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Sample records for polycyclic quinone pigments

  1. Persistent and widespread occurrence of bioactive quinone pigments during post-Paleozoic crinoid diversification.

    PubMed

    Wolkenstein, Klaus

    2015-03-01

    Secondary metabolites often play an important role in the adaptation of organisms to their environment. However, little is known about the secondary metabolites of ancient organisms and their evolutionary history. Chemical analysis of exceptionally well-preserved colored fossil crinoids and modern crinoids from the deep sea suggests that bioactive polycyclic quinones related to hypericin were, and still are, globally widespread in post-Paleozoic crinoids. The discovery of hypericinoid pigments both in fossil and in present-day representatives of the order Isocrinida indicates that the pigments remained almost unchanged since the Mesozoic, also suggesting that the original color of hypericinoid-containing ancient crinoids may have been analogous to that of their modern relatives. The persistent and widespread occurrence, spatially as well as taxonomically, of hypericinoid pigments in various orders during the adaptive radiation of post-Paleozoic crinoids suggests a general functional importance of the pigments, contributing to the evolutionary success of the Crinoidea.

  2. Persistent and widespread occurrence of bioactive quinone pigments during post-Paleozoic crinoid diversification

    PubMed Central

    Wolkenstein, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Secondary metabolites often play an important role in the adaptation of organisms to their environment. However, little is known about the secondary metabolites of ancient organisms and their evolutionary history. Chemical analysis of exceptionally well-preserved colored fossil crinoids and modern crinoids from the deep sea suggests that bioactive polycyclic quinones related to hypericin were, and still are, globally widespread in post-Paleozoic crinoids. The discovery of hypericinoid pigments both in fossil and in present-day representatives of the order Isocrinida indicates that the pigments remained almost unchanged since the Mesozoic, also suggesting that the original color of hypericinoid-containing ancient crinoids may have been analogous to that of their modern relatives. The persistent and widespread occurrence, spatially as well as taxonomically, of hypericinoid pigments in various orders during the adaptive radiation of post-Paleozoic crinoids suggests a general functional importance of the pigments, contributing to the evolutionary success of the Crinoidea. PMID:25730856

  3. [Yield of pigment cation-radicals in the reaction of quinone photooxidation of chlorophyll].

    PubMed

    Kostikov, A P; Sadovnikova, N A; Evstigneev, V B

    1976-01-01

    Photoinduced transfer of electrons in alkohol solutions of chlorophyll and its deuterated analog, deuterochlorophyll containing the quinoses: p-benzoquinone, chloranyl, duroquinone, 1,4-naftoquinone and ubiquinone (coenzyme Q6) is studied. It is shown that pigment cation-radical and quinone anion-radical are the primary products of photoreaction. A relationship between stationary concentrations of deuterochlorophyll and p-benzoquinone radicals and quinone concentration in solution is obtained. The reaction mechanism and causes of other authors' (G. Tollin et al.) failure in finding pigment cation-radicals which are formed in the reaction of the latter with quinoses are discussed. It is shown that optimal conditions for accumulating photoinduced cation-radicals of the pigment in pigment solutions of chlorophyll with quinones are lowered temperature, high viscosity of the solvent, low pH of the solution, careful purification of the quinone from hydroquinone admixture.

  4. Bioactive Polycyclic Quinones from Marine Streptomyces sp. 182SMLY

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ying; Xie, Xin; Chen, Lu; Yan, Shilun; Ye, Xuewei; Anjum, Komal; Huang, Haocai; Lian, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Zhizhen

    2016-01-01

    Chemical investigation of the cultures of marine Streptomyces sp. 182SMLY led to the discovery of two new polycyclic anthraquinones, which were elucidated as N-acetyl-N-demethylmayamycin (1) and streptoanthraquinone A (2) based on the extensive spectroscopic analysis including 2D NMR, HRESIMS, and an electronic circular dichroism (ECD) calculation. Both anthraquinones remarkably suppressed the proliferation of four different glioma cell lines with IC50 values in a range from 0.5 to 7.3 μM and induced apoptosis in the glioma cells. The ratios of IC50 for normal human astrocytes to IC50 for glioma cells were 6.4–53 for 1 and >14–31 for 2. N-acetyl-N-demethylmayamycin (1) also inhibited the growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with MIC 20.0 μM. PMID:26751456

  5. Quinone

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Quinone ; CASRN 106 - 51 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  6. Regiospecific oxidation of polycyclic aromatic phenols to quinones by hypervalent iodine reagents.

    PubMed

    Wu, Anhui; Duan, Yazhen; Xu, Daiwang; Penning, Trevor M; Harvey, Ronald G

    2010-03-20

    The hypervalent iodine reagents o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) and bis(trifluoro-acetoxy)iodobenzene (BTI) are shown to be general reagents for regio-controlled oxidation of polycyclic aromatic phenols (PAPs) to specific isomers (ortho, para, or remote) of polycyclic aromatic quinones (PAQs). The oxidations of a series of PAPs with IBX take place under mild conditions to furnish the corresponding ortho-PAQs. In contrast, oxidations of the same series of PAPs with BTI exhibit variable regiospecificity, affording para-PAQs where structurally feasible and ortho-PAQs or remote PAQ isomers in other cases. The structures of the specific PAQ isomers formed are predictable on the basis of the inherent regioselectivities of the hypervalent iodine reagents in combination with the structural requirements of the phenol precursors. IBX and BTI are recommended as the preferred reagents for regio-controlled oxidation of PAPs to PAQs.

  7. Spectroscopic identification of 0-quinones as the products of polycyclic aromatic trans-dihydrodiol oxidation catalyzed by dihydrodiol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Smithgall, T.; Penning, T.

    1987-05-01

    Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase catalyzes the NADP-dependent oxidation of polycyclic aromatic trans-dihydrodiols, a reaction that may suppress their carcinogenicity provided the products of the reaction are non-carcinogenic. Oxidation of the trans-1,2-dihydrodiol of naphthalene (NP-diol) or the 7,8-dihydrodiol of benzo(a)pyrene (BP-diol) by the homogeneous rat liver dehydrogenase resulted in the formation of multiple products by TLC, and none of these co-migrated with the corresponding 0-quinones standards. In subsequent reactions, the 0-quinones were trapped by conducting the oxidation of either NP-diol or BP-diol in phosphate buffer containing mercaptoethanol. The products of these reactions were identified by 500 Mhz NMR and electron impact mass spectrometry as mercaptoethanol adducts of the 1,2-quinone of naphthalene (m/e M+=234) and the 7,8-quinone of benzo(a)pyrene (m/e M+=358). The 7,8-quinone of benzo(a)pyrene also reacted with glutathione and cysteine to form water-soluble metabolites, but did not react with adenosine or guanosine.

  8. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons - Primitive pigment systems in the prebiotic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The chemical evolution of meteoritic organics in the primitive earth is examined experimentally with attention given to the photochemical effects of hydrocarbon/water mixtures. Also addressed are the generation of amphiphilic products by photochemical reactions and the transduction of light energy into potentially useful forms. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) absorb light and exist in carbonaceous chondrites; PAHs are therefore examined as primitive pigments by means of salt solutions with pyrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene derivatives with hexadecane. The hexadecane undergoes photochemical oxidation and yields long-chain amphiphiles with oxygen supplied by water, and acid pH shifts also occur. PAHs are also tested in lipid bilayer membranes to examine light-energy transduction. Protons are found to accumulate within the membrane-bounded volume to form proton gradients, and this reaction is theorized to be a good model of primitive photochemical reactions that related to the transduction of light energy into useable forms.

  9. The Role of Human Aldo-Keto Reductases in the Metabolic Activation and Detoxication of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Interconversion of PAH Catechols and PAH o-Quinones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Jin, Yi; Huang, Meng; Penning, Trevor M

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. They are procarcinogens requiring metabolic activation to elicit their deleterious effects. Aldo-keto reductases (AKR) catalyze the oxidation of proximate carcinogenic PAH trans-dihydrodiols to yield electrophilic and redox-active PAH o-quinones. AKRs are also found to be capable of reducing PAH o-quinones to form PAH catechols. The interconversion of o-quinones and catechols results in the redox-cycling of PAH o-quinones to give rise to the generation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent oxidative DNA damage. On the other hand, PAH catechols can be intercepted through phase II metabolism by which PAH o-quinones could be detoxified and eliminated. The aim of the present review is to summarize the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation/detoxication of PAH and the relevance of phase II conjugation reactions to human lung carcinogenesis.

  10. UV irradiation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ices: production of alcohols, quinones, and ethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, M. P.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.; Gillette, J. S.; Clemett, S. J.; Zare, R. N.

    1999-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water ice were exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation under astrophysical conditions, and the products were analyzed by infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Peripheral carbon atoms were oxidized, producing aromatic alcohols, ketones, and ethers, and reduced, producing partially hydrogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, molecules that account for the interstellar 3.4-micrometer emission feature. These classes of compounds are all present in carbonaceous meteorites. Hydrogen and deuterium atoms exchange readily between the PAHs and the ice, which may explain the deuterium enrichments found in certain meteoritic molecules. This work has important implications for extraterrestrial organics in biogenesis.

  11. Metabolism of a Representative Oxygenated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Phenanthrene-9,10-quinone in Human Hepatoma (HepG2) Cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the food chain is the major human health hazard associated with the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Phenanthrene is a representative PAH present in crude oil, and it undergoes biological transformation, photooxidation, and chemical oxidation to produce its signature oxygenated derivative, phenanthrene-9,10-quinone. We report the downstream metabolic fate of phenanthrene-9,10-quinone in HepG2 cells. The structures of the metabolites were identified by HPLC–UV–fluorescence detection and LC–MS/MS. O-mono-Glucuronosyl-phenanthrene-9,10-catechol was identified, as reported previously. A novel bis-conjugate, O-mono-methyl-O-mono-sulfonated-phenanthrene-9,10-catechol, was discovered for the first time, and evidence for both of its precursor mono conjugates was obtained. The identities of these four metabolites were unequivocally validated by comparison to authentic enzymatically synthesized standards. Evidence was also obtained for a minor metabolic pathway of phenanthrene-9,10-quinone involving bis-hydroxylation followed by O-mono-sulfonation. The identification of 9,10-catechol conjugates supports metabolic detoxification of phenanthrene-9,10-quinone through interception of redox cycling by UGT, COMT, and SULT isozymes and indicates the possible use of phenanthrene-9,10-catechol conjugates as biomarkers of human exposure to oxygenated PAH. PMID:24646012

  12. Metabolism of a representative oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) phenanthrene-9,10-quinone in human hepatoma (HepG2) cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meng; Zhang, Li; Mesaros, Clementina; Zhang, Suhong; Blaha, Michael A; Blair, Ian A; Penning, Trevor M

    2014-05-19

    Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the food chain is the major human health hazard associated with the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Phenanthrene is a representative PAH present in crude oil, and it undergoes biological transformation, photooxidation, and chemical oxidation to produce its signature oxygenated derivative, phenanthrene-9,10-quinone. We report the downstream metabolic fate of phenanthrene-9,10-quinone in HepG2 cells. The structures of the metabolites were identified by HPLC-UV-fluorescence detection and LC-MS/MS. O-mono-Glucuronosyl-phenanthrene-9,10-catechol was identified, as reported previously. A novel bis-conjugate, O-mono-methyl-O-mono-sulfonated-phenanthrene-9,10-catechol, was discovered for the first time, and evidence for both of its precursor mono conjugates was obtained. The identities of these four metabolites were unequivocally validated by comparison to authentic enzymatically synthesized standards. Evidence was also obtained for a minor metabolic pathway of phenanthrene-9,10-quinone involving bis-hydroxylation followed by O-mono-sulfonation. The identification of 9,10-catechol conjugates supports metabolic detoxification of phenanthrene-9,10-quinone through interception of redox cycling by UGT, COMT, and SULT isozymes and indicates the possible use of phenanthrene-9,10-catechol conjugates as biomarkers of human exposure to oxygenated PAH.

  13. Polychlorinated biphenyl contamination of paints containing polycyclic- and Naphthol AS-type pigments.

    PubMed

    Anezaki, Katsunori; Kannan, Narayanan; Nakano, Takeshi

    2015-10-01

    This study reports the concentrations and congener partners of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in commercially available paints. Polycyclic-type pigments containing dioxazine violet (pigment violet (PV) 23, PV37) and diketopyrrolopyrrole (PR254, PR255) were found to contain PCB-56, PCB-77, PCB-40, PCB-5, and PCB-12, and PCB-6, PCB-13, and PCB-15, respectively, as major congeners. Dioxazine violet is contaminated with by-products during synthesis from o-dichlorobenzene, which is used as a solvent during synthesis, and diketopyrrolopyrrole is contaminated with by-products during synthesis from p-chlorobenzonitrile. The concentration of PCBs in paint containing PV23 or PV37 was 0.050-29 mg/kg, and toxic equivalency (TEQ) values ranged 1.1-160 pg-TEQ/g. The concentration of PCBs in paint containing PR254 or PR255 was 0.0019-2.4 mg/kg. Naphthol AS is an azo-type pigment, and PCB-52 was detected in paint containing pigment red (PR) 9 with 2,5-dichloroaniline as its source. PCB-146, PCB-149, and PCB-153 were identified from paint containing PR112 produced from 2,4,5-trichloroaniline, as major congeners. These congeners have chlorine positions similar to aniline, indicating that these congeners are by-products obtained during the synthesis of pigments. The concentrations of PCBs in paints containing PR9 and PR112 were 0.0042-0.43 and 0.0044-3.8 mg/kg, respectively. The corresponding TEQ for PR112 was 0.0039-8.6 pg-TEQ/g.

  14. Simultaneous determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon quinones by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, following a one-pot reductive trimethylsilyl derivatization.

    PubMed

    Toriba, Akira; Homma, Chiharu; Kita, Masahiro; Uozaki, Waka; Boongla, Yaowatat; Orakij, Walaiporn; Tang, Ning; Kameda, Takayuki; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2016-08-12

    We developed a sensitive and selective method to simultaneously analyze 37 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon quinones (PAHQs) with GC-MS/MS and applied the method to the analysis of standard atmospheric particulate matter samples. PAHQs were reduced with zinc granules and dithiothreitol (DTT) and the reductants were immediately converted to their silylated derivatives in a test tube. Two trimethylsilyl (TMS) groups were introduced into PAHQs through the one-pot reductive TMS derivatization. The PAHQs were derivatized with a mixed silylation reagent (BSA+TMCS+TMSI; (3:2:3)), which is one of the combinations of TMS-derivatization reagents with the highest reactivity. The derivatives produced different fragmentation between o-PAHQs and p-PAHQs. Therefore, isomers that have the same molecular weight are difficult to separate on a column were separated by the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode using the characteristic fragmentations, allowing separation and detection of all PAHQ derivatives in less than 30min. The instrumental detection limit (IDL) of each PAHQ was 1.2-29fg/injection and the method quantification limit (MQL) was 0.8-78μg/kg sample. For quantification, six deuterated PAHQs were used as internal standards to achieve high analytical precision. We applied the developed method to four standard atmospheric particulate matter samples. Results showed that out of 37 PAHQs, 33 compounds were identified and quantified. Moreover, from the 33 PAHQs, 14 were detected for the first time. Similar values were observed for the concentrations of PAHQs that have been quantified in previous reports. This method has the highest practicality in monitoring PAHQs in atmosphere, combustion exhaust gas, and toxicity evaluation. Thus, the method has the potential to become a standard analytical method for such applications. PMID:27401812

  15. Black tattoo inks induce reactive oxygen species production correlating with aggregation of pigment nanoparticles and product brand but not with the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content.

    PubMed

    Høgsberg, Trine; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Clausen, Per Axel; Serup, Jørgen

    2013-07-01

    Black tattoo inks are composed of carbon nanoparticles, additives and water and may contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We aimed to clarify whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by black inks in vitro is related to pigment chemistry, physico-chemical properties of the ink particles and the content of chemical additives and contaminants including PAHs. The study included nine brands of tattoo inks of six colours each (black, red, yellow, blue, green and white) and two additional black inks of different brands (n = 56). The ROS formation potential was determined by the dichlorofluorescein (DCFH) assay. A semiquantitative method was developed for screening extractable organic compounds in tattoo ink based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Two black inks produced high amounts of ROS. Peroxyl radicals accounted for up to 72% of the free radicals generated, whereas hydroxyl radicals and H₂O₂ accounted for <14% and 16%, respectively. The same two inks aggregated strongly in water in contrast to the other black inks. They did not exhibit any shared pattern in PAHs and other organic substances. Aggregation was exclusively shared by all ink colours belonging to the same two brands. Ten of 11 black inks had PAH concentrations exceeding the European Council's recommended level, and all 11 exceeded the recommended level for benzo(a)pyrene. It is a new finding that aggregation of tattoo pigment particles correlates with ROS production and brand, independently of chemical composition including PAHs. ROS is hypothesized to be implicated in minor clinical symptoms.

  16. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  17. Reactivities of Quinone Methides versus o-Quinones in Catecholamine Metabolism and Eumelanin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sugumaran, Manickam

    2016-01-01

    Melanin is an important biopolymeric pigment produced in a vast majority of organisms. Tyrosine and its hydroxylated product, dopa, form the starting material for melanin biosynthesis. Earlier studies by Raper and Mason resulted in the identification of dopachrome and dihydroxyindoles as important intermediates and paved way for the establishment of well-known Raper–Mason pathway for the biogenesis of brown to black eumelanins. Tyrosinase catalyzes the oxidation of tyrosine as well as dopa to dopaquinone. Dopaquinone thus formed, undergoes intramolecular cyclization to form leucochrome, which is further oxidized to dopachrome. Dopachrome is either converted into 5,6-dihydroxyindole by decarboxylative aromatization or isomerized into 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid. Oxidative polymerization of these two dihydroxyindoles eventually produces eumelanin pigments via melanochrome. While the role of quinones in the biosynthetic pathway is very well acknowledged, that of isomeric quinone methides, however, remained marginalized. This review article summarizes the key role of quinone methides during the oxidative transformation of a vast array of catecholamine derivatives and brings out the importance of these transient reactive species during the melanogenic process. In addition, possible reactions of quinone methides at various stages of melanogenesis are discussed. PMID:27657049

  18. Apparent inhibition of photoredox reactions of magnesium octaethylporphyrin at the lipid bilayer-water interface by neutral quinones.

    PubMed Central

    Krakover, T; Ilani, A; Mauzerall, D

    1981-01-01

    Neutral quinones rapidly equilibrate across the lipid bilayer, hereby rendering the photoeffects seen in pigmented bilayers sensitive to the redox properties at both interfaces. The lack of photoeffect by quinones themselves and their apparent quenching reactions with aqueous acceptors is thus explained. An aqueous donor is needed on one side to break the symmetry and to allow vectorial electron transfer to be recorded. It is concluded that the neutral quinone accumulates on the polar side of the interface with respect to the hydrophobic pigment. The system may allow the study of kinetics of proton transfer accompanying the redox reactions of the quinones. PMID:7260323

  19. The Metabolic Fate of ortho-Quinones Derived from Catecholamine Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Shosuke; Yamanaka, Yuta; Ojika, Makoto; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2016-01-01

    ortho-Quinones are produced in vivo through the oxidation of catecholic substrates by enzymes such as tyrosinase or by transition metal ions. Neuromelanin, a dark pigment present in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus of the brain, is produced from dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) via an interaction with cysteine, but it also incorporates their alcoholic and acidic metabolites. In this study we examined the metabolic fate of ortho-quinones derived from the catecholamine metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (DOPE), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethylene glycol (DOPEG), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylmandelic acid (DOMA). The oxidation of catecholic substrates by mushroom tyrosinase was followed by UV-visible spectrophotometry. HPLC analysis after reduction with NaBH4 or ascorbic acid enabled measurement of the half-lives of ortho-quinones and the identification of their reaction products. Spectrophotometric examination showed that the ortho-quinones initially formed underwent extensive degradation at pH 6.8. HPLC analysis showed that DOPE-quinone and DOPEG-quinone degraded with half-lives of 15 and 30 min at pH 6.8, respectively, and >100 min at pH 5.3. The major product from DOPE-quinone was DOPEG which was produced through the addition of a water molecule to the quinone methide intermediate. DOPEG-quinone yielded a ketone, 2-oxo-DOPE, through the quinone methide intermediate. DOPAC-quinone and DOMA-quinone degraded immediately with decarboxylation of the ortho-quinone intermediates to form 3,4-dihydroxybenzylalcohol (DHBAlc) and 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (DHBAld), respectively. DHBAlc-quinone was converted to DHBAld with a half-life of 9 min, while DHBAld-quinone degraded rapidly with a half-life of 3 min. This study confirmed the fact that ortho-quinones from DOPE, DOPEG, DOPAC and DOMA are converted to quinone methide tautomers as common intermediates, through proton rearrangement or decarboxylation. The unstable quinone methides

  20. The Metabolic Fate of ortho-Quinones Derived from Catecholamine Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shosuke; Yamanaka, Yuta; Ojika, Makoto; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2016-01-01

    ortho-Quinones are produced in vivo through the oxidation of catecholic substrates by enzymes such as tyrosinase or by transition metal ions. Neuromelanin, a dark pigment present in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus of the brain, is produced from dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) via an interaction with cysteine, but it also incorporates their alcoholic and acidic metabolites. In this study we examined the metabolic fate of ortho-quinones derived from the catecholamine metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (DOPE), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethylene glycol (DOPEG), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylmandelic acid (DOMA). The oxidation of catecholic substrates by mushroom tyrosinase was followed by UV-visible spectrophotometry. HPLC analysis after reduction with NaBH₄ or ascorbic acid enabled measurement of the half-lives of ortho-quinones and the identification of their reaction products. Spectrophotometric examination showed that the ortho-quinones initially formed underwent extensive degradation at pH 6.8. HPLC analysis showed that DOPE-quinone and DOPEG-quinone degraded with half-lives of 15 and 30 min at pH 6.8, respectively, and >100 min at pH 5.3. The major product from DOPE-quinone was DOPEG which was produced through the addition of a water molecule to the quinone methide intermediate. DOPEG-quinone yielded a ketone, 2-oxo-DOPE, through the quinone methide intermediate. DOPAC-quinone and DOMA-quinone degraded immediately with decarboxylation of the ortho-quinone intermediates to form 3,4-dihydroxybenzylalcohol (DHBAlc) and 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (DHBAld), respectively. DHBAlc-quinone was converted to DHBAld with a half-life of 9 min, while DHBAld-quinone degraded rapidly with a half-life of 3 min. This study confirmed the fact that ortho-quinones from DOPE, DOPEG, DOPAC and DOMA are converted to quinone methide tautomers as common intermediates, through proton rearrangement or decarboxylation. The unstable quinone

  1. Quinone diazides for olefin functionalization.

    PubMed

    Dao, Hai T; Baran, Phil S

    2014-12-22

    The utility of quinone diazides in materials science is vast and well-documented, yet this potentially useful motif has languished in the annals of organic synthesis. Herein we show that modern tools of catalysis can be employed with free or suitably masked quinone diazides to unleash the power of these classic diazo compounds in the context of both inter- and intramolecular olefin cyclopropanation.

  2. Quinones as photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy: ROS generation, mechanism and detection methods.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, M

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on the dye-sensitized photooxidation of biological matter in the target tissue, and utilizes light activated drugs for the treatment of a wide variety of malignancies. Quinones and porphyrins moiety are available naturally and involved in the biological process. Quinone metabolites perform a variety of key functions in plants which includes pathogen protection, oxidative phosphorylation, and redox signaling. Quinones and porphyrin are biologically accessible and will not create any allergic effects. In the field of photodynamic therapy, porphyrin derivatives are widely used, because it absorb in the photodynamic therapy window region (600-900 nm). Hence, researchers synthesize drugs based on porphyrin structure. Benzoquinone and its simple polycyclic derivatives such as naphthaquinone and anthraquinones absorb at lower wavelength region (300-400 nm), which is lower than porphyrin. Hence they are not involved in PDT studies. However, higher polycyclic quinones absorb in the photodynamic therapy window region (600-900 nm), because of its conjugation and can be used as PDT agents. Redox cycling has been proposed as a possible mechanism of action for many quinone species. Quinones are involved in the photodynamic as well as enzymatic generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Generations of ROS may be measured by optical, phosphorescence and EPR methods. The photodynamically generated ROS are also involved in many biological events. The photo-induced DNA cleavage by quinones correlates with the ROS generating efficiencies of the quinones. In this review basic reactions involving photodynamic generation of ROS by quinones and their biological applications were discussed.

  3. Quinones as photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy: ROS generation, mechanism and detection methods.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, M

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on the dye-sensitized photooxidation of biological matter in the target tissue, and utilizes light activated drugs for the treatment of a wide variety of malignancies. Quinones and porphyrins moiety are available naturally and involved in the biological process. Quinone metabolites perform a variety of key functions in plants which includes pathogen protection, oxidative phosphorylation, and redox signaling. Quinones and porphyrin are biologically accessible and will not create any allergic effects. In the field of photodynamic therapy, porphyrin derivatives are widely used, because it absorb in the photodynamic therapy window region (600-900 nm). Hence, researchers synthesize drugs based on porphyrin structure. Benzoquinone and its simple polycyclic derivatives such as naphthaquinone and anthraquinones absorb at lower wavelength region (300-400 nm), which is lower than porphyrin. Hence they are not involved in PDT studies. However, higher polycyclic quinones absorb in the photodynamic therapy window region (600-900 nm), because of its conjugation and can be used as PDT agents. Redox cycling has been proposed as a possible mechanism of action for many quinone species. Quinones are involved in the photodynamic as well as enzymatic generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Generations of ROS may be measured by optical, phosphorescence and EPR methods. The photodynamically generated ROS are also involved in many biological events. The photo-induced DNA cleavage by quinones correlates with the ROS generating efficiencies of the quinones. In this review basic reactions involving photodynamic generation of ROS by quinones and their biological applications were discussed. PMID:26241780

  4. Effects and mechanism of action of naphthalene, a petroleum-derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, on black pigment dispersion in the salt marsh fiddler crab, UCA pugilator

    SciTech Connect

    Staub, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    At a concentration of approximately 8 ppm, naphthalene inhibited circadian black pigment dispersion in the integumentary chromatophores of the fiddler crab no matter what the initial state of the black pigment. The inhibition was concentration dependent. Naphthalene was not toxic to fiddler crabs under these conditions at any concentration up to 16.69 ppm. No chemically induced phase shift in the circadian rhythm of naphthalene exposed crabs occurs. In addition there is no difference in the mean black chromatophore index at midnight between control and naphthalene exposed crabs, indicating that the release of black pigment concentrating hormone (BPCH) is not being influenced by naphthalene. The only possibility remaining is that naphthalene must interfere with some aspect of the control of BPDH release by NE. Exposure to naphthalene does not inhibit black pigment dispersion when crabs are placed on a black background or kept on a black background throughout the experiment. This argues against naphthalene acting to inhibit the synthesis of NE, or to promote its metabolism, since NE is involved in adaptation to a black background. Naphthalene, therefore, must act to prevent the release of BPDH by interfering with some aspect of the presynaptic control of BPDH release by NE.

