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Sample records for polycrystalline silicon promise

  1. Thin film polycrystalline silicon: Promise and problems in displays and solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fonash, S.J.

    1995-08-01

    Thin film polycrystalline Si (poly-Si) with its carrier mobilities, potentially good stability, low intragrain defect density, compatibility with silicon processing, and ease of doping activation is an interesting material for {open_quotes}macroelectronics{close_quotes} applications such as TFTs for displays and solar cells. The poly-Si films needed for these applications can be ultra-thin-in the 500{Angstrom} to 1000{Angstrom} thickness range for flat panel display TFTs and in the 4{mu}m to 10{mu}m thickness range for solar cells. Because the films needed for these microelectronics applications can be so thin, an effective approach to producing the films is that of crystallizing a-Si precursor material. Unlike cast materials, poly-Si films made this way can be produced using low temperature processing. Unlike deposited poly-Si films, these crystallized poly-Si films can have grain widths that are much larger than the film thickness and almost atomically smooth surfaces. This thin film poly-Si crystallized from a-Si precursor films, and its promise and problems for TFTs and solar cells, is the focus of this discussion.

  2. Recrystallization of polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lall, C.; Kulkarni, S. B.; Graham, C. D., Jr.; Pope, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Optical metallography is used to investigate the recrystallization properties of polycrystalline semiconductor-grade silicon. It is found that polycrystalline silicon recrystallizes at 1380 C in relatively short times, provided that the prior deformation is greater than 30%. For a prior deformation of about 40%, the recrystallization process is essentially complete in about 30 minutes. Silicon recrystallizes at a substantially slower rate than metals at equivalent homologous temperatures. The recrystallized grain size is insensitive to the amount of prestrain for strains in the range of 10-50%.

  3. Process Research On Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Performance limiting mechanisms in polycrystalline silicon are investigated by fabricating a matrix of solar cells of various thicknesses from polycrystalline silicon wafers of several bulk resistivities. The analysis of the results for the entire matrix indicates that bulk recombination is the dominant factor limiting the short circuit current in large grain (greater than 1 to 2 mm diameter) polycrystalline silicon, the same mechanism that limits the short circuit current in single crystal silicon. An experiment to investigate the limiting mechanisms of open circuit voltage and fill factor for large grain polycrystalline silicon is designed. Two process sequences to fabricate small cells are investigated.

  4. Process Research on Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.; Wrigley, C. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Results of hydrogen-passivated polycrysalline silicon solar cell research are summarized. The short-circuit current of solar cells fabricated from large-grain cast polycrystalline silicon is nearly equivalent to that of single-crystal cells, which indicates long bulk minority-carrier diffusion length. Treatments with molecular hydrogen showed no effect on large-grain cast polycrystalline silicon solar cells.

  5. Casting larger polycrystalline silicon ingots

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Tomlinson, T.; Cliber, J.; Shea, S.; Narayanan, M.

    1995-08-01

    Solarex has developed and patented a directional solidification casting process specifically designed for photovoltaics. In this process, silicon feedstock is melted in a ceramic crucible and solidified into a large grained semicrystalline silicon ingot. In-house manufacture of low cost, high purity ceramics is a key to the low cost fabrication of Solarex polycrystalline wafers. The casting process is performed in Solarex designed casting stations. The casting operation is computer controlled. There are no moving parts (except for the loading and unloading) so the growth process proceeds with virtually no operator intervention Today Solarex casting stations are used to produce ingots from which 4 bricks, each 11.4 cm by 11.4 cm in cross section, are cut. The stations themselves are physically capable of holding larger ingots, that would yield either: 4 bricks, 15 cm by 15 an; or 9 bricks, 11.4 cm by 11.4 an in cross-section. One of the tasks in the Solarex Cast Polycrystalline Silicon PVMaT Program is to design and modify one of the castings stations to cast these larger ingots. If successful, this effort will increase the production capacity of Solarex`s casting stations by 73% and reduce the labor content for casting by an equivalent percentage.

  6. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-03-17

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions.

  7. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-03-01

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions.

  8. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions. PMID:28303948

  9. Bioactivity of polycrystalline silicon layers.

    PubMed

    Pramatarova, Lilyana; Pecheva, Emilia; Montgomery, Paul; Dimova-Malinovska, Doriana; Petrov, Todor; Toth, Attila L; Dimitrova, Magdalena

    2008-02-01

    After oxygen, silicon is the second most abundant element in the environment and is present as an impurity in most materials. The widespread occurrence of siliceous biominerals as structural elements in lower plants and animals suggests that Si plays a role in the production and maintenance of connective tissue in higher organisms. It has been shown that the presence of Si is necessary in bones, cartilage and in the formation of connective tissue, as well as in some important metabolic processes. In this work, polycrystalline silicon layers are tested in terms of bioactivity, i.e., their ability to induce hydroxyapatite formation from simulated body fluid. Hydroxyapatite is a biologically compatible material with chemical similarity to the inorganic part of bones and teeth. Polycrystalline silicon layers are obtained by aluminum induced crystallization of Al and amorphous Si thin films deposited sequentially on glass substrates by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering and subsequently annealed in different atmospheres. The hydroxyapatite formation is induced by applying a method of laser-liquid-solid interaction. The method consists of irradiating the samples with laser light while immersed in a solution that is supersaturated with respect to Ca and P. As a result, heterogeneous porous sponge-like carbonate-containing hydroxyapatite is grown on the polysilicon surfaces. Crystals that are spherical in shape, containing Ca, P and O, Na, Cl, Mg, Al, Si and S, as well as well-faceted NaCl crystals are embedded in the hydroxyapatite layer. Enhancement of the hydroxyapatite growth and increased crystallinity is observed due to the applied laser-liquid-solid interaction.

  10. Process Research on Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    The performance limiting mechanisms in large grain (greater than 1-2 mm in diameter) polycrystalline silicon was investigated by measuring the illuminated current voltage (I-V) characteristics of the minicell wafer set. The average short circuit current on different wafers is 3 to 14 percent lower than that of single crystal Czochralski silicon. The scatter was typically less than 3 percent. The average open circuit voltage is 20 to 60 mV less than that of single crystal silicon. The scatter in the open circuit voltage of most of the polycrystalline silicon wafers was 15 to 20 mV, although two wafers had significantly greater scatter than this value. The fill factor of both polycrystalline and single crystal silicon cells was typically in the range of 60 to 70 percent; however several polycrystalline silicon wafers have fill factor averages which are somewhat lower and have a significantly larger degree of scatter.

  11. Fluidized bed for production of polycrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Flagella, R.N.

    1992-08-18

    This patent describes a method for removing silicon powder particles from a reactor that produces polycrystalline silicon by the pyrolysis of a silane containing gas in a fluidized bed reaction zone of silicon seed particles. It comprises introducing the silane containing gas stream into the reaction zone of fluidized silicon seed particles; heterogeneously decomposing the silane containing gas under conditions; collecting the silicon product particles from the collection zone; and removing silicon powder particles from the reactor.

  12. Polycrystalline Silicon: a Biocompatibility Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Pecheva, E.; Fingarova, D.; Pramatarova, L.; Hikov, T.; Laquerriere, P.; Bouthors, Sylvie; Dimova-Malinovska, D.; Montgomery, P.

    2010-01-21

    Polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) layers were functionalized through the growth of biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) on their surface. HA is the mineral component of bones and teeth and thus possesses excellent bioactivity and biocompatibility. MG-63 osteoblast-like cells were cultured on both HA-coated and un-coated poly-Si surfaces for 1, 3, 5 and 7 days and toxicity, proliferation and cell morphology were investigated. The results revealed that the poly-Si layers were bioactive and compatible with the osteoblast-like cells. Nevertheless, the HA coating improved the cell interactions with the poly-Si surfaces based on the cell affinity to the specific chemical composition of the bone-like HA and/or to the higher HA roughness.

  13. Polycrystalline silicon study: Low-cost silicon refining technology prospects and semiconductor-grade polycrystalline silicon availability through 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costogue, E. N.; Ferber, R.; Lutwack, R.; Lorenz, J. H.; Pellin, R.

    1984-01-01

    Photovoltaic arrays that convert solar energy into electrical energy can become a cost effective bulk energy generation alternative, provided that an adequate supply of low cost materials is available. One of the key requirements for economic photovoltaic cells is reasonably priced silicon. At present, the photovoltaic industry is dependent upon polycrystalline silicon refined by the Siemens process primarily for integrated circuits, power devices, and discrete semiconductor devices. This dependency is expected to continue until the DOE sponsored low cost silicon refining technology developments have matured to the point where they are in commercial use. The photovoltaic industry can then develop its own source of supply. Silicon material availability and market pricing projections through 1988 are updated based on data collected early in 1984. The silicon refining industry plans to meet the increasing demands of the semiconductor device and photovoltaic product industries are overviewed. In addition, the DOE sponsored technology research for producing low cost polycrystalline silicon, probabilistic cost analysis for the two most promising production processes for achieving the DOE cost goals, and the impacts of the DOE photovoltaics program silicon refining research upon the commercial polycrystalline silicon refining industry are addressed.

  14. Efficient Process for Making Polycrystalline Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, J. R.; Plahutnik, F. JR.; Sawyer, D. H.; Arvidson, A. N.; Goldfarb, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    Solar cells made with lower capital and operating costs. Process based on chemical-vapor deposition (CVD) of dichlorosilane produces high-grade polycrystalline silicon for solar cells. Process has potential as cost-effective replacement for CVD of trichlorosilane.

  15. Improving Solar Cells With Polycrystalline Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Campbell, Robert B.; Rai-Choudhury, Prosenjit

    1987-01-01

    In proposed solar-cell design, layers of polycrystalline silicon grown near front metal grid and back metal surface. Net electrical effect increases open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current, resulting in greater cell power output and energy conversion efficiency. Solar-cell configuration differs from existing one in that layers of doped polycrystalline silicon added to reduce recombination in emitter and back surface field regions.

  16. Polycrystalline silicon ion sensitive field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, F.; Estrela, P.; Mo, Y.; Migliorato, P.; Maeda, H.; Inoue, S.; Shimoda, T.

    2005-01-01

    We report the operation of polycrystalline silicon ion sensitive field effect transistors. These devices can be fabricated on inexpensive disposable substrates such as glass or plastics and are, therefore, promising candidates for low cost single-use intelligent multisensors. In this work we have developed an extended gate structure with a Si3N4 sensing layer. Nearly ideal pH sensitivity (54mV /pH) and stable operation have been achieved. Temperature effects have been characterized. A penicillin sensor has been fabricated by functionalizing the sensing area with penicillinase. The sensitivity to penicillin G is about 10mV/mM, in solutions with concentration lower than the saturation value, which is about 7 mM.

  17. Process Research of Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    A passivation process (hydrogenation) that will improve the power generation of solar cells fabricated from presently produced, large grain, cast polycrystalline silicon (Semix), a potentially low cost material are developed. The first objective is to verify the operation of a DC plasma hydrogenation system and to investigate the effect of hydrogen on the electrical performance of a variety of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. The second objective is to parameterize and optimize a hydrogenation process for cast polycrystalline silicon, and will include a process sensitivity analysis. The sample preparation for the first phase is outlined. The hydrogenation system is described, and some early results that were obtained using the hydrogenation system without a plasma are summarized. Light beam induced current (LBIC) measurements of minicell samples, and their correlation to dark current voltage characteristics, are discussed.

  18. Process for Polycrystalline film silicon growth

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2001-01-01

    A process for depositing polycrystalline silicon on substrates, including foreign substrates, occurs in a chamber at about atmospheric pressure, wherein a temperature gradient is formed, and both the atmospheric pressure and the temperature gradient are maintained throughout the process. Formation of a vapor barrier within the chamber that precludes exit of the constituent chemicals, which include silicon, iodine, silicon diiodide, and silicon tetraiodide. The deposition occurs beneath the vapor barrier. One embodiment of the process also includes the use of a blanketing gas that precludes the entrance of oxygen or other impurities. The process is capable of repetition without the need to reset the deposition zone conditions.

  19. Process Research On Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Culik, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanisms limiting performance in polycrystalline silicon was determined. The initial set of experiments in this task entails the fabrication of cells of various thicknesses for four different bulk resistivities between 0.1 and 10 omega-cm. The results for the first two lots are presented.

  20. Polycrystalline silicon on tungsten substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevolo, A. J.; Schmidt, F. A.; Shanks, H. R.; Campisi, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    Thin films of electron-beam-vaporized silicon were deposited on fine-grained tungsten substrates under a pressure of about 1 x 10 to the -10th torr. Mass spectra from a quadrupole residual-gas analyzer were used to determine the partial pressure of 13 residual gases during each processing step. During separate silicon depositions, the atomically clean substrates were maintained at various temperatures between 400 and 780 C, and deposition rates were between 20 and 630 A min. Surface contamination and interdiffusion were monitored by in situ Auger electron spectrometry before and after cleaning, deposition, and annealing. Auger depth profiling, X-ray analysis, and SEM in the topographic and channeling modes were utilized to characterize the samples with respect to silicon-metal interface, interdiffusion, silicide formation, and grain size of silicon. The onset of silicide formation was found to occur at approximately 625 C. Above this temperature tungsten silicides were formed at a rate faster than the silicon deposition. Fine-grain silicon films were obtained at lower temperatures.

  1. Process Research on Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.; Wrigley, C. Y.

    1984-01-01

    Results of hydrogen-passivated polycrystalline silicon solar cells are summarized. Very small grain or short minority-carrier diffusion length silicon was used. Hydrogenated solar cells fabricated from this material appear to have effective minority-carrier diffusion lengths that are still not very long, as shown by the open-circuit voltages of passivated cells that are still significantly less than those of single-crystal solar cells. The short-circuit current of solar cells fabricated from large-grain cast polycrystalline silicon is nearly equivalent to that of single-crystal cells, which indicates long bulk minority-carrier diffusion length. However, the open-circuit voltage, which is sensitive to grain boundary recombination, is sometimes 20 to 40 mV less. The goal was to minimize variations in open-circuit voltage and fill-factor caused by defects by passivating these defects using a hydrogenation process. Treatments with molecular hydrogen showed no effect on large-grain cast polycrystaline silicon solar cells.

  2. Process Research on Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    The investigation of the performance limiting mechanisms in large grain (greater than 1-2 mm in diameter) polycrystalline silicon was continued by fabricating a set of minicell wafers on a selection of 10 cm x 10 cm wafers. A minicell wafer consists of an array of small (approximately 0.2 sq cm in area) photodiodes which are isolated from one another by a mesa structure. The junction capacitance of each minicell was used to obtain the dopant concentration, and therefore the resistivity, as a function of position across each wafer. The results indicate that there is no significant variation in resistivity with position for any of the polycrystalline wafers, whether Semix or Wacker. However, the resistivity of Semix brick 71-01E did decrease slightly from bottom to top.

  3. Solution-processed polycrystalline silicon on paper

    SciTech Connect

    Trifunovic, M.; Ishihara, R.; Shimoda, T.

    2015-04-20

    Printing electronics has led to application areas which were formerly impossible with conventional electronic processes. Solutions are used as inks on top of large areas at room temperatures, allowing the production of fully flexible circuitry. Commonly, research in these inks have focused on organic and metal-oxide ink materials due to their printability, while these materials lack in the electronic performance when compared to silicon electronics. Silicon electronics, on the other hand, has only recently found their way in solution processes. Printing of cyclopentasilane as the silicon ink has been conducted and devices with far superior electric performance have been made when compared to other ink materials. A thermal annealing step of this material, however, was necessary, which prevented its usage on inexpensive substrates with a limited thermal budget. In this work, we introduce a method that allows polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) production directly from the same liquid silicon ink using excimer laser irradiation. In this way, poly-Si could be formed directly on top of paper even with a single laser pulse. Using this method, poly-Si transistors were created at a maximum temperature of only 150 °C. This method allows silicon device formation on inexpensive, temperature sensitive substrates such as polyethylene terephthalate, polyethylene naphthalate or paper, which leads to applications that require low-cost but high-speed electronics.

  4. Solution-processed polycrystalline silicon on paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifunovic, M.; Shimoda, T.; Ishihara, R.

    2015-04-01

    Printing electronics has led to application areas which were formerly impossible with conventional electronic processes. Solutions are used as inks on top of large areas at room temperatures, allowing the production of fully flexible circuitry. Commonly, research in these inks have focused on organic and metal-oxide ink materials due to their printability, while these materials lack in the electronic performance when compared to silicon electronics. Silicon electronics, on the other hand, has only recently found their way in solution processes. Printing of cyclopentasilane as the silicon ink has been conducted and devices with far superior electric performance have been made when compared to other ink materials. A thermal annealing step of this material, however, was necessary, which prevented its usage on inexpensive substrates with a limited thermal budget. In this work, we introduce a method that allows polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) production directly from the same liquid silicon ink using excimer laser irradiation. In this way, poly-Si could be formed directly on top of paper even with a single laser pulse. Using this method, poly-Si transistors were created at a maximum temperature of only 150 °C. This method allows silicon device formation on inexpensive, temperature sensitive substrates such as polyethylene terephthalate, polyethylene naphthalate or paper, which leads to applications that require low-cost but high-speed electronics.

  5. Polycrystalline silicon semiconducting material by nuclear transmutation doping

    DOEpatents

    Cleland, John W.; Westbrook, Russell D.; Wood, Richard F.; Young, Rosa T.

    1978-01-01

    A NTD semiconductor material comprising polycrystalline silicon having a mean grain size less than 1000 microns and containing phosphorus dispersed uniformly throughout the silicon rather than at the grain boundaries.

  6. Hydrogen passivation of polycrystalline silicon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheller, L.-P.; Weizman, M.; Simon, P.; Fehr, M.; Nickel, N. H.

    2012-09-01

    The influence of post-hydrogenation on the electrical and optical properties of solid phase crystallized polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) was examined. The passivation of grain-boundary defects was measured as a function of the passivation time. The silicon dangling-bond concentration decreases with increasing passivation time due to the formation of Si-H complexes. In addition, large H-stabilized platelet-like clusters are generated. The influence of H on the electrical properties was investigated using temperature dependent conductivity and Hall-effect measurements. For poly-Si on Corning glass, the dark conductivity decreases upon hydrogenation, while it increases when the samples are fabricated on silicon-nitride covered Borofloat glass. Hall-effect measurements reveal that for poly-Si on Corning glass the hole concentration and the mobility decrease upon post-hydrogenation, while a pronounced increase is observed for poly-Si on silicon-nitride covered Borofloat glass. This indicates the formation of localized states in the band gap, which is supported by sub band-gap absorption measurments. The results are discussed in terms of hydrogen-induced defect passivation and generation mechanisms.

  7. Tribological properties of sintered polycrystalline and single crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Srinivasan, M.

    1982-01-01

    Tribological studies and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses were conducted with sintered polycrystalline and single crystal silicon carbide surfaces in sliding contact with iron at various temperatures to 1500 C in a vacuum of 30 nPa. The results indicate that there is a significant temperature influence on both the friction properties and the surface chemistry of silicon carbide. The main contaminants on the as received sintered polycrystalline silicon carbide surfaces are adsorbed carbon, oxygen, graphite, and silicon dioxide. The surface revealed a low coefficient of friction. This is due to the presence of the graphite on the surface. At temperatures of 400 to 600 C graphite and copious amount of silicon dioxide were observed on the polycrystalline silicon carbide surface in addition to silicon carbide. At 800 C, the amount of the silicon dioxide decreased rapidly and the silicon carbide type silicon and carbon peaks were at a maximum intensity in the XPS spectra. The coefficients of friction were high in the temperature range 400 to 800 C. Small amounts of carbon and oxygen contaminants were observed on the as received single crystal silicon carbide surface below 250 C. Silicon carbide type silicon and carbon peaks were seen on the silicon carbide in addition to very small amount of graphite and silicon dioxide at temperatures of 450 to 800 C.

  8. Effect of copper impurity on polycrystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Koliwad, K. M.

    1978-01-01

    The presence of copper impurity, up to 10 to the 15th atoms/cc, in single crystal silicon has been shown to have no deleterious effect on the p-n junction solar cell performance. However, in polycrystalline silicon, copper atoms tend to migrate to the defect sites because of the structural sensitive properties of copper. This study was undertaken to investigate the influence of this behavior of copper impurity on the performance of p-n junction solar cells fabricated from structurally imperfect silicon. Two sets of polycrystalline silicon substrates containing copper were examined. In one set of samples, copper was incorporated during growth, whereas in the other, copper was diffused. Solar cells were fabricated on both the sets of substrates by a standard process. Dark and light I-V and spectral response characteristics of the cells were measured and compared with copper-free polycrystalline silicon solar cells. The results and the model are discussed.

  9. Defect behavior of polycrystalline solar cell silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Schroder, D.K.; Park, S.H.; Hwang, I.G.; Mohr, J.B.; Hanly, M.P.

    1993-05-01

    The major objective of this study, conducted from October 1988 to September 1991, was to gain an understanding of the behavior of impurities in polycrystalline silicon and the influence of these impurities on solar cell efficiency. The authors studied edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) and cast poly-Si materials and solar cells. With EFG Si they concentrated on chromium-doped materials and cells to determine the role of Cr on solar cell performance. Cast poly-Si samples were not deliberately contaminated. Samples were characterized by cell efficiency, current-voltage, deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), surface photovoltage (SPV), open-circuit voltage decay, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. They find that Cr forms Cr-B pairs with boron at room temperature and these pairs dissociate into Cr{sub i}{sup +} and B{sup {minus}} during anneals at 210{degrees}C for 10 min. Following the anneal, Cr-B pairs reform at room temperature with a time constant of 230 h. Chromium forms CrSi{sub 2} precipitates in heavily contaminated regions and they find evidence of CrSi{sub 2} gettering, but a lack of chromium segregation or precipitation to grain boundaries and dislocations. Cr-B pairs have well defined DLTS peaks. However, DLTS spectra of other defects are not well defined, giving broad peaks indicative of defects with a range of energy levels in the band gap. In some high-stress, low-efficiency cast poly-Si they detect SiC precipitates, but not in low-stress, high-efficiency samples. SPV measurements result in nonlinear SPV curves in some materials that are likely due to varying optical absorption coefficients due to locally varying stress in the material.

  10. Influence of substrates on formation of polycrystalline silicon nanowire films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shinya; Yamazaki, Tatsuya; Miyajima, Shinsuke; Konagai, Makoto

    2014-10-01

    Polycrystalline silicon nanowires (poly-SiNWs) films were successfully prepared by using metal assisted chemical etching of polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films. The poly-Si films were prepared by solid-phase crystallization of amorphous silicon (a-Si) deposited by different deposition techniques on different substrates. In the case of the electron beam evaporated a-Si on a quartz substrate, the formation of poly-SiNWs was not observed and the structure was found to be porous silicon. On the other hand, poly-SiNWs successfully formed from poly-Si on a silicon substrate. We also found that deposition techniques for a-Si films affect the formation of poly-SiNWs.

  11. Polycrystalline silicon conductivity modulated thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anish, Kumar K. P.

    1997-09-01

    Polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin-film transistors (TFTs) on glass has received significant attention for use in large area microelectronic applications. These applications include both niche and large volume applications such as printer drivers, image scanners, active-matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs), electro-luminescent displays, plasma assisted displays, etc. Currently, the leading technology for these applications is amorphous-Si (a-Si) TFT. However, as the information content increases, a-Si technology encounters severe challenges due to its inherent low mobility, high parasitic capacitance, low aperture ratio, and non-compatibility to CMOS process. On the other hand, poly-Si technology offers high mobility, low parasitic capacitance, small size, CMOS compatibility, good stability, and uses the infrastructure of silicon science and technology. Thus, a simple low temperature poly-Si technology which allows large area system integration on panel will be in great demand for future high definition displays. However, it was found that poly-Si material properties vary with its method of preparation, its grain size, its surface roughness, and the nature and distribution of the inter-granular and bulk defects. Therefore, extensive studies are needed to optimize the key parameters such as the off-current, on-current, and breakdown voltage of the devices. These parameters can be optimized by means of material preparation as well as innovative device designs. In this thesis, three TFT structures were invented and fabricated using a simple low temperature poly-Si technology. With these novel structures, pixels, pixel drivers, and analog and digital peripheral circuits can all be built on the same glass substrate. This allows the ultimate goal of display systems on glass to be much more closer to reality. First, a high voltage transistor called the Conductivity Modulated Thin Film Transistor (CMTFT) is presented. Using this structure, the fundamental current

  12. Polycrystalline silicon material availability and market pricing outlook study for 1980 to 88: January 1983 update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costogue, E.; Pellin, R.

    1983-01-01

    Photovoltaic solar cell arrays which convert solar energy into electrical energy can become a cost effective, alternative energy source provided that an adequate supply of low priced materials and automated fabrication techniques are available. Presently, silicon is the most promising cell material for achieving the near term cost goals of the Photovoltaics Program. Electronic grade silicon is produced primarily for the semiconductor industry with the photovoltaic industry using, in most cases, the production rejects of slightly lower grade material. Therefore, the future availability of adequate supplies of low cost silicon is one of the major concerns of the Photovoltaic Program. The supply outlook for silicon with emphasis on pricing is updated and is based primarily on an industry survey conducted by a JPL consultant. This survey included interviews with polycrystalline silicon manufacturers, a large cross section of silicon users and silicon solar cell manufacturers.

  13. Laser-induced amorphization of silicon during pulsed-laser irradiation of TiN/Ti/polycrystalline silicon/SiO2/silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Y. F.; Pey, K. L.; Wee, A. T. S.; Thompson, M. O.; Tung, C. H.; See, A.

    2002-11-01

    In this letter, we report on the complex solidification structures formed during laser irradiation of a titanium nitride/titanium/polycrystalline silicon/silicon dioxide/silicon film stack. Due to enhanced optical coupling, the titanium nitride/titanium capping layer increases the melt depth of polycrystalline silicon by more than a factor of 2. It is found that the titanium atoms diffuse through the entire polycrystalline silicon layer during irradiation. Contrary to the expected polycrystalline silicon growth, distinct regions of polycrystalline and amorphous silicon are formed instead. Possible mechanisms for the formation of these microstructures are proposed.

  14. Slot waveguides with polycrystalline silicon for electrical injection.

    PubMed

    Preston, Kyle; Lipson, Michal

    2009-02-02

    We demonstrate horizontal slot waveguides using high-index layers of polycrystalline and single crystalline silicon separated by a 10 nm layer of silicon dioxide. We measure waveguide propagation loss of 7 dB/cm and a ring resonator intrinsic quality factor of 83,000. The electric field of the optical mode is strongly enhanced in the low-index oxide layer, which can be used to induce a strong modal gain when an active material is embedded in the slot. Both high-index layers are made of electrically conductive silicon which can efficiently transport charge to the slot region. The incorporation of conductive silicon materials with high-Q slot waveguide cavities is a key step for realizing electrical tunneling devices such as electrically pumped silicon-based light sources.

  15. Process Research of Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was begun into the usefulness of molecular hydrogen annealing on polycrystalline solar cells. No improvement was realized even after twenty hours of hydrogenation. Thus, samples were chosen on the basis of: (1) low open circuit voltage; (2) low shunt conductance; and (3) high light generated current. These cells were hydrogenated in molecular hydrogen at 300 C. The differences between the before and after hydrogenation values are so slight as to be negligible. These cells have light generated current densities that indicate long minority carrier diffusion lengths. The open circuit voltage appears to be degraded, and quasi-neutral recombination current enhanced. Therefore, molecular hydrogen is not usful for passivating electrically active defects.

  16. Piezoresistive Transduction in Multilayer Polycrystalline Silicon Resonators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    semiconductor CMOS foundry processes,6 and as such, is amenable to integration with minimal process disruption. A further advantage of this approach is...poly- crystalline silicon CMOS foundry processes, opening up the possibility of directly integrating MEMS devices and trans- ducers with CMOS . This... Fab - rication was performed at the Cornell Nanoscale Science and Technology Facility, and certain measurements were per- formed at the Cornell Center

  17. An EBIC study of HEM polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, T.; Ast, D.

    1982-01-01

    Low-cost silicon for solar cells grown by the heat exchanger method (HEM) was studied in the electron beam induced current (EBIC) mode of a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Comparisons were made between the defects observed optically and the recombination centers visible in EBIC. Much of the HEM material was single crystalline, but structural defects were found from areas near the corners of the grown material. Most of these defects consisted of linear twin boundaries and grain boundaries. The electrical activity of these boundaries was dependent on symmetry of the boundaries. Symmetric twin boundaries did not exhibit recombination activity while unsymmetric twin boundaries were electrically active.

  18. Dependence of resistivity on the doping level of polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fripp, A. L.

    1975-01-01

    The electrical resistivity of polycrystalline silicon films has been studied as a function of doping concentration and heat treatment. The films were grown by the chemical vapor decomposition of silane on oxidized silicon wafers. The resistivity of the as-deposited films was widely scattered but independent of dopant atom concentration at the lightly doped levels and was strong function of dopant level in the more heavily doped regions. Postdeposition heat treatments in an oxidizing atmosphere remove scatter in the data. The resultant resistivity for dopant levels less than 10 to the 16th atoms/per cu cm was approximately equal to that of intrinsic silicon. In the next 2 orders of magnitude increase in dopant level, the resistivity dropped 6 orders of magnitude. A model, based on high dopant atom segregation in the grain boundaries, is proposed to explain the results.

  19. Backside damage-gettering in cast polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J.; Roncin, S.; Alexander, P.

    1984-01-01

    The technique of backside-damage gettering improves the performance of short minority-carrier diffusion length, large-grain (grain diameter greater than 1 to 2 mm), cast polycrystalline silicon. On average, increases of nearly 20 percent in short-circuit current, 10 mV in open-circuit voltage, and 15 percent in peak-power were obtained by heat-treating 300 micron thick polycrystalline wafers at 1000 C in flowing nitrogen for 5 hours. Additional measurements of the bulk and space-charge recombination current components indicate that this improvement results from a significant increase in the minority-carrier diffusion length due to gettering of impurities from the bulk.

  20. Polycrystalline silicon optical fibers with atomically smooth surfaces.

    PubMed

    Healy, Noel; Lagonigro, Laura; Sparks, Justin R; Boden, Stuart; Sazio, Pier J A; Badding, John V; Peacock, Anna C

    2011-07-01

    We investigate the surface roughness of polycrystalline silicon core optical fibers fabricated using a high-pressure chemical deposition technique. By measuring the optical transmission of two fibers with different core sizes, we will show that scattering from the core-cladding interface has a negligible effect on the losses. A Zemetrics ZeScope three-dimensional optical profiler has been used to directly measure the surface of the core material, confirming a roughness of only ~0.1 nm. The ability to fabricate low-loss polysilicon optical fibers with ultrasmooth cores scalable to submicrometer dimensions should establish their use in a range of nonlinear optical applications.

  1. Polycrystalline silicon availability for photovoltaic and semiconductor industries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferber, R. R.; Costogue, E. N.; Pellin, R.

    1982-01-01

    Markets, applications, and production techniques for Siemens process-produced polycrystalline silicon are surveyed. It is noted that as of 1982 a total of six Si materials suppliers were servicing a worldwide total of over 1000 manufacturers of Si-based devices. Besides solar cells, the Si wafers are employed for thyristors, rectifiers, bipolar power transistors, and discrete components for control systems. An estimated 3890 metric tons of semiconductor-grade polycrystalline Si will be used in 1982, and 6200 metric tons by 1985. Although the amount is expected to nearly triple between 1982-89, research is being carried out on the formation of thin films and ribbons for solar cells, thereby eliminating the waste produced in slicing Czolchralski-grown crystals. The free-world Si production in 1982 is estimated to be 3050 metric tons. Various new technologies for the formation of polycrystalline Si at lower costs and with less waste are considered. New entries into the industrial Si formation field are projected to produce a 2000 metric ton excess by 1988.

  2. Spherical silicon photonic microcavities: From amorphous to polycrystalline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenollosa, R.; Garín, M.; Meseguer, F.

    2016-06-01

    Shaping silicon as a spherical object is not an obvious task, especially when the object size is in the micrometer range. This has the important consequence of transforming bare silicon material in a microcavity, so it is able to confine light efficiently. Here, we have explored the inside volume of such microcavities, both in their amorphous and in their polycrystalline versions. The synthesis method, which is based on chemical vapor deposition, causes amorphous microspheres to have a high content of hydrogen that produces an onionlike distributed porous core when the microspheres are crystallized by a fast annealing regime. This substantially influences the resonant modes. However, a slow crystallization regime does not yield pores, and produces higher-quality-factor resonances that could be fitted to the Mie theory. This allows the establishment of a procedure for obtaining size calibration standards with relative errors of the order of 0.1%.

  3. Edge determination for polycrystalline silicon lines on gate oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarrubia, John S.; Vladar, Andras E.; Lowney, Jeremiah R.; Postek, Michael T., Jr.

    2001-08-01

    In a scanning electron microscope (SEM) top-down secondary electron image, areas within a few tens of nanometers of the line edges are characteristically brighter than the rest of the image. In general, the shape of the secondary electron signal within such edge regions depends upon the energy and spatial distribution of the electron beam and the sample composition, and it is sensitive to small variations in sample geometry. Assigning edge shape and position is done by finding a model sample that is calculated, on the basis of a mathematical model of the instrument-sample interaction, to produce an image equal to the one actually observed. Edge locations, and consequently line widths, are then assigned based upon this model sample. In previous years we have applied this strategy to lines with geometry constrained by preferential etching of single crystal silicon. With this study we test the procedure on polycrystalline silicon lines. Polycrystalline silicon lines fabricated according to usual industrial processes represent a commercially interesting albeit technically more challenging application of this method. With the sample geometry less constrained a priori, a larger set of possible sample geometries must be modeled and tested for a match to the observed line scan, and the possibility of encountering multiple acceptable matches is increased. For this study we have implemented a data analysis procedure that matches measured image line scans to a precomputed library of sample shapes and their corresponding line scans. Linewidth test patterns containing both isolated and dense lines separated form the underlying silicon substrate by a thin gate oxide have been fabricated. Line scans from test pattern images have been fitted to the library of modeled shapes.

  4. Limiting mechanisms in large-grain polycrystalline silicon Spatial homogeneity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J.; Grimes, K.

    1984-01-01

    An experiment to investigate the spatial homogeneity of large-grain polycrystalline silicon shows a number of performance-loss mechanisms. Arrays of up to 400 small (about 0.2 sq cm in area) photodiodes were fabricated on a selection of 10 cm x 10 cm polycrystalline silicon wafers. Measurements of the illuminated current-voltage (J-V) characteristics were used to generate maps of Voc, Jsc, and FF as a function of position; and dark J-V and LBIC analysis were used to determine the cause of low performance in areas with significantly degraded J-V characteristics. In addition to the presence of inclusions, which act as resistive shunts, the performance of many of the cells is limited by quasineutral recombination current, which may vary by up to an order of magnitude across a wafer. The increase is the result of either electrically-active grain boundaries or numerous subgrain boundaries within the grain bulk. In other isolated instances, the open-circuit voltage is reduced by excess space-charge recombination current that is not correlated with either grain or subgrain boundary activity.

  5. Formation of porous grain boundaries in polycrystalline silicon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Yasuyuki; Murase, Yoshie; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Funabashi, Hirofumi; Sakata, Jiro

    2002-06-01

    Unique polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin films, which were permeable to a concentrated hydrofluoric acid solution through their porous grain boundaries, were investigated to elucidate the formation mechanism of their microstructure. 0.1-μm-thick permeable poly-Si thin films were made through processes of amorphous silicon film formation by low pressure chemical vapor deposition, successive postannealing for crystallization, and excess phosphorus diffusion by a phosphorus oxichloride predeposition. At the grain boundaries, porous microstructures were formed after the films were cleaned in an SC1 solution (a 1:1:5 mixture of NH4OH:H2O2:H2O at 80 °C for 10 min), whereas segregated soluble precipitates observed by a field emission secondary electron microscope were present before the SC1 cleaning. Auger electron microscope revealed that the surface of the precipitates mainly consist of silicon (˜80 at. %) and oxygen (˜20 at. %). As a result of transmission electron microscope observation, it is concluded that enhancement of silicon atom mobility by the phosphorus doping process induced consequent segregation of the soluble precipitates at the grain boundaries.

  6. Surface roughness measurements of micromachined polycrystalline silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phinney, L. M.; Lin, G.; Wellman, J.; Garcia, A.

    2004-07-01

    The characteristics of the materials and surfaces in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and microsystems technology (MST) profoundly affect the performance, reliability, and wear of MEMS and MST devices. It is critical to measure the properties of surfaces that are in contact during microstructure movement, such as the underside of a MEMS gear and the underlying substrate. However, contacting surfaces are usually inaccessible unless the MEMS device is broken and removed from the substrate. This paper presents a nondestructive method for characterizing commercially fabricated surface micromachined polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) devices. Microhinged flaps were designed that enable access to the upper surface, the part of a structural layer deposited last; the lower surface, the part of a structural layer deposited first; and the underlying substrate. Due to the susceptibility of surface-micromachined MEMS to adhesion failures, the surface roughness is a key parameter for predicting device behavior. Using the microhinged flaps, the RMS surface roughness for polycrystalline surfaces was measured and indicated that the upper surfaces were 3.5-6.4 times rougher than the lower surfaces. The difference in the surface roughness for the upper surface, which is easily accessed and the one most commonly characterized, and that for the lower surface reveals the importance of characterizing contacting surfaces in MEMS and MST devices.

  7. Recombination-active defects in silicon ribbon and polycrystalline solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports results from a study of recombination-active structural defects in silicon ribbon and polycrystalline solar cells using the electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique in a scanning electron microscope. It is demonstrated that low temperature EBIC measurements can reveal a range of defects that are not observable at room temperature, including slip dislocations in silicon dendritic web ribbons as well as decorated twin boundaries and dislocation complexes in cast polycrystalline silicon solar cell materials.

  8. Fabricating micro-instruments in surface-micromachined polycrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Comtois, J.H.; Michalicek, M.A.; Barron, C.C.

    1997-04-01

    Smaller, lighter instruments can be fabricated as Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), having micron scale moving parts packaged together with associated control and measurement electronics. Batch fabrication of these devices will make economical applications such as condition-based machine maintenance and remote sensing. The choice of instrumentation is limited only by the designer`s imagination. This paper presents one genre of MEMS fabrication, surface-micromachined polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon). Two currently available but slightly different polysilicon processes are presented. One is the ARPA-sponsored ``Multi-User MEMS ProcesS`` (MUMPS), available commercially through MCNC; the other is the Sandia National Laboratories ``Sandia Ultra-planar Multilevel MEMS Technology`` (SUMMiT). Example components created in both processes will be presented, with an emphasis on actuators, actuator force testing instruments, and incorporating actuators into larger instruments.

  9. Effect of localized polycrystalline silicon properties on solar cell performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, D.; Iles, P. A.; Hyland, S.; Kachare, A.

    1984-01-01

    Several forms of polycrystalline silicon, mostly from cast ingots, (including UCP, SILSO and HEM) were studied. On typical slices, localized properties were studied in two ways. Small area (about 2.5 sq mm) mesa diodes were formed, and localized photovoltaic properties were measured. Also a small area (about .015 sq mm) light spot was scanned across the cells; the light spot response was calibrated to measure local diffusion length directly. Using these methods, the effects of grain boundaries, or of intragrain imperfections were correlated with cell performance. Except for the fine grain portion of SILSO, grain boundaries played only a secondary role in determining cell performance. The major factor was intra-grain material quality and it varied with position in ingots and probably related to solidification procedure.

  10. Predicting fracture in micron-scale polycrystalline silicon MEMS structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, Siddharth S.; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Boyce, Brad Lee; Ohlhausen, James Anthony; Foulk, James W., III; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2010-09-01

    Designing reliable MEMS structures presents numerous challenges. Polycrystalline silicon fractures in a brittle manner with considerable variability in measured strength. Furthermore, it is not clear how to use a measured tensile strength distribution to predict the strength of a complex MEMS structure. To address such issues, two recently developed high throughput MEMS tensile test techniques have been used to measure strength distribution tails. The measured tensile strength distributions enable the definition of a threshold strength as well as an inferred maximum flaw size. The nature of strength-controlling flaws has been identified and sources of the observed variation in strength investigated. A double edge-notched specimen geometry was also tested to study the effect of a severe, micron-scale stress concentration on the measured strength distribution. Strength-based, Weibull-based, and fracture mechanics-based failure analyses were performed and compared with the experimental results.

  11. Highly doped polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes reduce noise in neuronal recordings in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saha, Rajarshi; Jackson, Nathan; Patel, Chetan; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2010-10-01

    The aims of this study are to 1) experimentally validate for the first time the nonlinear current-potential characteristics of bulk doped polycrystalline silicon in the small amplitude voltage regimes (0-200 μV) and 2) test if noise amplitudes ( 0-15 μV ) from single neuronal electrical recordings get selectively attenuated in doped polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes due to the above property. In highly doped polycrystalline silicon, bulk resistances of several hundred kilo-ohms were experimentally measured for voltages typical of noise amplitudes and 9-10 kΩ for voltages typical of neural signal amplitudes ( > 150-200 μV). Acute multiunit measurements and noise measurements were made in n=6 and n=8 anesthetized adult rats, respectively, using polycrystalline silicon and tungsten microelectrodes. There was no significant difference in the peak-to-peak amplitudes of action potentials recorded from either microelectrode (p > 0.10). However, noise power in the recordings from tungsten microelectrodes (26.36 ±10.13 pW) was significantly higher than the corresponding value in polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes (7.49 ±2.66 pW). We conclude that polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes result in selective attenuation of noise power in electrical recordings compared to tungsten microelectrodes. This reduction in noise compared to tungsten microelectrodes is likely due to the exponentially higher bulk resistances offered by highly doped bulk polycrystalline silicon in the range of voltages corresponding to noise in multiunit measurements.

  12. Properties of boron-doped thin films of polycrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Merabet, Souad

    2013-12-16

    The properties of polycrystalline-silicon films deposited by low pressure chemical vapor deposition and doped heavily in situ boron-doped with concentration level of around 2×10{sup 20}cm{sup −3} has been studied. Their properties are analyzed using electrical and structural characterization means by four points probe resistivity measurements and X-ray diffraction spectra. The thermal-oxidation process are performed on sub-micron layers of 200nm/c-Si and 200nm/SiO{sub 2} deposited at temperatures T{sub d} ranged between 520°C and 605°C and thermally-oxidized in dry oxygen ambient at 945°C. Compared to the as-grown resistivity with silicon wafers is known to be in the following sequence <ρ{sub 200nm/c−Si}> < <ρ{sub 200nm/SiO2}> and <ρ{sub 520}> < <ρ{sub 605}>. The measure X-ray spectra is shown, that the Bragg peaks are marked according to the crystal orientation in the film deposited on bare substrates (poly/c-Si), for the second series of films deposited on bare oxidized substrates (poly/SiO{sub 2}) are clearly different.

  13. Advanced Micro-Polycrystalline Silicon Films Formed by Blue-Multi-Laser-Diode Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Takashi; Chen, Yi; Miyahira, Tomoyuki; de Dieu Mugiraneza, Jean; Ogino, Yoshiaki; Iida, Yasuhiro; Sahota, Eiji; Terao, Motoyasu

    2010-03-01

    Semiconductor blue-multi-laser-diode annealing (BLDA) for amorphous Si film was performed to obtain a film containing uniform polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) grains as a low temperature poly-Si (LTPS) process used for thin-film transistor (TFT). By adopting continuous wave (CW) mode at the 445 nm wavelength of the BLDA system, the light beam is efficiently absorbed into the thin amorphous silicon film of 50 nm thickness and can be crystallized stably. By adjusting simply the laser power below 6 W with controlled beam shape, the isotropic Si grains from uniform micro-grains to arbitral grain size of polycrystalline phase can be obtained with reproducible by fixing the scan speed at 500 mm/s. As a result of analysis using electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM), uniform distributed micro-poly-Si grains of smooth surface were observed at a power condition below 5 W and the preferred crystal orientation of (111) face was confirmed. As arbitral grain size can be obtained stably and reproducibly merely by controlling the laser power, BLDA is promising as a next-generation LTPS process for AM OLED panel including a system on glass (SoG).

  14. Fluorine redistribution in a chemical vapor deposited tungsten/polycrystalline silicon gate structure during heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, Th.; Carlsson, J.-O.; Keinonen, J.; Petersson, C. S.

    1988-09-01

    Fluorine redistribution during heat treatment of chemical vapor deposited tungsten/polycrystalline silicon gate structures was analyzed by the nuclear resonance broadening technique. The tungsten layer was deposited from a hydrogen/tungsten hexafluoride gas mixture. Upon heat treatment in the temperature range 1020-1325-K tungsten disilicide formation was observed using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. In the as-deposited sample, the fluorine was accumulated at the tungsten/polycrystalline silicon interface. After silicide formation the fluorine was observed at the tungsten disilicide/polycrystalline silicon interface. At temperatures above 1120 K fluorine starts to diffuse through the polycrystalline silicon layer. A variation in the total fluorine content between the samples was also observed. The origin of the fluorine redistribution as well as the variation in the total fluorine content is discussed in connection to conceivable mechanisms.

  15. Fluorine redistribution in a chemical vapor deposited tungsten/polycrystalline silicon gate structure during heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, T.; Carlsson, J.; Keinonen, J.; Petersson, C.S.

    1988-09-15

    Fluorine redistribution during heat treatment of chemical vapor deposited tungsten/polycrystalline silicon gate structures was analyzed by the nuclear resonance broadening technique. The tungsten layer was deposited from a hydrogen/tungsten hexafluoride gas mixture. Upon heat treatment in the temperature range 1020--1325-K tungsten disilicide formation was observed using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. In the as-deposited sample, the fluorine was accumulated at the tungsten/polycrystalline silicon interface. After silicide formation the fluorine was observed at the tungsten disilicide/polycrystalline silicon interface. At temperatures above 1120 K fluorine starts to diffuse through the polycrystalline silicon layer. A variation in the total fluorine content between the samples was also observed. The origin of the fluorine redistribution as well as the variation in the total fluorine content is discussed in connection to conceivable mechanisms.

  16. Study of polycrystalline silicon obtained by aluminum-induced crystallization depending on process conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyaslavtsev, Alexander; Sokolov, Igor; Sinev, Leonid

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we have decided to consider an alternative method of producing polycrystalline silicon and study change of its electrophysical characteristics depending on process parameters. As an alternative low-pressure chemical vapor deposition method appears aluminum-induced crystallization (AIC), which allows to obtain a polycrystalline silicon film is significantly larger grain size, thereby reducing contribution of grain boundaries. A comprehensive study of polycrystalline silicon was carried out using a variety of microscopic (OM, SEM) and spectroscopic (RAMAN, XPS) and diffraction (EBSD, XRD) analytic methods. We also considered possibility of self-doping in AIC, result of which was obtained polycrystalline silicon with different resistance. Additionally considered changes in temperature coefficient of resistance depending on technological parameters of AIC process.

  17. Mechanisms limiting the performance of large grain polycrystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.; Alexander, P.; Dumas, K. A.; Wohlgemuth, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current of large-grain (1 to 10 mm grain diameter) polycrystalline silicon solar cells is determined by the minority-carrier diffusion length within the bulk of the grains. This was demonstrated by irradiating polycrystalline and single-crystal (Czochralski) silicon solar cells with 1 MeV electrons to reduce their bulk lifetime. The variation of short-circuit current with minority-carrier diffusion length for the polycrystalline solar cells is identical to that of the single-crystal solar cells. The open-circuit voltage versus short-circuit current characteristic of the polycrystalline solar cells for reduced diffusion lengths is also identical to that of the single-crystal solar cells. The open-circuit voltage of the polycrystalline solar cells is a strong function of quasi-neutral (bulk) recombination, and is reduced only slightly, if at all, by grain-boundary recombination.

  18. Highly Doped Polycrystalline Silicon Microelectrodes Reduce Noise in Neuronal Recordings In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Rajarshi; Jackson, Nathan; Patel, Chetan; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study are to 1) experimentally validate for the first time the nonlinear current-potential characteristics of bulk doped polycrystalline silicon in the small amplitude voltage regimes (0–200 μV) and 2) test if noise amplitudes (0–15 μV) from single neuronal electrical recordings get selectively attenuated in doped polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes due to the above property. In highly doped polycrystalline silicon, bulk resistances of several hundred kilo-ohms were experimentally measured for voltages typical of noise amplitudes and 9–10 kΩ for voltages typical of neural signal amplitudes (>150–200 μV). Acute multiunit measurements and noise measurements were made in n = 6 and n = 8 anesthetized adult rats, respectively, using polycrystalline silicon and tungsten microelectrodes. There was no significant difference in the peak-to-peak amplitudes of action potentials recorded from either microelectrode (p > 0.10). However, noise power in the recordings from tungsten microelectrodes (26.36 ± 10.13 pW) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than the corresponding value in polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes (7.49 ± 2.66 pW). We conclude that polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes result in selective attenuation of noise power in electrical recordings compared to tungsten microelectrodes. This reduction in noise compared to tungsten microelectrodes is likely due to the exponentially higher bulk resistances offered by highly doped bulk polycrystalline silicon in the range of voltages corresponding to noise in multiunit measurements. PMID:20667815

  19. The effect of heat treatment on the resistivity of polycrystalline silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fripp, A. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The resistivity of doped polycrystalline silicon films has been studied as a function of post deposition heat treatments in an oxidizing atmosphere. It was found that a short oxidation cycle may produce a resistivity increase as large as three orders of magnitude in the polycrystalline films. The extent of change was dependent on the initial resistivity and the films' doping level and was independent of the total oxidation time.

  20. Depletion effect of polycrystalline-silicon gate electrode by phosphorus deactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Woojin; Ahn, Ji-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    A study of the polycrystalline silicon depletion effect generated from the subsequent thermal process is undertaken. Although phosphorus out-diffusion, which causes the polycrystalline silicon depletion effect, is increased with an increase in the thermal process temperature, the polysilicon depletion effect is stronger when inducing rapid thermal annealing in lower temperatures of 600-800 °C than in 900 °C. This indicates that the major reason for the polysilicon depletion effect is not the out-diffusion of phosphorus but the electrical deactivation of phosphorus, which is segregated at the grain boundary. Therefore, by increasing the size of polycrystalline silicon grain, we can efficiently reduce the polysilicon depletion effect and enhance the tolerance to deactivation.

  1. The effects of intragrain defects on the local photoresponse of polycrystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, N.; Wilmsen, C. W.; Jones, K. A.

    1981-02-01

    Intragrain defects in Wacker cast and Monsanto zone-refined polycrystalline silicon materials were investigated using the electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) technique. The EBIC response maps were compared with etch pit, local diffusion length and local photoresponse measurements. It was determined that the Wacker polycrystalline silicon has a much lower density of defects than does the Monsanto polycrystalline silicon and that most of the defects in the Wacker material are not active recombination sites. A correlation was found between the recombination site density, as determined by EBIC, and the local diffusion length. It is shown that a large density of intragrain recombination sites greatly reduces the minority carrier diffusion length and thus can significantly reduce the photoresponse of solar cells.

  2. Boron- and phosphorus-doped polycrystalline silicon thin films prepared by silver-induced layer exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Antesberger, T.; Wassner, T. A.; Jaeger, C.; Algasinger, M.; Kashani, M.; Scholz, M.; Matich, S.; Stutzmann, M.

    2013-05-27

    Intentional boron and phosphorus doping of polycrystalline silicon thin films on glass prepared by the silver-induced layer exchange is presented. A silver/(titanium) oxide/amorphous silicon stack is annealed at temperatures below the eutectic temperature of the Ag/Si system, leading to a complete layer exchange and simultaneous crystallization of the amorphous silicon. Intentional doping of the amorphous silicon prior to the exchange process results in boron- or phosphorus-doped polycrystalline silicon. Hall effect measurements show carrier concentrations between 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} and 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} for phosphorus and 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} for boron-doped layers, with carrier mobilities up to 90 cm{sup 2}/V s.

  3. Recovery of cutting fluids used in polycrystalline silicon ingot slicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecini, Mouna; Drouiche, Nadjib; Bouchelaghem, Ouahiba

    2016-11-01

    A recovery process for effective separation of silicon, silicon carbide micro powders and polyethylene glycol from the wire sawing slurry is proposed. The separation between silicon and silicon carbide is based on their size difference and surface charging state. The aim of this work is the study of the solid phase and liquid phase separation of silicon carbide and Silicon. Some methods applied for this purpose are the centrifugation process, phase-transfer separation as well as liquid-liquid extraction followed by the regeneration of polyethylene glycol by the distillation process. It is verified experimentally that silicon and silicon carbide micro powder can be effectively separated by phase transfer separation, centrifugation, chemical cleaning, filtering and distillation. In this study, the liquid-liquid extraction was used to separate a particle from a powder mixture. The removal of liquid component from a solution via a solvent separated considerably larger silicon carbide particles. The optimal results showed that Si content can reach 82% in the Si-rich powder and 3.8% wt% in the silicon carbide-rich powder. By separating the mixed powder the content reached 31.2 wt% of silicon, 63.3 wt% of silicon carbide as the raw material, 5.3 wt% of the iron fragment, and 0.2 wt% of other impurities.

  4. Process Research On Polycrystalline Silicon Material (PROPSM). [flat plate solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culik, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    The performance-limiting mechanisms in large-grain (greater than 1 to 2 mm in diameter) polycrystalline silicon solar cells were investigated by fabricating a matrix of 4 sq cm solar cells of various thickness from 10 cm x 10 cm polycrystalline silicon wafers of several bulk resistivities. Analysis of the illuminated I-V characteristics of these cells suggests that bulk recombination is the dominant factor limiting the short-circuit current. The average open-circuit voltage of the polycrystalline solar cells is 30 to 70 mV lower than that of co-processed single-crystal cells; the fill-factor is comparable. Both open-circuit voltage and fill-factor of the polycrystalline cells have substantial scatter that is not related to either thickness or resistivity. This implies that these characteristics are sensitive to an additional mechanism that is probably spatial in nature. A damage-gettering heat-treatment improved the minority-carrier diffusion length in low lifetime polycrystalline silicon, however, extended high temperature heat-treatment degraded the lifetime.

  5. Poisson's ratio for polycrystalline silicon used in disk-shaped microresonators.

    PubMed

    Meitzler, Allen H

    2006-02-01

    Integrated circuit technology has been used to fabricate miniature disk resonators of polycrystalline silicon that operate at frequencies above 100 MHz. The ratios of low-order resonant frequencies in these resonators can be used to determine the value of Poisson's ratio and to confirm assumptions regarding homogeneity and isotropy.

  6. The properties of polycrystalline silicon solar cells with controlled titanium additions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, A.; Hopkins, R. H.; Davis, J. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    By coupling the results of electrical measurements, such as spectral response, lighted and dark I-V determinations, and deep-level-transient spectroscopy with optical and laser scan photomicroscopy, the effects of grain boundaries and impurities on silicon solar cells were evaluated. Titanium, which produces two deep levels in silicon, degrades cell performance by reducing bulk lifetime and thus cell short-circuit current. Electrically active grain boundaries induce carrier recombination in the bulk and depletion regions of the solar cell. Experimental data imply a small but measurable segregation of titanium into some grain boundaries of the polycrystalline silicon containing high Ti concentration. However, for the titanium-contaminated polycrystalline material used in this study, solar cell performance is dominated by the electrically active titanium concentration in the grains. Microstructural impacts on the devices are of secondary importance

  7. High efficiency polycrystalline silicon solar cells using low temperature PECVD process

    SciTech Connect

    Elgamel, H.E.A.

    1998-10-01

    Conventionally directionally solidified (DS) and silicon film (SF) polycrystalline silicon solar cells are fabricated using gettering and low temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) passivation. Thin layer ({approximately}10 nm) of PECVD SiO{sub 2} is used to passivate the emitter of the solar cell, while direct hydrogen rf plasma and PECVD silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) are implemented to provide emitter and bulk passivation. It is found in this work that hydrogen rf plasma can significantly improve the solar cell blue and long wavelength responses when it is performed through a thin layer of PECVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. High efficiency DS and SF polycrystalline silicon solar cells have been achieved using a simple solar cell process with uniform emitter, Al/POCL{sub 3} gettering, hydrogen rf plasma/PECVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and PECVD SiO{sub 2} passivation. On the other hand, a comprehensive experimental study of the characteristics of the PECVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer and its role in improving the efficiency of polycrystalline silicon solar cells is carried out in this paper. For the polycrystalline silicon used in this investigation, it is found that the PECVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer doesn`t provide a sufficient cap for the out diffusion of hydrogen at temperatures higher than 500 C. Low temperature ({le}400 C) annealing of the PECVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} provides efficient hydrogen bulk passivation, while higher temperature annealing relaxes the deposition induced stress and improves mainly the short wavelength (blue) response of the solar cells.

  8. GaAs nanowire growth on polycrystalline silicon thin films using selective-area MOVPE.

    PubMed

    Ikejiri, Keitaro; Ishizaka, Fumiya; Tomioka, Katsuhiro; Fukui, Takashi

    2013-03-22

    The growth mechanism of GaAs nanowires (NWs) grown on polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin films using selective-area metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy was investigated. Wire structures were selectively grown in the mask openings on a poly-Si substrate. The appearance ratio of wire structures strongly depended on the growth conditions and deposition temperature of the poly-Si substrate. Evaluation of the grown shapes and growth characteristics revealed that GaAs NWs grown on a poly-Si substrate have the same growth mechanism as conventional GaAs NWs grown on a single-crystalline GaAs or Si substrate. Experiments showed that the wire structure yield can be improved by increasing the Si grain size and/or increasing the Si deposition temperature. The growth model proposed for understanding NW growth on poly-Si is based on the mask opening size, the Si grain size, and the growth conditions. The ability to control the growth mode is promising for the formation of NWs with complex structures on poly-Si thin layers.

