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Sample records for polyadenylation element binding

  1. Further analysis of cytoplasmic polyadenylation in Xenopus embryos and identification of embryonic cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Simon, R; Richter, J D

    1994-12-01

    Early development in Xenopus laevis is programmed in part by maternally inherited mRNAs that are synthesized and stored in the growing oocyte. During oocyte maturation, several of these messages are translationally activated by poly(A) elongation, which in turn is regulated by two cis elements in the 3' untranslated region, the hexanucleotide AAUAAA and a cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE) consisting of UUUUUAU or similar sequence. In the early embryo, a different set of maternal mRNAs is translationally activated. We have shown previously that one of these, C12, requires a CPE consisting of at least 12 uridine residues, in addition to the hexanucleotide, for its cytoplasmic polyadenylation and subsequent translation (R. Simon, J.-P. Tassan, and J.D. Richter, Genes Dev. 6:2580-2591, 1992). To assess whether this embryonic CPE functions in other maternal mRNAs, we have chosen Cl1 RNA, which is known to be polyadenylated during early embryogenesis (J. Paris, B. Osborne, A. Couturier, R. LeGuellec, and M. Philippe, Gene 72:169-176, 1988). Wild-type as well as mutated versions of Cl1 RNA were injected into fertilized eggs and were analyzed for cytoplasmic polyadenylation at times up to the gastrula stage. This RNA also required a poly(U) CPE for cytoplasmic polyadenylation in embryos, but in this case the CPE consisted of 18 uridine residues. In addition, the timing and extent of cytoplasmic poly(A) elongation during early embryogenesis were dependent upon the distance between the CPE and the hexanucleotide. Further, as was the case with Cl2 RNA, Cl1 RNA contains a large masking element that prevents premature cytoplasmic polyadenylation during oocyte maturation. To examine the factors that may be involved in the cytoplasmic polyadenylation of both C12 and C11 RNAs, we performed UV cross-linking experiments in egg extracts. Two proteins with sizes of ~36 and ~45 kDa interacted specifically with the CPEs of both RNAs, although they bound preferentially to the C12

  2. Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein-dependent protein synthesis is regulated by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Coleen M; Nozaki, Naohito; Shigeri, Yasushi; Soderling, Thomas R

    2004-06-01

    Phosphorylation of cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein (CPEB) regulates protein synthesis in hippocampal dendrites. CPEB binds the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of cytoplasmic mRNAs and, when phosphorylated, initiates mRNA polyadenylation and translation. We report that, of the protein kinases activated in the hippocampus during synaptic plasticity, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) robustly phosphorylated the regulatory site (threonine 171) in CPEB in vitro. In postsynaptic density fractions or hippocampal neurons, CPEB phosphorylation increased when CaMKII was activated. These increases in CPEB phosphorylation were attenuated by a specific peptide inhibitor of CaMKII and by the general CaM-kinase inhibitor KN-93. Inhibitors of protein phosphatase 1 increased basal CPEB phosphorylation in neurons; this was also attenuated by a CaM-kinase inhibitor. To determine whether CaM-kinase activity regulates CPEB-dependent mRNA translation, hippocampal neurons were transfected with luciferase fused to a 3' UTR containing CPE-binding elements. Depolarization of neurons stimulated synthesis of luciferase; this was abrogated by inhibitors of protein synthesis, mRNA polyadenylation, and CaMKII. These results demonstrate that CPEB phosphorylation and translation are regulated by CaMKII activity and provide a possible mechanism for how dendritic protein synthesis in the hippocampus may be stimulated during synaptic plasticity.

  3. Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE)- and CPE-binding protein (CPEB)-independent mechanisms regulate early class maternal mRNA translational activation in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Amanda; Cox, Linda L; MacNicol, Angus M

    2004-04-23

    Meiotic cell cycle progression during vertebrate oocyte maturation requires the correct temporal translation of maternal mRNAs encoding key regulatory proteins. The mechanism by which specific mRNAs are temporally activated is unknown, although both cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements (CPE) within the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of mRNAs and the CPE-binding protein (CPEB) have been implicated. We report that in progesterone-stimulated Xenopus oocytes, the early cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translational activation of multiple maternal mRNAs occur in a CPE- and CPEB-independent manner. We demonstrate that polyadenylation response elements, originally identified in the 3'-UTR of the mRNA encoding the Mos proto-oncogene, direct CPE- and CPEB-independent polyadenylation of an early class of Xenopus maternal mRNAs. Our findings refute the hypothesis that CPE sequences alone account for the range of temporal inductions of maternal mRNAs observed during Xenopus oocyte maturation. Rather, our data indicate that the sequential action of distinct 3'-UTR-directed translational control mechanisms coordinates the complex temporal patterns and extent of protein synthesis during vertebrate meiotic cell cycle progression.

  4. Alternative polyadenylation and RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Erson-Bensan, Ayse Elif

    2016-08-01

    Our understanding of the extent of microRNA-based gene regulation has expanded in an impressive pace over the past decade. Now, we are beginning to better appreciate the role of 3'-UTR (untranslated region) cis-elements which harbor not only microRNA but also RNA-binding protein (RBP) binding sites that have significant effect on the stability and translational rate of mRNAs. To add further complexity, alternative polyadenylation (APA) emerges as a widespread mechanism to regulate gene expression by producing shorter or longer mRNA isoforms that differ in the length of their 3'-UTRs or even coding sequences. Resulting shorter mRNA isoforms generally lack cis-elements where trans-acting factors bind, and hence are differentially regulated compared with the longer isoforms. This review focuses on the RBPs involved in APA regulation and their action mechanisms on APA-generated isoforms. A better understanding of the complex interactions between APA and RBPs is promising for mechanistic and clinical implications including biomarker discovery and new therapeutic approaches. PMID:27208003

  5. PUB1 is a major nuclear and cytoplasmic polyadenylated RNA-binding protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J T; Paddy, M R; Swanson, M S

    1993-01-01

    Proteins that directly associate with nuclear polyadenylated RNAs, or heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding proteins (hnRNPs), and those that associate with cytoplasmic mRNAs, or mRNA-binding proteins (mRNPs), play important roles in regulating gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Previous work with a variety of eukaryotic cells has demonstrated that hnRNPs are localized predominantly within the nucleus whereas mRNPs are cytoplasmic. While studying proteins associated with polyadenylated RNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we discovered an abundant polyuridylate-binding protein, PUB1, which appears to be both an hnRNP and an mRNP. PUB1 and PAB1, the polyadenylate tail-binding protein, are the two major proteins cross-linked by UV light to polyadenylated RNAs in vivo. The deduced primary structure of PUB1 indicates that it is a member of the ribonucleoprotein consensus sequence family of RNA-binding proteins and is structurally related to the human hnRNP M proteins. Even though the PUB1 protein is a major cellular polyadenylated RNA-binding protein, it is nonessential for cell growth. Indirect cellular immunofluorescence combined with digital image processing allowed a detailed comparison of the intracellular distributions of PUB1 and PAB1. While PAB1 is predominantly, and relatively uniformly, distributed within the cytoplasm, PUB1 is localized in a nonuniform pattern throughout both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic distribution of PUB1 is considerably more discontinuous than that of PAB1. Furthermore, sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis demonstrates that PAB1 cofractionates with polyribosomes whereas PUB1 does not. These results suggest that PUB1 is both an hnRNP and an mRNP and that it may be stably bound to a translationally inactive subpopulation of mRNAs within the cytoplasm. Images PMID:8413212

  6. Specificity factors in cytoplasmic polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Amanda; Meijer, Hedda A; de Moor, Cornelia H

    2013-01-01

    Poly(A) tail elongation after export of an messenger RNA (mRNA) to the cytoplasm is called cytoplasmic polyadenylation. It was first discovered in oocytes and embryos, where it has roles in meiosis and development. In recent years, however, has been implicated in many other processes, including synaptic plasticity and mitosis. This review aims to introduce cytoplasmic polyadenylation with an emphasis on the factors and elements mediating this process for different mRNAs and in different animal species. We will discuss the RNA sequence elements mediating cytoplasmic polyadenylation in the 3' untranslated regions of mRNAs, including the CPE, MBE, TCS, eCPE, and C-CPE. In addition to describing the role of general polyadenylation factors, we discuss the specific RNA binding protein families associated with cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements, including CPEB (CPEB1, CPEB2, CPEB3, and CPEB4), Pumilio (PUM2), Musashi (MSI1, MSI2), zygote arrest (ZAR2), ELAV like proteins (ELAVL1, HuR), poly(C) binding proteins (PCBP2, αCP2, hnRNP-E2), and Bicaudal C (BICC1). Some emerging themes in cytoplasmic polyadenylation will be highlighted. To facilitate understanding for those working in different organisms and fields, particularly those who are analyzing high throughput data, HUGO gene nomenclature for the human orthologs is used throughout. Where human orthologs have not been clearly identified, reference is made to protein families identified in man.

  7. An element in the bovine papillomavirus late 3' untranslated region reduces polyadenylated cytoplasmic RNA levels.

    PubMed

    Furth, P A; Baker, C C

    1991-11-01

    Expression of the two bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) late genes, L1 and L2, coding for the two capsid proteins, is limited to terminally differentiated keratinocytes in bovine fibropapillomas. This pattern of expression is determined both by the activity of the late promoter and by the inhibition of late region expression in less well differentiated cells. Inhibition of L1 and L2 mRNA production in nonpermissive cells must occur since the late region potentially could be transcribed from early region promoters. Nuclear runoff analysis of the late region has demonstrated that up to 95% of transcripts which are initiated in the early region in nonpermissive cells terminate within the late region upstream of the late polyadenylation site (C. C. Baker and J. Noe, J. Virol. 63:3529-3534, 1989). However, very few of the primary transcripts which include the late polyadenylation site are processed into mRNA. In this study, we have used expression vectors to characterize an inhibitory element active in nonpermissive cells which is located in the late 3' untranslated region (3'UTR). While the late polyadenylation site is functional in these cells, a 53-bp element in the late 3'UTR reduces levels of polyadenylated cytoplasmic RNA. This element inhibited chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) expression 6- to 10-fold when cloned in the sense orientation into the 3'UTR of a CAT expression vector. No block to expression was seen when the fragment was cloned immediately downstream of the poly(A) site, in an intron upstream of the CAT coding sequence, or in an antisense orientation in the 3'UTR. When the same fragment was deleted from a BPV-1 L1 expression vector, a sixfold increase in mRNA levels was seen. Actinomycin D chase experiments using BPV-1 L1 expression vectors indicated that the element does not destabilize cytoplasmic polyadenylated RNA. Therefore, the element must act before the mature mRNA reaches the cytoplasm. The data presented are consistent with effects

  8. Alternative Polyadenylation in Glioblastoma Multiforme and Changes in Predicted RNA Binding Protein Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jiaofang; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Zengming; Jiang, Huawei; Lou, Xiaoyan; Foltz, Gregory; Lan, Qing; Huang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is widely present in the human genome and plays a key role in carcinogenesis. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of the APA products in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, one of the most lethal brain tumors) and normal brain tissues and further developed a computational pipeline, RNAelements (http://sysbio.zju.edu.cn/RNAelements/), using covariance model from known RNA binding protein (RBP) targets acquired by RNA Immunoprecipitation (RIP) analysis. We identified 4530 APA isoforms for 2733 genes in GBM, and found that 182 APA isoforms from 148 genes showed significant differential expression between normal and GBM brain tissues. We then focused on three genes with long and short APA isoforms that show inconsistent expression changes between normal and GBM brain tissues. These were myocyte enhancer factor 2D, heat shock factor binding protein 1, and polyhomeotic homolog 1 (Drosophila). Using the RNAelements program, we found that RBP binding sites were enriched in the alternative regions between the first and the last polyadenylation sites, which would result in the short APA forms escaping regulation from those RNA binding proteins. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first comprehensive APA isoform dataset for GBM and normal brain tissues. Additionally, we demonstrated a putative novel APA-mediated mechanism for controlling RNA stability and translation for APA isoforms. These observations collectively lay a foundation for novel diagnostics and molecular mechanisms that can inform future therapeutic interventions for GBM. PMID:23421905

  9. Characterization of Rous sarcoma virus polyadenylation site use in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Maciolek, Nicole L.; McNally, Mark T.

    2008-05-10

    Polyadenylation of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) RNA is inefficient, as approximately 15% of RSV RNAs represent read-through transcripts that use a downstream cellular polyadenylation site (poly(A) site). Read-through transcription has implications for the virus and the host since it is associated with oncogene capture and tumor induction. To explore the basis of inefficient RSV RNA 3'-end formation, we characterized RSV polyadenylation in vitro using HeLa cell nuclear extracts and HEK293 whole cell extracts. RSV polyadenylation substrates composed of the natural 3' end of viral RNA and various lengths of upstream sequence showed little or no polyadenylation, indicating that the RSV poly(A) site is suboptimal. Efficiently used poly(A) sites often have identifiable upstream and downstream elements (USEs and DSEs) in close proximity to the conserved AAUAAA signal. The sequences upstream and downstream of the RSV poly(A) site deviate from those found in efficiently used poly(A) sites, which may explain inefficient RSV polyadenylation. To assess the quality of the RSV USEs and DSEs, the well-characterized SV40 late USEs and/or DSEs were substituted for the RSV elements and vice versa, which showed that the USEs and DSEs from RSV are suboptimal but functional. CstF interacted poorly with the RSV polyadenylation substrate, and the inactivity of the RSV poly(A) site was at least in part due to poor CstF binding since tethering CstF to the RSV substrate activated polyadenylation. Our data are consistent with poor polyadenylation factor binding sites in both the USE and DSE as the basis for inefficient use of the RSV poly(A) site and point to the importance of additional elements within RSV RNA in promoting 3' end formation.

  10. The RNA-binding protein hnRNPLL induces a T cell alternative splicing program delineated by differential intron retention in polyadenylated RNA

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Retention of a subset of introns in spliced polyadenylated mRNA is emerging as a frequent, unexplained finding from RNA deep sequencing in mammalian cells. Results Here we analyze intron retention in T lymphocytes by deep sequencing polyadenylated RNA. We show a developmentally regulated RNA-binding protein, hnRNPLL, induces retention of specific introns by sequencing RNA from T cells with an inactivating Hnrpll mutation and from B lymphocytes that physiologically downregulate Hnrpll during their differentiation. In Ptprc mRNA encoding the tyrosine phosphatase CD45, hnRNPLL induces selective retention of introns flanking exons 4 to 6; these correspond to the cassette exons containing hnRNPLL binding sites that are skipped in cells with normal, but not mutant or low, hnRNPLL. We identify similar patterns of hnRNPLL-induced differential intron retention flanking alternative exons in 14 other genes, representing novel elements of the hnRNPLL-induced splicing program in T cells. Retroviral expression of a normally spliced cDNA for one of these targets, Senp2, partially corrects the survival defect of Hnrpll-mutant T cells. We find that integrating a number of computational methods to detect genes with differentially retained introns provides a strategy to enrich for alternatively spliced exons in mammalian RNA-seq data, when complemented by RNA-seq analysis of purified cells with experimentally perturbed RNA-binding proteins. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that intron retention in mRNA is induced by specific RNA-binding proteins and suggest a biological significance for this process in marking exons that are poised for alternative splicing. PMID:24476532

  11. The rotaviral NSP3 protein stimulates translation of polyadenylated target mRNAs independently of its RNA-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Keryer-Bibens, Cecile; Legagneux, Vincent; Namanda-Vanderbeken, Allen; Cosson, Bertrand; Paillard, Luc; Poncet, Didier; Osborne, H. Beverley

    2009-12-11

    The non-structural protein 3 (NSP3) of rotaviruses is an RNA-binding protein that specifically recognises a 4 nucleotide sequence at the 3' extremity of the non-polyadenylated viral mRNAs. NSP3 also has a high affinity for eIF4G. These two functions are clearly delimited in separate domains the structures of which have been determined. They are joined by a central domain implicated in the dimerisation of the full length protein. The bridging function of NSP3 between the 3' end of the viral mRNA and eIF4G has been proposed to enhance the synthesis of viral proteins. However, this role has been questioned as knock-down of NSP3 did not impair viral protein synthesis. We show here using a MS2/MS2-CP tethering assay that a C-terminal fragment of NSP3 containing the eIF4G binding domain and the dimerisation domain can increase the expression of a protein encoded by a target reporter mRNA in HEK 293 cells. The amount of reporter mRNA in the cells is not significantly affected by the presence of the NSP3 derived fusion protein showing that the enhanced protein expression is due to increased translation. These results show that NSP3 can act as a translational enhancer even on a polyadenylated mRNA that should be a substrate for PABP1.

  12. Comprehensive polyadenylation site maps in yeast and human reveal pervasive alternative polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Ozsolak, Fatih; Kapranov, Philipp; Foissac, Sylvain; Kim, Sang Woo; Fishilevich, Elane; Monaghan, A Paula; John, Bino; Milos, Patrice M

    2010-12-10

    The emerging discoveries on the link between polyadenylation and disease states underline the need to fully characterize genome-wide polyadenylation states. Here, we report comprehensive maps of global polyadenylation events in human and yeast generated using refinements to the Direct RNA Sequencing technology. This direct approach provides a quantitative view of genome-wide polyadenylation states in a strand-specific manner and requires only attomole RNA quantities. The polyadenylation profiles revealed an abundance of unannotated polyadenylation sites, alternative polyadenylation patterns, and regulatory element-associated poly(A)(+) RNAs. We observed differences in sequence composition surrounding canonical and noncanonical human polyadenylation sites, suggesting novel noncoding RNA-specific polyadenylation mechanisms in humans. Furthermore, we observed the correlation level between sense and antisense transcripts to depend on gene expression levels, supporting the view that overlapping transcription from opposite strands may play a regulatory role. Our data provide a comprehensive view of the polyadenylation state and overlapping transcription. PMID:21145465

  13. Alterations in Polyadenylation and Its Implications for Endocrine Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rehfeld, Anders; Plass, Mireya; Krogh, Anders; Friis-Hansen, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Polyadenylation is the process in which the pre-mRNA is cleaved at the poly(A) site and a poly(A) tail is added – a process necessary for normal mRNA formation. Genes with multiple poly(A) sites can undergo alternative polyadenylation (APA), producing distinct mRNA isoforms with different 3′ untranslated regions (3′ UTRs) and in some cases different coding regions. Two thirds of all human genes undergo APA. The efficiency of the polyadenylation process regulates gene expression and APA plays an important part in post-transcriptional regulation, as the 3′ UTR contains various cis-elements associated with post-transcriptional regulation, such as target sites for micro-RNAs and RNA-binding proteins. Implications of alterations in polyadenylation for endocrine disease: Alterations in polyadenylation have been found to be causative of neonatal diabetes and IPEX (immune dysfunction, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked) and to be associated with type I and II diabetes, pre-eclampsia, fragile X-associated premature ovarian insufficiency, ectopic Cushing syndrome, and many cancer diseases, including several types of endocrine tumor diseases. Perspectives: Recent developments in high-throughput sequencing have made it possible to characterize polyadenylation genome-wide. Antisense elements inhibiting or enhancing specific poly(A) site usage can induce desired alterations in polyadenylation, and thus hold the promise of new therapeutic approaches. Summary: This review gives a detailed description of alterations in polyadenylation in endocrine disease, an overview of the current literature on polyadenylation and summarizes the clinical implications of the current state of research in this field. PMID:23658553

  14. Compilation of mRNA Polyadenylation Signals in Arabidopsis Revealed a New Signal Element and Potential Secondary Structures1[w

    PubMed Central

    Loke, Johnny C.; Stahlberg, Eric A.; Strenski, David G.; Haas, Brian J.; Wood, Paul Chris; Li, Qingshun Quinn

    2005-01-01

    Using a novel program, SignalSleuth, and a database containing authenticated polyadenylation [poly(A)] sites, we analyzed the composition of mRNA poly(A) signals in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and reevaluated previously described cis-elements within the 3′-untranslated (UTR) regions, including near upstream elements and far upstream elements. As predicted, there are absences of high-consensus signal patterns. The AAUAAA signal topped the near upstream elements patterns and was found within the predicted location to only approximately 10% of 3′-UTRs. More importantly, we identified a new set, named cleavage elements, of poly(A) signals flanking both sides of the cleavage site. These cis-elements were not previously revealed by conventional mutagenesis and are contemplated as a cluster of signals for cleavage site recognition. Moreover, a single-nucleotide profile scan on the 3′-UTR regions unveiled a distinct arrangement of alternate stretches of U and A nucleotides, which led to a prediction of the formation of secondary structures. Using an RNA secondary structure prediction program, mFold, we identified three main types of secondary structures on the sequences analyzed. Surprisingly, these observed secondary structures were all interrupted in previously constructed mutations in these regions. These results will enable us to revise the current model of plant poly(A) signals and to develop tools to predict 3′-ends for gene annotation. PMID:15965016

  15. The murine IgM secretory poly(A) site contains dual upstream and downstream elements which affect polyadenylation.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, C; Virtanen, A

    1997-01-01

    Regulation of polyadenylation efficiency at the secretory poly(A) site plays an essential role in gene expression at the immunoglobulin (IgM) locus. At this poly(A) site the consensus AAUAAA hexanucleotide sequence is embedded in an extended AU-rich region and there are two downstream GU-rich regions which are suboptimally placed. As these sequences are involved in formation of the polyadenylation pre-initiation complex, we examined their function in vivo and in vitro . We show that the upstream AU-rich region can function in the absence of the consensus hexanucleotide sequence both in vivo and in vitro and that both GU-rich regions are necessary for full polyadenylation activity in vivo and for formation of polyadenylation-specific complexes in vitro . Sequence comparisons reveal that: (i) the dual structure is distinct for the IgM secretory poly(A) site compared with other immunoglobulin isotype secretory poly(A) sites; (ii) the presence of an AU-rich region close to the consensus hexanucleotide is evolutionarily conserved for IgM secretory poly(A) sites. We propose that the dual structure of the IgM secretory poly(A) site provides a flexibility to accommodate changes in polyadenylation complex components during regulation of polyadenylation efficiency. PMID:9171084

  16. The stem-loop luciferase assay for polyadenylation (SLAP) method for determining CstF-64-dependent polyadenylation activity.

    PubMed

    Hockert, J Andrew; Macdonald, Clinton C

    2014-01-01

    Polyadenylation is an essential cellular process in eukaryotic cells (Edmonds M and Abrams R, J Biol Chem 235, 1142-1149, 1960; Zhao J et al., Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 63, 405-445, 1999; Edmonds M, Progr Nucleic Acid Res Mol Biol 71, 285-389, 2002). For this reason, it has been difficult to examine the functions of specific polyadenylation proteins in vivo. Here, we describe a cell culture assay that allows structure-function experiments on CstF-64, a protein that binds to pre-mRNAs downstream of the cleavage site for accurate and efficient polyadenylation. We also demonstrate that the stem-loop luciferase assay for polyadenylation (SLAP) accurately reflects CstF-64-dependent polyadenylation. This assay could be easily adapted to the study of other important RNA-binding proteins in polyadenylation.

  17. Reconstitution of CPSF active in polyadenylation: recognition of the polyadenylation signal by WDR33.

    PubMed

    Schönemann, Lars; Kühn, Uwe; Martin, Georges; Schäfer, Peter; Gruber, Andreas R; Keller, Walter; Zavolan, Mihaela; Wahle, Elmar

    2014-11-01

    Cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) is the central component of the 3' processing machinery for polyadenylated mRNAs in metazoans: CPSF recognizes the polyadenylation signal AAUAAA, providing sequence specificity in both pre-mRNA cleavage and polyadenylation, and catalyzes pre-mRNA cleavage. Here we show that of the seven polypeptides that have been proposed to constitute CPSF, only four (CPSF160, CPSF30, hFip1, and WDR33) are necessary and sufficient to reconstitute a CPSF subcomplex active in AAUAAA-dependent polyadenylation, whereas CPSF100, CPSF73, and symplekin are dispensable. WDR33 is required for binding of reconstituted CPSF to AAUAAA-containing RNA and can be specifically UV cross-linked to such RNAs, as can CPSF30. Transcriptome-wide identification of WDR33 targets by photoactivatable ribonucleoside-enhanced cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) showed that WDR33 binds in and very close to the AAUAAA signal in vivo with high specificity. Thus, our data indicate that the large CPSF subunit participating in recognition of the polyadenylation signal is WDR33 and not CPSF160, as suggested by previous studies.

  18. LPS injection reprograms the expression and the 3' UTR of a CAP gene by alternative polyadenylation and the formation of a GAIT element in Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Vizzini, Aiti; Bonura, Angela; Longo, Valeria; Sanfratello, Maria Antonietta; Parrinello, Daniela; Cammarata, Matteo; Colombo, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    The diversification of cellular functions is one of the major characteristics of multicellular organisms which allow cells to modulate their gene expression, leading to the formation of transcripts and proteins with different functions and concentrations in response to different stimuli. CAP genes represent a widespread family of proteins belonging to the cysteine-rich secretory protein, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 superfamily which, it has been proposed, play key roles in the infection process and the modulation of immune responses in host animals. The ascidian Ciona intestinalis represents a group of proto-chordates with an exclusively innate immune system that has been widely studied in the field of comparative and developmental immunology. Using this biological system, we describe the identification of a novel APA mechanism by which an intronic polyadenylation signal is activated by LPS injection, leading to the formation of a shorter CAP mRNA capable of expressing the first CAP exon plus 19 amino acid residues whose sequence is contained within the first intron of the annotated gene. Furthermore, such an APA event causes the expression of a translational controlling cis-acting GAIT element which is not present in the previously isolated CAP isoform and identified in the 3'-UTR of other immune-related genes, suggesting an intriguing scenario in which both transcriptional and post-transcriptional control mechanisms are involved in the activation of the CAP gene during inflammatory response in C. intestinalis. PMID:27514009

  19. LPS injection reprograms the expression and the 3' UTR of a CAP gene by alternative polyadenylation and the formation of a GAIT element in Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Vizzini, Aiti; Bonura, Angela; Longo, Valeria; Sanfratello, Maria Antonietta; Parrinello, Daniela; Cammarata, Matteo; Colombo, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    The diversification of cellular functions is one of the major characteristics of multicellular organisms which allow cells to modulate their gene expression, leading to the formation of transcripts and proteins with different functions and concentrations in response to different stimuli. CAP genes represent a widespread family of proteins belonging to the cysteine-rich secretory protein, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 superfamily which, it has been proposed, play key roles in the infection process and the modulation of immune responses in host animals. The ascidian Ciona intestinalis represents a group of proto-chordates with an exclusively innate immune system that has been widely studied in the field of comparative and developmental immunology. Using this biological system, we describe the identification of a novel APA mechanism by which an intronic polyadenylation signal is activated by LPS injection, leading to the formation of a shorter CAP mRNA capable of expressing the first CAP exon plus 19 amino acid residues whose sequence is contained within the first intron of the annotated gene. Furthermore, such an APA event causes the expression of a translational controlling cis-acting GAIT element which is not present in the previously isolated CAP isoform and identified in the 3'-UTR of other immune-related genes, suggesting an intriguing scenario in which both transcriptional and post-transcriptional control mechanisms are involved in the activation of the CAP gene during inflammatory response in C. intestinalis.

  20. The STAR protein QKI-7 recruits PAPD4 to regulate post-transcriptional polyadenylation of target mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ryota; Tsusaka, Takeshi; Mitsunaga, Hiroko; Maehata, Takaharu; Hoshino, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence has demonstrated that regulating the length of the poly(A) tail on an mRNA is an efficient means of controlling gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In early development, transcription is silenced and gene expression is primarily regulated by cytoplasmic polyadenylation. In somatic cells, considerable progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms of negative regulation by deadenylation. However, positive regulation through elongation of the poly(A) tail has not been widely studied due to the difficulty in distinguishing whether any observed increase in length is due to the synthesis of new mRNA, reduced deadenylation or cytoplasmic polyadenylation. Here, we overcame this barrier by developing a method for transcriptional pulse-chase analysis under conditions where deadenylases are suppressed. This strategy was used to show that a member of the Star family of RNA binding proteins, QKI, promotes polyadenylation when tethered to a reporter mRNA. Although multiple RNA binding proteins have been implicated in cytoplasmic polyadenylation during early development, previously only CPEB was known to function in this capacity in somatic cells. Importantly, we show that only the cytoplasmic isoform QKI-7 promotes poly(A) tail extension, and that it does so by recruiting the non-canonical poly(A) polymerase PAPD4 through its unique carboxyl-terminal region. We further show that QKI-7 specifically promotes polyadenylation and translation of three natural target mRNAs (hnRNPA1, p27kip1 and β-catenin) in a manner that is dependent on the QKI response element. An anti-mitogenic signal that induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase elicits polyadenylation and translation of p27kip1 mRNA via QKI and PAPD4. Taken together, our findings provide significant new insight into a general mechanism for positive regulation of gene expression by post-transcriptional polyadenylation in somatic cells. PMID:26926106

  1. Inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor-binding protein released with inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IRBIT) associates with components of the mRNA 3' processing machinery in a phosphorylation-dependent manner and inhibits polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Hélène; Mizutani, Akihiro; Iemura, Shun-Ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Ando, Hideaki; Kuroda, Yukiko; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2009-04-17

    IRBIT is a recently identified protein that modulates the activities of both inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor and pancreas-type Na(+)/HCO(3)(-) cotransporter 1, and the multisite phosphorylation of IRBIT is required for achieving this modulatory action. Here, we report the identification of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF), which is a multi-protein complex involved in 3' processing of mRNA precursors, as an additional binding partner for IRBIT. We found that IRBIT interacted with CPSF and was recruited to an exogenous polyadenylation signal-containing RNA. The main target for IRBIT in CPSF was Fip1 subunit, and the phosphorylation of the serine-rich region of IRBIT was required both for direct association with Fip1 in vitro and for redistribution of Fip1 into the cytoplasm of intact cells. Furthermore, tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), an agent that induces oxidative stress, increased the phosphorylation level of IRBIT in vivo and in parallel enhanced the interaction between IRBIT and CPSF and promoted the cytoplasmic distribution of endogenous Fip1. In addition to CPSF, IRBIT interacted in vitro with poly(A) polymerase (PAP), which is the enzyme recruited by CPSF to elongate the poly(A) tail, and inhibited PAP activity in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. These findings raise the possibility that IRBIT modulates the polyadenylation state of specific mRNAs, both by controlling the cytoplasmic/nuclear partitioning of Fip1 and by inhibiting PAP activity, in response to a stimulus that alters its phosphorylation state.

  2. Aurora Kinase A Is Not Involved in CPEB1 Phosphorylation and cyclin B1 mRNA Polyadenylation during Meiotic Maturation of Porcine Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Komrskova, Pavla; Susor, Andrej; Malik, Radek; Prochazkova, Barbora; Liskova, Lucie; Supolikova, Jaroslava; Hladky, Stepan; Kubelka, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of mRNA translation by cytoplasmic polyadenylation is known to be important for oocyte maturation and further development. This process is generally controlled by phosphorylation of cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 1 (CPEB1). The aim of this study is to determine the role of Aurora kinase A in CPEB1 phosphorylation and the consequent CPEB1-dependent polyadenylation of maternal mRNAs during mammalian oocyte meiosis. For this purpose, we specifically inhibited Aurora kinase A with MLN8237 during meiotic maturation of porcine oocytes. Using poly(A)-test PCR method, we monitored the effect of Aurora kinase A inhibition on poly(A)-tail extension of long and short cyclin B1 encoding mRNAs as markers of CPEB1-dependent cytoplasmic polyadenylation. Our results show that inhibition of Aurora kinase A activity impairs neither cyclin B1 mRNA polyadenylation nor its translation and that Aurora kinase A is unlikely to be involved in CPEB1 activating phosphorylation. PMID:24983972

  3. Aurora kinase A is not involved in CPEB1 phosphorylation and cyclin B1 mRNA polyadenylation during meiotic maturation of porcine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Komrskova, Pavla; Susor, Andrej; Malik, Radek; Prochazkova, Barbora; Liskova, Lucie; Supolikova, Jaroslava; Hladky, Stepan; Kubelka, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of mRNA translation by cytoplasmic polyadenylation is known to be important for oocyte maturation and further development. This process is generally controlled by phosphorylation of cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 1 (CPEB1). The aim of this study is to determine the role of Aurora kinase A in CPEB1 phosphorylation and the consequent CPEB1-dependent polyadenylation of maternal mRNAs during mammalian oocyte meiosis. For this purpose, we specifically inhibited Aurora kinase A with MLN8237 during meiotic maturation of porcine oocytes. Using poly(A)-test PCR method, we monitored the effect of Aurora kinase A inhibition on poly(A)-tail extension of long and short cyclin B1 encoding mRNAs as markers of CPEB1-dependent cytoplasmic polyadenylation. Our results show that inhibition of Aurora kinase A activity impairs neither cyclin B1 mRNA polyadenylation nor its translation and that Aurora kinase A is unlikely to be involved in CPEB1 activating phosphorylation.

  4. Global profiling of stimulus-induced polyadenylation in cells using a poly(A) trap

    PubMed Central

    Curanovic, Dusica; Cohen, Michael; Singh, Irtisha; Slagle, Christopher E.; Leslie, Christina S.; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2013-01-01

    Polyadenylation of mRNA leads to increased protein expression in response to diverse stimuli, but it is difficult to identify mRNAs that become polyadenylated in living cells. Here we describe a click chemistry-compatible nucleoside analog that is selectively incorporated into poly(A) tails of transcripts in cells. Next-generation sequencing of labeled mRNAs enables a transcriptome-wide profile of polyadenylation and provides insights into the mRNA sequence elements that are correlated with polyadenylation. PMID:23995769

  5. Bacterial/archaeal/organellar polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Bijoy K; Kushner, Sidney R

    2011-01-01

    Although the first poly(A) polymerase (PAP) was discovered in Escherichia coli in 1962, the study of polyadenylation in bacteria was largely ignored for the next 30 years. However, with the identification of the structural gene for E. coli PAP I in 1992, it became possible to analyze polyadenylation using both biochemical and genetic approaches. Subsequently, it has been shown that polyadenylation plays a multifunctional role in prokaryotic RNA metabolism. Although the bulk of our current understanding of prokaryotic polyadenylation comes from studies on E. coli, recent limited experiments with Cyanobacteria, organelles, and Archaea have widened our view on the diversity, complexity, and universality of the polyadenylation process. For example, the identification of polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), a reversible phosphorolytic enzyme that is highly conserved in bacteria, as an additional PAP in E. coli caught everyone by surprise. In fact, PNPase has now been shown to be the source of post-transcriptional RNA modifications in a wide range of cells of prokaryotic origin including those that lack a eubacterial PAP homolog. Accordingly, the past few years have witnessed increased interest in the mechanism and role of post-transcriptional modifications in all species of prokaryotic origin. However, the fact that many of the poly(A) tails are very short and unstable as well as the presence of polynucleotide tails has posed significant technical challenges to the scientific community trying to unravel the mystery of polyadenylation in prokaryotes. This review discusses the current state of knowledge regarding polyadenylation and its functions in bacteria, organelles, and Archaea.

  6. Means to an end: mechanisms of alternative polyadenylation of messenger RNA precursors

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Andreas R; Martin, Georges; Keller, Walter; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2014-01-01

    Expression of mature messenger RNAs (mRNAs) requires appropriate transcription initiation and termination, as well as pre-mRNA processing by capping, splicing, cleavage, and polyadenylation. A core 3′-end processing complex carries out the cleavage and polyadenylation reactions, but many proteins have been implicated in the selection of polyadenylation sites among the multiple alternatives that eukaryotic genes typically have. In recent years, high-throughput approaches to map both the 3′-end processing sites as well as the binding sites of proteins that are involved in the selection of cleavage sites and in the processing reactions have been developed. Here, we review these approaches as well as the insights into the mechanisms of polyadenylation that emerged from genome-wide studies of polyadenylation across a range of cell types and states. WIREs RNA 2014, 5:183–196. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1206 PMID:24243805

  7. Mechanisms and consequences of alternative polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Di Giammartino, Dafne Campigli; Nishida, Kensei; Manley, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is emerging as a widespread mechanism used to control gene expression. Like alternative splicing, usage of alternative poly(A) sites allows a single gene to encode multiple mRNA transcripts. In some cases, this changes the mRNA coding potential; in other cases, the code remains unchanged but the 3’UTR length is altered, influencing the fate of mRNAs in several ways, for example, by altering the availability of RNA binding protein sites and microRNA binding sites. The mechansims governing both global and gene-specific APA are only starting to be deciphered. Here we review what is known about these mechanisms and the functional consequences of alternative polyadenlyation. PMID:21925375

  8. A comprehensive analysis of 3′ end sequencing data sets reveals novel polyadenylation signals and the repressive role of heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein C on cleavage and polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Andreas J.; Schmidt, Ralf; Gruber, Andreas R.; Martin, Georges; Ghosh, Souvik; Belmadani, Manuel; Keller, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is a general mechanism of transcript diversification in mammals, which has been recently linked to proliferative states and cancer. Different 3′ untranslated region (3′ UTR) isoforms interact with different RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), which modify the stability, translation, and subcellular localization of the corresponding transcripts. Although the heterogeneity of pre-mRNA 3′ end processing has been established with high-throughput approaches, the mechanisms that underlie systematic changes in 3′ UTR lengths remain to be characterized. Through a uniform analysis of a large number of 3′ end sequencing data sets, we have uncovered 18 signals, six of which are novel, whose positioning with respect to pre-mRNA cleavage sites indicates a role in pre-mRNA 3′ end processing in both mouse and human. With 3′ end sequencing we have demonstrated that the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein C (HNRNPC), which binds the poly(U) motif whose frequency also peaks in the vicinity of polyadenylation (poly(A)) sites, has a genome-wide effect on poly(A) site usage. HNRNPC-regulated 3′ UTRs are enriched in ELAV-like RBP 1 (ELAVL1) binding sites and include those of the CD47 gene, which participate in the recently discovered mechanism of 3′ UTR–dependent protein localization (UDPL). Our study thus establishes an up-to-date, high-confidence catalog of 3′ end processing sites and poly(A) signals, and it uncovers an important role of HNRNPC in regulating 3′ end processing. It further suggests that U-rich elements mediate interactions with multiple RBPs that regulate different stages in a transcript's life cycle. PMID:27382025

  9. A comprehensive analysis of 3' end sequencing data sets reveals novel polyadenylation signals and the repressive role of heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein C on cleavage and polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Andreas J; Schmidt, Ralf; Gruber, Andreas R; Martin, Georges; Ghosh, Souvik; Belmadani, Manuel; Keller, Walter; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2016-08-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is a general mechanism of transcript diversification in mammals, which has been recently linked to proliferative states and cancer. Different 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) isoforms interact with different RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), which modify the stability, translation, and subcellular localization of the corresponding transcripts. Although the heterogeneity of pre-mRNA 3' end processing has been established with high-throughput approaches, the mechanisms that underlie systematic changes in 3' UTR lengths remain to be characterized. Through a uniform analysis of a large number of 3' end sequencing data sets, we have uncovered 18 signals, six of which are novel, whose positioning with respect to pre-mRNA cleavage sites indicates a role in pre-mRNA 3' end processing in both mouse and human. With 3' end sequencing we have demonstrated that the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein C (HNRNPC), which binds the poly(U) motif whose frequency also peaks in the vicinity of polyadenylation (poly(A)) sites, has a genome-wide effect on poly(A) site usage. HNRNPC-regulated 3' UTRs are enriched in ELAV-like RBP 1 (ELAVL1) binding sites and include those of the CD47 gene, which participate in the recently discovered mechanism of 3' UTR-dependent protein localization (UDPL). Our study thus establishes an up-to-date, high-confidence catalog of 3' end processing sites and poly(A) signals, and it uncovers an important role of HNRNPC in regulating 3' end processing. It further suggests that U-rich elements mediate interactions with multiple RBPs that regulate different stages in a transcript's life cycle. PMID:27382025

  10. Experimental Genome-Wide Determination of RNA Polyadenylation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Stephen A.; Shen, Chi; Brown, Alishea; Hunt, Arthur G.

    2016-01-01

    The polyadenylation of RNA is a near-universal feature of RNA metabolism in eukaryotes. This process has been studied in the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using low-throughput (gene-by-gene) and high-throughput (transcriptome sequencing) approaches that recovered poly(A)-containing sequence tags which revealed interesting features of this critical process in Chlamydomonas. In this study, RNA polyadenylation has been studied using the so-called Poly(A) Tag Sequencing (PAT-Seq) approach. Specifically, PAT-Seq was used to study poly(A) site choice in cultures grown in four different media types—Tris-Phosphate (TP), Tris-Phosphate-Acetate (TAP), High-Salt (HS), and High-Salt-Acetate (HAS). The results indicate that: 1. As reported before, the motif UGUAA is the primary, and perhaps sole, cis-element that guides mRNA polyadenylation in the nucleus; 2. The scope of alternative polyadenylation events with the potential to change the coding sequences of mRNAs is limited; 3. Changes in poly(A) site choice in cultures grown in the different media types are very few in number and do not affect protein-coding potential; 4. Organellar polyadenylation is considerable and affects primarily ribosomal RNAs in the chloroplast and mitochondria; and 5. Organellar RNA polyadenylation is a dynamic process that is affected by the different media types used for cell growth. PMID:26730730

  11. Internal polyadenylation of parvoviral precursor mRNA limits progeny virus production.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qinfeng; Deng, Xuefeng; Best, Sonja M; Bloom, Marshall E; Li, Yi; Qiu, Jianming

    2012-05-10

    Aleutian Mink Disease Virus (AMDV) is the only virus in the genus Amdovirus of family Parvoviridae. In adult mink, AMDV causes a persistent infection associated with severe dysfunction of the immune system. Cleavage of AMDV capsid proteins has been previously shown to play a role in regulating progeny virus production (Fang Cheng et al., J. Virol. 84:2687-2696, 2010). The present study shows that AMDV has evolved a second strategy to limit expression of capsid proteins by preventing processing of the full-length capsid protein-encoding mRNA transcripts. Characterization of the cis-elements of the proximal polyadenylation site [(pA)p] in the infectious clone of AMDV revealed that polyadenylation at the (pA)p site is controlled by an upstream element (USE) of 200 nts in length, the AAUAAA signal, and a downstream element (DSE) of 40 nts. A decrease in polyadenylation at the (pA)p site, either by mutating the AAUAAA signal or the DSE, which does not affect the encoding of amino acids in the infectious clone, increased the expression of capsid protein VP1/VP2 and thereby increased progeny virus production approximately 2-3-fold. This increase was accompanied by enhanced replication of the AMDV genome. Thus, this study reveals correlations among internal polyadenylation, capsid production, viral DNA replication and progeny virus production of AMDV, indicating that internal polyadenylation is a limiting step for parvovirus replication and progeny virus production. PMID:22361476

  12. Internal Polyadenylation of Parvoviral Precursor mRNA Limits Progeny Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qinfeng; Deng, Xuefeng; Best, Sonja M.; Bloom, Marshall E.; Li, Yi; Qiu, Jianming

    2012-01-01

    Aleutian Mink Disease Virus (AMDV) is the only virus in the genus Amdovirus of family Parvoviridae. In adult mink, AMDV causes a persistent infection associated with severe dysfunction of the immune system. Cleavage of AMDV capsid proteins has been previously shown to play a role in regulating progeny virus production (Fang Cheng et al, J. Virol. 84:2687–2696, 2010). The present study shows that AMDV has evolved a second strategy to limit expression of capsid proteins by preventing processing of the full-length capsid protein-encoding mRNA transcripts. Characterization of the cis-elements of the proximal polyadenylation site [(pA)p] in the infectious clone of AMDV revealed that polyadenylation at the (pA)p site is controlled by an upstream element (USE) of 200 nts in length, the AAUAAA signal, and a downstream element (DSE) of 40 nts. A decrease in polyadenylation at the (pA)p site, either by mutating the AAUAAA signal or the DSE, which does not affect the encoding of amino acids in the infectious clone, increased the expression of capsid protein VP1/VP2 and thereby increased progeny virus production approximately 2-3-fold. This increase was accompanied by enhanced replication of the AMDV genome. Thus, this study reveals correlations among internal polyadenylation, capsid production, viral DNA replication and progeny virus production of AMDV, indicating that internal polyadenylation is a limiting step for parvovirus replication and progeny virus production. PMID:22361476

  13. A DNA-binding protein factor recognizes two binding domains within the octopine synthase enhancer element.

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhisa, J G; Singh, K; Dennis, E S; Peacock, W J

    1990-01-01

    A protein that binds to the enhancing element of the octopine synthase gene has been identified in nuclear extracts from maize cell suspension cultures. Two protein-DNA complexes are distinguishable by electrophoretic mobility in gel retardation assays. Footprint analyses of these low and high molecular weight complexes show, respectively, half and complete protection of the ocs-element DNA from cleavage by methidiumpropyl-EDTA.FE(II). Two lines of evidence indicate that the element has two recognition sites, each of which can bind identical protein units. Elements that are mutated in one or the other half and form only the low molecular weight complex interfere with the formation of both the low and high molecular weight complexes by the wild-type element. Protein isolated from a complex with only one binding site occupied can bind to the wild-type ocs-element and generate complexes with protein occupying one or both binding sites. Occupation of both sites of the ocs-element is a prerequisite for transcriptional enhancement. PMID:2152113

  14. A Genome-wide Study of “Non-3UTR” Polyadenylation Sites in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Cheng; Spinelli, Matthew; Liu, Man; Li, Qingshun Q.; Liang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation has been recognized as a key contributor of gene expression regulation by generating different transcript isoforms with altered 3′ ends. Although polyadenylation is well known for marking the end of a 3′ UTR, an increasing number of studies have reported previously less-addressed polyadenylation events located in other parts of genes in many eukaryotic organisms. These other locations include 5′ UTRs, introns and coding sequences (termed herein as non-3UTR), as well as antisense and intergenic polyadenlation. Focusing on the non-3UTR polyadenylation sites (n3PASs), we detected and characterized more than 11000 n3PAS clusters in the Arabidopsis genome using poly(A)-tag sequencing data (PAT-Seq). Further analyses suggested that the occurrence of these n3PASs were positively correlated with certain characteristics of their respective host genes, including the presence of spliced, diminutive or diverse beginning of 5′ UTRs, number of introns and whether introns have extreme lengths. The interaction of the host genes with surrounding genetic elements, like a convergently overlapped gene and associated transposable element, may contribute to the generation of a n3PAS as well. Collectively, these results provide a better understanding of n3PASs, and offer some new insights of the underlying mechanisms for non-3UTR polyadenylation and its regulation in plants. PMID:27301740

  15. A Genome-wide Study of "Non-3UTR" Polyadenylation Sites in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cheng; Spinelli, Matthew; Liu, Man; Li, Qingshun Q; Liang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation has been recognized as a key contributor of gene expression regulation by generating different transcript isoforms with altered 3' ends. Although polyadenylation is well known for marking the end of a 3' UTR, an increasing number of studies have reported previously less-addressed polyadenylation events located in other parts of genes in many eukaryotic organisms. These other locations include 5' UTRs, introns and coding sequences (termed herein as non-3UTR), as well as antisense and intergenic polyadenlation. Focusing on the non-3UTR polyadenylation sites (n3PASs), we detected and characterized more than 11000 n3PAS clusters in the Arabidopsis genome using poly(A)-tag sequencing data (PAT-Seq). Further analyses suggested that the occurrence of these n3PASs were positively correlated with certain characteristics of their respective host genes, including the presence of spliced, diminutive or diverse beginning of 5' UTRs, number of introns and whether introns have extreme lengths. The interaction of the host genes with surrounding genetic elements, like a convergently overlapped gene and associated transposable element, may contribute to the generation of a n3PAS as well. Collectively, these results provide a better understanding of n3PASs, and offer some new insights of the underlying mechanisms for non-3UTR polyadenylation and its regulation in plants. PMID:27301740

  16. Automatic generation of matrix element derivatives for tight binding models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elena, Alin M.; Meister, Matthias

    2005-10-01

    Tight binding (TB) models are one approach to the quantum mechanical many-particle problem. An important role in TB models is played by hopping and overlap matrix elements between the orbitals on two atoms, which of course depend on the relative positions of the atoms involved. This dependence can be expressed with the help of Slater-Koster parameters, which are usually taken from tables. Recently, a way to generate these tables automatically was published. If TB approaches are applied to simulations of the dynamics of a system, also derivatives of matrix elements can appear. In this work we give general expressions for first and second derivatives of such matrix elements. Implemented in a tight binding computer program, like, for instance, DINAMO, they obviate the need to type all the required derivatives of all occurring matrix elements by hand.

  17. Characterization of the Role of Hexamer AGUAAA and Poly(A) Tail in Coronavirus Polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yu-Hui; Lin, Ching-Houng; Lin, Chao-Nan; Lo, Chen-Yu; Tsai, Tsung-Lin; Wu, Hung-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Similar to eukaryotic mRNA, the positive-strand coronavirus genome of ~30 kilobases is 5’-capped and 3’-polyadenylated. It has been demonstrated that the length of the coronaviral poly(A) tail is not static but regulated during infection; however, little is known regarding the factors involved in coronaviral polyadenylation and its regulation. Here, we show that during infection, the level of coronavirus poly(A) tail lengthening depends on the initial length upon infection and that the minimum length to initiate lengthening may lie between 5 and 9 nucleotides. By mutagenesis analysis, it was found that (i) the hexamer AGUAAA and poly(A) tail are two important elements responsible for synthesis of the coronavirus poly(A) tail and may function in concert to accomplish polyadenylation and (ii) the function of the hexamer AGUAAA in coronaviral polyadenylation is position dependent. Based on these findings, we propose a process for how the coronaviral poly(A) tail is synthesized and undergoes variation. Our results provide the first genetic evidence to gain insight into coronaviral polyadenylation. PMID:27760233

  18. Prebending the estrogen response element destabilizes binding of the estrogen receptor DNA binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J; de Haan, G; Nardulli, A M; Shapiro, D J

    1997-01-01

    Binding of many eukaryotic transcription regulatory proteins to their DNA recognition sequences results in conformational changes in DNA. To test the effect of altering DNA topology by prebending a transcription factor binding site, we examined the interaction of the estrogen receptor (ER) DNA binding domain (DBD) with prebent estrogen response elements (EREs). When the ERE in minicircle DNA was prebent toward the major groove, which is in the same direction as the ER-induced DNA bend, there was no significant effect on ER DBD binding relative to the linear counterparts. However, when the ERE was bent toward the minor groove, in a direction that opposes the ER-induced DNA bend, there was a four- to eightfold reduction in ER DBD binding. Since reduced binding was also observed with the ERE in nicked circles, the reduction in binding was not due to torsional force induced by binding of ER DBD to the prebent ERE in covalently closed minicircles. To determine the mechanism responsible for reduced binding to the prebent ERE, we examined the effect of prebending the ERE on the association and dissociation of the ER DBD. Binding of the ER DBD to ERE-containing minicircles was rapid when the EREs were prebent toward either the major or minor groove of the DNA (k(on) of 9.9 x 10(6) to 1.7 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)). Prebending the ERE toward the minor groove resulted in an increase in k(off) of four- to fivefold. Increased dissociation of the ER DBD from the ERE is, therefore, the major factor responsible for reduced binding of the ER DBD to an ERE prebent toward the minor groove. These data provide the first direct demonstration that the interaction of a eukaryotic transcription factor with its recognition sequence can be strongly influenced by altering DNA topology through prebending the DNA. PMID:9154816

  19. Distinctive interactions of the Arabidopsis homolog of the 30 kD subunit of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (AtCPSF30) with other polyadenylation factor subunits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The Arabidopsis ortholog of the 30 kD subunit of the mammalian Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor (AtCPSF30) is an RNA-binding endonuclease that is associated with other Arabidopsis CPSF subunits (orthologs of the 160, 100, and 73 kD subunits of CPSF). In order to better u...

  20. Alternative polyadenylation in the nervous system: to what lengths will 3′ UTR extensions take us?

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Pedro; Sanfilippo, Piero; Shenker, Sol; Lai, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) can diversify coding and non-coding regions, but has particular impact on increasing 3′ UTR diversity. Through the gain or loss of regulatory elements such as RNA binding protein and microRNA sites, APA can influence transcript stability, localization, and translational efficiency. Strikingly, the central nervous systems of invertebrate and vertebrate species express a broad range of transcript isoforms bearing extended 3′ UTRs. The molecular mechanism that permits proximal 3′ end bypass in neurons is mysterious, and only beginning to be elucidated. This landscape of neural 3′ UTR extensions, many reaching unprecedented lengths, may help service the unique post-transcriptional regulatory needs of neurons. A combination of approaches, including transcriptome-wide profiling, genetic screening to identify APA factors, biochemical dissection of alternative 3′ end formation, and manipulation of individual neural APA targets, will be necessary to gain fuller perspectives on the mechanism and biology of neural-specific 3′ UTR lengthening. PMID:24903459

  1. Inhibition of polyadenylation reduces inflammatory gene induction.

    PubMed

    Kondrashov, Alexander; Meijer, Hedda A; Barthet-Barateig, Adeline; Parker, Hannah N; Khurshid, Asma; Tessier, Sarah; Sicard, Marie; Knox, Alan J; Pang, Linhua; De Moor, Cornelia H

    2012-12-01

    Cordycepin (3' deoxyadenosine) has long been used in the study of in vitro assembled polyadenylation complexes, because it terminates the poly(A) tail and arrests the cleavage complex. It is derived from caterpillar fungi, which are highly prized in Chinese traditional medicine. Here we show that cordycepin specifically inhibits the induction of inflammatory mRNAs by cytokines in human airway smooth muscle cells without affecting the expression of control mRNAs. Cordycepin treatment results in shorter poly(A) tails, and a reduction in the efficiency of mRNA cleavage and transcription termination is observed, indicating that the effects of cordycepin on 3' processing in cells are similar to those described in in vitro reactions. For the CCL2 and CXCL1 mRNAs, the effects of cordycepin are post-transcriptional, with the mRNA disappearing during or immediately after nuclear export. In contrast, although the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to the IL8 promoter is also unaffected, the levels of nascent transcript are reduced, indicating a defect in transcription elongation. We show that a reporter construct with 3' sequences from a histone gene is unaffected by cordycepin, while CXCL1 sequences confer cordycepin sensitivity to the reporter, demonstrating that polyadenylation is indeed required for the effect of cordycepin on gene expression. In addition, treatment with another polyadenyation inhibitor and knockdown of poly(A) polymerase α also specifically reduced the induction of inflammatory mRNAs. These data demonstrate that there are differences in the 3' processing of inflammatory and housekeeping genes and identify polyadenylation as a novel target for anti-inflammatory drugs.

  2. Alternative polyadenylation can regulate post-translational membrane localization

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Mithun; Johnson, Elizabeth L.; Coller, Hilary A.

    2016-01-01

    For many genomic loci, there are more than one potential cleavage and polyadenylation site, resulting in the generation of multiple distinct transcripts. When the proximal polyadenylation site is present within the coding region of the transcript, alternative polyadenylation can result in proteins with distinct amino acid sequences and potentially distinct functions. In most cases, the different possible polyadenylation sites are all present within the 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs), and the amino acid sequence of the encoded proteins are not affected by polyadenylation site selection. In individual instances, the selection of the proximal versus distal polyadenylation site in the 3′UTR can dramatically affect transcript stability and translatability. In some instances, UTR alternative polyadenylation generates RNA isoforms that have distinct subcellular localization patterns, and that can regulate the location of the encoded protein in an RNA-guided manner. In a recent paper, the laboratory of Christine Mayr demonstrated that alternative polyadenylation of the transmembrane protein CD47 results in transcripts with the same localization pattern, but the encoded protein localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum when it is encoded by the transcript generated by using the proximal polyadenylation site in 3′UTR, and the identical protein localizes to the plasma membrane when the transcript is encoded by the distal polyadenylation site, also in the 3′ UTR. Unlike previous studies, the mechanism of localization does not rely on differential trafficking of the mRNA and is instead, based on RNA-mediated recruitment of proteins to the cytoplasmic side of CD47 that support its plasma membrane localization. Other transmembrane proteins were discovered to be regulated similarly. The results demonstrate that the choice of polyadenylation site can affect protein localization and function, even when the sequence of the protein is unaffected. Further, the transcript encoding

  3. Stability of polyadenylic and polyadenylated ribonucleic acids in radish (Raphanus sativus) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Aspart, L; Cooke, R; Delseny, M

    1979-08-29

    The stability of polyadenylic acid and polyadenylated RNA was investigated in young radish (Raphanus sativus) seedlings. We first studied the decay of poly(A) content, using a [3H]poly(U) assay, following a complete block of transcription by cordycepin (200 microgram/ml). Two lifetime classes of polyadenylic acid have been determined in these seedlings: a short-lived component with a half-life of 30 min which represents 60% of poly(A) and a more stable component with varying half-lives of which the majority range from 4-10 h and a few are considerably longer. During this period rRNA was shown to decay linearly, taking about 41 h for half of this RNA to disappear. The life-time of the other moiety of polyadenylated-RNA was analysed by continuous labelling with [3H]uridine. We have been able to demonstrate that a significant part of the mRNA molecules turns over with a half-life similar to that of the more slowly turning-over poly(A). No evidence could be obtained for rapidly turning-over messenger RNA. Thus the rapidly turning over poly(A) could correspond to a poly(A) turn-over independent of the remainder of the sequence. When labelling was very long, an apparent steady-state was reached and we determined the polyadenylated RNA content of seedlings to be 2.2% of whole cell RNA. Finally, these results were compared with those previously obtained in studying early germination of radish embryo axes. In contrast with stored mRNA which is rapidly degraded following imbibition, part of the mRNA present in 22 h old seedlings is stable for several hours.

  4. In vivo analysis of polyadenylation in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Bijoy K; Kushner, Sidney R

    2014-01-01

    Polyadenylation at the 3' ends of mRNAs, tRNAs, rRNAs, and sRNAs plays important roles in RNA metabolism in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, the nature of poly(A) tails in prokaryotes is distinct compared to their eukaryotic counterparts. Specifically, depending on the organism, eukaryotic poly(A) tails average between 50 and >200 nt and can easily be isolated by several techniques involving oligo(dT)-dependent cDNA amplification. In contrast, the bulk of the poly(A) tails present on prokaryotic transcripts is relatively short (<10 nt) and is difficult to characterize using similar techniques. This chapter describes methods that can circumvent these problems. For example, we discuss how to isolate total RNA and characterize its overall polyadenylation status employing a poly(A) sizing assay. Furthermore, we describe a technique involving RNase H treatment of total RNA followed by northern analysis in order to distinguish length of poly(A) tails on various types of transcripts. Finally, we outline a useful procedure to clone the poly(A) tails of specific transcripts using 5'-3' end-ligated RNA, which is independent of oligo(dT)-dependent cDNA amplification. These approaches are particularly helpful in analyzing transcripts with either short or long poly(A) tails both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  5. Analysis of figwort mosaic virus (plant pararetrovirus) polyadenylation signal.

    PubMed

    Sanfaçon, H

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) polyadenylation (poly(A)) signal has revealed several striking differences to poly(A) signals from animal genes such as the absence of activating sequences downstream from the cleavage site. Instead, upstream sequences were shown to induce recognition of an AAUAAA sequence. To test whether these features are representative of other plant pararetrovirus poly(A) signals, a characterization of the figwort mosaic virus (FMV) poly(A) signal is presented here. The FMV RNAs were isolated from infected plants and mapped, and the different elements composing the FMV poly(A) signal were identified. Multiple upstream sequences were found to be essential for efficient processing at the FMV poly(A) site and could be replaced by the CaMV upstream elements. The FMV upstream sequences showed homologies to other characterized upstream sequences from CaMV, from animal viruses, and from plant poly(A) signals. Surprisingly, neither the FMV nor the CaMV upstream elements could induce recognition of an AAUAAA sequence present in the FMV poly(A) signal, instead a UAUAAA sequence 55 nucleotides further downstream was utilized. It is proposed that additional features may be required for appropriate cleavage such as the context of the AAUAAA-like sequence or perhaps the cleavage site itself.

  6. An in-depth map of polyadenylation sites in cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuefeng; Li, Zhihua; Ozsolak, Fatih; Kim, Sang Woo; Arango-Argoty, Gustavo; Liu, Teresa T; Tenenbaum, Scott A; Bailey, Timothy; Monaghan, A Paula; Milos, Patrice M; John, Bino

    2012-09-01

    We present a comprehensive map of over 1 million polyadenylation sites and quantify their usage in major cancers and tumor cell lines using direct RNA sequencing. We built the Expression and Polyadenylation Database to enable the visualization of the polyadenylation maps in various cancers and to facilitate the discovery of novel genes and gene isoforms that are potentially important to tumorigenesis. Analyses of polyadenylation sites indicate that a large fraction (∼30%) of mRNAs contain alternative polyadenylation sites in their 3' untranslated regions, independent of the cell type. The shortest 3' untranslated region isoforms are preferentially upregulated in cancer tissues, genome-wide. Candidate targets of alternative polyadenylation-mediated upregulation of short isoforms include POLR2K, and signaling cascades of cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix contact, particularly involving regulators of Rho GTPases. Polyadenylation maps also helped to improve 3' untranslated region annotations and identify candidate regulatory marks such as sequence motifs, H3K36Me3 and Pabpc1 that are isoform dependent and occur in a position-specific manner. In summary, these results highlight the need to go beyond monitoring only the cumulative transcript levels for a gene, to separately analysing the expression of its RNA isoforms. PMID:22753024

  7. Patterns of Variant Polyadenylation Signal Usage in Human Genes

    PubMed Central

    Beaudoing, Emmanuel; Freier, Susan; Wyatt, Jacqueline R.; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Gautheret, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    The formation of mature mRNAs in vertebrates involves the cleavage and polyadenylation of the pre-mRNA, 10–30 nt downstream of an AAUAAA or AUUAAA signal sequence. The extensive cDNA data now available shows that these hexamers are not strictly conserved. In order to identify variant polyadenylation signals on a large scale, we compared over 8700 human 3′ untranslated sequences to 157,775 polyadenylated expressed sequence tags (ESTs), used as markers of actual mRNA 3′ ends. About 5600 EST-supported putative mRNA 3′ ends were collected and analyzed for significant hexameric sequences. Known polyadenylation signals were found in only 73% of the 3′ fragments. Ten single-base variants of the AAUAAA sequence were identified with a highly significant occurrence rate, potentially representing 14.9% of the actual polyadenylation signals. Of the mRNAs, 28.6% displayed two or more polyadenylation sites. In these mRNAs, the poly(A) sites proximal to the coding sequence tend to use variant signals more often, while the 3′-most site tends to use a canonical signal. The average number of ESTs associated with each signal type suggests that variant signals (including the common AUUAAA) are processed less efficiently than the canonical signal and could therefore be selected for regulatory purposes. However, the position of the site in the untranslated region may also play a role in polyadenylation rate. PMID:10899149

  8. Connecting RNA Processing to Abiotic Environmental Response in Arabidopsis: the role of a polyadenylation factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q. Q.; Xu, R.; Hunt, A. G.; Falcone, D. L.

    Plants are constantly challenged by numerous environmental stresses both biotic and abiotic It is clear that plants have evolved to counter these stresses using all but limited means We recently discovered the potential role of a messenger RNA processing factor namely the Arabidopsis cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 kDa subunit AtCPSF30 when a mutant deficient in this factor displayed altered responses to an array of abiotic stresses This AtCPSF30 mutant named oxt6 exhibited an elevated tolerance to oxidative stress Microarray experiments of oxt6 and its complemented lines revealed an altered gene expression profile among which were antioxidative defense genes Interestingly the same gene encoding AtCPSF30 can also be transcribed into a large transcript that codes for a potential splicing factor Both protein products have a domain for RNA binding and a calmodulin binding domain activities of which have been confirmed by biochemical assays Surprisingly binding of AtCPSF30 to calmodulin inhibits the RNA-binding activity of the protein Mutational analysis shows that a small part of the protein is responsible for calmodulin binding and point mutations in this region abolished both RNA binding activity and the inhibition of this activity by calmodulin Analyses of the potential splicing factor are on going and the results will be presented The interesting possibilities for both the interplay between splicing and polyadenylation and the regulation of these processes by stimuli that act through

  9. Integration of Developmental and Environmental Signals via a Polyadenylation Factor in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Man; Xu, Ruqiang; Merrill, Carrie; Hong, Liwei; Von Lanken, Carol; Hunt, Arthur G.; Li, Qingshun Q.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to integrate environmental and developmental signals with physiological responses is critical for plant survival. How this integration is done, particularly through posttranscriptional control of gene expression, is poorly understood. Previously, it was found that the 30 kD subunit of Arabidopsis cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (AtCPSF30) is a calmodulin-regulated RNA-binding protein. Here we demonstrated that mutant plants (oxt6) deficient in AtCPSF30 possess a novel range of phenotypes – reduced fertility, reduced lateral root formation, and altered sensitivities to oxidative stress and a number of plant hormones (auxin, cytokinin, gibberellic acid, and ACC). While the wild-type AtCPSF30 (C30G) was able to restore normal growth and responses, a mutant AtCPSF30 protein incapable of interacting with calmodulin (C30GM) could only restore wild-type fertility and responses to oxidative stress and ACC. Thus, the interaction with calmodulin is important for part of AtCPSF30 functions in the plant. Global poly(A) site analysis showed that the C30G and C30GM proteins can restore wild-type poly(A) site choice to the oxt6 mutant. Genes associated with hormone metabolism and auxin responses are also affected by the oxt6 mutation. Moreover, 19 genes that are linked with calmodulin-dependent CPSF30 functions, were identified through genome-wide expression analysis. These data, in conjunction with previous results from the analysis of the oxt6 mutant, indicate that the polyadenylation factor AtCPSF30 is a regulatory hub where different signaling cues are transduced, presumably via differential mRNA 3′ end formation or alternative polyadenylation, into specified phenotypic outcomes. Our results suggest a novel function of a polyadenylation factor in environmental and developmental signal integration. PMID:25546057

  10. Molecular structure of the chicken vitamin D-induced calbindin-D28K gene reveals eleven exons, six Ca2+-binding domains, and numerous promoter regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Minghetti, P P; Cancela, L; Fujisawa, Y; Theofan, G; Norman, A W

    1988-04-01

    The seco-steroid hormone 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 is known to induce the expression of a calcium binding protein termed calbindin-D28K in a variety of target tissues. In order to comprehend the mechanism of induction we have cloned and sequenced the chicken calbindin-D28K gene. The gene spans some 18.5 kilobases (kb) of chromosomal DNA from the putative Cap site to the polyadenylation site of the 2.8 kb mRNA. It is split into 11 coding exons by 10 intervening sequences. The promoter region of this gene is markedly G + C-rich (60-80%) extending from -225 to +400. Within this region we find 70 CpG dinucleotides, four G-C boxes, and numerous known promoter regulatory signals. These putative regulatory signals include a TATA box (ATAAATA) at -30 and a CAT box (CCAAT) at -326. Ten additional variant CAT boxes are found in the upstream promoter region (-218 to -770) of this gene. Furthermore we have identified a glucocorticoid-like responsive element at -410 (TCTACACACTGTTCC) and this element overlaps a metal responsive element (TGCACTC) and a variant CAT box (CCAAAT) and juxtaposes an enhancer-like core element (AAATGGT) on its 3'-side. In addition, the calbindin-D28K promoter is composed of a variety of simple repeated sequences, some of which are components of putative regulatory signals. All splice junctions were found to conform to the GT-AG rule. A consensus sequence of the 5'-splice junction reads AG/GTAAG-TTATA. A consensus sequence of the 3'-splice site consists of two elements: a pyrimidine track (mainly T) followed by ACAG/G-T. A two-dimensional model of calbindin-D28K was constructed which projects the existence of 6 alpha-helix-loop-alpha-helix regions characteristic of calcium binding domains. The 3'-end of the gene consists of a single large (2039 base pair) uninterrupted exon, an organizational feature common to other members of the calcium binding protein gene family which include calmodulin, parvalbumin, Spec I, myosin light chains, etc. Another feature

  11. Complexes of polyadenylic acid and the methyl esters of amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khaled, M. A.; Mulins, D. W., Jr.; Swindle, M.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A study of amino acid methyl esters binding to polyadenylic acid supports the theory that the genetic code originated through weak but selective affinities between amino acids and nucleotides. NMR, insoluble complex analysis, and ultraviolet spectroscopy are used to illustrate a correlation between the hydrophybicities of A amino acids and their binding constants, which, beginning with the largest, are in the order of Phe (having nominally a hydrophobic AAA anticodon), Ile, Leu, Val and Gly (having a hydrophilic anticodon with no A). In general, the binding constants are twice the values by Reuben and Polk (1980) for monomeric AMP, which suggests that polymer amino acids are interacting with only one base. No real differences are found betwen poly A binding for free Phe, Phe methyl ester or Phe amide, except that the amide value is slightly lower.

  12. Four p53 DNA-binding domain peptides bind natural p53-response elements and bend the DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Balagurumoorthy, P; Sakamoto, H; Lewis, M S; Zambrano, N; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M; Appella, E; Harrington, R E

    1995-01-01

    Recent structural studies of the minimal core DNA-binding domain of p53 (p53DBD) complexed to a single consensus pentamer sequence and of the isolated p53 tetramerization domain have provided valuable insights into their functions, but many questions about their interacting roles and synergism remain unanswered. To better understand these relationships, we have examined the binding of the p53DBD to two biologically important full-response elements (the WAF1 and ribosomal gene cluster sites) by using DNA circularization and analytical ultracentrifugation. We show that the p53DBD binds DNA strongly and cooperatively with p53DBD to DNA binding stoichiometries of 4:1. For the WAF1 element, the mean apparent Kd is (8.3 +/- 1.4) x 10(-8) M, and no intermediate species of lower stoichiometries can be detected. We show further that complex formation induces an axial bend of at least 60 degrees in both response elements. These results, taken collectively, demonstrate that p53DBD possesses the ability to direct the formation of a tight nucleoprotein complex having the same 4:1 DNA-binding stoichiometry as wild-type p53 which is accompanied by a substantial conformational change in the response-element DNA. This suggests that the p53DBD may play a role in the tetramerization function of p53. A possible role in this regard is proposed. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7567980

  13. Regulated Pumilio-2 binding controls RINGO/Spy mRNA translation and CPEB activation.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Kiran; Richter, Joel D

    2006-01-15

    CPEB is a sequence-specific RNA-binding protein that controls the polyadenylation-induced translation of mos and cyclin B1 mRNAs in maturing Xenopus oocytes. CPEB activity requires not only the phosphorylation of S174, but also the synthesis of a heretofore-unknown upstream effector molecule. We show that the synthesis of RINGO/Spy, an atypical activator of cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks), is necessary for CPEB-directed polyadenylation. Deletion analysis and mRNA reporter assays show that a cis element in the RINGO/Spy 3'UTR is necessary for translational repression in immature (G2-arrested) oocytes. The repression is mediated by 3'UTR Pumilio-Binding Elements (PBEs), and by its binding protein Pumilio 2 (Pum2). Pum2 also interacts with the Xenopus homolog of human Deleted for Azoospermia-like (DAZL) and the embryonic poly(A)-binding protein (ePAB). Following the induction of maturation, Pum2 dissociates not only from RINGO/Spy mRNA, but from XDAZL and ePAB as well; as a consequence, RINGO/Spy mRNA is translated. These results demonstrate that a reversible Pum2 interaction controls RINGO/Spy mRNA translation and, as a result, CPEB-mediated cytoplasmic polyadenylation.

  14. Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation: the long and short of it

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bin; Manley, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Cleavage and polyadenylation (C/P) of nascent transcripts is essential for maturation of the 3′ ends of most eukaryotic mRNAs. Over the past three decades, biochemical studies have elucidated the machinery responsible for the seemingly simple C/P reaction. Recent genomic analyses have indicated that most eukaryotic genes have multiple cleavage and polyadenylation sites (pAs), leading to transcript isoforms with different coding potentials and/or variable 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs). As such, alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) is an important layer of gene regulation impacting mRNA metabolism. Here, we review our current understanding of APA and recent progress in this field. PMID:23632313

  15. Identification of a complex associated with processing and polyadenylation in vitro of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase precursor RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, F; Cole, C N

    1987-01-01

    Cleavage and polyadenylation of substrate RNAs containing the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) thymidine kinase (tk) gene polyadenylation signal region were examined in HeLa cell nuclear extract. 3'-End RNA processing was accurate and efficient and required ATP and Mg2+. Cleavage, but not polyadenylation, occurred in the presence of EDTA or when ATP was replaced with 3' dATP (cordycepin) or AMP(CH2)PP, a nonhydrolyzable analog of ATP. Processing in vitro and in vivo showed the same signal element requirements: a series of substrates containing linker scanning, internal deletion, and small insertion mutations was processed with the same relative efficiencies and at the same sites in vitro and in vivo. A complex involved in 3'-end RNA processing was identified by gel mobility shift analysis. This complex formed rapidly, reached a maximum level after 20 to 30 min, and was much reduced after 2 h. Very little complex was formed at 0 degree C or with substrates lacking a polyadenylation signal. Entry of 32P-labeled tk substrate into the complex could be prevented by addition of excess 35S-labeled tk or adenovirus L3 precursor RNAs. Competition was not observed with tk RNAs lacking a complete polyadenylation signal. Images PMID:2823124

  16. Genome-Wide Analysis of Polyadenylation Events in Schmidtea mediterranea

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmanan, Vairavan; Bansal, Dhiru; Kulkarni, Jahnavi; Poduval, Deepak; Krishna, Srikar; Sasidharan, Vidyanand; Anand, Praveen; Seshasayee, Aswin; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) play important roles in regulating posttranscriptional gene expression. The 3′UTR is defined by regulated cleavage/polyadenylation of the pre-mRNA. The advent of next-generation sequencing technology has now enabled us to identify these events on a genome-wide scale. In this study, we used poly(A)-position profiling by sequencing (3P-Seq) to capture all poly(A) sites across the genome of the freshwater planarian, Schmidtea mediterranea, an ideal model system for exploring the process of regeneration and stem cell function. We identified the 3′UTRs for ∼14,000 transcripts and thus improved the existing gene annotations. We found 97 transcripts, which are polyadenylated within an internal exon, resulting in the shrinking of the ORF and loss of a predicted protein domain. Around 40% of the transcripts in planaria were alternatively polyadenylated (ApA), resulting either in an altered 3′UTR or a change in coding sequence. We identified specific ApA transcript isoforms that were subjected to miRNA mediated gene regulation using degradome sequencing. In this study, we also confirmed a tissue-specific expression pattern for alternate polyadenylated transcripts. The insights from this study highlight the potential role of ApA in regulating the gene expression essential for planarian regeneration. PMID:27489207

  17. A nucleolar localizing Rev binding element inhibits HIV replication.

    PubMed

    Michienzi, Alessandro; De Angelis, Fernanda G; Bozzoni, Irene; Rossi, John J

    2006-01-01

    The Rev protein of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) facilitates the nuclear export of intron containing viral mRNAs allowing formation of infectious virions. Rev traffics through the nucleolus and shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Rev multimerization and interaction with the export protein CRM1 takes place in the nucleolus. To test the importance of Rev nucleolar trafficking in the HIV-1 replication cycle, we created a nucleolar localizing Rev Response Element (RRE) decoy and tested this for its anti-HIV activity. The RRE decoy provided marked inhibition of HIV-1 replication in both the CEM T-cell line and in primary CD34+ derived monocytes. These results demonstrate that titration of Rev in the nucleolus impairs HIV-1 replication and supports a functional role for Rev trafficking in this sub-cellular compartment.

  18. Nonconsensus Protein Binding to Repetitive DNA Sequence Elements Significantly Affects Eukaryotic Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Gordân, Raluca; Lukatsky, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome-wide experiments in different eukaryotic genomes provide an unprecedented view of transcription factor (TF) binding locations and of nucleosome occupancy. These experiments revealed that a large fraction of TF binding events occur in regions where only a small number of specific TF binding sites (TFBSs) have been detected. Furthermore, in vitro protein-DNA binding measurements performed for hundreds of TFs indicate that TFs are bound with wide range of affinities to different DNA sequences that lack known consensus motifs. These observations have thus challenged the classical picture of specific protein-DNA binding and strongly suggest the existence of additional recognition mechanisms that affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We have previously demonstrated that repetitive DNA sequence elements characterized by certain symmetries statistically affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We call this binding mechanism nonconsensus protein-DNA binding in order to emphasize the point that specific consensus TFBSs do not contribute to this effect. In this paper, using the simple statistical mechanics model developed previously, we calculate the nonconsensus protein-DNA binding free energy for the entire C. elegans and D. melanogaster genomes. Using the available chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) results on TF-DNA binding preferences for ~100 TFs, we show that DNA sequences characterized by low predicted free energy of nonconsensus binding have statistically higher experimental TF occupancy and lower nucleosome occupancy than sequences characterized by high free energy of nonconsensus binding. This is in agreement with our previous analysis performed for the yeast genome. We suggest therefore that nonconsensus protein-DNA binding assists the formation of nucleosome-free regions, as TFs outcompete nucleosomes at genomic locations with enhanced nonconsensus binding. In addition, here we perform a new, large-scale analysis using

  19. Retinoic acid receptors recognize the mouse genome through binding elements with diverse spacing and topology.

    PubMed

    Moutier, Emmanuel; Ye, Tao; Choukrallah, Mohamed-Amin; Urban, Sylvia; Osz, Judit; Chatagnon, Amandine; Delacroix, Laurence; Langer, Diana; Rochel, Natacha; Moras, Dino; Benoit, Gerard; Davidson, Irwin

    2012-07-27

    Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) heterodimerize with retinoid X receptors (RXRs) and bind to RA response elements (RAREs) in the regulatory regions of their target genes. Although previous studies on limited sets of RA-regulated genes have defined canonical RAREs as direct repeats of the consensus RGKTCA separated by 1, 2, or 5 nucleotides (DR1, DR2, DR5), we show that in mouse embryoid bodies or F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, RARs occupy a large repertoire of sites with DR0, DR8, and IR0 (inverted repeat 0) elements. Recombinant RAR-RXR binds these non-canonical spacings in vitro with comparable affinities to DR2 and DR5. Most DR8 elements comprise three half-sites with DR2 and DR0 spacings. This specific half-site organization constitutes a previously unrecognized but frequent signature of RAR binding elements. In functional assays, DR8 and IR0 elements act as independent RAREs, whereas DR0 does not. Our results reveal an unexpected diversity in the spacing and topology of binding elements for the RAR-RXR heterodimer. The differential ability of RAR-RXR bound to DR0 compared to DR2, DR5, and DR8 to mediate RA-dependent transcriptional activation indicates that half-site spacing allosterically regulates RAR function.

