-C3N4/AC) was prepared through an in situ thermal approach and used as a metal free catalyst for pollutants degradation in the presence of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) without light irradiation. It was found that g-C3N4 was highly dispersed on the surface of AC with the increase of surface area and the exposition of more edges and defects. The much easier oxidation of C species in g-C3N4 to CO was also observed from XPS spectra. Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and other organic pollutants could be completely degraded by the g-C3N4/AC catalyst within 20min with PMS, while g-C3N4+PMS and AC+PMS showed no significant activity for the reaction. The performance of the catalyst was significantly influenced by the amount of g-C3N4 loaded on AC; but was nearly not affected by the initial solution pH and reaction temperature. In addition, the catalysts presented good stability. A nonradical mechanism accompanied by radical generation (HO and SO4(-)) in AO7 oxidation was proposed in the system. The CO groups play a key role in the process; while the exposure of more N-(C)3 group can further increase its electron density and basicity. This study can contribute to the development of green materials for sustainable remediation of aqueous organic pollutants. PMID:27214000

  18. Activation of peroxymonosulfate by graphitic carbon nitride loaded on activated carbon for organic pollutants degradation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Mingyu; Gao, Long; Li, Jun; Fang, Jia; Cai, Wenxuan; Li, Xiaoxia; Xu, Aihua

    2016-10-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride supported on activated carbon (g-C3N4/AC) was prepared through an in situ thermal approach and used as a metal free catalyst for pollutants degradation in the presence of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) without light irradiation. It was found that g-C3N4 was highly dispersed on the surface of AC with the increase of surface area and the exposition of more edges and defects. The much easier oxidation of C species in g-C3N4 to CO was also observed from XPS spectra. Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and other organic pollutants could be completely degraded by the g-C3N4/AC catalyst within 20min with PMS, while g-C3N4+PMS and AC+PMS showed no significant activity for the reaction. The performance of the catalyst was significantly influenced by the amount of g-C3N4 loaded on AC; but was nearly not affected by the initial solution pH and reaction temperature. In addition, the catalysts presented good stability. A nonradical mechanism accompanied by radical generation (HO and SO4(-)) in AO7 oxidation was proposed in the system. The CO groups play a key role in the process; while the exposure of more N-(C)3 group can further increase its electron density and basicity. This study can contribute to the development of green materials for sustainable remediation of aqueous organic pollutants.

  19. Atrazine and its metabolites degradation in mineral salts medium and soil using an enrichment culture.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anup; Singh, Neera

    2016-03-01

    An atrazine-degrading enrichment culture was used to study degradation of atrazine metabolites viz. hydroxyatrazine, deethylatrazine, and deisopropylatrazine in mineral salts medium. Results suggested that the enrichment culture was able to degrade only hydroxyatrazine, and it was used as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. Hydroxyatrazine degradation slowed down when sucrose and/or ammonium hydrogen phosphate were supplemented as the additional sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively. The enrichment culture could degrade high concentrations of atrazine (up to 110 μg/mL) in mineral salts medium, and neutral pH was optimum for atrazine degradation. Further, except in an acidic soil, enrichment culture was able to degrade atrazine in three soil types having different physico-chemical properties. Raising the pH of acidic soil to neutral or alkaline enabled the enrichment culture to degrade atrazine suggesting that acidic pH inhibited atrazine-degrading ability. The study suggested that the enrichment culture can be successfully utilized to achieve complete degradation of atrazine and its persistent metabolite hydroxyatrazine in the contaminated soil and water.

  20. Fate of Triclosan in Irrigated Soil: Degradation in Soil and Translocation into Onion and Tomato.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Monica O; Valdez, Erika M; Martinez, Eileen M; Saucedo, Melissa; Wilson, Brittan A

    2016-05-01

    This study determined the fate of triclosan, a prevalent wastewater contaminant in recycled waters and surface streams, when soil and crop plants were irrigated at environmentally relevant concentrations. Soil triclosan concentrations were monitored in an 8-wk and in a 16-wk study without plants to determine triclosan degradation. Onion ( O. Fedtsch.) and tomato ( L.) were assessed for growth and triclosan accumulation at four levels of triclosan exposure (0, 0.015, 0.15, and 1.5 µg L) in irrigation waters within ranges of those found in recycled waters and associated receiving streams. Onions were grown for 8 wk and tomatoes were grown for 8 wk (short-term study) and 12 wk (long-term study) in potting soil. Soil triclosan concentrations increased (5-fold) with triclosan levels applied to soils alone. With repeated application, the half-life of triclosan was 18 d, with low-level accumulation in soil. Bioaccumulation of triclosan was observed in all edible portions of onions (115-435 ng g), primarily in bulbs, with no discernible impact on biomass. In both short- and long-term tomato studies, triclosan translocated to shoots and fruits (approaching a translocation factor of 1) at the highest level examined. Even at low triclosan concentrations typically found in recycled waters and receiving streams, agricultural irrigation presents an additional exposure route for organic contaminants to humans via commercial crops. Our study indicates that bulb crops, in particular, would likely accumulate high levels of triclosan. However, concentrations detected in both onions and tomato fruits determined here are below current human exposure limits.

  1. Fate of Triclosan in Irrigated Soil: Degradation in Soil and Translocation into Onion and Tomato.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Monica O; Valdez, Erika M; Martinez, Eileen M; Saucedo, Melissa; Wilson, Brittan A

    2016-05-01

    This study determined the fate of triclosan, a prevalent wastewater contaminant in recycled waters and surface streams, when soil and crop plants were irrigated at environmentally relevant concentrations. Soil triclosan concentrations were monitored in an 8-wk and in a 16-wk study without plants to determine triclosan degradation. Onion ( O. Fedtsch.) and tomato ( L.) were assessed for growth and triclosan accumulation at four levels of triclosan exposure (0, 0.015, 0.15, and 1.5 µg L) in irrigation waters within ranges of those found in recycled waters and associated receiving streams. Onions were grown for 8 wk and tomatoes were grown for 8 wk (short-term study) and 12 wk (long-term study) in potting soil. Soil triclosan concentrations increased (5-fold) with triclosan levels applied to soils alone. With repeated application, the half-life of triclosan was 18 d, with low-level accumulation in soil. Bioaccumulation of triclosan was observed in all edible portions of onions (115-435 ng g), primarily in bulbs, with no discernible impact on biomass. In both short- and long-term tomato studies, triclosan translocated to shoots and fruits (approaching a translocation factor of 1) at the highest level examined. Even at low triclosan concentrations typically found in recycled waters and receiving streams, agricultural irrigation presents an additional exposure route for organic contaminants to humans via commercial crops. Our study indicates that bulb crops, in particular, would likely accumulate high levels of triclosan. However, concentrations detected in both onions and tomato fruits determined here are below current human exposure limits. PMID:27136171

  2. [Characteristic and evaluation of soil pollution by heavy metal in different functional zones of Hohhot].

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Sun, Wen-Hui; Zhao, Ren-Xin; Zhao, Wen-Jing; Fu, Rui-Ying; Zhang, Jun

    2013-04-01

    The residential areas, cultural and educational areas, city parks, commercial areas, urban roads, industrial zones, and development zones in Hohhot were selected as the research objects. Sixty-two soil samples were collected by triple subsampling technique in the seven functional zones. The aim of this study is to control the soil heavy metal pollution of Hohhot and provide the basic information. To investigate and analyze the heavy metal pollution in soil in different functional zones of Hohhot, the pollution of heavy metal was assessed with single factor pollution index and Nemerow integrated pollution index, and the pollution sources were discriminated by Principal Component Analysis. Contents of seven kinds of heavy metals were analyzed in different functional zones of Hohhot. The mean contents of heavy metals in soil samples exceeded the corresponding background values in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. The mean contents of Cu and Zn were 2. 33 and 1. 85 times, respectively, as high as the soil background values of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. Single factor pollution index showed that the urban soil in Hohhot has been polluted by heavy metals. The Cu pollution was the most severe in commercial areas, and the pollution degree was in the following order: Cu > Zn > Cr > Mn > As > Ni > Pb. Nemerow integrated pollution index showed that soils from the commercial areas were seriously contaminated by heavy metals. The soil of urban roads was moderately polluted. The soils from cultural and educational areas and the city parks were slightly polluted. The Nemerow integrated pollution index of the seven areas ranked as follows: commercial areas (3.03) > urban roads (2.12) > residential areas (1.98) > cultural and educational areas (1.81) > industrial zones (1.72) > development zones (1.36) > city parks (1. 28). The results of Principal Component Analysis showed that the heavy metals in soil of Hohhot came from different sources. Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn were

  3. Anodic Fenton process assisted by a microbial fuel cell for enhanced degradation of organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-Wei; Sun, Xue-Fei; Li, Dao-Bo; Li, Wen-Wei; Huang, Yu-Xi; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2012-09-15

    The electro-Fenton process is efficient for degradation of organic pollutants, but it suffers from the high operating costs due to the need of power investment. Here, a new anodic Fenton system is developed for energy-saving and efficient treatment of organic pollutants by incorporating microbial fuel cell (MFC) into an anodic Fenton process. This system is composed of an anodic Fenton reactor and a two-chamber air-cathode MFC. The power generated from a two-chamber MFC is used to drive the anodic Fenton process for Acid Orange 7 (AO7) degradation through accelerating in situ generation of Fe(2+) from sacrificial iron. The kinetic results show that the MFC-assisted anodic Fenton process system had a significantly higher pseudo-first-order rate constant than those for the chemical Fenton methods. The electrochemical analysis reveals that AO7 did not hinder the corrosion of iron. The anodic Fenton process was influenced by the MFC performance. It was also found that increasing dissolved oxygen in the cathode improved the MFC power density, which in turn enhanced the AO7 degradation rate. These clearly demonstrate that the anodic Fenton process could be integrated with MFC to develop a self-sustained system for cost-effective and energy-saving electrochemical wastewater treatment.

  4. Degradation of Metalaxyl and Mefenoxam and Effects on the Microbiological Properties of Tropical and Temperate Soils

    PubMed Central

    Monkiedje, Adolphe; Spiteller, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The degradation of various formulations of the racemic mixture and the enantiomers (including mefenoxam) of metalaxyl in typical soils from Germany and Cameroon in controlled incubation experiments was studied. The kinetics of the degradation or transformation was determined by means of reversed phase HPLC, while the enantiomeric ratios were measured by HPLC with a chiral Whelk O1 column. The dynamics of the quantitative changes in microbiological properties induced by the addition of these fungicides at their recommended field rates were determined in the soils during a 120-day incubation experiment. The degradation followed first-order kinetics (R2≥0.96). Higher metalaxyl acid metabolite concentrations were found in German than in Cameroonian soils. The enantiomers of the fungicide had different degradation rates in both soils, with half-lives ranging from 17 to 38 days. All forms of metalaxyl had lower degradation rates in the Cameroonian soil than in the German soil. The degradation of the R-enantiomer was much faster than the S-enantiomer in the German soil and slower than the S-enantiomer in the Cameroonian soil, suggesting that different microbial populations, which may be using different enzymes, have different degradation preferences. The type of soil significantly influenced the effect of these fungicides on the soil parameters studied. Incorporation of these fungicides resulted in a change in the ecophysiological status of the soil microbial community as expressed by microbial activities. The activity of phosphatases and β-glucosidase, the mineralization and availability of N and most plant nutrients in soils were stimulated, whereas the activity of dehydrogenase and the availability of NO3−, were generally adversely affected. The soil NH4+, NO3−, and enzymes activities values in general did not correlate with the degradation of metalaxyl in both soils. However, the degradation of formulated and unformulated metalaxyl was positively correlated to

  5. Supported and unsupported nanomaterials for water and soil remediation: are they a useful solution for worldwide pollution?

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Reyes, J; Peralta-Videa, J R; Gardea-Torresdey, J L

    2014-09-15

    Remediation technologies for wastes generated by industrial processes include coagulation, reverse osmosis, electrochemistry, photoelectrochemistry, advanced oxidation processes, and biological methods, among others. Adsorption onto activated carbon, sewage sludge, zeolites, chitosan, silica, and agricultural wastes has shown potential for pollutants' removal from aqueous media. Recently, nanoscale systems [nanoparticles (NPs) supported on different inorganic adsorbents] have shown additional benefits for the removal/degradation of several contaminants. According to the literature, NPs enhance the adsorption capacity of adsorbent materials and facilitate degradation of pollutants through redox reactions. In this review we analyzed relevant literature from 2011 to 2013, dealing with water and soil remediation by nanomaterials (NMs), either unsupported or supported upon inorganic adsorbents. Despite the outstanding reported results for some NMs, the analysis of the literature makes clear the necessity of more studies. There is lack of information about NMs regeneration and reusability, their large-scale application, and their efficiency in actual industrial wastewaters and contaminated soils. Additionally, little is known about NMs' life cycle, release of metal ions, disposal of pollutant loaded NMs, and their impacts on different ecosystems.

  6. Supported and unsupported nanomaterials for water and soil remediation: are they a useful solution for worldwide pollution?