  9. Absence of an abrupt phase change from polycrystalline to amorphous in silicon with deposition temperature.

    PubMed

    Voyles, P M; Gerbi, J E; Treacy, M M; Gibson, J M; Abelson, J R

    2001-06-11

    Using fluctuation electron microscopy, we have observed an increase in the mesoscopic spatial fluctuations in the diffracted intensity from vapor-deposited silicon thin films as a function of substrate temperature from the amorphous to polycrystalline regimes. We interpret this increase as an increase in paracrystalline medium-range order in the sample. A paracrystal consists of topologically crystalline grains in a disordered matrix; in this model the increase in ordering is caused by an increase in the grain size or density. Our observations are counter to the previous belief that the amorphous to polycrystalline transition is a discontinuous disorder-order phase transition.

  10. Polycrystalline Silicon Sheets for Solar Cells by the Improved Spinning Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, Y.; Yokoyama, T.; Hide, I.

    1984-01-01

    Cost reduction of silicon materials in the photovoltaic program of materials was examined. The current process of producing silicon sheets is based entirely on the conventional Czochralski ingot growth and wafering used in the semiconductor industry. The current technology cannot meet the cost reduction demands for producing low cost silicon sheets. Alternative sheet production processes such as unconventional crystallization are needed. The production of polycrystalline silicon sheets by unconventional ingot technology is the casting technique. Though large grain sheets were obtained by this technique, silicon ribbon growth overcomes deficiencies of the casting process by obtaining the sheet directly from the melt. The need to solve difficulties of growth stability and impurity effects are examined. The direct formation process of polycrystalline silicon sheets with large grain size, smooth surface, and sharp edges from the melt with a high growth rate which will yield low cost silicon sheets for solar cells and the photovoltaic characteristics associated with this type of sheet to include an EBIC study of the grain boundaries are described.

  11. Electron channeling and EBIC studies of polycrystalline silicon sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuo, Y S; Matson, R J

    1984-05-01

    Electron channeling and EBIC studies have been performed on silicon sheets grown by the edge-supported pulling (ESP) and low-angle silicon sheet (LASS) processes. We have found that the dominant grain structure of the ESP sheets is long, narrow grains with surface normals oriented near (011); grains with this structure tend to have better electronic quality than random grains. We have also studied the twin-stabilized planar growth material of LASS sheets. This material, grown at 200 cm/sup 2//min, is essentially single-crystal.

  12. Defect engineering by ultrasound treatment in polycrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ostapenko, S.; Jastrzebski, L.

    1995-08-01

    By applying ultrasound treatment (UST) to bulk and thin film polycrystalline Si (poly-Si) we have found a dramatic improvement of recombination and transport properties. The increasing of minority carrier lifetime by as much as one order of magnitude was found in short diffusion length regions, while exhibiting a strong dispersion for entire solar-grade poly-Si wafer. Relevant mechanisms are attributed to ultrasound processing on crystallographic defects, as well as UST stimulated dissociation of Fe-B pairs followed by Fe{sub i} gettering. A spectacular improvement of hydrogenation efficiency in poly-Si thin-films on glass substrate is demonstrated by resistivity study and confirmed using spatially resolved photoluminescence and nanoscale contact potential difference mapping. By applying UST to commercial solar cells we found the increasing of cell efficiency at low light excitation.

  13. Solar cells utilizing pulsed-energy crystallized microcrystalline/polycrystalline silicon

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, James L.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing multi-terminal devices such as solar cells wherein a pulsed high energy source is used to melt and crystallize amorphous silicon deposited on a substrate which is intolerant to high processing temperatures, whereby to amorphous silicon is converted into a microcrystalline/polycrystalline phase. Dopant and hydrogenization can be added during the fabrication process which provides for fabrication of extremely planar, ultra shallow contacts which results in reduction of non-current collecting contact volume. The use of the pulsed energy beams results in the ability to fabricate high efficiency microcrystalline/polycrystalline solar cells on the so-called low-temperature, inexpensive plastic substrates which are intolerant to high processing temperatures.

  14. Solar cells utilizing pulsed-energy crystallized microcrystalline/polycrystalline silicon

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, J.L.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1995-10-10

    A process for producing multi-terminal devices such as solar cells wherein a pulsed high energy source is used to melt and crystallize amorphous silicon deposited on a substrate which is intolerant to high processing temperatures, whereby the amorphous silicon is converted into a microcrystalline/polycrystalline phase. Dopant and hydrogenation can be added during the fabrication process which provides for fabrication of extremely planar, ultra shallow contacts which results in reduction of non-current collecting contact volume. The use of the pulsed energy beams results in the ability to fabricate high efficiency microcrystalline/polycrystalline solar cells on the so-called low-temperature, inexpensive plastic substrates which are intolerant to high processing temperatures.

  15. Influence of Grain Structure and Doping on the Deformation and Fracture of Polycrystalline Silicon for MEMS/NEMS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Champaign Influence of Grain Structure and Doping on the Deformation and Fracture of Polycrystalline Silicon for MEMS /NEMS AFOSR Grant # FA9550-09-1...thin films for MEMS and mechanical properties under open and short circuit conditions: They were the first data of their kind and have drawn interest by industry too. ...Structure and Doping on the Deformation and Fracture of Polycrystalline Silicon for MEMS /NEMS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  16. Formation of polycrystalline-silicon films with hemispherical grains for capacitor structures with increased capacitance

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, A. V.

    2014-12-15

    The effect of formation conditions on the morphology of silicon films with hemispherical grains (HSG-Si) obtained by the method of low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) is investigated by atomic-force microscopy. The formation conditions for HSG-Si films with a large surface area are found. The obtained HSG-Si films make it possible to fabricate capacitor structures, the electric capacitance of which is twice as large in comparison to that of capacitors with “smooth” electrodes from polycrystalline silicon.

  17. Nano silver-catalyzed chemical etching of polycrystalline silicon wafer for solar cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. R.; Liang, Z. C.; Wang, D. L.

    2016-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of polycrystalline silicon wafer via vacuum thermal evaporation and metal-catalyzed chemical etching (MCCE) was conducted in a HF-H2O2 etching system. Treatment of the etched silicon wafer with HF transformed the textured structure on the surface from nanorods into nanocones. An etching time of 30 s and treatment with HF resulted in nanocones with uniform size distribution and a reflectivity as low as 1.98% across a spectral range from 300 to 1000 nm.

  18. Polycrystalline indium phosphide on silicon by indium assisted growth in hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Metaferia, Wondwosen; Sun, Yan-Ting Lourdudoss, Sebastian; Pietralunga, Silvia M.; Zani, Maurizio; Tagliaferri, Alberto

    2014-07-21

    Polycrystalline InP was grown on Si(001) and Si(111) substrates by using indium (In) metal as a starting material in hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) reactor. In metal was deposited on silicon substrates by thermal evaporation technique. The deposited In resulted in islands of different size and was found to be polycrystalline in nature. Different growth experiments of growing InP were performed, and the growth mechanism was investigated. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy for morphological investigation, Scanning Auger microscopy for surface and compositional analyses, powder X-ray diffraction for crystallinity, and micro photoluminescence for optical quality assessment were conducted. It is shown that the growth starts first by phosphidisation of the In islands to InP followed by subsequent selective deposition of InP in HVPE regardless of the Si substrate orientation. Polycrystalline InP of large grain size is achieved and the growth rate as high as 21 μm/h is obtained on both substrates. Sulfur doping of the polycrystalline InP was investigated by growing alternating layers of sulfur doped and unintentionally doped InP for equal interval of time. These layers could be delineated by stain etching showing that enough amount of sulfur can be incorporated. Grains of large lateral dimension up to 3 μm polycrystalline InP on Si with good morphological and optical quality is obtained. The process is generic and it can also be applied for the growth of other polycrystalline III–V semiconductor layers on low cost and flexible substrates for solar cell applications.

  19. Oxygen-aided synthesis of polycrystalline graphene on silicon dioxide substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianyi; Wen, Yugeng; Guo, Yunlong; Wu, Bin; Huang, Liping; Xue, Yunzhou; Geng, Dechao; Wang, Dong; Yu, Gui; Liu, Yunqi

    2011-11-09

    We report the metal-catalyst-free synthesis of high-quality polycrystalline graphene on dielectric substrates [silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) or quartz] using an oxygen-aided chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The growth was carried out using a CVD system at atmospheric pressure. After high-temperature activation of the growth substrates in air, high-quality polycrystalline graphene is subsequently grown on SiO(2) by utilizing the oxygen-based nucleation sites. The growth mechanism is analogous to that of growth for single-walled carbon nanotubes. Graphene-modified SiO(2) substrates can be directly used in transparent conducting films and field-effect devices. The carrier mobilities are about 531 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in air and 472 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in N(2), which are close to that of metal-catalyzed polycrystalline graphene. The method avoids the need for either a metal catalyst or a complicated and skilled postgrowth transfer process and is compatible with current silicon processing techniques.

  20. New biomaterial as a promising alternative to silicone breast implants.

    PubMed

    Teck Lim, Goy; Valente, Stephanie A; Hart-Spicer, Cherie R; Evancho-Chapman, Mary M; Puskas, Judit E; Horne, Walter I; Schmidt, Steven P

    2013-05-01

    One in eight American women develops breast cancer. Of the many patients requiring mastectomy yearly as a consequence, most elect some form of breast reconstruction. Since 2006, only silicone breast implants have been approved by the FDA for the public use. Unfortunately, over one-third of women with these implants experience complications as a result of tissue-material biocompatibility issues, which may include capsular contracture, calcification, hematoma, necrosis and implant rupture. Our group has been working on developing alternatives to silicone. Linear triblock poly(styrene-b-isobutylene-b-styrene) (SIBS) polymers are self-assembling nanostructured thermoplastic rubbers, already in clinical practice as drug eluting stent coatings. New generations with a branched (arborescent or dendritic) polyisobutylene core show promising potential as a biomaterial alternative to silicone rubber. The purpose of this pre-clinical research was to evaluate the material-tissue interactions of a new arborescent block copolymer (TPE1) in a rabbit implantation model compared to a linear SIBS (SIBSTAR 103T) and silicone rubber. This study is the first to compare the molecular weight and molecular weight distribution, tensile properties and histological evaluation of arborescent SIBS-type materials with silicone rubber before implantation and after explantation.

  1. Phase transitions from semiconductive amorphous to conductive polycrystalline in indium silicon oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Da, Bo; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nabatame, Toshihide; Takahashi, Makoto; Ito, Kazuhiro; Kizu, Takio; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito

    2016-11-01

    The enhancement in electrical conductivity and optical transparency induced by a phase transition from amorphous to polycrystalline in lightly silicon-doped indium oxide (InSiO) thin films is studied. The phase transition caused by simple thermal annealing transforms the InSiO thin films from semiconductors to conductors. Silicon atoms form SiO4 tetrahedra in InSiO, which enhances the overlap of In 5s orbitals as a result of the distortion of InO6 octahedral networks. Desorption of weakly bonded oxygen releases electrons from deep subgap states and enhances the electrical conductivity and optical transparency of the films. Optical absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements reveal that the phase transition causes a Fermi energy shift of ˜0.2 eV.

  2. Investigation of diffusion length distribution on polycrystalline silicon wafers via photoluminescence methods.

    PubMed

    Lou, Shishu; Zhu, Huishi; Hu, Shaoxu; Zhao, Chunhua; Han, Peide

    2015-09-14

    Characterization of the diffusion length of solar cells in space has been widely studied using various methods, but few studies have focused on a fast, simple way to obtain the quantified diffusion length distribution on a silicon wafer. In this work, we present two different facile methods of doing this by fitting photoluminescence images taken in two different wavelength ranges or from different sides. These methods, which are based on measuring the ratio of two photoluminescence images, yield absolute values of the diffusion length and are less sensitive to the inhomogeneity of the incident laser beam. A theoretical simulation and experimental demonstration of this method are presented. The diffusion length distributions on a polycrystalline silicon wafer obtained by the two methods show good agreement.

  3. Polycrystalline silicon germanium for fabrication, release, and packaging of microelectromechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, John Mccaslin

    Polycrystalline silicon germanium has recently proven to be a compelling alternative to polysilicon for micromachining. Low temperature fabrication of micromechanical structures is possible, which enables their modular integration with conventional electronics. The deposition and crystallization temperatures are significantly lower than for polysilicon, and low-stress, low-resistivity structural films can be achieved with little or no annealing. Poly-Ge can be used as a hydrogen peroxide-soluble sacrificial layer, so a wide variety of microfabrication materials can withstand the release etch. Several aspects of our research on poly-SiGe micromachining are presented in this dissertation. First, a "handbook" of poly-SiGe processing for MEMS is given, along with an overview of the advantages of this material system. An extensive study of the etching of poly-Ge sacrificial layers by heated hydrogen peroxide is presented. The dissolution of poly-Ge is limited by the dissolution of a GeO2 surface layer, and the activation energy was determined to be 9.3 kcal/mol. The etch rate was determined to be roughly 0.5 mum/min at 90°C, which is 4--6 orders of magnitude faster than structural films containing 20--60% Ge. The reaction was determined to be limited partly by the reaction rate and partly by diffusion, and diffusion limits on the order of 1 mm were observed. The fabrication of robust, high-aspect-ratio poly-SiGe structures by a thin film micromolding process (hexsil) is presented. Due to the excellent conformality of poly-Ge compared to SiO2 sacrificial layers, precise replication of the mold wafer was achieved. A gimbal/microactuator fabricated in this process enabled a critical dimension to be reduced from 7 to 4.5 mum when compared to a device made in a conventional process. Poly-SiGe hexsil was also used to fabricate micromachined caps for a precision MEMS packaging technology. In this process, the hexsil caps were fabricated on a mold wafer and transferred to a

  4. 1/f noise in positive-negative-positive (PNP) polycrystalline silicon-emitter bipolar transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoque, Md Mazhar Ul; Celik-Butler, Zeynep; Trogolo, Joe; Weiser, Douglas; Green, Keith

    2005-04-01

    The origin of 1/f fluctuations in positive-negative-positive (PNP) polycrystalline silicon-emitter bipolar-junction transistors is described. The interfacial oxide (IFO) at the monosilicon-polycrystalline silicon interface is found to significantly affect the noise behavior. The low-frequency noise originates from two independent fluctuation mechanisms: in the diffusion and tunneling components of the base current noise power spectral density (SI_B) and from the diffusion current and carrier number fluctuations in the collector current noise power spectral density (SI_C). The Hooge noise parameters for electrons and holes are calculated from the diffusion fluctuation models for SI_B and SI_C, respectively. Noise measurements on devices with different sizes and different IFO thicknesses indicate that the fluctuations occur in the minority-carrier (electron) tunneling current component of SI_B through the IFO. The thickness of the IFO is estimated using this noise model. The tunneling fluctuations dominate over the diffusion fluctuations for the smaller (0.7×0.7μm2) transistors, while the opposite is the case for the larger (0.7×100μm2) ones. The scaling effect on the noise performance of these transistors is discussed. The effect of the IFO on the dc characteristics and the noise behavior of the PNP transistors is compared to that of the negative-positive-negative (NPN) counterparts on the same wafer.

  5. Ultrafast carrier dynamics and the role of grain boundaries in polycrystalline silicon thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titova, Lyubov V.; Cocker, Tyler L.; Xu, Sijia; Baribeau, Jean-Marc; Wu, Xiaohua; Lockwood, David J.; Hegmann, Frank A.

    2016-10-01

    We have used time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy to study microscopic photoconductivity and ultrafast photoexcited carrier dynamics in thin, pure, non-hydrogenated silicon films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on quartz substrates at temperatures ranging from 335 °C to 572 °C. By controlling the growth temperature, thin silicon films ranging from completely amorphous to polycrystalline with minimal amorphous phase can be achieved. Film morphology, in turn, determines its photoconductive properties: in the amorphous phase, carriers are trapped in bandtail states on sub-picosecond time scales, while the carriers excited in crystalline grains remain free for tens of picoseconds. We also find that in polycrystalline silicon the photoexcited carrier mobility is carrier-density-dependent, with higher carrier densities mitigating the effects of grain boundaries on inter-grain transport. In a film grown at the highest temperature of 572 °C, the morphology changes along the growth direction from polycrystalline with needles of single crystals in the bulk of the film to small crystallites interspersed with amorphous silicon at the top of the film. Depth profiling using different excitation wavelengths shows corresponding differences in the photoconductivity: the photoexcited carrier lifetime and mobility are higher in the first 100-150 nm from the substrate, suggesting that thinner, low-temperature grown polycrystalline silicon films are preferable for photovoltaic applications.

  6. Polycrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells with plasmonic-enhanced light-trapping.

    PubMed

    Varlamov, Sergey; Rao, Jing; Soderstrom, Thomas

    2012-07-02

    One of major approaches to cheaper solar cells is reducing the amount of semiconductor material used for their fabrication and making cells thinner. To compensate for lower light absorption such physically thin devices have to incorporate light-trapping which increases their optical thickness. Light scattering by textured surfaces is a common technique but it cannot be universally applied to all solar cell technologies. Some cells, for example those made of evaporated silicon, are planar as produced and they require an alternative light-trapping means suitable for planar devices. Metal nanoparticles formed on planar silicon cell surface and capable of light scattering due to surface plasmon resonance is an effective approach. The paper presents a fabrication procedure of evaporated polycrystalline silicon solar cells with plasmonic light-trapping and demonstrates how the cell quantum efficiency improves due to presence of metal nanoparticles. To fabricate the cells a film consisting of alternative boron and phosphorous doped silicon layers is deposited on glass substrate by electron beam evaporation. An Initially amorphous film is crystallised and electronic defects are mitigated by annealing and hydrogen passivation. Metal grid contacts are applied to the layers of opposite polarity to extract electricity generated by the cell. Typically, such a ~2 μm thick cell has a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 14-16 mA/cm(2), which can be increased up to 17-18 mA/cm(2) (~25% higher) after application of a simple diffuse back reflector made of a white paint. To implement plasmonic light-trapping a silver nanoparticle array is formed on the metallised cell silicon surface. A precursor silver film is deposited on the cell by thermal evaporation and annealed at 23°C to form silver nanoparticles. Nanoparticle size and coverage, which affect plasmonic light-scattering, can be tuned for enhanced cell performance by varying the precursor film thickness and its annealing

  7. The effect of grain boundaries on the resistivity of polycrystalline silicon. Ph.D. Thesis - Va. Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fripp, A. L., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The electrical resistivity of polycrystalline silicon films was investigated. The films were grown by the chemical vapor decomposition of silane on oxidized silicon wafers. The resistivity was found to be independent of dopant atom concentration in the lightly doped regions but was a strong function of dopant levels in the more heavily doped regions. A model, based on high dopant atom segregation in the grain boundaries, is proposed to explain the results.

  8. Adsorption of alkali metals and their effect on electronic properties of grain boundaries in bulk of polycrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Olimov, L. O.

    2010-05-15

    The adsorption of alkali metals and their effect on the electronic properties of grain boundaries in bulk of polycrystalline silicon has been studied experimentally. The results obtained show that the potential barrier grows during diffusion and adsorption of alkali metal atoms along grain boundaries.

  9. Effect of Alkaline pH on Polishing and Etching of Single and Polycrystalline Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, R. Prasanna; Prasad, Y. Nagendra; Kwon, Tae-Young; Kang, Young-Jae; Park, Jin-Goo

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, the polishing and etching behavior of single and polycrystalline silicon were studied. Prior to chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process, the surfaces were treated with dilute hydrofluoric acid (DHF) to remove native oxides. The surface analysis shows that the poly contains trace amount of oxygen even after DHF treatment. The static and dynamic etch rates, and removal rates were measured as a function of slurry pH. The single silicon showed a higher static etch rate than the poly. After static etch rate measurements, poly showed higher surface roughness and more hydrophilic which indicates that the surface of poly is different from single crystal silicon. The friction force between pad and substrate and pad temperature was also measured as a function of pH during polishing in order to get more understanding of polishing process. At all the pH values being investigated, poly showed lower dynamic and removal rates, higher friction force and higher temperature. This indicates that the removal of poly in CMP is predominantly by mechanical actions. Also, these results, suggest a mechanism in which the oxygen present in the poly grain boundaries strongly influences the etching and removal mechanism.

  10. Suppressing light reflection from polycrystalline silicon thin films through surface texturing and silver nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Akhter, Perveen; Huang, Mengbing Kadakia, Nirag; Spratt, William; Malladi, Girish; Bakhru, Hassarum

    2014-09-21

    This work demonstrates a novel method combining ion implantation and silver nanostructures for suppressing light reflection from polycrystalline silicon thin films. Samples were implanted with 20-keV hydrogen ions to a dose of 10¹⁷/cm², and some of them received an additional argon ion implant to a dose of 5×10¹⁵ /cm² at an energy between 30 and 300 keV. Compared to the case with a single H implant, the processing involved both H and Ar implants and post-implantation annealing has created a much higher degree of surface texturing, leading to a more dramatic reduction of light reflection from polycrystalline Si films over a broadband range between 300 and 1200 nm, e.g., optical reflection from the air/Si interface in the AM1.5 sunlight condition decreasing from ~30% with an untextured surface to below 5% for a highly textured surface after post-implantation annealing at 1000°C. Formation of Ag nanostructures on these ion beam processed surfaces further reduces light reflection, and surface texturing is expected to have the benefit of diminishing light absorption losses within large-size (>100 nm) Ag nanoparticles, yielding an increased light trapping efficiency within Si as opposed to the case with Ag nanostructures on a smooth surface. A discussion of the effects of surface textures and Ag nanoparticles on light trapping within Si thin films is also presented with the aid of computer simulations.

  11. Charge transport in polycrystalline silicon thin-films on glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheller, L.-P.; Nickel, N. H.

    2012-07-01

    Charge carrier transport in solid-phase crystallized polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) was investigated as a function of the deposition temperature, Td, the amorphous starting material and the used substrates. The samples were characterized using temperature dependent transport measurements to determine the carrier concentration, mobility, and conductivity. Samples prepared on a-SiN:H covered borofloat glass exhibit a low carrier concentration that is independent of Td. In these samples, charge transport is dominated by intra-grain scattering mechanisms. In contrast, when poly-Si is prepared on corning glass, the carrier concentration shows an inverted U-shape behavior with increasing deposition temperature. The Hall mobility is thermally activated, which is consistent with thermionic carrier emission over potential energy barriers. The change of the activation energy with experimental parameters is accompanied by a large change of the exponential prefactor by more than 4 orders of magnitude. This is indicative of a Meyer-Neldel behavior. Moreover, at low temperatures, the conductivity deviates from an activated behavior indicating hopping transport with a mean hopping distance of ≈140 Å and an energy difference of ≈82 meV between the participating states. To derive insight into the underlying transport mechanisms and to determine information on barrier energy heights and grain-boundary defect-densities, the experimental data were analyzed employing transport models for polycrystalline materials.

  12. On properties of boundaries and electron conductivity in mesoscopic polycrystalline silicon films for memory devices

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, G.P.; Doolen, G.D.; Mainieri, R.; Rehacek, J.; Campbell, D.K.; Luchnikov, V.A.; Nagaev, K.E.

    1998-02-01

    The authors present the results of MD modeling on the structural properties of grain boundaries (GB) in thin polycrystalline films. The transition from crystalline boundaries with low mismatch angle to amorphous boundaries is investigated. It is shown that the structures of the GBs satisfy a thermodynamical criterion suggested in a cited reference. The potential energy of silicon atoms is closely related with a geometrical quantity -- tetragonality of their coordination with their nearest neighbors. A crossover of the length of localization is observed to analyze the crossover of the length of localization of the single electron states and properties of conductance of the thin polycrystalline film at low temperature. They use a two-dimensional Anderson localization model, with the random one site electron charging energy for a single grain (dot), random non-diagonal matrix elements, and random number of connections between the neighboring grains. The results on the crossover behavior of localization length of the single electron states and characteristic properties of conductance are presented in the region of parameters where the transition from an insulator to a conductor regimes takes place.

  13. High sheet resistance, arsenic implanted polycrystalline silicon for integrated circuit resistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, W. K.

    1984-11-01

    The electrical properties of high sheet resistance polycrystalline silicon were investigated to facilitate its use in fabricating integrated circuit resistors. The effects of ion implantation dose, energy and annealing procedures were studied. Sheet resistances ranging from 10(2) to 10(9) omega/square were produced. A double depletion layer, thermionic emission model for electrical transport across grain boundaries accounts for many of the electrical properties, including the correlation of high activation energies with high sheet resistances. A reverse annealing peak in the sheet resistance is found for annealing temperatures between 800 and 1100 C. This irreversible effect is stronger in more lightly doped samples. The final sheet resistance value is primarily determined by the implantation dose and the highest processing temperature used.

  14. Crystallization to polycrystalline silicon thin film and simultaneous inactivation of electrical defects by underwater laser annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, Emi; Horita, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Ikenoue, Hiroshi

    2012-12-17

    We propose a low-temperature laser annealing method of a underwater laser annealing (WLA) for polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films. We performed crystallization to poly-Si films by laser irradiation in flowing deionized-water where KrF excimer laser was used for annealing. We demonstrated that the maximum value of maximum grain size of WLA samples was 1.5 {mu}m, and that of the average grain size was 2.8 times larger than that of conventional laser annealing in air (LA) samples. Moreover, WLA forms poly-Si films which show lower conductivity and larger carrier life time attributed to fewer electrical defects as compared to LA poly-Si films.

  15. Graphitization of n-type polycrystalline silicon carbide for on-chip supercapacitor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; Gutes, Albert; Laboriante, Ian; Carraro, Carlo; Maboudian, Roya

    2011-09-01

    Synthesis of silicon carbide-derived carbon films with excellent supercapacitor characteristics is demonstrated by a process that is fully compatible with standard microfabrication technology. NiTi alloy deposited on nitrogen-doped polycrystalline SiC films is shown to result in the growth of a rough, porous, high conductivity, nanocrystalline graphitic carbon film upon rapid thermal annealing to 1050 °C. Electrodes fabricated in this manner exhibit high charge/discharge rates with a time constant of about 0.062 s. Analysis shows that the incorporated nitrogen in the carbon electrode may induce pseudo-capacitance, and the electrodes exhibit the capacitance/area values comparable to those reported on carbon nanotube-based supercapacitors.

  16. Schottky Barrier Thin Film Transistor (SB-TFT) on low-temperature polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Iacovo, A.; Ferrone, A.; Colace, L.; Minotti, A.; Maiolo, L.; Pecora, A.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of Schottky barrier transistors on polycrystalline silicon. The transistors were realized exploiting Cr-Si and Ti-Si Schottky barrier with a low thermal budget process, compatible with polymeric, ultraflexible substrates. We obtained devices with threshold voltages as low as 1.7 V (for n channel) and 4 V (for p channel) with channel lengths ranging from 2 to 40 μm. Resulting on/off ratios are as high as 5 · 103. The devices showed threshold voltages and subthreshold slopes comparable with already published N- and P-MOS devices realized with the same process on polyimide substrates thus representing a cheaper and scalable alternative to ultraflexible transistors with doped source and drain.

  17. Crystallization to polycrystalline silicon thin film and simultaneous inactivation of electrical defects by underwater laser annealing.

    PubMed

    Machida, Emi; Horita, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Ikenoue, Hiroshi

    2012-12-17

    We propose a low-temperature laser annealing method of a underwater laser annealing (WLA) for polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films. We performed crystallization to poly-Si films by laser irradiation in flowing deionized-water where KrF excimer laser was used for annealing. We demonstrated that the maximum value of maximum grain size of WLA samples was 1.5 μm, and that of the average grain size was 2.8 times larger than that of conventional laser annealing in air (LA) samples. Moreover, WLA forms poly-Si films which show lower conductivity and larger carrier life time attributed to fewer electrical defects as compared to LA poly-Si films.

  18. Enhancement of polycrystalline silicon solar cells efficiency using indium nitride particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkis, Sabri; Imtiaz Chowdhury, Farsad; Alevli, Mustafa; Dietz, Nikolaus; Yalızay, Berna; Aktürk, Selçuk; Nayfeh, Ammar; Kemal Okyay, Ali

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we present a hybrid indium nitride particle/polycrystalline silicon solar cell based on 230 nm size indium nitride particles (InN-Ps) obtained through laser ablation. The solar cell performance measurements indicate that there is an absolute 1.5% increase (Δη) in the overall solar cell efficiency due to the presence of InN-Ps. Within the spectral range 300-1100 nm, improvements of up to 8.26% are observed in the external quantum efficiency (EQE) and increases of up to 8.75% are observed in the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) values of the corresponding solar cell. The enhancement in power performance is due to the down-shifting properties of the InN-Ps. The electrical measurements are supplemented by TEM, Raman, UV/VIS and PL spectroscopy of the InN-Ps.

  19. Modeling and simulation of temperature effect in polycrystalline silicon PV cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, M.; Niculescu, T.; Slusariuc, R. I.; Popescu, F. G.

    2016-06-01

    Due to the human needs of energy, there is a need to apply new technologies in energy conversion to supply the demand of clean and cheap energy in the context of environmental issues. Renewable energy sources like solar energy has one of the highest potentials. In this paper, solar panel is the key part of a photovoltaic system which converts solar energy to electrical energy. The purpose of this paper is to give a MATLAB/ Simulink simulation for photovoltaic module based on the one-diode model of a photovoltaic cell made of polycrystalline silicon. This model reveals the effect of the ambient temperature and the heating of the panel due to the solar infrared radiation. Also the measurements on the solar cell exposed to solar radiation can confirm the simulation.

  20. Polycrystalline silicon ring resonator photodiodes in a bulk complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor process.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Karan K; Orcutt, Jason S; Shainline, Jeffrey M; Tehar-Zahav, Ofer; Sternberg, Zvi; Meade, Roy; Popović, Miloš A; Ram, Rajeev J

    2014-02-15

    We present measurements on resonant photodetectors utilizing sub-bandgap absorption in polycrystalline silicon ring resonators, in which light is localized in the intrinsic region of a p+/p/i/n/n+ diode. The devices, operating both at λ=1280 and λ=1550  nm and fabricated in a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) dynamic random-access memory emulation process, exhibit detection quantum efficiencies around 20% and few-gigahertz response bandwidths. We observe this performance at low reverse biases in the range of a few volts and in devices with dark currents below 50 pA at 10 V. These results demonstrate that such photodetector behavior, previously reported by Preston et al. [Opt. Lett. 36, 52 (2011)], is achievable in bulk CMOS processes, with significant improvements with respect to the previous work in quantum efficiency, dark current, linearity, bandwidth, and operating bias due to additional midlevel doping implants and different material deposition. The present work thus offers a robust realization of a fully CMOS-fabricated all-silicon photodetector functional across a wide wavelength range.

  1. Polycrystalline Silicon Thin-film Solar cells with Plasmonic-enhanced Light-trapping

    PubMed Central

    Varlamov, Sergey; Rao, Jing; Soderstrom, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    One of major approaches to cheaper solar cells is reducing the amount of semiconductor material used for their fabrication and making cells thinner. To compensate for lower light absorption such physically thin devices have to incorporate light-trapping which increases their optical thickness. Light scattering by textured surfaces is a common technique but it cannot be universally applied to all solar cell technologies. Some cells, for example those made of evaporated silicon, are planar as produced and they require an alternative light-trapping means suitable for planar devices. Metal nanoparticles formed on planar silicon cell surface and capable of light scattering due to surface plasmon resonance is an effective approach. The paper presents a fabrication procedure of evaporated polycrystalline silicon solar cells with plasmonic light-trapping and demonstrates how the cell quantum efficiency improves due to presence of metal nanoparticles. To fabricate the cells a film consisting of alternative boron and phosphorous doped silicon layers is deposited on glass substrate by electron beam evaporation. An Initially amorphous film is crystallised and electronic defects are mitigated by annealing and hydrogen passivation. Metal grid contacts are applied to the layers of opposite polarity to extract electricity generated by the cell. Typically, such a ~2 μm thick cell has a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 14-16 mA/cm2, which can be increased up to 17-18 mA/cm2 (~25% higher) after application of a simple diffuse back reflector made of a white paint. To implement plasmonic light-trapping a silver nanoparticle array is formed on the metallised cell silicon surface. A precursor silver film is deposited on the cell by thermal evaporation and annealed at 23°C to form silver nanoparticles. Nanoparticle size and coverage, which affect plasmonic light-scattering, can be tuned for enhanced cell performance by varying the precursor film thickness and its annealing

  2. Molybdenum Silicide Formation on Single Crystal, Polycrystalline and Amorphous Silicon: Growth, Structure and Electrical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doland, Charles Michael

    The solid state reactions that occur between a thin metal film and a silicon substrate are of scientific and technological interest. The initial interactions are poorly understood, yet the final state may critically depend on the initial interactions. In this work, the reactions of thin molybdenum films on amorphous, polycrystalline, and single crystal silicon substrates were studied, with an emphasis on the initial interdiffusion and the nucleation of the crystalline silicide phase. Our research was carried out in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) system in order to minimize effects of contaminants. In situ Raman scattering and Auger electron spectroscopy were used to probe the structure and composition of the films. Electron microscopy, low energy electron diffraction and Schottky barrier height measurements were used to obtain additional information. The hexagonal phase of the disilicide (h-MoSi _2) is the first phase formed. This occurs after 30 minute annealing at 400^ circC on clean samples. Impurities interfere with this reaction, but substrate crystallinity has no effect. The hexagonal phase transforms to the tetragonal phase (t-MoSi_2) after 800 ^circC annealing for all substrate types. Contamination retards this reaction, resulting in films containing both phases. For the thin films in this study, the transformation to t-MoSi_2 is accompanied by agglomeration of the films. From bulk thermodynamics, t-MoSi_2 is expected to be the first phase formed, but h -MoSi_2 is the first phase observed. This phase nucleates before t-MoSi_2, due to a lower silicide-silicon interfacial energy. Detailed knowledge of interfacial energies and effects of impurities are required to understand the initial phases of thin film solid state reactions.

  3. Low temperature deposition of polycrystalline silicon thin films on a flexible polymer substrate by hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-hoon; Jung, Jae-soo; Lee, Sung-soo; Lee, Sung-bo; Hwang, Nong-moon

    2016-11-01

    For the applications such as flexible displays and solar cells, the direct deposition of crystalline silicon films on a flexible polymer substrate has been a great issue. Here, we investigated the direct deposition of polycrystalline silicon films on a polyimide film at the substrate temperature of 200 °C. The low temperature deposition of crystalline silicon on a flexible substrate has been successfully made based on two ideas. One is that the Si-Cl-H system has a retrograde solubility of silicon in the gas phase near the substrate temperature. The other is the new concept of non-classical crystallization, where films grow by the building block of nanoparticles formed in the gas phase during hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). The total amount of precipitation of silicon nanoparticles decreased with increasing HCl concentration. By adding HCl, the amount and the size of silicon nanoparticles were reduced remarkably, which is related with the low temperature deposition of silicon films of highly crystalline fraction with a very thin amorphous incubation layer. The dark conductivity of the intrinsic film prepared at the flow rate ratio of RHCl=[HCl]/[SiH4]=3.61 was 1.84×10-6 Scm-1 at room temperature. The Hall mobility of the n-type silicon film prepared at RHCl=3.61 was 5.72 cm2 V-1s-1. These electrical properties of silicon films are high enough and could be used in flexible electric devices.

  4. Two-stage metal-catalyst-free growth of high-quality polycrystalline graphene films on silicon nitride substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianyi; Guo, Yunlong; Wen, Yugeng; Huang, Liping; Xue, Yunzhou; Geng, Dechao; Wu, Bin; Luo, Birong; Yu, Gui; Liu, Yunqi

    2013-02-20

    By using two-stage, metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD), it is demonstrated that high-quality polycrystalline graphene films can directly grow on silicon nitride substrates. The carrier mobility can reach about 1500 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) , which is about three times the value of those grown on SiO(2) /Si substrates, and also is better than some examples of metal-catalyzed graphene, reflecting the good quality of the graphene lattice.

  5. Noise Characterization of Polycrystalline Silicon Thin Film Transistors for X-ray Imagers Based on Active Pixel Architectures.

    PubMed

    Antonuk, L E; Koniczek, M; McDonald, J; El-Mohri, Y; Zhao, Q; Behravan, M

    2008-01-01

    An examination of the noise of polycrystalline silicon thin film transistors, in the context of flat panel x-ray imager development, is reported. The study was conducted in the spirit of exploring how the 1/f, shot and thermal noise components of poly-Si TFTs, determined from current noise power spectral density measurements, as well as through calculation, can be used to assist in the development of imagers incorporating pixel amplification circuits based on such transistors.

  6. Propagation losses in undoped and n-doped polycrystalline silicon wire waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shiyang; Fang, Q; Yu, M B; Lo, G Q; Kwong, D L

    2009-11-09

    Polycrystalline silicon (polySi) wire waveguides with width ranging from 200 to 500 nm are fabricated by solid-phase crystallization (SPC) of deposited amorphous silicon (a-Si) on SiO(2) at a maximum temperature of 1000 degrees C. The propagation loss at 1550 nm decreases from 13.0 to 9.8 dB/cm with the waveguide width shrinking from 500 to 300 nm while the 200-nm-wide waveguides exhibit quite large loss (>70 dB/cm) mainly due to the relatively rough sidewall of waveguides induced by the polySi dry etch. By modifying the process sequence, i.e., first patterning the a-Si layer into waveguides by dry etch and then SPC, the sidewall roughness is significantly improved but the polySi crystallinity is degraded, leading to 13.9 dB/cm loss in the 200-nm-wide waveguides while larger losses in the wider waveguides. Phosphorus implantation causes an additional loss in the polySi waveguides. The doping-induced optical loss increases relatively slowly with the phosphorus concentration increasing up to 1 x 10(18) cm(-3), whereas the 5 x 10(18) cm(-3) doped waveguides exhibit large loss due to the dominant free carrier absorption. For all undoped polySi waveguides, further 1-2 dB/cm loss reduction is obtained by a standard forming gas (10%H(2) + 90%N(2)) annealing owing to the hydrogen passivation of Si dangling bonds present in polySi waveguides, achieving the lowest loss of 7.9 dB/cm in the 300-nm-wide polySi waveguides. However, for the phosphorus doped polySi waveguides, the propagation loss is slightly increased by the forming gas annealing.

  7. Method to extract diffusion length from solar cell parameters—Application to polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taretto, K.; Rau, U.; Werner, J. H.

    2003-05-01

    A closed form, analytical expression for the interdependence of the effective diffusion length Leff and the open-circuit voltage of solar cells is derived for the parallel connection of recombination in the space-charge region and in the neutral base region. This expression allows for the calculation of Leff from the open-circuit voltage, the short-circuit current, and the base doping of the solar cell as the only quantities that need to be determined experimentally. Values of Leff calculated with our method match with an accuracy of 35% values that are determined experimentally by quantum-efficiency measurements of silicon solar cells. The agreement holds in a range 0.3 μm polycrystalline silicon solar cells covering grain sizes from 10-2 to 104 μm. We calculate Leff for these solar cells with our method and interpret the results in terms of grain-boundary recombination velocity SGB. We find that the data points split into two distinct groups, one with 105 cm/s

  8. A study of photovoltaic loss-mechanisms due to defects and grain boundaries in polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopori, B. L.

    1980-01-01

    Various photovoltaic loss mechanisms associated with defects and grain boundaries (gbs) in polycrystalline silicon have been experimentally studied. Analysis was carried out on two types of substrates/cells viz. Wacker Silso and laser-crystallized RTR ribbons. Solar cells were fabricated on selected regions of the substrates and their characteristics related to the substrate structure. Mechanisms related to photovoltaic losses are divided into two categories: electronic and physical. Parameters describing electronic loss mechanisms, such as changes in minority carrier diffusion length, dark current and local photo-current losses were measured, and their dependence on density and type of defects was determined. A variety of analytical techniques were used for this study. These include I-V characterization of solar cells, I-V characterization of gbs, and light intensity dependences of some material parameters. Loss mechanisms associated with physical effects are defect-defect and impurity-defect interactions. It is shown that physical effects such as impurity segregation and defect annihilation can lead to significant loss/gain in photovoltaic characteristics.

  9. On-Current Modeling of Polycrystalline Silicon Thin-Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Navneet; Tyagi, B. P.

    2005-01-01

    We propose an on-current (above threshold voltage) model of polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors (poly-Si TFTs). The model includes the study of the effect of trap state density, poly-Si inversion layer thickness and temperature on the TFT characteristics. Effective carrier mobility and I-V characteristics are described by considering the mechanism of capture and release of carriers at grain boundary trap states and the thermionic emission theory. It is found that at low as well as at high doping concentrations, the effective carrier mobility (µeff) increases with increasing temperature whereas a dip is observed at intermediate doping concentration. At very high and very low doping concentration the effect of temperature on the mobility is found to be almost negligible. Calculations reveal that effective carrier mobility and drain current increase as the gate bias increases and are larger for a lower trap state density. The calculated value of activation energy decreases as the gate bias increases and is larger for a larger poly-Si inversion layer thickness. A comparison between the present predictions and the experimental results shows reasonably good agreement.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of large-grain solid-phase crystallized polycrystalline silicon thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Avishek E-mail: dalapatig@imre.a-star.edu.sg; Law, Felix; Widenborg, Per I.; Dalapati, Goutam K. E-mail: dalapatig@imre.a-star.edu.sg; Subramanian, Gomathy S.; Tan, Hui R.; Aberle, Armin G.

    2014-11-01

    n-type polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films with very large grains, exceeding 30 μm in width, and with high Hall mobility of about 71.5 cm{sup 2}/V s are successfully prepared by the solid-phase crystallization technique on glass through the control of the PH{sub 3} (2% in H{sub 2})/SiH{sub 4} gas flow ratio. The effect of this gas flow ratio on the electronic and structural quality of the n-type poly-Si thin film is systematically investigated using Hall effect measurements, Raman microscopy, and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), respectively. The poly-Si grains are found to be randomly oriented, whereby the average area weighted grain size is found to increase from 4.3 to 18 μm with increase of the PH{sub 3} (2% in H{sub 2})/SiH{sub 4} gas flow ratio. The stress in the poly-Si thin films is found to increase above 900 MPa when the PH{sub 3} (2% in H{sub 2})/SiH{sub 4} gas flow ratio is increased from 0.025 to 0.45. Finally, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, high angle annular dark field-scanning tunneling microscopy, and EBSD are used to identify the defects and dislocations caused by the stress in the fabricated poly-Si films.

  11. A junctionless SONOS nonvolatile memory device constructed with in situ-doped polycrystalline silicon nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a silicon-oxide-nitride-silicon nonvolatile memory constructed on an n+-poly-Si nanowire [NW] structure featuring a junctionless [JL] configuration is presented. The JL structure is fulfilled by employing only one in situ heavily phosphorous-doped poly-Si layer to simultaneously serve as source/drain regions and NW channels, thus greatly simplifying the manufacturing process and alleviating the requirement of precise control of the doping profile. Owing to the higher carrier concentration in the channel, the developed JL NW device exhibits significantly enhanced programming speed and larger memory window than its counterpart with conventional undoped-NW-channel. Moreover, it also displays acceptable erase and data retention properties. Hence, the desirable memory characteristics along with the much simplified fabrication process make the JL NW memory structure a promising candidate for future system-on-panel and three-dimensional ultrahigh density memory applications. PMID:22373446

  12. A junctionless SONOS nonvolatile memory device constructed with in situ-doped polycrystalline silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Su, Chun-Jung; Su, Tuan-Kai; Tsai, Tzu-I; Lin, Horng-Chih; Huang, Tiao-Yuan

    2012-02-29

    In this paper, a silicon-oxide-nitride-silicon nonvolatile memory constructed on an n+-poly-Si nanowire [NW] structure featuring a junctionless [JL] configuration is presented. The JL structure is fulfilled by employing only one in situ heavily phosphorous-doped poly-Si layer to simultaneously serve as source/drain regions and NW channels, thus greatly simplifying the manufacturing process and alleviating the requirement of precise control of the doping profile. Owing to the higher carrier concentration in the channel, the developed JL NW device exhibits significantly enhanced programming speed and larger memory window than its counterpart with conventional undoped-NW-channel. Moreover, it also displays acceptable erase and data retention properties. Hence, the desirable memory characteristics along with the much simplified fabrication process make the JL NW memory structure a promising candidate for future system-on-panel and three-dimensional ultrahigh density memory applications.

  13. Performance of in-pixel circuits for photon counting arrays (PCAs) based on polycrystalline silicon TFTs.

    PubMed

    Liang, Albert K; Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Street, Robert A; Lu, Jeng Ping

    2016-03-07

    Photon counting arrays (PCAs), defined as pixelated imagers which measure the absorbed energy of x-ray photons individually and record this information digitally, are of increasing clinical interest. A number of PCA prototypes with a 1 mm pixel-to-pixel pitch have recently been fabricated with polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si)-a thin-film technology capable of creating monolithic imagers of a size commensurate with human anatomy. In this study, analog and digital simulation frameworks were developed to provide insight into the influence of individual poly-Si transistors on pixel circuit performance-information that is not readily available through empirical means. The simulation frameworks were used to characterize the circuit designs employed in the prototypes. The analog framework, which determines the noise produced by individual transistors, was used to estimate energy resolution, as well as to identify which transistors contribute the most noise. The digital framework, which analyzes how well circuits function in the presence of significant variations in transistor properties, was used to estimate how fast a circuit can produce an output (referred to as output count rate). In addition, an algorithm was developed and used to estimate the minimum pixel pitch that could be achieved for the pixel circuits of the current prototypes. The simulation frameworks predict that the analog component of the PCA prototypes could have energy resolution as low as 8.9% full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 70 keV; and the digital components should work well even in the presence of significant thin-film transistor (TFT) variations, with the fastest component having output count rates as high as 3 MHz. Finally, based on conceivable improvements in the underlying fabrication process, the algorithm predicts that the 1 mm pitch of the current PCA prototypes could be reduced significantly, potentially to between ~240 and 290 μm.

  14. A first passage based model for probabilistic fracture of polycrystalline silicon MEMS structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhifeng; Le, Jia-Liang

    2017-02-01

    Experiments have shown that the failure loads of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) devices usually exhibit a considerable level of variability, which is believed to be caused by the random material strength and the geometry-induced random stress field. Understanding the strength statistics of MEMS devices is of paramount importance for the device design guarding against a tolerable failure risk. In this study, we develop a continuum-based probabilistic model for polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) MEMS structures within the framework of first passage analysis. The failure of poly-Si MEMS structures is considered to be triggered by fracture initiation from the sidewalls governed by a nonlocal failure criterion. The model takes into account an autocorrelated random field of material tensile strength. The nonlocal random stress field is obtained by stochastic finite element simulations based on the information of the uncertainties of the sidewall geometry. The model is formulated within the contexts of both stationary and non-stationary stochastic processes for MEMS structures of various geometries and under different loading configurations. It is shown that the model agrees well with the experimentally measured strength distributions of uniaxial tensile poly-Si MEMS specimens of different gauge lengths. The model is further used to predict the strength distribution of poly-Si MEMS beams under three-point bending, and the result is compared with the Monte Carlo simulation. The present model predicts strong size effects on both the strength distribution and the mean structural strength. It is shown that the mean size effect curve consists of three power-law asymptotes in the small, intermediate, and large-size regimes. By matching these three asymptotes, an approximate size effect equation is proposed. The present model is shown to be a generalization of the classical weakest-link statistical model, and it provides a physical interpretation of the material length

  15. Grain boundary evaluation in sequentially laterally solidified polycrystalline-silicon devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valletta, A.; Bonfiglietti, A.; Rapisarda, M.; Mariucci, L.; Fortunato, G.; Brotherton, S. D.

    2007-05-01

    A systematic study has been made of the conduction process in polycrystalline-silicon thin film transistors (poly-Si TFTs) using carrier flow parallel and perpendicular to sub-grain-boundaries in sequentially laterally solidified material. The objective of this investigation was to obtain an unambiguous characterization of grain boundary (GB) behavior. By studying orthogonal TFTs in this anisotropic material, it was possible to distinguish grain boundary carrier trapping from intragrain trapping. In conventional poly-Si, the material is isotropic over distances greater than the grain size of ˜300nm, and there is no direct and clear-cut way of distinguishing between intragrain and intergrain trapping centers. In the experimental samples, the thermal activation energy of the channel current was measured in the two orthogonal directions, and the difference in activation energy was related to carrier flow over perpendicular sub-GBs. The detailed interpretation of the experimental results was facilitated by two-dimensional numerical simulations, demonstrating that a planar barrier GB, which simply resulted in a potential barrier within the channel, was fundamentally incompatible with the experimental drain current activation energy data. It was only possible to obtain a satisfactory representation of all the experimental data by using a finite width GB, in which carrier flow was controlled by transport across the resistive GB region, rather than by emission over a barrier. This representation of the sub-GB permitted the essential combination of reduced field effect mobility, for orthogonal carrier flow, and a drain current activation energy, which was close to zero.

  16. Performance of in-pixel circuits for photon counting arrays (PCAs) based on polycrystalline silicon TFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Albert K.; Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Street, Robert A.; Lu, Jeng Ping

    2016-03-01

    Photon counting arrays (PCAs), defined as pixelated imagers which measure the absorbed energy of x-ray photons individually and record this information digitally, are of increasing clinical interest. A number of PCA prototypes with a 1 mm pixel-to-pixel pitch have recently been fabricated with polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si)—a thin-film technology capable of creating monolithic imagers of a size commensurate with human anatomy. In this study, analog and digital simulation frameworks were developed to provide insight into the influence of individual poly-Si transistors on pixel circuit performance—information that is not readily available through empirical means. The simulation frameworks were used to characterize the circuit designs employed in the prototypes. The analog framework, which determines the noise produced by individual transistors, was used to estimate energy resolution, as well as to identify which transistors contribute the most noise. The digital framework, which analyzes how well circuits function in the presence of significant variations in transistor properties, was used to estimate how fast a circuit can produce an output (referred to as output count rate). In addition, an algorithm was developed and used to estimate the minimum pixel pitch that could be achieved for the pixel circuits of the current prototypes. The simulation frameworks predict that the analog component of the PCA prototypes could have energy resolution as low as 8.9% full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 70 keV; and the digital components should work well even in the presence of significant thin-film transistor (TFT) variations, with the fastest component having output count rates as high as 3 MHz. Finally, based on conceivable improvements in the underlying fabrication process, the algorithm predicts that the 1 mm pitch of the current PCA prototypes could be reduced significantly, potentially to between ~240 and 290 μm.

  17. Non-contact printing of high aspect ratio Ag electrodes for polycrystalline silicone solar cell with electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Yonghee; Hartarto Tambunan, Indra; Tak, Hyowon; Dat Nguyen, Vu; Kang, TaeSam; Byun, Doyoung

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a non-contact printing mechanism for high aspect ratio silver (Ag) electrodes fabricated by an electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing technique. Using high viscosity Ag paste ink, we were able to fabricate narrow and high aspect ratio electrodes. We investigated the effect of the surface energy of the substrate and improved the aspect ratio of printed lines through multiple printing. We fabricated the polycrystalline silicone solar cell with the Ag electrode and achieved cell efficiency of around 13.7%. The EHD jet printing mechanism may be an alternative method for non-contact fabrication of solar cells electrodes.

  18. Influence of Grain Structure and Doping on the Deformation and Fracture of Polycrystalline Silicon for MEMS and NEMS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-03

    the KIC,eff for polysilicon fabricated by a different process ( MUMPS ) previously reported by this group [24,25]. The average KIC,eff varied slightly...agreement with the values reported by this group before for MUMPs polycrystalline silicon in the range of 0.8-1.2 MPa√m [24,25]. Due to its...b) within a grain. KIC,eff = 0.86 MPa√m KIC,eff = 1.03 MPa√m 0.5 µm 0.5 µm Crack tip Crack tip 14 Similarly to a previous report on MUMPs

  19. Investigation of structural defects within grain volumes that affect the efficiency of polycrystalline silicon solar cell materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, K. C.; Regnault, W. F.; Johnson, S. M.; Storti, G. M.

    The origin and character of subgrain boundaries generated within large grains of cast polycrystalline silicon have been investigated using X-ray topography and electron beam induced current scanning techniques. It has been found that the subgrain structures originate at kinks in high angle grain boundaries when the material is subjected to thermal stress. Further, whenever adjacent grains have a common rotation axis which satisfies the slip system in both grains, it is possible, under a suitable stress, to generate bundles of dislocations simultaneously in both grains. The resultant dislocations are electrically active and serve to decrease the effective minority carrier diffusion length. By controlling the thermal gradients in the silicon bricks, the generation of subgrain boundaries can be minimized.

  20. Exploration of maximum count rate capabilities for large-area photon counting arrays based on polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Albert K.; Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua

    2016-03-01

    Pixelated photon counting detectors with energy discrimination capabilities are of increasing clinical interest for x-ray imaging. Such detectors, presently in clinical use for mammography and under development for breast tomosynthesis and spectral CT, usually employ in-pixel circuits based on crystalline silicon - a semiconductor material that is generally not well-suited for economic manufacture of large-area devices. One interesting alternative semiconductor is polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si), a thin-film technology capable of creating very large-area, monolithic devices. Similar to crystalline silicon, poly-Si allows implementation of the type of fast, complex, in-pixel circuitry required for photon counting - operating at processing speeds that are not possible with amorphous silicon (the material currently used for large-area, active matrix, flat-panel imagers). The pixel circuits of two-dimensional photon counting arrays are generally comprised of four stages: amplifier, comparator, clock generator and counter. The analog front-end (in particular, the amplifier) strongly influences performance and is therefore of interest to study. In this paper, the relationship between incident and output count rate of the analog front-end is explored under diagnostic imaging conditions for a promising poly-Si based design. The input to the amplifier is modeled in the time domain assuming a realistic input x-ray spectrum. Simulations of circuits based on poly-Si thin-film transistors are used to determine the resulting output count rate as a function of input count rate, energy discrimination threshold and operating conditions.

  1. Characterization of nanometer-thick polycrystalline silicon with phonon-boundary scattering enhanced thermoelectric properties and its application in infrared sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huchuan; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Lee, Chengkuo

    2015-01-14

    Although significantly reducing the thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires has been reported, it remains a challenge to integrate silicon nanowires with structure materials and electrodes in the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process. In this paper, we investigated the thermal conductivity of nanometer-thick polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) theoretically and experimentally. By leveraging the phonon-boundary scattering, the thermal conductivity of 52 nm thick poly-Si was measured as low as around 12 W mK(-1) which is only about 10% of the value of bulk single crystalline silicon. The ZT of n-doped and p-doped 52 nm thick poly-Si was measured as 0.067 and 0.024, respectively, while most previously reported data had values of about 0.02 and 0.01 for a poly-Si layer with a thickness of 0.5 μm and above. Thermopile infrared sensors comprising 128 pairs of thermocouples made of either n-doped or p-doped nanometer-thick poly-Si strips in a series connected by an aluminium (Al) metal interconnect layer are fabricated using microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology. The measured vacuum specific detectivity (D*) of the n-doped and p-doped thermopile infrared (IR) sensors are 3.00 × 10(8) and 1.83 × 10(8) cm Hz(1/2) W(-1) for sensors of 52 nm thick poly-Si, and 5.75 × 10(7) and 3.95 × 10(7) cm Hz(1/2) W(-1) for sensors of 300 nm thick poly-Si, respectively. The outstanding thermoelectric properties indicate our approach is promising for diverse applications using ultrathin poly-Si technology.

  2. Investigation of p-channel and n-channel junctionless gate-all-around polycrystalline silicon nanowires with silicon nanocrystals nonvolatile memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Mu-Shih; Wu, Yung-Chun; Chung, Ming-Hsien; Jhan, Yi-Ruei; Chang-Liao, Kuei-Shu; Liu, Kuan-Cheng; Wu, Min-Hsin; Hung, Min-Feng

    2014-07-01

    This work presents p-channel and n-channel junctionless (JL) polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) nanowires gate-all-around (GAA) nonvolatile memory (NVM) devices with silicon nanocrystals charge trapping layer. Experimental results indicate that the n-channel device has better programming efficiency and p-channel device has better erasing efficiency. For p-channel device, an extrapolation of the memory window to 10 yr demonstrates that 95% of the stored charge can be retained at high temperature of 85 °C. Such the p-channel and n-channel JL-GAA NVMs are feasible for use in system-on-panel (SOP) and 3-D stacked flash memory applications.

  3. Very high-cycle fatigue failure in micron-scale polycrystalline silicon films: Effects of environment and surface oxide thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsem, D. H.; Timmerman, R.; Boyce, B. L.; Stach, E. A.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Ritchie, R. O.

    2007-01-01

    Fatigue failure in micron-scale polycrystalline silicon structural films, a phenomenon that is not observed in bulk silicon, can severely impact the durability and reliability of microelectromechanical system devices. Despite several studies on the very high-cycle fatigue behavior of these films (up to 1012cycles), there is still an on-going debate on the precise mechanisms involved. We show here that for devices fabricated in the multiuser microelectromechanical system process (MUMPs) foundry and Sandia Ultra-planar, Multi-level MEMS Technology (SUMMiT V™) process and tested under equi-tension/compression loading at ˜40kHz in different environments, stress-lifetime data exhibit similar trends in fatigue behavior in ambient room air, shorter lifetimes in higher relative humidity environments, and no fatigue failure at all in high vacuum. The transmission electron microscopy of the surface oxides in the test samples shows a four- to sixfold thickening of the surface oxide at stress concentrations after fatigue failure, but no thickening after overload fracture in air or after fatigue cycling in vacuo. We find that such oxide thickening and premature fatigue failure (in air) occur in devices with initial oxide thicknesses of ˜4nm (SUMMiT V™) as well as in devices with much thicker initial oxides ˜20nm (MUMPs). Such results are interpreted and explained by a reaction-layer fatigue mechanism. Specifically, moisture-assisted subcritical cracking within a cyclic stress-assisted thickened oxide layer occurs until the crack reaches a critical size to cause catastrophic failure of the entire device. The entirety of the evidence presented here strongly indicates that the reaction-layer fatigue mechanism is the governing mechanism for fatigue failure in micron-scale polycrystalline silicon thin films.