  20. Polyadenylation Factor CPSF-73 is the Pre-mRNA 3'-end-processing Endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel,C.; Kaneko, S.; Zhang, H.; Gebauer, D.; Vethantham, V.; Manley, J.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Most eukaryotic messenger RNA precursors (pre-mRNAs) undergo extensive maturational processing, including cleavage and polyadenylation at the 3'-end. Despite the characterization of many proteins that are required for the cleavage reaction, the identity of the endonuclease is not known. Recent analyses indicated that the 73-kDa subunit of cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF-73) might be the endonuclease for this and related reactions, although no direct data confirmed this. Here we report the crystal structures of human CPSF-73 at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, complexed with zinc ions and a sulphate that might mimic the phosphate group of the substrate, and the related yeast protein CPSF-100 (Ydh1) at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution. Both CPSF-73 and CPSF-100 contain two domains, a metallo-{beta}-lactamase domain and a novel -CASP (named for metallo-{beta}-lactamase, CPSF, Artemis, Snm1, Pso2) domain. The active site of CPSF-73, with two zinc ions, is located at the interface of the two domains. Purified recombinant CPSF-73 possesses RNA endonuclease activity, and mutations that disrupt zinc binding in the active site abolish this activity. Our studies provide the first direct experimental evidence that CPSF-73 is the pre-mRNA 3'-end-processing endonuclease.

  1. Binding among select episodic elements is altered via active short-term retrieval.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Donna J; Voss, Joel L

    2015-08-01

    Of the many elements that comprise an episode, are any disproportionately bound to the others? We tested whether active short-term retrieval selectively increases binding. Individual objects from multiobject displays were retrieved after brief delays. Memory was later tested for the other objects. Cueing with actively retrieved objects facilitated memory of associated objects, which was associated with unique patterns of viewing behavior during study and enhanced ERP correlates of retrieval during test, relative to other reminder cues that were not actively retrieved. Active short-term retrieval therefore enhanced binding of retrieved elements with others, thus creating powerful memory cues for entire episodes. PMID:26179229

  2. Putative alternative polyadenylation (APA) events in the early interaction of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and human host cells.

    PubMed

    Afonso-Grunz, Fabian

    2015-12-01

    The immune response of epithelial cells upon infection is mediated by changing activity levels of a variety of proteins along with changes in mRNA, and also ncRNA abundance. Alternative polyadenylation (APA) represents a mechanism that diversifies gene expression similar to alternative splicing. T-cell activation, neuronal activity, development and several human diseases including viral infections involve APA, but at present it remains unclear if this mechanism is also implicated in the response to bacterial infections. Our recently published study of interacting Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and human host cells includes genome-wide expression profiles of human epithelial cells prior and subsequent to infection with the invasive pathogen. The generated dataset (GEO accession number: GSE61730) covers several points of time post infection, and one of these interaction stages was additionally profiled with MACE-based dual 3'Seq, which allows for identification of polyadenylation (PA) sites. The present study features the polyadenylation landscape in early interacting cells based on this data, and provides a comparison of the identified PA sites with those of a corresponding 3P-Seq dataset of non-interacting cells. Differential PA site usage of FTL, PRDX1 and VAPA results in transcription of mRNA isoforms with distinct sets of miRNA and protein binding sites that influence processing, localization, stability, and translation of the respective mRNA. APA of these candidate genes consequently harbors the potential to modulate the host cell response to bacterial infection.

  3. Telomerase RNA stem terminus element affects template boundary element function, telomere sequence, and shelterin binding.

    PubMed

    Webb, Christopher J; Zakian, Virginia A

    2015-09-01

    The stem terminus element (STE), which was discovered 13 y ago in human telomerase RNA, is required for telomerase activity, yet its mode of action is unknown. We report that the Schizosaccharomyces pombe telomerase RNA, TER1 (telomerase RNA 1), also contains a STE, which is essential for telomere maintenance. Cells expressing a partial loss-of-function TER1 STE allele maintained short stable telomeres by a recombination-independent mechanism. Remarkably, the mutant telomere sequence was different from that of wild-type cells. Generation of the altered sequence is explained by reverse transcription into the template boundary element, demonstrating that the STE helps maintain template boundary element function. The altered telomeres bound less Pot1 (protection of telomeres 1) and Taz1 (telomere-associated in Schizosaccharomyces pombe 1) in vivo. Thus, the S. pombe STE, although distant from the template, ensures proper telomere sequence, which in turn promotes proper assembly of the shelterin complex.

  4. The unique extracellular disulfide loop of the glycine receptor is a principal ligand binding element.

    PubMed Central

    Rajendra, S; Vandenberg, R J; Pierce, K D; Cunningham, A M; French, P W; Barry, P H; Schofield, P R

    1995-01-01

    A loop structure, formed by the putative disulfide bridging of Cys198 and Cys209, is a principal element of the ligand binding site in the glycine receptor (GlyR). Disruption of the loop's tertiary structure by Ser mutations of these Cys residues either prevented receptor assembly on the cell surface, or created receptors unable to be activated by agonists or to bind the competitive antagonist, strychnine. Mutation of residues Lys200, Tyr202 and Thr204 within this loop reduced agonist binding and channel activation sensitivities by up to 55-, 520- and 190-fold, respectively, without altering maximal current sizes, and mutations of Lys200 and Tyr202 abolished strychnine binding to the receptor. Removal of the hydroxyl moiety from Tyr202 by mutation to Phe profoundly reduced agonist sensitivity, whilst removal of the benzene ring abolished strychnine binding, thus demonstrating that Tyr202 is crucial for both agonist and antagonist binding to the GlyR. Tyr202 also influences receptor assembly on the cell surface, with only large chain substitutions (Phe, Leu and Arg, but not Thr, Ser and Ala) forming functional receptors. Our data demonstrate the presence of a second ligand binding site in the GlyR, consistent with the three-loop model of ligand binding to the ligand-gated ion channel superfamily. Images PMID:7621814

  5. GAGA factor binding to DNA via a single trinucleotide sequence element.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, R C; Lis, J T

    1998-01-01

    GAGA transcription factor (GAF) is an essential protein in Drosophila , important for the transcriptional regulation of numerous genes. GAF binds to GA repeats in the promoters of these genes via a DNA-binding domain containing a single zinc finger. While GAF binding sites are typically composed of 3.5 GA repeats, the Drosophila hsp70 gene contains much smaller elements, some of which are as little as three bases (GAG) in length. Interestingly, the binding of GAF to more distant trinucleotide elements is relatively strong and not appreciably affected by the removal of larger GA arrays in the promoter. Moreover, a simple synthetic GAG sequence is sufficient to bind GAF in vitro . Here we directly compare the affinity of GAF for different sequence elements by immunoprecipitation and gel mobility shift analysis. Furthermore, our measures of the concentration of GAF in vivo indicate that it is a highly abundant nuclear protein, prevalent enough to occupy a sizable fraction of correspondingly abundant trinucleotide sites. PMID:9592153

  6. Evolution of the mammalian transcription factor binding repertoire via transposable elements.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Guillaume; Leong, Bernard; Vega, Vinsensius B; Chen, Xi; Lee, Yen Ling; Srinivasan, Kandhadayar G; Chew, Joon-Lin; Ruan, Yijun; Wei, Chia-Lin; Ng, Huck Hui; Liu, Edison T

    2008-11-01

    Identification of lineage-specific innovations in genomic control elements is critical for understanding transcriptional regulatory networks and phenotypic heterogeneity. We analyzed, from an evolutionary perspective, the binding regions of seven mammalian transcription factors (ESR1, TP53, MYC, RELA, POU5F1, SOX2, and CTCF) identified on a genome-wide scale by different chromatin immunoprecipitation approaches and found that only a minority of sites appear to be conserved at the sequence level. Instead, we uncovered a pervasive association with genomic repeats by showing that a large fraction of the bona fide binding sites for five of the seven transcription factors (ESR1, TP53, POU5F1, SOX2, and CTCF) are embedded in distinctive families of transposable elements. Using the age of the repeats, we established that these repeat-associated binding sites (RABS) have been associated with significant regulatory expansions throughout the mammalian phylogeny. We validated the functional significance of these RABS by showing that they are over-represented in proximity of regulated genes and that the binding motifs within these repeats have undergone evolutionary selection. Our results demonstrate that transcriptional regulatory networks are highly dynamic in eukaryotic genomes and that transposable elements play an important role in expanding the repertoire of binding sites. PMID:18682548

  7. Binding among Select Episodic Elements Is Altered via Active Short-Term Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, Donna J.; Voss, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Of the many elements that comprise an episode, are any disproportionately bound to the others? We tested whether active short-term retrieval selectively increases binding. Individual objects from multiobject displays were retrieved after brief delays. Memory was later tested for the other objects. Cueing with actively retrieved objects facilitated…

  8. Polyadenylation of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    1974-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) mRNA isolated from infected cell polysomes contains polyadenylic acid [poly(A)] sequences. Detergent-activated purified virions in vitro can transcribe complementary RNA, which has sedimentation properties similar to mRNA, and this RNA also contains poly(A) sequences. Digestion of virion RNA with U2 RNase under conditions where hydrolysis is specific for purine linkages leaves no sequences of polyuridylic acid corresponding in length to the poly(A) on the transcripts. Growth of infectious virus is not inhibited by 3-deoxyadenosine (cordycepin) under conditions in which it inhibits polyadenylation of cellular mRNA. The virus-specific mRNA produced in the presence of cordycepin has poly(A) sequences of the same size distribution as that synthesized in the absence of cordycepin. PMID:4363251

  9. Methods for studying the biochemical properties of an Inr element binding protein: TFII-I.

    PubMed

    Novina, C D; Cheriyath, V; Denis, M C; Roy, A L

    1997-07-01

    Transcription initiation in eukaryotic mRNA coding genes is brought about by a host of general transcription factors, which assemble into a functional preinitiation complex (PIC) at the core promoter region, and gene-specific factors, which exert their effects on the rate and/or stability of the PIC. The core promoter region consists of a well-characterized TATA box and/or a less well-characterized pyrimidine-rich initiator element (Inr). While the biochemical mechanisms of TATA-mediated transcription initiation are extensively studied and known to be directed by the TATA binding protein, the mechanisms via the Inr element are poorly understood, as several factors have been shown to bind to an Inr. Here, we describe the biochemical properties of an Inr binding protein, TFII-I, employing the naturally occurring TATA-less but Inr-containing promoter derived from the T-cell receptor beta chain gene (V beta).

  10. Far Upstream Element-Binding Protein 1 Binds the 3' Untranslated Region of PKD2 and Suppresses Its Translation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wang; Shen, Fan; Hu, Ruikun; Roy, Birbickram; Yang, JungWoo; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Fan; King, Jennifer C; Sergi, Consolato; Liu, Song-Mei; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Tang, Jingfeng; Cao, Ying; Ali, Declan; Chen, Xing-Zhen

    2016-09-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease pathogenesis can be recapitulated in animal models by gene mutations in or dosage alterations of polycystic kidney disease 1 (PKD1) or PKD2, demonstrating that too much and too little PKD1/PKD2 are both pathogenic. Gene dosage manipulation has become an appealing approach by which to compensate for loss or gain of gene function, but the mechanisms controlling PKD2 expression remain incompletely characterized. In this study, using cultured mammalian cells and dual-luciferase assays, we found that the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of PKD2 mRNA inhibits luciferase protein expression. We then identified nucleotides 691-1044, which we called 3FI, as the 3'UTR fragment necessary for repressing the expression of luciferase or PKD2 in this system. Using a pull-down assay and mass spectrometry we identified far upstream element-binding protein 1 (FUBP1) as a 3FI-binding protein. In vitro overexpression of FUBP1 inhibited the expression of PKD2 protein but not mRNA. In embryonic zebrafish, FUBP1 knockdown (KD) by morpholino injection increased PKD2 expression and alleviated fish tail curling caused by morpholino-mediated KD of PKD2. Conversely, FUBP1 overexpression by mRNA injection significantly increased pronephric cyst occurrence and tail curling in zebrafish embryos. Furthermore, FUBP1 binds directly to eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1, indicating a link to the translation initiation complex. These results show that FUBP1 binds 3FI in the PKD2 3'UTR to inhibit PKD2 translation, regulating zebrafish disease phenotypes associated with PKD2 KD.

  11. Far Upstream Element-Binding Protein 1 Binds the 3' Untranslated Region of PKD2 and Suppresses Its Translation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wang; Shen, Fan; Hu, Ruikun; Roy, Birbickram; Yang, JungWoo; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Fan; King, Jennifer C; Sergi, Consolato; Liu, Song-Mei; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Tang, Jingfeng; Cao, Ying; Ali, Declan; Chen, Xing-Zhen

    2016-09-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease pathogenesis can be recapitulated in animal models by gene mutations in or dosage alterations of polycystic kidney disease 1 (PKD1) or PKD2, demonstrating that too much and too little PKD1/PKD2 are both pathogenic. Gene dosage manipulation has become an appealing approach by which to compensate for loss or gain of gene function, but the mechanisms controlling PKD2 expression remain incompletely characterized. In this study, using cultured mammalian cells and dual-luciferase assays, we found that the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of PKD2 mRNA inhibits luciferase protein expression. We then identified nucleotides 691-1044, which we called 3FI, as the 3'UTR fragment necessary for repressing the expression of luciferase or PKD2 in this system. Using a pull-down assay and mass spectrometry we identified far upstream element-binding protein 1 (FUBP1) as a 3FI-binding protein. In vitro overexpression of FUBP1 inhibited the expression of PKD2 protein but not mRNA. In embryonic zebrafish, FUBP1 knockdown (KD) by morpholino injection increased PKD2 expression and alleviated fish tail curling caused by morpholino-mediated KD of PKD2. Conversely, FUBP1 overexpression by mRNA injection significantly increased pronephric cyst occurrence and tail curling in zebrafish embryos. Furthermore, FUBP1 binds directly to eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1, indicating a link to the translation initiation complex. These results show that FUBP1 binds 3FI in the PKD2 3'UTR to inhibit PKD2 translation, regulating zebrafish disease phenotypes associated with PKD2 KD. PMID:26839368

  12. Hormone response element binding proteins: novel regulators of vitamin D and estrogen signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lisse, Thomas S.; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Insights from vitamin D-resistant New World primates and their human homologues as models of natural and pathological insensitivity to sterol/steroid action have uncovered a family of novel intracellular vitamin D and estrogen regulatory proteins involved in hormone action. The proteins, known as “vitamin D or estrogen response element-binding proteins”, behave as potent cis-acting, transdominant regulators to inhibit steroid receptor binding to DNA response elements and is responsible for vitamin D and estrogen resistances. This set of interactors belongs to the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) family of previously known pre-mRNA-interacting proteins. This review provides new insights into the mechanism by which these novel regulators of signaling and metabolism can act to regulate responses to vitamin D and estrogen. In addition the review also describes other molecules that are known to influence nuclear receptor signaling through interaction with hormone response elements. PMID:21236284

  13. A tobacco DNA binding protein that interacts with a light-responsive box II element.

    PubMed Central

    Perisic, O; Lam, E

    1992-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase plays a key role in photosynthetic carbon fixation in higher plants. The small subunit of this chloroplast enzyme (rbcS), encoded by a family of nuclear genes, is regulated at the transcriptional level by light. Promoter analyses have previously identified the box II sequence as a cis element critical for the light-regulated expression of rbcS genes. Nuclear factor GT-1 binds specifically to this element and is one of the plant nuclear factors that has been detected and studied in great detail. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of a tobacco cDNA encoding a protein, designated B2F (Box II Factor), with similar binding specificity and mobility in gel retardation assays as nuclear GT-1. Steady state levels of mRNA encoding B2F do not appear to be regulated by light; this is consistent with the previous observation that nuclear GT-1 activity is present in extracts from both light-grown and dark-adapted plants. Sequence comparison with another plant trans-acting factor, GT-2, which binds to a GT-like element in the rice phytochrome promoter, shows striking homology in three putative alpha-helices that may be involved in DNA binding. PMID:1392597

  14. A common set of nuclear factors bind to promoter elements regulated by the retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Udvadia, A J; Rogers, K T; Horowitz, J M

    1992-09-01

    A 30-base pair element within the c-fos promoter, termed the RCE (retinoblastoma control element), has previously been shown to be the target of transcriptional regulation by the product of the retinoblastoma (Rb) gene. We have identified three nuclear proteins [retinoblastoma control proteins (RCPs)] that complex with this promoter element in vitro. The Rb gene does not appear to encode the RCPs as the expression of Rb in vivo does not correlate with RCE-RCP complex formation in vitro. A single binding site for the RCPs within the c-fos RCE was identified, and the nucleotides required for protein-DNA complex formation were defined. Similar sequences are found in the promoters of two additional genes that are regulated by Rb (c-myc and TGF-beta 1), and binding assays demonstrate that the RCPs also interact with these elements. Linkage of the c-fos RCE to the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter led to a 4-fold stimulation of expression in transient transfection assays. Mutations within the RCP binding site that abrogate stable interaction of the RCPs with the RCE in vitro block RCE transcriptional activity in vivo. Our results suggest a role for the RCPs in RCE-dependent transcription and the regulation of transcription by the Rb protein. PMID:1419910

  15. Global and Quantitative Profiling of Polyadenylated RNAs Using PAS-seq

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chengguo; Shi, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    mRNA alternative polyadenylation (APA) has been increasingly recognized as a widespread and evolutionarily conserved mechanism for eukaryotic gene regulation. Here we describe a method called poly(A) site sequencing that can not only map RNA polyadenylation sites on a transcriptome level but also provide quantitative information on the relative abundance of polyadenylated RNAs. This method has been successfully used for both global APA analysis and digital gene expression profiling. PMID:24590790

  16. Ethylene-inducible DNA binding proteins that interact with an ethylene-responsive element.

    PubMed Central

    Ohme-Takagi, M; Shinshi, H

    1995-01-01

    We demonstrated that the GCC box, which is an 11-bp sequence (TAAGAGCCGCC) conserved in the 5' upstream region of ethylene-inducible pathogenesis-related protein genes in Nicotiana spp and in some other plants, is the sequence that is essential for ethylene responsiveness when incorporated into a heterologous promoter. Competitive gel retardation assays showed DNA binding activities to be specific to the GCC box sequence in tobacco nuclear extracts. Four different cDNAs encoding DNA binding proteins specific for the GCC box sequence were isolated, and their products were designated ethylene-responsive element binding proteins (EREBPs). The deduced amino acid sequences of EREBPs exhibited no homology with those of known DNA binding proteins or transcription factors; neither did the deduced proteins contain a basic leucine zipper or zinc finger motif. The DNA binding domain was identified within a region of 59 amino acid residues that was common to all four deduced EREBPs. Regions highly homologous to the DNA binding domain of EREBPs were found in proteins deduced from the cDNAs of various plants, suggesting that this domain is evolutionarily conserved in plants. RNA gel blot analysis revealed that accumulation of mRNAs for EREBPs was induced by ethylene, but individual EREBPs exhibited different patterns of expression. PMID:7756828

  17. The trehalose/maltose-binding protein as the sensitive element of a glucose biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonin, A. V.; Povarova, O. I.; Staiano, M.; D'Auria, S.; Turoverov, K. K.; Kuznetsova, I. M.

    2014-08-01

    The promising direction of the development of a modern glucometer is the construction of sensing element on the basis of stained (dyed) protein which changes its fluorescence upon glucose binding. One of the proteins that can be used for this purpose is the D-trehalose/D-maltose-binding protein (TMBP) from the thermophilic bacteria Thermococcus litoralis. We investigated the physical-chemical properties of the protein and evaluated its stability to the denaturing action of GdnHCl and heating. It was confirmed that TMBP is an extremely stable protein. In vivo, the intrinsic ligands of TMBP are trehalose and maltose, but TMBP can also bind glucose. The dissociation constant of the TMBP-glucose complex is in the range of 3-8 mM. The binding of glucose does not noticeably change the intrinsic fluorescence of the TMBP. To register protein-glucose binding, we used the fluorescence of the thiol-reactive dye BADAN attached to TMBP. Because the fluorescence of BADAN attached to the cysteine Cys182 of TMBP does not change upon glucose binding, the mutant forms ТМВР/C182S/X_Cys were created. In these mutant proteins, Cys182 is replaced by Ser, removing intrinsic binding site of BADAN and a new dye binding sites were introduced. The largest increase (by 1.4 times) in the intensity of the dye fluorescence was observed upon TMBP/C182S/A14C-BADAN-Glc complex formation. The dissociation constant of this complex is 3.4 ± 0.1 mM. We consider TMBP/C182S/A14C mutant form with attached fluorescent dye BADAN as a good basis for further research aimed to develop of series of TMBP mutant forms with different affinities to glucose labeled with fluorescent dyes.

  18. Effects of rare earth elements and REE-binding proteins on physiological responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongwu; Wang, Xue; Chen, Zhiwei

    2012-02-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs), which include 17 elements in the periodic table, share chemical properties related to a similar external electronic configuration. REEs enriched fertilizers have been used in China since the 1980s. REEs could enter the cell and cell organelles, influence plant growth, and mainly be bound with the biological macromolecules. REE-binding proteins have been found in some plants. In addition, the chlorophyll activities and photosynthetic rate can be regulated by REEs. REEs could promote the protective function of cell membrane and enhance the plant resistance capability to stress produced by environmental factors, and affect the plant physiological mechanism by regulating the Ca²⁺ level in the plant cells. The focus of present review is to describe how REEs and REE-binding proteins participate in the physiological responses in plants.

  19. Conserved cis-elements bind a protein complex that regulates Drosophila ras2/rop bidirectional expression.

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoot, K.; Maltby, L.; Duarte, R.; Veale, R.; Segev, O.

    1994-01-01

    The Drosophila ras2 promoter region exhibits bidirectional activity, as has been demonstrated for the human c-Ha-ras1 and the mouse c-Ki-ras. Here we address a unique case of ras regulation, as Drosophila ras2 provides the only example to date in which the flanking gene (rop) and its product have been isolated. A linking mechanism of control suggests a mutual interaction between the two gene products. Our studies indicate that the Drosophila ras2 promoter region shares with the human c-Ha-ras1 promoter a CACCC box and an AP-1-like sequence. A 14 bp promoter fragment which holds a CACCC element is demonstrated to interact with a specific transcription factor (factor B). This CACCC promoter element represents a stretch of imperfect palindrome. We present evidence that this factor can form a complex with another specific DNA-binding protein (factor A). The binding sites (A + B) for these protein factors are essential for 95% expression of both genes flanking the promoter (ras2 and rop). Region A consists of four overlapping consensus sequences: a TATA-like element, a DSE-like motif (the core sequence of the serum response element), a DRE octamer, which has been shown to play a role in cell proliferation, and a 5 bp direct repeat representing the GATA consensus sequence. Factor A has a very weak affinity to the full promoter region, but when complexed with factor B binding efficiency is enhanced. We also show that alterations of DNA-protein binding specificities can be achieved by supplementing the growth media with different sera. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8297724

  20. Streptococcus pneumoniae Genome-wide Identification and Characterization of BOX Element-binding Domains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Wang, Changzheng; Wan, Min; Wu, Yin; Ma, Qianli

    2015-11-01

    The BOX elements are short repetitive DNA sequences that distribute randomly in intergenic regions of the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome. The function and origin of such elements are still unknown, but they were found to modulate expression of neighboring genes. Evidences suggested that the modulation's mechanism can be fulfilled by sequence-specific interaction of BOX elements with transcription factor family proteins. However, the type and function of these BOX-binding proteins still remain largely unexplored to date. In the current study we described a synthetic protocol to investigate the recognition and interaction between a highly conserved site of BOX elements and the DNA-binding domains of a variety of putative transcription factors in the pneumococcal genome. With the protocol we were able to predict those high-affinity domain binders of the conserved BOX DNA site (BOX DNA) in a high-throughput manner, and analyzed sequence-specific interaction in the domainDNA recognition at molecular level. Consequently, a number of putative transcription factor domains with both high affinity and specificity for the BOX DNA were identified, from which the helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif of a small heat shock factor was selected as a case study and tested for its binding capability toward the double-stranded BOX DNA using fluorescence anisotropy analysis. As might be expected, a relatively high affinity was detected for the interaction of HTH motif with BOX DNA with dissociation constant at nanomolar level. Molecular dynamics simulation, atomic structure examination and binding energy analysis revealed a complicated network of intensive nonbonded interactions across the complex interface, which confers both stability and specificity for the complex architecture. PMID:27491035

  1. Identification of a high affinity nucleocapsid protein binding element from the bovine leukemia virus genome.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, F Zehra; Babalola, Kathlene; Summers, Michael F

    2013-02-01

    Retroviral genome recognition is mediated by interactions between the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of the virally encoded Gag polyprotein and cognate RNA packaging elements that, for most retroviruses, appear to reside primarily within the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the genome. Recent studies suggest that a major packaging determinant of bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a member of the human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)/BLV family and a non-primate animal model for HTLV-induced leukemogenesis, resides within the gag open reading frame. We have prepared and purified the recombinant BLV NC protein and conducted electrophoretic mobility shift and isothermal titration calorimetry studies with RNA fragments corresponding to these proposed packaging elements. The gag-derived RNAs did not exhibit significant affinity for NC, suggesting an alternate role in packaging. However, an 83-nucleotide fragment of the 5'-UTR that resides just upstream of the gag start codon binds NC stoichiometrically and with high affinity (K(d)=136±21 nM). These nucleotides were predicted to form tandem hairpin structures, and studies with smaller fragments indicate that the NC binding site resides exclusively within the distal hairpin (residues G369-U399, K(d)=67±8 nM at physiological ionic strength). Unlike all other structurally characterized retroviral NC binding RNAs, this fragment is not expected to contain exposed guanosines, suggesting that RNA binding may be mediated by a previously uncharacterized mechanism.

  2. Alternative polyadenylation and gene expression regulation in plants.

    PubMed

    Xing, Denghui; Li, Qingshun Quinn

    2011-01-01

    Functioning as an essential step of pre-mRNA processing, polyadenylation has been realized in recent years to play an important regulatory role during eukaryotic gene expression. Such regulation occurs mostly through the use of alternative polyadenylation (APA) sites and generates different transcripts with altered coding capacity for proteins and/or RNA. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie APAs are poorly understood. Besides APA cases demonstrated in animal embryo development, cancers, and other diseases, there are a number of APA examples reported in plants. The best-known ones are related to flowering time control pathways and stress responses. Genome-wide studies have revealed that plants use APA extensively to generate diversity in their transcriptomes. Although each transcript produced by RNA polymerase II has a poly(A) tail, over 50% of plant genes studied possess multiple APA sites in their transcripts. The signals defining poly(A) sites in plants were mostly studied through classical genetic means. Our understanding of these poly(A) signals is enhanced by the tallies of whole plant transcriptomes. The profiles of these signals have been used to build computer models that can predict poly(A) sites in newly sequenced genomes, potential APA sites in genes of interest, and/or to identify, and then mutate, unwanted poly(A) sites in target transgenes to facilitate crop improvements. In this review, we provide readers an update on recent research advances that shed light on the understanding of polyadenylation, APA, and its role in gene expression regulation in plants.

  3. The bacterial DnaA-trio replication origin element specifies single-stranded DNA initiator binding.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Tomas T; Harran, Omar; Murray, Heath

    2016-06-16

    DNA replication is tightly controlled to ensure accurate inheritance of genetic information. In all organisms, initiator proteins possessing AAA+ (ATPases associated with various cellular activities) domains bind replication origins to license new rounds of DNA synthesis. In bacteria the master initiator protein, DnaA, is highly conserved and has two crucial DNA binding activities. DnaA monomers recognize the replication origin (oriC) by binding double-stranded DNA sequences (DnaA-boxes); subsequently, DnaA filaments assemble and promote duplex unwinding by engaging and stretching a single DNA strand. While the specificity for duplex DnaA-boxes by DnaA has been appreciated for over 30 years, the sequence specificity for single-strand DNA binding has remained unknown. Here we identify a new indispensable bacterial replication origin element composed of a repeating trinucleotide motif that we term the DnaA-trio. We show that the function of the DnaA-trio is to stabilize DnaA filaments on a single DNA strand, thus providing essential precision to this binding mechanism. Bioinformatic analysis detects DnaA-trios in replication origins throughout the bacterial kingdom, indicating that this element is part of the core oriC structure. The discovery and characterization of the novel DnaA-trio extends our fundamental understanding of bacterial DNA replication initiation, and because of the conserved structure of AAA+ initiator proteins these findings raise the possibility of specific recognition motifs within replication origins of higher organisms. PMID:27281207

  4. Rec (formerly Corf) function requires interaction with a complex, folded RNA structure within its responsive element rather than binding to a discrete specific binding site.

    PubMed

    Magin-Lachmann, C; Hahn, S; Strobel, H; Held, U; Löwer, J; Löwer, R

    2001-11-01

    It was recently reported that the human endogenous retrovirus HTDV/HERV-K encodes the regulatory protein Rec (formerly designated Corf), which is functionally equivalent to the nuclear export adapter proteins Rev of human immunodeficiency virus and Rex of human T-cell leukemia virus. We have demonstrated that the Rec protein interacts with a characteristic 429-nucleotide RNA element, the Rec-responsive element (RcRE), present in the 3' long terminal repeat of HTDV/HERV-K transcripts. In analogy to the Rev and Rex proteins, which have distinct RNA binding sites in their responsive elements, we have proposed that Rec may also have a defined binding site in the RcRE. In this report, we demonstrate that not every HTDV/HERV-K copy present in the human genome contains an active RcRE, and we characterize mutations that abrogate Rec function. In addition, we demonstrate that Rec function requires binding to a complex, folded RNA structure rather than binding to a discrete specific binding site, in contrast to Rev and Rex and their homologous responsive elements. We define four stem-loop structures in the RcRE that are essential for Rec function. Finally, we demonstrate that both Rev and Rex can mediate nuclear export through the RcRE but that their binding sites are different from each other and from that of Rec.

  5. Capicua DNA-binding sites are general response elements for RTK signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ajuria, Leiore; Nieva, Claudia; Winkler, Clint; Kuo, Dennis; Samper, Núria; Andreu, María José; Helman, Aharon; González-Crespo, Sergio; Paroush, Ze'ev; Courey, Albert J; Jiménez, Gerardo

    2011-03-01

    RTK/Ras/MAPK signaling pathways play key functions in metazoan development, but how they control expression of downstream genes is not well understood. In Drosophila, it is generally assumed that most transcriptional responses to RTK signal activation depend on binding of Ets-family proteins to specific cis-acting sites in target enhancers. Here, we show that several Drosophila RTK pathways control expression of downstream genes through common octameric elements that are binding sites for the HMG-box factor Capicua, a transcriptional repressor that is downregulated by RTK signaling in different contexts. We show that Torso RTK-dependent regulation of terminal gap gene expression in the early embryo critically depends on Capicua octameric sites, and that binding of Capicua to these sites is essential for recruitment of the Groucho co-repressor to the huckebein enhancer in vivo. We then show that subsequent activation of the EGFR RTK pathway in the neuroectodermal region of the embryo controls dorsal-ventral gene expression by downregulating the Capicua protein, and that this control also depends on Capicua octameric motifs. Thus, a similar mechanism of RTK regulation operates during subdivision of the anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral embryonic axes. We also find that identical DNA octamers mediate Capicua-dependent regulation of another EGFR target in the developing wing. Remarkably, a simple combination of activator-binding sites and Capicua motifs is sufficient to establish complex patterns of gene expression in response to both Torso and EGFR activation in different tissues. We conclude that Capicua octamers are general response elements for RTK signaling in Drosophila.

  6. FBI-1, a factor that binds to the HIV-1 inducer of short transcripts (IST), is a POZ domain protein.

    PubMed

    Morrison, D J; Pendergrast, P S; Stavropoulos, P; Colmenares, S U; Kobayashi, R; Hernandez, N

    1999-03-01

    The HIV-1 promoter directs the synthesis of two classes of transcripts, short, non-polyadenylated transcripts and full-length, polyadenylated transcripts. The synthesis of short transcripts is activated by a bipartite DNA element, the inducer of short transcripts or IST, located downstream of the HIV-1 transcriptional start site, while the synthesis of full-length transcripts is activated by the viral activator Tat. Tat binds to the RNA element TAR, which is encoded largely between the two IST half-elements. Upon activation by Tat, the synthesis of short RNAs is repressed. We have previously purified a factor called FBI-1 (for factor that binds to IST) whose binding to wild-type and mutated ISTs correlated well with the abilities of these ISTs to direct the synthesis of short transcripts. Here, we report the cloning of cDNAs encoding FBI-1. FBI-1 contains a POZ domain at its N-terminus and four Krüppel-type zinc fingers at its C-terminus. The C-terminus is sufficient for specific binding, and FBI-1 can form homomers through its POZ domain and, in vivo, through its zinc finger domain as well. In addition, FBI-1 associates with Tat, suggesting that repression of the short transcripts by Tat may be mediated through interactions between the two factors.

  7. FBI-1, a factor that binds to the HIV-1 inducer of short transcripts (IST), is a POZ domain protein.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, D J; Pendergrast, P S; Stavropoulos, P; Colmenares, S U; Kobayashi, R; Hernandez, N

    1999-01-01

    The HIV-1 promoter directs the synthesis of two classes of transcripts, short, non-polyadenylated transcripts and full-length, polyadenylated transcripts. The synthesis of short transcripts is activated by a bipartite DNA element, the inducer of short transcripts or IST, located downstream of the HIV-1 transcriptional start site, while the synthesis of full-length transcripts is activated by the viral activator Tat. Tat binds to the RNA element TAR, which is encoded largely between the two IST half-elements. Upon activation by Tat, the synthesis of short RNAs is repressed. We have previously purified a factor called FBI-1 (for factor that binds to IST) whose binding to wild-type and mutated ISTs correlated well with the abilities of these ISTs to direct the synthesis of short transcripts. Here, we report the cloning of cDNAs encoding FBI-1. FBI-1 contains a POZ domain at its N-terminus and four Krüppel-type zinc fingers at its C-terminus. The C-terminus is sufficient for specific binding, and FBI-1 can form homomers through its POZ domain and, in vivo, through its zinc finger domain as well. In addition, FBI-1 associates with Tat, suggesting that repression of the short transcripts by Tat may be mediated through interactions between the two factors. PMID:9973611

  8. Spacing between GT-1 binding sites within a light-responsive element is critical for transcriptional activity.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmartin, P M; Chua, N H

    1990-01-01

    Dissection of the light-responsive element (LRE) located between -166 and -50 of rbcS-3A from pea has revealed critical spacing requirements between the two GT-1 binding sites for light-responsive transcription. An increase in spacing between the two sites by as little as 2 bp reduces dramatically the rbcS-3A transcript levels in vivo. Mutation of the 10 bp between the binding sites leads to slightly lower transcript levels, as do deletions of either 3 bp or 8 bp. Deletions of 5 bp or 7 bp from between the GT-1 binding sites do not affect rbcS-3A transcript levels; however, a deletion of 10 bp virtually abolishes the activity of this element. These spacing changes within the light-responsive element similarly affect transcription of a divergently oriented and truncated nopaline synthase promoter. Most spacing changes between the two GT-1 binding sites, however, do not impair the binding of GT-1 to this element in vitro. Together with previous observations, these results suggest that the nuclear factor GT-1 may interact with the binding sites in either a productive or nonproductive manner and that GT-1 binding is necessary but not sufficient for light-responsive transcription. We also discuss our results in relation to the observed spacing of similar sequence elements present within other light-responsive promoters. PMID:2152170

  9. Identification of the REST regulon reveals extensive transposable element-mediated binding site duplication

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Rory; Gamblin, Richard J.; Ooi, Lezanne; Bruce, Alexander W.; Donaldson, Ian J.; Westhead, David R.; Wood, Ian C.; Jackson, Richard M.; Buckley, Noel J.

    2006-01-01

    The genome-wide mapping of gene-regulatory motifs remains a major goal that will facilitate the modelling of gene-regulatory networks and their evolution. The repressor element 1 is a long, conserved transcription factor-binding site which recruits the transcriptional repressor REST to numerous neuron-specific target genes. REST plays important roles in multiple biological processes and disease states. To map RE1 sites and target genes, we created a position specific scoring matrix representing the RE1 and used it to search the human and mouse genomes. We identified 1301 and 997 RE1s inhuman and mouse genomes, respectively, of which >40% are novel. By employing an ontological analysis we show that REST target genes are significantly enriched in a number of functional classes. Taking the novel REST target gene CACNA1A as an experimental model, we show that it can be regulated by multiple RE1s of different binding affinities, which are only partially conserved between human and mouse. A novel BLAST methodology indicated that many RE1s belong to closely related families. Most of these sequences are associated with transposable elements, leading us to propose that transposon-mediated duplication and insertion of RE1s has led to the acquisition of novel target genes by REST during evolution. PMID:16899447

  10. Cleavage factor Im (CFIm) as a regulator of alternative polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Jessica G; Norbury, Chris J

    2016-08-15

    Most mammalian protein coding genes are subject to alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA), which can generate distinct mRNA 3'UTRs with differing regulatory potential. Although this process has been intensely studied in recent years, it remains unclear how and to what extent cleavage site selection is regulated under different physiological conditions. The cleavage factor Im (CFIm) complex is a core component of the mammalian cleavage machinery, and the observation that its depletion causes transcriptome-wide changes in cleavage site use makes it a key candidate regulator of APA. This review aims to summarize current knowledge of the CFIm complex, and explores the evidence surrounding its potential contribution to regulation of APA. PMID:27528751

  11. Cleavage/polyadenylation factor IA associates with the carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Barillà, Daniela; Lee, Barbara A.; Proudfoot, Nick J.

    2001-01-01

    The carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II plays an important role in transcription and processing of the nascent transcript by interacting with both transcription and RNA processing factors. We show here that the cleavage/polyadenylation factor IA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae directly contacts CTD. First by affinity chromatography experiments with yeast extracts we demonstrate that the Rna15p, Rna14p, and Pcf11p subunits of this complex are associated with phosphorylated CTD. This interaction is confirmed for Rna15p by yeast two-hybrid analysis. Second, Pcf11p, but not Rna15p, is shown to directly contact phosphorylated CTD based on in vitro binding studies with recombinant proteins. These findings establish a direct interaction of cleavage/polyadenylation factor IA with the CTD. Furthermore, a quantitative analysis of transcription run-on performed on temperature-sensitive mutant strains reveals that the lack of either functional Rna14p or Pcf11p affects transcription termination more severely than the absence of a functional Rna15p. Moreover, these data reinforce the concept that CTD phosphorylation acts as a regulatory mechanism in the maturation of the primary transcript. PMID:11149954

  12. The CHR promoter element controls cell cycle-dependent gene transcription and binds the DREAM and MMB complexes

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Gerd A.; Quaas, Marianne; Schümann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Padi, Megha; Fischer, Martin; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A.; Engeland, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle-dependent gene expression is often controlled on the transcriptional level. Genes like cyclin B, CDC2 and CDC25C are regulated by cell cycle-dependent element (CDE) and cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) promoter elements mainly through repression in G0/G1. It had been suggested that E2F4 binding to CDE sites is central to transcriptional regulation. However, some promoters are only controlled by a CHR. We identify the DREAM complex binding to the CHR of mouse and human cyclin B2 promoters in G0. Association of DREAM and cell cycle-dependent regulation is abrogated when the CHR is mutated. Although E2f4 is part of the complex, a CDE is not essential but can enhance binding of DREAM. We show that the CHR element is not only necessary for repression of gene transcription in G0/G1, but also for activation in S, G2 and M phases. In proliferating cells, the B-myb-containing MMB complex binds the CHR of both promoters independently of the CDE. Bioinformatic analyses identify many genes which contain conserved CHR elements in promoters binding the DREAM complex. With Ube2c as an example from that screen, we show that inverse CHR sites are functional promoter elements that can bind DREAM and MMB. Our findings indicate that the CHR is central to DREAM/MMB-dependent transcriptional control during the cell cycle. PMID:22064854

  13. Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins are transcriptional regulators of the thyroglobulin gene in thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Gaiping; Eder, Klaus; Ringseis, Robert

    2016-08-01

    The genes encoding sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO), both of which are essential for thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis, were shown to be regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP)-1c and -2. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that transcription of a further gene essential for TH synthesis, the thyroglobulin (TG) gene, is under the control of SREBP. To test this hypothesis, we studied the influence of inhibition of SREBP maturation and SREBP knockdown on TG expression in FRTL-5 thyrocytes and explored transcriptional regulation of the TG promoter by reporter gene experiments in FRTL-5 and HepG2 cells, gel shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Inhibition of SREBP maturation by 25-hydroxycholesterol and siRNA-mediated knockdown of either SREBP-1c or SREBP-2 decreased mRNA and protein levels of TG in FRTL-5 thyrocytes. Reporter gene assays with wild-type and mutated TG promoter reporter truncation constructs revealed that the rat TG promoter is transcriptionally activated by nSREBP-1c and nSREBP-2. DNA-binding assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that both nSREBP-1c and nSREBP-2 bind to a SREBP binding motif with characteristics of an E-box SRE at position -63 in the rat TG promoter. In connection with recent findings that NIS and TPO are regulated by SREBP in thyrocytes the present findings support the view that SREBP are regulators of essential steps of TH synthesis in the thyroid gland such as iodide uptake, iodide oxidation and iodination of tyrosyl residues of TG. This moreover suggests that SREBP may be molecular targets for pharmacological modulation of TH synthesis. PMID:27321819

  14. Strategy for molecular beacon binding readout: separating molecular recognition element and signal reporter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongxiang; Li, Jishan; Jin, Jianyu; Wang, Hao; Tang, Hongxing; Yang, Ronghua; Wang, Kemin

    2009-12-01

    A new strategy for molecular beacon binding readout is proposed by using separation of the molecular recognition element and signal reporter. The signal transduction of the target binding event is based on displacing interaction between the target DNA and a competitor, the signal transducer. The target-free capture DNA is first interacted with the competitor, forming an assembled complex. In the presence of a target DNA that the affinity is stronger than that of the competitor, hybridization between capture DNA and the target disassembles the assembled complex and releases the free competitor to change the readout of the signal reporter. To demonstrate the feasibility of the design, a thymine-rich oligonucleotide was examined as a model system. Hg2+ was selected as the competitor, and mercaptoacetic acid-coated CdTe/ZnS quantum dots served as the fluorescent reporter. Selective binding of Hg2+ between the two thymine bases of the capture DNA forms a hairpin-structure. Hybridization between the capture DNA and target DNA destroys the hairpin-structure, releasing Hg2+ ions to quench the quantum dots fluorescence. Under the optimal conditions, fluorescence intensity of the quantum dots against the concentration of perfect cDNA was linear over the concentration range of 0.1-1.6 microM, with a limit of detection of 25 nM. This new assay method is simple in design, avoiding any oligonucleotide labeling. Furthermore, this strategy is generalizable since any target binding can in principle release the signal transducer and be detected with separated signal reporter.

  15. Regulation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) binding in the mammalian clock pacemaker by light but not a circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Kako, K; Banasik, M; Lee, K; Ishida, N

    1997-02-01

    Mammalian circadian rhythms are considered to be regulated by a clock pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus. The molecular mechanism of entrainment and oscillation of circadian rhythm are not well understood but photic induction of immediate-early gene (IEG) expression in the SCN is thought to play a role. Here we show that under 12 h light:12 h dark (LD) condition, the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) binding to cAMP responsive promoter element (CRE) of NMDAR1/zeta1 promoter region in the SCN is higher during the light than the dark by electro-mobility shift assay (EMSA). When animals are placed in constant dark, CREB DNA binding activity in the SCN is low and does not vary with circadian time when compared with cortex nuclear extract as a control. Most significantly, photic induction of CREB binding activity in the SCN occurs at all circadian times tested, indicating that CREB DNA binding in the SCN is not gated by the endogenous clock. These results implicate the role of CREB in photic neuronal signaling in the SCN and suggest that CREB DNA binding activities may not be regulated by a circadian clock. PMID:9030696

  16. Isolation of transcription factors binding auxin response elements using a yeast one-hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Qi, Mei; Huang, Meijuan; Chen, Fan

    2002-04-01

    Plant hormones play an important role during higher plant embryogenesis. Auxin is central to the development of vascular tissues, formation of lateral and adventitious roots, control of apical dominance, and tropic responses. Auxin response element (AuxRE), present in the promoters of many auxin-induced genes, can confer auxin responsiveness. Using carrot somatic embryo under specific developmental phase, a cDNA expression library was constructed. Several plasmids were recombined containing the tetramer of AuxRE as a bait. After screening by a yeast one-hy-brid system, one positive clone was confirmed and characterized. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that AxRF1 protein expressed in yeast cell could bind AuxRE in vitro. It suggests that AxRF1 participates in regulation of the expression of auxin responsive gene during carrot somatic embryogenesis. PMID:18763077

  17. Transcriptomic profiling of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis reveals polyadenylation of the large subunit ribosomal RNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyadenylation of eukaryotic transcripts is usually restricted to mRNA, whereby providing transcripts with stability from degradation by nucleases. Conversely, an RNA degradation pathway can be signaled through poly (A) tailing in prokaryotic, archeal, and organeller biology. Recently polyadenyla...

  18. Regulation of alternative polyadenylation by Nkx2-5 and Xrn2 during mouse heart development.

    PubMed

    Nimura, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Masamichi; Takeichi, Makiko; Saga, Kotaro; Takaoka, Katsuyoshi; Kawamura, Norihiko; Nitta, Hirohisa; Nagano, Hiromichi; Ishino, Saki; Tanaka, Tatsuya; Schwartz, Robert J; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors organize gene expression profiles by regulating promoter activity. However, the role of transcription factors after transcription initiation is poorly understood. Here, we show that the homeoprotein Nkx2-5 and the 5'-3' exonuclease Xrn2 are involved in the regulation of alternative polyadenylation (APA) during mouse heart development. Nkx2-5 occupied not only the transcription start sites (TSSs) but also the downstream regions of genes, serving to connect these regions in primary embryonic cardiomyocytes (eCMs). Nkx2-5 deficiency affected Xrn2 binding to target loci and resulted in increases in RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) occupancy and in the expression of mRNAs with long 3'untranslated regions (3' UTRs) from genes related to heart development. siRNA-mediated suppression of Nkx2-5 and Xrn2 led to heart looping anomaly. Moreover, Nkx2-5 genetically interacts with Xrn2 because Nkx2-5(+/-)Xrn2(+/-), but neither Nkx2-5(+/-)nor Xrn2(+/-), newborns exhibited a defect in ventricular septum formation, suggesting that the association between Nkx2-5 and Xrn2 is essential for heart development. Our results indicate that Nkx2-5 regulates not only the initiation but also the usage of poly(A) sites during heart development. Our findings suggest that tissue-specific transcription factors is involved in the regulation of APA. PMID:27331609

  19. Alternative intronic polyadenylation generates the interleukin-6 trans-signaling inhibitor sgp130-E10.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Jan; Garbers, Christoph; Wolf, Janina; Trad, Ahmad; Moll, Jens M; Sack, Markus; Fischer, Rainer; Grötzinger, Joachim; Waetzig, Georg H; Floss, Doreen M; Scheller, Jürgen

    2014-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 signals via a receptor complex composed of the signal-transducing β-receptor gp130 and the non-signaling membrane-bound or soluble IL-6 receptor α (IL-6R, sIL-6R), which is referred to as classic and trans-signaling, respectively. IL-6 trans-signaling is functionally associated with the development of chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Soluble gp130 (sgp130) variants are natural inhibitors of trans-signaling. Differential splicing yields sgp130 isoforms. Here, we describe that alternative intronic polyadenylation in intron 10 of the gp130 transcript results in a novel mRNA coding for an sgp130 protein isoform (sgp130-E10) of 70-80 kDa. The sgp130-E10 protein was expressed in vivo in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. To assess the biological activity of sgp130-E10, we expressed this variant as Fc-tagged fusion protein (sgp130-E10Fc). Recombinant sgp130-E10Fc binds to a complex of IL-6 and sIL-6R, but not to IL-6 alone, and specifically inhibits IL-6 trans-signaling. Thus, it might play an important role in the regulation of trans-signaling in vivo.

  20. Coordination of RNA Polymerase II Pausing and 3' End Processing Factor Recruitment with Alternative Polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Fusby, Becky; Kim, Soojin; Erickson, Benjamin; Kim, Hyunmin; Peterson, Martha L; Bentley, David L

    2015-01-01

    Most mammalian genes produce transcripts whose 3' ends are processed at multiple alternative positions by cleavage/polyadenylation (CPA). Poly(A) site cleavage frequently occurs cotranscriptionally and is facilitated by CPA factor binding to the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD) phosphorylated on Ser2 residues of its heptad repeats (YS2PTSPS). The function of cotranscriptional events in the selection of alternative poly(A) sites is poorly understood. We investigated Pol II pausing, CTD Ser2 phosphorylation, and processing factor CstF recruitment at wild-type and mutant IgM transgenes that use alternative poly(A) sites to produce mRNAs encoding the secreted and membrane-bound forms of the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain. The results show that the sites of Pol II pausing and processing factor recruitment change depending on which poly(A) site is utilized. In contrast, the extent of Pol II CTD Ser2 phosphorylation does not closely correlate with poly(A) site selection. We conclude that changes in properties of the transcription elongation complex closely correlate with utilization of different poly(A) sites, suggesting that cotranscriptional events may influence the decision between alternative modes of pre-mRNA 3' end processing. PMID:26527620

  1. Core-level binding-energy shifts for the metallic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Börje; Mårtensson, Nils

    1980-05-01

    A general treatment of core-level binding-energy shifts in metals relative to the free atom is introduced and applied to all elemental metals in the Periodic Table. The crucial ingredients of the theoretical description are (a) the assumption of a fully screened final state in the metallic case and (b) the (Z+1) approximation for the screening valence charge distribution around the core-ionized site. This core-ionized site is, furthermore, treated as an impurity in an otherwise perfect metal. The combination of the complete screening picture and the (Z+1) approximation makes it possible to introduce a Born-Haber cycle which connects the initial state with the final state of the core-ionization process. From this cycle it becomes evident that the main contributions to the core-level shift are the cohesive energy difference between the (Z+1) and Z metal and an appropriate ionization energy of the (Z+1) atom (usually the first ionization potential). The appearance of the ionization potential in the shift originates from the assumption of a charge-neutral final state, while the contribution from the cohesive energies essentially describes the change of bonding properties between the initial and final state of the site. The calculated shifts show very good agreement with available experimental values (at present, for 19 elements). For the other elements we have made an effort to combine experimental ionization potentials with theoretical calculations in order to obtain accurate estimates of some of the atomic-core-level binding energies. Such energies together with measured metallic binding energies give "pseudoexperimental" shifts for many elements. Our calculated core-level shifts agree exceedingly well also with these data. For some of the transition elements the core-level shift shows a deviating behavior in comparison with that of neighboring elements. This is shown to be due to a difference in the atomic ground-state configuration, such as, for example, d5s in

  2. Phosphate binding protein as the biorecognition element in a biosensor for phosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salins, Lyndon L E.; Deo, Sapna K.; Daunert, Sylvia

    2004-01-01

    This work explores the potential use of a member of the periplasmic family of binding proteins, the phosphate binding protein (PBP), as the biorecognition element in a sensing scheme for the detection of inorganic phosphate (Pi). The selectivity of this protein originates from its natural role which, in Escherichia coli, is to serve as the initial receptor for the highly specific translocation of Pi to the cytoplasm. The single polypeptide chain of PBP is folded into two similar domains connected by three short peptide linkages that serve as a hinge. The Pi binding site is located deep within the cleft between the two domains. In the presence of the ligand, the two globular domains engulf the former in a hinge-like manner. The resultant conformational change constitutes the basis of the sensor development. A mutant of PBP (MPBP), where an alanine was replaced by a cysteine residue, was prepared by site-directed mutagenesis using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The mutant was expressed, from plasmid pSD501, in the periplasmic space of E. coli and purified in a single chromatographic step on a perfusion anion-exchange column. Site-specific labeling was achieved by attaching the fluorophore, N-[2-(1-maleimidyl)ethyl]-7-(diethylamino)coumarin-3-carboxamide (MDCC), to the protein through the sulfhydryl group of the cysteine moiety. Steady-state fluorescence studies of the MPBP-MDCC conjugate showed a change in the intensity of the signal upon addition of Pi. Calibration curves for Pi were constructed by relating the intensity of the fluorescence signal with the amount of analyte present in the sample. The sensing system was first developed and optimized on a spectrofluorometer using ml volumes of sample. It was then adapted to be used on a microtiter plate arrangement with microliter sample volumes. The system's versatility was finally proven by developing a fiber optic fluorescence-based sensor for monitoring Pi. In all three cases the detection limits for the

  3. Structure of a Thyroid Hormone Receptor DNA-Binding Domain Homodimer Bound to an Inverted Palindrome DNA Response Element

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yi; Young, Matthew A.

    2010-10-22

    Thyroid hormone receptor (TR), as a member of the nuclear hormone receptor family, can recognize and bind different classes of DNA response element targets as either a monomer, a homooligomer, or a heterooligomer. We report here the first crystal structure of a homodimer TR DNA-binding domain (DBD) in complex with an inverted repeat class of thyroid response element (TRE). The structure shows a nearly symmetric structure of the TR DBD assembled on the F2 TRE where the base recognition contacts in the homodimer DNA complex are conserved relative to the previously published structure of a TR-9-cis-retinoic acid receptor heterodimer DNA complex. The new structure also reveals that the T-box region of the DBD can function as a structural hinge that enables a large degree of flexibility in the position of the C-terminal extension helix that connects the DBD to the ligand-binding domain. Although the isolated TR DBDs exist as monomers in solution, we have measured highly cooperative binding of the two TR DBD subunits onto the inverted repeat DNA sequence. This suggests that elements of the DBD can influence the specific TR oligomerization at target genes, and it is not just interactions between the ligand-binding domains that are responsible for TR oligomerization at target genes. Mutational analysis shows that intersubunit contacts at the DBD C terminus account for some, but not all, of the cooperative homodimer TR binding to the inverted repeat class TRE.

  4. An element in the 3' untranslated region of human LINE-1 retrotransposon mRNA binds NXF1(TAP) and can function as a nuclear export element.

    PubMed Central

    Lindtner, Susan; Felber, Barbara K; Kjems, Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    Export of unspliced mRNA to the cytoplasm is required for the replication of all retroviruses. In simian type D retroviruses, the RNA export is mediated by the constitutive transport element (CTE) that binds the cellular nuclear export factor 1, NXF1(TAP). To search for potential cellular RNA substrates for NXF1, we have set up an in vitro selection procedure, using an RNA library expressed from total human genomic DNA. A sequence that was isolated most frequently as independent clones exhibits extensive homology to the 3' untranslated region of expressed LINE1 (L1) retrotransposons. This region, termed L1-NXF1 binding element (L1-NBE) bears no structural resemblance to the viral CTE, but binds NXF1 as strongly as CTE, based on gel mobility shift competition assays. A deletion analysis of the NXF1 protein reveals that CTE and L1-NBE have different, but overlapping, binding domains on NXF1. Placed in an intron, L1-NBE is capable of mediating nuclear export of lariat RNA species in Xenopus laevis oocytes and of an unspliced HIV-1 derived RNA in human 293 cells, suggesting that it may function as a nuclear export element for the intronless L1 mRNA. PMID:12003494

  5. Mitochondrial Polyadenylation Is a One-Step Process Required for mRNA Integrity and tRNA Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Garrido, Javier; Maffezzini, Camilla; Felser, Andrea; Wibom, Rolf; Wedell, Anna; Wredenberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Polyadenylation has well characterised roles in RNA turnover and translation in a variety of biological systems. While polyadenylation on mitochondrial transcripts has been suggested to be a two-step process required to complete translational stop codons, its involvement in mitochondrial RNA turnover is less well understood. We studied knockdown and knockout models of the mitochondrial poly(A) polymerase (MTPAP) in Drosophila melanogaster and demonstrate that polyadenylation of mitochondrial mRNAs is exclusively performed by MTPAP. Further, our results show that mitochondrial polyadenylation does not regulate mRNA stability but protects the 3' terminal integrity, and that despite a lack of functioning 3' ends, these trimmed transcripts are translated, suggesting that polyadenylation is not required for mitochondrial translation. Additionally, loss of MTPAP leads to reduced steady-state levels and disturbed maturation of tRNACys, indicating that polyadenylation in mitochondria might be important for the stability and maturation of specific tRNAs. PMID:27176048

  6. Fine structure of E. coli RNA polymerase-promoter interactions: α subunit binding to the UP element minor groove

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Wilma; Ernst, Alexander; Gourse, Richard L.

    2001-01-01

    The α subunit of E. coli RNAP plays an important role in the recognition of many promoters by binding to the A+T-rich UP element, a DNA sequence located upstream of the recognition elements for the ς subunit, the −35 and −10 hexamers. We examined DNA–RNAP interactions using high resolution interference and protection footprinting methods and using the minor groove-binding drug distamycin. Our results suggest that α interacts with bases in the DNA minor groove and with the DNA backbone along the minor groove, but that UP element major groove surfaces do not make a significant contribution to α binding. On the basis of these and previous results, we propose a model in which α contacts UP element DNA through amino acid residues located in a pair of helix–hairpin–helix motifs. Furthermore, our experiments extend existing information about recognition of the core promoter by ς70 by identifying functional groups in the major grooves of the −35 and −10 hexamers in which modifications interfere with RNAP binding. These studies greatly improve the resolution of our picture of the promoter–RNAP interaction. PMID:11238372

  7. Productive life cycle of adeno-associated virus serotype 2 in the complete absence of a conventional polyadenylation signal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lina; Yin, Zifei; Wang, Yuan; Lu, Yuan; Zhang, Daniel; Srivastava, Arun; Ling, Changquan

    2015-01-01

    We showed that WT adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) genome devoid of a conventional polyadenylation [poly(A)] signal underwent complete genome replication, encapsidation and progeny virion production in the presence of adenovirus. The infectivity of the progeny virion was also retained. Using recombinant AAV2 vectors devoid of a human growth hormone poly(A) signal, we also demonstrated that a subset of mRNA transcripts contained the inverted terminal repeat (ITR) sequence at the 3′ end, which we designated ITR in RNA (ITRR). Furthermore, AAV replication (Rep) proteins were able to interact with the ITRR. Taken together, our studies suggest a new function of the AAV2 ITR as an RNA element to mediate transgene expression from poly(A)-deleted mRNA. PMID:26297494

  8. FootprintDB: Analysis of Plant Cis-Regulatory Elements, Transcription Factors, and Binding Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Sebastian, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    FootprintDB is a database and search engine that compiles regulatory sequences from open access libraries of curated DNA cis-elements and motifs, and their associated transcription factors (TFs). It systematically annotates the binding interfaces of the TFs by exploiting protein-DNA complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank. Each entry in footprintDB is thus a DNA motif linked to the protein sequence of the TF(s) known to recognize it, and in most cases, the set of predicted interface residues involved in specific recognition. This chapter explains step-by-step how to search for DNA motifs and protein sequences in footprintDB and how to focus the search to a particular organism. Two real-world examples are shown where this software was used to analyze transcriptional regulation in plants. Results are described with the aim of guiding users on their interpretation, and special attention is given to the choices users might face when performing similar analyses. PMID:27557773

  9. cAMP-response-element-binding protein positively regulates breast cancer metastasis and subsequent bone destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Jieun; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Ha-Neui; Ha, Hyunil Lee, Zang Hee

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} CREB is highly expressed in advanced breast cancer cells. {yields} Tumor-related factors such as TGF-{beta} further elevate CREB expression. {yields} CREB upregulation stimulates metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. {yields} CREB signaling is required for breast cancer-induced bone destruction. -- Abstract: cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) signaling has been reported to be associated with cancer development and poor clinical outcome in various types of cancer. However, it remains to be elucidated whether CREB is involved in breast cancer development and osteotropism. Here, we found that metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibited higher CREB expression than did non-metastatic MCF-7 cells and that CREB expression was further increased by several soluble factors linked to cancer progression, such as IL-1, IGF-1, and TGF-{beta}. Using wild-type CREB and a dominant-negative form (K-CREB), we found that CREB signaling positively regulated the proliferation, migration, and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, K-CREB prevented MDA-MB-231 cell-induced osteolytic lesions in a mouse model of cancer metastasis. Furthermore, CREB signaling in cancer cells regulated the gene expression of PTHrP, MMPs, and OPG, which are closely involved in cancer metastasis and bone destruction. These results indicate that breast cancer cells acquire CREB overexpression during their development and that this CREB upregulation plays an important role in multiple steps of breast cancer bone metastasis.

  10. Bioadsorption of rare earth elements through cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Park, Dan M.; Reed, David W.; Yung, Mimi C.; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Anderko, Andrzej; Fujita, Yoshiko; Riman, Richard E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-02-02

    In this study, with the increasing demand for rare earth elements (REEs) in many emerging clean energy technologies, there is an urgent need for the development of new approaches for efficient REE extraction and recovery. As a step toward this goal, we genetically engineered the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus for REE adsorption through high-density cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) on its S-layer. The LBT-displayed strains exhibited enhanced adsorption of REEs compared to cells lacking LBT, high specificity for REEs, and an adsorption preference for REEs with small atomic radii. Adsorbed Tb3+ could be effectively recovered using citrate,more » consistent with thermodynamic speciation calculations that predicted strong complexation of Tb3+ by citrate. No reduction in Tb3+ adsorption capacity was observed following citrate elution, enabling consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. The LBT-displayed strain was effective for extracting REEs from the acid leachate of core samples collected at a prospective rare earth mine. Our collective results demonstrate a rapid, efficient, and reversible process for REE adsorption with potential industrial application for REE enrichment and separation.« less

  11. Bioadsorption of Rare Earth Elements through Cell Surface Display of Lanthanide Binding Tags.

    PubMed

    Park, Dan M; Reed, David W; Yung, Mimi C; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Fujita, Yoshiko; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-03-01

    With the increasing demand for rare earth elements (REEs) in many emerging clean energy technologies, there is an urgent need for the development of new approaches for efficient REE extraction and recovery. As a step toward this goal, we genetically engineered the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus for REE adsorption through high-density cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) on its S-layer. The LBT-displayed strains exhibited enhanced adsorption of REEs compared to cells lacking LBT, high specificity for REEs, and an adsorption preference for REEs with small atomic radii. Adsorbed Tb(3+) could be effectively recovered using citrate, consistent with thermodynamic speciation calculations that predicted strong complexation of Tb(3+) by citrate. No reduction in Tb(3+) adsorption capacity was observed following citrate elution, enabling consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. The LBT-displayed strain was effective for extracting REEs from the acid leachate of core samples collected at a prospective rare earth mine. Our collective results demonstrate a rapid, efficient, and reversible process for REE adsorption with potential industrial application for REE enrichment and separation. PMID:26836847

  12. Bioadsorption of Rare Earth Elements through Cell Surface Display of Lanthanide Binding Tags.

    PubMed

    Park, Dan M; Reed, David W; Yung, Mimi C; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Fujita, Yoshiko; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-03-01

    With the increasing demand for rare earth elements (REEs) in many emerging clean energy technologies, there is an urgent need for the development of new approaches for efficient REE extraction and recovery. As a step toward this goal, we genetically engineered the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus for REE adsorption through high-density cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) on its S-layer. The LBT-displayed strains exhibited enhanced adsorption of REEs compared to cells lacking LBT, high specificity for REEs, and an adsorption preference for REEs with small atomic radii. Adsorbed Tb(3+) could be effectively recovered using citrate, consistent with thermodynamic speciation calculations that predicted strong complexation of Tb(3+) by citrate. No reduction in Tb(3+) adsorption capacity was observed following citrate elution, enabling consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. The LBT-displayed strain was effective for extracting REEs from the acid leachate of core samples collected at a prospective rare earth mine. Our collective results demonstrate a rapid, efficient, and reversible process for REE adsorption with potential industrial application for REE enrichment and separation.

  13. SeqGL Identifies Context-Dependent Binding Signals in Genome-Wide Regulatory Element Maps.

    PubMed

    Setty, Manu; Leslie, Christina S

    2015-05-01

    Genome-wide maps of transcription factor (TF) occupancy and regions of open chromatin implicitly contain DNA sequence signals for multiple factors. We present SeqGL, a novel de novo motif discovery algorithm to identify multiple TF sequence signals from ChIP-, DNase-, and ATAC-seq profiles. SeqGL trains a discriminative model using a k-mer feature representation together with group lasso regularization to extract a collection of sequence signals that distinguish peak sequences from flanking regions. Benchmarked on over 100 ChIP-seq experiments, SeqGL outperformed traditional motif discovery tools in discriminative accuracy. Furthermore, SeqGL can be naturally used with multitask learning to identify genomic and cell-type context determinants of TF binding. SeqGL successfully scales to the large multiplicity of sequence signals in DNase- or ATAC-seq maps. In particular, SeqGL was able to identify a number of ChIP-seq validated sequence signals that were not found by traditional motif discovery algorithms. Thus compared to widely used motif discovery algorithms, SeqGL demonstrates both greater discriminative accuracy and higher sensitivity for detecting the DNA sequence signals underlying regulatory element maps. SeqGL is available at http://cbio.mskcc.org/public/Leslie/SeqGL/. PMID:26016777

  14. Endotoxin regulates the maturation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 through the induction of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Diomede, L; Albani, D; Bianchi, M; Salmona, M

    2001-01-01

    Endotoxin (LPS), by raising the levels of cytokines, markedly influences lipid metabolism. To clarify the molecular mechanism of this effect, we examined the action of endotoxin in vitro and in vivo on the regulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1). In HepG2 cells stimulated with LPS, a dose-dependent increase in the level of the mature form of SREBP-1 was observed. For in vivo studies, endotoxin was administered intraperitoneally to CD1 mice fed with a standard or a cholesterol-enriched diet to increase the basal levels of circulating and liver cholesterol. Endotoxin raised cholesterol levels and stimulated the maturation of hepatic SREBP-1 in both normal and cholesterol-fed mice, indicating that the lipogenic effect of LPS was independent of endogenous sterol levels. To assess whether the lipogenic effect of endotoxin was linked to cytokine production, we administered LPS to C57Bl/6J endotoxin-sensitive and to C3H/HeJ endotoxin-resistant mice, which do not produce tumor necrosis factor in response to LPS. Significant induction of cholesterol levels and SREBP-1 activation was observed only in C57Bl/6J mice, indicating that cytokine production is crucial for the regulation of SREBP-1, and that the transcriptional activation of cholesterol biosynthesis may be part of the acute-phase response.

  15. Safety assessment of dehydration-responsive element-binding (DREB) 4 protein expressed in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Cao, Bo; He, Xiaoyun; Luo, Yunbo; Ma, Lina; Liu, Pengfei; Cao, Sishuo; Liu, Yaozheng; Zou, Shiying; Xu, Wentao; Huang, Kunlun

    2012-11-01

    Dehydration-responsive element-binding (DREB) proteins are important transcription factors in plant responses and signal transduction. The DREB proteins can improve the drought and salt tolerance of plants, which provides an excellent opportunity to develop stress-tolerant genetically modified crops in the future. In the present study, a novel TaDREB4 gene (GenBank Accession No: AY781355.1) from Triticum aestivum was amplified by PCR (polymerase chain reaction), and the recombinant plasmid pET 30a(+)/TaDREB4 was successfully constructed. The fusion protein was induced by IPTG (isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside) and purified by the HisPrep™ FF 16/10 Column. The purity of the final purified TaDREB4 protein was 93.0%.Bioinformatic analysis and digestive stability tests were conducted to assess the allergenicity of the TaDREB4 protein, and acute toxicity tests were conducted in mice by oral administration of the TaDREB4 protein (5000 mg/kg BW). The results indicated that there was almost no similarity between the TaDREB4 protein and known allergens, and the protein was immediately degraded in simulated gastric and intestinal fluid within 15 s. In addition, no observed adverse effects were found in mice after 14 days. The results preliminary revealed that the protein is safe for human based on the current experiment.

  16. Preliminary characterization of a light-rare-earth-element-binding peptide of a natural perennial fern Dicranopteris dichotoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiou; Shan, Xiao-Quan; Zhang, Shuzhen; Wen, Bei

    2003-05-01

    A light-rare-earth-element (LREE)-binding peptide was isolated from LREE hyperaccumulator Dicranopteris dichotomaleaves and characterized in terms of molecular weight and ultraviolet absorption spectrum. The molecular weight of the LREE-binding peptide was determined to be 2208 Da by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS). The characteristic ultraviolet absorption spectrum of the peptide was observed at 220-300 nm, suggesting that the peptide chain contained aromatic amino acids. Compared to the unique features of the phytochelatins with a low absorption at 280 nm, the LREE-binding peptide is unlikely to be a typical phytochelatin. The present study suggests that the LREE-binding peptide is probably a natural peptide in D. dichotoma, and it may play an important role in hyperaccumulation of LREEs. PMID:12734617

  17. RNA-Seq profiling of single bovine oocyte transcript abundance and its modulation by cytoplasmic polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Juan M; Chitwood, James L; Ross, Pablo J

    2014-01-01

    Molecular changes occurring during mammalian oocyte maturation are partly regulated by cytoplasmic polyadenylation (CP) and affect oocyte quality, yet the extent of CP activity during oocyte maturation remains unknown. Single bovine oocyte RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) was performed to examine changes in transcript abundance during in vitro oocyte maturation in cattle. Polyadenylated RNA from individual germinal-vesicle and metaphase-II oocytes was amplified and processed for Illumina sequencing, producing approximately 30 million reads per replicate for each sample type. A total of 10,494 genes were found to be expressed, of which 2,455 were differentially expressed (adjusted P<0.05 and fold change >2) between stages, with 503 and 1,952 genes respectively increasing and decreasing in abundance. Differentially expressed genes with complete 3’-untranslated-region sequence (279 increasing and 918 decreasing in polyadenylated transcript abundance) were examined for the presence, position, and distribution of motifs mediating CP, revealing enrichment (85%) and lack there of (18%) in up- and down-regulated genes, respectively. Examination of total and polyadenylated RNA abundance by quantitative PCR validated these RNA-Seq findings. The observed increases in polyadenylated transcript abundance within the RNA-Seq data are likely due to CP, providing novel insight into targeted transcripts and resultant differential gene expression profiles that contribute to oocyte maturation. PMID:25560149

  18. Complex Selection on Human Polyadenylation Signals Revealed by Polymorphism and Divergence Data

    PubMed Central

    Kainov, Yaroslav A.; Aushev, Vasily N.; Naumenko, Sergey A.; Tchevkina, Elena M.; Bazykin, Georgii A.

    2016-01-01

    Polyadenylation is a step of mRNA processing which is crucial for its expression and stability. The major polyadenylation signal (PAS) represents a nucleotide hexamer that adheres to the AATAAA consensus sequence. Over a half of human genes have multiple cleavage and polyadenylation sites, resulting in a great diversity of transcripts differing in function, stability, and translational activity. Here, we use available whole-genome human polymorphism data together with data on interspecies divergence to study the patterns of selection acting on PAS hexamers. Common variants of PAS hexamers are depleted of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and SNPs within PAS hexamers have a reduced derived allele frequency (DAF) and increased conservation, indicating prevalent negative selection; at the same time, the SNPs that “improve” the PAS (i.e., those leading to higher cleavage efficiency) have increased DAF, compared to those that “impair” it. SNPs are rarer at PAS of “unique” polyadenylation sites (one site per gene); among alternative polyadenylation sites, at the distal PAS and at exonic PAS. Similar trends were observed in DAFs and divergence between species of placental mammals. Thus, selection permits PAS mutations mainly at redundant and/or weakly functional PAS. Nevertheless, a fraction of the SNPs at PAS hexamers likely affect gene functions; in particular, some of the observed SNPs are associated with disease. PMID:27324920

  19. RNA-Seq profiling of single bovine oocyte transcript abundance and its modulation by cytoplasmic polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Juan M; Chitwood, James L; Ross, Pablo J

    2015-02-01

    Molecular changes occurring during mammalian oocyte maturation are partly regulated by cytoplasmic polyadenylation (CP) and affect oocyte quality, yet the extent of CP activity during oocyte maturation remains unknown. Single bovine oocyte RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) was performed to examine changes in transcript abundance during in vitro oocyte maturation in cattle. Polyadenylated RNA from individual germinal-vesicle and metaphase-II oocytes was amplified and processed for Illumina sequencing, producing approximately 30 million reads per replicate for each sample type. A total of 10,494 genes were found to be expressed, of which 2,455 were differentially expressed (adjusted P < 0.05 and fold change >2) between stages, with 503 and 1,952 genes respectively increasing and decreasing in abundance. Differentially expressed genes with complete 3'-untranslated-region sequence (279 increasing and 918 decreasing in polyadenylated transcript abundance) were examined for the presence, position, and distribution of motifs mediating CP, revealing enrichment (85%) and lack thereof (18%) in up- and down-regulated genes, respectively. Examination of total and polyadenylated RNA abundance by quantitative PCR validated these RNA-Seq findings. The observed increases in polyadenylated transcript abundance within the RNA-Seq data are likely due to CP, providing novel insight into targeted transcripts and resultant differential gene expression profiles that contribute to oocyte maturation.

  20. Iron regulates cytoplasmic levels of a novel iron-responsive element-binding protein without aconitase activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, B; Yu, Y; Leibold, E A

    1994-09-30

    Iron-responsive element-binding proteins (IRE-BPs) are cytosolic proteins that bind to a conserved RNA stem-loop, termed the iron-responsive element (IRE), that is located in the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions of mRNAs involved in iron metabolism. Binding of the IRE-BP to 5'-IREs represses translation, whereas binding to 3'-IREs stabilizes the mRNA. The previously identified IRE-BP (BP1) contains a 4Fe-4S cluster and has sequence homology to mitochondrial aconitase. The 4Fe-4S cluster is important for iron-dependent regulation: BP1 containing iron has low affinity for the IRE and contains aconitase activity, whereas BP1 lacking iron has high affinity for the IRE, but lacks aconitase activity. A second IRE-BP (BP2) has been identified in rat tissues and cells and exhibits many of the hallmarks of an IRE-BP, including binding to the IRE and functioning as a translational repressor of IRE-containing RNAs. BP1 and BP2 RNA binding activities are decreased in extracts from cells treated with iron, indicating that BP1 and BP2 are negatively regulated by iron. Although BP1 and BP2 share similar characteristics, they differ in two significant ways. Unlike BP1 levels, which do not change when RNA binding activity decreases in response to iron, BP2 decreases to undetectable levels in extracts from cells treated with iron; and unlike BP1, BP2 does not have aconitase activity. These data indicate that BP1 and BP2 are distinct proteins that have similar specificity for IRE binding and that function similarly in translation, but are regulated by iron via different mechanisms. PMID:7523370

  1. Characterization of a gene encoding a DNA binding protein with specificity for a light-responsive element.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmartin, P M; Memelink, J; Hiratsuka, K; Kay, S A; Chua, N H

    1992-01-01

    The sequence element of box II (GTGTGGTTAATATG) is a regulatory component of a light-responsive element present within the upstream region of pea rbcS-3A. The nuclear protein GT-1 was defined previously as a DNA binding activity that interacts with box II. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of cDNA sequences that encode a DNA binding protein with specificity for this element. The recombinant protein, tobacco GT-1a, shows similar sequence requirements for DNA binding to nuclear GT-1, as assayed by its ability to interact with previously defined 2-bp scanning mutations of box II, and is shown to be immunologically related to nuclear GT-1. The predicted structure of the 43-kD protein derived from the cDNA sequence suggests the presence of a novel helix-helix-turn-helix (HHTH) motif. Comparison between the predicted protein sequence encoded by the tobacco GT-1a cDNA and that of another GT binding protein, rice GT-2, reveals strong amino acid conservation over the HHTH region; this motif appears to be involved in the interaction between the recombinant protein and box II. Genomic DNA gel blot analysis indicated the presence of a small gene family of related sequences within the tobacco nuclear genome. RNA gel blot analysis of tobacco mRNA using the isolated cDNA as a probe showed that transcripts are present in several tissues, including both light-grown and dark-adapted leaves. PMID:1392598

  2. CstF-64 and 3'-UTR cis-element determine Star-PAP specificity for target mRNA selection by excluding PAPα.

    PubMed

    Kandala, Divya T; Mohan, Nimmy; A, Vivekanand; A P, Sudheesh; G, Reshmi; Laishram, Rakesh S

    2016-01-29

    Almost all eukaryotic mRNAs have a poly (A) tail at the 3'-end. Canonical PAPs (PAPα/γ) polyadenylate nuclear pre-mRNAs. The recent identification of the non-canonical Star-PAP revealed specificity of nuclear PAPs for pre-mRNAs, yet the mechanism how Star-PAP selects mRNA targets is still elusive. Moreover, how Star-PAP target mRNAs having canonical AAUAAA signal are not regulated by PAPα is unclear. We investigate specificity mechanisms of Star-PAP that selects pre-mRNA targets for polyadenylation. Star-PAP assembles distinct 3'-end processing complex and controls pre-mRNAs independent of PAPα. We identified a Star-PAP recognition nucleotide motif and showed that suboptimal DSE on Star-PAP target pre-mRNA 3'-UTRs inhibit CstF-64 binding, thus preventing PAPα recruitment onto it. Altering 3'-UTR cis-elements on a Star-PAP target pre-mRNA can switch the regulatory PAP from Star-PAP to PAPα. Our results suggest a mechanism of poly (A) site selection that has potential implication on the regulation of alternative polyadenylation.

  3. CstF-64 and 3′-UTR cis-element determine Star-PAP specificity for target mRNA selection by excluding PAPα

    PubMed Central

    Kandala, Divya T.; Mohan, Nimmy; A, Vivekanand; AP, Sudheesh; G, Reshmi; Laishram, Rakesh S.