  5. Activity of quinone alkylating agents in quinone-resistant cells.

    PubMed

    Begleiter, A; Leith, M K

    1990-05-15

    The role of the quinone group in the antitumor activity of quinone alkylating agents, such as mitomycin C and 2,5-diaziridinyl-3,5-bis(carboethoxyamino)-1,4-benzoquinone, is still uncertain. The quinone group may contribute to antitumor activity by inducing DNA strand breaks through the formation of free radicals and/or by influencing the alkylating activity of the quinone alkylators. The cytotoxic activity and DNA damage produced by the model quinone alkylating agents, benzoquinone mustard and benzoquinone dimustard, were compared in L5178Y murine lymphoblasts sensitive and resistant to the model quinone antitumor agent, hydrolyzed benzoquinone mustard. The resistant cell lines, L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10, have increased concentrations of glutathione and elevated catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase, and DT-diaphorase activity. L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells were 7.4- and 8.5-fold less sensitive to benzoquinone mustard and 1.7- and 4.3-fold less sensitive to benzoquinone dimustard, respectively, compared with sensitive cells, but showed no resistance to the non-quinone alkylating agent, aniline mustard. The formation of DNA double strand breaks by benzoquinone mustard was reduced by 2- and 8-fold in L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells, respectively, while double strand break formation by benzoquinone dimustard was reduced only in the L5178Y/HBM10 cells. The number of DNA-DNA cross-links produced by benzoquinone mustard was 3- and 6-fold lower, and the number produced by benzoquinone dimustard was 35% and 2-fold lower in L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells, respectively, compared with L5178Y parental cells. In contrast, cross-linking by aniline mustard was unchanged in sensitive and resistant cells. Dicoumarol, an inhibitor of DT-diaphorase, increased the cytotoxic activity of both benzoquinone mustard and benzoquinone dimustard in L5178Y/HBM10 cells. This study provides evidence that elevated DT-diaphorase activity in the resistant cells

  6. Skin Pigment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professional Version Pigment Disorders Overview of Skin Pigment Albinism Vitiligo Hyperpigmentation Melasma Melanin is the brown pigment ... dark-skinned people produce the most. People with albinism have little or no melanin and thus their ...

  7. Synthetic Strategies to Terpene Quinones/Hydroquinones

    PubMed Central

    Gordaliza, Marina

    2012-01-01

    The cytotoxic and antiproliferative properties of many natural sesquiterpene-quinones and -hydroquinones from sponges offer promising opportunities for the development of new drugs. A review dealing with different strategies for obtaining bioactive terpenyl quinones/hydroquinones is presented. The different synthetic approches for the preparation of the most relevant quinones/hydroquinones are described. PMID:22412807

  8. Benzofuran-, benzothiophene-, indazole- and benzisoxazole- quinones: excellent substrates for NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, Jeffery J.; Hassani, Mary; Swann, Elizabeth; Bibby, Jane M.; Beall, Howard D.; Moody, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    A series of heterocyclic quinones based on benzofuran, benzothiophene, indazole and benzisoxazole has been synthesized, and evaluated for their ability to function as substrates for recombinant human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), a two-electron reductase upregulated in tumor cells. Overall, the quinones are excellent substrates for NQO1, approaching the reduction rates observed for menadione PMID:23635904

  9. Quinone Photoreactivity: An Undergraduate Experiment in Photochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Pamela P.; Cochran, Michael; Haubrich, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    An experiment exploring the photochemical properties of quinones was developed. Their unique photochemistry and highly reactive nature make them an ideal class of compounds for examining structure-activity relationships. For several substituted quinones, photochemical reactivity was related to structure and ultimately to the Gibbs energy for…

  10. Lipid-membrane modified electrodes to study quinone oxidoreductases

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Sophie A.; Jeuken, Lars J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Quinone oxidoreductases are a class of membrane enzymes that catalyse the oxidation or reduction of membrane-bound quinols/quinones. The conversion of quinone/quinol by these enzymes is difficult to study due to the hydrophobic nature of the enzymes and their substrates. We describe some biochemical properties of quinones and quinone oxidoreductases and then look in more detail at two model membranes that can be used to study quinone oxidoreductases in a native-like membrane environment with their native lipophylic quinone substrates. The results obtained with these model membranes are compared to classical enzyme assays that use water-soluble quinone analogues. PMID:19614580

  11. [Macular pigments].

    PubMed

    Canovas, Renata; Cypel, Marcela; Farah, Michel Eid; Belfort, Rubens

    2009-01-01

    Lutein and Zeaxanthin are yellow pigments located at the macula. Because of your location macular pigments decrease and filter the amount of blue light that reach photoreceptors, protect the outer retina from oxidative stress and may improve the vision quality. This is a review regarding incorporation mechanism, function and knowledge update. PMID:20098912

  12. Pigmented casts.

    PubMed

    Miteva, Mariya; Romanelli, Paolo; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented casts have been reported with variable frequency in scalp biopsies from alopecia areata, trichotillomania, chemotherapy-induced alopecia and postoperative (pressure induced) alopecia. Their presence and morphology in other scalp disorders has not been described. The authors assessed for the presence and morphology of pigmented casts in 308 transversely bisected scalp biopsies from nonscarring and scarring alopecia, referred to the Department of Dermatology, University of Miami within a year. The pigmented casts were present in 21 of 29 cases of alopecia areata (72%), 7 of 7 cases of trichotillomania (100%), 1 case of friction alopecia, 4 of 28 cases of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (14%), and 4 of 4 cases of dissecting cellulitis (100%). They did not show any distinguishing features except for the morphology in trichotillomania, which included twisted, linear (zip), and "button"-like pigment aggregation. The linear arrangement was found also in friction alopecia and dissecting cellulitis. Pigmented casts in the hair canals of miniaturized/vellus hairs was a clue to alopecia areata. Pigmented casts can be observed in biopsies of different hair disorders, but they are not specific for the diagnosis. Horizontal sections allow to better assess their morphology and the follicular level of presence of pigmented casts, which in the context of the other follicular findings may be a clue to the diagnosis. PMID:23823025

  13. Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Smithgall, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Carcinogenic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by microsomal monoxygenases proceeds through trans-dihydrodiol metabolites to diol-epoxide ultimate carcinogens. This thesis directly investigated the role of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, a cytosolic NAD(P)-linked oxidoreductase, in the detoxification of polycyclic aromatic trans-dihydrodiols. A wide variety of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols were synthesized and shown to be substrates for the homogeneous rat liver dehydrogenase, including several potent proximate carcinogens derived from 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, 5-methylchrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Since microsomal activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is highly stereospecific, the stereochemical course of enzymatic trans-dihydrodiol oxidation was monitored using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry. The major product formed from the dehydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of the trans-1,2-dihydrodiol of naphthalene was characterized using UV, IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy, and appears to be 4-hydroxy-1,2-naphthoquinone. Mass spectral analysis suggests that an analogous hydroxylated o-quinone is formed as the major product of benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation of trans-dihydrodiols was shown to be potently inhibited by all of the major classes of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Enhancement of trans-dihydrodiol proximate carcinogen oxidation may protect against possible adverse effects of the aspirin-like drugs, and help maintain the balance between activation and detoxification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  14. Quinone reductases multitasking in the metabolic world.

    PubMed

    Ross, David

    2004-10-01

    The multiple functions of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1, DT-diaphorase) in the cell are reviewed. NQO1 has long been viewed as a chemoprotective enzyme involved in cellular defense against the electrophilic and oxidizing metabolites of xenobiotic quinones. It also participates in reduction of endogenous quinones, such as vitamin E quinone and ubiquinone, generating antioxidant forms of these molecules. NQO1 has recently been shown to interact with superoxide and may be involved in scavenging superoxide within the cell. In addition, the possible role of NQO1 in p53 stabilization and consequently in contributing to p53-dependent stress responses is summarized. Such protein multitasking is a good strategy in terms of cellular economy. NQO1 can also be exploited in the design of NQO1-directed antitumor agents such as the new aziridinylbenzoquinone RH1 and Hsp90 inhibitors such as 17AAG. Polymorphisms in NQO1 which have profound influence on phenotype such as the NQO1*2 polymorphism may influence the chemoprotective actions of NQO1, and should be considered when NQO1-directed antitumor quinones are used for therapy in patients.

  15. Quinone-Catalyzed Selective Oxidation of Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wendlandt, Alison E; Stahl, Shannon S

    2015-12-01

    Quinones are common stoichiometric reagents in organic chemistry. Para-quinones with high reduction potentials, such as DDQ and chloranil, are widely used and typically promote hydride abstraction. In recent years, many catalytic applications of these methods have been achieved by using transition metals, electrochemistry, or O2 to regenerate the oxidized quinone in situ. Complementary studies have led to the development of a different class of quinones that resemble the ortho-quinone cofactors in copper amine oxidases and mediate the efficient and selective aerobic and/or electrochemical dehydrogenation of amines. The latter reactions typically proceed by electrophilic transamination and/or addition-elimination reaction mechanisms, rather than hydride abstraction pathways. The collective observations show that the quinone structure has a significant influence on the reaction mechanism and has important implications for the development of new quinone reagents and quinone-catalyzed transformations. PMID:26530485

  16. [A diterpenoid quinone from Periploca forrestii].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Sun, Lei; Qiao, Shanyi

    2010-06-01

    Tanshinone II A, which was known unique to the salvia, was separated and purified by silica gel column chromatography and recrystallisation from an ethyl acetate-soluble portion (the anti-inflammatory active portion) of ethanol extract of Periploca forrestii. The diterpenoid quinone was obtained from the Periploca for the first time. PMID:20815227

  17. Redox reactions between iron and quinones: Thermodynamic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchimiya, Minori; Stone, Alan T.

    2006-03-01

    Iron is the most abundant redox-active metallic element on the earth's surface. Quinones, a term that encompasses dihydroxybenzenes (catechol and hydroquinone), semiquinone radicals, and benzoquinones, are abundant moieties within natural organic matter. Separately or in concert, iron species (both dissolved and precipitated) and quinones are believed to be key participants in a wide range of environmental redox reactions. Here, we investigate how pH, quinone structure, and iron speciation impose thermodynamic constraints on possible reactions. The steps outlined in this work must be followed to evaluate whether postulated redox processes involving iron and quinones are energetically feasible.

  18. Reversible redox chemistry of quinones: impact on biogeochemical cycles.

    PubMed

    Uchimiya, Minori; Stone, Alan T

    2009-10-01

    The role of quinone biomolecules and quinone moieties of natural organic matter (NOM) as the electron transfer mediator in essential biogeochemical processes such as iron bioreduction and contaminant degradation has received considerable interests in the past decade. Hypothesized electron shuttling mechanism must be evaluated based on the availability and stability of quinones under a given environmental setting. The goal of this review is to examine the source, reactivity, and fate of potential quinone catalysts with respect to chemical interactions (e.g., with other quinones and nucleophiles) that will inevitably occur in complex environmental media. We will first discuss natural and anthropogenic sources of quinones in aqueous environments, and fundamental transformation pathways including cross reaction, autoxidation, and addition reactions. We will then assess how the described sources (molecular structure) and transformation pathways (stability) will impact the ability of a quinone molecule to catalyze a biogeochemical process. Thermodynamics and kinetics of electron transfer reactions with both the electron donor (e.g., hydrogen sulfide as a bulk reductant) and the terminal electron acceptor (e.g., nitroaromatic explosives in contaminant degradation), and stability towards irreversible side reactions are the key factors determining the geochemical conditions under which the catalysis by a quinone molecule will be operative.

  19. Molecular mechanism of quinone signaling mediated through S-quinonization of a YodB family repressor QsrR

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Quanjiang; Zhang, Liang; Jones, Marcus B.; Sun, Fei; Deng, Xin; Liang, Haihua; Cho, Hoonsik; Brugarolas, Pedro; Gao, Yihe N.; Peterson, Scott N.; Lan, Lefu; Bae, Taeok; He, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Quinone molecules are intracellular electron-transport carriers, as well as critical intra- and extracellular signals. However, transcriptional regulation of quinone signaling and its molecular basis are poorly understood. Here, we identify a thiol-stress-sensing regulator YodB family transcriptional regulator as a central component of quinone stress response of Staphylococcus aureus, which we have termed the quinone-sensing and response repressor (QsrR). We also identify and confirm an unprecedented quinone-sensing mechanism based on the S-quinonization of the essential residue Cys-5. Structural characterizations of the QsrR–DNA and QsrR–menadione complexes further reveal that the covalent association of menadione directly leads to the release of QsrR from operator DNA following a 10° rigid-body rotation as well as a 9-Å elongation between the dimeric subunits. The molecular level characterization of this quinone-sensing transcriptional regulator provides critical insights into quinone-mediated gene regulation in human pathogens. PMID:23479646

  20. Brain glutamate decarboxylase and pyrroloquinoline quinone.

    PubMed

    Choi, S Y; Khemlani, L S; Churchich, J E

    1992-01-01

    Porcine brain glutamate decarboxylase was examined for the presence of covalently bound pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ). HPLC analysis of pure glutamate decarboxylase subjected to the hexanol extraction procedure gave negative results when monitored at 320 nm, the maximum of absorbance of 4-hydroxy-5-hexoxy-PQQ. Resolved glutamate decarboxylase exhibits a structureless absorption band at wavelengths longer than 300 nm which cannot be attributed to PQQ. The holoenzyme is not a pyridoxal-quinoprotein; its catalytic mechanism involves the participation of only one cofactor, i.e. pyridoxal-5-P. Free PQQ is a strong inhibitor of the decarboxylase (Ki = 13 microM) and the reaction with the protein results in spectral changes resembling those of polylysine treated with PQQ. If the concentration of free PQQ in some regions of the brain reaches the micromolar level, then PQQ might play a role in the regulation of glutamate decarboxylase activity.

  1. Directly probing redox-linked quinones in photosystem II membrane fragments via UV resonance Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Yao, Mingdong; Pagba, Cynthia V; Zheng, Yang; Fei, Liping; Feng, Zhaochi; Barry, Bridgette A

    2015-01-01

    In photosynthesis, photosystem II (PSII) harvests sunlight with bound pigments to oxidize water and reduce quinone to quinol, which serves as electron and proton mediators for solar-to-chemical energy conversion. At least two types of quinone cofactors in PSII are redox-linked: QA, and QB. Here, we for the first time apply 257-nm ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy to acquire the molecular vibrations of plastoquinone (PQ) in PSII membranes. Owing to the resonance enhancement effect, the vibrational signal of PQ in PSII membranes is prominent. A strong band at 1661 cm(-1) is assigned to ring CC/CO symmetric stretch mode (ν8a mode) of PQ, and a weak band at 469 cm(-1) to ring stretch mode. By using a pump-probe difference UVRR method and a sample jet technique, the signals of QA and QB can be distinguished. A frequency difference of 1.4 cm(-1) in ν8a vibrational mode between QA and QB is observed, corresponding to ~86 mV redox potential difference imposed by their protein environment. In addition, there are other PQs in the PSII membranes. A negligible anharmonicity effect on their combination band at 2130 cm(-1) suggests that the 'other PQs' are situated in a hydrophobic environment. The detection of the 'other PQs' might be consistent with the view that another functional PQ cofactor (not QA or QB) exists in PSII. This UVRR approach will be useful to the study of quinone molecules in photosynthesis or other biological systems. PMID:25791219

  2. Directly probing redox-linked quinones in photosystem II membrane fragments via UV resonance Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Yao, Mingdong; Pagba, Cynthia V; Zheng, Yang; Fei, Liping; Feng, Zhaochi; Barry, Bridgette A

    2015-01-01

    In photosynthesis, photosystem II (PSII) harvests sunlight with bound pigments to oxidize water and reduce quinone to quinol, which serves as electron and proton mediators for solar-to-chemical energy conversion. At least two types of quinone cofactors in PSII are redox-linked: QA, and QB. Here, we for the first time apply 257-nm ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy to acquire the molecular vibrations of plastoquinone (PQ) in PSII membranes. Owing to the resonance enhancement effect, the vibrational signal of PQ in PSII membranes is prominent. A strong band at 1661 cm(-1) is assigned to ring CC/CO symmetric stretch mode (ν8a mode) of PQ, and a weak band at 469 cm(-1) to ring stretch mode. By using a pump-probe difference UVRR method and a sample jet technique, the signals of QA and QB can be distinguished. A frequency difference of 1.4 cm(-1) in ν8a vibrational mode between QA and QB is observed, corresponding to ~86 mV redox potential difference imposed by their protein environment. In addition, there are other PQs in the PSII membranes. A negligible anharmonicity effect on their combination band at 2130 cm(-1) suggests that the 'other PQs' are situated in a hydrophobic environment. The detection of the 'other PQs' might be consistent with the view that another functional PQ cofactor (not QA or QB) exists in PSII. This UVRR approach will be useful to the study of quinone molecules in photosynthesis or other biological systems.

  3. Peltomexicanin, a Peltogynoid Quinone Methide from Peltogyne Mexicana Martínez Purple Heartwood.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Macías, Paulina; Peralta-Cruz, Javier; Borja-de-la-Rosa, Amparo; Barragán-Huerta, Blanca E

    2016-02-04

    Peltomexicanin (7,10-dihydroxy-6,12-dioxa-5H-tetraphen-3-one) is a new peltogynoid quinone methide isolated from Palo Morado (Peltogyne mexicana Martínez) heartwood by column chromatography. Its chemical structure was elucidated by IR, NMR (¹H, (13)C), 2D NMR experiments (COSY, NOESY, HMQC, and HSQC), ESI-MS, and UV-Vis spectroscopic analysis. According to HPLC quantification, this compound is the main pigment and accounts for 1.21% of Palo Morado heartwood material. The antioxidant activity of peltomexicanin and dried methanolic extract (DEx) of purple heartwood was evaluated using the radical of 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) assay, and the corresponding values expressed as Trolox equivalents (µmol TE/mg sample) were 4.25 and 4.57, respectively.

  4. Chemical purity and toxicology of pigments used in tattoo inks.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Henrik; Lewe, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The safety of tattoo inks has obviously increased in Europe since the existence of European Union Resolution ResAP(2008)1, which resulted in the improved quality control of pigment raw materials due to the definition of impurity limits that manufacturers can refer to. High-performance pigments are mostly used in tattoo inks, and these pigments are supposed to be chemically inert and offer high light fastness and low migration in solvents. However, these pigments were not developed or produced for applications involving long-term stay in the dermis or contact with bodily fluids. Therefore, these pigments often do not comply with the purity limits of the resolution; however, it is required that every distributed tattoo ink does not contain aromatic amines and not exceed the limits of heavy metals or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Current toxicity studies of pigments underline that no ecotoxicological threat to human health or to the environment should be expected. However, the pigment as well as its impurities and coating materials must be considered. In order to evaluate the safety of pigments according to their impurities, two different validated sample preparation methods are necessary: (1) simulation of their long-term stay in the bodily fluid of the dermis and (2) simulation of cleavage due to laser removal or ultraviolet exposure. The development of standardized, validated and well-adapted methods for this application has to be part of prospective efforts. Concerning legislation, it might be appropriate that the first regulative approaches be based on those of cosmetics.

  5. Unique proline-benzoquinone pigment from the colored nectar of "bird's Coca cola tree" functions in bird attractions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shi-Hong; Liu, Yan; Hua, Juan; Niu, Xue-Mei; Jing, Shu-Xi; Zhao, Xu; Schneider, Bernd; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Li, Sheng-Hong

    2012-08-17

    The major pigment responsible for the dark brown nectar of the "bird's Coca cola tree", Leucosceptrum canum (Labiatae), was isolated and identified as a unique symmetric proline-quinone conjugate, 2,5-di-(N-(-)-prolyl)-para-benzoquinone (DPBQ). Behavioral experiments with both isolated and synthetic authentic samples indicated that DPBQ functions mainly as a color attractant to bird pollinators.

  6. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or unhealthy, it affects melanin production. Some pigmentation disorders affect just patches of ...

  7. Role of chlorogenic acid quinone and interaction of chlorogenic acid quinone and catechins in the enzymatic browning of apple.

    PubMed

    Amaki, Kanako; Saito, Eri; Taniguchi, Kumiko; Joshita, Keiko; Murata, Masatsune

    2011-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CQA) is one of the major polyphenols in apple and a good substrate for the polyphenol oxidase (PPO) in apple. Apple contains catechins as well as CQA, and the role of CQA quinone and its interaction with catechins in the enzymatic browning of apple were examined. Browning was repressed and 2-cysteinyl-CQA was formed when cysteine was added to apple juice. CQA quinone was essential for browning to occur. Although catechins and CQA were oxidized by PPO, some catechins seemed to be non-enzymatically oxidized by CQA quinone.

  8. Oral pigmentation: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sreeja, C.; Ramakrishnan, K.; Vijayalakshmi, D.; Devi, M.; Aesha, I.; Vijayabanu, B.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations. PMID:26538887

  9. Oral pigmentation: A review.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, C; Ramakrishnan, K; Vijayalakshmi, D; Devi, M; Aesha, I; Vijayabanu, B

    2015-08-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations. PMID:26538887

  10. Overview of plant pigments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorophylls, carotenoids, flavonoids and betalains are four major classes of biological pigments produced in plants. Chlorophylls are the primary pigments responsible for plant green and photosynthesis. The other three are accessary pigments and secondary metabolites that yield non-green colors and...

  11. Production and Radioprotective Effects of Pyrroloquinoline Quinone

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiang-Hua; Zhao, Yan; Ge, Xin; Yuan, Shou-Jun; Wang, Jian-Hua; Zhi, Jing-Juan; Yang, Yan-Xin; Du, Bao-Hua; Guo, Wan-Jun; Wang, Shan-Shan; Yang, De-Xuan; Zhang, Wei-Cai

    2011-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was produced by fermentation of the Methylovorus sp. MP688 strain and purified by ion-exchange chromatography, crystallization and recrystallization. The yield of PQQ reached approximately 125 mg/L and highly pure PQQ was obtained. To determine the optimum dose of PQQ for radioprotection, three doses (2 mg/kg, 4 mg/kg, 8 mg/kg) of PQQ were orally administrated to the experimental animals subjected to a lethal dose of 8.0 Gy in survival test. Survival of mice in the irradiation + PQQ (4 mg/kg) group was found to be significantly higher in comparison with the irradiation and irradiation + nilestriol (10 mg/kg) groups. The numbers of hematocytes and bone marrow cells were measured for 21 days after sublethal 4 Gy gamma-ray irradiation with per os of 4 mg/kg of PQQ. The recovery of white blood cells, reticulocytes and bone marrow cells in the irradiation + PQQ group was faster than that in the irradiation group. Furthermore, the recovery of bone marrow cell in the irradiation + PQQ group was superior to that in irradiation + nilestriol group. Our results clearly indicate favourable effects on survival under higher lethal radiation doses and the ability of pyrroloquinoline quinine to enhance haemopoietic recovery after sublethal radiation exposure. PMID:22272111

  12. A primer on pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, David G

    2015-01-01

    There is at least a temporary loss of skin pigmentation with all but first-degree burns. Commonly, pigment changes persist for months, and sometimes, permanent changes in skin color add to the ultimate change in appearance that commonly affects burn patients. There are many different treatment modalities for the treatment of pigment changes, but most of them have little scientific basis and often lead to disappointing results. The purpose of this review is to discuss the molecular and cellular mechanisms of skin pigmentation, mechanisms of repigmentation after burns, treatment options for dealing with pigmentation changes, and advice for dealing with the sun after burn injury. PMID:25501768

  13. A primer on pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, David G

    2015-01-01

    There is at least a temporary loss of skin pigmentation with all but first-degree burns. Commonly, pigment changes persist for months, and sometimes, permanent changes in skin color add to the ultimate change in appearance that commonly affects burn patients. There are many different treatment modalities for the treatment of pigment changes, but most of them have little scientific basis and often lead to disappointing results. The purpose of this review is to discuss the molecular and cellular mechanisms of skin pigmentation, mechanisms of repigmentation after burns, treatment options for dealing with pigmentation changes, and advice for dealing with the sun after burn injury.

  14. Quinone-induced protein handling changes: Implications for major protein handling systems in quinone-mediated toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Rui; Siegel, David; Ross, David

    2014-10-15

    Para-quinones such as 1,4-Benzoquinone (BQ) and menadione (MD) and ortho-quinones including the oxidation products of catecholamines, are derived from xenobiotics as well as endogenous molecules. The effects of quinones on major protein handling systems in cells; the 20/26S proteasome, the ER stress response, autophagy, chaperone proteins and aggresome formation, have not been investigated in a systematic manner. Both BQ and aminochrome (AC) inhibited proteasomal activity and activated the ER stress response and autophagy in rat dopaminergic N27 cells. AC also induced aggresome formation while MD had little effect on any protein handling systems in N27 cells. The effect of NQO1 on quinone induced protein handling changes and toxicity was examined using N27 cells stably transfected with NQO1 to generate an isogenic NQO1-overexpressing line. NQO1 protected against BQ–induced apoptosis but led to a potentiation of AC- and MD-induced apoptosis. Modulation of quinone-induced apoptosis in N27 and NQO1-overexpressing cells correlated only with changes in the ER stress response and not with changes in other protein handling systems. These data suggested that NQO1 modulated the ER stress response to potentiate toxicity of AC and MD, but protected against BQ toxicity. We further demonstrated that NQO1 mediated reduction to unstable hydroquinones and subsequent redox cycling was important for the activation of the ER stress response and toxicity for both AC and MD. In summary, our data demonstrate that quinone-specific changes in protein handling are evident in N27 cells and the induction of the ER stress response is associated with quinone-mediated toxicity. - Highlights: • Unstable hydroquinones contributed to quinone-induced ER stress and toxicity.