  4. A method for polycrystalline silicon delineation applicable to a double-diffused MOS transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halsor, J. L.; Lin, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    Method is simple and eliminates requirement for unreliable special etchants. Structure is graded in resistivity to prevent punch-through and has very narrow channel length to increase frequency response. Contacts are on top to permit planar integrated circuit structure. Polycrystalline shield will prevent creation of inversion layer in isolated region.

  5. Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline Diamond/Silicon Carbide Nanocomposites for Drill Bits

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop and produce in quantity novel superhard and ultratough thermally stable polycrystalline (TSP) diamond/SiC nanocomposites reinforced with SiC/C nanofibers for drill-bit applications and multiple industrial functions.

  6. Initial steps toward the realization of large area arrays of single photon counting pixels based on polycrystalline silicon TFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Albert K.; Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao; Street, Robert A.; Lu, Jeng Ping

    2014-03-01

    The thin-film semiconductor processing methods that enabled creation of inexpensive liquid crystal displays based on amorphous silicon transistors for cell phones and televisions, as well as desktop, laptop and mobile computers, also facilitated the development of devices that have become ubiquitous in medical x-ray imaging environments. These devices, called active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs), measure the integrated signal generated by incident X rays and offer detection areas as large as ~43×43 cm2. In recent years, there has been growing interest in medical x-ray imagers that record information from X ray photons on an individual basis. However, such photon counting devices have generally been based on crystalline silicon, a material not inherently suited to the cost-effective manufacture of monolithic devices of a size comparable to that of AMFPIs. Motivated by these considerations, we have developed an initial set of small area prototype arrays using thin-film processing methods and polycrystalline silicon transistors. These prototypes were developed in the spirit of exploring the possibility of creating large area arrays offering single photon counting capabilities and, to our knowledge, are the first photon counting arrays fabricated using thin film techniques. In this paper, the architecture of the prototype pixels is presented and considerations that influenced the design of the pixel circuits, including amplifier noise, TFT performance variations, and minimum feature size, are discussed.

  7. Rapid recovery of polycrystalline silicon from kerf loss slurry using double-layer organic solvent sedimentation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Peng-fei; Guo, Jing; Zhuang, Yan-xin; Li, Feng; Tu, Gan-feng

    2013-10-01

    The rapid development of photovoltaic (PV) industries has led to a shortage of silicon feedstock. However, more than 40% silicon goes into slurry wastes due to the kerf loss in the wafer slicing process. To effectively recycle polycrystalline silicon from the kerf loss slurry, an innovative double-layer organic solvent sedimentation process was presented in the paper. The sedimentation velocities of Si and SiC particles in some organic solvents were investigated. Considering the polarity, viscosity, and density of solvents, the chloroepoxy propane and carbon tetrachloride were selected to separate Si and SiC particles. It is found that Si and SiC particles in the slurry waste can be successfully separated by the double-layer organic solvent sedimentation method, which can greatly reduce the sedimentation time and improve the purity of obtained Si-rich and SiC-rich powders. The obtained Si-rich powders consist of 95.04% Si, and the cast Si ingot has 99.06% Si.

  8. Effects of defects and impurities on minority carrier lifetime in cast-grown polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshita, Y.; Nishikawa, Y.; Tachibana, M.; Tuong, V. K.; Sasaki, T.; Kojima, N.; Tanaka, S.; Yamaguchi, M.

    2005-02-01

    The grain size distribution of B-doped cast-grown polycrystalline Si could not explain the minority carrier lifetime map. The lifetime was not mainly determined by the grain boundary recombination, since the grain size of the present cast-grown polycrystalline Si exceeded 1 cm and was large enough as compared with the minority carrier diffusion length (0.25 μm). In the region where lifetime was relatively short, there were many defects, which appeared as etch-pit by the Secco etching. The relationship between the etch-pit density and the minority carrier lifetime suggested that these defects acted as a recombination center and that they mainly determined the lifetime. There were many C atoms (>10 17 cm 3), which exist as substitutional impurities, in the as-grown wafer. The thermal annealing induced the C segregation, which might deteriorate the solar cell performance through the cell fabrication processes.

  9. The effect of germanium ion implantation dose on the amorphization and recrystallization of polycrystalline silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komem, Y.; Hall, I. W.

    1981-11-01

    Polycrystalline Si films have been amorphized by implantation with 130-keV Ge ions and subsequently recrystallized by conventional heat treatment. It is found that, after amorphization with a low ion dose, recrystallization produces a structure which is morphologically similar to the original film. By contrast, after high Ge dose implantation, recrystallization proceeds dendritically. An initial rationale for this behavior is proposed in terms of the lattice disorder introduced by ion implantation.

  10. Deformation and fracture of single-crystal and sintered polycrystalline silicon carbide produced by cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Hattori, Shuji; Okada, Tsunenori; Buckley, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the deformation and fracture behavior of single-crystal and sintered polycrystalline SiC surfaces exposed to cavitation. Cavitation erosion experiments were conducted in distilled water at 25 C by using a magnetostrictive oscillator in close proximity (1 mm) to the surface of SiC. The horn frequency was 20 kHz, and the double amplitude of the vibrating disk was 50 microns. The results of the investigation indicate that the SiC (0001) surface could be deformed in a plastic manner during cavitation. Dislocation etch pits were formed when the surface was chemically etched. The number of defects, including dislocations in SiC (0001) surface, increased with increasing exposure time to cavitation. The presence of intrinsic defects such as voids in the surficial layers of the sintered polycrystalline SiC determined the zones at which fractured grains and fracture pits (pores) were generated. Single-crystal SiC had superior erosion resistance to that of sintered polycrystalline SiC.

  11. Deformation and fracture of single-crystal and sintered polycrystalline silicon carbide produced by cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Hattori, Shuji; Okada, Tsunenori; Buckley, Donald H.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the deformation and fracture behavior of single-crystal and sintered polycrystalline SiC surfaces exposed to cavitation. Cavitation erosion experiments were conducted in distilled water at 25 C by using a magnetostrictive oscillator in close proximity (1 mm) to the surface of SiC. The horn frequency was 20 kHz, and the double amplitude of the vibrating disk was 50 microns. The results of the investigation indicate that the SiC (0001) surface could be deformed in a plastic manner during cavitation. Dislocation etch pits were formed when the surface was chemically etched. The number of defects, including dislocations in the SiC (0001) surface, increased with increasing exposure time to cavitation. The presence of intrinsic defects such as voids in the surficial layers of the sintered polycrystalline SiC determined the zones at which fractured grains and fracture pits (pores) were generated. Single-crystal SiC had superior erosion resistance to that of sintered polycrystalline SiC.

  12. Fatigue of polycrystalline silicon for MEMS applications: Crack growth and stability under resonant loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Muhlstein, C.L.; Howe, R.T.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2001-12-05

    Although bulk silicon is not known to exhibit susceptibility to cyclic fatigue, micron-scale structures made from silicon films are known to be vulnerable to degradation by fatigue in ambient air environments, a phenomenon that has been recently modeled in terms of a mechanism of sequential oxidation and stress-corrosion cracking of the native oxide layer.

  13. Development of low cost thin film polycrystalline silicon solar cells for terrestrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    The AMO efficiencies (no anti-reflection coating) obtained to date are 2.5% for solar cells deposited on graphite substrates, 3.5% for solar cells deposited on metallurgical silicon substrates, and 4.5% for solar cells fabricated from purified metallurgical silicon.

  14. Mechanism of fatigue in micron-scale films of polycrystalline silicon for microelectromechanical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Muhlstein, C.L.; Stach, E.A.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2001-08-02

    Reported nearly a decade ago, cyclic fatigue failure in silicon thin films has remained a mystery. Silicon does not display the room temperature plasticity or extrinsic toughening mechanisms necessary to cause fatigue in either ductile (e.g., metals) or brittle (e.g., ceramics and ordered mintermetallic) materials.

  15. In-Plane Grain Orientation Alignment of Polycrystalline Silicon Films by Normal and Oblique-Angle Ion Implantations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Anri; Kuroki, Shin-Ichiro; Fujii, Shuntaro; Ito, Takashi

    2012-04-01

    Random crystallographic orientations of polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) grains in the films grown on a SiO2 substrate by chemical vapor deposition were laterally aligned by maintaining the 110 restricted pillar texture through double Si+ self-ion implantations. The in-plane X-ray diffraction pattern and rocking curve clearly indicate the lateral alignment. The oblique-angle Si+ self-ion implantation was also found to be useful for increasing the amount of the 110 pillar texture. The electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) pattern supports the increase in the amount of the 110 pillar texture and the lateral crystal orientation alignment. The transmission electron micrography and EBSD results also suggest that grain size is increased by double Si+ self-ion implantations. Although further systematic optimization may be required, the technique will be useful for improving the electrical characteristics of poly-Si devices for future electronic systems on insulators.

  16. Abnormal degradation of high-voltage p-type MOSFET with n+ polycrystalline silicon gate during AC stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongjun; Joo, Ikhyung; Lee, Changsub; Song, Duheon; Choi, Byoungdeog

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the abnormal degradation of high-voltage p-type MOSFET (HV pMOSFET) under negative AC gate bias stress. In HV pMOSFET with n+ polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) gate, the abnormal degradation occurs after the gradual degradation during negative AC stress. The abnormal degradation is suppressed by changing the gate material from n+ poly-Si to p+ poly-Si, and it is caused by hot holes produced by the impact ionization near the surface when electrons move from the gate toward the gate oxide. We suggest a possible mechanism to explain the improvement of degradation by using p+ poly-Si as a gate material.

  17. <100>-textured self-assembled square-shaped polycrystalline silicon grains by multiple shot excimer laser crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    He Ming; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Metselaar, Wim; Beenakker, Kees

    2006-10-15

    Strong preference for <100> surface and in-plane orientations has been observed in polycrystalline silicon film on SiO{sub 2} after crystallization with multiple excimer laser pulses. Laser induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is developed in the film, constructing self-assembled square-shaped grains. The clear texture can be observed in a relatively wide energy density window, from 250 to 275 mJ/cm{sup 2}, for a 30 nm thick {alpha}-Si layer. It is speculated that the lateral growth velocity of <100>-oriented grains is the fastest, and the orthogonal in-plane <100> directions are developed due to the alternate directions of melting and solidification during the LIPSS formation.

  18. Temperature- and doping-concentration-dependent characteristics of junctionless gate-all-around polycrystalline-silicon thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tso, Chia-Tsung; Liu, Tung-Yu; Pan, Fu-Ming; Sheu, Jeng-Tzong

    2017-04-01

    The temperature effects of both gate-all-around polycrystalline silicon nanowire (GAA poly-Si NW) junctionless (JL) and inversion mode (IM) transistor devices at various temperatures (77–410 K) were investigated. The electrical characteristics of these devices, such as subthreshold swing (SS), threshold voltage (V th), and drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL), were also characterized and compared in this study. Moreover, JL devices with different doping concentrations at various temperatures were also discussed. Both V th and I on showed significant doping concentration dependences for JL devices with doping concentrations of 1 × 1019 and 5 × 1019 cm‑3. However, the electrical characteristics of JL devices showed less thermal sensitivity when the doping concentration reached 1020 cm‑3.

  19. Characterization of electrothermal actuators and arrays fabricated in a four-level, planarized surface-micromachined polycrystalline silicon process

    SciTech Connect

    Comtois, J.H.; Michalicek, M.A.; Barron, C.C.

    1997-06-01

    This paper presents the results of tests performed on a variety of electrothermal microactuators and arrays of these actuators recently fabricated in the four-level planarized polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) SUMMiT process at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Sandia National Laboratories. These results are intended to aid designers of thermally actuated mechanisms, and will apply to similar actuators made in other polysilicon MEMS processes. The measurements include force and deflection versus input power, maximum operating frequency, effects of long term operation, and ideal actuator and array geometries for different design criteria. A typical application in a stepper motor is shown to illustrate the utility of these actuators and arrays.

  20. Large-Scale PV Module Manufacturing Using Ultra-Thin Polycrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, 1 April 2002--28 February 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Narayanan, M.

    2006-07-01

    The major objectives of this program were to continue advances of BP Solar polycrystalline silicon manufacturing technology. The Program included work in the following areas. (1) Efforts in the casting area to increase ingot size, improve ingot material quality, and improve handling of silicon feedstock as it is loaded into the casting stations. (2) Developing wire saws to slice 100-..mu..m-thick silicon wafers on 290-..mu..m-centers. (3) Developing equipment for demounting and subsequent handling of very thin silicon wafers. (4) Developing cell processes using 100-..mu..m-thick silicon wafers that produce encapsulated cells with efficiencies of at least 15.4% at an overall yield exceeding 95%. (5) Expanding existing in-line manufacturing data reporting systems to provide active process control. (6) Establishing a 50-MW (annual nominal capacity) green-field Mega-plant factory model template based on this new thin polycrystalline silicon technology. (7) Facilitating an increase in the silicon feedstock industry's production capacity for lower-cost solar-grade silicon feedstock..

  1. Improvement in pH sensitivity of low-temperature polycrystalline-silicon thin-film transistor sensors using H2 sintering.

    PubMed

    Yen, Li-Chen; Tang, Ming-Tsyr; Chang, Fang-Yu; Pan, Tung-Ming; Chao, Tien-Sheng; Lee, Chiang-Hsuan

    2014-02-25

    In this article, we report an improvement in the pH sensitivity of low-temperature polycrystalline-silicon (poly-Si) thin-film transistor (TFT) sensors using an H2 sintering process. The low-temperature polycrystalline-silicon (LTPS) TFT sensor with H2 sintering exhibited a high sensitivity than that without H2 sintering. This result may be due to the resulting increase in the number of Si-OH2(+) and Si-O(-) bonds due to the incorporation of H in the gate oxide to reduce the dangling silicon bonds and hence create the surface active sites and the resulting increase in the number of chemical reactions at these surface active sites. Moreover, the LTPS TFT sensor device not only offers low cost and a simple fabrication processes, but the technique also can be extended to integrate the sensor into other systems.

  2. Comparison between laser terahertz emission microscope and conventional methods for analysis of polycrystalline silicon solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Hidetoshi Ito, Akira; Takayama, Kazuhisa Kawayama, Iwao Murakami, Hironaru Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2015-11-15

    A laser terahertz emission microscope (LTEM) can be used for noncontact inspection to detect the waveforms of photoinduced terahertz emissions from material devices. In this study, we experimentally compared the performance of LTEM with conventional analysis methods, e.g., electroluminescence (EL), photoluminescence (PL), and laser beam induced current (LBIC), as an inspection method for solar cells. The results showed that LTEM was more sensitive to the characteristics of the depletion layer of the polycrystalline solar cell compared with EL, PL, and LBIC and that it could be used as a complementary tool to the conventional analysis methods for a solar cell.

  3. Thin film polycrystalline silicon solar cells: first technical progress report, April 15, 1980-July 15, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    The objectives of this contract are to fabricate large area thin film silicon solar cells with AM1 efficiency of 10% or greater with good reproducibility and good yield and to assess the feasibility of implementing this process for manufacturing solar cells at a cost of $300/kWe. Efforts during the past quarter have been directed to the purification of metallurgical silicon, the preparation of substrates, and the fabrication and characterization of solar cells. The partial purification of metallurgical silicon by extraction with aqua regia has been investigated in detail, and the resulting silicon was analyzed by the atomic absorption technique. The unidirectional solidification of aqua regia-extracted metallurgical silicon on graphite was used for the preparation of substrates, and the impurity distribution in the substrate was also determined. Large area (> 30 cm/sup 2/) solar cells have been prepared from aqua regia-extracted metallurgical silicon substrates by the thermal reduction of trichlorosilane containing appropriate dopants. Chemically deposited tin-dioxide films were used as antireflection coatings. Solar cells with AM1 efficiencies of about 8.5% have been obtained. Their spectral response, minority carrier diffusion length, and I/sub sc/-V/sub oc/ relation have been measured.

  4. On the Discontinuity of Polycrystalline Silicon Thin Films Realized by Aluminum-Induced Crystallization of PECVD-Deposited Amorphous Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Qingtao; Wang, Tao; Yan, Hui; Zhang, Ming; Mai, Yaohua

    2017-04-01

    Crystallization of glass/Aluminum (50, 100, 200 nm) /hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) (50, 100, 200 nm) samples by Aluminum-induced crystallization (AIC) is investigated in this article. After annealing and wet etching, we found that the continuity of the polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin films was strongly dependent on the double layer thicknesses. Increasing the a-Si:H/Al layer thickness ratio would improve the film microcosmic continuity. However, too thick Si layer might cause convex or peeling off during annealing. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) are introduced to analyze the process of the peeling off. When the thickness ratio of a-Si:H/Al layer is around 1 to 1.5 and a-Si:H layer is less than 200 nm, the poly-Si film has a good continuity. Hall measurements are introduced to determine the electrical properties. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that the poly-Si film is completely crystallized and has a preferential (111) orientation.

  5. On the Discontinuity of Polycrystalline Silicon Thin Films Realized by Aluminum-Induced Crystallization of PECVD-Deposited Amorphous Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Qingtao; Wang, Tao; Yan, Hui; Zhang, Ming; Mai, Yaohua

    2017-01-01

    Crystallization of glass/Aluminum (50, 100, 200 nm) /hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) (50, 100, 200 nm) samples by Aluminum-induced crystallization (AIC) is investigated in this article. After annealing and wet etching, we found that the continuity of the polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin films was strongly dependent on the double layer thicknesses. Increasing the a-Si:H/Al layer thickness ratio would improve the film microcosmic continuity. However, too thick Si layer might cause convex or peeling off during annealing. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) are introduced to analyze the process of the peeling off. When the thickness ratio of a-Si:H/Al layer is around 1 to 1.5 and a-Si:H layer is less than 200 nm, the poly-Si film has a good continuity. Hall measurements are introduced to determine the electrical properties. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that the poly-Si film is completely crystallized and has a preferential (111) orientation.

  6. Polycrystalline silicon material availability and market pricing outlook for 1980 through 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costogue, E. N.; Ferber, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    The results of the second JPL update to an original report to assess the availability and prices of polycrystalline Si for solar cells in the 1983-88 interval are reported. It is noted that the demand for poly-Si for solar cells competes with the demand for the same material for semiconductors, although the solar cell industry can use material rejected from the semiconductor industry. A sufficient supply is projected for the 6 yr period, rising from 3224 metric tons to 10,220 metric tons in 1988, with prices dropping from the 1980 level of $140/kg to $25/kg. The price reduction and improved production are noted to be due in large part to DOE efforts at defining lower-cost production processes.

  7. Activation of ion-implanted polycrystalline silicon thin films prepared on glass substrates

    SciTech Connect

    So, Byoung-Soo; Bae, Seung-Muk; You, Yil-Hwan; Kim, Young-Hwan; Hwang, Jin-Ha

    2012-10-15

    Phosphorous-implanted polycrystalline Si thin films were subjected to thermal annealing between 300 °C and 650 °C. The thermal activation was monitored electrically and structurally using Hall measurements, Raman spectroscopy, UV–visible spectrophotometry, and transmission electron microscopy. Charge transport information was correlated to the corresponding structural evolution in thermal activation. Phosphorous-implanted activation is divided into short-range ordering at low temperatures and long-range ordering at high temperatures, with the boundary between low and high temperatures set at 425 °C. Short-range ordering allows for significant increase in electronic concentration through substitution of P for Si. Higher temperatures are attributed to long-range ordering, thereby increasing electronic mobility.

  8. A comparison of scattering and non-scattering anti-reflection designs for back contacted polycrystalline thin film silicon solar cells in superstrate configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockau, Daniel; Hammerschmidt, M.; Haschke, Jan; Blome, Mark; Ruske, F.; Schmidt, F.; Rech, B.

    2014-05-01

    A new generation of polycrystalline silicon thin film solar cells is currently being developed in laboratories, employing a combination of novel laser or electron beam based liquid phase crystallization (LPC) techniques and single side contacting systems. The lateral grain size of these polycrystalline cells is in the millimeter range at an absorber thickness of up to 10 μm. In this contribution we present a comparative simulation study of several 1D, 2D and 3D nano-optical designs for the substrate / illumination side interface to the several micrometer thick back contacted LPC silicon absorber material. The compared geometries comprise multilayer coatings, gratings with step and continuous profiles as well as combinations thereof. Using the transfer matrix method and a finite element method implementation to rigorously solve Maxwell's equations, we discuss anti-reflection and scattering properties of the different front interface designs in view of the angular distribution of incident light.

  9. Optimal angle of polycrystalline silicon solar panels placed in a building using the ant colony optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saouane, I.; Chaker, A.; Zaidi, B.; Shekhar, C.

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes the mathematical model used to determine the amount of solar radiation received on an inclined solar photovoltaic panel. The optimum slope angles for each month, season, and year have also been calculated for a solar photovoltaic panel. The optimization of the procedure to maximize the solar energy collected by the solar panel by varying the tilt angle is also presented. As a first step, the global solar radiation on the horizontal surface of a thermal photovoltaic panel during clear sky is estimated. Thereafter, the Muneer model, which provides the most accurate estimation of the total solar radiation at a given geographical point has been used to determine the optimum collector slope. Also, the Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) algorithm was applied to obtain the optimum tilt angle settings for PV collector to improve the PV collector efficiency. The results show good agreement between calculated and predicted results. Additionally, this paper presents studies carried out on the polycrystalline silicon solar panels for electrical energy generation in the city of Ghardaia. The electrical energy generation has been studied as a function of amount of irradiation received and the angle of optimum orientation of the solar panels.

  10. Enhanced Extraction of Silicon-Vacancy Centers Light Emission Using Bottom-Up Engineered Polycrystalline Diamond Photonic Crystal Slabs.

    PubMed

    Ondič, Lukáš; Varga, Marian; Hruška, Karel; Fait, Jan; Kapusta, Peter

    2017-03-03

    Silicon vacancy (SiV) centers are optically active defects in diamond. The SiV centers, in contrast to nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers, possess narrow and efficient luminescence spectrum (centered at ≈738 nm) even at room temperature, which can be utilized for quantum photonics and sensing applications. However, most of light generated in diamond is trapped in the material due to the phenomenon of total internal reflection. In order to overcome this issue, we have prepared two-dimensional photonic crystal slabs from polycrystalline diamond thin layers with high density of SiV centers employing bottom-up growth on quartz templates. We have shown that the spectral overlap between the narrow light emission of the SiV centers and the leaky modes extracting the emission into almost vertical direction (where it can be easily detected) can be obtained by controlling the deposition time. More than 14-fold extraction enhancement of the SiV centers photoluminescence was achieved compared to an uncorrugated sample. Computer simulation confirmed that the extraction enhancement originates from the efficient light-matter interaction between light emitted from the SiV centers and the photonic crystal slab.

  11. Modified data analysis for thermal conductivity measurements of polycrystalline silicon microbridges using a steady state Joule heating technique.

    PubMed

    Sayer, Robert A; Piekos, Edward S; Phinney, Leslie M

    2012-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of thermophysical properties is needed to predict and optimize the thermal performance of microsystems. Thermal conductivity is experimentally determined by measuring quantities such as voltage or temperature and then inferring a thermal conductivity from a thermal model. Thermal models used for data analysis contain inherent assumptions, and the resultant thermal conductivity value is sensitive to how well the actual experimental conditions match the model assumptions. In this paper, a modified data analysis procedure for the steady state Joule heating technique is presented that accounts for bond pad effects including thermal resistance, electrical resistance, and Joule heating. This new data analysis method is used to determine the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) microbridges fabricated using the Sandia National Laboratories SUMMiT V™ micromachining process over the temperature range of 77-350 K, with the value at 300 K being 71.7 ± 1.5 W/(m K). It is shown that making measurements on beams of multiple lengths is useful, if not essential, for inferring the correct thermal conductivity from steady state Joule heating measurements.

  12. Modified data analysis for thermal conductivity measurements of polycrystalline silicon microbridges using a steady state Joule heating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, Robert A.; Piekos, Edward S.; Phinney, Leslie M.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of thermophysical properties is needed to predict and optimize the thermal performance of microsystems. Thermal conductivity is experimentally determined by measuring quantities such as voltage or temperature and then inferring a thermal conductivity from a thermal model. Thermal models used for data analysis contain inherent assumptions, and the resultant thermal conductivity value is sensitive to how well the actual experimental conditions match the model assumptions. In this paper, a modified data analysis procedure for the steady state Joule heating technique is presented that accounts for bond pad effects including thermal resistance, electrical resistance, and Joule heating. This new data analysis method is used to determine the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) microbridges fabricated using the Sandia National Laboratories SUMMiT V™ micromachining process over the temperature range of 77-350 K, with the value at 300 K being 71.7 ± 1.5 W/(m K). It is shown that making measurements on beams of multiple lengths is useful, if not essential, for inferring the correct thermal conductivity from steady state Joule heating measurements.

  13. Magnetic-composite-modified polycrystalline silicon nanowire field-effect transistor for vascular endothelial growth factor detection and cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Qiu, Jian-Tai; Yang, Fu-Liang; Liu, Yin-Chih; Chen, Min-Cheng; Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Yang, Hung-Wei; Lin, Chia-Yi; Lin, Chu-Chi; Wu, Tzong-Shoon; Tu, Yi-Ming; Xiao, Min-Cong; Ho, Chia-Hua; Huang, Chien-Chao; Lai, Chao-Sung; Hua, Mu-Yi

    2014-10-07

    This study proposes a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) biosensor for diagnosing various stages of cervical carcinoma. In addition, VEGF concentrations at various stages of cancer therapy are determined and compared to data obtained by computed tomography (CT) and cancer antigen 125 (CA-125). The increase in VEGF concentrations during operations offers useful insight into dosage timing during cancer therapy. This biosensor uses Avastin as the biorecognition element for the potential cancer biomarker VEGF and is based on a n-type polycrystalline silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (poly-SiNW-FET). Magnetic nanoparticles with poly[aniline-co-N-(1-one-butyric acid) aniline]-Fe3O4 (SPAnH-Fe3O4) shell-core structures are used as carriers for Avastin loading and provide rapid purification due to their magnetic properties, which prevent the loss of bioactivity; furthermore, the high surface area of these structures increases the quantity of Avastin immobilized. Average concentrations in human blood for species that interfere with detection specificity are also evaluated. The detection range of the biosensor for serum samples covers the results expected from both healthy individuals and cancer patients.

  14. Sodium Accumulation at Potential-Induced Degradation Shunted Areas in Polycrystalline Silicon Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Steven P.; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Hacke, Peter; Guthrey, Harvey; Johnston, Steve; Al-Jassim, Mowafak

    2016-11-01

    We investigated potential-induced degradation (PID) in silicon mini-modules that were subjected to accelerated stressing to induce PID conditions. Shunted areas on the cells were identified with photoluminescence and dark lock-in thermography (DLIT) imaging. The identical shunted areas were then analyzed via time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (TOFSIMS) imaging, 3-D tomography, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The TOF-SIMS imaging indicates a high concentration of sodium in the shunted areas, and 3-D tomography reveals that the sodium extends more than 2 um from the surface below shunted regions. Transmission electron microscopy investigation reveals that a stacking fault is present at an area identified as shunted by DLIT imaging. After the removal of surface sodium, tomography reveals persistent sodium present around the junction depth of 300 nm and a drastic difference in sodium content at the junction when comparing shunted and nonshunted regions.

  15. Interfacial Layer Control by Dry Cleaning Technology for Polycrystalline and Single Crystalline Silicon Growth.

    PubMed

    Im, Dong-Hyun; Kong-Soo Lee; Kang, Yoongoo; Jeong, Myoungho; Park, Kwang Wuk; Lee, Soon-Gun; Ma, Jin-Won; Kim, Youngseok; Kim, Bonghyun; Im, Ki-Vin; Lim, Hanjin; Lee, Jeong Yong

    2016-05-01

    Native oxide removal prior to poly-Si contact and epitaxial growth of Si is the most critical technology to ensure process and device performances of poly-Si plugs and selective epitaxial growth (SEG) layers for DRAM, flash memory, and logic device. Recently, dry cleaning process for interfacial oxide removal has attracted a world-wide attention due to its superior passivation properties to conventional wet cleaning processes. In this study, we investigated the surface states of Si substrate during and after dry cleaning process, and the role of atomic elements including fluorine and hydrogen on the properties of subsequent deposited silicon layer using SIMS, XPS, and TEM analysis. The controlling of residual fluorine on the Si surface after dry cleaning is a key factor for clean interface. The mechanism of native oxide re-growth caused by residual fluorine after dry cleaning is proposed based on analytical results.

  16. Nanoscale silicon as anode for Li-ion batteries: The fundamentals, promises, and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Meng; He, Yang; Zheng, Jianming; Wang, Chongmin

    2015-10-01

    Silicon (Si), associated with its natural abundance, low discharge voltage vs. Li/Li+, and extremely high theoretical discharge capacity (~ 4200 mAh g-1,), has been extensively explored as anode for lithium ion battery. One of the key challenges for using Si as anode is the large volume change upon lithiation and delithiation, which causes a fast capacity fading. Over the last few years, dramatic progress has been made for addressing this issue. In this paper, we summarize the progress towards tailoring of Si as anode for lithium ion battery. The paper is organized such that it covers the fundamentals, the promise offered based on nanoscale designing, and the remaining challenges that need to be attacked to allow using of Si based materials as anode for battery.

  17. Active pixel imagers incorporating pixel-level amplifiers based on polycrystalline-silicon thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E; Koniczek, Martin; Zhao, Qihua; Li, Yixin; Street, Robert A; Lu, Jeng-Ping

    2009-07-01

    Active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) employing a 2D matrix of a-Si addressing TFTs have become ubiquitous in many x-ray imaging applications due to their numerous advantages. However, under conditions of low exposures and/or high spatial resolution, their signal-to-noise performance is constrained by the modest system gain relative to the electronic additive noise. In this article, a strategy for overcoming this limitation through the incorporation of in-pixel amplification circuits, referred to as active pixel (AP) architectures, using polycrystalline-silicon (poly-Si) TFTs is reported. Compared to a-Si, poly-Si offers substantially higher mobilities, enabling higher TFT currents and the possibility of sophisticated AP designs based on both n- and p-channel TFTs. Three prototype indirect detection arrays employing poly-Si TFTs and a continuous a-Si photodiode structure were characterized. The prototypes consist of an array (PSI-1) that employs a pixel architecture with a single TFT, as well as two arrays (PSI-2 and PSI-3) that employ AP architectures based on three and five TFTs, respectively. While PSI-1 serves as a reference with a design similar to that of conventional AMFPI arrays, PSI-2 and PSI-3 incorporate additional in-pixel amplification circuitry. Compared to PSI-1, results of x-ray sensitivity demonstrate signal gains of approximately 10.7 and 20.9 for PSI-2 and PSI-3, respectively. These values are in reasonable agreement with design expectations, demonstrating that poly-Si AP circuits can be tailored to provide a desired level of signal gain. PSI-2 exhibits the same high levels of charge trapping as those observed for PSI-1 and other conventional arrays employing a continuous photodiode structure. For PSI-3, charge trapping was found to be significantly lower and largely independent of the bias voltage applied across the photodiode. MTF results indicate that the use of a continuous photodiode structure in PSI-1, PSI-2, and PSI-3 results in

  18. Active pixel imagers incorporating pixel-level amplifiers based on polycrystalline-silicon thin-film transistors

    PubMed Central

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Koniczek, Martin; Zhao, Qihua; Li, Yixin; Street, Robert A.; Lu, Jeng-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) employing a 2D matrix of a-Si addressing TFTs have become ubiquitous in many x-ray imaging applications due to their numerous advantages. However, under conditions of low exposures and∕or high spatial resolution, their signal-to-noise performance is constrained by the modest system gain relative to the electronic additive noise. In this article, a strategy for overcoming this limitation through the incorporation of in-pixel amplification circuits, referred to as active pixel (AP) architectures, using polycrystalline-silicon (poly-Si) TFTs is reported. Compared to a-Si, poly-Si offers substantially higher mobilities, enabling higher TFT currents and the possibility of sophisticated AP designs based on both n- and p-channel TFTs. Three prototype indirect detection arrays employing poly-Si TFTs and a continuous a-Si photodiode structure were characterized. The prototypes consist of an array (PSI-1) that employs a pixel architecture with a single TFT, as well as two arrays (PSI-2 and PSI-3) that employ AP architectures based on three and five TFTs, respectively. While PSI-1 serves as a reference with a design similar to that of conventional AMFPI arrays, PSI-2 and PSI-3 incorporate additional in-pixel amplification circuitry. Compared to PSI-1, results of x-ray sensitivity demonstrate signal gains of ∼10.7 and 20.9 for PSI-2 and PSI-3, respectively. These values are in reasonable agreement with design expectations, demonstrating that poly-Si AP circuits can be tailored to provide a desired level of signal gain. PSI-2 exhibits the same high levels of charge trapping as those observed for PSI-1 and other conventional arrays employing a continuous photodiode structure. For PSI-3, charge trapping was found to be significantly lower and largely independent of the bias voltage applied across the photodiode. MTF results indicate that the use of a continuous photodiode structure in PSI-1, PSI-2, and PSI-3 results in optical fill

  19. High-performance polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors with two-dimensional location control of the grain boundary via excimer laser crystallization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Lung; Lee, I-Che; Wu, Chun-Yu; Liao, Chan-Yu; Cheng, Yu-Ting; Cheng, Huang-Chung

    2012-07-01

    High-performance low-temperature polycrystalline silicon (Poly-Si) thin-film transistors (TFTs) have been fabricated with two-dimensional (2-D) location-controlled grain boundaries using excimer laser crystallization (ELC). By locally increased thickness of the amorphous silicon (a-Si) film that was served as the seed crystals with a partial-melting crystallization scheme, the cross-shaped grain boundary structures were produced between the thicker a-Si grids. The Poly-Si TFTs with one parallel and one perpendicular grain boundary along the channel direction could therefore be fabricated to reach excellent field-effect mobility of 530 cm2/V-s while the conventional ones exhibited field-effect mobility of 198 cm2/V-s. Furthermore, the proposed TFTs achieved not only superior electric properties but also improved uniformity as compared with the conventional ones owing to the artificially controlled locations of grain boundaries.

  20. Supported growth of polycrystalline silicon sheet on low-cost ceramic, carbon, or reusable substrate. Quarterly report No. 1, September 26-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, P.W.; Heaps, J.D.; Schuldt, S.B.; Zook, J.D.

    1980-02-01

    The overall objective of this program is to identify and develop high-throughput, supported-growth methods for producing low-cost, large-area polycrystalline silicon sheet on ceramic, carbon, or reusable substrates. The first method being investigated is the SCIM coating technique. (SCIM is an acronym for Silicon Coating by Inverted Meniscus.) With this technique, a low-cost ceramic substrate is silicon-coated in a continuous manner by passing the substrate over a molten silicon meniscus which is contained in a narrow fused-silica trough. During this reporting period, several mullite substrates were silicon-coated with this method. The best coatings were approximately 100 ..mu..m thick with large columnar grains up to 0.5 cm wide and several cm long. Structural characterization of these coatings shows that these large grains are heavily twinned with boundaries perpendicular to the surface of the layer. Minority-carrier diffusion length measurements made on photodiodes fabricated from these coatings indicate diffusion lengths of about 25 ..mu..m. The short-circuit current densities of the diodes were about 23 mA/cm/sup 2/, with open-circuit voltages of approximately 0.49 V. With the substrates positioned horizontally as they pass over the meniscus trough, instability usually occurs, causing a buildup of molten silicon immediately downstream from the trough. This solicon eventually spills over onto key parts of the coater. By tilting the substrate at angles of 10, 15, and 20/sup 0/, stability can be achieved. A theoretical study of meniscus shapes conducted during this reporting period suggests that with an appropriate trough design and the right pressure and substrate height, a SCIM-coating with horizontal substrates should also be possible.

  1. Sub-kT/q Subthreshold-Slope Using Negative Capacitance in Low-Temperature Polycrystalline-Silicon Thin-Film Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Hyo; Jang, Gil Su; Kim, Hyung Yoon; Seok, Ki Hwan; Chae, Hee Jae; Lee, Sol Kyu; Joo, Seung Ki

    2016-04-01

    Realizing a low-temperature polycrystalline-silicon (LTPS) thin-film transistor (TFT) with sub-kT/q subthreshold slope (SS) is significantly important to the development of next generation active-matrix organic-light emitting diode displays. This is the first time a sub-kT/q SS (31.44 mV/dec) incorporated with a LTPS-TFT with polycrystalline-Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT)/ZrTiO4 (ZTO) gate dielectrics has been demonstrated. The sub-kT/q SS was observed in the weak inversion region at -0.5 V showing ultra-low operating voltage with the highest mobility (250.5 cm2/Vsec) reported so far. In addition, the reliability of DC negative bias stress, hot carrier stress and self-heating stress in LTPS-TFT with negative capacitance was investigated for the first time. It was found that the self-heating stress showed accelerated SS degradation due to the PZT Curie temperature.

  2. Sub-kT/q Subthreshold-Slope Using Negative Capacitance in Low-Temperature Polycrystalline-Silicon Thin-Film Transistor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hyo; Jang, Gil Su; Kim, Hyung Yoon; Seok, Ki Hwan; Chae, Hee Jae; Lee, Sol Kyu; Joo, Seung Ki

    2016-01-01

    Realizing a low-temperature polycrystalline-silicon (LTPS) thin-film transistor (TFT) with sub-kT/q subthreshold slope (SS) is significantly important to the development of next generation active-matrix organic-light emitting diode displays. This is the first time a sub-kT/q SS (31.44 mV/dec) incorporated with a LTPS-TFT with polycrystalline-Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT)/ZrTiO4 (ZTO) gate dielectrics has been demonstrated. The sub-kT/q SS was observed in the weak inversion region at −0.5 V showing ultra-low operating voltage with the highest mobility (250.5 cm2/Vsec) reported so far. In addition, the reliability of DC negative bias stress, hot carrier stress and self-heating stress in LTPS-TFT with negative capacitance was investigated for the first time. It was found that the self-heating stress showed accelerated SS degradation due to the PZT Curie temperature. PMID:27098115

  3. Sub-kT/q Subthreshold-Slope Using Negative Capacitance in Low-Temperature Polycrystalline-Silicon Thin-Film Transistor.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyo; Jang, Gil Su; Kim, Hyung Yoon; Seok, Ki Hwan; Chae, Hee Jae; Lee, Sol Kyu; Joo, Seung Ki

    2016-04-21

    Realizing a low-temperature polycrystalline-silicon (LTPS) thin-film transistor (TFT) with sub-kT/q subthreshold slope (SS) is significantly important to the development of next generation active-matrix organic-light emitting diode displays. This is the first time a sub-kT/q SS (31.44 mV/dec) incorporated with a LTPS-TFT with polycrystalline-Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT)/ZrTiO4 (ZTO) gate dielectrics has been demonstrated. The sub-kT/q SS was observed in the weak inversion region at -0.5 V showing ultra-low operating voltage with the highest mobility (250.5 cm(2)/Vsec) reported so far. In addition, the reliability of DC negative bias stress, hot carrier stress and self-heating stress in LTPS-TFT with negative capacitance was investigated for the first time. It was found that the self-heating stress showed accelerated SS degradation due to the PZT Curie temperature.

  4. Controllability of self-aligned four-terminal planar embedded metal double-gate low-temperature polycrystalline-silicon thin-film transistors on a glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsawa, Hiroki; Sasaki, Shun; Hara, Akito

    2016-03-01

    Self-aligned four-terminal n-channel (n-ch) and p-channel (p-ch) planar embedded metal double-gate polycrystalline-silicon (poly-Si) thin-film transistors (TFTs) were fabricated on a glass substrate at a low temperature of 550 °C. This device includes a metal top gate (TG) and a metal bottom gate (BG), which are used as the drive and control gates or vice versa. The BG was embedded in a glass substrate, and a poly-Si channel with large lateral grains was fabricated by continuous-wave laser lateral crystallization. The threshold voltage modulation factors under various control gate voltages (γ = ΔVth/ΔVCG) were nearly equal to the theoretical predictions in both the n- and p-ch TFTs. By exploiting this high controllability, an enhancement depletion (ED) inverter was fabricated, and successful operation at 2.0 V was confirmed.

  5. Low loss (approximately 6.45dB/cm) sub-micron polycrystalline silicon waveguide integrated with efficient SiON waveguide coupler.

    PubMed

    Fang, Q; Song, J F; Tao, S H; Yu, M B; Lo, G Q; Kwong, D L

    2008-04-28

    In this communication, the sub-micron size polycrystalline silicon (poly- Si) single mode waveguides are fabricated and integrated with SiON waveguide coupler by deep UV lithography. The propagation loss of poly-Si waveguide and coupling loss with optical flat polarization-maintaining fiber (PMF) are measured. For whole C-band (i.e., lambda approximately 1520-1565nm), the propagation loss of TE mode is measured to approximately 6.45+/-0.3dB/cm. The coupling loss with optical flat PMF is approximately 3.4dB/facet for TE mode. To the best of our knowledge, the propagation loss is among the best reported results. This communication discusses the factors reducing the propagation loss, especially the effect of the refractive index contrast. Compared to the SiO(2) cladding, poly-Si waveguide with SiON cladding exhibits lower propagation loss.

  6. Charge retention characteristics of silicide-induced crystallized polycrystalline silicon floating gate thin-film transistors for active matrix organic light-emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyo; Son, Se Wan; Byun, Chang Woo; Kim, Hyung Yoon; Joo, So Na; Lee, Yong Woo; Yun, Seung Jae; Joo, Seung Ki

    2013-10-01

    In this work, non-volatile memory thin-film transistor (NVM-TFT) was fabricated by nickel silicide-induced laterally crystallized (SILC) polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) as the active layer. The nickel seed silicide-induced crystallized (SIC) poly-Si was used as storage layer which is embedded in the gate insulator. The novel unit pixel of active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) using NVM-TFT is proposed and investigated the electrical and optical performance. The threshold voltage shift showed 17.2 V and the high reliability of retention characteristic was demonstrated until 10 years. The retention time can modulate the recharge refresh time of the unit pixel of AMOLED up to 5000 sec.

  7. Low-cost conversion of polycrystalline silicon into sheet by HEM and FAST. [Heat Exchanger Method and Fixed Abrasive Slicing Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattak, C. P.; Schmid, F.

    1980-01-01

    The conversion of polycrystalline silicon to sheet form (the wafers produced are 10 cm x 10 cm cross section with minimum surface damage) by the Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) and multi-wire Fixed Abrasive Slicing Technique (FAST), as a means of reducing the cost of solar arrays for adaptation of photovoltaic technology for terrestrial applications, is given. A schematic of a HEM furnace, which includes a silica crucible, and developments in the HEM process are presented. A new machine for slicing with wire was designed and fabricated. The high-speed slicer has been used to slice 19 wafers per cm from 10 cm diameter crystals. Both HEM and FAST are low-cost processes and they have the potential of giving one of the lowest add-on costs ($6.24 and $6.48 per square meter of sheet respectively, with the combination add-on cost of $14.87 per square meter) of this conversion.

  8. Removal of the process-induced fluorine associated to chemical vapor deposition of tungsten onto a polycrystalline silicon gate structure by heat treatment in a hydrogen-containing atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, Th.; Carlsson, J.-O.; Mohadjeri, B.; Östling, M.; d'Heurle, F. M.; Petersson, C. S.; Keinonen, J.

    1990-09-01

    Tungsten was deposited from a gas mixture of hydrogen and tungsten hexafluoride onto a polycrystalline silicon gate structure in a chemical vapor deposition system. During the deposition process fluorine was also deposited as an undesired impurity. In order to remove the fluorine, heat treatments in the temperature range 550-1050 °C were performed in a hydrogen atmosphere. By this treatment it is possible to form volatile hydrofluoric acid and hence remove fluorine from the structure. Nuclear-resonance-broadening technique and secondary ion mass spectrometry were used for the analysis of fluorine. Fluorine was detected in all the samples except for the sample heat treated at 1050 °C. Moreover, etching of the polycrystalline silicon was observed. The gettering of fluorine, the etching of silicon and the observed formation of tungsten disilicide at 650 °C are discussed with respect to conceivable mechanisms. A thermodynamic study supporting the interpretations is also included.

  9. Predoping effects of boron and phosphorous on arsenic diffusion along grain boundaries in polycrystalline silicon investigated by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamizawa, Hisashi; Shimizu, Yasuo; Inoue, Koji; Nozawa, Yasuko; Toyama, Takeshi; Yano, Fumiko; Inoue, Masao; Nishida, Akio; Nagai, Yasuyoshi

    2016-10-01

    The effect of P or B predoping on As diffusion in polycrystalline Si was investigated by atom probe tomography. In all samples, a high concentration of As was found at grain boundaries, indicating that such boundaries are the main diffusion path. However, As grain-boundary diffusion was suppressed in the B-doped sample and enhanced in the P-doped sample. In a sample codoped with both P and B, As diffusion was somewhat enhanced, indicating competition between the effects of the two dopants. The results suggest that As grain-boundary diffusion can be controlled by varying the local concentration of P or B.

  10. Fundamental studies of grain boundary passivation in polycrystalline silicon with application to improved photovoltaic devices. A final research report covering work completed from February-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Seager, C.H.; Ginley, D.S.

    1980-02-01

    Several aspects of the electrical properties of silicon grain boundaries have been studied. The temperature dependence of the zero-bias conductance and capacitance of single boundaries has been measured and shown to be in good agreement with a simple double depletion layer/thermal emission (DDL/TE) model developed to predict the transport properties of such structures. In addition, it has been shown that deconvolution of the I-V properties of some boundaries via a deconvolution scheme suggested by Pike and Seager yields effective one-electron densities of trapping states which are in good agreement with estimates obtained by low temperature electron emission measurements. Experiments have also been performed which indicate that diffusion of atomic hydrogen into silicon grain boundaries greatly reduces this density of trapping states. In properly prepared, large grained polycrystalline samples all measurable traces of grain boundary potential barriers can be removed to substantial penetration depths after several hours exposure to a hydrogen plasma at elevated temperatures. Initial experiments on prototype polysilicon solar cells have shown that this passivation process can improve AM1 efficiencies. In order to more fully understand and develop this process for improving practical multigrained cells, several device research efforts with other DOE/SERI funded contractors have been initiated.

  11. Near single-crystalline, high-carrier-mobility silicon thin film on a polycrystalline/amorphous substrate

    DOEpatents

    Findikoglu, Alp T.; Jia, Quanxi; Arendt, Paul N.; Matias, Vladimir; Choi, Woong

    2009-10-27

    A template article including a base substrate including: (i) a base material selected from the group consisting of polycrystalline substrates and amorphous substrates, and (ii) at least one layer of a differing material upon the surface of the base material; and, a buffer material layer upon the base substrate, the buffer material layer characterized by: (a) low chemical reactivity with the base substrate, (b) stability at temperatures up to at least about 800.degree. C. under low vacuum conditions, and (c) a lattice crystal structure adapted for subsequent deposition of a semiconductor material; is provided, together with a semiconductor article including a base substrate including: (i) a base material selected from the group consisting of polycrystalline substrates and amorphous substrates, and (ii) at least one layer of a differing material upon the surface of the base material; and, a buffer material layer upon the base substrate, the buffer material layer characterized by: (a) low chemical reactivity with the base substrate, (b) stability at temperatures up to at least about 800.degree. C. under low vacuum conditions, and (c) a lattice crystal structure adapted for subsequent deposition of a semiconductor material, and, a top-layer of semiconductor material upon the buffer material layer.

  12. Photovoltaic mechanisms in polycrystalline thin film silicon solar cells. Quarterly technical progress report No. 1, July 30-October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.

    1980-07-30

    Major accomplishments during the first quarter of the contract period are reported. Small area diode fabrication and analysis has been continued. This technique has further been applied to many RTR ribbons. An optical technique for determination of crystallite orientations has been placed in operation. This technique has many distinct advantages. These are: (1) rapid; (2) can be set-up very inexpensively; (3) well suited for polycrystalline substrates of small grain size; and (4) can easily characterize twins. Accuracies obtained with this technique are about the same as that of the Laue technique. A technique to qualitatively evaluate grain boundary activity in unprocessed substrates has been used and valuable results obtained. Further analysis is being done to use this technique for quantitative evaluation. A major study of G.B. orientation effects is underway. Initial results on RTR ribbons have shown a good correlation of G.B. barrier height with misorientation (tilt boundaries).

  13. Ultralow-loss polycrystalline silicon waveguides and high uniformity 1x12 MMI fanout for 3D photonic integration.

    PubMed

    Kwong, David; Covey, John; Hosseini, Amir; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Xiaochuan; Chen, Ray T

    2012-09-10

    We have investigated the feasibility of multimode polysilicon waveguides to demonstrate the suitability of polysilicon as a candidate for multilayer photonic applications. Solid Phase Crystallization (SPC) with a maximum temperature of 1000°C is used to create polysilicon on thermally grown SiO2. We then measure the propagation losses for various waveguide widths on both polysilicon and crystalline silicon platforms. We find that as the width increases for polysilicon waveguides, the propagation loss decreases similar to crystalline silicon waveguides. At a waveguide width of 10 µm, polysilicon and crystalline silicon waveguides have propagation losses of 0.56 dB/cm and 0.31 dB/cm, respectively, indicating there is little bulk absorption from the polysilicon and is the lowest propagation loss for polysilicon demonstrated to date. In addition, the first 1x12 polysilicon MMI is demonstrated with a low insertion loss of -1.29dB and a high uniformity of 1.07 dB. These results vindicate the use of polysilicon waveguides of varying widths in photonic integrated circuits.

  14. Chemical speciation at buried interfaces in high-temperature processed polycrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells on ZnO:Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Christiane; Pagels, Marcel; Zachäus, Carolin; Pollakowski, Beatrix; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Kanngießer, Birgit; Rech, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    The combination of polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin films with aluminum doped zinc oxide layers (ZnO:Al) as transparent conductive oxide enables the design of appealing optoelectronic devices at low costs, namely in the field of photovoltaics. The fabrication of both thin-film materials requires high-temperature treatments, which are highly desired for obtaining a high electrical material quality. Annealing procedures are typically applied during crystallization and defect-healing processes for silicon and can boost the carrier mobility and conductivity of ZnO:Al layers. In a combined poly-Si/ZnO:Al layer system, an in-depth knowledge of the interaction of both layers and the control of interface reactions upon thermal treatments is crucial. Therefore, we analyze the influence of rapid thermal treatments up to 1050 °C on solid phase crystallized poly-Si thin-film solar cells on ZnO:Al-coated glass, focusing on chemical interface reactions and modifications of the poly-Si absorber material quality. The presence of a ZnO:Al layer in the solar cell stack was found to limit the poly-Si solar cell performance with open circuit voltages only below 390 mV (compared to 435 mV without ZnO film), even if a silicon nitride (SiN) diffusion barrier was included. A considerable amount of diffused zinc inside the silicon was observed. By grazing-incidence X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, a depth-resolving analysis of the elemental composition close to the poly-Si/(SiN)/ZnO:Al interface was carried out. Temperatures above 1000 °C were found to promote the formation of new chemical compounds within about 10 nm of interface, such as zinc silicates (Zn2SiO4) and aluminium oxide (AlxOy). These results give valuable insights about the temperature-limitations of Si/ZnO thin-film solar cell fabrication and the formation of high-mobility ZnO-layers by thermal anneal.

  15. Improvement of polycrystalline silicon wafer solar cell efficiency by forming nanoscale pyramids on wafer surface using a self-mask etching technique.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Han; Chen, Wen-Hwa; Hong, Franklin C-N

    2013-05-01

    The creation of nanostructures on polycrystalline silicon wafer surface to reduce the solar reflection can enhance the solar absorption and thus increase the solar-electricity conversion efficiency of solar cells. The self-masking reactive ion etching (RIE) was studied to directly fabricate nanostructures on silicon surface without using a masking process for antireflection purpose. Reactive gases comprising chlorine (Cl2), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), and oxygen (O2) were activated by radio-frequency plasma in an RIE system at a typical pressure of 120-130 mTorr to fabricate the nanoscale pyramids. Poly-Si wafers were etched directly without masking for 6-10 min to create surface nanostructures by varying the compositions of SF6, Cl2, and O2 gas mixtures in the etching process. The wafers were then treated with acid (KOH:H2O = 1:1) for 1 min to remove the damage layer (100 nm) induced by dry etching. The damage layer significantly reduced the solar cell efficiencies by affecting the electrical properties of the surface layer. The light reflectivity from the surface after acid treatment could be significantly reduced to <10% for the wavelengths between 500 and 900 nm. The effects of RIE and surface treatment conditions on the surface nanostructures and the optical performance as well as the efficiencies of solar cells will be presented and discussed. The authors have successfully fabricated large-area (156 × 156 mm(2)) subwavelength antireflection structure on poly-Si substrates, which could improve the solar cell efficiency reproducibly up to 16.27%, higher than 15.56% using wet etching.

  16. Improvement of polycrystalline silicon wafer solar cell efficiency by forming nanoscale pyramids on wafer surface using a self-mask etching technique

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsin-Han; Chen, Wen-Hwa; Hong, Franklin C.-N.

    2013-01-01

    The creation of nanostructures on polycrystalline silicon wafer surface to reduce the solar reflection can enhance the solar absorption and thus increase the solar-electricity conversion efficiency of solar cells. The self-masking reactive ion etching (RIE) was studied to directly fabricate nanostructures on silicon surface without using a masking process for antireflection purpose. Reactive gases comprising chlorine (Cl2), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), and oxygen (O2) were activated by radio-frequency plasma in an RIE system at a typical pressure of 120–130 mTorr to fabricate the nanoscale pyramids. Poly-Si wafers were etched directly without masking for 6–10 min to create surface nanostructures by varying the compositions of SF6, Cl2, and O2 gas mixtures in the etching process. The wafers were then treated with acid (KOH:H2O = 1:1) for 1 min to remove the damage layer (100 nm) induced by dry etching. The damage layer significantly reduced the solar cell efficiencies by affecting the electrical properties of the surface layer. The light reflectivity from the surface after acid treatment could be significantly reduced to <10% for the wavelengths between 500 and 900 nm. The effects of RIE and surface treatment conditions on the surface nanostructures and the optical performance as well as the efficiencies of solar cells will be presented and discussed. The authors have successfully fabricated large-area (156 × 156 mm2) subwavelength antireflection structure on poly-Si substrates, which could improve the solar cell efficiency reproducibly up to 16.27%, higher than 15.56% using wet etching. PMID:23847751

  17. Effects of gate insulator using high pressure annealing on the characteristics of solid phase crystallized polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moojin; Jin, GuangHai

    2009-04-01

    The oxidizing ambient was built using high pressure H2O vapor at 550 °C. For the solid phase crystallization (SPC) polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) that is annealed for 1 h at 2 MPa, the oxide thickness is about 150 Å. The oxide layer is approximately 90 Å above the original surface of the poly-Si and 60 Å below the original surface. The oxide layer is used as the first gate insulator layer of thin-film transistors (TFTs). The heating at 550 °C with 2 MPa H2O vapor increased the carrier mobility from 17.6 cm2/V s of the conventional SPC process to 30.4 cm2/V s, and it reduced the absolute value of the threshold voltage (Vth) from 4.13 to 3.62 V. The subthreshold swing also decreased from 0.72 to 0.60 V/decade. This improvement is attributed mainly to the reduction in defect density at the oxide/poly-Si interface and in the poly-Si film by the high pressure annealing (HPA) process. Since the realization of excellent performance at the oxide/poly-Si interface and in poly-Si depends on the defect density, the poly-Si having the thermal oxide formed by a combined process of SPC and HPA may be well suited for fabrication of poly-Si TFTs for flat panel displays such as active matrix organic light emitting diodes.

  18. Surface Engineering of Polycrystalline Silicon for Long-term Mechanical Stress Endurance Enhancement in Flexible Low Temperature Poly-Si Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo-Wei; Chang, Ting-Chang; Hung, Yu-Ju; Huang, Shin-Ping; Chen, Hua-Mao; Liao, Po-Yung; Lin, Yu-Ho; Huang, Hui-Chun; Chiang, Hsiao-Cheng; Yang, Chung-I; Zheng, Yu-Zhe; Chu, Ann-Kuo; Li, Hung-Wei; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Lu, Hsueh-Hsing; Wang, Terry Tai-Jui; Chang, Tsu-Chiang

    2017-02-08

    Surface morphology in polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) film is an issue regardless of whether conventional excimer laser annealing (ELA) or the newer metal-induced lateral crystallization (MILC) process is used. This paper investigates the stress distribution while undergoing long-term mechanical stress and the influence of stress on electrical characteristics. Our simulated results show that the non-uniform stress in the gate insulator is more pronounced near the polysilicon/gate insulator edge and at the two sides of the polysilicon protrusion. This stress results in defects in the gate insulator and leads to a non-uniform degradation phenomenon, which affects both the performance and reliability in thin-film transistors (TFTs). The degree of degradation is similar regardless of bending axis (channel-length axis, channel-width axis) or bending type (compression, tension), which means that the degradation is dominated by the protrusion effects. Furthermore, by utilizing long-term electrical bias stresses after undergoing long-tern bending stress, it is apparent that the carrier injection is severe in the sub-channel region, which confirms that the influence of protrusions is crucial. To eliminate the influence of surface morphology in poly-Si, three kinds of laser energy density were used during crystallization to control the protrusion height. The device with lowest protrusions demonstrates the smallest degradation after undergoing long-term bending.