    2016-01-01

    Almost all eukaryotic mRNAs have a poly (A) tail at the 3′-end. Canonical PAPs (PAPα/γ) polyadenylate nuclear pre-mRNAs. The recent identification of the non-canonical Star-PAP revealed specificity of nuclear PAPs for pre-mRNAs, yet the mechanism how Star-PAP selects mRNA targets is still elusive. Moreover, how Star-PAP target mRNAs having canonical AAUAAA signal are not regulated by PAPα is unclear. We investigate specificity mechanisms of Star-PAP that selects pre-mRNA targets for polyadenylation. Star-PAP assembles distinct 3′-end processing complex and controls pre-mRNAs independent of PAPα. We identified a Star-PAP recognition nucleotide motif and showed that suboptimal DSE on Star-PAP target pre-mRNA 3′-UTRs inhibit CstF-64 binding, thus preventing PAPα recruitment onto it. Altering 3′-UTR cis-elements on a Star-PAP target pre-mRNA can switch the regulatory PAP from Star-PAP to PAPα. Our results suggest a mechanism of poly (A) site selection that has potential implication on the regulation of alternative polyadenylation. PMID:26496945

  4. Regulation of alternative polyadenylation by Nkx2-5 and Xrn2 during mouse heart development

    PubMed Central

    Nimura, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Masamichi; Takeichi, Makiko; Saga, Kotaro; Takaoka, Katsuyoshi; Kawamura, Norihiko; Nitta, Hirohisa; Nagano, Hiromichi; Ishino, Saki; Tanaka, Tatsuya; Schwartz, Robert J; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors organize gene expression profiles by regulating promoter activity. However, the role of transcription factors after transcription initiation is poorly understood. Here, we show that the homeoprotein Nkx2-5 and the 5’-3’ exonuclease Xrn2 are involved in the regulation of alternative polyadenylation (APA) during mouse heart development. Nkx2-5 occupied not only the transcription start sites (TSSs) but also the downstream regions of genes, serving to connect these regions in primary embryonic cardiomyocytes (eCMs). Nkx2-5 deficiency affected Xrn2 binding to target loci and resulted in increases in RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) occupancy and in the expression of mRNAs with long 3’untranslated regions (3’ UTRs) from genes related to heart development. siRNA-mediated suppression of Nkx2-5 and Xrn2 led to heart looping anomaly. Moreover, Nkx2-5 genetically interacts with Xrn2 because Nkx2-5+/-Xrn2+/-, but neither Nkx2-5+/-nor Xrn2+/-, newborns exhibited a defect in ventricular septum formation, suggesting that the association between Nkx2-5 and Xrn2 is essential for heart development. Our results indicate that Nkx2-5 regulates not only the initiation but also the usage of poly(A) sites during heart development. Our findings suggest that tissue-specific transcription factors is involved in the regulation of APA. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16030.001 PMID:27331609

  5. Cleavage of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) by CPP32 during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Zelenski, N G; Yang, J; Sakai, J; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L

    1996-01-01

    Cellular cholesterol homeostasis is controlled by sterol-regulated proteolysis of membrane-bound transcription factors called sterol-regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs). CPP32, a cysteine protease, was shown previously to cleave SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 in vitro at an aspartic acid between the basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper domain and the first trans-membrane domain, liberating a transcriptionally active fragment. Here, we show that CPP32 exists in an inactive 32 kDa form in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. When apoptosis was induced with the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine, CPP32 was cleaved to subunits of 20 and 10 kDa to form the active protease. Under these conditions membrane-bound SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 were both cleaved, and the transcriptionally active N-terminal fragments were found in nuclear extracts. Similar results were obtained in human U937 cells induced to undergo apoptosis by anti-Fas and etoposide. The apoptosis-induced cleavage of SREBPs was not suppressed by sterols, indicating that apoptosis-induced cleavage and sterol-regulated cleavage are mediated by different proteases. CHO cells expressing a mutant SREBP-2 with an Asp--> Ala mutation at the CPP32 cleavage site showed sterol-regulated cleavage but no apoptosis-induced cleavage. These data are consistent with the emerging concept that CPP32 is a central mediator in apoptosis. They also indicate that SREBPs, like poly (ADP) ribose polymerase, are cleaved by CPP32 during programmed cell death. Images PMID:8605870

  6. Far upstream element-binding protein 1 is a prognostic biomarker and promotes nasopharyngeal carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Z-H; Hu, J-L; Liang, J-Z; Zhou, A-J; Li, M-Z; Yan, S-M; Zhang, X; Gao, S; Chen, L; Zhong, Q; Zeng, M-S

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a malignant epithelial tumor with tremendous invasion and metastasis capacities, and it has a high incidence in southeast Asia and southern China. Previous studies identified that far upstream element-binding protein 1 (FBP1), a transcriptional regulator of c-Myc that is one of the most frequently aberrantly expressed oncogenes in various human cancers, including NPC, is an important biomarker for many cancers. Our study aimed to investigate the expression and function of FBP1 in human NPC. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), western blot and immunohistochemical staining (IHC) were performed in NPC cells and biopsies. Furthermore, the effect of FBP1 knockdown on cell proliferation, colony formation, side population tests and tumorigenesis in nude mice were measured by MTT, clonogenicity analysis, flow cytometry and a xenograft model, respectively. The results showed that the mRNA and protein levels of FBP1, which are positively correlated with c-Myc expression, were substantially higher in NPC than that in nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. IHC revealed that the patients with high FBP1 expression had a significantly poorer prognosis compared with the patients with low expression (P=0.020). In univariate analysis, high FBP1 and c-Myc expression predicted poorer overall survival (OS) and poorer progression-free survival. Multivariate analysis indicated that high FBP1 and c-Myc expression were independent prognostic markers. Knockdown of FBP1 reduced cell proliferation, clonogenicity and the ratio of side populations, as well as tumorigenesis in nude mice. These data indicate that FBP1 expression, which is closely correlated with c-Myc expression, is an independent prognostic factor and promotes NPC progression. Our results suggest that FBP1 can not only serve as a useful prognostic biomarker for NPC but also as a potential therapeutic target for NPC patients. PMID:26469968

  7. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulates Myelination in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs) might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation of zebrafish

  8. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulates Myelination in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs) might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation of zebrafish

  9. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulates Myelination in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs) might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation of zebrafish

  10. Genome-wide identification and predictive modeling of polyadenylation sites in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Guoli; Guan, Jinting; Zeng, Yong; Li, Qingshun Q; Wu, Xiaohui

    2015-03-01

    Polyadenylation [poly(A)] is a vital step in post-transcriptional processing of pre-mRNA. Alternative polyadenylation is a widespread mechanism of regulating gene expression in eukaryotes. Defining poly(A) sites contributes to the annotation of transcripts' ends and the study of gene regulatory mechanisms. Here, we survey methods for collecting poly(A) sites using high-throughput sequencing technologies and summarize the general processes for genome-wide poly(A) site identifications. We also compare the performances of various poly(A) site prediction models and discuss the relationship between poly(A) site identification from sequencing projects and predictive modeling. Moreover, we attempt to address some potential problems in current researches and propose future directions related to polyadenylation research.

  11. DNase I hypersensitivity sites and nuclear protein binding on the fatty acid synthase gene: identification of an element with properties similar to known glucose-responsive elements.

    PubMed Central

    Foufelle, F; Lepetit, N; Bosc, D; Delzenne, N; Morin, J; Raymondjean, M; Ferré, P

    1995-01-01

    We have shown previously that fatty acid synthase (FAS) gene expression is positively regulated by glucose in rat adipose tissue and liver. In the present study, we have identified in the first intron of the gene a sequence closely related to known glucose-responsive elements such as in the L-pyruvate kinase and S14 genes, including a putative upstream stimulatory factor/major late transcription factor (USF/MLTF) binding site (E-box) (+ 292 nt to + 297 nt). Location of this sequence corresponds to a site of hypersensitivity to DNase I which is present in the liver but not in the spleen. Moreover, using this information from a preliminary report of the present work, others have shown that a + 283 nt to + 303 nt sequence of the FAS gene can confer glucose responsiveness to a heterologous promoter. The protein binding to this region has been investigated in vitro by a combination of DNase I footprinting and gel-retardation experiments with synthetic oligonucleotides and known nuclear proteins. DNase I footprinting experiments using a + 161 nt to + 405 nt fragment of the FAS gene demonstrate that a region from + 290 nt to + 316 nt is protected by nuclear extracts from liver and spleen. This region binds two ubiquitous nuclear factors, USF/MLTF and the CAAT-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor 1 (CTF/NF1). Binding of these factors is similar in nuclear extracts from liver which does or does not express the FAS gene as observed for glucose-responsive elements in the L-pyruvate kinase and S14 genes. This suggests a posttranslational modification of a factor of the complex after glucose stimulation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7772036

  12. DNase I hypersensitivity sites and nuclear protein binding on the fatty acid synthase gene: identification of an element with properties similar to known glucose-responsive elements.

    PubMed

    Foufelle, F; Lepetit, N; Bosc, D; Delzenne, N; Morin, J; Raymondjean, M; Ferré, P

    1995-06-01

    We have shown previously that fatty acid synthase (FAS) gene expression is positively regulated by glucose in rat adipose tissue and liver. In the present study, we have identified in the first intron of the gene a sequence closely related to known glucose-responsive elements such as in the L-pyruvate kinase and S14 genes, including a putative upstream stimulatory factor/major late transcription factor (USF/MLTF) binding site (E-box) (+ 292 nt to + 297 nt). Location of this sequence corresponds to a site of hypersensitivity to DNase I which is present in the liver but not in the spleen. Moreover, using this information from a preliminary report of the present work, others have shown that a + 283 nt to + 303 nt sequence of the FAS gene can confer glucose responsiveness to a heterologous promoter. The protein binding to this region has been investigated in vitro by a combination of DNase I footprinting and gel-retardation experiments with synthetic oligonucleotides and known nuclear proteins. DNase I footprinting experiments using a + 161 nt to + 405 nt fragment of the FAS gene demonstrate that a region from + 290 nt to + 316 nt is protected by nuclear extracts from liver and spleen. This region binds two ubiquitous nuclear factors, USF/MLTF and the CAAT-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor 1 (CTF/NF1). Binding of these factors is similar in nuclear extracts from liver which does or does not express the FAS gene as observed for glucose-responsive elements in the L-pyruvate kinase and S14 genes. This suggests a posttranslational modification of a factor of the complex after glucose stimulation.

  13. Termination and pausing of RNA polymerase II downstream of yeast polyadenylation sites.

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, L E; Moore, C L

    1993-01-01

    Little is known about the transcriptional events which occur downstream of polyadenylation sites. Although the polyadenylation site of a gene can be easily identified, it has been difficult to determine the site of transcription termination in vivo because of the rapid processing of pre-mRNAs. Using an in vitro approach, we have shown that sequences from the 3' ends of two different Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes, ADH2 and GAL7, direct transcription termination and/or polymerase pausing in yeast nuclear extracts. In the case of the ADH2 sequence, the RNA synthesized in vitro ends approximately 50 to 150 nucleotides downstream of the poly(A) site. This RNA is not polyadenylated and may represent the primary transcript. A similarly sized nonpolyadenylated [poly(A)-] transcript can be detected in vivo from the same transcriptional template. A GAL7 template also directs the in vitro synthesis of an RNA which extends a short distance past the poly(A) site. However, a significant amount of the GAL7 RNA is polyadenylated at or close to the in vivo poly(A) site. Mutations of GAL7 or ADH2 poly(A) signals prevent polyadenylation but do not affect the in vitro synthesis of the extended poly(A)- transcript. Since transcription of the mutant template continues through this region in vivo, it is likely that a strong RNA polymerase II pause site lies within the 3'-end sequences. Our data support the hypothesis that the coupling of this pause site to a functional polyadenylation signal results in transcription termination. Images PMID:8355675

  14. The Runt domain of AML1 (RUNX1) binds a sequence-conserved RNA motif that mimics a DNA element

    PubMed Central

    Fukunaga, Junichi; Nomura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Amano, Ryo; Tanaka, Taku; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Gota; Sakamoto, Taiichi; Kozu, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    AML1 (RUNX1) is a key transcription factor for hematopoiesis that binds to the Runt-binding double-stranded DNA element (RDE) of target genes through its N-terminal Runt domain. Aberrations in the AML1 gene are frequently found in human leukemia. To better understand AML1 and its potential utility for diagnosis and therapy, we obtained RNA aptamers that bind specifically to the AML1 Runt domain. Enzymatic probing and NMR analyses revealed that Apt1-S, which is a truncated variant of one of the aptamers, has a CACG tetraloop and two stem regions separated by an internal loop. All the isolated aptamers were found to contain the conserved sequence motif 5′-NNCCAC-3′ and 5′-GCGMGN′N′-3′ (M:A or C; N and N′ form Watson–Crick base pairs). The motif contains one AC mismatch and one base bulged out. Mutational analysis of Apt1-S showed that three guanines of the motif are important for Runt binding as are the three guanines of RDE, which are directly recognized by three arginine residues of the Runt domain. Mutational analyses of the Runt domain revealed that the amino acid residues used for Apt1-S binding were similar to those used for RDE binding. Furthermore, the aptamer competed with RDE for binding to the Runt domain in vitro. These results demonstrated that the Runt domain of the AML1 protein binds to the motif of the aptamer that mimics DNA. Our findings should provide new insights into RNA function and utility in both basic and applied sciences. PMID:23709277

  15. Regulation of CYP3A4 by pregnane X receptor: The role of nuclear receptors competing for response element binding

    SciTech Connect

    Istrate, Monica A.; Nussler, Andreas K.; Eichelbaum, Michel; Burk, Oliver

    2010-03-19

    Induction of the major drug metabolizing enzyme CYP3A4 by xenobiotics contributes to the pronounced interindividual variability of its expression and often results in clinically relevant drug-drug interactions. It is mainly mediated by PXR, which regulates CYP3A4 expression by binding to several specific elements in the 5' upstream regulatory region of the gene. Induction itself shows a marked interindividual variability, whose underlying determinants are only partly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of nuclear receptor binding to PXR response elements in CYP3A4, as a potential non-genetic mechanism contributing to interindividual variability of induction. By in vitro DNA binding experiments, we showed that several nuclear receptors bind efficiently to the proximal promoter ER6 and distal xenobiotic-responsive enhancer module DR3 motifs. TR{alpha}1, TR{beta}1, COUP-TFI, and COUP-TFII further demonstrated dose-dependent repression of PXR-mediated CYP3A4 enhancer/promoter reporter activity in transient transfection in the presence and absence of the PXR inducer rifampin, while VDR showed this effect only in the absence of treatment. By combining functional in vitro characterization with hepatic expression analysis, we predict that TR{alpha}1, TR{beta}1, COUP-TFI, and COUP-TFII show a strong potential for the repression of PXR-mediated activation of CYP3A4 in vivo. In summary, our results demonstrate that nuclear receptor binding to PXR response elements interferes with PXR-mediated expression and induction of CYP3A4 and thereby contributes to the interindividual variability of induction.

  16. Reciprocal control of RNA-binding and aconitase activity in the regulation of the iron-responsive element binding protein: role of the iron-sulfur cluster.

    PubMed

    Haile, D J; Rouault, T A; Tang, C K; Chin, J; Harford, J B; Klausner, R D

    1992-08-15

    Several mechanisms of posttranscriptional gene regulation are involved in regulation of the expression of essential proteins of iron metabolism. Coordinate regulation of ferritin and transferrin receptor expression is produced by binding of a cytosolic protein, the iron-responsive element binding protein (IRE-BP) to specific stem-loop structures present in target RNAs. The affinity of this protein for its cognate RNA is regulated by the cell in response to changes in iron availability. The IRE-BP demonstrates a striking level of amino acid sequence identity to the iron-sulfur (Fe-S) protein mitochondrial aconitase. Moreover, the recombinant IRE-BP has aconitase function. The lability of the Fe-S cluster in mitochondrial aconitase has led us to propose that the mechanism by which iron levels are sensed by the IRE-BP involves changes in an Fe-S cluster in the IRE-BP. In this study, we demonstrate that procedures aimed at altering the IRE-BP Fe-S cluster in vitro reciprocally alter the RNA binding and aconitase activity of the IRE-BP. The changes in the RNA binding of the protein produced in vitro appear to match the previously described alterations of the protein in response to iron availability in the cell. Furthermore, iron manipulation of cells correlates with the activation or inactivation of the IRE-BP aconitase activity. The results are consistent with a model for the posttranslational regulation of the IRE-BP in which the Fe-S cluster is altered in response to the availability of intracellular iron and this, in turn, regulates the RNA-binding activity. PMID:1502165

  17. The Study of Stability of Compression-Loaded Multispan Composite Panel Upon Failure of Elements Binding it to Panel Supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamula, G. N.; Ierusalimsky, K. M.; Fomin, V. P.; Grishin, V. I.; Kalmykova, G. S.

    1999-01-01

    The present document is a final technical report carried out within co-operation between United States'NASA Langley RC and Russia's Goskomoboronprom in aeronautics, and continues similar programs, accomplished in 1996, 1997, and 1998, respectively). The report provides results of "The study of stability of compression-loaded multispan composite panels upon failure of elements binding it to panel supports"; these comply with requirements established at TsAGI on 24 March 1998 and at NASA on 15 September 1998.

  18. Response Element Composition Governs Correlations between Binding Site Affinity and Transcription in Glucocorticoid Receptor Feed-forward Loops.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Sarah K; Zuo, Zheng; Kadiyala, Vineela; Zhang, Liyang; Pufall, Miles A; Jain, Mukesh K; Phang, Tzu L; Stormo, Gary D; Gerber, Anthony N

    2015-08-01

    Combinatorial gene regulation through feed-forward loops (FFLs) can bestow specificity and temporal control to client gene expression; however, characteristics of binding sites that mediate these effects are not established. We previously showed that the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and KLF15 form coherent FFLs that cooperatively induce targets such as the amino acid-metabolizing enzymes AASS and PRODH and incoherent FFLs exemplified by repression of MT2A by KLF15. Here, we demonstrate that GR and KLF15 physically interact and identify low affinity GR binding sites within glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) for PRODH and AASS that contribute to combinatorial regulation with KLF15. We used deep sequencing and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to derive in vitro GR binding affinities across sequence space. We applied these data to show that AASS GRE activity correlated (r(2) = 0.73) with predicted GR binding affinities across a 50-fold affinity range in transfection assays; however, the slope of the linear relationship more than doubled when KLF15 was expressed. Whereas activity of the MT2A GRE was even more strongly (r(2) = 0.89) correlated with GR binding site affinity, the slope of the linear relationship was sharply reduced by KLF15, consistent with incoherent FFL logic. Thus, GRE architecture and co-regulator expression together determine the functional parameters that relate GR binding site affinity to hormone-induced transcriptional responses. Utilization of specific affinity response functions and GR binding sites by FFLs may contribute to the diversity of gene expression patterns within GR-regulated transcriptomes. PMID:26088140

  19. Binding of type II nuclear receptors and estrogen receptor to full and half-site estrogen response elements in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Klinge, C M; Bodenner, D L; Desai, D; Niles, R M; Traish, A M

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism by which retinoids, thyroid hormone (T3) and estrogens modulate the growth of breast cancer cells is unclear. Since nuclear type II nuclear receptors, including retinoic acid receptor (RAR), retinoid X receptor (RXR) and thyroid hormone receptor (TR), bind direct repeats (DR) of the estrogen response elements (ERE) half-site (5'-AGGTCA-3'), we examined the ability of estrogen receptor (ER) versus type II nuclear receptors, i.e. RARalpha, beta and gamma, RXRbeta, TRalpha and TRbeta, to bind various EREs in vitro . ER bound a consensus ERE, containing a perfectly palindromic 17 bp inverted repeat (IR), as a homodimer. In contrast, ER did not bind to a single ERE half-site. Likewise, ER did not bind two tandem (38 bp apart) half-sites, but low ER binding was detected to three tandem copies of the same half-site. RARalpha,beta or gamma bound both ERE and half-site constructs as a homodimer. RXRbeta did not bind full or half-site EREs, nor did RXRbeta enhance RARalpha binding to a full ERE. However, RARalpha and RXRbeta bound a half-site ERE cooperatively forming a dimeric complex. The RARalpha-RXRbeta heterodimer bound the Xenopus vitellogenin B1 estrogen responsive unit, with two non-consensus EREs, with higher affinity than one or two copies of the full or half-site ERE. Both TRalpha and TRbeta bound the full and the half-site ERE as monomers and homodimers and cooperatively as heterodimers with RXRbeta. We suggest that the cellular concentrations of nuclear receptors and their ligands, and the nature of the ERE or half-site sequence and those of its flanking sequences determine the occupation of EREs in estrogen-regulated genes in vivo . PMID:9115356

  20. An octopine synthase enhancer element directs tissue-specific expression and binds ASF-1, a factor from tobacco nuclear extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, H; Katagiri, F; Chua, N H

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the expression pattern conferred by a cis-regulatory element (-212 to -154) from the upstream region of the octopine synthase (ocs) gene in transgenic tobacco plants. Analysis of beta-glucuronidase expression driven by the ocs regulatory element revealed a pattern that is tissue-specific and developmentally regulated. In young seedlings, expression is confined primarily to root tips. In older seedlings, expression is stronger and becomes apparent also in the shoot apex. Insertion of a 16-base pair palindromic sequence (-193 to -178), which is included in the regulatory element, into an rbcS promoter results in the expression of rbcS in roots. The 16-base pair palindrome binds activation sequence factor (ASF)-1, a factor from tobacco nuclear extracts that interacts with the sequence between -83 to -63, designated as activation sequence (as)-1, of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter [Lam et al. (1989). Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86, in press]. The in vivo expression patterns and in vitro binding properties of the ocs palindromic sequence are remarkably similar to those of the as-1 element of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. These results suggest the involvement of ASF-1 in the transcriptional regulation of the ocs promoter and the 35S promoter. PMID:2562557

  1. A comparative study of element concentrations and binding in transgenic and non-transgenic soybean seeds.

    PubMed

    Mataveli, Lidiane Raquel Verola; Pohl, Pawel; Mounicou, Sandra; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi; Szpunar, Joanna

    2010-12-01

    Transgenic and non-transgenic soybean seeds were compared in terms of total element concentrations, behavior of elements during sequential extraction fractionation and element bioaccessibility using an in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion. The analysis were carried out by ICP-sector field-MS or size-exclusion ICP-MS (25 elements in concentrations varying from ng g⁻¹ to the % level). It seems that transgenic and non-transgenic soybean seeds exhibit statistically significant differences in concentrations of Cu, Fe and Sr, which are also reflected by element contents in water extracts and residues. Additionally, contributions of bioaccessible fractions of Cu, Fe and other elements (Mn, S, Zn) for transgenic soybean seeds appear to be larger than those found in non-transgenic soybean seeds.

  2. Human TREX component Thoc5 affects alternative polyadenylation site choice by recruiting mammalian cleavage factor I

    PubMed Central

    Katahira, Jun; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Inoue, Hitomi; Yoneda, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki

    2013-01-01

    The transcription-export complex (TREX) couples mRNA transcription, processing and nuclear export. We found that CFIm68, a large subunit of a heterotetrameric protein complex mammalian cleavage factor I (CFIm), which is implicated in alternative polyadenylation site choice, co-purified with Thoc5, a component of human TREX. Immunoprecipitation using antibodies against different components of TREX indicated that most likely both complexes interact via an interaction between Thoc5 and CFIm68. Microarray analysis using human HeLa cells revealed that a subset of genes was differentially expressed on Thoc5 knockdown. Notably, the depletion of Thoc5 selectively attenuated the expression of mRNAs polyadenylated at distal, but not proximal, polyadenylation sites, which phenocopied the depletion of CFIm68. Chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq) indicated that CFIm68 preferentially associated with the 5′ regions of genes; strikingly, the 5′ peak of CFIm68 was significantly and globally reduced on Thoc5 knockdown. We suggest a model in which human Thoc5 controls polyadenylation site choice through the co-transcriptional loading of CFIm68 onto target genes. PMID:23685434

  3. Binding of cellular repressor protein or the IE2 protein to a cis-acting negative regulatory element upstream of a human cytomegalovirus early promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, L; Stinski, M F

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown that the human cytomegalovirus early UL4 promoter has upstream negative and positive cis-acting regulatory elements. In the absence of the upstream negative regulatory region, the positive element confers strong transcriptional activity. The positive element contains a CCAAT box dyad symmetry and binds the cellular transcription factor NF-Y. The effect of the negative regulatory element is negated by the viral IE2 protein (L. Huang, C.L. Malone, and M.F. Stinski, J. Virol. 68:2108, 1994). We investigated the binding of cellular or viral IE2 protein to the negative regulatory region. The major cis-acting negative regulatory element was located between -168 and -134 bp relative to the transcription start site. This element could be transferred to a heterologous promoter, and it functioned in either orientation. Mutational analysis demonstrated that a core DNA sequence in the cis-acting negative regulatory element, 5'-GTTTGGAATCGTT-3', was required for the binding of either a cellular repressor protein(s) or the viral IE2 protein. The cellular DNA binding activity was present in both nonpermissive HeLa and permissive human fibroblast cells but more abundant in HeLa cells. Binding of the cellular repressor protein to the upstream cis-acting negative regulatory element correlates with repression of transcription from the early UL4 promoter. Binding of the viral IE2 protein correlates with negation of the repressive effect. PMID:7494269

  4. Functional analysis of peroxisome-proliferator-responsive element motifs in genes of fatty acid-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Retinoic acids and long-chain fatty acids are lipophilic agonists of nuclear receptors such as RXRs (retinoic X receptors) and PPARs (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors) respectively. These agonists are also ligands of intracellular lipid-binding proteins, which include FABPs (fatty acid-binding proteins). We reported previously that L (liver-type)-FABP targets fatty acids to the nucleus of hepatocytes and affects PPARα activation, which binds together with an RXR subtype to a PPRE (peroxisome-proliferator-responsive element). In the present study, we first determined the optimal combination of murine PPAR/RXR subtypes for binding to known murine FABP-PPREs and to those found by computer search and then tested their in vitro functionality. We show that all PPARs bind to L-FABP-PPRE, PPARα, PPARγ1 and PPARγ2 to A (adipocyte-type)-FABP-PPRE. All PPAR/RXR heterodimers transactivate L-FABP-PPRE, best are combinations of PPARα with RXRα or RXRγ. In contrast, PPARα heterodimers do not transactivate A-FABP-PPRE, best combinations are of PPARγ1 with RXRα and RXRγ, and of PPARγ2 with all RXR subtypes. We found that the predicted E (epidermal-type)- and H (heart-type)-FABP-PPREs are not activated by any PPAR/RXR combination without or with the PPAR pan-agonist bezafibrate. In the same way, C2C12 myoblasts transfected with promoter fragments of E-FABP and H-FABP genes containing putative PPREs are also not activated through stimulation of PPARs with bezafibrate applied to the cells. These results demonstrate that only PPREs of L- and A-FABP promoters are functional, and that binding of PPAR/RXR heterodimers to a PPRE in vitro does not necessarily predict transactivation. PMID:15130092

  5. Pyrazole-based cathepsin S inhibitors with arylalkynes as P1 binding elements

    SciTech Connect

    Ameriks, Michael K.; Axe, Frank U.; Bembenek, Scott D.; Edwards, James P.; Gu, Yin; Karlsson, Lars; Randal, Mike; Sun, Siquan; Thurmond, Robin L.; Zhu, Jian

    2010-01-12

    A crystal structure of 1 bound to a Cys25Ser mutant of cathepsin S helped to elucidate the binding mode of a previously disclosed series of pyrazole-based CatS inhibitors and facilitated the design of a new class of arylalkyne analogs. Optimization of the alkyne and tetrahydropyridine portions of the pharmacophore provided potent CatS inhibitors (IC{sub 50} = 40-300 nM), and an X-ray structure of 32 revealed that the arylalkyne moiety binds in the S1 pocket of the enzyme.

  6. NR6A1 couples with cAMP response element binding protein and regulates vascular smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinfang; Zhang, Yahui; Dai, Xiuqin; Liu, Zongjun; Yin, Peihao; Wang, Nanping; Zhang, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration is implicated in atherosclerosis and restenosis. Nuclear receptor subfamily 6, group A, member 1 (NR6A1) is involved in regulating embryonic stem cell differentiation, reproduction, neuronal differentiation. Functional cooperation between cAMP response element modulator tau (CREMtau) and NR6A1 can direct gene expression in cells. cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) plays a key role in VSMC migration. In this study, we sought to determine whether CREB involved in NR6A1-modulated VSMC migration. VSMCs treated with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) displayed reduced mRNA and protein levels of NR6A1. Adenovirus-mediated expression of NR6A1 (Ad-NR6A1) could inhibit PDGF-BB- and serum-induced VSMC migration. The mRNA and protein expressions of secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1) were down-regulated by NR6A1 overexpression. SPP1 promoter reporter activity was repressed by NR6A1. NR6A1 was found to physically couple with nuclear actin and the large subunit of RNA polymerase II. Furthermore, we showed that CREB interacted with NR6A1 in VSMCs. NR6A1 overexpression repressed cAMP response element (CRE) activity. ChIP assay revealed that NR6A1 bind to SPP1 promoter. Luciferase reporter assay showed that NR6A1 regulated SPP1 promoter activity via a putative CRE site. Adenovirus mediated local NR6A1 gene transfer attenuated stenosis after balloon-induced arterial injury in Sprague-Dawley rats. Taken together, this study provided experimental evidence that NR6A1 modulated SPP1 expression via its binding with CREB protein in VSMCs. We also revealed a NR6A1-CREB-SPP1 axis that serves as a regulatory mechanism for atherosclerosis and restenosis. PMID:26546462

  7. Inhibition of Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP)-response Element-binding Protein (CREB)-binding Protein (CBP)/β-Catenin Reduces Liver Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Yosuke; Oboki, Keisuke; Imamura, Jun; Kojika, Ekumi; Hayashi, Yukiko; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Saibara, Toshiji; Shibasaki, Futoshi; Kohara, Michinori; Kimura, Kiminori

    2015-11-01

    Wnt/β-catenin is involved in every aspect of embryonic development and in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, and is also implicated in organ fibrosis. However, the role of β-catenin-mediated signaling on liver fibrosis remains unclear. To explore this issue, the effects of PRI-724, a selective inhibitor of the cAMP-response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP)/β-catenin interaction, on liver fibrosis were examined using carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)- or bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced mouse liver fibrosis models. Following repetitive CCl4 administrations, the nuclear translocation of β-catenin was observed only in the non-parenchymal cells in the liver. PRI-724 treatment reduced the fibrosis induced by CCl4 or BDL. C-82, an active form of PRI-724, inhibited the activation of isolated primary mouse quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and promoted cell death in culture-activated HSCs. During the fibrosis resolution period, an increase in F4/80(+) CD11b(+) and Ly6C(low) CD11b(+) macrophages was induced by CCl4 and was sustained for two weeks thereafter, even after having stopped CCl4 treatment. PRI-724 accelerated the resolution of CCl4-induced liver fibrosis, and this was accompanied by increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-2, and MMP-8 expression in intrahepatic leukocytes. In conclusion, targeting the CBP/β-catenin interaction may become a new therapeutic strategy in treating liver fibrosis. PMID:26870800

  8. A green fluorescent protein solubility screen in E. coli reveals domain boundaries of the GTP-binding domain in the P element transposase

    PubMed Central

    Sabogal, Alex; Rio, Donald C

    2010-01-01

    Guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding and hydrolysis events often act as molecular switches in proteins, modulating conformational changes between active and inactive states in many signaling molecules and transport systems. The P element transposase of Drosophila melanogaster requires GTP binding to proceed along its reaction pathway, following initial site-specific DNA binding. GTP binding is unique to P elements and may represent a novel form of transpositional regulation, allowing the bound transposase to find a second site, looping the transposon DNA for strand cleavage and excision. The GTP-binding activity has been previously mapped to the central portion of the transposase protein; however, the P element transposase contains little sequence identity with known GTP-binding folds. To identify soluble, active transposase domains, a GFP solubility screen was used testing the solubility of random P element gene fragments in E. coli. The screen produced a single clone spanning known GTP-binding residues in the central portion of the transposase coding region. This clone, amino acids 275–409 in the P element transposase, was soluble, highly expressed in E.coli and active for GTP-binding activity, therefore is a candidate for future biochemical and structural studies. In addition, the chimeric screen revealed a minimal N-terminal THAP DNA-binding domain attached to an extended leucine zipper coiled-coil dimerization domain in the P element transposase, precisely delineating the DNA-binding and dimerization activities on the primary sequence. This study highlights the use of a GFP-based solubility screen on a large multidomain protein to identify highly expressed, soluble truncated domain subregions. PMID:20842711

  9. The Study of Stability of Compression-loaded Multispan Composite Panel Upon Failure of elements Binding it to Panel Supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamula, G. N.; Ierusalimsky, K. M.; Fomin, V. P.; Grishin, V. I.; Kalmykova, G. S.

    1999-01-01

    The present document is a final technical report under the NCC-1-233 research program (dated September 15, 1998; see Appendix 5) carried out within co-operation between United States'NASA Langley RC and Russia's Goskomoboronprom in aeronautics, and continues similar programs, NCCW-73, NCC-1-233 and NCCW 1-233 accomplished in 1996, 1997, and 1998, respectively. The report provides results of "The study of stability of compression-loaded multispan composite panels upon failure of elements binding it to panel supports"; these comply with requirements established at TsAGI on 24 March 1998 and at NASA on 15 September 1998.

  10. Confined housing system increased abdominal and subcutaneous fat deposition and gene expressions of carbohydrate response element-binding protein and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 in chicken.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Zhao, X L; Gilbert, E R; Liu, Y P; Wang, Y; Qiu, M H; Zhu, Q

    2015-01-01

    Free-range production system is increasingly being used in poultry breeding and feed production in many countries. The objective of the current experiment was to evaluate the effects of different raising systems on fat-related traits and mRNA levels of liver lipogenesis genes in Erlang Mountainous chicken. Each of 10 birds (91 day old) from caged, indoor-floor housed, and free-range housing systems was slaughtered, and fat-related traits, live body weight (BW), subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT), abdominal fat weight (AFW), abdominal fat percentage (AFP), and intramuscular fat content were determined. The mRNA levels of liver X receptor α, carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP1), and fatty acid synthase were detected. The caged chicken exhibited significantly higher BW, SFT, and AFW than those of free-ranged chicken (P < 0.05). All the 4 genes had a similar expression pattern, and they showed the highest level in caged chicken, while the lowest level was found in free-ranged chicken. Association analysis indicated that there were significant (P < 0.05) or highly significant (P < 0.01) positive correlations between the mRNA levels of ChREBP, SREBP1, and fat traits of SFT, AFW, and AFP. Thus, we deduced that increased fat deposition in caged chicken was probably induced by increased gene expression of ChREBP and SREBP1 in the liver. PMID:25730060

  11. Confined housing system increased abdominal and subcutaneous fat deposition and gene expressions of carbohydrate response element-binding protein and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 in chicken.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Zhao, X L; Gilbert, E R; Liu, Y P; Wang, Y; Qiu, M H; Zhu, Q

    2015-02-06

    Free-range production system is increasingly being used in poultry breeding and feed production in many countries. The objective of the current experiment was to evaluate the effects of different raising systems on fat-related traits and mRNA levels of liver lipogenesis genes in Erlang Mountainous chicken. Each of 10 birds (91 day old) from caged, indoor-floor housed, and free-range housing systems was slaughtered, and fat-related traits, live body weight (BW), subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT), abdominal fat weight (AFW), abdominal fat percentage (AFP), and intramuscular fat content were determined. The mRNA levels of liver X receptor α, carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP1), and fatty acid synthase were detected. The caged chicken exhibited significantly higher BW, SFT, and AFW than those of free-ranged chicken (P < 0.05). All the 4 genes had a similar expression pattern, and they showed the highest level in caged chicken, while the lowest level was found in free-ranged chicken. Association analysis indicated that there were significant (P < 0.05) or highly significant (P < 0.01) positive correlations between the mRNA levels of ChREBP, SREBP1, and fat traits of SFT, AFW, and AFP. Thus, we deduced that increased fat deposition in caged chicken was probably induced by increased gene expression of ChREBP and SREBP1 in the liver.

  12. A DNA-centric protein interaction map of ultraconserved elements reveals contribution of transcription factor binding hubs to conservation.

    PubMed

    Viturawong, Tar; Meissner, Felix; Butter, Falk; Mann, Matthias

    2013-10-31

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) have been the subject of great interest because of their extreme sequence identity and their seemingly cryptic and largely uncharacterized functions. Although in vivo studies of UCE sequences have demonstrated regulatory activity, protein interactors at UCEs have not been systematically identified. Here, we combined high-throughput affinity purification, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and SILAC quantification to map intrinsic protein interactions for 193 UCE sequences. The interactome contains over 400 proteins, including transcription factors with known developmental roles. We demonstrate based on our data that UCEs consist of strongly conserved overlapping binding sites. We also generated a fine-resolution interactome of a UCE, confirming the hub-like nature of the element. The intrinsic interactions mapped here are reflected in open chromatin, as indicated by comparison with existing ChIP data. Our study argues for a strong contribution of protein-DNA interactions to UCE conservation and provides a basis for further functional characterization of UCEs.

  13. Protein phosphatase 2A and Cdc7 kinase regulate the DNA unwinding element-binding protein in replication initiation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanzhe; Yao, Jianhong; Poudel, Sumeet; Romer, Eric; Abu-Niaaj, Lubna; Leffak, Michael

    2014-12-26

    The DNA unwinding element (DUE)-binding protein (DUE-B) binds to replication origins coordinately with the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase and the helicase activator Cdc45 in vivo, and loads Cdc45 onto chromatin in Xenopus egg extracts. Human DUE-B also retains the aminoacyl-tRNA proofreading function of its shorter orthologs in lower organisms. Here we report that phosphorylation of the DUE-B unstructured C-terminal domain unique to higher organisms regulates DUE-B intermolecular binding. Gel filtration analyses show that unphosphorylated DUE-B forms multiple high molecular weight (HMW) complexes. Several aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and Mcm2-7 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry of the HMW complexes. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase binding is RNase A sensitive, whereas interaction with Mcm2-7 is nuclease resistant. Unphosphorylated DUE-B HMW complex formation is decreased by PP2A inhibition or direct DUE-B phosphorylation, and increased by inhibition of Cdc7. These results indicate that the state of DUE-B phosphorylation is maintained by the equilibrium between Cdc7-dependent phosphorylation and PP2A-dependent dephosphorylation, each previously shown to regulate replication initiation. Alanine mutation of the DUE-B C-terminal phosphorylation target sites increases MCM binding but blocks Cdc45 loading in vivo and inhibits cell division. In egg extracts alanine mutation of the DUE-B C-terminal phosphorylation sites blocks Cdc45 loading and inhibits DNA replication. The effects of DUE-B C-terminal phosphorylation reveal a novel S phase kinase regulatory mechanism for Cdc45 loading and MCM helicase activation.

  14. The Retroviruses Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus Adopt Radically Different Strategies To Regulate Promoter-Proximal Polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Furger, Andre; Monks, Joan; Proudfoot, Nick J.

    2001-01-01

    Maximal gene expression in retroviruses requires that polyadenylation in the 5′ long terminal repeat (LTR) is suppressed. In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) the promoter-proximal poly(A) site is blocked by interaction of U1 snRNP with the closely positioned major splice donor site (MSD) 200 nucleotides downstream. Here we investigated whether the same mechanism applies to down-regulate 5′ LTR polyadenylation in Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV). Although the same molecular architecture is present in both viruses, the MoMLV poly(A) signal in the 5′ LTR is active whether or not the MSD is mutated. This surprising difference between the two retroviruses is not due to their actual poly(A) signals or MSD sequences, since exchange of either element between the two viral sequences does not alter their ability to regulate 5′ LTR poly(A) site use. Instead we demonstrate that sequence between the cap and AAUAAA is required for MSD-dependent poly(A) regulation in HIV-1, indicating a key role for this part of the LTR in poly(A) site suppression. We also show that the MoMLV poly(A) signal is an intrinsically weak RNA-processing signal. This suggests that in the absence of a poly(A) site suppression mechanism, MoMLV is forced to use a weak poly(A) signal. PMID:11689654

  15. The intergenic region of maize streak virus contains a GC-rich element that activates rightward transcription and binds maize nuclear factors.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, C; Schwarz, J J; Black, D M; Schneider, M; Howell, S H

    1990-12-01

    Maize streak virus (MSV) is transcribed bidirectionally from an intergenic region and rightward transcription produces an RNA that encodes the coat protein. The intergenic region contains promoter elements required for rightward transcription including an upstream activating sequence (UAS) which endows the promoter with full activity in a maize transient expression system. The UAS contains two GC-rich repeats (GC boxes) and a long inverted repeat or hairpin with a loop harboring a TAATATTAC sequence common to all geminiviruses. Deletions through the UAS demonstrated the presence of an element, called the rightward promoter element (rpe1), which is responsible for transcriptional activation. Rpe1 includes the two GC-rich boxes, which are similar in sequence to Sp1 binding sites in mammalian cells, but not the conserved hairpin loop. Rpe1 binds maize nuclear factors in vitro and the characteristics of the binding interaction have been determined by 1) binding competition with oligonucleotides, 2) methidiumpropyl-EDTA footprinting and 3) methylation interference assays. Binding of maize nuclear factors to the UAS generates two major bands, slow and fast migrating bands, in gel retardation assays. Footprinting and factor titration data suggest that the fast bands arise by the binding of factors to one GC box while the slow bands are generated by factors binding to both boxes. The data further indicate that the factors bind to the two GC-rich boxes with little cooperativity and bind on opposite faces of the DNA helix.

  16. Characterization of ribonucleoprotein complexes containing an abundant polyadenylated nuclear RNA encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (human herpesvirus 8).

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, W; Ganem, D

    1997-01-01

    Infection with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) (also called human herpesvirus 8) is strongly linked to all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma. We have previously identified two polyadenylated KSHV transcripts that are actively transcribed in Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) tumors and in KSHV-infected B-lymphoma cells. One of these RNAs (termed T1.1 or nut-1 RNA) is a 1.1-kb transcript present in a subpopulation of KS tumor cells. This RNA is localized to the nucleus of infected cells and has no open reading frames longer than 62 codons, suggesting that it may not function as an mRNA in vivo. Here we demonstrate that nut-1 RNA is a lytic-cycle gene product that is found in high-molecular-weight ribonucleoprotein complexes in infected cell nuclei. The transcript lacks the trimethylguanosine (TMG) cap found in many U-like small nuclear RNAs, but a subpopulation of nut-1 RNAs can associate with Sm protein-containing small nuclear ribonucleoproteins, as judged by immunoprecipitation analyses using monoclonal anti-Sm and anti-TMG antibodies. This interaction does not require other viral gene products, and deletion of the sole candidate Sm binding site on nut-1 RNA does not ablate this association. This finding suggests an indirect interaction with Sm-containing structures, and models for such associations are presented. PMID:8995643

  17. Rotavirus prevents the expression of host responses by blocking the nucleocytoplasmic transport of polyadenylated mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Rosa M; Mora, Silvia I; Romero, Pedro; Arias, Carlos F; López, Susana

    2013-06-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important agent of severe gastroenteritis in young children. Early in infection, these viruses take over the host translation machinery, causing a severe shutoff of cell protein synthesis while viral proteins are efficiently synthesized. In infected cells, there is an accumulation of the cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein in the nucleus, induced by the viral protein NSP3. Here we found that poly(A)-containing mRNAs also accumulate and become hyperadenylated in the nuclei of infected cells. Using reporter genes bearing the untranslated regions (UTRs) of cellular or viral genes, we found that the viral UTRs do not determine the efficiency of translation of mRNAs in rotavirus-infected cells. Furthermore, we showed that while a polyadenylated reporter mRNA directly delivered into the cytoplasm of infected cells was efficiently translated, the same reporter introduced as a plasmid that needs to be transcribed and exported to the cytoplasm was poorly translated. Altogether, these results suggest that nuclear retention of poly(A)-containing mRNAs is one of the main strategies of rotavirus to control cell translation and therefore the host antiviral and stress responses.

  18. A human cytomegalovirus early promoter with upstream negative and positive cis-acting elements: IE2 negates the effect of the negative element, and NF-Y binds to the positive element.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, L; Malone, C L; Stinski, M F

    1994-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus early promoter for the UL4 gene, which codes for an early viral envelope glycoprotein designated gpUL4, requires immediate-early viral protein two (IE2) synthesis to be activated (C.-P. Chang, C. L. Malone, and M. F. Stinski, J. Virol. 63:281, 1989). We investigated the cis-acting and trans-acting factors that regulate transcription from this UL4 promoter. In transient transfection assays, the viral IE2 protein negated the effect of an upstream cis-acting negative element and enhanced downstream gene expression. A cis-acting positive element contributed to the activity of the viral promoter when an upstream cis-acting negative element was deleted or when the viral IE2 protein was present. The cellular protein(s) that binds to the cis-acting negative element requires further investigation. The cellular protein that binds to the cis-acting positive element was characterized. Two DNA sequence-specific protein complexes were detected with DNA probes spanning the region containing the cis-acting positive element and human cytomegalovirus-infected human fibroblast cell nuclear extracts. The more slowly migrating complex was labeled complex A, and the faster was labeled complex B. Only complex B was detected with mock-infected cell nuclear extracts. Competition experiments confirmed the specificity of the A and B complexes. The protein bound to the DNA in both the complexes contacts a CCAAT box imperfect dyad symmetry (5'CCAATCACTGG3'). Either CCAAT box within the dyad symmetry could compete for binding the nuclear factor. Mutation of the CCAAT box dyad symmetry resulted in a decrease of the transcriptional activity from the UL4 promoter. A cellular transcription factor, antigenically related to nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y), was found in both complexes A and B. Events associated with viral infection caused phosphorylation of protein complex A. Dephosphorylation of the DNA-binding protein converts complex A to complex B. The effect of phosphorylation

  19. Sp-1 binds promoter elements regulated by the RB protein and Sp-1-mediated transcription is stimulated by RB coexpression.

    PubMed Central

    Udvadia, A J; Rogers, K T; Higgins, P D; Murata, Y; Martin, K H; Humphrey, P A; Horowitz, J M

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) protein is implicated in transcriptional regulation of at least five cellular genes, including c-fos, c-myc, and transforming growth factor beta 1. Cotransfection of RB and truncated promoter constructs has defined a discrete element (retinoblastoma control element; RCE) within the promoters of each of these genes as being necessary for RB-mediated transcription control. Previously, we have shown that RCEs form protein-DNA complexes in vitro with three heretofore unidentified nuclear proteins and mutation of their DNA-binding site within the c-fos RCE results in an abrogation of RCE-dependent transcription in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that one of the nuclear proteins that binds the c-fos, c-myc, and transforming growth factor beta 1 RCEs in vitro is Sp-1 and that Sp-1 stimulates RCE-dependent transcription in vivo. Moreover, we show that Sp-1-mediated transcription is stimulated by the transient coexpression of RB protein. We conclude from these observations that RB may regulate transcription in part by virtue of its ability to functionally interact with Sp-1. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8475068

  20. Mitochondrial mRNA stability and polyadenylation during anoxia-induced quiescence in the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana.

    PubMed

    Eads, Brian D; Hand, Steven C

    2003-10-01

    Polyadenylation of messenger RNA is known to be an important mechanism for regulating mRNA stability in a variety of systems, including bacteria, chloroplasts and plant mitochondria. By comparison, little is known about the role played by polyadenylation in animal mitochondrial gene expression. We have used embryos of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana to test hypotheses regarding message stability and polyadenylation under conditions simulating anoxia-induced quiescence. In response to anoxia, these embryos undergo a profound and acute metabolic downregulation, characterized by a steep drop in intracellular pH (pH(i)) and ATP levels. Using dot blots of total mitochondrial RNA, we show that during in organello incubations both O(2) deprivation and acidic pH (pH 6.4) elicit increases in half-lives of selected mitochondrial transcripts on the order of five- to tenfold or more, relative to normoxic controls at pH 7.8. Polyadenylation of these transcripts was measured under the same incubation conditions using a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based assay. The results demonstrate that low pH and anoxia promote significant deadenylation of the stabilized transcripts in several cases, measured either as change over time in the amount of polyadenylation within a given size class of poly(A)(+) tail, or as the total amount of polyadenylation at the endpoint of the incubation. This study is the first direct demonstration that for a metazoan mitochondrion, polyadenylation is associated with destabilized mRNA. This pattern has also been demonstrated in bacteria, chloroplasts and plant mitochondria and may indicate a conserved mechanism for regulating message half-life that differs from the paradigm for eukaryotic cytoplasm, where increased mRNA stability is associated with polyadenylation. PMID:12966060

  1. NF-κB and BRG1 bind a distal regulatory element in the IL-3/GM-CSF locus.

    PubMed

    Wurster, Andrea L; Precht, Patricia; Pazin, Michael J

    2011-09-01

    We investigated gene regulation at the IL-3/GM-CSF gene cluster. We found BRG1, a SWI/SNF remodeling ATPase, bound a distal element, CNSa. BRG1 binding was strongest in differentiated, stimulated T helper cells, paralleling IL-3 and GM-CSF expression. Depletion of BRG1 reduced IL-3 and GM-CSF transcription. BAF-specific SWI/SNF subunits bound to this locus and regulated IL-3 expression. CNSa was in closed chromatin in fibroblasts, open chromatin in differentiated T helper cells, and moderately open chromatin in naïve (undifferentiated) T helper cells; BRG1 was required for the most open state. CNSa increased transcription of a reporter in an episomal expression system, in a BRG1-dependent manner. The NF-κB subunit RelA/p65 bound CNSa in activated T helper cells. Inhibition of NF-κB blocked BRG1 binding to CNSa, chromatin opening at CNSa, and activation of IL-3 and GM-CSF. Together, these findings suggest CNSa is a distal enhancer that binds BRG1 and NF-κB.

  2. NF-κB and BRG1 bind a distal regulatory element in the IL-3/GM-CSF locus

    PubMed Central

    Wurster, Andrea L.; Precht, Patricia; Pazin, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated gene regulation at the IL-3/GM-CSF gene cluster. We found BRG1, a SWI/SNF remodeling ATPase, bound a distal element, CNSa. BRG1 binding was strongest in differentiated, stimulated T helper cells, paralleling IL-3 and GM-CSF expression. Depletion of BRG1 reduced IL-3 and GM-CSF transcription. BAF-specific SWI/SNF subunits bound to this locus and regulated IL-3 expression. CNSa was in closed chromatin in fibroblasts, open chromatin in differentiated T helper cells, and moderately open chromatin in naïve (undifferentiated) T helper cells; BRG1 was required for the most open state. CNSa increased transcription of a reporter in an episomal expression system, in a BRG1-dependent manner. The NF-κB subunit RelA/p65 bound CNSa in activated T helper cells. Inhibition of NF-κB blocked BRG1 binding to CNSa, chromatin opening at CNSa, and activation of IL-3 and GM-CSF. Together, these findings suggest CNSa is a distal enhancer that binds BRG1 and NF-κB. PMID:21831442

  3. CONREAL: conserved regulatory elements anchored alignment algorithm for identification of transcription factor binding sites by phylogenetic footprinting.

    PubMed

    Berezikov, Eugene; Guryev, Victor; Plasterk, Ronald H A; Cuppen, Edwin

    2004-01-01

    Prediction of transcription-factor target sites in promoters remains difficult due to the short length and degeneracy of the target sequences. Although the use of orthologous sequences and phylogenetic footprinting approaches may help in the recognition of conserved and potentially functional sequences, correct alignment of the short transcription-factor binding sites can be problematic for established algorithms, especially when aligning more divergent species. Here, we report a novel phylogenetic footprinting approach, CONREAL, that uses biologically relevant information, that is, potential transcription-factor binding sites as represented by positional weight matrices, to establish anchors between orthologous sequences and to guide promoter sequence alignment. Comparison of the performance of CONREAL with the global alignment programs LAGAN and AVID using a reference data set, shows that CONREAL performs equally well for closely related species like rodents and human, and has a clear added value for aligning promoter elements of more divergent species like human and fish, as it identifies conserved transcription-factor binding sites that are not found by other methods. CONREAL is accessible via a Web interface at http://conreal.niob.knaw.nl/.

  4. Modeling Group IV elements with new transferable tight-binding models

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, I.; Biswas, R.

    1993-10-01

    An outstanding problem in the computer-based microscopic description of Group IV materials, is the need for an accurate transferable model of the energetic and electronic properties of semiconductor structures. The three complementary approaches have been the ab-initio method including Car-Parinello simulations, the classical molecular dynamics method, and tight-binding molecular dynamics. While being very accurate, the ab-initio molecular dynamics has been performed on small systems ({approximately}100 atoms) for short time scales ({approximately}10 ps). On the other hand, classical potential models have had much success in describing melting of silicon, amorphous silicon structures, thin film growth and a variety of computationally intensive molecular dynamics simulations. However, the classical based models do not contain important electronic information which is essential in a variety of problems in electronic materials such as determining the gap states for structural defects. The accuracy of the classical models in configurations, far from the fitting database, may be uncertain. Our approach is to find transferable tight-binding models for silicon that are in between the ab-initio simulations and the classical models for molecular dynamics in level of sophistication.

  5. Multiscaled exploration of coupled folding and binding of an intrinsically disordered molecular recognition element in measles virus nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Chu, Xiakun; Longhi, Sonia; Roche, Philippe; Han, Wei; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2013-10-01

    Numerous relatively short regions within intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) serve as molecular recognition elements (MoREs). They fold into ordered structures upon binding to their partner molecules. Currently, there is still a lack of in-depth understanding of how coupled binding and folding occurs in MoREs. Here, we quantified the unbound ensembles of the α-MoRE within the intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain of the measles virus nucleoprotein. We developed a multiscaled approach by combining a physics-based and an atomic hybrid model to decipher the mechanism by which the α-MoRE interacts with the X domain of the measles virus phosphoprotein. Our multiscaled approach led to remarkable qualitative and quantitative agreements between the theoretical predictions and experimental results (e.g., chemical shifts). We found that the free α-MoRE rapidly interconverts between multiple discrete partially helical conformations and the unfolded state, in accordance with the experimental observations. We quantified the underlying global folding-binding landscape. This leads to a synergistic mechanism in which the recognition event proceeds via (minor) conformational selection, followed by (major) induced folding. We also provided evidence that the α-MoRE is a compact molten globule-like IDP and behaves as a downhill folder in the induced folding process. We further provided a theoretical explanation for the inherent connections between "downhill folding," "molten globule," and "intrinsic disorder" in IDP-related systems. Particularly, we proposed that binding and unbinding of IDPs proceed in a stepwise way through a "kinetic divide-and-conquer" strategy that confers them high specificity without high affinity. PMID:24043820

  6. Putative polyadenylation signals in nuclear genes of higher plants: a compilation and analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, C P

    1987-01-01

    In animal and viral pre-mRNAS, the process of polyadenylation is mediated through several cis-acting poly (A) signals present upstream and downstream from poly (A) sites. The situation regarding polyadenylation of higher plant pre-mRNAS, however, has remained obscure so far. In this paper, a search for putative poly (A) signals is made by considering the published data from 46 plant genomic DNA sequences. Certain domains in the 3' untranslated regions from nuclear genes of higher plants were compiled and occurrence of sequence motifs such as AATAAA, CAYTG, YGTGTTYY and YAYTG was scored in relation to poly (A) sites. Moreover, consensus sequences for important regions in the 3' untranslated sequences and poly (A) signals were also deduced from the data. It was inferred that sequence motifs similar to poly (A) signals exist around poly (A) sites but some of them are in entirely different spatial relationship than observed in other eukaryotes. This indicates their probable non-involvement in the process of polyadenylation in higher plants necessitating a functional analysis approach to define the plant specific poly (A) signals. PMID:3697078

  7. CPSF30 at the Interface of Alternative Polyadenylation and Cellular Signaling in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Manohar; Hunt, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional processing, involving cleavage of precursor messenger RNA (pre mRNA), and further incorporation of poly(A) tail to the 3' end is a key step in the expression of genetic information. Alternative polyadenylation (APA) serves as an important check point for the regulation of gene expression. Recent studies have shown widespread prevalence of APA in diverse systems. A considerable amount of research has been done in characterizing different subunits of so-called Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor (CPSF). In plants, CPSF30, an ortholog of the 30 kD subunit of mammalian CPSF is a key polyadenylation factor. CPSF30 in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was reported to possess unique biochemical properties. It was also demonstrated that poly(A) site choice in a vast majority of genes in Arabidopsis are CPSF30 dependent, suggesting a pivotal role of this gene in APA and subsequent regulation of gene expression. There are also indications of this gene being involved in oxidative stress and defense responses and in cellular signaling, suggesting a role of CPSF30 in connecting physiological processes and APA. This review will summarize the biochemical features of CPSF30, its role in regulating APA, and possible links with cellular signaling and stress response modules. PMID:26061761

  8. VAAPA: a web platform for visualization and analysis of alternative polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jinting; Fu, Jingyi; Wu, Mingcheng; Chen, Longteng; Ji, Guoli; Quinn Li, Qingshun; Wu, Xiaohui

    2015-02-01

    Polyadenylation [poly(A)] is an essential process during the maturation of most mRNAs in eukaryotes. Alternative polyadenylation (APA) as an important layer of gene expression regulation has been increasingly recognized in various species. Here, a web platform for visualization and analysis of alternative polyadenylation (VAAPA) was developed. This platform can visualize the distribution of poly(A) sites and poly(A) clusters of a gene or a section of a chromosome. It can also highlight genes with switched APA sites among different conditions. VAAPA is an easy-to-use web-based tool that provides functions of poly(A) site query, data uploading, downloading, and APA sites visualization. It was designed in a multi-tier architecture and developed based on Smart GWT (Google Web Toolkit) using Java as the development language. VAAPA will be a valuable addition to the community for the comprehensive study of APA, not only by making the high quality poly(A) site data more accessible, but also by providing users with numerous valuable functions for poly(A) site analysis and visualization. PMID:25506822

  9. STUbL-mediated degradation of the transcription factor MATα2 requires degradation elements that coincide with corepressor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Christopher M; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2015-10-01

    The yeast transcription factor MATα2 (α2) is a short-lived protein known to be ubiquitylated by two distinct pathways, one involving the ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2s) Ubc6 and Ubc7 and the ubiquitin ligase (E3) Doa10 and the other operating with the E2 Ubc4 and the heterodimeric E3 Slx5/Slx8. Although Slx5/Slx8 is a small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL), it does not require SUMO to target α2 but instead directly recognizes α2. Little is known about the α2 determinants required for its Ubc4- and STUbL-mediated degradation or how these determinants substitute for SUMO in recognition by the STUbL pathway. We describe two distinct degradation elements within α2, both of which are necessary for α2 recognition specifically by the Ubc4 pathway. Slx5/Slx8 can directly ubiquitylate a C-terminal fragment of α2, and mutating one of the degradation elements impairs this ubiquitylation. Surprisingly, both degradation elements identified here overlap specific interaction sites for α2 corepressors: the Mcm1 interaction site in the central α2 linker and the Ssn6 (Cyc8) binding site in the α2 homeodomain. We propose that competitive binding to α2 by the ubiquitylation machinery and α2 cofactors is balanced so that α2 can function in transcription repression yet be short lived enough to allow cell-type switching.

  10. T box transcription antitermination riboswitch: Influence of nucleotide sequence and orientation on tRNA binding by the antiterminator element

    PubMed Central

    Fauzi, Hamid; Agyeman, Akwasi; Hines, Jennifer V.

    2008-01-01

    Many bacteria utilize riboswitch transcription regulation to monitor and appropriately respond to cellular levels of important metabolites or effector molecules. The T box transcription antitermination riboswitch responds to cognate uncharged tRNA by specifically stabilizing an antiterminator element in the 5′-untranslated mRNA leader region and precluding formation of a thermodynamically more stable terminator element. Stabilization occurs when the tRNA acceptor end base pairs with the first four nucleotides in the seven nucleotide bulge of the highly conserved antiterminator element. The significance of the conservation of the antiterminator bulge nucleotides that do not base pair with the tRNA is unknown, but they are required for optimal function. In vitro selection was used to determine if the isolated antiterminator bulge context alone dictates the mode in which the tRNA acceptor end binds the bulge nucleotides. No sequence conservation beyond complementarity was observed and the location was not constrained to the first four bases of the bulge. The results indicate that formation of a structure that recognizes the tRNA acceptor end in isolation is not the determinant driving force for the high phylogenetic sequence conservation observed within the antiterminator bulge. Additional factors or T box leader features more likely influenced the phylogenetic sequence conservation. PMID:19152843

  11. Genome-wide characterization of methylguanosine-capped and polyadenylated small RNAs in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Malali; Nunes, Cristiano C.; Sailsbery, Joshua; Xue, Minfeng; Chen, Feng; Nelson, Cassie A.; Brown, Douglas E.; Oh, Yeonyee; Meng, Shaowu; Mitchell, Thomas; Hagedorn, Curt H.; Dean, Ralph A.

    2010-01-01

    Small RNAs are well described in higher eukaryotes such as mammals and plants; however, knowledge in simple eukaryotes such as filamentous fungi is limited. In this study, we discovered and characterized methylguanosine-capped and polyadenylated small RNAs (CPA-sRNAs) by using differential RNA selection, full-length cDNA cloning and 454 transcriptome sequencing of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. This fungus causes blast, a devastating disease on rice, the principle food staple for over half the world’s population. CPA-sRNAs mapped primarily to the transcription initiation and termination sites of protein-coding genes and were positively correlated with gene expression, particularly for highly expressed genes including those encoding ribosomal proteins. Numerous CPA-sRNAs also mapped to rRNAs, tRNAs, snRNAs, transposable elements and intergenic regions. Many other 454 sequence reads could not be mapped to the genome; however, inspection revealed evidence for non-template additions and chimeric sequences. CPA-sRNAs were independently confirmed using a high affinity variant of eIF-4E to capture 5′-methylguanosine-capped RNA followed by 3′-RACE sequencing. These results expand the repertoire of small RNAs in filamentous fungi. PMID:20660015

  12. Prolactin Regulatory Element Binding Protein Is Involved in Hepatitis C Virus Replication by Interaction with NS4B

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lingbao; Fujimoto, Akira; Nakamura, Mariko; Aoyagi, Haruyo; Matsuda, Mami; Watashi, Koichi; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Arita, Minetaro; Yamagoe, Satoshi; Dohmae, Naoshi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Sakamaki, Yuriko; Ichinose, Shizuko; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Wakita, Takaji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been proposed that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS4B protein triggers the membranous HCV replication compartment, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we screened for NS4B-associated membrane proteins by tandem affinity purification and proteome analysis and identified 202 host proteins. Subsequent screening of replicon cells with small interfering RNA identified prolactin regulatory element binding (PREB) to be a novel HCV host cofactor. The interaction between PREB and NS4B was confirmed by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and proximity ligation assays. PREB colocalized with double-stranded RNA and the newly synthesized HCV RNA labeled with bromouridine triphosphate in HCV replicon cells. Furthermore, PREB shifted to detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), where HCV replication complexes reside, in the presence of NS4B expression in Huh7 cells. However, a PREB mutant lacking the NS4B-binding region (PREBd3) could not colocalize with double-stranded RNA and did not shift to the DRM in the presence of NS4B. These results indicate that PREB locates at the HCV replication complex by interacting with NS4B. PREB silencing inhibited the formation of the membranous HCV replication compartment and increased the protease and nuclease sensitivity of HCV replicase proteins and RNA in DRMs, respectively. Collectively, these data indicate that PREB promotes HCV RNA replication by participating in the formation of the membranous replication compartment and by maintaining its proper structure by interacting with NS4B. Furthermore, PREB was induced by HCV infection in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide new insights into HCV host cofactors. IMPORTANCE The hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein NS4B can induce alteration of the endoplasmic reticulum and the formation of a membranous web structure, which provides a platform for the HCV replication complex. The molecular mechanism by which NS4B induces the membranous HCV replication

  13. Structural differences between light and heavy rare earth element binding chlorophylls in naturally grown fern: Dicranopteris linearis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhenggui; Hong, Fashui; Yin, Ming; Li, Huixin; Hu, Feng; Zhao, Guiwen; Wong, Jonathan Woonchung

    2005-09-01

    Chloroplasts and chlorophylls were isolated from the leaves of Dicranopteris linearis, a natural perennial fern sampled at rare earth element (REE) mining areas in the South-Jiangxi region (southern China). The inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) results indicated that REEs were present in the chloroplasts and chlorophylls of D. linearis. The in vivo coordination environment of light REE (lanthanum) or heavy REE (yttrium) ions in D. linearis chlorophyll-a was determined by the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Results revealed that there were eight nitrogen atoms in the first coordination shell of the lanthanum atom, whereas there were four nitrogen atoms in the first coordination shell of yttrium. It was postulated that the lanthanum-chlorophyll-a complex might have a double-layer sandwich-like structure, but yttrium-binding chlorophyll-a might be in a single-layer form. Because the content of REE-binding chlorophylls in D. linearis chlorophylls was very low, it is impossible to obtain structural characteristics of REE-binding chlorophylls by direct analysis of the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectra of D. linearis chlorophylls. In order to acquire more structural information of REE-binding chlorophyll-a in D. linearis, lanthanum - and yttrium-chlorophyll-a complexes were in vitro synthesized in acetone solution. Element analyses and EXAFS results indicated that REE ions (lanthanum or yttrium) of REE-chlorophyll-a possessed the same coordination environment whether in vivo or in vitro. The FTIR spectra of the REE-chlorophyll-a complexes indicated that REEs were bound to the porphyrin rings of chlorophylls. UV-visible results showed that the intensity ratios of Soret to the Q-band of REE-chlorophyll-a complexes were higher than those of standard chlorophyll-a and pheophytin-a, indicating that REE-chlorophyll-a might have a much stronger ability to absorb the ultraviolet light. The MCD spectrum in

  14. A genomic approach to the identification and characterization of HOXA13 functional binding elements

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Colleen D.; Innis, Jeffrey W.

    2005-01-01

    HOX proteins are important transcriptional regulators in mammalian embryonic development and are dysregulated in human cancers. However, there are few known direct HOX target genes and their mechanisms of regulation are incompletely understood. To isolate and characterize gene segments through which HOX proteins regulate transcription we used cesium chloride centrifugation-based chromatin purification and immunoprecipitation (ChIP). From NIH 3T3-derived HOXA13-FLAG expressing cells, 33% of randomly selected, ChIP clones were reproducibly enriched. Hox-enriched fragments (HEFs) were more AT-rich compared with cloned fragments that failed reproducible ChIP. All HEFs augmented transcription of a heterologous promoter upon coexpression with HOXA13. One HEF was from intron 2 of Enpp2, a gene highly upregulated in these cells and has been implicated in cell motility. Using Enpp2 as a candidate direct target, we identified three additional HEFs upstream of the transcription start site. HOXA13 upregulated transcription from an Enpp2 promoter construct containing these sites, and each site was necessary for full HOXA13-induced expression. Lastly, given that HOX proteins have been demonstrated to interact with histone deacetylases and/or CBP, we explored whether histone acetylation changed at Enpp2 upon HOXA13-induced activation. No change in the general histone acetylation state was observed. Our results support models in which occupation of multiple HOX binding sites is associated with highly activated genes. PMID:16321965

  15. The genome of RNA tumor viruses contains polyadenylic acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Green, M; Cartas, M

    1972-04-01

    The 70S genome of two RNA tumor viruses, murine sarcoma virus and avian myeloblastosis virus, binds to Millipore filters in buffer with high salt concentration and to glass fiber filters containing poly(U). These observations suggest that 70S RNA contains adenylic acid-rich sequences. When digested by pancreatic RNase, 70S RNA of murine sarcoma virus yielded poly(A) sequences that contain 91% adenylic acid. These poly(A) sequences sedimented as a relatively homogenous peak in sucrose gradients with a sedimentation coefficient of 4-5 S, but had a mobility during polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis that corresponds to molecules that sediment at 6-7 S. If we estimate a molecular weight for each sequence of 30,000-60,000 (100-200 nucleotides) and a molecular weight for viral 70S RNA of 3-12 million, each viral genome could contain 1-8 poly(A) sequences. Possible functions of poly(A) in the infecting viral RNA may include a role in the initiation of viral DNA or RNA synthesis, in protein maturation, or in the assembly of the viral genome.

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of interferon alpha/beta response element binding factors of the murine (2'-5')oligoadenylate synthetase ME-12 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, C; Tamm, I

    1991-01-01

    Seven clones encoding interferon response element binding factors have been isolated from a mouse fibroblast lambda gt11 cDNA library by using a 32P end-labeled tandem trimer of the mouse (2'-5')oligoadenylate synthetase gene interferon response element as a probe. Clone 16 shares strong similarity (95%) at both DNA and amino acid level with YB-1, a human major histocompatibility complex class II Y-box DNA-binding protein, and with dbpB, a human epidermal growth factor receptor gene enhancer region binding protein. The product of the gene represented by clone 16 may represent a factor that regulates multiple genes by binding to a variety of 5' regulatory elements. Clone 25 is a 2407-base-pair-long cDNA and contains a putative 311-amino acid open reading frame corresponding to an estimated mass of 35.5 kDa. This putative protein, designated as interferon response element binding factor 1 (IREBF-1), contains an acidic domain, three heptad repeat leucine arrays, and a region that shares similarity with the yeast transcriptional factor GAL4 DNA-binding domain. Furthermore, the C terminus of IREBF-1 shows an unusual amphipathic property: within a 79-amino acid range, one side of the alpha-helical region contains a preponderance of hydrophobic amino acids and the other side contains hydrophilic amino acids. This type of structure provides a strong hydrophobic force for protein-protein interaction. Images PMID:1986360

  17. Song-induced phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein in the songbird brain.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, H; Wada, K; Maekawa, M; Watsuji, T; Hagiwara, M

    1999-05-15

    We have investigated the participation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in the response of the songbird brain to a natural auditory stimulus, a conspecific song. The cells in the two song control nuclei, the higher vocal center (HVC) and area X of zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), were intensely stained with an anti-CREB monoclonal antibody. Double-labeling studies showed that CREB immunoreactivity was detected only in area X-projecting neurons in the HVC. The cloned CREB cDNA from zebra finches (zCREB) is highly homologous to mammalian delta CREB. Phosphorylation of zCREB at Ser119 in area X-projecting HVC neurons was induced by hearing tape-recorded conspecific songs of zebra finches, but not by birdsongs of another species or white noise. These results raise the possibility that zCREB plays a crucial role in the sensory process of song learning.

  18. Song-induced phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein in the songbird brain.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, H; Wada, K; Maekawa, M; Watsuji, T; Hagiwara, M

    1999-05-15

    We have investigated the participation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in the response of the songbird brain to a natural auditory stimulus, a conspecific song. The cells in the two song control nuclei, the higher vocal center (HVC) and area X of zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), were intensely stained with an anti-CREB monoclonal antibody. Double-labeling studies showed that CREB immunoreactivity was detected only in area X-projecting neurons in the HVC. The cloned CREB cDNA from zebra finches (zCREB) is highly homologous to mammalian delta CREB. Phosphorylation of zCREB at Ser119 in area X-projecting HVC neurons was induced by hearing tape-recorded conspecific songs of zebra finches, but not by birdsongs of another species or white noise. These results raise the possibility that zCREB plays a crucial role in the sensory process of song learning. PMID:10234027

  19. High-resolution analysis of four efficient yeast replication origins reveals new insights into the ORC and putative MCM binding elements.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fujung; May, Caitlin D; Hoggard, Timothy; Miller, Jeremy; Fox, Catherine A; Weinreich, Michael

    2011-08-01

    In budding yeast, the eukaryotic initiator protein ORC (origin recognition complex) binds to a bipartite sequence consisting of an 11 bp ACS element and an adjacent B1 element. However, the genome contains many more matches to this consensus than actually bind ORC or function as origins in vivo. Although ORC-dependent loading of the replicative MCM helicase at origins is enhanced by a distal B2 element, less is known about this element. Here, we analyzed four highly active origins (ARS309, ARS319, ARS606 and ARS607) by linker scanning mutagenesis and found that sequences adjacent to the ACS contributed substantially to origin activity and ORC binding. Using the sequences of four additional B2 elements we generated a B2 multiple sequence alignment and identified a shared, degenerate 8 bp sequence that was enriched within 228 known origins. In addition, our high-resolution analysis revealed that not all origins exist within nucleosome free regions: a class of Sir2-regulated origins has a stably positioned nucleosome overlapping or near B2. This study illustrates the conserved yet flexible nature of yeast origin architecture to promote ORC binding and origin activity, and helps explain why a strong match to the ORC binding site is insufficient to identify origins within the genome.

  20. Post-Transcriptional Control of the Hypoxic Response by RNA-Binding Proteins and MicroRNAs.

    PubMed

    Gorospe, Myriam; Tominaga, Kumiko; Wu, Xue; Fähling, Michael; Ivan, Mircea

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian gene expression patterns change profoundly in response to low oxygen levels. These changes in gene expression programs are strongly influenced by post-transcriptional mechanisms mediated by mRNA-binding factors: RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs). Here, we review the RBPs and miRNAs that modulate mRNA turnover and translation in response to hypoxic challenge. RBPs such as HuR (human antigen R), PTB (polypyrimidine tract-binding protein), heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), tristetraprolin, nucleolin, iron-response element-binding proteins (IRPs), and cytoplasmic polyadenylation-element-binding proteins (CPEBs), selectively bind to numerous hypoxia-regulated transcripts and play a major role in establishing hypoxic gene expression patterns. MiRNAs including miR-210, miR-373, and miR-21 associate with hypoxia-regulated transcripts and further modulate the levels of the encoded proteins to implement the hypoxic gene expression profile. We discuss the potent regulation of hypoxic gene expression by RBPs and miRNAs and their integrated actions in the cellular hypoxic response.