  15. Pyrroloquinoline quinone: Metabolism and analytical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Smidt, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) functions as a cofactor for bacterial oxidoreductases. Whether or not PQQ serves as a cofactor in higher plants and animals remains controversial. Nevertheless, strong evidence exists that PQQ has nutritional importance. In highly purified, chemically defined diets PQQ stimulates animal growth. Further PQQ deprivation impairs connective tissue maturation, particularly when initiated in utero and throughout perinatal development. The study addresses two main objectives: (1) to elucidate basic aspects of the metabolism of PQQ in animals, and (2) to develop and improve existing analytical methods for PQQ. To study intestinal absorption of PQQ, ten mice were administered [[sup 14]C]-PQQ per os. PQQ was readily absorbed (62%) in the lower intestine and was excreted by the kidney within 24 hours. Significant amounts of labeled-PQQ were retained only by skin and kidney. Three approaches were taken to answer the question whether or not PQQ is synthesized by the intestinal microflora of mice. First, dietary antibiotics had no effect on fecal PQQ excretion. Then, no bacterial isolates could be identified that are known to synthesize PQQ. Last, cecal contents were incubated anaerobically with radiolabeled PQQ-precursors with no label appearing in isolated PQQ. Thus, intestinal PQQ synthesis is unlikely. Analysis of PQQ in biological samples is problematic since PQQ forms adducts with nucleophilic compounds and binds to the protein fraction. Existing analytical methods are reviewed and a new approach is introduced that allows for detection of PQQ in animal tissue and foods. PQQ is freed from proteins by ion exchange chromatography, purified on activated silica cartridges, detected by a colorimetric redox-cycling assay, and identified by mass spectrometry. That compounds with the properties of PQQ may be nutritionally important offers interesting areas for future investigation.

  16. The Domestication of ortho-Quinone Methides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus An ortho-quinone methide (o-QM) is a highly reactive chemical motif harnessed by nature for a variety of purposes. Given its extraordinary reactivity and biological importance, it is surprising how few applications within organic synthesis exist. We speculate that their widespread use has been slowed by the complications that surround the preparation of their precursors, the harsh generation methods, and the omission of this stratagem from computer databases due to its ephemeral nature. About a decade ago, we discovered a mild anionic triggering procedure to generate transitory o-QMs at low temperature from readily available salicylaldehydes, particularly OBoc derivatives. This novel reaction cascade included both the o-QM formation and the subsequent consumption reaction. The overall transformation was initiated by the addition of the organometallic reagent, usually a Grignard reagent, which resulted in the formation of a benzyloxy alkoxide. Boc migration from the neighboring phenol produced a magnesium phenoxide that we supposed underwent β-elimination of the transferred Boc residue to form an o-QM for immediate further reactions. Moreover, the cascade proved controllable through careful manipulation of metallic and temperature levers so that it could be paused, stopped, or restarted at various intermediates and stages. This new level of domestication enabled us to deploy o-QMs for the first time in a range of applications including diastereocontrolled reactions. This sequence ultimately could be performed in either multipot or single pot processes. The subsequent reaction of the fleeting o-QM intermediates included the 1,4-conjugate additions that led to unbranched or branched ortho-alkyl substituted phenols and Diels–Alder reactions that provided 4-unsubstituted or 4-substituted benzopyrans and chroman ketals. The latter cycloadducts were obtained for the first time with outstanding diastereocontrol. In addition, the steric effects of the newly

  17. The domestication of ortho-quinone methides.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wen-Ju; David, Jonathan G; Feng, Zhen-Gao; Weaver, Marisa G; Wu, Kun-Liang; Pettus, Thomas R R

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: An ortho-quinone methide (o-QM) is a highly reactive chemical motif harnessed by nature for a variety of purposes. Given its extraordinary reactivity and biological importance, it is surprising how few applications within organic synthesis exist. We speculate that their widespread use has been slowed by the complications that surround the preparation of their precursors, the harsh generation methods, and the omission of this stratagem from computer databases due to its ephemeral nature. About a decade ago, we discovered a mild anionic triggering procedure to generate transitory o-QMs at low temperature from readily available salicylaldehydes, particularly OBoc derivatives. This novel reaction cascade included both the o-QM formation and the subsequent consumption reaction. The overall transformation was initiated by the addition of the organometallic reagent, usually a Grignard reagent, which resulted in the formation of a benzyloxy alkoxide. Boc migration from the neighboring phenol produced a magnesium phenoxide that we supposed underwent β-elimination of the transferred Boc residue to form an o-QM for immediate further reactions. Moreover, the cascade proved controllable through careful manipulation of metallic and temperature levers so that it could be paused, stopped, or restarted at various intermediates and stages. This new level of domestication enabled us to deploy o-QMs for the first time in a range of applications including diastereocontrolled reactions. This sequence ultimately could be performed in either multipot or single pot processes. The subsequent reaction of the fleeting o-QM intermediates included the 1,4-conjugate additions that led to unbranched or branched ortho-alkyl substituted phenols and Diels-Alder reactions that provided 4-unsubstituted or 4-substituted benzopyrans and chroman ketals. The latter cycloadducts were obtained for the first time with outstanding diastereocontrol. In addition, the steric effects of the newly

  18. Electronic transport properties of a quinone-based molecular switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ya-Peng; Bian, Bao-An; Yuan, Pei-Pei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we carried out first-principles calculations based on density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function to investigate the electronic transport properties of a quinone-based molecule sandwiched between two Au electrodes. The molecular switch can be reversibly switched between the reduced hydroquinone (HQ) and oxidized quinone (Q) states via redox reactions. The switching behavior of two forms is analyzed through their I- V curves, transmission spectra and molecular projected self-consistent Hamiltonian at zero bias. Then we discuss the transmission spectra of the HQ and Q forms at different bias, and explain the oscillation of current according to the transmission eigenstates of LUMO energy level for Q form. The results suggest that this kind of a quinone-based molecule is usable as one of the good candidates for redox-controlled molecular switches.

  19. Quinone derivatives from the genus Rubia and their bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kuo; Wang, Penglong; Wang, Lin; Liu, Congmin; Xu, Shixun; Cheng, Yatao; Wang, Yanhui; Li, Qiang; Lei, Haimin

    2014-03-01

    The extracts and phytochemicals of the genus Rubia have drawn much attention due to their potent effects; among them, naphthoquinone and cyclopeptide derivatives, with significant biological activities, have great potential to be developed to new drugs. This review updates and compiles a total of 142 quinone derivatives including anthraquinone and naphthoquinone derivatives, occuring in twelve Rubia species. These compounds were listed together with their sources, melting points, bioactivities, as well as 112 corresponding references. Furthermore, the structureactivity relationships of these quinone derivatives were discussed.

  20. Novel Quinone-Based Couples for Flow Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huskinson, Brian; Nawar, Saraf; Aziz, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Flow batteries are of interest for low-cost grid-scale electrical energy storage in the face of rising electricity production from intermittent renewables like wind and solar. We will report on investigations of redox couples based on the reversible protonation of small organic molecules called quinones. We will report half-cell measurements of current density vs. potential for aqueous solutions of various quinones and hydroquinones in sulfuric acid, facilitated by a variety of electrocatalysts. For a subset of these we will report full fuel cell measurements as well.

  1. Pigment Cell Differentiation in Sea Urchin Blastula-Derived Primary Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Ageenko, Natalya V.; Kiselev, Konstantin V.; Dmitrenok, Pavel S.; Odintsova, Nelly A.

    2014-01-01

    The quinone pigments of sea urchins, specifically echinochrome and spinochromes, are known for their effective antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal, and antitumor activities. We developed in vitro technology for inducing pigment differentiation in cell culture. The intensification of the pigment differentiation was accompanied by a simultaneous decrease in cell proliferation. The number of pigment cells was two-fold higher in the cells cultivated in the coelomic fluids of injured sea urchins than in those intact. The possible roles of the specific components of the coelomic fluids in the pigment differentiation process and the quantitative measurement of the production of naphthoquinone pigments during cultivation were examined by MALDI and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Echinochrome A and spinochrome E were produced by the cultivated cells of the sand dollar Scaphechinus mirabilis in all tested media, while only spinochromes were found in the cultivated cells of another sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus intermedius. The expression of genes associated with the induction of pigment differentiation was increased in cells cultivated in the presence of shikimic acid, a precursor of naphthoquinone pigments. Our results should contribute to the development of new techniques in marine biotechnology, including the generation of cell cultures producing complex bioactive compounds with therapeutic potential. PMID:24979272

  2. Phylogenetic comparison of two polycyclic aromatic hydrogen-degrading mycobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Govindaswami, M.; Loper, J.C.; Feldhake, D.J.

    1995-09-01

    Two mycobacterial strains previously isolated from fossil-fuel-contaminated environments and shown to degrade four- and/or five-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were further characterized. The two strains, PYR-I and RJGII-135, had similar growth characteristics, colony morphologies, and scotochromogenic pigmentations. DNA amplification fringerprints obtained with total genomic DNA indicated some strain similarities but with several distinctly different bands. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis based upon essentially full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences separates the two strains as distinct species within the fast-growing group of mycobacteria. Although both strains are thermosensitive, strain PYR-I has the bulged U between positions 184 and 193 characteristic of thermotolerant mycobacteria. Both strains are of potential use for reintroduction into and bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soils. 26 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Exploration of industrially important pigments from soil fungi.

    PubMed

    Akilandeswari, P; Pradeep, B V

    2016-02-01

    The worldwide interest of the current era is to increase tendency towards the use of natural substances instead of synthetic ones. So, alternative and effective environment friendly sustainable technologies are highly needed. Due to a broad range of biological activities, fungi are considered as a significant source of pigments. Among the fungal species in the soil, the genera of Aspergillus, Fusarium, Penicillium, Paecilomyces, and Trichoderma are dominant. The pigments commonly produced by fungi belong to aromatic polyketide groups such as melanins, quinones, flavins, ankaflavin, anthraquinone, and naphthoquinone. The use of fungal pigments has benefits which comprise easy and fast growth in the cheap culture medium and different color shades being independent of weather conditions and would be useful in various industrial applications. In relation to the toxic effects of the synthetic dyes, the natural dyes are easily degradable since they cause no detrimental effects. Thus, the study of pigments produced by soil fungi has tremendous use in medical, textile coloring, food coloring, and cosmetics.

  4. Exploration of industrially important pigments from soil fungi.

    PubMed

    Akilandeswari, P; Pradeep, B V

    2016-02-01

    The worldwide interest of the current era is to increase tendency towards the use of natural substances instead of synthetic ones. So, alternative and effective environment friendly sustainable technologies are highly needed. Due to a broad range of biological activities, fungi are considered as a significant source of pigments. Among the fungal species in the soil, the genera of Aspergillus, Fusarium, Penicillium, Paecilomyces, and Trichoderma are dominant. The pigments commonly produced by fungi belong to aromatic polyketide groups such as melanins, quinones, flavins, ankaflavin, anthraquinone, and naphthoquinone. The use of fungal pigments has benefits which comprise easy and fast growth in the cheap culture medium and different color shades being independent of weather conditions and would be useful in various industrial applications. In relation to the toxic effects of the synthetic dyes, the natural dyes are easily degradable since they cause no detrimental effects. Thus, the study of pigments produced by soil fungi has tremendous use in medical, textile coloring, food coloring, and cosmetics. PMID:26701360

  5. A neural networks study of quinone compounds with trypanocidal activity.

    PubMed

    de Molfetta, Fábio Alberto; Angelotti, Wagner Fernando Delfino; Romero, Roseli Aparecida Francelin; Montanari, Carlos Alberto; da Silva, Albérico Borges Ferreira

    2008-10-01

    This work investigates neural network models for predicting the trypanocidal activity of 28 quinone compounds. Artificial neural networks (ANN), such as multilayer perceptrons (MLP) and Kohonen models, were employed with the aim of modeling the nonlinear relationship between quantum and molecular descriptors and trypanocidal activity. The calculated descriptors and the principal components were used as input to train neural network models to verify the behavior of the nets. The best model for both network models (MLP and Kohonen) was obtained with four descriptors as input. The descriptors were T5 (torsion angle), QTS1 (sum of absolute values of the atomic charges), VOLS2 (volume of the substituent at region B) and HOMO-1 (energy of the molecular orbital below HOMO). These descriptors provide information on the kind of interaction that occurs between the compounds and the biological receptor. Both neural network models used here can predict the trypanocidal activity of the quinone compounds with good agreement, with low errors in the testing set and a high correctness rate. Thanks to the nonlinear model obtained from the neural network models, we can conclude that electronic and structural properties are important factors in the interaction between quinone compounds that exhibit trypanocidal activity and their biological receptors. The final ANN models should be useful in the design of novel trypanocidal quinones having improved potency.

  6. Human aldo-keto reductases and the metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Penning, Trevor M

    2014-11-17

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are promiscuous NAD(P)(H) dependent oxidoreductases implicated in the metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These enzymes catalyze the oxidation of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols to the corresponding o-quinones with the concomitant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The PAH o-quinones are Michael acceptors and can form adducts but are also redox-active and enter into futile redox cycles to amplify ROS formation. Evidence exists to support this metabolic pathway in humans. The human recombinant AKR1A1 and AKR1C1-AKR1C4 enzymes all catalyze the oxidation of PAH trans-dihydrodiols to PAH o-quinones. Many human AKRs also catalyze the NADPH-dependent reduction of the o-quinone products to air-sensitive catechols, exacerbating ROS formation. Moreover, this pathway of PAH activation occurs in a panel of human lung cell lines, resulting in the production of ROS and oxidative DNA damage in the form of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine. Using stable-isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, this pathway of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) metabolism was found to contribute equally with the diol-epoxide pathway to the activation of this human carcinogen in human lung cells. Evaluation of the mutagenicity of anti-B[a]P-diol epoxide with B[a]P-7,8-dione on p53 showed that the o-quinone produced by AKRs was the more potent mutagen, provided that it was permitted to redox cycle, and that the mutations observed were G to T transversions, reminiscent of those observed in human lung cancer. It is concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation of PAH in human lung cell lines and that they may contribute to the causation of human lung cancer.

  7. Human Aldo-Keto Reductases and the Metabolic Activation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are promiscuous NAD(P)(H) dependent oxidoreductases implicated in the metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These enzymes catalyze the oxidation of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols to the corresponding o-quinones with the concomitant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The PAH o-quinones are Michael acceptors and can form adducts but are also redox-active and enter into futile redox cycles to amplify ROS formation. Evidence exists to support this metabolic pathway in humans. The human recombinant AKR1A1 and AKR1C1–AKR1C4 enzymes all catalyze the oxidation of PAH trans-dihydrodiols to PAH o-quinones. Many human AKRs also catalyze the NADPH-dependent reduction of the o-quinone products to air-sensitive catechols, exacerbating ROS formation. Moreover, this pathway of PAH activation occurs in a panel of human lung cell lines, resulting in the production of ROS and oxidative DNA damage in the form of 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine. Using stable-isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, this pathway of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) metabolism was found to contribute equally with the diol-epoxide pathway to the activation of this human carcinogen in human lung cells. Evaluation of the mutagenicity of anti-B[a]P-diol epoxide with B[a]P-7,8-dione on p53 showed that the o-quinone produced by AKRs was the more potent mutagen, provided that it was permitted to redox cycle, and that the mutations observed were G to T transversions, reminiscent of those observed in human lung cancer. It is concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation of PAH in human lung cell lines and that they may contribute to the causation of human lung cancer. PMID:25279998

  8. Ion transport in pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W.; Oancea, Elena V.

    2014-01-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system,, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmentation, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates melanin synthesis, storage, and transfer are not understood. In this review we first discuss ion channels and transporters that function at the plasma membrane of melanocytes; in the second part we consider ion transport across the membrane of intracellular organelles, with emphasis on melanosomes. We discuss recently characterized lysosomal and endosomal ion channels and transporters associated with pigmentation phenotypes. We then review the evidence for melanosomal channels and transporters critical for pigmentation, discussing potential molecular mechanisms mediating their function. The studies investigating ion transport in pigmentation physiology open new avenues for future research and could reveal novel molecular mechanisms underlying melanogenesis. PMID:25034214

  9. Ion transport in pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Oancea, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmentation, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates melanin synthesis, storage, and transfer are not understood. In this review we first discuss ion channels and transporters that function at the plasma membrane of melanocytes; in the second part we consider ion transport across the membrane of intracellular organelles, with emphasis on melanosomes. We discuss recently characterized lysosomal and endosomal ion channels and transporters associated with pigmentation phenotypes. We then review the evidence for melanosomal channels and transporters critical for pigmentation, discussing potential molecular mechanisms mediating their function. The studies investigating ion transport in pigmentation physiology open new avenues for future research and could reveal novel molecular mechanisms underlying melanogenesis.

  10. Aldehydic DNA lesions in calf thymus DNA and HeLa S3 cells produced by bacterial quinone metabolites of fluoranthene and pyrene.

    PubMed

    Zielinska-Park, Joanna; Nakamura, Jun; Swenberg, James A; Aitken, Michael D

    2004-09-01

    There is increasing concern that compounds formed during the chemical or biological transformation of pollutants in the environment may be more detrimental to human and environmental health than the original pollutant. In this study, two bacterial transformation products of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pyrene-4,5-quinone (P45Q) and fluoranthene-2,3-quinone (F23Q), were evaluated for mutagenicity by measuring aldehydic DNA lesions (ADL) in calf thymus DNA and HeLa S3 cells. Both quinones caused oxidative DNA damage in vitro through a copper-mediated redox cycle and subsequent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hydrogen peroxide and copper were essential for causing oxidative DNA damage and glutathione (GSH) prevented DNA damage from F23Q better than from P45Q. In experiments using HeLa cells, F23Q decreased cell viability, but did not produce measurable levels of ADL or base oxidation. To test the hypothesis that DNA damage was being prevented by conjugation of F23Q with GSH, GSH-depleted cells were treated with both quinones. GSH depletion did not increase the toxicity of F23Q or cause it to oxidize DNA. Treatment of HeLa cells with metal chelators did not decrease F23Q toxicity. It is therefore possible that F23Q affected cell viability through a ROS-independent mechanism, either by conjugation with essential cellular proteins or through cellular or mitochondrial membrane damage, which precluded oxidation of DNA. In contrast, P45Q caused both ADL and base oxidation in cells. Neocuproine reduced the amount of ADL caused by P45Q, indicating that copper was still important for the intracellular generation of damaging oxidants. P45Q is a novel metabolite and its effects on DNA have not been investigated previously. This study exemplifies the importance of considering not only primary environmental pollutants, but also their biologically or chemically generated transformation products.

  11. Chemical purity and toxicology of pigments used in tattoo inks.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Henrik; Lewe, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The safety of tattoo inks has obviously increased in Europe since the existence of European Union Resolution ResAP(2008)1, which resulted in the improved quality control of pigment raw materials due to the definition of impurity limits that manufacturers can refer to. High-performance pigments are mostly used in tattoo inks, and these pigments are supposed to be chemically inert and offer high light fastness and low migration in solvents. However, these pigments were not developed or produced for applications involving long-term stay in the dermis or contact with bodily fluids. Therefore, these pigments often do not comply with the purity limits of the resolution; however, it is required that every distributed tattoo ink does not contain aromatic amines and not exceed the limits of heavy metals or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Current toxicity studies of pigments underline that no ecotoxicological threat to human health or to the environment should be expected. However, the pigment as well as its impurities and coating materials must be considered. In order to evaluate the safety of pigments according to their impurities, two different validated sample preparation methods are necessary: (1) simulation of their long-term stay in the bodily fluid of the dermis and (2) simulation of cleavage due to laser removal or ultraviolet exposure. The development of standardized, validated and well-adapted methods for this application has to be part of prospective efforts. Concerning legislation, it might be appropriate that the first regulative approaches be based on those of cosmetics. PMID:25833635

  12. Removal of bisphenol derivatives through quinone oxidation by polyphenol oxidase and subsequent quinone adsorption on chitosan in the heterogeneous system.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuji; Takahashi, Ayumi; Kashiwada, Ayumi; Yamada, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the combined use of a biopolymer chitosan and an oxidoreductase polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was systematically investigated for the removal of bisphenol derivatives from aqueous medium. The process parameters, such as the pH value, temperature, and PPO concentration, were estimated to conduct the enzymatic quinone oxidation of bisphenol derivatives by as little enzyme as possible. Bisphenol derivatives effectively underwent PPO-catalysed quinone oxidation without H2O2 unlike other oxidoreductases, such as peroxidase and tyrosinase, and the optimum conditions were determined to be pH 7.0 and 40°C for bisphenol B, bisphenol E, bisphenol O, and bisphenol Z; pH 7.0 and 30°C for bisphenol C and bisphenol F; and pH 8.0 and 40°C for bisphenol T. They were completely removed through adsorption of enzymatically generated quinone derivatives on chitosan beads or chitosan powders. Quinone adsorption on chitosan beads or chitosan powders in the heterogeneous system was found to be a more effective procedure than generation of aggregates in the homogeneous system with chitosan solution. The removal time was shortened by increasing the amount of chitosan beads or decreasing the size of the chitosan powders.

  13. Pigment-protein complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Siegelman, H W

    1980-01-01

    The photosynthetically-active pigment protein complexes of procaryotes and eucaryotes include chlorophyll proteins, carotenochlorophyll proteins, and biliproteins. They are either integral components or attached to photosynthetic membranes. Detergents are frequently required to solubilize the pigment-protein complexes. The membrane localization and detergent solubilization strongly suggest that the pigment-protein complexes are bound to the membranes by hydrophobic interactions. Hydrophobic interactions of proteins are characterized by an increase in entropy. Their bonding energy is directly related to temperature and ionic strength. Hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, a relatively new separation procedure, can furnish an important method for the purification of pigment-protein complexes. Phycobilisome purification and properties provide an example of the need to maintain hydrophobic interactions to preserve structure and function.

  14. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  15. Synthetic organic pigments of the 20th and 21st century relevant to artist's paints: Raman spectra reference collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrer, Nadim C.; Stefan, Zumbuehl; Francoise, Delavy; Annette, Fritsch; Renate, Kuehnen

    2009-08-01

    Some 170 organic pigments relevant to artist's paints have been collected from historic collections and modern manufacturers. The number includes multiples of the same pigment from different sources and comprises 118 different color indices (C.I.). All of them have been analysed with FTIR spectroscopy and 125 pigments (93 different C.I. No.s) of particular relevance to artist's paints have been characterised with Raman spectroscopy so far. The pigment collection encompasses the following pigment classes and subgroups: monoazo pigments represented by acetoacetic arylide yellow (hansa yellow), β-naphthol, BON, naphthol AS and benzimidazolone; disazo pigments with disazo condensation, diarylide, bisacetoacetarylide, pyrazolone; azo-azomethin metal complex pigments; non-azo, polycyclic pigments such as phthalocyanines, diketopyrrolo-pyrroles (DPP), perylenes and perinones, quinacridones, isoindolinones, polycarbocyclic anthraquinones and dioxanines. The selection of references was based on availability (historic collections) and current use in 16 acrylic, alkyd and oil-based artist's paints, and it covers pigment colors PY yellow (27 C.I. No.s), PR red (38), PO orange (9), PB blue (8), PV violet (6), PG green (3) and PBr brown (2). Besides peak tables and spectra patterns, flow charts based on color, pigment class, group and individual color index are presented to help identification of unknowns and mixed paint samples. While Raman could isolate all different C.I. numbers, multiple references of the same C.I. from different sources could not be distinguished.

  16. Uranium Exerts Acute Toxicity by Binding to Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Cofactor

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R. VanEngelen; Robert I. Szilagyi; Robin Gerlach; Brady E. Lee; William A. Apel; Brent M. Peyton

    2011-02-01

    Uranium as an environmental contaminant has been shown to be toxic to eukaryotes and prokaryotes; however, no specific mechanisms of uranium toxicity have been proposed so far. Here a combination of in vivo, in vitro, and in silico studies are presented describing direct inhibition of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent growth and metabolism by uranyl cations. Electrospray-ionization mass spectroscopy, UV-vis optical spectroscopy, competitive Ca2+/uranyl binding studies, relevant crystal structures, and molecular modeling unequivocally indicate the preferred binding of uranyl simultaneously to the carboxyl oxygen, pyridine nitrogen, and quinone oxygen of the PQQ molecule. The observed toxicity patterns are consistent with the biotic ligand model of acute metal toxicity. In addition to the environmental implications, this work represents the first proposed molecular mechanism of uranium toxicity in bacteria, and has relevance for uranium toxicity in many living systems.