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Reyes, J; Peralta-Videa, J R; Gardea-Torresdey, J L

    2014-09-15

    Remediation technologies for wastes generated by industrial processes include coagulation, reverse osmosis, electrochemistry, photoelectrochemistry, advanced oxidation processes, and biological methods, among others. Adsorption onto activated carbon, sewage sludge, zeolites, chitosan, silica, and agricultural wastes has shown potential for pollutants' removal from aqueous media. Recently, nanoscale systems [nanoparticles (NPs) supported on different inorganic adsorbents] have shown additional benefits for the removal/degradation of several contaminants. According to the literature, NPs enhance the adsorption capacity of adsorbent materials and facilitate degradation of pollutants through redox reactions. In this review we analyzed relevant literature from 2011 to 2013, dealing with water and soil remediation by nanomaterials (NMs), either unsupported or supported upon inorganic adsorbents. Despite the outstanding reported results for some NMs, the analysis of the literature makes clear the necessity of more studies. There is lack of information about NMs regeneration and reusability, their large-scale application, and their efficiency in actual industrial wastewaters and contaminated soils. Additionally, little is known about NMs' life cycle, release of metal ions, disposal of pollutant loaded NMs, and their impacts on different ecosystems. PMID:25203809

  7. The remediation of the lead-polluted garden soil by natural zeolite.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Shi, Wei-yu; Shao, Hong-bo; Shao, Ming-an

    2009-09-30

    The current study investigated the remediation effect of lead-polluted garden soil by natural zeolite in terms of soil properties, Pb fraction of sequential extraction in soil and distribution of Pb in different parts of rape. Natural zeolite was added to artificially polluted garden soil to immobilize and limit the uptake of lead by rape through changing soil physical and chemical properties in the pot experiment under greenhouse conditions. Results indicated that the addition of natural zeolite could increase soil pH, CEC, content of soil organic matter and promote formation of soil aggregate. The application of zeolite decreased the available fraction of Pb in the garden soil by adjusting soil pH rather than CEC, and restrained the Pb uptake by rape. Data obtained suggested that the application of a dose of zeolite was adequate (>or=10 g kg(-1)) to reduce soluble lead significantly, even if lead pollution is severe in garden soil (>or=1000 mg kg(-1)). An appropriate dose of zeolite (20 g kg(-1)) could reduce the Pb concentration in the edible part (shoots) of rape up to 30% of Pb in the seriously polluted soil (2000 mg kg(-1)).

  8. Degradation of soil cyanide by single and mixed cultures of Pseudomonas stutzeri and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Nwokoro, Ogbonnaya; Dibua, Marie Esther Uju

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study whether certain bacteria could be used for cyanide degradation in soil. The bacteria Pseudomonas stutzeri and Bacillus subtilis were selected based on their good growth in a minimal medium containing 0.8 mg mL-1 potassium cyanide (KCN). In this study we tested their ability to reduce cyanide levels in a medium containing 1.5 mg mL-1 of KCN. Although both microorganisms reduced cyanide levels, Pseudomonas stutzeri was the more effective test organism. Later on, the selected cultures were grown, diluted and their various cell concentrations were used individually and in combination to test their ability of cyanide degradation in soil samples collected around a cassava processing mill. Bacillus subtilis caused degradation of soil cyanide from 0.218 mg g-1 soil immediately with an inoculum concentration of 0.1 (OD600nm) to 0.072 mg g-1 soil after 10 days with an inoculum concentration of 0.6 (OD600nm) implying a 66.9 % reduction. Pseudomonas stutzeri cell concentration of 0.1 (OD600nm) decreased soil cyanide from 0.218 mg g-1 soil initially to 0.061 mg g-1 soil after 10 days with an inoculum concentration of 0.6 (OD600nm) (72 % reduction). The mixed culture of the two bacteria produced the best degradation of soil cyanide from 0.218 mg g-1 soil sample with a combined inoculum concentration of 0.1 (OD600nm) initially to 0.025 mg g-1 soil with a combined inoculum concentration of 0.6 (OD600nm) after 10 days incubation resulting in an 88.5 % degradation of soil cyanide. The analysed bacteria displayed high cyanide degradation potential and may be useful for efficient decontamination of cyanide contaminated sites.

  9. Construction of a chemical ranking system of soil pollution substances for screening of priority soil contaminants in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung-Woo; An, Youn-Joo

    2012-04-01

    The Korean government recently proposed expanding the number of soil-quality standards to 30 by 2015. The objectives of our study were to construct a reasonable protocol for screening priority soil contaminants for inclusion in the planned soil quality standard expansion. The chemical ranking system of soil pollution substances (CROSS) was first developed to serve as an analytical tool in chemical scoring and ranking of possible soil pollution substances. CROSS incorporates important parameters commonly used in several previous chemical ranking and scoring systems and the new soil pollution parameters. CROSS uses soil-related parameters in its algorithm, including information related to the soil environment, such as soil ecotoxicological data, the soil toxic release inventory (TRI), and soil partitioning coefficients. Soil TRI and monitoring data were incorporated as local specific parameters. In addition, CROSS scores the transportability of chemicals in soil because soil contamination may result in groundwater contamination. Dermal toxicity was used in CROSS only to consider contact with soil. CROSS uses a certainty score to incorporate data uncertainty. CROSS scores the importance of each candidate substance and assigns rankings on the basis of total scores. Cadmium was the most highly ranked. Generally, metals were ranked higher than other substances. Pentachlorophenol, phenol, dieldrin, and methyl tert-butyl ether were ranked the highest among chlorinated compounds, aromatic compounds, pesticides, and others, respectively. The priority substance list generated from CROSS will be used in selecting substances for possible inclusion in the Korean soil quality standard expansion; it will also provide important information for designing a soil-environment management scheme.

  10. Soil quality changes in response to their pollution by heavy metals, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Matchavariani, Lia; Kalandadze, Besik; Lagidze, Lamzira; Gokhelashvili, Nino; Sulkhanishvili, Nino; Paichadze, Nino; Dvalashvili, Giorgi

    2015-01-01

    The present study deals with the composition, migration and accumulation of heavy metals in irrigated soils, plants and partially natural waters; and also, establishing the possible sources of pollution and their impact on environmental situation. The content of toxic elements in the irrigated soils adjacent to ore mining and processing enterprise were studied. Content of toxic elements in the irrigated soils adjacent to ore mining, showed that more than half of territory was seriously polluted by copper and zinc. Some part of the area were considered catastrophically polluted. Expressed technogenesis taking place influenced irrigation. Heavy metals like copper, zinc and manganese negative by effected the properties of soil, thus composition and soil-forming processes taking place in the soil. It was especially well represented in the deterioration of hydro-physical potential of the soil. Irrigation of agricultural land plots by water, polluted with heavy metals changed the pH. Balanced correlation among solid, liquid and gas phases was disrupted. In highly polluted soil, the cementing processes took place that sharply increased the bulk density of the soil, deteriorated the porosity of soil and reduced water permeability critically.

  11. Soil quality changes in response to their pollution by heavy metals, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Matchavariani, Lia; Kalandadze, Besik; Lagidze, Lamzira; Gokhelashvili, Nino; Sulkhanishvili, Nino; Paichadze, Nino; Dvalashvili, Giorgi

    2015-01-01

    The present study deals with the composition, migration and accumulation of heavy metals in irrigated soils, plants and partially natural waters; and also, establishing the possible sources of pollution and their impact on environmental situation. The content of toxic elements in the irrigated soils adjacent to ore mining and processing enterprise were studied. Content of toxic elements in the irrigated soils adjacent to ore mining, showed that more than half of territory was seriously polluted by copper and zinc. Some part of the area were considered catastrophically polluted. Expressed technogenesis taking place influenced irrigation. Heavy metals like copper, zinc and manganese negative by effected the properties of soil, thus composition and soil-forming processes taking place in the soil. It was especially well represented in the deterioration of hydro-physical potential of the soil. Irrigation of agricultural land plots by water, polluted with heavy metals changed the pH. Balanced correlation among solid, liquid and gas phases was disrupted. In highly polluted soil, the cementing processes took place that sharply increased the bulk density of the soil, deteriorated the porosity of soil and reduced water permeability critically. PMID:26591886

  12. Enantioselective degradation and chiral stability of the herbicide fluazifop-butyl in soil and water.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yanli; Liu, Donghui; Luo, Mai; Jing, Xu; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2016-03-01

    The stereoselective degradation and transformation of the enantiomers of the herbicide fluazifop-butyl in soil and water were studied to investigate the environmental behavior and chiral stability of the optical pure product. Its main chiral metabolite fluazifop was also monitored. LC/MS/MS with Chiralpak IC chiral column was used to separate the enantiomers of fluazifop-butyl and fluazifop. Validated enantioselective residue analysis methods were established with recoveries ranging from 77.1 to 115.4% and RSDs from 0.85 to 8.9% for the enantiomers. It was found the dissipation of fluazifop-butyl was rapid in the three studied soils (Beijing, Harbin and Anhui soil), and the degradation half-lives of the enantiomers ranged from 0.136 to 2.7 d. Enantioselective degradations were found in two soils. In Beijing soil, R-fluazifop-butyl was preferentially degraded leading to relative enrichment of S-enantiomer, but in Anhui soil, S-fluazifop-butyl dissipated faster. There was no conversion of the R-fluazifop-butyl into S-fluazifop-butyl or vice versa in the soils. The formation of fluazifop in the soils was rapidly accompanied with the fast degradation of fluazifop-butyl, and the enantioselectivity and the transformation of S-fluazifop to R-fluazifop were found. The degradation of fluazifop-butyl in water was also quick, with half-lives of the enantiomers ranging from 0.34 to 2.52 d, and there was no significant enantioselectivity of the degradation of fluazifop-butyl and the formation of fluazifop. The effects of pH on the degradation showed fluazifop-butyl enantiomers degraded faster in alkaline conditions. This study showed an evidence of enantioselective behavior and enantiomerization of the chiral herbicide fluazifop-butyl.

  13. Enantioselective degradation and chiral stability of the herbicide fluazifop-butyl in soil and water.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yanli; Liu, Donghui; Luo, Mai; Jing, Xu; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2016-03-01

    The stereoselective degradation and transformation of the enantiomers of the herbicide fluazifop-butyl in soil and water were studied to investigate the environmental behavior and chiral stability of the optical pure product. Its main chiral metabolite fluazifop was also monitored. LC/MS/MS with Chiralpak IC chiral column was used to separate the enantiomers of fluazifop-butyl and fluazifop. Validated enantioselective residue analysis methods were established with recoveries ranging from 77.1 to 115.4% and RSDs from 0.85 to 8.9% for the enantiomers. It was found the dissipation of fluazifop-butyl was rapid in the three studied soils (Beijing, Harbin and Anhui soil), and the degradation half-lives of the enantiomers ranged from 0.136 to 2.7 d. Enantioselective degradations were found in two soils. In Beijing soil, R-fluazifop-butyl was preferentially degraded leading to relative enrichment of S-enantiomer, but in Anhui soil, S-fluazifop-butyl dissipated faster. There was no conversion of the R-fluazifop-butyl into S-fluazifop-butyl or vice versa in the soils. The formation of fluazifop in the soils was rapidly accompanied with the fast degradation of fluazifop-butyl, and the enantioselectivity and the transformation of S-fluazifop to R-fluazifop were found. The degradation of fluazifop-butyl in water was also quick, with half-lives of the enantiomers ranging from 0.34 to 2.52 d, and there was no significant enantioselectivity of the degradation of fluazifop-butyl and the formation of fluazifop. The effects of pH on the degradation showed fluazifop-butyl enantiomers degraded faster in alkaline conditions. This study showed an evidence of enantioselective behavior and enantiomerization of the chiral herbicide fluazifop-butyl. PMID:26735732

  14. Impact of Inoculation Protocols, Salinity, and pH on the Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and Survival of PAH-Degrading Bacteria Introduced into Soil

    PubMed Central

    Kästner, Matthias; Breuer-Jammali, Maren; Mahro, Bernd

    1998-01-01

    Degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and survival of bacteria in soil was investigated by applying different inoculation protocols. The soil was inoculated with Sphingomonas paucimobilis BA 2 and strain BP 9, which are able to degrade anthracene and pyrene, respectively. CFU of soil bacteria and of the introduced bacteria were monitored in native and sterilized soil at different pHs. Introduction with mineral medium inhibited PAH degradation by the autochthonous microflora and by the strains tested. After introduction with water (without increase of the pore water salinity), no inhibition of the autochthonous microflora was observed and both strains exhibited PAH degradation. PMID:9435090

  15. Effects of plant species coexistence on soil enzyme activities and soil microbial community structure under Cd and Pb combined pollution.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Zhou, Pei; Mao, Liang; Zhi, Yueer; Zhang, Chunhua; Shi, Wanjun

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between plant species coexistence and soil microbial communities under heavy metal pollution has attracted much attention in ecology. However, whether plant species coexistence could offset the impacts of heavy metal combined pollution on soil microbial community structure and soil enzymes activities is not well studied. The modified ecological dose model and PCR-RAPD method were used to assess the effects of two plant species coexistence on soil microbial community and enzymes activities subjected to Cd and Pb combined stress. The results indicated that monoculture and mixed culture would increased microbe populations under Cd and Pb combined stress, and the order of sensitivity of microbial community responding to heavy metal stress was: actinomycetes > bacteria > fungi. The respirations were significantly higher in planted soil than that in unplanted soil. The plant species coexistence could enhance soil enzyme activities under Cd and Pb combined. Furthermore, planted soil would be helpful to enhance soil genetic polymorphisms, but Cd and Pb pollution would cause a decrease on soil genetic polymorphisms. Mixed culture would increase the ecological dose 50% (EDs50) values, and the ED50 values for soil enzyme activities decreased with increasing culture time. The dehydrogenase was most sensitive to metal addition and easily loses activity under low dose of heavy metal. However, it was difficult to fully inhibit the phoshpatase activity, and urease responded similarly with phosphatase.