  1. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein (Srb1) Is Required for Hypoxic Adaptation and Virulence in the Dimorphic Fungus Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, Juwen C.; Smulian, A. George

    2016-01-01

    The Histoplasma capsulatum sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP), Srb1 is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH), leucine zipper DNA binding protein family of transcription factors that possess a unique tyrosine (Y) residue instead of an arginine (R) residue in the bHLH region. We have determined that Srb1 message levels increase in a time dependent manner during growth under oxygen deprivation (hypoxia). To further understand the role of Srb1 during infection and hypoxia, we silenced the gene encoding Srb1 using RNA interference (RNAi); characterized the resulting phenotype, determined its response to hypoxia, and its ability to cause disease within an infected host. Silencing of Srb1 resulted in a strain of H. capsulatum that is incapable of surviving in vitro hypoxia. We found that without complete Srb1 expression, H. capsulatum is killed by murine macrophages and avirulent in mice given a lethal dose of yeasts. Additionally, silencing Srb1 inhibited the hypoxic upregulation of other known H. capsulatum hypoxia-responsive genes (HRG), and genes that encode ergosterol biosynthetic enzymes. Consistent with these regulatory functions, Srb1 silenced H. capsulatum cells were hypersensitive to the antifungal azole drug itraconazole. These data support the theory that the H. capsulatum SREBP is critical for hypoxic adaptation and is required for H. capsulatum virulence. PMID:27711233

  2. A role for neuronal cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in brain responses to calorie restriction

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Salvatore; Ripoli, Cristian; Podda, Maria Vittoria; Ranieri, Sofia Chiatamone; Leone, Lucia; Toietta, Gabriele; McBurney, Michael W.; Schütz, Günther; Riccio, Antonella; Grassi, Claudio; Galeotti, Tommaso; Pani, Giovambattista

    2012-01-01

    Calorie restriction delays brain senescence and prevents neurodegeneration, but critical regulators of these beneficial responses other than the NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase Sirtuin-1 (Sirt-1) are unknown. We report that effects of calorie restriction on neuronal plasticity, memory and social behavior are abolished in mice lacking cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in the forebrain. Moreover, CREB deficiency drastically reduces the expression of Sirt-1 and the induction of genes relevant to neuronal metabolism and survival in the cortex and hippocampus of dietary-restricted animals. Biochemical studies reveal a complex interplay between CREB and Sirt-1: CREB directly regulates the transcription of the sirtuin in neuronal cells by binding to Sirt-1 chromatin; Sirt-1, in turn, is recruited by CREB to DNA and promotes CREB-dependent expression of target gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α and neuronal NO Synthase. Accordingly, expression of these CREB targets is markedly reduced in the brain of Sirt KO mice that are, like CREB-deficient mice, poorly responsive to calorie restriction. Thus, the above circuitry, modulated by nutrient availability, links energy metabolism with neurotrophin signaling, participates in brain adaptation to nutrient restriction, and is potentially relevant to accelerated brain aging by overnutrition and diabetes. PMID:22190495

  3. A role for neuronal cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in brain responses to calorie restriction.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Salvatore; Ripoli, Cristian; Podda, Maria Vittoria; Ranieri, Sofia Chiatamone; Leone, Lucia; Toietta, Gabriele; McBurney, Michael W; Schütz, Günther; Riccio, Antonella; Grassi, Claudio; Galeotti, Tommaso; Pani, Giovambattista

    2012-01-10

    Calorie restriction delays brain senescence and prevents neurodegeneration, but critical regulators of these beneficial responses other than the NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase Sirtuin-1 (Sirt-1) are unknown. We report that effects of calorie restriction on neuronal plasticity, memory and social behavior are abolished in mice lacking cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in the forebrain. Moreover, CREB deficiency drastically reduces the expression of Sirt-1 and the induction of genes relevant to neuronal metabolism and survival in the cortex and hippocampus of dietary-restricted animals. Biochemical studies reveal a complex interplay between CREB and Sirt-1: CREB directly regulates the transcription of the sirtuin in neuronal cells by binding to Sirt-1 chromatin; Sirt-1, in turn, is recruited by CREB to DNA and promotes CREB-dependent expression of target gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α and neuronal NO Synthase. Accordingly, expression of these CREB targets is markedly reduced in the brain of Sirt KO mice that are, like CREB-deficient mice, poorly responsive to calorie restriction. Thus, the above circuitry, modulated by nutrient availability, links energy metabolism with neurotrophin signaling, participates in brain adaptation to nutrient restriction, and is potentially relevant to accelerated brain aging by overnutrition and diabetes. PMID:22190495

  4. Xanthohumol Improves Diet-induced Obesity and Fatty Liver by Suppressing Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Shingo; Inoue, Jun; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are key transcription factors that stimulate the expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that a prenylated flavonoid in hops, xanthohumol (XN), is a novel SREBP inactivator that reduces the de novo synthesis of fatty acid and cholesterol. XN independently suppressed the maturation of SREBPs of insulin-induced genes in a manner different from sterols. Our results suggest that XN impairs the endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi translocation of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP)-SREBP complex by binding to Sec23/24 and blocking SCAP/SREBP incorporation into common coated protein II vesicles. Furthermore, in diet-induced obese mice, dietary XN suppressed SREBP-1 target gene expression in the liver accompanied by a reduction of the mature form of hepatic SREBP-1, and it inhibited the development of obesity and hepatic steatosis. Altogether, our data suggest that XN attenuates the function of SREBP-1 by repressing its maturation and that it has the potential of becoming a nutraceutical food or pharmacological agent for improving metabolic syndrome. PMID:26140926

  5. The anaerobic responsive element contains two GC-rich sequences essential for binding a nuclear protein and hypoxic activation of the maize Adh1 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Olive, M R; Peacock, W J; Dennis, E S

    1991-01-01

    We have identified a protein (GCBP-1) in nuclear extracts from maize suspension cell cultures that binds to specific sequences within the Anaerobic Responsive Element (ARE) of the maize Adh1 promoter. Competition analyses show that the GCBP-1 binding activity distinguishes ARE sequence motifs from other enhancer elements or pUC19 sequences. The binding activities of several mutant ARE sequences define two regions of the ARE important for GCBP-1 binding in vitro, between nucleotides -135 to -131 and nucleotides -120 to -112 of the maize Adh1 promoter. Both regions are required for efficient GCBP-1 binding to occur in vitro. The minimum consensus binding site for GCBP-1 is 5'-GC(G/C)CC-3'. This sequence is similar to a part of the binding site of the human transcription factor Sp1 (1). We demonstrate that maize GCBP-1 and human Sp1 have similar recognition properties. Using ARE mutants in a transient assay in maize protoplasts we have shown that mutation of the GCBP-1 binding sites prevents significant hypoxic activation of the maize Adh1 promoter. These results suggest a direct role for GCBP-1 in the hypoxic activation of Adh1 gene expression. GCBP-1 is present in both uninduced and induced nuclei, indicating that inducible gene expression is not dependent upon synthesis of GCBP-1 and suggesting that post-translational modification of bound GCBP-1 may be important for enhanced transcription to occur. Images PMID:1766868

  6. Systematic Profiling of Poly(A)+ Transcripts Modulated by Core 3’ End Processing and Splicing Factors Reveals Regulatory Rules of Alternative Cleavage and Polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wencheng; You, Bei; Hoque, Mainul; Zheng, Dinghai; Luo, Wenting; Ji, Zhe; Park, Ji Yeon; Gunderson, Samuel I.; Kalsotra, Auinash; Manley, James L.; Tian, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) results in mRNA isoforms containing different 3’ untranslated regions (3’UTRs) and/or coding sequences. How core cleavage/polyadenylation (C/P) factors regulate APA is not well understood. Using siRNA knockdown coupled with deep sequencing, we found that several C/P factors can play significant roles in 3’UTR-APA. Whereas Pcf11 and Fip1 enhance usage of proximal poly(A) sites (pAs), CFI-25/68, PABPN1 and PABPC1 promote usage of distal pAs. Strong cis element biases were found for pAs regulated by CFI-25/68 or Fip1, and the distance between pAs plays an important role in APA regulation. In addition, intronic pAs are substantially regulated by splicing factors, with U1 mostly inhibiting C/P events in introns near the 5’ end of gene and U2 suppressing those in introns with features for efficient splicing. Furthermore, PABPN1 inhibits expression of transcripts with pAs near the transcription start site (TSS), a property possibly related to its role in RNA degradation. Finally, we found that groups of APA events regulated by C/P factors are also modulated in cell differentiation and development with distinct trends. Together, our results support an APA code where an APA event in a given cellular context is regulated by a number of parameters, including relative location to the TSS, splicing context, distance between competing pAs, surrounding cis elements and concentrations of core C/P factors. PMID:25906188

  7. Molecular cloning of a small DNA binding protein with specificity for a tissue-specific negative element within the rps1 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, D X; Bisanz-Seyer, C; Mache, R

    1995-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a specific binding activity for the tissue-specific negative cis-element S1F binding site of spinach rps1 was isolated from a spinach cDNA expression library. This cDNA of 0.7 kb encodes an unusual small peptide of only 70 amino acids, with a basic domain which contains a nuclear localization signal and a putative DNA binding helix. This protein, named S1Fa, is highly conserved between dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous plants and may represent a novel class of DNA binding proteins. The corresponding mRNA is accumulated more in roots and in etiolated seedlings than in green leaves. This expression pattern is correlated with the tissue-specific function of the S1F binding site which represses the rps1 promoter preferentially in roots and in etiolated plants. Images PMID:7739894

  8. CaMKIIδ-dependent inhibition of cAMP-response element-binding protein activity in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongfeng; Sun, Li-Yan; Singer, Diane V; Ginnan, Roman; Singer, Harold A

    2013-11-22

    One transcription factor mediator of Ca(2+)-signals is cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). CREB expression and/or activity negatively correlates with vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cell proliferation and migration. Multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, including CaMKII, have been demonstrated to regulate CREB activity through both positive and negative phosphorylation events in vitro, but the function of CaMKII as a proximal regulator of CREB in intact cell systems, including VSM, is not clear. In this study, we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches to determine the function of CaMKIIδ in regulating CREB phosphorylation, localization, and activity in VSM. Overexpression of constitutively active CaMKIIδ specifically increased CREB phosphorylation on Ser(142) and silencing CaMKIIδ expression by siRNA or blocking endogenous CaMKII activity with KN93 abolished thrombin- or ionomycin-induced CREB phosphorylation on Ser(142) without affecting Ser(133) phosphorylation. CREB-Ser(142) phosphorylation correlated with transient nucleocytoplasmic translocation of CREB. Thrombin-induced CREB promoter activity, CREB binding to Sik1 and Rgs2 promoters, and Sik1/Rgs2 transcription were enhanced by a kinase-negative CaMKIIδ2 (K43A) mutant and inhibited by a constitutively active (T287D) mutant. Taken together, these studies establish negative regulation of CREB activity by endogenous CaMKIIδ-dependent CREB-Ser(142) phosphorylation and suggest a potential mechanism for CaMKIIδ/CREB signaling in modulating proliferation and migration in VSM cells. PMID:24106266

  9. Different motif requirements for the localization zipcode element of β-actin mRNA binding by HuD and ZBP1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak Hee; Lee, Seung Joon; Gardiner, Amy S.; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I.; Yoo, Soonmoon

    2015-01-01

    Interactions of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) with their target transcripts are essential for regulating gene expression at the posttranscriptional level including mRNA export/localization, stability, and translation. ZBP1 and HuD are RBPs that play pivotal roles in mRNA transport and local translational control in neuronal processes. While HuD possesses three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs), ZBP1 contains two RRMs and four K homology (KH) domains that either increase target specificity or provide a multi-target binding capability. Here we used isolated cis-element sequences of the target mRNA to examine directly protein-RNA interactions in cell-free systems. We found that both ZBP1 and HuD bind the zipcode element in rat β-actin mRNA's 3′ UTR. Differences between HuD and ZBP1 were observed in their binding preference to the element. HuD showed a binding preference for U-rich sequence. In contrast, ZBP1 binding to the zipcode RNA depended more on the structural level, as it required the proper spatial organization of a stem-loop that is mainly determined by the U-rich element juxtaposed to the 3′ end of a 5′-ACACCC-3′ motif. On the basis of this work, we propose that ZBP1 and HuD bind to overlapping sites in the β-actin zipcode, but they recognize different features of this target sequence. PMID:26152301

  10. Mobile Minos elements from Drosophila hydei encode a two-exon transposase with similarity to the paired DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Franz, G; Loukeris, T G; Dialektaki, G; Thompson, C R; Savakis, C

    1994-01-01

    Elements related to the Tc1-like Minos mobile element have been cloned from Drosophila hydei and sequenced. Southern blot and sequence analyses show that (i) the elements are actively transposing in the Drosophila hydei germ line, (ii) they are characterized by a striking degree of sequence and size homogeneity, and (iii) like Tc1, they insert at a TA dinucleotide that is probably duplicated during the process. The nucleotide sequences of two elements, Minos-2 and Minos-3, differ at only one position from each other and contain two nonoverlapping open reading frames that are separated by a putative 60-nucleotide intron. The amino-terminal part of the Minos putative transposase shows sequence similarity to the paired DNA-binding domain. Forced transcription of a modified Minos element that was introduced into the Drosophila melanogaster germ line by P element-mediated transformation resulted in the production of accurately spliced polyadenylylated RNA molecules. It is proposed that Minos-2 and/or Minos-3 may encode an active transposase containing an amino-terminal DNA-binding domain that is distantly related to the paired DNA-binding domain. Images PMID:8197129

  11. Hepatic PCSK9 expression is regulated by nutritional status via insulin and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c.

    PubMed

    Costet, Philippe; Cariou, Bertrand; Lambert, Gilles; Lalanne, Florent; Lardeux, Bernard; Jarnoux, Anne-Laure; Grefhorst, Aldo; Staels, Bart; Krempf, Michel

    2006-03-10

    Familial autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia is associated with high risk for cardiovascular accidents and is related to mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor or its ligand apolipoprotein B (apoB). Mutations in a third gene, proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9), were recently associated to this disease. PCSK9 acts as a natural inhibitor of the low density lipoprotein receptor pathway, and both genes are regulated by depletion of cholesterol cell content and statins, via sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP). Here we investigated the regulation of PCSK9 gene expression during nutritional changes. We showed that PCSK9 mRNA quantity is decreased by 73% in mice after 24 h of fasting, leading to a 2-fold decrease in protein level. In contrast PCSK9 expression was restored upon high carbohydrate refeeding. PCSK9 mRNA increased by 4-5-fold in presence of insulin in rodent primary hepatocytes, whereas glucose had no effect. Moreover, insulin up-regulated hepatic PCSK9 expression in vivo during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp in mice. Adenoviral mediated overexpression of a dominant or negative form of SREBP-1c confirmed the implication of this transcription factor in insulin-mediated stimulation of PCSK9 expression. Liver X receptor agonist T0901317 also regulated PCSK9 expression via this same pathway (a 2-fold increase in PCSK9 mRNA of primary hepatocytes cultured for 24 h in presence of 1 microm T0901317). As our last investigation, we isolated PCSK9 proximal promoter and verified the functionality of a SREBP-1c responsive element located from 335 bp to 355 bp upstream of the ATG. Together, these results show that PCSK9 expression is regulated by nutritional status and insulinemia. PMID:16407292

  12. Ectopic expression of dehydration responsive element binding proteins (StDREB2) confers higher tolerance to salt stress in potato.

    PubMed

    Bouaziz, Donia; Pirrello, Julien; Ben Amor, Hela; Hammami, Asma; Charfeddine, Mariam; Dhieb, Amina; Bouzayen, Mondher; Gargouri-Bouzid, Radhia

    2012-11-01

    Dehydration responsive element binding proteins (DREB) are members of a larger family of transcription factors, many of which have been reported to contribute to plant responses to abiotic stresses in several species. While, little is known about their role in potato (Solanum tuberosum). This report describes the cloning and characterization of a DREB transcription factor cDNA, StDREB2, isolated from potato (cv Nicola) plants submitted to salt treatment. Based on a multiple sequence alignment, this protein was classified into the A-5 group of DREB subfamily. Expression studies revealed that StDREB2 was induced in leaves, roots and stems upon various abiotic stresses and in response to exogenous treatment with abscisic acid (ABA). In agreement with this expression pattern, over-expression of StDREB2 in transgenic potato plants resulted in enhanced tolerance to salt stress. These data suggest that the isolated StDREB2 encodes a functional protein involved in plant response to different abiotic stresses. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) indicated that the StDREB2 protein bound specifically to the DRE core element (ACCGAGA) in vitro. Moreover, Semi quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the transcript level of a putative target gene i.e. δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS) was up-regulated in transgenic plants submitted to salt stress conditions. A concomitant increase in proline accumulation was also observed under these conditions. Taking together, all these data suggest that StDREB2 takes part in the processes underlying plant responses to abiotic stresses probably via the regulation of ABA hormone signaling and through a mechanism allowing proline synthesis.

  13. Drosophila TDP-43 RNA-Binding Protein Facilitates Association of Sister Chromatid Cohesion Proteins with Genes, Enhancers and Polycomb Response Elements

    PubMed Central

    Misulovin, Ziva; Gause, Maria; Rickels, Ryan A; Shilatifard, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The cohesin protein complex mediates sister chromatid cohesion and participates in transcriptional control of genes that regulate growth and development. Substantial reduction of cohesin activity alters transcription of many genes without disrupting chromosome segregation. Drosophila Nipped-B protein loads cohesin onto chromosomes, and together Nipped-B and cohesin occupy essentially all active transcriptional enhancers and a large fraction of active genes. It is unknown why some active genes bind high levels of cohesin and some do not. Here we show that the TBPH and Lark RNA-binding proteins influence association of Nipped-B and cohesin with genes and gene regulatory sequences. In vitro, TBPH and Lark proteins specifically bind RNAs produced by genes occupied by Nipped-B and cohesin. By genomic chromatin immunoprecipitation these RNA-binding proteins also bind to chromosomes at cohesin-binding genes, enhancers, and Polycomb response elements (PREs). RNAi depletion reveals that TBPH facilitates association of Nipped-B and cohesin with genes and regulatory sequences. Lark reduces binding of Nipped-B and cohesin at many promoters and aids their association with several large enhancers. Conversely, Nipped-B facilitates TBPH and Lark association with genes and regulatory sequences, and interacts with TBPH and Lark in affinity chromatography and immunoprecipitation experiments. Blocking transcription does not ablate binding of Nipped-B and the RNA-binding proteins to chromosomes, indicating transcription is not required to maintain binding once established. These findings demonstrate that RNA-binding proteins help govern association of sister chromatid cohesion proteins with genes and enhancers. PMID:27662615

  14. Long-Term Memory for Place Learning Is Facilitated by Expression of cAMP Response Element-Binding Protein in the Dorsal Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brightwell, Jennifer J.; Smith, Clayton A.; Neve, Rachael L.; Colombo, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Extensive research has shown that the hippocampus is necessary for consolidation of long-term spatial memory in rodents. We reported previously that rats using a place strategy to solve a cross maze task showed sustained phosphorylation of hippocampus cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a transcription factor implicated in…

  15. Spatial Memory in the Morris Water Maze and Activation of Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding (CREB) Protein within the Mouse Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porte, Yves; Buhot, Marie Christine; Mons, Nicole E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the spatio-temporal dynamics of learning-induced cAMP response element-binding protein activation/phosphorylation (pCREB) in mice trained in a spatial reference memory task in the water maze. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined pCREB immunoreactivity (pCREB-ir) in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 and related brain structures. During the…

  16. Alternative polyadenylation sites of human endothelial nitric oxide synthase mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ihara, Hideshi; Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Ida, Tomoaki; Kozaki, Shunji; Tsuyama, Shingo; Moss, Joel

    2010-01-01

    The mRNA 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) has been shown to have important roles in the regulation of mRNA function. In this study, we investigated the human endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) 3′-UTR to evaluate its potential regulatory role. 3′-RACE analysis revealed that the human eNOS mRNA has multiple alternative polyadenylation sites. Apart from the proximal site (418 bp downstream of the stop codon), we identified two additional distal sites approximately 770 and 1478 bp downstream of the stop codon. In addition, Northern analysis showed that the usage of these sites differed among human tissues. Further, amounts of these eNOS mRNAs were changed during growth of cultured human aortic endothelial cells; mRNAs with long 3′-UTRs decreased more rapidly than total mRNA, as cells approached confluency. Thus, the 3′-UTRs of human eNOS results from alternative polyadenylation sites and differ across tissues and during cell growth. PMID:17825792

  17. 3'READS+, a sensitive and accurate method for 3' end sequencing of polyadenylated RNA.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dinghai; Liu, Xiaochuan; Tian, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Sequencing of the 3' end of poly(A)(+) RNA identifies cleavage and polyadenylation sites (pAs) and measures transcript expression. We previously developed a method, 3' region extraction and deep sequencing (3'READS), to address mispriming issues that often plague 3' end sequencing. Here we report a new version, named 3'READS+, which has vastly improved accuracy and sensitivity. Using a special locked nucleic acid oligo to capture poly(A)(+) RNA and to remove the bulk of the poly(A) tail, 3'READS+ generates RNA fragments with an optimal number of terminal A's that balance data quality and detection of genuine pAs. With improved RNA ligation steps for efficiency, the method shows much higher sensitivity (over two orders of magnitude) compared to the previous version. Using 3'READS+, we have uncovered a sizable fraction of previously overlooked pAs located next to or within a stretch of adenylate residues in human genes and more accurately assessed the frequency of alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) in HeLa cells (∼50%). 3'READS+ will be a useful tool to accurately study APA and to analyze gene expression by 3' end counting, especially when the amount of input total RNA is limited. PMID:27512124

  18. Serotonin transporter polyadenylation polymorphism modulates the retention of fear extinction memory.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Catherine A; McKenna, Morgan C; Salman, Rabia; Holmes, Andrew; Casey, B J; Phelps, Elizabeth A; Glatt, Charles E

    2012-04-01

    Growing evidence suggests serotonin's role in anxiety and depression is mediated by its effects on learned fear associations. Pharmacological and genetic manipulations of serotonin signaling in mice alter the retention of fear extinction learning, which is inversely associated with anxious temperament in mice and humans. Here, we test whether genetic variation in serotonin signaling in the form of a common human serotonin transporter polyadenylation polymorphism (STPP/rs3813034) is associated with spontaneous fear recovery after extinction. We show that the risk allele of this polymorphism is associated with impaired retention of fear extinction memory and heightened anxiety and depressive symptoms. These STPP associations in humans mirror the phenotypic effects of serotonin transporter knockout in mice, highlighting the STPP as a potential genetic locus underlying interindividual differences in serotonin transporter function in humans. Furthermore, we show that the serotonin transporter polyadenylation profile associated with the STPP risk allele is altered through the chronic administration of fluoxetine, a treatment that also facilitates retention of extinction learning. The propensity to form persistent fear associations due to poor extinction recall may be an intermediate phenotype mediating the effects of genetic variation in serotonergic function on anxiety and depression. The consistency and specificity of these data across species provide robust support for this hypothesis and suggest that the little-studied STPP may be an important risk factor for mood and anxiety disorders in humans.

  19. Subcellular RNA profiling links splicing and nuclear DICER1 to alternative cleavage and polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Neve, Jonathan; Burger, Kaspar; Li, Wencheng; Hoque, Mainul; Patel, Radhika; Tian, Bin; Gullerova, Monika; Furger, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) plays a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression across eukaryotes. Although APA is extensively studied, its regulation within cellular compartments and its physiological impact remains largely enigmatic. Here, we used a rigorous subcellular fractionation approach to compare APA profiles of cytoplasmic and nuclear RNA fractions from human cell lines. This approach allowed us to extract APA isoforms that are subjected to differential regulation and provided us with a platform to interrogate the molecular regulatory pathways that shape APA profiles in different subcellular locations. Here, we show that APA isoforms with shorter 3′ UTRs tend to be overrepresented in the cytoplasm and appear to be cell-type–specific events. Nuclear retention of longer APA isoforms occurs and is partly a result of incomplete splicing contributing to the observed cytoplasmic bias of transcripts with shorter 3′ UTRs. We demonstrate that the endoribonuclease III, DICER1, contributes to the establishment of subcellular APA profiles not only by expected cytoplasmic miRNA-mediated destabilization of APA mRNA isoforms, but also by affecting polyadenylation site choice. PMID:26546131

  20. 3'READS+, a sensitive and accurate method for 3' end sequencing of polyadenylated RNA.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dinghai; Liu, Xiaochuan; Tian, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Sequencing of the 3' end of poly(A)(+) RNA identifies cleavage and polyadenylation sites (pAs) and measures transcript expression. We previously developed a method, 3' region extraction and deep sequencing (3'READS), to address mispriming issues that often plague 3' end sequencing. Here we report a new version, named 3'READS+, which has vastly improved accuracy and sensitivity. Using a special locked nucleic acid oligo to capture poly(A)(+) RNA and to remove the bulk of the poly(A) tail, 3'READS+ generates RNA fragments with an optimal number of terminal A's that balance data quality and detection of genuine pAs. With improved RNA ligation steps for efficiency, the method shows much higher sensitivity (over two orders of magnitude) compared to the previous version. Using 3'READS+, we have uncovered a sizable fraction of previously overlooked pAs located next to or within a stretch of adenylate residues in human genes and more accurately assessed the frequency of alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) in HeLa cells (∼50%). 3'READS+ will be a useful tool to accurately study APA and to analyze gene expression by 3' end counting, especially when the amount of input total RNA is limited.

  1. Picornavirus RNA polyadenylation by 3Dpol, the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Brian J; Barton, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Poly(A) tails are functionally important features of all picornavirus RNA genomes. Some viruses have genomes with relatively short poly(A) tails (encephalomyocarditis virus) whereas others have genomes with longer poly(A) tails (polioviruses and rhinoviruses). Here we review the polyadenylation of picornavirus RNA as it relates to the structure and function of 3Dpol. Poliovirus 3Dpol uses template-dependent reiterative transcription mechanisms as it replicates the poly(A) tails of viral RNA (Steil et al., 2010). These mechanisms are analogous to those involved in the polyadenylation of vesicular stomatitis virus and influenza virus mRNAs. 3Dpol residues intimately associated with viral RNA templates and products regulate the size of poly(A) tails in viral RNA (Kempf et al., 2013). Consistent with their ancient evolutionary origins, picornavirus 3Dpol and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) share structural and functional features. Structurally, both 3Dpol and TERT assume a “right-hand” conformation with thumb, palm and fingers domains encircling templates and products. Functionally, both 3Dpol and TERT use template-dependent reiterative transcription mechanisms to synthesize repetitive sequences: poly(A) tails in the case of picornavirus RNA genomes and DNA telomeres in the case of eukaryotic chromosomes. Thus, picornaviruses and their eukaryotic hosts (humans & animals) maintain the 3’ ends of their respective genomes via evolutionarily related mechanisms. PMID:25559071

  2. Regulation of OsmiR156h through Alternative Polyadenylation Improves Grain Yield in Rice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meng; Liu, Binmei; Wu, Kun; Ye, Yafeng; Huang, Shixia; Wang, Shuansuo; Wang, Yi; Han, Ruixi; Liu, Qian; Fu, Xiangdong; Wu, Yuejin

    2015-01-01

    Substantial increases in grain yield of cereal crops are required to feed a growing human population. Here we show that a natural variant of SEMIDWARF AND HIGH-TILLERING (SDT) increases harvest index and grain productivity in rice. Gain-of-function sdt mutation has a shortened polyadenylation tail on the OsmiR156h microRNA precursor, which cause the up-regulation of OsmiR156h. The plants carrying the semidominant sdt allele exhibit reduced plant height, enhanced lodging resistance, increased tiller numbers per plant, and resulting in an increased grain yield. We also show that combining the sdt allele with the OsSPL14WFP allele can be effective in simultaneously improving tillering capacity and panicle branching, thereby leading to higher harvest index and grain yield. Most importantly, pyramiding of the sdt allele and the green revolution gene sd1 enhances grain yield by about 20% in hybrid rice breeding. Our results suggest that the manipulation of the polyadenylation status of OsmiR156 represents a novel strategy for improving the yield potential of rice over what is currently achievable. PMID:25954944

  3. Subcellular RNA profiling links splicing and nuclear DICER1 to alternative cleavage and polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Neve, Jonathan; Burger, Kaspar; Li, Wencheng; Hoque, Mainul; Patel, Radhika; Tian, Bin; Gullerova, Monika; Furger, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) plays a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression across eukaryotes. Although APA is extensively studied, its regulation within cellular compartments and its physiological impact remains largely enigmatic. Here, we used a rigorous subcellular fractionation approach to compare APA profiles of cytoplasmic and nuclear RNA fractions from human cell lines. This approach allowed us to extract APA isoforms that are subjected to differential regulation and provided us with a platform to interrogate the molecular regulatory pathways that shape APA profiles in different subcellular locations. Here, we show that APA isoforms with shorter 3' UTRs tend to be overrepresented in the cytoplasm and appear to be cell-type-specific events. Nuclear retention of longer APA isoforms occurs and is partly a result of incomplete splicing contributing to the observed cytoplasmic bias of transcripts with shorter 3' UTRs. We demonstrate that the endoribonuclease III, DICER1, contributes to the establishment of subcellular APA profiles not only by expected cytoplasmic miRNA-mediated destabilization of APA mRNA isoforms, but also by affecting polyadenylation site choice. PMID:26546131

  4. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein Regulates the Expression and Metabolic Functions of Wild-Type and Oncogenic IDH1.

    PubMed

    Ricoult, Stéphane J H; Dibble, Christian C; Asara, John M; Manning, Brendan D

    2016-09-15

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) is a major transcriptional regulator of the enzymes underlying de novo lipid synthesis. However, little is known about the SREBP-mediated control of processes that indirectly support lipogenesis, for instance, by supplying reducing power in the form of NAPDH or directing carbon flux into lipid precursors. Here, we characterize isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) as a transcriptional target of SREBP across a spectrum of cancer cell lines and human cancers. IDH1 promotes the synthesis of lipids specifically from glutamine-derived carbons. Neomorphic mutations in IDH1 occur frequently in certain cancers, leading to the production of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). We found that SREBP induces the expression of oncogenic IDH1 and influences 2-HG production from glucose. Treatment of cells with 25-hydroxycholesterol or statins, which respectively inhibit or activate SREBP, further supports SREBP-mediated regulation of IDH1 and, in cells with oncogenic IDH1, carbon flux into 2-HG. PMID:27354064

  5. spongeScan: A web for detecting microRNA binding elements in lncRNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Furió-Tarí, Pedro; Tarazona, Sonia; Gabaldón, Toni; Enright, Anton J.; Conesa, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNA transcripts such as microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important genetic regulators. However, the functions of many of these transcripts are still not clearly understood. Recently, it has become apparent that there is significant crosstalk between miRNAs and lncRNAs and that this creates competition for binding between the miRNA, a lncRNA and other regulatory targets. Indeed, various competitive endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) have already been identified where a lncRNA acts by sequestering miRNAs. This implies the down-regulation in the interaction of the miRNAs with their mRNA targets, what has been called a sponge effect. Multiple approaches exist for the prediction of miRNA targets in mRNAs. However, few methods exist for the prediction of miRNA response elements (MREs) in lncRNAs acting as ceRNAs (sponges). Here, we present spongeScan (http://spongescan.rc.ufl.edu), a graphical web tool to compute and visualize putative MREs in lncRNAs, along with different measures to assess their likely behavior as ceRNAs. PMID:27198221

  6. A novel processing system of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c regulated by polyunsaturated fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Nakakuki, Masanori; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Tatsuto; Imada, Kazunori; Mizuguchi, Kiyoshi; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    The proteolytic cascade is the key step in transactivation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), a transcriptional factor of lipid synthesis. Proteolysis of SREBP-2 is strictly regulated by sterols, but that of SREBP-1c was not strongly sterol-regulated, but inhibited by polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). In this study, the proteolytic processing of SREBP-1 and -2 was examined by transfection studies of cDNA-encoding mutants in which all the known cleavage sites were disrupted. In cultured cells, sterol-regulated SREBP-2 processing was completely eliminated by mutation of cleavage sites. In contrast, the corresponding SREBP-1c mutants as well as wild type exhibited large amounts of cleaved products in the nuclear extracts from culture cells and murine liver in vivo. The nuclear form of the mutant SREBP-1c was induced by delipidated condition and suppressed by eicosapentaenoic acid, an n-3 PUFA, but not by sterols. This novel processing mechanism was affected by neither SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) nor insulin-induced gene (Insig)-1, unlike SREBP-2, but abolished by a serine protease inhibitor. Through analysis of deletion mutant, a site-2 protease recognition sequence (DRSR) was identified to be involved in this novel processing. These findings suggest that SREBP-1c cleavage could be subjected to a novel PUFA-regulated cleavage system in addition to the sterol-regulatory SCAP/Insig system.

  7. Microbiota Modulates Behavior and Protein Kinase C mediated cAMP response element-binding protein Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Li; Zeng, Benhua; Wang, Haiyang; Li, Bo; Huo, Ran; Zheng, Peng; Zhang, Xiaotong; Du, Xiangyu; Liu, Meiling; Fang, Zheng; Xu, Xuejiao; Zhou, Chanjuan; Chen, Jianjun; Li, Wenxia; Guo, Jing; Wei, Hong; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary pressure drives gut microbiota-host coevolution and results in complex interactions between gut microbiota and neural development; however, the molecular mechanisms by which the microbiota governs host behavior remain obscure. Here, we report that colonization early in life is crucial for the microbiota to modulate brain development and behavior; later colonization or deletion of microbiota cannot completely reverse the behaviors. Microarray analysis revealed an association between absence of gut microbiota and expression in cAMP responding element-binding protein (CREB) regulated genes in the hippocampus. The absence of gut microbiota from birth was shown to be associated with decreased CREB expression, followed by decreases of protein kinase C beta (PRKCB) and AMPA receptors expression, and an increase of phosphorylation CREB (pCREB) expression. Microbiota colonization in adolescence restored CREB and pCREB expression, but did not alter PRKCB and AMPARs expression. The removal of the gut microbiota from SPF mice using antibiotics only reduced pCREB expression. These findings suggest that (i) colonization of the gut microbiota early in life might facilitate neurodevelopment via PKC-CREB signaling and (ii) although GF mice and ABX mice display reduced anxiety-related behaviors, the molecular mechanisms behind this might differ. PMID:27444685

  8. Enhanced phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein in Brain of mice following repetitive hypoxic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Yanan; Gao Ge; Long Caixia; Han Song; Zu Pengyu; Fang Li . E-mail: lfang@utmb.edu; Li Junfa . E-mail: junfali@cpums.edu.cn

    2006-02-10

    Cerebral ischemic/hypoxic preconditioning (I/HPC) is a phenomenon of endogenous protection that renders Brain tolerant to sustained ischemia/hypoxia. This profound protection induced by I/HPC makes it an attractive target for developing potential clinical therapeutic approaches. However, the molecular mechanism of I/HPC is unclear. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB), a selective nuclear transcriptional factor, plays a key role in the neuronal functions. Phosphorylation of CREB on Ser-133 may facilitate its transcriptional activity in response to various stresses. In the current study, we observed the changes in CREB phosphorylation (Ser-133) and protein expression in Brain of auto-hypoxia-induced HPC mice by using Western blot analysis. We found that the levels of phosphorylated CREB (Ser-133), but not protein expression of CREB, increased significantly (p < 0.05) in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex of mice after repetitive hypoxic exposure (H2-H4, n = 6 for each group), when compared to that of the normoxic (H0, n = 6) or hypoxic exposure once group (H1, n = 6). In addition, a significant enhancement (p < 0.05) of CREB phosphorylation (Ser-133) could also be found in the nuclear extracts from the whole hippocampus of hypoxic preconditioned mice (H2-H4, n = 6 for each group). These results suggest that the phosphorylation of CREB might be involved in the development of cerebral hypoxic preconditioning.

  9. Far upstream element binding protein 2 interacts with enterovirus 71 internal ribosomal entry site and negatively regulates viral translation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing-Yi; Li, Mei-Ling; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2009-01-01

    An internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) that directs the initiation of viral protein translation is a potential drug target for enterovirus 71 (EV71). Regulation of internal initiation requires the interaction of IRES trans-acting factors (ITAFs) with the internal ribosomal entry site. Biotinylated RNA-affinity chromatography and proteomic approaches were employed to identify far upstream element (FUSE) binding protein 2 (FBP2) as an ITAF for EV71. The interactions of FBP2 with EV71 IRES were confirmed by competition assay and by mapping the association sites in both viral IRES and FBP2 protein. During EV71 infection, FBP2 was enriched in cytoplasm where viral replication occurs, whereas FBP2 was localized in the nucleus in mock-infected cells. The synthesis of viral proteins increased in FBP2-knockdown cells that were infected by EV71. IRES activity in FBP2-knockdown cells exceeded that in the negative control (NC) siRNA-treated cells. On the other hand, IRES activity decreased when FBP2 was over-expressed in the cells. Results of this study suggest that FBP2 is a novel ITAF that interacts with EV71 IRES and negatively regulates viral translation. PMID:19010963

  10. Hypoxia induces phosphorylation of the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein by a novel signaling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Beitner-Johnson, D; Millhorn, D E

    1998-07-31

    To investigate signaling mechanisms by which hypoxia regulates gene expression, we examined the effect of hypoxia on the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in PC12 cells. Exposure to physiological levels of hypoxia (5% O2, approximately 50 mm Hg) rapidly induced a persistent phosphorylation of CREB on Ser133, an event that is required for CREB-mediated transcriptional activation. Hypoxia-induced phosphorylation of CREB was more robust than that induced by any other stimulus tested, including forskolin, depolarization, and osmotic stress. Furthermore, this effect was not mediated by any of the previously known signaling pathways that lead to phosphorylation of CREB, including protein kinase A, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C, ribosomal S6 kinase-2, and mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase-2. Hypoxic activation of a CRE-containing reporter (derived from the 5'-flanking region of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene) was attenuated markedly by mutation of the CRE. Thus, a physiological reduction in O2 levels induces a functional phosphorylation of CREB at Ser133 via a novel signaling pathway. PMID:9677418

  11. Phosphorylation-dependent targeting of cAMP response element binding protein to the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway in hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Cormac T.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Synnestvedt, Kristin; Colgan, Sean P.

    2000-01-01

    Hypoxia activates a number of gene products through degradation of the transcriptional coactivator cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Other transcriptional regulators (e.g., β-catenin and NF-κB) are controlled through phosphorylation-targeted proteasomal degradation, and thus, we hypothesized a similar degradative pathway for CREB. Differential display analysis of mRNA derived from hypoxic epithelia revealed a specific and time-dependent repression of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a serine phosphatase important in CREB dephosphorylation. Subsequent studies identified a previously unappreciated proteasomal-targeting motif within the primary structure of CREB (DSVTDS), which functions as a substrate for PP1. Ambient hypoxia resulted in temporally sequential CREB serine phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and degradation (in vitro and in vivo). HIV-tat peptide-facilitated loading of intact epithelia with phosphopeptides corresponding to this proteasome targeting motif resulted in inhibition of CREB ubiquitination. Further studies revealed that PP1 inhibitors mimicked hypoxia-induced gene expression, whereas proteasome inhibitors reversed the hypoxic phenotype. Thus, hypoxia establishes conditions that target CREB to proteasomal degradation. These studies may provide unique insight into a general mechanism of transcriptional regulation by hypoxia. PMID:11035795

  12. Genetic variation in T-box binding element functionally affects SCN5A/SCN10A enhancer.

    PubMed

    van den Boogaard, Malou; Wong, L Y Elaine; Tessadori, Federico; Bakker, Martijn L; Dreizehnter, Lisa K; Wakker, Vincent; Bezzina, Connie R; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Bakkers, Jeroen; Barnett, Phil; Christoffels, Vincent M

    2012-07-01

    The contraction pattern of the heart relies on the activation and conduction of the electrical impulse. Perturbations of cardiac conduction have been associated with congenital and acquired arrhythmias as well as cardiac arrest. The pattern of conduction depends on the regulation of heterogeneous gene expression by key transcription factors and transcriptional enhancers. Here, we assessed the genome-wide occupation of conduction system-regulating transcription factors TBX3, NKX2-5, and GATA4 and of enhancer-associated coactivator p300 in the mouse heart, uncovering cardiac enhancers throughout the genome. Many of the enhancers colocalized with ion channel genes repressed by TBX3, including the clustered sodium channel genes Scn5a, essential for cardiac function, and Scn10a. We identified 2 enhancers in the Scn5a/Scn10a locus, which were regulated by TBX3 and its family member and activator, TBX5, and are functionally conserved in humans. We also provided evidence that a SNP in the SCN10A enhancer associated with alterations in cardiac conduction patterns in humans disrupts TBX3/TBX5 binding and reduces the cardiac activity of the enhancer in vivo. Thus, the identification of key regulatory elements for cardiac conduction helps to explain how genetic variants in noncoding regulatory DNA sequences influence the regulation of cardiac conduction and the predisposition for cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:22706305

  13. Involvement of cyclic-nucleotide response element-binding family members in the radiation response of Ramos B lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Di Nisio, Chiara; Sancilio, Silvia; Di Giacomo, Viviana; Rapino, Monica; Sancillo, Laura; Genovesi, Domenico; Di Siena, Alessandro; Rana, Rosa Alba; Cataldi, Amelia; Di Pietro, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Cyclic-nucleotide Response Element-Binding (CREB) family members and related nuclear transcription factors in the radiation response of human B lymphoma cell lines (Daudi and Ramos). Unlike the more radiosensitive Daudi cells, Ramos cells demonstrated only a moderate increase in early apoptosis after 3-5 Gy irradiation doses, which was detected with Annexin V/PI staining. Moreover, a significant and dose-dependent G2/M phase accumulation was observed in the same cell line at 24 h after both ionizing radiation (IR) doses. Western blot analysis showed an early increase in CREB protein expression that was still present at 3 h and more evident after 3 Gy IR in Ramos cells, along with the dose-dependent upregulation of p53 and NF-κB. These findings were consistent with real-time RT-PCR analysis that showed an early- and dose-dependent upregulation of NFKB1, IKBKB and XIAP gene expression. Unexpectedly, pre-treatment with SN50 did not increase cell death, but cell viability. Taken together, these findings let us hypothesise that the early induction and activation of NF-κB1 in Ramos cells could mediate necrotic cell death and be linked to other molecules belonging to CREB family and involved in the cell cycle regulation. PMID:26573110

  14. Overexpression of Arabidopsis Dehydration-Responsive Element-Binding protein 2A confers tolerance to salinity stress to transgenic canola.

    PubMed

    Shafeinie, Alireza; Mohammadi, Valiollah; Alizadeh, Houshang; Zali, Abas Ali

    2014-05-01

    Stress responsive transcriptional regulation is an adaptive strategy of plants that alleviates the adverse effects of environmental stresses. The ectopic overexpression of Dehydration-Responsive Element Binding transcription factors (DREBs) either in homologous or in heterologous plants are the classical transcriptional regulators involved in plant responses to drought, salt and cold stresses. To elucidate the transcriptional mechanism associated with the DREB2A gene after removing PEST sequence, which acts as a signal peptide for protein degradation, 34 transgenic T0 canola plants overexpressing DREB2A were developed. The quantitative Real time PCR of transgenic plants showed higher expression of downstream stress-responsive genes including COR14, HSF3, HSP70, PEROX and RD20. The transgenic plants exhibited enhanced tolerance to salt stress. At the high concentration of NaCl the growth of non-transformed plants had been clearly diminished, whereas transgenic line was survived. These results indicated that transformed DREB2A gene might improve the plant response to salinity in transgenic canola plants. PMID:26030994

  15. Microbiota Modulates Behavior and Protein Kinase C mediated cAMP response element-binding protein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Li; Zeng, Benhua; Wang, Haiyang; Li, Bo; Huo, Ran; Zheng, Peng; Zhang, Xiaotong; Du, Xiangyu; Liu, Meiling; Fang, Zheng; Xu, Xuejiao; Zhou, Chanjuan; Chen, Jianjun; Li, Wenxia; Guo, Jing; Wei, Hong; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary pressure drives gut microbiota–host coevolution and results in complex interactions between gut microbiota and neural development; however, the molecular mechanisms by which the microbiota governs host behavior remain obscure. Here, we report that colonization early in life is crucial for the microbiota to modulate brain development and behavior; later colonization or deletion of microbiota cannot completely reverse the behaviors. Microarray analysis revealed an association between absence of gut microbiota and expression in cAMP responding element-binding protein (CREB) regulated genes in the hippocampus. The absence of gut microbiota from birth was shown to be associated with decreased CREB expression, followed by decreases of protein kinase C beta (PRKCB) and AMPA receptors expression, and an increase of phosphorylation CREB (pCREB) expression. Microbiota colonization in adolescence restored CREB and pCREB expression, but did not alter PRKCB and AMPARs expression. The removal of the gut microbiota from SPF mice using antibiotics only reduced pCREB expression. These findings suggest that (i) colonization of the gut microbiota early in life might facilitate neurodevelopment via PKC–CREB signaling and (ii) although GF mice and ABX mice display reduced anxiety-related behaviors, the molecular mechanisms behind this might differ. PMID:27444685

  16. Identification of the RNA recognition element of the RBPMS family of RNA-binding proteins and their transcriptome-wide mRNA targets.

    PubMed

    Farazi, Thalia A; Leonhardt, Carl S; Mukherjee, Neelanjan; Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Li, Song; Max, Klaas E A; Meyer, Cindy; Yamaji, Masashi; Cekan, Pavol; Jacobs, Nicholas C; Gerstberger, Stefanie; Bognanni, Claudia; Larsson, Erik; Ohler, Uwe; Tuschl, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies implicated the RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (RBPMS) family of proteins in oocyte, retinal ganglion cell, heart, and gastrointestinal smooth muscle development. These RNA-binding proteins contain a single RNA recognition motif (RRM), and their targets and molecular function have not yet been identified. We defined transcriptome-wide RNA targets using photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) in HEK293 cells, revealing exonic mature and intronic pre-mRNA binding sites, in agreement with the nuclear and cytoplasmic localization of the proteins. Computational and biochemical approaches defined the RNA recognition element (RRE) as a tandem CAC trinucleotide motif separated by a variable spacer region. Similar to other mRNA-binding proteins, RBPMS family of proteins relocalized to cytoplasmic stress granules under oxidative stress conditions suggestive of a support function for mRNA localization in large and/or multinucleated cells where it is preferentially expressed.

  17. SEC-ICP-MS studies for elements binding to different molecular weight fractions of humic substances in compost extract obtained from urban solid waste.

    PubMed

    Sadi, Baki B M; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Kannamkumarath, Sasi S; Castillo, J R; Caruso, J A

    2002-12-01

    In this work, the speciation of elements in compost was studied with emphasis on their binding to humic substances. In order to assess the distribution of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, U, Th and Zn among molecular weight fractions of humic substances, the compost extract (extracted by 0.1 mol l(-1) sodium pyrophosphate) was analyzed by size exclusion chromatography coupled on-line with UV-Vis spectrophotometric and ICP-MS detection. Similar chromatograms were obtained for standard humic acid (Fluka) and for compost extract (254 nm, 400 nm) and three size fractions were operationally defined that corresponded to the apparent molecular weight ranges > 15 kDa, 1-15 kDa and < 1 kDa. The percentage of total element content in compost that was leached to the extract ranged from 30% up to 100% for different elements. The elution profiles of Co, Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb (ICP-MS) followed that of humic substances, while for other elements the bulk elution peak matched the retention time observed for the element in the absence of compost extract. Spiking experiments were carried out to confirm elements' binding and to estimate the affinity of individual elements for humic substances derived from compost. The results obtained indicated the following order of decreasing affinity: Cu > Ni > Co > Pb > Cd > (Cr, U, Th) > (As, Mn, Mo, Zn). After standard addition, further binding of Cu, Ni and Co with the two molecular weight fractions of humic substances was observed, indicating that humic substances derived from compost were not saturated with these elements.

  18. Hydraulic Binding Between Structural Elements and Groundwater Circulation in a Volcanic Aquifer : Insights from Riano Quarries District (Rome Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, David; Preziosi, Elisabetta; Ghergo, Stefano; Parrone, Daniele; Amalfitano, Stefano; Bruna Petrangeli, Anna; Zoppini, Annamaria

    2016-04-01

    A field survey and laboratory analysis of fracture systems crosscutting volcanic rocks was performed in the North-East of Rome urban area (Central Italy) to assess the hydraulic binding between structural elements, groundwater circulation and geochemistry. Fracture features (orientation, density, apertures, length and spacing) as well as groundwater heads and geochemical characteristics of rock and groundwater were analysed. We present and discuss the macro and mesostructural deformation pattern of the Riano quarries district (Central Italy) to highlight the close relationships between geological heterogeneity and water circulation. Laboratory analyses were carried out on rock samples: using XRF, microwave acid digestion and diffractometer to identify the chemical and mineralogical characters of the outcropping rock samples with a special focus on altered bands of fractures. On water samples using ICP-OES for major cations, ICP-MS for trace elements, IC for major anions and Spectrophotometry for NO2, PO4, NH4 . A total of 26 quarries with different dimension, shape and depth were examined by both remote and field analyses. Despite all the quarries were realized within the same tuff formation interval, a different fracture spatial distribution was recognized. From North to South a progressively increment of fracture density was observed. It was possible to observe a close relationship between orientation, spatial distribution and length. For each single fractured set, a 5° max orientation variation was observed, suggesting that fracture genesis was likely related to an extensional/transtensional tectonic process. Most of the fractures directly examined show an alteration band with different colors and thickness around the whole fracture shape. A preliminary overview of the laboratory results highlights that altered and unaltered tuffs (belonging to the same formation) show different chemical compositions. In particular, an enrichment of Mn, accompanied by a

  19. Cloning of a DNA-binding protein that interacts with the ethylene-responsive enhancer element of the carnation GST1 gene.

    PubMed

    Maxson, J M; Woodson, W R

    1996-07-01

    Ethylene transcriptionally activates a glutathione S-transferase gene (GST1) at the onset of the senescence program in carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) flower petals. A 126 bp region of the GST1 promoter sequence has been identified as an ethylene-responsive enhancer element (ERE). In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of nuclear proteins from senescing petals to recognize a 22 bp sequence within the ERE (ERE oligonucleotide). Mutation of the ERE oligonucleotide sequence significantly alters the strength of this nuclear protein-DNA association. The wild-type ERE oligonucleotide sequence was used to isolate a cDNA clone encoding a sequence-specific DNA binding protein. Nucleotide sequencing and deduced amino acid sequence analysis of this cDNA predicted a 32 kDa protein which we have designated carnation ethylene-responsive element-binding protein-1 (CEBP-1). The mRNA expression pattern of CEBP-1 suggests that it is not transcriptionally regulated by ethylene. The amino acid sequence homology of CEBP-1 with other plant nucleic acid binding proteins indicates a conserved nucleic acid binding domain. Within this domain are two highly conserved RNA-binding motifs, RNP-1 and RNP-2. An acidic region and a putative nuclear localization signal are also identified.

  20. BjMYB1, a transcription factor implicated in plant defence through activating BjCHI1 chitinase expression by binding to a W-box-like element

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Jia, Shuangwei; Wang, Chunlian; Wang, Fujun; Wang, Fajun; Zhao, Kaijun

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified the W-box-like-4 (Wbl-4) element (GTAGTGACTCAT), one of six Wbl elements in the BjC-P promoter of the unusual chitinase gene BjCHI1 from Brassica juncea, as the core element responsive to fungal infection. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of the cognate transcription factor interacting with the Wbl-4 element. Using Wbl-4 as a target, we performed yeast one-hybrid screening of a B. juncea cDNA library and isolated an R2R3-MYB transcription factor designated as BjMYB1. BjMYB1 was localized in the nucleus of plant cells. EMSA assays confirmed that BjMYB1 binds to the Wbl-4 element. Transiently expressed BjMYB1 up-regulated the activity of the BjC-P promoter through its binding to the Wbl-4 element in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves. In B. juncea, BjMYB1 displayed a similar induced expression pattern as that of BjCHI1 upon infection by the fungus Botrytis cinerea. Moreover, heterogeneous overexpression of BjMYB1 significantly elevated the resistance of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana to the fungus B. cinerea. These results suggest that BjMYB1 is potentially involved in host defence against fungal attack through activating the expression of BjCHI1 by binding to the Wbl-4 element in the BjC-P promoter. This finding demonstrates a novel DNA target of plant MYB transcription factors. PMID:27353280

  1. Sequences Just Upstream of the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Core Enhancer Allow Efficient Replication in the Absence of NF-κB and Sp1 Binding Elements

    PubMed Central

    Pöhlmann, Stefan; Flöss, Stefan; Ilyinskii, Petr O.; Stamminger, Thomas; Kirchhoff, Frank

    1998-01-01

    Large deletions of the upstream U3 sequences in the long terminal repeats (LTRs) of human immunodeficiency virus and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) accumulate in vivo in the absence of an intact nef gene. In the SIV U3 region, about 65 bp just upstream of the single NF-κB binding site always remained intact, and some evidence for a novel enhancer element in this region exists. We analyzed the transcriptional and replicative capacities of SIVmac239 mutants containing deletions or mutations in these upstream U3 sequences and/or the NF-κB and Sp1 binding sites. Even in the absence of 400 bp of upstream U3 sequences, the NF-κB site and all four Sp1 binding sites, the SIV promoter maintained about 15% of the wild-type LTR activity and was fully responsive to Tat activation in transient reporter assays. The effects of these deletions on virus production after transfection of COS-1 cells with full-length proviral constructs were much greater. Deletion of the upstream U3 sequences had no significant influence on viral replication when either the single NF-κB site or the Sp1 binding sites were intact. In contrast, the 26 bp of sequence located immediately upstream of the NF-κB site was essential for efficient replication when all core enhancer elements were deleted. A purine-rich site in this region binds specifically to the transcription factor Elf-1, a member of the ets proto-oncogene-encoded family. Our results indicate a high degree of functional redundancy in the SIVmac U3 region. Furthermore, we defined a novel regulatory element located immediately upstream of the NF-κB binding site that allows efficient viral replication in the absence of the entire core enhancer region. PMID:9621017

  2. Cloning and characterization of the dehydration-responsive element-binding protein 2A gene in Eruca vesicaria subsp sativa.

    PubMed

    Huang, B L; Zhang, X K; Li, Y Y; Li, D Y; Ma, M Y; Cai, D T; Wu, W H; Huang, B Q

    2016-01-01

    Eruca vesicaria subsp sativa is one of the most tolerant Cruciferae species to drought, and dehydration-responsive element-binding protein 2A (DREB2A) is involved in responses to salinity, heat, and particularly drought. In this study, a gene encoding EvDREB2A was cloned and characterized in E. vesicaria subsp sativa. The full-length EvDREB2A cDNA sequence contained a 388-bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), a 348-bp 3'-UTR, and a 1002-bp open reading frame that encoded 334 amino acid residues. The theoretical isoelectric point of the EvDREB2A protein was 4.80 and the molecular weight was 37.64 kDa. The genomic sequence of EvDREB2A contained no introns. Analysis using SMART indicated that EvDREB2A contains a conserved AP2 domain, similar to other plant DREBs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that EvDREB2A and DREB2As from Brassica rapa, Eutrema salsugineum, Arabidopsis thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata, and Arachis hypogaea formed a small subgroup, which clustered with DREB2Bs from A. lyrata, A. thaliana, Camelina sativa, and B. rapa to form a larger subgroup. EvDREB2A is most closely related to B. rapa DREB2A, followed by DREB2As from E. salsugineum, A. thaliana, A. hypogaea, and A. lyrata. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction indicated that EvDREB2A expression was highest in the leaves, followed by the roots and hypocotyls, and was lowest in the flower buds. EvDREB2A could be used to improve drought tolerance in crops.

  3. Cloning and characterization of the dehydration-responsive element-binding protein 2A gene in Eruca vesicaria subsp sativa.

    PubMed

    Huang, B L; Zhang, X K; Li, Y Y; Li, D Y; Ma, M Y; Cai, D T; Wu, W H; Huang, B Q

    2016-01-01

    Eruca vesicaria subsp sativa is one of the most tolerant Cruciferae species to drought, and dehydration-responsive element-binding protein 2A (DREB2A) is involved in responses to salinity, heat, and particularly drought. In this study, a gene encoding EvDREB2A was cloned and characterized in E. vesicaria subsp sativa. The full-length EvDREB2A cDNA sequence contained a 388-bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), a 348-bp 3'-UTR, and a 1002-bp open reading frame that encoded 334 amino acid residues. The theoretical isoelectric point of the EvDREB2A protein was 4.80 and the molecular weight was 37.64 kDa. The genomic sequence of EvDREB2A contained no introns. Analysis using SMART indicated that EvDREB2A contains a conserved AP2 domain, similar to other plant DREBs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that EvDREB2A and DREB2As from Brassica rapa, Eutrema salsugineum, Arabidopsis thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata, and Arachis hypogaea formed a small subgroup, which clustered with DREB2Bs from A. lyrata, A. thaliana, Camelina sativa, and B. rapa to form a larger subgroup. EvDREB2A is most closely related to B. rapa DREB2A, followed by DREB2As from E. salsugineum, A. thaliana, A. hypogaea, and A. lyrata. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction indicated that EvDREB2A expression was highest in the leaves, followed by the roots and hypocotyls, and was lowest in the flower buds. EvDREB2A could be used to improve drought tolerance in crops. PMID:27525923

  4. A petunia ethylene-responsive element binding factor, PhERF2, plays an important role in antiviral RNA silencing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Daoyang; Nandety, Raja Sekhar; Zhang, Yanlong; Reid, Michael S.; Niu, Lixin; Jiang, Cai-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Virus-induced RNA silencing is involved in plant antiviral defense and requires key enzyme components, including RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs), Dicer-like RNase III enzymes (DCLs), and Argonaute proteins (AGOs). However, the transcriptional regulation of these critical components is largely unknown. In petunia (Petunia hybrida), an ethylene-responsive element binding factor, PhERF2, is induced by Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) infection. Inclusion of a PhERF2 fragment in a TRV silencing construct containing reporter fragments of phytoene desaturase (PDS) or chalcone synthase (CHS) substantially impaired silencing efficiency of both the PDS and CHS reporters. Silencing was also impaired in PhERF2- RNAi lines, where TRV-PhPDS infection did not show the expected silencing phenotype (photobleaching). In contrast, photobleaching in response to infiltration with the TRV-PhPDS construct was enhanced in plants overexpressing PhERF2. Transcript abundance of the RNA silencing-related genes RDR2, RDR6, DCL2, and AGO2 was lower in PhERF2-silenced plants but higher in PhERF2-overexpressing plants. Moreover, PhERF2-silenced lines showed higher susceptibility to Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) than wild-type (WT) plants, while plants overexpressing PhERF2 exhibited increased resistance. Interestingly, growth and development of PhERF2-RNAi lines were substantially slower, whereas the overexpressing lines were more vigorous than the controls. Taken together, our results indicate that PhERF2 functions as a positive regulator in antiviral RNA silencing. PMID:27099376

  5. A petunia ethylene-responsive element binding factor, PhERF2, plays an important role in antiviral RNA silencing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Daoyang; Nandety, Raja Sekhar; Zhang, Yanlong; Reid, Michael S; Niu, Lixin; Jiang, Cai-Zhong

    2016-05-01

    Virus-induced RNA silencing is involved in plant antiviral defense and requires key enzyme components, including RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs), Dicer-like RNase III enzymes (DCLs), and Argonaute proteins (AGOs). However, the transcriptional regulation of these critical components is largely unknown. In petunia (Petunia hybrida), an ethylene-responsive element binding factor, PhERF2, is induced by Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) infection. Inclusion of a PhERF2 fragment in a TRV silencing construct containing reporter fragments of phytoene desaturase (PDS) or chalcone synthase (CHS) substantially impaired silencing efficiency of both the PDS and CHS reporters. Silencing was also impaired in PhERF2- RNAi lines, where TRV-PhPDS infection did not show the expected silencing phenotype (photobleaching). In contrast, photobleaching in response to infiltration with the TRV-PhPDS construct was enhanced in plants overexpressing PhERF2 Transcript abundance of the RNA silencing-related genes RDR2, RDR6, DCL2, and AGO2 was lower in PhERF2-silenced plants but higher in PhERF2-overexpressing plants. Moreover, PhERF2-silenced lines showed higher susceptibility to Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) than wild-type (WT) plants, while plants overexpressing PhERF2 exhibited increased resistance. Interestingly, growth and development of PhERF2-RNAi lines were substantially slower, whereas the overexpressing lines were more vigorous than the controls. Taken together, our results indicate that PhERF2 functions as a positive regulator in antiviral RNA silencing. PMID:27099376

  6. The 73 kD Subunit of the Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor (CPSF) Complex Affects Reproductive Development in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) is an important multi-subunit component of the mRNA 3’-end processing apparatus in eukaryotes. We have identified the Arabidopsis CPSF complex that involves five protein subunits named AtCPSF160, AtCPSF100, AtCPSF73-I, AtCPSF73-II and AtCPSF30....

  7. Molecular beacons can assess changes in expression and 3'-polyadenylation of human eNOS mRNA.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rachel; Baker, Meredith B; Weber, Martina; Harrison, David G; Bao, Gang; Searles, Charles D

    2009-03-01

    The endothelium plays an essential role in maintaining vascular homeostasis, and it fulfills this role by modulating intracellular signaling and gene expression in response to chemical and mechanical stimuli. Assessing changes in endothelial gene expression is essential to understanding how physiological and pathophysiological processes modulate vascular homeostasis. Here we describe the use of molecular beacons to rapidly and quantitatively assess expression and 3'-polyadenylation of a gene that is important for vascular homeostasis, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Single- and dual-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) molecular beacon hybridization assays were developed to measure changes in mRNA levels and 3'-polyadenylation, respectively, in primary human endothelial cell cultures subjected to laminar shear stress or statin treatment. Optimized beacon hybridization assays took approximately 15 min to perform, and eNOS mRNA levels were validated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Competitive inhibition assays and posttranscriptional silencing of eNOS expression were used to verify the specificity of molecular beacon fluorescence. Finally, the dual-FRET method was used to assess eNOS polyadenylation in tissues isolated from mice subjected to exercise training. These data demonstrate that molecular beacons can be used to rapidly and efficiently measure endothelial gene expression and 3'-polyadenylation. This approach could easily be adapted for studies of other endothelial genes and has promise for applications in live endothelial cells.

  8. Antisense Transcript and RNA Processing Alterations Suppress Instability of Polyadenylated mRNA in Chlamydomonas Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yoshiki; Kikis, Elise A.; Zimmer, Sara L.; Komine, Yutaka; Stern, David B.

    2004-01-01

    In chloroplasts, the control of mRNA stability is of critical importance for proper regulation of gene expression. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain Δ26pAtE is engineered such that the atpB mRNA terminates with an mRNA destabilizing polyadenylate tract, resulting in this strain being unable to conduct photosynthesis. A collection of photosynthetic revertants was obtained from Δ26pAtE, and gel blot hybridizations revealed RNA processing alterations in the majority of these suppressor of polyadenylation (spa) strains, resulting in a failure to expose the atpB mRNA 3′ poly(A) tail. Two exceptions were spa19 and spa23, which maintained unusual heteroplasmic chloroplast genomes. One genome type, termed PS+, conferred photosynthetic competence by contributing to the stability of atpB mRNA; the other, termed PS−, was required for viability but could not produce stable atpB transcripts. Based on strand-specific RT-PCR, S1 nuclease protection, and RNA gel blots, evidence was obtained that the PS+ genome stabilizes atpB mRNA by generating an atpB antisense transcript, which attenuates the degradation of the polyadenylated form. The accumulation of double-stranded RNA was confirmed by insensitivity of atpB mRNA from PS+ genome-containing cells to S1 nuclease digestion. To obtain additional evidence for antisense RNA function in chloroplasts, we used strain Δ26, in which atpB mRNA is unstable because of the lack of a 3′ stem-loop structure. In this context, when a 121-nucleotide segment of atpB antisense RNA was expressed from an ectopic site, an elevated accumulation of atpB mRNA resulted. Finally, when spa19 was placed in a genetic background in which expression of the chloroplast exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase was diminished, the PS+ genome and the antisense transcript were no longer required for photosynthesis. Taken together, our results suggest that antisense RNA in chloroplasts can protect otherwise unstable transcripts from 3′→5

  9. Hormonally induced alterations of chromatin structure in the polyadenylation and transcription termination regions of the chicken ovalbumin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Bellard, M; Dretzen, G; Bellard, F; Kaye, J S; Pratt-Kaye, S; Chambon, P

    1986-01-01

    We have studied the chromatin structure of a 16-kb region of the chicken genome containing the 3'-terminal 2 kb of the ovalbumin pre-mRNA coding sequence and the 14-kb segment located immediately downstream from the main mRNA polyadenylation site. Using the indirect end-labelling technique, four major and two minor DNase I-hypersensitive regions were found in the oviduct chromatin, whereas they were not present in liver, kidney or erythrocyte chromatin. The first hypersensitive region (region A) was present in chromatin of oviducts from laying hen and estrogen- or progesterone-stimulated immature chicks, in which the ovalbumin gene is expressed, but not in the chromatin of 'acute withdrawn' chicks where the gene is no longer transcribed. Region A spans 1.3 kb, from 7.2 to 8.5 kb downstream from the ovalbumin gene capsite (position +1), and encompasses the 3' moiety of the last exon including the major polyadenylation signal and polyadenylation site located at +7546 and +7564, respectively. Region A also contains a minor polyadenylation signal present at +7294 and the corresponding polyadenylation site at +7368. Two putative termination sequences at +8445 and +8483 are also found at the 3' extremity of region A in a 170-bp DNA segment within which 90% of the ovalbumin primary transcripts apparently terminate. Two minor hormone-independent DNase I-hypersensitive regions (a1 and a2) located at +8.6 and +8.8 kb are also specific to oviduct chromatin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3011414

  10. Crystal Structure of the Zorbamycin-Binding Protein ZbmA, the Primary Self-Resistance Element in Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf, Jeffrey D.; Bigelow, Lance; Chang, Changsoo; Cuff, Marianne E.; Lohman, Jeremy R.; Chang, Chin-Yuan; Ma, Ming; Yang, Dong; Clancy, Shonda; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Phillips, George N.; Shen, Ben

    2015-11-17

    The bleomycins (BLMs), tallysomycins (TLMs), phleomycin, and zorbamycin (ZBM) are members of the BLM family of glycopeptide-derived antitumor antibiotics. The BLM-producing Streptomyces verticillus ATCC15003 and the TLM-producing Streptoalloteichus hindustanus E465-94 ATCC31158 both possess at least two self-resistance elements, an N-acetyltransferase and a binding protein. The N-acetyltransferase provides resistance by disrupting the metal-binding domain of the antibiotic that is required for activity, while the binding protein confers resistance by sequestering the metal-bound antibiotic and preventing drug activation via molecular oxygen. We recently established that the ZBM producer, Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892, lacks the N-acetyltransferase resistance gene and that the ZBM-binding protein, ZbmA, is sufficient to confer resistance in the producing strain. To investigate the resistance mechanism attributed to ZbmA, we determined the crystal structures of apo and Cu(II)-ZBM-bound ZbmA at high resolutions of 1.90 and 1.65 angstrom, respectively. A comparison and contrast with other structurally characterized members of the BLM-binding protein family revealed key differences in the protein ligand binding environment that fine-tunes the ability of ZbmA to sequester metal-bound ZBM and supports drug sequestration as the primary resistance mechanism in the producing organisms of the BLM family of antitumor antibiotics.

  11. Genome-wide alternative polyadenylation in animals: insights from high-throughput technologies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Fu, Yonggui; Li, Yuxin; Xu, Anlong

    2012-12-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) plays an important role in gene expression by affecting mRNA stability, translation, and translocation in cells. However, genome-wide APA events have only recently been subjected to more systematic analysis with newly developed high-throughput methods. In this review, we focus on the recent technological development of APA analyses on a genome-wide scale, as well as the impact of APA switches on a number of critical biological processes in animals, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and oncogenic transformation. With the highly enlarged scope of genome-wide APA analyses, the APA regulations of various biological processes have increasingly become a new paradigm for the regulation of gene transcription and translation.

  12. The differential expression of alternatively polyadenylated transcripts is a common stress-induced response mechanism that modulates mammalian mRNA expression in a quantitative and qualitative fashion

    PubMed Central

    Hollerer, Ina; Curk, Tomaz; Haase, Bettina; Benes, Vladimir; Hauer, Christian; Neu-Yilik, Gabriele; Bhuvanagiri, Madhuri; Hentze, Matthias W.; Kulozik, Andreas E.

    2016-01-01

    Stress adaptation plays a pivotal role in biological processes and requires tight regulation of gene expression. In this study, we explored the effect of cellular stress on mRNA polyadenylation and investigated the implications of regulated polyadenylation site usage on mammalian gene expression. High-confidence polyadenylation site mapping combined with global pre-mRNA and mRNA expression profiling revealed that stress induces an accumulation of genes with differentially expressed polyadenylated mRNA isoforms in human cells. Specifically, stress provokes a global trend in polyadenylation site usage toward decreased utilization of promoter-proximal poly(A) sites in introns or ORFs and increased utilization of promoter-distal polyadenylation sites in intergenic regions. This extensively affects gene expression beyond regulating mRNA abundance by changing mRNA length and by altering the configuration of open reading frames. Our study highlights the impact of post-transcriptional mechanisms on stress-dependent gene regulation and reveals the differential expression of alternatively polyadenylated transcripts as a common stress-induced mechanism in mammalian cells. PMID:27407180

  13. PAF Complex Plays Novel Subunit-Specific Roles in Alternative Cleavage and Polyadenylation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; Li, Wencheng; Hoque, Mainul; Hou, Liming; Shen, Steven; Tian, Bin; Dynlacht, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    The PAF complex (Paf1C) has been shown to regulate chromatin modifications, gene transcription, and RNA polymerase II (PolII) elongation. Here, we provide the first genome-wide profiles for the distribution of the entire complex in mammalian cells using chromatin immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing. We show that Paf1C is recruited not only to promoters and gene bodies, but also to regions downstream of cleavage/polyadenylation (pA) sites at 3’ ends, a profile that sharply contrasted with the yeast complex. Remarkably, we identified novel, subunit-specific links between Paf1C and regulation of alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) and upstream antisense transcription using RNAi coupled with deep sequencing of the 3’ ends of transcripts. Moreover, we found that depletion of Paf1C subunits resulted in the accumulation of PolII over gene bodies, which coincided with APA. Depletion of specific Paf1C subunits led to global loss of histone H2B ubiquitylation, although there was little impact of Paf1C depletion on other histone modifications, including tri-methylation of histone H3 on lysines 4 and 36 (H3K4me3 and H3K36me3), previously associated with this complex. Our results provide surprising differences with yeast, while unifying observations that link Paf1C with PolII elongation and RNA processing, and indicate that Paf1C subunits could play roles in controlling transcript length through suppression of PolII accumulation at transcription start site (TSS)-proximal pA sites and regulating pA site choice in 3’UTRs. PMID:26765774

  14. PAF Complex Plays Novel Subunit-Specific Roles in Alternative Cleavage and Polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Li, Wencheng; Hoque, Mainul; Hou, Liming; Shen, Steven; Tian, Bin; Dynlacht, Brian D

    2016-01-01

    The PAF complex (Paf1C) has been shown to regulate chromatin modifications, gene transcription, and RNA polymerase II (PolII) elongation. Here, we provide the first genome-wide profiles for the distribution of the entire complex in mammalian cells using chromatin immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing. We show that Paf1C is recruited not only to promoters and gene bodies, but also to regions downstream of cleavage/polyadenylation (pA) sites at 3' ends, a profile that sharply contrasted with the yeast complex. Remarkably, we identified novel, subunit-specific links between Paf1C and regulation of alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) and upstream antisense transcription using RNAi coupled with deep sequencing of the 3' ends of transcripts. Moreover, we found that depletion of Paf1C subunits resulted in the accumulation of PolII over gene bodies, which coincided with APA. Depletion of specific Paf1C subunits led to global loss of histone H2B ubiquitylation, although there was little impact of Paf1C depletion on other histone modifications, including tri-methylation of histone H3 on lysines 4 and 36 (H3K4me3 and H3K36me3), previously associated with this complex. Our results provide surprising differences with yeast, while unifying observations that link Paf1C with PolII elongation and RNA processing, and indicate that Paf1C subunits could play roles in controlling transcript length through suppression of PolII accumulation at transcription start site (TSS)-proximal pA sites and regulating pA site choice in 3'UTRs. PMID:26765774

  15. Polyadenylation in Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus: cis-Acting Signals and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rothnie, Helen M.; Chen, Gang; Fütterer, Johannes; Hohn, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The polyadenylation signal of rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) was characterized by mutational and deletion analysis. The cis-acting signals required to direct polyadenylation conformed to what is known for plant poly(A) signals in general and were very similar to those of the related cauliflower mosaic virus. Processing was directed by a canonical AAUAAA poly(A) signal, an upstream UG-rich region considerably enhanced processing efficiency, and sequences downstream of the cleavage site were not required. When present at the end of a transcription unit, the cis-acting signals for 3′-end processing were highly efficient in both monocot (rice) and dicot (Nicotiana plumbaginifolia) protoplasts. In a promoter-proximal position, as in the viral genome, the signal was also efficiently processed in rice protoplasts, giving rise to an abundant “short-stop” (SS-) RNA. The proportion of SS-RNA was considerably lower in N. plumbaginifolia protoplasts. In infected plants, SS-RNA was hardly detectable, suggesting either that SS-RNA is unstable in infected plants or that read-through of the promoter-proximal poly(A) site is very efficient. SS-RNA is readily detectable in transgenic rice plants (A. Klöti, C. Henrich, S. Bieri, X. He, G. Chen, P. K. Burkhardt, J. Wünn, P. Lucca, T. Hohn, I. Potrylus, and J. Fütterer, 1999. Plant Mol. Biol. 40:249–266), thus the absence of SS-RNA in infected plants can be attributed to poly(A) site bypass in the viral context to ensure production of the full-length pregenomic viral RNA. RTBV poly(A) site suppression thus depends both on context and the expression system; our results suggest that the circular viral minichromosome directs assembly of a transcription-processing complex with specific properties to effect read-through of the promoter-proximal poly(A) signal. PMID:11287568

  16. Exploring the Polyadenylated RNA Virome of Sweet Potato through High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xian-Jun; Wang, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Yi-Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Viral diseases are the second most significant biotic stress for sweet potato, with yield losses reaching 20% to 40%. Over 30 viruses have been reported to infect sweet potato around the world, and 11 of these have been detected in China. Most of these viruses were detected by traditional detection approaches that show disadvantages in detection throughput. Next-generation sequencing technology provides a novel, high sensitive method for virus detection and diagnosis. Methodology/Principal Findings We report the polyadenylated RNA virome of three sweet potato cultivars using a high throughput RNA sequencing approach. Transcripts of 15 different viruses were detected, 11 of which were detected in cultivar Xushu18, whilst 11 and 4 viruses were detected in Guangshu 87 and Jingshu 6, respectively. Four were detected in sweet potato for the first time, and 4 were found for the first time in China. The most prevalent virus was SPFMV, which constituted 88% of the total viral sequence reads. Virus transcripts with extremely low expression levels were also detected, such as transcripts of SPLCV, CMV and CymMV. Digital gene expression (DGE) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses showed that the highest viral transcript expression levels were found in fibrous and tuberous roots, which suggest that these tissues should be optimum samples for virus detection. Conclusions/Significance A total of 15 viruses were presumed to present in three sweet potato cultivars growing in China. This is the first insight into the sweet potato polyadenylated RNA virome. These results can serve as a basis for further work to investigate whether some of the 'new' viruses infecting sweet potato are pathogenic. PMID:24901789

  17. Nuclear proteins TREF1 and TREF2 bind to the transcriptional control element of the transferrin receptor gene and appear to be associated as a heterodimer.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, M R; Miskimins, W K; Ruddle, F H

    1989-01-01

    Two novel proteins that bind specifically to the transferrin receptor (TR) promoter, have been isolated from HeLa cell nuclear extract using a combination of ion exchange and oligonucleotide-affinity chromatography. TREF1 and TREF2, which have apparent molecular weights of 82 and 62 kDa, respectively, appear to be associated as a heterocomplex (TREF), and both proteins are able to contact target DNA directly. TREF interacts specifically with a region of the TR promoter which contains the TR transcriptional control element. This region is similar in sequence to the cAMP-responsive and phorbol ester-responsive elements found in several viral and cellular genes. Binding of TREF to the TR promoter results in modification of DNA topology over multiple helical turns, including a sequence revealed by a helical periodicity map as having an unusual structure. Images PMID:2519614

  18. Electrostatic and Hydrophobic Interactions Mediate Single-Stranded DNA Recognition and Acta2 Repression by Purine-Rich Element-Binding Protein B.

    PubMed

    Rumora, Amy E; Ferris, Lauren A; Wheeler, Tamar R; Kelm, Robert J

    2016-05-17

    Myofibroblast differentiation is characterized by an increased level of expression of cytoskeletal smooth muscle α-actin. In human and murine fibroblasts, the gene encoding smooth muscle α-actin (Acta2) is tightly regulated by a network of transcription factors that either activate or repress the 5' promoter-enhancer in response to environmental cues signaling tissue repair and remodeling. Purine-rich element-binding protein B (Purβ) suppresses the expression of Acta2 by cooperatively interacting with the sense strand of a 5' polypurine sequence containing an inverted MCAT cis element required for gene activation. In this study, we evaluated the chemical basis of nucleoprotein complex formation between the Purβ repressor and the purine-rich strand of the MCAT element in the mouse Acta2 promoter. Quantitative single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding assays conducted in the presence of increasing concentrations of monovalent salt or anionic detergent suggested that the assembly of a high-affinity nucleoprotein complex is driven by a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Consistent with the results of pH titration analysis, site-directed mutagenesis revealed several basic amino acid residues in the intermolecular (R267) and intramolecular (K82 and R159) subdomains that are essential for Purβ transcriptional repressor function in Acta2 promoter-reporter assays. In keeping with their diminished Acta2 repressor activity in fibroblasts, purified Purβ variants containing an R267A mutation exhibited reduced binding affinity for purine-rich ssDNA. Moreover, certain double and triple-point mutants were also defective in binding to the Acta2 corepressor protein, Y-box-binding protein 1. Collectively, these findings establish the repertoire of noncovalent interactions that account for the unique structural and functional properties of Purβ. PMID:27064749

  19. Suppression of the pancreatic duodenal homeodomain transcription factor-1 (Pdx-1) promoter by sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c).

    PubMed

    Amemiya-Kudo, Michiyo; Oka, Junko; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Okazaki, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yahagi, Naoya; Matsuzaka, Kaori; Okazaki, Sachiko; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Murase, Toshio; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2011-08-12

    Overexpression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) in β cells causes impaired insulin secretion and β cell dysfunction associated with diminished pancreatic duodenal homeodomain transcription factor-1 (PDX-1) expression in vitro and in vivo. To identify the molecular mechanism responsible for this effect, the mouse Pdx-1 gene promoter (2.7 kb) was analyzed in β cell and non-β cell lines. Despite no apparent sterol regulatory element-binding protein-binding sites, the Pdx-1 promoter was suppressed by SREBP-1c in β cells in a dose-dependent manner. PDX-1 activated its own promoter. The E-box (-104/-99 bp) in the proximal region, occupied by ubiquitously expressed upstream stimulatory factors (USFs), was crucial for the PDX-1-positive autoregulatory loop through direct PDX-1·USF binding. This positive feedback activation was a prerequisite for SREBP-1c suppression of the promoter in non-β cells. SREBP-1c and PDX-1 directly interact through basic helix-loop-helix and homeobox domains, respectively. This robust SREBP-1c·PDX-1 complex interferes with PDX-1·USF formation and inhibits the recruitment of PDX-1 coactivators. SREBP-1c also inhibits PDX-1 binding to the previously described PDX-1-binding site (-2721/-2646 bp) in the distal enhancer region of the Pdx-1 promoter. Endogenous up-regulation of SREBP-1c in INS-1 cells through the activation of liver X receptor and retinoid X receptor by 9-cis-retinoic acid and 22-hydroxycholesterol inhibited PDX-1 mRNA and protein expression. Conversely, SREBP-1c RNAi restored Pdx-1 mRNA and protein levels. Through these multiple mechanisms, SREBP-1c, when induced in a lipotoxic state, repressed PDX-1 expression contributing to the inhibition of insulin expression and β cell dysfunction.

  20. The Ewing sarcoma protein (EWS) binds directly to the proximal elements of the macrophage-specific promoter of the CSF-1 receptor (csf1r) gene.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A; Sasmono, Tedjo; Himes, S Roy; Sharma, Sudarshana M; Bronisz, Agnieszka; Constantin, Myrna; Ostrowski, Michael C; Ross, Ian L

    2008-05-15

    Many macrophage-specific promoters lack classical transcriptional start site elements such as TATA boxes and Sp1 sites. One example is the CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R, CD115, c-fms), which is used as a model of the transcriptional regulation of macrophage genes. To understand the molecular basis of start site recognition in this gene, we identified cellular proteins binding specifically to the transcriptional start site (TSS) region. The mouse and human csf1r TSS were identified using cap analysis gene expression (CAGE) data. Conserved elements flanking the TSS cluster were analyzed using EMSAs to identify discrete DNA-binding factors in primary bone marrow macrophages as candidate transcriptional regulators. Two complexes were identified that bind in a highly sequence-specific manner to the mouse and human TSS proximal region and also to high-affinity sites recognized by myeloid zinc finger protein 1 (Mzf1). The murine proteins were purified by DNA affinity isolation from the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line and identified by mass spectrometry as EWS and FUS/TLS, closely related DNA and RNA-binding proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments in bone marrow macrophages confirmed that EWS, but not FUS/TLS, was present in vivo on the CSF-1R proximal promoter in unstimulated primary macrophages. Transfection assays suggest that EWS does not act as a conventional transcriptional activator or repressor. We hypothesize that EWS contributes to start site recognition in TATA-less mammalian promoters.