  19. Abnormal Threshold Voltage Shifts in P-Channel Low-Temperature Polycrystalline Silicon Thin Film Transistors Under Negative Bias Temperature Stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Sub; Choi, Pyung Ho; Baek, Do Hyun; Lee, Jae Hyeong; Choi, Byoung Deog

    2015-10-01

    In this research, we have investigated the instability of P-channel low-temperature polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin-film transistors (LTPS TFTs) with double-layer SiO2/SiNx dielectrics. A negative gate bias temperature instability (NBTI) stress was applied and a turn-around behavior phenomenon was observed in the Threshold Voltage Shift (Vth). A positive threshold voltage shift occurs in the first stage, resulting from the negative charge trapping at the SiNx/SiO2 dielectric interface being dominant over the positive charge trapping at dielectric/Poly-Si interface. Following a stress time of 7000 s, the Vth switches to the negative voltage direction, which is "turn-around" behavior. In the second stage, the Vth moves from -1.63 V to -2 V, overwhelming the NBTI effect that results in the trapping of positive charges at the dielectric/Poly-Si interface states and generating grain-boundary trap states and oxide traps.

  20. Real-time and label-free detection of the prostate-specific antigen in human serum by a polycrystalline silicon nanowire field-effect transistor biosensor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Wen; Wu, Chung-Shu; Chuang, Cheng-Keng; Pang, See-Tong; Pan, Tung-Ming; Yang, Yuh-Shyong; Ko, Fu-Hsiang

    2013-08-20

    In this research, we used a polycrystalline silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (poly-Si NWFET) as a biosensor that employs the sidewall spacer technique instead of an expensive electron beam lithography method. When compared with commercial semiconductor processes, the sidewall spacer technique has the advantages of simplicity and low cost. In this study, we employed a novel poly-Si NWFET device for real-time, label-free, and ultrahigh-sensitivity detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in human serum. Since serum proteome is very complex containing high levels of salts and other interfering compounds, we hereby developed a standard operating procedure for real-sample pretreatment to keep a proper pH value and ionic strength of the desalted serum and also utilized Tween 20 to serve as the passivation agent by surface modification on the NWFET to reduce nonspecific binding for medical diagnostic applications. We first modified 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane on the surface of a poly-Si nanowire device followed by glutaraldehyde functionalization, and the PSA antibodies were immobilized on the aldehyde terminal. While PSA was prepared in the buffers to maintain an appropriate pH value and ionic strength, the results indicated that the sensor could detect trace PSA at less than 5 fg/mL in a microfluidic channel. The novel poly-Si NWFET is developed as a diagnostic platform for monitoring prostate cancer and predicting the risk of early biochemical relapse.

  1. A sensitive and selective magnetic graphene composite-modified polycrystalline-silicon nanowire field-effect transistor for bladder cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Chen, Yi-Ting; Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Chen, Min-Cheng; Chen, Shi-Liang; Xiao, Min-Cong; Chen, Chien-Lun; Hua, Mu-Yi

    2015-04-15

    In this study, we describe the urinary quantification of apolipoprotein A II protein (APOA2 protein), a biomarker for the diagnosis of bladder cancer, using an n-type polycrystalline silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (poly-SiNW-FET). The modification of poly-SiNW-FET by magnetic graphene with long-chain acid groups (MGLA) synthesized via Friedel-Crafts acylation was compared with that obtained using short-chain acid groups (MGSA). Compared with MGSA, the MGLA showed a higher immobilization degree and bioactivity to the anti-APOA2 antibody (Ab) due to its lower steric hindrance. In addition, the magnetic properties enabled rapid separation and purification during Ab immobilization, ultimately preserving its bioactivity. The Ab-MGLA/poly-SiNW-FET exhibited a linear dependence of relative response to the logarithmical concentration in a range between 19.5pgmL(-1) and 1.95µgmL(-1), with a limit of detection (LOD) of 6.7pgmL(-1). An additional washing step before measurement aimed at excluding the interfering biocomponents ensured the reliability of the assay. We conclude that our biosensor efficiently distinguishes mean values of urinary APOA2 protein concentrations between patients with bladder cancer (29-344ngmL(-1)) and those with hernia (0.425-9.47ngmL(-1)).

  2. Reactive gas pulsing sputtering process, a promising technique to elaborate silicon oxynitride multilayer nanometric antireflective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhaoui, A.; Bousquet, A.; Smaali, R.; Moreau, A.; Centeno, E.; Cellier, J.; Bernard, C.; Rapegno, R.; Réveret, F.; Tomasella, E.

    2017-01-01

    The oxynitride materials present a high versatility, which enables their properties to be controlled by tuning their elemental composition. This is the case for silicon oxynitrides used for multilayer antireflective coatings (ARCs), where several thin films with various refractive indexes are needed. Different techniques allow for the modification of the thin film composition. In this paper, we investigate the reactive gas pulsing sputtering process to easily tune the thin film composition, from an oxide to a nitride, by controlling the averaged oxygen flow rate, without reducing the deposition rate, compared to a conventional reactive process (CP). We then demonstrated that the refractive indexes of films deposited by this pulsing process (PP) can be varied in the same range compared to films obtained by CP (from 1.83 to 1.45 at 1.95 eV), whereas their extinction coefficients remain low. Finally, the multilayer ARC has been simulated and optimized by a genetic algorithm for wavelength at 600 nm and for the silicon substrate. Various optimized multilayer (mono-, bi- and tri-layers) structures have been deposited by the PP technique and characterized. They are presented in good agreement with the simulated reflectivity. Hence, the PP allows for an easy depositing tri-layer system with a reasonable deposition rate and low reflectivity (8.1% averaged on 400-750 nm visible light range).

  3. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  4. Nanoscale deformation and fracture mechanics of polycrystalline silicon and diamond-like carbon for MEMS by the AFM/DIC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung Woo

    A method for nanoscale experimental mechanics was developed to address problems in deformation and fracture of micron-scale components in Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS). Specifically, the effective and local, elastic and fracture behavior of polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) and tetrahedral amorphous diamond-like carbon (ta-C) were studied using freestanding thin films subject to uniaxial tension. In this method, direct measurements of local deformations were derived from Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) images in specimen areas varying between 1x2 mum2 and 15x15 mum2 using Digital Image Correlation (DIC) to extract displacements and strains with spatial resolution of 1-2 nm. The effective elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio of polysilicon and ta-C from the Sandia National Laboratories (SUMMiT) were 155 +/- 6 GPa and 0.22 +/- 0.02, and 759 +/- 22 GPa and 0.17 +/- 0.03, respectively. Similarly, the elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio of polysilicon fabricated at MCNC via the Multi-User MEMS Processes (MUMPs) with <110> texture were 164 +/- 7 GPa and 0.22 +/- 0.02, respectively. A second problem studied using the AFM/DIC method was the fracture of polysilicon in the presence of atomically sharp cracks. The effective (macroscopic) Mode-I critical stress intensity factor for polysilicon from different MUMPs runs was 1.00 +/- 0.1 MPa√m, where 0.1 MPa√m was the standard deviation, attributed to local cleavage anisotropy and grain boundary toughening. The variation in the effective critical stress intensity factor and the subcritical crack growth of polysilicon that was spatially recorded and quantified for the first time were the result of the spatial variation of the 4 local stress intensity factor at the crack tip that controlled crack initiation and thus, the overall fracture process. The AFM/DIC method was also applied to determine the minimum size of a polysilicon domain whose effective mechanical behavior could be described by the isotropic elastic

  5. Abnormality in fracture strength of polycrystalline silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Hong, Jiawang; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-09-01

    Silicene, a silicon-based homologue of graphene, arouses great interest in nano-electronic devices due to its outstanding electronic properties. However, its promising electronic applications are greatly hindered by lack of understanding in the mechanical strength of silicene. Therefore, in order to design mechanically reliable devices with silicene, it is necessary to thoroughly explore the mechanical properties of silicene. Due to current fabrication methods, graphene is commonly produced in a polycrystalline form; the same may hold for silicene. Here we perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the mechanical properties of polycrystalline silicene. First, an annealing process is employed to construct a more realistic modeling structure of polycrystalline silicene. Results indicate that a more stable structure is formed due to the breaking and reformation of bonds between atoms on the grain boundaries. Moreover, as the grain size decreases, the efficiency of the annealing process, which is quantified by the energy change, increases. Subsequently, biaxial tensile tests are performed on the annealed samples in order to explore the relation between grain size and mechanical properties, namely in-plane stiffness, fracture strength and fracture strain etc. Results indicate that as the grain size decreases, the fracture strain increases while the fracture strength shows an inverse trend. The decreasing fracture strength may be partly attributed to the weakening effect from the increasing area density of defects which acts as the reservoir of stress-concentrated sites on the grain boundary. The observed crack localization and propagation and fracture strength are well-explained by a defect-pileup model.

  6. polycrystalline ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yunqi; Ma, Ji; Cui, Qi; Wang, Wenzhang; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Qingming

    2014-12-01

    La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 polycrystalline ceramics were synthesized by sol-gel method. Sharp temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) variation (with peak value up to 22 %) has been observed near the metal-insulator transition temperature T MI (273 K) for the sample sintered at 1,450 °C. This TCR value is much higher than the previously reported values for the undoped and Ag-doped La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 samples and is comparable to the optimized thin films. It was concluded that the improved physical properties of the La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 material are due to its improved microstructure and homogeneity.

  7. Top-Coating Silicon Onto Ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Nelson, L. D.; Zook, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon for solar cells produced at low cost. Molten silicon poured from quartz trough onto moving carbon-coated ceramic substrate. Doctor blade spreads liquid silicon evenly over substrate. Molten material solidifies to form sheet of polycrystalline silicon having photovoltaic conversion efficiency greater than 10 percent. Method produces 100-um-thick silicon coatings at speed 0.15 centimeter per second.

  8. Deep etching of single- and polycrystalline silicon with high speed, high aspect ratio, high uniformity, and 3D complexity by electric bias-attenuated metal-assisted chemical etching (EMaCE).

    PubMed

    Li, Liyi; Zhao, Xueying; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2014-10-08

    In this work, a novel wet silicon (Si) etching method, electric bias-attenuated metal-assisted chemical etching (EMaCE), is demonstrated to be readily available for three-dimensional (3D) electronic integration, microelectromechinal systems, and a broad range of 3D electronic components with low cost. On the basis of the traditional metal-assisted chemical etching process, an electric bias was applied to the Si substrate in EMaCE. The 3D geometry of the etching profile was effectively controlled by the bias in a real-time manner. The reported method successfully fabricated an array of over 10 000 vertical holes with diameters of 28 μm on 1 cm(2) silicon chips at a rate of up to 11 μm/min. The sidewall roughness was kept below 50 nm, and a high aspect ratio of over 10:1 was achieved. The 3D geometry could be attenuated by the variable applied bias in real time. Vertical deep etching was realized on (100)-, (111)-Si, and polycrystalline Si substrates. Complex features with lateral dimensions of 0.8-500 μm were also fabricated with submicron accuracy.

  9. Electronic transport in polycrystalline graphene.

    PubMed

    Yazyev, Oleg V; Louie, Steven G

    2010-10-01

    Most materials in available macroscopic quantities are polycrystalline. Graphene, a recently discovered two-dimensional form of carbon with strong potential for replacing silicon in future electronics, is no exception. There is growing evidence of the polycrystalline nature of graphene samples obtained using various techniques. Grain boundaries, intrinsic topological defects of polycrystalline materials, are expected to markedly alter the electronic transport in graphene. Here, we develop a theory of charge carrier transmission through grain boundaries composed of a periodic array of dislocations in graphene based on the momentum conservation principle. Depending on the grain-boundary structure we find two distinct transport behaviours--either high transparency, or perfect reflection of charge carriers over remarkably large energy ranges. First-principles quantum transport calculations are used to verify and further investigate this striking behaviour. Our study sheds light on the transport properties of large-area graphene samples. Furthermore, purposeful engineering of periodic grain boundaries with tunable transport gaps would allow for controlling charge currents without the need to introduce bulk bandgaps in otherwise semimetallic graphene. The proposed approach can be regarded as a means towards building practical graphene electronics.

  10. Polycrystalline Thin-Film Photovoltaic Technologies: Progress and Technical Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Ullal, H. S.

    2004-08-01

    Polycrystalline thin-film materials based on copper indium diselenide (CuInSe2, CIS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) are promising thin-film solar cells for various power and specialty applications. Impressive results have been obtained in the past few years for both thin-film copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) solar cells and thin-film CdTe solar cells. NCPV/NREL scientists have achieved world-record, total-area efficiencies of 19.3% for a thin-film CIGS solar cell and 16.5% for thin-film CdTe solar cell. A number of technical R&D issues related to CIS and CdTe have been identified. Thin-film power module efficiencies up to 13.4% has been achieved thus far. Tremendous progress has been made in the technology development for module fabrication, and multi-megawatt manufacturing facilities are coming on line with expansion plans in the next few years. Several 40-480 kW polycrystalline thin-film, grid-connected PV arrays have been deployed worldwide. Hot and humid testing is also under way to validate the long-term reliability of these emerging thin-film power products. The U.S. thin-film production (amorphous silicon[a-Si], CIS, CdTe) is expected to exceed 50 MW by the end of 2005.

  11. Role of surface-reaction layer in HBr/fluorocarbon-based plasma with nitrogen addition formed by high-aspect-ratio etching of polycrystalline silicon and SiO2 stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Taku; Matsui, Miyako; Yokogawa, Kenetsu; Arase, Takao; Mori, Masahito

    2016-06-01

    The etching of polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si)/SiO2 stacks by using VHF plasma was studied for three-dimensional NAND fabrication. One critical goal is achieving both a vertical profile and high throughput for multiple-stack etching. While the conventional process consists of multiple steps for each stacked layer, in this study, HBr/fluorocarbon-based gas chemistry was investigated to achieve a single-step etching process to reduce process time. By analyzing the dependence on wafer temperature, we improved both the etching profile and rate at a low temperature. The etching mechanism is examined considering the composition of the surface reaction layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis revealed that the adsorption of N-H and Br was enhanced at a low temperature, resulting in a reduced carbon-based-polymer thickness and enhanced Si etching. Finally, a vertical profile was obtained as a result of the formation of a thin and reactive surface-reaction layer at a low wafer temperature.

  12. Method of forming buried oxide layers in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2000-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  13. Silicon materials outlook study for 1980-1985 calendar years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costogue, E.; Ferber, R.; Hasbach, W.; Pellin, R.; Yaws, C.

    1979-01-01

    The polycrystalline silicon industry was studied in relation to future market needs. Analysis of the data obtained indicates that there is a high probability of polycrystalline silicon shortage by the end of 1982 and a strong seller's market after 1981 which will foster price competition for available silicon.

  14. Silicon on graphite cloth

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, J.A.; Cotter, J.E.; Thomas, C.J.; Ingram, A.E.; Bai, Y.B.; Ruffins, T.R.; Barnett, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    A new polycrystalline silicon solar cell has been developed that utilizes commercially available graphite cloth as a substrate. This solar cell has achieved an energy conversion efficiency of 13.4% (AM1.5G). It is believed that this is a record efficiency for a silicon solar cell formed on a graphite substrate. The silicon-on-fabric structure is comprised of a thin layer of polycrystalline silicon grown directly on the graphite fabric substrate. The structure is fabricated by a low-cost ribbon process that avoids the expense and waste of wafering. The fabric substrate gives structural support to the thin device. Critical to the achievement of device quality silicon layers is control over impurities in the graphite fabric. The silicon-on-fabric technology has the potential to supply lightweight, low-cost solar cells to weight-sensitive markets at a fraction of the cost of conventionally thinned wafers.

  15. Polycrystalline CVD diamond device level modeling for particle detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozzi, A.; Passeri, D.; Kanxheri, K.; Servoli, L.; Lagomarsino, S.; Sciortino, S.

    2016-12-01

    Diamond is a promising material whose excellent physical properties foster its use for radiation detection applications, in particular in those hostile operating environments where the silicon-based detectors behavior is limited due to the high radiation fluence. Within this framework, the application of Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) simulation tools is highly envisaged for the study, the optimization and the predictive analysis of sensing devices. Since the novelty of using diamond in electronics, this material is not included in the library of commercial, state-of-the-art TCAD software tools. In this work, we propose the development, the application and the validation of numerical models to simulate the electrical behavior of polycrystalline (pc)CVD diamond conceived for diamond sensors for particle detection. The model focuses on the characterization of a physically-based pcCVD diamond bandgap taking into account deep-level defects acting as recombination centers and/or trap states. While a definite picture of the polycrystalline diamond band-gap is still debated, the effect of the main parameters (e.g. trap densities, capture cross-sections, etc.) can be deeply investigated thanks to the simulated approach. The charge collection efficiency due to β -particle irradiation of diamond materials provided by different vendors and with different electrode configurations has been selected as figure of merit for the model validation. The good agreement between measurements and simulation findings, keeping the traps density as the only one fitting parameter, assesses the suitability of the TCAD modeling approach as a predictive tool for the design and the optimization of diamond-based radiation detectors.

  16. Polycrystalline-silicon microbridge combustible gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manginell, Ronald Paul

    Catalytic, calorimetric gas detection is the most commonly used method for the detection of combustible gases below the lower-explosive limit (LEL). In this method, the heat of oxidation of a combustible species on a heated catalyst surface is detected by a resistance thermometer in proximity. Conventionally fabricated sensors suffer from high-power consumption (˜500 mW), slow thermal response (˜15 sec) and low thermal sensitivity (1-2sp°C/mW). Fully CMOS-compatible, surface-micromachined polysilicon bridges have been fabricated for use in catalytic, calorimetric gas detection and are characterized by low-power consumption (35 mW), fast response (0.2 msec) and high sensitivity (16sp°C/mW). The batch fabrication techniques used here significantly increase the manufacturability of these devices as compared with their conventional predecessors, since hand manufacture/sorting conventionally used ate eliminated. A post-processing, post-packaging micro-chemical-vapor-deposition technique was developed for the purpose of selectively depositing catalytic films only in the active area of the sensor. Film microstructure was modified using a pulsed-deposition technique and in situ methods of film growth monitoring were investigated. With a Pt catalyst, ultimate device sensitivity to hydrogen was 100 ppm in air. To predict device response, knowledge of the temperature distribution along a microbridge is required. Both analytical and numerical techniques were used to model this distribution and are in good agreement with measurements obtained by infrared microscopy, For modeling purposes the temperature dependence of the thermal and electrical conductivity of polysilicon at high temperature ({>}300sp°C) were measured using microbridges outfitted with special high-temperature bond pads. Physical models of thermal and electrical conduction in polysilicon were constructed.

  17. Thermal conductivity measurements of Summit polycrystalline silicon.

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, Rebecca; Kuppers, Jaron D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2006-11-01

    A capability for measuring the thermal conductivity of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) materials using a steady state resistance technique was developed and used to measure the thermal conductivities of SUMMiT{trademark} V layers. Thermal conductivities were measured over two temperature ranges: 100K to 350K and 293K to 575K in order to generate two data sets. The steady state resistance technique uses surface micromachined bridge structures fabricated using the standard SUMMiT fabrication process. Electrical resistance and resistivity data are reported for poly1-poly2 laminate, poly2, poly3, and poly4 polysilicon structural layers in the SUMMiT process from 83K to 575K. Thermal conductivity measurements for these polysilicon layers demonstrate for the first time that the thermal conductivity is a function of the particular SUMMiT layer. Also, the poly2 layer has a different variation in thermal conductivity as the temperature is decreased than the poly1-poly2 laminate, poly3, and poly4 layers. As the temperature increases above room temperature, the difference in thermal conductivity between the layers decreases.

  18. Thin film polycrystalline silicon nanowire biosensors.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Mohammad M A; Lombardini, Marta; Sun, Kai; Giustiniano, Francesco; Roach, Peter L; Davies, Donna E; Howarth, Peter H; de Planque, Maurits R R; Morgan, Hywel; Ashburn, Peter

    2012-04-11

    Polysilicon nanowire biosensors have been fabricated using a top-down process and were used to determine the binding constant of two inflammatory biomarkers. A very low cost nanofabrication process was developed, based on simple and mature photolithography, thin film technology, and plasma etching, enabling an easy route to mass manufacture. Antibody-functionalized nanowire sensors were used to detect the proteins interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) over a wide range of concentrations, demonstrating excellent sensitivity and selectivity, exemplified by a detection sensitivity of 10 fM in the presence of a 100,000-fold excess of a nontarget protein. Nanowire titration curves gave antibody-antigen dissociation constants in good agreement with low-salt enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). This fabrication process produces high-quality nanowires that are suitable for low-cost mass production, providing a realistic route to the realization of disposable nanoelectronic point-of-care (PoC) devices.

  19. Measuring Diffusion and Recombination in Polycrystalline Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zook, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Light-beam-induced currents yield information about solar cell material. Apparatus measures short-circuit current generated when spot of concentrated light is scanned across grains and grain boundaries in material under test. Technique used to evaluate SOC samples for diffusion and recombination effects of cell processing and chemical and structural defects.

  20. Polycrystalline semiconductor processing

    DOEpatents

    Glaeser, Andreas M.; Haggerty, John S.; Danforth, Stephen C.

    1983-01-01

    A process for forming large-grain polycrystalline films from amorphous films for use as photovoltaic devices. The process operates on the amorphous film and uses the driving force inherent to the transition from the amorphous state to the crystalline state as the force which drives the grain growth process. The resultant polycrystalline film is characterized by a grain size that is greater than the thickness of the film. A thin amorphous film is deposited on a substrate. The formation of a plurality of crystalline embryos is induced in the amorphous film at predetermined spaced apart locations and nucleation is inhibited elsewhere in the film. The crystalline embryos are caused to grow in the amorphous film, without further nucleation occurring in the film, until the growth of the embryos is halted by imgingement on adjacently growing embryos. The process is applicable to both batch and continuous processing techniques. In either type of process, the thin amorphous film is sequentially doped with p and n type dopants. Doping is effected either before or after the formation and growth of the crystalline embryos in the amorphous film, or during a continuously proceeding crystallization step.

  1. Polycrystalline semiconductor processing

    DOEpatents

    Glaeser, A.M.; Haggerty, J.S.; Danforth, S.C.

    1983-04-05

    A process is described for forming large-grain polycrystalline films from amorphous films for use as photovoltaic devices. The process operates on the amorphous film and uses the driving force inherent to the transition from the amorphous state to the crystalline state as the force which drives the grain growth process. The resultant polycrystalline film is characterized by a grain size that is greater than the thickness of the film. A thin amorphous film is deposited on a substrate. The formation of a plurality of crystalline embryos is induced in the amorphous film at predetermined spaced apart locations and nucleation is inhibited elsewhere in the film. The crystalline embryos are caused to grow in the amorphous film, without further nucleation occurring in the film, until the growth of the embryos is halted by impingement on adjacently growing embryos. The process is applicable to both batch and continuous processing techniques. In either type of process, the thin amorphous film is sequentially doped with p and n type dopants. Doping is effected either before or after the formation and growth of the crystalline embryos in the amorphous film, or during a continuously proceeding crystallization step. 10 figs.

  2. Phosphorus and boron diffusion paths in polycrystalline silicon gate of a trench-type three-dimensional metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor investigated by atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Bin Takamizawa, Hisashi Shimizu, Yasuo; Inoue, Koji; Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Yano, Fumiko; Kunimune, Yorinobu; Inoue, Masao; Nishida, Akio

    2015-07-13

    The dopant (P and B) diffusion path in n- and p-types polycrystalline-Si gates of trench-type three-dimensional (3D) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) were investigated using atom probe tomography, based on the annealing time dependence of the dopant distribution at 900 °C. Remarkable differences were observed between P and B diffusion behavior. In the initial stage of diffusion, P atoms diffuse into deeper regions from the implanted region along grain boundaries in the n-type polycrystalline-Si gate. With longer annealing times, segregation of P on the grain boundaries was observed; however, few P atoms were observed within the large grains or on the gate/gate oxide interface distant from grain boundaries. These results indicate that P atoms diffuse along grain boundaries much faster than through the bulk or along the gate/gate oxide interface. On the other hand, in the p-type polycrystalline-Si gate, segregation of B was observed only at the initial stage of diffusion. After further annealing, the B atoms became uniformly distributed, and no clear segregation of B was observed. Therefore, B atoms diffuse not only along the grain boundary but also through the bulk. Furthermore, B atoms diffused deeper than P atoms along the grain boundaries under the same annealing conditions. This information on the diffusion behavior of P and B is essential for optimizing annealing conditions in order to control the P and B distributions in the polycrystalline-Si gates of trench-type 3D MOSFETs.

  3. Optical properties of atomic layer deposited materials and their application in silicon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alasaarela, Tapani; Hiltunen, Jussi; Khanna, Amit; Säynätjoki, Antti; Tervonen, Ari; Honkanen, Seppo

    2010-02-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a promising method to grow optical materials on waveguide structures. Propagation loss analysis indicates that amorphous TiO2 and Al2O3 films are promising for the waveguide purposes. Instead, polycrystalline ZnO does not work properly as a waveguide by itself, but the waveguiding properties can probably be enhanced by introducing intermediate Al2O3 layers. The wide variety of available materials, conformal growth properties and low scattering losses of many ALD films enable their usage in various waveguide applications. Experimental coating of silicon waveguides is discussed.

  4. Silicon-on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth and device developmentt for the Large-Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Quarterly report No. 13, October 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, P W; Zook, J D; Grung, B L; McHenry, K; Schuldt, S B

    1980-02-15

    Research on the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating inexpensive ceramic substrates with a thin layer of polycrystalline silicon is reported. The coating methods to be developed are directed toward a minimum-cost process for producing solar cells with a terrestrial conversion efficiency of 11 percent or greater. By applying a graphite coating to one face of a ceramic substrate, molten silicon can be caused to wet only that graphite-coated face and produce uniform thin layers of large-grain polycrystalline silicon; thus, only a minimal quantity of silicon is consumed. A variety of ceramic materials have been dip coated with silicon. The investigation has shown that mullite substrates containing an excess of SiO/sub 2/ best match the thermal expansion coefficient of silicon and hence produce the best SOC layers. With such substrates, smooth and uniform silicon layers 25 cm/sup 2/ in area have been achieved with single-crystal grains as large as 4 mm in width and several cm in length. Crystal length is limited by the length of the substrate. The thickness of the coating and the size of the crystalline grains are controlled by the temperature of the melt and the rate at which the substrate is withdrawn from the melt. The solar-cell potential of this SOC sheet silicon is promising. To date, solar cells with areas from 1 to 10 cm/sup 2/ have been fabricated from material with an as-grown surface. Conversion efficiencies of about 10 percent with antireflection (AR) coating have been achieved. Such cells typically have open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current densities of 0.55V and 23 mA/cm/sup 2/, respectively.

  5. Silicon-on-ceramic process: Silicon sheet growth and device development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, A. B.; Zook, J. D.; Grung, B. L.; Heaps, J. D.; Schmit, F.; Schuldt, S. B.; Chapman, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    The technical feasibility of producing solar cell quality sheet silicon to meet the DOE 1986 cost goal of 70 cents/watt was investigated. The silicon on ceramic approach is to coat a low cost ceramic substrate with large grain polycrystalline silicon by unidirectional solidification of molten silicon. Results and accomplishments are summarized.

  6. Gelcasting Polycrystalline Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, M.A.; Zuk, K.J.; Wei, G.C.

    2000-01-01

    OSRAM SYLVANIA INC. is a major U.S. manufacturer of high-intensity lighting. Among its products is the Lumalux TM line of high-pressure sodium vapor arc lamps, which are used for industrial, highway, and street lighting. The key to the performance of these lamps is the polycrystalline alumina (PCA) tube that is used to contain the plasma that is formed in the electric arc. That plasma consists of ionized sodium, mercury, and xenon vapors. The key attributes of the PCA tubes are their transparency ({approximately}97% total transmittance in the visible), their refractoriness (inner wall temperature can reach l2OOC), and their chemical resistance (sodium and mercury vapor are extremely corrosive). The current efficiency of the lamps is very high, up to 100 initial lumens per watt. (Compare incandescent lamps 10-20 lumens per watt, fluorescent lamps 25-90 lumens per watt.)

  7. Low temperature production of large-grain polycrystalline semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Naseem, Hameed A.; Albarghouti, Marwan

    2007-04-10

    An oxide or nitride layer is provided on an amorphous semiconductor layer prior to performing metal-induced crystallization of the semiconductor layer. The oxide or nitride layer facilitates conversion of the amorphous material into large grain polycrystalline material. Hence, a native silicon dioxide layer provided on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), followed by deposited Al permits induced crystallization at temperatures far below the solid phase crystallization temperature of a-Si. Solar cells and thin film transistors can be prepared using this method.

  8. Keeping Promises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Gregory A.

    2005-01-01

    Commitments are between people, not schedules. Project management as practiced today creates a "commitment-free zone," because it assumes that people will commit to centrally managed schedules without providing a mechanism to ensure their work can be done. So they give it their best, but something always seems to come up ..."I tried, but you know how it is." This form of project management does not provide a mechanism to ensure that what should be done, can in fact be done at the required moment. Too often, promises reliable promise. made in coordination meetings are conditional and unreliable. It has been my experience that at times trust can be low and hard to build in this environment. The absence of reliable promises explains why on well-run projects, people are often only completing 30-50 percent of the deliverables they d promised for the week. We all know what a promise is; we have plenty of experience making them and receiving them from others. So what s the problem? The sad fact is that the project environment-like many other work environments- is often so filled with systemic dishonesty, that we don t expect promises that are reliable. Project managers excel when they manage their projects as networks of commitments and help their people learn to elicit and make reliable promises.

  9. Continuous method of producing silicon carbide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor); Rabe, James Alan (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    This invention pertains to a method for production of polycrystalline ceramic fibers from silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) ceramic fibers wherein the method comprises heating an amorphous ceramic fiber containing silicon and carbon in an inert environment comprising a boron oxide and carbon monoxide at a temperature sufficient to convert the amorphous ceramic fiber to a polycrystalline ceramic fiber. By having carbon monoxide present during the heating of the ceramic fiber, it is possible to achieve higher production rates on a continuous process.

  10. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1996-10-15

    A process is disclosed for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  11. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    A process for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary from 1-1e4 are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

  12. Silicon-rich SiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} multilayers: A promising material for the third generation of solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Gourbilleau, F.; Ternon, C.; Dufour, C.

    2009-07-01

    Si-rich-SiO{sub 2}(SRSO)/SiO{sub 2} multilayers (MLs) have been grown by reactive magnetron sputtering. The presence of silicon nanoclusters (Si-ncls) within the SRSO sublayer and annealing temperature influence optical absorption as well as photoluminescence. The optimized annealing temperature has been found to be 1100 deg. C, which allows the recovery of defects and thus enhances photoluminescence. Four MLs with Si-ncl size ranging from 1.5 to 8 nm have been annealed using the optimized conditions and then studied by transmission measurements. Optical absorption has been modeled so that a size effect in the linear absorption coefficient alpha (in cm{sup -1}) has been evidenced and correlated with TEM observations. It is demonstrated that amorphous Si-ncl absorption is fourfold higher than that of crystalline Si-ncls.

  13. Gelcasting polycrystalline alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, M.A.

    1997-04-01

    This work is being done as part of a CRADA with Osram-Sylvania, Inc. (OSI) OSI is a major U.S. manufacturer of high-intensity lighting. Among its products is the Lumalux{reg_sign} line of high-pressure sodium vapor arc lamps, which are used for industrial, highway, and street lighting. The key to the performance of these lamps is the polycrystalline alumina (PCA) tube that is used to contain the plasma that is formed in the electric arc. That plasma consists of ionized sodium, mercury, and xenon vapors. The key attributes of the PCA tubes are their transparency (95% total transmittance in the visible region), their refractoriness (inner wall temperature can reach 1400{degrees}C), and their chemical resistance (sodium and mercury vapor are extremely corrosive). The current efficiency of the lamps is very high, on the order of several hundred lumens / watt. (Compare - incandescent lamps -13 lumens/watt fluorescent lamps -30 lumens/watt.) Osram-Sylvania would like to explore using gelcasting to form PCA tubes for Lumalux{reg_sign} lamps, and eventually for metal halide lamps (known as quartz-halogen lamps). Osram-Sylvania, Inc. currently manufactures PCA tubes by isostatic pressing. This process works well for the shapes that they presently use. However, there are several types of tubes that are either difficult or impossible to make by isostatic pressing. It is the desire to make these new shapes and sizes of tubes that has prompted Osram-Sylvania`s interest in gelcasting. The purpose of the CRADA is to determine the feasibility of making PCA items having sufficient optical quality that they are useful in lighting applications using gelcasting.

  14. Porous silicon gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Pitts, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    The authors have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that uses the large surface areas produced by a porous-silicon etch as gettering sites. The annealing step of the gettering used a high-flux solar furnace. They found that a high density of photons during annealing enhanced the impurity diffusion to the gettering sites. The authors used metallurgical-grade Si (MG-Si) prepared by directional solidification casing as the starting material. They propose to use porous-silicon-gettered MG-Si as a low-cost epitaxial substrate for polycrystalline silicon thin-film growth.

  15. Conduction mechanisms in undoped polycrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Hsueh-Tao; Lee, Chia-Chang; Sun, Chia-Hsin

    2000-07-01

    The unadopted polycrystalline diamond films are deposited on p-type silicon substrates by a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) system. The deposition conditions are CH4?/H(subscript 2=0.5%, pressure equals 45 torr, power equals 2.2kW, and subtract temperature equals 885 degree(s)C. SEM was used to inspect the surface morphology, Raman Spectroscopy to determine the quality, and XPS to analyze the chemical composition. It in concluded that a cleaning procedure on diamond surfaces can eliminate the carbon phase but enhance the oxygenation on the films. The electrical characteristics were investigated by current-voltage-temperature measurements in a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure with top metal contacts and back silicon substrates contacts. It can be found a transition electric field of 240 kV/cm, where Schottky emission (SE) mechanism is responsible for electric conduction below 240kV/cm, and Poole-Frenkel transport (PF) mechanism dominates beyond 240 kV/cm. By the extrapolations, the Schottky barrier height of silver and diamond film is 2.4 eV, and the tarp depth is 4.75 eV in the diamond film.

  16. Development of Novel Polycrystalline Ceramic Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wisniewska, Monika; Boatner, Lynn A; Neal, John S; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; North, Andrea L; Wisniewski, Monica; Payzant, E Andrew; Howe, Jane Y; Lempicki, Aleksander; Brecher, Charlie; Glodo, J.

    2008-01-01

    For several decades most of the efforts to develop new scintillator materials have concentrated on high-light-yield inorganic single-crystals while polycrystalline ceramic scintillators, since their inception in the early 1980 s, have received relatively little attention. Nevertheless, transparent ceramics offer a promising approach to the fabrication of relatively inexpensive scintillators via a simple mechanical compaction and annealing process that eliminates single-crystal growth. Until recently, commonly accepted concepts restricted the polycrystalline ceramic approach to materials exhibiting a cubic crystal structure. Here, we report our results on the development of two novel ceramic scintillators based on the non-cubic crystalline materials: Lu SiO:Ce (LSO:Ce) and LaBr:Ce. While no evidence for texturing has been found in their ceramic microstructures, our LSO:Ce ceramics exhibit a surprisingly high level of transparency/ translucency and very good scintillation characteristics. The LSO:Ce ceramic scintillation reaches a light yield level of about 86% of that of a good LSO:Ce single crystal, and its decay time is even faster than in single crystals. Research on LaBr:Ce shows that translucent ceramics of the high-light-yield rare-earth halides can also be synthesized. Our LaBr:Ce ceramics have light yields above 42 000 photons/MeV (i.e., 70%of the single-crystal light yield).

  17. Smart integration of silicon nanowire arrays in all-silicon thermoelectric micro-nanogenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Luis; Santos, Jose-Domingo; Roncaglia, Alberto; Narducci, Dario; Calaza, Carlos; Salleras, Marc; Donmez, Inci; Tarancon, Albert; Morata, Alex; Gadea, Gerard; Belsito, Luca; Zulian, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Micro and nanotechnologies are called to play a key role in the fabrication of small and low cost sensors with excellent performance enabling new continuous monitoring scenarios and distributed intelligence paradigms (Internet of Things, Trillion Sensors). Harvesting devices providing energy autonomy to those large numbers of microsensors will be essential. In those scenarios where waste heat sources are present, thermoelectricity will be the obvious choice. However, miniaturization of state of the art thermoelectric modules is not easy with the current technologies used for their fabrication. Micro and nanotechnologies offer an interesting alternative considering that silicon in nanowire form is a material with a promising thermoelectric figure of merit. This paper presents two approaches for the integration of large numbers of silicon nanowires in a cost-effective and practical way using only micromachining and thin-film processes compatible with silicon technologies. Both approaches lead to automated physical and electrical integration of medium-high density stacked arrays of crystalline or polycrystalline silicon nanowires with arbitrary length (tens to hundreds microns) and diameters below 100 nm.

  18. Selective and low temperature synthesis of polycrystalline diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, R.; Roppel, T.; Ellis, C.; Baugh, W.; Jaworske, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Polycrystalline diamond thin films have been deposited on single-crystal silicon substrates at low temperatures (not above 600 C) using a mixture of hydrogen and methane gases by high-pressure microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. Low-temperature deposition has been achieved by cooling the substrate holder with nitrogen gas. For deposition at reduced substrate temperature, it has been found that nucleation of diamond will not occur unless the methane/hydrogen ratio is increased significantly from its value at higher substrate temperature. Selective deposition of polycrystalline diamond thin films has been achieved at 600 C. Decrease in the diamond particle size and growth rate and an increase in surface smoothness have been observed with decreasing substrate temperature during the growth of thin films. As-deposited films are identified by Raman spectroscopy, and the morphology is analyzed by scanning electron microscopy.

  19. Semi-transparent perovskite solar cells for tandems with silicon and CIGS

    DOE PAGES

    Bailie, Colin D.; Christoforo, M. Greyson; Mailoa, Jonathan P.; ...

    2014-12-23

    A promising approach for upgrading the performance of an established low-bandgap solar technology without adding much cost is to deposit a high bandgap polycrystalline semiconductor on top to make a tandem solar cell. We use a transparent silver nanowire electrode on perovskite solar cells to achieve a semi-transparent device. We place the semi-transparent cell in a mechanically-stacked tandem configuration onto copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) and low-quality multicrystalline silicon (Si) to achieve solid-state polycrystalline tandem solar cells with a net improvement in efficiency over the bottom cell alone. Furthermore, this work paves the way for integrating perovskites into a low-costmore » and high-efficiency (>25%) tandem cell.« less

  20. Semi-transparent perovskite solar cells for tandems with silicon and CIGS

    SciTech Connect

    Bailie, Colin D.; Christoforo, M. Greyson; Mailoa, Jonathan P.; Bowring, Andrea R.; Unger, Eva L.; Nguyen, William H.; Burschka, Julian; Pellet, Norman; Lee, Jungwoo Z.; Grätzel, Michael; Noufi, Rommel; Buonassisi, Tonio; Salleo, Alberto; McGehee, Michael D.

    2014-12-23

    A promising approach for upgrading the performance of an established low-bandgap solar technology without adding much cost is to deposit a high bandgap polycrystalline semiconductor on top to make a tandem solar cell. We use a transparent silver nanowire electrode on perovskite solar cells to achieve a semi-transparent device. We place the semi-transparent cell in a mechanically-stacked tandem configuration onto copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) and low-quality multicrystalline silicon (Si) to achieve solid-state polycrystalline tandem solar cells with a net improvement in efficiency over the bottom cell alone. Furthermore, this work paves the way for integrating perovskites into a low-cost and high-efficiency (>25%) tandem cell.

  1. Hopping conduction in polycrystalline semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, R. P.; Shukla, A. K.; Kapoor, A. K.; Srivastava, R.; Mathur, P. C.

    1985-03-01

    Measurements of dc conductivity (sigma) on polycrystalline semiconductors, viz., InSb, Si, and CdTe, have been reported in the temperature range 77-300 K. The conduction mechanism near liquid-nitrogen temperature has been identified as the hopping of charge carriers from the charged trap centers to empty traps near the Fermi level.

  2. Silicon on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zook, J. D.; Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Koepke, B. G.; Butter, C. D.; Schuldt, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon was investigated. The sheets were made by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. Significant progress was made in all areas of the program.

  3. Back contacts for silicon-on-ceramic solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, T. L.; Marquardt, S.

    1981-01-01

    Grooved substrate exposes back surface of photovoltaic cells, allowing dopant diffusion into surface and electrical contact. When substrate is coated successively with carbon and molten silicon, polycrystalline-silicon bridges form over grooves, but leave channels open. Best adhesion results when substrate grooves run perpendicular to direction of liquid-silicon layer and are closely spaced.

  4. Eye-Safe Polycrystalline Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    examination the fiber ends were mechanically polished with 600 grit silicon carbide ( SiC ) bonded paper. Un-coated samples were investigated using a...JCPDS card no.42-1463). The sintered samples were mechanically polished using 600, 800, and 1200 grit silicon carbide papers. Final polishing was...were mechanically polished using 600, 800, and 1200 grit silicon carbide papers. Final polishing was performed with colloidal silica suspension. The

  5. Fracture toughness of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents a study to determine the fracture toughness and to characterize fracture modes of silicon as a function of the orientation of single-crystal and polycrystalline material. It is shown that bar specimens cracked by Knoop microhardness indentation and tested to fracture under four-point bending at room temperature were used to determine the fracture toughness values. It is found that the lowest fracture toughness value of single crystal silicon was 0.82 MN/m to the 3/2 in the 111 plane type orientation, although the difference in values in the 111, 110, and 100 planes was small.

  6. Directed vapor deposition of amorphous and polycrystalline electronic materials: Nonhydrogenated a-Si

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, J.F.; Jones, S.H.; Globus, T.; Hsiung, L.M.; Wadley, H.

    1995-10-01

    A novel directed vapor deposition (DVD) process for creating amorphous and polycrystalline electronic materials is reported. Initial experimental results for DVD of nonhydrogenated a-Si indicate that growth rates at least between 0.02 and 1.0 {micro}m/min can be achieved. In this process, evaporated silicon is efficiently entrained in a previously formed low pressure supersonic He jet. The silicon is evaporated using a high energy, high voltage, electron beam. The collimated jet of He entrained with silicon is used to deposit thin films of a-Si at room temperature on glass substrates. Initial TEM microstructure analysis and optical absorption analysis is presented.

  7. Transmutation doping of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, R. F.; Westbrook, R. D.; Young, R. T.; Cleland, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Normal isotopic silicon contains 3.05% of Si-30 which transmutes to P-31 after thermal neutron absorption, with a half-life of 2.6 hours. This reaction is used to introduce extremely uniform concentrations of phosphorus into silicon, thus eliminating the areal and spatial inhomogeneities characteristic of chemical doping. Annealing of the lattice damage in the irradiated silicon does not alter the uniformity of dopant distribution. Transmutation doping also makes it possible to introduce phosphorus into polycrystalline silicon without segregation of the dopant at the grain boundaries. The use of neutron transmutation doped (NTD) silicon in solar cell research and development is discussed.

  8. Fracture behaviour of polycrystalline tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaganidze, Ermile; Rupp, Daniel; Aktaa, Jarir

    2014-03-01

    Fracture behaviour of round blank polycrystalline tungsten was studied by means of three point bending Fracture-Mechanical (FM) tests at temperatures between RT and 1000 °C and under high vacuum. To study the influence of the anisotropic microstructure on the fracture toughness (FT) and ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) the specimens were extracted in three different, i.e. longitudinal, radial and circumferential orientations. The FM tests yielded distinctive fracture behaviour for each specimen orientation. The crack propagation was predominantly intergranular for longitudinal orientation up to 600 °C, whereas transgranular cleavage was observed at low test temperatures for radial and circumferentially oriented specimens. At intermediate test temperatures the change of the fracture mode took place for radial and circumferential orientations. Above 800 °C all three specimen types showed large ductile deformation without noticeable crack advancement. For longitudinal specimens the influence of the loading rate on the FT and DBT was studied in the loading rate range between 0.06 and 18 MPa m1/2/s. Though an increase of the FT was observed for the lowest loading rate, no resolvable dependence of the DBT on the loading rate was found partly due to loss of FT validity. A Master Curve approach is proposed to describe FT vs. test temperature data on polycrystalline tungsten. Fracture safe design space was identified by analysis compiled FT data.

  9. Transformational silicon electronics.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto; Torres Sevilla, Galo Andres; Ghoneim, Mohamed Tarek; Inayat, Salman Bin; Ahmed, Sally M; Hussain, Aftab Mustansir; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2014-02-25

    In today's traditional electronics such as in computers or in mobile phones, billions of high-performance, ultra-low-power devices are neatly integrated in extremely compact areas on rigid and brittle but low-cost bulk monocrystalline silicon (100) wafers. Ninety percent of global electronics are made up of silicon. Therefore, we have developed a generic low-cost regenerative batch fabrication process to transform such wafers full of devices into thin (5 μm), mechanically flexible, optically semitransparent silicon fabric with devices, then recycling the remaining wafer to generate multiple silicon fabric with chips and devices, ensuring low-cost and optimal utilization of the whole substrate. We show monocrystalline, amorphous, and polycrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide fabric, all from low-cost bulk silicon (100) wafers with the semiconductor industry's most advanced high-κ/metal gate stack based high-performance, ultra-low-power capacitors, field effect transistors, energy harvesters, and storage to emphasize the effectiveness and versatility of this process to transform traditional electronics into flexible and semitransparent ones for multipurpose applications.

  10. Dip coating process: Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Zook, J. D.; Harrison, W. B.; Scott, M. W.; Hendrickson, G.; Wolner, H. A.; Nelson, L. D.; Schuller, T. L.; Peterson, A. A.

    1976-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing solar cell quality sheet silicon by dip-coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large grain polycrystalline silicon was investigated. The dip-coating methods studied were directed toward a minimum cost process with the ultimate objective of producing solar cells with a conversion efficiency of 10% or greater. The technique shows excellent promise for low cost, labor-saving, scale-up potentialities and would provide an end product of sheet silicon with a rigid and strong supportive backing. An experimental dip-coating facility was designed and constructed, several substrates were successfully dip-coated with areas as large as 25 sq cm and thicknesses of 12 micron to 250 micron. There appears to be no serious limitation on the area of a substrate that could be coated. Of the various substrate materials dip-coated, mullite appears to best satisfy the requirement of the program. An inexpensive process was developed for producing mullite in the desired geometry.

  11. Screen-Cage Ion Plating Of Silver On Polycrystalline Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, Talivaldis; Sliney, Harold E.; Deadmore, Daniel L.

    1995-01-01

    Screen-cage ion plating (SCIP) cost-effective technique offering high throwing power for deposition of adherent metal films on ceramic substrates. Applies silver films to complexly shaped substrates of polycrystalline alumina. Silver adheres tenaciously and reduces friction. SCIP holds promise for applying lubricating soft metallic films to high-temperature ceramic components of advanced combustion engines. Other potential uses include coating substrates with metal for protection against corrosion, depositing electrical conductors on dielectric substrates, making optically reflective or electrically or thermally conductive surface layers, and applying decorative metal coats to ceramic trophies or sculptures.

  12. Progress and issues in polycrystalline thin-film PV technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Zweibel, K.; Ullal, H.S.; Roedern, B. von

    1996-05-01

    Substantial progress has occurred in polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic technologies in the past 18 months. However, the transition to first-time manufacturing is still under way, and technical problems continue. This paper focuses on the promise and the problems of the copper indium diselenide and cadmium telluride technologies, with an emphasis on continued R&D needs for the near-term transition to manufacturing and for next-generation improvements. In addition, it highlights the joint R&D efforts being performed in the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Thin-Film Photovoltaic Partnership Program.

  13. Polycrystalline diamond based detector for Z-pinch plasma diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linyue; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhao, Jizhen; Chen, Liang; Wang, Lan

    2010-08-01

    A detector setup based on polycrystalline chemical-vapor-deposition diamond film is developed with great characteristics: low dark current (lower than 60 pA within 3 V/mum), fast pulsed response time (rise time: 2-3 ns), flat spectral response (3-5 keV), easy acquisition, low cost, and relative large sensitive area. The characterizing data on Qiangguang-I accelerator show that this detector can satisfy the practical requirements in Z-pinch plasma diagnosis very well, which offers a promising prototype for the x-ray detection in Z-pinch diagnosis.

  14. Polishing of polycrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harker, Alan B.; Flintoff, John F.; DeNatale, Jeffrey F.

    1990-12-01

    Optically smooth surfaces can be produced on initially rough polycrystalline diamond film through the combined use of reactive ion etching and high temperature lapping on Fe metai Protective thin film barriers are first applied to the diamond surface to restrict the reactiv oxygen or hydrogen ion etching process to regions of greatest roughness. When the overaJ surface roughness has been reduced sufficiently by etching mechanical lapping of the surfac on an Fe plate at temperatures of 730C-900C in the presence of hydrogen can be used t produce surface roughnesses of less than 10 nm as measured by profilimetry. The tw techniques are complementary for flat surfaces while the reactive etching process alone can b used with shaped substrates to produce a surface finish suitable for LWIR optical applications. 1.

  15. Shock waves in polycrystalline iron.

    PubMed

    Kadau, Kai; Germann, Timothy C; Lomdahl, Peter S; Albers, Robert C; Wark, Justin S; Higginbotham, Andrew; Holian, Brad Lee

    2007-03-30

    The propagation of shock waves through polycrystalline iron is explored by large-scale atomistic simulations. For large enough shock strengths the passage of the wave causes the body-centered-cubic phase to transform into a close-packed phase with most structure being isotropic hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) and, depending on shock strength and grain orientation, some fraction of face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure. The simulated shock Hugoniot is compared to experiments. By calculating the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) directly from the atomic configurations, a comparison to experimental EXAFS measurements of nanosecond-laser shocks shows that the experimental data is consistent with such a phase transformation. However, the atomistically simulated EXAFS spectra also show that an experimental distinction between the hcp or fcc phase is not possible based on the spectra alone.

  16. Interface scattering in polycrystalline thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, Adrian; Haney, Paul M.

    2014-03-28

    We study the effect of electron and phonon interface scattering on the thermoelectric properties of disordered, polycrystalline materials (with grain sizes larger than electron and phonons' mean free path). Interface scattering of electrons is treated with a Landauer approach, while that of phonons is treated with the diffuse mismatch model. The interface scattering is embedded within a diffusive model of bulk transport, and we show that, for randomly arranged interfaces, the overall system is well described by effective medium theory. Using bulk parameters similar to those of PbTe and a square barrier potential for the interface electron scattering, we identify the interface scattering parameters for which the figure of merit ZT is increased. We find the electronic scattering is generally detrimental due to a reduction in electrical conductivity; however, for sufficiently weak electronic interface scattering, ZT is enhanced due to phonon interface scattering.

  17. Polycrystalline lead selenide: the resurgence of an old infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, G.; Montojo, M. T.; Torquemada, M. C.; Rodrigo, M. T.; Sánchez, F. J.; Gómez, L. J.; Almazán, R. M.; Verdú, M.; Rodríguez, P.; Villamayor, V.; Álvarez, M.; Diezhandino, J.; Plaza, J.; Catalán, I.

    2007-06-01

    The existing technology for uncooled MWIR photon detectors based on polycrystalline lead salts is stigmatized for being a 50-year-old technology. It has been traditionally relegated to single-element detectors and relatively small linear arrays due to the limitations imposed by its standard manufacture process based on a chemical bath deposition technique (CBD) developed more than 40 years ago. Recently, an innovative method for processing detectors, based on a vapour phase deposition (VPD) technique, has allowed manufacturing the first 2D array of polycrystalline PbSe with good electro optical characteristics. The new method of processing PbSe is an all silicon technology and it is compatible with standard CMOS circuitry. In addition to its affordability, VPD PbSe constitutes a perfect candidate to fill the existing gap in the photonic and uncooled IR imaging detectors sensitive to the MWIR photons. The perspectives opened are numerous and very important, converting the old PbSe detector in a serious alternative to others uncooled technologies in the low cost IR detection market. The number of potential applications is huge, some of them with high commercial impact such as personal IR imagers, enhanced vision systems for automotive applications and other not less important in the security/defence domain such as sensors for active protection systems (APS) or low cost seekers. Despite the fact, unanimously accepted, that uncooled will dominate the majority of the future IR detection applications, today, thermal detectors are the unique plausible alternative. There is plenty of room for photonic uncooled and complementary alternatives are needed. This work allocates polycrystalline PbSe in the current panorama of the uncooled IR detectors, underlining its potentiality in two areas of interest, i.e., very low cost imaging IR detectors and MWIR fast uncooled detectors for security and defence applications. The new method of processing again converts PbSe into an

  18. Conductive polycrystalline diamond probes for local anodic oxidation lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, A. J.; Radadia, A. D.

    2015-11-01

    This is the first report characterizing local anodic oxidation (LAO) lithography performed using conductive monolithic polycrystalline diamond (MD) and conductive polycrystalline diamond-coated (DC) tips and comparing it to the diamond-like carbon-coated and metal-coated silicon tips. The range and the rate of increase in the lithographic linewidth and height with tip bias (dw/dV and dh/dV) differed based on the tip material. The DC tips resulted in wider and taller lines and a higher dw/dV and dh/dV compared to metal-coated tips with a similar force constant (k Avg). The metal-coated and the DC tips with comparable k Avg showed comparable threshold voltages, whereas the MD tips with similar k Avg showed a higher threshold voltage. The MD tips exhibited less than half the height and nearly half the dw/dV and dh/dV obtained with the metal-coated tips with similar k Avg, thus also resulting in a smaller width at -10 V. The linewidths were found to be proportional to the inverse of the log of write speed (v) for all the tips; however, the proportionality constant varied with tip material; the DC tips had larger values, and the MD and the metal-coated tips had comparable values. When varying the speed, the height was found to be a sigmoidal function of width, with the MD probes achieving lower height compared to the metal-coated and the DC tips with comparable k Avg. This study expands the application of monolithic conductive polycrystalline diamond (PCD) probes with outstanding wear resistance to fine LAO lithography.

  19. Conductive polycrystalline diamond probes for local anodic oxidation lithography.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, A J; Radadia, A D

    2015-11-20

    This is the first report characterizing local anodic oxidation (LAO) lithography performed using conductive monolithic polycrystalline diamond (MD) and conductive polycrystalline diamond-coated (DC) tips and comparing it to the diamond-like carbon-coated and metal-coated silicon tips. The range and the rate of increase in the lithographic linewidth and height with tip bias (dw/dV and dh/dV) differed based on the tip material. The DC tips resulted in wider and taller lines and a higher dw/dV and dh/dV compared to metal-coated tips with a similar force constant (k(Avg)). The metal-coated and the DC tips with comparable k(Avg) showed comparable threshold voltages, whereas the MD tips with similar k(Avg) showed a higher threshold voltage. The MD tips exhibited less than half the height and nearly half the dw/dV and dh/dV obtained with the metal-coated tips with similar k Avg, thus also resulting in a smaller width at -10 V. The linewidths were found to be proportional to the inverse of the log of write speed(v) for all the tips; however, the proportionality constant varied with tip material; the DC tips had larger values, and the MD and the metal-coated tips had comparable values. When varying the speed, the height was found to be a sigmoidal function of width, with the MD probes achieving lower height compared to the metal-coated and the DC tips with comparable k(Avg). This study expands the application of monolithic conductive polycrystalline diamond (PCD) probes with outstanding wear resistance to fine LAO lithography.

  20. Ceramic for Silicon-Shaping Dies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekercioglu, I.; Wills, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    Silicon beryllium oxynitride (SiBON) is a promising candidate material for manufacture of shaping dies used in fabricating ribbons or sheets of silicon. It is extremely stable, resists thermal shock, and has excellent resistance to molten silicon. SiBON is a solid solution of beryllium silicate in beta-silicon nitride.

  1. High purity silane and silicon production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, William C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Silicon tetrachloride, hydrogen and metallurgical silicon are reacted at about 400.degree.-600.degree. C. and at pressures in excess of 100 psi, and specifically from about 300 up to about 600 psi to form di- and trichlorosilane that is subjected to disproportionation in the presence of an anion exchange resin to form high purity silane. By-product and unreacted materials are recycled, with metallurgical silicon and hydrogen being essentially the only consumed feed materials. The silane product may be further purified, as by means of activated carbon or cryogenic distillation, and decomposed in a fluid bed or free space reactor to form high purity polycrystalline silicon and by-product hydrogen which can be recycled for further use. The process results in simplified waste disposal operations and enhances the overall conversion of metallurgical grade silicon to silane and high purity silicon for solar cell and semiconductor silicon applications.

  2. Silicon-Based Blue Light Emitting Diode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-27

    dark layer on top is the ITO which does not thin as readily as the silicon underneath it. The ITO layer has remained electron-opaque in this particular...of an amorphous structure with Si nanocrystals embedded within it. Figure 6b shows a high magnification lattice image of the porous Si layer. The back...polycrystalline silicon materials by anodic etching and stain etching. Figure 7 shows the PL spectrum from a thin film of PPSI-on-quartz irradiated

  3. Si nanotubes and nanospheres with two-dimensional polycrystalline walls.

    PubMed

    Castrucci, Paola; Diociaiuti, Marco; Tank, Chiti Manohar; Casciardi, Stefano; Tombolini, Francesca; Scarselli, Manuela; De Crescenzi, Maurizio; Mathe, Vikas Laxman; Bhoraskar, Sudha Vasant

    2012-08-21

    We report on the characteristics of a new class of Si-based nanotubes and spherical nanoparticles synthesized by the dc-arc plasma method in a mixture of argon and hydrogen. These two nanostructures share common properties: they are hollow and possess very thin, highly polycrystalline and mainly oxidized walls. In particular, we get several hints indicating that their walls could constitute only one single Si oxidized layer. Moreover, we find that only the less oxidized nanotubes exhibit locally atomic ordered, snakeskin-like areas which possess a hexagonal arrangement which can be interpreted either as an sp(2) or sp(3) hybridized Si or Si-H layer. Their ability to not react with oxygen seems to suggest the presence of sp(2) configuration or the formation of silicon-hydrogen bonding.