  16. Abundance, composition and activity of denitrifier communities in metal polluted paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Liu, Yongzhuo; Zhou, Huimin; Li, Lianqing; Zheng, Jinwei; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jufeng; Pan, Genxing

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is one of the most important soil microbial processes leading to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O). The potential changes with metal pollution in soil microbial community for N2O production and reduction are not well addressed. In this study, topsoil samples were collected both from polluted and non-polluted rice paddy fields and denitrifier communities were characterized with molecular fingerprinting procedures. All the retrieved nirK sequences could be grouped into neither α- nor β- proteobacteria, while most of the nosZ sequences were affiliated with α-proteobacteria. The abundances of the nirK and nosZ genes were reduced significantly in the two polluted soils. Thus, metal pollution markedly affected composition of both nirK and nosZ denitrifiers. While the total denitrifying activity and N2O production rate were both reduced under heavy metal pollution of the two sites, the N2O reduction rate showed no significant change. These findings suggest that N2O production activity could be sensitive to heavy metal pollution, which could potentially lead to a decrease in N2O emission in polluted paddies. Therefore, metal pollution could have potential impacts on soil N transformation and thus on N2O emission from paddy soils.

  17. Abundance, composition and activity of denitrifier communities in metal polluted paddy soils

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Liu, Yongzhuo; Zhou, Huimin; Li, Lianqing; Zheng, Jinwei; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jufeng; Pan, Genxing

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is one of the most important soil microbial processes leading to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O). The potential changes with metal pollution in soil microbial community for N2O production and reduction are not well addressed. In this study, topsoil samples were collected both from polluted and non-polluted rice paddy fields and denitrifier communities were characterized with molecular fingerprinting procedures. All the retrieved nirK sequences could be grouped into neither α- nor β- proteobacteria, while most of the nosZ sequences were affiliated with α-proteobacteria. The abundances of the nirK and nosZ genes were reduced significantly in the two polluted soils. Thus, metal pollution markedly affected composition of both nirK and nosZ denitrifiers. While the total denitrifying activity and N2O production rate were both reduced under heavy metal pollution of the two sites, the N2O reduction rate showed no significant change. These findings suggest that N2O production activity could be sensitive to heavy metal pollution, which could potentially lead to a decrease in N2O emission in polluted paddies. Therefore, metal pollution could have potential impacts on soil N transformation and thus on N2O emission from paddy soils. PMID:26739424

  18. [Soil organic pollution characteristics and microbial properties in coal mining areas of Mentougou].

    PubMed

    Jia, Jian-Li; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Chen; Li, Dong; Liu, Bo-Wen; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Le; Yang, Si-Qi

    2011-03-01

    Soil micro-ecosystem including organic pollution characteristics, basic physicochemical parameters, and microbial properties was analyzed which contaminated with organic pollutants in coal mining area. Results showed that the organic pollution level in coal mining area soils distributed from 0.4 to 1.5 mg/g dry soil, which was 1. 5-6 times as much as the background sample. Furthermore, the column chromatography and GC-MS analysis revealed that content of lightly components including saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons exceeded 40%, specifically was alkenes (> C15), hydrocarbon derivatives, and a small amount aromatic hydrocarbons. Totally, the components of organic pollutants extracted in soils were similar to which in coal gangue samples, illustrating the source of soil pollution to a certain extent in coal mining areas. The physicochemical factors such as nutrient level and moisture contents were not conducive to the growth and reproduction of microbe except pH level, which might show inhibition to microbial activities. Microbial density of pollutant soils in coal mining areas was totally low, with specific amount 10(4)-10(5) cell/g dry soil and FDA activity 2.0-2.9 mg/(g x min). Generally, the microbial density and activity were decreased as the enhancing pollution level. However, in-depth analysis was needed urgently because of the complex impact of environmental conditions like pH, moisture, and nutrition.

  19. Improvement of the soil nitrogen content and maize growth by earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in soils polluted by oxytetracycline.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jia; Wang, Chong; Ji, Dingge

    2016-11-15

    Interactions between earthworms (Eisenia fetida) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Rhizophagus intraradices, AM fungi) have been suggested to improve the maize nitrogen (N) content and biomass and were studied in soils polluted by oxytetracycline (OTC). Maize was planted and amended with AMF and/or earthworms (E) in the soil with low (1mgkg(-1) soil DM) or high (100mgkg(-1) soil DM) amounts of OTC pollution in comparison to soil without OTC. The root colonization, shoot and root biomass, shoot and root N contents, soil nitrogen forms, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) were measured at harvest. The results indicated that OTC decreased maize shoot and root biomass (p<0.05) by mediating the soil urease activity and AOB and AOA abundance, which resulted in a lower N availability for maize roots and shoots. There was a significant interaction between earthworms and AM fungi on the urease activity in soil polluted by OTC (p<0.05). Adding earthworms or AM fungi could increase the maize biomass and N content (p<0.05) in OTC polluted soil by increasing the urease activity and relieving the stress from OTC on the soil N cycle. AM fungi and earthworms interactively increased maize shoot and root biomass (p<0.05) in the OTC polluted soils through their regulation of the urease activity and the abundance of ammonia oxidizers, resulting in different soil NH4(+)-N and NO3(-)-N contents, which may contribute to the N content of maize shoots and roots. Earthworms and AM fungi could be used as an efficient method to relieve the OTC stress in agro-ecosystems. PMID:27496075

  20. Improvement of the soil nitrogen content and maize growth by earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in soils polluted by oxytetracycline.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jia; Wang, Chong; Ji, Dingge

    2016-11-15

    Interactions between earthworms (Eisenia fetida) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Rhizophagus intraradices, AM fungi) have been suggested to improve the maize nitrogen (N) content and biomass and were studied in soils polluted by oxytetracycline (OTC). Maize was planted and amended with AMF and/or earthworms (E) in the soil with low (1mgkg(-1) soil DM) or high (100mgkg(-1) soil DM) amounts of OTC pollution in comparison to soil without OTC. The root colonization, shoot and root biomass, shoot and root N contents, soil nitrogen forms, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) were measured at harvest. The results indicated that OTC decreased maize shoot and root biomass (p<0.05) by mediating the soil urease activity and AOB and AOA abundance, which resulted in a lower N availability for maize roots and shoots. There was a significant interaction between earthworms and AM fungi on the urease activity in soil polluted by OTC (p<0.05). Adding earthworms or AM fungi could increase the maize biomass and N content (p<0.05) in OTC polluted soil by increasing the urease activity and relieving the stress from OTC on the soil N cycle. AM fungi and earthworms interactively increased maize shoot and root biomass (p<0.05) in the OTC polluted soils through their regulation of the urease activity and the abundance of ammonia oxidizers, resulting in different soil NH4(+)-N and NO3(-)-N contents, which may contribute to the N content of maize shoots and roots. Earthworms and AM fungi could be used as an efficient method to relieve the OTC stress in agro-ecosystems.

  1. Impact of Soil Heavy Metal Pollution on Food Safety in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuying; Zhong, Taiyang; Liu, Lei; Ouyang, Xiaoying

    2015-01-01

    Food safety is a major concern for the Chinese public. This study collected 465 published papers on heavy metal pollution rates (the ratio of the samples exceeding the Grade II limits for Chinese soils, the Soil Environmental Quality Standard-1995) in farmland soil throughout China. The results showed that Cd had the highest pollution rate of 7.75%, followed by Hg, Cu, Ni and Zn, Pb and Cr had the lowest pollution rates at lower than 1%. The total pollution rate in Chinese farmland soil was 10.18%, mainly from Cd, Hg, Cu, and Ni. The human activities of mining and smelting, industry, irrigation by sewage, urban development, and fertilizer application released certain amounts of heavy metals into soil, which resulted in the farmland soil being polluted. Considering the spatial variations of grain production, about 13.86% of grain production was affected due to the heavy metal pollution in farmland soil. These results many provide valuable information for agricultural soil management and protection in China.

  2. Impact of Soil Heavy Metal Pollution on Food Safety in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuying; Zhong, Taiyang; Liu, Lei; Ouyang, Xiaoying

    2015-01-01

    Food safety is a major concern for the Chinese public. This study collected 465 published papers on heavy metal pollution rates (the ratio of the samples exceeding the Grade II limits for Chinese soils, the Soil Environmental Quality Standard-1995) in farmland soil throughout China. The results showed that Cd had the highest pollution rate of 7.75%, followed by Hg, Cu, Ni and Zn, Pb and Cr had the lowest pollution rates at lower than 1%. The total pollution rate in Chinese farmland soil was 10.18%, mainly from Cd, Hg, Cu, and Ni. The human activities of mining and smelting, industry, irrigation by sewage, urban development, and fertilizer application released certain amounts of heavy metals into soil, which resulted in the farmland soil being polluted. Considering the spatial variations of grain production, about 13.86% of grain production was affected due to the heavy metal pollution in farmland soil. These results many provide valuable information for agricultural soil management and protection in China. PMID:26252956

  3. Impact of Soil Heavy Metal Pollution on Food Safety in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuying; Zhong, Taiyang; Liu, Lei; Ouyang, Xiaoying

    2015-01-01

    Food safety is a major concern for the Chinese public. This study collected 465 published papers on heavy metal pollution rates (the ratio of the samples exceeding the Grade II limits for Chinese soils, the Soil Environmental Quality Standard-1995) in farmland soil throughout China. The results showed that Cd had the highest pollution rate of 7.75%, followed by Hg, Cu, Ni and Zn, Pb and Cr had the lowest pollution rates at lower than 1%. The total pollution rate in Chinese farmland soil was 10.18%, mainly from Cd, Hg, Cu, and Ni. The human activities of mining and smelting, industry, irrigation by sewage, urban development, and fertilizer application released certain amounts of heavy metals into soil, which resulted in the farmland soil being polluted. Considering the spatial variations of grain production, about 13.86% of grain production was affected due to the heavy metal pollution in farmland soil. These results many provide valuable information for agricultural soil management and protection in China. PMID:26252956

  4. Potential particulate pollution derived from UV-induced degradation of odorous dimethyl sulfide.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liping; Chen, Jianmin; Yang, Xin

    2011-01-01

    UV-induced degradation of odorous dimethyl sulfide (DMS) was carried out in a static White cell chamber with UV irradiation. The combination of in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer, gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS), wide-range particle spectrometer (WPS) technique, filter sampling and ion chromatographic (IC) analysis was used to monitor the gaseous and potential particulate products. During 240 min of UV irradiation, the degradation efficiency of DMS attained 20.9%, and partially oxidized sulfur-containing gaseous products, such as sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbonyl sulfide (OCS), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO2) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) were identified by in situ FT-IR and GC-MS analysis, respectively. Accompanying with the oxidation of DMS, suspended particles were directly detected to be formed by WPS techniques. These particles were measured mainly in the size range of accumulation mode, and increased their count median diameter throughout the whole removal process. IC analysis of the filter samples revealed that methanesulfonic acid (MSA), sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and other unidentified chemicals accounted for the major non-refractory compositions of these particles. Based on products analysis and possible intermediates formed, the degradation pathways of DMS were proposed as the combination of the O(1D)- and the OH- initiated oxidation mechanisms. A plausible formation mechanism of the suspended particles was also analyzed. It is concluded that UV-induced degradation of odorous DMS is potentially a source of particulate pollutants in the atmosphere.

  5. Fate and significance of major degradation products of atrazine in the soil environment

    SciTech Connect

    Coats, J.R.; Kruger, E.L.; Baluch, H.U.

    1995-12-01

    Complete metabolism studies using radiotracers were performed in the laboratory to determine the fate of atrazine and major degradation products, deethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, and hydroxyatrazine, in soil as affected by soil type, soil moisture, soil depth, and previous long-term atrazine history. Several soil factors have been shown to significantly affect the fate of these compounds in soil. Persistence of the 4 compounds was significantly increased in subsurface soils. Hydroxyatrazine was the most persistent of the 4 compounds in surface and subsurface soil. Desiopropylatrazine was the most susceptible to mineralization in both surface and subsurface soil. A higher amount of bound residues were formed in deisopropylatrazine-treated soils. Soil moisture significantly affects the persistence of atrazine, deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine with decreased persistence under saturated soil moisture conditions. Persistence of deethylatrazine was positively correlated with percent clay and negatively correlated with percent organic matter. In soils with long-term atrazine history, deethylatrazine undergoes enhanced degradation. In soil column studies, the relative movement of deethylatrazine was greater than that of atrazine.

  6. Assessing the pollution risk of soil Chromium based on loading capacity of paddy soil at a regional scale

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Mingkai; Li, Weidong; Zhang, Chuanrong; Huang, Biao; Zhao, Yongcun

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of a trace metal in rice grain is not only affected by the total concentration of the soil trace metal, but also by crop variety and related soil properties, such as soil pH, soil organic matter (SOM) and so on. However, these factors were seldom considered in previous studies on mapping the pollution risk of trace metals in paddy soil at a regional scale. In this study, the spatial nonstationary relationships between rice-Cr and a set of perceived soil properties (soil-Cr, soil pH and SOM) were explored using geographically weighted regression; and the relationships were then used for calculating the critical threshold (CT) of soil-Cr concentration that may ensure the concentration of rice-Cr being below the permissible limit. The concept of “loading capacity” (LC) for Cr in paddy soil was then defined as the difference between the CT and the real concentration of Cr in paddy soil, so as to map the pollution risk of soil-Cr to rice grain and assess the risk areas in Jiaxing city, China. Compared with the information of the concentration of the total soil-Cr, such results are more valuable for spatial decision making in reducing the accumulation of rice-Cr at a regional scale. PMID:26675587

  7. Assessing the pollution risk of soil Chromium based on loading capacity of paddy soil at a regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Mingkai; Li, Weidong; Zhang, Chuanrong; Huang, Biao; Zhao, Yongcun

    2015-12-01

    The accumulation of a trace metal in rice grain is not only affected by the total concentration of the soil trace metal, but also by crop variety and related soil properties, such as soil pH, soil organic matter (SOM) and so on. However, these factors were seldom considered in previous studies on mapping the pollution risk of trace metals in paddy soil at a regional scale. In this study, the spatial nonstationary relationships between rice-Cr and a set of perceived soil properties (soil-Cr, soil pH and SOM) were explored using geographically weighted regression; and the relationships were then used for calculating the critical threshold (CT) of soil-Cr concentration that may ensure the concentration of rice-Cr being below the permissible limit. The concept of “loading capacity” (LC) for Cr in paddy soil was then defined as the difference between the CT and the real concentration of Cr in paddy soil, so as to map the pollution risk of soil-Cr to rice grain and assess the risk areas in Jiaxing city, China. Compared with the information of the concentration of the total soil-Cr, such results are more valuable for spatial decision making in reducing the accumulation of rice-Cr at a regional scale.