  1. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-dependent regulation of lipid synthesis supports cell survival and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Regulation of lipid metabolism via activation of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) has emerged as an important function of the Akt/mTORC1 signaling axis. Although the contribution of dysregulated Akt/mTORC1 signaling to cancer has been investigated extensively and altered lipid metabolism is observed in many tumors, the exact role of SREBPs in the control of biosynthetic processes required for Akt-dependent cell growth and their contribution to tumorigenesis remains unclear. Results We first investigated the effects of loss of SREBP function in non-transformed cells. Combined ablation of SREBP1 and SREBP2 by siRNA-mediated gene silencing or chemical inhibition of SREBP activation induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress and engaged the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway, specifically under lipoprotein-deplete conditions in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Induction of ER-stress led to inhibition of protein synthesis through increased phosphorylation of eIF2α. This demonstrates for the first time the importance of SREBP in the coordination of lipid and protein biosynthesis, two processes that are essential for cell growth and proliferation. SREBP ablation caused major changes in lipid composition characterized by a loss of mono- and poly-unsaturated lipids and induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. Alterations in lipid composition and increased ROS levels, rather than overall changes to lipid synthesis rate, were required for ER-stress induction. Next, we analyzed the effect of SREBP ablation in a panel of cancer cell lines. Importantly, induction of apoptosis following SREBP depletion was restricted to lipoprotein-deplete conditions. U87 glioblastoma cells were highly susceptible to silencing of either SREBP isoform, and apoptosis induced by SREBP1 depletion in these cells was rescued by antioxidants or by restoring the levels of mono-unsaturated fatty acids. Moreover, silencing of SREBP1

  2. Transforming growth factor beta 1-responsive element: closely associated binding sites for USF and CCAAT-binding transcription factor-nuclear factor I in the type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, A; Pedone, P V; Lund, L R; Olesen, T; Olsen, H S; Andreasen, P A

    1992-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is the name of a group of closely related polypeptides characterized by a multiplicity of effects, including regulation of extracellular proteolysis and turnover of the extracellular matrix. Its cellular mechanism of action is largely unknown. TGF-beta 1 is a strong and fast inducer of type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor gene transcription. We have identified a TGF-beta 1-responsive element in the 5'-flanking region of the human type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor gene and shown that it is functional both in its natural context and when fused to a heterologous nonresponsive promoter. Footprinting and gel retardation experiments showed that two different nuclear factors, present in extracts from both TGF-beta 1-treated and nontreated cells, bind to adjacent sequences contained in the responsive unit. A palindromic sequence binds a trans-acting factor(s) of the CCAAT-binding transcription factor-nuclear factor I family. A partially overlapping dyad symmetry interacts with a second protein that much evidence indicates to be USF. USF is a transactivator belonging to the basic helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors. Mutations which abolish the binding of either CCAAT-binding transcription factor-nuclear factor I or USF result in reduction of transcriptional activation upon exposure to TGF-beta 1, thus showing that both elements of the unit are necessary for the TGF-beta 1 response. We discuss the possible relationship of these findings to the complexity of the TGF-beta action. Images PMID:1549130

  3. Alkane-induced expression, substrate binding profile, and immunolocalization of a cytochrome P450 encoded on the nifD excision element of Anabaena 7120

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Sergio; Fjetland, Conrad R; Lammers, Peter J

    2005-01-01

    Background Alkanes have been hypothesized to act as universal inducers of bacterial cytochrome P450 gene expression. We tested this hypothesis on an unusual P450 gene (cyp110) found on a conserved 11 kilobase episomal DNA element of unknown function found in filamentous cyanobacteria. We also monitored the binding of potential substrates to the P450 protein and explored the distribution of P450 protein in vegetative cells and nitrogen-fixing heterocysts using immuno-electron microscopy. Results Hexadecane treatments resulted in a two-fold increase in mRNA, and a four-fold increase in P450 protein levels relative to control cultures. Hexane, octane and dodecane were toxic and induced substantial changes in membrane morphology. Long-chain saturated and unsaturated fatty acids were shown to bind the CYP110 protein using a spectroscopic spin-shift assay, but alkanes did not bind. CYP110 protein was detected in vegetative cells but not in differentiated heterocysts where nitrogen fixation occurs. Conclusion Hexadecane treatment was an effective inducer of CYP110 expression in cyanobacteria. Based on substrate binding profiles and amino acid sequence similarities it is hypothesized that CYP110 is a fatty acid ω-hydroxylase in photosynthetic cells. CYP110 was found associated with membrane fractions unlike other soluble microbial P450 proteins, and in this regard CYP110 more closely resembles eukarytotic P450s. Substrate stablization is an unlikely mechanism for alkane induction because alkanes did not bind to purified CYP110 protein. PMID:15790415

  4. Hx, a novel fluorescent, minor groove and sequence specific recognition element: design, synthesis, and DNA binding properties of p-anisylbenzimidazole-imidazole/pyrrole-containing polyamides.

    PubMed

    Chavda, Sameer; Liu, Yang; Babu, Balaji; Davis, Ryan; Sielaff, Alan; Ruprich, Jennifer; Westrate, Laura; Tronrud, Christopher; Ferguson, Amanda; Franks, Andrew; Tzou, Samuel; Adkins, Chandler; Rice, Toni; Mackay, Hilary; Kluza, Jerome; Tahir, Sharjeel A; Lin, Shicai; Kiakos, Konstantinos; Bruce, Chrystal D; Wilson, W David; Hartley, John A; Lee, Moses

    2011-04-19

    With the aim of incorporating a recognition element that acts as a fluorescent probe upon binding to DNA, three novel pyrrole (P) and imidazole (I)-containing polyamides were synthesized. The compounds contain a p-anisylbenzimidazolecarboxamido (Hx) moiety attached to a PP, IP, or PI unit, giving compounds HxPP (2), HxIP (3), and HxPI (4), respectively. These fluorescent hybrids were tested against their complementary nonfluorescent, non-formamido tetraamide counterparts, namely, PPPP (5), PPIP (6), and PPPI (7) (cognate sequences 5'-AAATTT-3', 5'-ATCGAT-3', and 5'-ACATGT-3', respectively). The binding affinities for both series of polyamides for their cognate and noncognate sequences were ascertained by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies, which revealed that the Hx-containing polyamides gave binding constants in the 10(6) M(-1) range while little binding was observed for the noncognates. The binding data were further compared to the corresponding and previously reported formamido-triamides f-PPP (8), f-PIP (9), and f-PPI (10). DNase I footprinting studies provided additional evidence that the Hx moiety behaved similarly to two consecutive pyrroles (PP found in 5-7), which also behaved like a formamido-pyrrole (f-P) unit found in distamycin and many formamido-triamides, including 8-10. The biophysical characterization of polyamides 2-7 on their binding to the abovementioned DNA sequences was determined using thermal melts (ΔT(M)), circular dichroism (CD), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies. Density functional calculations (B3LYP) provided a theoretical framework that explains the similarity between PP and Hx on the basis of molecular electrostatic surfaces and dipole moments. Furthermore, emission studies on polyamides 2 and 3 showed that upon excitation at 322 nm binding to their respective cognate sequences resulted in an increase in fluorescence at 370 nm. These low molecular weight polyamides show promise for use as probes for monitoring

  5. Assembly of Functional Ribonucleoprotein Complexes by AU-rich Element RNA-binding Protein 1 (AUF1) Requires Base-dependent and -independent RNA Contacts*

    PubMed Central

    Zucconi, Beth E.; Wilson, Gerald M.

    2013-01-01

    AU-rich element RNA-binding protein 1 (AUF1) regulates the stability and/or translational efficiency of diverse mRNA targets, including many encoding products controlling the cell cycle, apoptosis, and inflammation by associating with AU-rich elements residing in their 3′-untranslated regions. Previous biochemical studies showed that optimal AUF1 binding requires 33–34 nucleotides with a strong preference for U-rich RNA despite observations that few AUF1-associated cellular mRNAs contain such extended U-rich domains. Using the smallest AUF1 isoform (p37AUF1) as a model, we employed fluorescence anisotropy-based approaches to define thermodynamic parameters describing AUF1 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex formation across a panel of RNA substrates. These data demonstrated that 15 nucleotides of AU-rich sequence were sufficient to nucleate high affinity p37AUF1 RNP complexes within a larger RNA context. In particular, p37AUF1 binding to short AU-rich RNA targets was significantly stabilized by interactions with a 3′-purine residue and largely base-independent but non-ionic contacts 5′ of the AU-rich site. RNP stabilization by the upstream RNA domain was associated with an enhanced negative change in heat capacity consistent with conformational changes in protein and/or RNA components, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assays demonstrated that these contacts were required for p37AUF1 to remodel local RNA structure. Finally, reporter mRNAs containing minimal high affinity p37AUF1 target sequences associated with AUF1 and were destabilized in a p37AUF1-dependent manner in cells. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the diverse population of AUF1 target mRNAs but also suggest how AUF1 binding could regulate protein and/or microRNA binding events at adjacent sites. PMID:23940053

  6. Multiple, conserved iron-responsive elements in the 3'-untranslated region of transferrin receptor mRNA enhance binding of iron regulatory protein 2.

    PubMed

    Erlitzki, Ronit; Long, Joanne C; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2002-11-01

    Synthesis of proteins for iron homeostasis is regulated by specific, combinatorial mRNA/protein interactions between RNA stem-loop structures (iron-responsive elements, IREs) and iron-regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2), controlling either mRNA translation or stability. The transferrin receptor 3'-untranslated region (TfR-3'-UTR) mRNA is unique in having five IREs, linked by AU-rich elements. A C-bulge in the stem of each TfR-IRE folds into an IRE that has low IRP2 binding, whereas a loop/bulge in the stem of the ferritin-IRE allows equivalent IRP1 and IRP2 binding. Effects of multiple IRE interactions with IRP1 and IRP2 were compared between the native TfR-3'-UTR sequence (5xIRE) and RNA with only 3 or 2 IREs. We show 1) equivalent IRP1 and IRP2 binding to multiple TfR-IRE RNAs; 2) increased IRP-dependent nuclease resistance of 5xIRE compared with lower IRE copy-number RNAs; 3) distorted TfR-IRE helix structure within the context of 5xIRE, detected by Cu-(phen)(2) binding/cleavage, that coincides with ferritin-IRE conformation and enhanced IRP2 binding; and 4) variable IRP1 and IRP2 expression in human cells and during development (IRP2-mRNA predominated). Changes in TfR-IRE structure conferred by the full length TfR-3'-UTR mRNA explain in part evolutionary conservation of multiple IRE-RNA, which allows TfR mRNA stabilization and receptor synthesis when IRP activity varies, and ensures iron uptake for cell growth.

  7. The use of alternative polyadenylation sites renders integrin β1 (Itgb1) mRNA isoforms with differential stability during mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Naipauer, Julian; Gattelli, Albana; Degese, Maria Sol; Slomiansky, Victoria; Wertheimer, Eva; LaMarre, Jonathan; Castilla, Lucio; Abba, Martin; Kordon, Edith C; Coso, Omar A

    2013-09-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric cell-surface adhesion receptors that play a critical role in tissue development. Characterization of the full-length mRNA encoding the β1 subunit (Itgb1) revealed an alternative functional cleavage and polyadenylation site that yields a new Itgb1 mRNA isoform 578 bp shorter than that previously reported. Using a variety of experimental and bioinformatic approaches, we found that the two Itgb1 isoforms are expressed at different levels in a variety of mouse tissues, including the mammary gland, where they are differentially regulated at successive developmental stages. The longer mRNA species is prevelant during lactation, whereas the shorter is induced after weaning. In 3D cultures, where expression of integrin β1 protein is required for normal formation of acini, experimental blockade of the longer isoform induced enhanced expression of the shorter species which allowed normal morphological mammary differentiation. The short isoform lacks AU-rich motifs and miRNA target sequences that are potentially implicated in the regulation of mRNA stability and translation efficiency. We further determined that the AU-binding protein HuR appears to selectively stabilize the longer isoform in the mammary gland. In summary, the results of the present study identify a new regulatory instance involved in the fine-tuning of Itgb1 expression during mammary gland development and function.

  8. Hoxb-2 transcriptional activation in rhombomeres 3 and 5 requires an evolutionarily conserved cis-acting element in addition to the Krox-20 binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Vesque, C; Maconochie, M; Nonchev, S; Ariza-McNaughton, L; Kuroiwa, A; Charnay, P; Krumlauf, R

    1996-01-01

    Segmentation is a key feature of the development of the vertebrate hindbrain where it involves the generation of repetitive morphological units termed rhombomeres (r). Hox genes are likely to play an essential role in the specification of segmental identity and we have been investigating their regulation. We show here that the mouse and chicken Hoxb-2 genes are dependent for their expression in r3 and r5 on homologous enhancer elements and on binding to this enhancer of the r3/r5-specific transcriptional activator Krox-20. Among the three Krox-20 binding sites of the mouse Hoxb-2 enhancer, only the high-affinity site is absolutely necessary for activity. In contrast, we have identified an additional cis-acting element, Box1, essential for r3/r5 enhancer activity. It is conserved both in sequence and in position respective to the high-affinity Krox-20 binding site within the mouse and chicken enhancers. Furthermore, a short 44 bp sequence spanning the Box1 and Krox-20 sites can act as an r3/r5 enhancer when oligomerized. Box1 may therefore constitute a recognition sequence for another factor cooperating with Krox-20. Taken together, these data demonstrate the conservation of Hox gene regulation and of Krox-20 function during vertebrate evolution. Images PMID:8895582

  9. RNA polyadenylation sites on the genomes of microorganisms, animals, and plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Qing; Du, Donglei

    2013-01-01

    Pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) 3'-end cleavage and subsequent polyadenylation strongly regulate gene expression. In comparison with the upstream or downstream motifs, relatively little is known about the feature differences of polyadenylation [poly(A)] sites among major kingdoms. We suspect that the precise poly(A) sites are very selective, and we therefore mapped mRNA poly(A) sites on complete and nearly complete genomes using mRNA sequences available in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Nucleotide database. In this paper, we describe the mRNA nucleotide [i.e., the poly(A) tail attachment position] that is directly in attachment with the poly(A) tail and the pre-mRNA nucleotide [i.e., the poly(A) tail starting position] that corresponds to the first adenosine of the poly(A) tail in the 29 most-mapped species (2 fungi, 2 protists, 18 animals, and 7 plants). The most representative pre-mRNA dinucleotides covering these two positions were UA, CA, and GA in 17, 10, and 2 of the species, respectively. The pre-mRNA nucleotide at the poly(A) tail starting position was typically an adenosine [i.e., A-type poly(A) sites], sometimes a uridine, and occasionally a cytidine or guanosine. The order was U>C>G at the attachment position but A>U>C≥G at the starting position. However, in comparison with the mRNA nucleotide composition (base composition), the poly(A) tail attachment position selected C over U in plants and both C and G over U in animals, in both A-type and non-A-type poly(A) sites. Animals, dicot plants, and monocot plants had clear differences in C/G ratios at the poly(A) tail attachment position of the non-A-type poly(A) sites. This study of poly(A) site evolution indicated that the two positions within poly(A) sites had distinct nucleotide compositions and were different among kingdoms.

  10. A human chromosome 12-associated 83-kilodalton cellular protein specifically binds to the loop region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 trans-activation response element RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, C E; Saltrelli, M J; Galphin, J C; Schochetman, G

    1995-01-01

    trans activation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) involves the viral trans-activator protein (Tat) and a cellular factor(s) encoded on human chromosome 12 (HuChr12) that targets the trans-activation response element (TAR) in the viral long terminal repeat. Because nascent TAR RNA is predicted to form a secondary structure that specifically binds cellular proteins, we investigated the composition of the TAR RNA-protein complex for HuChr12-specific proteins. UV cross-linking of TAR RNA-nuclear protein complexes formed in vitro identified an 83-kDa protein in human cells and in a human-hamster hybrid cell containing only HuChr12. The 83-kDa TAR RNA-binding protein was absent in the parental hamster cells. TAR RNA mutations that inhibited binding of the 83-kDa protein in vitro also inhibited HuChr12-dependent Tat trans activation. These TAR mutations changed the native sequence or secondary structure of the TAR loop. The TAR RNA binding activity of the 83-kDa protein also correlated with a HuChr12-dependent increase in steady-state HIV-1 RNA expression during Tat trans activation. Our results suggest that either a species-specific 83-kDa TAR RNA loop-binding protein is directly encoded on HuChr12 or a HuChr12 protein(s) induces the expression of an 83-kDa TAR-binding protein in nonprimate cells. PMID:7666565

  11. Context-dependent modulation of Pol II CTD phosphatase SSUP-72 regulates alternative polyadenylation in neuronal development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Zhou, Yu; Qi, Yingchuan B.; Khivansara, Vishal; Li, Hairi; Chun, Sang Young; Kim, John K.; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Jin, Yishi

    2015-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is widespread in neuronal development and activity-mediated neural plasticity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. We used systematic genetic studies and genome-wide surveys of the transcriptional landscape to identify a context-dependent regulatory pathway controlling APA in the Caenorhabditis elegans nervous system. Loss of function in ssup-72, a Ser5 phosphatase for the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD), dampens transcription termination at a strong intronic polyadenylation site (PAS) in unc-44/ankyrin yet promotes termination at the weak intronic PAS of the MAP kinase dlk-1. A nuclear protein, SYDN-1, which regulates neuronal development, antagonizes the function of SSUP-72 and several nuclear polyadenylation factors. This regulatory pathway allows the production of a neuron-specific isoform of unc-44 and an inhibitory isoform of dlk-1. Dysregulation of the unc-44 and dlk-1 mRNA isoforms in sydn-1 mutants impairs neuronal development. Deleting the intronic PAS of unc-44 results in increased pre-mRNA processing of neuronal ankyrin and suppresses sydn-1 mutants. These results reveal a mechanism by which regulation of CTD phosphorylation controls coding region APA in the nervous system. PMID:26588990

  12. Binding of Chromium(III) to Transferrin Could Be Involved in Detoxification of Dietary Chromium(III) Rather than Transport of an Essential Trace Element.

    PubMed

    Levina, Aviva; Pham, T H Nguyen; Lay, Peter A

    2016-07-01

    Cr(III) binding to transferrin (Tf; the main Fe(III) transport protein) has been postulated to mediate cellular uptake of Cr(III) to facilitate a purported essential role for this element. Experiments using HepG2 (human hepatoma) cells, which were chosen because of high levels of the transferrin receptor, showed that Cr(III) binding to vacant Fe(III) -binding sites of human Tf effectively blocks cellular Cr(III) uptake. Through bio-layer interferometry studies of the Tf cycle, it was found that both exclusion and efflux of Cr2 (III) Tf from cells was caused by 1) relatively low Cr2 Tf affinity to cell-surface Tf receptors compared to Fe2 Tf, and 2) disruption of metal release under endosomal conditions and post-endosomal Tf dissociation from the receptor. These data support mounting evidence that Cr(III) is not essential and that Tf binding is likely to be a natural protective mechanism against the toxicity and potential genotoxicity of dietary Cr through blocking Cr(III) cellular accumulation. PMID:27197571

  13. Dynamics of water around the complex structures formed between the KH domains of far upstream element binding protein and single-stranded DNA molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2015-07-28

    Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) binding proteins specifically bind to the single-stranded regions of the DNA and protect it from premature annealing, thereby stabilizing the DNA structure. We have carried out atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the aqueous solutions of two DNA binding K homology (KH) domains (KH3 and KH4) of the far upstream element binding protein complexed with two short ss-DNA segments. Attempts have been made to explore the influence of the formation of such complex structures on the microscopic dynamics and hydrogen bond properties of the interfacial water molecules. It is found that the water molecules involved in bridging the ss-DNA segments and the protein domains form a highly constrained thin layer with extremely retarded mobility. These water molecules play important roles in freezing the conformational oscillations of the ss-DNA oligomers and thereby forming rigid complex structures. Further, it is demonstrated that the effect of complexation on the slow long-time relaxations of hydrogen bonds at the interface is correlated with hindered motions of the surrounding water molecules. Importantly, it is observed that the highly restricted motions of the water molecules bridging the protein and the DNA components in the complexed forms originate from more frequent hydrogen bond reformations.

  14. Analysis of the Key Elements of FFAT-Like Motifs Identifies New Proteins That Potentially Bind VAP on the ER, Including Two AKAPs and FAPP2

    PubMed Central

    Mikitova, Veronika; Levine, Timothy P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Two phenylalanines (FF) in an acidic tract (FFAT)-motifs were originally described as having seven elements: an acidic flanking region followed by 6 residues (EFFDA–E). Such motifs are found in several lipid transfer protein (LTP) families, and they interact with a protein on the cytosolic face of the ER called vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein (VAP). Mutation of which causes ER stress and motor neuron disease, making it important to determine which proteins bind VAP. Among other proteins that bind VAP, some contain FFAT-like motifs that are missing one or more of the seven elements. Defining how much variation is tolerated in FFAT-like motifs is a preliminary step prior to the identification of the full range of VAP interactors. Results We used a quantifiable in vivo system that measured ER targeting in a reporter yeast strain that over-expressed VAP to study the effect of substituting different elements of FFAT-like motifs in turn. By defining FFAT-like motifs more widely than before, we found them in novel proteins the functions of which had not previously been directly linked to the ER, including: two PKA anchoring proteins, AKAP220 and AKAP110; a family of plant LTPs; and the glycolipid LTP phosphatidylinositol-four-phosphate adaptor-protein-2 (FAPP-2). Conclusion All of the seven essential elements of a FFAT motif tolerate variation, and weak targeting to the ER via VAP is still detected if two elements are substituted. In addition to the strong FFAT motifs already known, there are additional proteins with weaker FFAT-like motifs, which might be functionally important VAP interactors. PMID:22276202

  15. Transcription of angiogenin and ribonuclease 4 is regulated by RNA polymerase III elements and a CCCTC binding factor (CTCF)-dependent intragenic chromatin loop.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jinghao; Luo, Chi; Jiang, Yuxiang; Hinds, Philip W; Xu, Zhengping; Hu, Guo-fu

    2014-05-01

    Angiogenin (ANG) and ribonuclease 4 (RNASE4), two members of the secreted and vertebrate-specific ribonuclease superfamily, play important roles in cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. The ANG and RNASE4 genes share genetic regions with promoter activities, but the structure and regulation of these putative promotes are unknown. We have characterized the promoter regions, defined the transcription start site, and identified a mechanism of transcription regulation that involves both RNA polymerase III (Pol III) elements and CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) sites. We found that two Pol III elements within the promoter region influence ANG and RNASE4 expression in a position- and orientation-dependent manner. We also provide evidence for the presence of an intragenic chromatin loop between the two CTCF binding sites located in two introns flanking the ANG coding exon. We found that formation of this intragenic loop preferentially enhances ANG transcription. These results suggest a multilayer transcriptional regulation of ANG and RNASE4 gene locus. These data also add more direct evidence to the notion that Pol III elements are able to directly influence Pol II gene transcription. Furthermore, our data indicate that a CTCF-dependent chromatin loop is able to differentially regulate transcription of genes that share the same promoters.

  16. Light-inducible and constitutively expressed DNA-binding proteins recognizing a plant promoter element with functional relevance in light responsiveness.

    PubMed Central

    Weisshaar, B; Armstrong, G A; Block, A; da Costa e Silva, O; Hahlbrock, K

    1991-01-01

    Four cis-acting elements, designated as Boxes I, II, III and IV, have previously been identified as functionally relevant components of the light-responsive chalcone synthase (CHS) promoter in parsley (Petroselinum crispum). This paper describes the isolation of three cDNAs encoding proteins which bind specifically to Box II, one of two cis-acting elements found within a 52 bp CHS promoter region shown here to be sufficient for light responsiveness in parsley. The deduced amino acid sequences of all three proteins reveal conserved basic and leucine zipper domains characteristic of transcription factors of the bZIP class. Nucleotide sequences recognized by these factors contain an ACGT motif common to many cis-acting elements. Therefore, we have termed the proteins CPRF-1, -2 and -3 (Common Plant Regulatory Factor). The characteristics of CPRF-1 binding to Box II and the timing of transient CPRF-1 mRNA accumulation during light exposure of previously dark-grown parsley cells are consistent with the hypothesis that this factor participates in the light-mediated activation of the CHS gene in parsley. Images PMID:2050115

  17. Transcriptional regulation of the human glycoprotein hormone common alpha subunit gene by cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP)/p300 and p53.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xian; Grand, Roger J A; McCabe, Christopher J; Franklyn, Jayne A; Gallimore, Phillip H; Turnell, Andrew S

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the functional interactions between adenovirus early region 1A (AdE1A) protein, the co-activators cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP)/p300 and SUG1, and the transcriptional repressor retinoblastoma (Rb) in mediating T3-dependent repression. Utilizing the human glycoprotein hormone common alpha-subunit (alpha-subunit) promoter and AdE1A mutants with selective binding capacity to these molecules we have determined an essential role for CBP/p300. In normal circumstances, wild-type 12 S AdE1A inhibited alpha-subunit activity. In contrast, adenovirus mutants that retain both the SUG1- and Rb-binding sites, but lack the CBP/p300-binding site, were unable to repress promoter activity. We have also identified a role for the tumour-suppressor gene product p53 in regulation of the alpha-subunit promoter. Akin to 12 S AdE1A, exogenous p53 expression repressed alpha-subunit activity. This function resided in the ability of p53 to interact with CBP/p300; an N-terminal mutant incapable of interacting with CBP/p300 did not inhibit alpha-subunit activity. Stabilization of endogenous p53 by UV irradiation also correlated positively with reduced alpha-subunit activity. Intriguingly, T3 stimulated endogenous p53 transcriptional activity, implicating p53 in T3-dependent signalling pathways. These data indicate that CBP/p300 and p53 are key regulators of alpha-subunit activity. PMID:12164786

  18. LRPPRC is necessary for polyadenylation and coordination of translation of mitochondrial mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Metodiev, Metodi D; Wredenberg, Anna; Bratic, Ana; Park, Chan Bae; Cámara, Yolanda; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Zickermann, Volker; Wibom, Rolf; Hultenby, Kjell; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Brandt, Ulrich; Stewart, James B; Gustafsson, Claes M; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of mtDNA expression is critical for maintaining cellular energy homeostasis and may, in principle, occur at many different levels. The leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing (LRPPRC) protein regulates mitochondrial mRNA stability and an amino-acid substitution of this protein causes the French-Canadian type of Leigh syndrome (LSFC), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by complex IV deficiency. We have generated conditional Lrpprc knockout mice and show here that the gene is essential for embryonic development. Tissue-specific disruption of Lrpprc in heart causes mitochondrial cardiomyopathy with drastic reduction in steady-state levels of most mitochondrial mRNAs. LRPPRC forms an RNA-dependent protein complex that is necessary for maintaining a pool of non-translated mRNAs in mammalian mitochondria. Loss of LRPPRC does not only decrease mRNA stability, but also leads to loss of mRNA polyadenylation and the appearance of aberrant mitochondrial translation. The translation pattern without the presence of LRPPRC is misregulated with excessive translation of some transcripts and no translation of others. Our findings point to the existence of an elaborate machinery that regulates mammalian mtDNA expression at the post-transcriptional level. PMID:22045337

  19. Profiling of alternative polyadenylation sites in luminal B breast cancer using the SAPAS method

    PubMed Central

    WANG, XINMEI; LI, MINGYUE; YIN, YINGCHUN; LI, LIANG; TAO, YUQIAN; CHEN, DENGGUO; LI, JIANZHAO; HAN, HONGMEI; HOU, ZHENBO; ZHANG, BAOHUA; WANG, XINYUN; DING, YU; CUI, HAIYAN; ZHANG, HENGMING

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality in females and is recognized as a molecularly heterogeneous disease. Previous studies have suggested that alternative messenger RNA (mRNA) processing, particularly alternative polyadenylation [poly(A)] (APA), can be a powerful molecular biomarker with prognostic potential. Therefore, in the present study, we profiled APA sites in the luminal B subtype of BC by sequencing APA sites (SAPAS) method, in order to assess the relation of these APA site-switching events to the recognized molecular subtypes of BC, and to discover novel candidate genes and pathways in BC. Through comprehensive analysis, the trend of APA site-switching events in the 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTRs) in the luminal B subtype of BC were found to be the same as that in MCF7 cell lines. Among the genes involved in the events, a significantly greater number of genes was found with shortened 3′UTRs in the samples, which were samples of primary cancer with relatively low proliferation. These findings may provide novel information for the clinical diagnosis and prognosis on a molecular level. Several potential biomarkers with significantly differential tandem 3′UTRs and expression were found and validated. The related biological progresses and pathways involved were partly confirmed by other studies. In conclusion, this study provides new insight into the diagnosis and prognosis of BC from the APA site profile aspect. PMID:25333330

  20. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus noncoding polyadenylated nuclear RNA interacts with virus- and host cell-encoded proteins and suppresses expression of genes involved in immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Rossetto, Cyprian C; Pari, Gregory S

    2011-12-01

    During lytic infection, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) expresses a polyadenylated nuclear RNA (PAN RNA). This noncoding RNA (ncRNA) is localized to the nucleus and is the most abundant viral RNA during lytic infection; however, to date, the role of PAN RNA in the virus life cycle is unknown. Many examples exist where ncRNAs have a defined key regulatory function controlling gene expression by various mechanisms. Our goal for this study was to identify putative binding partners for PAN RNA in an effort to elucidate a possible function for the transcript in KSHV infection. We employed an in vitro affinity protocol where PAN RNA was used as bait for factors present in BCBL-1 cell nuclear extract to show that PAN RNA interacts with several virus- and host cell-encoded factors, including histones H1 and H2A, mitochondrial and cellular single-stranded binding proteins (SSBPs), and interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4). RNA chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed that PAN RNA interacted with these factors in the infected cell environment. A luciferase reporter assay showed that PAN RNA expression interfered with the ability of IRF4/PU.1 to activate the interleukin-4 (IL-4) promoter, strongly suggesting a role for PAN RNA in immune modulation. Since the proteomic screen and functional data suggested a role in immune responses, we investigated if constitutive PAN RNA expression could affect other genes involved in immune responses. PAN RNA expression decreased expression of gamma interferon, interleukin-18, alpha interferon 16, and RNase L. These data strongly suggest that PAN RNA interacts with viral and cellular proteins and can function as an immune modulator. PMID:21957289

  1. Presenilins regulate neurotrypsin gene expression and neurotrypsin-dependent agrin cleavage via cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) modulation.

    PubMed

    Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Kim, Sonia N; Benner, Christopher; Herrera, Cheryl M; Kang, David E; Garcia-Bassets, Ivan; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2013-12-01

    Presenilins, the catalytic components of the γ-secretase complex, are upstream regulators of multiple cellular pathways via regulation of gene transcription. However, the underlying mechanisms and the genes regulated by these pathways are poorly characterized. In this study, we identify Tequila and its mammalian ortholog Prss12 as genes negatively regulated by presenilins in Drosophila larval brains and mouse embryonic fibroblasts, respectively. Prss12 encodes the serine protease neurotrypsin, which cleaves the heparan sulfate proteoglycan agrin. Altered neurotrypsin activity causes serious synaptic and cognitive defects; despite this, the molecular processes regulating neurotrypsin expression and activity are poorly understood. Using γ-secretase drug inhibitors and presenilin mutants in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we found that a mature γ-secretase complex was required to repress neurotrypsin expression and agrin cleavage. We also determined that PSEN1 endoproteolysis or processing of well known γ-secretase substrates was not essential for this process. At the transcriptional level, PSEN1/2 removal induced cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)/CREB-binding protein binding, accumulation of activating histone marks at the neurotrypsin promoter, and neurotrypsin transcriptional and functional up-regulation that was dependent on GSK3 activity. Upon PSEN1/2 reintroduction, this active epigenetic state was replaced by a methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2)-containing repressive state and reduced neurotrypsin expression. Genome-wide analysis revealed hundreds of other mouse promoters in which CREB binding is similarly modulated by the presence/absence of presenilins. Our study thus identifies Tequila and neurotrypsin as new genes repressed by presenilins and reveals a novel mechanism used by presenilins to modulate CREB signaling based on controlling CREB recruitment.

  2. Periplasmic binding protein-based detection of maltose using liposomes: a new class of biorecognition elements in competitive assays.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Katie A; Baeumner, Antje J

    2013-03-01

    A periplasmic binding protein (PBP) was investigated as a novel binding species in a similar manner to an antibody in a competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), resulting in a highly sensitive and specific assay utilizing liposome-based signal amplification. PBPs are located at high concentrations (10(-4) M) between the inner and outer membranes of gram negative bacteria and are involved in the uptake of solutes and chemotaxis of bacteria toward nutrient sources. Previous sensors relying on PBPs took advantage of the change in local environment or proximity of site-specific fluorophore labels resulting from the significant conformational shift of these proteins' two globular domains upon target binding. Here, rather than monitoring conformational shifts, we have instead utilized the maltose binding protein (MBP) in lieu of an antibody in an ELISA. To our knowledge, this is the first PBP-based sensor without the requirement for engineering site-specific modifications within the protein. MBP conjugated fluorescent dye-encapsulating liposomes served to provide recognition and signal amplification in a competitive assay for maltose using amylose magnetic beads in a microtiter plate-based format. The development of appropriate binding buffers and competitive surfaces are described, with general observations expected to extend to PBPs for other analytes. The resulting assay was specific for d-(+)-maltose versus other sugar analogs including d-(+)-raffinose, sucrose, d-trehalose, d-(+)-xylose, d-fructose, 1-thio-β-d-glucose sodium salt, d-(+)-galactose, sorbitol, glycerol, and dextrose. Cross-reactivity with d-lactose and d-(+)-glucose occurred only at concentrations >10(4)-fold greater than d-(+)-maltose. The limit of detection was 78 nM with a dynamic range covering over 3 orders of magnitude. Accurate detection of maltose as an active ingredient in a pharmaceutical preparation was demonstrated. This method offers a significant improvement over existing

  3. Specificity of a retinoic acid response element in the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene promoter: consequences of both retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptor binding.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, P C; Forman, B M; Samuels, H H; Granner, D K

    1991-01-01

    The ability of a retinoic acid (RA) response element (RARE) in the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene promoter to mediate effects of either RA or thyroid hormone (T3) on gene expression was studied. Fusion gene constructs consisting of PEPCK promoter sequences ligated to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene were used for this analysis. While T3 induced CAT expression to a small degree (about twofold) when such constructs were transiently transfected into H4IIE rat hepatoma cells, along with an expression vector encoding the alpha subtype of the T3 receptor (TR), this effect was mediated by promoter sequences distinct from the PEPCK RARE. Although TRs were capable of binding the PEPCK RARE in the form of putative monomers, dimers, and heterodimers with RA receptors (RARs), this element failed to mediate any positive effect of T3 on gene expression. In contrast, the PEPCK RARE mediated six- to eightfold induction of CAT expression by RA. When TRs were coexpressed along with RARs in transfected H4IIE cells, this RA induction was substantially blunted in a T3-independent manner. This inhibitory effect may be due to the binding of nonfunctional TRs or TR-RAR heterodimers to the PEPCK RARE. A model is proposed to explain the previously observed in vivo effects of T3 on PEPCK gene expression. Images PMID:1656224

  4. Mutational analysis of a Dcp2-binding element reveals general enhancement of decapping by 5′-end stem-loop structures

    PubMed Central

    Li, You; Ho, Eric S.; Gunderson, Samuel I.; Kiledjian, Megerditch

    2009-01-01

    mRNA decapping is a critical step in the control of mRNA stability and gene expression and is carried out by the Dcp2 protein. Dcp2 is an RNA-binding protein that must bind the RNA in order to recognize the cap for hydrolysis. We previously demonstrated that a 60 nucleotide (nt) element at the 5′ end of the mRNA encoding Rrp41 is preferentially bound and decapped by Dcp2. Here, we demonstrate that enhanced decapping of this element is dependent on the structural integrity of its first 33 nt and not its primary sequence. The structure consists of a stem-loop positioned <10 nt from the 5′ end of the mRNA. The generality of a stem-loop structure in enhanced Dcp2-mediated decapping was underscored by the identification of additional potential Dcp2 substrate mRNAs by a global analysis of human mRNAs containing a similar predicted stem-loop structure at their respective 5′ end. These studies suggest a general role for 5′ stem-loops in enhancing decapping activity and the utilization of this structure as a predictive tool for Dcp2 target substrates. These studies also demonstrate that Dcp2 alone in the absence of additional proteins can preferentially associate with and modulate mRNA decapping. PMID:19233875

  5. S2F, a leaf-specific trans-acting factor, binds to a novel cis-acting element and differentially activates the RPL21 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lagrange, T; Gauvin, S; Yeo, H J; Mache, R

    1997-01-01

    Tissue-specific factors control the differential expression of nuclear genes encoding plastid proteins. To identify some of these factors, the light-independent spinach RPL21 gene encoding the plastid ribosomal protein L21 was chosen as a model. The RPL21 promoter organization was defined by transient and stable transfections of RPL21 promoter deletion mutants fused to a reporter gene. The following results were obtained. (1) We identified a strong core promoter, spanning the transcription start site region, sufficient to drive high levels of gene expression. (2) We identified two non-overlapping positive and negative domains, located upstream from the core promoter region, that modulate core promoter activity independently of light. (3) We found that the positive domain contains a new cis-acting element, the S2 site, related to but different from the light-responsive GT-1 binding site. We show that the S2 site binds a leaf-specific nuclear factor (named S2F). The S2 site is conserved in the promoter region of many nuclear genes encoding plastid proteins. Experiments with transgenic tobacco plants confirmed that the S2 site is critical for positive domain activity in leaf tissues. The S2 site is thus identified as a new tissue-specific, light-independent regulatory element. PMID:9286115

  6. ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR 96 positively regulates Arabidopsis resistance to necrotrophic pathogens by direct binding to GCC elements of jasmonate - and ethylene-responsive defence genes.

    PubMed

    Catinot, Jérémy; Huang, Jing-Bo; Huang, Pin-Yao; Tseng, Min-Yuan; Chen, Ying-Lan; Gu, Shin-Yuan; Lo, Wan-Sheng; Wang, Long-Chi; Chen, Yet-Ran; Zimmerli, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    The ERF (ethylene responsive factor) family is composed of transcription factors (TFs) that are critical for appropriate Arabidopsis thaliana responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here we identified and characterized a member of the ERF TF group IX, namely ERF96, that when overexpressed enhances Arabidopsis resistance to necrotrophic pathogens such as the fungus Botrytis cinerea and the bacterium Pectobacterium carotovorum. ERF96 is jasmonate (JA) and ethylene (ET) responsive and ERF96 transcripts accumulation was abolished in JA-insensitive coi1-16 and in ET-insensitive ein2-1 mutants. Protoplast transactivation and electrophoresis mobility shift analyses revealed that ERF96 is an activator of transcription that binds to GCC elements. In addition, ERF96 mainly localized to the nucleus. Microarray analysis coupled to chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR of Arabidopsis overexpressing ERF96 revealed that ERF96 enhances the expression of the JA/ET defence genes PDF1.2a, PR-3 and PR-4 as well as the TF ORA59 by direct binding to GCC elements present in their promoters. While ERF96-RNAi plants demonstrated wild-type resistance to necrotrophic pathogens, basal PDF1.2 expression levels were reduced in ERF96-silenced plants. This work revealed ERF96 as a key player of the ERF network that positively regulates the Arabidopsis resistance response to necrotrophic pathogens.

  7. A reporter promoter assay confirmed the role of a distal promoter NOBOX binding element in enhancing expression of GDF9 gene in buffalo oocytes.

    PubMed

    Roy, Bhaskar; Rajput, Sandeep; Raghav, Sarvesh; Kumar, Parveen; Verma, Arpana; Kumar, Sandeep; De, Sachinandan; Goswami, Surender Lal; Datta, Tirtha Kumar

    2012-11-01

    Growth differentiation factor 9 is primarily expressed in oocytes and plays a vital role in oocyte cumulus crosstalk. Earlier studies with buffalo oocytes revealed differential expression of this gene under different media stimulation conditions which, in turn, are correlated with the blastocyst yield. In this study, different germ cell specific cis elements including a NOBOX binding elements (NBE) and several E-boxes were identified at the 5' upstream region of buffalo GDF9 gene and their potential role in GDF9 expression was investigated. Transfecting oocytes with GDF9 promoter deletion constructs harbouring the NBE reporter gene revealed a 33% increase in GFP as well as the luciferase signal signifying its role in stimulating the minimal promoter activity of GDF9 in buffalo oocytes. Site directed mutation of core binding nucleotides at NBE at 1.8 kb upstream to TSS further confirmed its role for enhancing the basal transcriptional activity of GDF9 promoter in buffalo oocytes. Current work will provide important leads for understanding the role of GDF9 in oocytes competence and designing a more physiological IVF protocol in case of buffalo.

  8. UNR translation can be driven by an IRES element that is negatively regulated by polypyrimidine tract binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Sigrid; Tinton, Sandrine A.; Schepens, Bert; Bruynooghe, Yanik; Beyaert, Rudi

    2005-01-01

    Upstream of N-ras (Unr) has been described as an internal initiation trans-acting factor (ITAF) in the cap-independent translation of some particular viral and cellular mRNAs. Two factors led us to hypothesize that the UNR 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) may contain an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). The first was the requirement for persisting Unr expression under conditions that correlate with cap-independent translation. The other was the observation that the primary UNR transcript contains a 447 nt long 5′-UTR including two upstream AUGs that may restrict translation initiation via cap-dependent ribosome scanning. Here we report that the UNR 5′-UTR allows IRES-dependent translation, as revealed by a dicistronic reporter assay. Various controls ruled out the contribution of leaky scanning, cryptic promoter sequences or RNA processing events to the ability of the UNR 5′-UTR to mediate internal initiation of translation. Ultraviolet cross-linking analysis and RNA affinity chromatography revealed the binding of polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) to the UNR IRES, requiring a pyrimidine-rich region (nucleotides 335–355). Whereas overexpression of PTB in several cell lines inhibited UNR IRES activity and UNR protein expression, depletion of endogenous PTB using RNAi increased UNR IRES activity. Moreover, a mutant version of the UNR IRES lacking the PTB binding site was more efficient at directing IRES-mediated translation. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that translation of the ITAF Unr can itself be regulated by an IRES that is downregulated by PTB. PMID:15928332

  9. Relaxase DNA binding and cleavage are two distinguishable steps in conjugative DNA processing that involve different sequence elements of the nic site.

    PubMed

    Lucas, María; González-Pérez, Blanca; Cabezas, Matilde; Moncalian, Gabriel; Rivas, Germán; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2010-03-19

    TrwC, the relaxase of plasmid R388, catalyzes a series of concerted DNA cleavage and strand transfer reactions on a specific site (nic) of its origin of transfer (oriT). nic contains the cleavage site and an adjacent inverted repeat (IR(2)). Mutation analysis in the nic region indicated that recognition of the IR(2) proximal arm and the nucleotides located between IR(2) and the cleavage site were essential for supercoiled DNA processing, as judged either by in vitro nic cleavage or by mobilization of a plasmid containing oriT. Formation of the IR(2) cruciform and recognition of the distal IR(2) arm and loop were not necessary for these reactions to take place. On the other hand, IR(2) was not involved in TrwC single-stranded DNA processing in vitro. For single-stranded DNA nic cleavage, TrwC recognized a sequence embracing six nucleotides upstream of the cleavage site and two nucleotides downstream. This suggests that TrwC DNA binding and cleavage are two distinguishable steps in conjugative DNA processing and that different sequence elements are recognized by TrwC in each step. IR(2)-proximal arm recognition was crucial for the initial supercoiled DNA binding. Subsequent recognition of the adjacent single-stranded DNA binding site was required to position the cleavage site in the active center of the protein so that the nic cleavage reaction could take place.

  10. Additive Promotion of Viral Internal Ribosome Entry Site-Mediated Translation by Far Upstream Element-Binding Protein 1 and an Enterovirus 71-Induced Cleavage Product

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chuan-Tien; Kung, Yu-An; Li, Mei-Ling; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Liu, Shih-Tung; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2016-01-01

    The 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of the enterovirus 71 (EV71) RNA genome contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that is indispensable for viral protein translation. Due to the limited coding capacity of their RNA genomes, EV71 and other picornaviruses typically recruit host factors, known as IRES trans-acting factors (ITAFs), to mediate IRES-dependent translation. Here, we show that EV71 viral proteinase 2A is capable of cleaving far upstream element-binding protein 1 (FBP1), a positive ITAF that directly binds to the EV71 5' UTR linker region to promote viral IRES-driven translation. The cleavage occurs at the Gly-371 residue of FBP1 during the EV71 infection process, and this generates a functional cleavage product, FBP11-371. Interestingly, the cleavage product acts to promote viral IRES activity. Footprinting analysis and gel mobility shift assay results showed that FBP11-371 similarly binds to the EV71 5' UTR linker region, but at a different site from full-length FBP1; moreover, FBP1 and FBP11-371 were found to act additively to promote IRES-mediated translation and virus yield. Our findings expand the current understanding of virus-host interactions with regard to viral recruitment and modulation of ITAFs, and provide new insights into translational control during viral infection. PMID:27780225

  11. Intramolecular Interactions and Regulation of Cofactor Binding by the Four Repressive Elements in the Caspase Recruitment Domain-containing Protein 11 (CARD11) Inhibitory Domain.

    PubMed

    Jattani, Rakhi P; Tritapoe, Julia M; Pomerantz, Joel L

    2016-04-15

    The CARD11 signaling scaffold transmits signaling between antigen receptors on B and T lymphocytes and the transcription factor NF-κB during the adaptive immune response. CARD11 activity is controlled by an inhibitory domain (ID), which participates in intramolecular interactions and prevents cofactor binding prior to receptor triggering. Oncogenic CARD11 mutations associated with the activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma somehow perturb ID-mediated autoinhibition to confer CARD11 with the dysregulated spontaneous signaling to NF-κB that is required for the proliferation and survival of the lymphoma. Here, we investigate how the four repressive elements (REs) we have discovered in the CARD11 ID function to inhibit CARD11 activity with cooperativity and redundancy. We find that each RE contributes to the maintenance of the closed inactive state of CARD11 that predominates in the absence of receptor engagement. Each RE also contributes to the prevention of Bcl10 binding in the basal unstimulated state. RE1, RE2, and RE3 participate in intramolecular interactions with other CARD11 domains and share domain targets for binding. Remarkably, diffuse large B cell lymphoma-associated gain-of-function mutations in the caspase recruitment domain, LATCH, or coiled coil can perturb intramolecular interactions mediated by multiple REs, suggesting how single amino acid oncogenic CARD11 mutations can perturb or bypass the action of redundant inhibitory REs to achieve the level of hyperactive CARD11 signaling required to support lymphoma growth.

  12. ARF-B2: A Protein Complex that Specifically Binds to Part of the Anaerobic Response Element of Maize Adh 11

    PubMed Central

    Ferl, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Crude whole cell extracts from maize (Zea mays L.) suspension cells were examined for DNA binding proteins that specifically interact with a portion of the maize Adh 1 promoter that was previously shown to be in contact with a trans-acting factor in vivo. A 17 base pair, double-stranded oligonucleotide probe was constructed that centered around a strong in vivo dimethylsulfate footprint (B2) that coincides with part of the anaerobic response element (ARE). Gel retardation assays were used to characterize a major, specific DNA binding protein activity found in the crude extracts. The activity is present in both aerobic and hypoxically treated cultures and has been designated ARF-B2 (ARE binding factor). ARF-B2 appears to be a multicomponent complex, with a 54 kilodalton subunit termed ARF-B2α in primary contact with the target DNA. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:16667563

  13. Activation of nuclear protein binding to the antioxidant/electrophile response element in vascular smooth muscle cells by benzo(a)pyrene.

    PubMed

    Holderman, M T; Miller, K P; Ramos, K S

    2000-01-01

    This laboratory has previously shown that binding of nuclear proteins to the antioxidant/electrophile response element (ARE/EpRE) participates in deregulation of vascular gene expression by benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), a suspected atherogen. In the present study, oligonucleotides representing ARE/EpREs within the c-Ha-ras and glutathione-S-transferase (GST-Ya) promoters were employed to evaluate the role of flanking sequences in stabilizing protein:DNA interactions in BaP-treated vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs). We also wanted to define promoter-specific patterns of protein recognition to ARE/EpREs in this cell system. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), optimal protein binding to a human Ha-ras ARE/EpRE variant sequence fitted to match the extended mouse(m) GST-Ya ARE/EpRE core (5'-TMAnnRTGAYnnnGCR-3') was dependent on 5' nucleic acid sequence. Using immobilized DNA affinity chromatography (IDAC), we identified four nuclear proteins of M(r) 62, 60, 50, and 30 kDa that associated specifically with the mGSTYa ARE/EpRE. Photo crosslinking to a BrdU-substituted hHa-ras or mGST ARE/EpRE probe identified specific proteins of M(r) 80, 60, 55, 25, 23 kDa or 80, 60, 55, 27, 25, 23 kDa, respectively. Protein:DNA complexes detected using IDAC eluate overlapped with those observed in crude nuclear extracts. Chemical treatments known to modulate ARE/EpRE protein binding in vSMCs did not alter overall protein:DNA affinity and/or sequence recognition to either hHa-ras or mGST-Ya elements. We conclude that nucleotide sequences 5' to the core ARE/EpRE influence specific binding of nuclear proteins and that multiple proteins bind to ARE/EpREs in a promoter-specific manner in vSMCs.

  14. SP1-binding elements, within the common metaxin-thrombospondin 3 intergenic region, participate in the regulation of the metaxin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, M; Bornstein, P

    1996-01-01

    Metaxin (Mtx) is an essential nuclear gene which is expressed ubiquitously in mice and encodes a mitochondrial protein. The gene is located upstream and is transcribed divergently from the thrombospondin 3 (Thbs3) gene; 1352 nucleotides separate the putative translation start sites. Although the Mtx and Thbs3 genes share a common intergenic region, transient transfection experiments in rat chondro-sarcoma cells and in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts demonstrated that the elements required for expression of the Mtx gene are situated within a short proximal promoter and have no major effect on the transcription of Thbs3. The metaxin --377 bp promoter contains four clustered GC boxes between nucleotides --146 and --58 and an inverted GT box between nucleotides --152 and --161, but does not contain TATA or CCAAT boxes. Like many genes regulated by a TATA-less promoter, the transcription start site of metaxin is heterogeneous. The major start site is only 13 bp upstream from the putative translation start site. Electrophoretic mobility shift, competition and supershift assays showed that the ubiquitous transcription factor, Sp1, and, to a lesser extent, the Sp1-related protein, Sp3, bind to four of these Sp1-binding motifs. Co-transfection of metaxin promoter-luciferase constructs and an Sp1 expression vector into Schneider Drosophila cells, which do not synthesize Sp1, demonstrated that the metaxin gene is activated by Sp1. Deletion of the four upstream Sp1-binding elements, on the other hand, demonstrated that these motifs are superfluous in context of the larger Mtx promoter. Thus, despite the potential for common regulatory mechanisms, the available evidence indicates that the Mtx minimal promoter does not significantly affect Thbs3 gene expression. PMID:8871542

  15. PlantAPA: A Portal for Visualization and Analysis of Alternative Polyadenylation in Plants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yumin; Li, Qingshun Q

    2016-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is an important layer of gene regulation that produces mRNAs that have different 3' ends and/or encode diverse protein isoforms. Up to 70% of annotated genes in plants undergo APA. Increasing numbers of poly(A) sites collected in various plant species demand new methods and tools to access and mine these data. We have created an open-access web service called PlantAPA (http://bmi.xmu.edu.cn/plantapa) to visualize and analyze genome-wide poly(A) sites in plants. PlantAPA provides various interactive and dynamic graphics and seamlessly integrates a genome browser that can profile heterogeneous cleavage sites and quantify expression patterns of poly(A) sites across different conditions. Particularly, through PlantAPA, users can analyze poly(A) sites in extended 3' UTR regions, intergenic regions, and ambiguous regions owing to alternative transcription or RNA processing. In addition, it also provides tools for analyzing poly(A) site selections, 3' UTR lengthening or shortening, non-canonical APA site switching, and differential gene expression between conditions, making it more powerful for the study of APA-mediated gene expression regulation. More importantly, PlantAPA offers a bioinformatics pipeline that allows users to upload their own short reads or ESTs for poly(A) site extraction, enabling users to further explore poly(A) site selection using stored PlantAPA poly(A) sites together with their own poly(A) site datasets. To date, PlantAPA hosts the largest database of APA sites in plants, including Oryza sativa, Arabidopsis thaliana, Medicago truncatula, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. As a user-friendly web service, PlantAPA will be a valuable addition to the community of biologists studying APA mechanisms and gene expression regulation in plants. PMID:27446120

  16. PlantAPA: A Portal for Visualization and Analysis of Alternative Polyadenylation in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yumin; Li, Qingshun Q.

    2016-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is an important layer of gene regulation that produces mRNAs that have different 3′ ends and/or encode diverse protein isoforms. Up to 70% of annotated genes in plants undergo APA. Increasing numbers of poly(A) sites collected in various plant species demand new methods and tools to access and mine these data. We have created an open-access web service called PlantAPA (http://bmi.xmu.edu.cn/plantapa) to visualize and analyze genome-wide poly(A) sites in plants. PlantAPA provides various interactive and dynamic graphics and seamlessly integrates a genome browser that can profile heterogeneous cleavage sites and quantify expression patterns of poly(A) sites across different conditions. Particularly, through PlantAPA, users can analyze poly(A) sites in extended 3′ UTR regions, intergenic regions, and ambiguous regions owing to alternative transcription or RNA processing. In addition, it also provides tools for analyzing poly(A) site selections, 3′ UTR lengthening or shortening, non-canonical APA site switching, and differential gene expression between conditions, making it more powerful for the study of APA-mediated gene expression regulation. More importantly, PlantAPA offers a bioinformatics pipeline that allows users to upload their own short reads or ESTs for poly(A) site extraction, enabling users to further explore poly(A) site selection using stored PlantAPA poly(A) sites together with their own poly(A) site datasets. To date, PlantAPA hosts the largest database of APA sites in plants, including Oryza sativa, Arabidopsis thaliana, Medicago truncatula, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. As a user-friendly web service, PlantAPA will be a valuable addition to the community of biologists studying APA mechanisms and gene expression regulation in plants. PMID:27446120

  17. Insights into the Regulation of mRNA Processing of Polycistronic Transcripts Mediated by DRBD4/PTB2, a Trypanosome Homolog of the Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    De Gaudenzi, Javier G; Jäger, Adriana V; Izcovich, Ronan; Campo, Vanina A

    2016-07-01

    Trypanosomes regulate gene expression mostly by posttranscriptional mechanisms, including control of mRNA turnover and translation efficiency. This regulation is carried out via certain elements located at the 3'-untranslated regions of mRNAs, which are recognized by RNA-binding proteins. In trypanosomes, trans-splicing is of central importance to control mRNA maturation. We have previously shown that TcDRBD4/PTB2, a trypanosome homolog of the human polypyrimidine tract-binding protein splicing regulator, interacts with the intergenic region of one specific dicistronic transcript, referred to as TcUBP (and encoding for TcUBP1 and TcUBP2, two closely kinetoplastid-specific proteins). In this work, a survey of TcUBP RNA processing revealed certain TcDRBD4/PTB2-regulatory elements within its intercistronic region, which are likely to influence the trans-splicing rate of monocistronic-derived transcripts. Furthermore, TcDRBD4/PTB2 overexpression in epimastigote cells notably decreased both UBP1 and UBP2 protein expression. This type of posttranscriptional gene regulatory mechanism could be extended to other transcripts as well, as we identified several other RNA precursor molecules that specifically bind to TcDRBD4/PTB2. Altogether, these findings support a model in which TcDRBD4/PTB2-containing ribonucleoprotein complexes can prevent trans-splicing. This could represent another stage of gene expression regulation mediated by the masking of trans-splicing/polyadenylation signals.

  18. Subunit architecture of the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase required for sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) cleavage in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, S Julie-Ann; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Espenshade, Peter J

    2013-07-19

    The membrane-bound sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors regulate lipogenesis in mammalian cells and are activated through sequential cleavage by the Golgi-localized Site-1 and Site-2 proteases. The mechanism of fission yeast SREBP cleavage is less well defined and, in contrast, requires the Golgi-localized Dsc E3 ligase complex. The Dsc E3 ligase consists of five integral membrane subunits, Dsc1 through Dsc5, and resembles membrane E3 ligases that function in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. Using immunoprecipitation assays and blue native electrophoresis, we determined the subunit architecture for the complex of Dsc1 through Dsc5, showing that the Dsc proteins form subcomplexes and display defined connectivity. Dsc2 is a rhomboid pseudoprotease family member homologous to mammalian UBAC2 and a central component of the Dsc E3 ligase. We identified conservation in the architecture of the Dsc E3 ligase and the multisubunit E3 ligase gp78 in mammals. Specifically, Dsc1-Dsc2-Dsc5 forms a complex resembling gp78-UBAC2-UBXD8. Further characterization of Dsc2 revealed that its C-terminal UBA domain can bind to ubiquitin chains but that the Dsc2 UBA domain is not essential for yeast SREBP cleavage. Based on the ability of rhomboid superfamily members to bind transmembrane proteins, we speculate that Dsc2 functions in SREBP recognition and binding. Homologs of Dsc1 through Dsc4 are required for SREBP cleavage and virulence in the human opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Thus, these studies advance our organizational understanding of multisubunit E3 ligases involved in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation and fungal pathogenesis.

  19. The first intron of the 4F2 heavy-chain gene contains a transcriptional enhancer element that binds multiple nuclear proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Karpinski, B.A.; Yang, L.H.; Cacheris, P.; Morle, G.D.; Leiden, J.M.

    1989-06-01

    The authors utilized the human 4F2 heavy-chain (4F2HC) gene as a model system to study the regulation of inducible gene expression during normal human T-cell activation. Previous studies have demonstrated that 4F2HC gene expression is induced during normal T-cell activation and that the activity of the gene is regulated, at least in part, by the interaction of a constitutively active 5'-flanking housekeeping promoter and a phorbol ester-responsive transcriptional attenuator element located in the exon 1-intron 1 region of the gene. They now report that 4F2HC intron 1 contains a transcriptional enhancer element which is active on a number of heterologous promoters in a variety of murine and human cells. This enhancer element has been mapped to a 187-base-pair RsaI-AluI fragment from 4F2HC intron 1. DNase I footprinting and gel mobility shift analyses demonstrated that this fragment contains two nuclear protein-binding sites (NF-4FA and NF-4FB) which flank a consensus binding site for the inducible AP-1 transcription factor. Deletion analysis showed that the NF-4FA, NF-4FB, and AP-1 sequences are each necessary for full enhancer activity. Murine 4F2HC intron 1 displayed enhancer activity similar to that of its human counterpart. Comparison of the sequences of human and murine 4F2HC intron 1s demonstrated that the NF-4FA, NF-4FB, and AP-1 sequence motifs have been highly conserved during mammalian evolution.

  20. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1)c promoter: Characterization and transcriptional regulation by mature SREBP-1 and liver X receptor α in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, H F; Luo, J; Wang, H P; Wang, H; Zhang, T Y; Tian, H B; Yao, D W; Loor, J J

    2016-02-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) is a key transcription factor that regulates lipogenesis in rodent liver. Two isoforms (SREBP-1a and SREBP-1c) of SREBP-1 are transcribed by an alternative promoter on the same gene (SREBF1), and the isoforms differ only in their first exon. Although the regulatory effects of SREBP-1 on lipid and milk fat synthesis have received much attention in ruminants, SREBP-1c promoter and its regulatory mechanisms have not been characterized in the goat. In the present study, we cloned and sequenced a 2,012-bp fragment of the SREBP-1c 5'-flanking region from goat genomic DNA. A luciferase reporter assay revealed that SREBP-1c is transcriptionally activated by the liver X receptor α (LXRα) agonist T0901317, and is decreased by SREBP-1 small interfering (si)RNA. A 5' deletion analysis revealed a core promoter region located -395 to +1 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site (TSS). Site-directed mutagenesis of LXRα binding elements (LXRE1 and LXRE2) and sterol regulatory elements (SRE1 and SRE2) revealed that the full effects of T 4506585 require the presence of both LXRE and SRE. We also characterized a new SRE (SRE1) and demonstrated a direct role of SREBP-1 (auto-loop regulation) in maintaining its basal transcription activity. Results suggest that goat SREBP-1c gene is transcriptionally regulated by mature SREBP-1 (auto-loop circuit regulation) and LXRα in goat mammary epithelial cells. PMID:26709176

  1. The Arginine/Lysine-Rich Element within the DNA-Binding Domain Is Essential for Nuclear Localization and Function of the Intracellular Pathogen Resistance 1.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kezhen; Wu, Yongyan; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Zihan; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The mouse intracellular pathogen resistance 1 (Ipr1) gene plays important roles in mediating host immunity and previous work showed that it enhances macrophage apoptosis upon mycobacterium infection. However, to date, little is known about the regulation pattern of Ipr1 action. Recent studies have investigated the protein-coding genes and microRNAs regulated by Ipr1 in mouse macrophages, but the structure and the functional motif of the Ipr1 protein have yet to be explored. In this study, we analyzed the domains and functional motif of the Ipr1 protein. The resulting data reveal that Ipr1 protein forms a homodimer and that the Sp100-like domain mediates the targeting of Ipr1 protein to nuclear dots (NDs). Moreover, we found that an Ipr1 mutant lacking the classic nuclear localization signal (cNLS) also translocated into the nuclei, suggesting that the cNLS is not the only factor that directs Ipr1 nuclear localization. Additionally, mechanistic studies revealed that an arginine/lysine-rich element within the DNA-binding domain (SAND domain) is critical for Ipr1 binding to the importin protein receptor NPI-1, demonstrating that this element plays an essential role in mediating the nuclear localization of Ipr1 protein. Furthermore, our results show that this arginine/lysine-rich element contributes to the transcriptional regulation and apoptotic activity of Ipr1. These findings highlight the structural foundations of Ipr1 action and provide new insights into the mechanism of Ipr1-mediated resistance to mycobacterium. PMID:27622275

  2. The Arginine/Lysine-Rich Element within the DNA-Binding Domain Is Essential for Nuclear Localization and Function of the Intracellular Pathogen Resistance 1

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kezhen; Wu, Yongyan; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Zihan; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The mouse intracellular pathogen resistance 1 (Ipr1) gene plays important roles in mediating host immunity and previous work showed that it enhances macrophage apoptosis upon mycobacterium infection. However, to date, little is known about the regulation pattern of Ipr1 action. Recent studies have investigated the protein-coding genes and microRNAs regulated by Ipr1 in mouse macrophages, but the structure and the functional motif of the Ipr1 protein have yet to be explored. In this study, we analyzed the domains and functional motif of the Ipr1 protein. The resulting data reveal that Ipr1 protein forms a homodimer and that the Sp100-like domain mediates the targeting of Ipr1 protein to nuclear dots (NDs). Moreover, we found that an Ipr1 mutant lacking the classic nuclear localization signal (cNLS) also translocated into the nuclei, suggesting that the cNLS is not the only factor that directs Ipr1 nuclear localization. Additionally, mechanistic studies revealed that an arginine/lysine-rich element within the DNA-binding domain (SAND domain) is critical for Ipr1 binding to the importin protein receptor NPI-1, demonstrating that this element plays an essential role in mediating the nuclear localization of Ipr1 protein. Furthermore, our results show that this arginine/lysine-rich element contributes to the transcriptional regulation and apoptotic activity of Ipr1. These findings highlight the structural foundations of Ipr1 action and provide new insights into the mechanism of Ipr1-mediated resistance to mycobacterium. PMID:27622275

  3. Overlapping protein-binding sites within a negative regulatory element modulate the brain-preferential expression of the human HPRT gene

    SciTech Connect

    Rincon-Limas, D.E.; Amaya-Manzanares, E.; Nino-Rosales, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    The hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene, whose deficiency in humans causes the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, is constitutively expressed at low levels in all tissues but at higher levels in the brain, the significance and mechanism of which is unknown. Towards dissecting this molecular mechanism, we have previously identified a 182 bp element (hHPRT-NE) within the 5{prime}-flanking region of the human HPRT gene which is involved not only in conferring neuronal specificity but also in repressing gene expression in non-neuronal tissues. Here we report that this element interacts with different nuclear proteins, some of which are present specifically in neuronal cells (complex I) and others of which are present in cells showing constitutive expression of the gene (complex II). In addition, we found that complex I factors are expressed in human NT2/D1 cells following induction of neuronal differentiation by retinoic acid. This finding correlates with an increase of HPRT gene transcription following neuronal differentiation, as demonstrated by RT-PCR and RNAase protection assays. We also mapped the binding sites for both complexes to a 60 bp region which, when tested by transient transfections in cultured fibroblasts, functioned as a repressor element. Methylation interference footprinting revealed a minimal unique DNA motif as the binding site for nuclear proteins from both neuronal and non-neuronal sources. Moreover, UV-crosslinking experiments showed that both complexes are formed by the association of several distinct proteins. Strikingly, site-directed mutagenesis of the footprinted region indicated that different nucleotides are essential for the association of these two complexes. These data suggest that differential formation of DNA-protein complexes at this regulatory domain could be a major determinant in the brain-preferential expression of the human HPRT gene.

  4. Nerve growth factor-induced derepression of peripherin gene expression is associated with alterations in proteins binding to a negative regulatory element.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, M A; Lee, E; Lawe, D; Gizang-Ginsberg, E; Ziff, E B

    1992-01-01

    The peripherin gene, which encodes a neuronal-specific intermediate filament protein, is transcriptionally induced with a late time course when nerve growth factor (NGF) stimulates PC12 cells to differentiate into neurons. We have studied its transcriptional regulation in order to better understand the neuronal-specific end steps of the signal transduction pathway of NGF. By 5' deletion mapping of the peripherin promoter, we have localized two positive regulatory elements necessary for full induction by NGF: a distal positive element and a proximal constitutive element within 111 bp of the transcriptional start site. In addition, there is a negative regulatory element (NRE; -179 to -111), the deletion of which results in elevated basal expression of the gene. Methylation interference footprinting of the NRE defined a unique sequence, GGCAGGGCGCC, as the binding site for proteins present in nuclear extracts from both undifferentiated and differentiated PC12 cells. However, DNA mobility shift assays using an oligonucleotide probe containing the footprinted sequence demonstrate a prominent retarded complex in extracts from undifferentiated PC12 cells which migrates with slower mobility than do the complexes produced by using differentiated PC12 cell extract. Transfection experiments using peripherin-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs in which the footprinted sequence has been mutated confirm that the NRE has a functional, though not exclusive, role in repressing peripherin expression in undifferentiated and nonneuronal cells. We propose a two-step model of activation of peripherin by NGF in which dissociation of a repressor from the protein complex at the NRE, coupled with a positive signal from the distal positive element, results in depression of the gene. Images PMID:1588954

  5. Pervasive and dynamic protein binding sites of the mRNA transcriptome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein-RNA interactions are integral components of nearly every aspect of biology, including regulation of gene expression, assembly of cellular architectures, and pathogenesis of human diseases. However, studies in the past few decades have only uncovered a small fraction of the vast landscape of the protein-RNA interactome in any organism, and even less is known about the dynamics of protein-RNA interactions under changing developmental and environmental conditions. Results Here, we describe the gPAR-CLIP (global photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunopurification) approach for capturing regions of the untranslated, polyadenylated transcriptome bound by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) in budding yeast. We report over 13,000 RBP crosslinking sites in untranslated regions (UTRs) covering 72% of protein-coding transcripts encoded in the genome, confirming 3' UTRs as major sites for RBP interaction. Comparative genomic analyses reveal that RBP crosslinking sites are highly conserved, and RNA folding predictions indicate that secondary structural elements are constrained by protein binding and may serve as generalizable modes of RNA recognition. Finally, 38% of 3' UTR crosslinking sites show changes in RBP occupancy upon glucose or nitrogen deprivation, with major impacts on metabolic pathways as well as mitochondrial and ribosomal gene expression. Conclusions Our study offers an unprecedented view of the pervasiveness and dynamics of protein-RNA interactions in vivo. PMID:23409723

  6. The cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 transactivates epithelial membrane protein 2, a potential tumor suppressor in the urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Chien-Feng; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Wu, Wen-Ren; Liao, Yu-Jing; Chen, Lih-Ren; Huang, Chun-Nung; Li, Ching-Chia; Li, Wei-Ming; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Chen, Yi-Ling; Liang, Shih-Shin; Chow, Nan-Haw; Shiue, Yow-Ling

    2015-04-20

    In this study, we report that EMP2 plays a tumor suppressor role by inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest, suppressing cell viability, proliferation, colony formation/anchorage-independent cell growth via regulation of G2/M checkpoints in distinct urinary bladder urothelial carcinoma (UBUC)-derived cell lines. Genistein treatment or exogenous expression of the cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1) gene in different UBUC-derived cell lines induced EMP2 transcription and subsequent translation. Mutagenesis on either or both cAMP-responsive element(s) dramatically decreased the EMP2 promoter activity with, without genistein treatment or exogenous CREB1 expression, respectively. Significantly correlation between the EMP2 immunointensity and primary tumor, nodal status, histological grade, vascular invasion and mitotic activity was identified. Multivariate analysis further demonstrated that low EMP2 immunoexpression is an independent prognostic factor for poor disease-specific survival. Genistein treatments, knockdown of EMP2 gene and double knockdown of CREB1 and EMP2 genes significantly inhibited tumor growth and notably downregulated CREB1 and EMP2 protein levels in the mice xenograft models. Therefore, genistein induced CREB1 transcription, translation and upregulated pCREB1(S133) protein level. Afterward, pCREB1(S133) transactivated the tumor suppressor gene, EMP2, in vitro and in vivo. Our study identified a novel transcriptional target, which plays a tumor suppressor role, of CREB1.

  7. Identification of novel regulatory NFAT and TFII-I binding elements in the calbindin-D28k promoter in response to serum deprivation.

    PubMed

    Hajibeigi, Asghar; Dioum, Elhadji M; Guo, Jianfei; Öz, Orhan K

    2015-09-25

    Calbindin-D28k, a key regulator of calcium homeostasis plays a cytoprotective role in various tissues. We used serum free (SFM) and charcoal stripped serum (csFBS) culture media as models of cellular stress to modulate calbindin D28k expression and identify regulatory cis-elements and trans-acting factors in kidney and beta cells. The murine calbindin-D28k promoter activity was significantly upregulated under SFM or csFBS condition. Promoter analysis revealed evolutionary conserved regulatory cis-elements and deletion of 23 nt from +117/+139 as critical for basal transcription. Bioinformatics analysis of the promoter revealed conserved NFAT and TFII regulators elements. Forced expression of NFAT stimulated promoter activity. Inhibition of NFAT transcriptional activity by FK506 attenuated calbindin-D28k expression. TFII-I was shown to be necessary for basal promoter activity and to act cooperatively with NFAT. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, NFAT was shown to bind to both proximal and distal promoter regions. ChIP assays also revealed recruitment of TFII to the -36/+139 region. Knockdown of TFII-I decreased promoter activity. In summary, calbindin-D28k expression during serum deprivation is partly regulated by NFAT and TF-II. This regulation may be important in vivo during ischemia and growth factor withdrawal to regulate cellular function and maintenance.

  8. The effects of differential polyadenylation on expression of the dihydrofolate reductase-encoding gene in Chinese hamster lung cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Hussain, A; Melera, P W

    1995-10-01

    Three differently sized mRNAs are expressed from each of two DHFR (encoding dihydrofolate reductase) alleles present in the Chinese hamster lung (CHL) cell line, DC-3F. The relative abundancy of the transcripts produced from each allele differs dramatically as a result of differential utilization of the multiple poly(A) sites present in the DHFR DHFR gene and a genetic polymorphism located within the third poly(A) signal of one allele. We sought to determine whether such differences in polyadenylation affect the steady-state levels of DHFR and mRNAs expressed from either allele and, in a more general sense, to ask whether differences in 3' end RNA processing in a gene containing multiple poly(A) sites affects the final level of gene expression. An SV40 promoter-based transient expression system producing chimeric cat::DHFR transcripts was developed to regenerate the in vivo mRNA polyadenylation patterns associated with each of the two DHFR alleles. The results demonstrate that the total amount of polyadenylated RNA expressed from each of these constructs in vitro is the same regardless of the differential utilization of the poly(A) signals that occurs between them. Moreover, measurement of the individual turnover rates of the DHFR mRNAs expressed in vivo from each allele, as determined by pulse-chase labeling and actinomycin D inhibition studies, revealed no significant allele-specific differences in transcript half-lives. Finally, measuring the steady-state levels of DHFR poly(A)+ mRNA in parental DC-3F cells demonstrated that both alleles are expressed to the same extent during normal growth. Thus, even though dramatic allele-specific differences in 3' end processing of DHFR transcripts occur in vivo, such differences do not appear to influence the steady-state levels of DHFR gene expression. PMID:7590264

  9. Motif types, motif locations and base composition patterns around the RNA polyadenylation site in microorganisms, plants and animals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The polyadenylation of RNA is critical for gene functioning, but the conserved sequence motifs (often called signal or signature motifs), motif locations and abundances, and base composition patterns around mRNA polyadenylation [poly(A)] sites are still uncharacterized in most species. The evolutionary tendency for poly(A) site selection is still largely unknown. Results We analyzed the poly(A) site regions of 31 species or phyla. Different groups of species showed different poly(A) signal motifs: UUACUU at the poly(A) site in the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi; UGUAAC (approximately 13 bases upstream of the site) in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii; UGUUUG (or UGUUUGUU) at mainly the fourth base downstream of the poly(A) site in the parasite Blastocystis hominis; and AAUAAA at approximately 16 bases and approximately 19 bases upstream of the poly(A) site in animals and plants, respectively. Polyadenylation signal motifs are usually several hundred times more abundant around poly(A) sites than in whole genomes. These predominant motifs usually had very specific locations, whether upstream of, at, or downstream of poly(A) sites, depending on the species or phylum. The poly(A) site was usually an adenosine (A) in all analyzed species except for B. hominis, and there was weak A predominance in C. reinhardtii. Fungi, animals, plants, and the protist Phytophthora infestans shared a general base abundance pattern (or base composition pattern) of “U-rich—A-rich—U-rich—Poly(A) site—U-rich regions”, or U-A-U-A-U for short, with some variation for each kingdom or subkingdom. Conclusion This study identified the poly(A) signal motifs, motif locations, and base composition patterns around mRNA poly(A) sites in protists, fungi, plants, and animals and provided insight into poly(A) site evolution. PMID:25052519

  10. CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) and C/EBPalpha (CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) are required for the superstimulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase gene transcription by adenoviral E1a and cAMP.

    PubMed Central

    Routes, J M; Colton, L A; Ryan, S; Klemm, D J

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, we observed superstimulated levels of cAMP-stimulated transcription from the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene promoter in cells infected with wild-type adenovirus expressing 12 S and 13 S E1a proteins, or in cells expressing 13 S E1a alone. cAMP-stimulated transcription was inhibited in cells expressing only 12 S E1a, but slightly elevated in cells expressing E1a proteins with mutations in conserved regions 1 or 2, leading us to conclude that the superstimulation was mediated by conserved region 3 of 13 S E1a. E1a failed to enhance cAMP-stimulated transcription from promoters containing mutations that abolish binding by cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) or CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs). This result was supported by experiments in which expression of dominant-negative CREB and/or C/EBP proteins repressed E1a- and cAMP-stimulated transcription from the PEPCK gene promoter. In reconstitution experiments using a Gal4-responsive promoter, E1a enhanced cAMP-stimulated transcription when chimaeric Gal4-CREB and Gal4-C/EBPalpha were co-expressed. Phosphorylation of CREB on serine-133 was stimulated in cells treated with dibutyryl cAMP, whereas phosphorylation of C/EBPalpha was increased by E1a expression. Our data support a model in which cAMP agonists increase CREB activity and stimulate PEPCK gene transcription, a process that is enhanced by E1a through the phosphorylation of C/EBPalpha. PMID:11085926

  11. Binding of TFIIIC to SINE Elements Controls the Relocation of Activity-Dependent Neuronal Genes to Transcription Factories

    PubMed Central

    Crepaldi, Luca; Policarpi, Cristina; Coatti, Alessandro; Sherlock, William T.; Jongbloets, Bart C.; Down, Thomas A.; Riccio, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In neurons, the timely and accurate expression of genes in response to synaptic activity relies on the interplay between epigenetic modifications of histones, recruitment of regulatory proteins to chromatin and changes to nuclear structure. To identify genes and regulatory elements responsive to synaptic activation in vivo, we performed a genome-wide ChIPseq analysis of acetylated histone H3 using somatosensory cortex of mice exposed to novel enriched environmental (NEE) conditions. We discovered that Short Interspersed Elements (SINEs) located distal to promoters of activity-dependent genes became acetylated following exposure to NEE and were bound by the general transcription factor TFIIIC. Importantly, under depolarizing conditions, inducible genes relocated to transcription factories (TFs), and this event was controlled by TFIIIC. Silencing of the TFIIIC subunit Gtf3c5 in non-stimulated neurons induced uncontrolled relocation to TFs and transcription of activity-dependent genes. Remarkably, in cortical neurons, silencing of Gtf3c5 mimicked the effects of chronic depolarization, inducing a dramatic increase of both dendritic length and branching. These findings reveal a novel and essential regulatory function of both SINEs and TFIIIC in mediating gene relocation and transcription. They also suggest that TFIIIC may regulate the rearrangement of nuclear architecture, allowing the coordinated expression of activity-dependent neuronal genes. PMID:23966877

  12. Structure and Functional Characterization of the RNA-Binding Element of the NLRX1 Innate Immune Modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Minsun; Yoon, Sung-il; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-06-20

    Mitochondrial NLRX1 is a member of the family of nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich-repeat-containing proteins (NLRs) that mediate host innate immunity as intracellular surveillance sensors against common molecular patterns of invading pathogens. NLRX1 functions in antiviral immunity, but the molecular mechanism of its ligand-induced activation is largely unknown. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fragment (residues 629975) of human NLRX1 (cNLRX1) at 2.65 {angstrom} resolution reveals that cNLRX1 consists of an N-terminal helical (LRRNT) domain, central leucine-rich repeat modules (LRRM), and a C-terminal three-helix bundle (LRRCT). cNLRX1 assembles into a compact hexameric architecture that is stabilized by intersubunit and interdomain interactions of LRRNT and LRRCT in the trimer and dimer components of the hexamer, respectively. Furthermore, we find that cNLRX1 interacts directly with RNA and supports a role for NLRX1 in recognition of intracellular viral RNA in antiviral immunity.

  13. Brome mosaic virus capsid protein regulates accumulation of viral replication proteins by binding to the replicase assembly RNA element.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guanghui; Letteney, Ester; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Kao, C Cheng

    2009-04-01

    Viruses provide valuable insights into the regulation of molecular processes. Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is one of the simplest entities with four viral proteins and three genomic RNAs. Here we report that the BMV capsid protein (CP), which functions in RNA encapsidation and virus trafficking, also represses viral RNA replication in a concentration-dependent manner by inhibiting the accumulation of the RNA replication proteins. Expression of the replication protein 2a in trans can partially rescue BMV RNA accumulation. A mutation in the CP can decrease the repression of translation. Translation repression by the CP requires a hairpin RNA motif named the B Box that contains seven loop nucleotides (nt) within the 5' untranslated regions (UTR) of BMV RNA1 and RNA2. Purified CP can bind directly to the B Box RNA with a K (d) of 450 nM. The secondary structure of the B Box RNA was determined to contain a highly flexible 7-nt loop using NMR spectroscopy, native gel analysis, and thermal denaturation studies. The B Box is also recognized by the BMV 1a protein to assemble the BMV replicase, suggesting that the BMV CP can act to regulate several viral infection processes.