  4. Polycrystalline configurations that maximize electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesi, Vincenzo; Milton, Graeme W.

    A lower bound on the effective conductivity tensor of polycrystalline aggregates formed from a single basic crystal of conductivity σ was recently established by Avellaneda. Cherkaev, Lurie and Milton. The bound holds for any basic crystal, but for isotropic aggregates of a uniaxial crystal, the bound is achieved by a sphere assemblage model of Schulgasser. This left open the question of attainability of the bound when the crystal is not uniaxial. The present work establishes that the bound is always attained by a rather large class of polycrystalline materials. These polycrystalline materials, with maximal electrical resistivity, are constructed by sequential lamination of the basic crystal and rotations of itself on widely separated length scales. The analysis is facilitated by introducing a tensor S = 0( 0I + σ) -1 where 0 > 0 is chosen so that Tr S = 1. This tensor s is related to the electric field in the optimal polycrystalline configurations.

  5. Disposal of metal fragments released during polycrystalline slicing by multi-wire saw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutouchent-Guerfi, N.; Drouiche, N.; Medjahed, S.; Ould-Hamou, M.; Sahraoui, F.

    2016-08-01

    The environmental and economic impacts linked with solar systems are largely based on discharges of slurry generated during the various stages of sawing and cutting ingots. These discharges into the environment are subject to the general regulations on hazardous and special industrial waste disposal. Therefore, they should not be abandoned or burned in open air. The cutting of Silicon ingots leads to the production of Silicon wafers additional costs, losing more than 30% of Silicon material. Abrasive grains (Silicon Carbide) trapped between the wire and the block of Silicon need to be removed by various mechanisms to be later evacuated by slurry fragments. In the interest of decreasing operational costs during polycrystalline ingot slicing at Semiconductors Research Center, and, avoid environmental problems; it is necessary to recover the solar grade Silicon from the Silicon sawing waste. For this reason, the removal of metal fragments has become a preliminary requirement to regenerate the slurry; in addition, the solid phase needs to be separated from the liquid phase after the dissolution PEG with the solvent. In the present study, magnetic separation and centrifugation methods were adopted for metals removal, followed by the analysis of some operating parameters such as: washing time, pH, and initial concentration of Silicon. Finally, analytical, morphological and basic methods were performed in order to evaluate the efficiency of the process undertaken.

  6. A New Polycrystalline Co-Ni Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knop, M.; Mulvey, P.; Ismail, F.; Radecka, A.; Rahman, K. M.; Lindley, T. C.; Shollock, B. A.; Hardy, M. C.; Moody, M. P.; Martin, T. L.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Dye, D.

    2014-12-01

    In 2006, a new-ordered L12 phase, Co3(Al,W), was discovered that can form coherently in a face-centered cubic (fcc) A1 Co matrix. Since then, a community has developed that is attempting to take these alloys forward into practical applications in gas turbines. A new candidate polycrystalline Co-Ni γ/ γ' superalloy, V208C, is presented that has the nominal composition 36Co-35Ni-15Cr-10Al-3W-1Ta (at.%). The alloy was produced by conventional powder metallurgy superalloy methods. After forging, a γ' fraction of ~56% and a secondary γ' size of 88 nm were obtained, with a grain size of 2.5 μm. The solvus temperature was 1000°C. The density was found to be 8.52 g cm-3, which is similar to existing Ni alloys with this level of γ'. The alloy showed the flow stress anomaly and a yield strength of 920 MPa at room temperature and 820 MPa at 800°C, similar to that of Mar-M247. These values are significantly higher than those found for either conventional solution and carbide-strengthened Co alloys or the γ/ γ' Co superalloys presented in the literature thus far. The oxidation resistance, with a mass gain of 0.08 mg cm-2 in 100 h at 800°C, is also comparable with that of existing high-temperature Ni superalloys. These results suggest that Co-based and Co-Ni superalloys may hold some promise for the future in gas turbine applications.

  7. Method for producing silicon thin-film transistors with enhanced forward current drive

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.

    1998-06-30

    A method is disclosed for fabricating amorphous silicon thin film transistors (TFTs) with a polycrystalline silicon surface channel region for enhanced forward current drive. The method is particularly adapted for producing top-gate silicon TFTs which have the advantages of both amorphous and polycrystalline silicon TFTs, but without problem of leakage current of polycrystalline silicon TFTs. This is accomplished by selectively crystallizing a selected region of the amorphous silicon, using a pulsed excimer laser, to create a thin polycrystalline silicon layer at the silicon/gate-insulator surface. The thus created polysilicon layer has an increased mobility compared to the amorphous silicon during forward device operation so that increased drive currents are achieved. In reverse operation the polysilicon layer is relatively thin compared to the amorphous silicon, so that the transistor exhibits the low leakage currents inherent to amorphous silicon. A device made by this method can be used, for example, as a pixel switch in an active-matrix liquid crystal display to improve display refresh rates. 1 fig.

  8. Method for producing silicon thin-film transistors with enhanced forward current drive

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.

    1998-01-01

    A method for fabricating amorphous silicon thin film transistors (TFTs) with a polycrystalline silicon surface channel region for enhanced forward current drive. The method is particularly adapted for producing top-gate silicon TFTs which have the advantages of both amorphous and polycrystalline silicon TFTs, but without problem of leakage current of polycrystalline silicon TFTs. This is accomplished by selectively crystallizing a selected region of the amorphous silicon, using a pulsed excimer laser, to create a thin polycrystalline silicon layer at the silicon/gate-insulator surface. The thus created polysilicon layer has an increased mobility compared to the amorphous silicon during forward device operation so that increased drive currents are achieved. In reverse operation the polysilicon layer is relatively thin compared to the amorphous silicon, so that the transistor exhibits the low leakage currents inherent to amorphous silicon. A device made by this method can be used, for example, as a pixel switch in an active-matrix liquid crystal display to improve display refresh rates.

  9. Silicon heterojunction solar cell and crystallization of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Meijun

    they use less materials resulting in lower cost. Polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) is one promising thin-film material. It has the potential advantages to not only retain the performance and stability of c-Si, but also use the well established manufacturing techniques on thin-film. One of the main difficulties of poly-Si thin-film solar cells is growing large-grained poly-Si films (grain sizes comparable to the film thickness of micrometers) onto foreign substrates. Aluminum-induced crystallization (AIC) is one technique that has been developed to transform the amorphous Si to large-grain poly-Si. In this dissertation, our systematic studies of AIC samples with different stack structures, with and without interface oxide layer, annealed both below and above eutectic temperature will be introduced, and a phenomenological model will be proposed to explain the experimental results.

  10. Promises, promises for neuroscience and law.

    PubMed

    Buckholtz, Joshua W; Faigman, David L

    2014-09-22

    Stunning technical advances in the ability to image the human brain have provoked excited speculation about the application of neuroscience to other fields. The 'promise' of neuroscience for law has been touted with particular enthusiasm. Here, we contend that this promise elides fundamental conceptual issues that limit the usefulness of neuroscience for law. Recommendations for overcoming these challenges are offered.

  11. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Primary and Steady State Creep in B- and Al- Containing Alpha Silicon Carbide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    silicon carbide , devoid of sintering aids, creeps by dislocation motion and climb. Silicon carbide containing...impurity substitution in the sintered silicon carbide . Experimental measurements of grain boundary sliding offsets on polycrystalline silicon carbide have... carbide whisker reinforcement has no beneficial effect on the creep resistance of Si3N4, whereas, in the more easily deformed mullite, silicon carbide whisker reinforcement does result in a reduced steady state

  12. Removing Undesired Fine Powder From Silicon Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flagella, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    Fluidized-bed reactor produces highly pure polycrystalline silicon particles with diameters approximately greater than 400 micrometers. Operates by pyrolysis of silane in reaction zone, which is bed of silicon seed particles fluidized by flow of silane and carrier gas. Above reaction zone, gas mixture flows rapidly enough to entrain silicon powders, but not larger seed and product particles. Entrained particles swept out of reactor. Applicable to other processes such as production of fine metal and ceramic powders where control of sizes of product needed.

  13. Scaling properties of polycrystalline graphene: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isacsson, Andreas; Cummings, Aron W.; Colombo, Luciano; Colombo, Luigi; Kinaret, Jari M.; Roche, Stephan

    2017-03-01

    We present an overview of the electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties of polycrystalline graphene. Most global properties of this material, such as the charge mobility, thermal conductivity, or Young’s modulus, are sensitive to its microstructure, for instance the grain size and the presence of line or point defects. Both the local and global features of polycrystalline graphene have been investigated by a variety of simulations and experimental measurements. In this review, we summarize the properties of polycrystalline graphene, and by establishing a perspective on how the microstructure impacts its large-scale physical properties, we aim to provide guidance for further optimization and improvement of applications based on this material, such as flexible and wearable electronics, and high-frequency or spintronic devices.

  14. Elastic properties of polycrystalline dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobyakov, D.; Pethick, C. J.

    2015-04-01

    Elastic properties of the solid regions of neutron star crusts and white dwarfs play an important role in theories of stellar oscillations. Matter in compact stars is presumably polycrystalline and, since the elastic properties of single crystals of such matter are very anisotropic, it is necessary to relate elastic properties of the polycrystal to those of a single crystal. We calculate the effective shear modulus of polycrystalline matter with randomly oriented crystallites using a self-consistent theory that has been very successful in applications to terrestrial materials and show that previous calculations overestimate the shear modulus by approximately 28 per cent.

  15. Grain boundary dominated ion migration in polycrystalline organic–inorganic halide perovskite films

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yuchuan; Fang, Yanjun; Li, Tao; Wang, Qi; Dong, Qingfeng; Deng, Yehao; Yuan, Yongbo; Wei, Haotong; Wang, Meiyu; Gruverman, Alexei; Shield, Jeffery; Huang, Jinsong

    2016-03-21

    The efficiency of perovskite solar cells is approaching that of single-crystalline silicon solar cells despite the presence of large grain boundary (GB) area in the polycrystalline thin films. Here, by using a combination of nanoscopic and macroscopic level measurements, we show that the ion migration in polycrystalline perovskites is dominated through GBs. Conducting atomic force microscopy measurements reveal much stronger hysteresis both for photocurrent and dark-current at the GBs than on the grains interiors, which can be explained by faster ion migration at the GBs. The dramatically enhanced ion migration results in a redistribution of ions along the GBs after electric poling, in contrast to the intact grain area. The perovskite single-crystal devices without GBs show negligible current hysteresis and no ion-migration signal. Furthermore, the discovery of dominating ion migration through GBs in perovskites can lead to broad applications in many types of devices including photovoltaics, memristors, and ion batteries.

  16. Radiation hardness of three-dimensional polycrystalline diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lagomarsino, Stefano Sciortino, Silvio; Bellini, Marco; Corsi, Chiara; Cindro, Vladimir; Kanxheri, Keida; Servoli, Leonello; Morozzi, Arianna; Passeri, Daniele; Schmidt, Christian J.

    2015-05-11

    The three-dimensional concept in particle detection is based on the fabrication of columnar electrodes perpendicular to the surface of a solid state radiation sensor. It permits to improve the radiation resistance characteristics of a material by lowering the necessary bias voltage and shortening the charge carrier path inside the material. If applied to a long-recognized exceptionally radiation-hard material like diamond, this concept promises to pave the way to the realization of detectors of unprecedented performances. We fabricated conventional and three-dimensional polycrystalline diamond detectors, and tested them before and after neutron damage up to 1.2 ×10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}, 1 MeV-equivalent neutron fluence. We found that the signal collected by the three-dimensional detectors is up to three times higher than that of the conventional planar ones, at the highest neutron damage ever experimented.

  17. Dosimetric characterization of a 2D polycrystalline CVD diamond detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, A.; Cupparo, I.; Baldi, A.; Scaringella, M.; Pasquini, A.; Pallotta, S.; Talamonti, C.; Bruzzi, M.

    2017-03-01

    A bidimensional pixelated dosimeter composed of two polycrystalline Chemical Vapour Deposited diamond films, 2.5 × 2.5 cm2 each placed aside, has been manufactured so as to obtain a detector with a 2 mm pitch over a total active area of 5.0 × 2.5 cm2. We performed the dosimetric characterization of the detector with an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator using a 6 MV photon beam. Uniformity maps, rise and fall times, signal repeatability, dependence on dose rate, linearity with dose and sensitivity show that the device is suitable for dosimetric evaluations in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) treatments. Then, a first quantitative evaluation of the dose distribution in a lung VMAT treatment plan has been carried out, by comparing data from our device with Treatment Planning Sistem values by means of a Γ test, with promising results.

  18. Fast bolometric sensor built-in into polycrystalline CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klokov, A. Yu; Sharkov, A. I.; Galkina, T. I.; Khmelnitsky, R. A.; Dravin, V. A.; Ralchenko, V. G.; Gippius, A. A.

    2007-12-01

    Diamond, with its unique combination of physical properties, is a promising material for electronic devices operating under extreme conditions. Due to its exceptionally high thermal conductivity, diamond-based bolometers should possess very short response time. A fast bolometric sensor was formed within a polycrystalline diamond plate by ion implantation and subsequent annealing. The response kinetics of the structure was studied under a nitrogen laser pulsed illumination. The response time at room temperature was less than 20 ns. The spatial-temporal distribution of responses allowed us to distinguish between thermal responses and those of different nature (e.g. photoconductivity). This study was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, project nos. 05-02-17545 and 07-02-00575.

  19. Bosonic Anomalies in Boron-Doped Polycrystalline Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gufei; Samuely, Tomas; Kačmarčík, Jozef; Ekimov, Evgeny A.; Li, Jun; Vanacken, Johan; Szabó, Pavol; Huang, Junwei; Pereira, Paulo J.; Cerbu, Dorin; Moshchalkov, Victor V.

    2016-12-01

    Quantum confinement and coherence effects are considered the cause of many specific features for systems which are generally low dimensional, strongly disordered, and/or situated in the vicinity of the metal-insulator transition. Here, we report on the observation of anomalous resistance peak and specific heat peaks superimposed at the superconducting transition of heavily boron-doped polycrystalline bulk diamond, which is a three-dimensional system situated deep on the metallic side of the boron-doping-driven metal-insulator transition in diamond. The anomalous resistance peak and specific heat peaks are interpreted as a result of confinement and coherence effects in the presence of intrinsic and extrinsic granularity. Our data, obtained for superconducting diamond, provide a reference for understanding the superconductivity in other granular disordered systems. Furthermore, our study brings attention to the significant influence of granular disorder on the physical properties of boron-doped diamond, which is considered a promising candidate for electronics applications.

  20. Silicone metalization

    SciTech Connect

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  1. Silicone metalization

    SciTech Connect

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2006-12-05

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  2. RESEARCH ON THIN FILM POLYCRYSTALLINE SOLAR CELLS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Studies of factors affecting the properties of polycrystalline CdTe film grown by the vapor reaction process are discussed and a variety of...molybdenum substrates are compared. No real differences are found. Rough measures of temperature effects and tellurium flow rate on film growth rate are

  3. Developing Mathematically Promising Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheffield, Linda Jensen, Ed.

    This book, written on the recommendation of the Task Force on Mathematically Promising Students, investigates issues involving the development of promising mathematics students. Recommendations are made concerning topics such as the definition of promising students; the identification of such students; appropriate curriculum, instruction, and…

  4. Stochastic multiscale modeling of polycrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Bin

    Mechanical properties of engineering materials are sensitive to the underlying random microstructure. Quantification of mechanical property variability induced by microstructure variation is essential for the prediction of extreme properties and microstructure-sensitive design of materials. Recent advances in high throughput characterization of polycrystalline microstructures have resulted in huge data sets of microstructural descriptors and image snapshots. To utilize these large scale experimental data for computing the resulting variability of macroscopic properties, appropriate mathematical representation of microstructures is needed. By exploring the space containing all admissible microstructures that are statistically similar to the available data, one can estimate the distribution/envelope of possible properties by employing efficient stochastic simulation methodologies along with robust physics-based deterministic simulators. The focus of this thesis is on the construction of low-dimensional representations of random microstructures and the development of efficient physics-based simulators for polycrystalline materials. By adopting appropriate stochastic methods, such as Monte Carlo and Adaptive Sparse Grid Collocation methods, the variability of microstructure-sensitive properties of polycrystalline materials is investigated. The primary outcomes of this thesis include: (1) Development of data-driven reduced-order representations of microstructure variations to construct the admissible space of random polycrystalline microstructures. (2) Development of accurate and efficient physics-based simulators for the estimation of material properties based on mesoscale microstructures. (3) Investigating property variability of polycrystalline materials using efficient stochastic simulation methods in combination with the above two developments. The uncertainty quantification framework developed in this work integrates information science and materials science, and

  5. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Several techniques were employed to apply or otherwise form porous layers of various materials on the surface of hot-pressed silicon carbide ceramic. From mechanical properties measurements and studies, it was concluded that although porous layers could be applied to the silicon carbide ceramic, sufficient damage was done to the silicon carbide surface by the processing required so as to drastically reduce its mechanical strength. It was further concluded that there was little promise of success in forming an effective energy absorbing layer on the surface of already densified silicon carbide ceramic that would have the mechanical strength of the untreated or unsurfaced material. Using a process for the pressureless sintering of silicon carbide powders it was discovered that porous layers of silicon carbide could be formed on a dense, strong silicon carbide substrate in a single consolidation process.

  6. High-Production Silicon-Ingot Slicer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Y. S.

    1983-01-01

    New concept for slicing silicon ingots into wafers promises to increase production rates and improve yields of good wafers, thereby reducing cost of manufacturing silicon solar cells. In proposed wafer slicer, stack of ganged blades cuts group of silicon ingots simultaneously. Blades cut horizontally while ingots rotate about their vertical axes.

  7. Short circuit current in indium tin oxide/silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.

    1980-09-01

    The short-circuit current density of indium tin oxide/single and polycrystalline silicon solar cells reported by Schunck and Coche (1979) is much higher than other silicon solar cells. It is shown that the short-circuit current density reported in the above reference does not represent the true value of these devices.

  8. Low-cost-silicon-process development. Phase IV: process improvement. Second quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Giraudi, R. V.; Newman, C. G.

    1981-04-01

    A number of promising techniques for improving the overall yield and economics of the tribromosilane based process to produce solar cell grade silicon is investigated. The current work is aimed at the identification of an optimum process and the characterization of that process through mini-plant operation and analysis. The three project tasks include process improvement studies, kinetic studies, and process economic studies. During this second quarter reporting period process improvement studies continued in the mini-plant, focusing on the correlation of current mini-plant yield results with prior laboratory scale work. Silicon bromination in the synthesis unit and tribromosilane purification in the distillation unit proceeded efficiently and without complication during this reporting period. Tribromosilane yields in the synthesis unit were low due to unobtainable higher reaction temperatures. Initial polycrystalline silicon production studies have indicated consistent yields of 85%. The laboratory scale static bulb reactor system was calibrated by observing the decomposition of t-butyl chloride. These results compared very well to results obtained by previous investigators for the same decomposition. Upon the conclusion of the calibration tests, the tribromosilane decomposition rate study was initiated. Two decompositions were completed and it was concluded that the reaction order can not be determined at this time. A free space reactor apparatus was assembled and tribromosilane decompositions, as a function of dilution in argon, was studied.

  9. Modeling of polycrystalline thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrenbruch, Alan L.

    1999-03-01

    This paper describes modeling polycrystalline thin-film solar cells using the program AMPS-1D1 to visualize the relationships between the many variables involved. These simulations are steps toward two dimensional modeling the effects of grain boundaries in polycrystalline cells. Although this paper describes results for the CdS/CdTe cell, the ideas presented here are applicable to copper-indium-gallium selenide (CIGS) cells as well as other types of cells. Results of these one-dimensional simulations are presented: (a) the duplication of experimentally observed cell parameters, (b) the effects of back-contact potential barrier height and its relation to stressing the cell, (c) the effects of the depletion layer width in the CdTe layer on cell parameters, and (d) the effects of CdS layer thickness on the cell parameters. Experience using the software is also described.

  10. Rapid epitaxy-free graphene synthesis on silicidated polycrystalline platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babenko, Vitaliy; Murdock, Adrian T.; Koós, Antal A.; Britton, Jude; Crossley, Alison; Holdway, Philip; Moffat, Jonathan; Huang, Jian; Alexander-Webber, Jack A.; Nicholas, Robin J.; Grobert, Nicole

    2015-07-01

    Large-area synthesis of high-quality graphene by chemical vapour deposition on metallic substrates requires polishing or substrate grain enlargement followed by a lengthy growth period. Here we demonstrate a novel substrate processing method for facile synthesis of mm-sized, single-crystal graphene by coating polycrystalline platinum foils with a silicon-containing film. The film reacts with platinum on heating, resulting in the formation of a liquid platinum silicide layer that screens the platinum lattice and fills topographic defects. This reduces the dependence on the surface properties of the catalytic substrate, improving the crystallinity, uniformity and size of graphene domains. At elevated temperatures growth rates of more than an order of magnitude higher (120 μm min-1) than typically reported are achieved, allowing savings in costs for consumable materials, energy and time. This generic technique paves the way for using a whole new range of eutectic substrates for the large-area synthesis of 2D materials.

  11. Rapid epitaxy-free graphene synthesis on silicidated polycrystalline platinum

    PubMed Central

    Babenko, Vitaliy; Murdock, Adrian T.; Koós, Antal A.; Britton, Jude; Crossley, Alison; Holdway, Philip; Moffat, Jonathan; Huang, Jian; Alexander-Webber, Jack A.; Nicholas, Robin J.; Grobert, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Large-area synthesis of high-quality graphene by chemical vapour deposition on metallic substrates requires polishing or substrate grain enlargement followed by a lengthy growth period. Here we demonstrate a novel substrate processing method for facile synthesis of mm-sized, single-crystal graphene by coating polycrystalline platinum foils with a silicon-containing film. The film reacts with platinum on heating, resulting in the formation of a liquid platinum silicide layer that screens the platinum lattice and fills topographic defects. This reduces the dependence on the surface properties of the catalytic substrate, improving the crystallinity, uniformity and size of graphene domains. At elevated temperatures growth rates of more than an order of magnitude higher (120 μm min−1) than typically reported are achieved, allowing savings in costs for consumable materials, energy and time. This generic technique paves the way for using a whole new range of eutectic substrates for the large-area synthesis of 2D materials. PMID:26175062

  12. Rapid epitaxy-free graphene synthesis on silicidated polycrystalline platinum.

    PubMed

    Babenko, Vitaliy; Murdock, Adrian T; Koós, Antal A; Britton, Jude; Crossley, Alison; Holdway, Philip; Moffat, Jonathan; Huang, Jian; Alexander-Webber, Jack A; Nicholas, Robin J; Grobert, Nicole

    2015-07-15

    Large-area synthesis of high-quality graphene by chemical vapour deposition on metallic substrates requires polishing or substrate grain enlargement followed by a lengthy growth period. Here we demonstrate a novel substrate processing method for facile synthesis of mm-sized, single-crystal graphene by coating polycrystalline platinum foils with a silicon-containing film. The film reacts with platinum on heating, resulting in the formation of a liquid platinum silicide layer that screens the platinum lattice and fills topographic defects. This reduces the dependence on the surface properties of the catalytic substrate, improving the crystallinity, uniformity and size of graphene domains. At elevated temperatures growth rates of more than an order of magnitude higher (120 μm min(-1)) than typically reported are achieved, allowing savings in costs for consumable materials, energy and time. This generic technique paves the way for using a whole new range of eutectic substrates for the large-area synthesis of 2D materials.

  13. Characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, L.C.; Ishida, Takanobu

    1991-12-01

    The characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces has been accomplished through the use of four major electrochemical techniques. These were chronoamperometry, chronopotentiommetry, cyclic voltammetry, and linear sweep voltammetry. A systematic study on the under-potential deposition of several transition metals has been performed. The most interesting of these were: Ag, Cu, Cd, and Pb. It was determined, by subjecting the platinum electrode surface to a single potential scan between {minus}0.24 and +1.25 V{sub SCE} while stirring the solution, that the electrocatalytic activity would be regenerated. As a consequence of this study, a much simpler method for producing ultra high purity water from acidic permanganate has been developed. This method results in water that surpasses the water produced by pyrocatalytic distillation. It has also been seen that the wettability of polycrystalline platinum surfaces is greatly dependent on the quantity of oxide present. Oxide-free platinum is hydrophobic and gives a contact angle in the range of 55 to 62 degrees. We have also modified polycrystalline platinum surface with the electrically conducting polymer poly-{rho}-phenylene. This polymer is very stable in dilute sulfuric acid solutions, even under applied oxidative potentials. It is also highly resistant to electrochemical hydrogenation. The wettability of the polymer modified platinum surface is severely dependent on the choice of supporting electrolyte chosen for the electrochemical polymerization. Tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate produces a film that is as hydrophobic as Teflon, whereas tetraethylammonium perchlorate produces a film that is more hydrophilic than oxide-free platinum.

  14. The Kalamazoo Promise Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartik, Timothy J.; Lachowska, Marta

    2014-01-01

    This study takes advantage of the unexpected announcement of the Kalamazoo Promise to study its effects on student achievement and behavior in high school. The Kalamazoo Promise provides college scholarships to graduates of Kalamazoo Public Schools (KPS), a midsized urban school district in Michigan that is racially and economically diverse.…

  15. Keeping the Promise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whissemore, Tabitha

    2016-01-01

    Since its launch in September 2015, Heads Up America has collected information on nearly 125 promise programs across the country, many of which were instituted long before President Barack Obama announced the America's College Promise (ACP) plan in 2015. At least 27 new free community college programs have launched in states, communities, and at…

  16. Tracking performance of a single-crystal and a polycrystalline diamond pixel-detector

    SciTech Connect

    Menasce, D.; et al.

    2013-06-01

    We present a comparative characterization of the performance of a single-crystal and a polycrystalline diamond pixel-detector employing the standard CMS pixel readout chips. Measurements were carried out at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility, FTBF, using protons of momentum 120 GeV/c tracked by a high-resolution pixel telescope. Particular attention was directed to the study of the charge-collection, the charge-sharing among adjacent pixels and the achievable position resolution. The performance of the single-crystal detector was excellent and comparable to the best available silicon pixel-detectors. The measured average detection-efficiency was near unity, ε = 0.99860±0.00006, and the position-resolution for shared hits was about 6 μm. On the other hand, the performance of the polycrystalline detector was hampered by its lower charge collection distance and the readout chip threshold. A new readout chip, capable of operating at much lower threshold (around 1 ke$-$), would be required to fully exploit the potential performance of the polycrystalline diamond pixel-detector.

  17. Basic research challenges in crystalline silicon photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, J.H.

    1995-08-01

    Silicon is abundant, non-toxic and has an ideal band gap for photovoltaic energy conversion. Experimental world record cells of 24 % conversion efficiency with around 300 {mu}m thickness are only 4 % (absolute) efficiency points below the theoretical Auger recombination-limit of around 28 %. Compared with other photovoltaic materials, crystalline silicon has only very few disadvantages. The handicap of weak light absorbance may be mastered by clever optical designs. Single crystalline cells of only 48 {mu}m thickness showed 17.3 % efficiency even without backside reflectors. A technology of solar cells from polycrystalline Si films on foreign substrates arises at the horizon. However, the disadvantageous, strong activity of grain boundaries in Si could be an insurmountable hurdle for a cost-effective, terrestrial photovoltaics based on polycrystalline Si on foreign substrates. This talk discusses some basic research challenges related to a Si based photovoltaics.

  18. Laser-zone growth in a Ribbon-To-Ribbon (RTR) process. Silicon sheet growth development for the large area sheet task of the low-cost solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baghdadi, A.; Gurtler, R. W.; Legge, R.; Sopori, B.; Ellis, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    A new calculation of the effects of thermal stresses during growth on silicon ribbon quality is reported. Thermal stress distributions are computed for ribbon growth under a variety of temperature profiles. A growth rate of 55 cu cm/min with a single ribbon was achieved. The growth of RTR ribbon with a fairly uniform parallel dendritic structure was demonstrated. Results with two approaches were obtained for reducing the Mo impurity level in polycrystalline feedstock. Coating the Mo substrate with Si3N4 does not effect thermal shear separation of the polyribbon; this process shows promise of improving cell efficiency and also increasing the useful life of the molybdenum substrate. A number of solar cells were fabricated on RTR silicon grown from CVD feedstock.

  19. Crystallization of amorphous silicon beyond the crystallized polycrystalline silicon region induced by metal nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongli; Wang, Mingxiang; Wong, Man; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2017-01-01

    Not Available Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61301077 and 61574096), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BK20130319), and the Science and Technology Program of Suzhou City, China (Grant No. SYG201538).

  20. Light emission from porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penczek, John

    The continuous evolution of silicon microelectronics has produced significant gains in electronic information processing. However, greater improvements in performance are expected by utilizing optoelectronic techniques. But these techniques have been severely limited in silicon- based optoelectronics due to the lack of an efficient silicon light emitter. The recent observation of efficient light emission from porous silicon offer a promising opportunity to develop a suitable silicon light source that is compatible with silicon microelectronics. This dissertation examined the porous silicon emission mechanism via photoluminescence, and by a novel device structure for porous silicon emitters. The investigation first examined the correlation between porous silicon formation conditions (and subsequent morphology) with the resulting photoluminescence properties. The quantum confinement theory for porous silicon light emission contends that the morphology changes induced by the different formation conditions determine the optical properties of porous silicon. The photoluminescence spectral shifts measured in this study, in conjunction with TEM analysis and published morphological data, lend support to this theory. However, the photoluminescence spectral broadening was attributed to electronic wavefunction coupling between adjacent silicon nanocrystals. An novel device structure was also investigated in an effort to improve current injection into the porous silicon layer. The selective etching properties of porous silicon were used to create a p-i-n structure with crystalline silicon contacts to the porous silicon layer. The resulting device was found to have unique characteristics, with a negative differential resistance region and current-induced emission that spanned from 400 nm to 5500 nm. The negative differential resistance was correlated to resistive heating effects in the device. A numerical analysis of thermal emission spectra from silicon films, in addition to

  1. Photoluminescence and Raman Spectroscopy of Polycrystalline ZnO Nanofibers Deposited by Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Banani; Stroscio, Michael; Dutta, Mitra

    2011-09-01

    The technique of electrospinning offers the advantage of growing nanowires in bulk quantities in comparison with traditional methods. We report optical studies of polycrystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) nanofibers (˜100 nm thick and 5 μm long) deposited by electrospinning. Photoluminescence from the nanofibers shows a near-ultraviolet (near-UV) peak corresponding to near-band-edge emission and a strong broad peak in the visible region from oxygen antisite and interstitial defects. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals that different carrier recombination mechanisms are dominant at low temperature. Our Raman spectroscopy results demonstrate that characterization of the quasimodes of longitudinal optical (LO) and transverse optical (TO) phonons present in an ensemble of polycrystalline nanofibers tilted at various angles in addition to the dominant E 2(high) mode provides a promising technique for assessing the quality of such randomly oriented nanowires.

  2. Large room-temperature rotating magnetocaloric effect in NdCo4Al polycrystalline alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Hu, Q. B.; Wang, C. C.; Cao, Q. Q.; Gao, W. L.; Wang, D. H.; Du, Y. W.

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic refrigeration based on rotating magnetocaloric effect (MCE) is promising to build a simplified magnetic cooling system. Until now, most magnetic refrigerants for rotating MCE are single crystal and work at low temperature, which hinder the development of this refrigeration technology. In present paper, we report a large room-temperature rotating MCE in a magnetic-field-aligned NdCo4Al polycrystalline alloy. A large rotating magnetic entropy change of 1.3 J kg-1 K-1 under 10 kOe and a broad operating temperature window of 52 K are achieved. The origin of large rotating MCE in NdCo4Al polycrystalline alloy and its advantages for rotating magnetic refrigeration are discussed.

  3. Growth of High Purity Oxygen-Free Silicon by Cold Crucible Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    REMOVED FROM THE COLD CRUCIBLE 38 8 POLYCRYSTALLINE SILICON INGOT PULLED FROM THE COLD CRUCIBLE 39 9 RESISTANCE HEATED SEED HOLDER 40 10 CRYSTAL...PULLING EXPERIMENT UTILIZING THE RESISTANCE HEATED 41 SEED HOLDER 11 GRAPHITE REFLECTOR USED FOR THE GROWTH OF SILICON CRYSTALS 42 FROM A MELT CONFINED IN...silicon crystals. Generation of oxygen donors by heat treatment of 4500 C for example, confuses the measurement of dopant concentration via resistivity

  4. A silicon nanocrystal tunnel field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Drouin, Dominique; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a silicon nanocrystal Field Effect Transistor (ncFET). Its operation is similar to that of a Tunnelling Field Effect Transistor (TFET) with two barriers in series. The tunnelling barriers are fabricated in very thin silicon dioxide and the channel in intrinsic polycrystalline silicon. The absence of doping eliminates the problem of achieving sharp doping profiles at the junctions, which has proven a challenge for large-scale integration and, in principle, allows scaling down the atomic level. The demonstrated ncFET features a 104 on/off current ratio at room temperature, a low 30 pA/μm leakage current at a 0.5 V bias, an on-state current on a par with typical all-Si TFETs and bipolar operation with high symmetry. Quantum dot transport spectroscopy is used to assess the band structure and energy levels of the silicon island.

  5. Multilayer hexagonal silicon forming in slit nanopore.

    PubMed

    He, Yezeng; Li, Hui; Sui, Yanwei; Qi, Jiqiu; Wang, Yanqing; Chen, Zheng; Dong, Jichen; Li, Xiongying

    2015-10-05

    The solidification of two-dimensional liquid silicon confined to a slit nanopore has been studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The results clearly show that the system undergoes an obvious transition from liquid to multilayer hexagonal film with the decrease of temperature, accompanied by dramatic change in potential energy, atomic volume, coordination number and lateral radial distribution function. During the cooling process, some hexagonal islands randomly appear in the liquid first, then grow up to grain nuclei, and finally connect together to form a complete polycrystalline film. Moreover, it is found that the quenching rate and slit size are of vital importance to the freezing structure of silicon film. The results also indicate that the slit nanopore induces the layering of liquid silicon, which further induces the slit size dependent solidification behavior of silicon film with different electrical properties.

  6. A silicon nanocrystal tunnel field effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Drouin, Dominique; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel

    2014-05-12

    In this work, we demonstrate a silicon nanocrystal Field Effect Transistor (ncFET). Its operation is similar to that of a Tunnelling Field Effect Transistor (TFET) with two barriers in series. The tunnelling barriers are fabricated in very thin silicon dioxide and the channel in intrinsic polycrystalline silicon. The absence of doping eliminates the problem of achieving sharp doping profiles at the junctions, which has proven a challenge for large-scale integration and, in principle, allows scaling down the atomic level. The demonstrated ncFET features a 10{sup 4} on/off current ratio at room temperature, a low 30 pA/μm leakage current at a 0.5 V bias, an on-state current on a par with typical all-Si TFETs and bipolar operation with high symmetry. Quantum dot transport spectroscopy is used to assess the band structure and energy levels of the silicon island.

  7. Singlet exciton fission in polycrystalline pentacene: from photophysics toward devices.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark W B; Rao, Akshay; Ehrler, Bruno; Friend, Richard H

    2013-06-18

    Singlet exciton fission is the process in conjugated organic molecules bywhich a photogenerated singlet exciton couples to a nearby chromophore in the ground state, creating a pair of triplet excitons. Researchers first reported this phenomenon in the 1960s, an event that sparked further studies in the following decade. These investigations used fluorescence spectroscopy to establish that exciton fission occurred in single crystals of several acenes. However, research interest has been recently rekindled by the possibility that singlet fission could be used as a carrier multiplication technique to enhance the efficiency of photovoltaic cells. The most successful architecture to-date involves sensitizing a red-absorbing photoactive layer with a blue-absorbing material that undergoes fission, thereby generating additional photocurrent from higher-energy photons. The quest for improved solar cells has spurred a drive to better understand the fission process, which has received timely aid from modern techniques for time-resolved spectroscopy, quantum chemistry, and small-molecule device fabrication. However, the consensus interpretation of the initial studies using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy was that exciton fission was suppressed in polycrystalline thin films of pentacene, a material that would be otherwise expected to be an ideal model system, as well as a viable candidate for fission-sensitized photovoltaic devices. In this Account, we review the results of our recent transient absorption and device-based studies of polycrystalline pentacene. We address the controversy surrounding the assignment of spectroscopic features in transient absorption data, and illustrate how a consistent interpretation is possible. This work underpins our conclusion that singlet fission in pentacene is extraordinarily rapid (∼80 fs) and is thus the dominant decay channel for the photoexcited singlet exciton. Further, we discuss our demonstration that triplet excitons

  8. Polycrystalline gamma plutonium's elastic moduli versus temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Albert; Betts, J; Trugman, A; Mielke, C H; Mitchell, J N; Ramos, M; Stroe, I

    2009-01-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy was used to measure the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline {sup 239}Pu in the {gamma} phase. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli were measured simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth, linear, and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. They calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519 K to 0.252 at 571 K. These measurements on extremely well characterized pure Pu are in agreement with other reported results where overlap occurs.

  9. All-silicon spherical-Mie-resonator photodiode with spectral response in the infrared region.

    PubMed

    Garín, M; Fenollosa, R; Alcubilla, R; Shi, L; Marsal, L F; Meseguer, F

    2014-03-10

    Silicon is the material of choice for visible light photodetection and solar cell fabrication. However, due to the intrinsic band gap properties of silicon, most infrared photons are energetically useless. Here, we show the first example of a photodiode developed on a micrometre scale sphere made of polycrystalline silicon whose photocurrent shows the Mie modes of a classical spherical resonator. The long dwell time of resonating photons enhances the photocurrent response, extending it into the infrared region well beyond the absorption edge of bulk silicon. It opens the door for developing solar cells and photodetectors that may harvest infrared light more efficiently than silicon photovoltaic devices that are so far developed.

  10. Promising More Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    When NASA needed a real-time, online database system capable of tracking documentation changes in its propulsion test facilities, engineers at Stennis Space Center joined with ECT International, of Brookfield, Wisconsin, to create a solution. Through NASA's Dual-Use Program, ECT developed Exdata, a software program that works within the company's existing Promise software. Exdata not only satisfied NASA s requirements, but also expanded ECT s commercial product line. Promise, ECT s primary product, is an intelligent software program with specialized functions for designing and documenting electrical control systems. An addon to AutoCAD software, Promis e generates control system schematics, panel layouts, bills of material, wire lists, and terminal plans. The drawing functions include symbol libraries, macros, and automatic line breaking. Primary Promise customers include manufacturing companies, utilities, and other organizations with complex processes to control.

  11. Acidic magnetorheological finishing of infrared polycrystalline materials

    DOE PAGES

    Salzman, S.; Romanofsky, H. J.; West, G.; ...

    2016-10-12

    Here, chemical-vapor–deposited (CVD) ZnS is an example of a polycrystalline material that is difficult to polish smoothly via the magnetorheological–finishing (MRF) technique. When MRF-polished, the internal infrastructure of the material tends to manifest on the surface as millimeter-sized “pebbles,” and the surface roughness observed is considerably high. The fluid’s parameters important to developing a magnetorheological (MR) fluid that is capable of polishing CVD ZnS smoothly were previously discussed and presented. These parameters were acidic pH (~4.5) and low viscosity (~47 cP). MRF with such a unique MR fluid was shown to reduce surface artifacts in the form of pebbles; however,more » surface microroughness was still relatively high because of the absence of a polishing abrasive in the formulation. In this study, we examine the effect of two polishing abrasives—alumina and nanodiamond—on the surface finish of several CVD ZnS substrates, and on other important IR polycrystalline materials that were finished with acidic MR fluids containing these two polishing abrasives. Surface microroughness results obtained were as low as ~28 nm peak-to-valley and ~6-nm root mean square.« less

  12. Electrical properties of polycrystalline methane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du Frane, W. L.; Stern, L.A.; Weitemeyer, K.A.; Constable, S.; Pinkston, J.C.; Roberts, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) remote-sensing techniques are demonstrated to be sensitive to gas hydrate concentration and distribution and complement other resource assessment techniques, particularly seismic methods. To fully utilize EM results requires knowledge of the electrical properties of individual phases and mixing relations, yet little is known about the electrical properties of gas hydrates. We developed a pressure cell to synthesize gas hydrate while simultaneously measuring in situ frequency-dependent electrical conductivity (σ). Synthesis of methane (CH4) hydrate was verified by thermal monitoring and by post run cryogenic scanning electron microscope imaging. Impedance spectra (20 Hz to 2 MHz) were collected before and after synthesis of polycrystalline CH4 hydrate from polycrystalline ice and used to calculate σ. We determined the σ of CH4 hydrate to be 5 × 10−5 S/m at 0°C with activation energy (Ea) of 30.6 kJ/mol (−15 to 15°C). After dissociation back into ice, σ measurements of samples increased by a factor of ~4 and Ea increased by ~50%, similar to the starting ice samples.

  13. Reversible piezomagnetoelectric switching in bulk polycrystalline ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, T. Bennett, J.; Brown, A. P.; Wines, T.; Bell, A. J.; Comyn, T. P.; Smith, R. I.

    2014-08-01

    Magnetoelectric (ME) coupling in materials offer tremendous advantages in device functionality enabling technologies including advanced electronic memory, combining electronic speed, and efficiency with magnetic robustness. However, low cost polycrystalline ME materials are excluded from most commercial applications, operating only at cryogenic temperatures, impractically large electric/magnetic fields, or with low ME coefficients (1-100 mV/cm Oe). Despite this, the technological potential of single compound ME coupling has continued to drive research into multiferroics over the last two decades. Here we show that by manipulating the large induced atomic strain within the polycrystalline, room temperature multiferroic compound 0.7BiFeO{sub 3}–0.3PbTiO{sub 3}, we can induce a reversible, piezoelectric strain controlled ME effect. Employing an in situ neutron diffraction experiment, we have demonstrated that this piezomagnetoelectric effect manifests with an applied electric field >8 kV/mm at the onset of piezoelectric strain, engineered in to the compound by crystallographic phase mixing. This produces a remarkable intrinsic ME coefficient of 1276 mV/cm Oe, due to a strain driven modification to the oxygen sub-lattice, inducing an increase in magnetic moment per Fe{sup 3+} ion of +0.142 μ{sub B}. This work provides a framework for investigations into strain engineered nanostructures to realize low-cost ME devices designed from the atoms up, as well as contributing to the deeper understanding of single phase ME coupling mechanisms.

  14. Acidic magnetorheological finishing of infrared polycrystalline materials

    SciTech Connect

    Salzman, S.; Romanofsky, H. J.; West, G.; Marshall, K. L.; Jacobs, S. D.; Lambropoulos, J. C.

    2016-10-12

    Here, chemical-vapor–deposited (CVD) ZnS is an example of a polycrystalline material that is difficult to polish smoothly via the magnetorheological–finishing (MRF) technique. When MRF-polished, the internal infrastructure of the material tends to manifest on the surface as millimeter-sized “pebbles,” and the surface roughness observed is considerably high. The fluid’s parameters important to developing a magnetorheological (MR) fluid that is capable of polishing CVD ZnS smoothly were previously discussed and presented. These parameters were acidic pH (~4.5) and low viscosity (~47 cP). MRF with such a unique MR fluid was shown to reduce surface artifacts in the form of pebbles; however, surface microroughness was still relatively high because of the absence of a polishing abrasive in the formulation. In this study, we examine the effect of two polishing abrasives—alumina and nanodiamond—on the surface finish of several CVD ZnS substrates, and on other important IR polycrystalline materials that were finished with acidic MR fluids containing these two polishing abrasives. Surface microroughness results obtained were as low as ~28 nm peak-to-valley and ~6-nm root mean square.

  15. Integrated silicon and silicon nitride photonic circuits on flexible substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Li, Mo

    2014-06-15

    Flexible integrated photonic devices based on crystalline materials on plastic substrates have a promising potential in many unconventional applications. In this Letter, we demonstrate a fully integrated photonic system including ring resonators and grating couplers, based on both crystalline silicon and silicon nitride, on flexible plastic substrate by using the stamping-transfer method. A high yield has been achieved by a simple, yet reliable transfer method without significant performance degradation.

  16. Deposited silicon high-speed integrated electro-optic modulator.

    PubMed

    Preston, Kyle; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Gondarenko, Alexander; Poitras, Carl B; Lipson, Michal

    2009-03-30

    We demonstrate a micrometer-scale electro-optic modulator operating at 2.5 Gbps and 10 dB extinction ratio that is fabricated entirely from deposited silicon. The polycrystalline silicon material exhibits properties that simultaneously enable high quality factor optical resonators and sub-nanosecond electrical carrier injection. We use an embedded p(+)n(-)n(+) diode to achieve optical modulation using the free carrier plasma dispersion effect. Active optical devices in a deposited microelectronic material can break the dependence on the traditional single layer silicon-on-insulator platform and help lead to monolithic large-scale integration of photonic networks on a microprocessor chip.

  17. Memristive Phenomena in Polycrystalline Single Layer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwan, Vinod; Jariwala, Deep; Kim, In-Soo; Chen, Kan-Sheng; Marks, Tobin; Lauhon, Lincoln; Hersam, Mark; Hersam Laboratory Team

    Recently, a new class of layered two-dimensional semiconductors has shown promise for various electronic applications. In particular, single layer transition metal dichalcogenides (e.g. MoS2) present a host of attractive features such as high electrical conductivity, tunable band-gap, and strong light-matter interaction. However, available growth methods produce large-area polycrystalline films with grain-boundaries and point defects that can be detrimental in conventional electronic devices. In contrast, we have developed unconventional device structures that exploit these defects for useful electronic functions. In particular, we observe grain-boundary mediated memristive phenomena in single layer MoS2 transistors. Memristor current-voltage characteristics depend strongly on the topology of grain-boundaries in MoS2. A grain boundary directly connecting metal electrodes produces thermally assisted switching with dynamic negative differential resistance, whereas a grain boundary bisecting the channel shows non-filamentary soft-switching. In addition, devices with intersecting grain boundaries in the channel show bipolar resistive switching with high on/off ratios up to ~103. Furthermore, the gate electrode in the field-effect geometry can be used to control the absolute resistance of the on and off states. Complementary electrostatic force microscopy, photoluminescence, and Raman microscopy reveal the role of sulfur vacancies in the switching mechanism.

  18. Memristive Phenomena in Polycrystalline Single Layer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwan, Vinod; Jariwala, Deep; Kim, In-Soo; Chen, Kan-Sheng; Marks, Tobin; Lauhon, Lincoln; Hersam, Mark; Hersam Laboratory Team

    Recently, a new class of layered two-dimensional semiconductors has shown promise for various electronic applications. In particular, ultrathin transition metal dichalcogenides (e.g. MoS2) present a host of attractive features such as high carrier mobility and tunable band-gap. However, available growth methods produce polycrystalline films with grain-boundaries and point defects that can be detrimental in conventional electronic devices. In contrast, we have developed unconventional device structures that exploit these defects for useful electronic functions. In particular, we observe grain-boundary mediated memristive phenomena in single layer MoS2 transistors. Memristor current-voltage characteristics depend strongly on the topology of grain-boundaries in MoS2. A grain boundary directly connecting metal electrodes produces thermally assisted switching with dynamic negative differential resistance, whereas a grain boundary bisecting the channel shows non-filamentary soft-switching. In addition, devices with intersecting grain boundaries in the channel show bipolar resistive switching with high on/off ratios up to ~103. Furthermore, the gate electrode in the field-effect geometry can be used to control the absolute resistance of the on and off states. Correlated electrostatic force microscopy, photoluminescence, and Raman microscopy reveal the role of sulfur vacancies in the switching mechanism. This abstract is replacing MAR16-2015-004166 that had exceeded the character limit.

  19. High-Efficiency Polycrystalline Thin Film Tandem Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kranz, Lukas; Abate, Antonio; Feurer, Thomas; Fu, Fan; Avancini, Enrico; Löckinger, Johannes; Reinhard, Patrick; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael; Buecheler, Stephan; Tiwari, Ayodhya N

    2015-07-16

    A promising way to enhance the efficiency of CIGS solar cells is by combining them with perovskite solar cells in tandem devices. However, so far, such tandem devices had limited efficiency due to challenges in developing NIR-transparent perovskite top cells, which allow photons with energy below the perovskite band gap to be transmitted to the bottom cell. Here, a process for the fabrication of NIR-transparent perovskite solar cells is presented, which enables power conversion efficiencies up to 12.1% combined with an average sub-band gap transmission of 71% for photons with wavelength between 800 and 1000 nm. The combination of a NIR-transparent perovskite top cell with a CIGS bottom cell enabled a tandem device with 19.5% efficiency, which is the highest reported efficiency for a polycrystalline thin film tandem solar cell. Future developments of perovskite/CIGS tandem devices are discussed and prospects for devices with efficiency toward and above 27% are given.

  20. Progress in polycrystalline thin-film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zweibel, K; Hermann, A; Mitchell, R

    1983-07-01

    Photovoltaic devices based on several polycrystalline thin-film materials have reached near and above 10% sunlight-to-electricity conversion efficiencies. This paper examines the various polycrystalline thin-film PV materials including CuInSe/sub 2/ and CdTe in terms of their material properties, fabrication techniques, problems, and potentials.

  1. Electron diffraction from polycrystalline materials showing stress induced preferred orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    1999-07-01

    The Gibbs free energy as generalized by J. F. Nye [Physical Properties of Crystals (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1957), p. 179] is minimized in thermodynamic systems held at constant temperature and constant stress. This function is orientation dependent in all crystal systems in stress fields which are not purely hydrostatic. There are situations in which preferred orientation arises as a result of the synthesis of materials under impressed stress conditions such as thin film growth under ion bombardment and the pressing of powders into solids. Here, we derive the orientational constraints for cubic crystals which result from growth under a general biaxial stress field. The sign of the expression δ=s11-s12-1/2s44 determines the behavior of a cubic crystal. Electron diffraction patterns of face-centered-cubic specimens with both positive and negative values of δ are calculated using a program in MATLAB and displayed in a form suitable for direct comparison with experiment. The use of a biaxial stress with unequal principal components for producing highly oriented polycrystalline material is discussed. In the case of δ positive, as occurs in silicon, the preferred orientation is simply an alignment of the <100> directions along the principal stresses. For δ negative, as occurs in titanium nitride, the preferred orientation depends on the ratio of the principal stresses and low index directions are aligned with the principal stresses only when the principal stresses are either equal or one of them is zero. In the general case, arc-like diffraction patterns are produced. The results of a calculation of a diffraction pattern from a cross-sectional TiN film are compared with diffraction patterns reported by L. Hultman et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 78, 5395 (1995)] and show good agreement.

  2. Modelling heat conduction in polycrystalline hexagonal boron-nitride films.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Bohayra; Pereira, Luiz Felipe C; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Rabczuk, Timon

    2015-08-19

    We conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) films. To this aim, we constructed large atomistic models of polycrystalline h-BN sheets with random and uniform grain configuration. By performing equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations, we investigated the influence of the average grain size on the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline h-BN films at various temperatures. Using the EMD results, we constructed finite element models of polycrystalline h-BN sheets to probe the thermal conductivity of samples with larger grain sizes. Our multiscale investigations not only provide a general viewpoint regarding the heat conduction in h-BN films but also propose that polycrystalline h-BN sheets present high thermal conductivity comparable to monocrystalline sheets.

  3. Modelling heat conduction in polycrystalline hexagonal boron-nitride films

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Bohayra; Pereira, Luiz Felipe C.; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Rabczuk, Timon

    2015-01-01

    We conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) films. To this aim, we constructed large atomistic models of polycrystalline h-BN sheets with random and uniform grain configuration. By performing equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations, we investigated the influence of the average grain size on the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline h-BN films at various temperatures. Using the EMD results, we constructed finite element models of polycrystalline h-BN sheets to probe the thermal conductivity of samples with larger grain sizes. Our multiscale investigations not only provide a general viewpoint regarding the heat conduction in h-BN films but also propose that polycrystalline h-BN sheets present high thermal conductivity comparable to monocrystalline sheets. PMID:26286820

  4. Multiscale modeling of thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Bohayra; Pötschke, Markus; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2014-03-21

    We developed a multiscale approach to explore the effective thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene sheets. By performing equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations, the grain size effect on the thermal conductivity of ultra-fine grained polycrystalline graphene sheets is investigated. Our results reveal that the ultra-fine grained graphene structures have thermal conductivity one order of magnitude smaller than that of pristine graphene. Based on the information provided by the EMD simulations, we constructed finite element models of polycrystalline graphene sheets to probe the thermal conductivity of samples with larger grain sizes. Using the developed multiscale approach, we also investigated the effects of grain size distribution and thermal conductivity of grains on the effective thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene. The proposed multiscale approach on the basis of molecular dynamics and finite element methods could be used to evaluate the effective thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene and other 2D structures.

  5. Inverse pseudo Hall-Petch relation in polycrystalline graphene.

    PubMed

    Sha, Z D; Quek, S S; Pei, Q X; Liu, Z S; Wang, T J; Shenoy, V B; Zhang, Y W

    2014-08-08

    Understanding the grain size-dependent failure behavior of polycrystalline graphene is important for its applications both structurally and functionally. Here we perform molecular dynamics simulations to study the failure behavior of polycrystalline graphene by varying both grain size and distribution. We show that polycrystalline graphene fails in a brittle mode and grain boundary junctions serve as the crack nucleation sites. We also show that its breaking strength and average grain size follow an inverse pseudo Hall-Petch relation, in agreement with experimental measurements. Further, we find that this inverse pseudo Hall-Petch relation can be naturally rationalized by the weakest-link model, which describes the failure behavior of brittle materials. Our present work reveals insights into controlling the mechanical properties of polycrystalline graphene and provides guidelines for the applications of polycrystalline graphene in flexible electronics and nano-electronic-mechanical devices.

  6. Epitaxial growth of cadmium telluride films on silicon with a buffer silicon carbide layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, V. V.; Kukushkin, S. A.; Osipov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    An epitaxial 1-3-μm-thick cadmium telluride film has been grown on silicon with a buffer silicon carbide layer using the method of open thermal evaporation and condensation in vacuum for the first time. The optimum substrate temperature was 500°C at an evaporator temperature of 580°C, and the growth time was 4 s. In order to provide more qualitative growth of cadmium telluride, a high-quality 100-nm-thick buffer silicon carbide layer was previously synthesized on the silicon surface using the method of topochemical substitution of atoms. The ellipsometric, Raman, X-ray diffraction, and electron-diffraction analyses showed a high structural perfection of the CdTe layer in the absence of a polycrystalline phase.

  7. Synchrotron X-ray Microdiffraction Analysis of Proton Irradiated Polycrystalline Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. I.; Davidson, J. L.; Ice, G. E.; Liu, W.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray microdiffraction is a non-destructive technique that allows for depth-resolved, strain measurements with sub-micron spatial resolution. These capabilities make this technique promising for understanding the mechanical properties of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). This investigation examined the local strain induced by irradiating a polycrystalline diamond thin film with a dose of 2x10(exp 17) H(+)per square centimeter protons. Preliminary results indicate that a measurable strain, on the order of 10(exp -3), was introduced into the film near the End of Range (EOR) region of the protons.

  8. Tensile creep behavior of polycrystalline alumina fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Tensile creep studies were conducted on polycrystalline Nextel 610 and Fiber FP alumina fibers with grain sizes of 100 and 300 nm, respectively. Test conditions were temperatures from 800 to 1050 C and stresses from 60 to 1000 MPa. For both fibers, only a small primary creep portion occurred followed by steady-state creep. The stress exponents for steady-state creep of Nextel 610 and Fiber FP were found to be about 3 and 1, respectively. At lower temperatures, below 1000 C, the finer grained Nextel 610 had a much higher 0.2 percent creep strength for 100 hr than the Fiber FP; while at higher temperatures, Nextel 610 had a comparable creep strength to the Fiber FP. The stress and grain size dependencies suggest Nextel 610 and Fiber FP creep rates are due to grain boundary sliding controlled by interface reaction and Nabarro-Herring mechanisms, respectively.

  9. Imaging performance of crystalline and polycrystalline oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Donald D.; Lange, Charles H.; Fischer, David J.

    1990-10-01

    Knowledge of the scatter characteristics of candidate infrared sensor dome materials is necessary for the evaluation of image quality and susceptibility to bright off-axis sources. For polycrystalline materials in particular, the scattering levels are high enough to warrant concern. To evaluate the effects of scatter on image quality, estimates of the window Point Spread Function (PSF), or its transform, the Optical Transfer Function (OTF) are required. Additionally, estimates of the material scatter cross-section per unit volume are essential for determining flare susceptibility. Experimental procedures and models in use at JHU/APL allow the determination of each. Measurement results are provided for samples of A1203 (ordinary ray), Y203, LaO3-doped Y203, MgAL2O4, and ALON. Applications of these results are illustrated for planar windows having arbitrary orientations with respect to the optical axis.

  10. Plastic deformation of polycrystalline zirconium carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darolia, R.; Archbold, T. F.