  17. Two new quinones from the roots of Juglans mandshurica.

    PubMed

    Jin, Mei; Sun, Jinfeng; Li, Ren; Diao, Shengbao; Zhang, Changhao; Cui, Jiongmo; Son, Jong-Keun; Zhou, Wei; Li, Gao

    2016-09-01

    Two new quinones, 1-hydroxy-5-pentyl-anthraquinone (1) and 4-(5-hydroxy-1,4-dioxo-1,4-dihydro-naphthalen-2-ylamino)-butyric acid methyl ester (2), together with two known quinones, 5-hydroxy-2-(2-hydroxy-ethylamino)-(1,4) naphthoquinone (3) and juglone (4) were isolated from the roots of Juglans mandshurica (Juglandaceae). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral data. Compound 3 was isolated from the Juglans genus for the first time. Compounds 1-4 exhibited significant cytotoxicity towards cultured MDA-MB231, HepG2 and SNU638 cells with IC50 values ranging from 4.46 to 88.47 μM.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading capabilities of Phanerochaete laevis HHB-1625 and its extracellular ligninolytic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Bogan, B W; Lamar, R T

    1996-01-01

    The ability of Phanerochaete laevis HHB-1625 to transform polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in liquid culture was studied in relation to its complement of extracellular ligninolytic enzymes. In nitrogen-limited liquid medium, P. laevis produced high levels of manganese peroxidase (MnP). MnP activity was strongly regulated by the amount of Mn2+ in the culture medium, as has been previously shown for several other white rot species. Low levels of laccase were also detected. No lignin peroxidase (LiP) was found in the culture medium, either by spectrophotometric assay or by Western blotting (immunoblotting). Despite the apparent reliance of the strain primarily on MnP, liquid cultures of P. laevis were capable of extensive transformation of anthracene, phenanthrene, benz[a]anthracene, and benzo[a]pyrene. Crude extracellular peroxidases from P. laevis transformed all of the above PAHs, either in MnP-Mn2+ reactions or in MnP-based lipid peroxidation systems. In contrast to previously published studies with Phanerochaete chrysosporium, metabolism of each of the four PAHs yielded predominantly polar products, with no significant accumulation of quinones. Further studies with benz[a]anthracene and its 7,12-dione indicated that only small amounts of quinone products were ever present in P. laevis cultures and that quinone intermediates of PAH metabolism were degraded faster and more extensively by P. laevis than by P. chrysosporium. PMID:8633857

  19. Thiols oxidation and covalent binding of BSA by cyclolignanic quinones are enhanced by the magnesium cation

    PubMed Central

    ALEGRIA, ANTONIO E.; SANCHEZ-CRUZ, PEDRO; KUMAR, AJAY; GARCIA, CARMELO; GONZALEZ, FERNANDO A.; ORELLANO, AIMEE; ZAYAS, BEATRIZ; GORDALIZA, MARINA

    2009-01-01

    A novel cyclolignanic quinone, 7-acetyl-3′,4′-didemethoxy-3′,4′-dioxopodophyllotoxin (CLQ), inhibits topoisomerase II (TOPO II) activity. The extent of this inhibition was greater than that produced by the etoposide quinone (EQ) or etoposide. Glutathione (GSH) reduces EQ and CLQ to their corresponding semiquinones under anaerobic conditions. The latter were detected by EPR spectroscopy in the presence of MgCl2 but not in its absence. Semiquinone EPR spectra change with quinone/GSH mol ratio, suggesting covalent binding of GSH to the quinones. Quinone-GSH covalent adducts were isolated and identified by ESI-MS. These orthoquinones also react with nucleophilic groups from BSA to bind covalently under anaerobic conditions. BSA thiol consumption and covalent binding by these quinones are enhanced by MgCl2. Complex formation between the parent quinones and Mg+2 was also observed. Density functional calculations predict the observed blue-shifts in the absorption spectra peaks and large decreases in the partial negative charge of electrophilic carbons at the quinone ring when the quinones are complexed to Mg+2. These observations suggest a possible role of Mg+2 chelation by these quinones in increasing TOPO II thiol and/or amino/imino reactivity with these orthoquinones. PMID:18324525

  20. Evidence by ESI-MS for NQO1-catalyzed reduction of estrogen ortho-quinones

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Nilesh W.; Rogan, Eleanor G.; Cavalieri, Ercole L.

    2007-01-01

    Estrogen ortho-quinones have been implicated as ultimate carcinogenic metabolites of estrogens. The present conclusion that estrogen ortho-quinones are not substrates for NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) stems from earlier reports. In this investigation, we were successful in circumventing the problem of nonenzymatic reduction of estrogen quinone by NAD(P)H, which led to the above conclusion, and for the first time show that NQO1 catalyzes the reduction of estrogen quinones. Mass spectrometric binding studies involving estradiol-3,4-quinone or menadione with NQO1 clearly support the formation of an enzyme-substrate physical complex. However, the NQO1 mass spectrum did not alter after addition of cholesterol, the control. Two different strategies were employed to ascertain the NQO1 activity in estrogen quinone reduction. First, the ping-pong mechanism of NQO1 catalysis was utilized to overcome the problem of nonenzymatic reduction of the substrate by NADH. Second, tetrahydrofolic acid, which has a lower reducing potential, was used as an alternate cofactor. Both of these methods confirmed the reduction of estradiol-3,4-quinone by NQO1, when assay mixtures were analyzed by UV or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Furthermore, reduction of 9,10-phenanthrene quinone or menadione was observed using the reported assay conditions. Thus, clear evidence for the catalytic reduction of estrogen ortho-quinones by NQO1 has been obtained; its mechanism and implications are discussed. PMID:17893042

  1. Quinone Methide Bioactivation Pathway: Contribution to Toxicity and/or Cytoprotection?

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Judy L.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of quinone methides (QMs) from either direct 2-electron oxidation of 2- or 4-alkylphenols, isomerization of o-quinones, or elimination of a good leaving group could explain the cytotoxic/cytoprotective effects of several drugs, natural products, as well as endogenous compounds. For example, the antiretroviral drug nevirapine and the antidiabetic agent troglitazone both induce idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity through mechanisms involving quinone methide formation. The anesthetic phencyclidine induces psychological side effects potentially through quinone methide mediated covalent modification of crucial macromolecules in the brain. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) such as tamoxifen, toremifene, and raloxifene are metabolized to quinone methides which could potentially contribute to endometrial carcinogenic properties and/or induce detoxification enzymes and enhance the chemopreventive effects of these SERMs. Endogenous estrogens and/or estrogens present in estrogen replacement formulations are also metabolized to catechols and further oxidized to o-quinones which can isomerize to quinone methides. Both estrogen quinoids could cause DNA damage which could enhance hormone dependent cancer risk. Natural products such as the food and flavor agent eugenol can be directly oxidized to a quinone methide which may explain the toxic effects of this natural compound. Oral toxicities associated with chewing areca quid could be the result of exposure to hydroxychavicol through initial oxidation to an o-quinone which isomerizes to a p-quinone methide. Similar o-quinone to p-quinone methide isomerization reactions have been reported for the ubiquitous flavonoid quercetin which needs to be taken into consideration when evaluating risk-benefit assessments of these natural products. The resulting reaction of these quinone methides with proteins, DNA, and/or resulting modulation of gene expression may explain the toxic and/or beneficial effects of the parent

  2. NADH-quinone oxidoreductase: PSST subunit couples electron transfer from iron–sulfur cluster N2 to quinone

    PubMed Central

    Schuler, Franz; Yano, Takahiro; Di Bernardo, Salvatore; Yagi, Takao; Yankovskaya, Victoria; Singer, Thomas P.; Casida, John E.

    1999-01-01

    The proton-translocating NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (EC 1.6.99.3) is the largest and least understood enzyme complex of the respiratory chain. The mammalian mitochondrial enzyme (also called complex I) contains more than 40 subunits, whereas its structurally simpler bacterial counterpart (NDH-1) in Paracoccus denitrificans and Thermus thermophilus HB-8 consists of 14 subunits. A major unsolved question is the location and mechanism of the terminal electron transfer step from iron–sulfur cluster N2 to quinone. Potent inhibitors acting at this key region are candidate photoaffinity probes to dissect NADH-quinone oxidoreductases. Complex I and NDH-1 are very sensitive to inhibition by a variety of structurally diverse toxicants, including rotenone, piericidin A, bullatacin, and pyridaben. We designed (trifluoromethyl)diazirinyl[3H]pyridaben ([3H]TDP) as our photoaffinity ligand because it combines outstanding inhibitor potency, a suitable photoreactive group, and tritium at high specific activity. Photoaffinity labeling of mitochondrial electron transport particles was specific and saturable. Isolation, protein sequencing, and immunoprecipitation identified the high-affinity specifically labeled 23-kDa subunit as PSST of complex I. Immunoprecipitation of labeled membranes of P. denitrificans and T. thermophilus established photoaffinity labeling of the equivalent bacterial NQO6. Competitive binding and enzyme inhibition studies showed that photoaffinity labeling of the specific high-affinity binding site of PSST is exceptionally sensitive to each of the high-potency inhibitors mentioned above. These findings establish that the homologous PSST of mitochondria and NQO6 of bacteria have a conserved inhibitor-binding site and that this subunit plays a key role in electron transfer by functionally coupling iron–sulfur cluster N2 to quinone. PMID:10097178

  3. Potential Metabolic Activation of a Representative C2-Alkylated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon 6-Ethylchrysene Associated with the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in Human Hepatoma (HepG2) Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is the major human health hazard associated with the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. C2-Chrysenes are representative PAHs present in crude oil and could contaminate the food chain. We describe the metabolism of a C2-chrysene regioisomer, 6-ethylchrysene (6-EC), in human HepG2 cells. The structures of the metabolites were identified by HPLC-UV-fluorescence detection and LC-MS/MS. 6-EC-tetraol isomers were identified as signature metabolites of the diol-epoxide pathway. O-Monomethyl-O-monosulfonated-6-EC-catechol, its monohydroxy products, and N-acetyl-l-cysteine(NAC)-6-EC-ortho-quinone were discovered as signature metabolites of the ortho-quinone pathway. Potential dual metabolic activation of 6-EC involving the formation of bis-electrophiles, i.e., a mono-diol-epoxide and a mono-ortho-quinone within the same structure, bis-diol-epoxides, and bis-ortho-quinones was observed as well. The identification of 6-EC-tetraol, O-monomethyl-O-monosulfonated-6-EC-catechol, its monohydroxy products, and NAC-6-EC-ortho-quinone supports potential metabolic activation of 6-EC by P450 and AKR enzymes followed by metabolic detoxification of the ortho-quinone through interception of its redox cycling capability by catechol-O-methyltransferase and sulfotransferase enzymes. The tetraols and catechol conjugates could be used as biomarkers of human exposure to 6-EC resulting from oil spills. PMID:27054409

  4. Potential Metabolic Activation of a Representative C2-Alkylated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon 6-Ethylchrysene Associated with the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in Human Hepatoma (HepG2) Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meng; Mesaros, Clementina; Zhang, Suhong; Blair, Ian A; Penning, Trevor M

    2016-06-20

    Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is the major human health hazard associated with the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. C2-Chrysenes are representative PAHs present in crude oil and could contaminate the food chain. We describe the metabolism of a C2-chrysene regioisomer, 6-ethylchrysene (6-EC), in human HepG2 cells. The structures of the metabolites were identified by HPLC-UV-fluorescence detection and LC-MS/MS. 6-EC-tetraol isomers were identified as signature metabolites of the diol-epoxide pathway. O-Monomethyl-O-monosulfonated-6-EC-catechol, its monohydroxy products, and N-acetyl-l-cysteine(NAC)-6-EC-ortho-quinone were discovered as signature metabolites of the ortho-quinone pathway. Potential dual metabolic activation of 6-EC involving the formation of bis-electrophiles, i.e., a mono-diol-epoxide and a mono-ortho-quinone within the same structure, bis-diol-epoxides, and bis-ortho-quinones was observed as well. The identification of 6-EC-tetraol, O-monomethyl-O-monosulfonated-6-EC-catechol, its monohydroxy products, and NAC-6-EC-ortho-quinone supports potential metabolic activation of 6-EC by P450 and AKR enzymes followed by metabolic detoxification of the ortho-quinone through interception of its redox cycling capability by catechol-O-methyltransferase and sulfotransferase enzymes. The tetraols and catechol conjugates could be used as biomarkers of human exposure to 6-EC resulting from oil spills.

  5. Potential Metabolic Activation of a Representative C2-Alkylated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon 6-Ethylchrysene Associated with the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in Human Hepatoma (HepG2) Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meng; Mesaros, Clementina; Zhang, Suhong; Blair, Ian A; Penning, Trevor M

    2016-06-20

    Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is the major human health hazard associated with the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. C2-Chrysenes are representative PAHs present in crude oil and could contaminate the food chain. We describe the metabolism of a C2-chrysene regioisomer, 6-ethylchrysene (6-EC), in human HepG2 cells. The structures of the metabolites were identified by HPLC-UV-fluorescence detection and LC-MS/MS. 6-EC-tetraol isomers were identified as signature metabolites of the diol-epoxide pathway. O-Monomethyl-O-monosulfonated-6-EC-catechol, its monohydroxy products, and N-acetyl-l-cysteine(NAC)-6-EC-ortho-quinone were discovered as signature metabolites of the ortho-quinone pathway. Potential dual metabolic activation of 6-EC involving the formation of bis-electrophiles, i.e., a mono-diol-epoxide and a mono-ortho-quinone within the same structure, bis-diol-epoxides, and bis-ortho-quinones was observed as well. The identification of 6-EC-tetraol, O-monomethyl-O-monosulfonated-6-EC-catechol, its monohydroxy products, and NAC-6-EC-ortho-quinone supports potential metabolic activation of 6-EC by P450 and AKR enzymes followed by metabolic detoxification of the ortho-quinone through interception of its redox cycling capability by catechol-O-methyltransferase and sulfotransferase enzymes. The tetraols and catechol conjugates could be used as biomarkers of human exposure to 6-EC resulting from oil spills. PMID:27054409

  6. Biology of pigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, F.

    1981-01-01

    The many factors involved in the normal pigmentation of human skin are highly complex involving anatomic, biochemical, and genetic aspects of melanocytes in the skin and the influence of UV light and various hormones on the melanocytes. It is probably more than just coincidence that the melanocytes, which are of neurogenic origin, are so responsive to several trophic hormones produced in the brain. Understanding of the various factors involved in the normal pigmentary process is crucial to explaining the many alterations and anomalies in human pigmentation.

  7. Embryological pigment epithelial dystrophies.

    PubMed

    François, J

    1976-01-01

    The embryological pigment epithelial dystrophies may be due, although rather rarely, to chemical factors, such as antibiotics and thalidomide, to ionizing radiation and to infectious factors, syphilis or viral infections, such as mumps, measles, varicella, or cytomegalovirus. The most frequent and the most typical dystrophy is, nevertheless, the rubella epitheliopathy with its widespread scattered black pigment deposits, found predominantly in the posterior pole, and its unaffected visual functions. The macular dystrophy associated with deaf-mutism is also often due to a maternal rubella infection.

  8. Bioassay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kirk, E.A.

    1980-08-01

    A positive relationship was found between the photodynamic activity of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons versus published results on the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and initiation of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene resulted in detection of increased mutagenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia as found also in the Ames Salmonella assay. The utility of P. tetraurelia as a biological detector of hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed.

  9. Troglitazone quinone formation catalyzed by human and rat CYP3A: an atypical CYP oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    He, K; Woolf, T F; Kindt, E K; Fielder, A E; Talaat, R E

    2001-07-15

    Oxidative ring opening of troglitazone (TGZ)(1) a thiazolidine 2,4-dione derivative used for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus, leads to the formation of a quinone metabolite. The formation of TGZ quinone was shown to be NADPH dependent and to require active microsomal enzymes. Quinone formation was not affected by co-incubation with catalase or sodium azide and was partially inhibited (25%) by superoxide dismutase (SOD). Kinetic analysis of TGZ quinone formation in human liver microsomes implied single enzyme involvement. CYP3A isoforms were characterized as the primary enzymes involved in quinone formation by several lines of evidence including: (a) troleandomycin and ketoconazole almost completely inhibited microsomal quinone formation when SOD was present, whereas other CYP inhibitors had minimal effects (<20%); (b) TGZ quinone formation was highly correlated with regard to both contents (r(2): 0.9374) and activities (r(2): 0.7951) of CYP3A4 in human liver microsomes (HLM); (c) baculovirus insect cell-expressed human CYP3A4 was able to catalyze TGZ quinone formation at a higher capacity (V(max)/K(m)) than other human CYPs with the relative contribution of CYP3A4 in HLM estimated to be 20-fold higher than that of other CYPs; (d) TGZ quinone formation was increased by 350% in liver microsomes from rats pretreated with dexamethasone (DEX); and (e) plasma concentrations of TGZ quinone were increased by 260-680% in rats pretreated with DEX. The chemical nature of the quinone metabolite suggests an atypical CYP reaction consistent with a one-electron oxidation mechanism where an intermediate phenoxy radical combines with ferryl oxygen to subsequently form the quinone metabolite.

  10. The mechanism of the quinone reductase reaction of pig heart lipoamide dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Vienozinskis, J; Butkus, A; Cenas, N; Kulys, J

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the NADH:lipoamide reductase and NADH:quinone reductase reactions of pig heart lipoamide dehydrogenase (EC 1.6.4.3) was investigated. At pH 7.0 the catalytic constant of the quinone reductase reaction (kcat.) is 70 s-1 and the rate constant of the active-centre reduction by NADH (kcat./Km) is 9.2 x 10(5) M-1.s-1. These constants are almost an order lower than those for the lipoamide reductase reaction. The maximal quinone reductase activity is observed at pH 6.0-5.5. The use of [4(S)-2H]NADH as substrate decreases kcat./Km for the lipoamide reductase reaction and both kcat. and kcat./Km for the quinone reductase reaction. The kcat./Km values for quinones in this case are decreased 1.85-3.0-fold. NAD+ is a more effective inhibitor in the quinone reductase reaction than in the lipoamide reductase reaction. The pattern of inhibition reflects the shift of the reaction equilibrium. Various forms of the four-electron-reduced enzyme are believed to reduce quinones. Simple and 'hybrid ping-pong' mechanisms of this reaction are discussed. The logarithms of kcat./Km for quinones are hyperbolically dependent on their single-electron reduction potentials (E1(7]. A three-step mechanism for a mixed one-electron and two-electron reduction of quinones by lipoamide dehydrogenase is proposed. PMID:2375745

  11. Substituted quinoline quinones as surrogates for the PQQ cofactor: an electrochemical and computational study.

    PubMed

    Dorfner, Walter L; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2015-04-17

    Pyrroloquinoline quinones (PQQ) are important cofactors that shuttle redox equivalents in diverse metalloproteins. Quinoline 7,8-quinones have been synthesized and characterized as surrogates for PQQ to elucidate redox energetics within metalloenzyme active sites. The quinoline 7,8-quinones were accessed using polymer-supported iodoxybenzoic acid and the compounds evaluated using solution electrochemistry. Together with a family of quinones, the products were evaluated computationally and used to generate a predictive correlation between a computed ΔG and the experimental reduction potentials.

  12. Compositions comprising a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a quinone compound and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Quinlan, Jason; Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising: a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a quinone compound. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  13. Retinal pigment epithelial cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Sally

    2015-01-01

    The human retinal pigment epithelium forms early in development and subsequently remains dormant, undergoing minimal proliferation throughout normal life. Retinal pigment epithelium proliferation, however, can be activated in disease states or by removing retinal pigment epithelial cells into culture. We review the conditions that control retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in culture, in animal models and in human disease and interpret retinal pigment epithelium proliferation in context of the recently discovered retinal pigment epithelium stem cell that is responsible for most in vitro retinal pigment epithelial proliferation. Retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated wound repair that occurs in selected macular diseases is contrasted with retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated fibroblastic scar formation that underlies proliferative vitreoretinopathy. We discuss the role of retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in age-related macular degeneration which is reparative in some cases and destructive in others. Macular retinal pigment epithelium wound repair and regression of choroidal neovascularization are more pronounced in younger than older patients. We discuss the possibility that the limited retinal pigment epithelial proliferation and latent wound repair in older age-related macular degeneration patients can be stimulated to promote disease regression in age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26041390

  14. Approaches to Polycyclic 1,4-Dioxygenated Xanthones. Application to Total Synthesis of the Aglycone of IB-00208

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hexacyclic xanthone natural products such as IB-00208 present a formidable challenge in organic synthesis. A new approach to polycyclic 1,4-dioxygenated xanthones from benzocyclobutenones has been developed and applied to the first total synthesis of the aglycone of IB-00208. The 22-step synthesis features an acetylide stitching process that joins an aryl aldehyde with an angularly fused benzocyclobutenone, which was prepared by a ring-closing metathesis reaction. The resulting acetylenic benzocyclobutenone diol underwent a Moore rearrangement to give an intermediate that was further elaborated to the aglycone of IB-00208 as a mixture of hydroquinone–quinone tautomers. PMID:25513888

  15. 4-alkyl-o-quinone/2-hydroxy-p-quinone methide isomerase from the larval hemolymph of Sarcophaga bullata. I. Purification and characterization of enzyme-catalyzed reaction.

    PubMed

    Saul, S J; Sugumaran, M

    1990-10-01

    An enzyme which catalyzes the conversion of certain 4-alkyl-o-benzoquinones to 2-hydroxy-p-quinone methides has been purified to apparent homogeneity from the hemolymph of Sarcophaga bullata by employing conventional protein purification techniques. The purified enzyme migrated with an approximate molecular weight of 98,000 on gel filtration chromatography. On sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, it migrated as a single band with a molecular weight of 46,000, indicating that it is made up of two identical subunits. It exhibited a pH optimum of 6.0 and readily converted chemically synthesized as well as enzymatically generated quinones derived from N-acetyldopamine, N-beta-alanyldopamine, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenethyl alcohol to highly unstable 2-hydroxy-p-quinone methides. The quinone methides thus formed were rapidly and nonenzymatically hydrated to form side chain hydroxylated o-diphenols as the stable product. In support of this proposition, when the enzyme reaction with N-acetyldopamine quinone was conducted in the presence of 10% methanol, racemic beta-methoxy-N-acetyldopamine was recovered as an additional product. The quinones of N-acetylnorepinephrine, N-beta-alanylnorepinephrine, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol were also attacked by the isomerase, resulting in the formation of N-acetylarterenone, N-beta-alanylarterenone and 2-hydroxy-3',4'-dihydroxyacetophenone, respectively as the stable products. The isomerase converted the dihydrocaffeiyl methyl amide quinone to its quinone methide analog which rapidly tautomerized to yield caffeiyl methyl amide. The importance of quinone isomerase in insect immunity and sclerotization of insect cuticle is discussed.

  16. A new sesquiterpenoid quinone with cytotoxicity from Abelmoschus sagittifolius.

    PubMed

    Chen, De-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Po; Ma, Guo-Xu; Wu, Hai-Feng; Yang, Jun-Shan; Xu, Xu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    A new sesquiterpenoid quinone, Acyl hibiscone B (1), together with five known compounds, (R)-lasiodiplodin (2), (R)-de-O-methyllasiodiplodin, (3) dibutyl phthalate (4), (R)-9-phenylnonan-2-ol (5) and hibiscone B (6), was obtained from the stem tuber of Abelmoschus sagittifolius. The structure of compound 1 was elucidated by analysing its (1)H and (13)C NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC, NOESY and HR-ESI-MS values. Compound 1 showed significant cytotoxicity against Hela and HepG-2 human cancer cell lines.

  17. Terpenoids from Diplophyllum taxifolium with quinone reductase-inducing activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Jiao-Zhen; Zhou, Jin-Chuan; Shen, Tao; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Two new ent-prenylaromadendrane-type diterpenoids, diplotaxifols A (1) and B (2), a new ent-eudesmol, ent-eudesma-4(15),11(13)-dien-6α,12-diol (3), eight new eudesmanolides enantiomers (4-11) of the corresponding compounds from higher plants along with four known ent-eudesmanolides (12-15) were isolated from the 95% EtOH extract of Chinese liverwort Diplophyllum taxifolium. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of MS, NMR and IR spectral data, and confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The quinone reductase-inducing activity of the compounds was evaluated. PMID:26656409

  18. A new sesquiterpenoid quinone with cytotoxicity from Abelmoschus sagittifolius.

    PubMed

    Chen, De-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Po; Ma, Guo-Xu; Wu, Hai-Feng; Yang, Jun-Shan; Xu, Xu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    A new sesquiterpenoid quinone, Acyl hibiscone B (1), together with five known compounds, (R)-lasiodiplodin (2), (R)-de-O-methyllasiodiplodin, (3) dibutyl phthalate (4), (R)-9-phenylnonan-2-ol (5) and hibiscone B (6), was obtained from the stem tuber of Abelmoschus sagittifolius. The structure of compound 1 was elucidated by analysing its (1)H and (13)C NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC, NOESY and HR-ESI-MS values. Compound 1 showed significant cytotoxicity against Hela and HepG-2 human cancer cell lines. PMID:26230217

  19. Metabolism of an Alkylated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon 5-Methylchrysene in Human Hepatoma (HepG2) Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meng; Zhang, Li; Mesaros, Clementina; Hackfeld, Linda C; Hodge, Richard P; Blair, Ian A; Penning, Trevor M

    2015-10-19

    Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the food chain is the major human health hazard associated with the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. C1-chrysenes are representative PAHs present in the crude oil and have been detected in contaminated sea food in amounts that exceed their permissible safety thresholds. We describe the metabolism of the most carcinogenic C1-chrysene regioisomer, 5-methylchrysene (5-MC), in human HepG2 cells. The structures of the metabolites were identified by HPLC-UV-fluorescence detection and LC-MS/MS. 5-MC-tetraol, a signature metabolite of the diol-epoxide pathway, was identified as reported previously. Novel O-monosulfonated-5-MC-catechol isomers and O-monomethyl-O-monosulfonated-5-MC-catechol were discovered, and evidence for their precursor ortho-quinones was obtained. The identities of O-monosulfonated-5-MC-1,2-catechol, O-monomethyl-O-monosulfonated-5-MC-1,2-catechol, and 5-MC-1,2-dione were validated by comparison to authentic synthesized standards. Dual metabolic activation of 5-MC involving the formation of bis-electrophiles, i.e., a mono-diol-epoxide and a mono-ortho-quinone within the same structure, bis-diol-epoxides, and bis-ortho-quinones is reported for the first time. Evidence was also obtained for minor metabolic conversion of 5-MC to form monohydroxylated-quinones and bis-phenols. The identification of 5-MC-tetraol, O-monosulfonated-5-MC-1,2-catechol, O-monomethyl-O-monosulfonated-5-MC-1,2-catechol, and 5-MC-1,2-dione supports metabolic activation of 5-MC by P450 and AKR isozymes followed by metabolic detoxification of the ortho-quinone through interception of redox cycling by COMT and SULT isozymes. The major metabolites, O-monosulfonated-catechols and tetraols, could be used as biomarkers of human exposure to 5-MC resulting from oil spills.

  20. The enzymic oxidation of chlorogenic acid and some reactions of the quinone produced

    PubMed Central

    Pierpoint, W. S.