  14. Crystal structure of the restriction-modification system control element C.Bcll and mapping of its binding site.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, Michael R; Zhu, Zhenyu; Mersha, Fana; Chan, Siu-Hong; Dabur, Rajesh; Xu, Shuang-Yong; Balendiran, Ganesaratnam K

    2005-12-01

    Protection from DNA invasion is afforded by restriction-modification systems in many bacteria. The efficiency of protection depends crucially on the relative expression levels of restriction versus methytransferase genes. This regulation is provided by a controller protein, named C protein. Studies of the Bcll system in E. coli suggest that C.Bcll functions as a negative regulator for M.Bcll expression, implying that it plays a role in defense against foreign DNA during virus infection. C.Bcll binds (Kd = 14.3 nM) to a 2-fold symmetric C box DNA sequence that overlaps with the putative -35 promoter region upstream of the bcllM and bcllC genes. The C.Bcll fold comprises five alpha helices: two helices form a helix-turn-helix motif, and the remaining three helices form the extensive dimer interface. The C.Bcll-DNA model proposed suggests that DNA bending might play an important role in gene regulation, and that Glu27 and Asp31 in C.Bcll might function critically in the regulation.

  15. Farnesoid X receptor, through the binding with steroidogenic factor 1-responsive element, inhibits aromatase expression in tumor Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Stefania; Malivindi, Rocco; Giordano, Cinzia; Gu, Guowei; Panza, Salvatore; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Lanzino, Marilena; Sisci, Diego; Panno, Maria Luisa; Andò, Sebastiano

    2010-02-19

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that regulates bile acid homeostasis. It is expressed in the liver and the gastrointestinal tract, but also in several non-enterohepatic tissues including testis. Recently, FXR was identified as a negative modulator of the androgen-estrogen-converting aromatase enzyme in human breast cancer cells. In the present study we detected the expression of FXR in Leydig normal and tumor cell lines and in rat testes tissue. We found, in rat Leydig tumor cells, R2C, that FXR activation by the primary bile acid chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) or a synthetic agonist GW4064, through a SHP-independent mechanism, down-regulates aromatase expression in terms of mRNA, protein levels, and its enzymatic activity. Transient transfection experiments, using vector containing rat aromatase promoter PII, evidenced that CDCA reduces basal aromatase promoter activity. Mutagenesis studies, electrophoretic mobility shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis reveal that FXR is able to compete with steroidogenic factor 1 in binding to a common sequence present in the aromatase promoter region interfering negatively with its activity. Finally, the FXR-mediated anti-proliferative effects exerted by CDCA on tumor Leydig cells are at least in part due to an inhibition of estrogen-dependent cell growth. In conclusion our findings identify for the first time the activators of FXR as negative modulators of the aromatase enzyme in Leydig tumor cell lines.

  16. Multiple DNA-binding factors interact with overlapping specificities at the aryl hydrocarbon response element of the cytochrome P450IA1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Saatcioglu, F; Perry, D J; Pasco, D S; Fagan, J B

    1990-01-01

    Three nuclear factors, the Ah receptor, XF1, and XF2, bind sequence specifically to the Ah response elements or xenobiotic response elements (XREs) of the cytochrome P450IA1 (P450c) gene. The interactions of these factors with the Ah response element XRE1 were compared by three independent methods, methylation interference footprinting, orthophenanthroline-Cu+ footprinting, and mobility shift competition experiments, using a series of synthetic oligonucleotides with systematic alterations in the XRE core sequence. These studies established the following (i) all three factors interact sequence specifically with the core sequence of XRE1; (ii) the pattern of contacts made with this sequence by the Ah receptor are different from those made by XF1 and XF2; and (iii) although XF1 and XF2 can be distinguished by the mobility shift assay, the sequence specificities of their interactions with XRE1 are indistinguishable. Further characterization revealed the following additional differences among these three factors: (i) XF1 and XF2 could be extracted from nuclei under conditions quite different from those required for extraction of the Ah receptor; (ii) XF1 and XF2 were present in the nuclei of untreated cells and did not respond to polycyclic compounds, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and beta-napthoflavone, while nuclear Ah receptor was undetectable in untreated cells and rapidly increased in response to TCDD; (iii) inhibition of protein synthesis did not affect the TCDD-induced appearance of the Ah receptor but substantially decreased the constitutive activities of XF1 and XF2, suggesting that the Ah receptor must be present in untreated cells in an inactive form that can be rapidly activated by polycyclic compounds, while the constitutive expression of XF1 and XF2 depends on the continued synthesis of a relatively unstable protein; (iv) the receptor-deficient and nuclear translocation-defective mutants of the hepatoma cell line Hepa1, which are known

  17. Lithium induces gene expression through lymphoid enhancer-binding factor/T-cell factor responsive element in rat PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Bettini, Ezio; Magnani, Enrico; Terstappen, Georg C

    2002-01-01

    Lithium inhibits glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), which leads to an increase of cytoplasmic beta-catenin levels. In some cell types, but not in others, activated beta-catenin interacts with members of the lymphoid enhancer-binding factor (LEF)/T-cell factor (TCF) family of transcription factors and induces gene expression. Lithium effect on LEF/TCF-mediated gene expression has never been evaluated in cells with a neuronal phenotype. We have constructed a LEF/TCF-dependent luciferase reporter gene to investigate lithium effects on transcription in PC12 cells. In transiently transfected PC12 cells, lithium induced a time-dependent increase in LEF/TCF-mediated luciferase activity. These results are consistent with the known inhibitory effects of lithium on GSK-3 and represent the first demonstration that a LEF/TCF responsive element also mediates lithium-induced gene expression in PC12 cells.

  18. Aberrant Alternative Polyadenylation is Responsible for Survivin Up-regulation in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiang-Jun; Zhang, Qi; Ma, Li-Ping; Li, Na; Chang, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Survivin is an oncoprotein silenced in normal mature tissues but reactivated in serous ovarian cancer (SOC). Although transcriptional activation is assumed for its overexpression, the long 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) in survivin gene, which contains many alternate polyadenylation (APA) sites, implies a propensity for posttranscriptional control and therefore was the aim of our study. Methods: The abundance of the coding region, the proximal and the distal region of survivin mRNA 3'-UTR, was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in SOC samples, cell lines, and normal fallopian tube (NFT) tissues. The APA sites were confirmed by rapid amplification of cDNA 3' ends and DNA sequencing. Real-time PCR were used to screen survivin-targeting microRNAs (miRNAs) that were inversely correlated with survivin. The expression of an inversely correlated miRNA was restored by pre-miRNA transfection or induction with a genotoxic agent to test its inhibitory effect on survivin overexpression. Results: Varying degrees of APA were observed in SOC by comparing the abundance of the proximal and the distal region of survivin 3'-UTR, and changes of 3'-UTR correlated significantly with survivin expression (r = 0.708, P < 0.01). The main APA sites are proved at 1197 and 1673 of survivin 3'-UTR by DNA sequencing. Higher level of 3'-UTR proximal region than coding region was observed in NFT, as well as in SOC and cell lines. Among the survivin-targeting miRNAs, only a few highly expressed miRNAs were inversely correlated with survivin levels, and they mainly targeted the distal part of the 3'-UTR. However, in ovarian cancer cells, restoration of an inversely correlated miRNA (miR-34c) showed little effect on survivin expression. Conclusions: In NFT tissues, survivin is not transcriptionally silenced but regulate posttranscriptionally. In SOC, aberrant APA leads to the shortening of survivin 3'-UTR which enables it to escape the negative regulation of mi

  19. Chicken beta B1-crystallin gene expression: presence of conserved functional polyomavirus enhancer-like and octamer binding-like promoter elements found in non-lens genes.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, H J; Das, G C; Piatigorsky, J

    1991-01-01

    Expression of the chicken beta B1-crystallin gene was examined. Northern (RNA) blot and primer extension analyses showed that while abundant in the lens, the beta B1 mRNA is absent from the liver, brain, heart, skeletal muscle, and fibroblasts of the chicken embryo, suggesting lens specificity. Promoter fragments ranging from 434 to 126 bp of 5'-flanking sequence (plus 30 bp of exon 1) of the beta B1 gene fused to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene functioned much more efficiently in transfected embryonic chicken lens epithelial cells than in transfected primary muscle fibroblasts or HeLa cells. Transient expression of recombinant plasmids in cultured lens cells, DNase I footprinting, in vitro transcription in a HeLa cell extract, and gel mobility shift assays were used to identify putative functional promoter elements of the beta B1-crystallin gene. Sequence analysis revealed a number of potential regulatory elements between positions -126 and -53 of the beta B1 promoter, including two Sp1 sites, two octamer binding sequence-like sites (OL-1 and OL-2), and two polyomavirus enhancer-like sites (PL-1 and PL-2). Deletion and site-specific mutation experiments established the functional importance of PL-1 (-116 to -102), PL-2 (-90 to -76), and OL-2 (-75 to -68). DNase I footprinting using a lens or a HeLa cell nuclear extract and gel mobility shifts using a lens nuclear extract indicated the presence of putative lens transcription factors binding to these DNA sequences. Competition experiments provided evidence that PL-1 and PL-2 recognize the same or very similar factors, while OL-2 recognizes a different factor. Our data suggest that the same or closely related transcription factors found in many tissues are used for expression of the chicken beta B1-crystallin gene in the lens. Images PMID:1996106

  20. Regulation of Calcium-Independent Phospholipase A2 Expression by Adrenoceptors and Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein-Potential Crosstalk Between Sterol and Glycerophospholipid Mediators.

    PubMed

    Chew, Wee-Siong; Ong, Wei-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) is an 85-kDa enzyme that releases docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from glycerophospholipids. DHA can be metabolized to resolvins and neuroprotectins that have anti-inflammatory properties and effects on neural plasticity. Recent studies show an important role of prefrontal cortical iPLA2 in hippocampo-prefrontal cortical LTP and antidepressant-like effect of the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (NRI) antidepressant, maprotiline. In this study, we elucidated the cellular mechanisms through which stimulation of adrenergic receptors could lead to increased iPLA2 expression. Treatment of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with maprotiline, another tricyclic antidepressant with noradrenaline reuptake inhibiting properties, nortriptyline, and the adrenergic receptor agonist, phenylephrine, resulted in increased iPLA2β mRNA expression. This increase was blocked by inhibitors to alpha-1 adrenergic receptor, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, and sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP). Maprotiline and phenylephrine induced binding of SREBP-2 to sterol regulatory element (SRE) region on the iPLA2 promoter, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Together, results indicate that stimulation of adrenoreceptors causes increased iPLA2 expression via MAP kinase/ERK 1/2 and SREBP, and suggest a possible mechanism for effect of CNS noradrenaline on neural plasticity and crosstalk between sterol and glycerophospholipid mediators, that may play a role in physiological or pathophysiological processes in the brain and other organs.

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis of Ethylene-Responsive Element Binding Factor-Associated Amphiphilic Repression Motif-Containing Transcriptional Regulators in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kagale, Sateesh; Links, Matthew G.; Rozwadowski, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif is a transcriptional regulatory motif identified in members of the ethylene-responsive element binding factor, C2H2, and auxin/indole-3-acetic acid families of transcriptional regulators. Sequence comparison of the core EAR motif sites from these proteins revealed two distinct conservation patterns: LxLxL and DLNxxP. Proteins containing these motifs play key roles in diverse biological functions by negatively regulating genes involved in developmental, hormonal, and stress signaling pathways. Through a genome-wide bioinformatics analysis, we have identified the complete repertoire of the EAR repressome in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) comprising 219 proteins belonging to 21 different transcriptional regulator families. Approximately 72% of these proteins contain a LxLxL type of EAR motif, 22% contain a DLNxxP type of EAR motif, and the remaining 6% have a motif where LxLxL and DLNxxP are overlapping. Published in vitro and in planta investigations support approximately 40% of these proteins functioning as negative regulators of gene expression. Comparative sequence analysis of EAR motif sites and adjoining regions has identified additional preferred residues and potential posttranslational modification sites that may influence the functionality of the EAR motif. Homology searches against protein databases of poplar (Populus trichocarpa), grapevine (Vitis vinifera), rice (Oryza sativa), and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) revealed that the EAR motif is conserved across these diverse plant species. This genome-wide analysis represents the most extensive survey of EAR motif-containing proteins in Arabidopsis to date and provides a resource enabling investigations into their biological roles and the mechanism of EAR motif-mediated transcriptional regulation. PMID:20097792

  2. Metal binding properties of the EPS produced by Halomonas sp. TG39 and its potential in enhancing trace element bioavailability to eukaryotic phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Biller, Dondra V; Shimmield, Tracy; Green, David H

    2012-12-01

    An emergent property of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by marine bacteria is their net negative charge, predominantly conferred by their high uronic acids content. Here, we investigated the EPS produced by an algal-associated marine bacterium, Halomonas sp. strain TG39, for its capacity to sequester trace metals and mediate their bioavailability to eukaryotic phytoplankton. Metal analysis of the purified EPS revealed that it contained high levels of K, Ca, Mg and several essential trace metals, including Zn, Cu, Fe and the metalloid Si. Desorption experiments with marine sediment showed that the EPS possessed a specific binding capacity for Ca, Si, Fe, Mn, Mg and Al. Depending on the ionic conditions, Fe was the third or fourth most highly-adsorbed metal out of 27 elements analyzed. Experiments employing Fe-limited synthetic ocean seawater showed that growth of the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii (axenic strain) was enhanced when incubated in the presence of either purified EPS or EPS that had been pre-exposed to marine sediment, compared to non-EPS amended controls. This growth enhancement was attributed to the EPS binding and increasing the bioavailability of key trace metal elements, such as Fe(III). Since the bacterium used in this study was originally isolated from a marine micro-alga, this work highlights the possibility that bacterial associates of eukaryotic algae could be influencing the bioavailability of Fe(III) to phytoplankton via their production of polyanionic EPS. More widely, this work reinforces the potential importance of marine bacterial EPS in trace metal biogeochemical cycling.

  3. Tissue-specific response of carbohydrate-responsive element binding protein (ChREBP) to mammalian hibernation in 13-lined ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Logan, Samantha M; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-10-01

    Mammalian hibernation is characterized by a general suppression of energy expensive processes and a switch to lipid oxidation as the primary fuel source. Glucose-responsive carbohydrate responsive element binding protein (ChREBP) has yet to be studied in hibernating organisms, which prepare for the cold winter months by feeding until they exhibit an obesity-like state that is accompanied by naturally-induced and completely reversible insulin resistance. Studying ChREBP expression and activity in the hibernating 13-lined ground squirrel is important to better understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate energy metabolism under cellular stress. Immunoblotting was used to determine the relative expression level and subcellular localization of ChREBP, as well as serine phosphorylation at 95 kDa, comparing euthermic and late torpid ground squirrel liver, kidney, heart and muscle. DNA-binding ELISAs and RT-PCR were used to explore ChREBP transcriptional activity during cold stress. ChREBP activity seemed generally suppressed in liver and kidney. During torpor, ChREBP total protein levels decreased to 44% of EC in liver, phosphoserine levels increased 2.1-fold of EC in kidney, and downstream Fasn/Pkl transcript levels decreased to <60% of EC in liver. By contrast, ChREBP activity generally increased during torpor in cardiac and skeletal muscle, where ChREBP total protein levels increased over 1.5-fold and 5-fold of EC in muscle and heart, respectively; where DNA-binding increased by ∼2-fold of EC in muscle; and where Fasn transcript levels increased over 3-fold and 7-fold in both muscle and heart, respectively. In summary, ChREBP has a tissue-specific role in regulating energy metabolism during hibernation.

  4. Saturated fatty acids induce post-transcriptional regulation of HAMP mRNA via AU-rich element-binding protein, human antigen R (HuR).

    PubMed

    Lu, Sizhao; Mott, Justin L; Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee

    2015-10-01

    Iron is implicated in fatty liver disease pathogenesis. The human hepcidin gene, HAMP, is the master switch of iron metabolism. The aim of this study is to investigate the regulation of HAMP expression by fatty acids in HepG2 cells. For these studies, both saturated fatty acids (palmitic acid (PA) and stearic acid (SA)) and unsaturated fatty acid (oleic acid (OA)) were used. PA and, to a lesser extent, SA, but not OA, up-regulated HAMP mRNA levels, as determined by real-time PCR. To understand whether PA regulates HAMP mRNA at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level, the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D was employed. PA-mediated induction of HAMP mRNA expression was not blocked by actinomycin D. Furthermore, PA activated HAMP 3'-UTR, but not promoter, activity, as shown by reporter assays. HAMP 3'-UTR harbors a single AU-rich element (ARE). Mutation of this ARE abolished the effect of PA, suggesting the involvement of ARE-binding proteins. The ARE-binding protein human antigen R (HuR) stabilizes mRNA through direct interaction with AREs on 3'-UTR. HuR is regulated by phosphorylation-mediated nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling. PA activated this process. The binding of HuR to HAMP mRNA was also induced by PA in HepG2 cells. Silencing of HuR by siRNA abolished PA-mediated up-regulation of HAMP mRNA levels. PKC is known to phosphorylate HuR. Staurosporine, a broad-spectrum PKC inhibitor, inhibited both PA-mediated translocation of HuR and induction of HAMP expression. Similarly, rottlerin, a novel class PKC inhibitor, abrogated PA-mediated up-regulation of HAMP expression. In conclusion, lipids mediate post-transcriptional regulation of HAMP throughPKC- and HuR-dependent mechanisms. PMID:26304124

  5. Saturated fatty acids induce post-transcriptional regulation of HAMP mRNA via AU-rich element-binding protein, human antigen R (HuR).

    PubMed

    Lu, Sizhao; Mott, Justin L; Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee

    2015-10-01

    Iron is implicated in fatty liver disease pathogenesis. The human hepcidin gene, HAMP, is the master switch of iron metabolism. The aim of this study is to investigate the regulation of HAMP expression by fatty acids in HepG2 cells. For these studies, both saturated fatty acids (palmitic acid (PA) and stearic acid (SA)) and unsaturated fatty acid (oleic acid (OA)) were used. PA and, to a lesser extent, SA, but not OA, up-regulated HAMP mRNA levels, as determined by real-time PCR. To understand whether PA regulates HAMP mRNA at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level, the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D was employed. PA-mediated induction of HAMP mRNA expression was not blocked by actinomycin D. Furthermore, PA activated HAMP 3'-UTR, but not promoter, activity, as shown by reporter assays. HAMP 3'-UTR harbors a single AU-rich element (ARE). Mutation of this ARE abolished the effect of PA, suggesting the involvement of ARE-binding proteins. The ARE-binding protein human antigen R (HuR) stabilizes mRNA through direct interaction with AREs on 3'-UTR. HuR is regulated by phosphorylation-mediated nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling. PA activated this process. The binding of HuR to HAMP mRNA was also induced by PA in HepG2 cells. Silencing of HuR by siRNA abolished PA-mediated up-regulation of HAMP mRNA levels. PKC is known to phosphorylate HuR. Staurosporine, a broad-spectrum PKC inhibitor, inhibited both PA-mediated translocation of HuR and induction of HAMP expression. Similarly, rottlerin, a novel class PKC inhibitor, abrogated PA-mediated up-regulation of HAMP expression. In conclusion, lipids mediate post-transcriptional regulation of HAMP throughPKC- and HuR-dependent mechanisms.

  6. Honokiol reverses alcoholic fatty liver by inhibiting the maturation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c and the expression of its downstream lipogenesis genes

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Huquan; Kim, Youn-Chul; Chung, Young-Suk; Kim, Young-Chul; Shin, Young-Kee; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2009-04-01

    Ethanol induces hepatic steatosis via a complex mechanism that is not well understood. Among the variety of molecules that have been proposed to participate in this mechanism, the sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding proteins (SREBPs) have been identified as attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of honokiol on alcoholic steatosis and investigated its possible effect on the inhibition of SREBP-1c maturation. In in vitro studies, H4IIEC3 rat hepatoma cells developed increased lipid droplets when exposed to ethanol, but co-treatment with honokiol reversed this effect. Honokiol inhibited the maturation of SREBP-1c and its translocation to the nucleus, the binding of nSREBP-1c to SRE or SRE-related sequences of its lipogenic target genes, and the expression of genes for fatty acid synthesis. In contrast, magnolol, a structural isomer of honokiol, had no effect on nSREBP-1c levels. Male Wistar rats fed with a standard Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet for 4 weeks exhibited increased hepatic triglyceride and decreased hepatic glutathione levels, with concomitantly increased serum alanine aminotransferase and TNF-{alpha} levels. Daily administration of honokiol (10 mg/kg body weight) by gavage during the final 2 weeks of ethanol treatment completely reversed these effects on hepatotoxicity markers, including hepatic triglyceride, hepatic glutathione, and serum TNF-{alpha}, with efficacious abrogation of fat accumulation in the liver. Inhibition of SREBP-1c protein maturation and of the expression of Srebf1c and its target genes for hepatic lipogenesis were also observed in vivo. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated inhibition of specific binding of SREBP-1c to the Fas promoter by honokiol in vivo. These results demonstrate that honokiol has the potential to ameliorate alcoholic steatosis by blocking fatty acid synthesis regulated by SREBP-1c.

  7. Tissue-specific response of carbohydrate-responsive element binding protein (ChREBP) to mammalian hibernation in 13-lined ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Logan, Samantha M; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-10-01

    Mammalian hibernation is characterized by a general suppression of energy expensive processes and a switch to lipid oxidation as the primary fuel source. Glucose-responsive carbohydrate responsive element binding protein (ChREBP) has yet to be studied in hibernating organisms, which prepare for the cold winter months by feeding until they exhibit an obesity-like state that is accompanied by naturally-induced and completely reversible insulin resistance. Studying ChREBP expression and activity in the hibernating 13-lined ground squirrel is important to better understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate energy metabolism under cellular stress. Immunoblotting was used to determine the relative expression level and subcellular localization of ChREBP, as well as serine phosphorylation at 95 kDa, comparing euthermic and late torpid ground squirrel liver, kidney, heart and muscle. DNA-binding ELISAs and RT-PCR were used to explore ChREBP transcriptional activity during cold stress. ChREBP activity seemed generally suppressed in liver and kidney. During torpor, ChREBP total protein levels decreased to 44% of EC in liver, phosphoserine levels increased 2.1-fold of EC in kidney, and downstream Fasn/Pkl transcript levels decreased to <60% of EC in liver. By contrast, ChREBP activity generally increased during torpor in cardiac and skeletal muscle, where ChREBP total protein levels increased over 1.5-fold and 5-fold of EC in muscle and heart, respectively; where DNA-binding increased by ∼2-fold of EC in muscle; and where Fasn transcript levels increased over 3-fold and 7-fold in both muscle and heart, respectively. In summary, ChREBP has a tissue-specific role in regulating energy metabolism during hibernation. PMID:27614289

  8. The far-upstream element-binding protein 2 is correlated with proliferation and doxorubicin resistance in human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Gu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Chao; Wang, Hua; Ni, Qi-Chao; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Yu, Xia-Fei; Yang, Li-Yi; He, Zhi-Xian; Mao, Guo-Xin; Yang, Shu-Yun

    2016-07-01

    Far-upstream element (FUSE)-binding protein 2 (FBP2) was a member of single-stranded DNA-binding protein family; it played an important role in regulating transcription and post-transcription and is involved in the regulation of C-MYC gene expression in liver tumors. However, the role of FBP2 in breast cancer and its mechanism has not been studied yet. Here, we discovered that FBP2 was up-regulated in breast cancer tissues and breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that up-regulated FBP2 was highly associated with tumor grade, Ki-67, and poor prognosis, which was an independent prognostic factor for survival of breast cancer patients. At the cellular level, we found that FBP2 was correlated with cell cycle progression by accelerating G1/S transition, and knockdown of FBP2 could weaken cell proliferation, anchorage-independent cell growth, while enhancing the sensitivity of breast cancer cells to doxorubicin. More importantly, we found that activation of PI3K/AKT pathway could phosphorylate FBP2, and then make FBP2 shuttle from cytoplasm into the nucleus, which was the main mechanism of breast cancer cell proliferation and drug resistance. Taken together, our findings supported the notion that FBP2 might via PI3K/AKT pathway influence breast cancer progression and drug resistance, which might provide a new target for the design of anti-cancer drugs for breast cancer patients. PMID:26810065

  9. Metabolite Regulation of Nuclear Localization of Carbohydrate-response Element-binding Protein (ChREBP): ROLE OF AMP AS AN ALLOSTERIC INHIBITOR.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shogo; Jung, Hunmin; Nakagawa, Tsutomu; Pawlosky, Robert; Takeshima, Tomomi; Lee, Wan-Ru; Sakiyama, Haruhiko; Laxman, Sunil; Wynn, R Max; Tu, Benjamin P; MacMillan, John B; De Brabander, Jef K; Veech, Richard L; Uyeda, Kosaku

    2016-05-13

    The carbohydrate-response element-binding protein (ChREBP) is a glucose-responsive transcription factor that plays an essential role in converting excess carbohydrate to fat storage in the liver. In response to glucose levels, ChREBP is regulated by nuclear/cytosol trafficking via interaction with 14-3-3 proteins, CRM-1 (exportin-1 or XPO-1), or importins. Nuclear localization of ChREBP was rapidly inhibited when incubated in branched-chain α-ketoacids, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide. Here, we discovered that protein-free extracts of high fat-fed livers contained, in addition to ketone bodies, a new metabolite, identified as AMP, which specifically activates the interaction between ChREBP and 14-3-3. The crystal structure showed that AMP binds directly to the N terminus of ChREBP-α2 helix. Our results suggest that AMP inhibits the nuclear localization of ChREBP through an allosteric activation of ChREBP/14-3-3 interactions and not by activation of AMPK. AMP and ketone bodies together can therefore inhibit lipogenesis by restricting localization of ChREBP to the cytoplasm during periods of ketosis. PMID:26984404

  10. Thermodynamics of complex structures formed between single-stranded DNA oligomers and the KH domains of the far upstream element binding protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Sinha, Sudipta Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2016-05-01

    The noncovalent interaction between protein and DNA is responsible for regulating the genetic activities in living organisms. The most critical issue in this problem is to understand the underlying driving force for the formation and stability of the complex. To address this issue, we have performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of two DNA binding K homology (KH) domains (KH3 and KH4) of the far upstream element binding protein (FBP) complexed with two single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) oligomers in aqueous media. Attempts have been made to calculate the individual components of the net entropy change for the complexation process by adopting suitable statistical mechanical approaches. Our calculations reveal that translational, rotational, and configurational entropy changes of the protein and the DNA components have unfavourable contributions for this protein-DNA association process and such entropy lost is compensated by the entropy gained due to the release of hydration layer water molecules. The free energy change corresponding to the association process has also been calculated using the Free Energy Perturbation (FEP) method. The free energy gain associated with the KH4-DNA complex formation has been found to be noticeably higher than that involving the formation of the KH3-DNA complex.

  11. Epigenetically regulated miR-449a enhances hepatitis B virus replication by targeting cAMP-responsive element binding protein 5 and modulating hepatocytes phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Liu, Hongyan; Xie, Zhanglian; Deng, Wangyu; Wu, Chunchen; Qin, Bo; Hou, Jinlin; Lu, Mengji

    2016-01-01

    Cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) are able to influence hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication directly by binding to HBV transcripts or indirectly by targeting cellular factors. Here, we investigate the effect of epigenetically regulated miR-449a on HBV replication and the underlying mechanisms. miR-449a expression was lower in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells than in primary hepatocytes and could be induced by trichostatin A. Ectopic miR-449a expression in HCC cells strongly enhanced HBV replication, transcription, progeny virions secretion, and antigen expression in a dose-dependent manner. miR-449a directly targeted cAMP-responsive element binding protein 5 (CREB5), which in turn induced the expression of farnesoid X receptor α (FXRα), a transcription factor that facilitates HBV replication. CREB5 knockdown and overexpression demonstrated that it is a negative regulator of HBV replication. Additionally, miR-449a overexpression inhibited proliferation, caused cell cycle arrest, and promoted HCC cell differentiation. The results indicated that epigenetically regulated miR-449a targets CREB5 to increase FXRα expression, thereby promoting HBV replication and gene expression. Our findings provide a new understanding of the role of miRNAs in HBV replication. PMID:27138288

  12. Novel mutations in the ferritin-L iron-responsive element that only mildly impair IRP binding cause hereditary hyperferritinaemia cataract syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hereditary Hyperferritinaemia Cataract Syndrome (HHCS) is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by increased serum ferritin levels and early onset of bilateral cataract. The disease is caused by mutations in the Iron-Responsive Element (IRE) located in the 5′ untranslated region of L-Ferritin (FTL) mRNA, which post-transcriptionally regulates ferritin expression. Methods We describe two families presenting high serum ferritin levels and juvenile cataract with novel mutations in the L-ferritin IRE. The mutations were further characterized by in vitro functional studies. Results We have identified two novel mutations in the IRE of L-Ferritin causing HHCS: the Badalona +36C > U and the Heidelberg +52 G > C mutation. Both mutations conferred reduced binding affinity on recombinant Iron Regulatory Proteins (IPRs) in EMSA experiments. Interestingly, the Badalona +36C > U mutation was found not only in heterozygosity, as expected for an autosomal dominant disease, but also in the homozygous state in some affected subjects. Additionally we report an update of all mutations identified so far to cause HHCS. Conclusions The Badalona +36C > U and Heidelberg +52 G > C mutations within the L-ferritin IRE only mildly alter the binding capacity of the Iron Regulatory Proteins but are still causative for the disease. PMID:23421845

  13. Distal Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) Response Element of Human Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) Binds Activator Protein 1 (AP-1) Transcription Factors and Regulates Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Schmucker, Adam C.; Wright, Jason B.; Cole, Michael D.; Brinckerhoff, Constance E.

    2012-01-01

    The collagenase matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) plays an important role in the destruction of cartilage in arthritic joints. MMP-13 expression is strongly up-regulated in arthritis, largely because of stimulation by inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β. Treatment of chondrocytes with IL-1β induces transcription of MMP-13 in vitro. IL-1β signaling converges upon the activator protein-1 transcription factors, which have been shown to be required for IL-1β-induced MMP-13 gene expression. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we detected activator protein-1 binding within an evolutionarily conserved DNA sequence ∼20 kb 5′ relative to the MMP-13 transcription start site (TSS). Also using ChIP, we detected histone modifications and binding of RNA polymerase II within this conserved region, all of which are consistent with transcriptional activation. Chromosome conformation capture indicates that chromosome looping brings this region in close proximity with the MMP-13 TSS. Finally, a luciferase reporter construct driven by a component of the conserved region demonstrated an expression pattern similar to that of endogenous MMP-13. These data suggest that a conserved region at 20 kb upstream from the MMP-13 TSS includes a distal transcriptional response element of MMP-13, which contributes to MMP-13 gene expression. PMID:22102411

  14. Adeno-associated virus Rep78/Rep68 promotes localized melting of the rep binding element in the absence of adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Lou, Hua Jane; Brister, J Rodney; Li, Jianwei Jeffery; Chen, Weijun; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Tan, Weihong

    2004-03-01

    We have applied fluorescence anisotropy and molecular beacon fluorescence methods to study the interactions between the Adeno-associated virus Rep78/Rep68 protein and the 23-bp Rep binding element (RBE). Rep78/Rep68 stably interacted with both the single- and double-stranded conformations of the RBE, but the interaction mechanisms of single- and double-stranded DNA appeared to be fundamentally different. The stoichiometry of Rep78 association with both the separate top and bottom strands of the RBE was 1:1, and the relative dissociation constant (K(D)) values of these associations were calculated to be 2.3x10(-8) and 3.2x10(-8) M, respectively. In contrast, the stoichiometry of Rep78 association with the double-stranded RBE was 2:1, and the dissociation constant was determined to be 4.2x10(-15) M(2). Moreover, Rep78/Rep68 interaction with the 23-bp duplex RBE appeared to cause localized melting of the double-stranded DNA substrate in the absence of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). This melting activity showed slower kinetics than binding and may contribute to the initiation of ATP-dependent Rep78 helicase activity.

  15. The transcription factor Mesp1 interacts with cAMP-responsive element binding protein 1 (Creb1) and coactivates Ets variant 2 (Etv2) gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaozhong; Zirbes, Katie M; Rasmussen, Tara L; Ferdous, Anwarul; Garry, Mary G; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Garry, Daniel J

    2015-04-10

    Mesoderm posterior 1 (Mesp1) is well recognized for its role in cardiac development, although it is expressed broadly in mesodermal lineages. We have previously demonstrated important roles for Mesp1 and Ets variant 2 (Etv2) during lineage specification, but their relationship has not been defined. This study reveals that Mesp1 binds to the proximal promoter and transactivates Etv2 gene expression via the CRE motif. We also demonstrate the protein-protein interaction between Mesp1 and cAMP-responsive element binding protein 1 (Creb1) in vitro and in vivo. Utilizing transgenesis, lineage tracing, flow cytometry, and immunostaining technologies, we define the lineage relationship between Mesp1- and Etv2-expressing cell populations. We observe that the majority of Etv2-EYFP(+) cells are derived from Mesp1-Cre(+) cells in both the embryo and yolk sac. Furthermore, we observe that the conditional deletion of Etv2, using a Mesp1-Cre transgenic strategy, results in vascular and hematopoietic defects similar to those observed in the global deletion of Etv2 and that it has embryonic lethality by embryonic day 9.5. In summary, our study supports the hypothesis that Mesp1 is a direct upstream transactivator of Etv2 during embryogenesis and that Creb1 is an important cofactor of Mesp1 in the transcriptional regulation of Etv2 gene expression. PMID:25694434

  16. Hyper conserved elements in vertebrate mRNA 3′-UTRs reveal a translational network of RNA-binding proteins controlled by HuR

    PubMed Central

    Dassi, Erik; Zuccotti, Paola; Leo, Sara; Provenzani, Alessandro; Assfalg, Michael; D’Onofrio, Mariapina; Riva, Paola; Quattrone, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Little is known regarding the post-transcriptional networks that control gene expression in eukaryotes. Additionally, we still need to understand how these networks evolve, and the relative role played in them by their sequence-dependent regulatory factors, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Here, we used an approach that relied on both phylogenetic sequence sharing and conservation in the whole mapped 3′-untranslated regions (3′-UTRs) of vertebrate species to gain knowledge on core post-transcriptional networks. The identified human hyper conserved elements (HCEs) were predicted to be preferred binding sites for RBPs and not for ncRNAs, namely microRNAs and long ncRNAs. We found that the HCE map identified a well-known network that post-transcriptionally regulates histone mRNAs. We were then able to discover and experimentally confirm a translational network composed of RNA Recognition Motif (RRM)-type RBP mRNAs that are positively controlled by HuR, another RRM-type RBP. HuR shows a preference for these RBP mRNAs bound in stem–loop motifs, confirming its role as a ‘regulator of regulators’. Analysis of the transcriptome-wide HCE distribution revealed a profile of prevalently small clusters separated by unconserved intercluster RNA stretches, which predicts the formation of discrete small ribonucleoprotein complexes in the 3′-UTRs. PMID:23376935

  17. NUDT21-spanning CNVs lead to neuropsychiatric disease and altered MeCP2 abundance via alternative polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Gennarino, Vincenzo A; Alcott, Callison E; Chen, Chun-An; Chaudhury, Arindam; Gillentine, Madelyn A; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Parikh, Sumit; Wheless, James W; Roeder, Elizabeth R; Horovitz, Dafne D G; Roney, Erin K; Smith, Janice L; Cheung, Sau W; Li, Wei; Neilson, Joel R; Schaaf, Christian P; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-08-27

    The brain is sensitive to the dose of MeCP2 such that small fluctuations in protein quantity lead to neuropsychiatric disease. Despite the importance of MeCP2 levels to brain function, little is known about its regulation. In this study, we report eleven individuals with neuropsychiatric disease and copy-number variations spanning NUDT21, which encodes a subunit of pre-mRNA cleavage factor Im. Investigations of MECP2 mRNA and protein abundance in patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells from one NUDT21 deletion and three duplication cases show that NUDT21 regulates MeCP2 protein quantity. Elevated NUDT21 increases usage of the distal polyadenylation site in the MECP2 3' UTR, resulting in an enrichment of inefficiently translated long mRNA isoforms. Furthermore, normalization of NUDT21 via siRNA-mediated knockdown in duplication patient lymphoblasts restores MeCP2 to normal levels. Ultimately, we identify NUDT21 as a novel candidate for intellectual disability and neuropsychiatric disease, and elucidate a mechanism of pathogenesis by MeCP2 dysregulation via altered alternative polyadenylation.

  18. Identification of sequences involved in the polyadenylation of higher plant nuclear transcripts using Agrobacterium T-DNA genes as models.

    PubMed Central

    Dhaese, P; De Greve, H; Gielen, J; Seurinck, L; Van Montagu, M; Schell, J

    1983-01-01

    Sequences in the 3'-untranslated region of two different octopine T-DNA genes were analyzed with regard to their significance in polyadenylation. Poly(A) addition sites were localized precisely by S1 nuclease mapping with T-DNA-derived mRNAs isolated from tobacco. The gene encoding transcript 7' contains two AATAAA hexanucleotides, respectively 119 bp and 170 bp downstream of the TAA stop codon. A single poly(A) site was mapped 24-25 bp downstream of the first AATAAA. Further, we show that a mutant octopine synthase gene, which has lost part of its 3'-untranslated region by deletion, is still active. This mutant gene terminates 19 bp upstream from the major wild-type polyadenylation site. The deletion also removes the AATAAT signal preceding this site. The mutant octopine synthase gene contains a minimum of four different poly(A) sites. The most prominent of these sites is identical to the minor poly(A) site of the wild-type gene, and is preceded by a sequence AATGAATATA. Three other sites are located within the adjacent plant DNA, giving rise to hybrid T-DNA/plant DNA transcripts. The two most distal sites are probably dependent on a motif AATAAATAAA, found 29 bp away from the T-DNA/plant DNA junction. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 6. PMID:11894958

  19. PA-seq for Global Identification of RNA Polyadenylation Sites of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Transcripts.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ting; Majerciak, Vladimir; Zheng, Zhi-Ming; Zhu, Jun

    2016-05-06

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a human oncovirus linked to the development of several malignancies in immunocompromised patients. Like other herpesviruses, KSHV has a large DNA genome encoding more than 100 distinct gene products. Despite being transcribed and processed by cellular machinery, the structure and organization of KSHV genes in the virus genome differ from what is observed in cellular genes from the human genome. A typical feature of KSHV expression is the production of polycistronic transcripts initiated from different promoters but sharing the same polyadenylation site (pA site). This represents a challenge in determination of the 3' end of individual viral transcripts. Such information is critical for generation of a virus transcriptional map for genetic studies. Here we present PA-seq, a high-throughput method for genome-wide analysis of pA sites of KSHV transcripts in B lymphocytes with latent or lytic KSHV infection. Besides identification of all viral pA sites, PA-seq also provides quantitative information about the levels of viral transcripts associated with each pA site, making it possible to determine the relative expression levels of viral genes at various stages of infection. Due to the indiscriminate nature of PA-seq, the pA sites of host transcripts are also concurrently mapped in the testing samples. Therefore, this technology can simultaneously estimate the expression changes of host genes and RNA polyadenylation upon KSHV infection. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Structure of a prokaryotic sodium channel pore reveals essential gating elements and an outer ion binding site common to eukaryotic channels

    PubMed Central

    Shaya, David; Findeisen, Felix; Abderemane-Ali, Fayal; Arrigoni, Cristina; Wong, Stephanie; Nurva, Shailika Reddy; Loussouarn, Gildas; Minor, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) are central elements of cellular excitation. Notwithstanding advances from recent bacterial NaV (BacNaV) structures, key questions about gating and ion selectivity remain. Here, we present a closed conformation of NaVAe1p, a pore-only BacNaV derived from NaVAe1, a BacNaV from the arsenite oxidizer Alkalilimnicola ehrlichei found in Mono Lake, California, that provides insight into both fundamental properties. The structure reveals a pore domain in which the pore-lining S6 helix connects to a helical cytoplasmic tail. Electrophysiological studies of full-length BacNaVs show that two elements defined by the NaVAe1p structure, an S6 activation gate position and the cytoplasmic tail ‘neck’, are central to BacNaV gating. The structure also reveals the selectivity filter ion entry site, termed the ‘outer ion’ site. Comparison with mammalian voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV) selectivity filters, together with functional studies shows that this site forms a previously unknown determinant of CaV high affinity calcium binding. Our findings underscore commonalities between BacNaVs and eukaryotic voltage-gated channels and provide a framework for understanding gating and ion permeation in this superfamily. PMID:24120938

  1. GmDREB2A;2, a canonical DEHYDRATION-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN2-type transcription factor in soybean, is posttranslationally regulated and mediates dehydration-responsive element-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mizoi, Junya; Ohori, Teppei; Moriwaki, Takashi; Kidokoro, Satoshi; Todaka, Daisuke; Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Kusakabe, Kazuya; Osakabe, Yuriko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2013-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is an important crop around the world. Abiotic stress conditions, such as drought and heat, adversely affect its survival, growth, and production. The DEHYDRATION-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN2 (DREB2) group includes transcription factors that contribute to drought and heat stress tolerance by activating transcription through the cis-element dehydration-responsive element (DRE) in response to these stress stimuli. Two modes of regulation, transcriptional and posttranslational, are important for the activation of gene expression by DREB2A in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, the regulatory system of DREB2 in soybean is not clear. We identified a new soybean DREB2 gene, GmDREB2A;2, that was highly induced not only by dehydration and heat but also by low temperature. GmDREB2A;2 exhibited a high transactivation activity via DRE and has a serine/threonine-rich region, which corresponds to a negative regulatory domain of DREB2A that is involved in its posttranslational regulation, including destabilization. Despite the partial similarity between these sequences, the activity and stability of the GmDREB2A;2 protein were enhanced by removal of the serine/threonine-rich region in both Arabidopsis and soybean protoplasts, suggestive of a conserved regulatory mechanism that involves the recognition of serine/threonine-rich sequences with a specific pattern. The heterologous expression of GmDREB2A;2 in Arabidopsis induced DRE-regulated stress-inducible genes and improved stress tolerance. However, there were variations in the growth phenotypes of the transgenic Arabidopsis, the induced genes, and their induction ratios between GmDREB2A;2 and DREB2A. Therefore, the basic function and regulatory machinery of DREB2 have been maintained between Arabidopsis and soybean, although differentiation has also occurred.

  2. The proteins encoded by the pogo-like Lemi1 element bind the TIRs and subterminal repeated motifs of the Arabidopsis Emigrant MITE: consequences for the transposition mechanism of MITEs

    PubMed Central

    Loot, Céline; Santiago, Néstor; Sanz, Alicia; Casacuberta, Josep M.

    2006-01-01

    MITEs (miniature inverted-repeated transposable elements) are a particular class of defective DNA transposons usually present within genomes as high copy number populations of highly homogeneous elements. Although an active MITE, the mPing element, has recently been characterized in rice, the transposition mechanism of MITEs remains unknown. It has been proposed that transposases of related transposons could mobilize MITEs in trans. Moreover, it has also been proposed that the presence of conserved terminal inverted-repeated (TIR) sequences could be the only requirement of MITEs for mobilization, allowing divergent or unrelated elements to be mobilized by a particular transposase. We present here evidence for a recent mobility of the Arabidopsis Emigrant MITE and we report on the capacity of the proteins encoded by the related Lemi1 transposon, a pogo-related element, to specifically bind Emigrant elements. This suggests that Lemi1 could mobilize Emigrant elements and makes the Lemi1/Emigrant couple an ideal system to study the transposition mechanism of MITEs. Our results show that Lemi1 proteins bind Emigrant TIRs but also bind cooperatively to subterminal repeated motifs. The requirement of internal sequences for the formation of proper DNA/protein structure could affect the capacity of divergent MITEs to be mobilized by distantly related transposases. PMID:17003053

  3. Poly(A) tail recognition by a viral RNA element through assembly of a triple helix.

    PubMed

    Mitton-Fry, Rachel M; DeGregorio, Suzanne J; Wang, Jimin; Steitz, Thomas A; Steitz, Joan A

    2010-11-26

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus produces a highly abundant, nuclear noncoding RNA, polyadenylated nuclear (PAN) RNA, which contains an element that prevents its decay. The 79-nucleotide expression and nuclear retention element (ENE) was proposed to adopt a secondary structure like that of a box H/ACA small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA), with a U-rich internal loop that hybridizes to and protects the PAN RNA poly(A) tail. The crystal structure of a complex between the 40-nucleotide ENE core and oligo(A)(9) RNA at 2.5 angstrom resolution reveals that unlike snoRNAs, the U-rich loop of the ENE engages its target through formation of a major-groove triple helix. A-minor interactions extend the binding interface. Deadenylation assays confirm the functional importance of the triple helix. Thus, the ENE acts as an intramolecular RNA clamp, sequestering the PAN poly(A) tail and preventing the initiation of RNA decay.

  4. Poly(A) Tail Recognition by a Viral RNA Element Through Assembly of a Triple Helix

    SciTech Connect

    M Mitton-Fry; S DeGregorio; J Wang; T Steitz; J Steitz

    2011-12-31

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus produces a highly abundant, nuclear noncoding RNA, polyadenylated nuclear (PAN) RNA, which contains an element that prevents its decay. The 79-nucleotide expression and nuclear retention element (ENE) was proposed to adopt a secondary structure like that of a box H/ACA small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA), with a U-rich internal loop that hybridizes to and protects the PAN RNA poly(A) tail. The crystal structure of a complex between the 40-nucleotide ENE core and oligo(A){sub 9} RNA at 2.5 angstrom resolution reveals that unlike snoRNAs, the U-rich loop of the ENE engages its target through formation of a major-groove triple helix. A-minor interactions extend the binding interface. Deadenylation assays confirm the functional importance of the triple helix. Thus, the ENE acts as an intramolecular RNA clamp, sequestering the PAN poly(A) tail and preventing the initiation of RNA decay.

  5. Temporal expression of the human alcohol dehydrogenase gene family during liver development correlates with differential promoter activation by hepatocyte nuclear factor 1, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha, liver activator protein, and D-element-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    van Ooij, C; Snyder, R C; Paeper, B W; Duester, G

    1992-01-01

    The human class I alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene family consists of ADH1, ADH2, and ADH3, which are sequentially activated in early fetal, late fetal, and postnatal liver, respectively. Analysis of ADH promoters revealed differential activation by several factors previously shown to control liver transcription. In cotransfection assays, the ADH1 promoter, but not the ADH2 or ADH3 promoter, was shown to respond to hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF-1), which has previously been shown to regulate transcription in early liver development. The ADH2 promoter, but not the ADH1 or ADH3 promoter, was shown to respond to CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha), a transcription factor particularly active during late fetal liver and early postnatal liver development. The ADH1, ADH2, and ADH3 promoters all responded to the liver transcription factors liver activator protein (LAP) and D-element-binding protein (DBP), which are most active in postnatal liver. For all three promoters, the activation by LAP or DBP was higher than that seen by HNF-1 or C/EBP alpha, and a significant synergism between C/EBP alpha and LAP was noticed for the ADH2 and ADH3 promoters when both factors were simultaneously cotransfected. A hierarchy of ADH promoter responsiveness to C/EBP alpha and LAP homo- and heterodimers is suggested. In all three ADH genes, LAP bound to the same four sites previously reported for C/EBP alpha (i.e., -160, -120, -40, and -20 bp), but DBP bound strongly only to the site located at -40 bp relative to the transcriptional start. Mutational analysis of ADH2 indicated that the -40 bp element accounts for most of the promoter regulation by the bZIP factors analyzed. These studies suggest that HNF-1 and C/EBP alpha help establish ADH gene family transcription in fetal liver and that LAP and DBP help maintain high-level ADH gene family transcription in postnatal liver. Images PMID:1620113

  6. Transcription initiation at the TATA-less spliced leader RNA gene promoter requires at least two DNA-binding proteins and a tripartite architecture that includes an initiator element.

    PubMed

    Luo, H; Gilinger, G; Mukherjee, D; Bellofatto, V

    1999-11-01

    Eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory signals, defined as core and activator promoter elements, have yet to be identified in the earliest diverging group of eukaryotes, the primitive protozoans, which include the Trypanosomatidae family of parasites. The divergence within this family is highlighted by the apparent absence of the "universal" transcription factor TATA-binding protein. To understand gene expression in these protists, we have investigated spliced leader RNA gene transcription. The RNA product of this gene provides an m(7)G cap and a 39-nucleotide leader sequence to all cellular mRNAs via a trans-splicing reaction. Regulation of spliced leader RNA synthesis is controlled by a tripartite promoter located exclusively upstream from the transcription start site. Proteins PBP-1 and PBP-2 bind to two of the three promoter elements in the trypanosomatid Leptomonas seymouri. They represent the first trypanosome transcription factors with typical double-stranded DNA binding site recognition. These proteins ensure efficient transcription. However, accurate initiation is determined an initiator element with a a loose consensus of CYAC/AYR (+1), which differs from that found in metazoan initiator elements as well as from that identified in one of the earliest diverging protozoans, Trichomonas vaginalis. Trypanosomes may utilize initiator element-protein interactions, and not TATA sequence-TATA-binding protein interactions, to direct proper transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II.

  7. Hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein-5A activates sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c through transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Zhonghua; Qiao, Ling; Zhou, Yan; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Liu, Qiang

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} A chimeric subgenomic HCV replicon expresses HCV-3a NS5A in an HCV-1b backbone. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A increases mature SREBP-1c protein level. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription. {yields} Domain II of HCV-3a NS5A is more effective in SREBP-1c promoter activation. {yields} Transcription factor Sp1 is required for SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A. -- Abstract: Steatosis is an important clinical manifestation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The molecular mechanisms of HCV-associated steatosis are not well understood. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is a key transcription factor which activates the transcription of lipogenic genes. Here we showed that the nuclear, mature SREBP-1c level increases in the nucleus of replicon cells expressing HCV-3a nonstructural protein-5A (NS5A). We further showed that HCV-3a NS5A up-regulates SREBP-1c transcription. Additional analysis showed that transcriptional factor Sp1 is involved in SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A because inhibition of Sp1 activity by mithramycin A or a dominant-negative Sp1 construct abrogated SREBP-1c promoter activation by HCV-3a NS5A. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated enhanced binding of Sp1 on the SREBP-1c promoter in HCV-3a NS5A replicon cells. These results showed that HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription through Sp1. Taken together, our results suggest that HCV-3a NS5A is a contributing factor for steatosis caused by HCV-3a infection.

  8. Carbohydrate-Responsive Element-Binding Protein (ChREBP) Is a Negative Regulator of ARNT/HIF-1β Gene Expression in Pancreatic Islet β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Noordeen, Nafeesa A.; Khera, Tarnjit K.; Sun, Gao; Longbottom, E. Rebecca; Pullen, Timothy J.; da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Rutter, Guy A.; Leclerc, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) is a transcription factor that has been shown to regulate carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and pancreatic β-cells in response to elevated glucose concentrations. Because few genes have been identified so far as bona fide ChREBP-target genes, we have performed a genome-wide analysis of the ChREBP transcriptome in pancreatic β-cells. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-density oligonucleotide tiling arrays (ChIP-chip; Agilent Technologies) using MIN6 pancreatic β-cell extracts were performed together with transcriptional and other analysis using standard techniques. RESULTS One of the genes identified by ChIP-chip and linked to glucose sensing and insulin secretion was aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)/hypoxia-inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β), a transcription factor implicated in altered gene expression and pancreatic-islet dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. We first confirmed that elevated glucose concentrations decreased ARNT/HIF-1β levels in INS-1 (832/13) cells and primary mouse islets. Demonstrating a role for ChREBP in ARNT gene regulation, ChREBP silencing increased ARNT mRNA levels in INS-1 (832/13) cells, and ChREBP overexpression decreased ARNT mRNA in INS-1 (832/13) cells and primary mouse islets. We demonstrated that ChREBP and Max-like protein X (MLX) bind on the ARNT/HIF-1β promoter on the proximal region that also confers the negative glucose responsiveness. CONCLUSIONS These results demonstrate that ChREBP acts as a novel repressor of the ARNT/HIF-1β gene and might contribute to β-cell dysfunction induced by glucotoxicity. PMID:19833882

  9. Arabidopsis miR171-targeted scarecrow-like proteins bind to GT cis-elements and mediate gibberellin-regulated chlorophyll biosynthesis under light conditions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhaoxue; Hu, Xupeng; Cai, Wenjuan; Huang, Weihua; Zhou, Xin; Luo, Qian; Yang, Hongquan; Wang, Jiawei; Huang, Jirong

    2014-08-01

    An extraordinarily precise regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis is essential for plant growth and development. However, our knowledge on the complex regulatory mechanisms of chlorophyll biosynthesis is very limited. Previous studies have demonstrated that miR171-targeted scarecrow-like proteins (SCL6/22/27) negatively regulate chlorophyll biosynthesis via an unknown mechanism. Here we showed that SCLs inhibit the expression of the key gene encoding protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) in light-grown plants, but have no significant effect on protochlorophyllide biosynthesis in etiolated seedlings. Histochemical analysis of β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity in transgenic plants expressing pSCL27::rSCL27-GUS revealed that SCL27-GUS accumulates at high levels and suppresses chlorophyll biosynthesis at the leaf basal proliferation region during leaf development. Transient gene expression assays showed that the promoter activity of PORC is indeed regulated by SCL27. Consistently, chromatin immunoprecipitation and quantitative PCR assays showed that SCL27 binds to the promoter region of PORC in vivo. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that SCL27 is directly interacted with G(A/G)(A/T)AA(A/T)GT cis-elements of the PORC promoter. Furthermore, genetic analysis showed that gibberellin (GA)-regulated chlorophyll biosynthesis is mediated, at least in part, by SCLs. We demonstrated that SCL27 interacts with DELLA proteins in vitro and in vivo by yeast-two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation analysis and found that their interaction reduces the binding activity of SCL27 to the PORC promoter. Additionally, we showed that SCL27 activates MIR171 gene expression, forming a feedback regulatory loop. Taken together, our data suggest that the miR171-SCL module is critical for mediating GA-DELLA signaling in the coordinate regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis and leaf growth in light.

  10. HIV-1 Tat triggers nuclear localization of ZO-1 via Rho signaling and cAMP response element-binding protein activation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yu; Zhang, Bei; Eum, Sung Yong; Toborek, Michal

    2012-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific protein trans-activator of transcription (Tat) can contribute to the dysfunction of brain endothelial cells and HIV trafficking into the brain by disrupting tight junction (TJ) integrity at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) level. Specific TJ proteins, such as zonula occludens (ZO) proteins, localize not only at the cell-cell borders but are also present in the nuclei. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the mechanisms and significance of Tat-induced nuclear localization of ZO-1. Treatment of a brain endothelial cell line (hCMEC/D3 cells) with Tat resulted in a decrease in total levels of ZO-1 but significantly upregulated ZO-1 protein expression in the nuclei. In addition, exposure to Tat stimulated Rho signaling and induced phosphorylation and activity of transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), binding sites that have been identified in the proximal region of the ZO-1 promoter. Interestingly, inhibition of the Rho cascade protected against Tat-induced upregulation of ZO-1 in the nuclei and activation of CREB. Depletion of CREB by infection of cells with specific shRNA lentiviral particles attenuated both Tat-induced Rho signaling and nuclear targeting of ZO-1. A decrease in CREB levels also attenuated Tat-induced endothelial and BBB hyperpermeability as well as transendothelial migration of monocytic cells. The role of CREB in Tat-mediated alterations of ZO-1 was confirmed in brain microvessels in mice with CREB shRNA lentiviral particles injected into the cerebral circulation. The present results indicate the crucial role of Rho signaling and CREB in modulation of nuclear localization of ZO-1 and maintaining the integrity of endothelial monolayers. PMID:22219277

  11. Molecular cloning and preliminary function study of iron responsive element binding protein 1 gene from cypermethrin-resistant Culex pipiens pallens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Insecticide resistance jeopardizes the control of mosquito populations and mosquito-borne disease control, which creates a major public health concern. Two-dimensional electrophoresis identified one protein segment with high sequence homology to part of Aedes aegypti iron-responsive element binding protein (IRE-BP). Method RT-PCR and RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA end) were used to clone a cDNA encoding full length IRE-BP 1. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR was used to evaluate the transcriptional level changes in the Cr-IRE strain Aedes aegypti compared to the susceptible strain of Cx. pipiens pallens. The expression profile of the gene was established in the mosquito life cycle. Methyl tritiated thymidine (3H-TdR) was used to observe the cypermethrin resistance changes in C6/36 cells containing the stably transfected IRE-BP 1 gene of Cx. pipiens pallens. Results The complete sequence of iron responsive element binding protein 1 (IRE-BP 1) has been cloned from the cypermethrin-resistant strain of Culex pipiens pallens (Cr-IRE strain). Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that the IRE-BP 1 transcription level was 6.7 times higher in the Cr-IRE strain than in the susceptible strain of 4th instar larvae. The IRE-BP 1 expression was also found to be consistently higher throughout the life cycle of the Cr-IRE strain. A protein of predicted size 109.4 kDa has been detected by Western blotting in IRE-BP 1-transfected mosquito C6/36 cells. These IRE-BP 1-transfected cells also showed enhanced cypermethrin resistance compared to null-transfected or plasmid vector-transfected cells as determined by 3H-TdR incorporation. Conclusion IRE-BP 1 is expressed at higher levels in the Cr-IRE strain, and may confer some insecticide resistance in Cx. pipiens pallens. PMID:22075242

  12. Disappearance of stored polyadenylic acid and mRNA during early germination of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) embryo axes.

    PubMed

    Delseny, M; Aspart, L; Guitton, Y

    1977-01-01

    Polyadenylic acid [poly (A)] is detected, characterized and quantitated in dry radish embryo axis RNA using a (3)H poly (U) probe. The amount of poly (A) gradually decreases after the onset of soaking, and, after a few hours, recovers to the initial level. This variation is shown to result from the addition of two opposed phenomena: the decay of stored poly (A) and the accumulation of newly synthesized poly (A). Stored poly (A), as well as the "in vivo" protein synthesis coded for by preformed mRNA, decreases during early germination with a half-life of two hours. As a whole, these results demonstrate that at least a fraction of the stored mRNA is translated as soon as the seed is soaked and that its role is rapidly taken over by newly-made mRNA.

  13. Amino Acid Change in the Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein is associated with lower triglycerides and myocardial infarction incidence depending on level of adherence to the Mediterranean diet in the PREDIMED trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variant (rs3812316, C771G, and Gln241His) in the MLXIPL (Max-like protein X interacting protein-like) gene encoding the carbohydrate response element binding protein has been associated with lower triglycerides. However, its association with cardiovascular diseases and gene-diet interactions modul...

  14. Defects in RNA polyadenylation impair both lysogenization by and lytic development of Shiga toxin-converting bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Dariusz; Bloch, Sylwia; Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Szalewska-Pałasz, Agnieszka; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-07-01

    In Escherichia coli, the major poly(A) polymerase (PAP I) is encoded by the pcnB gene. In this report, a significant impairment of lysogenization by Shiga toxin-converting (Stx) bacteriophages (Φ24B, 933W, P22, P27 and P32) is demonstrated in host cells with a mutant pcnB gene. Moreover, lytic development of these phages after both infection and prophage induction was significantly less efficient in the pcnB mutant than in the WT host. The increase in DNA accumulation of the Stx phages was lower under conditions of defective RNA polyadenylation. Although shortly after prophage induction, the levels of mRNAs of most phage-borne early genes were higher in the pcnB mutant, at subsequent phases of the lytic development, a drastically decreased abundance of certain mRNAs, including those derived from the N, O and Q genes, was observed in PAP I-deficient cells. All of these effects observed in the pcnB cells were significantly more strongly pronounced in the Stx phages than in bacteriophage λ. Abundance of mRNA derived from the pcnB gene was drastically increased shortly (20 min) after prophage induction by mitomycin C and decreased after the next 20 min, while no such changes were observed in non-lysogenic cells treated with this antibiotic. This prophage induction-dependent transient increase in pcnB transcript may explain the polyadenylation-driven regulation of phage gene expression. PMID:25711968

  15. Silibinin inhibits aberrant lipid metabolism, proliferation and emergence of androgen-independence in prostate cancer cells via primarily targeting the sterol response element binding protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Dhanya K.; Deep, Gagan; Singh, Rana P.; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) kills thousands of men every year, demanding additional approaches to better understand and target this malignancy. Recently, critical role of aberrant lipogenesis is highlighted in prostate carcinogenesis, offering a unique opportunity to target it to reduce PCA. Here, we evaluated efficacy and associated mechanisms of silibinin in inhibiting lipid metabolism in PCA cells. At physiologically achievable levels in human, silibinin strongly reduced lipid and cholesterol accumulation specifically in human PCA cells but not in non-neoplastic prostate epithelial PWR-1E cells. Silibinin also decreased nuclear protein levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 and 2 (SREBP1/2) and their target genes only in PCA cells. Mechanistically, silibinin activated AMPK, thereby increasing SREBP1 phosphorylation and inhibiting its nuclear translocation; AMPK inhibition reversed silibinin-mediated decrease in nuclear SREBP1 and lipid accumulation. Additionally, specific SREBP inhibitor fatostatin and stable overexpression of SREBP1 further confirmed the central role of SREBP1 in silibinin-mediated inhibition of PCA cell proliferation and lipid accumulation and cell cycle arrest. Importantly, silibinin also inhibited synthetic androgen R1881-induced lipid accumulation and completely abrogated the development of androgen-independent LNCaP cell clones via targeting SREBP1/2. Together, these mechanistic studies suggest that silibinin would be effective against PCA by targeting critical aberrant lipogenesis. PMID:25294820

  16. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c mediates increase of postprandial stearic acid, a potential target for improving insulin resistance, in hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xia; Liu, Liyan; Na, Lixin; Lu, Huimin; Li, Songtao; Li, Ying; Sun, Changhao

    2013-02-01

    Elevated serum free fatty acids (FFAs) levels play an important role in the development of insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes. We investigated the dynamic changes and the underlying regulatory mechanism of postprandial FFA profile in hyperlipidemia (HLP) and their relation with insulin sensitivity in both humans and mice. We found that serum stearic acid (SA) is the only fatty acid that is increased dramatically in the postprandial state. The elevation of SA is due to increased insulin-stimulated de novo synthesis mediated by sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c)/acetyl-CoA carboxylase/fatty acid synthase/elongation of long-chain fatty acid family member 6 (ELOVL6) and the elongation of palmitic acid (PA) catalyzed by ELOVL6. Downregulation of SREBP-1c or ELOVL6 by small interfering RNA can reduce SA synthesis in liver and serum SA level, followed by amelioration of IR in HLP mice. However, inhibition of SREBP-1c is more effective in improving IR than suppression of ELOVL6, which resulted in accumulation of PA. In summary, increased postprandial SA is caused by the insulin-stimulated SREBP-1c pathway and elongation of PA in HLP. Reduction of postprandial SA is a good candidate for improving IR, and SREBP-1c is potentially a better target to prevent IR and diabetes by decreasing SA.

  17. Factor-binding element in the human c-myc promoter involved in transcriptional regulation by transforming growth factor. beta. 1 and by the retinoblastoma gene product

    SciTech Connect

    Pietenpol, J.A.; Stein, R.W.; Moses, H.L. ); Muenger, K.; Howley, P.M. )

    1991-11-15

    Previous studies have shown that transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) inhibition of keratinocyte proliferation involves suppression of c-myc transcription, and indirect evidence has suggested that the retinoblastoma gene product (pRB) may be involved in this process. In this study, transient expression of pRB in skin keratinocytes was shown to repress transcription of the human c-myc promoter region was required for regulation by both TGF-{beta}1 and pRB. These sequences, termed the TGF-{beta} control element (TCE), lie between positions {minus}86 and {minus}63 relative to the P1 transcription start site. Oligonucleotides containing the TCE bound to several nuclear factors in mobility-shift assays using extracts from cells with or without normal pRB. Binding of some factors was inhibited by TGF-{beta}1 treatment of TGF-{beta}-sensitive but not TGF-{beta}-insensitive cells. These data indicate that pRB can suppress c-myc transcription and growth inhibition.

  18. Regulation of sterol regulatory-element binding protein 1 gene expression in liver: role of insulin and protein kinase B/cAkt.

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, M; Iynedjian, P B

    2000-01-01

    Insulin stimulates the transcription of the sterol regulatory- element binding protein (SREBP) 1/ADD1 gene in liver. Hepatocytes in primary culture were used to delineate the insulin signalling pathway for induction of SREBP1 gene expression. The inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), wortmannin and LY 294002, abolished the insulin-dependent increase in SREBP1 mRNA, whereas the inhibitor of the mitogen- activated protein kinase cascade, PD 98059, was without effect. To investigate the role of protein kinase B (PKB)/cAkt downstream of PI 3-kinase, hepatocytes were transduced with an adenovirus encoding a PKB--oestrogen receptor fusion protein. The PKB activity of this recombinant protein was rapidly activated in hepatocytes challenged with 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT), as was endogenous PKB in hepatocytes challenged with insulin. The addition of OHT to transduced hepatocytes resulted in accumulation of SREBP1 mRNA, with a time-course and magnitude similar to the effect of insulin in non-transduced cells. The level of SREBP1 mRNA was not increased by OHT in hepatocytes expressing a mutant form of the recombinant protein whose PKB activity was not activated by OHT. Thus acute activation of PKB is sufficient to induce SREBP1 mRNA accumulation in primary hepatocytes, and might be the major signalling event by which insulin induces SREBP1 gene expression in the liver. PMID:10861205

  19. GPR26-deficient mice display increased anxiety- and depression-like behaviors accompanied by reduced phosphorylated cyclic AMP responsive element-binding protein level in central amygdala.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L-L; Wang, J-J; Liu, Y; Lu, X-B; Kuang, Y; Wan, Y-H; Chen, Y; Yan, H-M; Fei, J; Wang, Z-G

    2011-11-24

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common and well studied psychiatric disorders in humans. A number of animal models have been established to study the mechanisms of anxiety and to test putative anxiolytic drugs. Gpr26 belongs to the G-protein-coupled receptor family and is exclusively expressed in brain tissue. To investigate the biological function of Gpr26 in vivo, we have generated Gpr26 knockout mice. The mutant mice grew and developed normally but displayed increased levels of anxiety-like behaviors in the open field and elevated plus maze tests, as well as a higher level of depression-like behaviors in the forced-swim and tail-suspension tests. Meanwhile, no significant alteration in spatial learning and memory abilities were found for Gpr26-deficient mice in the Morris water maze test. Previous studies demonstrated that lower protein kinase A (PKA)-cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB)-neuropeptide Y (NPY) signaling in the amygdala is linked to higher anxiety and excessive alcohol-drinking behaviors in rats. Therefore, we further examined the phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) and CREB levels in the brains of Gpr26-deficient mice. Reduced pCREB levels were observed in the central amygdala but not in the other regions, while total CREB levels remained comparable between wild-type and mutant mice. Combined, our data indicate that Gpr26 is important for emotion regulation in mice, a function probably mediated by the phosphorylation of CREB in the central amygdala.

  20. Pu-Erh Tea Down-Regulates Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein and Stearyol-CoA Desaturase to Reduce Fat Storage in Caenorhaditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ding, YiHong; Zou, XiaoJu; Jiang, Xue; Wu, JieYu; Zhang, YuRu; Chen, Dan; Liang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of Pu-erh has been reported to result in numerous health benefits, but the mechanisms underlying purported weight-loss and lowering of lipid are poorly understood. Here, we used the nematode Caenorhaditis elegans to explore the water extract of Pu-erh tea (PTE) functions to reduce fat storage. We found that PTE down-regulates the expression of the master fat regulator SBP-1, a homologue of sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) and its target stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), a key enzyme in fat biosynthesis, leading to an increased ratio of stearic acid (C18:0) to oleic acid (C18:1n-9), and subsequently decreased fat storage. We also found that both the pharyngeal pumping rate and food uptake of C. elegans decreased with exposure to PTE. Collectively, these results provide an experimental basis for explaining the ability of Pu-erh tea in promoting inhibition of food uptake and the biosynthesis of fat via SBP-1 and SCD, thereby reducing fat storage. PMID:25659129

  1. Nontelomeric splice variant of telomere repeat-binding factor 2 maintains neuronal traits by sequestering repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peisu; Casaday-Potts, Rebecca; Precht, Patricia; Jiang, Haiyang; Liu, Yie; Pazin, Michael J; Mattson, Mark P

    2011-09-27

    Telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) is critical for telomere integrity in dividing stem and somatic cells, but its role in postmitotic neurons is unknown. Apart from protecting telomeres, nuclear TRF2 interacts with the master neuronal gene-silencer repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST), and disruption of this interaction induces neuronal differentiation. Here we report a developmental switch from the expression of TRF2 in proliferating neural progenitor cells to expression of a unique short nontelomeric isoform of TRF2 (TRF2-S) as neurons establish a fully differentiated state. Unlike nuclear TRF2, which enhances REST-mediated gene repression, TRF2-S is located in the cytoplasm where it sequesters REST, thereby maintaining the expression of neuronal genes, including those encoding glutamate receptors, cell adhesion, and neurofilament proteins. In neurons, TRF2-S-mediated antagonism of REST nuclear activity is greatly attenuated by either overexpression of TRF2 or administration of the excitatory amino acid kainic acid. Overexpression of TRF2-S rescues kainic acid-induced REST nuclear accumulation and its gene-silencing effects. Thus, TRF2-S acts as part of a unique developmentally regulated molecular switch that plays critical roles in the maintenance and plasticity of neurons.

  2. Nontelomeric splice variant of telomere repeat-binding factor 2 maintains neuronal traits by sequestering repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peisu; Casaday-Potts, Rebecca; Precht, Patricia; Jiang, Haiyang; Liu, Yie; Pazin, Michael J.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2011-01-01

    Telomere repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) is critical for telomere integrity in dividing stem and somatic cells, but its role in postmitotic neurons is unknown. Apart from protecting telomeres, nuclear TRF2 interacts with the master neuronal gene-silencer repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST), and disruption of this interaction induces neuronal differentiation. Here we report a developmental switch from the expression of TRF2 in proliferating neural progenitor cells to expression of a unique short nontelomeric isoform of TRF2 (TRF2-S) as neurons establish a fully differentiated state. Unlike nuclear TRF2, which enhances REST-mediated gene repression, TRF2-S is located in the cytoplasm where it sequesters REST, thereby maintaining the expression of neuronal genes, including those encoding glutamate receptors, cell adhesion, and neurofilament proteins. In neurons, TRF2-S–mediated antagonism of REST nuclear activity is greatly attenuated by either overexpression of TRF2 or administration of the excitatory amino acid kainic acid. Overexpression of TRF2-S rescues kainic acid-induced REST nuclear accumulation and its gene-silencing effects. Thus, TRF2-S acts as part of a unique developmentally regulated molecular switch that plays critical roles in the maintenance and plasticity of neurons. PMID:21903926

  3. Regulation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Expression by Adipocyte Differentiation and Determination Factor 1/Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1: Implications for Adipocyte Differentiation and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fajas, Lluis; Schoonjans, Kristina; Gelman, Laurent; Kim, Jae B.; Najib, Jamila; Martin, Genevieve; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Briggs, Michael; Spiegelman, Bruce M.; Auwerx, Johan

    1999-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor implicated in adipocyte differentiation and insulin sensitivity. We investigated whether PPARγ expression is dependent on the activity of adipocyte differentiation and determination factor 1/sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (ADD-1/SREBP-1), another transcription factor associated with both adipocyte differentiation and cholesterol homeostasis. Ectopic expression of ADD-1/SREBP-1 in 3T3-L1 and HepG2 cells induced endogenous PPARγ mRNA levels. The related transcription factor SREBP-2 likewise induced PPARγ expression. In addition, cholesterol depletion, a condition known to result in proteolytic activation of transcription factors of the SREBP family, induced PPARγ expression and improved PPRE-driven transcription. The effect of the SREBPs on PPARγ expression was mediated through the PPARγ1 and -3 promoters. Both promoters contain a consensus E-box motif that mediates the regulation of the PPARγ gene by ADD-1/SREBP-1 and SREBP-2. These results suggest that PPARγ expression can be controlled by the SREBP family of transcription factors and demonstrate new interactions between transcription factors that can regulate different pathways of lipid metabolism. PMID:10409739

  4. GABA-cAMP response element-binding protein signaling regulates maturation and survival of newly generated neurons in the adult hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Jagasia, Ravi; Steib, Kathrin; Englberger, Elisabeth; Herold, Sabine; Faus-Kessler, Theresa; Saxe, Michael; Gage, Fred H; Song, Hongjun; Lie, D Chichung

    2009-06-24

    Survival and integration of new neurons in the hippocampal circuit are rate-limiting steps in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Neuronal network activity is a major regulator of these processes, yet little is known about the respective downstream signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the role of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) signaling in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. CREB is activated in new granule neurons during a distinct developmental period. Loss of CREB function in a cell-autonomous manner impairs dendritic development, decreases the expression of the neurogenic transcription factor NeuroD and of the neuronal microtubule-associated protein, doublecortin (DCX), and compromises the survival of newborn neurons. In addition, GABA-mediated excitation regulates CREB activation at early developmental stages. Importantly, developmental defects after loss of GABA-mediated excitation can be compensated by enhanced CREB signaling. These results indicate that CREB signaling is a central pathway in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, regulating the development and survival of new hippocampal neurons downstream of GABA-mediated excitation.

  5. The role of the glucose-sensing transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein pathway in termite queen fertility.

    PubMed

    Sillam-Dussès, David; Hanus, Robert; Poulsen, Michael; Roy, Virginie; Favier, Maryline; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille

    2016-05-01

    Termites are among the few animals that themselves can digest the most abundant organic polymer, cellulose, into glucose. In mice and Drosophila, glucose can activate genes via the transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) to induce glucose utilization and de novo lipogenesis. Here, we identify a termite orthologue of ChREBP and its downstream lipogenic targets, including acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase. We show that all of these genes, including ChREBP, are upregulated in mature queens compared with kings, sterile workers and soldiers in eight different termite species. ChREBP is expressed in several tissues, including ovaries and fat bodies, and increases in expression in totipotent workers during their differentiation into neotenic mature queens. We further show that ChREBP is regulated by a carbohydrate diet in termite queens. Suppression of the lipogenic pathway by a pharmacological agent in queens elicits the same behavioural alterations in sterile workers as observed in queenless colonies, supporting that the ChREBP pathway partakes in the biosynthesis of semiochemicals that convey the signal of the presence of a fertile queen. Our results highlight ChREBP as a likely key factor for the regulation and signalling of queen fertility. PMID:27249798

  6. ZmMBD101 is a DNA-binding protein that maintains Mutator elements chromatin in a repressive state in maize.

    PubMed

    Questa, Julia I; Rius, Sebastián P; Casadevall, Romina; Casati, Paula

    2016-01-01

    In maize (Zea mays), as well as in other crops, transposable elements (TEs) constitute a great proportion of the genome. Chromatin modifications play a vital role in establishing transposon silencing and perpetuating the acquired repressive state. Nucleosomes associated with TEs are enriched for dimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 and 27 (H3K9me2 and H3K27me2, respectively), signals of repressive chromatin. Here, we describe a chromatin protein, ZmMBD101, involved in the regulation of Mutator (Mu) genes in maize. ZmMBD101 is localized to the nucleus and contains a methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) and a zinc finger CW (CW) domain. Transgenic lines with reduced levels of ZmMBD101 transcript present enhanced induction of Mu genes when plants are irradiated with UV-B. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis with H3K9me2 and H3K27me2 antibodies indicated that ZmMBD101 is required to maintain the levels of these histone repressive marks at Mu terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) under UV-B conditions. Although Mutator inactivity is associated with DNA methylation, cytosine methylation at Mu TIRs is not affected in ZmMBD101 deficient plants. Several plant proteins are predicted to share the simple CW-MBD domain architecture present in ZmMBD101. We hypothesize that plant CW-MBD proteins may also function to protect plant genomes from deleterious transposition.

  7. Sterol regulatory element-binding factor 2 (SREBF-2) predicts 7-year NAFLD incidence and severity of liver disease and lipoprotein and glucose dysmetabolism.

    PubMed

    Musso, Giovanni; Cassader, Maurizio; Bo, Simona; De Michieli, Franco; Gambino, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    We prospectively assessed the impact of a sterol regulatory element-binding factor-2 (SREBF-2) polymorphism on the risk of developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and on liver histology and lipoprotein and glucose metabolism in biopsy-proven NAFLD. In a population-based study, we followed 175 nonobese, nondiabetic participants without NAFLD or metabolic syndrome at baseline, characterized for the SREBF-2 rs133291 C/T polymorphism, dietary habits, physical activity, adipokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), and endothelial adhesion molecules. A comparable cohort of NAFLD patients underwent liver biopsy, an oral glucose tolerance test with minimal model analysis to yield glucose homeostasis parameters, and an oral fat tolerance test with measurement of plasma lipoproteins, adipokines, and cytokeratin-18 fragments. After 7 years, 27% of subjects developed NAFLD and 5% developed diabetes. SREBF-2 predicted incident NAFLD and diabetes and CRP and endothelial adhesion molecule changes. In biopsy-proven NAFLD patients, SREBF-2 predicted nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (odds ratio 2.92 [95% CI 2.08-4.18], P = 0.002) and the severity of tissue insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction, and oral fat intolerance (characterized by higher postprandial lipemia, cholesterol enrichment of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and oxidized LDLs, HDL cholesterol fall, adipokine imbalance, and postprandial apoptosis activation). An SREBF-2 polymorphism predisposes individuals to NAFLD and associated cardiometabolic abnormalities and affects liver histology and glucose and lipid metabolism in biopsy-proven NAFLD.

  8. Andrographolide prevents high-fat diet-induced obesity in C57BL/6 mice by suppressing the sterol regulatory element-binding protein pathway.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lili; Li, Jinmei; Song, Baoliang; Xiao, Xu; Huang, Wendong; Zhang, Binfeng; Tang, Xiaowen; Qi, Meng; Yang, Qiming; Yang, Qiaoling; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao

    2014-11-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are major transcription factors regulating the expression of genes involved in biosynthesis of cholesterol, fatty acids, and triglycerides. We investigated the effect of the specific SREBP suppressor andrographolide, a natural compound isolated from Andrographis paniculata, on the regulation of SREBP signaling by use of Western blot, reporter gene assay, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. In addition, the antiobesity effects of andrographolide were evaluated in C57BL/6 mice with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Our results showed that andrographolide downregulated the expressions of SREBPs target genes and decreased cellular lipid accumulation in vitro. Further, andrographolide (100 mg/kg per day) attenuated HFD-induced body weight gain and fat accumulation in liver or adipose tissues, and improved serum lipid levels and insulin or glucose sensitivity in HFD-induced obese mice. Andrographolide effectively suppressed the respiratory quotient, energy expenditure, and oxygen consumption, which may have contributed to the decreased body-weight gain of the obese mice fed with a HFD. Consistently, andrographolide regulated SREBP target genes and metabolism-associated genes in liver or brown adipose tissue, which may have directly contributed to the lower lipid levels and enhanced insulin sensitivity. Taken together, our results indicated that andrographolide ameliorated lipid metabolism and improved glucose use in mice with HFD-induced obesity. Andrographolide has potential as a leading compound in the prevention or treatment of obesity and insulin resistance.