  8. Climate changes, lead pollution and soil erosion in south Greenland over the past 700 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Sánchez, Noemí; Schofield, J. Edward; Mighall, Tim M.; Martínez Cortizas, Antonio; Edwards, Kevin J.; Foster, Ian

    2015-09-01

    A peat core from southern Greenland provided a rare opportunity to investigate human-environment interactions, climate change and atmospheric pollution over the last ~ 700 years. X-ray fluorescence, gas chromatography-combustion, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, peat humification and fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy were applied and combined with palynological and archaeological evidence. Variations in peat mineral content seem to be related to soil erosion linked with human activity during the late Norse period (13th-14th centuries AD) and the modern era (20th century). Cooler conditions during the Little Ice Age (LIA) are reflected by both slow rates of peat growth and carbon accumulation, and by low bromine (Br) concentrations. Spörer and Maunder minima in solar activity may be indicated by further declines in Br and enrichment in easily degradable compounds such as polysaccharides. Peat organic matter composition was also influenced by vegetation changes at the end of the LIA when the expansion of oceanic heath was associated with polysaccharide enrichment. Atmospheric lead pollution was recorded in the peat after ~ AD 1845, and peak values occurred in the 1970s. There is indirect support for a predominantly North American lead source, but further Pb isotopic analysis would be needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  9. Efficiently Evaluating Heavy Metal Urban Soil Pollution Using an Improved Entropy-Method-Based Topsis Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Chun; Han, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Urban soil pollution is evaluated utilizing an efficient and simple algorithmic model referred to as the entropy method-based Topsis (EMBT) model. The model focuses on pollution source position to enhance the ability to analyze sources of pollution accurately. Initial application of EMBT to urban soil pollution analysis is actually implied. The pollution degree of sampling point can be efficiently calculated by the model with the pollution degree coefficient, which is efficiently attained by first utilizing the Topsis method to determine evaluation value and then by dividing the evaluation value of the sample point by background value. The Kriging interpolation method combines coordinates of sampling points with the corresponding coefficients and facilitates the formation of heavy metal distribution profile. A case study is completed with modeling results in accordance with actual heavy metal pollution, proving accuracy and practicality of the EMBT model.

  10. Efficiently Evaluating Heavy Metal Urban Soil Pollution Using an Improved Entropy-Method-Based Topsis Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Chun; Han, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Urban soil pollution is evaluated utilizing an efficient and simple algorithmic model referred to as the entropy method-based Topsis (EMBT) model. The model focuses on pollution source position to enhance the ability to analyze sources of pollution accurately. Initial application of EMBT to urban soil pollution analysis is actually implied. The pollution degree of sampling point can be efficiently calculated by the model with the pollution degree coefficient, which is efficiently attained by first utilizing the Topsis method to determine evaluation value and then by dividing the evaluation value of the sample point by background value. The Kriging interpolation method combines coordinates of sampling points with the corresponding coefficients and facilitates the formation of heavy metal distribution profile. A case study is completed with modeling results in accordance with actual heavy metal pollution, proving accuracy and practicality of the EMBT model. PMID:27469469

  11. Effect of charcoal amendment on adsorption, leaching and degradation of isoproturon in soils.

    PubMed

    Si, Youbin; Wang, Midao; Tian, Chao; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Dongmei

    2011-04-01

    The effects of charcoal amendment on adsorption, leaching and degradation of the herbicide isoproturon in soils were studied under laboratory conditions. The adsorption data all fitted well with the Freundlich empirical equation. It was found that the adsorption of isoproturon in soils increased with the rate of charcoal amended (correlation coefficient r=0.957**, P<0.01). The amount of isoproturon in leachate decreased with the increase of the amount of charcoal addition to soil column, while the retention of isoproturon in soils increased with an increase in the charcoal content of soil samples. Biodegradation was still the most significant mechanism for isoproturon dissipation from soil. Charcoal amendment greatly reduced the biodegradation of isoproturon in soils. The half-lives of isoproturon degradation (DT(50)) in soils greatly extended when the rate of added charcoal increased from 0 to 50 g kg(-1) (for Paddy soil, DT(50) values increased from 54.6 to 71.4 days; for Alfisol, DT(50) from 16.0 to 136 days; and for Vertisol, DT(50) from 15.2 to 107 days). The degradation rate of isoproturon in soils was significantly negatively correlated with the amount of added charcoal. This research suggests that charcoal amendment may be an effective management practice for reducing pesticide leaching and enhancing its persistence in soils.

  12. Effect of charcoal amendment on adsorption, leaching and degradation of isoproturon in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Youbin; Wang, Midao; Tian, Chao; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Dongmei

    2011-04-01

    The effects of charcoal amendment on adsorption, leaching and degradation of the herbicide isoproturon in soils were studied under laboratory conditions. The adsorption data all fitted well with the Freundlich empirical equation. It was found that the adsorption of isoproturon in soils increased with the rate of charcoal amended (correlation coefficient r = 0.957 **, P < 0.01). The amount of isoproturon in leachate decreased with the increase of the amount of charcoal addition to soil column, while the retention of isoproturon in soils increased with an increase in the charcoal content of soil samples. Biodegradation was still the most significant mechanism for isoproturon dissipation from soil. Charcoal amendment greatly reduced the biodegradation of isoproturon in soils. The half-lives of isoproturon degradation ( DT50) in soils greatly extended when the rate of added charcoal inceased from 0 to 50 g kg - 1 (for Paddy soil, DT50 values increased from 54.6 to 71.4 days; for Alfisol, DT50 from 16.0 to 136 days; and for Vertisol, DT50 from 15.2 to 107 days). The degradation rate of isoproturon in soils was significantly negatively correlated with the amount of added charcoal. This research suggests that charcoal amendment may be an effective management practice for reducing pesticide leaching and enhancing its persistence in soils.

  13. Generic reactive transport codes as flexible tools to integrate soil organic matter degradation models with water, transport and geochemistry in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Diederik; Gérard, Fréderic; Mayer, Uli; Simunek, Jirka; Leterme, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    A large number of organic matter degradation, CO2 transport and dissolved organic matter models have been developed during the last decades. However, organic matter degradation models are in many cases strictly hard-coded in terms of organic pools, degradation kinetics and dependency on environmental variables. The scientific input of the model user is typically limited to the adjustment of input parameters. In addition, the coupling with geochemical soil processes including aqueous speciation, pH-dependent sorption and colloid-facilitated transport are not incorporated in many of these models, strongly limiting the scope of their application. Furthermore, the most comprehensive organic matter degradation models are combined with simplified representations of flow and transport processes in the soil system. We illustrate the capability of generic reactive transport codes to overcome these shortcomings. The formulations of reactive transport codes include a physics-based continuum representation of flow and transport processes, while biogeochemical reactions can be described as equilibrium processes constrained by thermodynamic principles and/or kinetic reaction networks. The flexibility of these type of codes allows for straight-forward extension of reaction networks, permits the inclusion of new model components (e.g.: organic matter pools, rate equations, parameter dependency on environmental conditions) and in such a way facilitates an application-tailored implementation of organic matter degradation models and related processes. A numerical benchmark involving two reactive transport codes (HPx and MIN3P) demonstrates how the process-based simulation of transient variably saturated water flow (Richards equation), solute transport (advection-dispersion equation), heat transfer and diffusion in the gas phase can be combined with a flexible implementation of a soil organic matter degradation model. The benchmark includes the production of leachable organic matter

  14. Changes in Flow and Transport Patterns in Fen Peat as a Result of Soil Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haojie; Janssen, Manon; Lennartz, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The preferential movement of water and transport of substances play an important role in soils and are not yet fully understood especially in degraded peat soils. In this study, we aimed at deducing changes in flow and transport patterns in the course of soil degradation as resulting from peat drainage, using titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a dye tracer. The dye tracer experiments were conducted on columns of eight types of differently degraded peat soils from three sites taken both in vertical and horizontal directions. The titanium dioxide suspension (average particle size of 0.3 μm; 10 g l‑1) was applied in a pulse of 40 mm to each soil core. Twenty-four hours after the application of the tracer, cross sections of the soil cores were prepared for photo documentation. In addition, the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) was determined. Preferential flow occurred in all investigated peat types. From the stained soil structural elements, we concluded that undecomposed plant remains are the major preferential flow pathways in less degraded peat. For more strongly degraded peat, bio-pores, such as root and earthworm channels, operated as the major transport domain. Results show that Ks and the effective pore network in less degraded peat soils are anisotropic. With increasing peat degradation, the Ks and cross section of effective pore network decreased. The results also indicate a strong positive relationship between Ks and number of macropores as well as pore continuity. Hence, we conclude that changes in flow and transport pathways as well as Ks with an increasing peat degradation are due to the disintegration of the peat forming plant material and decrement of number and continuity of macropores after drainage.

  15. Changes in Flow and Transport Patterns in Fen Peat as a Result of Soil Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haojie; Janssen, Manon; Lennartz, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The preferential movement of water and transport of substances play an important role in soils and are not yet fully understood especially in degraded peat soils. In this study, we aimed at deducing changes in flow and transport patterns in the course of soil degradation as resulting from peat drainage, using titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a dye tracer. The dye tracer experiments were conducted on columns of eight types of differently degraded peat soils from three sites taken both in vertical and horizontal directions. The titanium dioxide suspension (average particle size of 0.3 μm; 10 g l-1) was applied in a pulse of 40 mm to each soil core. Twenty-four hours after the application of the tracer, cross sections of the soil cores were prepared for photo documentation. In addition, the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) was determined. Preferential flow occurred in all investigated peat types. From the stained soil structural elements, we concluded that undecomposed plant remains are the major preferential flow pathways in less degraded peat. For more strongly degraded peat, bio-pores, such as root and earthworm channels, operated as the major transport domain. Results show that Ks and the effective pore network in less degraded peat soils are anisotropic. With increasing peat degradation, the Ks and cross section of effective pore network decreased. The results also indicate a strong positive relationship between Ks and number of macropores as well as pore continuity. Hence, we conclude that changes in flow and transport pathways as well as Ks with an increasing peat degradation are due to the disintegration of the peat forming plant material and decrement of number and continuity of macropores after drainage.

  16. Appetite for danger - genetic potential for PCP degradation at historically polluted groundwater sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkonen, Anu; Yläranta, Kati; Tiirola, Marja; Romantschuk, Martin; Sinkkonen, Aki

    2016-04-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a priority pollutant of exclusively anthropogenic origin. Formerly used commonly in timber preservatives, PCP has persisted at polluted groundwater sites decades after its use was banned, typically as the last detectable contaminant component. Notorious for its toxicity and poor biodegradability, little is known about the genetic potential and pathways for PCP degradation in the environment. The only fully characterized mineralization pathway is initiated by the enzyme coded by chromosomal pcpB gene, previously detected in PCP degrading Sphingomonadaceae bacteria isolated at two continents. However, there is no information about the abundance or diversity of any PCP degradation related gene at contaminated sites in situ. Our aim was to assess whether pcpB and/or sphingomonads seem to play a role in in situ degradation of PCP, by studying whether pcpB i) is detectable at chlorophenol-polluted groundwater sediments, ii) responds to PCP concentration changes, and iii) shows correlation with the abundance of sphingomonads or a specific sphingomonad genus. Novel protocols for quantification and profiling of pcpB, with primers covering full known diversity, were developed and tested at two sites in Finland with well-documented long-term chlorophenol contamination history: Kärkölä and Pursiala. High throughput sequencing complemented characterization of the total bacterial community and pcpB gene pool. The relative abundance of pcpB in bacterial community was associated with spatial variability in groundwater PCP concentration in Pursiala, and with temporal differences in groundwater PCP concentration in Kärkölä. T-RFLP fingerprinting results indicated and Ion Torrent PGM and Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of a single phylotype of pcpB at both geographically distant, historically contaminated sites, matching the one detected previously in Canadian bioreactor clones and Kärkölä bioreactor isolates. Sphingomonad abundance

  17. Effects of long term irrigation with polluted water and sludge amendment on some soil enzyme activities

    SciTech Connect

    Topac, F.O.; Baskaya, H.S.; Alkan, U.; Katkat, A.V.

    2008-01-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of wastewater sludge-fly ash mixtures on urease, dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase and beta-glucosidase activities in soils. In order to evaluate the probable effects of previous soil management practices (irrigation with polluted water) on soil enzymes, two different soil samples which were similar in physical properties, but different in irrigation practice were used. The application of wastewater sludges supplemented with varying doses of fly ash increased potential enzyme activities for a short period of time (3 months) in comparison to unamended soils. However, the activity levels generally showed a decreasing trend with increasing ash ratios indicating the inhibitory effect of fly ash. The urease and dehydrogenase activities were particularly lower in soils irrigated from a polluted stream, indicating the negative effects of the previous soil management on soil microbial activity.