    1976-01-01

    The compressive yield strength of arc-melted polycrystalline zirconium carbide has been found to vary from 77 kg per sq mm at 1200 C to 19 kg per sq mm at 1800 C. Yield drops were observed with plastic strain-rates greater than 0.003/sec but not with slower strain rates. Strain-rate change experiments yielded values for the strain-rate sensitivity parameter m which range from 6.5 at 1500 C to 3.8 at 1800 C, and the product dislocation velocity stress exponent times T was found to decrease linearly with increasing temperature. The deformation rate results are consistent with the Kelly-Rowcliffe model in which the diffusion of carbon assists the motion of dislocations.

  11. Modeling of Irradiation Hardening of Polycrystalline Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongsheng; Zbib, Hussein M.; Garmestani, Hamid; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-09-14

    High energy particle irradiation of structural polycrystalline materials usually produces irradiation hardening and embrittlement. The development of predict capability for the influence of irradiation on mechanical behavior is very important in materials design for next generation reactors. In this work a multiscale approach was implemented to predict irradiation hardening of body centered cubic (bcc) alpha-iron. The effect of defect density, texture and grain boundary was investigated. In the microscale, dislocation dynamics models were used to predict the critical resolved shear stress from the evolution of local dislocation and defects. In the macroscale, a viscoplastic self-consistent model was applied to predict the irradiation hardening in samples with changes in texture and grain boundary. This multiscale modeling can guide performance evaluation of structural materials used in next generation nuclear reactors.

  12. Polycrystalline-thin-film thermophotovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.

    1996-02-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cells convert thermal energy to electricity. Modularity, portability, silent operation, absence of moving parts, reduced air pollution, rapid start-up, high power densities, potentially high conversion efficiencies, choice of a wide range of heat sources employing fossil fuels, biomass, and even solar radiation are key advantages of TPV cells in comparison with fuel cells, thermionic and thermoelectric convertors, and heat engines. The potential applications of TPV systems include: remote electricity supplies, transportation, co-generation, electric-grid independent appliances, and space, aerospace, and military power applications. The range of bandgaps for achieving high conversion efficiencies using low temperature (1000-2000 K) black-body or selective radiators is in the 0.5-0.75 eV range. Present high efficiency convertors are based on single crystalline materials such as In1-xGaxAs, GaSb, and Ga1-xInxSb. Several polycrystalline thin films such as Hg1-xCdxTe, Sn1-xCd2xTe2, and Pb1-xCdxTe, etc., have great potential for economic large-scale applications. A small fraction of the high concentration of charge carriers generated at high fluences effectively saturates the large density of defects in polycrystalline thin films. Photovoltaic conversion efficiencies of polycrystalline thin films and PV solar cells are comparable to single crystalline Si solar cells, e.g., 17.1% for CuIn1-xGaxSe2 and 15.8% for CdTe. The best recombination-state density Nt is in the range of 10-15-10-16 cm-3 acceptable for TPV applications. Higher efficiencies may be achieved because of the higher fluences, possibility of bandgap tailoring, and use of selective emitters such as rare earth oxides (erbia, holmia, yttria) and rare earth-yttrium aluminium garnets. As compared to higher bandgap semiconductors such as CdTe, it is easier to dope the lower bandgap semiconductors. TPV cell development can benefit from the more mature PV solar cell and opto

  13. Dynamical electrophotoconductivity in polycrystalline thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowel, S. T.; Kornreich, P. G.

    1982-01-01

    Polycrystalline cadmium sulfide (CdS) films were deposited on lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrates by vacuum evaporation and annealed to obtain high photosensitivity. The change in photoconductivity of these films due to the penetration of electric fields associated with elastic waves propagating on their substrates was demonstrated and studied. The relationship between the acoustic electric field and the induced change in film conductivity was found to be a nonlinear one. The fractional change in conductivity is strongly dependent on the light intensity and the film temperature, showing a prominent maximum as a function of these quantities. The largest recorded fractional change in conductivity was about 25% at electric fields of the order of 1,000 volts per centimeter. A phenomological model was developed based on the interaction between the space charge created by the electric field and the electron trapping states in the photoconductor.

  14. Polycrystalline Thin Film Device Degradation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, D. S.; McMahon, T. J.; Pankow, J. W.; Noufi, R.; Demtsu, S. H.; Davies, A.

    2005-11-01

    Oxygen during vapor CdCl2 (VCC) treatments significantly reduced resistive shunts observed in CdS/CdTe polycrystalline devices using thinner CdS layers during 100 deg C, open-circuit, 1-sun accelerated stress testing. Cu oxidation resulting from the reduction of various trace oxides present in as-grown and VCC treated films is the proposed mechanism by which Cu diffusion, and subsequent shunts are controlled. Graphite paste layers between metallization and CdTe behave like diffusion barriers and similarly benefit device stability. Ni-based contacts form a protective Ni2Te3 intermetallic layer that reduces metal diffusion but degrades performance through increased series resistance.

  15. New Deep Reactive Ion Etching Process Developed for the Microfabrication of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Laura J.; Beheim, Glenn M.

    2005-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a promising material for harsh environment sensors and electronics because it can enable such devices to withstand high temperatures and corrosive environments. Microfabrication techniques have been studied extensively in an effort to obtain the same flexibility of machining SiC that is possible for the fabrication of silicon devices. Bulk micromachining using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) is attractive because it allows the fabrication of microstructures with high aspect ratios (etch depth divided by lateral feature size) in single-crystal or polycrystalline wafers. Previously, the Sensors and Electronics Branch of the NASA Glenn Research Center developed a DRIE process for SiC using the etchant gases sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and argon (Ar). This process provides an adequate etch rate of 0.2 m/min and yields a smooth surface at the etch bottom. However, the etch sidewalls are rougher than desired, as shown in the preceding photomicrograph. Furthermore, the resulting structures have sides that slope inwards, rather than being precisely vertical. A new DRIE process for SiC was developed at Glenn that produces smooth, vertical sidewalls, while maintaining an adequately high etch rate.

  16. Preparation of Silicon Nanowire Field-effect Transistor for Chemical and Biosensing Applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jennifer Yun-Shin; Lin, Chih-Heng; Feng, Mei-Huei; Chen, Chien-Hung; Su, Ping-Chia; Yang, Po-Wen; Zheng, Jian-Ming; Fu, Chang-Wei; Yang, Yuh-Shyong

    2016-04-21

    Surveillance using biomarkers is critical for the early detection, rapid intervention, and reduction in the incidence of diseases. In this study, we describe the preparation of polycrystalline silicon nanowire field-effect transistors (pSNWFETs) that serve as biosensing devices for biomarker detection. A protocol for chemical and biomolecular sensing by using pSNWFETs is presented. The pSNWFET device was demonstrated to be a promising transducer for real-time, label-free, and ultra-high-sensitivity biosensing applications. The source/drain channel conductivity of a pSNWFET is sensitive to changes in the environment around its silicon nanowire (SNW) surface. Thus, by immobilizing probes on the SNW surface, the pSNWFET can be used to detect various biotargets ranging from small molecules (dopamine) to macromolecules (DNA and proteins). Immobilizing a bioprobe on the SNW surface, which is a multistep procedure, is vital for determining the specificity of the biosensor. It is essential that every step of the immobilization procedure is correctly performed. We verified surface modifications by directly observing the shift in the electric properties of the pSNWFET following each modification step. Additionally, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to examine the surface composition following each modification. Finally, we demonstrated DNA sensing on the pSNWFET. This protocol provides step-by-step procedures for verifying bioprobe immobilization and subsequent DNA biosensing application.

  17. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Karthik

    2011-12-01

    Silicon Photonics is quickly proving to be a suitable interconnect technology for meeting the future goals of on-chip bandwidth and low power requirements. However, it is not clear how silicon photonics will be integrated into CMOS chips, particularly microprocessors. The issue of integrating photonic circuits into electronic IC fabrication processes to achieve maximum flexibility and minimum complexity and cost is an important one. In order to minimize usage of chip real estate, it will be advantageous to integrate in three-dimensions. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is emerging as a promising material for the 3-D integration of silicon photonics for on-chip optical interconnects. In addition, a-Si:H film can be deposited using CMOS compatible low temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at any point in the fabrication process allowing maximum flexibility and minimal complexity. In this thesis, we demonstrate a-Si:H as a high performance alternate platform to crystalline silicon, enabling backend integration of optical interconnects in a hybrid photonic-electronic network-on-chip architecture. High quality passive devices are fabricated on a low-loss a-Si:H platform enabling wavelength division multiplexing schemes. We demonstrate a broadband all-optical modulation scheme based on free-carrier absorption effect, which can enable compact electro-optic modulators in a-Si:H. Furthermore, we comprehensively characterize the optical nonlinearities in a-Si:H and observe that a-Si:H exhibits enhanced nonlinearities as compared to crystalline silicon. Based on the enhanced nonlinearities, we demonstrate low-power four-wave mixing in a-Si:H waveguides enabling high speed all-optical devices in an a-Si:H platform. Finally, we demonstrate a novel data encoding scheme using thermal and all-optical tuning of silicon waveguides, increasing the spectral efficiency in an interconnect link.

  18. Synthesis of silane and silicon in a non-equilibrium plasma jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calcote, H. F.; Felder, W.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of using a non-equilibrium hydrogen plasma jet as a chemical synthesis tool was investigated. Four possible processes were identified for further study: (1) production of polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic surfaces, (2) production of SiHCl3 from SiCl4, (3) production of SiH4 from SiHCl3, and (4) purification of SiCl4 by metal impurity nucleation. The most striking result was the recognition that the strongly adhering silicon films, amorphous or polycrystalline, produced in our studies could be the basis for preparing a photovoltaic surface directly; this process has potential advantages over other vapor deposition processes.

  19. Expanding the versatility of silicon carbide thin films and nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Lunet

    Silicon carbide (SiC) based electronics and sensors hold promise for pushing past the limits of current technology to achieve small, durable devices that can function in high-temperature, high-voltage, corrosive, and biological environments. SiC is an ideal material for such conditions due to its high mechanical strength, excellent chemical stability, and its biocompatibility. Consequently, SiC thin films and nanowires have attracted interest in applications such as micro- and nano-electromechanical systems, biological sensors, field emission cathodes, and energy storage devices. However to fully realize SiC in such technologies, the reliability of metal contacts to SiC at high temperatures must be improved and the nanowire growth mechanism must be understood to enable strict control of nanowire crystal structure and orientation. Here, we present a novel metallization scheme, utilizing solid-state graphitization of SiC, to improve the long-term reliability of Pt/Ti contacts to polycrystalline n-type SiC films at high temperature. The metallization scheme includes an alumina protection layer and exhibits low, stable contact resistivity even after long-term (500 hr) testing in air at 450 ºC. We also report the crystal structure and growth mechanism of Ni-assisted silicon carbide nanowires using single-source precursor, methyltrichlorosilane. The effects of growth parameters, such as substrate and temperature, on the structure and morphology of the resulting nanowires will also be presented. Overall, this study provides new insights towards the realization of novel SiC technologies, enabled by advanced electron microscopy techniques located in the user facilities at the Molecular Foundry in Berkeley, California. This work was performed in part at the Molecular Foundry, supported by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  20. Study of silicon strip waveguides with diffraction gratings and photonic crystals tuned to a wavelength of 1.5 µm

    SciTech Connect

    Barabanenkov, M. Yu. Vyatkin, A. F.; Volkov, V. T.; Gruzintsev, A. N.; Il’in, A. I.; Trofimov, O. V.

    2015-12-15

    Single-mode submicrometer-thick strip waveguides on silicon-on-insulator substrates, fabricated by silicon-planar-technology methods are considered. To solve the problem of 1.5-µm wavelength radiation input-output and its frequency filtering, strip diffraction gratings and two-dimensional photonic crystals are integrated into waveguides. The reflection and transmission spectra of gratings and photonic crystals are calculated. The waveguide-mode-attenuation coefficient for a polycrystalline silicon waveguide is experimentally estimated.

  1. Analysis of twelve-month degradation in three polycrystalline photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, T.; Potter, B. G.; Simmons-Potter, K.

    2016-09-01

    Polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic (PV) modules have the advantage of lower manufacturing cost as compared to their monocrystalline counterparts, but generally exhibit both lower initial module efficiencies and more significant early-stage efficiency degradation than do similar monocrystalline PV modules. For both technologies, noticeable deterioration in power conversion efficiency typically occurs over the first two years of usage. Estimating PV lifetime by examining the performance degradation behavior under given environmental conditions is, therefore, one of continual goals for experimental research and economic analysis. In the present work, accelerated lifecycle testing (ALT) on three polycrystalline PV technologies was performed in a full-scale, industrial-standard environmental chamber equipped with single-sun irradiance capability, providing an illumination uniformity of 98% over a 2 x 1.6m area. In order to investigate environmental aging effects, timedependent PV performance (I-V characteristic) was evaluated over a recurring, compressed day-night cycle, which simulated local daily solar insolation for the southwestern United States, followed by dark (night) periods. During a total test time of just under 4 months that corresponded to a year equivalent exposure on a fielded module, the temperature and humidity varied in ranges from 3°C to 40°C and 5% to 85% based on annual weather profiles for Tucson, AZ. Removing the temperature de-rating effect that was clearly seen in the data enabled the computation of normalized efficiency degradation with time and environmental exposure. Results confirm the impact of environmental conditions on the module long-term performance. Overall, more than 2% efficiency degradation in the first year of usage was observed for all thee polycrystalline Si solar modules. The average 5-year degradation of each PV technology was estimated based on their determined degradation rates.

  2. Long Carrier Lifetimes in Large-Grain Polycrystalline CdTe Without CdCl2

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Soren A.; Burst, James M.; Duenow, Joel N.; Guthrey, Harvey L.; Moseley, John; Moutinho, Helio R.; Johnston, Steve W.; Kanevce, Ana; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.; Metzger, Wyatt K.

    2016-06-27

    For decades, polycrystalline CdTe thin films for solar applications have been restricted to grain sizes of microns or less whereas other semiconductors such as silicon and perovskites have produced devices with grains ranging from less than a micron to more than 1 mm. Because the lifetimes in as-deposited polycrystalline CdTe films are typically limited to less than a few hundred picoseconds, a CdCl2 treatment is generally used to improve the lifetime; but this treatment may limit the achievable hole density by compensation. Here, we establish methods to produce CdTe films with grain sizes ranging from hundreds of nanometers to several hundred microns by close-spaced sublimation at industrial manufacturing growth rates. Two-photon excitation photoluminescence spectroscopy shows a positive correlation of lifetime with grain size. Large-grain, as-deposited CdTe exhibits lifetimes exceeding 10 ns without Cl, S, O, or Cu. This uncompensated material allows dopants such as P to achieve a hole density of 1016 cm-3, which is an order of magnitude higher than standard CdCl2-treated devices, without compromising the lifetime.

  3. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Vecchio, K. S.; Huskins, E. L.; Casem, D. T.; Gruner, S. M.; Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Woll, A. R.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T.; Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T.; Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ∼103–104 s−1 in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (∼40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation. PMID:25273733

  4. Long carrier lifetimes in large-grain polycrystalline CdTe without CdCl2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, S. A.; Burst, J. M.; Duenow, J. N.; Guthrey, H. L.; Moseley, J.; Moutinho, H. R.; Johnston, S. W.; Kanevce, A.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Metzger, W. K.

    2016-06-01

    For decades, polycrystalline CdTe thin films for solar applications have been restricted to grain sizes of microns or less whereas other semiconductors such as silicon and perovskites have produced devices with grains ranging from less than a micron to more than 1 mm. Because the lifetimes in as-deposited polycrystalline CdTe films are typically limited to less than a few hundred picoseconds, a CdCl2 treatment is generally used to improve the lifetime; but this treatment may limit the achievable hole density by compensation. Here, we establish methods to produce CdTe films with grain sizes ranging from hundreds of nanometers to several hundred microns by close-spaced sublimation at industrial manufacturing growth rates. Two-photon excitation photoluminescence spectroscopy shows a positive correlation of lifetime with grain size. Large-grain, as-deposited CdTe exhibits lifetimes exceeding 10 ns without Cl, S, O, or Cu. This uncompensated material allows dopants such as P to achieve a hole density of 1016 cm-3, which is an order of magnitude higher than standard CdCl2-treated devices, without compromising the lifetime.

  5. Grain boundary dominated ion migration in polycrystalline organic–inorganic halide perovskite films

    DOE PAGES

    Shao, Yuchuan; Fang, Yanjun; Li, Tao; ...

    2016-03-21

    The efficiency of perovskite solar cells is approaching that of single-crystalline silicon solar cells despite the presence of large grain boundary (GB) area in the polycrystalline thin films. Here, by using a combination of nanoscopic and macroscopic level measurements, we show that the ion migration in polycrystalline perovskites is dominated through GBs. Conducting atomic force microscopy measurements reveal much stronger hysteresis both for photocurrent and dark-current at the GBs than on the grains interiors, which can be explained by faster ion migration at the GBs. The dramatically enhanced ion migration results in a redistribution of ions along the GBs aftermore » electric poling, in contrast to the intact grain area. The perovskite single-crystal devices without GBs show negligible current hysteresis and no ion-migration signal. Furthermore, the discovery of dominating ion migration through GBs in perovskites can lead to broad applications in many types of devices including photovoltaics, memristors, and ion batteries.« less

  6. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C.; Vecchio, K. S.; Huskins, E. L.; Casem, D. T.; Gruner, S. M.; Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T.; Woll, A. R.; Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T.; Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J.

    2014-09-15

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ∼10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} s{sup −1} in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (∼40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  7. In-Plane Thermal Conductivity of Polycrystalline Chemical Vapor Deposition Graphene with Controlled Grain Sizes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woomin; Kihm, Kenneth David; Kim, Hong Goo; Shin, Seungha; Lee, Changhyuk; Park, Jae Sung; Cheon, Sosan; Kwon, Oh Myoung; Lim, Gyumin; Lee, Woorim

    2017-03-06

    Manipulation of the chemical vapor deposition graphene synthesis conditions, such as operating P, T, heating/cooling time intervals, and precursor gas concentration ratios (CH4/H2), allowed for synthesis of polycrystalline single-layered graphene with controlled grain sizes. The graphene samples were then suspended on 8 μm diameter patterned holes on a silicon-nitride (Si3N4) substrate, and the in-plane thermal conductivities k(T) for 320 K < T < 510 K were measured to be 2660-1230, 1890-1020, and 680-340 W/m·K for average grain sizes of 4.1, 2.2, and 0.5 μm, respectively, using an opto-thermal Raman technique. Fitting of these data by a simple linear chain model of polycrystalline thermal transport determined k = 5500-1980 W/m·K for single-crystal graphene for the same temperature range above; thus, significant reduction of k was achieved when the grain size was decreased from infinite down to 0.5 μm. Furthermore, detailed elaborations were performed to assess the measurement reliability of k by addressing the hole-edge boundary condition, and the air-convection/radiation losses from the graphene surface.

  8. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading.

    PubMed

    Lambert, P K; Hustedt, C J; Vecchio, K S; Huskins, E L; Casem, D T; Gruner, S M; Tate, M W; Philipp, H T; Woll, A R; Purohit, P; Weiss, J T; Kannan, V; Ramesh, K T; Kenesei, P; Okasinski, J S; Almer, J; Zhao, M; Ananiadis, A G; Hufnagel, T C

    2014-09-01

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ~10(3)-10(4) s(-1) in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10-20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (~40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  9. Polycrystallinity and stacking in CVD graphene.

    PubMed

    Tsen, Adam W; Brown, Lola; Havener, Robin W; Park, Jiwoong

    2013-10-15

    Graphene, a truly two-dimensional hexagonal lattice of carbon atoms, possesses remarkable properties not seen in any other material, including ultrahigh electron mobility, high tensile strength, and uniform broadband optical absorption. While scientists initially studied its intrinsic properties with small, mechanically exfoliated graphene crystals found randomly, applying this knowledge would require growing large-area films with uniform structural and physical properties. The science of graphene has recently experienced revolutionary change, mainly due to the development of several large-scale growth methods. In particular, graphene synthesis by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper is a reliable method to obtain films with mostly monolayer coverage. These films are also polycrystalline, consisting of multiple graphene crystals joined by grain boundaries. In addition, portions of these graphene films contain more than one layer, and each layer can possess a different crystal orientation and stacking order. In this Account, we review the structural and physical properties that originate from polycrystallinity and stacking in CVD graphene. To begin, we introduce dark-field transmission electron microscopy (DF-TEM), a technique which allows rapid and accurate imaging of key structural properties, including the orientation of individual domains and relative stacking configurations. Using DF-TEM, one can easily identify "lateral junctions," or grain boundaries between adjacent domains, as well as "vertical junctions" from the stacking of graphene multilayers. With this technique, we can distinguish between oriented (Bernal or rhombohedral) and misoriented (twisted) configurations. The structure of lateral junctions in CVD graphene is sensitive to growth conditions and is reflected in the material's electrical and mechanical properties. In particular, grain boundaries in graphene grown under faster reactant flow conditions have no gaps or overlaps, unlike more

  10. [Promising technologies in surgery].

    PubMed

    Kotiv, B N; Maĭstrenko, N A

    2013-06-01

    In modern conditions of local wars and armed conflicts, the basic principle of medical care is to reduce injuries stages of medical evacuation, aimed at accelerating the provision of specialized surgical care. In this regard, significantly increases the need for the development and implementation of new high-tech methods that can improve quality of care, both on the battlefield and on the stages of specialized surgical care. A promising direction is the introduction into clinical practice: minimally invasive technologies, the concept of hybrid navigation surgery, operations with the use of laser technology and robotics, advanced and extremely extensive interventions to cancer patients; technology reduces blood loss, use of cell therapy, transplantation techniques, the development of the concept of organ transplantation, lost in combat trauma, the creation of artificial organs and tissues, the creation of personal protective equipment, integrated with a system of combat, etc.

  11. Credible threats and promises.

    PubMed

    McNamara, John M; Houston, Alasdair I

    2002-11-29

    We consider various implications of information about the other player in two-player evolutionary games. A simple model of desertion shows that information about the partner's behaviour can be disadvantageous, and highlights the idea of credible threats. We then discuss the general issue of whether the partner can convince the focal player that it will behave in a specific way, i.e. whether the focal player can make credible threats or promises. We show that when desertion decisions depend on reserves, a player can manipulate its reserves so as to create a credible threat of desertion. We then extend previous work on the evolution of trust and commitment, discussing conditions under which it is advantageous to assume that a partner will behave in a certain way even though it is not in its best interest.

  12. Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-06-01

    This National Center for Photovoltaics sheet describes the capabilities of its polycrystalline thin-film research in the area of cadmium telluride. The scope and core competencies and capabilities are discussed.

  13. Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  14. Silicon spintronics.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Ron

    2012-04-23

    Worldwide efforts are underway to integrate semiconductors and magnetic materials, aiming to create a revolutionary and energy-efficient information technology in which digital data are encoded in the spin of electrons. Implementing spin functionality in silicon, the mainstream semiconductor, is vital to establish a spin-based electronics with potential to change information technology beyond imagination. Can silicon spintronics live up to the expectation? Remarkable advances in the creation and control of spin polarization in silicon suggest so. Here, I review the key developments and achievements, and describe the building blocks of silicon spintronics. Unexpected and puzzling results are discussed, and open issues and challenges identified. More surprises lie ahead as silicon spintronics comes of age.

  15. Colloidal polycrystalline monolayers under oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttinoni, Ivo; Steinacher, Mathias; Spanke, Hendrik Th.; Pokki, Juho; Bahmann, Severin; Nelson, Bradley; Foffi, Giuseppe; Isa, Lucio

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we probe the structural response to oscillatory shear deformations of polycrystalline monolayers of soft repulsive colloids with varying area fraction over a broad range of frequencies and amplitudes. The particles are confined at a fluid interface, sheared using a magnetic microdisk, and imaged through optical microscopy. The structural and mechanical response of soft materials is highly dependent on their microstructure. If crystals are well understood and deform through the creation and mobilization of specific defects, the situation is much more complex for disordered jammed materials, where identifying structural motifs defining plastically rearranging regions remains an elusive task. Our materials fall between these two classes and allow the identification of clear pathways for structural evolution. In particular, we demonstrate that large enough strains are able to fluidize the system, identifying critical strains that fulfill a local Lindemann criterion. Conversely, smaller strains lead to localized and erratic irreversible particle rearrangements due to the motion of structural defects. In this regime, oscillatory shear promotes defect annealing and leads to the growth of large crystalline domains. Numerical simulations help identify the population of rearranging particles with those exhibiting the largest deviatoric stresses and indicate that structural evolution proceeds towards the minimization of the stress stored in the system. The particles showing high deviatoric stresses are localized around grain boundaries and defects, providing a simple criterion to spot regions likely to rearrange plastically under oscillatory shear.

  16. Interface cavitation damage in polycrystalline copper

    SciTech Connect

    Field, D.P.; Adams, B.L. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-06-01

    In this paper determination of an interface damage function (IDF), from a stereological procedure similar to that presented by Hillard is described. The mathematical and experimental simplicity of the method is utilized in measuring an IDF for polycrystalline copper crept at 0.6T{sub m} under uniaxial tension. Whereas previous work focussed on a five parameter description of the local state of a grain boundary, the domain of the IDF is increased to eight degrees of freedom in the present study to include the complete geometrical description of grain boundary structure. The resulting functions identify certain types of grain boundaries which were preferentially damaged. Most of the damage occurred on interfaces oriented nearly normal to the principal stress axis. Some relatively small angle boundaries demonstrated a surprising propensity to cavitate as did certain special boundaries distinguished by a group multiplicity in misorientation space greater than one. A sequence of two dimensional projections through the eight-dimensional domain of the IDF is shown to identify a number of interface structures which are readily damaged.

  17. Stability of polycrystalline Nextel 720 fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Das, G.

    1996-12-31

    The microstructure and tensile properties of polycrystalline Nextel 720 fiber (85 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - 15 wt-% SiO{sub 2}), both crystallized and precrystallized, were evaluated following prolonged thermal exposure at 982{degrees}C in air. The room temperature tensile strengths of Nextel 720 fibers did not appear to suffer degradation for exposures up to 3000 h and the microstructure remained unaffected by thermal exposures. The tensile strength of precrystallized Nextel 720 fiber was also determined at room temperature following heat treatments at 1093-1427{degrees}C in air. The precrystallized Nextel 720 fiber started to show a slight loss of strength after heat treatment at 1093{degrees}C/4 h and the strength deterioration was exacerbated for heat treatments at 1204{degrees}C/4 h and above. Microstructural characterization by x-ray and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the formation of mullite in heat treated precrystallized Nextel 720 fiber at 1204{degrees}C and a coarsening of microstructure above 1204{degrees}C. The degradation of strength in precrystallized Nextel 720 fiber heat treated at 1204{degrees}C/4 h and above may be attributed to phase instability and grain coarsening. Fractographs showed that fracture originated predominantly at the fiber surface.

  18. Polishing of dental porcelain by polycrystalline diamond.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Sato, Hideaki; Ohtsuka, Masaki; Hojo, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Polycrystalline diamond (PCD) exhibits excellent abrasive characteristics and is commonly used as loose grains for precision machining of hard ceramics and other materials that are difficult to grind and polish. In the present study, we investigated using bonded PCD for polishing dental porcelain, for which a lustrous surface is difficult to obtain by polishing. We compared the surface texture and characteristics of dental porcelain after polishing with bonded PCD with that obtained using bonded monocrystalline diamond (MCD), which is commonly used for this purpose. Polishing was performed at various pressures and rotational speeds on a custom-built polishing apparatus using bonded PCD or MCD with grain sizes of 3.92 μm on specimens consisting of VITA Omega 900 dentin porcelain after firing and then glazing to a specified surface roughness. The surface roughness of the polished porcelain and the abrasion quantity in terms of its polishing depth were measured, and its surface texture and characteristics were investigated. At low polishing pressures, PCD yielded a finer polished surface than MCD. The polishing depth after polishing for 20-30 min was approximately 2-3 μm with PCD and 1-2 μm with MCD. The polished surface was more uniform and smooth with PCD than with MCD.

  19. Water vapor interactions with polycrystalline titanium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, A.; Shamir, N.; Volterra, V.; Mintz, M. H.

    1999-02-01

    The initial interactions of water vapor with polycrystalline titanium surfaces were studied at room temperature. Measurements of water vapor surface accumulation were performed in a combined surface analysis system incorporating direct recoils spectrometry (DRS), Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The kinetics of accommodation of the water dissociation fragments (H, O and OH) displayed a complex behavior depending not only on the exposure dose but also on the exposure pressure. For a given exposure dose the efficiency of chemisorption increased with increasing exposure pressure. DRS measurements indicated the occurrence of clustered hydroxyl moieties with tilted O-H bonds formed even at very low surface coverage. A model which assumes two parallel routes of chemisorption, by direct collisions (Langmuir type) and by a precursor state is proposed to account for the observed behavior. The oxidation efficiency of water seemed to be much lower than that of oxygen. No Ti 4+ states were detected even at high water exposure values. It is likely that hydroxyl species play an important role in the reduced oxidation efficiency of water.

  20. Abnormal hopping conduction in semiconducting polycrystalline graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeongho; Mitchel, William C.; Elhamri, Said; Grazulis, Larry; Altfeder, Igor

    2013-07-01

    We report the observation of an abnormal carrier transport phenomenon in polycrystalline semiconducting graphene grown by solid carbon source molecular beam epitaxy. At the lowest temperatures in samples with small grain size, the conduction does not obey the two-dimensional Mott-type variable-range hopping (VRH) conduction often reported in semiconducting graphene. The hopping exponent p is found to deviate from the 1/3 value expected for Mott VRH with several samples exhibiting a p=2/5 dependence. We also show that the maximum energy difference between hopping sites is larger than the activation energy for nearest-neighbor hopping, violating the assumptions of the Mott model. The 2/5 dependence more closely agrees with the quasi-one-dimensional VRH model proposed by Fogler, Teber, and Shklovskii (FTS). In the FTS model, conduction occurs by tunneling between neighboring metallic wires. We suggest that metallic edge states and conductive grain boundaries play the role of the metallic wires in the FTS model.

  1. Thermophotovoltaic Cells on Zinc Diffused Polycrystalline GaSb

    SciTech Connect

    Sulima, O.V.; Bett, A.W.; Dutta, P.S.; Ehsani, H.; Gutmann, R.J.

    2000-05-01

    For the first time, it has been demonstrated that thermophotovoltaic cells made of polycrystalline GaSb with small grain sizes (down to 100 x 100 {micro}m) have similar characteristics to the best Zinc diffused single crystal GaSb cells with identified device parameters. The grain boundaries in polycrystalline GaSb do not degrade TPV cell parameters, indicating that such material can be used for high-efficiency thermophotovoltaic cells.

  2. Photovoltaic Cell Having A P-Type Polycrystalline Layer With Large Crystals

    DOEpatents

    Albright, Scot P.; Chamberlin, Rhodes R.

    1996-03-26

    A photovoltaic cell has an n-type polycrystalline layer and a p-type polycrystalline layer adjoining the n-type polycrystalline layer to form a photovoltaic junction. The p-type polycrystalline layer comprises a substantially planar layer portion having relatively large crystals adjoining the n-type polycrystalline layer. The planar layer portion includes oxidized impurities which contribute to obtainment of p-type electrical properties in the planar layer portion.

  3. Mid-infrared silicon pillar waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Neetesh; Hudson, Darren D.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2015-12-01

    In this work silicon pillar waveguides have been proposed to exploit the entire transparent window of silicon. These geometries posses a broad and at dispersion (from 2 to 6 μm) with four zero dispersion wavelengths. We calculate supercontinuum generation spanning over two octaves (2 to >8 μm) with long wavelengths interacting weakly with the lossy substrate. These structures have higher mode confinement in the silicon - away from the substrate, which makes them substrate independent and are promising for exploring new nonlinear phenomena and highly sensitive molecular sensing over the entire silicon's transparency range

  4. Analysis of porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earwaker, L. G.; Farr, J. P. G.; Grzeszczyk, P. E.; Sturland, I.; Keen, J. M.

    1985-06-01

    Porous silicon, suitable after oxidation for dielectric isolation, has been produced successfully by anodizing silicon in strong HF. The oxidized layer has been shown to have promise in device manufacture, providing high packing densities and radiation hardness. Anodizing has been carried out using both single and double cells, following the effects of current density. HF concentration and silicon resistivity. The resultant porous layers have been characterised with respect to composition and structure. The materials produced differ considerably in lattice strain, composition and reactivities. Prompt radiation analyses 19F(p,αγ), 16O(d,α), 12C(d,p), are useful for monitoring the anodizing procedures and subsequent oxidation: currently, interest centres on the mechanistic information obtained. RBS analysis using α-particles gives a much lower Si response from porous than from bulk silicon. Glancing angle proton recoil analyses reveal considerable quantities of hydrogen in the porous layers. These mutually consistent findings have considerable mechanistic significance; extensive Si-H bonding occurs following a 2 equivalent Faradaic process.

  5. Surface finish and subsurface damage in polycrystalline optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafrir, Shai Negev

    We measure and describe surface microstructure and subsurface damage (SSD) induced by microgrinding of hard metals and hard ceramics used in optical applications. We examine grinding of ceramic materials with bonded abrasives, and, specifically, deterministic microgrinding (DMG). DMG, at fixed nominal infeed rate and with bound diamond abrasive tools, is the preferred technique for optical fabrication of ceramic materials. In DMG material removal is by microcracking. DMG provides cost effective high manufacturing rates, while attaining higher strength and performance, i.e., low level of subsurface damage (SSD). A wide range of heterogeneous materials of interest to the optics industry were studied in this work. These materials include: A binderless tungsten carbide, nonmagnetic Ni-based tungsten carbides, magnetic Co-based tungsten carbides, and, in addition, other hard optical ceramics, such as aluminum oxynitride (Al23O27N5/ALON), polycrystalline alumina (Al2O3/PCA), and chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (Si4C/SiC). These materials are all commercially available. We demonstrate that spots taken with magnetorheological finishing (MRF) platforms can be used for estimating SSD depth induced by the grinding process. Surface morphology was characterized using various microscopy techniques, such as: contact interferometer, noncontact white light interferometer, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The evolution of surface roughness with the amount of material removed by the MRF process, as measured within the spot deepest point of penetration, can be divided into two stages. In the first stage the induced damaged layer and associated SSD from microgrinding are removed, reaching a low surface roughness value. In the second stage we observe interaction between the MRF process and the material's microstructure as MRF exposes the subsurface without introducing new damage. Line scans taken parallel to the MR

  6. Poly-crystalline thin-film by aluminum induced crystallization on aluminum nitride substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhopal, Muhammad Fahad; Lee, Doo Won; Lee, Soo Hong

    2016-09-01

    Thin-film polycrystalline silicon ( pc-Si) on foreign (non-silicon) substrates has been researched by various research groups for the production of photovoltaic cells. High quality pc-Si deposition on foreign substrates with superior optical properties is considered to be the main hurdle in cell fabrication. Metal induced crystallization (MIC) is one of the renowned techniques used to produce this quality of material. In the current study, an aluminum induced crystallization (AIC) method was adopted to produce pc-Si thin-film on aluminum nitride (AlN) substrate by a seed layer approach. Aluminum and a-Si layer were deposited using an e-beam evaporator. Various annealing conditions were used in order to investigate the AIC grown pc-Si seed layers for process optimization. The effect of thermal annealing on grain size, defects preferentially crystallographic orientation of the grains were analyzed. Surface morphology was studied using an optical microscope. Poly-silicon film with a crystallinity fraction between 95-100% and an FWHM between 5-6 cm-1 is achievable at low temperatures and for short time intervals. A grain size of about 10 micron can be obtained at a low deposition rate on an AIN substrate. Similarly, Focused ion beam (FIB) also showed that at 425 °C sample B and at 400 °C sample A were fully crystallized. The crystalline quality of pc-Si was evaluated using μ-Raman spectroscopy as a function of annealed conditions and Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) was used to determine the phase direction of the pc-Si layer. The current study implicates that a poly-silicon layer with good crystallographic orientation and crystallinity fraction is achievable on AIN substrate at low temperatures and short time frames.

  7. Dip-coating process: Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zook, J. D.; Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Koepke, B. G.; Gutter, C. D.; Schuldt, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. The past quarter demonstrated significant progress in several areas. Seeded growth of silicon-on-ceramic (SOC) with an EFG ribbon seed was demonstrated. Different types of mullite were successfully coated with silicon. A new method of deriving minority carrier diffusion length, L sub n from spectral response measurements was evaluated. ECOMOD cost projections were found to be in good agreement with the interim SAMIS method proposed by JPL. On the less positive side, there was a decrease in cell performance which we believe to be due to an unidentified source of impurities.

  8. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide by heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  9. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide includes heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  10. The Promise Rich vs. The Promise Poor. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    America's Promise Alliance (NJ1), 2007

    2007-01-01

    The second "Every Child, Every Promise" research brief examines the association between a family's income and the presence of the Five Promises in their child's life. The report documents the Promise gap that exists between children in low-income families and those in higher income families. Although parents in low-income families are typically…

  11. Nonlinear alternating current conduction in polycrystalline manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, T. N.; Nandi, U. N.; Jana, D.; Dey, K.; Giri, S.

    2014-06-28

    The real part of ac conductance Σ(T, f) of yttrium-doped mixed-valent polycrystalline manganite systems La{sub 1−x−y}Y{sub y}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} with x = 0.33 and 0.05 and y = 0.07 and iron doped LaMn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 3} with x = 0.15 is measured as a function of frequency f by varying zero-frequency Ohmic conductance Σ{sub 0} by T. The former shows a metal-insulator transition, whereas the latter exhibits insulating character throughout the measured temperature range. At a fixed temperature T, Σ(T, f) remains almost constant to the value Σ{sub 0} up to a certain frequency, known as the onset frequency f{sub c} and increases from Σ{sub 0} as frequency is increased from f{sub c}. Scaled appropriately, the data for Σ(T, f) at different T fall on the same universal curve, indicating the existence of a general scaling formalism for the ac conductance. f{sub c} scales with Σ{sub 0} as f{sub c}∼Σ{sub 0}{sup x{sub f}}, where x{sub f} is the nonlinearity exponent characterising the onset. With the help of data for ac conduction, it is shown that x{sub f} is very much phase sensitive and can be used to characterize the different phases in a manganite system originated due to change in temperature or disorder. Scaling theories and existing theoretical models are used to analyze the results of ac conduction and the nonlinearity exponent x{sub f}.

  12. A holistic view of crystalline silicon module reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Hanoka, J.I.

    1995-11-01

    Several aspects of module reliability are discussed, particularly with reference to the encapsulant and its interaction with the metallization and interconnection of a module. A need to look at the module as a whole single unit is stressed. Also, the issue of a slight light degradation effect in crystalline silicon cells is discussed. A model for this is mentioned and it may well be that polycrystalline cells with dislocations may have an advantage.

  13. Silicon-on Ceramic Process: Silicon Sheet Growth and Device Development for the Large-area Silicon Sheet and Cell Development Tasks of the Low-cost Solar Array Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, P. W.; Zook, J. D.; Heaps, J. D.; Grung, B. L.; Koepke, B.; Schuldt, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing solar cell-quality silicon was investigated. This was done by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. Significant progress in the following areas was demonstrated: (1) fabricating a 10 sq cm cell having 9.9 percent conversion efficiency; (2) producing a 225 sq cm layer of sheet silicon; and (3) obtaining 100 microns thick coatings at pull speed of 0.15 cm/sec, although approximately 50 percent of the layer exhibited dendritic growth.

  14. Sheet silicon cell/module technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    The cost involved in the performance of the standard operations for the manufacture of silicon wafers is insignificant in the case of space photovoltaics applications. It is, however, a decisive factor with respect to terrestrial applications of silicon photovoltaic devices. In 1975, a program was, therefore, begun to develop low cost silicon solar arrays for terrestrial applications. The goal was silicon-based photovoltaic (PV) modules ready for installation at a selling price of $0.50/watt (1975 dollars). Sheet and ribbon silicon growth held out the promise of reduced cost through continuous operation, high material throughput, high material utilization efficiency, and a product whose shape lent itself to the assembly of high packing density modules. Attention is given to ribbon growth technologies, sheet technology generic problems, and ribbon cell and module technology status. It is concluded that the potential for crystalline ribbon silicon appears to be better today than ever before.

  15. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-06-11

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  16. A promising new thermoelectric material - Ruthenium silicide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vining, Cronin B.; Mccormack, Joseph A.; Zoltan, Andrew; Zoltan, Leslie D.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical efforts directed toward increasing thermoelectric figure of merit values by a factor of 2 or 3 have been encouraging in several respects. An accurate and detailed theoretical model developed for n-type silicon-germanium (SiGe) indicates that ZT values several times higher than currently available are expected under certain conditions. These new, high ZT materials are expected to be significantly different from SiGe, but not unreasonably so. Several promising candidate materials have been identified which may meet the conditions required by theory. One such candidate, ruthenium silicide, currently under development at JPL, has been estimated to have the potential to exhibit figure of merit values 4 times higher than conventional SiGe materials. Recent results are summarized.

  17. Direct-patterned optical waveguides on amorphous silicon films

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Steve; Bond, Tiziana C.; Bond, Steven W.; Pocha, Michael D.; Hau-Riege, Stefan

    2005-08-02

    An optical waveguide structure is formed by embedding a core material within a medium of lower refractive index, i.e. the cladding. The optical index of refraction of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and polycrystalline silicon (p-Si), in the wavelength range between about 1.2 and about 1.6 micrometers, differ by up to about 20%, with the amorphous phase having the larger index. Spatially selective laser crystallization of amorphous silicon provides a mechanism for controlling the spatial variation of the refractive index and for surrounding the amorphous regions with crystalline material. In cases where an amorphous silicon film is interposed between layers of low refractive index, for example, a structure comprised of a SiO.sub.2 substrate, a Si film and an SiO.sub.2 film, the formation of guided wave structures is particularly simple.

  18. Formation of silicon sheet on a rotating substrate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewoo; Lee, Changbum; Kim, Joonsoo; Jang, Bo-Yun; Ahn, Youngsoo; Yoon, Wooyoung

    2012-04-01

    A spin casting process to fabricate polycrystalline silicon sheets for use as solar cell wafers is presented and the parameters that control the sheet thickness are investigated. The computational model for the spin casting is proposed in order to understand the melt flow and solidification behaviors in the mold. The effect of the rotating speed of the mold and substrate morphology on the silicon sheets is studied via computer simulations, and the simulation results are compared with the experimental results. The numerical study of the fluidity and solidification behavior of the silicon predicted that the formation of rectangular sheets via spin casting is feasible, and the subsequent experiment confirmed this prediction. Using a square mold, rectangular silicon sheets can be produced under appropriate experimental conditions. Microstructural analyses verified the presence of long columnar structures on the sheets.

  19. Laser-induced phase separation of silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Choi, Insung; Jeong, Hu Young; Shin, Hyeyoung; Kang, Gyeongwon; Byun, Myunghwan; Kim, Hyungjun; Chitu, Adrian M; Im, James S; Ruoff, Rodney S; Choi, Sung-Yool; Lee, Keon Jae

    2016-11-30

    Understanding the phase separation mechanism of solid-state binary compounds induced by laser-material interaction is a challenge because of the complexity of the compound materials and short processing times. Here we present xenon chloride excimer laser-induced melt-mediated phase separation and surface reconstruction of single-crystal silicon carbide and study this process by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and a time-resolved reflectance method. A single-pulse laser irradiation triggers melting of the silicon carbide surface, resulting in a phase separation into a disordered carbon layer with partially graphitic domains (∼2.5 nm) and polycrystalline silicon (∼5 nm). Additional pulse irradiations cause sublimation of only the separated silicon element and subsequent transformation of the disordered carbon layer into multilayer graphene. The results demonstrate viability of synthesizing ultra-thin nanomaterials by the decomposition of a binary system.

  20. Laser-induced phase separation of silicon carbide

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Insung; Jeong, Hu Young; Shin, Hyeyoung; Kang, Gyeongwon; Byun, Myunghwan; Kim, Hyungjun; Chitu, Adrian M.; Im, James S.; Ruoff, Rodney S.; Choi, Sung-Yool; Lee, Keon Jae

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the phase separation mechanism of solid-state binary compounds induced by laser–material interaction is a challenge because of the complexity of the compound materials and short processing times. Here we present xenon chloride excimer laser-induced melt-mediated phase separation and surface reconstruction of single-crystal silicon carbide and study this process by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and a time-resolved reflectance method. A single-pulse laser irradiation triggers melting of the silicon carbide surface, resulting in a phase separation into a disordered carbon layer with partially graphitic domains (∼2.5 nm) and polycrystalline silicon (∼5 nm). Additional pulse irradiations cause sublimation of only the separated silicon element and subsequent transformation of the disordered carbon layer into multilayer graphene. The results demonstrate viability of synthesizing ultra-thin nanomaterials by the decomposition of a binary system. PMID:27901015

  1. Laser-induced phase separation of silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Insung; Jeong, Hu Young; Shin, Hyeyoung; Kang, Gyeongwon; Byun, Myunghwan; Kim, Hyungjun; Chitu, Adrian M.; Im, James S.; Ruoff, Rodney S.; Choi, Sung-Yool; Lee, Keon Jae

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the phase separation mechanism of solid-state binary compounds induced by laser-material interaction is a challenge because of the complexity of the compound materials and short processing times. Here we present xenon chloride excimer laser-induced melt-mediated phase separation and surface reconstruction of single-crystal silicon carbide and study this process by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and a time-resolved reflectance method. A single-pulse laser irradiation triggers melting of the silicon carbide surface, resulting in a phase separation into a disordered carbon layer with partially graphitic domains (~2.5 nm) and polycrystalline silicon (~5 nm). Additional pulse irradiations cause sublimation of only the separated silicon element and subsequent transformation of the disordered carbon layer into multilayer graphene. The results demonstrate viability of synthesizing ultra-thin nanomaterials by the decomposition of a binary system.

  2. Silicon bulk growth for solar cells: Science and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakimoto, Koichi; Gao, Bing; Nakano, Satoshi; Harada, Hirofumi; Miyamura, Yoshiji

    2017-02-01

    The photovoltaic industry is in a phase of rapid expansion, growing by more than 30% per annum over the last few decades. Almost all commercial solar cells presently use single-crystalline or multicrystalline silicon wafers similar to those used in microelectronics; meanwhile, thin-film compounds and alloy solar cells are currently under development. The laboratory performance of these cells, at 26% solar energy conversion efficiency, is now approaching thermodynamic limits, with the challenge being to incorporate these improvements into low-cost commercial products. Improvements in the optical design of cells, particularly in their ability to trap weakly absorbed light, have also led to increasing interest in thin-film cells based on polycrystalline silicon; these cells have advantages over other thin-film photovoltaic candidates. This paper provides an overview of silicon-based solar cell research, especially the development of silicon wafers for solar cells, from the viewpoint of growing both single-crystalline and multicrystalline wafers.

  3. Silicon Film[trademark] photovoltaic manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bottenberg, W.R.; Hall, R.B.; Jackson, E.L.; Lampo, S.; Mulligan, W.E.; Barnett, A.M. )

    1993-04-01

    This report describes work on a project to develop an advanced low-cost manufacturing process for a new utility-scale flatplate module based on thin active layers of polycrystalline silicon on a low-cost substrate. This is called the Silicon-Film[trademark] process. This new power module is based on a new large solar cell that is 675 cm[sup 2] in area. Eighteen of these solar cells form a 170-W module. Twelve ofthese modules form a 2-kW array. The program has three components: (1) development of a Silicon-Film[trademark] wafer machine that can manufacture wafer 675 cm[sup 2] in size with a total product cost reductionof 70%; (2) development of an advanced solar cell manufacturing process that will turn the Silicon-Film[trademark] wafer into a 14%-efficient solar cell; and (3) development of an advanced module design based on these large-area, efficient silicon solar cells with an average power of 170 watts. The completion of these three tasks will lead to a new power module designed for utility and other power applications with asubstantially lower cost.

  4. Shielded silicon gate complementary MOS integrated circuit.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, H. C.; Halsor, J. L.; Hayes, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    An electrostatic shield for complementary MOS integrated circuits was developed to minimize the adverse effects of stray electric fields created by the potentials in the metal interconnections. The process is compatible with silicon gate technology. N-doped polycrystalline silicon was used for all the gates and the shield. The effectiveness of the shield was demonstrated by constructing a special field plate over certain transistors. The threshold voltages obtained on an oriented silicon substrate ranged from 1.5 to 3 V for either channel. Integrated inverters performed satisfactorily from 3 to 15 V, limited at the low end by the threshold voltages and at the high end by the drain breakdown voltage of the n-channel transistors. The stability of the new structure with an n-doped silicon gate as measured by the shift in C-V curve under 200 C plus or minus 20 V temperature-bias conditions was better than conventional aluminum gate or p-doped silicon gate devices, presumably due to the doping of gate oxide with phosphorous.

  5. Polycrystalline thin film materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, B. N.; Birkmire, R. W.; Phillips, J. E.; Shafarman, W. N.; Hegedus, S. S.; McCandless, B. E.

    1991-11-01

    Results and conclusions of Phase 1 of a multi-year research program on polycrystalline thin film solar cells are presented. The research comprised investigation of the relationships among processing, materials properties and device performance of both CuInSe2 and CdTe solar cells. The kinetics of the formation of CuInSe2 by selenization with hydrogen selenide was investigated and a CuInSe2/Cds solar cell was fabricated. An alternative process involving the reaction of deposited copper-indium-selenium layers was used to obtain single phase CuInSe2 films and a cell efficiency of 7 percent. Detailed investigations of the open circuit voltage of CuInSe2 solar cells showed that a simple Shockley-Read-Hall recombination mechanism can not account for the limitations in open circuit voltage. Examination of the influence of CuInSe2 thickness on cell performance indicated that the back contact behavior has a significant effect when the CuInSe2 is less than 1 micron thick. CdTe/CdS solar cells with efficiencies approaching 10 percent can be repeatedly fabricated using physical vapor deposition and serial post deposition processing. The absence of moisture during post deposition was found to be critical. Improvements in short circuit current of CdTe solar cells to levels approaching 25 mA/cm(exp 2) are achievable by making the CdS window layer thinner. Further reductions in the CdS window layer thickness are presently limited by interdiffusion between the CdS and the CdTe. CdTe/CdS cells stored without protection from the atmosphere were found to degrade. The degradation was attributed to the metal contact. CdTe cells with ZnTe:Cu contacts to the CdTe were found to be more stable than cells with metal contacts. Analysis of current-voltage and spectral response of CdTe/CdS cells indicates the cell operates as a p-n heterojunction with the diode current dominated by SRH recombination in the junction region of the CdTe.

  6. The electrical conductivity of polycrystalline metallic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraga, Luis; Arenas, Claudio; Henriquez, Ricardo; Bravo, Sergio; Solis, Basilio

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the electrical conductivity of polycrystalline metallic films by means of a semi-numerical procedure that provides solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation, that are essentially exact, by summing over classical trajectories according to Chambers' method. Following Mayadas and Shatzkes (MS), grain boundaries are modeled as an array of parallel plane barriers situated perpendicularly to the direction of the current. Alternatively, according to Szczyrbowski and Schmalzbauer (SS), the model consists in a triple array of these barriers in mutual perpendicular directions. The effects of surface roughness are described by means of Fuchs' specularity parameters. Following SS, the scattering properties of grain boundaries are taken into account by means of another specularity parameter and a probability of coherent passage. The difference between the sum of these and one is the probability of diffuse scattering. When this formalism is compared with the approximate formula of Mayadas and Shatzkes (Phys. Rev. B 1, 103 (1986)) it is shown that the latter greatly overestimates the film resistivity over most values of the reflectivity of the grain boundaries. The dependence of the conductivity of thin films on the probability of coherent passage and grain diameters is examined. In accordance with MS we find that the effects of disorder in the distribution of grain diameters is quite small. Moreover, we find that it is not safe to neglect the effects of the scattering by the additional interfaces created by stacked grains. However, when compared with recent resitivity-thickness data, it is shown that all three formalisms can provide accurate fits to experiment. In addition, it is shown that, depending on the respective reflectivities and distance from a surface, some of these interfaces may increase or diminish considerably the conductivity of the sample. As an illustration of this effect, we show a tentative fit of resistivity data of gold films measured by

  7. Silicon material task review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenz, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA) Project Silicon Material Task are to evaluate technologies, new and old; to develop the most promising technologies; to establish practicality of the processes to meet production, energy use, and economic criteria; and to develop an information base on impurities in polysilicon and to determine their effects on solar cell performance. The approach involves determining process feasibility, setting milestones for the forced selection of the processes, and establishing the technical readiness of the integrated process.

  8. Reduction of Fermi level pinning and recombination at polycrystalline CdTe surfaces by laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Simonds, Brian J.; Kheraj, Vipul; Palekis, Vasilios; Ferekides, Christos; Scarpulla, Michael A.

    2015-06-14

    Laser processing of polycrystalline CdTe is a promising approach that could potentially increase module manufacturing throughput while reducing capital expenditure costs. For these benefits to be realized, the basic effects of laser irradiation on CdTe must be ascertained. In this study, we utilize surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS) to investigate the changes to the electronic properties of the surface of polycrystalline CdTe solar cell stacks induced by continuous-wave laser annealing. The experimental data explained within a model consisting of two space charge regions, one at the CdTe/air interface and one at the CdTe/CdS junction, are used to interpret our SPS results. The frequency dependence and phase spectra of the SPS signal are also discussed. To support the SPS findings, low-temperature spectrally-resolved photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence were also measured. The data show that a modest laser treatment of 250 W/cm{sup 2} with a dwell time of 20 s is sufficient to reduce the effects of Fermi level pinning at the surface due to surface defects.

  9. Submicrometer-wide amorphous and polycrystalline anatase TiO2 waveguides for microphotonic devices.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Jonathan D B; Evans, Christopher C; Choy, Jennifer T; Reshef, Orad; Deotare, Parag B; Parsy, François; Phillips, Katherine C; Lončar, Marko; Mazur, Eric

    2012-10-08

    We demonstrate amorphous and polycrystalline anatase TiO(2) thin films and submicrometer-wide waveguides with promising optical properties for microphotonic devices. We deposit both amorphous and polycrystalline anatase TiO(2) using reactive sputtering and define waveguides using electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching. For the amorphous TiO(2), we obtain propagation losses of 0.12 ± 0.02 dB/mm at 633 nm and 0.04 ± 0.01 dB/mm at 1550 nm in thin films and 2.6 ± 0.5 dB/mm at 633 nm and 0.4 ± 0.2 dB/mm at 1550 nm in waveguides. Using single-mode amorphous TiO(2) waveguides, we characterize microphotonic features including microbends and optical couplers. We show transmission of 780-nm light through microbends having radii down to 2 μm and variable signal splitting in microphotonic couplers with coupling lengths of 10 μm.

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Modelling polycrystalline solidification using phase field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gránásy, László; Pusztai, Tamás; Warren, James A.

    2004-10-01

    We review recent advances made in the phase field modelling of polycrystalline solidification. Areas covered include the development of theory from early approaches that allow for only a few crystal orientations, to the latest models relying on a continuous orientation field and a free energy functional that is invariant to the rotation of the laboratory frame. We discuss a variety of phenomena, including homogeneous nucleation and competitive growth of crystalline particles having different crystal orientations, the kinetics of crystallization, grain boundary dynamics, and the formation of complex polycrystalline growth morphologies including disordered ('dizzy') dendrites, spherulites, fractal-like polycrystalline aggregates, etc. Finally, we extend the approach by incorporating walls, and explore phenomena such as heterogeneous nucleation, particle-front interaction, and solidification in confined geometries (in channels or porous media).

  11. Guided photoluminescence study of Nd-doped silicon rich silicon oxide and silicon rich silicon nitride waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirasteh, Parastesh; Charrier, Joël; Dumeige, Yannick; Doualan, Jean-Louis; Camy, Patrice; Debieu, Olivier; Liang, Chuan-hui; Khomenkova, Larysa; Lemaitre, Jonathan; Boucher, Yann G.; Gourbilleau, Fabrice

    2013-07-01

    Planar waveguides made of Nd3+-doped silicon rich silicon oxide (SRSO) and silicon rich silicon nitride (SRSN) have been fabricated by reactive magnetron sputtering and characterized with special emphasis on the comparison of the guided photoluminescence (PL) properties of these two matrices. Guided fluorescence excited by top surface pumping at 488 nm on planar waveguides was measured as a function of the distance between the excitation area and the output of the waveguide, as well as a function of the pump power density. The PL intensity increased linearly with pump power without any saturation even at high power. The linear intensity increase of the Nd3+ guided PL under a non-resonant excitation (488 nm) confirms the efficient coupling between either Si-np and rare-earth ions for SRSO or radiative defects and rare earth ions for SRSN. The guided fluorescences at 945 and 1100 nm were observed until 4 mm and 8 mm of the output of the waveguide for Nd3+ doped SRSO and SRSN waveguides, respectively. The guided fluorescence decays of Nd3+-doped-SRSO and -SRSN planar waveguides have been measured and found equal to 97 μs ±7 and 5 μs ± 2, respectively. These results show notably that the Nd3+-doped silicon rich silicon oxide is a very promising candidate on the way to achieve a laser cavity at 1.06 μm.

  12. Software optimization for electrical conductivity imaging in polycrystalline diamond cutters

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, G.; Ludwig, R.; Wiggins, J.; Bertagnolli, K.

    2014-02-18

    We previously reported on an electrical conductivity imaging instrument developed for measurements on polycrystalline diamond cutters. These cylindrical cutters for oil and gas drilling feature a thick polycrystalline diamond layer on a tungsten carbide substrate. The instrument uses electrical impedance tomography to profile the conductivity in the diamond table. Conductivity images must be acquired quickly, on the order of 5 sec per cutter, to be useful in the manufacturing process. This paper reports on successful efforts to optimize the conductivity reconstruction routine, porting major portions of it to NVIDIA GPUs, including a custom CUDA kernel for Jacobian computation.