  9. Tanshinone IIA inhibits the dihydrotestosterone-induced secretion of lipids and activation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 in HaCaT cells

    PubMed Central

    SONG, DONG-YAN; HUANG, QIU-HONG; ZHOU, BING-RONG; XU, YANG; YIN, ZHI-QIANG; PERMATASARI, FELICIA; LUO, DAN

    2012-01-01

    To study the effects and mechanisms of Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA) on the dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1), the synthesis and secretion of lipids in HaCaT cells were examined. HaCaT cells were treated with DHT and Tan IIA at different concentrations. Real-time PCR was used to detect the expression of SREBP-1c, fatty acid synthase (FAS), acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) and HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) mRNA in HaCaT cells. Western blotting was used to analyze the protein expression of SREBP-1 and phosphorylation of Akt. Flow cytometry and Nile red staining were used to detect the synthesis and secretion of lipids in HaCaT cells. We observed that Tan IIA inhibited the DHT-induced expression of SREBP-1 and p-AKT in HaCaT cells, which produced an effect similar to that of LY294002. Tan IIA significantly inhibited the transcription of lipid synthesis-related genes and decreased lipid secretion in HaCaT cells. In conclusion, Tan IIA downregulates the expression of lipid synthesis-related genes and decreases lipid secretion in HaCaT cells, which is correlated with the inhibitory effect on the DHT-induced mRNA and protein expression of SREBP-1 in HaCaT cells. PMID:23139722

  10. Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein 2 Couples HIV-1 Transcription to Cholesterol Homeostasis and T Cell Activation ▿§

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Harry E.; Linde, Michael E.; Khatua, Atanu K.; Popik, Waldemar; Hildreth, James E. K.

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol plays an essential role in the life cycle of several enveloped viruses. Many of these viruses manipulate host cholesterol metabolism to facilitate their replication. HIV-1 infection of CD4+ T cells activates the sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP2) transcriptional program, which includes genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis. However, the role of SREBP2-dependent transcription in HIV-1 biology has not been fully examined. Here, we identify TFII-I, a gene critical for HIV-1 transcription in activated T cells, as a novel SREBP2 target gene. We found TFII-I expression increased after HIV-1 infection or activation of human primary CD4+ T cells. We show that inhibition of SREBP2 activity reduced TFII-I induction in response to these stimuli. More importantly, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing of either SREBP2 or TFII-I significantly reduced HIV-1 production in CD4+ T cells. We also found that TFII-I potentiates Tat-dependent viral gene expression, consistent with a role at the level of HIV-1 transcription. Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that HIV-1 transcription in T cells is linked to cholesterol homeostasis through control of TFII-I expression by SREBP2. PMID:21613400

  11. The role of the glucose-sensing transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein pathway in termite queen fertility

    PubMed Central

    Sillam-Dussès, David; Hanus, Robert; Poulsen, Michael; Roy, Virginie; Favier, Maryline

    2016-01-01

    Termites are among the few animals that themselves can digest the most abundant organic polymer, cellulose, into glucose. In mice and Drosophila, glucose can activate genes via the transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) to induce glucose utilization and de novo lipogenesis. Here, we identify a termite orthologue of ChREBP and its downstream lipogenic targets, including acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase. We show that all of these genes, including ChREBP, are upregulated in mature queens compared with kings, sterile workers and soldiers in eight different termite species. ChREBP is expressed in several tissues, including ovaries and fat bodies, and increases in expression in totipotent workers during their differentiation into neotenic mature queens. We further show that ChREBP is regulated by a carbohydrate diet in termite queens. Suppression of the lipogenic pathway by a pharmacological agent in queens elicits the same behavioural alterations in sterile workers as observed in queenless colonies, supporting that the ChREBP pathway partakes in the biosynthesis of semiochemicals that convey the signal of the presence of a fertile queen. Our results highlight ChREBP as a likely key factor for the regulation and signalling of queen fertility. PMID:27249798

  12. Rolipram stimulates angiogenesis and attenuates neuronal apoptosis through the cAMP/cAMP-responsive element binding protein pathway following ischemic stroke in rats

    PubMed Central

    HU, SHOUYE; CAO, QINGWEN; XU, PENG; JI, WENCHEN; WANG, GANG; ZHANG, YUELIN

    2016-01-01

    Rolipram, a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, can activate the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) pathway to facilitate functional recovery following ischemic stroke. However, to date, the effects of rolipram on angiogenesis and cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal apoptosis are yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, the aim was to reveal the effect of rolipram on the angiogenesis and neuronal apoptosis following brain cerebral ischemia. Rat models of ischemic stroke were established following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and rolipram was administered for three, seven and 14 days. The results were examined using behavioral tests, triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining, immunostaining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) to evaluate the effects of rolipram therapy on functional outcome, angiogenesis and apoptosis. Western blot analysis was used to show the phosphorylated- (p-)CREB protein level in the ischemic hemisphere. The rolipram treatment group exhibited a marked reduction in infarct size and modified neurological severity score compared with the vehicle group, and rolipram treatment significantly promoted the microvessel density in the ischemic boundary region and increased p-CREB protein levels in the ischemic hemisphere. Furthermore, a significant reduction in the number of TUNEL-positive cells was observed in the rolipram group compared with the vehicle group. These findings suggest that rolipram has the ability to attenuate cerebral ischemic injury, stimulate angiogenesis and reduce neuronal apoptosis though the cAMP/CREB pathway. PMID:26998028

  13. Renoprotective effect of myricetin restrains dyslipidemia and renal mesangial cell proliferation by the suppression of sterol regulatory element binding proteins in an experimental model of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan

    2014-11-15

    Myricetin is a natural flavonoid used in various health management systems. In this present study myricetin tested to evaluate the effect on lipids and lipid metabolism enzymes in normal and streptozotocin (STZ) with cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. Diabetic nephrotoxic rats were significantly (P<0.05) increased the levels of urinary albumin and lipid profiles: total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TGs), free fatty acids (FFAs), phospholipids (PLs), low density lipoprotein (LDL), very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), and decreased in the levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDL). In addition, the activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT) were decreased significantly, whereas the 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HmgCoA) reductase activity was increased. The upregulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1a (SREBP-1a), SREBP-1c, SREBP-2, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and downregulation peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) proteins expression levels were noticed. An administration of myricetin (1.0 mg/kg body weight (b/w)) for 12 weeks was brought the above parameters towards normal level. Histopathological study of kidney samples showed that extracellular mesangial matrix expansion, glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis in diabetic nephrotoxic rats was suppressed by myricetin treatment. Further our results indicate that administration of myricetin afforded remarkable protection against STZ-Cd induced alterations in lipid metabolism and thereby reduced the diabetic nephropathy in experimental rats. PMID:25240712

  14. Nitric oxide protects neuroblastoma cells from apoptosis induced by serum deprivation through cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) activation.

    PubMed

    Ciani, Elisabetta; Guidi, Sandra; Della Valle, Giuliano; Perini, Giovanni; Bartesaghi, Renata; Contestabile, Antonio

    2002-12-20

    The transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) mediates survival in many cells, including neurons. Recently, death of cerebellar granule neurons due to nitric oxide (NO) deprivation was shown to be accompanied by down-regulation of CREB activity (). We now provide evidence that overproduction of endogenous NO or supplementation with exogenous NO renders SK-N-BE human neuroblastoma cells more resistant to apoptosis induced by serum deprivation. Parental cells underwent apoptosis after 24 h of serum deprivation, an outcome largely absent in clones overexpressing human neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). This protective effect was reversed by the inhibition of NOS itself or soluble guanylyl cyclase, pointing at cGMP as an intermediate effector of NO-mediated rescue. A slow-releasing NO donor protected parental cells to a significant extent, thus confirming the survival effect of NO. The impaired viability of serum-deprived parental cells was accompanied by a strong decrease of CREB phosphorylation and transcriptional activity, effects significantly attenuated in nNOS-overexpressing clones. To confirm the role of CREB in survival, the ectopic expression of CREB and/or protein kinase A largely counteracted serum deprivation-induced cell death of SK-N-BE cells, whereas transfection with a CREB negative mutant was ineffective. These experiments indicate that CREB activity is an important step for NO-mediated survival in neuronal cells.

  15. Drosophila salt-inducible kinase (SIK) regulates starvation resistance through cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC).

    PubMed

    Choi, Sekyu; Kim, Wonho; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2011-01-28

    Salt-inducible kinase (SIK), one of the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK)-related kinases, has been suggested to play important functions in glucose homeostasis by inhibiting the cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC). To examine the role of SIK in vivo, we generated Drosophila SIK mutant and found that the mutant flies have higher amounts of lipid and glycogen stores and are resistant to starvation. Interestingly, SIK transcripts are highly enriched in the brain, and we found that neuron-specific expression of exogenous SIK fully rescued lipid and glycogen storage phenotypes as well as starvation resistance of the mutant. Using genetic and biochemical analyses, we demonstrated that CRTC Ser-157 phosphorylation by SIK is critical for inhibiting CRTC activity in vivo. Furthermore, double mutants of SIK and CRTC became sensitive to starvation, and the Ser-157 phosphomimetic mutation of CRTC reduced lipid and glycogen levels in the SIK mutant, suggesting that CRTC mediates the effects of SIK signaling. Collectively, our results strongly support the importance of the SIK-CRTC signaling axis that functions in the brain to maintain energy homeostasis in Drosophila.

  16. Nitric oxide protects neuroblastoma cells from apoptosis induced by serum deprivation through cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) activation.

    PubMed

    Ciani, Elisabetta; Guidi, Sandra; Della Valle, Giuliano; Perini, Giovanni; Bartesaghi, Renata; Contestabile, Antonio

    2002-12-20

    The transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) mediates survival in many cells, including neurons. Recently, death of cerebellar granule neurons due to nitric oxide (NO) deprivation was shown to be accompanied by down-regulation of CREB activity (). We now provide evidence that overproduction of endogenous NO or supplementation with exogenous NO renders SK-N-BE human neuroblastoma cells more resistant to apoptosis induced by serum deprivation. Parental cells underwent apoptosis after 24 h of serum deprivation, an outcome largely absent in clones overexpressing human neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). This protective effect was reversed by the inhibition of NOS itself or soluble guanylyl cyclase, pointing at cGMP as an intermediate effector of NO-mediated rescue. A slow-releasing NO donor protected parental cells to a significant extent, thus confirming the survival effect of NO. The impaired viability of serum-deprived parental cells was accompanied by a strong decrease of CREB phosphorylation and transcriptional activity, effects significantly attenuated in nNOS-overexpressing clones. To confirm the role of CREB in survival, the ectopic expression of CREB and/or protein kinase A largely counteracted serum deprivation-induced cell death of SK-N-BE cells, whereas transfection with a CREB negative mutant was ineffective. These experiments indicate that CREB activity is an important step for NO-mediated survival in neuronal cells. PMID:12368293

  17. Performance of the TPSS Functional on Predicting Core Level Binding Energies of Main Group Elements Containing Molecules: A Good Choice for Molecules Adsorbed on Metal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pueyo Bellafont, Noèlia; Viñes, Francesc; Illas, Francesc

    2016-01-12

    Here we explored the performance of Hartree-Fock (HF), Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE), and Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) functionals in predicting core level 1s binding energies (BEs) and BE shifts (ΔBEs) for a large set of 68 molecules containing a wide variety of functional groups for main group elements B → F and considering up to 185 core levels. A statistical analysis comparing with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experiments shows that BEs estimations are very accurate, TPSS exhibiting the best performance. Considering ΔBEs, the three methods yield very similar and excellent results, with mean absolute deviations of ∼0.25 eV. When considering relativistic effects, BEs deviations drop approaching experimental values. So, the largest mean percentage deviation is of 0.25% only. Linear trends among experimental and estimated values have been found, gaining offsets with respect to ideality. By adding relativistic effects to offsets, HF and TPSS methods underestimate experimental values by solely 0.11 and 0.05 eV, respectively, well within XPS chemical precision. TPSS is posed as an excellent choice for the characterization, by XPS, of molecules on metal solid substrates, given its suitability in describing metal substrates bonds and atomic and/or molecular orbitals.

  18. Pu-erh tea down-regulates sterol regulatory element-binding protein and stearyol-CoA desaturase to reduce fat storage in Caenorhaditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ding, YiHong; Zou, XiaoJu; Jiang, Xue; Wu, JieYu; Zhang, YuRu; Chen, Dan; Liang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of Pu-erh has been reported to result in numerous health benefits, but the mechanisms underlying purported weight-loss and lowering of lipid are poorly understood. Here, we used the nematode Caenorhaditis elegans to explore the water extract of Pu-erh tea (PTE) functions to reduce fat storage. We found that PTE down-regulates the expression of the master fat regulator SBP-1, a homologue of sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) and its target stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), a key enzyme in fat biosynthesis, leading to an increased ratio of stearic acid (C18:0) to oleic acid (C18:1n-9), and subsequently decreased fat storage. We also found that both the pharyngeal pumping rate and food uptake of C. elegans decreased with exposure to PTE. Collectively, these results provide an experimental basis for explaining the ability of Pu-erh tea in promoting inhibition of food uptake and the biosynthesis of fat via SBP-1 and SCD, thereby reducing fat storage. PMID:25659129

  19. AthaMap web tools for database-assisted identification of combinatorial cis-regulatory elements and the display of highly conserved transcription factor binding sites in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Nils Ole; Galuschka, Claudia; Schindler, Martin; Bülow, Lorenz; Hehl, Reinhard

    2005-07-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of cis-regulatory elements for the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. AthaMap contains more than 7.4 x 10(6) putative binding sites for 36 transcription factors (TFs) from 16 different TF families. A newly implemented functionality allows the display of subsets of higher conserved transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). Furthermore, a web tool was developed that permits a user-defined search for co-localizing cis-regulatory elements. The user can specify individually the level of conservation for each TFBS and a spacer range between them. This web tool was employed for the identification of co-localizing sites of known interacting TFs and TFs containing two DNA-binding domains. More than 1.8 x 10(5) combinatorial elements were annotated in the AthaMap database. These elements can also be used to identify more complex co-localizing elements consisting of up to four TFBSs. The AthaMap database and the connected web tools are a valuable resource for the analysis and the prediction of gene expression regulation at http://www.athamap.de. PMID:15980498

  20. alpha-Tocopherol decreases the somatostatin receptor-effector system and increases the cyclic AMP/cyclic AMP response element binding protein pathway in the rat dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pinto, A M; Puebla-Jiménez, L; Arilla-Ferreiro, E

    2009-08-01

    Neuronal survival has been shown to be enhanced by alpha-tocopherol and modulated by cyclic AMP (cAMP). Somatostatin (SST) receptors couple negatively to adenylyl cyclase (AC), thus leading to decreased cAMP levels. Whether alpha-tocopherol can stimulate neuronal survival via regulation of the somatostatinergic system, however, is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of alpha-tocopherol on the SST signaling pathway in the rat dentate gyrus. To that end, 15-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated daily for 1 week with (+)-alpha-tocopherol or vehicle and sacrificed on the day following the last administration. No changes in either SST-like immunoreactivity (SST-LI) content or SST mRNA levels were detected in the dentate gyrus as a result of alpha-tocopherol treatment. A significant decrease in the density of the SST binding sites and an increase in the dissociation constant, however, were detected. The lower SST receptor density in the alpha-tocopherol-treated rats correlated with a significant decrease in the protein levels of the SST receptor subtypes SSTR1-SSTR4, whereas the corresponding mRNA levels were unaltered. G-protein-coupled-receptor kinase 2 expression was decreased by alpha-tocopherol treatment. This vitamin induced a significant increase in both basal and forskolin-stimulated AC activity, as well as a decrease in the inhibitory effect of SST on AC. Whereas the protein levels of AC type V/VI were not modified by alpha-tocopherol administration, ACVIII expression was significantly enhanced, suggesting it might account for the increase in AC activity. In addition, this treatment led to a reduction in Gialpha1-3 protein levels and in Gi functionality. alpha-Tocopherol did not affect the expression of the regulator of G-protein signaling 6/7 (RGS6/7). Finally, alpha-tocopherol induced an increase in the levels of phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (p-CREB) and total CREB in the dentate gyrus. Since CREB

  1. Identification of two factors which bind to the upstream sequences of a number of nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins and to genetic elements important for cell division in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Dorsman, J C; van Heeswijk, W C; Grivell, L A

    1988-01-01

    Two abundant factors, GFI and GFII which interact with the 5' flanking regions of nuclear genes coding for proteins of the mitochondrial respiratory chain have been identified. In one case (subunit VIII of QH2: cytochrome c oxidoreductase) the binding sites for both factors overlap completely and their binding is mutually exclusive. For the other 5' regions tested the GFI and GFII binding sites do not coincide. Interestingly, binding sites for GFI and GFII are also present in or at the 3' ends of the coding regions of two genes of the PHO gene family and in DNA elements important for optimal ARS and CEN function respectively. The sites recognized by GFI conform to the consensus RTCRNNNNNNACGNR, while those recognized by GFII contain the element RTCACGTG. We speculate that GFI and GFII may play a role in different cellular processes, dependent on the context of their binding sites and that one of these processes may be the coordination of the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis with the progress of the cell cycle. Images PMID:3045755

  2. Mammalian cAMP-responsive element can activate transcription in yeast and binds a yeast factor(s) that resembles the mammalian transcription factor ANF.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R H; Jones, N C

    1989-01-01

    The human ATF and AP1 transcription factors bind to highly related DNA sequences. Their consensus binding sites differ by a single nucleotide, but this single change is crucial in determining factor binding specificity. We have previously identified an AP1 (yAP1) binding activity in yeast. In this report we identify a yeast ATF (yATF) binding activity whose specificity can be distinguished from that of yAP1 by the same crucial nucleotide that distinguishes binding of human ATF and AP1. The ATF binding site can act as an efficient upstream activating sequence in vivo, suggesting that yATF is a transcriptional activator. The yATF DNA-binding complex is phosphorylated and the binding activity of partially purified yATF can be enhanced in vitro by the addition of protein kinase A, indicating that the phosphorylation state of yATF may be important in determining its ability to bind DNA. Images PMID:2538834

  3. Butyrate activates the cAMP-protein kinase A-cAMP response element-binding protein signaling pathway in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aihua; Si, Hongwei; Liu, Dongmin; Jiang, Honglin

    2012-01-01

    Butyrate is a major SCFA produced by microbial fermentation of dietary fiber in the gastrointestinal tract. Butyrate is widely thought to mediate the benefits of fiber and resistant starch consumption to colon health in humans. Besides serving as a substrate for energy production, butyrate has many regulatory effects in animals. Little is known about the signaling mechanisms underlying the regulatory effects of butyrate and other SCFA. In this study, we determined whether butyrate can activate cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA)- cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB) signaling in Caco-2 cells, a model of intestinal epithelial cells. Butyrate promoted luciferase expression from a CRE-reporter construct, induced phosphorylation of CREB, increased the activity of PKA, and elevated the levels of cAMP in Caco-2 cells. These data suggest that butyrate activates cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling in Caco-2 cells. Butyrate, however, had no effect on the activities of adenylyl cyclase (AC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE), two enzymes that determine the production and degradation of intracellular cAMP, respectively. Because the activities of AC and PDE are primarily regulated by G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)-mediated intracellular signaling, lack of an effect of butyrate on these two enzymes suggests that butyrate does not activate cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling through GPR. Butyrate-treated Caco-2 cells had greater concentrations of ATP than untreated cells. Because ATP is the substrate for cAMP production, this difference suggests that butyrate may activate cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling in Caco-2 cells through increased ATP production. Overall, this study raises the possibility that some of the regulatory effects of butyrate in animals, including those on the colonocytes, may be mediated by the cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway at the cellular level.

  4. cAMP-Response Element-Binding 3-Like Protein 1 (CREB3L1) is Required for Decidualization and its Expression is Decreased in Women with Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, J I; Yoo, J-Y; Kim, T H; Kim, Y I; Ferguson, S D; Fazleabas, A T; Young, S L; Lessey, B A; Ahn, J Y; Lim, J M; Jeong, J-W

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a major cause of infertility and pelvic pain, affecting more than 10% of reproductive-aged women. Progesterone resistance has been observed in the endometrium of women with this disease, as evidenced by alterations in progesterone-responsive gene and protein expression. cAMPResponse Element-Binding 3-like protein 1 (Creb3l1) has previously been identified as a progesterone receptor (PR) target gene in mouse uterus via high density DNA microarray analysis. However, CREB3L1 function has not been studied in the context of endometriosis and uterine biology. In this study, we validated progesterone (P4) regulation of Creb3l1 in the uteri of wild-type and progesterone receptor knockout (PRKO) mice. Furthermore, we observed that CREB3L1 expression was significantly higher in secretory phase human endometrium compared to proliferative phase and that CREB3L1 expression was significantly decreased in the endometrium of women with endometriosis. Lastly, by transfecting CREB3L1 siRNA into cultured human endometrial stromal cells (hESCs) prior to hormonal induction of in vitro decidualization, we showed that CREB3L1 is required for the decidualization process. Interestingly, phosphorylation of ERK1/2, critical factor for decidualization, was also significantly reduced in CREB3L1-silenced hESCs. It is known that hESCs from patients with endometriosis show impaired decidualization and that dysregulation of the P4-PR signaling axis is linked to a variety of endometrial diseases including infertility and endometriosis. Therefore, these results suggest that CREB3L1 is required for decidualization in mice and humans and may be linked to the pathogenesis of endometriosis in a P4-dependent manner. PMID:26917262

  5. Preventing Phosphorylation of Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein 1a by MAP-Kinases Protects Mice from Fatty Liver and Visceral Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Jutta; Kremer, Lorena; Jacob, Sylvia; Hartwig, Sonja; Nitzgen, Ulrike; Muller–Wieland, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1a plays a pivotal role in lipid metabolism. Using the SREBP-1a expressing human hepatoma cell line HepG2 we have shown previously that human SREBP-1a is phosphorylated at serine 117 by ERK-mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Using a combination of cell biology and protein chemistry approach we show that SREBP-1a is also target of other MAPK-families, i.e. c-JUN N-terminal protein kinases (JNK) or p38 stress activated MAP kinases. Serine 117 is also the major phosphorylation site in SREBP-1a for JNK. In contrast to that the major phosphorylation sites of p38 MAPK family are serine 63 and threonine 426. Functional analyses reveal that phosphorylation of SREBP-1a does not alter protein/DNA interaction. The identified phosphorylation sites are specific for both kinase families also in cellular context. To provide direct evidence that phosphorylation of SREBP-1a is a regulatory principle of biological and clinical relevance, we generated transgenic mice expressing mature transcriptionally active N-terminal domain of human SREBP–1a variant lacking all identified phosphorylaton sites designed as alb-SREBP-1aΔP and wild type SREBP-1a designed as alb-SREBP-1a liver specific under control of the albumin promoter and a liver specific enhancer. In contrast to alb-SREBP–1a mice the phosphorylation–deficient mice develop no enlarged fatty livers under normocaloric conditions. Phenotypical examination reveales a massive accumulation of adipose tissue in alb-SREBP-1a but not in the phosphorylation deficient alb-SREBP-1aΔP mice. Moreover, preventing phosphorylation of SREBP-1a protects mice also from dyslipidemia. In conclusion, phosphorylation of SREBP-1a by ERK, JNK and p38 MAPK-families resembles a biological principle and plays a significant role, in vivo. PMID:22384276

  6. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27627966

  7. Aldose Reductase Regulates Microglia/Macrophages Polarization Through the cAMP Response Element-Binding Protein After Spinal Cord Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Bian, Ganlan; Chen, Peng; Liu, Ling; Yu, Caiyong; Liu, Fangfang; Xue, Qian; Chung, Sookja K; Song, Bing; Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory reactions are the most critical pathological processes occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Activated microglia/macrophages have either detrimental or beneficial effects on neural regeneration based on their functional polarized M1/M2 subsets. However, the mechanism of microglia/macrophage polarization to M1/M2 at the injured spinal cord environment remains unknown. In this study, wild-type (WT) or aldose reductase (AR)-knockout (KO) mice were subjected to SCI by a spinal crush injury model. The expression pattern of AR, behavior tests for locomotor activity, and lesion size were assessed at between 4 h and 28 days after SCI. We found that the expression of AR is upregulated in microglia/macrophages after SCI in WT mice. In AR KO mice, SCI led to smaller injury lesion areas compared to WT. AR deficiency-induced microglia/macrophages induce the M2 rather than the M1 response and promote locomotion recovery after SCI in mice. In the in vitro experiments, microglia cell lines (N9 or BV2) were treated with the AR inhibitor (ARI) fidarestat. AR inhibition caused 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) accumulation, which induced the phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) to promote Arg1 expression. KG501, the specific inhibitor of phosphorylated CREB, could cancel the upregulation of Arg1 by ARI or HNE stimulation. Our results suggest that AR works as a switch which can regulate microglia by polarizing cells to either the M1 or the M2 phenotype under M1 stimulation based on its states of activity. We suggest that inhibiting AR may be a promising therapeutic method for SCI in the future.

  8. The Hepatitis C Virus-induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activates the Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) and Regulates Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    McRae, Steven; Iqbal, Jawed; Sarkar-Dutta, Mehuli; Lane, Samantha; Nagaraj, Abhiram; Ali, Naushad; Waris, Gulam

    2016-02-12

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) relies on host lipids and lipid droplets for replication and morphogenesis. The accumulation of lipid droplets in infected hepatocytes manifests as hepatosteatosis, a common pathology observed in chronic hepatitis C patients. One way by which HCV promotes the accumulation of intracellular lipids is through enhancing de novo lipogenesis by activating the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). In general, activation of SREBPs occurs during cholesterol depletion. Interestingly, during HCV infection, the activation of SREBPs occurs under normal cholesterol levels, but the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Our previous study has demonstrated the activation of the inflammasome complex in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells. In this study, we elucidate the potential link between chronic hepatitis C-associated inflammation and alteration of lipid homeostasis in infected cells. Our results reveal that the HCV-activated NLRP3 inflammasome is required for the up-regulation of lipogenic genes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Using pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA against the inflammasome components (NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD, and caspase-1), we further show that the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in lipid droplet formation. NLRP3 inflammasome activation in HCV-infected cells enables caspase-1-mediated degradation of insulin-induced gene proteins. This subsequently leads to the transport of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein·SREBP complex from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi, followed by proteolytic activation of SREBPs by S1P and S2P in the Golgi. Typically, inflammasome activation leads to viral clearance. Paradoxically, here we demonstrate how HCV exploits the NLRP3 inflammasome to activate SREBPs and host lipid metabolism, leading to liver disease pathogenesis associated with

  9. Bidirectional regulation of the cAMP response element binding protein encodes spatial map alignment in prism-adapting barn owls.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Grant S; DeBello, William M

    2008-10-01

    The barn owl midbrain contains mutually aligned maps of auditory and visual space. Throughout life, map alignment is maintained through the actions of an instructive signal that encodes the magnitude of auditory-visual mismatch. The intracellular signaling pathways activated by this signal are unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) provides a cell-specific readout of instructive information. Owls were fitted with prismatic or control spectacles and provided rich auditory-visual experience: hunting live mice. CREB activation was analyzed within 30 min of hunting using phosphorylation state-specific CREB (pCREB) and CREB antibodies, confocal imaging, and immunofluorescence measurements at individual cell nuclei. In control owls or prism-adapted owls, which experience small instructive signals, the frequency distributions of pCREB/CREB values obtained for cell nuclei within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX) were unimodal. In contrast, in owls adapting to prisms or readapting to normal conditions, the distributions were bimodal: certain cells had received a signal that positively regulated CREB and, by extension, transcription of CREB-dependent genes, whereas others received a signal that negatively regulated it. These changes were restricted to the subregion of the inferior colliculus that received optically displaced input, the rostral ICX, and were not evident in the caudal ICX or central nucleus. Finally, the topographic pattern of CREB regulation was patchy, not continuous, as expected from the actions of a topographically precise signal encoding discrete events. These results support a model in which the magnitude of CREB activation within individual cells provides a readout of the instructive signal that guides plasticity and learning. PMID:18829948

  10. Effects of carvedilol treatment on cardiac cAMP response element binding protein expression and phosphorylation in acute coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of β-adrenergic stimulation on viral myocarditis has been investigated in animal models of viral myocarditis. Excess stimulation of β-adrenergic receptors by catecholamines causes phosphorylation/activation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) by the cAMP signaling pathway. CREB as an important regulator of gene expression mediates the cardiovascular remodeling process and promotes anti-inflammatory immune responses. However, the CREB expression and phosphorylation have not been studied, and the effects of carvedilol (a nonselective β-adrenoceptor antagonist) on the CREB has not been investigated in the setting of acute viral myocarditis. Methods This study was therefore designed to examine the effects of carvedilol on the transcriptional factor CREB in a murine model of acute viral myocarditis. In a coxsackievirus B3 murine myocarditis model (Balb/c), effects of carvedilol on plasma noradrenaline, heart rate and blood pressure, myocardial histopathological changes and fibrosis, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, cardiac CREB and phosphorylated CREB, cytokine levels, and viral RNA were studied. Results The expression and phosphorylation of CREB were decreased with concomitant increase of IL-6 and TNF-α in murine coxsackievirus-induced acute viral myocarditis. The levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were correlated with the expression of CREB or phosphorylated CREB. Carvedilol increased the cardiac CREB expression and phosphorylation and decreased the plasma catecholamine levels and the production of IL-6 and TNF-α with amelioration of acute viral myocarditis. Conclusion These results show that CREB may be involved in the pathophysiology of viral myocarditis and carvedilol exerts some of its beneficial effects by increasing the CREB expression and phosphorylation. PMID:24225056

  11. Real-time monitoring of cAMP response element binding protein signaling in porcine granulosa cells modulated by ovarian factors.

    PubMed

    He, Pei Jian; Fujimoto, Yasunori; Yamauchi, Nobuhiko; Hattori, Masa-Aki

    2006-10-01

    The present study was performed to establish a real-time monitoring of the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) signalling using granulosa cells, and to assess the modulation of CREB activity by potential ovarian autocrine/paracrine and oocyte-derived factors. Granulosa cells were isolated from porcine follicles and cultured for 2 days, and then transfected with CRE-containing pGL3. The cells were directly stimulated or cultured with FSH, LH, forskolin, or a permeable cAMP analog, and/or IGF-I, EGF, bFGF, TGF-beta2 or TNF-alpha, or cumulus-oocyte complex (COCs) for the real-time monitoring of CREB signaling. The activation pattern of CREB signaling consisted of three distinct phases, i.e., burst, attenuation and refractory. In contrast to FSH, LH, and forskolin, a cAMP analog induced the prolonged activation, although three distinct phases were observed at its high concentration. Of all the autocrine/paracrine factors, only IGF-I slightly induced CREB activity. On the other hand, TGF-beta2 and TNF-alpha significantly repressed FSH-stimulated transcriptional activation of CREB by 30% (P < 0.05) and 45% (P < 0.05), respectively. Additionally, coculture with COCs caused a significant suppression of transcriptional activation of CREB signaling stimulated by FSH. These results indicate that ovarian autocrine/paracrine factors such as IGF-I, TGF-beta2, TNF-alpha and oocyte-derived factors modulate the CREB signaling. The present study provides a new approach for direct signaling study on transcription factors under the influences of potential factors.

  12. Ethylene-responsive element binding protein (EREBP) expression and the transcriptional regulation of class I beta-1,3-glucanase during tobacco seed germination.

    PubMed

    Leubner-Metzger, G; Petruzzelli, L; Waldvogel, R; Vögeli-Lange, R; Meins, F

    1998-11-01

    Class I beta-1,3-glucanase (betaGLU I) is transcriptionally induced in the micropylar endosperm just before its rupture prior to the germination (i.e. radicle emergence) of Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. 'Havana 425' seeds. Ethylene is involved in endosperm rupture and high-level betaGLU I expression; but, it does not affect the spatial and temporal pattern of betaGLU I expression. A promoter deletion analysis of the tobacco betaGLU I B gene suggests that (1) the distal - 1452 to - 1193 region, which contains the positively acting ethylene-responsive element (ERE), is required for high-level, ethylene-sensitive expression, (2) the regions - 1452 to - 1193 and -402 to 0 contribute to downregulation by abscisic acid (ABA), and (3) the region -402 to -211 is necessary and sufficient for low-level micropylar-endosperm-specific expression. Transcripts of the ERE-binding proteins (EREBPs) showed a novel pattern of expression during seed germination: light or gibberellin was required for EREBP-3 and EREBP-4 expression; EREBP-4 expression was constitutive and unaffected by ABA or ethylene; EREBP-3 showed transient induction just before endosperm rupture, which was earlier in ethylene-treated seeds and inhibited by ABA. No expression of EREBP- and EREBP-2 was detected. In contrast to betaGLU I, EREBP-3 and EREBP-4 were not expressed specifically in the micropylar endosperm. The results suggest that transcriptional regulation of betaGLU I could depend on: activation of ethylene signalling pathways acting via EREBP-3 with the ERE as the target, and ethylene-independent signalling pathways with targets in the proximal promoter region that are likely to determine spatial and temporal patterns of expression.

  13. The Hepatitis C Virus-induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activates the Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) and Regulates Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    McRae, Steven; Iqbal, Jawed; Sarkar-Dutta, Mehuli; Lane, Samantha; Nagaraj, Abhiram; Ali, Naushad; Waris, Gulam

    2016-02-12

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) relies on host lipids and lipid droplets for replication and morphogenesis. The accumulation of lipid droplets in infected hepatocytes manifests as hepatosteatosis, a common pathology observed in chronic hepatitis C patients. One way by which HCV promotes the accumulation of intracellular lipids is through enhancing de novo lipogenesis by activating the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). In general, activation of SREBPs occurs during cholesterol depletion. Interestingly, during HCV infection, the activation of SREBPs occurs under normal cholesterol levels, but the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Our previous study has demonstrated the activation of the inflammasome complex in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells. In this study, we elucidate the potential link between chronic hepatitis C-associated inflammation and alteration of lipid homeostasis in infected cells. Our results reveal that the HCV-activated NLRP3 inflammasome is required for the up-regulation of lipogenic genes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Using pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA against the inflammasome components (NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD, and caspase-1), we further show that the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in lipid droplet formation. NLRP3 inflammasome activation in HCV-infected cells enables caspase-1-mediated degradation of insulin-induced gene proteins. This subsequently leads to the transport of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein·SREBP complex from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi, followed by proteolytic activation of SREBPs by S1P and S2P in the Golgi. Typically, inflammasome activation leads to viral clearance. Paradoxically, here we demonstrate how HCV exploits the NLRP3 inflammasome to activate SREBPs and host lipid metabolism, leading to liver disease pathogenesis associated with

  14. The cAMP response element-binding protein in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis modulates the formalin-induced pain behavior in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Hiroko; Ishida, Maho; Arita, Jun; Mitsushima, Dai; Takahashi, Takuya; Kimura, Fukuko; Funabashi, Toshiya

    2009-12-01

    Abstract Differences in male and female responses to pain are widely recognized in many species, including humans, but the cerebral mechanisms that generate these responses are unknown. Using the formalin test, we confirmed that proestrus female rats showed nociceptive behavior, modulated by estrogen that was distinct from male rats, particularly during the interphase period. We then explored the brain areas, which were involved in the female pattern of nociceptive behavior. We found that, after a formalin injection and at the time corresponding to the behavioral interphase, the number of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB)-immunoreactive neurons observed by immunocytochemistry increased in the dorsolateral division of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTLD) in female but not male rats. There were no significant sex differences in pCREB expression following formalin in any region other than the BSTLD. The increased pCREB in female rats was eliminated after an ovariectomy and restored with 17beta-estradiol treatment. Neither an orchidectomy nor 17beta-estradiol treatment affected the pCREB response in male rats. The increase in pCREB expression in the BSTLD in female rats after formalin injection was confirmed with immunoblotting. To determine the role of CREB in the BSTLD, adenovirus-mediated expression of a dominant-negative form of CREB (mCREB) was carried out. The nociceptive behavior during interphase was significantly attenuated by injection of virus carrying mCREB into the BSTLD in female rats but not in male rats. These results suggest a novel role for CREB in the BSTLD as a modulator of the pain response in a female-specific, estrogen-dependent manner.

  15. High Glucose-induced O-GlcNAcylated Carbohydrate Response Element-binding Protein (ChREBP) Mediates Mesangial Cell Lipogenesis and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min-Jung; Kim, Dong-Il; Lim, Seul-Ki; Choi, Joo-Hee; Han, Ho-Jae; Yoon, Kyung-Chul; Park, Soo-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) is a transcription factor responsible for carbohydrate metabolism in the liver. However, the role of ChREBP in diabetic nephropathy has not been elucidated. Thus, we investigated the role of ChREBP in mesangial cells in diabetic nephropathy. Treatment with 25 mm glucose (high glucose; HG) increased cellular O-GlcNAc and O-GlcNAcylated ChREBP in mesangial cells compared with normal 5.5 mm glucose. O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucopyranosylidene) amino N-phenylcarbamate (PUGNAc), a drug that increases O-GlcNAc, augmented the expression of ChREBP targets, whereas DON, a drug that decreases O-GlcNAc and O-GlcNAcase overexpression, mitigated the increase with HG. O-GlcNAc augmented the protein stability, transcriptional activity, and nuclear translocation of ChREBP. HG treatment also stimulated lipid accumulation and the contents of triglyceride and cholesterol in mesangial cells. In addition, HG triggered expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α, vascular endothelial growth factor, and extracellular matrix components related to nephrosclerosis. The ChREBP mutant, W130A, did not exhibit HG-induced lipid accumulation and fibrotic proteins, suggesting that the Trp-130 residue in the MCR3 domain is important in the development of glomerulosclerosis. O-GlcNAcylated ChREBP was elevated in mesangium cells of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In conclusion, HG increased the O-GlcNAcylated ChREBP level, which resulted in lipid accumulation and up-regulation of fibrotic proteins in mesangial cells. These effects may lead mesangial cells to an ultimately pathological state. PMID:24616092

  16. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27627966

  17. A Composite Element that Binds Basic Helix Loop Helix and Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors Is Important for Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Regulation of the Follicle-Stimulating Hormone β Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ciccone, Nick A.; Lacza, Charlemagne T.; Hou, Melody Y.; Gregory, Susan J.; Kam, Kyung-Yoon; Xu, Shuyun; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2008-01-01

    Although FSH plays an essential role in controlling gametogenesis, the biology of FSHβ transcription remains poorly understood, but is known to involve the complex interplay of multiple endocrine factors including GnRH. We have identified a GnRH-responsive element within the rat FSHβ promoter containing an E-box and partial cAMP response element site that are bound by the basic helix loop helix transcription factor family members, upstream stimulating factor (USF)-1/USF-2, and the basic leucine zipper member, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), respectively. Expression studies with CREB, USF-1/USF-2, and activating protein-1 demonstrated that the USF transcription factors increased basal transcription, an effect not observed if the cognate binding site was mutated. Conversely, expression of a dominant negative CREB mutant or CREB knockdown attenuated induction by GnRH, whereas dominant negative Fos or USF had no effect on the GnRH response. GnRH stimulation specifically induced an increase in phosphorylated CREB occupation of the FSHβ promoter, leading to the recruitment of CREB-binding protein to enhance gene transcription. In conclusion, a composite element bound by both USF and CREB serves to integrate signals for basal and GnRH-stimulated transcription of the rat FSHβ gene. PMID:18550775

  18. Arabidopsis CLP1-SIMILAR PROTEIN3, an ortholog of human polyadenylation factor CLP1, functions in gametophyte, embryo, and postembryonic development.

    PubMed

    Xing, Denghui; Zhao, Hongwei; Li, Qingshun Quinn

    2008-12-01

    Polyadenylation factor CLP1 is essential for mRNA 3'-end processing in yeast and mammals. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CLP1-SIMILAR PROTEIN3 (CLPS3) is an ortholog of human hCLP1. CLPS3 was previously found to be a subunit in the affinity-purified PCFS4-TAP (tandem affinity purification) complex involved in the alternative polyadenylation of FCA and flowering time control in Arabidopsis. In this article, we further explored the components in the affinity-purified CLPS3-TAP complex, from which Arabidopsis cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) subunits AtCPSF100 and AtCPSF160 were found. This result implies that CLPS3 may bridge CPSF to the PCFS4 complex. Characterization of the CLPS3 mutant revealed that CLPS3 was essential for embryo development and important for female gametophyte transmission. Overexpression of CLPS3-TAP fusion caused a range of postembryonic development abnormalities, including early flowering time, altered phyllotaxy, and abnormal numbers and shapes of flower organs. These phenotypes are associated with the altered gene expression levels of FCA, WUS, and CUC1. The decreased ratio of FCA-beta to FCA-gamma in the overexpression plants suggests that CLPS3 favored the usage of FCA regular poly(A) site over the alternative site. These observations indicate that Arabidopsis CLPS3 might be involved in the processing of pre-mRNAs encoded by a distinct subset of genes that are important in plant development.

  19. SLaP mapper: a webserver for identifying and quantifying spliced-leader addition and polyadenylation site usage in kinetoplastid genomes.

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Michael; Gluenz, Eva; Carrington, Mark; Kelly, Steven

    2014-09-01

    The Kinetoplastida are a diverse and globally distributed class of free-living and parasitic single-celled eukaryotes that collectively cause a significant burden on human health and welfare. In kinetoplastids individual genes do not have promoters, but rather all genes are arranged downstream of a small number of RNA polymerase II transcription initiation sites and are thus transcribed in polycistronic gene clusters. Production of individual mRNAs from this continuous transcript occurs co-transcriptionally by trans-splicing of a ∼39 nucleotide capped RNA and subsequent polyadenylation of the upstream mRNA. SLaP mapper (Spliced-Leader and Polyadenylation mapper) is a fully automated web-service for identification, quantitation and gene-assignment of both spliced-leader and polyadenylation addition sites in Kinetoplastid genomes. SLaP mapper only requires raw read data from paired-end Illumina RNAseq and performs all read processing, mapping, quality control, quantification, and analysis in a fully automated pipeline. To provide usage examples and estimates of the quantity of sequence data required we use RNAseq obtained from two different library preparations from both Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania mexicana to show the number of expected reads that are obtained from each preparation type. SLaP mapper is an easy to use, platform independent webserver that is freely available for use at http://www.stevekellylab.com/software/slap. Example files are provided on the website.

  20. DNA sequence determinants of nuclear protein binding to the c-Ha-ras antioxidant/electrophile response element in vascular smooth muscle cells: identification of Nrf2 and heat shock protein 90 beta as heterocomplex components.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kimberly P; Ramos, Kenneth S

    2005-01-01

    The antioxidant/electrophile response element (ARE/EpRE) is a cis-acting element involved in redox regulation of c-Ha-ras gene. Protein binding to the ARE/EpRE may be credited to deoxyribonucleic acid sequence; therefore, studies were conducted to evaluate the influence of internal and flanking regions to the 10-bp human c-Ha-ras ARE/EpRE core (hHaras10) on nuclear protein binding in oxidant-treated vascular smooth muscle cells. A protein doublet bound to an extended oligonucleotide comprising the ARE/EpRE core in genomic context (hHaras27), whereas a single complex bound to hHarasl0. Protein binding involved specific interactions of 25- and 23-kDa proteins with hHarasl0, and binding of 80-, 65-, and 55-kDa proteins to hHaras27. Competition assays with hNQO1 and rGSTA2 confirmed the specificity of deoxyribonucleic acid-protein interactions and indicated preferred binding of p25 and p23 to the c-Ha-ras ARE/EpRE. "NNN" sequences within the core afforded unique protein-binding profiles to the c-Ha-ras ARE/EpRE. In addition, Nrf2 and heat shock protein 90beta (p80) were identified as components of the c-Ha-ras ARE/EpRE heterocomplex. We conclude that both internal bases and flanking sequences regulate nuclear protein recruitment and complex assembly on the c-Ha-ras ARE/EpRE.

  1. A rice dehydration-inducible SNF1-related protein kinase 2 phosphorylates an abscisic acid responsive element-binding factor and associates with ABA signaling.

    PubMed

    Chae, Min-Ju; Lee, Jung-Sook; Nam, Myung-Hee; Cho, Kun; Hong, Ji-Yeon; Yi, Sang-A; Suh, Seok-Cheol; Yoon, In-Sun

    2007-01-01

    By a differential cDNA screening technique, we have isolated a dehydration-inducible gene (designated OSRK1) that encodes a 41.8 kD protein kinase of SnRK2 family from Oryza sativa. The OSRK1 transcript level was undetectable in vegetative tissues, but significantly increased by hyperosmotic stress and Abscisic acid (ABA). To determine its biochemical properties, we expressed and isolated OSRK1 and its mutants as glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. In vitro kinase assay showed that OSRK1 can phosphorylate itself and generic substrates as well. Interestingly, OSRK1 showed strong substrate preference for rice bZIP transcription factors and uncommon cofactor requirement for Mn(2+) over Mg(2+). By deletion of C-terminus 73 amino acids or mutations of Ser-158 and Thr-159 to aspartic acids (Asp) in the activation loop, the activity of OSRK1 was dramatically decreased. OSRK1 can transphosphorylate the inactive deletion protein. A rice family of abscisic acid-responsive element (ABRE) binding factor, OREB1 was phosphorylated in vitro by OSRK1 at multiple sites of different functional domains. MALDI-TOF analysis identified a phosphorylation site at Ser44 of OREB1 and mutation of the residue greatly decreased the substrate specificity for OSRK1. The recognition motif for OSRK1, RQSS is highly similar to the consensus substrate sequence of AMPK/SNF1 kinase family. We further showed that OSRK1 interacts with OREB1 in a yeast two-hybrid system and co-localized to nuclei by transient expression analysis of GFP-fused protein in onion epidermis. Finally, ectopic expression of OSRK1 in transgenic tobacco resulted in a reduced sensitivity to ABA in seed germination and root elongation. These findings suggest that OSRK1 is associated with ABA signaling, possibly through the phosphorylation of ABF family in vivo. The interaction between SnRK2 family kinases and ABF transcription factors may constitute an important part of cross-talk mechanism in the stress

  2. The TL-DNA in octopine crown-gall tumours codes for seven well-defined polyadenylated transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Willmitzer, Lothar; Simons, Gisela; Schell, Jeff

    1982-01-01

    Seven polyadenylated transcripts of significantly different relative abundance were detected in octopine crown-gall tissue after gel electrophoretic separation and subsequent transfer to diazobenzyloxymethyl paper. The transcripts range from 670 to 2700 bases long. The different transcripts were located using 19 different fragments of the TL-region as probes. By hybridizing labelled RNA to separated complementary strands of the T-DNA, and parallel determination of the chemical polarity of the strands, the 5' - 3' orientations of six of the seven transcripts was identified. Both strands of the T-DNA code RNA. Hybridization of octopine TL-DNA against poly A+ RNA's present in two nopaline tumour-lines C58-S1 and BT37, and vice versa, reveals a minimum of two and possibly four transcripts common to both octopine and nopaline tumours. These transcripts originate from corresponding parts of the conserved region of the T-DNA and are of similar size. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:16453403

  3. Accurate Profiling of Gene Expression and Alternative Polyadenylation with Whole Transcriptome Termini Site Sequencing (WTTS-Seq)

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Li, Rui; Michal, Jennifer J.; Wu, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Zhongzhen; Zhao, Hui; Xia, Yin; Du, Weiwei; Wildung, Mark R.; Pouchnik, Derek J.; Harland, Richard M.; Jiang, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    Construction of next-generation sequencing (NGS) libraries involves RNA manipulation, which often creates noisy, biased, and artifactual data that contribute to errors in transcriptome analysis. In this study, a total of 19 whole transcriptome termini site sequencing (WTTS-seq) and seven RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) libraries were prepared from Xenopus tropicalis adult and embryo samples to determine the most effective library preparation method to maximize transcriptomics investigation. We strongly suggest that appropriate primers/adaptors are designed to inhibit amplification detours and that PCR overamplification is minimized to maximize transcriptome coverage. Furthermore, genome annotation must be improved so that missing data can be recovered. In addition, a complete understanding of sequencing platforms is critical to limit the formation of false-positive results. Technically, the WTTS-seq method enriches both poly(A)+ RNA and complementary DNA, adds 5′- and 3′-adaptors in one step, pursues strand sequencing and mapping, and profiles both gene expression and alternative polyadenylation (APA). Although RNA-seq is cost prohibitive, tends to produce false-positive results, and fails to detect APA diversity and dynamics, its combination with WTTS-seq is necessary to validate transcriptome-wide APA. PMID:27098915

  4. PiggyBac transposon-based polyadenylation-signal trap for genome-wide mutagenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Limei; Liu, Peng; Sun, Liangliang; Bin Zhou; Fei, Jian

    2016-01-01

    We designed a new type of polyadenylation-signal (PAS) trap vector system in living mice, the piggyBac (PB) (PAS-trapping (EGFP)) gene trapping vector, which takes advantage of the efficient transposition ability of PB and efficient gene trap and insertional mutagenesis of PAS-trapping. The reporter gene of PB(PAS-trapping (EGFP)) is an EGFP gene with its own promoter, but lacking a poly(A) signal. Transgenic mouse lines carrying PB(PAS-trapping (EGFP)) and protamine 1 (Prm1) promoter-driven PB transposase transgenes (Prm1-PBase) were generated by microinjection. Male mice doubly positive for PB(PAS-trapping (EGFP)) and Prm1-PBase were crossed with WT females, generating offspring with various insertion mutations. We found that 44.8% (26/58) of pups were transposon-positive progenies. New transposon integrations comprised 26.9% (7/26) of the transposon-positive progenies. We found that 100% (5/5) of the EGFP fluorescence-positive mice had new trap insertions mediated by a PB transposon in transcriptional units. The direction of the EGFP gene in the vector was consistent with the direction of the endogenous gene reading frame. Furthermore, mice that were EGFP-PCR positive, but EGFP fluorescent negative, did not show successful gene trapping. Thus, the novel PB(PAS-trapping (EGFP)) system is an efficient genome-wide gene-trap mutagenesis in mice. PMID:27292714

  5. The Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor 6 (CPSF6) Subunit of the Capsid-recruited Pre-messenger RNA Cleavage Factor I (CFIm) Complex Mediates HIV-1 Integration into Genes.

    PubMed

    Rasheedi, Sheeba; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Serrao, Erik; Sowd, Gregory A; Qian, Juan; Hao, Caili; Dasgupta, Twishasri; Engelman, Alan N; Skowronski, Jacek

    2016-05-27

    HIV-1 favors integration into active genes and gene-enriched regions of host cell chromosomes, thus maximizing the probability of provirus expression immediately after integration. This requires cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 6 (CPSF6), a cellular protein involved in pre-mRNA 3' end processing that binds HIV-1 capsid and connects HIV-1 preintegration complexes to intranuclear trafficking pathways that link integration to transcriptionally active chromatin. CPSF6 together with CPSF5 and CPSF7 are known subunits of the cleavage factor I (CFIm) 3' end processing complex; however, CPSF6 could participate in additional protein complexes. The molecular mechanisms underpinning the role of CPSF6 in HIV-1 infection remain to be defined. Here, we show that a majority of cellular CPSF6 is incorporated into the CFIm complex. HIV-1 capsid recruits CFIm in a CPSF6-dependent manner, which suggests that the CFIm complex mediates the known effects of CPSF6 in HIV-1 infection. To dissect the roles of CPSF6 and other CFIm complex subunits in HIV-1 infection, we analyzed virologic and integration site targeting properties of a CPSF6 variant with mutations that prevent its incorporation into CFIm We show, somewhat surprisingly, that CPSF6 incorporation into CFIm is not required for its ability to direct preferential HIV-1 integration into genes. The CPSF5 and CPSF7 subunits appear to have only a minor, if any, role in this process even though they appear to facilitate CPSF6 binding to capsid. Thus, CPSF6 alone controls the key molecular interactions that specify HIV-1 preintegration complex trafficking to active chromatin. PMID:26994143

  6. A Xenopus laevis gene encoding EF-1 alpha S, the somatic form of elongation factor 1 alpha: sequence, structure, and identification of regulatory elements required for embryonic transcription.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A D; Krieg, P A

    1995-01-01

    Transcription of the Xenopus laevis EF-1 alpha S gene commences at the mid-blastula stage of embryonic development and then continues constitutively in all somatic tissues. The EF-1 alpha S promoter is extremely active in the early Xenopus embryo where EF-1 alpha S transcripts account for as much as 40% of all new polyadenylated transcripts. We have isolated the Xenopus EF-1 alpha S gene and used microinjection techniques to identify promoter elements responsible for embryonic transcription. These in vivo expression studies have identified an enhancer fragment, located approximately 4.4 kb upstream of the transcription start site, that is required for maximum expression from the EF-1 alpha S promoter. The enhancer fragment contains both an octamer and a G/C box sequence, but mutation studies indicate that the octamer plays no significant role in regulation of EF-1 alpha S expression in the embryo. The presence of a G/C element in the enhancer and of multiple G/C boxes in the proximal promoter region suggests that the G/C box binding protein, Sp1, plays a major role in the developmental regulation of EF-1 alpha S promoter activity. PMID:8565334

  7. Overexpression of SREBP1 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 1) promotes de novo fatty acid synthesis and triacylglycerol accumulation in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, H F; Luo, J; Zhao, W S; Yang, Y C; Tian, H B; Shi, H B; Bionaz, M

    2016-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1; gene name SREBF1) is known to be the master regulator of lipid homeostasis in mammals, including milk fat synthesis. The major role of SREBP1 in controlling milk fat synthesis has been demonstrated in bovine mammary epithelial cells. Except for a demonstrated role in controlling the expression of FASN, a regulatory role of SREBP1 on milk fat synthesis is very likely, but has not yet been demonstrated in goat mammary epithelial cells (GMEC). To explore the regulatory function of SREBP1 on de novo fatty acids and triacylglycerol synthesis in GMEC, we overexpressed the mature form of SREBP1 (active NH2-terminal fragment) in GMEC using a recombinant adenovirus vector (Ad-nSREBP1), with Ad-GFP (recombinant adenovirus of green fluorescent protein) as control, and infected the GMEC for 48 h. In infected cells, we assessed the expression of 20 genes related to milk fat synthesis using real time-quantitative PCR, the protein abundance of SREBP1 and FASN by Western blot, the production of triacylglycerol, and the fatty acid profile. Expression of SREBF1 was modest in mammary compared with the other tissues in dairy goats but its expression increased approximately 30-fold from pregnancy to lactation. The overexpression of the mature form of SREBP1 was confirmed by >200-fold higher expression of SREBF1 in Ad-nSREBP1 compared with Ad-GFP. We observed no changes in amount of the precursor form of SREBP1 protein but a >10-fold increase of the mature form of SREBP1 protein with Ad-nSREBP1. Compared with Ad-GFP cells (control), Ad-nSREBP1 cells had a significant increase in expression of genes related to long-chain fatty acid activation (ACSL1), transport (FABP3), desaturation (SCD1), de novo synthesis of fatty acids (ACSS2, ACLY, IDH1, ACACA, FASN, and ELOVL6), and transcriptional factors (NR1H3 and PPARG). We observed a >10-fold increase in expression of INSIG1 but SCAP was downregulated by Ad-nSREBP1. Among genes related to

  8. Overexpression of SREBP1 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 1) promotes de novo fatty acid synthesis and triacylglycerol accumulation in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, H F; Luo, J; Zhao, W S; Yang, Y C; Tian, H B; Shi, H B; Bionaz, M

    2016-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1; gene name SREBF1) is known to be the master regulator of lipid homeostasis in mammals, including milk fat synthesis. The major role of SREBP1 in controlling milk fat synthesis has been demonstrated in bovine mammary epithelial cells. Except for a demonstrated role in controlling the expression of FASN, a regulatory role of SREBP1 on milk fat synthesis is very likely, but has not yet been demonstrated in goat mammary epithelial cells (GMEC). To explore the regulatory function of SREBP1 on de novo fatty acids and triacylglycerol synthesis in GMEC, we overexpressed the mature form of SREBP1 (active NH2-terminal fragment) in GMEC using a recombinant adenovirus vector (Ad-nSREBP1), with Ad-GFP (recombinant adenovirus of green fluorescent protein) as control, and infected the GMEC for 48 h. In infected cells, we assessed the expression of 20 genes related to milk fat synthesis using real time-quantitative PCR, the protein abundance of SREBP1 and FASN by Western blot, the production of triacylglycerol, and the fatty acid profile. Expression of SREBF1 was modest in mammary compared with the other tissues in dairy goats but its expression increased approximately 30-fold from pregnancy to lactation. The overexpression of the mature form of SREBP1 was confirmed by >200-fold higher expression of SREBF1 in Ad-nSREBP1 compared with Ad-GFP. We observed no changes in amount of the precursor form of SREBP1 protein but a >10-fold increase of the mature form of SREBP1 protein with Ad-nSREBP1. Compared with Ad-GFP cells (control), Ad-nSREBP1 cells had a significant increase in expression of genes related to long-chain fatty acid activation (ACSL1), transport (FABP3), desaturation (SCD1), de novo synthesis of fatty acids (ACSS2, ACLY, IDH1, ACACA, FASN, and ELOVL6), and transcriptional factors (NR1H3 and PPARG). We observed a >10-fold increase in expression of INSIG1 but SCAP was downregulated by Ad-nSREBP1. Among genes related to

  9. Evolving nucleotide binding surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber-Emmons, T.; Rein, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the stability and nature of binding of a nucleotide to several known dehydrogenases. The employed approach includes calculation of hydrophobic stabilization of the binding motif and its intermolecular interaction with the ligand. The evolutionary changes of the binding motif are studied by calculating the Euclidean deviation of the respective dehydrogenases. Attention is given to the possible structural elements involved in the origin of nucleotide recognition by non-coded primordial polypeptides.

  10. Neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF) represses cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) transcription and antagonizes cAMP-response element-binding protein signaling through a dual NRSE mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Sihan; Yuan, Lin; Yang, Yinxiang; Zhang, Bowen; Liu, Qingbin; Chen, Lin; Yue, Wen; Li, Yanhua; Pei, Xuetao

    2012-12-14

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide plays a pivotal role in neuroprotection against stroke-related brain injury. However, the regulatory mechanism on CART transcription, especially the repression mechanism, is not fully understood. Here, we show that the transcriptional repressor neuron-restrictive silencer elements (NRSF, also known as REST) represses CART expression through direct binding to two NRSF-binding elements (NRSEs) in the CART promoter and intron 1 (named pNRSE and iNRSE, respectively). EMSA show that NRSF binds to pNRSE and iNRSE directly in vitro. ChIP assays show that NRSF recruits differential co-repressor complexes including CoREST and HDAC1 to these NRSEs. The presence of both NRSEs is required for efficient repression of CART transcription as indicated by reporter gene assays. NRSF overexpression antagonizes forskolin-mediated up-regulation of CART mRNA and protein. Ischemia insult triggered by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) enhances NRSF mRNA levels and then NRSF antagonizes the CREB signaling on CART activation, leading to augmented cell death. Depletion of NRSF in combination with forskolin treatment increases neuronal survival after ischemic insult. These findings reveal a novel dual NRSE mechanism by which NRSF represses CART expression and suggest that NRSF may serve as a therapeutic target for stroke treatment. PMID:23086924

  11. Neuron-restrictive Silencer Factor (NRSF) Represses Cocaine- and Amphetamine-regulated Transcript (CART) Transcription and Antagonizes cAMP-response Element-binding Protein Signaling through a Dual NRSE Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Sihan; Yuan, Lin; Yang, Yinxiang; Zhang, Bowen; Liu, Qingbin; Chen, Lin; Yue, Wen; Li, Yanhua; Pei, Xuetao

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide plays a pivotal role in neuroprotection against stroke-related brain injury. However, the regulatory mechanism on CART transcription, especially the repression mechanism, is not fully understood. Here, we show that the transcriptional repressor neuron-restrictive silencer elements (NRSF, also known as REST) represses CART expression through direct binding to two NRSF-binding elements (NRSEs) in the CART promoter and intron 1 (named pNRSE and iNRSE, respectively). EMSA show that NRSF binds to pNRSE and iNRSE directly in vitro. ChIP assays show that NRSF recruits differential co-repressor complexes including CoREST and HDAC1 to these NRSEs. The presence of both NRSEs is required for efficient repression of CART transcription as indicated by reporter gene assays. NRSF overexpression antagonizes forskolin-mediated up-regulation of CART mRNA and protein. Ischemia insult triggered by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) enhances NRSF mRNA levels and then NRSF antagonizes the CREB signaling on CART activation, leading to augmented cell death. Depletion of NRSF in combination with forskolin treatment increases neuronal survival after ischemic insult. These findings reveal a novel dual NRSE mechanism by which NRSF represses CART expression and suggest that NRSF may serve as a therapeutic target for stroke treatment. PMID:23086924

  12. Direct mass spectrometric determination of the stoichiometry and binding affinity of the complexes between nucleocapsid protein and RNA stem-loop hairpins of the HIV-1 Psi-recognition element.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Nathan; Fabris, Daniele

    2003-09-16

    The formation of noncovalent complexes between the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein p7 (NC) and RNA hairpins SL2-SL4 of the Psi-recognition element was investigated by direct infusion electrospray ionization-Fourier transform mass spectrometry (ESI-FTMS). The high resolution afforded by this method provided the unambiguous characterization of the stoichiometry and composition of complexes formed by multiple equilibria in solution. For each hairpin, the formation of a 1:1 complex was found to be the primary binding mode in solutions of intermediate salt content (150 mM ammonium acetate). Binding of multiple units of NC was observed with lower affinity and a maximum stoichiometry matching the limit calculated from the number of nucleotides in the construct and the size of the footprint of NC onto single-stranded nucleic acids, thus implying the defolding of the hairpin three-dimensional (3D) structure. Dissociation constants of 62 +/- 22 nM, 178 +/- 64 nM, and 1.3 +/- 0.5 microM were determined for SL2, SL3-2, and SL4, respectively, which are similar to values obtained by spectroscopic and calorimetric methods with the additional confidence offered by a direct, rather than inferred, knowledge of the binding stoichiometry. Competitive binding experiments carried out in solutions of intermediate ionic strength, which has the effect of weakening the electrostatic interactions in solution, provided a direct way of evaluating the stabilizing contributions of H-bonding and hydrophobic interactions that are more sensitive to the sequence and structural context of the different hairpins. The relative scale of binding affinity obtained in this environment reflects the combination of contributions provided by the different structures of both the tetraloop and the double-stranded stem. The importance of the stem 3D structure in modulating the binding activity was tested by a competitive binding experiment that included the SL3-2 RNA construct, a DNA analogue of SL3 (SL3(DNA)), and a

  13. An AU-Rich Sequence Element (UUUN[A/U]U) Downstream of the Edited C in Apolipoprotein B mRNA Is a High-Affinity Binding Site for Apobec-1: Binding of Apobec-1 to This Motif in the 3′ Untranslated Region of c-myc Increases mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Anant, Shrikant; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2000-01-01

    Apobec-1, the catalytic subunit of the mammalian apolipoprotein B (apoB) mRNA-editing enzyme, is a cytidine deaminase with RNA binding activity for AU-rich sequences. This RNA binding activity is required for Apobec-1 to mediate C-to-U RNA editing. Filter binding assays, using immobilized Apobec-1, demonstrate saturable binding to a 105-nt apoB RNA with a Kd of ∼435 nM. A series of AU-rich templates was used to identify a high-affinity (∼50 nM) binding site of consensus sequence UUUN[A/U]U, with multiple copies of this sequence constituting the high-affinity binding site. In order to determine whether this consensus site could be functionally demonstrated from within an apoB RNA, circular-permutation analysis was performed, revealing one major (UUUGAU) and one minor (UU) site located 3 and 16 nucleotides, respectively, downstream of the edited base. Secondary-structure predictions reveal a stem-loop flanking the edited base with Apobec-1 binding to the consensus site(s) at an open loop. A similar consensus (AUUUA) is present in the 3′ untranslated regions of several mRNAs, including that of c-myc, that are known to undergo rapid degradation. In this context, it is presumed that the consensus motif acts as a destabilizing element. As an independent test of the ability of Apobec-1 to bind to this sequence, F442A cells were transfected with Apobec-1 and the half-life of c-myc mRNA was determined following actinomycin D treatment. These studies demonstrated an increase in the half-life of c-myc mRNA from 90 to 240 min in control versus Apobec-1-expressing cells. Apobec-1 expression mutants, in which RNA binding activity is eliminated, failed to alter c-myc mRNA turnover. Taken together, the data establish a consensus binding site for Apobec-1 embedded in proximity to the edited base in apoB RNA. Binding to this site in other target RNAs raises the possibility that Apobec-1 may be involved in other aspects of RNA metabolism, independent of its role as an apoB RNA

  14. A unique element resembling a processed pseudogene.

    PubMed

    Robins, A J; Wang, S W; Smith, T F; Wells, J R

    1986-01-01

    We describe a unique DNA element with structural features of a processed pseudogene but with important differences. It is located within an 8.4-kilobase pair region of chicken DNA containing five histone genes, but it is not related to these genes. The presence of terminal repeats, an open reading frame (and stop codon), polyadenylation/processing signal, and a poly(A) rich region about 20 bases 3' to this, together with a lack of 5' promoter motifs all suggest a processed pseudogene. However, no parent gene can be detected in the genome by Southern blotting experiments and, in addition, codon boundary values and mid-base correlations are not consistent with a protein coding region of a eukaryotic gene. The element was detected in DNA from different chickens and in peafowl, but not in quail, pheasant, or turkey.

  15. A unique element resembling a processed pseudogene.

    PubMed

    Robins, A J; Wang, S W; Smith, T F; Wells, J R

    1986-01-01

    We describe a unique DNA element with structural features of a processed pseudogene but with important differences. It is located within an 8.4-kilobase pair region of chicken DNA containing five histone genes, but it is not related to these genes. The presence of terminal repeats, an open reading frame (and stop codon), polyadenylation/processing signal, and a poly(A) rich region about 20 bases 3' to this, together with a lack of 5' promoter motifs all suggest a processed pseudogene. However, no parent gene can be detected in the genome by Southern blotting experiments and, in addition, codon boundary values and mid-base correlations are not consistent with a protein coding region of a eukaryotic gene. The element was detected in DNA from different chickens and in peafowl, but not in quail, pheasant, or turkey. PMID:3941070

  16. Binding of estrogen receptors to switch sites and regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus of activated B cells suggests a direct influence of estrogen on antibody expression.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bart G; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Neale, Geoff; Gearhart, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Females and males differ in antibody isotype expression patterns and in immune responses to foreign- and self-antigens. For example, systemic lupus erythematosus is a condition that associates with the production of isotype-skewed anti-self antibodies, and exhibits a 9:1 female:male disease ratio. To explain differences between B cell responses in males and females, we sought to identify direct interactions of the estrogen receptor (ER) with the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus. This effort was encouraged by our previous identification of estrogen response elements (ERE) in heavy chain switch (S) regions. We conducted a full-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis (ChIP-seq) using DNA from LPS-activated B cells and an ERα-specific antibody. Results revealed ER binding to a wide region of DNA, spanning sequences from the JH cluster to Cδ, with peaks in Eμ and Sμ sites. Additional peaks of ERα binding were coincident with hs1,2 and hs4 sites in the 3' regulatory region (3'RR) of the heavy chain locus. This first demonstration of direct binding of ER to key regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin locus supports our hypothesis that estrogen and other nuclear hormone receptors and ligands may directly influence antibody expression and class switch recombination (CSR). Our hypothesis encourages the conduct of new experiments to evaluate the consequences of ER binding. A better understanding of ER:DNA interactions in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, and respective mechanisms, may ultimately translate to better control of antibody expression, better protection against pathogens, and prevention of pathologies caused by auto-immune disease. PMID:27494228

  17. Binding of estrogen receptors to switch sites and regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus of activated B cells suggests a direct influence of estrogen on antibody expression.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bart G; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Neale, Geoff; Gearhart, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Females and males differ in antibody isotype expression patterns and in immune responses to foreign- and self-antigens. For example, systemic lupus erythematosus is a condition that associates with the production of isotype-skewed anti-self antibodies, and exhibits a 9:1 female:male disease ratio. To explain differences between B cell responses in males and females, we sought to identify direct interactions of the estrogen receptor (ER) with the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus. This effort was encouraged by our previous identification of estrogen response elements (ERE) in heavy chain switch (S) regions. We conducted a full-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis (ChIP-seq) using DNA from LPS-activated B cells and an ERα-specific antibody. Results revealed ER binding to a wide region of DNA, spanning sequences from the JH cluster to Cδ, with peaks in Eμ and Sμ sites. Additional peaks of ERα binding were coincident with hs1,2 and hs4 sites in the 3' regulatory region (3'RR) of the heavy chain locus. This first demonstration of direct binding of ER to key regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin locus supports our hypothesis that estrogen and other nuclear hormone receptors and ligands may directly influence antibody expression and class switch recombination (CSR). Our hypothesis encourages the conduct of new experiments to evaluate the consequences of ER binding. A better understanding of ER:DNA interactions in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, and respective mechanisms, may ultimately translate to better control of antibody expression, better protection against pathogens, and prevention of pathologies caused by auto-immune disease.

  18. Conserved cis-regulatory elements for DNA-binding-with-one-finger and homeo-domain-leucine-zipper transcription factors regulate companion cell-specific expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana SUCROSE TRANSPORTER 2 gene.

    PubMed

    Schneidereit, Alexander; Imlau, Astrid; Sauer, Norbert

    2008-09-01

    The transition from young carbon-importing sink leaves of higher plants to mature carbon-exporting source leaves is paralleled by a complete reversal of phloem function. While sink-leaf phloem mediates the influx of reduced carbon from older source leaves and the release of this imported carbon to the sink-leaf mesophyll, source-leaf phloem catalyzes the uptake of photoassimilates into companion cells (CCs) and sieve elements (SEs) and the net carbon export from the leaf. Phloem loading in source leaves with sucrose, the main or exclusive transport form for fixed carbon in most higher plants, is catalyzed by plasma membrane-localized sucrose transporters. Consistent with the described physiological switch from sink to source, the promoter of the Arabidopsis AtSUC2 gene is active only in source-leaf CCs of Arabidopsis or of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). For the identification of regulatory elements involved in this companion cell-specific and source-specific gene expression, we performed detailed analyses of the AtSUC2 promoter by truncation and mutagenesis. A 126-bp promoter fragment was identified, which seems to contain these fragments and which drives AtSUC2-typical expression when combined with a 35S minimal promoter. Within this fragment, linker-scanning analyses revealed two cis-regulatory elements that were further characterized as putative binding sites for transcription factors of the DNA-binding-with-one-finger or the homeo-domain-leucine-zipper families. Similar or identical binding sites are found in other genes and in different plant species, suggesting an ancient regulatory mechanism for this important physiological switch. PMID:18551303

  19. A Transcription Factor γMYB1 Binds to the P1BS cis-Element and Activates PLA2-γ Expression with its Co-Activator γMYB2.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha Thi Kim; Kim, Soo Youn; Cho, Kwang-Moon; Hong, Jong Chan; Shin, Jeong Sheop; Kim, Hae Jin

    2016-04-01

    Phospholipase A2(PLA2) hydrolyzes phospholipid molecules to produce two products that are both precursors of second messengers of signaling pathways and signaling molecules per se.Arabidopsis thaliana PLA2 paralogs (-β,-γ and -δ) play critical roles during pollen development, pollen germination and tube growth. In this study, analysis of the PLA2-γ promoter using a deletion series revealed that the promoter region -153 to -1 is crucial for its pollen specificity. Using a yeast one-hybrid screening assay with the PLA2-γ promoter and an Arabidopsis transcription factor (TF)-only library, we isolated two novel MYB-like TFs belonging to the MYB-CC family, denoted here as γMYB1 and γMYB2. By electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we found that these two TFs bind directly to the P1BS (phosphate starvation response 1-binding sequence)cis-element of the PLA2-γ promoter. γMYB1 alone functioned as a transcriptional activator for PLA2-γ expression, whereas γMYB2 directly interacted with γMYB1 and enhanced its activation. Overexpression of γMYB1 in the mature pollen grain led to increased expression of not only the PLA2-γ gene but also of several genes whose promoters contain the P1BS cis-element and which are involved in the Pi starvation response, phospholipid biosynthesis and sugar synthesis. Based on these results, we suggest that the TF γMYB1 binds to the P1BS cis-element, activates the expression of PLA2-γ with the assistance of its co-activator, γMYB2, and regulates the expression of several target genes involved in many plant metabolic reactions. PMID:26872838

  20. Identification of a high affinity nucleocapsid protein binding element within the Moloney murine leukemia virus Psi-RNA packaging signal: implications for genome recognition.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, V; Melamed, J; Habib, D; Pullen, K; Wallace, K; Summers, M F

    2001-11-23

    Murine leukemia virus (MLV) is currently the most widely used gene delivery system in gene therapy trials. The simple retrovirus packages two copies of its RNA genome by a mechanism that involves interactions between the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of a virally-encoded Gag polyprotein and a segment of the RNA genome located just upstream of the Gag initiation codon, known as the Psi-site. Previous studies indicated that the MLV Psi-site contains three stem loops (SLB-SLD), and that stem loops SLC and SLD play prominent roles in packaging. We have developed a method for the preparation and purification of large quantities of recombinant Moloney MLV NC protein, and have studied its interactions with a series of oligoribonucleotides that contain one or more of the Psi-RNA stem loops. At RNA concentrations above approximately 0.3 mM, isolated stem loop SLB forms a duplex and stem loops SL-C and SL-D form kissing complexes, as expected from previous studies. However, neither the monomeric nor the dimeric forms of these isolated stem loops binds NC with significant affinity. Longer constructs containing two stem loops (SL-BC and SL-CD) also exhibit low affinities for NC. However, NC binds with high affinity and stoichiometrically to both the monomeric and dimeric forms of an RNA construct that contains all three stem loops (SL-BCD; K(d)=132(+/-55) nM). Titration of SL-BCD with NC also shifts monomer-dimer equilibrium toward the dimer. Mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that the conserved GACG tetraloops of stem loops C and D do not influence the monomer-dimer equilibrium of SL-BCD, that the tetraloop of stem loop B does not participate directly in NC binding, and that the tetraloops of stem loops C and D probably also do not bind to NC. These surprising results differ considerably from those observed for HIV-1, where NC binds to individual stem loops with high affinity via interactions with exposed residues of the tetraloops. The present results indicate that MLV NC binds

  1. Drosophila melanogaster mini spindles TOG3 utilizes unique structural elements to promote domain stability and maintain a TOG1- and TOG2-like tubulin-binding surface.

    PubMed

    Howard, Amy E; Fox, Jaime C; Slep, Kevin C

    2015-04-17

    Microtubule-associated proteins regulate microtubule (MT) dynamics spatially and temporally, which is essential for proper formation of the bipolar mitotic spindle. The XMAP215 family is comprised of conserved microtubule-associated proteins that use an array of tubulin-binding tumor overexpressed gene (TOG) domains, consisting of six (A-F) Huntingtin, elongation factor 3, protein phosphatase 2A, target of rapamycin (HEAT) repeats, to robustly increase MT plus-end polymerization rates. Recent work showed that TOG domains have differentially conserved architectures across the array, with implications for position-dependent TOG domain tubulin binding activities and function within the XMAP215 MT polymerization mechanism. Although TOG domains 1, 2, and 4 are well described, structural and mechanistic information characterizing TOG domains 3 and 5 is outstanding. Here, we present the structure and characterization of Drosophila melanogaster Mini spindles (Msps) TOG3. Msps TOG3 has two unique features as follows: the first is a C-terminal tail that stabilizes the ultimate four HEAT repeats (HRs), and the second is a unique architecture in HR B. Structural alignments of TOG3 with other TOG domain structures show that the architecture of TOG3 is most similar to TOG domains 1 and 2 and diverges from TOG4. Docking TOG3 onto recently solved Stu2 TOG1· and TOG2·tubulin complex structures suggests that TOG3 uses similarly conserved tubulin-binding intra-HEAT loop residues to engage α- and β-tubulin. This indicates that TOG3 has maintained a TOG1- and TOG2-like TOG-tubulin binding mode despite structural divergence. The similarity of TOG domains 1-3 and the divergence of TOG4 suggest that a TOG domain array with polarized structural diversity may play a key mechanistic role in XMAP215-dependent MT polymerization activity.