  18. Arsenic pollution of agricultural soils by concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueping; Zhang, Wenfeng; Hu, Yuanan; Hu, Erdan; Xie, Xiande; Wang, Lingling; Cheng, Hefa

    2015-01-01

    Animal wastes from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) can cause soil arsenic pollution due to the widespread use of organoarsenic feed additives. This study investigated the arsenic pollution of surface soils in a typical CAFO zone, in comparison with that of agricultural soils in the Pearl River Delta, China. The mean soil arsenic contents in the CAFO zone were elevated compared to those in the local background and agricultural soils of the Pearl River Delta region. Chemical speciation analysis showed that the soils in the CAFO zone were clearly contaminated by the organoarsenic feed additive, p-arsanilic acid (ASA). Transformation of ASA to inorganic arsenic (arsenite and arsenate) in the surface soils was also observed. Although the potential ecological risk posed by the arsenic in the surface soils was relatively low in the CAFO zone, continuous discharge of organoarsenic feed additives could cause accumulation of arsenic and thus deserves significant attention. PMID:25036941

  19. Enantioselectivity in tebuconazole and myclobutanil non-target toxicity and degradation in soils.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanbo; Dong, Fengshou; Liu, Xingang; Xu, Jun; Han, Yongtao; Zheng, Yongquan

    2015-03-01

    Tebuconazole and myclobutanil are two widely used triazole fungicides, both comprising two enantiomers with different fungicidal activity. However, their non-target toxicity and environmental behavior with respect to enantioselectivity have received limited attention. In the present study, tebuconazole and myclobutanil enantiomers were isolated and used to evaluate the occurrence of enantioselectivity in their acute toxicity to three non-target organisms (Scenedesmus obliquus, Daphnia magna, and Danio rerio). Significant differences were found: R-(-)-tebuconazole was about 1.4-5.9 times more toxic than S-(+)-tebuconazole; rac-myclobutanil was about 1.3-6.1 and 1.4-7.3 more toxic than (-)-myclobutanil and (+)-myclobutanil, respectively. Enantioselectivity was further investigated in terms of fungicide degradation in seven soil samples, which were selected to cover a broad range of soil properties. In aerobic or anaerobic soils, the S-(+)-tebuconazole degraded faster than R-(-)-tebuconazole, and the enantioselectivity showed a correlation with soil organic carbon content. (+)-Myclobutanil was preferentially degraded than (-)-myclobutanil in aerobic soils, whereas both enantiomers degraded at similar rates in anaerobic soils. Apparent correlations of enantioselectivity with soil pH and soil texture were observed for myclobutanil under aerobic conditions. In addition, both fungicides were configurationally stable in soils, i.e., no enantiomerization was found. Enantioselectivity may be a common phenomenon in both aquatic toxicity and biodegradation of chiral triazole fungicides, and this should be considered when assessing ecotoxicological risks of these compounds in the environment. PMID:25475972

  20. Enantioselectivity in tebuconazole and myclobutanil non-target toxicity and degradation in soils.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanbo; Dong, Fengshou; Liu, Xingang; Xu, Jun; Han, Yongtao; Zheng, Yongquan

    2015-03-01

    Tebuconazole and myclobutanil are two widely used triazole fungicides, both comprising two enantiomers with different fungicidal activity. However, their non-target toxicity and environmental behavior with respect to enantioselectivity have received limited attention. In the present study, tebuconazole and myclobutanil enantiomers were isolated and used to evaluate the occurrence of enantioselectivity in their acute toxicity to three non-target organisms (Scenedesmus obliquus, Daphnia magna, and Danio rerio). Significant differences were found: R-(-)-tebuconazole was about 1.4-5.9 times more toxic than S-(+)-tebuconazole; rac-myclobutanil was about 1.3-6.1 and 1.4-7.3 more toxic than (-)-myclobutanil and (+)-myclobutanil, respectively. Enantioselectivity was further investigated in terms of fungicide degradation in seven soil samples, which were selected to cover a broad range of soil properties. In aerobic or anaerobic soils, the S-(+)-tebuconazole degraded faster than R-(-)-tebuconazole, and the enantioselectivity showed a correlation with soil organic carbon content. (+)-Myclobutanil was preferentially degraded than (-)-myclobutanil in aerobic soils, whereas both enantiomers degraded at similar rates in anaerobic soils. Apparent correlations of enantioselectivity with soil pH and soil texture were observed for myclobutanil under aerobic conditions. In addition, both fungicides were configurationally stable in soils, i.e., no enantiomerization was found. Enantioselectivity may be a common phenomenon in both aquatic toxicity and biodegradation of chiral triazole fungicides, and this should be considered when assessing ecotoxicological risks of these compounds in the environment.

  1. Soil Organic Carbon Degradation, Barrow, 2013-2014

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gu, Baohua; Yang, Ziming

    2015-03-30

    This dataset provides information about soil organic carbon decomposition in Barrow soil incubation studies. The soil cores were collected from low-center polygon (Area A) and were incubated in the laboratory at different temperatures for up to 60 days. Transformations of soil organic carbon were characterized by UV and FT-IR, and small organic acids in water-soluble carbons were quantified by ion chromatography during the incubation

  2. Microbial activity and soil organic matter decay in roadside soils polluted with petroleum hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mykhailova, Larysa; Fischer, Thomas; Iurchenko, Valentina

    2015-04-01

    It has been demonstrated previously that hydrocarbon addition to soil provokes soil organic matter priming (Zyakun et al., 2011). It has further been shown that petroleum hydrocarbons deposit to roadside soils bound to fine mineral particles and together with vehicle spray (Mykhailova et al., 2014), and that hydrocarbon concentrations decrease to safe levels within the first 15 m from the road, reaching background concentrations at 60-100 m distance (Mykhailova et al., 2013). It was the aim of this study to (I) identify the bioavailability of different petroleum hydrocarbon fractions to degradation and to (II) identify the native (i.e. pedogenic) C fraction affected by hydrocarbon-mediated soil organic matter priming during decay. To address this aim, we collected soil samples at distances from 1 to 100 m (sampling depth 15 cm) near the Traktorostroiteley avenue and the Pushkinskaya street in Kharkov, as well as near the country road M18 near Kharkov, Ukraine. The roads have been under exploitation for several decades, so microbial adaptation to enhanced hydrocarbon levels and full expression of effects could be assumed. The following C fractions were quantified using 13C-CP/MAS-NMR: Carbohydrates, Proteins, Lignin, Aliphates, Carbonyl/Carboxyl as well as black carbon according to Nelson and Baldock (2005). Petroleum hydrocarbons were determind after hexane extraction using GC-MS and divided into a light fraction (chain-length C27, Mykhailova et al., 2013). Potential soil respiration was determined every 48 h by trapping of CO2 evolving from 20 g soil in NaOH at 20 ° C and at 60% of the maximum water holding capacity and titration after a total incubation period of 4 weeks in the lab. It was found that soil respiration positively correlated with the ratio of the light fraction to the sum of medium and heavy fractions of petroleum hydrocarbons, which indicates higher biodegradation primarily of the light petroleum hydrocarbon fraction. Further, soil respiration was

  3. Reference values for soil structural degradation evaluation: an approach using shrinkage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, Alice; Weisskopf, Peter; Schulin, Rainer; Boivin, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    Introduction Diagnosis of soil compaction and other soil structural degradation require reference threshold values defining non-degraded soil structure versus degraded soil structure. Large-scale application, e.g. for soil protection regulation, require accurate, cost-efficient and robust methods providing meaningful information with respect to soil quality. The shrinkage curve analysis (ShC)(Braudeau et al., 2004) does not only provide relevant parameters for soil functions such as water and air content of structural porosity but also holds promises to fulfil these requirements. Our objective was to test the potential of ShC analysis to define reference values for soil structural degradation at Swiss scale. Material and Methods Agricultural soils of the most common soil order on the Swiss plateau, namely cambi-luvisol, were sampled. Undisturbed samples were collected from topsoil at 200 locations from spring 2012 to fall 2014 on a large area (240 km) across Switzerland. Three types of soil managements were represented, namely permanent pasture (PP), conventional tillage and no-till. Only soils showing no evidence of structural degradation, as assessed visually and according to a VESS score smaller than 3 (Ball et al., 2007), were sampled. Compaction, erosion, waterlogging and poor degradation of organic matter were criteria to discard sampling locations. The undisturbed soil samples were analysed for SOC, texture, CEC and ShC, from which a set of parameters defining the soil porosities and hydrostructural stability was obtained. Results and Discussion The texture properties were similar between the different soil management, with clay content ranging from 10 to 35%. SOC content ranged from 0.5 to 4.5% and was significantly larger in average for PP, though the ranges were largely overlapping amongst the 3 soil managements. ShC parameters were found to be highly determined by SOC, with the R2 of the regressions usually over 70%, regardless of soil management, large

  4. Sorption and degradation of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in soils.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong; Liu, Yin; Wu, Laosheng

    2013-06-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are one class of the most urgent emerging contaminants, which have drawn much public and scientific concern due to widespread contamination in aquatic environment. Most studies on the environmental fate and behavior of PPCPs have focused on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Some other compounds with high concentrations were less mentioned. In this study, sorption and degradation of five selected PPCPs, including bisphenol A (BPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), gemfibrozil (GFB), octylphenol (OP), and triclosan (TCS) have been investigated using three different soils. Sorption isotherms of all tested PPCPs in soils were well described by Freundlich equation. TCS and OP showed moderate to strong sorption, while the sorption of GFB and CBZ in soils was negligible. Degradation of PPCPs in three soils was generally fitted first-order exponential decay model, with half-lives (t 1/2) varying from 9.8 to 39.1 days. Sterilization could prolong the t 1/2 of PPCPs in soil, indicating that microbial activity played an important role in the degradation of these chemicals in soils. Degradation of PPCPs in soils was also influenced by the soil organic carbon (f oc) contents. Results from our data show that sorption to the soils varied among the different PPCPs, and their sorption affinity on soil followed the order of TCS > OP > BPA > GFB > CBZ. The degradation of the selected PPCPs in soil was influenced by the microbial activity and soil type. The poor sorption and relative persistence of CBZ suggest that it may pose a high leaching risk for groundwater contamination when recycled for irrigation.

  5. [Effects of fungi on co-metabolic degradation of benzo [a] pyrene in droughty red soil].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shi-liang; Luo, Yong-ming; Wu, Long-hua; Cao, Zhi-hong

    2010-08-01

    Simulated bioslurry remediation of PAHs contaminated soil was carried out. Penicillium, Aspergillus niger and white-rot fungus etc. three strains of fungi isolated from petroleum-contaminated soils were inoculated into droughty red soils differently in application rates of phenanthrene and phthalic acid, to investigate their effects of co-metabolic degradation of B[a]P. Results show that in natural soils, some native microorganisms were able to degrade B[a] P and with addition of low molecular weight PAHs-phenanthrene increased degradation rate of B[a] P in the soil. The effect was greater when the application rate of phenanthrene was 100 mg x kg(-1) than 200 mg x kg(-1). But the addition of phthalic acid did not show much effect. In sterilized soils, degradation of B[a]P in soils was hardly observed, and application of co-metabolism has no significant effect. However, inoculation of Penicillium stimulated degradation of B[a]P in all three treatments, i.e., phenanthrene at 100 mg x kg(-1), phenanthrene at 200 mg x kg(-1) and phthalic acid, but the effect of phenanthrene treatment was better than that of phthalic acid treatment. Inoculation of Aspergillus niger also showed similar effect, however, was inhibited by the presence of phenanthrene and phthalic acid in the soil. The degradation ability of white-rot fungus to B[a]P was very poor, but both kinds of phenanthrene concentration and phthalic acid treatments all could promote white-rot fungus to degrade B[a]P in soils, and the effect of phenanthrene was better than that of phthalic acid.

  6. Effects of sterile storage, cation saturation and substrate additions on the degradability and extractability of nonylphenol and phenanthrene in soil.

    PubMed

    Shchegolikhina, Anastasia; Marschner, Bernd

    2013-11-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the effects of long-term abiotic processes during aging of organic pollutants in soil on their microbial degradability and formation of non-extractable residues. The specific aims of our study were to investigate how the fate of p353-nonylphenol (NP) and phenanthrene (Phe) in soils might be affected by: (i) saturation of soil by cations with different valency (Na(+), Ca(2+) or Al(3+)), (ii) addition of organic substrate (wood flour) during incubation period and (iii) different soil moisture levels. This study showed positive effect of long-term aging of sterilized samples on respiration of re-inoculated samples. However, the lack of aging effects on the mineralization of NP and Phe indicates that slow sorption processes by diffusion into less bioaccessible domains were not relevant in studied soils. Similarly, the lower respiration and xenobiotic mineralization rates in the Na(+) and Al(3+) treated soils indicate that this is due to toxic effects on microbial activity and not due to xenobiotic accessibility. Instead, the formation of non-extractable residues was strongly promoted by biological activity, most likely through formation of more reactive metabolites. The addition of wood flour greatly stimulated microbial respiration and enhanced NP mineralization while inhibiting that of Phe. Along with negligible effect of water addition after 4 weeks of incubation on kinetics of soil respiration, the soil moisture effect on xenobiotics mineralization indicates that most probably the bioavailability of NP and Phe increased due to bridging role of water films in soil.