    1966-01-01

    1. Partially purified preparations of tobacco-leaf o-diphenol oxidase (o-quinol–oxygen oxidoreductase; EC 1.10.3.1) oxidize chlorogenic acid to brown products, absorbing, on average, 1·6atoms of oxygen/mol. oxidized, and evolving a little carbon dioxide. 2. The effect of benzenesulphinic acid on the oxidation suggests that the first stage is the formation of a quinone; the solution does not go brown, oxygen uptake is restricted to 1 atom/mol. oxidized, and a compound is produced whose composition corresponds to that of a sulphone of the quinone derived from chlorogenic acid. 3. Several other compounds that react with quinones affect the oxidation of chlorogenic acid. The colour of the products formed and the oxygen absorbed in their formation suggest that the quinone formed in the oxidation reacts with these compounds in the same way as do simpler quinones. 4. Some compounds that are often used to prevent the oxidation of polyphenols were tested to see if they act by inhibiting o-diphenol oxidase, by reacting with quinone intermediates, or both. 5. Ascorbate inhibits the enzyme and also reduces the quinone. 6. Potassium ethyl xanthate, diethyldithiocarbamate and cysteine inhibit the enzyme to different extents, and also react with the quinone. The nature of the reaction depends on the relative concentrations of inhibitor and chlorogenic acid. Excess of inhibitor prevents the solution from turning brown and restricts oxygen uptake to 1 atom/mol. of chlorogenic acid oxidized; smaller amounts do not prevent browning and slightly increase oxygen uptake. 7. 2-Mercaptobenzothiazole inhibits the enzyme, and also probably reacts with the quinone; inhibited enzyme is reactivated as if the inhibitor is removed as traces of quinone are produced. 8. Thioglycollate and polyvinylpyrrolidone inhibit the enzyme. Thioglycollate probably reduces the quinone to a small extent. PMID:5941350

  1. Two-Mechanism Model for the Interaction of Etoposide Quinone with Topoisomerase IIα.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Elizabeth G; King, McKenzie M; Mercer, Susan L; Deweese, Joseph E

    2016-09-19

    Topoisomerase II is an essential nuclear enzyme involved in regulating DNA topology to facilitate replication and cell division. Disruption of topoisomerase II function by chemotherapeutic agents is in use as an effective strategy to fight cancer. Etoposide is an anticancer therapeutic that disrupts the catalytic cycle of topoisomerase II and stabilizes enzyme-bound DNA strand breaks. Etoposide is metabolized into several species including active quinone and catechol metabolites. Our previous studies have explored some of the details of how these compounds act against topoisomerase II. In our present study, we extend those analyses by examining several effects of etoposide quinone on topoisomerase IIα including whether the quinone impacts ATP hydrolysis, DNA ligation, cleavage complex persistence, and enzyme/DNA binding. Our results demonstrate that the quinone inhibits relaxation at 100-fold lower levels of drug when compared to that of etoposide. Further, the quinone inhibits ATP hydrolysis by topoisomerase IIα. The quinone does appear to stabilize single-strand breaks similar to etoposide suggesting a traditional poisoning mechanism. However, there is minimal difference in cleavage complex persistence in the presence of etoposide or etoposide quinone. In contrast to etoposide, we find that etoposide quinone blocks enzyme/DNA binding, which provides an explanation for previous data showing the ability of the quinone to inactivate the enzyme over time. Finally, etoposide quinone is able to stabilize the N-terminal protein clamp implying an interaction between the compound and this portion of the enzyme. Taken together, the evidence supports a two-mechanism model for the effect of the quinone on topoisomerase II: (1) interfacial poison and (2) covalent poison that interacts with the N-terminal clamp and impacts the binding of DNA. PMID:27533850

  2. THE PHOTOTOXICITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues to be interested in developing methods for the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) in the environment. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) are common contaminants in our environment. Being major product...

  3. Photooxidations in pigmented Blepharisma.

    PubMed

    GIESE, A C; ZEUTHEN, E

    1949-03-20

    1. Blepharisma undulans, a protozoan with a reddish pigment, shows increased oxygen consumption under the influence of light. 2. If the light intensity is high, the animals are killed during a burst of oxygen consumption. 3. If the blepharismas are first bleached by exposure to light of low intensity they show only slightly increased oxygen consumption under the influence of light and they are not killed. 4. A preparation in which the animals are killed by heat still shows the increase in oxygen consumption on illumination with brilliant light. The supernatant solution does so as well, as does an alcohol extract of the dye. 5. The conclusion is drawn that the blepharismas are killed during photooxidation of the pigment, but the mechanism of action is not clear. Several possibilities are considered in the discussion.

  4. Syntheses of covalently-linked porphyria-quinone complexes. I

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, J.L.Y.; Loach, P.A.

    1980-06-01

    A synthetic route for the preparation of covalently-linked prophyin-quinone and metalloporphyrinquinone complexes as models for the phototrap in bacterial photosynthesis is described. 5(5-Carboxyphenyl)-10,15,20-tritolylporphyrin, prepared by a mixed aldehyde approach, was attached to benzoquinone center with a propanediol bridge by means of ester linkages. The starting point for the benzoquinone moiety was 2,5-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, whose hydroquinone function was first protected by preparing its dimethyl ether. The spacing between the two centers of the complex could be altered simply by varying the length of the bridging group (a diol) employed. Boron tribomide was used to unmask the quinol derivatives in the final coupled products. The zinc(II) derivative of porphyrin-quinone complex was prepared by addition of a saturated solution of zinc acetate in methanol to a solution of the corresponding prophyrin-hydroqyuinone complex in dichloromethane at room temperature. The structures of these complexes were confirmed by nmr spectroscopy, uv-visible absorption, and mass spectroscopy. Oxidation of the quinol moiety in the covalently-linked complex to its corresponding quinonoid derivative was accomplished by treating a solution of the complex in dichloromethane with a stoichiometric amount of 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone, a high potential benzoquinone.

  5. Phospholipid and Respiratory Quinone Analyses From Extreme Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfiffner, S. M.

    2008-12-01

    Extreme environments on Earth have been chosen as surrogate sites to test methods and strategies for the deployment of space craft in the search for extraterrestrial life. Surrogate sites for many of the NASA astrobiology institutes include the South African gold mines, Canadian subpermafrost, Atacama Desert, and acid rock drainage. Soils, sediments, rock cores, fracture waters, biofilms, and service and drill waters represent the types of samples collected from these sites. These samples were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry for phospholipid fatty acid methyl esters and by high performance liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry for respiratory quinones. Phospholipid analyses provided estimates of biomass, community composition, and compositional changes related to nutritional limitations or exposure to toxic conditions. Similar to phospholipid analyses, respiratory quinone analyses afforded identification of certain types of microorganisms in the community based on respiration and offered clues to in situ redox conditions. Depending on the number of samples analyzed, selected multivariate statistical methods were applied to relate membrane lipid results with site biogeochemical parameters. Successful detection of life signatures and refinement of methodologies at surrogate sites on Earth will be critical for the recognition of extraterrestrial life. At this time, membrane lipid analyses provide useful information not easily obtained by other molecular techniques.

  6. Carbons, ionic liquids and quinones for electrochemical capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Raul; Doherty, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Carbons are the main electrode materials used in electrochemical capacitors, which are electrochemical energy storage devices with high power densities and long cycling lifetimes. However, increasing their energy density will improve their potential for commercial implementation. In this regard, the use of high surface area carbons and high voltage electrolytes are well known strategies to increase the attainable energy density, and lately ionic liquids have been explored as promising alternatives to current state of the art acetonitrile-based electrolytes. Also, in terms of safety and sustainability ionic liquids are attractive electrolyte materials for electrochemical capacitors. In addition, it has been shown that the matching of the carbon pore size with the electrolyte ion size further increases the attainable electric double layer (EDL) capacitance and energy density. The use of pseudocapacitive reactions can significantly increase the attainable energy density, and quinonic-based materials offer a potentially sustainable and cost effective research avenue for both the electrode and the electrolyte. This perspective will provide an overview of the current state of the art research on electrochemical capacitors based on combinations of carbons, ionic liquids and quinonic compounds, highlighting performances and challenges and discussing possible future research avenues. In this regard, current interest is mainly focused on strategies which may ultimately lead to commercially competitive sustainable high performance electrochemical capacitors for different applications including those requiring mechanical flexibility and biocompatibility.

  7. Atypical features of Thermus thermophilus succinate:quinone reductase.

    PubMed

    Kolaj-Robin, Olga; Noor, Mohamed R; O'Kane, Sarah R; Baymann, Frauke; Soulimane, Tewfik

    2013-01-01

    The Thermus thermophilus succinate:quinone reductase (SQR), serving as the respiratory complex II, has been homologously produced under the control of a constitutive promoter and subsequently purified. The detailed biochemical characterization of the resulting wild type (wt-rcII) and His-tagged (rcII-His(8)-SdhB and rcII-SdhB-His(6)) complex II variants showed the same properties as the native enzyme with respect to the subunit composition, redox cofactor content and sensitivity to the inhibitors malonate, oxaloacetate, 3-nitropropionic acid and nonyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (NQNO). The position of the His-tag determined whether the enzyme retained its native trimeric conformation or whether it was present in a monomeric form. Only the trimer exhibited positive cooperativity at high temperatures. The EPR signal of the [2Fe-2S] cluster was sensitive to the presence of substrate and showed an increased rhombicity in the presence of succinate in the native and in all recombinant forms of the enzyme. The detailed analysis of the shape of this signal as a function of pH, substrate concentration and in the presence of various inhibitors and quinones is presented, leading to a model for the molecular mechanism that underlies the influence of succinate on the rhombicity of the EPR signal of the proximal iron-sulfur cluster.

  8. Reactivity of 4',4"-diethylstilbestrol quinone, a metabolic intermediate of diethylstilbestrol.

    PubMed

    Liehr, J G; DaGue, B B; Ballatore, A M

    1985-06-01

    In a search for the carcinogenic metabolite of diethylstilbestrol, the interactions of 4',4"-diethylstilbestrol quinone with peptides and nucleic acids were investigated. Nonextractable binding of 4',4"-diethylstilbestrol quinone to calf thymus DNA or poly G were observed. However, adduct nucleosides could not be isolated subsequent to enzymatic digestion of nucleic acids. Binding to dGMP or dAMP also occurred, but the initially bound stilbene estrogen could mostly be extracted with 18 extractions using various organic solvents. Non-covalent interactions of 4',4"-diethylstilbestrol quinone with calf thymus DNA were observed spectrally only after exhaustive dialysis of the DNA versus water, but not with native DNA. In chemical reactions of 4',4"-diethylstilbestrol quinone and nucleosides, nucleotides, and amines such as n-pentyl amine, only Z,Z-dienestrol could be identified as reaction product. The quinone did react with mercaptoethanol via Michael addition to the unsaturated carbonyl system to form a stable adduct, 4-(2-hydroxyethylthio)-3,4-di(p-hydroxyphenyl)-2-hexene. It also reacted covalently with sulfur-containing peptides such as reduced glutathione or bovine serum albumin. Partially purified rat liver cytochrome P-450 reductase reduced 4',4"-diethylstilbestrol quinone to E- and Z-diethylstilbestrol. It is proposed that 4',4"-diethylstilbestrol quinone forms unstable adduct intermediates with DNA which decompose with time. Also, covalent binding of 4',4"-diethylstilbestrol quinone to important proteins via thioether linkages may play a role in carcinogenesis.

  9. Respiratory quinones in Archaea: phylogenetic distribution and application as biomarkers in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Elling, Felix J; Becker, Kevin W; Könneke, Martin; Schröder, Jan M; Kellermann, Matthias Y; Thomm, Michael; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-02-01

    The distribution of respiratory quinone electron carriers among cultivated organisms provides clues on both the taxonomy of their producers and the redox processes these are mediating. Our study of the quinone inventories of 25 archaeal species belonging to the phyla Eury-, Cren- and Thaumarchaeota facilitates their use as chemotaxonomic markers for ecologically important archaeal clades. Saturated and monounsaturated menaquinones with six isoprenoid units forming the alkyl chain may serve as chemotaxonomic markers for Thaumarchaeota. Other diagnostic biomarkers are thiophene-bearing quinones for Sulfolobales and methanophenazines as functional quinone analogues of the Methanosarcinales. The ubiquity of saturated menaquinones in the Archaea in comparison to Bacteria suggests that these compounds may represent an ancestral and diagnostic feature of the Archaea. Overlap between quinone compositions of distinct thermophilic and halophilic archaea and bacteria may indicate lateral gene transfer. The biomarker potential of thaumarchaeal quinones was exemplarily demonstrated on a water column profile of the Black Sea. Both, thaumarchaeal quinones and membrane lipids showed similar distributions with maxima at the chemocline. Quinone distributions indicate that Thaumarchaeota dominate respiratory activity at a narrow interval in the chemocline, while they contribute only 9% to the microbial biomass at this depth, as determined by membrane lipid analysis.

  10. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials play an important role in space. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a ubiquitous component of the carbonaceous materials. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands. They are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge is to reproduce in the laboratory the physical conditions that exist in the emission and absorption interstellar zones. The harsh physical conditions of the ISM -low temperature, collisionless, strong UV radiation fields- are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions and radicals are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature and probed with high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy in the NUV-NIR range. Carbon nanoparticles are also formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma and are characterized with time-offlight mass spectrometry. These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of large carbonaceous molecules and ions in the gas phase that can now be directly compared to interstellar and circumstellar observations (IR emission bands, DIBs, extinction curve). These findings also hold great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar carbonaceous grains. We will review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical studies of PAHs, compare the laboratory data with astronomical observations and discuss the global implications.

  11. Quinone-based stable isotope probing for assessment of 13C substrate-utilizing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunihiro, Tadao; Katayama, Arata; Demachi, Toyoko; Veuger, Bart; Boschker, Henricus T. S.; van Oevelen, Dick

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we attempted to establish quinone-stable-isotope probing (SIP) technique to link substrate-utilizing bacterial group to chemotaxonomic group in bacterial community. To identify metabolically active bacterial group in various environments, SIP techniques combined with biomarkers have been widely utilized as an attractive method for environmental study. Quantitative approaches of the SIP technique have unique advantage to assess substrate-incorporation into bacteria. As a most major quantitative approach, SIP technique based on phospholipid-derived fatty acids (PLFA) have been applied to simultaneously assess substrate-incorporation rate into bacteria and microbial community structure. This approach is powerful to estimate the incorporation rate because of the high sensitivity due to the detection by a gas chromatograph-combustion interface-isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-c-IRMS). However, its phylogenetic resolution is limited by specificity of a compound-specific marker. We focused on respiratory quinone as a biomarker. Our previous study found a good correlation between concentrations of bacteria-specific PLFAs and quinones over several orders of magnitude in various marine sediments, and the quinone method has a higher resolution (bacterial phylum level) for resolving differences in bacterial community composition more than that of bacterial PLFA. Therefore, respiratory quinones are potentially good biomarkers for quantitative approaches of the SIP technique. The LC-APCI-MS method as molecular-mass based detection method for quinone was developed and provides useful structural information for identifying quinone molecular species in environmental samples. LC-MS/MS on hybrid triple quadrupole/linear ion trap, which enables to simultaneously identify and quantify compounds in a single analysis, can detect high molecular compounds with their isotope ions. Use of LC-MS/MS allows us to develop quinone-SIP based on molecular mass differences due to

  12. Activation of Electron-Deficient Quinones through Hydrogen-Bond-Donor-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Turek, Amanda K; Hardee, David J; Ullman, Andrew M; Nocera, Daniel G; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2016-01-11

    Quinones are important organic oxidants in a variety of synthetic and biological contexts, and they are susceptible to activation towards electron transfer through hydrogen bonding. Whereas this effect of hydrogen bond donors (HBDs) has been observed for Lewis basic, weakly oxidizing quinones, comparable activation is not readily achieved when more reactive and synthetically useful electron-deficient quinones are used. We have successfully employed HBD-coupled electron transfer as a strategy to activate electron-deficient quinones. A systematic investigation of HBDs has led to the discovery that certain dicationic HBDs have an exceptionally large effect on the rate and thermodynamics of electron transfer. We further demonstrate that these HBDs can be used as catalysts in a quinone-mediated model synthetic transformation.

  13. Raman Spectroscopy of Microbial Pigments

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid nondestructive technique providing spectroscopic and structural information on both organic and inorganic molecular compounds. Extensive applications for the method in the characterization of pigments have been found. Due to the high sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy for the detection of chlorophylls, carotenoids, scytonemin, and a range of other pigments found in the microbial world, it is an excellent technique to monitor the presence of such pigments, both in pure cultures and in environmental samples. Miniaturized portable handheld instruments are available; these instruments can be used to detect pigments in microbiological samples of different types and origins under field conditions. PMID:24682303

  14. Genotoxicity of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) disodium salt (BioPQQ™).

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masahiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Imamura, Tadashi; Lau, Annette; Lynch, Barry

    2013-11-01

    The genotoxic potential of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) disodium salt (BioPQQ™) was evaluated in a battery of genotoxicity tests. The results of the bacterial mutation assay (Ames test) were negative. Weak positive results were obtained in 2 separate in vitro chromosomal aberration test in Chinese hamster lung (CHL) fibroblasts. Upon testing in an in vitro chromosomal aberration test in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, no genotoxic activity of PQQ was noted. In the in vivo micronucleus assay in mice, PQQ at doses up to 2,000 mg/kg body weight demonstrated that no genotoxic effects are expressed in vivo in bone marrow erythrocytes. The weak responses in the in vitro test CHL cells were considered of little relevance under conditions of likely human exposure. PQQ disodium was concluded to have no genotoxic activity in vivo.

  15. Quinones as Reversible Electron Relays in Artificial Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Rodenberg, Alexander; Orazietti, Margherita; Mosberger, Mathias; Bachmann, Cyril; Probst, Benjamin; Alberto, Roger; Hamm, Peter

    2016-05-01

    We explore the potential of various hydroquinone/quinone redox couples as electron relays in a homogenous water reduction system between a Re-based photosensitizer and a sacrificial electron donor [tris-(2-carboxyethyl)-phosphine, TCEP]. By using transient IR spectroscopy, flash photolysis as well as stopped-flow techniques covering timescales from picoseconds to 100 ms, we determine quenching rates and cage escape yields, the kinetics of the follow-up chemistry of the semiquinone, the recombination rates, as well as the re-reduction rates by TCEP. The overall quantum yield of hydrogen production is low, and we show that the limiting factors are the small cage escape yields and, more importantly, the slow regeneration rate by TCEP in comparison to the undesired charge recombination with the reduced water reduction catalyst.

  16. Black-pigmented sputum

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Girón, Rafael; Mosquera-Martínez, Joaquín; Martínez-Torre, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Black-pigmented sputum, also called “melanoptysis,” is a symptom that may be observed in certain pathologies such us coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (anthracosis). The cavitation and liquefaction of a fibrosed mass by an infectious process (tuberculosis, infections by anaerobes, etc.) or by ischemic necrosis may cause expectoration of a blackish secretion. We report the case of a patient with labor precedents as a coal worker, from whom abundant black sputum was obtained in the course of an incidental expectoration. Cyto-histological findings are shown and a differential diagnosis is established. PMID:24648674

  17. Insights into the redox cycle of human quinone reductase 2.

    PubMed

    Reybier, Karine; Perio, Pierre; Ferry, Gilles; Bouajila, Jalloul; Delagrange, Philippe; Boutin, Jean A; Nepveu, Françoise

    2011-10-01

    NRH:quinone oxidoreductase 2 (QR2) is a cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of quinones, such as menadione and co-enzymes Q. With the aim of understanding better the mechanisms of action of QR2, we approached this enzyme catalysis via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of the by-products of the QR2 redox cycle. The variation in the production of oxidative species such as H(2)O(2), and subsequent hydroxyl radical generation, was measured during the course of QR2 activity under aerobic conditions and using pure human enzyme. The effects on the activity of the following were compared: (i) synthetic (N-benzyldihydronicotinamide, BNAH) or natural (nicotinamide riboside, NRH) co-substrates; (ii) synthetic (menadione) or natural (co-enzyme Q0, Q2) substrates; (iii) QR2 modulators and inhibitors (melatonin, resveratrol and S29434); (iv) a pro-drug activated via a redox cycle [CB1954, 5-(aziridin-1-yl)-2,4-dinitrobenzamide]. The results were also compared with those obtained with human QR1. The production of hydroxyl radicals is: (i) observed whatever the substrate/co-substrate used; ii) quenched by adding catalase; (iii) not observed with the specific QR2 inhibitor S29434; (iv) observed with the pro-drug CB1954. While QR2 produced free radicals with this pro-drug, QR1 gave no EPR signal showing the strong reducing capacity of QR2. In conclusion, EPR analysis of QR2 enzyme activity through free radical production enables modulators and effective inhibitors to be distinguished. PMID:21762045

  18. Quinone-amino acid conjugates targeting Leishmania amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Prati, Federica; Goldman-Pinkovich, Adele; Lizzi, Federica; Belluti, Federica; Koren, Roni; Zilberstein, Dan; Bolognesi, Maria Laura

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of targeting Leishmania transporters via appropriately designed chemical probes. Leishmania donovani, the parasite that causes visceral leishmaniasis, is auxotrophic for arginine and lysine and has specific transporters (LdAAP3 and LdAAP7) to import these nutrients. Probes 1-15 were originated by conjugating cytotoxic quinone fragments (II and III) with amino acids (i.e. arginine and lysine) by means of an amide linkage. The toxicity of the synthesized conjugates against Leishmania extracellular (promastigotes) and intracellular (amastigotes) forms was investigated, as well their inhibition of the relevant amino acid transporters. We observed that some conjugates indeed displayed toxicity against the parasites; in particular, 7 was identified as the most potent derivative (at concentrations of 1 µg/mL and 2.5 µg/mL residual cell viability was reduced to 15% and 48% in promastigotes and amastigotes, respectively). Notably, 6, while retaining the cytotoxic activity of quinone II, displayed no toxicity against mammalian THP1 cells. Transport assays indicated that the novel conjugates inhibited transport activity of lysine, arginine and proline transporters. Furthermore, our analyses suggested that the toxic conjugates might be translocated by the transporters into the cells. The non-toxic probes that inhibited transport competed with the natural substrates for binding to the transporters without being translocated. Thus, it is likely that 6, by exploiting amino acid transporters, can selectively deliver its toxic effects to Leishmania cells. This work provides the first evidence that amino acid transporters of the human pathogen Leishmania might be modulated by small molecules, and warrants their further investigation from drug discovery and chemical biology perspectives. PMID:25254495

  19. [Decolorization of azo dyes using quinone reductase and quinoid compounds].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mi; Liu, Guang-Fei; Zhou, Ji-Ti; Jin, Ruo-Fei; Chen, Ming-Xiang; Wang, Yan-Qing

    2009-06-15

    Using quinoid redox mediator and bacterial cellular quinone reductase, we investigated the decolorization ability of gene-engineered strain Escherichia coli YB and the effects of methylhydroquinone (MHQ) pretreatement on decolorization performance of E. coli JM109 and anaerobic sludge. The results indicate that lawsone is an effective accelerator for azo dye decolorization by E. coli YB overexpressing cellular quinone reductase AZR. In the presence of 0.2 mmol x L(-1) lawsone, 75% Amaranth (1 mmol x L(-1)) can be decolorized in 2 h. E. coli YB can also decolorize high concentration of azo dye in the presence of lawsone. Around 50% Amaranth (5 mmol x L(-1)) is decolorized in 8 h. Compared to lawsone, menadione is a less effective mediator. E. coli YB takes 12 h to reach 70% decolorization in the presence of 2.5 mmol x L(-1) menadione. Repeated decolorization studies showed that E. coli YB had stable decolorizing ability in the presence of lawsone. Four rounds of repeated decolorization can be completed in 12 h. Lawsone can also accelerate the decolorization of azo dyes with complex structures such as Acid Scarlet GR and Reactive Brilliant Red K-2BP. With the optimal LQ concentrations, 70% Acid Scarlet GR and Reactive Brilliant Red K-2BP are decolorized in 9 h and 30 h,respectively. Decolorization performances of E. coli JM109 and anaerobic sludge pretreated with MHQ are improved. After MHQ pretreatment,in the presence of lawsone, 80% Amaranth (1 mmol x L(-1)) can be decolorized in 5 h by E. coli JM109, while more than 75% Amaranth can be removed in 11 h by sludge.

  20. A simple, comprehensive, and miniaturized solvent extraction method for determination of particulate-phase polycyclic aromatic compounds in air.

    PubMed

    Santos, Aldenor G; Regis, Ana Carla D; da Rocha, Gisele O; Bezerra, Marcos de A; de Jesus, Robson M; de Andrade, Jailson B

    2016-02-26

    The method allowed simultaneous characterization of PAHs, nitro-PAHs and quinones in atmospheric particulate matter. This method employs a miniaturized micro-extraction step that uses 500 μL of an acetonitrile-dichloromethane mix and instrumental analysis by means of a high-resolution GC-MS. The method was validated using the SRM1649b NIST standard reference material as well as deuterated internal standards. The results are in good agreement with the certified values and show recoveries between 75% and 145%. Limit of detection (LOD) values for PAHs were found to be between 0.5 pg (benzo[a]pyrene) to 2.1 pg (dibenzo[a,h]anthracene), for nitro-PAHs ranged between 3.2 pg (1-nitrobenzo[e]pyrene) and 22.2 pg (3-nitrophenanthrene), and for quinones ranged between 11.5 pg (1,4-naphthoquinone) and 458 pg (9,10-phenanthraquinone). The validated method was applied to real PM10 samples collected on quartz fiber filters. Concentrations in the PM10 samples ranged from 0.06 to 15 ng m(-3) for PAHs, fromquinones. This procedure was found to be precise, accurate and suitable to be employed for determination of polycyclic aromatic compounds in airborne particles from both polluted and non-polluted atmospheres.

  1. A simple, comprehensive, and miniaturized solvent extraction method for determination of particulate-phase polycyclic aromatic compounds in air.