  13. Improved transport properties of polycrystalline YBCO thin-films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, J.; Verdyan, A.; Lapsker, I.

    1994-12-01

    Resistive evaporation technique was used to fabricate polycrystalline YBaCuO and YBaNaCuO thin films on MgO substrates. Heat treatment was carried out in a low oxygen partial pressure. Polycrystalline YBCO and Na doped YBCO thin films samples were thus obtained using the same technique and conditions. The critical current density of Na doped YBCO sample was measured to be significantly higher than that of the undoped YBCO one. The results are discussed in terms of the Na contribution to the intragrain conductivity.

  14. Cu Migration in Polycrystalline CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Da; Akis, Richard; Brinkman, Daniel; Sankin, Igor; Fang, Tian; Vasileska, Dragica; Ringhofer, Christian

    2014-03-12

    An impurity reaction-diffusion model is applied to Cu defects and related intrinsic defects in polycrystalline CdTe for a better understanding of Cu’s role in the cell level reliability of CdTe PV devices. The simulation yields transient Cu distributions in polycrystalline CdTe during solar cell processing and stressing. Preliminary results for Cu migration using available diffusivity and solubility data show that Cu accumulates near the back contact, a phenomena that is commonly observed in devices after back-contact processing or stress conditions.

  15. State distribution in hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balberg, I.; Dover, Y.; Naides, R.; Conde, J. P.; Chu, V.

    2004-01-01

    We have been able to determine the density of states map in the band gap of a semiconductor by the measurement of the phototransport properties of its majority and minority carriers. In particular we found that the carrier recombination in single-phase hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) is significantly different from the one in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and that it is controlled only by its two band tails. The comparison of the observed temperature dependence of the phototransport properties of this material with model simulations further suggests that, while the conduction-band tail has an exponential distribution of states, the valence-band-tail states have a Gaussian-like distribution. This, in turn, meets the challenge of the determination of the analytical shape of the density of states distribution from experimental data. Our experimental procedure implies then that this distribution is associated with the route through which the transport and phototransport take place and thus we conclude that both the recombination and transport in undoped single-phase μc-Si:H take place in the disordered layer that wraps the crystallites. We further conclude that, from the transport and phototransport points of view, the single-phase μc-Si:H is, in general, different from both polycrystalline silicon and a-Si:H. The polycrystalline-silicon-like behavior, when found, appears to be an asymptotic case in which the crystallites are large enough, while the a-Si:H behavior prevails only when there is a significant content of its phase within the system.

  16. New Perspectives in Silicon Micro and Nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalino, M.; Coppola, G.; De Stefano, L.; Calio, A.; Rea, I.; Mocella, V.; Dardano, P.; Romano, S.; Rao, S.; Rendina, I.

    2015-05-01

    In the last two decades, there has been growing interest in silicon-based photonic devices for many optical applications: telecommunications, interconnects and biosensors. In this work, an advance overview of our results in this field is presented. Proposed devices allow overcoming silicon intrinsic drawbacks limiting its application as a photonic substrate. Taking advantages of both non-linear and linear effects, size reduction at nanometric scale and new two-dimensional emerging materials, we have obtained a progressive increase in device performance along the last years. In this work we show that a suitable design of a thin photonic crystal slab realized in silicon nitride can exhibit a very strong field enhancement. This result is very promising for all photonic silicon devices based on nonlinear phenomena. Moreover we report on the fabrication and characterization of silicon photodetectors working at near-infrared wavelengths based on the internal photoemission absorption in a Schottky junction. We show as an increase in device performance can be obtained by coupling light into both micro-resonant cavity and waveguiding structures. In addition, replacing metal with graphene in a Schottky junction, a further improve in PD performance can be achieved. Finally, silicon-based microarray for biomedical applications, are reported. Microarray of porous silicon Bragg reflectors on a crystalline silicon substrate have been realized using a technological process based on standard photolithography and electrochemical anodization of the silicon. Our insights show that silicon is a promising platform for the integration of various optical functionalities on the same chip opening new frontiers in the field of low-cost silicon micro and nanophotonics.

  17. Record Low Thermal Conductivity of Polycrystalline Si Nanowire: Breaking the Casimir Limit by Severe Suppression of Propagons.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanguang; Hu, Ming

    2016-10-12

    . Our investigation provides a deep insight into the thermal transport in polycrystalline NWs and offers a promising strategy to construct a new kind of semiconducting thermoelectric NW with high figure of merit.

  18. Polycrystalline CdZnTe thick films for low energy x-ray: system evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Sunwoo; Park, Shin-Woong; Yi, Yun

    2006-01-01

    The X-ray response of polycrystalline-CdZnTe was measured by signal-to-noise (S/N) analysis. The CdZnTe material has optimal properties in a solid-state X-ray detector, and much research has focused on single crystal CdZnTe with a small-sized, silicon readout device. However, it would be difficult to apply CdTe or CdZnTe single crystal to large area, flat panel detectors, such as those used for radiography and mammography. As an alternative of single crystal CdZnTe, we have grown thick, polycrystalline CdZnTe films of high resistivity (>5 x 10(9) Ohm cm) using the thermal evaporation method on carbon substrate. A high signal-to-noise value has a direct impact on the performance of CdZnTe X-ray detectors. Important image parameters, such as dynamic range and detective quantum efficiency, rely on the signal and noise characteristics of the system. In this paper, we analyzed the properties of the X-ray detector and obtained images of the X-ray detector using the data acquisition system. The X-ray detector used the Cd1-xZnxTe (x=0.04), which used carbon substrate and gold as the electrode. The detector design is planar and 32 mm x 10 mm in size, and it has a 1.75mm x 1mm pixel electrode size and a detector thickness of 150 microm.

  19. Monolithic uncooled IR detectors of polycrystalline PbSe: a real alternative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, G.; Gómez, L. J.; Villamayor, V.; Álvarez, M.; Torquemada, M. C.; Rodrigo, M. T.; Verdú, M.; Sánchez, F. J.; Almazán, R. M.; Plaza, J.; Rodriguez, P.; Catalán, I.; Gutierrez, R.; Montojo, M. T.; Serra-Graells, F.; Margarit, J. M.; Terés, L.

    2007-04-01

    Paradoxically more than 50 years after being used in WWII, polycrystalline PbSe technology has turned today into an emerging technology. Without any doubt one of the main facts responsible for the PbSe resurgence is a new method for processing detectors based on a Vapour Phase Deposition (VPD) technique developed at CIDA. Using this method, the first low density 2D PbSe Focal Plane Array (FPA), an x-y addressed type device, was processed on silicon. Even though the last advances have been important they are not yet enough to consider this technology as a real alternative to other uncooled technologies. To reach technical relevance and commercial interest it is obligated to integrate monolithically or hybridize the sensors with their corresponding read out electronics (ROIC). Aiming to process monolithic devices, a proper CMOS read out electronics were designed. In parallel, enabled technologies were developed for adapting the material peculiarities to the CMOS substrates. In this work, the first monolithic device of VPD PbSe is presented. Even though it is a modest 16x16 FPA with a pitch of 200 μm, it represents an important milestone, allocating polycrystalline PbSe among the major players in the short list of uncooled IR detectors. Unlike microbolometers and ferroelectrics, it is a photonic detector suitable for being used as a detector in low cost IR imagers sensitive to the MWIR band and with frame rates as high as 1000 fps. The number of applications is therefore huge, some of them specific, unique and highly demanded in the military and security fields such as sensors applied to fast imagers, Active Protection Systems or low cost seekers.

  20. Fully-depleted, back-illuminated charge-coupled devices fabricated on high-resistivity silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Stephen E.; Groom, Donald E.; Palaio, Nick P.; Stover, Richard J.; Wei, Mingzhi

    2002-03-28

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD's) have been fabricated on high-resistivity silicon. The resistivity, on the order of 10,000 {Omega}-cm, allows for depletion depths of several hundred microns. Fully-depleted, back-illuminated operation is achieved by the application of a bias voltage to a ohmic contact on the wafer back side consisting of a thin in-situ doped polycrystalline silicon layer capped by indium tin oxide and silicon dioxide. This thin contact allows for good short wavelength response, while the relatively large depleted thickness results in good near-infrared response.

  1. Recent developments in silicones for topical and transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Aliyar, Hyder; Schalau, Gerald

    2015-07-01

    Silicones have been used in medicines, cosmetics and medical devices for over 60 years. Polydimethylsiloxanes are polymers that are typically used either as an active in oral drug products or as excipients in topical and transdermal drug products. Inherent characteristics like hydrophobicity, adhesion and aesthetics allow silicones to offer function and performance to drug products. Recent technologies like swollen crosslinked silicone elastomer blend networks, sugar siloxanes, amphiphilic resin linear polymers and silicone hybrid pressure sensitive adhesives promise potential performance advantages and improved drug delivery efficacy. This article presents a review of recent silicone material developments focusing on their function as excipients influencing drug delivery in topical and transdermal systems.

  2. Waveguide silicon nitride grating coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvik, Jan; Dolnak, Ivan; Dado, Milan

    2016-12-01

    Grating couplers are one of the most used elements for coupling of light between optical fibers and photonic integrated components. Silicon-on-insulator platform provides strong confinement of light and allows high integration. In this work, using simulations we have designed a broadband silicon nitride surface grating coupler. The Fourier-eigenmode expansion and finite difference time domain methods are utilized in design optimization of grating coupler structure. The fully, single etch step grating coupler is based on a standard silicon-on-insulator wafer with 0.55 μm waveguide Si3N4 layer. The optimized structure at 1550 nm wavelength yields a peak coupling efficiency -2.6635 dB (54.16%) with a 1-dB bandwidth up to 80 nm. It is promising way for low-cost fabrication using complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor fabrication process.

  3. Wetting and infiltration of nitride bonded silicon nitride by liquid silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, V.; Reimann, C.; Friedrich, J.

    2016-04-01

    Nitride bonded silicon nitride (NBSN) is a promising crucible material for the repeated use in the directional solidification of multicrystalline (mc) silicon ingots for photovoltaic applications. Due to wetting and infiltration, however, silicon nitride in its initial state does not offer the desired reusability. In this work the sessile drop method is used to systematically study the wetting and infiltration behavior of NBSN after applying different oxidation procedures. It is found that the wetting of the NBSN crucible by liquid silicon can be prevented by the oxidation of the geometrical surface. The infiltration of liquid silicon into the porous crucible can be suppressed by oxygen enrichment within the volume of the NBSN, i.e. at the pore walls of the crucibles. The realized reusability of the NBSN is demonstrated by reusing a NBSN crucible six times for the directional solidification of undoped multicrystalline silicon ingots.

  4. Silicon microdosimetry.

    PubMed

    Agosteo, Stefano; Pola, Andrea

    2011-02-01

    Silicon detectors are being studied as microdosemeters since they can provide sensitive volumes of micrometric dimensions. They can be applied for assessing single-event effects in electronic instrumentation exposed to complex fields around high-energy accelerators or in space missions. When coupled to tissue-equivalent converters, they can be used for measuring the quality of radiation therapy beams or for dosimetry. The use of micrometric volumes avoids the contribution of wall effects to the measured spectra. Further advantages of such detectors are their compactness, cheapness, transportability and a low sensitivity to vibrations. The following problems need to be solved when silicon devices are used for microdosimetry: (i) the sensitive volume has to be confined in a region of well-known dimensions; (ii) the electric noise limits the minimum detectable energy; (iii) corrections for tissue-equivalency should be made; (iv) corrections for shape equivalency should be made when referring to a spherical simulated site of tissue; (v) the angular response should be evaluated carefully; (vi) the efficiency of a single detector of micrometric dimensions is very poor and detector arrays should be considered. Several devices have been proposed as silicon microdosemeters, based on different technologies (telescope detectors, silicon on insulator detectors and arrays of cylindrical p-n junctions with internal amplification), in order to satisfy the issues mentioned above.

  5. Mechanical properties of monocrystalline and polycrystalline monolayer black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Pinqiang; Wu, Jianyang; Zhang, Zhisen; Ning, Fulong

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical properties of monocrystalline and polycrystalline monolayer black phosphorus (MBP) are systematically investigated using classic molecular dynamic simulations. For monocrystalline MBP, it is found that the shear strain rate, sample dimensions, temperature, atomic vacancies and applied statistical ensemble affect the shear behaviour. The wrinkled morphology is closely connected with the direction of the in-plane shear, dimensions of the samples, and applied ensembles. Particularly, small samples subjected to loading/unloading of the shear deformation along the armchair direction demonstrate a clear mechanical hysteresis loop. For polycrystalline MBP, the maximum shear stress as a function of the average grain size follows an inverse pseudo Hall-Petch type relationship under an isothermal-isobaric (NPT) ensemble, whereas under a canonical (NVT) ensemble, the maximum shear stress of polycrystalline MBP exhibits a ‘flipped’ behaviour. Furthermore, polycrystalline MBP subjected to uniaxial tension also exhibits a strongly grain size-dependent mechanical response, and it can fail by brittle intergranular and transgranular fractures because of its weaker grain boundary structures and the direction-dependent edge energy, respectively. These findings provide useful insight into the mechanical design of BP for nanoelectronic devices.

  6. System of polarization correlometry of biological liquids layers polycrystalline structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushenko, A. G.; Boychuk, T. M.; Mincer, O. P.; Angelsky, P. O.; Bodnar, N. B.; Oleinichenko, B. P.; Bizer, L. I.

    2013-09-01

    A model of generalized optical anisotropy of human bile is suggested and a method of polarimetric of the module and phase Fourier of the image of the field of laser radiation is analytically substantiated, that is generated by the mechanisms of linear and circular birefringence of polycrystalline networks with a diagnosis and differentiation of cholelithiasis against a background of chronic cholecystitis.

  7. Raman Microscopic Characterization of Proton-Irradiated Polycrystalline Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. L.; Davidson, J. L.; Lance, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    The microstructural effects of irradiating polycrystalline diamond films with proton dosages ranging from 10(exp 15) to 10(exp 17) H(+) per square centimeter was examined. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Raman microscopy were used to examine the changes in the diamond crystalline lattice as a function of depth. Results indicate that the diamond lattice is retained, even at maximum irradiation levels.

  8. Anomalous photoelectric effect of a polycrystalline topological insulator film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbin; Yao, Jiandong; Shao, Jianmei; Li, Hai; Li, Shuwei; Bao, Dinghua; Wang, Chengxin; Yang, Guowei

    2014-07-29

    A topological insulator represents a new state of quantum matter that possesses an insulating bulk band gap as well as a spin-momentum-locked Dirac cone on the surface that is protected by time-reversal symmetry. Photon-dressed surface states and light-induced surface photocurrents have been observed in topological insulators. Here, we report experimental observations of an anomalous photoelectric effect in thin films of Bi2Te3, a polycrystalline topological insulator. Under illumination with non-polarised light, transport measurements reveal that the resistance of the topological surface states suddenly increases when the polycrystalline film is illuminated. The resistance variation is positively dependent on the light intensity but has no relation to the applied electric field; this finding can be attributed to the gap opening of the surface Dirac cone. This observation of an anomalous photoelectric effect in polycrystalline topological insulators offers exciting opportunities for the creation of photodetectors with an unusually broad spectral range. Moreover, polycrystalline topological insulator films provide an attractive material platform for exploring the nature and practical application of topological insulators.

  9. Anomalous Photoelectric Effect of a Polycrystalline Topological Insulator Film

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongbin; Yao, Jiandong; Shao, Jianmei; Li, Hai; Li, Shuwei; Bao, Dinghua; Wang, Chengxin; Yang, Guowei

    2014-01-01

    A topological insulator represents a new state of quantum matter that possesses an insulating bulk band gap as well as a spin-momentum-locked Dirac cone on the surface that is protected by time-reversal symmetry. Photon-dressed surface states and light-induced surface photocurrents have been observed in topological insulators. Here, we report experimental observations of an anomalous photoelectric effect in thin films of Bi2Te3, a polycrystalline topological insulator. Under illumination with non-polarised light, transport measurements reveal that the resistance of the topological surface states suddenly increases when the polycrystalline film is illuminated. The resistance variation is positively dependent on the light intensity but has no relation to the applied electric field; this finding can be attributed to the gap opening of the surface Dirac cone. This observation of an anomalous photoelectric effect in polycrystalline topological insulators offers exciting opportunities for the creation of photodetectors with an unusually broad spectral range. Moreover, polycrystalline topological insulator films provide an attractive material platform for exploring the nature and practical application of topological insulators. PMID:25069391

  10. Silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fei; Cao, Zhaohui; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Chu, Binbin; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology suggests new and exciting opportunities for early diagnosis and therapy of cancer. During the recent years, silicon-based nanomaterials featuring unique properties have received great attention, showing high promise for myriad biological and biomedical applications. In this review, we will particularly summarize latest representative achievements on the development of silicon nanostructures as a powerful platform for cancer early diagnosis and therapy. First, we introduce the silicon nanomaterial-based biosensors for detecting cancer markers (e.g., proteins, tumor-suppressor genes and telomerase activity, among others) with high sensitivity and selectivity under molecular level. Then, we summarize in vitro and in vivo applications of silicon nanostructures as efficient nanoagents for cancer therapy. Finally, we discuss the future perspective of silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  11. Epitaxy of silicon carbide on silicon: Micromorphological analysis of growth surface evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhgasan, Ramazanov; Ştefan, Ţălu; Dinara, Sobola; Sebastian, Stach; Guseyn, Ramazanov

    2015-10-01

    The main purpose of our research was the study of evolution of silicon carbide films on silicon by micromorphological analysis. Surface micromorphologies of Silicon Carbide epilayers with two different thicknesses were compared by means of fractal geometry. Silicon Carbide films were prepared on Si substrates by magnetron sputtering of polycrystalline target SiC in Ar atmosphere (99.999% purity). Synthesis of qualitative SiC/Si templates solves the questions of large diameter SiC single-crystal wafers formation. This technology decreases financial expenditure and provides integration of SiC into silicon technology. These hybrid substrates with buffer layer of high oriented SiC are useful for growth of both wide band gap materials (SiC, AlN, GaN) and graphene. The main problem of SiC heteroepitaxy on Si (1 1 1) is the large difference (∼20%) of the lattice parameters. Fractal analysis of surface morphology of heteroepitaxial films could help to understand the films growth mechanisms. The 3D (three-dimensional) surfaces revealed a fractal structure at the nanometer scale. The fractal dimension (D) provided global quantitative values that characterize the scale properties of surface geometry.

  12. Ultra-compact silicon photonic devices reconfigured by an optically induced semiconductor-to-metal transition.

    PubMed

    Ryckman, Judson D; Hallman, Kent A; Marvel, Robert E; Haglund, Richard F; Weiss, Sharon M

    2013-05-06

    Vanadium dioxide (VO(2)) is a promising reconfigurable optical material and has long been a focus of condensed matter research owing to its distinctive semiconductor-to-metal phase transition (SMT), a feature that has stimulated recent development of thermally reconfigurable photonic, plasmonic, and metamaterial structures. Here, we integrate VO(2) onto silicon photonic devices and demonstrate all-optical switching and reconfiguration of ultra-compact broadband Si-VO(2) absorption modulators (L < 1 μm) and ring-resonators (R ~ λ(0)). Optically inducing the SMT in a small, ~0.275 μm(2), active area of polycrystalline VO(2) enables Si-VO(2) structures to achieve record values of absorption modulation, ~4 dB μm(-1), and intracavity phase modulation, ~π/5 rad μm(-1). This in turn yields large, tunable changes to resonant wavelength, |Δλ(SMT)| ~ 3 nm, approximately 60 times larger than Si-only control devices, and enables reconfigurable filtering and optical modulation in excess of 7 dB from modest Q-factor (~10(3)), high-bandwidth ring resonators (>100 GHz). All-optical integrated Si-VO(2) devices thus constitute platforms for reconfigurable photonics, bringing new opportunities to realize dynamic on-chip networks and ultrafast optical shutters and modulators.

  13. Carbonitriding of silicon using plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbar, S.; Khan, I. A.; Ahmad, R.; Zakaullah, M.; Pan, J. S.

    2009-03-15

    Carbonitride thin films have been deposited on silicon substrate by the irradiation of energetic nitrogen ions emanated from dense plasma focus device. The carbon ions are ablated by the irradiation of relativistic electrons from the insert material (graphite) placed at the anode tip. The x-ray diffraction analysis demonstrates that a polycrystalline thin film consisting of various compounds such as Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, SiC, and C{sub 3}N{sub 4} is formed on the silicon (100) substrate. Crystallinity of different compounds decreases with the increase in angular positions (0 deg., 10 deg., and 20 deg. ). Raman spectroscopy shows the appearance of graphitic and disordered bands with silicon nitride and silicon carbide indicating the formation of carbonitride. Raman spectra also indicate that broadening of bands increases with the increase in focus deposition shots, leading to the amorphization of the thin film. The amorphization of the thin films depends on the ion energy flux as well as on the sample angular position. The scanning electron microscopy exhibits the damaging of the substrate surface at 0 deg. angular position. The microstructure shows the tubular shape for higher ion dose (40 focus shots). At 10 deg. angular position, a two phase phenomenon is observed with the ordered phase in the solid solution. A smooth and uniform surface morphology showing a small cluster is observed for the 20 deg. angular position.

  14. Role of nitrogen additive and temperature on growth of diamond films from nanocrystalline to polycrystalline.

    PubMed

    Chunjiu, Tang; José, Grácio; Neves, A J; Hugo, Calisto; Fernandes, A J S; Lianshe, Fu; Sérgio, Pereira; Liping, Gu; Gil, Cabral; Carmo, M C

    2010-04-01

    In this work, the coupled effect of nitrogen addition into CH4/H2 mixtures and surface temperature on diamond growth ranging from large grained polycrystalline to fine-grained nanocrystalline were investigated. Moreover a new growth parameter window for simultaneous growth of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) and {100} textured large-grained diamond films was developed by using a high power high pressure 5 kW microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are employed to characterize the morphology, crystalline quality and texture of the diamond samples. Our results can be grouped by two catalogs: First, deposition run without and with 0.24% N2 addition, while keeping all the other parameters constant, resulted in a high quality transparent large-grained polycrystalline diamond film and a NCD film, respectively. This result clearly evidences nitrogen induced nanocrystallinity. Then, two different substrate surface temperatures were obtained by overlapping a small silicon slice on the top centre of a large silicon wafer of 5.08 cm in diameter in only one deposition run using 0.24% N2 addition and the same set of parameters as the previous runs. From this growth run, a NCD film of growth rate around 2.3 microm/h was obtained at low temperature, while a {100} textured large-grained diamond film of much higher growth rate about 10.4 microm/h was grown at high temperature. These results not only confirm the reproducibility of NCD by N2 addition, but also indicate that distinct growth modes were involved at different substrate temperatures with 0.24% nitrogen addition, or coupled effect of nitrogen addition and temperature on the growth of CVD diamond films happened. Finite element method (FEM) analysis was employed to simulate the temperature gradient and distribution on these two samples, and based on this simulation and other simulation results in the literature, the

  15. Refining of metallurgical-grade silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietl, J.

    1986-01-01

    A basic requirement of large scale solar cell fabrication is to provide low cost base material. Unconventional refining of metallurical grade silicon represents one of the most promising ways of silicon meltstock processing. The refining concept is based on an optimized combination of metallurgical treatments. Commercially available crude silicon, in this sequence, requires a first pyrometallurgical step by slagging, or, alternatively, solvent extraction by aluminum. After grinding and leaching, high purity qualtiy is gained as an advanced stage of refinement. To reach solar grade quality a final pyrometallurgical step is needed: liquid-gas extraction.

  16. Manufacturing technologies for photovoltaics and possible means of their development in Russia (Review). Part 1: General approach to the development of photoelectric converters and basic silicon technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, A. B.; Popel', O. S.

    2015-11-01

    The state and key tendencies of the development of basic technologies for manufacture of photoelectric converters (PECs) in the world are considered, and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The first part of the review gives short information on the development of photovoltaics in the world and planes of the development of solar power plants in Russia. Total power of photoelectric plants operating in various countries in 2015 exceeded 150 GW and increased in the last ten years with a rate of approximately 50% per year. Russia made important state decisions on the support of the development of renewable power engineering and developed mechanisms, which were attractive for business, on the stimulation of building of the network of solar power plants with a total power to 1.5 GW in the country to 2020. At the same time, the rigid demands are made with respect to the localization of the production of components of these plants that opens new abilities for the development of the domestic production of photovoltaics manufacture. Data on the efficiency of PECs of various types that are attained in the leading laboratories of the world are given. Particular emphasis has been placed on the consideration of basic silicon technologies of PEC manufacture, which had the widest commercial application. The basic methods for production of polycrystalline silicon and making single-crystal and multicrystal silicon are described. Fundamentals of making techniques for plates, PECs, and photoelectric modules based on single-crystal and polycrystalline silicon are considered. The second part will be devoted to modifications of manufacturing techniques for photoelectric converters, enhancement methods for contact structures, and recommendations of authors with respect to the choice of prospective technologies for the expansion of PEC production in Russia. It will involve formulations and substantiations of the most promising lines of the development of photoelectric

  17. Nanotechnology: Its Promise and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Vicki Colvin

    2009-05-14

    Vicki Colvin of Rice University talks about how nanotechnology-enabled systems, with dimensions on the scale of a billionth of a meter, offer great promise for solving difficult social problems and creating enormous possibilities.

  18. Liquid crystal claddings for passive temperature stabilization of silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptasinski, Joanna N.; Khoo, Iam-Choon; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2014-10-01

    Silicon photonics allows for high density component integration on a single chip and it brings promise for low-loss, high-bandwidth data processing in modern computing systems. Owing to silicon's high positive thermo-optic coefficient, temperature fluctuations tend to degrade the device performance. This work explores passive thermal stabilization of silicon photonic devices using nematic liquid crystal (NLC) claddings, as they possess large negative thermo-optic coefficients in addition to low absorption at the telecommunication wavelengths.

  19. Silicon-on ceramic process: Silicon sheet growth and device development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grung, B. L.; Heaps, J. D.; Schmit, F. M.; Schuldt, S. B.; Zook, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    The technical feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon to meet the Department of Energy (DOE) 1986 overall price goal of $0.70/watt was investigated. With the silicon-on-ceramic (SOC) approach, a low-cost ceramic substrate is coated with large-grain polycrystalline silicon by unidirectional solidification of molten silicon. This effort was divided into several areas of investigation in order to most efficiently meet the goals of the program. These areas include: (1) dip-coating; (2) continuous coating designated SCIM-coating, and acronym for Silicon Coating by an Inverted Meniscus (SCIM); (3) material characterization; (4) cell fabrication and evaluation; and (5) theoretical analysis. Both coating approaches were successful in producing thin layers of large grain, solar-cell-quality silicon. The dip-coating approach was initially investigated and considerable effort was given to this technique. The SCIM technique was adopted because of its scale-up potential and its capability to produce more conventiently large areas of SOC.

  20. [Study on the micro-infrared spectra and origin of polycrystalline diamonds from Mengyin kimberlite pipes].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Jun; Liang, Rong; Zeng, Xiang-Qing; Ge, Tie-Yan; Ai, Qun; Zheng, Yun-Long; Peng, Ming-Sheng

    2012-06-01

    The natural polycrystalline diamonds from the Mengyin kimberlite pipes can be classified as the euhedral faceted polycrystalline diamonds and anhedral rounded polycrystalline diamonds. The results of micro-FTIR spectra characterization of the polycrystalline diamonds show that the concentration of nitrogen is low, varying from 16.69 to 72.81 microgram per gram and is different among different diamond grains or position in polycrystalline diamonds. The euhedral faceted polycrystalline diamonds are Ia AB type and have higher concentration of A-center defects than B-center defects. Most of the anhedral rounded polycrystalline diamonds are Ia AB type and have higher content of B-center defects. A minority of the anhedral rounded polycrystalline diamonds have C-center, A-center and B-center defects simultaneously. The polycrystalline diamonds probably originated from the relatively deeper mantle and were not formed in diamond nucleation stage, but in the diamond growth period or some special conditions after the diamond grains were formed already. Furthermore, the euhedral faceted polycrystalline diamonds were formed slightly later and the anhedral rounded polycrystalline diamonds were formed obviously earlier than the diamond single crystals from the Mengyin kimberlite pipes.

  1. Thermoelastic micromechanical stresses associated with a large alpha-silicon carbide grain in a polycrystalline beta-silicon carbide matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhuang; Bradt, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The thermoelastic micromechanical stresses associated with a single large hexagonal alpha-SiC grain within a fine-grain-size cubic (3C) beta-SiC matrix were calculated. The naturally occurring residual stresses which are created during cooling from the processing temperatures and the effects of superimposed applied external stresses are both considered. A significant effect of the shape or geometry of the alpha-SiC grain is revealed, with the largest residual stresses associated with the naturally occurring tabular or platelet structure. The stresses are compared with the published strength results for these materials, which suggests that the residual stresses assume a significant role in the strength reduction that is observed.

  2. Grain boundary engineering for improved thin silicon photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Raghunathan, Rajamani; Johlin, Eric; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2014-09-10

    In photovoltaic devices, the bulk disorder introduced by grain boundaries (GBs) in polycrystalline silicon is generally considered to be detrimental to the physical stability and electronic transport of the bulk material. However, at the extremum of disorder, amorphous silicon is known to have a beneficially increased band gap and enhanced optical absorption. This study is focused on understanding and utilizing the nature of the most commonly encountered Σ3 GBs, in an attempt to balance incorporation of the advantageous properties of amorphous silicon while avoiding the degraded electronic transport of a fully amorphous system. A combination of theoretical methods is employed to understand the impact of ordered Σ3 GBs on the material properties and full-device photovoltaic performance.

  3. Growth of GaN epitaxial films on polycrystalline diamond by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Quanzhong; Allsopp, Duncan W. E.; Bowen, Chris R.

    2017-04-01

    Heat extraction is often essential in ensuring efficient performance of semiconductor devices and requires minimising the thermal resistance between the functional semiconductor layers and any heat sink. This paper reports the epitaxial growth of N-polar GaN films on polycrystalline diamond substrates of high thermal conductivity with metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy, by using a Si x C layer formed during deposition of polycrystalline diamond on a silicon substrate. The Si x C layer acts to provide the necessary structure ordering information for the formation of a single crystal GaN film at the wafer scale. It is shown that a three-dimensional island (3D) growth process removes hexagonal defects that are induced by the non-single crystal nature of the Si x C layer. It is also shown that intensive 3D growth and the introduction of a convex curvature of the substrate can be deployed to reduce tensile stress in the GaN epitaxy to enable the growth of a crack-free layer up to a thickness of 1.1µm. The twist and tilt can be as low as 0.65° and 0.39° respectively, values broadly comparable with GaN grown on Si substrates with a similar structure.

  4. Patterning of Bi2Te3 Polycrystalline Thin-Films on Silicon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Regia .” Since we desire to use photoresist as the masking material for process flexibility, we used a diluted version of Aqua Regia (3 HCl:1 HNO3...spin coat AZ5214e at 1200 rpm for 30 s, (2) soft bake at 110 °C for 60 s, (3) contact exposure for 3.3 s, (4) reverse -image bake at120 °C for 30 s...well as the metal pad. As an alternative, Shafai and Brett (5) used a diluted combination of HCl and nitric acid (HNO3), a variant of the common “ Aqua

  5. Total Ionizing Dose Radiation Effects in the P-Type Polycrystalline Silicon Thin Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Liu, Kai; Chen, Rong-Sheng; Liu, Yu-Rong; En, Yun-Fei; Li, Bin; Fang, Wen-Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Not Available Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos 61574048 and 61204112, the Science and Technology Research Project of Guangdong Province under Grant Nos 2015B090912002 and 2014A030313656, and the Pearl River S&T Nova Program of Guangzhou.

  6. Fatigue and Fracture of Polycrystalline Silicon and Diamond MEMS at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    NUMBER Aerospace Engineering, U. Illinois at Urbana -Champaign, 5e. TASK NUMBER M/C 236 305A Talbot Lab, 104 South Wright St., Urbana , IL 61801 5f. WORK...University of Illinois at Urbana -Champaign Talbot Lab, 104 S. Wright Street, Urbana , IL 61801 Telephone: (217) 244-1474, Fax: (217) 244-0720, E-mail...defended: May 5, 2005 Personnel supported 1. loannis Chasiotis, Faculty and PI, University of Illinois at Urbana -Champaign 2. Krishna Jonnalagadda, Ph.D

  7. A conduction model for semiconductor-grain-boundary-semiconductor barriers in polycrystalline-silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, N. C.-C.; Gerzberg, L.; Meindl, J. D.; Lu, C.-Y.

    1983-02-01

    A quantitative model is introduced to describe the electrical properties of a semiconductor-grain boundary-semiconductor barrier in polysilicon films over a wide temperature range. The model verifies the applicability of a single-crystal band diagram for the crystallite within which an impurity level exists. It describes a new analytical approach to the study of the grain-boundary effect on carrier transport under different experimental conditions by studying the behavior of grain-boundary potential barrier height and width. By characterizing the experimental data from a combination of these trapping effects and conduction processes, the electrical properties of polysilicon films with grain sizes of less than one micron, doping levels up to 8 x 10 to the 19th per cubic centimeter, and measurement temperatures from -176 C to 144 C can be better understood.

  8. Effects of Temperature and Concentration Mono and Polycrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Extraction Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalis, M.; Masrour, R.; Khrypunov, G.; Kirichenko, M.; Kudiy, D.; Zazoui, M.

    2016-10-01

    The simple and efficient method for the extraction of all the parameters of a solar cell from a single current-voltage curve under one constant illumination level based on the Lambert W function. On calculating the lsqcurvefit function with constraints, between the experimental current-voltage characteristic and a theoretical arbitrary characteristic based on Lambert W-function. It is significant to understand the effect of the light intensity and temperature on output performance of the crystalline solar cells. The effect of light intensity and temperature on performance parameters of mc-si and pc-si solar cells is discusses. The experiments have been carried out under a solar simulator for various intensity levels in the range 1-2.5 sun and 25-60°C, respectively. The experiment was carried out employing solar cell simulator with varying cell temperature at constant light intensity. The results show that cell temperature has a significant effect on the photovoltaic parameters and it controls the quality and performance of the solar cell. The maximum power and efficiency are found to be decreased with cell temperature and the temperature coefficient of the efficiency and maximum output power is found to be negative.

  9. Electrothermal actuators fabricated in four-level planarized surface-miromachined polycrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Comtois, J.H.; Michalicek, A.; Barron, C.C.

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents the results of tests performed on a variety of electrochemical microactuators and arrays of these actuators fabricated in the SUMMiT process at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Sandia National Laboratories. These results are intended to aid designers of thermally actuated mechanisms, and they apply to similar actuators made in other polysilicon MEMS processes such as the MUMPS process. Measurements include force and deflection versus input power, maximum operating frequency, effects of long term operation, and ideal actuator and array geometries for different applications` force requirements. Also, different methods of arraying these actuators together are compared. It is found that a method using rotary joints, enabled by the advanced features of the SUMMiT fabrication process, is the most efficient array design. The design and operation of a thermally actuated stepper motor is explained to illustrate a useful application of these arrays.

  10. X-ray measurements of stresses and defects in EFG and large grained polycrystalline silicon ribbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. N. J.

    1979-01-01

    The Bond method was employed to measure the lattice parameter in an area of 0.4 mm in diameter of EFG Si-ribbons to an accuracy of + or - 0.00008 A. A Bond goniometer was built which included a goniostat with a special specimen holder to mount ribbons 1 m in length and 75 mm in width which could be rotated about two orthogonal axes, and a Leitz microscope for precision alignment of a particular area into the center of the goniostat and the small primary X-ray beam. The (321) planes were found to be parallel to the surface of the ribbons with an angular spread of about 15 deg. The poles of the (111) planes clustered about an angle of 25 deg away from the surface normal, again with a spread of 10 deg. The lattice parameter of a small piece of ribbon material was found to be a sub o = 5.43075 A. A maximum stress of 115 MPa was observed in a fractured ribbon which corresponded to the fracture stress of single crystals of Si.

  11. Slicing of single crystal and polycrystalline silicon ingots using multi-blade saws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    Optimization of the Multi-Blade Slurry wafering technique was evaluated. Several wafering runs were made. Sufficient data necessary for a complete cost analysis of each of the three types of saw utilized are provided.

  12. Epitaxially grown polycrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells on solid-phase crystallised seed layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Varlamov, Sergey; Xue, Chaowei

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents the fabrication of poly-Si thin film solar cells on glass substrates using seed layer approach. The solid-phase crystallised P-doped seed layer is not only used as the crystalline template for the epitaxial growth but also as the emitter for the solar cell structure. This paper investigates two important factors, surface cleaning and intragrain defects elimination for the seed layer, which can greatly influence the epitaxial grown solar cell performance. Shorter incubation and crystallisation time is observed using a simplified RCA cleaning than the other two wet chemical cleaning methods, indicating a cleaner seed layer surface is achieved. Cross sectional transmission microscope images confirm a crystallographic transferal of information from the simplified RCA cleaned seed layer into the epi-layer. RTA for the SPC seed layer can effectively eliminate the intragrain defects in the seed layer and improve structural quality of both of the seed layer and the epi-layer. Consequently, epitaxial grown poly-Si solar cell on the RTA treated seed layer shows better solar cell efficiency, Voc and Jsc than the one on the seed layer without RTA treatment.

  13. Field-effect electroluminescence in silicon nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Walters, Robert J; Bourianoff, George I; Atwater, Harry A

    2005-02-01

    There is currently worldwide interest in developing silicon-based active optical components in order to leverage the infrastructure of silicon microelectronics technology for the fabrication of optoelectronic devices. Light emission in bulk silicon-based devices is constrained in wavelength to infrared emission, and in efficiency by the indirect bandgap of silicon. One promising strategy for overcoming these challenges is to make use of quantum-confined excitonic emission in silicon nanocrystals. A critical challenge for silicon nanocrystal devices based on nanocrystals embedded in silicon dioxide has been the development of a method for efficient electrical carrier injection. We report here a scheme for electrically pumping dense silicon nanocrystal arrays by a field-effect electroluminescence mechanism. In this excitation process, electrons and holes are both injected from the same semiconductor channel across a tunnelling barrier in a sequential programming process, in contrast to simultaneous carrier injection in conventional pn-junction light-emitting-diode structures. Light emission is strongly correlated with the injection of a second carrier into a nanocrystal that has been previously programmed with a charge of the opposite sign.

  14. Silicon: the health benefits of a metalloid.

    PubMed

    Martin, Keith R

    2013-01-01

    Silicon is the second most abundant element in nature behind oxygen. As a metalloid, silicon has been used in many industrial applications including use as an additive in the food and beverage industry. As a result, humans come into contact with silicon through both environmental exposures but also as a dietary component. Moreover, many forms of silicon, that is, Si bound to oxygen, are water-soluble, absorbable, and potentially bioavailable to humans presumably with biological activity. However, the specific biochemical or physiological functions of silicon, if any, are largely unknown although generally thought to exist. As a result, there is growing interest in the potential therapeutic effects of water-soluble silica on human health. For example, silicon has been suggested to exhibit roles in the structural integrity of nails, hair, and skin, overall collagen synthesis, bone mineralization, and bone health and reduced metal accumulation in Alzheimer's disease, immune system health, and reduction of the risk for atherosclerosis. Although emerging research is promising, much additional, corroborative research is needed particularly regarding speciation of health-promoting forms of silicon and its relative bioavailability. Orthosilicic acid is the major form of bioavailable silicon whereas thin fibrous crystalline asbestos is a health hazard promoting asbestosis and significant impairment of lung function and increased cancer risk. It has been proposed that relatively insoluble forms of silica can also release small but meaningful quantities of silicon into biological compartments. For example, colloidal silicic acid, silica gel, and zeolites, although relatively insoluble in water, can increase concentrations of water-soluble silica and are thought to rely on specific structural physicochemical characteristics. Collectively, the food supply contributes enough silicon in the forms aforementioned that could be absorbed and significantly improve overall human health

  15. Silicon materials task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project: Phase IV. Effects of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Twenty-first quarterly report, October-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, R.H.; Hanes, M.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Mollenkopf, H.C.

    1981-01-30

    The overall objective of this program is to define the effects of impurities, various thermochemical processes, and any impurity-process interactions upon the performance of terrestrial solar cells. The results of the study form a basis for silicon producers, wafer manufacturers, and cell fabricators to develop appropriate cost-benefit relationships for the use of less pure, less costly solar grade silicon. Cr is highly mobile in silicon even at temperatures as low as 600/sup 0/C. Contrasting with earlier data for Mo, Ti, and V, Cr concentrations vary from place to place in polycrystalline silicon wafers and the electrically-active Cr concentration in the polysilicon is more than an order of magnitude smaller than would be projected from single crystal impurity data. We hypothesize that Cr diffuses during ingot cooldown after groth, preferentially segregates to grain boundaries and becomes electrically deactivated. Both Al and Au introduce deep levels when grown into silicon crystals. Accelerated aging data from Ni-contaminated silicon imply that no significant impurity-induced cell performance reduction should be expected over a twenty-year device lifetime. Combined electrical bias and thermal stressing of silicon solar cells containing Nb, Fe, Cu, Ti, Cr, and Ag, respectively produces no performance loss after 100 hour exposures up to 225/sup 0/C. Ti and V, but not Mo, can be gettered from polycrystalline silicon by POCl/sub 3/ or HCl at temperatures of 1000 and 1100/sup 0/C.

  16. Carbon Cryogel Silicon Composite Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodworth James; Baldwin, Richard; Bennett, William

    2010-01-01

    A variety of materials are under investigation for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries, of which, the most promising are those containing silicon. 10 One such material is a composite formed via the dispersion of silicon in a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) gel followed by pyrolysis. Two silicon-carbon composite materials, carbon microspheres and nanofoams produced from nano-phase silicon impregnated RF gel precursors have been synthesized and investigated. Carbon microspheres are produced by forming the silicon-containing RF gel into microspheres whereas carbon nano-foams are produced by impregnating carbon fiber paper with the silicon containing RF gel to create a free standing electrode. 1-4,9 Both materials have demonstrated their ability to function as anodes and utilize the silicon present in the material. Stable reversible capacities above 400 mAh/g for the bulk material and above 1000 mAh/g of Si have been observed.

  17. Further development and application of polycrystalline metal whiskers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schladitz, H. J.

    1979-01-01

    High strength metal whiskers have a larger versatile field of application than monocrystalline whiskers. Although polycrystalline metal whiskers can be used for composites, preferably by extrusion in thermoplastics or by infiltration of resins or metals into whisker networks, the chief application at present may be the production and various use of whisker networks. Such networks can be produced up to high degrees of porosity and besides high mechanical strength, they have high inside surfaces and high electric conductivity. There are for instance, applications concerning construction of electrodes for batteries and fuel cells, catalysts and also new heat-exchanger material, capable of preparing fuel oil and gasoline in order to assist a high-efficiency combustion. The technical application of polycrystalline metal whiskers require their modification as well as the construction of a pilot production unit.

  18. Ultrathin polycrystalline 6,13-Bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-pentacene films

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Min-Cherl; Zhang, Dongrong; Nikiforov, Gueorgui O.; Lee, Michael V.; Qi, Yabing; Joo Shin, Tae; Ahn, Docheon; Lee, Han-Koo; Baik, Jaeyoon; Shin, Hyun-Joon

    2015-03-15

    Ultrathin (<6 nm) polycrystalline films of 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-P) are deposited with a two-step spin-coating process. The influence of spin-coating conditions on morphology of the resulting film was examined by atomic force microscopy. Film thickness and RMS surface roughness were in the range of 4.0–6.1 and 0.6–1.1 nm, respectively, except for small holes. Polycrystalline structure was confirmed by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements suggested that the plane through aromatic rings of TIPS-P molecules was perpendicular to the substrate surface.

  19. Mechanical instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianyang; Ning, Fulong; Trinh, Thuat T.; Kjelstrup, Signe; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; He, Jianying; Skallerud, Bjørn H.; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    Despite observations of massive methane release and geohazards associated with gas hydrate instability in nature, as well as ductile flow accompanying hydrate dissociation in artificial polycrystalline methane hydrates in the laboratory, the destabilising mechanisms of gas hydrates under deformation and their grain-boundary structures have not yet been elucidated at the molecular level. Here we report direct molecular dynamics simulations of the material instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates under mechanical loading. The results show dislocation-free brittle failure in monocrystalline hydrates and an unexpected crossover from strengthening to weakening in polycrystals. Upon uniaxial depressurisation, strain-induced hydrate dissociation accompanied by grain-boundary decohesion and sliding destabilises the polycrystals. In contrast, upon compression, appreciable solid-state structural transformation dominates the response. These findings provide molecular insight not only into the metastable structures of grain boundaries, but also into unusual ductile flow with hydrate dissociation as observed during macroscopic compression experiments. PMID:26522051

  20. Nucleation and growth of polycrystalline SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, M.; Schimmel, S.; Jokubavicius, V.; Linnarsson, M. K.; Ou, H.; Syväjärvi, M.; Wellmann, P.

    2014-03-01

    The nucleation and bulk growth of polycrystalline SiC in a 2 inch PVT setup using isostatic and pyrolytic graphite as substrates was studied. Textured nucleation occurs under near-thermal equilibrium conditions at the initial growth stage with hexagonal platelet shaped crystallites of 4H, 6H and 15R polytypes. It is found that pyrolytic graphite results in enhanced texturing of the nucleating gas species. Reducing the pressure leads to growth of the crystallites until a closed polycrystalline SiC layer containing voids with a rough surface is developed. Bulk growth was conducted at 35 mbar Ar pressure at 2250°C in diffusion limited mass transport regime generating a convex shaped growth form of the solid-gas interface leading to lateral expansion of virtually [001] oriented crystallites. Growth at 2350°C led to the stabilization of 6H polytypic grains. The micropipe density in the bulk strongly depends on the substrate used.

  1. Compton profile study of polycrystalline ZnBr{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Dhaka, M. S.; Sharma, G.; Mishra, M. C.; Kothari, R. K.; Sharma, B. K.

    2010-12-01

    The first ever Compton profile study of polycrystalline ZnBr{sub 2} is presented in this paper. The measurement of polycrystalline sample of ZnBr{sub 2} is performed using 59.54 keV gamma-rays emanating from an {sup 241}Am radioisotope. Theoretical calculations are performed following the Ionic model calculations for a number of configurations Zn{sup +x}Br{sub 2}{sup -x/2}(0.0{<=}x{<=}2.0 in step of 0.5) utilizing free atom profiles. The ionic model suggest transfer of 2.0 electrons from 4 s state of Zn to 4 p state of two Br atoms. The autocorrelation function B(z) is also derived from experiment and the most favoured ionic valence Compton profiles.

  2. Flexible polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaics for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. H.; Lanning, B. R.; Misra, M. S.; Kapur, V. K.; Basol, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    Polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaics (PV), such as CIS and CdTe, have received considerable attention recently with respect to space power applications. Their combination of stability, efficiency, and economy from large-scale monolithic-integration of modules can have significant impact on cost and weight of PV arrays for spacecraft and planetary experiments. An added advantage, due to their minimal thickness (approximately 6 microns sans substrate), is the ability to manufacture lightweight, flexible devices (approximately 2000 W/kg) using large-volume manufacturing techniques. The photovoltaic effort at Martin Marietta and ISET is discussed, including large-area, large-volume thin-film deposition techniques such as electrodeposition and rotating cylindrical magnetron sputtering. Progress in the development of flexible polycrystalline thin-film PV is presented, including evaluation of flexible CIS cells. In addition, progress on flexible CdTe cells is presented. Finally, examples of lightweight, flexible arrays and their potential cost and weight impact is discussed.

  3. A characterization study of a hydroxylated polycrystalline tin oxide surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoflund, Gar B.; Grogan, Austin L., Jr.; Asbury, Douglas A.; Schryer, David R.

    1989-01-01

    In this study Auger electron spectroscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) have been used to examine a polycrystalline tin oxide surface before and after annealing in vacuum at 500 C. Features due to surface hydroxyl groups are present in both the ESCA and ESD spectra, and ESD shows that several chemical states of hydrogen are present. Annealing at 500 C causes a large reduction in the surface hydrogen concentration but not complete removal.

  4. Acoustic Nonlinearity in Polycrystalline Nickel from Fatigue-Generated Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, John H.

    2005-04-09

    An analytical model of the nonlinear interaction of ultrasonic waves with dislocation substructures formed during the fatigue of wavy slip metals is presented. The model is applied to the calculation of the acoustic nonlinearity parameters {beta} of polycrystalline nickel for increasingly higher levels of fatigue from the virgin state. The values calculated for stress-controlled loading at 345 MPa predict a monotonic increase in {beta} of more than 390 percent as a function of percent life to fracture due to substructural evolution.

  5. Coulometric Study of Ethanol Adsorption at a Polycrystalline Platinum Electrode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    value of the ratio Ian/Icalc: 1. The minimal ratio would be 1, corresponding to a one- electron oxidation of one-site attached CH3CH2O surface...Coulometric Study of Ethanol Adsorption at a Polycrystalline Platinum Electrode Sol Gilman Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL...noble metals and noble metal alloys that can provide what amounts to an adsorbed oxygen “valve” for initiating adsorption/reaction on a clean and

  6. Hardness of polycrystalline tungsten and molybdenum oxides at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Flom, D.G. . Corporate Research and Development Center)

    1990-07-01

    Vickers hardness of WO{sub 3} W{sub 18}O{sub 49} and MoO{sub 2} is reported for temperatures up to 800{degrees}C. Polycrystalline samples of the oxides were prepared by hot-pressing, and hardness was determined using a Vickers hardness tester modified for high-temperature applications. The hardness of a heavily deformed tungsten rod was also measured as a reference.

  7. Local impedance imaging of boron-doped polycrystalline diamond thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Zieliński, A.; Ryl, J.; Burczyk, L.; Darowicki, K.

    2014-09-29

    Local impedance imaging (LII) was used to visualise surficial deviations of AC impedances in polycrystalline boron-doped diamond (BDD). The BDD thin film electrodes were deposited onto the highly doped silicon substrates via microwave plasma-enhanced CVD. The studied boron dopant concentrations, controlled by the [B]/[C] ratio in plasma, ranged from 1 × 10{sup 16} to 2 × 10{sup 21} atoms cm{sup −3}. The BDD films displayed microcrystalline structure, while the average size of crystallites decreased from 1 to 0.7 μm with increasing [B]/[C] ratios. The application of LII enabled a direct and high-resolution investigation of local distribution of impedance characteristics within the individual grains of BDD. Such an approach resulted in greater understanding of the microstructural control of properties at the grain level. We propose that the obtained surficial variation of impedance is correlated to the areas of high conductance which have been observed at the grain boundaries by using LII. We also postulate that the origin of high conductivity is due to either preferential boron accumulation, the presence of defects, or sp{sup 2} regions in the intragrain regions. The impedance modulus recorded by LII was in full agreement with the bulk impedance measurements. Both variables showed a decreasing trend with increasing [B]/[C] ratios, which is consistent with higher boron incorporation into BDD film.

  8. Selective deposition of polycrystalline diamond films using photolithography with addition of nanodiamonds as nucleation centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okhotnikov, V. V.; Linnik, S. A.; Gaidaichuk, A. V.; Shashev, D. V.; Nazarova, G. Yu; Yurchenko, V. I.

    2016-02-01

    A new method of selective deposition of polycrystalline diamond has been developed and studied. The diamond coatings with a complex, predetermined geometry and resolution up to 5 μm were obtained. A high density of polycrystallites in the coating area was reached (up to 32·107 pcs/cm2). The uniformity of the film reached 100%, and the degree of the surface contamination by parasitic crystals did not exceed 2%. The technology was based on the application of the standard photolithography with an addition of nanodiamond suspension into the photoresist that provided the creation of the centers of further nucleation in the areas which require further overgrowth. The films were deposited onto monocrystalline silicon substrates using the method of “hot filaments” in the CVD reactor. The properties of the coating and the impact of the nanodiamond suspension concentration in the photoresist were also studied. The potential use of the given method includes a high resolution, technological efficiency, and low labor costs compared to the standard methods (laser treatment, chemical etching in aggressive environments,).

  9. Physics of grain boundaries in polycrystalline photovoltaic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yanfa; Yin, Wan-Jian; Wu, Yelong; Shi, Tingting; Paudel, Naba R.; Li, Chen; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Wang, Zhiwei; Moseley, John; Guthrey, Harvey; Moutinho, Helio; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.

    2015-03-01

    Thin-film solar cells based on polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) and CdTe photovoltaic semiconductors have reached remarkable laboratory efficiencies. It is surprising that these thin-film polycrystalline solar cells can reach such high efficiencies despite containing a high density of grain boundaries (GBs), which would seem likely to be nonradiative recombination centers for photo-generated carriers. In this paper, we review our atomistic theoretical understanding of the physics of grain boundaries in CIGS and CdTe absorbers. We show that intrinsic GBs with dislocation cores exhibit deep gap states in both CIGS and CdTe. However, in each solar cell device, the GBs can be chemically modified to improve their photovoltaic properties. In CIGS cells, GBs are found to be Cu-rich and contain O impurities. Density-functional theory calculations reveal that such chemical changes within GBs can remove most of the unwanted gap states. In CdTe cells, GBs are found to contain a high concentration of Cl atoms. Cl atoms donate electrons, creating n-type GBs between p-type CdTe grains, forming local p-n-p junctions along GBs. This leads to enhanced current collections. Therefore, chemical modification of GBs allows for high efficiency polycrystalline CIGS and CdTe thin-film solar cells.

  10. Stress-dependent ultrasonic scattering in polycrystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Kube, Christopher M; Turner, Joseph A

    2016-02-01

    Stress-dependent elastic moduli of polycrystalline materials are used in a statistically based model for the scattering of ultrasonic waves from randomly oriented grains that are members of a stressed polycrystal. The stress is assumed to be homogeneous and can be either residual or generated from external loads. The stress-dependent elastic properties are incorporated into the definition of the differential scattering cross-section, which defines how strongly an incident wave is scattered into various directions. Nine stress-dependent differential scattering cross-sections or scattering coefficients are defined to include all possibilities of incident and scattered waves, which can be either longitudinal or (two) transverse wave types. The evaluation of the scattering coefficients considers polycrystalline aluminum that is uniaxially stressed. An analysis of the influence of incident wave propagation direction, scattering direction, frequency, and grain size on the stress-dependency of the scattering coefficients follows. Scattering coefficients for aluminum indicate that ultrasonic scattering is much more sensitive to a uniaxial stress than ultrasonic phase velocities. By developing the stress-dependent scattering properties of polycrystals, the influence of acoustoelasticity on the amplitudes of waves propagating in stressed polycrystalline materials can be better understood. This work supports the ongoing development of a technique for monitoring and measuring stresses in metallic materials.

  11. Physics of grain boundaries in polycrystalline photovoltaic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yanfa Yin, Wan-Jian; Wu, Yelong; Shi, Tingting; Paudel, Naba R.; Li, Chen; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Wang, Zhiwei; Moseley, John; Guthrey, Harvey; Moutinho, Helio; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2015-03-21

    Thin-film solar cells based on polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) and CdTe photovoltaic semiconductors have reached remarkable laboratory efficiencies. It is surprising that these thin-film polycrystalline solar cells can reach such high efficiencies despite containing a high density of grain boundaries (GBs), which would seem likely to be nonradiative recombination centers for photo-generated carriers. In this paper, we review our atomistic theoretical understanding of the physics of grain boundaries in CIGS and CdTe absorbers. We show that intrinsic GBs with dislocation cores exhibit deep gap states in both CIGS and CdTe. However, in each solar cell device, the GBs can be chemically modified to improve their photovoltaic properties. In CIGS cells, GBs are found to be Cu-rich and contain O impurities. Density-functional theory calculations reveal that such chemical changes within GBs can remove most of the unwanted gap states. In CdTe cells, GBs are found to contain a high concentration of Cl atoms. Cl atoms donate electrons, creating n-type GBs between p-type CdTe grains, forming local p-n-p junctions along GBs. This leads to enhanced current collections. Therefore, chemical modification of GBs allows for high efficiency polycrystalline CIGS and CdTe thin-film solar cells.

  12. In Situ Graphene Growth Dynamics on Polycrystalline Catalyst Foils

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of graphene growth on polycrystalline Pt foils during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are investigated using in situ scanning electron microscopy and complementary structural characterization of the catalyst with electron backscatter diffraction. A general growth model is outlined that considers precursor dissociation, mass transport, and attachment to the edge of a growing domain. We thereby analyze graphene growth dynamics at different length scales and reveal that the rate-limiting step varies throughout the process and across different regions of the catalyst surface, including different facets of an individual graphene domain. The facets that define the domain shapes lie normal to slow growth directions, which are determined by the interfacial mobility when attachment to domain edges is rate-limiting, as well as anisotropy in surface diffusion as diffusion becomes rate-limiting. Our observations and analysis thus reveal that the structure of CVD graphene films is intimately linked to that of the underlying polycrystalline catalyst, with both interfacial mobility and diffusional anisotropy depending on the presence of step edges and grain boundaries. The growth model developed serves as a general framework for understanding and optimizing the growth of 2D materials on polycrystalline catalysts. PMID:27576749

  13. Grain-boundary-induced melting in quenched polycrystalline monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutschländer, Sven; Boitard, Charlotte; Maret, Georg; Keim, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Melting in two dimensions can successfully be explained with the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young (KTHNY) scenario which describes the formation of the high-symmetry phase with the thermal activation of topological defects within an (ideally) infinite monodomain. With all state variables being well defined, it should hold also as freezing scenario where oppositely charged topological defects annihilate. The Kibble-Zurek mechanism, on the other hand, shows that spontaneous symmetry breaking alongside a continuous phase transition cannot support an infinite monodomain but leads to polycrystallinity. For any nonzero cooling rate, critical fluctuations will be frozen out in the vicinity of the transition temperature. This leads to domains with different director of the broken symmetry, separated by a defect structure, e.g., grain boundaries in crystalline systems. After instantaneously quenching a colloidal monolayer from a polycrystalline to the isotropic fluid state, we show that such grain boundaries increase the probability for the formation of dislocations. In addition, we determine the temporal decay of defect core energies during the first few Brownian times after the quench. Despite the fact that the KTHNY scenario describes a continuous phase transition and phase equilibrium does not exist, melting in polycrystalline samples starts at grain boundaries similar to first-order phase transitions.