  7. [Analysis and research on the degradation and migration of organic pollutants in textile wastewater treatment process by GC-MS].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-jing; Zhang, Long; Wu, Wei; Tu, Yong

    2010-04-01

    In order to analyze the advantages/disadvantages of the combined treatment process between "physicochemical + biochemical" and "biochemical + physicochemical" in treatment of textile wastewater, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to determine the degradation process of organic pollutants in this two totally different treatment processes. The same analysis was also conducted to the sludge and discharged water. The results showed that the "physicochemical + biochemical" process displayed a poorer effect than "biochemical + physicochemical" in degrading the organic pollutants. The latter was 6.2% higher than the former in removing the organic pollutants averagely. The difference was mainly manifested in the efficiency of anaerobic hydrolysis in the two coupled processes. Moreover, the implement of "physicochemical + biochemical" process resulted in the migration of plenty of typical organic pollutants to sludge from primary coagulation sedimentation process and to the discharged water, which would cause secondary pollution easily.

  8. Enantioselective Degradation Mechanism of Beta-Cypermethrin in Soil From the Perspective of Functional Genes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Hua; Ji, Guo-Dong

    2015-12-01

    The behavior and mechanisms of the enantioselective degradation of beta-cypermethrin were studied in soil. The four isomers were degraded at different rates, and the enantiomer fractions of alpha-cypermethrin and theta-cypermethrin exceeded 0.5. Moreover, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid, phenol, and protocatechuic acid were detected; based on the presence of these metabolites, we predicted the degradation pathway and identified the functional genes that are related to this degradation process. We established quantitative relationships between the data on degradation kinetics and functional genes; we found that the quantitative relationships between different enantiomers differed even under the same conditions, and the genes pobA and pytH played key roles in limiting the degradation rate. Data obtained using path analysis revealed that the same gene had different direct and indirect effects on the degradation of different isomers. A mechanism was successfully proposed to explain the selective degradation of chiral compounds based on the perspective of functional genes.

  9. Biotic and abiotic degradation of CL-20 and RDX in soils.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Fiona H; Thompson, Karen T; Szecsody, James E; Fredrickson, Herbert L

    2005-01-01

    The caged cyclic nitramine 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) is a new explosive that has the potential to replace existing military explosives, but little is known about its environmental toxicity, transport, and fate. We quantified and compared the aerobic environmental fate of CL-20 to the widely used cyclic nitramine explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in surface and subsurface soil microcosms. Soil-free controls and biologically attenuated soil controls were used to separate abiotic processes from biologically mediated processes. Both abiotic and biological processes significantly degraded CL-20 in all soils examined. Apparent abiotic, first-order degradation rates (k) for CL-20 were not significantly different between soil-free controls (0.018 < k < 0.030 d(-1)) and biologically attenuated soil controls (0.003 < k < 0.277 d(-1)). The addition of glucose to biologically active soil microcosms significantly increased CL-20 degradation rates (0.068 < k < 1.22 d(-1)). Extents of mineralization of (14)C-CL-20 to (14)CO(2) in biologically active soil microcosms were 41.1 to 55.7%, indicating that the CL-20 cage was broken, since all carbons are part of the heterocyclic cage. Under aerobic conditions, abiotic degradation rates of RDX were generally slower (0 < k < 0.032 d(-1)) than abiotic CL-20 degradation rates. In biologically active soil microcosms amended with glucose aerobic RDX degradation rates varied between 0.010 and 0.474 d(-1). Biodegradation was a key factor in determining the environmental fate of RDX, while a combination of biotic and abiotic processes was important with CL-20. Our data suggest that CL-20 should be less recalcitrant than RDX in aerobic soils. PMID:16275722

  10. Ecological, morphological, and histological studies on Blaps polycresta (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) as biomonitors of cadmium soil pollution.

    PubMed

    Osman, Wafaa; El-Samad, Lamia M; Mokhamer, El-Hassan; El-Touhamy, Aya; Shonouda, Mourad

    2015-09-01

    Soil pollution in Egypt became far more serious than before due to either the heavy usage of different toxic pesticides or aerosol deposition of industrial pollutants. The present mentioned ground beetle, Blaps polycresta Tschinkel 1975 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), showed ecological, morphological, and histological alterations in adult insects as biomonitors. Two cultivated sites (reference and polluted) were chosen for sampling the insects. The results indicated a significant increase in soil cadmium concentration of the polluted site leading to sex-specific difference in cadmium accumulation in gonads and alimentary canal of insects that being higher in males than females. The cadmium pollution leads significantly to a decrease in population density, a reduction in body weight, an increase in mortality rate, and an increase in sex ratio of the insects. The results also revealed a striking decrease in body length of the polluted insects with a marked increase in the percentage of deformed gonads and alimentary canal of both sexes. Some histopathological alterations were also recorded in testis, ovary, and midgut of the polluted insects. Our results confirmed that beetles are a good bioindicator for soil pollution, and the different studied parameters could be easily employed as sensitive monitors for cadmium soil pollution.

  11. Bioremediation of Cd and carbendazim co-contaminated soil by Cd-hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii associated with carbendazim-degrading bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wendan; Wang, Huan; Li, Tingqiang; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jie; He, Zhenli; Yang, Xiaoe

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a bioremediation strategy for cadmium (Cd) and carbendazim co-contaminated soil using a hyperaccumulator plant (Sedum alfredii) combined with carbendazim-degrading bacterial strains (Bacillus subtilis, Paracoccus sp., Flavobacterium and Pseudomonas sp.). A pot experiment was conducted under greenhouse conditions for 180 days with S. alfredii and/or carbendazim-degrading strains grown in soil artificially polluted with two levels of contaminants (low level, 1 mg kg(-1) Cd and 21 mg kg(-1) carbendazim; high level, 6 mg kg(-1) Cd and 117 mg kg(-1) carbendazim). Cd removal efficiencies were 32.3-35.1 % and 7.8-8.2 % for the low and high contaminant level, respectively. Inoculation with carbendazim-degrading bacterial strains significantly (P < 0.05) increased Cd removal efficiencies at the low level. The carbendazim removal efficiencies increased by 32.1-42.5 % by the association of S. alfredii with carbendazim-degrading bacterial strains, as compared to control, regardless of contaminant level. Cultivation with S. alfredii and inoculation of carbendazim-degrading bacterial strains increased soil microbial biomass, dehydrogenase activities and microbial diversities by 46.2-121.3 %, 64.2-143.4 %, and 2.4-24.7 %, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis revealed that S. alfredii stimulated the activities of Flavobacteria and Bradyrhizobiaceae. The association of S. alfredii with carbendazim-degrading bacterial strains enhanced the degradation of carbendazim by changing microbial activity and community structure in the soil. The results demonstrated that association of S. alfredii with carbendazim-degrading bacterial strains is promising for remediation of Cd and carbendazim co-contaminated soil. PMID:22529002

  12. Degradation and formation of polycyclic aromatic compounds during bioslurry treatment of an aged gasworks soil.

    PubMed

    Lundstedt, Staffan; Haglund, Peter; Oberg, Lars

    2003-07-01

    The goals of this study were to investigate the relative degradation rates of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in contaminated soil, and to assess whether persistent oxidation products are formed during their degradation. Samples were taken on five occasions during a pilot-scale bioslurry treatment of soil from a former gasworks site. More than 100 PACs were identified in the soil, including unsubstituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylated PAHs (alkyl-PAHs), heterocyclic PACs, and oxygenated PAHs (oxy-PAHs), such as ketones, quinones, and coumarins. During the treatment, the low molecular weight PAHs and heterocyclics were degraded faster than the high molecular weight compounds. The unsubstituted PAHs also appear to have degraded more quickly than the corresponding alkyl-PAHs and nitrogen-containing heterocyclics. No new oxidation products that were not present in the untreated soil were identified after the soil treatment. However, oxy-PAHs that were present in the untreated soil were generally degraded more slowly than the parent compounds, suggesting that they were formed during the treatment or that they are more persistent. Two oxidation products, 1-acenaphthenone and 4-oxapyrene-5-one, were found at significantly higher concentrations at the end of the study. Because oxy-PAHs can be acutely toxic, mutagenic, or carcinogenic, we suggest that this group of compounds should also be monitored during the treatment of PAH-contaminated soil. PMID:12836964

  13. Photocatalytic activity of porous multiwalled carbon nanotube-TiO2 composite layers for pollutant degradation.

    PubMed

    Zouzelka, Radek; Kusumawati, Yuly; Remzova, Monika; Rathousky, Jiri; Pauporté, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles are suitable building blocks nanostructures for the synthesis of porous functional thin films. Here we report the preparation of films using brookite, P25 titania and anatase pristine nanoparticles and of nanocomposite layers combining anatase nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) at various concentrations. The structure and phase composition of the layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Their morphology and texture properties were determined by scanning electron microscopy and krypton adsorption experiments, respectively. Additionally to a strong absorption in the UV range, the composites exhibited light absorption in the visible range as well. The photocatalytic performance of the layers was tested in the degradation of aqueous solutions of 4-chlorophenol serving as a model of an eco-persistent pollutant. Besides the determination of the decrease in the concentration of 4-chlorophenol, also the formation of intermediate degradation products, namely hydroquinone and benzoquinone, was followed. The presence of MWCNTs had a beneficial effect on the photocatalytic performance, a marked increase in the photocatalytic degradation rate constant being observed even at very low concentrations of MWCNTs. Compared to a P25 reference layer, the first order rate reaction constant increased by about 100% for the composite films containing MWCNTs at concentrations above 0.6 wt%. The key parameters for the enhancement of the photocatalytic performance are discussed. The presence of carbon nanotubes influences beneficially the degradation of 4-chlorophenol by an attack of the primarily photoproduced hydroxyl radicals onto the 4-chlorophenol molecules. The degradation due to the direct charge transfer is practically not influenced at all.

  14. Photocatalytic activity of porous multiwalled carbon nanotube-TiO2 composite layers for pollutant degradation.

    PubMed

    Zouzelka, Radek; Kusumawati, Yuly; Remzova, Monika; Rathousky, Jiri; Pauporté, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles are suitable building blocks nanostructures for the synthesis of porous functional thin films. Here we report the preparation of films using brookite, P25 titania and anatase pristine nanoparticles and of nanocomposite layers combining anatase nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) at various concentrations. The structure and phase composition of the layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Their morphology and texture properties were determined by scanning electron microscopy and krypton adsorption experiments, respectively. Additionally to a strong absorption in the UV range, the composites exhibited light absorption in the visible range as well. The photocatalytic performance of the layers was tested in the degradation of aqueous solutions of 4-chlorophenol serving as a model of an eco-persistent pollutant. Besides the determination of the decrease in the concentration of 4-chlorophenol, also the formation of intermediate degradation products, namely hydroquinone and benzoquinone, was followed. The presence of MWCNTs had a beneficial effect on the photocatalytic performance, a marked increase in the photocatalytic degradation rate constant being observed even at very low concentrations of MWCNTs. Compared to a P25 reference layer, the first order rate reaction constant increased by about 100% for the composite films containing MWCNTs at concentrations above 0.6 wt%. The key parameters for the enhancement of the photocatalytic performance are discussed. The presence of carbon nanotubes influences beneficially the degradation of 4-chlorophenol by an attack of the primarily photoproduced hydroxyl radicals onto the 4-chlorophenol molecules. The degradation due to the direct charge transfer is practically not influenced at all. PMID:27262272

  15. Analysing flow patterns in degraded peat soils using TiO2 dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haojie; Lennartz, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Dye tracing is a valuable method for studying the flow patterns in soils. However, limited information is available on water flow and solute transport pathways in dark colored peat soils because the frequently used Brilliant Blue FCF dye does not visibly stain the soil. In this study, we were aiming at testing the suitability of Titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a dye tracer for dark peat soils. The objectives were to quantify the physical properties of different degraded peat soils and visualize the flow patterns. Soil samples were collected from two low-lying fen sites, where the top soil was highly degraded, while lower horizons were less decomposed. Dye tracer experiments were conducted at both sites by applying a TiO2 suspension (10 g/l) with a pulse of 40 mm. Soil profiles were prepared for photo documentation the following day. It was found that the physical and hydraulic properties of peat were significantly influenced by the degree of peat decomposition and degradation. Higher decomposed and degraded peat soils had a higher bulk density, lower organic matter content and lower porosity. Moreover, higher decomposition and degradation resulted in a lower saturated hydraulic conductivity as long as investigated samples originated from the same site. In addition, degraded peat soils showed less anisotropy than un-degraded peat. It turned out that TiO2 is a suitable dye tracer to visualize the flow paths in peat soils. Although dye patterns differed within the same plot and between different plots, most of the flow patterns indicated a preferential flow situation. The distribution of TiO2 in the soil profile, as analyzed from 5 by 5 cm grid cells, compared to the distribution of bromide, which was applied along with the dye confirming the suitability of the dye tracer. Un-decomposed plant structures, such as wood branches and leaves, were identified as the major preferential flow path in un-degraded peat. For degraded peat, bio-pores, such as root and earthworm

  16. Laboratory degradation studies of bentazone, dichlorprop, MCPA, and propiconazole in Norwegian soils.

    PubMed

    Thorstensen, C W; Lode, O

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory degradation studies were performed in Norwegian soils using two commercial formulations (Tilt and Triagran-P) containing either propiconazole alone or a combination of bentazone, dichlorprop, and MCPA. These soils included a fine sandy loam from Hole and a loam from Kroer, both of which are representative of Norwegian agricultural soils. The third soil was a highly decomposed organic material from the Froland forest. A fourth soil from the Skuterud watershed was used only for propiconazole degradation. After 84 d, less than 0.1% of the initial MCPA concentration remained in all three selected soils. For dichlorprop, the same results were found for the fine sandy loam and the organic-rich soil, but in the loam, 26% of the initial concentration remained. After 84 d, less than 0.1% of the initial concentration of bentazone remained in the organic-rich soil, but in the loam and the fine sandy loam 52 and 69% remained, respectively. Propiconazole was shown to be different from the other pesticides by its persistence. Amounts of initial concentration remaining varied from 40, 70, and 82% in the reference soils after 84 d for the organic-rich soil, fine sandy loam, and loam, respectively. The organic-rich soil showed the highest capacity to decompose all four pesticides. The results from the agricultural soils and the Skuterud watershed showed that the persistence of propiconazole was high. Pesticide degradation was approximated to first-order kinetics. Slow rates of degradation, where more than 50% of the pesticide remained in the soil after the 84-d duration of the experiment, did not fit well with first-order kinetics.