    PubMed

    Santos, Aldenor G; Regis, Ana Carla D; da Rocha, Gisele O; Bezerra, Marcos de A; de Jesus, Robson M; de Andrade, Jailson B

    2016-02-26

    The method allowed simultaneous characterization of PAHs, nitro-PAHs and quinones in atmospheric particulate matter. This method employs a miniaturized micro-extraction step that uses 500 μL of an acetonitrile-dichloromethane mix and instrumental analysis by means of a high-resolution GC-MS. The method was validated using the SRM1649b NIST standard reference material as well as deuterated internal standards. The results are in good agreement with the certified values and show recoveries between 75% and 145%. Limit of detection (LOD) values for PAHs were found to be between 0.5 pg (benzo[a]pyrene) to 2.1 pg (dibenzo[a,h]anthracene), for nitro-PAHs ranged between 3.2 pg (1-nitrobenzo[e]pyrene) and 22.2 pg (3-nitrophenanthrene), and for quinones ranged between 11.5 pg (1,4-naphthoquinone) and 458 pg (9,10-phenanthraquinone). The validated method was applied to real PM10 samples collected on quartz fiber filters. Concentrations in the PM10 samples ranged from 0.06 to 15 ng m(-3) for PAHs, fromquinones. This procedure was found to be precise, accurate and suitable to be employed for determination of polycyclic aromatic compounds in airborne particles from both polluted and non-polluted atmospheres. PMID:26830633

  2. Molecular analysis of proanthocyanidins related to pigmentation in brown cotton fibre (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Feng, Hongjie; Li, Yanjun; Wang, Shaofang; Zhang, Liangliang; Liu, Yongchuang; Xue, Fei; Sun, Yuqiang; Wang, Yongmei; Sun, Jie

    2014-11-01

    The structural characteristics and component differences of proanthocyanidins in brown and white cotton fibres were identified by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analyses. Proanthocyanidins in brown and white cotton fibres were found to contain mainly procyanidin (PC) and prodelphidin (PD) units with 2, 3-cis form (epigallocatechin and epicatechin). However, part of the proanthocyanidins in the white cotton fibres were modified by acylation and were constitutively different from the proanthocyanidins in brown cotton fibres. The relative amount of PD was similar to that of PC in white cotton fibres, while proanthocyanidins in brown cotton fibres consisted mainly of PD units with a relative ratio of 9:1. In brown cotton fibres, the proanthocyanidin monomeric composition was consistent with the expression profiles of proanthocyanidin synthase genes, suggesting that anthocyanidin reductase represented the major flow of the proanthocyanidin biosynthesis pathway. In addition, the structural characteristics and component differences of proanthocanidins in brown and white cotton fibres suggested that quinones, the oxidation products of proanthocyanidins, were the direct contributors to colour development in brown cotton fibre. This was demonstrated by vanillin-HCl staining and Borntrager's test. Collectively, these data demonstrated that the biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins is a crucial pigmentation process in brown cotton fibre, and that quinones may represent the main pigments contributing to formation of the the brown colour. This study revealed the molecular basis of pigmentation in brown cotton fibres, and provided important insights for genetic manipulation of pigment production in cotton fibres.

  3. Human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase2. Gene structure, activity, and tissue-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, A K

    1994-05-20

    Human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase2 (NQO2) gene, 1336 base pairs (bp) of the 5'-flanking region and 165 bp of the 3'-flanking region, have been sequenced. NQO2 gene is 20 kilobase pairs in length and have seven exons interrupted by six introns as compared to the previously cloned NQO1 gene which contains six exons. 187 bp of the first exon in the NQO2 gene are noncoding and are absent in the NQO1 gene. 92 bp of the second exon in the NQO2 gene corresponded to the first exon of the NQO1 gene and so on. The sizes and nucleotide sequences of exons 3-6 are highly conserved between NQO2 and NQO1 genes. The last exon in the NQO2 gene is 1603 bp shorter than the last exon of the NQO1 gene and encodes for 58 amino acids as compared to 101 amino acids encoded by the NQO1 gene. This makes NQO2 protein 43 amino acids shorter than the NQO1 protein. The high degree of conservation between NQO2 and NQO1 gene organization and sequence confirmed that NQO2 gene encodes for a second member of the NQO gene family in human. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the 5'-flanking region of the NQO2 gene revealed presence of four SP1 binding sites at positions -214, -170, -106, and -75, a single copy of the antioxidant response element (ARE) at nucleotide -936, and three copies of xenobiotic response element (XRE) at positions -708, -557, and -51. ARE and XRE elements have previously been found in the promoters of the NQO1 and glutathione S-transferase Ya subunit genes and mediate increases in their expression in response to polycyclic aromatic compounds, phenolic antioxidants, and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), respectively. The NQO2 cDNA-derived protein in monkey kidney COS1 cells efficiently catalyzed nitroreduction of anti-tumor compound CB10-200, an analog of nitrophenylaziridine. Northern blot analysis indicates that NQO2 gene is expressed in human heart, brain, lung, liver, and skeletal muscle but does not express in placenta. In contrast, the NQO1 gene was expressed in

  4. Contribution of reductase activity to quinone toxicity in three kinds of hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Tsuji, Kaori; Ishii, Satomi; Kashiwagi, Kyoko; Shimamoto, Norio

    2012-01-01

    Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain quinone cytotoxicity: oxidative stress via the redox cycle, and the arylation of intracellular nucleophiles. The redox cycle is catalyzed by intracellular reductases, and therefore the toxicity of redox cycling quinone is considered to be closely associated with the reductase activity. This study examined the relationship between quinone toxicity and the intracellular reductase activity using 3 kinds of hepatic cells; rat primary hepatocytes, HepG2 and H4IIE. The intracellular reductase activity was; primary hepatocyte >HepG2>H4IIE. The three kinds of cells showed almost the same vulnerability to an arylating quinone, 1,4-naphthoquinone (NQ). However, the susceptibility to a redox cycling quinone, 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ) was; primary hepatocyte>HepG2>H4IIE. In addition, the cytotoxicity elicited by DMNQ was significantly attenuated in HepG2 cells and almost completely suppressed in primary hepatocytes by diphenyleneiodonium chloride, a reductase inhibitor. These data suggest that cells with a high reductase activity are susceptible to redox cycling quinones. This study provides essential evidence to assess the toxicity of quinone-based drugs during their developmental processes.

  5. Cosmetic tattoo pigment reaction.

    PubMed

    Greywal, Tanya; Cohen, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundCutaneous reactions to tattoos are most commonly granulomatous or lichenoid.PurposeWe describe a woman who developed a lymphocytic reaction following a cosmetic tattoo procedure with black dye. The reaction occurred not only at the site of the tattoos (eyebrows and eyelash lines), but also in non-tattooed skin (bilateral malar cheeks).Methods and MaterialsWe reviewed PubMed for the following terms: cosmetic, dye, granuloma, granulomatous, lichenoid, lymphocytic, perivascular, pigment, pseudolymphoma, reaction, and tattoo. We also reviewed papers containing these terms and their references.ResultsHistopathologic examination of the left eyebrow and left cheek punch biopsies showed predominantly a perivascular lymphocytic reaction secondary to exogenous tattoo pigment.ConclusionsPerivascular lymphocytic reaction is an uncommonly described complication of tattooing. Our patient had an atypical presentation since she had no prior tattoos, became symptomatic only a few days after the procedure, reacted to black dye, and involved skin both within and outside the confines of the tattoos. Her symptoms and lesions resolved after treatment with systemic and topical corticosteroids and oral antihistamines. PMID:27617722

  6. A Structural Determinant of Chemical Reactivity and Potential Health Effects of Quinones from Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Tingting; Giblin, Daryl; Gross, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Although many phenols and catechols found as polyphenol natural products are antioxidants and have putative disease-preventive properties, others have deleterious health effects. One possible route to toxicity is the bioactivation of the phenolic function to quinones that are electrophilic, redox-agents capable of modifying DNA and proteins. The structure-property relationships of biologically important quinones and their precursors may help understand the balance between their health benefits and risks. We describe a mass-spectrometry-based study of four quinones produced by oxidizing flavanones and flavones. Those with a C2-C3 double bond on ring C of the flavonoid stabilize by delocalization an incipient positive charge from protonation and render the protonated quinone particularly susceptible to nucleophilic attack. We hypothesize that the absence of this double bond is one specific structural determinant that is responsible for the ability of quinones to modify biological macromolecules. Those quinones containing a C2-C3 single bond have relative higher aqueous stability and longer half-lives than those with a double bond at the same position; the latter have short half-lives at or below ~ 1 s. Quinones with a C2-C3 double bond show little ability to depurinate DNA because they are rapidly hydrated to unreactive species. Molecular-orbital calculations support that quinone hydration by a highly structure-dependent mechanism accounts for their chemical properties. The evidence taken together support a hypothesis that those flavonoids and related natural products that undergo oxidation to quinones and are then rapidly hydrated are unlikely to damage important biological macromolecules. PMID:21721570

  7. Contorted polycyclic aromatics.

    PubMed

    Ball, Melissa; Zhong, Yu; Wu, Ying; Schenck, Christine; Ng, Fay; Steigerwald, Michael; Xiao, Shengxiong; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: This Account describes a body of research in the design, synthesis, and assembly of molecular materials made from strained polycyclic aromatic molecules. The strain in the molecular subunits severely distorts the aromatic molecules away from planarity. We coined the term "contorted aromatics" to describe this class of molecules. Using these molecules, we demonstrate that the curved pi-surfaces are useful as subunits to make self-assembled electronic materials. We have created and continue to study two broad classes of these "contorted aromatics": discs and ribbons. The figure that accompanies this conspectus displays the three-dimensional surfaces of a selection of these "contorted aromatics". The disc-shaped contorted molecules have well-defined conformations that create concave pi-surfaces. When these disc-shaped molecules are substituted with hydrocarbon side chains, they self-assemble into columnar superstructures. Depending on the hydrocarbon substitution, they form either liquid crystalline films or macroscopic cables. In both cases, the columnar structures are photoconductive and form p-type, hole- transporting materials in field effect transistor devices. This columnar motif is robust, allowing us to form monolayers of these columns attached to the surface of dielectrics such as silicon oxide. We use ultrathin point contacts made from individual single-walled carbon nanotubes that are separated by a few nanometers to probe the electronic properties of short stacks of a few contorted discs. We find that these materials have high mobility and can sense electron-deficient aromatic molecules. The concave surfaces of these disc-shaped contorted molecules form ideal receptors for the molecular recognition and assembly with spherical molecules such as fullerenes. These interfaces resemble ball-and-socket joints, where the fullerene nests itself in the concave surface of the contorted disc. The tightness of the binding between the two partners can be

  8. Contorted polycyclic aromatics.

    PubMed

    Ball, Melissa; Zhong, Yu; Wu, Ying; Schenck, Christine; Ng, Fay; Steigerwald, Michael; Xiao, Shengxiong; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: This Account describes a body of research in the design, synthesis, and assembly of molecular materials made from strained polycyclic aromatic molecules. The strain in the molecular subunits severely distorts the aromatic molecules away from planarity. We coined the term "contorted aromatics" to describe this class of molecules. Using these molecules, we demonstrate that the curved pi-surfaces are useful as subunits to make self-assembled electronic materials. We have created and continue to study two broad classes of these "contorted aromatics": discs and ribbons. The figure that accompanies this conspectus displays the three-dimensional surfaces of a selection of these "contorted aromatics". The disc-shaped contorted molecules have well-defined conformations that create concave pi-surfaces. When these disc-shaped molecules are substituted with hydrocarbon side chains, they self-assemble into columnar superstructures. Depending on the hydrocarbon substitution, they form either liquid crystalline films or macroscopic cables. In both cases, the columnar structures are photoconductive and form p-type, hole- transporting materials in field effect transistor devices. This columnar motif is robust, allowing us to form monolayers of these columns attached to the surface of dielectrics such as silicon oxide. We use ultrathin point contacts made from individual single-walled carbon nanotubes that are separated by a few nanometers to probe the electronic properties of short stacks of a few contorted discs. We find that these materials have high mobility and can sense electron-deficient aromatic molecules. The concave surfaces of these disc-shaped contorted molecules form ideal receptors for the molecular recognition and assembly with spherical molecules such as fullerenes. These interfaces resemble ball-and-socket joints, where the fullerene nests itself in the concave surface of the contorted disc. The tightness of the binding between the two partners can be

  9. Comparative chromatography of chloroplast pigment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandolfo, M.; Sherma, J.; Strain, H. H.

    1969-01-01

    Methods for isolation of low concentration pigments of the cocklebur species are described. The methods entail two step chromatography so that the different sorption properties of the various pigments in varying column parameters can be utilized. Columnar and thin layer methods are compared. Many conditions influence separability of the chloroplasts.

  10. Nonphotosynthetic pigments as potential biosignatures.

    PubMed

    Schwieterman, Edward W; Cockell, Charles S; Meadows, Victoria S

    2015-05-01

    Previous work on possible surface reflectance biosignatures for Earth-like planets has typically focused on analogues to spectral features produced by photosynthetic organisms on Earth, such as the vegetation red edge. Although oxygenic photosynthesis, facilitated by pigments evolved to capture photons, is the dominant metabolism on our planet, pigmentation has evolved for multiple purposes to adapt organisms to their environment. We present an interdisciplinary study of the diversity and detectability of nonphotosynthetic pigments as biosignatures, which includes a description of environments that host nonphotosynthetic biologically pigmented surfaces, and a lab-based experimental analysis of the spectral and broadband color diversity of pigmented organisms on Earth. We test the utility of broadband color to distinguish between Earth-like planets with significant coverage of nonphotosynthetic pigments and those with photosynthetic or nonbiological surfaces, using both 1-D and 3-D spectral models. We demonstrate that, given sufficient surface coverage, nonphotosynthetic pigments could significantly impact the disk-averaged spectrum of a planet. However, we find that due to the possible diversity of organisms and environments, and the confounding effects of the atmosphere and clouds, determination of substantial coverage by biologically produced pigments would be difficult with broadband colors alone and would likely require spectrally resolved data.

  11. Nonphotosynthetic Pigments as Potential Biosignatures

    PubMed Central

    Cockell, Charles S.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous work on possible surface reflectance biosignatures for Earth-like planets has typically focused on analogues to spectral features produced by photosynthetic organisms on Earth, such as the vegetation red edge. Although oxygenic photosynthesis, facilitated by pigments evolved to capture photons, is the dominant metabolism on our planet, pigmentation has evolved for multiple purposes to adapt organisms to their environment. We present an interdisciplinary study of the diversity and detectability of nonphotosynthetic pigments as biosignatures, which includes a description of environments that host nonphotosynthetic biologically pigmented surfaces, and a lab-based experimental analysis of the spectral and broadband color diversity of pigmented organisms on Earth. We test the utility of broadband color to distinguish between Earth-like planets with significant coverage of nonphotosynthetic pigments and those with photosynthetic or nonbiological surfaces, using both 1-D and 3-D spectral models. We demonstrate that, given sufficient surface coverage, nonphotosynthetic pigments could significantly impact the disk-averaged spectrum of a planet. However, we find that due to the possible diversity of organisms and environments, and the confounding effects of the atmosphere and clouds, determination of substantial coverage by biologically produced pigments would be difficult with broadband colors alone and would likely require spectrally resolved data. Key Words: Biosignatures—Exoplanets—Halophiles—Pigmentation—Reflectance spectroscopy—Spectral models. Astrobiology 15, 341–361. PMID:25941875

  12. New directions in phthalocyanine pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Diep VO

    1994-01-01

    Phthalocyanines have been used as a pigment in coatings and related applications for many years. These pigments are some of the most stable organic pigments known. The phthalo blue and green pigments have been known to be ultraviolet (UV) stable and thermally stable to over 400 C. These phthalocyanines are both a semiconductor and photoconductor, exhibiting catalytic activity and photostabilization capability of polymers. Many metal free and metallic phthalocyanine derivatives have been prepared. Development of the new classes of phthalocyanine pigment could be used as coating on NASA spacecraft material such as glass to decrease the optical degradation from UV light, the outside of the space station modules for UV protection, and coating on solar cells to increase lifetime and efficiency.

  13. [INHERITANCE OF EPIDERMIS PIGMENTATION IN SUNFLOWER ACHENES].

    PubMed

    Gorohivets, N A; Vedmedeva, E V

    2016-01-01

    Inheritance of epidermis pigmentation in the pericarp of sunflower seeds was studied. Inheritance of pigmentation was confirmed by three alleles Ew (epidermis devoid of pigmentation), Estr (epidermal pigmentation in strips), Edg (solid pigmentation). Dominance of the lack of epidermis pigmentation over striped epidermis and striped epidermis over solid pigmentation was established. It was shown that the striped epidermis pigmentation and the presence of testa layer are controlled by two genes, expression of which is independent from each other. Yellowish hypodermis was discovered in the sample I2K2218, which is inherited monogenically dominantly. PMID:27281924

  14. [INHERITANCE OF EPIDERMIS PIGMENTATION IN SUNFLOWER ACHENES].

    PubMed

    Gorohivets, N A; Vedmedeva, E V

    2016-01-01

    Inheritance of epidermis pigmentation in the pericarp of sunflower seeds was studied. Inheritance of pigmentation was confirmed by three alleles Ew (epidermis devoid of pigmentation), Estr (epidermal pigmentation in strips), Edg (solid pigmentation). Dominance of the lack of epidermis pigmentation over striped epidermis and striped epidermis over solid pigmentation was established. It was shown that the striped epidermis pigmentation and the presence of testa layer are controlled by two genes, expression of which is independent from each other. Yellowish hypodermis was discovered in the sample I2K2218, which is inherited monogenically dominantly.

  15. Natural pigments and sacred art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelekian, Lena, ,, Lady

    2010-05-01

    Since the dawn of mankind, cavemen has expressed himself through art. The earliest known cave paintings date to some 32,000 years ago and used 4 colours derived from the earth. These pigments were iron oxides and known as ochres, blacks and whites. All pigments known by the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans and Renaissance man were natural and it was not until the 18th century that synthetic pigments were made and widely used. Until that time all art, be it sacred or secular used only natural pigments, of which the preparation of many have been lost or rarely used because of their tedious preparation. As a geologist, a mineralogist and an artist specializing in iconography, I have been able to rediscover 89 natural pigments extracted from minerals. I use these pigments to paint my icons in the traditional Byzantine manner and also to restore old icons, bringing back their glamour and conserving them for years to come. The use of the natural pigments in its proper way also helps to preserve the traditional skills of the iconographer. In the ancient past, pigments were extremely precious. Many took an exceedingly long journey to reach the artists, and came from remote countries. Research into these pigments is the work of history, geography and anthropology. It is an interesting journey in itself to discover that the blue aquamarines came from Afghanistan, the reds from Spain, the greens Africa, and so on. In this contribution I will be describing the origins, preparation and use of some natural pigments, together with their history and provenance. Additionally, I will show how the natural pigments are used in the creation of an icon. Being a geologist iconographer, for me, is a sacrement that transforms that which is earthly, material and natural into a thing of beauty that is sacred. As bread and wine in the Eucharist, water during baptism and oil in Holy Union transmit sanctification to the beholder, natural pigments do the same when one considers an icon. The

  16. Regioselective oxidation of phenols to o-quinones with o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX).

    PubMed

    Magdziak, Derek; Rodriguez, Andy A; Van De Water, Ryan W; Pettus, Thomas R R

    2002-01-24

    [reaction: see text] An efficient regioselective method for oxidation of phenols to o-quinones is reported. When this procedure is combined with a subsequent reduction, it proves to be useful for the construction of a variety of catechols.

  17. Porphyrin-quinone compounds as synthetic models of the reaction centre in photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovkov, V. V.; Evstigneeva, Rima P.; Strekova, L. N.; Filippovich, E. I.

    1989-06-01

    Data on the synthesis, steric structure, and photochemical properties of porphyrin-quinone compounds as synthetic models of the reaction centre in photosynthesis are examined and described systematically. The bibliography includes 113 references.

  18. Purification and characterization of an NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase from Glycine max seedlings.

    PubMed

    Rescigno, A; Sollai, F; Masala, S; Porcu, M C; Sanjust, E; Rinaldi, A C; Curreli, N; Grifi, D; Rinaldi, A

    1995-01-01

    An NAD(P)H:(quinone acceptor) oxidoreductase (EC 1.6.99.2) was purified from Glycine max seedlings by means of chromatographic procedures. After 1371-fold purification, the enzyme showed a single band in IEF corresponding to an isoelectric point of 6.1. A single band was also found in native-PAGE both by activity staining and Coomassie brilliant blue staining. The molecular mass determined in SDS-PAGE was 21900 Da, while in HPLC gel-filtration it was 61000 Da. The NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase was able to use NADH or NADPH as the electron donor. Among the artificial quinones which are reduced by this enzyme, 6-hydroxydopa- and 6-hydroxydopamine-quinone are of particular interest because of their neurotoxic effects.

  19. Bioinspired aerobic oxidation of secondary amines and nitrogen heterocycles with a bifunctional quinone catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wendlandt, Alison E; Stahl, Shannon S

    2014-01-01

    Copper amine oxidases are a family of enzymes with quinone cofactors that oxidize primary amines to aldehydes. The native mechanism proceeds via an iminoquinone intermediate that promotes high selectivity for reactions with primary amines, thereby constraining the scope of potential biomimetic synthetic applications. Here we report a novel bioinspired quinone catalyst system consisting of 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione/ZnI2 that bypasses these constraints via an abiological pathway involving a hemiaminal intermediate. Efficient aerobic dehydrogenation of non-native secondary amine substrates, including pharmaceutically relevant nitrogen heterocycles, is demonstrated. The ZnI2 cocatalyst activates the quinone toward amine oxidation and provides a source of iodide, which plays an important redox-mediator role to promote aerobic catalytic turnover. These findings provide a valuable foundation for broader development of aerobic oxidation reactions employing quinone-based catalysts. PMID:24328193

  20. Bioinspired Aerobic Oxidation of Secondary Amines and Nitrogen Heterocycles with a Bifunctional Quinone Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Wendlandt, Alison E.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2014-01-01

    Copper amine oxidases are a family of enzymes with quinone cofactors that oxidize primary amines to aldehydes. The native mechanism proceeds via an iminoquinone intermediate that promotes high selectivity for reactions with primary amines, thereby constraining the scope of potential biomimetic synthetic applications. Here, we report a novel bioinspired quinone catalyst system, consisting of 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione/ZnI2, that bypasses these constraints via an abiological pathway involving a hemiaminal intermediate. Efficient aerobic dehydrogenation of non-native secondary amine substrates, including pharmaceutically relevant nitrogen heterocycles, is demonstrated. The ZnI2 cocatalyst activates the quinone toward amine oxidation and provides a source of iodide, which plays an important redox-mediator role to promote aerobic catalytic turnover. These findings provide a valuable foundation for broader development of aerobic oxidation reactions employing quinone-based catalysts. PMID:24328193

  1. Mild and rapid method for the generation of ortho-(naphtho)quinone methide intermediates.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Abdul kadar; Cobb, Alexander J A; Varvounis, George

    2012-01-20

    A new mild method has been devised for generating o-(naphtho)quinone methides via fluoride-induced desilylation of silyl derivatives of o-hydroxybenzyl(or 1-naphthylmethyl) nitrate. The reactive o-(naphtho)quinone methide intermediates were trapped by C, O, N, and S nucleophiles and underwent "inverse electron-demand" hetero-Diels-Alder reaction with dienophiles to give stable adducts. The method has useful potential application in natural product synthesis and drug research.

  2. The Balance of Beneficial and Deleterious Health Effects of Quinones: A Case Study of the Chemical Properties of Genistein and Estrone Quinones

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Tu, Tingting; d’Avignon, D. André; Gross, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Substances containing a phenolic moiety are often metabolized to quinones whose high reactivity makes them difficult to study. Some of these precursors have clear health benefits, and some quinones themselves are used in cancer therapy, whereas others are deleterious. For example, dietary intake of phytoestrogen, genistein (Gen), seems to play a preventive role in breast cancer (BC) whereas prolonged exposure to chemically similar mammalian estrogens is clearly associated with elevated incidence of BC. Although both can be metabolized to reactive quinones, the catechol estrogen quinones (CEQs) modify DNA by redox cycling and/or depurination via a Michael addition. Here, we report an investigation of the chemical reactivity of Gen and estrone quinones to determine the chemical differences in of these two biologically important molecules. The catechol genistein quinone (CGenQ), has a half life of 4 ± 1 s under physiological condition, as determined by glutathione trapping. It disappears by reacting with H2O to give a dihydrate, CGenQ·(H2O)2, whose structure was proved by NMR. Under reductive conditions, CGenQ·(H2O)2 is readily reduced to reform the catechol genistein (CGen). This reversible oxidation of CGen to CGenQ and the prompt moderation of its reactivity by hydration to CGenQ·(H2O)2 effectively moderates any redox cycling or depurination reaction of CGenQ with DNA. Catechol estrogen quinones, on the other hand, are sufficiently long-lived that they can damage DNA via a Michael addition or by redox cycling. Although the reactivity of CEQ in a nonaqueous solvent is similar to that of CGenQ, its reactivity in aqueous media with the free Ade base is more than 600 times that of CGenQ. These results suggest that rapid hydration of a quinone can moderate its reactivity toward biomolecules, allowing them to express, for example, estrogen-like properties without exhibiting the deleterious properties of redox cycling or directly damaging DNA via depurination

  3. Balance of beneficial and deleterious health effects of quinones: a case study of the chemical properties of genistein and estrone quinones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Tu, Tingting; d'Avignon, D André; Gross, Michael L

    2009-01-28

    Substances containing a phenolic moiety are often metabolized to quinones whose high reactivity makes them difficult to study. Some of these precursors have clear health benefits, and some quinones themselves are used in cancer therapy, whereas others are deleterious. For example, dietary intake of phytoestrogen, genistein (Gen), seems to play a preventive role in breast cancer (BC) whereas prolonged exposure to chemically similar mammalian estrogens is clearly associated with elevated incidence of BC. Although both can be metabolized to reactive quinones, the catechol estrogen quinones (CEQs) modify DNA by redox cycling and/or depurination via a Michael addition. Here, we report an investigation of the chemical reactivity of Gen and estrone quinones to determine the chemical differences of these two biologically important molecules. The catechol genistein quinone (CGenQ), has a half-life of 4 +/- 1 s under physiological condition, as determined by glutathione trapping. It disappears by reacting with H2O to give a dihydrate, CGenQ x (H2O)2, whose structure was proved by NMR. Under reductive conditions, CGenQ x (H2O)2 is readily reduced to reform the catechol genistein (CGen). This reversible oxidation of CGen to CGenQ and the prompt moderation of its reactivity by hydration to CGenQ x (H2O)2 effectively hinders any redox cycling or depurination reaction of CGenQ with DNA. Catechol estrogen quinones, on the other hand, are sufficiently long-lived that they can damage DNA via a Michael addition or by redox cycling. Although the reactivity of CEQ in a nonaqueous solvent is similar to that of CGenQ, its reactivity in aqueous media with the free Ade base is more than 600 times that of CGenQ. These results suggest that rapid hydration of a quinone can moderate its reactivity toward biomolecules, allowing them to express, for example, estrogen-like properties without exhibiting the deleterious properties of redox cycling or directly damaging DNA via depurination reactions.