  2. Melatonin decreases estrogen receptor binding to estrogen response elements sites on the OCT4 gene in human breast cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Juliana; Arnosti, David; Trosko, James E.; Tai, Mei-Hui; Zuccari, Debora

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) pose a challenge in cancer treatment, as these cells can drive tumor growth and are resistant to chemotherapy. Melatonin exerts its oncostatic effects through the estrogen receptor (ER) pathway in cancer cells, however its action in CSCs is unclear. Here, we evaluated the effect of melatonin on the regulation of the transcription factor OCT4 (Octamer Binding 4) by estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). The cells were grown as a cell suspension or as anchorage independent growth, for the mammospheres growth, representing the CSCs population and treated with 10 nM estrogen (E2) or 10 μM of the environmental estrogen Bisphenol A (BPA) and 1 mM of melatonin. At the end, the cell growth as well as OCT4 and ERα expression and the binding activity of ERα to the OCT4 was assessed. The increase in number and size of mammospheres induced by E2 or BPA was reduced by melatonin treatment. Furthermore, binding of the ERα to OCT4 was reduced, accompanied by a reduction of OCT4 and ERα expression. Thus, melatonin treatment is effective against proliferation of BCSCs in vitro and impacts the ER pathway, demonstrating its potential therapeutic use in breast cancer. PMID:27551335

  3. Melatonin decreases estrogen receptor binding to estrogen response elements sites on the OCT4 gene in human breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Juliana; Arnosti, David; Trosko, James E; Tai, Mei-Hui; Zuccari, Debora

    2016-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) pose a challenge in cancer treatment, as these cells can drive tumor growth and are resistant to chemotherapy. Melatonin exerts its oncostatic effects through the estrogen receptor (ER) pathway in cancer cells, however its action in CSCs is unclear. Here, we evaluated the effect of melatonin on the regulation of the transcription factor OCT4 (Octamer Binding 4) by estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). The cells were grown as a cell suspension or as anchorage independent growth, for the mammospheres growth, representing the CSCs population and treated with 10 nM estrogen (E2) or 10 μM of the environmental estrogen Bisphenol A (BPA) and 1 mM of melatonin. At the end, the cell growth as well as OCT4 and ERα expression and the binding activity of ERα to the OCT4 was assessed. The increase in number and size of mammospheres induced by E2 or BPA was reduced by melatonin treatment. Furthermore, binding of the ERα to OCT4 was reduced, accompanied by a reduction of OCT4 and ERα expression. Thus, melatonin treatment is effective against proliferation of BCSCs in vitro and impacts the ER pathway, demonstrating its potential therapeutic use in breast cancer. PMID:27551335

  4. The ribosomal protein L34 gene from the mosquito, Aedes albopictus: exon-intron organization, copy number, and potential regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Niu, L L; Fallon, A M

    1999-12-01

    We describe the structural analysis of genomic DNA encoding ribosomal protein (rp) L34 from the mosquito, Aedes albopictus. Comparison of genomic DNA sequences encompassing approximately 8 kb with the rpL34 cDNA sequence showed that the gene contains three exons and two introns, encoding a primary transcript with a deduced size of 6196 nucleotides from the transcription start site to the polyadenylation site. Exon 1, which is not translated, measures only 45 bp, and is separated from Exon 2 by a 359 bp intron. Exon 2 measures 78 bp, and contains the AUG translation initiation codon 14 nucleotides downstream of its 5'-end. Downstream of Exon 2 is a 5270 bp intron, followed by the remainder of the coding sequence in Exon 3, which measures 444 bp including the polyadenylation signal. We used a novel PCR-based procedure to obtain 1.7 kb of DNA upstream of the rpL34 gene. Like the previously described Ae. albopictus rpL8 gene and various mammalian rp genes, the DNA immediately upstream of the rpL34 gene lacks the TATA box, and the rpL34 transcription initiation site is embedded in a characteristic polypyrimidine tract. The 5'-flanking DNA contained a number of cis-acting elements that potentially interact with transcription factors characterized by basic domains, zinc-coordinating DNA binding domains, helix-turn-helix motifs, and beta scaffold factors with minor groove contacts. Particularly striking was the conservation of an AP-4 binding site within 100 nucleotides upstream of the transcription initiation site in both Aal-rpL34 and Aal-rpL8 genes. Comparison of Southern hybridization signals using probes from the 5' and 3'-ends of the 5.3 kb second intron and the cDNA suggested that the Ae. albopictus rpL34 gene most likely occurs as a single expressed copy per haploid genome with restriction enzyme polymorphisms in the upstream flanking DNA and the likely presence of one or more pseudogenes. PMID:10612044

  5. The Hexane Fraction of cyperus rotundus Prevents Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Through the Inhibition of Liver X Receptor α-Mediated Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein-1c.

    PubMed

    Oh, Gyun-Sik; Yoon, Jin; Lee, Gang Gu; Kwak, Jong Hwan; Kim, Seung-Whan

    2015-01-01

    The goals of this study were (1) to examine the effects of Cyperus rotundus (CR) rhizome on cellular lipogenesis and non-alcoholic/diet-induced fatty liver disease, and (2) to elucidate the molecular mechanism behind its actions. The present investigation showed that the hexane fraction of CR rhizome (CRHF) reduced the elevated transcription levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) in primary hepatocytes following exposure to the liver X receptor α (LXRα) agonist. The SREBP-1c gene is a master regulator of lipogenesis and a key target of LXRα. CRHF inhibited not only the LXRα-dependent activation of the synthetic LXR response element (LXRE) promoter, but also the activation of the natural SREBP-1c promoter. Moreover, CRHF decreased (a) the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to the LXRE of the SREBP-1c gene; (b) the LXRα-dependent up-regulation of various lipogenic genes; and (c) the LXRα-mediated accumulation of triglycerides in primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, CRHF ameliorated fatty liver disease and reduced the expression levels of hepatic lipogenic genes in high sucrose diet (HSD)-fed mice. Interestingly, CRHF did not affect the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1, another important LXR target gene that is required for reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) and protects against atherosclerosis. Taken together, these results suggest that CRHF might be a novel therapeutic remedy for fatty liver disease through the selective inhibition of the lipogenic pathway. PMID:25967664

  6. Steap4 plays a critical role in osteoclastogenesis in vitro by regulating cellular iron/reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) activation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Ye, Shiqiao; Fujiwara, Toshifumi; Manolagas, Stavros C; Zhao, Haibo

    2013-10-18

    Iron is essential for osteoclast differentiation, and iron overload in a variety of hematologic diseases is associated with excessive bone resorption. Iron uptake by osteoclast precursors via the transferrin cycle increases mitochondrial biogenesis, reactive oxygen species production, and activation of cAMP response element-binding protein, a critical transcription factor downstream of receptor activator of NF-κB-ligand-induced calcium signaling. These changes are required for the differentiation of osteoclast precursors to mature bone-resorbing osteoclasts. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating cellular iron metabolism in osteoclasts remain largely unknown. In this report, we provide evidence that Steap4, a member of the six-transmembrane epithelial antigen of prostate (Steap) family proteins, is an endosomal ferrireductase with a critical role in cellular iron utilization in osteoclasts. Specifically, we show that Steap4 is the only Steap family protein that is up-regulated during osteoclast differentiation. Knocking down Steap4 expression in vitro by lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNAs inhibits osteoclast formation and decreases cellular ferrous iron, reactive oxygen species, and the activation of cAMP response element-binding protein. These results demonstrate that Steap4 is a critical enzyme for cellular iron uptake and utilization in osteoclasts and, thus, indispensable for osteoclast development and function.

  7. A short fragment of 23S rRNA containing the binding sites for two ribosomal proteins, L24 and L4, is a key element for rRNA folding during early assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Stelzl, U; Nierhaus, K H

    2001-01-01

    Previously we described an in vitro selection variant abbreviated SERF (in vitro selection from random rRNA fragments) that identifies protein binding sites within large RNAs. With this method, a small rRNA fragment derived from the 23S rRNA was isolated that binds simultaneously and independently the ribosomal proteins L4 and L24 from Escherichia coli. Until now the rRNA structure within the ternary complex L24-rRNA-L4 could not be studied due to the lack of an appropriate experimental strategy. Here we tackle the issue by separating the various complexes via native gel-electrophoresis and analyzing the rRNA structure by in-gel iodine cleavage of phosphorothioated RNA. The results demonstrate that during the transition from either the L4 or L24 binary complex to the ternary complex the structure of the rRNA fragment changes significantly. The identified protein binding sites are in excellent agreement with the recently reported crystal structure of the 50S subunit. Because both proteins play a prominent role in early assembly of the large subunit, the results suggest that the identified rRNA fragment is a key element for the folding of the 23S RNA during early assembly. The introduced in-gel cleavage method should be useful when an RNA structure within mixed populations of different but related complexes should be studied. PMID:11345438

  8. A short fragment of 23S rRNA containing the binding sites for two ribosomal proteins, L24 and L4, is a key element for rRNA folding during early assembly.

    PubMed

    Stelzl, U; Nierhaus, K H

    2001-04-01

    Previously we described an in vitro selection variant abbreviated SERF (in vitro selection from random rRNA fragments) that identifies protein binding sites within large RNAs. With this method, a small rRNA fragment derived from the 23S rRNA was isolated that binds simultaneously and independently the ribosomal proteins L4 and L24 from Escherichia coli. Until now the rRNA structure within the ternary complex L24-rRNA-L4 could not be studied due to the lack of an appropriate experimental strategy. Here we tackle the issue by separating the various complexes via native gel-electrophoresis and analyzing the rRNA structure by in-gel iodine cleavage of phosphorothioated RNA. The results demonstrate that during the transition from either the L4 or L24 binary complex to the ternary complex the structure of the rRNA fragment changes significantly. The identified protein binding sites are in excellent agreement with the recently reported crystal structure of the 50S subunit. Because both proteins play a prominent role in early assembly of the large subunit, the results suggest that the identified rRNA fragment is a key element for the folding of the 23S RNA during early assembly. The introduced in-gel cleavage method should be useful when an RNA structure within mixed populations of different but related complexes should be studied.

  9. Requirement of upstream Hfq-binding (ARN)x elements in glmS and the Hfq C-terminal region for GlmS upregulation by sRNAs GlmZ and GlmY.

    PubMed

    Salim, Nilshad N; Faner, Martha A; Philip, Jane A; Feig, Andrew L

    2012-09-01

    Hfq is an important RNA-binding protein that helps bacteria adapt to stress. Its primary function is to promote pairing between trans-acting small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) and their target mRNAs. Identification of essential Hfq-binding motifs in up-stream regions of rpoS and fhlA led us to ask the question whether these elements are a common occurrence among other Hfq-dependent mRNAs as well. Here, we confirm the presence of a similar (ARN)(x) motif in glmS RNA, a gene controlled by two sRNAs (GlmZ and GlmY) in an Hfq-dependent manner. GlmZ represents a canonical sRNA:mRNA pairing system, whereas GlmY is non-canonical, interfacing with the RNA processing protein YhbJ. We show that glmS interacts with both Hfq-binding surfaces in the absence of sRNAs. Even though two (ARN)(x) motifs are present, using a glmS:gfp fusion system, we determined that only one specific (ARN)(x) element is essential for regulation. Furthermore, we show that residues 66-72 in the C-terminal extension of Escherichia coli Hfq are essential for activation of GlmS expression by GlmY, but not with GlmZ. This result shows that the C-terminal extension of Hfq may be required for some forms of non-canonical sRNA regulation involving ancillary components such as additional RNAs or proteins.

  10. Synergy of aromatic residues and phosphoserines within the intrinsically disordered DNA-binding inhibitory elements of the Ets-1 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Geneviève; Meeker, Charles A; Bhachech, Niraja; Currie, Simon L; Okon, Mark; Graves, Barbara J; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2014-07-29

    The E26 transformation-specific (Ets-1) transcription factor is autoinhibited by a conformationally disordered serine-rich region (SRR) that transiently interacts with its DNA-binding ETS domain. In response to calcium signaling, autoinhibition is reinforced by calmodulin-dependent kinase II phosphorylation of serines within the SRR. Using mutagenesis and quantitative DNA-binding measurements, we demonstrate that phosphorylation-enhanced autoinhibition requires the presence of phenylalanine or tyrosine (ϕ) residues adjacent to the SRR phosphoacceptor serines. The introduction of additional phosphorylated Ser-ϕ-Asp, but not Ser-Ala-Asp, repeats within the SRR dramatically reinforces autoinhibition. NMR spectroscopic studies of phosphorylated and mutated SRR variants, both within their native context and as separate trans-acting peptides, confirmed that the aromatic residues and phosphoserines contribute to the formation of a dynamic complex with the ETS domain. Complementary NMR studies also identified the SRR-interacting surface of the ETS domain, which encompasses its positively charged DNA-recognition interface and an adjacent region of neutral polar and nonpolar residues. Collectively, these studies highlight the role of aromatic residues and their synergy with phosphoserines in an intrinsically disordered regulatory sequence that integrates cellular signaling and gene expression.

  11. Identification of an osteoclast transcription factor that binds to the human T cell leukemia virus type I-long terminal repeat enhancer element.

    PubMed

    Inoue, D; Santiago, P; Horne, W C; Baron, R

    1997-10-01

    Transgenic mice expressing human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-tax under the control of HTLV-I-long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter develop skeletal abnormalities with high bone turnover and myelofibrosis. In these animals, Tax is highly expressed in bone with a pattern of expression restricted to osteoclasts and spindle-shaped cells within the endosteal myelofibrosis. To test the hypothesis that lineage-specific transcription factors promote transgene expression from the HTLV-I-LTR in osteoclasts, we first examined tax expression in transgenic bone marrow cultures. Expression was dependent on 1alpha,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol and coincided with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) expression, a marker of osteoclast differentiation. Furthermore, Tax was expressed in vitronectin receptor-positive mononuclear precursors as well as in mature osteoclast-like cells (OCLs). Consistent with our hypothesis, electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed the presence of an OCL nuclear factor (NFOC-1) that binds to the LTR 21-base pair direct repeat, a region critical for the promoter activity. This binding is further enhanced by Tax. Since NFOC-1 is absent in macrophages and conserved in osteoclasts among species including human, such a factor may play a role in lineage determination and/or in expression of the differentiated osteoclast phenotype.

  12. The Arabidopsis ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR1 Regulates Abiotic Stress-Responsive Gene Expression by Binding to Different cis-Acting Elements in Response to Different Stress Signals1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Mei-Chun; Liao, Po-Ming; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Lin, Tsan-Piao

    2013-01-01

    ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR1 (ERF1) is an upstream component in both jasmonate (JA) and ethylene (ET) signaling and is involved in pathogen resistance. Accumulating evidence suggests that ERF1 might be related to the salt stress response through ethylene signaling. However, the specific role of ERF1 in abiotic stress and the molecular mechanism underlying the signaling cross talk still need to be elucidated. Here, we report that ERF1 was highly induced by high salinity and drought stress in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The salt stress induction required both JA and ET signaling but was inhibited by abscisic acid. ERF1-overexpressing lines (35S:ERF1) were more tolerant to drought and salt stress. They also displayed constitutively smaller stomatal aperture and less transpirational water loss. Surprisingly, 35S:ERF1 also showed enhanced heat tolerance and up-regulation of heat tolerance genes compared with the wild type. Several suites of genes activated by JA, drought, salt, and heat were found in microarray analysis of 35S:ERF1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays found that ERF1 up-regulates specific suites of genes in response to different abiotic stresses by stress-specific binding to GCC or DRE/CRT. In response to biotic stress, ERF1 bound to GCC boxes but not DRE elements; conversely, under abiotic stress, we observed specific binding of ERF1 to DRE elements. Furthermore, ERF1 bound preferentially to only one among several GCC box or DRE/CRT elements in the promoter region of its target genes. ERF1 plays a positive role in salt, drought, and heat stress tolerance by stress-specific gene regulation, which integrates JA, ET, and abscisic acid signals. PMID:23719892

  13. Profiles of antioxidant/electrophile response element (ARE/EpRE) nuclear protein binding and c-Ha-ras transactivation in vascular smooth muscle cells treated with oxidative metabolites of benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Miller, K P; Chen, Y H; Hastings, V L; Bral, C M; Ramos, K S

    2000-11-01

    Activation of nuclear protein binding to the antioxidant/electrophile response element (ARE/EpRE) by benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) is associated with transcriptional deregulation of c-Ha-ras. This response may be mediated by oxidative intermediates of BaP generated during the course of cellular metabolism. To test this hypothesis, the profile of ARE/EpRE protein binding and transactivation elicited by BaP was compared with that of 3-hydroxy BaP (3-OH BaP) (0.03 to 3.0 microM), BaP 7,8-dihydrodiol (BaP 7,8-diol) (0.03 to 3.0 microM), BaP 3,6-quinone (BaP 3,6-Q) (0.0003 to 3.0 microM), and H(2)O(2) (25 to 100 microM). Specific protein binding to the consensus c-Ha-ras ARE/EpRE was observed in vSMCs treated with all BaP metabolites at concentrations considerably lower than those required for the parent compound. H(2)O(2), a by-product of BaP 3,6-Q redox cycling, also increased binding to the ARE/EpRE. Treatment of vSMCs with oxidative BaP metabolites or H(2)O(2) transactivated the c-Ha-ras promoter in all instances, but the response was consistently half of the maximal induction elicited by BaP. Similar proteins cross-linked specifically to the consensus c-Ha-ras ARE/EpRE sequence in cells treated with BaP or its oxidative intermediates. The protein binding profile in the c-Ha-ras promoter was similar to that in the NADPH:quinone reductase gene (NQO(1)) and the glutathione S-transferase Ya gene (GSTYa) promoters, but the relative abundance of individual complexes was promoter-specific. We conclude that oxidative intermediates of BaP mediate activation of nuclear protein binding to ARE/EpRE and contribute to transcriptional de-regulation of c-Ha-ras in vSMCs.

  14. Selective Modulation of Some Forms of Schaffer Collateral-CA1 Synaptic Plasticity in Mice with a Disruption of the "CPEB-1" Gene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alarcon, Juan M.; Hodgman, Rebecca; Theis, Martin; Huang, Yi-Shuian; Kandel, Eric R.; Richter, Joel D.

    2004-01-01

    CPEB-1 is a sequence-specific RNA binding protein that stimulates the polyadenylation-induced translation of mRNAs containing the cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE). Although CPEB-1 was identified originally in Xenopus oocytes, it has also been found at postsynaptic sites of hippocampal neurons where, in response to N-methyl-D-aspartate…

  15. High resolution 2D-NMR studies indicating complete assignments and conformational characteristics of the NF-kappa B binding enhancer element of HIV-LTR.

    PubMed

    Singh, M P; Fregeau, N L; Pon, R T; Lown, J W

    1995-10-01

    The asymmetrical DNA duplex [5'd(AAGGGACTTTCC)].[5'-d(GGAAAGTCCCTT)] has been studied by one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques. The sequence is comprised of the actual 10 base-pair long binding site for the transcription factor NF-kappa B in the enhancer sequence of the long term repeat (LTR) region of HIV and SIV types of retroviruses associated with the AIDS syndrome. Two additional A.T base-pairs are also included on one end for an added interest in the 12-bp duplex sequence with a pseudo dyad-symmetric disposition of the oligopurine and oligopyrimidine segments, as it appears in the HIV-1 genome. Phase-sensitive two-dimensional spectra (NOESY, ROESY, COSY and TOCSY) were obtained at three different temperatures (5, 15 and 25 degrees C) for a complete assignment of the non-exchangeable protons by tracing through sequence specific intra- and internucleotide connectivities. 2D-NOESY spectra were also acquired in aqueous (90% H2O-D2O) solutions, with two different methods of water signal suppression, to assign the exchangeable protons from specific NOE correlations. Adenine H2 protons were assigned by the use of NOE correlations and from T1 relaxation time measurements. The general spectral features and semi-quantitative interproton distance estimates indicate a B-DNA type conformation. However, some distinctly unusual features associated with the nucleotides at and immediately adjacent to both the 5'-and 3'-ends of AAA/TTT and GGG/CCC segments were noted. The complete assignments, and the observed characteristics, will be of significant value in studying the complexes of this transcriptionally active DNA domain with the protein and other rationally designed DNA binding agents.

  16. Tumor necrosis factor alpha induces proteins that bind specifically to kappa B-like enhancer elements and regulate interleukin 2 receptor alpha-chain gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Lowenthal, J W; Ballard, D W; Böhnlein, E; Greene, W C

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the biochemical basis for the activation of interleukin 2 receptor alpha-subunit (IL-2R alpha) gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes by a cytokine (tumor necrosis factor alpha), a T-cell mitogen (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate), and the transactivator protein (Tax) from the type I human T-cell leukemia virus. Using in vivo transfection techniques specificially designed for these primary T cells in conjunction with in vitro gel retardation and DNA footprinting assays, we found that activation of the IL-2R alpha promoter by each of these agents involves the induction of nuclear proteins that specifically interact with a kappa B-like enhancer element (i.e., an element resembling the immunoglobulin kappa-chain enhancer sequence recognized by transcription factor NF-kappa B). DNA-protein crosslinking studies revealed that primary T cells express at least three different inducible DNA-binding proteins (50-55, 70-75, and 80-90 kDa) that specifically interact with this IL-2R alpha kappa B element. Images PMID:2494663

  17. Retinoic acid activates human inducible nitric oxide synthase gene through binding of RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha} heterodimer to a novel retinoic acid response element in the promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Fang; Liu Yan; Liu Li; Wu Kailang; Wei Wei; Zhu Ying . E-mail: yingzhu@whu.edu.cn; Wu Jianguo . E-mail: wu9988@vip.sina.com

    2007-04-06

    Human inducible nitric oxide synthase (hiNOS) catalyzes nitric oxide (NO) which has a significant effect on tumor suppression and cancer therapy. Here we revealed the detailed molecular mechanism involved in the regulation of hiNOS expression induced by retinoic acid (RA). We showed that RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha} heterodimer was important in hiNOS promoter activation, hiNOS protein expression, and NO production. Serial deletion and site-directed mutation analysis revealed two half-sites of retinoic acid response element (RARE) spaced by 5 bp located at -172 to -156 in the hiNOS promoter. EMSA and ChIP assays demonstrated that RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha} directly bound to this RARE of hiNOS promoter. Our results suggested the identification of a novel RARE in the hiNOS promoter and the roles of the nuclear receptors (RAR{alpha}/RXR{alpha}) in the induction of hiNOS by RA.

  18. AzaHx, a novel fluorescent, DNA minor groove and G·C recognition element: Synthesis and DNA binding properties of a p-anisyl-4-aza-benzimidazole-pyrrole-imidazole (azaHx-PI) polyamide.

    PubMed

    Satam, Vijay; Babu, Balaji; Patil, Pravin; Brien, Kimberly A; Olson, Kevin; Savagian, Mia; Lee, Megan; Mepham, Andrew; Jobe, Laura Beth; Bingham, John P; Pett, Luke; Wang, Shuo; Ferrara, Maddi; Bruce, Chrystal D; Wilson, W David; Lee, Moses; Hartley, John A; Kiakos, Konstantinos

    2015-09-01

    The design, synthesis, and DNA binding properties of azaHx-PI or p-anisyl-4-aza-benzimidazole-pyrrole-imidazole (5) are described. AzaHx, 2-(p-anisyl)-4-aza-benzimidazole-5-carboxamide, is a novel, fluorescent DNA recognition element, derived from Hoechst 33258 to recognize G·C base pairs. Supported by theoretical data, the results from DNase I footprinting, CD, ΔT(M), and SPR studies provided evidence that an azaHx/IP pairing, formed from antiparallel stacking of two azaHx-PI molecules in a side-by-side manner in the minor groove, selectively recognized a C-G doublet. AzaHx-PI was found to target 5'-ACGCGT-3', the Mlu1 Cell Cycle Box (MCB) promoter sequence with specificity and significant affinity (K(eq) 4.0±0.2×10(7) M(-1)).

  19. Binding of NF-kappaB p65 subunit to the promoter elements is involved in LPS-induced transactivation of miRNA genes in human biliary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Hu, Guoku; Gong, Ai-Yu; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2010-01-01

    The majority of human miRNA genes is transcribed by polymerase II and can be classified as class II genes similar to protein-coding genes. Whereas current research on miRNAs has focused on the physiological and pathological functions, the molecular mechanisms underlying their transcriptional regulation are largely unknown. We recently reported that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alters mature miRNA expression profile in human biliary epithelial cells. In this study, we tested the role of transcription factor NF-κB in LPS-induced transcription of select miRNA genes. Of the majority of LPS-up-regulated mature miRNAs in cultured human biliary epithelial cells, potential NF-κB binding sites were identified in the putative promoter elements of their corresponding genes. Inhibition of NF-κB activation by SC-514, an IKK2 inhibitor, blocked LPS-induced up-regulation of a subset of pri-miRNAs, including pri-miR-17-92, pri-miR-125b-1, pri-miR-21, pri-miR-23b-27b-24-1, pri-miR-30b, pri-miR-130a and pri-miR-29a. Moreover, direct binding of NF-κB p65 subunit to the promoter elements of mir-17-92, mir-125b-1, mir-21, mir-23b-27b-24-1, mir-30b and mir-130a genes was identified by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis and confirmed by the luciferase reporter assay. Thus, a subset of miRNA genes is regulated in human biliary epithelial cells through NF-κB activation induced by LPS, suggesting a role of the NF-κB pathway in the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes. PMID:20144951

  20. Carbenoxolone prevents the development of fatty liver in C57BL/6-Lep ob/ob mice via the inhibition of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c activity and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Sang Dal; Kim, Chi-Hyun; Park, Ji Seon; Jung, Won Hoon; Park, Sung Bum; Kim, Hee Youn; Bae, Gyu Hwan; Kim, Ta Jan; Kim, Ki Young

    2012-09-15

    Carbenoxolone is the 3-hemisuccinate of glycyrrhetinic acid, the active principal of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra). It was reported that carbenoxolone improved glucose tolerance with increased insulin sensitivity in mice with high fat diet-induced obesity. In the present study, we elucidated the protective effect of carbenoxolone in fatty liver animal models of C57BL/6-Lep(ob/ob) mice through inhibition of hepatic lipogenesis and apoptosis. In addition, the potential mechanisms by which carbenoxolone could exert such protection were elucidated. Carbenoxolone was daily administrated by gavage for 28 days in C57BL/6 and C57BL/6-Lep(ob/ob) mice. Carbenoxolone prevented the plasma triglyceride and free fatty acid accumulation associated with the reduction of the expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c, liver X receptor, fatty acid synthase and acethyl-CoA carboxylase in the livers of C57BL/6-Lep(ob/ob) mice. Carbenoxolone also prevented hepatic injury through anti-apoptotic action in the livers of C57BL/6-Lep(ob/ob) mice, accompanied by increased Bcl-2 expression and suppressed Bax and cytochrome c expression. As a mechanism, increased inflammatory cytokine expressions were inhibited by carbenoxolone in the fatty livers of C57BL/6-Lep(ob/ob) mice. Furthermore, carbenoxolone inhibited free fatty acid (oleate/palmitate) induced reactive oxygen species formation and reversed free fatty acid induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization in HepG2 cells. Carbenoxolone prevents the development of fatty liver by inhibiting sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c expression and activity with an anti-apoptotic mechanism via the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine and reactive oxygen species formation in the livers of C57BL/6-Lep(ob/ob) mice. It is suggested that carbenoxolone prevents the development and progression of fatty liver disease in patients with insulin resistance.

  1. Ginsenoside F2 reduces hair loss by controlling apoptosis through the sterol regulatory element-binding protein cleavage activating protein and transforming growth factor-β pathways in a dihydrotestosterone-induced mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shin, Heon-Sub; Park, Sang-Yong; Hwang, Eun-Son; Lee, Don-Gil; Mavlonov, Gafurjon Turdalievich; Yi, Tae-Hoo

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to test whether ginsenoside F2 can reduce hair loss by influencing sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) and the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) pathway of apoptosis in dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-treated hair cells and in a DHT-induced hair loss model in mice. Results for ginsenoside F2 were compared with finasteride. DHT inhibits proliferation of hair cells and induces androgenetic alopecia and was shown to activate an apoptosis signal pathway both in vitro and in vivo. The cell-based 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay showed that the proliferation rates of DHT-treated human hair dermal papilla cells (HHDPCs) and HaCaTs increased by 48% in the ginsenoside F2-treated group and by 12% in the finasteride-treated group. Western blot analysis showed that ginsenoside F2 decreased expression of TGF-β2 related factors involved in hair loss. The present study suggested a hair loss related pathway by changing SCAP related apoptosis pathway, which has been known to control cholesterol metabolism. SCAP, sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) and caspase-12 expression in the ginsenoside F2-treated group were decreased compared to the DHT and finasteride-treated group. C57BL/6 mice were also prepared by injection with DHT and then treated with ginsenoside F2 or finasteride. Hair growth rate, density, thickness measurements and tissue histotological analysis in these groups suggested that ginsenoside F2 suppressed hair cell apoptosis and premature entry to catagen more effectively than finasteride. Our results indicated that ginsenoside F2 decreased the expression of TGF-β2 and SCAP proteins, which have been suggested to be involved in apoptosis and entry into catagen. This study provides evidence those factors in the SCAP pathway could be targets for hair loss prevention drugs.

  2. Additive roles of PthAs in bacterial growth and pathogenicity associated with nucleotide polymorphisms in effector-binding elements of citrus canker susceptibility genes.

    PubMed

    Abe, Valeria Yukari; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2016-10-01

    Citrus canker, caused by Xanthomonas citri, affects most commercial citrus varieties. All X. citri strains possess at least one transcription activator-like effector of the PthA family that activates host disease susceptibility (S) genes. The X. citri strain 306 encodes four PthA effectors; nevertheless, only PthA4 is known to elicit cankers on citrus. As none of the PthAs act as avirulence factors on citrus, we hypothesized that PthAs 1-3 might also contribute to pathogenicity on certain hosts. Here, we show that, although PthA4 is indispensable for canker formation in six Brazilian citrus varieties, PthAs 1 and 3 contribute to canker development in 'Pera' sweet orange, but not in 'Tahiti' lemon. Deletions in two or more pthA genes reduce bacterial growth in planta more pronouncedly than single deletions, suggesting an additive role of PthAs in pathogenicity and bacterial fitness. The contribution of PthAs 1 and 3 in canker formation in 'Pera' plants does not correlate with the activation of the canker S gene, LOB1 (LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES 1), but with the induction of other PthA targets, including LOB2 and citrus dioxygenase (DIOX). LOB1, LOB2 and DIOX show differential PthA-dependent expression between 'Pera' and 'Tahiti' plants that appears to be associated with nucleotide polymorphisms found at or near PthA-binding sites. We also present evidence that LOB1 activation alone is not sufficient to elicit cankers on citrus, and that DIOX acts as a canker S gene in 'Pera', but not 'Tahiti', plants. Our results suggest that the activation of multiple S genes, such as LOB1 and DIOX, is necessary for full canker development.

  3. Soy isoflavones increase quinone reductase in hepa-1c1c7 cells via estrogen receptor beta and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 binding to the antioxidant response element.

    PubMed

    Froyen, Erik B; Steinberg, Francene M

    2011-09-01

    Soy protein and isoflavones (genistein and daidzein) have been demonstrated to increase quinone reductase (QR) activity, protein, and mRNA in animal and cell culture models. However, their mechanism of action has not been completely characterized. Additionally, it has not been determined if equol, a daidzein metabolite, can modulate QR activity and expression. Estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is thought to be involved in stimulating QR gene transcription by anti-estrogens and phytoestrogens, along with nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). This study tested the hypothesis that genistein, daidzein and equol increase quinone reductase activity, protein and mRNA via ERβ and Nrf2 binding to the QR antioxidant response element (ARE). QR expression and activity were determined using TaqMan polymerase chain reaction, protein immunoblots and activity assays. Molecular events were investigated using luciferase reporter gene assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Hepa-1c1c7 cells were treated with control [0.1% (v:v) dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)]; 1 μmol/L β-naphthoflavone (positive control); 5 μmol/L resveratrol (ChIP positive control for ERβ binding) and 1, 5 and 25 μmol/L genistein, daidzein or equol. Treatment durations were 1 h (ChIP), 24 h (mRNA and luciferase assays) and 24 and 48 h (protein and activity). Genistein, daidzein and equol increased QR activity, protein and mRNA, with daidzein and equol having more of an impact at physiologic concentrations (1 and 5 μmol/L) compared to genistein. Furthermore, the study results demonstrate that genistein, daidzein and equol interact with the QR ARE and that daidzein and equol act via both ERβ and Nrf2 binding strongly to the QR ARE.

  4. Association of MMP7 -181A→G Promoter Polymorphism with Gastric Cancer Risk: INFLUENCE OF NICOTINE IN DIFFERENTIAL ALLELE-SPECIFIC TRANSCRIPTION VIA INCREASED PHOSPHORYLATION OF cAMP-RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN (CREB).

    PubMed

    Kesh, Kousik; Subramanian, Lakshmi; Ghosh, Nillu; Gupta, Vinayak; Gupta, Arnab; Bhattacharya, Samir; Mahapatra, Nitish R; Swarnakar, Snehasikta

    2015-06-01

    Elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase7 (MMP7) has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in cancer invasion. The -181A→G (rs11568818) polymorphism in the MMP7 promoter modulates gene expression and possibly affects cancer progression. Here, we evaluated the impact of -181A→G polymorphism on MMP7 promoter activity and its association with gastric cancer risk in eastern Indian case-control cohorts (n = 520). The GG genotype as compared with the AA genotype was predisposed (p = 0.02; odds ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.1-3.3) to gastric cancer risk. Stratification analysis showed that tobacco addiction enhanced gastric cancer risk in GG subjects when compared with AA subjects (p = 0.03, odds ratio = 2.46, and 95% confidence interval = 1.07-5.68). Meta-analysis revealed that tobacco enhanced the risk for cancer more markedly in AG and GG carriers. Activity and expression of MMP7 were significantly higher in GG than in AA carriers. In support, MMP7 promoter-reporter assays showed greater transcriptional activity toward A to G transition under basal/nicotine-induced/cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) overexpressed conditions in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Moreover, nicotine (a major component of tobacco) treatment significantly up-regulated MMP7 expression due to enhanced CREB phosphorylation followed by its nuclear translocation in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed higher binding of phosphorylated CREB with the -181G than the -181A allele. Altogether, specific binding of phosphorylated CREB to the G allele-carrying promoter enhances MMP7 gene expression that is further augmented by nicotine due to increased CREB phosphorylation and thereby increases the risk for gastric cancer.

  5. Dietary fiber prevents obesity-related liver lipotoxicity by modulating sterol-regulatory element binding protein pathway in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Han, Shufen; Jiao, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jiaying; Wan, Zhongxiao; Zhang, Weiguo; Gao, Xiaoran; Qin, Liqiang

    2015-10-29

    Adequate intake of dietary fibers has proven metabolic and cardiovascular benefits, molecular mechanisms remain still limited. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of cereal dietary fiber on obesity-related liver lipotoxicity in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet and underlying mechanism. Forty-eight adult male C57BL/6J mice were randomly given a reference chow diet, or a high fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet supplemented with or without oat fiber or wheat bran fiber for 24 weeks. Our results showed mice fed oat or wheat bran fiber exhibited lower weight gain, lipid profiles and insulin resistance, compared with HFC diet. The two cereal dietary fibers potently decreased protein expressions of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 and key factors involved in lipogenesis, including fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase in target tissues. At molecular level, the two cereal dietary fibers augmented protein expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and gamma, liver X receptor alpha, and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 in target tissues. Our findings indicated that cereal dietary fiber supplementation abrogated obesity-related liver lipotoxicity and dyslipidemia in C57BL/6J mice fed a HFC diet. In addition, the efficacy of oat fiber is greater than wheat bran fiber in normalizing these metabolic disorders and pathological profiles.

  6. Mogrol Derived from Siraitia grosvenorii Mogrosides Suppresses 3T3-L1 Adipocyte Differentiation by Reducing cAMP-Response Element-Binding Protein Phosphorylation and Increasing AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Harada, Naoki; Ishihara, Mikako; Horiuchi, Hiroko; Ito, Yuta; Tabata, Hiromitsu; Suzuki, Yasushi A; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Yamaji, Ryoichi; Inui, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of mogrol, an aglycone of mogrosides from Siraitia grosvenorii, on adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Mogrol, but not mogrosides, suppressed triglyceride accumulation by affecting early (days 0-2) and late (days 4-8), but not middle (days 2-4), differentiation stages. At the late stage, mogrol increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and reduced glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. At the early stage, mogrol promoted AMPK phosphorylation, inhibited the induction of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ; a master regulator of adipogenesis), and reduced 3T3-L1 cell contents (e.g., clonal expansion). In addition, mogrol, but not the AMPK activator AICAR, suppressed the phosphorylation and activity of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), which regulates C/EBPβ expression. These results indicated that mogrol suppressed adipogenesis by reducing CREB activation in the initial stage of cell differentiation and by activating AMPK signaling in both the early and late stages of this process. PMID:27583359

  7. Dietary fiber prevents obesity-related liver lipotoxicity by modulating sterol-regulatory element binding protein pathway in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shufen; Jiao, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jiaying; Wan, Zhongxiao; Zhang, Weiguo; Gao, Xiaoran; Qin, Liqiang

    2015-01-01

    Adequate intake of dietary fibers has proven metabolic and cardiovascular benefits, molecular mechanisms remain still limited. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of cereal dietary fiber on obesity-related liver lipotoxicity in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet and underlying mechanism. Forty-eight adult male C57BL/6J mice were randomly given a reference chow diet, or a high fat/choleserol (HFC) diet supplemented with or without oat fiber or wheat bran fiber for 24 weeks. Our results showed mice fed oat or wheat bran fiber exhibtied lower weight gain, lipid profiles and insulin resistance, compared with HFC diet. The two cereal dietary fibers potently decreased protein expressions of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 and key factors involved in lipogenesis, including fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase in target tissues. At molecular level, the two cereal dietary fibers augmented protein expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and gamma, liver X receptor alpha, and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 in target tissues. Our findings indicated that cereal dietary fiber supplementation abrogated obesity-related liver lipotoxicity and dyslipidemia in C57BL/6J mice fed a HFC diet. In addition, the efficacy of oat fiber is greater than wheat bran fiber in normalizing these metabolic disorders and pathological profiles. PMID:26510459

  8. Mogrol Derived from Siraitia grosvenorii Mogrosides Suppresses 3T3-L1 Adipocyte Differentiation by Reducing cAMP-Response Element-Binding Protein Phosphorylation and Increasing AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Naoki; Ishihara, Mikako; Horiuchi, Hiroko; Ito, Yuta; Tabata, Hiromitsu; Suzuki, Yasushi A.; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Yamaji, Ryoichi; Inui, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of mogrol, an aglycone of mogrosides from Siraitia grosvenorii, on adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Mogrol, but not mogrosides, suppressed triglyceride accumulation by affecting early (days 0–2) and late (days 4–8), but not middle (days 2–4), differentiation stages. At the late stage, mogrol increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and reduced glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. At the early stage, mogrol promoted AMPK phosphorylation, inhibited the induction of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ; a master regulator of adipogenesis), and reduced 3T3-L1 cell contents (e.g., clonal expansion). In addition, mogrol, but not the AMPK activator AICAR, suppressed the phosphorylation and activity of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), which regulates C/EBPβ expression. These results indicated that mogrol suppressed adipogenesis by reducing CREB activation in the initial stage of cell differentiation and by activating AMPK signaling in both the early and late stages of this process. PMID:27583359

  9. The BARD1 C-Terminal Domain Structure and Interactions with Polyadenylation Factor CstF-50

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Ross A.; Lee, Megan S.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Williams, R. Scott; Tainer, John A.; Glover, J. N. Mark

    2009-07-13

    The BARD1 N-terminal RING domain binds BRCA1 while the BARD1 C-terminal ankyrin and tandem BRCT repeat domains bind CstF-50 to modulate mRNA processing and RNAP II stability in response to DNA damage. Here we characterize the BARD1 structural biochemistry responsible for CstF- 50 binding. The crystal structure of the BARD1 BRCT domain uncovers a degenerate phosphopeptide binding pocket lacking the key arginine required for phosphopeptide interactions in other BRCT proteins.Small angle X-ray scattering together with limited proteolysis results indicates that ankyrin and BRCT domains are linked by a flexible tether and do not adopt a fixed orientation relative to one another. Protein pull-down experiments utilizing a series of purified BARD1 deletion mutants indicate that interactions between the CstF-50 WD-40 domain and BARD1 involve the ankyrin-BRCT linker but do not require ankyrin or BRCT domains. The structural plasticity imparted by the ANK-BRCT linker helps to explain the regulated assembly of different protein BARD1 complexes with distinct functions in DNA damage signaling including BARD1-dependent induction of apoptosis plus p53 stabilization and interactions. BARD1 architecture and plasticity imparted by the ANK-BRCT linker are suitable to allow the BARD1 C-terminus to act as a hub with multiple binding sites to integrate diverse DNA damage signals directly to RNA polymerase.

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat increases the expression of cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 73-kilodalton subunit modulating cellular and viral expression.

    PubMed

    Calzado, Marco A; Sancho, Rocío; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2004-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein, which is essential for HIV gene expression and viral replication, is known to mediate pleiotropic effects on various cell functions. For instance, Tat protein is able to regulate the rate of transcription of host cellular genes and to interact with the signaling machinery, leading to cellular dysfunction. To study the effect that HIV-1 Tat exerts on the host cell, we identified several genes that were up- or down-regulated in tat-expressing cell lines by using the differential display method. HIV-1 Tat specifically increases the expression of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) 73-kDa subunit (CPSF3) without affecting the expression of the 160- and 100-kDa subunits of the CPSF complex. This complex comprises four subunits and has a key function in the 3'-end processing of pre-mRNAs by a coordinated interaction with other factors. CPSF3 overexpression experiments and knockdown of the endogenous CPSF3 by mRNA interference have shown that this subunit of the complex is an important regulatory protein for both viral and cellular gene expression. In addition to the known CPSF3 function in RNA polyadenylation, we also present evidence that this protein exerts transcriptional activities by repressing the mdm2 gene promoter. Thus, HIV-1-Tat up-regulation of CPSF3 could represent a novel mechanism by which this virus increases mRNA processing, causing an increase in both cell and viral gene expression.

  11. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Tat Increases the Expression of Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor 73-Kilodalton Subunit Modulating Cellular and Viral Expression

    PubMed Central

    Calzado, Marco A.; Sancho, Rocío; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein, which is essential for HIV gene expression and viral replication, is known to mediate pleiotropic effects on various cell functions. For instance, Tat protein is able to regulate the rate of transcription of host cellular genes and to interact with the signaling machinery, leading to cellular dysfunction. To study the effect that HIV-1 Tat exerts on the host cell, we identified several genes that were up- or down-regulated in tat-expressing cell lines by using the differential display method. HIV-1 Tat specifically increases the expression of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) 73-kDa subunit (CPSF3) without affecting the expression of the 160- and 100-kDa subunits of the CPSF complex. This complex comprises four subunits and has a key function in the 3′-end processing of pre-mRNAs by a coordinated interaction with other factors. CPSF3 overexpression experiments and knockdown of the endogenous CPSF3 by mRNA interference have shown that this subunit of the complex is an important regulatory protein for both viral and cellular gene expression. In addition to the known CPSF3 function in RNA polyadenylation, we also present evidence that this protein exerts transcriptional activities by repressing the mdm2 gene promoter. Thus, HIV-1-Tat up-regulation of CPSF3 could represent a novel mechanism by which this virus increases mRNA processing, causing an increase in both cell and viral gene expression. PMID:15194760

  12. Genome-Wide Analysis of PAPS1-Dependent Polyadenylation Identifies Novel Roles for Functionally Specialized Poly(A) Polymerases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Ramming, Anna; Kolbe, Benjamin; Vi, Son Lang; Bispo, Cláudia; Becker, Jörg D.; de Moor, Cornelia; Lenhard, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The poly(A) tail at 3’ ends of eukaryotic mRNAs promotes their nuclear export, stability and translational efficiency, and changes in its length can strongly impact gene expression. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes three canonical nuclear poly(A) polymerases, PAPS1, PAPS2 and PAPS4. As shown by their different mutant phenotypes, these three isoforms are functionally specialized, with PAPS1 modifying organ growth and suppressing a constitutive immune response. However, the molecular basis of this specialization is largely unknown. Here, we have estimated poly(A)-tail lengths on a transcriptome-wide scale in wild-type and paps1 mutants. This identified categories of genes as particularly strongly affected in paps1 mutants, including genes encoding ribosomal proteins, cell-division factors and major carbohydrate-metabolic proteins. We experimentally verified two novel functions of PAPS1 in ribosome biogenesis and redox homoeostasis that were predicted based on the analysis of poly(A)-tail length changes in paps1 mutants. When overlaying the PAPS1-dependent effects observed here with coexpression analysis based on independent microarray data, the two clusters of transcripts that are most closely coexpressed with PAPS1 show the strongest change in poly(A)-tail length and transcript abundance in paps1 mutants in our analysis. This suggests that their coexpression reflects at least partly the preferential polyadenylation of these transcripts by PAPS1 versus the other two poly(A)-polymerase isoforms. Thus, transcriptome-wide analysis of poly(A)-tail lengths identifies novel biological functions and likely target transcripts for polyadenylation by PAPS1. Data integration with large-scale co-expression data suggests that changes in the relative activities of the isoforms are used as an endogenous mechanism to co-ordinately modulate plant gene expression. PMID:26305463

  13. hnRNPA2/B1 and nELAV proteins bind to a specific U-rich element in CDK5R1 3'-UTR and oppositely regulate its expression.

    PubMed

    Zuccotti, Paola; Colombrita, Claudia; Moncini, Silvia; Barbieri, Andrea; Lunghi, Marta; Gelfi, Cecilia; De Palma, Sara; Nicolin, Angelo; Ratti, Antonia; Venturin, Marco; Riva, Paola

    2014-06-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 regulatory subunit 1 (CDK5R1) encodes p35, a specific activator of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5). CDK5 and p35 have a fundamental role in neuronal migration and differentiation during CNS development. Both the CDK5R1 3'-UTR's remarkable size and its conservation during evolution strongly indicate an important role in post-transcriptional regulation. We previously validated different regulatory elements in the 3'-UTR of CDK5R1, which affect transcript stability, p35 levels and cellular migration through the binding with nELAV proteins and miR-103/7 miRNAs. Interestingly, a 138 bp-long region, named C2.1, was identified as the most mRNA destabilizing portion within CDK5R1 3'-UTR. This feature was maintained by a shorter region of 73 bp, characterized by two poly-U stretches. UV-CL experiments showed that this region interacts with protein factors. UV-CLIP assays and pull-down experiments followed by mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that nELAV and hnRNPA2/B1 proteins bind to the same U-rich element. These RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) were shown to oppositely control CDK5R1 mRNA stability and p35 protein content at post-trascriptional level. While nELAV proteins have a positive regulatory effect, hnRNPA2/B1 has a negative action that is responsible for the mRNA destabilizing activity both of the C2.1 region and of the full-length 3'-UTR. In co-expression experiments of hnRNPA2/B1 and nELAV RBPs we observed an overall decrease of p35 content. We also demonstrated that hnRNPA2/B1 can downregulate nELAV protein content but not vice versa. This study, by providing new insights on the combined action of different regulatory factors, contributes to clarify the complex post-transcriptional control of CDK5R1 gene expression. PMID:24792867

  14. Heterodimerization of human orexin receptor 1 and kappa opioid receptor promotes protein kinase A/cAMP-response element binding protein signaling via a Gαs-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Rumin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Wang, Chunmei; Cai, Xin; Liu, Haiqing; Jiang, Yunlu; Liu, Chuanxin; Bai, Bo

    2015-07-01

    Orexin and dynorphin are co-expressed in the same synaptic vesicles of hypothalamic neurons and play opposing roles in cocaine self-administration, brain stimulation reward, and impulsivity in ventral tegmental area (VTA), where dopamine neurons express both OX1R and KORs. However, detailed mechanisms of how the coreleased peptides and both receptors fine-tune their signalings and physiological/behavioral effects together remain unclear. Here we explore the possibility of heterodimerization between OX1R and KOR and reveal novel signal transduction mechanisms. First, we demonstrated co-expression of OX1R and KOR in rat hippocampal neurons by single-cell PCR. Furthermore, heterodimerization between OX1R and KOR was examined using bioluminescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (BRET and FRET). Our data revealed that human OX1R and KOR heterodimerize, and this heterodimer associates with Gαs, leading to increased protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway activity, including upregulation of intracellular cAMP levels and cAMP-response element (CRE) luciferase reporter activity, resulting in increased cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation. These results support the view that OX1R and KOR heterodimerization might have an anti-depressive role.

  15. A sugar beet chlorophyll a/b binding protein promoter void of G-box like elements confers strong and leaf specific reporter gene expression in transgenic sugar beet

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Dietmar J; Kloos, Dorothee U; Hehl, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    Background Modification of leaf traits in sugar beet requires a strong leaf specific promoter. With such a promoter, expression in taproots can be avoided which may otherwise take away available energy resources for sugar accumulation. Results Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) was utilized to generate an enriched and equalized cDNA library for leaf expressed genes from sugar beet. Fourteen cDNA fragments corresponding to thirteen different genes were isolated. Northern blot analysis indicates the desired tissue specificity of these genes. The promoters for two chlorophyll a/b binding protein genes (Bvcab11 and Bvcab12) were isolated, linked to reporter genes, and transformed into sugar beet using promoter reporter gene fusions. Transient and transgenic analysis indicate that both promoters direct leaf specific gene expression. A bioinformatic analysis revealed that the Bvcab11 promoter is void of G-box like regulatory elements with a palindromic ACGT core sequence. The data indicate that the presence of a G-box element is not a prerequisite for leaf specific and light induced gene expression in sugar beet. Conclusions This work shows that SSH can be successfully employed for the identification and subsequent isolation of tissue specific sugar beet promoters. These promoters are shown to drive strong leaf specific gene expression in transgenic sugar beet. The application of these promoters for expressing resistance improving genes against foliar diseases is discussed. PMID:15579211

  16. The application of an immobilized molecular beacon for the analysis of the DNA binding domains from the ecdysteroid receptor proteins Usp and EcR's interaction with the hsp27 response element.

    PubMed

    Krusiński, Tomasz; Laskowska, Anna; Ozyhar, Andrzej; Dobryszycki, Piotr

    2008-10-01

    The nonstandard molecular beacon described in this article consists of 2 fragments, each built of a short single-stranded oligonucleotide sequence and a double-stranded sequence. One of these hybridization probes, labeled with a fluorescence donor (fluorescein), is solid phase immobilized. The second nonimmobilized probe is labeled with a fluorescence quencher (dabcyl). Annealing of both probes via single-stranded sequences was possible only in the presence of a specific protein molecule that recognized the response element sequence initially separated between the immobilized and nonimmobilized fragments. The system was applied successfully to detect the sequence-specific interaction of a natural hsp27 response element from the promoter of the hsp27 gene with the DNA binding domains of 2 nuclear receptor proteins: ultraspiracle Usp (UspDBD) and the ecdysone receptor EcR (EcRDBD). Measured in the absence of EcRDBD, the dissociation constant, K(d) of the UspDBD-hsp27 complex, was determined to be 3.26 nM, whereas for UspDBD devoid of the A-box (UspDBDDeltaA-hsp27 ), the dissociation constant was 4.81 nM. The respective K(d) values in the presence of EcRDBD were 2.43 nM and 10.80 nM. The results obtained with the immobilized molecular beacon technology were in agreement with those obtained by conventional fluorescence titrations and by fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements with nonimmobilized beacons.

  17. Short interspersed elements (SINEs) from insectivores. Two classes of mammalian SINEs distinguished by A-rich tail structure.

    PubMed

    Borodulina, O R; Kramerov, D A

    2001-10-01

    Four tRNA-related SINE families were isolated from the genome of the shrew Sorex araneus (SOR element), mole Mogera robusta (TAL element), and hedgehog Mesechinus dauuricus (ERI-1 and ERI-2 elements). Each of these SINEs families is specific for a single Insectivora family: SOR, for Soricidae (shrews); TAL, for Talpidae (moles and desmans); ERI-1 and ERI-2, for Erinaceidae (hedgehogs). There is a long polypyrimidine region (TC-motif) in TAL, ERI-1, and ERI-2 elements located immediately upstream of an A-rich tail with polyadenylation signals (AATAAA) and an RNA polymerase III terminator (T(4-6)) or TCT(3-4)). Ten out of 14 analyzed mammalian tRNA-related SINE families have an A-rich tail similar to that of TAL, ERI-1, and ERI-2 elements. These elements were assigned to class T+. The other four SINEs including SOR element have no polyadenylation signal and transcription terminator in their A-rich tail and were assigned to class T-. Class T+ SINEs occur only in mammals, and most of them have a long polypyrimidine region. Possible models of retroposition of class T+ and T- SINEs are discussed.

  18. A novel sterol regulatory element-binding protein gene (sreA) identified in penicillium digitatum is required for prochloraz resistance, full virulence and erg11 (cyp51) regulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Yuan, Yongze; Wu, Zhi; Li, Na; Chen, Yuanlei; Qin, Tingting; Geng, Hui; Xiong, Li; Liu, Deli

    2015-01-01

    Penicillium digitatum is the most destructive postharvest pathogen of citrus fruits, causing fruit decay and economic loss. Additionally, control of the disease is further complicated by the emergence of drug-resistant strains due to the extensive use of triazole antifungal drugs. In this work, an orthologus gene encoding a putative sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) was identified in the genome of P. digitatum and named sreA. The putative SreA protein contains a conserved domain of unknown function (DUF2014) at its carboxyl terminus and a helix-loop-helix (HLH) leucine zipper DNA binding domain at its amino terminus, domains that are functionally associated with SREBP transcription factors. The deletion of sreA (ΔsreA) in a prochloraz-resistant strain (PdHS-F6) by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation led to increased susceptibility to prochloraz and a significantly lower EC50 value compared with the HS-F6 wild-type or complementation strain (COsreA). A virulence assay showed that the ΔsreA strain was defective in virulence towards citrus fruits, while the complementation of sreA could restore the virulence to a large extent. Further analysis by quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that prochloraz-induced expression of cyp51A and cyp51B in PdHS-F6 was completely abolished in the ΔsreA strain. These results demonstrate that sreA is a critical transcription factor gene required for prochloraz resistance and full virulence in P. digitatum and is involved in the regulation of cyp51 expression.

  19. MicroRNA-33b knock-in mice for an intron of sterol regulatory element-binding factor 1 (Srebf1) exhibit reduced HDL-C in vivo.

    PubMed

    Horie, Takahiro; Nishino, Tomohiro; Baba, Osamu; Kuwabara, Yasuhide; Nakao, Tetsushi; Nishiga, Masataka; Usami, Shunsuke; Izuhara, Masayasu; Nakazeki, Fumiko; Ide, Yuya; Koyama, Satoshi; Sowa, Naoya; Yahagi, Naoya; Shimano, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Koji; Kume, Noriaki; Yokode, Masayuki; Kita, Toru; Kimura, Takeshi; Ono, Koh

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are small non-protein-coding RNAs that bind to specific mRNAs and inhibit translation or promote mRNA degradation. Recent reports, including ours, indicated that miR-33a located within the intron of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) 2 controls cholesterol homeostasis and can be a possible therapeutic target for treating atherosclerosis. Primates, but not rodents, express miR-33b from an intron of SREBF1. Therefore, humanized mice, in which a miR-33b transgene is inserted within a Srebf1 intron, are required to address its function in vivo. We successfully established miR-33b knock-in (KI) mice and found that protein levels of known miR-33a target genes, such as ABCA1, ABCG1, and SREBP-1, were reduced compared with those in wild-type mice. As a consequence, macrophages from the miR-33b KI mice had a reduced cholesterol efflux capacity via apoA-I and HDL-C. Moreover, HDL-C levels were reduced by almost 35% even in miR-33b KI hetero mice compared with the control mice. These results indicate that miR-33b may account for lower HDL-C levels in humans than those in mice and that miR-33b is possibly utilized for a feedback mechanism to regulate its host gene SREBF1. Our mice will also aid in elucidating the roles of miR-33a/b in different genetic disease models. PMID:24931346

  20. Posttranslational Modification of the AU-Rich Element Binding Protein HuR by Protein Kinase Cδ Elicits Angiotensin II-Induced Stabilization and Nuclear Export of Cyclooxygenase 2 mRNA▿

    PubMed Central

    Doller, Anke; Akool, El-Sayed; Huwiler, Andrea; Müller, Roswitha; Radeke, Heinfried H.; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The mRNA stabilizing factor HuR is involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of many genes, including that coding for cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2). Employing RNA interference technology and actinomycin D experiments, we demonstrate that in human mesangial cells (hMC) the amplification of cytokine-induced COX-2 by angiotensin II (AngII) occurs via a HuR-mediated increase of mRNA stability. Using COX-2 promoter constructs with different portions of the 3′ untranslated region of COX-2, we found that the increase in COX-2 mRNA stability is attributable to a distal class III type of AU-rich element (ARE). Likewise, the RNA immunoprecipitation assay showed AngII-induced binding of HuR to this ARE. Using the RNA pulldown assay, we demonstrate that the AngII-caused HuR assembly with COX-2 mRNA is found in free and cytoskeleton-bound polysomes indicative of an active RNP complex. Mechanistically, the increased HuR binding to COX-2-ARE by AngII is accompanied by increased nucleocytoplasmic HuR shuttling and depends on protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), which physically interacts with nuclear HuR, thereby promoting its phosphorylation. Mapping of phosphorylation sites identified serines 221 and 318 as critical target sites for PKCδ-triggered HuR phosphorylation and AngII-induced HuR export to the cytoplasm. Posttranslational modification of HuR by PKCδ represents an important novel mode of HuR activation implied in renal COX-2 regulation. PMID:18285462

  1. Reduced function of the RNA-binding protein FPA rescues a T-DNA insertion mutant in the Arabidopsis ZHOUPI gene by promoting transcriptional read-through.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaohua; Li, Xin; Goodrich, Justin; Wu, Chunxia; Wei, Haichao; Yang, Suxin; Feng, Xianzhong

    2016-07-01

    T-DNA insertion mutants have been widely used to investigate plant gene functions. Unexpectedly, in several reported cases, the phenotype of T-DNA insertion mutations can be suppressed because of trans T-DNA interactions associated with epigenetic modification, which indicates that caution is needed when T-DNA mutants are used. In the present study, we characterized a novel process suppressing a T-DNA mutation. The spz2 (suppressor of zou 2) mutant was isolated as a suppressor of the phenotype of the zou-4 mutant caused by a T-DNA insertion in the first intron. The spz2 mutation partially recovered the native ZOU gene expression in the zou-4 background, but not in two other zou alleles, zou-2 and zou-3, with T-DNAs inserted in the exon and intron, respectively. The suppressed phenotype was inherited in a Mendelian fashion and is not associated with epigenetic modification. The recovery of the native ZOU gene expression in the spz2 zou-4 double mutant is caused by transcriptional read-through of the intronic T-DNA as a result of decreased proximal polyadenylation. SPZ2 encodes an RNA-binding protein, FPA, which is known to regulate polyadenylation site selection. This is the first example of FPA rescuing a T-DNA insertion mutation by affecting the polyadenylation site selection. PMID:27164978

  2. Transposable elements in cancer and other human diseases.

    PubMed

    Chenais, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are mobile DNA sequences representing a substantial fraction of most genomes. Through the creation of new genes and functions, TEs are important elements of genome plasticity and evolution. However TE insertion in human genomes may be the cause of genetic dysfunction and alteration of gene expression contributing to cancer and other human diseases. Besides the chromosome rearrangements induced by TE repeats, this mini-review shows how gene expression may be altered following TE insertion, for example by the creation of new polyadenylation sites, by the creation of new exons (exonization), by exon skipping and by other modification of alternative splicing, and also by the alteration of regulatory sequences. Through the correlation between TE mobility and the methylation status of DNA, the importance of chromatin regulation is evident in several diseases. Finally this overview ends with a brief presentation of the use of TEs as biotechnology tools for insertional mutagenesis screening and gene therapy with DNA transposons.

  3. Activation of the rat follicle-stimulating hormone receptor promoter by steroidogenic factor 1 is blocked by protein kinase a and requires upstream stimulatory factor binding to a proximal E box element.

    PubMed

    Heckert, L L

    2001-05-01

    The receptor for the pituitary glycoprotein hormone FSH (FSHR) and the nuclear hormone receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) play important roles in control of the hypothalamic-pituitary- gonadal axis. FSHR is essential for integrating the pituitary FSH signal to gonadal response, while SF-1 is an important transcriptional regulator of many genes that function within this axis and is essential for the development of gonads and adrenal glands. Given the critical role of SF-1 in regulation of the gonads and the coexpression of FSHR and SF-1 in Sertoli and granulosa cells, we examined the ability of SF-1 to regulate transcription of the FSHR gene. We found that SF-1 stimulated rat FSHR promoter activity in a dose-dependent and promoter-specific manner. Examination of various promoter deletion mutants indicated that SF-1 acts through the proximal promoter region and upstream promoter sequences. An E box element within the proximal promoter is essential for activation of the FSHR promoter by SF-1. This element binds the transcriptional regulators USF1 and USF2 (upstream stimulatory factors 1 and 2) but not SF-1, as shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. In addition, functional studies identified a requirement for the USF proteins in SF-1 activation of FSHR and mapped an important regulatory domain within exons 4 and 5 of USF2. Cotransfection studies revealed that activation of protein kinase A leads to inhibition of SF-1-stimulated transcription of FSHR, while it synergized with SF-1 to activate the equine LH beta-promoter (ebeta). Thus, stimulation of the cAMP pathway differentially regulates SF-1 activation of the FSHR and ebeta-promoters.

  4. Antisense targeting of 3' end elements involved in DUX4 mRNA processing is an efficient therapeutic strategy for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: a new gene-silencing approach.

    PubMed

    Marsollier, Anne-Charlotte; Ciszewski, Lukasz; Mariot, Virginie; Popplewell, Linda; Voit, Thomas; Dickson, George; Dumonceaux, Julie

    2016-04-15

    Defects in mRNA 3'end formation have been described to alter transcription termination, transport of the mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, stability of the mRNA and translation efficiency. Therefore, inhibition of polyadenylation may lead to gene silencing. Here, we choose facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) as a model to determine whether or not targeting key 3' end elements involved in mRNA processing using antisense oligonucleotide drugs can be used as a strategy for gene silencing within a potentially therapeutic context. FSHD is a gain-of-function disease characterized by the aberrant expression of the Double homeobox 4 (DUX4) transcription factor leading to altered pathogenic deregulation of multiple genes in muscles. Here, we demonstrate that targeting either the mRNA polyadenylation signal and/or cleavage site is an efficient strategy to down-regulate DUX4 expression and to decrease the abnormally high-pathological expression of genes downstream of DUX4. We conclude that targeting key functional 3' end elements involved in pre-mRNA to mRNA maturation with antisense drugs can lead to efficient gene silencing and is thus a potentially effective therapeutic strategy for at least FSHD. Moreover, polyadenylation is a crucial step in the maturation of almost all eukaryotic mRNAs, and thus all mRNAs are virtually eligible for this antisense-mediated knockdown strategy. PMID:26787513

  5. Short communication: Effects of β-lactoglobulin, stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1, and sterol regulatory element binding protein gene allelic variants on milk production, composition, acidity, and coagulation properties of Brown Swiss cows.

    PubMed

    Cecchinato, A; Ribeca, C; Maurmayr, A; Penasa, M; De Marchi, M; Macciotta, N P P; Mele, M; Secchiari, P; Pagnacco, G; Bittante, G

    2012-01-01

    Associations of allelic variants of the β-lactoglobulin (LGB), stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1 (SCD), and sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP-1) genes with milk production, composition (fat, protein, and casein content), acidity (pH and titratable acidity), and coagulation properties (rennet coagulation time and curd firmness) were investigated in Brown Swiss cows. In total, 294 animals (progeny of 15 sires) reared in 16 herds were milk-sampled once. The additive effects of LGB (rs109625649:C>T), SCD (ss469414220:C>T), and SREBP-1 (AB355704: g.101_185ins) polymorphisms on the aforementioned traits were analyzed through Bayesian linear models. The LGB genotype affected rennet coagulation time, with TT (or BB) alleles showing longer rennet coagulation time compared with CC (or AA) cows. The SCD gene allelic variants were found to be associated with protein and casein contents and curd firmness: CC animals had the lowest values for the aforementioned traits. An association was found between SREBP-1 alleles and fat content, with the highest values for cows carrying the 84-bp insertion (or L) allele. Results suggest a possible use of these loci in gene-assisted selection programs for the improvement of milk quality traits and coagulation properties in Brown Swiss cattle.

  6. ORA47 (octadecanoid-responsive AP2/ERF-domain transcription factor 47) regulates jasmonic acid and abscisic acid biosynthesis and signaling through binding to a novel cis-element.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsing-Yu; Hsieh, En-Jung; Cheng, Mei-Chun; Chen, Chien-Yu; Hwang, Shih-Ying; Lin, Tsan-Piao

    2016-07-01

    ORA47 (octadecanoid-responsive AP2/ERF-domain transcription factor 47) of Arabidopsis thaliana is an AP2/ERF domain transcription factor that regulates jasmonate (JA) biosynthesis and is induced by methyl JA treatment. The regulatory mechanism of ORA47 remains unclear. ORA47 is shown to bind to the cis-element (NC/GT)CGNCCA, which is referred to as the O-box, in the promoter of ABI2. We proposed that ORA47 acts as a connection between ABA INSENSITIVE1 (ABI1) and ABI2 and mediates an ABI1-ORA47-ABI2 positive feedback loop. PORA47:ORA47-GFP transgenic plants were used in a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay to show that ORA47 participates in the biosynthesis and/or signaling pathways of nine phytohormones. Specifically, many abscisic acid (ABA) and JA biosynthesis and signaling genes were direct targets of ORA47 under stress conditions. The JA content of the P35S:ORA47-GR lines was highly induced under wounding and moderately induced under water stress relative to that of the wild-type plants. The wounding treatment moderately increased ABA accumulation in the transgenic lines, whereas the water stress treatment repressed the ABA content. ORA47 is proposed to play a role in the biosynthesis of JA and ABA and in regulating the biosynthesis and/or signaling of a suite of phytohormone genes when plants are subjected to wounding and water stress. PMID:26974851

  7. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide induces long-lasting neuroprotection through the induction of activity-dependent signaling via the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein-regulated transcription co-activator 1

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Paul S; Martel, Marc-Andre; McMahon, Aoife; Kind, Peter C; Hardingham, Giles E

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) is a neuroprotective peptide which exerts its effects mainly through the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. Here, we show that in cortical neurons, PACAP-induced PKA signaling exerts a major part of its neuroprotective effects indirectly, by triggering action potential (AP) firing. Treatment of cortical neurons with PACAP induces a rapid and sustained PKA-dependent increase in AP firing and associated intracellular Ca2+ transients, which are essential for the anti-apoptotic actions of PACAP. Transient exposure to PACAP induces long-lasting neuroprotection in the face of apoptotic insults which is reliant on AP firing and the activation of cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein (CREB)-mediated gene expression. Although direct, activity-independent PKA signaling is sufficient to trigger phosphorylation on CREB’s activating serine-133 site, this is insufficient for activation of CREB-mediated gene expression. Full activation is dependent on CREB-regulated transcription co-activator 1 (CRTC1), whose PACAP-induced nuclear import is dependent on firing activity-dependent calcineurin signaling. Over-expression of CRTC1 is sufficient to rescue PACAP-induced CRE-mediated gene expression in the face of activity-blockade, while dominant negative CRTC1 interferes with PACAP-induced, CREB-mediated neuroprotection. Thus, the enhancement of AP firing may play a significant role in the neuroprotective actions of PACAP and other adenylate cyclase-coupled ligands. PMID:21623792

  8. The Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factor ABSCISIC ACID RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING FACTOR2 Is an Important Transcriptional Regulator of Abscisic Acid-Dependent Grape Berry Ripening Processes1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Philippe; Lecourieux, David; Kappel, Christian; Cluzet, Stéphanie; Cramer, Grant; Delrot, Serge; Lecourieux, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    In grape (Vitis vinifera), abscisic acid (ABA) accumulates during fruit ripening and is thought to play a pivotal role in this process, but the molecular basis of this control is poorly understood. This work characterizes ABSCISIC ACID RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING FACTOR2 (VvABF2), a grape basic leucine zipper transcription factor belonging to a phylogenetic subgroup previously shown to be involved in ABA and abiotic stress signaling in other plant species. VvABF2 transcripts mainly accumulated in the berry, from the onset of ripening to the harvesting stage, and were up-regulated by ABA. Microarray analysis of transgenic grape cells overexpressing VvABF2 showed that this transcription factor up-regulates and/or modifies existing networks related to ABA responses. In addition, grape cells overexpressing VvABF2 exhibited enhanced responses to ABA treatment compared with control cells. Among the VvABF2-mediated responses highlighted in this study, the synthesis of phenolic compounds and cell wall softening were the most strongly affected. VvABF2 overexpression strongly increased the accumulation of stilbenes that play a role in plant defense and human health (resveratrol and piceid). In addition, the firmness of fruits from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants overexpressing VvABF2 was strongly reduced. These data indicate that VvABF2 is an important transcriptional regulator of ABA-dependent grape berry ripening. PMID:24276949

  9. Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II/cAMP response element-binding protein/Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade regulates angiotensin II-induced podocyte injury and albuminuria.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Xu, Lingling; Song, Yuxian; Li, Jianzhong; Mao, Junhua; Zhao, Allan Zijian; He, Weichun; Yang, Junwei; Dai, Chunsun

    2013-08-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays a pivotal role in promoting podocyte dysfunction and albuminuria, however, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully delineated. In this study, we found that Ang II induced Wnt1 expression and β-catenin nuclear translocation in cultured mouse podocytes. Blocking Wnt signaling with Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1) or β-catenin siRNA attenuated Ang II-induced podocyte injury. Ang II could also induce the phosphorylation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) II and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in cultured podocytes. Blockade of this pathway with CK59 or CREB siRNA could significantly inhibit Ang II-induced Wnt/β-catenin signaling and podocyte injury. In in vivo studies, administration of Ang II promoted Wnt/β-catenin signaling, aggregated podocyte damage, and albuminuria in mice. CK59 could remarkably ameliorate Ang II-induced podocyte injury and albuminuria. Furthermore, ectopic expression of exogenous Dkk1 also attenuated Ang II-induced podocytopathy in mice. Taken together, this study demonstrates that the CaMK II/CREB/Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade plays an important role in regulating Ang II-induced podocytopathy. Targeting this signaling pathway may offer renal protection against the development of proteinuric kidney diseases. PMID:23803607

  10. Yeast sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) cleavage requires Cdc48 and Dsc5, a ubiquitin regulatory X domain-containing subunit of the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Emerson V; Lloyd, S Julie-Ann; Burg, John S; Nwosu, Christine C; Lintner, Robert E; Daza, Riza; Russ, Carsten; Ponchner, Karen; Nusbaum, Chad; Espenshade, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Sre1 is a membrane-bound transcription factor that controls adaptation to hypoxia. Like its mammalian homolog, sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP), Sre1 activation requires release from the membrane. However, in fission yeast, this release occurs through a strikingly different mechanism that requires the Golgi Dsc E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and the proteasome. The mechanistic details of Sre1 cleavage, including the link between the Dsc E3 ligase complex and proteasome, are not well understood. Here, we present results of a genetic selection designed to identify additional components required for Sre1 cleavage. From the selection, we identified two new components of the fission yeast SREBP pathway: Dsc5 and Cdc48. The AAA (ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities) ATPase Cdc48 and Dsc5, a ubiquitin regulatory X domain-containing protein, interact with known Dsc complex components and are required for SREBP cleavage. These findings provide a mechanistic link between the Dsc E3 ligase complex and the proteasome in SREBP cleavage and add to a growing list of similarities between the Dsc E3 ligase and membrane E3 ligases involved in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation.

  11. Reactive oxygen species decrease cAMP response element binding protein expression in cardiomyocytes via a protein kinase D1-dependent mechanism that does not require Ser133 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ozgen, Nazira; Guo, Jianfen; Gertsberg, Zoya; Danilo, Peter; Rosen, Michael R; Steinberg, Susan F

    2009-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) exert pleiotropic effects on a wide array of signaling proteins that regulate cellular growth and apoptosis. This study shows that long-term treatment with a low concentration of H2O2 leads to the activation of signaling pathways involving extracellular signal-regulated kinase, ribosomal protein S6 kinase, and protein kinase D (PKD) that increase cAMP binding response element protein (CREB) phosphorylation at Ser(133) in cardiomyocytes. Although CREB-Ser(133) phosphorylation typically mediates cAMP-dependent increases in CREB target gene expression, the H2O2-dependent increase in CREB-Ser(133) phosphorylation is accompanied by a decrease in CREB protein abundance and no change in Cre-luciferase reporter activity. Mutagenesis studies indicate that H2O2 decreases CREB protein abundance via a mechanism that does not require CREB-Ser(133) phosphorylation. Rather, the H2O2-dependent decrease in CREB protein is prevented by the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin, by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase or protein kinase C activity, or by adenoviral-mediated delivery of a small interfering RNA that decreases PKD1 expression. A PKD1-dependent mechanism that links oxidative stress to decreased CREB protein abundance is predicted to contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure by influencing cardiac growth and apoptosis responses.

  12. Equilibrium analysis of the DNA binding domain of the ultraspiracle protein interaction with the response element from the hsp27 gene promoter--the application of molecular beacon technology.

    PubMed

    Krusiński, Tomasz; Wietrzych, Marta; Grad, Iwona; Ozyhar, Andrzej; Dobryszycki, Piotr

    2008-01-01

    Ecdysteroids initiate molting and metamorphosis in insects via a receptor which belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors. The ecdysone receptor consists of two proteins: the ecdysone receptor (EcR) and the ultraspiracle (Usp). The EcR-Usp dimer conducts transcription through a hsp27(pal) response element. Usp acts as an anchor orienting the whole complex on the DNA. The molecular beacon methodology was applied to detect the sequence-specific DNA of a natural hsp27 (pal) or mutated protein interaction with the DNA binding domain from the Usp. The dissociation constant, K(d), of the UspDBD-hsp27 (pal) complex was determined to be 1.42+/-0.48 nM, whereas K(d) for UspDBD(DeltaA)-hsp27(pal) was 6.6+/-0.5 nM. Mutation of Val-71 for Ala blocks formation of the protein-DNA complex in contrast to Glu-19 mutation for Ala for which K(d)=4.31+/-1.01 nM. The results obtained with the molecular beacon technology are related to those obtained by fluorescence anisotropy titrations.

  13. Role of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcription coactivator 3 (CRTC3) in the initiation of mitochondrial biogenesis and stress response in liver cells.

    PubMed

    Than, Tin Aung; Lou, Huan; Ji, Cheng; Win, Sanda; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2011-06-24

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. PGC-1α expression is under the control of the transcription factor, cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). In searching for candidate transcription factors that mediate mitochondrial stress-initiated mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, we assessed the effect of silencing CREB-regulated transcription co-activators (CRTC). CRTC isoforms are co-activators of CREB-regulated transcription by a CREB phosphorylation-independent pathway. Using cultured HepG2 cells and primary mouse hepatocytes, we determined that mitochondrial stress imposed by the complex I inhibitor rotenone elicited mitochondrial biogenesis, which was dependent on an induction of PGC-1α, which was inhibited by silencing PGC-1α. PGC-1α induction in response to rotenone was inhibited by silencing the expression of CRTC3, which blocked downstream mitochondria biogenesis. In contrast, silencing CRTC2 did not affect the induction of this pathway in response to rotenone. Thus, CRTC3 plays a selective role in mitochondrial biogenesis in response to rotenone.

  14. The selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist ORG 34116 decreases immobility time in the forced swim test and affects cAMP-responsive element-binding protein phosphorylation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Cornelius G; Bilang-Bleuel, Alicia; De Carli, Sonja; Linthorst, Astrid C E; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2005-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonists can block the retention of the immobility response in the forced swimming test. Recently, we showed that forced swimming evokes a distinct spatiotemporal pattern of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in the dentate gyrus (DG) and neocortex. In the present study, we found that chronic treatment of rats with the selective GR antagonist ORG 34116 decreased the immobility time in the forced swim test, increased baseline levels of phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB) in the DG and neocortex and affected the forced swimming-induced changes in P-CREB levels in a time- and site-specific manner. Overall, we observed that, in control rats, forced swimming evoked increases in P-CREB levels in the DG and neocortex, whereas in ORG 34116-treated animals a major dephosphorylation of P-CREB was observed. These observations underscore an important role of GRs in the control of the phosphorylation state of CREB which seems to be of significance for the immobility response in the forced swim test and extend the molecular mechanism of action of GRs in the brain.

  15. Binding Procurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the binding procurement process in purchasing Aerospace Flight Battery Systems. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) requested NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to develop a set of guideline requirements document for Binding Procurement Contracts.

  16. Analysis of processing and polyadenylation signals of the hepatitis B virus surface antigen gene by using simian virus 40-hepatitis B virus chimeric plasmids

    SciTech Connect

    Simonsen, C.C.; Levinson, A.D.

    1983-12-01

    The authors examined the transcription of the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) gene in COs cells transfected with simian virus 40-based recombinant plasmids. When positioned behind the simian virus 40 late promoter, three transcripts were identified which hybridized to the HBsAg gene: a 2,000-nucleotide transcript colinear with a gene, a 1,100-nucleotide transcript representing a spliced molecule in which a major portion of the sequences encoding HBsAg were deleted, and an 800-nucleotide transcript derived primarily from sequences 3' to the HBsAg gene. The splice acceptor site utilized by the 1,100-nucleotide transcript is located immediately upstream of an open reading frame of unknown function contained within the 3' nontranslated region of the HBsAg gene. The HBsAg-specific mRNA species terminate 12 to 19 base pairs 3' of the sequence UAUAAA, similar to the concensus hexanucleotide which is thought to promote polyadenylation (AAUAAA). They constructed a series of plasmids with progressive deletions from the region surrounding where these transcripts terminate. Analysis of mRNA produced by cells transfected with these plasmids indicated that the signal hexanucleotide is in itself unable to promote the efficient processing of mRNA in the absence of downstream hepatitis B virus sequences. Processing proceeds properly, however, from plasmids containing an additional 30 nucleotides 3' of this signal.

  17. THOC5 controls 3′end-processing of immediate early genes via interaction with polyadenylation specific factor 100 (CPSF100)

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Doan Duy Hai; Saran, Shashank; Williamson, Andrew J.K.; Pierce, Andrew; Dittrich-Breiholz, Oliver; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Koch, Alexandra; Whetton, Anthony D.; Tamura, Teruko

    2014-01-01

    Transcription of immediate early genes (IEGs) in response to extrinsic and intrinsic signals is tightly regulated at multiple stages. It is known that untranslated regions of the RNA can play a role in these processes. Here we show that THOC5, a member of the TREX (transcription/export) complex, plays a role in expression of only a subset of constitutively active genes, however transcriptome analysis reveals that more than 90% of IEG were not induced by serum in THOC5 depleted cells. Furthermore, THOC5 depletion does not influence the expression of the most rapidly induced IEGs, e.g. Fos and Jun. One group of THOC5 target genes, including Id1, Id3 and Wnt11 transcripts, were not released from chromatin in THOC5 depleted cells. Genes in another group, including Myc and Smad7 transcripts, were released with shortening of 3′UTR by alternative cleavage, and were spliced but export was impaired in THOC5 depleted cells. By interactome analysis using THOC5 as bait, we show that upon stimulation with serum THOC5 forms a complex with polyadenylation-specific factor 100 (CPSF100). THOC5 is required for recruitment of CPSF100 to 3′UTR of THOC5 target genes. These data suggest the presence of a novel mechanism for the control of IEG response by THOC5 via 3′end-processing. PMID:25274738