  17. Simazine degradation in bioaugmented soil: urea impact and response of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and other soil bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingwei; Wan, Rui; Xie, Shuguang

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of exogenous urea nitrogen on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and other soil bacterial communities in soil bioaugmented for simazine remediation. The previously isolated simazine-degrading Arthrobacter sp. strain SD1 was used to degrade the herbicide. The effect of urea on the simazine degradation capacity of the soil bioaugmented with Arthrobacter strain SD1 was assessed using quantitative PCR targeting the s-triazine-degrading trzN and atzC genes. Structures of bacterial and AOB communities were characterized using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. Urea fertilizer could affect simazine biodegradation and decreased the proportion of its trzN and atzC genes in soil augmented with Arthrobacter strain SD1. Bioaugmentation process could significantly alter the structures of both bacterial and AOB communities, which were strongly affected by urea amendment, depending on the dosage. This study could provide some new insights towards s-triazine bioremediation and microbial ecology in a bioaugmented system. However, further studies are necessary in order to elucidate the impact of different types and levels of nitrogen sources on s-triazine-degraders and bacterial and AOB communities in bioaugmented soil.

  18. [Effects of strong reductive approach on remediation of degraded facility vegetable soil].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tong-Bin; Meng, Tian-Zhu; Zhang, Jin-Bo; Cai, Zu-Cong

    2013-09-01

    High application rate of chemical fertilizers and unreasonable rotation in facility vegetable cultivation can easily induce the occurrence of soil acidification, salinization, and serious soil-borne diseases, while to quickly and effectively remediate the degraded facility vegetable soil can considerably increase vegetable yield and farmers' income. In this paper, a degraded facility vegetable soil was amended with 0, 3.75, 7.50, and 11.3 t C x hm(-2) of air-dried alfalfa and flooded for 31 days to establish a strong reductive environment, with the variations of soil physical and chemical properties and the cucumber yield studied. Under the reductive condition, soil Eh dropped quickly below 0 mV, accumulated soil NO3(-) was effectively eliminated, soil pH was significantly raised, and soil EC was lowered, being more evident in higher alfalfa input treatments. After treated with the strong reductive approach, the cucumber yield in the facility vegetable field reached 53.3-57.9 t x hm(-2), being significantly higher than that in un-treated facility vegetable field in last growth season (10.8 t x hm(-2)). It was suggested that strong reductive approach could effectively remediate the degraded facility vegetable soil in a short term.

  19. Migration of radionuclides and heavy metals during the bioremediation of a polluted cinnamonic soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Plamen; Groudev, Stoyan; Spasova, Irena; Nikolova, Marina

    2013-04-01

    A fresh sample of cinnamonic soil polluted with radionuclides (U, Ra) and toxic heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Zn) was subjected to bioremediation in large-scale lysimeters by means of moulching. The aim of soil treatment was solubilization of pollutants located in horizon A, the migration of their dissolved complexes through the soil profile, and the pollutants` precipitation in the rich-in-clays below-lying horizons. The solubilization was due to the joint action of natural soil microflora and leach waters containing ammonium and phosphate ions, and in some variants-hydrocarbonate ions. The precipitation of pollutants was due to the enhanced activity of the indigenous microflora in which iron- and sulphate-reducing bacteria were the prevalent groups. After 24 months of treatment, each of the soil profiles in different lysimeters was divided into five sections reflecting the relevant soil layers (horizon A and the sub-horizons B1, B2, B3, and B4). The soil in these sections was subjected to a detailed chemical analysis and the obtained data were compared with the relevant data obtained before the start of soil bioremediation. It was found that considerable portions of the pollutants were removed from the horizon A and were migrated to the sub-horizons B3 and B4, mainly. In these sub-horizons the non-ferrous metals were precipitated mainly as the relevant sulphides, uranium was precipitated as uraninite (UO2), and radium-mainly as adsorbed ions and complexes.

  20. Development of MCM-41 based catalysts for the photo-Fenton's degradation of dye pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Leung Yuk Frank

    The continuous advancement in most industries has resulted in serious water pollution problems. The industrial effluents contain a variety of highly toxic organics such as dye pollutants. Numerous processes have been demonstrated for treating such pollutants. Among them, photo-Fenton's reaction is effective for organic mineralization by hydroxyl radicals generated from the Fenton's reagents (Fe2+ and H2O2). However, there is a drawback in that it requires a separation system to recover the homogeneous ferrous ion in the treated wastewater. In this research, new heterogeneous Fenton's catalysts are developed to solve such a problem and to achieve an efficient mineralization of dye pollutants. Two methods for catalyst preparation, including sol-gel hydrothermal (SG) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) techniques, were studied in this work. For SG-prepared catalysts, the iron element was successfully doped into the MCM-41 structure. These catalysts demonstrated a good catalytic efficiency but leaching of metal ions from the developed catalyst was found. In the MOCVD technique, a rotated tubular reactor system was developed to synthesize Fe/MCM-41 catalyst with uniform metal dispersion. It was found that using oxygen as a carrier gas during metal deposition was able to increase the stability of the deposited metal. In degradation of a model dye pollutant, Orange II, a total of 85% TOC mineralization was achieved at pH 3. A disadvantage of using Fe/MCM-41 was the reduced efficiency at higher pH. Cu/MCM-41 was thus developed and showed better catalytic activities than Fe/MCM-41 at neutral pH. Having the specific catalytic properties of Fe/MCM-41 and Cu/MCM-41, bimetallic (Fe+Cu) catalysts supported on MCM-41 were developed which show better activities in the Orange II mineralization than those monometallic (Fe or Cu) catalysts. The preparation conditions of the catalysts were experimentally optimized. The effects of catalyst dosage, metal loading

  1. Effect of application rate on fumigant degradation in five agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumigants continue to be used in soil disinfestation for many high value crops. There is a significant knowledge gap on how fumigant concentration in soil impacts fumigant dissipation and determination of the most efficient rate. The aim of this study was to determine the degradation characteristics...

  2. Isolation and identification of dioxin degrading bacteria found in soils contaminated with dioxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need to identify bacteria that can degrade environmental contaminants; a fruitful place to identify such bacteria is within contaminated soil. The dioxin content and congener distribution in soils collected from adjacent to old railroad track that were treated with pentachlorophenol (PCP...

  3. Detecting and Confirming Accelerated Atrazine Degradation in Illinois Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical abstract: Enhanced degradation of atrazine has been documented in many parts of the world where the herbicide has been extensively used. Atrazine is widely used in corn in Illinois, but enhanced degradation in the field has not been documented. In this study, the dissipation of atrazine...

  4. Microbiological indicators for assessing ecosystem soil quality and changes in it at degraded sites treated with compost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona, Valeria; Barra Caracciolo, Anna; Grenni, Paola; Di Lenola, Martina; Calabrese, Angelantonio; Campanale, Claudia; Felice Uricchio, Vito

    2014-05-01

    Soil quality is defined as the capacity of a soil to function as a vital system, within natural or managed ecosystem boundaries, sustain plant and animal health and productivity, maintain or enhance air and water environment quality and support human health and habitation. Soil organisms are extremely diverse and contribute to a wide range of ecosystem services that are essential to the sustainable functioning of natural and managed ecosystems. In particular, microbial communities provide several ecosystem services, which ensure soil quality and fertility. In fact, they adapt promptly to environmental changes by varying their activity and by increasing the reproduction of populations that have favourable skills. The structure (e.g. cell abundance) and functioning (e.g. viability and activity) of natural microbial communities and changes in them under different environmental conditions can be considered useful indicators of soil quality state. In this work we studied the quality state of three different soils, located in Taranto Province (Southern Italy), affected by land degradation processes, such as organic matter depletion, desertification and contamination (PCB and metals). Moreover, compost, produced from selected organic waste, was added to the soils studied in order to improve their quality state. Soil samples were collected before and after compost addition and both microbial and chemical analyses were performed in order to evaluate the soil quality state at each site at different times. For this purpose, the microbiological indicators evaluated were bacterial abundance (DAPI counts), cell viability (Live/Dead method), dehydrogenase activity (DHA) and soil respiration. At the same time, the main physico-chemical soil characteristics (organic carbon, available phosphorous, total nitrogen, carbonate and water content, texture and pH) were also measured. Moreover, in the contaminated soil samples PCB and inorganic (e.g. Pb, Se, Sn, Zn) contaminants were

  5. [Profile distribution and pollution assessment of heavy metals in soils under livestock feces composts].

    PubMed

    Chao, Lei; Zhou, Qi-xing; Cui, Shuang; Chen, Su; Ren, Li-ping

    2007-06-01

    This paper studied the profile distribution of heavy metals in soils under different kind livestock feces composts. The results showed that in the process of livestock feces composting, the pH value and organic matter content of soil under feces compost increased significantly, and had a decreased distribution with soil depth. The contents of soil Zn and Cd also had an obvious increase, and decreased with increasing soil depth. Under the composts of chicken and pig feces, soil Cu content decreased with soil depth, while under cattle feces compost, it had little change. Soil Cd and Zn had a stronger mobility than soil Cu, and the Zn, Cd and Cu contents in some soil layers exceeded the first level of the environmental quality standard for soils in China. The geo-accumulation indices showed that only the 0-10 cm soil layer under chicken feces compost and the 0-40 cm soil layer under egg chicken feces compost were lightly polluted by Zn, while the soil profiles under other kinds of livestock feces compost were not polluted by Pb, Cu, Zn and Cd.

  6. Biotic and Abiotic Degradation of CL-20 and RDX in Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Crocker, Fiona H.; Thompson, Karen T.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Fredrickson, Herbert L.

    2005-11-01

    The caged cyclic nitramine 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) is a new explosive that has the potential to replace existing military explosives, but little is known about its environmental toxicity, transport, and fate. We quantified and compared the aerobic environmental fate of CL-20 to the widely used cyclic nitramine explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in surface and subsurface soil microcosms. Soil-free controls and biologically mediated processes. Both abiotic and biological processes significantly degraded CL-20 in all soils examined. Apparent abiotic, first-order degradation rates (k) for CL-20 were not significantly different between soil-free controls (0.018 < k < 0.030 d-1) and biologically attenuated soil controls (0.003 soil microcosms significantly increased CL-20 degradation rates (0.068 < k <1.22 d-1). Extents of mineralization of 14C–CL-20 to 14CO2 in biologically active soil microcosms were 41.1 to 55.7%, indicating that the CL-20 cage was broken, since all carbons are part of the heterocyclic cage. Under aerobic conditions, abiotic degradation rates of RDX were generally slower (0 < k < 0.032 d-1) than abiotic CL-20 degradation rates. In biologically active soil microcosms amended with glucose aerobic RDX degradation rates varied between 0.010 and 0.474 d-1. Biodegradation was a key factor in determining the environmental fate of RDX, while a combination of biotic and abiotic processes was important with CL-20. Our data suggest that CL-20 should be less recalcitrant than RDX in aerobic soils.

  7. Traceability of polychlorinated dibenzo-dioxins/furans pollutants in soil and their ecotoxicological effects on genetics, functions and composition of bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Hanano, Abdulsamie; Ammouneh, Hassan; Almousally, Ibrahem; Alorr, Abdulfattah; Shaban, Mouhnad; Alnaser, Amer Abu; Ghanem, Iyad

    2014-08-01

    Dioxins (PCDD/Fs) are persistent organic pollutants. Their accumulation in soil is a crucial step in their transmission through the ecosystem. Traceability of dioxin in soil was evaluated in four sites A, B, C and D considered as potential industrial PCDD/Fs sources in Syria. Our results showed that the highest pollution with dioxin (⩾50 ppt) was found in site C (vicinity of Homs refinery). In parallel, analysis of physicochemical proprieties and bacterial density of soil samples were carried out. Bacterial density differed significantly among samples between 68×10(4) and 64×10(6) CFU g(-1)DW. Analysis of 16S rRNA encoding sequences showed that the genus Bacillus was the most abundant (74.7%) in all samples, followed by the genera Arthrobacter and Klebsiella with 5.2% and 4.7%, respectively. The genera Microbacterium, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter and Exiguobacterium formed between 2.1% and 2.6%. Cellulomonas, Kocuria, Lysinibacillus, Staphylococcus and Streptomyces were in a minority (0.5-1%). The bacterial richness and biodiversity, estimated by DMg and H' index, were highest in the heavily polluted site. Molecular screening for angular dioxygenase (AD α-subunit) and the cytochrome P450 (CYPBM3) genes, led to identification of 41 strains as AD-positive and 31 strains as CYPBM3-positive. RT-real-time PCR analysis showed a significant abundance of AD α-subunit transcript in the heavily dioxin-polluted soils, while the expression of CYPBM3 was highest in the moderately polluted soils. Our results illustrate the microbial diversity and functionality in soil exposed to dioxin pollution. Identification of dioxin-degrading bacteria from polluted sites should allow bioremediation to be carried out.