  4. Cyclooxygenase-independent neuroprotective effects of aspirin against dopamine quinone-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Masato; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Kikkawa, Yuri; Kimoto, Naotaka; Takeshima, Mika; Murakami, Shinki; Miyoshi, Ko

    2012-09-01

    Prostaglandin H synthase exerts not only cyclooxygenase activity but also peroxidase activity. The latter activity of the enzyme is thought to couple with oxidation of dopamine to dopamine quinone. Therefore, it has been proposed that cyclooxygenase inhibitors could suppress dopamine quinone formation. In the present study, we examined effects of various cyclooxygenase inhibitors against excess methyl L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)-induced quinoprotein (protein-bound quinone) formation and neurotoxicity using dopaminergic CATH.a cells. The treatment with aspirin inhibited excess methyl L-DOPA-induced quinoprotein formation and cell death. However, acetaminophen did not show protective effects, and indomethacin and meloxicam rather aggravated these methyl L-DOPA-induced changes. Aspirin and indomethacin did not affect the level of glutathione that exerts quenching dopamine quinone in dopaminergic cells. In contrast with inhibiting effects of higher dose in the previous reports, relatively lower dose of aspirin that affected methyl L-DOPA-induced quinoprotein formation and cell death failed to prevent cyclooxygenase-induced dopamine chrome generation in cell-free system. Furthermore, aspirin but not acetaminophen or meloxicam showed direct dopamine quinone-scavenging effects in dopamine-semiquinone generating systems. The present results suggest that cyclooxygenase shows little contribution to dopamine oxidation in dopaminergic cells and that protective effects of aspirin against methyl L-DOPA-induced dopamine quinone neurotoxicity are based on its cyclooxygenase-independent property. PMID:22674083

  5. Semiquinone formation and DNA base damage by toxic quinones and inhibition by N-acetylcysteine (NAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.C.; Shibamoto, T.

    1986-03-05

    Toxic, mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic effects have been reported for some quinones as well as compounds metabolized to quinones. Semiquinone radical formation, thymidine degradation, and protection by NAC were studied in a hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase (HX/XO) system. Quinone, benzo(a)pyrene-3,6-quinone, danthron, doxorubicin, emodin, juglone, menadione, and moniliformin were tested. Diethylstilbestrolquinone, N-acetylquinoneimine, and benzoquinonediimine, hypothesized toxic metabolites of diethylstilbestrol, acetaminophen and p-phenylenediamine, respectively, were synthesized and studied. Semiquinone radical formation was assessed in a HX/XO system monitoring cytochrome C reduction. Large differences in rates of semiquinone radical formation were noted for different quinones, with V/Vo values ranging from 1.2 to 10.6. DNA base degradation, thymine or thymidine glycol formation, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) production were measured in a similar system containing thymine, thymidine, calf thymus DNA, or deoxyribose. TBARS formation was observed with deoxyribose, but thymidine degradation without TBARS formation was noted with thymidine. NAC (0.5 to 10 mM) caused dose-dependent inhibition of quinone-induced cytochrome C reduction.

  6. Crystal Structure and Density Functional Theory Studies of Toxic Quinone Metabolites of Polychlorinated Biphenyls

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Ambati, Jyothirmai; Parkin, Sean; Rankin, Stephen E.; Robertson, Larry W.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Lower chlorinated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are readily metabolized via hydroxylated metabolites to reactive PCB quinones. Although these PCB metabolites elicit biochemical changes by mechanisms involving cellular target molecules, such as the Aryl hydrocarbon receptor, and toxicity by interacting with enzymes like topoisomerases, only few PCB quinones have been synthesized and their conformational properties investigated. Similar to the parent compounds, knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of PCB quinones may therefore be important to assess their fate and risk. To address this gap in our knowledge, the gas phase molecular structure of a series of PCB quinones was predicted using HF/3-21G, B3LYP/6-31G** and UB3LYP/6-311G** calculations and compared to the respective solid state structure. All three methods overestimated the Cl-C bond length, but otherwise provided a reasonable approximation of the solid state bond angles and bond lengths. Overall, the UB3LYP/6-311G** level of theory yielded the best approximation of the molecular structure of PCB quinones in the solid state. Chlorine addition at the ortho position of both rings was found to increase the dihedral angle of the resulting quinone compound, which may have important implications for their interaction with cellular targets and, thus, their toxicity. PMID:21824639

  7. Tyrosine codon corresponds to topa quinone at the active site of copper amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Mu, D; Janes, S M; Smith, A J; Brown, D E; Dooley, D M; Klinman, J P

    1992-04-25

    The recently discovered organic cofactor of bovine serum amine oxidase, topa quinone, is an uncommon amino acid residue in the polypeptide backbone (Janes, S. M., Mu, D., Wemmer, D., Smith, A. J., Kaur, S., Maltby, D., Burlingame, A. L., and Klinman, J. P. (1990) Science 248, 981-987). The amine oxidase gene from the yeast Hansenula polymorpha has been cloned and sequenced (Bruinenberg, P. G., Evers, M., Waterham, H. R., Kuipers, J., Arnberg, A. C., and Geert, A. B. (1989) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1008, 157-167). In order to understand the incorporation of topa quinone in eukaryotes, we have isolated yeast amine oxidase from H. polymorpha. Following protocols established with bovine serum amine oxidase, yeast amine oxidase was derivatized with [14C]phenylhydrazine, followed by thermolytic digestion and isolation of a dominant radiolabeled peptide by high pressure liquid chromatography. Comparison of resonance Raman spectra for this peptide to spectra of a model compound demonstrates that topa quinone is the cofactor. By alignment of a DNA-derived yeast amine oxidase sequence with the topa quinone-containing peptide sequence, it is found that the tyrosine codon, UAC, corresponds to topa quinone in the mature protein. In a similar manner, alignment of a tryptic peptide from bovine serum amine oxidase implicates tyrosine as the precursor to topa quinone in mammals.

  8. Activation of persulfate by quinones: free radical reactions and implication for the degradation of PCBs.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guodong; Gao, Juan; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Liu, Cun; Zhou, Dongmei

    2013-05-01

    There has been considerable interest in the use of persulfate for in situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants in soils, sediments, and groundwater. Since humic acid (HA) exists ubiquitously in these environmental compartments, its redox active functional moieties, such as quinones, may play an important role in the oxidation processes of persulfate treatments. Understanding the effects of HA, especially the quinone functional groups on the degradation of pollutants by persulfate and the production of sulfate radicals (SO4(•-)) from persulfate, is beneficial for devising effective and economically feasible remediation strategies. In this study, the effects of model quinone compounds and HA on the degradation of 2,4,4'-trichlorobiphenyl (PCB28) by persulfate and the production of SO4(•-) from persulfate were investigated. It was found that quinones and HA can efficiently activate persulfate for the degradation of PCB28. The mechanism of persulfate activation was elucidated by quenching and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies. The results indicated that production of SO4(•-) from persulfate and quinones was semiquinone radical-dependent. The effects of quinone concentrations were also studied. The findings of this study elucidated a new pathway of persulfate activation, which could degrade environmental contaminants efficiently and provide useful information for the remediation of contaminated soil and water by persulfate.

  9. Toxocara canis: anthelmintic activity of quinone derivatives in murine toxocarosis.

    PubMed

    Mata-Santos, T; Mata-Santos, H A; Carneiro, P F; De Moura, K C G; Fenalti, J M; Klafke, G B; Cruz, L A X; Martins, L H R; Pinto, N F; Pinto, M C F R; Berne, M E A; Da Silva, P E A; Scaini, C J

    2016-04-01

    Human toxocarosis is a chronic tissue parasitosis most often caused by Toxocara canis. The seroprevalence can reach up to 50%, especially among children and adolescents. The anthelmintics used in the treatment have moderate efficacy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anthelmintic activity of quinones and their derivatives against T. canis larvae and the cytotoxicity of the larvicidal compounds. The compounds were evaluated at 1 mg mL(-1) concentration in microculture plates containing third stage larvae in an Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 environment, incubated at 37 °C in 5% CO2 tension for 48 h. Five naphthoxiranes were selected for the cytotoxicity analysis. The cell viability evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays using murine peritoneal macrophages isolated from C57BL/6 mice revealed that the naphthoxiranes (1 and 3) were less cytotoxic at a concentration of 0.05 mg mL(-1). The efficacy of naphthoxiranes (1 and 3) was examined in murine toxocarosis also. The anthelmintic activity was examined by evaluating the number of larvae in the brain, carcass, liver, lungs, heart, kidneys and eyes. Compound (3) demonstrated anthelmintic activity similar to that of albendazole by decreasing the number of larvae in the organs of mice and thus could form the basis of the development of a new anthelmintic drug. PMID:26887285

  10. Gunacin, a new quinone antibiotic from Ustilago sp.

    PubMed

    Werner, R G; Appel, K R; Merk, W M

    1979-11-01

    In a screening program for antibiotics which were antagonized by cysteine, a strain, which was characterized as Ustilago sp., was found to produce a new quinone antibiotic, gunacin. The molecular weight M+ = 348.084 determined by mass spectroscopy, corresponds to a molecular formula of C17H16O8. Further spectroscopic data prove that gunacin is a new antibiotic. The antibiotic possesses a good inhibitory effect against mycoplasmas and Gram-positive bacteria including multi-resistant strains. It also possesses a weak activity against Gram-negative bacteria with the exception of Proteus vulgaris, which is more strongly inhibited. The main activity against fungi is found against Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Gunacin shows an inhibition of the DNA synthesis in vivo, is antagonized by mercapto compounds and possesses an acute toxicity of LD50 = 16 mg/kg i.p. and LD50 = 12 mg/kg i.v. in mice. Against HeLa-cell the antibiotic shows an ED50 = 12.11 microgram/ml. Thirty five microgram/ml of gunacin induces 1,063 interferon units. PMID:528380

  11. Detection and determination of pyrroloquinoline quinone, the coenzyme of quinoproteins.

    PubMed

    Duine, J A; Frank, J; Jongejan, J A

    1983-08-01

    A convenient determination of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) in extracts of purified enzymes is possible with ion-pair chromatography on a HPLC reverse-phase column and with uv detection. However, when culture supernatants have to be analyzed, a fluorescence detection system is more appropriate. Proof for the presence of PQQ can be obtained by treating such a sample with butyraldehyde, which converts the coenzyme into a stable adduct having a suitable retention time in the system. The sensitivity and selectivity of the analysis can be further enhanced by reducing the sample with NaBH4, which produces the dihydrodiol form of the coenzyme (PQQH4) and oxidizing PQQH4 with NaIO4 to a strongly fluorescing compound. A procedure is described for the easy preparation of an apoenzyme from the quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. With this biological test system, very low amounts of PQQ can be detected. However, when PQQ is present in the form of adducts, the analysis has to be performed via reduction to PQQH4, oxidation with NaIO4, and HPLC.

  12. Extractions of pyrroloquinoline quinone from crude biological samples.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, O; Kumazawa, T; Seno, H; Urakami, T; Matsumoto, T

    1990-01-01

    The best conditions for extractions of free pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) from crude biological samples were investigated with various organic solvents and Sep-Pak C18 cartridges. PQQ was measured with use of its native fluorescence in aqueous solution. PQQ was well extracted into n-butanol under acid conditions, and addition of NaCl did not improve the solvent extraction. PQQ, which had been extracted into n-butanol, could be re-extracted into an aqueous phase by addition of either n-heptane or pyridine, or combination of them. PQQ, which had been adsorbed to Sep-Pak C18 cartridges, could be eluted with a mixture of pyridine and water with very excellent recovery. The recovery of 1 micrograms PQQ, which had been added to 1 g human liver, brain and 1 ml plasma and had undergone the n-butanol and the Sep-Pak extractions, was 50, 75 and 105%, respectively. From the blank fluorescence, endogenous levels of free PQQ in human liver, brain and plasma were found not greater than 0.41, 0.08 and 0.13 micrograms/g or ml, respectively, if present.

  13. Toxocara canis: anthelmintic activity of quinone derivatives in murine toxocarosis.

    PubMed

    Mata-Santos, T; Mata-Santos, H A; Carneiro, P F; De Moura, K C G; Fenalti, J M; Klafke, G B; Cruz, L A X; Martins, L H R; Pinto, N F; Pinto, M C F R; Berne, M E A; Da Silva, P E A; Scaini, C J

    2016-04-01

    Human toxocarosis is a chronic tissue parasitosis most often caused by Toxocara canis. The seroprevalence can reach up to 50%, especially among children and adolescents. The anthelmintics used in the treatment have moderate efficacy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anthelmintic activity of quinones and their derivatives against T. canis larvae and the cytotoxicity of the larvicidal compounds. The compounds were evaluated at 1 mg mL(-1) concentration in microculture plates containing third stage larvae in an Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 environment, incubated at 37 °C in 5% CO2 tension for 48 h. Five naphthoxiranes were selected for the cytotoxicity analysis. The cell viability evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays using murine peritoneal macrophages isolated from C57BL/6 mice revealed that the naphthoxiranes (1 and 3) were less cytotoxic at a concentration of 0.05 mg mL(-1). The efficacy of naphthoxiranes (1 and 3) was examined in murine toxocarosis also. The anthelmintic activity was examined by evaluating the number of larvae in the brain, carcass, liver, lungs, heart, kidneys and eyes. Compound (3) demonstrated anthelmintic activity similar to that of albendazole by decreasing the number of larvae in the organs of mice and thus could form the basis of the development of a new anthelmintic drug.

  14. Terreic Acid, a Quinone Epoxide Inhibitor of Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Yuko; Hartman, Stephen E.; Kinoshita, Eiji; Suzuki, Hidefumi; Kitaura, Jiro; Yao, Libo; Inagaki, Naoki; Franco, Alessandra; Hata, Daisuke; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari; Fukamachi, Hiromi; Nagai, Hiroichi; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    1999-03-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) plays pivotal roles in mast cell activation as well as in B cell development. Btk mutations lead to severe impairments in proinflammatory cytokine production induced by cross-linking of high-affinity IgE receptor on mast cells. By using an in vitro assay to measure the activity that blocks the interaction between protein kinase C and the pleckstrin homology domain of Btk, terreic acid (TA) was identified and characterized in this study. This quinone epoxide specifically inhibited the enzymatic activity of Btk in mast cells and cell-free assays. TA faithfully recapitulated the phenotypic defects of btk mutant mast cells in high-affinity IgE receptor-stimulated wild-type mast cells without affecting the enzymatic activities and expressions of many other signaling molecules, including those of protein kinase C. Therefore, this study confirmed the important roles of Btk in mast cell functions and showed the usefulness of TA in probing into the functions of Btk in mast cells and other immune cell systems. Another insight obtained from this study is that the screening method used to identify TA is a useful approach to finding more efficacious Btk inhibitors.

  15. Biosynthesis of dehydro-N-acetyldopamine by a soluble enzyme preparation from the larval cuticle of Sarcophaga bullata involves intermediary formation of N-acetyldopamine quinone and N-acetyldopamine quinone methide.

    PubMed

    Saul, S J; Sugumaran, M

    1990-01-01

    The enzymes involved in the side chain hydroxylation and side chain desaturation of the sclerotizing precursor N-acetyldopamine (NADA) were obtained in the soluble form from the larval cuticle of Sarcophaga bullata and the mechanism of the reaction was investigated. Phenylthiourea, a well-known inhibitor of phenoloxidases, drastically inhibited both the reactions, indicating the requirement of a phenoloxidase component. N-acetylcysteine, a powerful quinone trap, trapped the transiently formed NADA quinone and prevented the production of both N-acetylnorepinephrine and dehydro NADA. Exogenously added NADA quinone was readily converted by these enzyme preparations to N-acetylnorepinephrine and dehydro NADA. 4-Alkyl-o-quinone:2-hydroxy-p-quinone methide isomerase obtained from the cuticular preparations converted chemically synthesized NADA quinone to its quinone methide. The quinone methide formed reacted rapidly and nonenzymatically with water to form N-acetylnorepinephrine as the stable product. Similarly 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-o-benzoquinone was converted to 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl glycol. When the NADA quinone-quinone isomerase reaction was performed in buffer containing 10% methanol, beta-methoxy NADA was obtained as an additional product. Furthermore, the quinones of N-acetylnorepinephrine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl glycol were converted to N-acetylarterenone and 2-hydroxy-3',4'-dihydroxyacetophenone, respectively, by the enzyme. Comparison of nonenzymatic versus enzymatic transformation of NADA to N-acetylnorepinephrine revealed that the enzymatic reaction is at least 100 times faster than the nonenzymatic rate. Resolution of the NADA desaturase system on Benzamidine Sepharose and Sephacryl S-200 columns yielded the above-mentioned quinone isomerase and NADA quinone methide:dehydro NADA isomerase. The latter, on reconstitution with mushroom tyrosinase and hemolymph quinone isomerase, catalyzed the biosynthesis of dehydro NADA from NADA with the intermediary formation of

  16. Efficacy of topical treatment of pigmentation skin disorders with plant hydroquinone glucosides as assessed by quantitative color analysis.

    PubMed

    Clarys, P; Barel, A

    1998-06-01

    Hydroquinone is a well known reagent used in the treatment of pigmentation disorders. The instability of the quinones and the required active concentration make topical treatment rather difficult. We tested the efficacy of an ascorbate-phytohydroquinone complex that inhibits the synthesis of melanin and promotes the degradation of the existing melanin. Lentigo senile lesions were evaluated before and after 1 month of treatment. Objective skin color evaluation was performed instrumentally. After one month of treatment, a clear depigmentation of the macules was measured. None of the volunteers reported any side effects from the prolonged treatment with the hydroquinone containing product. PMID:9675352

  17. Monitoring pigmented skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Vincent P.; Bamber, Jeffery C.; Ott, Robert J.; Crawford, Diane C.; Mortimer, Peter S.

    2002-06-01

    The rising incidence of skin cancer has led to an increase in the number of patients with skin lesions that require diagnosis, mostly using subjective visual examination. Successful treatment depends on early diagnosis. Unfortunately diagnostic accuracy, even by experts, can be as low as 56%; therefore, an accurate, objective diagnostic aid is greatly needed. Reflectance characteristics of pigmented skin lesions were documented to evaluate their diagnostic potential. Reflectance spectra in the wavelength range 320-1100nm were obtained from 260 lesions. Differences between spectra from benign and malignant lesions were utilized by extracting features with the best discriminating power. Discrimination was evaluated using two techniques: multivariate statistical analysis and artificial neural networks, using histology as the standard. Each technique was tested in a blind study and assessed in terms of its ability to diagnose new cases and compared to the clinical diagnosis. The artificial neural network achieved the best diagnostic performance for discriminating between malignant melanoma and benign nevi, having a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 65%. Utilization of visible and infrared techniques for monitoring skin lesions has lead to improvements in diagnostic accuracy. We conclude that these techniques are worthy of further development and evaluation in clinical practice as a screening tool.

  18. A pigmented calcifying odontogenic cyst.

    PubMed

    Soames, J V

    1982-04-01

    A case of the pigmented variant of the calcifying odontogenic cyst occurring in a 15-year-old West Indian girl is reported. Melanin pigment was widely distributed and appeared in greatest amount in cells exhibiting the appearance of stellate reticulum. Ultrastructural examination demonstrated large numbers of melanosomes in these cells but relatively few in epithelial ghost cells. The latter contained thick bundles of tonofilaments. Melanocytes were identified and two forms were distinguished, depending on their content of premelanosomes and fully melanized melanosomes.

  19. Degradation and formation of polycyclic aromatic compounds during bioslurry treatment of an aged gasworks soil.

    PubMed

    Lundstedt, Staffan; Haglund, Peter; Oberg, Lars

    2003-07-01

    The goals of this study were to investigate the relative degradation rates of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in contaminated soil, and to assess whether persistent oxidation products are formed during their degradation. Samples were taken on five occasions during a pilot-scale bioslurry treatment of soil from a former gasworks site. More than 100 PACs were identified in the soil, including unsubstituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylated PAHs (alkyl-PAHs), heterocyclic PACs, and oxygenated PAHs (oxy-PAHs), such as ketones, quinones, and coumarins. During the treatment, the low molecular weight PAHs and heterocyclics were degraded faster than the high molecular weight compounds. The unsubstituted PAHs also appear to have degraded more quickly than the corresponding alkyl-PAHs and nitrogen-containing heterocyclics. No new oxidation products that were not present in the untreated soil were identified after the soil treatment. However, oxy-PAHs that were present in the untreated soil were generally degraded more slowly than the parent compounds, suggesting that they were formed during the treatment or that they are more persistent. Two oxidation products, 1-acenaphthenone and 4-oxapyrene-5-one, were found at significantly higher concentrations at the end of the study. Because oxy-PAHs can be acutely toxic, mutagenic, or carcinogenic, we suggest that this group of compounds should also be monitored during the treatment of PAH-contaminated soil. PMID:12836964

  20. Accumulation and elimination of 16 polycyclic aromatic compounds in the earthworm (Eisenia fetida).

    PubMed

    Matscheko, Nadja; Lundstedt, Staffan; Svensson, Linda; Harju, Mikael; Tysklind, Mats

    2002-08-01

    Accumulation and elimination of different polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) were studied in earthworms (Eisenia fetida) exposed to contaminated soil from an old gasworks site. In total, 12 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), two N- and S-heterocyclic PACs, and two PAC-quinones were included in the study. Peak-shaped accumulation curves were found for many of the compounds. After 19 d of exposure, the ratio between concentrations in worm lipids and soil organic matter was 0.02 on average. The half-lives of the PACs were relatively long, between 2 and 11 d. The elimination rate constants, k2, correlated both with literature-derived octanol-water partition coefficients (Kow) for PAHs (r2 = 0.93) and the computed polarizability (r2 = 0.88) of all the compounds. The elimination rate constants of PAHs are comparable to those of PCBs found in earlier studies, and the linear regression coefficient, r2, of k2 against Kow for PAHs and PCBs together was 0.93. PMID:12152775

  1. Yolk pigments of the Mexican leaf frog.

    PubMed

    Marinetti, G V; Bagnara, J T

    1983-02-25

    Eggs of the Mexican leaf frog contain blue and yellow pigments identified as biliverdin and lutein, respectively. Both pigments are bound to proteins that occur in crystalline form in the yolk platelet. The major blue pigment is biliverdin IX alpha. The eggs vary in color from brilliant blue to pale yellow-green depending on the amount of each pigment. These pigments may provide protective coloration to the eggs. PMID:6681678

  2. Yolk pigments of the Mexican leaf frog.

    PubMed

    Marinetti, G V; Bagnara, J T

    1983-02-25

    Eggs of the Mexican leaf frog contain blue and yellow pigments identified as biliverdin and lutein, respectively. Both pigments are bound to proteins that occur in crystalline form in the yolk platelet. The major blue pigment is biliverdin IX alpha. The eggs vary in color from brilliant blue to pale yellow-green depending on the amount of each pigment. These pigments may provide protective coloration to the eggs.

  3. Syntrophic growth via quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jessica A.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which microbial species exchange electrons are of interest because interspecies electron transfer can expand the metabolic capabilities of microbial communities. Previous studies with the humic substance analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) suggested that quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer (QUIET) is feasible, but it was not determined if sufficient energy is available from QUIET to support the growth of both species. Furthermore, there have been no previous studies on the mechanisms for the oxidation of anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AHQDS). A co-culture of Geobacter metallireducens and G. sulfurreducens metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate much faster in the presence of AQDS, and there was an increase in cell protein. G. sulfurreducens was more abundant, consistent with G. sulfurreducens obtaining electrons from acetate that G. metallireducens produced from ethanol, as well as from AHQDS. Co-cultures initiated with a citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens that was unable to use acetate as an electron donor also metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate and cell growth, but acetate accumulated over time. G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens were equally abundant in these co-cultures reflecting the inability of the citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens to metabolize acetate. Evaluation of the mechanisms by which G. sulfurreducens accepts electrons from AHQDS demonstrated that a strain deficient in outer-surface c-type cytochromes that are required for AQDS reduction was as effective at QUIET as the wild-type strain. Deletion of additional genes previously implicated in extracellular electron transfer also had no impact on QUIET. These results demonstrate that QUIET can yield sufficient energy to support the growth of both syntrophic partners, but that the mechanisms by which electrons are derived from extracellular hydroquinones require further investigation. PMID

  4. Biotransformation of lepidocrocite in the presence of quinones and flavins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Sungjun; Lee, Woojin

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the bioreduction of lepidocrocite (γ-FeIIIOOH) and its mineral transformation in the presence of exogenous (quinones) and endogenous (flavins) electron transfer mediators (ETMs) at low concentrations of the ETMs and bacterial cells (Shewanella putrefaciens CN32). It is very important to investigate the bioreduction of lepidocrocite in the presence of different ETMs because biotransformation of Fe(III)-containing minerals can be stimulated by ETMs and affect fate and transport of contaminants in contaminated environments. In the absence of phosphate, green rust formation was observed with fast Fe(II) production rate (0.44-0.56 mM d-1) during the bioreduction of lepidocrocite with exogenous ETMs, while goethite formed at slow Fe(II) production rate (0.24-0.29 mM d-1) with endogenous ETMs. In the presence of phosphate, formation of green rust and vivianite was observed with fast Fe(II) production rate (0.54-0.74 mM d-1) during the bioreduction of lepidocrocite with exogenous ETMs, while vivianite formed at moderate Fe(II) production rate (0.36-0.40 mM d-1) with endogenous ETMs. Vivianite formed in all experimental cases with phosphate in a broad range of Fe(II) production rates (0.23-0.74 mM d-1). Our results (1) suggest that exogenous and endogenous ETMs can significantly but differently affect the biotransformation of lepidocrocite, especially at low concentrations of the ETMs and bacterial cells, (2) highlight the importance of Fe(II) production rate to determine the formation of specific biogenic minerals, (3) provide additional evidence that phosphate can significantly affect the bioreduction rate and the mineral transformation, and (4) help to understand the basic knowledge about complex interactions among microbial cell, soil mineral, and ETM in natural environments and engineered systems.

  5. Evidence for NQO2-mediated reduction of the carcinogenic estrogen ortho-quinones

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Nilesh W.; Yang, Li; Rogan, Eleanor G.; Cavalieri, Ercole L.