  14. Grain-boundary-induced melting in quenched polycrystalline monolayers.

    PubMed

    Deutschländer, Sven; Boitard, Charlotte; Maret, Georg; Keim, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Melting in two dimensions can successfully be explained with the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young (KTHNY) scenario which describes the formation of the high-symmetry phase with the thermal activation of topological defects within an (ideally) infinite monodomain. With all state variables being well defined, it should hold also as freezing scenario where oppositely charged topological defects annihilate. The Kibble-Zurek mechanism, on the other hand, shows that spontaneous symmetry breaking alongside a continuous phase transition cannot support an infinite monodomain but leads to polycrystallinity. For any nonzero cooling rate, critical fluctuations will be frozen out in the vicinity of the transition temperature. This leads to domains with different director of the broken symmetry, separated by a defect structure, e.g., grain boundaries in crystalline systems. After instantaneously quenching a colloidal monolayer from a polycrystalline to the isotropic fluid state, we show that such grain boundaries increase the probability for the formation of dislocations. In addition, we determine the temporal decay of defect core energies during the first few Brownian times after the quench. Despite the fact that the KTHNY scenario describes a continuous phase transition and phase equilibrium does not exist, melting in polycrystalline samples starts at grain boundaries similar to first-order phase transitions.

  15. Micromachined silicon seismic transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Armour, D.L.; Fleming, R.P.

    1995-08-01

    Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of CTBT monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily depolyable sensor arrays. Although our goal is to fabricate seismic sensors that provide the same performance level as the current state-of-the-art ``macro`` systems, if necessary one could deploy a larger number of these small sensors at closer proximity to the location being monitored in order to compensate for lower performance. We have chosen a modified pendulum design and are manufacturing prototypes in two different silicon micromachining fabrication technologies. The first set of prototypes, fabricated in our advanced surface- micromachining technology, are currently being packaged for testing in servo circuits -- we anticipate that these devices, which have masses in the 1--10 {mu}g range, will resolve sub-mG signals. Concurrently, we are developing a novel ``mold`` micromachining technology that promises to make proof masses in the 1--10 mg range possible -- our calculations indicate that devices made in this new technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach to 10{sup {minus}10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

  16. Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrozinski, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    The use of silicon detectors has experienced an exponential growth in accelerator and space based experiments, similar to trends in the semiconductor industry as a whole, usually paraphrased as ``Moore's Law.'' Some of the essentials for this phenomenon will be presented, together with examples of the exciting science results which it enabled. With the establishment of a ``semiconductor culture'' in universities and laboratories around the world, an increased understanding of the sensors results in thinner, faster, more radiation-resistant detectors, spawning an amazing wealth of new technologies and applications, which will be the main subject of the presentation.

  17. Promising Electric Aircraft Drive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    An overview of electric aircraft propulsion technology performance thresholds for key power system components is presented. A weight comparison of electric drive systems with equivalent total delivered energy is made to help identify component performance requirements, and promising research and development opportunities.

  18. Washington Promise Scholarship Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Higher Education Coordinating Board, Olympia.

    The Washington Promise Scholarship program was established to encourage excellent academic performance and to reward low- and middle-income students who demonstrate meritorious achievement in high school by providing them a 2-year scholarship. An evaluation was conducted to study the program and its impact on college attendance and student…

  19. The Promise of Transformative Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yendol-Hoppey, Diane

    2010-01-01

    The promise, potential, and problems associated with school-university partnerships interested in better preparing teachers for the challenges they face teaching in today's schools rest in educators' ability to actualize transformative practices within partnership contexts. To date, most partnerships have focused on less complex forms of…

  20. Is Technology Fulfilling Its Promise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2011-01-01

    Technology has promised trainers so much--from the ability to train distant learners to new ways of keeping young employees engaged. But has it delivered? In this article, several trainers consider whether their investment in training technology has been worth it.

  1. Numerical simulation and fabrication of silicon sheet via spin casting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewoo; Kim, Hyunhui; Lee, Changbum; Kim, Joonsoo; Jang, Bo-Yun; Lee, Jinseok; Ahn, Youngsoo; Yoon, Wooyoung

    2013-05-01

    A spin-casting process for fabricating polycrystalline silicon sheets for use as solar cell wafers is proposed, and the parameters that control the sheet thickness are investigated. A numerical study of the fluidity of molten silicon indicates that the formation of thin silicon sheets without a mold and via spin casting is feasible. The faster the rotation speed of graphite mold, the thinner the thickness of sheet. After the spread of the molten silicon to cover the graphite mold with rotation speed of above 500 rpm, the solidification has to start. Silicon sheets can be produced by using the centrifugal force under appropriate experimental conditions. The spin-cast sheet had a vertical columnar microstructure due to the normal heat extraction to the substrate, and the sheet lifetime varied from 0.1 microS to 0.3 microS measured by using the microwave photoconductance decay (MW-PCD) to confirm that the spin-cast silicon sheet is applicable to photovoltaics.

  2. Hot pressing densification of spherical polycrystalline particles of superplastic zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auechalitanukul, Chiraporn

    The hot pressing behavior of spherical polycrystalline particle powder compacts which deform by particle creep was studied in order to determine the effect of particle size and packing density on the creep-controlled densification. A superplastic zirconia: 3 mole% yttria-stabilized tetragonal polycrystalline zirconia particles doped with 0.3 mole% alumina, was used in the study. The densification behavior of the spherical polycrystalline particles under applied pressures of 6, 10, 20 and 40 MPa at 1350°C was both experimentally studied and numerically simulated. The spherical polycrystalline particles of superplastic zirconia (particle size range between 30 and 90 microns) were hot pressed in a cylindrical die to near full theoretical density and without significant grain growth under 40 MPa at 1350°C for 1 hour. The densification rate during hot pressing of the spherical polycrystalline particles was not particle size dependent at the relatively high pressures of 20 and 40 MPa. The slight particle size dependence on the densification rate, observed at the relatively low pressures of 6 and 10 MPa, is thought to be due to the die wall friction. An increase in the particle packing density increased the final density and reduced the pressing time. Creep-based densification simulations using both the Helle, Eastering and Ashby equations for a powder compact and by a finite element analysis (FEA) of a single sphere compaction agreed well with the experimental observations. Densification rate vs. relative density curves predicted using the Helle, Easterling and Ashby equations were discontinuous at a relative density of 0.9 since two equations were used for the initial (a relative density up to 0.9) and final stage (a relative density from 0.9 to 1). The densification rate curves obtained using the FEA were continuous. Predictions of the two methods were similar until the relative density reached 0.9. Above a relative density of 0.9 the rates predicted by the FEA were

  3. Laser wafering for silicon solar.

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2011-03-01

    Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W{sub p} (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs ({approx}20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions ({approx}50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 {micro}m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

  4. Damage accumulation in neon implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Oliviero, E.; Peripolli, S.; Amaral, L.; Fichtner, P. F. P.; Beaufort, M. F.; Barbot, J. F.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2006-08-15

    Damage accumulation in neon-implanted silicon with fluences ranging from 5x10{sup 14} to 5x10{sup 16} Ne cm{sup -2} has been studied in detail. As-implanted and annealed samples were investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry under channeling conditions and by transmission electron microscopy in order to quantify and characterize the lattice damage. Wavelength dispersive spectrometry was used to obtain the relative neon content stored in the matrix. Implantation at room temperature leads to the amorphization of the silicon while a high density of nanosized bubbles is observed all along the ion distribution, forming a uniform and continuous layer for implantation temperatures higher than 250 deg.C. Clusters of interstitial defects are also present in the deeper part of the layer corresponding to the end of range of ions. After annealing, the samples implanted at temperatures below 250 deg.C present a polycrystalline structure with blisters at the surface while in the other samples coarsening of bubbles occurs and nanocavities are formed together with extended defects identified as (311) defects. The results are discussed in comparison to the case of helium-implanted silicon and in the light of radiation-enhanced diffusion.

  5. Low cost silicon solar cell array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, F. T. C.

    1974-01-01

    The technological options available for producing low cost silicon solar cell arrays were examined. A project value of approximately $250/sq m and $2/watt is projected, based on mass production capacity demand. Recommendations are included for the most promising cost reduction options.

  6. Silicon-Based Optical Modulator with Ferroelectric Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    According to a proposal, a silicon dioxide layer in a high-speed, low-power, silicon- based electro-optical modulator would be replaced by a layer of lead zirconate titanate or other ferroelectric oxide material. The purpose of this modification is to enhance the power performance and functionality of the modulator. In its unmodified form, the particular silicon- based electro-optical modulator is of an advanced design that overcomes the speed limitation of prior silicon-based electro- optical modulators. Whereas modulation frequencies of such devices had been limited to about 20 MHz, this modulator can operate at modulation frequencies as high as 1 GHz. This modulator can be characterized as a silicon-waveguide-based metal oxide/semiconductor (MOS) capacitor phase shifter in which modulation of the index of refraction in silicon is obtained by exploiting the free-charge-carrier-plasma dispersion effect. As shown in the figure, the modulator includes an n-doped crystalline silicon slab (the silicon layer of a silicon- on-insulator wafer) and a p-doped polycrystalline silicon rib with a gate oxide layer (the aforementioned silicon dioxide layer) sandwiched between them. Under accumulation conditions, the majority charge carriers in the silicon waveguide modify the index of refraction so that a phase shift is induced in the optical mode propagating in the waveguide. The advantage of using an MOS capacitor phase shifter is that it is possible to achieve high modulation speed because there are no slow carrier-generation or -recombination processes involved in the accumulation operation. The main advantage of the proposed substitution of a ferroelectric oxide layer for the silicon dioxide layer would arise from the spontaneous polarization effect of the ferroelectric layer: This spontaneous polarization would maintain accumulation conditions in the absence of applied voltage. Consequently, once the device had been switched to a given optical state, it would remain in

  7. The promise of cyborg intelligence.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael F; Brown, Alexander A

    2017-03-01

    Yu et al. (2016) demonstrated that algorithms designed to find efficient routes in standard mazes can be integrated with the natural processes controlling rat navigation and spatial choices, and they pointed out the promise of such "cyborg intelligence" for biorobotic applications. Here, we briefly describe Yu et al.'s work, explore its relevance to the study of comparative cognition, and indicate how work involving cyborg intelligence would benefit from interdisciplinary collaboration between behavioral scientists and engineers.

  8. The promise of quantum simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Richard P.; Blume-Kohout, Robin

    2015-07-21

    In this study, quantum simulations promise to be one of the primary applications of quantum computers, should one be constructed. This article briefly summarizes the history of quantum simulation in light of the recent result of Wang and co-workers, demonstrating calculation of the ground and excited states for a HeH+ molecule, and concludes with a discussion of why this and other recent progress in the field suggest that quantum simulations of quantum chemistry have a bright future.

  9. The promise of quantum simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Muller, Richard P.; Blume-Kohout, Robin

    2015-07-21

    In this study, quantum simulations promise to be one of the primary applications of quantum computers, should one be constructed. This article briefly summarizes the history of quantum simulation in light of the recent result of Wang and co-workers, demonstrating calculation of the ground and excited states for a HeH+ molecule, and concludes with a discussion of why this and other recent progress in the field suggest that quantum simulations of quantum chemistry have a bright future.

  10. Hot forming of silicon sheet, silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, C. D., Jr.; Pope, D. P.; Kulkarni, S.; Wolf, M.

    1978-01-01

    The hot workability of polycrystalline silicon was studied. Uniaxail stress-strain curves are given for strain rates in the range of .0001 to .1/sec and temperatures from 1100 to 1380 C. At the highest strain rates at 1380 C axial strains in excess of 20% were easily obtainable without cracking. After deformations of 36%, recrystallization was completed within 0.1 hr at 1380 C. When the recrystallization was complete, there was still a small volume fraction of unrecyrstallized material which appeared very stable and may degrade the electronic properties of the bulk materials. Texture measurements showed that the as-produced vapor deposited polycrystalline rods have a 110 fiber texture with the 110 direction parallel to the growth direction and no preferred orientation about this axis. Upon axial compression perpendicular to the growth direction, the former 110 fiber axis changed to 111 and the compression axis became 110 . Recrystallization changed the texture to 110 along the former fiber axis and to 100 along the compression axis.

  11. Processing and Characterization of Polycrystalline Yag (Yttrium Aluminum Garnet) Core-Clad Fibers - Postprint

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TP-2014-0296 PROCESSING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF POLYCRYSTALLINE YAG ( YTTRIUM ALUMINUM GARNET) CORE-CLAD FIBERS -POSTPRINT...April 2013 – 1 April 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE PROCESSING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF POLYCRYSTALLINE YAG ( YTTRIUM ALUMINUM GARNET) CORE-CLAD FIBERS...of polycrystalline YAG ( Yttrium Aluminum Garnet) core-clad fibers Hyun Jun Kima,b, Geoff E. Faira*, Santeri A

  12. Silicon nanomaterials platform for bioimaging, biosensing, and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fei; Su, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Yiling; Fan, Chunhai; Lee, Shuit-Tong; He, Yao

    2014-02-18

    Silicon nanomaterials are an important class of nanomaterials with great potential for technologies including energy, catalysis, and biotechnology, because of their many unique properties, including biocompatibility, abundance, and unique electronic, optical, and mechanical properties, among others. Silicon nanomaterials are known to have little or no toxicity due to favorable biocompatibility of silicon, which is an important precondition for biological and biomedical applications. In addition, huge surface-to-volume ratios of silicon nanomaterials are responsible for their unique optical, mechanical, or electronic properties, which offer exciting opportunities for design of high-performance silicon-based functional nanoprobes, nanosensors, and nanoagents for biological analysis and detection and disease treatment. Moreover, silicon is the second most abundant element (after oxygen) on earth, providing plentiful and inexpensive resources for large-scale and low-cost preparation of silicon nanomaterials for practical applications. Because of these attractive traits, and in parallel with a growing interest in their design and synthesis, silicon nanomaterials are extensively investigated for wide-ranging applications, including energy, catalysis, optoelectronics, and biology. Among them, bioapplications of silicon nanomaterials are of particular interest. In the past decade, scientists have made an extensive effort to construct a silicon nanomaterials platform for various biological and biomedical applications, such as biosensors, bioimaging, and cancer treatment, as new and powerful tools for disease diagnosis and therapy. Nonetheless, there are few review articles covering these important and promising achievements to promote the awareness of development of silicon nanobiotechnology. In this Account, we summarize recent representative works to highlight the recent developments of silicon functional nanomaterials for a new, powerful platform for biological and

  13. Silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Ault, N.N.; Crowe, J.T. )

    1991-05-01

    This paper reports that, since silicon carbide (SiC) does not occur in nature, it must be synthesized by a high-temperature chemical reaction. The first commercial production began at the end of the 19th century when Acheson developed a process of reacting sand and coke in a resistance furnace. This process is still the basic SiC manufacturing process used today. High-quality silica sand (99.5% SiO{sub 2}), low-sulfur petroleum coke, and electricity (23.8 MJ/kg) are the major ingredients in the production of SiC. The reaction takes place in a trough-like furnace with a removable refractory side (or some similar configuration) and with permanent refractory ends holding carbon electrodes. When the furnace is started, the carbon electrodes are joined by the graphite core laid the length of the furnace near the center of the mixture which fills the furnace.

  14. Thin silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.B.; Bacon, C.; DiReda, V.; Ford, D.H.; Ingram, A.E.; Cotter, J.; Hughes-Lampros, T.; Rand, J.A.; Ruffins, T.R.; Barnett, A.M.

    1992-12-01

    The silicon-film design achieves high performance by using a dun silicon layer and incorporating light trapping. Optimally designed thin crystalline solar cells (<50 microns thick) have performance advantages over conventional thick devices. The high-performance silicon-film design employs a metallurgical barrier between the low-cost substrate and the thin silicon layer. Light trapping properties of silicon-film on ceramic solar cells are presented and analyzed. Recent advances in process development are described here.

  15. High-purity, isotopically enriched bulk silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Ager III, J.W.; Beeman, J.W.; Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.; Sharp, I.D.; Liao, C.; Yang, A.; Thewalt, M.L.W.; Riemann, H.

    2004-11-17

    The synthesis and characterization of dislocation-free, undoped, single crystals of Si enriched in all 3 stable isotopes is reported: {sup 28}Si (99.92%), {sup 29}Si (91.37%), and {sup 30}Si (89.8%). A silane-based process compatible with the relatively small amounts of isotopically enriched precursors that are practically available was used. The silane is decomposed to silicon on a graphite starter rod heated to 700-750 C in a recirculating flow reactor. A typical run produces 35 gm of polycrystalline Si at a growth rates of 5 {micro}m/min and conversion efficiency >95%. Single crystals are grown by the floating zone method and characterized by electrical and optical measurements. Concentrations of shallow dopants (P and B) are as low as mid-10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}. Concentrations of C and O lie below 10{sup 16} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}, respectively.

  16. Characterization of grain boundaries in silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, L. J.; Shyu, C. M.; Stika, K. M.; Daud, T.; Crotty, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Zero-bias conductance and capacitance measurements at various temperatures were used to study trapped charges and potential barrier height at the boundaries. Deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) was applied to measure the density of states at the boundary. A study of photoconductivity of grain boundaries in p-type silicon demonstrated the applicability of the technique in the measurement of minority carrier recombination velocity at the grain boundary. Enhanced diffusion of phosphorus at grain boundaries in three cast polycrystalline photovoltaic materials was studied. Enhancements for the three were the same, indicating that the properties of boundaries are similar, although grown by different techniques. Grain boundaries capable of enhancing the diffusion were found always to have strong recombination activities; the phenomena could be related to dangling bonds at the boundaries. Evidence that incoherent second-order twins of (111)/(115) type are diffusion-active is presented.

  17. Silicon Research and Technology Workshop report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The materials, structures, processing, modeling and measurements of high efficiency silicon solar cells were surveyed. In the materials area, highlights included: (1) the possibility of improving cell voltages by reducing minority carrier mobilities in critical regions of the solar cells; (2) the need for and possibility of lowering the surface recombination velocity for improvement of open circuit voltage in shallow junction cells; (3) the present need for improved lifetime in high resistivity cells; and (4) the potential for new materials such as polycrystalline or dendritic web material to perform well at end of life in a radiation environment. In the area of structures, distinction was made between those for terrestrial use and those that would survive radiation environments. Areas such as epitaxial growth and laser or elctron beam annealing (and diffusion) were proposed as having certain advantages over more conventional techniques.

  18. Integrated Nanophotonic Silicon Devices for Next Generation Computing Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, Stevan

    Development of the computing platform of the future depends largely on high bandwidth interconnects at intra-die level. Silicon photonics, as an innately CMOS compatible technology, is a promising candidate for delivering terabit per second bandwidths through the use of wavelength division multiplex (WDM) signaling. Silicon photonic interconnects offer unmatched bandwidth, density, energy efficiency, latency and reach, compared with the electrical interconnects. WDM silicon photonic links are viewed today as a promising solution for resolving the inter/intra-chip communication bottlenecks for high performance computing systems. Towards its maturity, silicon photonic technology has to resolve the issues of waveguide propagation loss, density of device integration, thermal stability of resonant devices, heterogeneous integration of various materials and many other problems. This dissertation describes the development of integrated photonic technology on silicon and silicon nitride platforms in the increased order of device complexity, from the fabrication process of low loss waveguides and efficient off-chip coupling devices, to the die-size reconfigurable lattice filters for optical signal processing. Particular emphasis of the dissertation is on the demonstration of CMOS-compatible, athermal silicon ring modulators that potentially hold the key to solving the thermal problem of silicon photonic devices. The development of high quality amorphous titanium dioxide films with negative thermo-optic coefficient enabled the fabrication of gigahertz-bandwidth silicon ring modulators that can be made insensitive to ambient temperature changes.

  19. Formation of silicon nanowire packed films from metallurgical-grade silicon powder using a two-step metal-assisted chemical etching method.

    PubMed

    Ouertani, Rachid; Hamdi, Abderrahmen; Amri, Chohdi; Khalifa, Marouan; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we use a two-step metal-assisted chemical etching method to produce films of silicon nanowires shaped in micrograins from metallurgical-grade polycrystalline silicon powder. The first step is an electroless plating process where the powder was dipped for few minutes in an aqueous solution of silver nitrite and hydrofluoric acid to permit Ag plating of the Si micrograins. During the second step, corresponding to silicon dissolution, we add a small quantity of hydrogen peroxide to the plating solution and we leave the samples to be etched for three various duration (30, 60, and 90 min). We try elucidating the mechanisms leading to the formation of silver clusters and silicon nanowires obtained at the end of the silver plating step and the silver-assisted silicon dissolution step, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs revealed that the processed Si micrograins were covered with densely packed films of self-organized silicon nanowires. Some of these nanowires stand vertically, and some others tilt to the silicon micrograin facets. The thickness of the nanowire films increases from 0.2 to 10 μm with increasing etching time. Based on SEM characterizations, laser scattering estimations, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, and Raman spectroscopy, we present a correlative study dealing with the effect of the silver-assisted etching process on the morphological and structural properties of the processed silicon nanowire films.

  20. Formation of silicon nanowire packed films from metallurgical-grade silicon powder using a two-step metal-assisted chemical etching method

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we use a two-step metal-assisted chemical etching method to produce films of silicon nanowires shaped in micrograins from metallurgical-grade polycrystalline silicon powder. The first step is an electroless plating process where the powder was dipped for few minutes in an aqueous solution of silver nitrite and hydrofluoric acid to permit Ag plating of the Si micrograins. During the second step, corresponding to silicon dissolution, we add a small quantity of hydrogen peroxide to the plating solution and we leave the samples to be etched for three various duration (30, 60, and 90 min). We try elucidating the mechanisms leading to the formation of silver clusters and silicon nanowires obtained at the end of the silver plating step and the silver-assisted silicon dissolution step, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs revealed that the processed Si micrograins were covered with densely packed films of self-organized silicon nanowires. Some of these nanowires stand vertically, and some others tilt to the silicon micrograin facets. The thickness of the nanowire films increases from 0.2 to 10 μm with increasing etching time. Based on SEM characterizations, laser scattering estimations, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, and Raman spectroscopy, we present a correlative study dealing with the effect of the silver-assisted etching process on the morphological and structural properties of the processed silicon nanowire films. PMID:25349554

  1. Formation of silicon nanowire packed films from metallurgical-grade silicon powder using a two-step metal-assisted chemical etching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouertani, Rachid; Hamdi, Abderrahmen; Amri, Chohdi; Khalifa, Marouan; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we use a two-step metal-assisted chemical etching method to produce films of silicon nanowires shaped in micrograins from metallurgical-grade polycrystalline silicon powder. The first step is an electroless plating process where the powder was dipped for few minutes in an aqueous solution of silver nitrite and hydrofluoric acid to permit Ag plating of the Si micrograins. During the second step, corresponding to silicon dissolution, we add a small quantity of hydrogen peroxide to the plating solution and we leave the samples to be etched for three various duration (30, 60, and 90 min). We try elucidating the mechanisms leading to the formation of silver clusters and silicon nanowires obtained at the end of the silver plating step and the silver-assisted silicon dissolution step, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs revealed that the processed Si micrograins were covered with densely packed films of self-organized silicon nanowires. Some of these nanowires stand vertically, and some others tilt to the silicon micrograin facets. The thickness of the nanowire films increases from 0.2 to 10 μm with increasing etching time. Based on SEM characterizations, laser scattering estimations, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, and Raman spectroscopy, we present a correlative study dealing with the effect of the silver-assisted etching process on the morphological and structural properties of the processed silicon nanowire films.

  2. Silicon solar cell process development, fabrication and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, D. C.; Iles, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of minority carrier diffusion lengths were made on the small mesa diodes from HEM Si and SILSO Si. The results were consistent with previous Voc and Isc measurements. Only the medium grain SILSO had a distinct advantage for the non grain boundary diodes. Substantial variations were observed for the HEM ingot 4141C. Also a quantitatively scaled light spot scan was being developed for localized diffusion length measurements in polycrystalline silicon solar cells. A change to a more monochromatic input for the light spot scan results in greater sensitivity and in principle, quantitative measurement of local material qualities is now possible.

  3. Process For Direct Integration Of A Thin-Film Silicon P-N Junction Diode With A Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    DOEpatents

    Toet, Daniel; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    2005-08-23

    A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

  4. Process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction

    DOEpatents

    Toet, Daniel; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    2003-01-01

    A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

  5. Process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction

    DOEpatents

    Toet, Daniel; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    2004-12-07

    A process for direct integration of a thin-film silicon p-n junction diode with a magnetic tunnel junction for use in advanced magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cells for high performance, non-volatile memory arrays. The process is based on pulsed laser processing for the fabrication of vertical polycrystalline silicon electronic device structures, in particular p-n junction diodes, on films of metals deposited onto low temperature-substrates such as ceramics, dielectrics, glass, or polymers. The process preserves underlayers and structures onto which the devices are typically deposited, such as silicon integrated circuits. The process involves the low temperature deposition of at least one layer of silicon, either in an amorphous or a polycrystalline phase on a metal layer. Dopants may be introduced in the silicon film during or after deposition. The film is then irradiated with short pulse laser energy that is efficiently absorbed in the silicon, which results in the crystallization of the film and simultaneously in the activation of the dopants via ultrafast melting and solidification. The silicon film can be patterned either before or after crystallization.

  6. Microstructure and texture analyses of polycrystalline ice during hot torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Journaux, B.; Montagnat, M.; Gest, L.; Barou, F.; Chauve, T.

    2015-12-01

    Water ice Ih is a material with very high plastic anisotropy where deformation is mainly accommodated by dislocation glide on the (0001) plane. This anisotropy gives rise to strong strain incompatibilities between grains during deformation, and therefore impacts texture and microstructure evolution. Accurate understanding of ice mechanical properties is significant for several areas of research such as glaciology, planetary sciences, but also in geosciences and metallurgy as ice can be seen as a model material with easier experimental handling at near melting temperatures. In the present study, we used torsion experiments to study non-coaxial shear strain (γ), very common in natural environments, up to very high values of γ. Numerous studies determined microstructure and texture evolution in polycrystalline assemblage submitted to torsion (metallic alloys and geological materials) but a very limited number focused on polycrystalline ice. Full cylinders of randomly oriented polycrystalline ice (grain size ~ 1 mm) were placed in a torsion apparatus and deformed under ductile regime under constant imposed torque at 266K (0.97 Tf). Macroscopic shear was monitored using a LVDT device or a rotary encoder. Several torsion tests with maximal shear strain up to γmax = 1 were performed. Tangent and axial sections were analyzed ex-situ using Automatic Ice Texture Analyzer (AITA) and Electron BackScatter Diffraction (EBSD). We were able to confirm the previously observed bimodal preferred orientation of the basal slip plane. Macroscopic strain evolution γ(t) displays a weakening after γmax = 0.04 (ɛmax ≃ 2 %), due to the beginning of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) processes. EBSD data provide novel informations on the microstructure that suggest very efficient grain boundary migration processes. In particular, we were able to measure differences of intra-granular misorientations density between the two ODF maxima populations that can highlight the role of DRX

  7. Advances in polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaics for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lanning, B.R.; Armstrong, J.H.; Misra, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    Polycrystalline, thin-film photovoltaics represent one of the few (if not the only) renewable power sources which has the potential to satisfy the demanding technical requirements for future space applications. The demand in space is for deployable, flexible arrays with high power-to-weight ratios and long-term stability (15-20 years). In addition, there is also the demand that these arrays be produced by scalable, low-cost, high yield, processes. An approach to significantly reduce costs and increase reliability is to interconnect individual cells series via monolithic integration. Both CIS and CdTe semiconductor films are optimum absorber materials for thin-film n-p heterojunction solar cells, having band gaps between 0.9-1.5 eV and demonstrated small area efficiencies, with cadmium sulfide window layers, above 16.5 percent. Both CIS and CdTe polycrystalline thin-film cells have been produced on a laboratory scale by a variety of physical and chemical deposition methods, including evaporation, sputtering, and electrodeposition. Translating laboratory processes which yield these high efficiency, small area cells into the design of a manufacturing process capable of producing 1-sq ft modules, however, requires a quantitative understanding of each individual step in the process and its effect on overall module performance. With a proper quantification and understanding of material transport and reactivity for each individual step, manufacturing process can be designed that is not `reactor-specific` and can be controlled intelligently with the design parameters of the process. The objective of this paper is to present an overview of the current efforts at MMC to develop large-scale manufacturing processes for both CIS and CdTe thin-film polycrystalline modules. CIS cells/modules are fabricated in a `substrate configuration` by physical vapor deposition techniques and CdTe cells/modules are fabricated in a `superstrate configuration` by wet chemical methods.

  8. Analysis of defect structure in silicon. Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the Low-Cost Solar array Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natesh, R.; Mena, M.; Plichta, M.; Smith, J. M.; Sellani, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    One hundred ninety-three silicon sheet samples, approximately 880 square centimeters, were analyzed for twin boundary density, dislocation pit density, and grain boundary length. One hundred fifteen of these samples were manufactured by a heat exchanger method, thirty-eight by edge defined film fed growth, twenty-three by the silicon on ceramics process, and ten by the dendritic web process. Seven solar cells were also step-etched to determine the internal defect distribution on these samples. Procedures were developed or the quantitative characterization of structural defects such as dislocation pits, precipitates, twin & grain boundaries using a QTM 720 quantitative image analyzing system interfaced with a PDP 11/03 mini computer. Characterization of the grain boundary length per unit area for polycrystalline samples was done by using the intercept method on an Olympus HBM Microscope.

  9. Fabrication of polycrystalline thin films by pulsed laser processing

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Truher, J.B.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Colella, N.J.

    1998-02-03

    A method is disclosed for fabricating polycrystalline thin films on low-temperature (or high-temperature) substrates which uses processing temperatures that are low enough to avoid damage to the substrate, and then transiently heating select layers of the thin films with at least one pulse of a laser or other homogenized beam source. The pulse length is selected so that the layers of interest are transiently heated to a temperature which allows recrystallization and/or dopant activation while maintaining the substrate at a temperature which is sufficiently low to avoid damage to the substrate. This method is particularly applicable in the fabrication of solar cells. 1 fig.

  10. Fabrication of polycrystalline thin films by pulsed laser processing

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Truher, Joel B.; Kaschmitter, James L.; Colella, Nicholas J.

    1998-02-03

    A method for fabricating polycrystalline thin films on low-temperature (or high-temperature) substrates which uses processing temperatures that are low enough to avoid damage to the substrate, and then transiently heating select layers of the thin films with at least one pulse of a laser or other homogenized beam source. The pulse length is selected so that the layers of interest are transiently heated to a temperature which allows recrystallization and/or dopant activation while maintaining the substrate at a temperature which is sufficiently low to avoid damage to the substrate. This method is particularly applicable in the fabrication of solar cells.

  11. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in polycrystalline bismuth telluride nanofilm

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Lin; Ma, Weigang; Zhang, Xing

    2014-06-16

    In this study, the dynamics of energy carriers in polycrystalline bismuth telluride nanofilm are investigated by the ultrafast pump-probe method. The energy relaxation processes are quantitatively analyzed by using the numerical fitting models. The extracted hot carrier relaxation times of photon excitation, thermalization, and diffusion are around sub-picosecond. The initial reflectivity recovery is found to be dominantly determined by the carrier diffusion, electron-phonon coupling, and photo-generated carriers trapping processes. High-frequency and low-frequency oscillations are both observed and attributed to coherent optical phonons and coherent acoustic phonons, respectively.

  12. An acoustic emission study of plastic deformation in polycrystalline aluminium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Frederick, J. R.; Felbeck, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    Acoustic emission experiments were performed on polycrystalline and single crystal 99.99% aluminum while undergoing tensile deformation. It was found that acoustic emission counts as a function of grain size showed a maximum value at a particular grain size. Furthermore, the slip area associated with this particular grain size corresponded to the threshold level of detectability of single dislocation slip events. The rate of decline in acoustic emission activity as grain size is increased beyond the peak value suggests that grain boundary associated dislocation sources are giving rise to the bulk of the detected acoustic emissions.

  13. Remobilization in the cratonic lithosphere recorded in polycrystalline diamond

    PubMed

    Jacob; Viljoen; Grassineau; Jagoutz

    2000-08-18

    Polycrystalline diamonds (framesites) from the Venetia kimberlite in South Africa contain silicate minerals whose isotopic and trace element characteristics document remobilization of older carbon and silicate components to form the framesites shortly before kimberlite eruption. Chemical variations within the garnets correlate with carbon isotopes in the diamonds, indicating contemporaneous formation. Trace element, radiogenic, and stable isotope variations can be explained by the interaction of eclogites with a carbonatitic melt, derived by remobilization of material that had been stored for a considerable time in the lithosphere. These results indicate more recent formation of diamonds from older materials within the cratonic lithosphere.

  14. Advances in polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaics for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanning, Bruce R.; Armstrong, Joseph H.; Misra, Mohan S.

    1994-09-01

    Polycrystalline, thin-film photovoltaics represent one of the few (if not the only) renewable power sources which has the potential to satisfy the demanding technical requirements for future space applications. The demand in space is for deployable, flexible arrays with high power-to-weight ratios and long-term stability (15-20 years). In addition, there is also the demand that these arrays be produced by scalable, low-cost, high yield, processes. An approach to significantly reduce costs and increase reliability is to interconnect individual cells series via monolithic integration. Both CIS and CdTe semiconductor films are optimum absorber materials for thin-film n-p heterojunction solar cells, having band gaps between 0.9-1.5 ev and demonstrated small area efficiencies, with cadmium sulfide window layers, above 16.5 percent. Both CIS and CdTe polycrystalline thin-film cells have been produced on a laboratory scale by a variety of physical and chemical deposition methods, including evaporation, sputtering, and electrodeposition. Translating laboratory processes which yield these high efficiency, small area cells into the design of a manufacturing process capable of producing 1-sq ft modules, however, requires a quantitative understanding of each individual step in the process and its (each step) effect on overall module performance. With a proper quantification and understanding of material transport and reactivity for each individual step, manufacturing process can be designed that is not 'reactor-specific' and can be controlled intelligently with the design parameters of the process. The objective of this paper is to present an overview of the current efforts at MMC to develop large-scale manufacturing processes for both CIS and CdTe thin-film polycrystalline modules. CIS cells/modules are fabricated in a 'substrate configuration' by physical vapor deposition techniques and CdTe cells/modules are fabricated in a 'superstrate configuration' by wet chemical

  15. Electron and Hole Trapping in Polycrystalline Metal Oxide Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mckenna, Keith P.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2011-07-08

    Electron and hole trapping by grain boundaries and dislocations in polycrystalline materials is important for wide ranging technological applications such as solar cells, microelectronics, photo-catalysts and rechargeable batteries. In this article, we first give an overview of the computational and methodological challenges involved in modelling such effects. This is followed by a discussion of two recent studies we have made on electron/hole trapping in wide gap insulators. The results suggest that such effects can be important for many applications which we discuss. These computationally demanding calculations have made extensive use of both the HPCx and HECToR services.

  16. The Effect of Crystal Orientation on Growth on Polycrystalline TNT,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    satisfactory mechanism to account for its occurrence [1,2]. Investigations carried out at Materials Research Laboratories have confirmed that growth of creamed...AD0A096 591 MATERIALS RESEARCH LABS ASCOT VALE (AUSTRALIA) F/G 20/ 2 THE EFFECT OF CRYSTAL ORIENTATION ON GROWTH ON POLYCRYSTALLINE -ETC(L MAT 80 W S...WILSON UNCLASSIFIED MRL-R775 N N R.-R-775 A/ R-002-156 DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE DEFENCE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ORGANISATION MATERIALS RESEARCH

  17. Machining graphite composites with polycrystalline diamond end mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohkonen, Kent E.; Anderson, Scott; Strong, A. B.

    One area of focus in developing light-strong materials has been the development of graphite/epoxy composites. The graphite/epoxy materials have created challenges in the area of fabrication and machining. The research objective was to determine if cutting tool material and style of cutting edge showed any significant differences in tool life. The cutting tool materials and cutter styles included helical carbide-end mills and straight and helical polycrystalline diamond-end mill cutters. The experimental design was developed using a fractional factorial design running twelve tests. Results were taken from cutting tool flank edge wear, composite part surface finish, and visual delamination of the part.

  18. Allylamine-mediated DNA attachment to polycrystalline diamond surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, H.; Srikanth, Vadali. V. S. S.; Jiang, X.; Luo, J.; Ihmels, H.; Aronov, I.; Wenclawiak, B. W.; Adlung, M.; Wickleder, C.

    2009-10-01

    Allylamine, an unsaturated short carbon chain amine was used to mediate ss-DNA attachment to an H-terminated polycrystalline diamond thin film surface for biosensoric applications. At first, allylamine was photochemically tethered onto the diamond film surface; ss-DNA was then attached via the allylamine linkage. The DNA molecules are then hybridized with the complementary DNA molecules containing fluorescence labels followed by denaturing. Time-of-fight secondary ion mass spectrometry and fluorescence spectroscopy are used to confirm the allylamine bonding and the covalent DNA bonding to the diamond film surface, respectively.

  19. Statistical thermodynamics of strain hardening in polycrystalline solids.

    PubMed

    Langer, J S

    2015-09-01

    This paper starts with a systematic rederivation of the statistical thermodynamic equations of motion for dislocation-mediated plasticity proposed in 2010 by Langer, Bouchbinder, and Lookman [Acta Mat. 58, 3718 (2010)ACMAFD1359-645410.1016/j.actamat.2010.03.009]. It then uses that theory to explain the anomalous rate-hardening behavior reported in 1988 by Follansbee and Kocks and to explore the relation between hardening rate and grain size reported in 1995 by Meyers et al. A central theme is the need for physics-based, nonequilibrium analyses in developing predictive theories of the strength of polycrystalline materials.

  20. PDC (polycrystalline diamond compact) bit research at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, J.T.; Glowka, D.A.

    1989-06-01

    From the beginning of the geothermal development program, Sandia has performed and supported research into polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits. These bits are attractive because they are intrinsically efficient in their cutting action (shearing, rather than crushing) and they have no moving parts (eliminating the problems of high-temperature lubricants, bearings, and seals.) This report is a summary description of the analytical and experimental work done by Sandia and our contractors. It describes analysis and laboratory tests of individual cutters and complete bits, as well as full-scale field tests of prototype and commercial bits. The report includes a bibliography of documents giving more detailed information on these topics. 26 refs.

  1. Scattering of ultrasound by minority phases in polycrystalline metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayers, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    The scattering of ultrasound by minority phases in polycrystalline metals is discussed. For discrete inclusions, the scattering theory of Ying and Truell describes the attenuation of longitudinal waves. This is demonstrated by comparison with experiments of Papadakis for graphite particles in modular cast iron. To treat the scattering by a second phase formed by segregation at a grain boundary, the scattering by a spherical shell with density and elastic constants different from those of the surrounding medium is developed. Reflection of ultrasound at this boundary is found to enhance the attenuation at low frequencies. Application is made to the scattering by manganese sulphide in free machining steel.

  2. Valley Filtering and Electronic Optics Using Polycrystalline Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, V. Hung; Dechamps, S.; Dollfus, P.; Charlier, J.-C.

    2016-12-01

    In this Letter, both the manipulation of valley-polarized currents and the optical-like behaviors of Dirac fermions are theoretically explored in polycrystalline graphene. When strain is applied, the misorientation between two graphene domains separated by a grain boundary can result in a mismatch of their electronic structures. Such a discrepancy manifests itself in a strong breaking of the inversion symmetry, leading to perfect valley polarization in a wide range of transmission directions. In addition, these graphene domains act as different media for electron waves, offering the possibility to modulate and obtain negative refraction indexes.

  3. Statistical thermodynamics of strain hardening in polycrystalline solids

    DOE PAGES

    Langer, James S.

    2015-09-18

    This paper starts with a systematic rederivation of the statistical thermodynamic equations of motion for dislocation-mediated plasticity proposed in 2010 by Langer, Bouchbinder, and Lookman. The paper then uses that theory to explain the anomalous rate-hardening behavior reported in 1988 by Follansbee and Kocks and to explore the relation between hardening rate and grain size reported in 1995 by Meyers et al. A central theme is the need for physics-based, nonequilibrium analyses in developing predictive theories of the strength of polycrystalline materials.

  4. Advances in polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaics for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanning, Bruce R.; Armstrong, Joseph H.; Misra, Mohan S.

    1994-01-01

    Polycrystalline, thin-film photovoltaics represent one of the few (if not the only) renewable power sources which has the potential to satisfy the demanding technical requirements for future space applications. The demand in space is for deployable, flexible arrays with high power-to-weight ratios and long-term stability (15-20 years). In addition, there is also the demand that these arrays be produced by scalable, low-cost, high yield, processes. An approach to significantly reduce costs and increase reliability is to interconnect individual cells series via monolithic integration. Both CIS and CdTe semiconductor films are optimum absorber materials for thin-film n-p heterojunction solar cells, having band gaps between 0.9-1.5 ev and demonstrated small area efficiencies, with cadmium sulfide window layers, above 16.5 percent. Both CIS and CdTe polycrystalline thin-film cells have been produced on a laboratory scale by a variety of physical and chemical deposition methods, including evaporation, sputtering, and electrodeposition. Translating laboratory processes which yield these high efficiency, small area cells into the design of a manufacturing process capable of producing 1-sq ft modules, however, requires a quantitative understanding of each individual step in the process and its (each step) effect on overall module performance. With a proper quantification and understanding of material transport and reactivity for each individual step, manufacturing process can be designed that is not 'reactor-specific' and can be controlled intelligently with the design parameters of the process. The objective of this paper is to present an overview of the current efforts at MMC to develop large-scale manufacturing processes for both CIS and CdTe thin-film polycrystalline modules. CIS cells/modules are fabricated in a 'substrate configuration' by physical vapor deposition techniques and CdTe cells/modules are fabricated in a 'superstrate configuration' by wet chemical

  5. Chemically assisted ion beam etching of polycrystalline and (100)tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Charles

    1987-01-01

    A chemically assisted ion-beam etching technique is described which employs an ion beam from an electron-bombardment ion source and a directed flux of ClF3 neutrals. This technique enables the etching of tungsten foils and films in excess of 40 microns thick with good anisotropy and pattern definition over areas of 30 sq mm, and with a high degree of selectivity. (100) tungsten foils etched with this process exhibit preferred-orientation etching, while polycrystalline tungsten films exhibit high etch rates. This technique can be used to pattern the dispenser cathode surfaces serving as electron emitters in traveling-wave tubes to a controlled porosity.

  6. Emission of nuclear quadrupole resonance from polycrystalline hexamethylenetetramine.

    PubMed

    Ota, G; Itozaki, H

    2008-03-01

    The angular dependence of the nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signal intensity emitted from polycrystalline hexamethylenetetramine has been analytically investigated for all directions for non-contact detection of chemicals by nuclear quadrupole resonance. The field pattern of the NQR signal from a column sample was measured. The emitted patterns were the same as that from a united single magnetic dipole, which fitted well to the estimation based on quadrupole principle axis system. This result is helpful to design an antenna for NQR remote detection.

  7. Penetration and lateral diffusion characteristics of polycrystalline graphene barriers.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Taeshik; Mun, Jeong Hun; Cho, Byung Jin; Kim, Taek-Soo

    2014-01-07

    We report penetration and lateral diffusion behavior of environmental molecules on synthesized polycrystalline graphene. Penetration occurs through graphene grain boundaries resulting in local oxidation. However, when the penetrated molecules diffuse laterally, the oxidation region will expand. Therefore, we measured the lateral diffusion rate along the graphene-copper interface for the first time by the environment-assisted crack growth test. It is clearly shown that the lateral diffusion is suppressed due to the high van der Waals interaction. Finally, we employed bilayer graphene for a perfect diffusion barrier facilitated by decreased defect density and increased lateral diffusion path.

  8. Silicon-Rich Silicon Carbide Hole-Selective Rear Contacts for Crystalline-Silicon-Based Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Nogay, Gizem; Stuckelberger, Josua; Wyss, Philippe; Jeangros, Quentin; Allebé, Christophe; Niquille, Xavier; Debrot, Fabien; Despeisse, Matthieu; Haug, Franz-Josef; Löper, Philipp; Ballif, Christophe

    2016-12-28

    The use of passivating contacts compatible with typical homojunction thermal processes is one of the most promising approaches to realizing high-efficiency silicon solar cells. In this work, we investigate an alternative rear-passivating contact targeting facile implementation to industrial p-type solar cells. The contact structure consists of a chemically grown thin silicon oxide layer, which is capped with a boron-doped silicon-rich silicon carbide [SiCx(p)] layer and then annealed at 800-900 °C. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that the thin chemical oxide layer disappears upon thermal annealing up to 900 °C, leading to degraded surface passivation. We interpret this in terms of a chemical reaction between carbon atoms in the SiCx(p) layer and the adjacent chemical oxide layer. To prevent this reaction, an intrinsic silicon interlayer was introduced between the chemical oxide and the SiCx(p) layer. We show that this intrinsic silicon interlayer is beneficial for surface passivation. Optimized passivation is obtained with a 10-nm-thick intrinsic silicon interlayer, yielding an emitter saturation current density of 17 fA cm(-2) on p-type wafers, which translates into an implied open-circuit voltage of 708 mV. The potential of the developed contact at the rear side is further investigated by realizing a proof-of-concept hybrid solar cell, featuring a heterojunction front-side contact made of intrinsic amorphous silicon and phosphorus-doped amorphous silicon. Even though the presented cells are limited by front-side reflection and front-side parasitic absorption, the obtained cell with a Voc of 694.7 mV, a FF of 79.1%, and an efficiency of 20.44% demonstrates the potential of the p(+)/p-wafer full-side-passivated rear-side scheme shown here.

  9. Problems and promises of NODC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    The National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC), the nation's warehouse for ocean data, often hears complaints from its users that requests for data from recent oceanographic cruises cannot be filled. The complaint highlights both sides of the data traffic problem that besets NODC: Researchers delay sending their data to the center, and NODC has had difficulties in processing some data, especially when changes in the computer systems are made or when data is submitted in incomplete form. Plans within NODC promise to minimize the data processing problems with eventual direct communication from desktop to data base.

  10. Silicene, a promising new 2D material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oughaddou, Hamid; Enriquez, Hanna; Tchalala, Mohammed Rachid; Yildirim, Handan; Mayne, Andrew J.; Bendounan, Azzedine; Dujardin, Gérald; Ait Ali, Mustapha; Kara, Abdelkader

    2015-02-01

    Silicene is emerging as a two-dimensional material with very attractive electronic properties for a wide range of applications; it is a particularly promising material for nano-electronics in silicon-based technology. Over the last decade, the existence and stability of silicene has been the subject of much debate. Theoretical studies were the first to predict a puckered honeycomb structure with electronic properties resembling those of graphene. Though these studies were for free-standing silicene, experimental fabrication of silicene has been achieved so far only through epitaxial growth on crystalline surfaces. Indeed, it was only in 2010 that researchers presented the first experimental evidence of the formation of silicene on Ag(1 1 0) and Ag(1 1 1), which has launched silicene in a similar way to graphene. This very active field has naturally led to the recent growth of silicene on Ir(1 1 1), ZrB2(0 0 0 1) and Au(1 1 0) substrates. However, the electronic properties of epitaxially grown silicene on metal surfaces are influenced by the strong silicene-metal interactions. This has prompted experimental studies of the growth of multi-layer silicene, though the nature of its "silicene" structure remains questionable. Of course, like graphene, synthesizing free-standing silicene represents the ultimate challenge. A first step towards this has been reported recently through chemical exfoliation from calcium disilicide (CaSi2). In this review, we discuss the experimental and theoretical studies of silicene performed to date. Special attention is given to different experimental studies of the electronic properties of silicene on metal substrates. New avenues for the growth of silicene on other substrates with different chemical characteristics are presented along with foreseeable applications such as nano-devices and novel batteries.

  11. Nonlinear optical imaging of defects in cubic silicon carbide epilayers.

    PubMed

    Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, Stefan G; Tranca, Denis E; Matei, Alecs; Stanciu, George A

    2014-06-11

    Silicon carbide is one of the most promising materials for power electronic devices capable of operating at extreme conditions. The widespread application of silicon carbide power devices is however limited by the presence of structural defects in silicon carbide epilayers. Our experiment demonstrates that optical second harmonic generation imaging represents a viable solution for characterizing structural defects such as stacking faults, dislocations and double positioning boundaries in cubic silicon carbide layers. X-ray diffraction and optical second harmonic rotational anisotropy were used to confirm the growth of the cubic polytype, atomic force microscopy was used to support the identification of silicon carbide defects based on their distinct shape, while second harmonic generation microscopy revealed the detailed structure of the defects. Our results show that this fast and noninvasive investigation method can identify defects which appear during the crystal growth and can be used to certify areas within the silicon carbide epilayer that have optimal quality.

  12. Reduced thermal resistance of the silicon-synthetic diamond composite substrates at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, V.; Subrina, S.; Nika, D. L.; Balandin, A. A.

    2010-07-01

    The authors report results of experimental investigation of thermal conductivity of synthetic diamond-silicon composite substrates. Although composite substrates are more thermally resistive than silicon at room temperature they outperform conventional wafers at elevated temperatures owing to different thermal conductivity dependence on temperature. The crossover point is reached near ˜360 K and can be made even lower by tuning the polycrystalline-grain size, film thickness, and interface quality. The reduction of thermal resistance of composite wafers at temperatures, typical for operation of electronic chips, may lead to better thermal management and new phonon-engineered methods for the electron mobility enhancement.

  13. Elastic modulus of supercooled liquid and hot solid silicon measured by inelastic X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Alatas, A.; Said, A. H.; Sinn, H.; Alp, E. E.; Kodituwakku, C. N.; Reinhart, B.; Saboungi, M. -L.; Price, D. L.

    2005-12-01

    We measured the dynamical structure factors of supercooled-liquid and hot-solid silicon by inelastic X-ray scattering at the same temperature, 1620 K. Two significant changes in the averaged longitudinal sound velocities and in the longitudinal modulus are observed. We, first observe a different longitudinal modulus in the polycrystalline hot-solid silicon compared to the extrapolated value obtained from the single-crystal measurement. Furthermore, this reduction of the modulus may be a precursor of the semiconductor-to-metal transition. Second, the increase in the longitudinal modulus in the liquid upon supercooling is consistent with an increase in the degree of the directional bonding.

  14. Purified silicon production system

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2004-03-30

    Method and apparatus for producing purified bulk silicon from highly impure metallurgical-grade silicon source material at atmospheric pressure. Method involves: (1) initially reacting iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to create silicon tetraiodide and impurity iodide byproducts in a cold-wall reactor chamber; (2) isolating silicon tetraiodide from the impurity iodide byproducts and purifying it by distillation in a distillation chamber; and (3) transferring the purified silicon tetraiodide back to the cold-wall reactor chamber, reacting it with additional iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to produce silicon diiodide and depositing the silicon diiodide onto a substrate within the cold-wall reactor chamber. The two chambers are at atmospheric pressure and the system is open to allow the introduction of additional source material and to remove and replace finished substrates.

  15. Status of Reconstruction of Fragmented Diamond-on-Silicon Collector From Genesis Spacecraft Solar Wind Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Melissa C.; Calaway, M. C.; McNamara, K. M.; Hittle, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to passive solar wind collector surfaces, the Genesis Discovery Mission science canister had on board an electrostatic concave mirror for concentrating the solar wind ions, known as the concentrator . The 30-mm-radius collector focal point (the target) was comprised of 4 quadrants: two of single crystal SiC, one of polycrystalline 13C diamond and one of diamond-like-carbon (DLC) on a silicon substrate. [DLC-on-silicon is also sometimes referenced as Diamond-on-silicon, DOS.] Three of target quadrants survived the hard landing intact, but the DLC-on-silicon quadrant fractured into numerous pieces (Fig. 1). This abstract reports the status of identifying the DLC target fragments and reconstructing their original orientation.

  16. On-chip silicon optical phased array for two-dimensional beam steering.

    PubMed

    Kwong, David; Hosseini, Amir; Covey, John; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Xiaochuan; Subbaraman, Harish; Chen, Ray T

    2014-02-15

    A 16-element optical phased array integrated on chip is presented for achieving two-dimensional (2D) optical beam steering. The device is fabricated on the silicon-on-insulator platform with a 250 nm silicon device layer. Steering is achieved via a combination of wavelength tuning and thermo-optic phase shifting with a switching power of P(π)=20  mW per channel. Using a silicon waveguide grating with a polycrystalline silicon overlay enables narrow far field beam widths while mitigating the precise etching needed for conventional shallow etch gratings. Using this system, 2D steering across a 20°×15° field of view is achieved with a sidelobe level better than 10 dB and with beam widths of 1.2°×0.5°.

  17. Controlling silicon crystallization in aluminum-induced crystallization via substrate plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainey, Mel F.; Innocent-Dolor, Jon-L.; Choudhury, Tanushree H.; Redwing, Joan M.

    2017-03-01

    The effect of reactive ion etching using chlorine or fluorine-based plasmas on aluminum-induced crystallization (AIC) of silicon on fused silica glass substrates was investigated with the goal of chemically modifying the substrate surface and thereby influencing the crystallization behavior. Chlorine etching of the glass prior to AIC resulted in six times faster silicon crystallization times and smaller grain sizes than films formed on untreated substrates while fluorine etching resulted in crystallization times double than those on untreated surfaces. The differences in crystallization behavior were attributed to changes in surface chemistry and surface energy of the glass as a result of the plasma treatment as supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The different surface treatments were then combined with optical lithography to control the location of crystallization on the substrate surface to realize the production of patterned polycrystalline silicon films from initially continuous aluminum and silicon.

  18. Development of processes for the production of low cost silicon dendritic web for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hopkins, R. H.; Skutch, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.; Hill, F. E.

    1980-01-01

    High area output rates and continuous, automated growth are two key technical requirements for the growth of low-cost silicon ribbons for solar cells. By means of computer-aided furnace design, silicon dendritic web output rates as high as 27 sq cm/min have been achieved, a value in excess of that projected to meet a $0.50 per peak watt solar array manufacturing cost. The feasibility of simultaneous web growth while the melt is replenished with pelletized silicon has also been demonstrated. This step is an important precursor to the development of an automated growth system. Solar cells made on the replenished material were just as efficient as devices fabricated on typical webs grown without replenishment. Moreover, web cells made on a less-refined, pelletized polycrystalline silicon synthesized by the Battelle process yielded efficiencies up to 13% (AM1).

  19. GaAs Photovoltaics on Polycrystalline Ge Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, David M.; Pal, AnnaMaria T.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.; Wolford, David S.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Smith, Mark A.; Scheiman, David; Jenkins, Phillip P.; McElroy Bruce

    2007-01-01

    High efficiency III-V multijunction solar cells deposited on metal foil or even polymer substrates can provide tremendous advantages in mass and stowage, particularly for planetary missions. As a first step towards that goal, poly-crystalline p/i/n GaAs solar cells are under development on polycrystalline Ge substrates. Organo Metallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy (OMVPE) parameters for pre-growth bake, nucleation and deposition have been examined. Single junction p/i/n GaAs photovoltaic devices, incorporating InGaP front and back window layers, have been grown and processed. Device performance has shown a dependence upon the thickness of a GaAs buffer layer deposited between the Ge substrate and the active device structure. A thick (2 m) GaAs buffer provides for both increased average device performance as well as reduced sensitivity to variations in grain size and orientation. Illumination under IR light (lambda > 1 micron), the cells showed a Voc, demonstrating the presence of an unintended photoactive junction at the GaAs/Ge interface. The presence of this junction limited the efficiency to approx.13% (estimated with an anti-refection coating) due to the current mismatch and lack of tunnel junction interconnect.

  20. Creep and stress relaxation modeling of polycrystalline ceramic fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, James A.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    1994-01-01

    A variety of high performance polycrystalline ceramic fibers are currently being considered as reinforcement for high temperature ceramic matrix composites. However, under mechanical loading about 800 C, these fibers display creep related instabilities which can result in detrimental changes in composite dimensions, strength, and internal stress distributions. As a first step toward understanding these effects, this study examines the validity of a mechanism-based empirical model which describes primary stage tensile creep and stress relaxation of polycrystalline ceramic fibers as independent functions of time, temperature, and applied stress or strain. To verify these functional dependencies, a simple bend test is used to measure stress relaxation for four types of commercial ceramic fibers for which direct tensile creep data are available. These fibers include both nonoxide (SCS-6, Nicalon) and oxide (PRD-166, FP) compositions. The results of the Bend Stress Relaxation (BSR) test not only confirm the stress, time, and temperature dependencies predicted by the model, but also allow measurement of model empirical parameters for the four fiber types. In addition, comparison of model tensile creep predictions based on the BSR test results with the literature data show good agreement, supporting both the predictive capability of the model and the use of the BSR text as a simple method for parameter determination for other fibers.