  8. Method for treatment of soils contaminated with organic pollutants

    DOEpatents

    Wickramanayake, Godage B.

    1993-01-01

    A method for treating soil contaminated by organic compounds wherein an ozone containing gas is treated with acid to increase the stability of the ozone in the soil environment and the treated ozone applied to the contaminated soil to decompose the organic compounds. The soil may be treated in situ or may be removed for treatment and refilled.

  9. Using Innovative Statistical Analyses to Assess Soil Degradation due to Land Use Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaledian, Yones; Kiani, Farshad; Ebrahimi, Soheila; Brevik, Eric C.; Aitkenhead-Peterson, Jacqueline

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion and overall loss of soil fertility is a serious issue for loess soils of the Golestan province, northern Iran. The assessment of soil degradation at large watershed scales is urgently required. This research investigated the role of land use change and its effect on soil degradation in cultivated, pasture and urban lands, when compared to native forest in terms of declines in soil fertility. Some novel statistical methods including partial least squares (PLS), principal component regression (PCR), and ordinary least squares regression (OLS) were used to predict soil cation-exchange capacity (CEC) using soil characteristics. PCA identified five primary components of soil quality. The PLS model was used to predict soil CEC from the soil characteristics including bulk density (BD), electrical conductivity (EC), pH, calcium carbonate equivalent (CCE), soil particle density (DS), mean weight diameter (MWD), soil porosity (F), organic carbon (OC), Labile carbon (LC), mineral carbon, saturation percentage (SP), soil particle size (clay, silt and sand), exchangeable cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Na+), and soil microbial respiration (SMR) collected in the Ziarat watershed. In order to evaluate the best fit, two other methods, PCR and OLS, were also examined. An exponential semivariogram using PLS predictions revealed stronger spatial dependence among CEC [r2 = 0.80, and RMSE= 1.99] than the other methods, PCR [r2 = 0.84, and RMSE= 2.45] and OLS [r2 = 0.84, and RMSE= 2.45]. Therefore, the PLS method provided the best model for the data. In stepwise regression analysis, MWD and LC were selected as influential variables in all soils, whereas the other influential parameters were different in various land uses. This study quantified reductions in numerous soil quality parameters resulting from extensive land-use changes and urbanization in the Ziarat watershed in Northern Iran.

  10. Effects of PV Module Soiling on Glass Surface Resistance and Potential-Induced Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Hacke, Peter; Button, Patrick; Hendrickson, Alex; Spataru, Sergiu; Glick, Stephen

    2015-06-14

    The goals of the project were: Determine applicability of transmission line method (TLM) to evaluate sheet resistance of soils on module glass;
    Evaluate various soils on glass for changes in surface resistance and their ability to promote potential-induced degradation with humidity (PID);
    Evaluate PID characteristics, rate, and leakage current increases on full-size mc-Si modules associated with a conductive soil on the surface.

  11. Laboratory studies on formation of bound residues and degradation of propiconazole in soils.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Seon; Shim, Jae Han; Suh, Yong Tack

    2003-03-01

    Laboratory studies on the formation of bound residues and on the degradation of the triazole fungicide propiconazole were conducted in two different soils. Soils treated with 14C-propiconazole were incubated at 22 degrees C and extracted exhaustively with a solvent at each sampling date until no further propiconazole was extracted. The solvent-extractable residues were used to measure propiconazole remaining in the soil, and the extracted soils were used to investigate bound residues of propiconazole. Mineralization of propiconazole was investigated by measuring [14C]carbon dioxide evolved from the soil samples. Formation of bound residues of propiconazole was higher in silty clay loam soil than in sandy loam soil, giving approximately 38 and 23% of the applied 14C, respectively. In contrast, the rates of degradation and mineralization of propiconazole were lower in silty clay loam soil than in sandy loam soil. Decreased extractability of the 14C residues with incubation time was observed with increased formation of bound residues. When the propiconazole remaining in the solvent-extractable residues was quantitatively measured by high-pressure liquid chromatographic analysis, the half-life value in sandy loam soil was about 315 days, while the half-life in silty clay loam soil exceeded the duration of the 1 year experimental period. Increased formation of bound residues was observed as propiconazole degraded with incubation time, suggesting that degradation products are involved in the formation of bound residues. Our study suggests that the formation of bound residues of propiconazole contributes to the persistence of this fungicide in soil.

  12. [Responses of soil properties to ecosystem degradation in Karst region of northwest Guangxi, China].

    PubMed

    Wei, Ya-wei; Su, Yi-rong; Chen, Xiang-bi; He, Xun-yang

    2010-05-01

    Four typical ecosystems, i.e., maize-sweet potato rotational cultivated land (KMS), grazing grassland burned annually in winter (KGB), natural restoration land (KNR), and primary forest land (KPF), in Karst region of northwest Guangxi were selected to investigate the responses of soil nutrients (C, N and P), soil microbial biomass, and soil structure to the degradation of ecosystem. The contents of soil organic C, total N and P, and soil microbial biomass C, N, and P were significantly higher in KPF than in KMS, KGB, and KNR (P < 0.01). In the latter three degraded ecosystems, the contents of soil organic C and total N were in the sequence of KNR>KGB> KMS but the difference was not significant, soil total P content in KMS (0.87 g x kg(-1)) was 2.07 and 9.67 times of that in KNR and KGB, respectively (P < 0.01), and soil microbial biomass C, N and P contents were significantly higher in KGB and KNR than in KMS (P < 0.05). The soil microbial biomass C was significantly higher in KGB than in KNR (P < 0.05), but there were no significant differences in soil microbial biomass N and P between the two ecosystems. These results illustrated that the reduction of human activity could induce a slight increase of soil organic C in Karst degraded ecosystems, and proper grazing and natural restoration could be the feasible modes for the restoration of degraded ecosystem. Soil microbial biomass was more sensitive in response to the change of ecosystem, being able to be used as a sensitive indicator to reflect the change of degraded ecosystem in Karst region. In KPF, KNR, and KGB, soil water-stable macro-aggregates (> 0.25 mm) accounted for more than 70%, and dominated by >2 mm aggregates; while in KMS, soil water-stable macro-aggregates only occupied 40.34%, and dominated by 2-0.25 mm aggregates. The destruction rate of soil structure in KMS, KGB, KNR, and KPF was 51.62%, 23.48%, 9.09%, and 9.46%, respectively (P < 0.05), indicating that human disturbance or farming practice

  13. Biostimulation Reveals Functional Redundancy of Anthracene-Degrading Bacteria in Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Dunlevy, Sage R.; Singleton, David R.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Stable-isotope probing was previously used to identify bacterial anthracene-degraders in untreated soil from a former manufactured gas plant site. However, subsequent pyrosequence analyses of total bacterial communities and quantification of 16S rRNA genes indicated that relative abundances of the predominant anthracene-degrading bacteria (designated Anthracene Group 1) diminished as a result of biological treatment conditions in lab-scale, aerobic bioreactors. This study identified Alphaproteobacterial anthracene-degrading bacteria in bioreactor-treated soil which were dissimilar to those previously identified. The largest group of sequences was from the Alterythrobacter genus while other groups of sequences were associated with bacteria within the order Rhizobiales and the genus Bradyrhizobium. Conditions in the bioreactor enriched for organisms capable of degrading anthracene which were not the same as those identified as dominant degraders in the untreated soil. Further, these data suggest that identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in contaminated but untreated soil may be a poor indicator of the most active degraders during biological treatment. PMID:24302851

  14. Visualizing Clogging up of Soil Pores in the Tropical Degraded Soils and Their Impact on Green Water Productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebebu, T.; Baver, C.; Stoof, C.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    Abstract Restrictive soil layers commonly known as hardpans restrict water and airflow in the soil profile and impede plant root growth below the plow depth. Preventing hardpans to form or ameliorate existing hardpans will allow plants root more deeply, increase water infiltration and reduce runoff, all resulting in greater amounts of water available for the crop (i.e. green water). However, there has been a lack of research on understanding the influence of transported disturbed soil particles (colloids) from the surface to the subsurface to form restrictive soil layers, which is a common occurrence in degraded soils. In this study we investigated the effect of disturbed soil particles on clogging up of soil pores to form hardpans. Unsaturated sand column experiments were performed by applying 0.04 g/ml soil water solution in two sand textures. For each experiment, soil water solution infiltration process was visualized using a bright field microscope and soil particles remained in the sand column was quantified collecting and measuring leachate at the end of the experiment in the soil and water lab of Cornell University. Preliminary results show that accumulation of significant amount of soil particles occur in between sand particles and at air water interfaces, indicating the clogging of soil pores occurs as a result of disturbed fine soil particles transported from the soil surface to the subsurface. Key Words: Soil pore clogging; Hardpans; Green water productivity Visualization of sand column experiment showing the sand column at the start of the experiment (left) and two hours after the second application in that soil particles were accumulated at the air water interfaces(right).

  15. Assessment of 20 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) pollution in suburban soil in Tianjin, China.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jungang; Shi, Rongguang; Cai, Yanming; Liu, Yong; Wang, Zhaohong; Feng, Jimin; Zhao, Meng

    2010-08-01

    Soil contamination with organochlorine pesticides has aroused worldwide concerns considering their high toxicities and long-term persistence. In this study, 87 representative soil samples from suburban areas (Xiqing, Dongli, Jinnan, Beichen) of Tianjin, the third biggest city in China, were collected to evaluate the pollution of 20 organochlorine pesticides. Surface soil samples were air-dried and sieved. Ultrasonic extraction was used for organochlorine pesticides preparation prior to analysis with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. It was revealed that p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD, o,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDD, hexachlorobenzene, dicofol and beta-HCH were seven pesticides detected most frequently. DDTs, HCHs and hexachlorobenzene were the predominant pesticide pollutants in soil. Spatial variation of these organochlorine pesticides in soil was illustrated; Pollution levels, characteristics and possible sources were also investigated. Most of other 13 kinds of pesticides were detected and the frequencies of detection were calculated to reveal the pollution status, which ranged from 0.0% (aldrin, dieldrin and endrin) to 34.5% (p,p'-DDT). These data were helpful to figure out the pollution of organochlorine pesticides and could be further used to evaluate the health risk associated with soil pollution.

  16. Pollution-induced community tolerance and functional redundancy in a decomposer food web in metal-stressed soil.

    PubMed

    Salminen, J; van Gestel, C A; Oksanen, J

    2001-10-01

    Pollution may lead to the development of pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT) in a stressed community. We studied the presence of PICT in soil food webs using soil microcosms. Soil microcosms containing soil invertebrates and microbes were collected from polluted and unpolluted areas and exposed to a range of soil zinc concentrations. A pine seedling was planted in each microcosm to measure the effects of the origin of the community and Zn pollution on above-ground plant production. The effects of the treatments on nutrient content in the soil were also measured. The diversity of soil microarthropods and the soil's mineral nutrient content were low at the Zn-polluted site. We did not observe an increasing Zn tolerance among the soil organisms in the polluted soil. However, low population growth rates of soil invertebrates from the polluted site may indicate the deleterious effects on fitness of long-lasting pollution. In the soil from the nonpolluted site, Zn additions caused changes in the invertebrate food web structure. These changes were explained by the good physiological condition of the animals and their insensitivity to Zn. The fact that the food web structure in soil from the polluted site did not change can be used as a rough indicator of PICT. Structural stability is presumed by the lack of Zn-sensitive species at this site and the inability of populations to acclimate by altering their growth or reproduction patterns in response to changing soil conditions. Although microbial-based soil decomposer systems may have a high functional redundancy, our results indicate that metal stress at the polluted site exceeds the tolerance limits of the system. As a consequence, ecosystem function at this site is endangered. This study also shows that the evolution of metal tolerance by soil decomposer organisms may not be a common reaction to soil pollution, although changes of population and community structure indicated severe metal stress on organisms.

  17. Bioremediation potential of glyphosate-degrading Pseudomonas spp. strains isolated from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haoyu; Tao, Ke; Zhu, Jianyi; Liu, Shengnan; Gao, Han; Zhou, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial strains capable of utilizing glyphosate as the sole carbon source were isolated from contaminated soil by the enrichment culture method and identified based on partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Pseudomonas spp. strains GA07, GA09 and GC04 demonstrated the best degradation capabilities towards glyphosate and were used for the laboratory experiments of glyphosate bioremediation. Inoculating glyphosate-treated soil samples with these three strains resulted in a 2-3 times higher rate of glyphosate removal than that in non-inoculated soil. The degradation kinetics was found to follow a first-order model with regression values greater than 0.96. Cell numbers of the introduced bacteria decreased from 4.4 × 10(6) CFU/g to 3.4-6.7 × 10(5) CFU/g dry soil within 18 days of inoculation. Due to the intense degradation of glyphosate, the total dehydrogenase activity of the soil microbial community increased by 21.2-25.6%. Analysis of glyphosate degradation products in cell-free extracts showed that glyphosate breakdown in strain GA09 was catalyzed both by C-P lyase and glyphosate oxidoreductase. Strains GA07 and GC04 degraded glyphosate only via glyphosate oxidoreductase, but no further metabolite was detected. These results highlight the potential of the isolated bacteria to be used in the bioremediation of GP-contaminated soils. PMID:26582285

  18. Use of mycelia as paths for the isolation of contaminant‐degrading bacteria from soil

    PubMed Central

    Furuno, Shoko; Remer, Rita; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Harms, Hauke; Wick, Lukas Y.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mycelia of fungi and soil oomycetes have recently been found to act as effective paths boosting bacterial mobili