    2009-01-01

    The physiological function of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1, DT-diaphorase) is to detoxify potentially reactive quinones by direct transfer of two electrons. A similar detoxification role has not been established for its homologue NRH:quinone oxidoreductase 2 (NQO2). Estrogen quinones, including estradiol(E2)-3,4-Q, generated by estrogen metabolism, are thought to be responsible for estrogen-initiated carcinogenesis. In this investigation, we have shown for the first time that NQO2 catalyzes the reduction of electrophilic estrogen quinones and thereby may act as a detoxification enzyme. ESI and MALDI mass spectrometric binding studies involving E2-3,4-Q with NQO2 clearly support the formation of an enzyme-substrate physical complex. The problem of spontaneous reduction of substrate by cofactor, benzyldihydronicotinamide riboside (BNAH), was successfully overcome by taking advantage of the ping-pong mechanism of NQO2 catalysis. The involvement of the enzyme in the reduction of E2-3,4-Q was further supported by addition of the inhibitor quercetin to the assay mixture. NQO2 is a newly discovered binding site (MT3) of melatonin. However, addition of melatonin to the assay mixture did not affect the catalytic activity of NQO2. Preliminary kinetic studies show that NQO2 is faster in reducing estrogen quinones than its homologue NQO1. Both UV and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assays unequivocally corroborate the reduction of estrogen ortho-quinones by NQO2, indicating that it could be a novel target for prevention of breast cancer initiation. PMID:18996184

  6. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as Plausible Prebiotic Membrane Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groen, Joost; Deamer, David W.; Kros, Alexander; Ehrenfreund, Pascale

    2012-08-01

    Aromatic molecules delivered to the young Earth during the heavy bombardment phase in the early history of our solar system were likely to be among the most abundant and stable organic compounds available. The Aromatic World hypothesis suggests that aromatic molecules might function as container elements, energy transduction elements and templating genetic components for early life forms. To investigate the possible role of aromatic molecules as container elements, we incorporated different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the membranes of fatty acid vesicles. The goal was to determine whether PAH could function as a stabilizing agent, similar to the role that cholesterol plays in membranes today. We studied vesicle size distribution, critical vesicle concentration and permeability of the bilayers using C6-C10 fatty acids mixed with amphiphilic PAH derivatives such as 1-hydroxypyrene, 9-anthracene carboxylic acid and 1,4 chrysene quinone. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) spectroscopy was used to measure the size distribution of vesicles and incorporation of PAH species was established by phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy. We employed conductimetric titration to determine the minimal concentration at which fatty acids could form stable vesicles in the presence of PAHs. We found that oxidized PAH derivatives can be incorporated into decanoic acid (DA) vesicle bilayers in mole ratios up to 1:10 (PAH:DA). Vesicle size distribution and critical vesicle concentration were largely unaffected by PAH incorporation, but 1-hydroxypyrene and 9-anthracene carboxylic acid lowered the permeability of fatty acid bilayers to small solutes up to 4-fold. These data represent the first indication of a cholesterol-like stabilizing effect of oxidized PAH derivatives in a simulated prebiotic membrane.

  7. Distribution and dynamics of quinones in the lipid bilayer mimicking the inner membrane of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kaurola, Petri; Sharma, Vivek; Vonk, Amanda; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Róg, Tomasz

    2016-09-01

    Quinone and its analogues (Q) constitute an important class of compounds that perform key electron transfer reactions in oxidative- and photo-phosphorylation. In the inner membrane of mitochondria, ubiquinone molecules undergo continuous redox transitions enabling electron transfer between the respiratory complexes. In such a dynamic system undergoing continuous turnover for ATP synthesis, an uninterrupted supply of substrate molecules is absolutely necessary. In the current work, we have performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations to assess the structure, dynamics, and localization of quinone and its analogues in a lipid bilayer, whose composition mimics the one in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The results show that there is a strong tendency of both quinone and quinol molecules to localize in the vicinity of the lipids' acyl groups, right under the lipid head group region. Additionally, we observe a second location in the middle of the bilayer where quinone molecules tend to stabilize. Translocation of quinone through a lipid bilayer is very fast and occurs in 10-100ns time scale, whereas the translocation of quinol is at least an order of magnitude slower. We suggest that this has important mechanistic implications given that the localization of Q ensures maximal occupancy of the Q-binding sites or Q-entry points in electron transport chain complexes, thereby maintaining an optimal turnover rate for ATP synthesis. PMID:27342376

  8. In vitro studies indicate a quinone is involved in bacterial Mn(II) oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Hope A.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2009-01-01

    Manganese(II)-oxidizing bacteria play an integral role in the cycling of Mn as well as other metals and organics. Prior work with Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria suggested that Mn(II) oxidation involves a multicopper oxidase, but whether this enzyme directly catalyzes Mn(II) oxidation is unknown. For a clearer understanding of Mn(II) oxidation, we have undertaken biochemical studies in the model marine α-proteobacterium, Erythrobacter sp. strain SD21. The optimum pH for Mn(II)-oxidizing activity was 8.0 with a specific activity of 2.5 nmol × min−1 × mg−1 and a Km = 204 µM. The activity was soluble suggesting a cytoplasmic or periplasmic protein. Mn(III) was an intermediate in the oxidation of Mn(II) and likely the primary product of enzymatic oxidation. The activity was stimulated by pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), NAD+, and calcium but not by copper. In addition, PQQ rescued Pseudomonas putida MnB1 non Mn(II)-oxidizing mutants with insertions in the anthranilate synthase gene. The substrate and product of anthranilate synthase are intermediates in various quinone biosyntheses. Partially purified Mn(II) oxidase was enriched in quinones and had a UV/VIS absorption spectrum similar to a known quinone requiring enzyme but not to multicopper oxidases. These studies suggest that quinones may play an integral role in bacterial Mn(II) oxidation. PMID:17673976

  9. Redox potential tuning through differential quinone binding in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Vermaas, Josh V; Taguchi, Alexander T; Dikanov, Sergei A; Wraight, Colin A; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-03-31

    Ubiquinone forms an integral part of the electron transport chain in cellular respiration and photosynthesis across a vast number of organisms. Prior experimental results have shown that the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is only fully functional with a limited set of methoxy-bearing quinones, suggesting that specific interactions with this substituent are required to drive electron transport and the formation of quinol. The nature of these interactions has yet to be determined. Through parameterization of a CHARMM-compatible quinone force field and subsequent molecular dynamics simulations of the quinone-bound RC, we have investigated and characterized the interactions of the protein with the quinones in the Q(A) and Q(B) sites using both equilibrium simulation and thermodynamic integration. In particular, we identify a specific interaction between the 2-methoxy group of ubiquinone in the Q(B) site and the amide nitrogen of GlyL225 that we implicate in locking the orientation of the 2-methoxy group, thereby tuning the redox potential difference between the quinones occupying the Q(A) and Q(B) sites. Disruption of this interaction leads to weaker binding in a ubiquinone analogue that lacks a 2-methoxy group, a finding supported by reverse electron transfer electron paramagnetic resonance experiments of the Q(A)⁻Q(B)⁻ biradical and competitive binding assays. PMID:25734689

  10. Quinones: reactions with hemoglobin, effects within erythrocytes and potential for antimalarial development

    SciTech Connect

    Denny, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    The focus of this research was to characterize the interactions of some simple quinone like compounds with purified hemoglobin and to study the effects of these compounds within erythrocytes. It is proposed that these sorts of agents can have an antimalarial effect. The simplest compounds chosen for study were benzoquinone, methylquinone (toluquinone) and hydroquinone. When /sup 14/C-quinone was reacted with purified hemoglobin (Hb) there was rapid binding of the first two moles of substrate per Hb molecule. An unusual property of the modified Hb's is that in the presence of a redox sensitive agent such as cytochrome c they are capable of generating superoxide anions. Within erythrocytes, quinone and toluquinone which differ only by a single methyl group have completely different effects. Toluquinone causes the cells to hemolyse and the effect was enhanced when the erythrocyte superoxide dismutase was inhibited; the effect was diminished when scavengers of activated oxygen such as histidine, mannitol and vital E were present. Benzoquinone on the other hand did not cause the cells to hemolyse and instead appeared to protect the cells from certain hemolytic stresses. Growth of malaria parasites in erythrocytes has been shown to be inhibited by activated forms of oxygen, also some quinone like agents in the past have been shown to inhibit the parasite's metabolism. An initial experiment with erythrocytes infected with malaria parasites showed that quinone and toluquinone could both inhibit the growth rate of parasites.

  11. Chlorophyll-quinone photochemistry in liposomes: mechanisms of radical formation and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.K.; Tollin, G.

    1980-01-01

    Laser flash photolysis has been used to investigate the mechanism of formation and decay of the radical species generated by light induced electron transfer from chlorophyll a triplet to quinone in egg phosphatidyl choline bilayer vesicles. Chlorophyll triplet quenching by quinone is controlled by diffusion occurring within the bilayer membrane and reflects bilayer viscosity. Radical formation via separation of the intermediate ion pair is also inhibited by increased bilayer viscosity. Cooperativity is observed in this process due to an enhancement of radical separation by electron transfer from semiquinone anion radical to a neighboring quinone molecule. Two modes of radical decay are observed, a rapid recombination occurring within the bilayer and a much slower recombination occurring across the bilayer. The slow decay is only observed with quinones which are not tightly anchored into the bilayer, and is probably the result of electron transfer from semiquinone anion radical formed within the bilayer to a quinone molecule residing at the bilayer-water interface. With benzoquinone, approximately 60% of the radical decay occurs via the slow mode. Triplet to radical conversion efficiencies in the bilayer systems are comparable to those obtained in fluid solution (approx. 60%). However, radical recombination, at least for the slow decay mechanism, is considerably retarded.

  12. Microprobe analysis of chlorpromazine pigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, T.L.; McCormack, K.M.; Ingram, P.; Kaplan, D.L.; Shelburne, J.D.

    1988-10-01

    We describe the histochemical, ultrastructural, and microanalytical features of a skin biopsy specimen obtained from a patient with chlorpromazine pigmentation. Golden-brown pigment granules were present in the dermis, predominantly in a perivascular arrangement. The granules stained positively with the Fontana-Masson stain for silver-reducing substances and negatively with Perl's stain for iron. Electron microscopy revealed dense inclusion bodies in dermal histiocytes, pericytes, endothelial cells, and Schwann cells, as well as lying free in the extracellular matrix. These ''chlorpromazine bodies'' were quite dense even in unosmicated, unstained ultrathin sections, indicating that the pigmentation is related, at least in part, to the inclusions. Microprobe analysis of the chlorpromazine bodies revealed a striking peak for sulfur, which strongly suggests the presence of the drug or its metabolite within these inclusions.

  13. Studies on the mechanism of quinone action on hormonal regulation of metabolism in the rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, E.Y.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanism of quinone actions in liver cell metabolism had been investigated using menadione as a model compound. Previous reports suggested that quinones and free radicals could produce perturbations in cellular calcium homeostasis. Since calcium plays an important role in the regulation of cellular metabolic processes, then regulation of cytosolic calcium concentrations, and thus of cellular metabolism, by calcium-mobilizing hormones such as phenylephrine and vasopressin could possibly be modified by quinones such as menadione. Methods used to approach this hypothesis included the assay for activation of glycogen phosphorylase, an indirect index of calcium mobilization; the determination of calcium mobilization with {sup 45}Ca efflux exchange and with fluorescent calcium indicator fura-2; and the measurement of phosphatidylinositides, an important link in the membrane-associated receptor-mediated signal transduction mechanism.

  14. TC and H NMR studies of PQQ and selected derivatives. [Pyrroloquinoline quinone

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, D.R.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    The ortho-quinone structure of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is famous for its reactivity with nucleophilic species of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen(Duine et. al. 1987). In fact, the crystal structure of PQQ was solved in the form of the C-5 acetone adduct(Salisbury et. al 1979). The propensity of the ortho-quinone to accept nucleophiles is the chemical basis of the function of PQQ at enzyme active sites. The present study focuses on the NMR of PQQ and various derivatives formed with oxygen and nitrogen nucleophiles. Our goals are to assign the H, TC, and VN NMR spectra and to rigorously confirm the structures of the adducts. Once the NMR data of the relevant adducts are well defined, we will use TC and VN labeled substrates to probe the active sites of PQQ containing enzymes. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Mechanism and analyses for extracting photosynthetic electrons using exogenous quinones - what makes a good extraction pathway?

    PubMed

    Longatte, G; Rappaport, F; Wollman, F-A; Guille-Collignon, M; Lemaître, F

    2016-08-01

    Plants or algae take many benefits from oxygenic photosynthesis by converting solar energy into chemical energy through the synthesis of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water. However, the overall yield of this process is rather low (about 4% of the total energy available from sunlight is converted into chemical energy). This is the principal reason why recently many studies have been devoted to extraction of photosynthetic electrons in order to produce a sustainable electric current. Practically, the electron transfer occurs between the photosynthetic organism and an electrode and can be assisted by an exogenous mediator, mainly a quinone. In this regard, we recently reported on a method involving fluorescence measurements to estimate the ability of different quinones to extract photosynthetic electrons from a mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. In the present work, we used the same kind of methodology to establish a zone diagram for predicting the most suitable experimental conditions to extract photoelectrons from intact algae (quinone concentration and light intensity) as a function of the purpose of the study. This will provide further insights into the extraction mechanism of photosynthetic electrons using exogenous quinones. Indeed fluorescence measurements allowed us to model the capacity of photosynthetic algae to donate electrons to an exogenous quinone by considering a numerical parameter called "open center ratio" which is related to the Photosystem II acceptor redox state. Then, using it as a proxy for investigating the extraction of photosynthetic electrons by means of an exogenous quinone, 2,6-DCBQ, we suggested an extraction mechanism that was globally found consistent with the experimentally extracted parameters.

  16. Mechanism and analyses for extracting photosynthetic electrons using exogenous quinones - what makes a good extraction pathway?

    PubMed

    Longatte, G; Rappaport, F; Wollman, F-A; Guille-Collignon, M; Lemaître, F

    2016-08-01

    Plants or algae take many benefits from oxygenic photosynthesis by converting solar energy into chemical energy through the synthesis of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water. However, the overall yield of this process is rather low (about 4% of the total energy available from sunlight is converted into chemical energy). This is the principal reason why recently many studies have been devoted to extraction of photosynthetic electrons in order to produce a sustainable electric current. Practically, the electron transfer occurs between the photosynthetic organism and an electrode and can be assisted by an exogenous mediator, mainly a quinone. In this regard, we recently reported on a method involving fluorescence measurements to estimate the ability of different quinones to extract photosynthetic electrons from a mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. In the present work, we used the same kind of methodology to establish a zone diagram for predicting the most suitable experimental conditions to extract photoelectrons from intact algae (quinone concentration and light intensity) as a function of the purpose of the study. This will provide further insights into the extraction mechanism of photosynthetic electrons using exogenous quinones. Indeed fluorescence measurements allowed us to model the capacity of photosynthetic algae to donate electrons to an exogenous quinone by considering a numerical parameter called "open center ratio" which is related to the Photosystem II acceptor redox state. Then, using it as a proxy for investigating the extraction of photosynthetic electrons by means of an exogenous quinone, 2,6-DCBQ, we suggested an extraction mechanism that was globally found consistent with the experimentally extracted parameters. PMID:27411477

  17. The determination of tocopherols and isoprenoid quinones in the grain and seedlings of wheat (Triticum vulgare)

    PubMed Central

    Hall, G. S.; Laidman, D. L.

    1968-01-01

    1. A comparison is made of several procedures for the extraction of tocopherols and isoprenoid quinones from plant tissues. 2. Gradient-elution column chromatography on acid-washed alumina efficiently separates the isoprenoid quinones and tocopherols into groups that can then be assayed spectrophotometrically or, with the tocopherols, separated into their individual components and determined by gas–liquid chromatography. 3. This improved analytical procedure was used to study the distribution of the tocopherols and of ubiquinone in the ungerminated wheat grain. PMID:5667256

  18. Magnetism and electronic structure of binuclear manganese complexes in ortho-quinone ligand and polymer environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhimov, R. R.; Arrington, S. A.; Hwang, J. S.; Prokof'ev, A. I.; Alexandrov, I. A.; Aleksandrov, A. I.

    2006-04-01

    By means of mechanochemical synthesis we obtained a coordination polymer containing binuclear manganese complexes with organic catechol/ortho-quinone ligands. The reaction system contained polystyrene, manganese acetylacetonate, and donor-acceptor mixture catechol/ortho-quinone. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and infrared spectroscopic data show that the binuclear manganese complex is covalently linked to the chain of polystyrene. Theoretical EPR spectrum analysis revealed a triplet state of the complex with two nonequivalent manganese ions coupled to each other by spin exchange. The type of magnetic coupling between manganese ions in this system is similar to the one in manganese based inorganic magnetic materials.

  19. Substituent effects on carbocation stability: the pK(R) for p-quinone methide.

    PubMed

    Toteva, Maria M; Moran, Michael; Amyes, Tina L; Richard, John P

    2003-07-23

    A value of k(H) = 1.5 x 10(-)(3) M(-)(1) s(-)(1) has been determined for the generation of simple p-quinone methide by the acid-catalyzed cleavage of 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol in water at 25 degrees C and I = 1.0 (NaClO(4)). This was combined with k(s) = 5.8 x 10(6) s(-)(1) for the reverse addition of solvent water to the 4-hydroxybenzyl carbocation [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 6349-6356] to give pK(R) = -9.6 as the Lewis acidity constant of O-protonated p-quinone methide. Values of pK(R) = 2.3 for the Lewis acidity constant of neutral p-quinone methide and pK(add) = -7.6 for the overall addition of solvent water to p-quinone methide to form 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol are also reported. The thermodynamic driving force for transfer of the elements of water from formaldehyde hydrate to p-quinone methide to form formaldehyde and p-(hydroxymethyl)phenol (4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol) is determined as 6 kcal/mol. This relatively small driving force represents the balance between the much stronger chemical bonds to oxygen at the reactant formaldehyde hydrate than at the product p-(hydroxymethyl)phenol and the large stabilization of product arising from the aromatization that accompanies solvent addition to p-quinone methide. The Marcus intrinsic barrier for nucleophilic addition of solvent water to the "extended" carbonyl group at p-quinone methide is estimated to be 4.5 kcal/mol larger than that for the addition of water to the simple carbonyl group of formaldehyde. O-Alkylation of p-quinone methide to give the 4-methoxybenzyl carbocation and of formaldehyde to give a simple oxocarbenium ion results in very little change in the relative Marcus intrinsic barriers for the addition of solvent water to these electrophiles.

  20. Biodegradation of polycyclic hydrocarbons by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are present in anthracene oil (a distillation product obtained from coal tar) was demonstrated. Analysis by capillary gas chromatography and high-performance li...

  1. Clofazimine-induced Hair Pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Philip, Mariam; Samson, Joan Felicita; Simi, Puthenveedu Salahudeen

    2012-07-01

    A 45-year-old man was treated with WHO multibacillary multidrug therapy for borderline leprosy and high dose daily Clofazimine for lepra reaction. Along with the expected side effect of skin pigmentation, the patient also noticed darkening of previously grey hair. This colour persisted eight months after completing multibacillary multidrug therapy. PMID:23180930

  2. Swapping one red pigment for another.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kevin M

    2015-01-01

    Betalains are bright red and yellow pigments, which are produced in only one order of plants, the Caryophyllales, and replace the more familiar anthocyanin pigments. The evolutionary origin of betalain production is a mystery, but a new study has identified the first regulator of betalain production and discovered a previously unknown link between the two pigment pathways. PMID:25547597

  3. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  4. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  5. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725 Food... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  6. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  7. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  8. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  9. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in...

  10. 21 CFR 178.3725 - Pigment dispersants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pigment dispersants. 178.3725 Section 178.3725... § 178.3725 Pigment dispersants. Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the substances listed in this section may be safely used as pigment dispersants in food-contact materials....

  11. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.352 Paracoccus pigment. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive paracoccus pigment consists of the heat-killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain...

  12. Pea (Pisum sativum) diamine oxidase contains pyrroloquinoline quinone as a cofactor.

    PubMed

    Glatz, Z; Kovár, J; Macholán, L; Pec, P

    1987-03-01

    Diamine oxidase was prepared from pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings by a new purification procedure involving two h.p.l.c. steps. We studied the optical and electrochemical properties of the homogeneous enzyme and also analysed the hydrolysed protein by several methods. The data presented here suggest that the carbonyl cofactor of diamine oxidase is firmly bound pyrroloquinoline quinone.

  13. Enantioselective Synthesis of Four Stereoisomers of Sulfinyl Ferrocenyl Quinones with Central, Planar, and Helical Chirality.

    PubMed

    del Hoyo, Ana M; Urbano, Antonio; Carreño, M Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Four stereoisomers of sulfinyl ferrocenyl-substituted helicenequinones having central, planar, and helical elements of chirality were stereoselectively formed, in one step, from reaction between enantiopure sulfinyl ferrocenyl dienes and a sulfinyl quinone. Asymmetric synthesis, kinetic resolution, or chemical resolution processes occurred in sequential cycloaddition, sulfoxide elimination, and partial aromatization steps.

  14. Rat liver mitochondrial and microsomal tests for the assessment of quinone toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, L.A.; Boardman, G.D.; Dietrich, A.M. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Bevan, D.R. . Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1994-02-01

    Short-term toxicity tests using mitochondrial and microsomal metabolism were developed and applied to a series of eight quinones. In the mitochondrial assay, the degree to which test compounds inhibited mitochondrial respiration varied from an effective concentration (EC50) of 9 to 125 [mu]M. In the microsomal assay, the maximum percentage of increase over control oxygen consumption rates elicited by the quinones ranged from 8 to 837%. The ability of the compounds to stimulate microsomal oxygen uptake reflects their capability to redox cycle and form reactive oxygen species. Results of the mitochondrial and microsomal assay were statistically correlated with several quinone physicochemical parameters and qualitatively compared to reduction potential. The biological response observed in both test systems appeared to be most strongly influenced by the reduction potential of the quinone. Biomechanisms of action were suggested on the basis of this relationship. To assess the ability of the mitochondrial and microsomal assays to indicate toxicity of the quinonoid compounds, results were statistically correlated with literature-derived toxicity data. It was concluded that the mitochondrial assay appears to be a valid indicator of acute toxicity, whereas the microsomal assay better portends the potential for chronic toxicity.

  15. EXAMINATION OF QUINONE TOXICITY USING YEAST SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE MODEL SYSTEM. (R827352C007)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of quinones is generally thought to occur by two mechanisms: the formation of covalent bonds with biological molecules by Michael addition chemistry and the catalytic reduction of oxygen to superoxide and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) (redox cycling). In an ...

  16. Mixed donor quinone complexes of nickel, zinc, cobalt, manganese and vanadium

    SciTech Connect

    Scotto, C.S.

    1992-01-01

    Mixed donor complexes of several first row metals have been prepared and examined for variations in redox properties, charge distribution and stability in comparison with homoleptic metal quinone species. Schiff base condensation between 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol and ammonia provided the 3,5 di-tert-butyl-1,2-quinone-1-(2-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butlyphenyl)imine ligand for known M(QNQ)[sub 2] compounds. X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry and solution susceptibility measurements were employed to compare properties with the pure quinone complexes and, in the case of Mn(QNQ)[sub 2] and CO(QNQ)[sub 2], with mixed ligand pyridyl quinone compounds of the two metals. Synthesis of the V(QNQ)[sub 2] analog was undertaken with partial characterization achieved through EPR, cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry. The vanadium chemistry was extended to mixed ligand catecholate complexes of V[sup III] and V[sup IV]. Such species are currently of interest in tunicate vanadium studies and in the catalytic oxygenation of pyrocatechols. Tetrachlorocatecholate analogs of known compounds were prepared and fully characterized. The x-ray structure of V(bipyridyl)(tetrachlorocatecholate)[sub 2] provided an unusual example of trigonal prismataic geometry about the metal center. A proposed intermediate in the synthesis of the target complex anion [V(bipyridyl)(tetrachlorocatecholate)[sub 2

  17. Genomic Analysis of the Human Gut Microbiome Suggests Novel Enzymes Involved in Quinone Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Thiele, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquinone and menaquinone are membrane lipid-soluble carriers of electrons that are essential for cellular respiration. Eukaryotic cells can synthesize ubiquinone but not menaquinone, whereas prokaryotes can synthesize both quinones. So far, most of the human gut microbiome (HGM) studies have been based on metagenomic analysis. Here, we applied an analysis of individual HGM genomes to the identification of ubiquinone and menaquinone biosynthetic pathways. In our opinion, the shift from metagenomics to analysis of individual genomes is a pivotal milestone in investigation of bacterial communities, including the HGM. The key results of this study are as follows. (i) The distribution of the canonical pathways in the HGM genomes was consistent with previous reports and with the distribution of the quinone-dependent reductases for electron acceptors. (ii) The comparative genomics analysis identified four alternative forms of the previously known enzymes for quinone biosynthesis. (iii) Genes for the previously unknown part of the futalosine pathway were identified, and the corresponding biochemical reactions were proposed. We discuss the remaining gaps in the menaquinone and ubiquinone pathways in some of the microbes, which indicate the existence of further alternate genes or routes. Together, these findings provide further insight into the biosynthesis of quinones in bacteria and the physiology of the HGM. PMID:26904004

  18. Differential antioxidant and quinone reductase inducing activity of American, Asian, and Siberian ginseng

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antioxidant and quinone reductase (QR) inducing activities of American, Asian, and Siberian ginseng have been reported using various plant materials, solvents, and assays. To directly establish their comparative bioactivity, the effects of extracts obtained from acidified methanol (MeOH), a gas...

  19. Synthesis and Anti-Platelet Activity of Thiosulfonate Derivatives Containing a Quinone Moiety

    PubMed Central

    Bolibrukh, Khrystyna; Polovkovych, Svyatoslav; Khoumeri, Omar; Halenova, Tetyana; Nikolaeva, Irina; Savchuk, Olexiy; Terme, Thierry; Vanelle, Patrice; Lubenets, Vira; Novikov, Volodymyr

    2015-01-01

    Thiosulfonate derivatives based on quinones were synthesized for studying “structure-activity relationship” compounds with an acylated and a free amino-group. Anti-platelet activity of the synthesized compounds was determined and the influence of substituents on the activity of the derivatives was assessed. PMID:26839819

  20. Quinone compounds regulate the level of ROS production by the NADPH oxidase Nox4.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Vu Chuong; Lardy, Bernard; Rousset, Francis; Hazane-Puch, Florence; Zhang, Leilei; Trocmé, Candice; Serrander, Lena; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Morel, Françoise

    2013-06-01

    NADPH oxidase Nox4 is expressed in a wide range of tissues and plays a role in cellular signaling by providing reactive oxygen species (ROS) as intracellular messengers. Nox4 oxidase activity is thought to be constitutive and regulated at the transcriptional level; however, we challenge this point of view and suggest that specific quinone derivatives could modulate this activity. In fact, we demonstrated a significant stimulation of Nox4 activity by 4 quinone derivatives (AA-861, tBuBHQ, tBuBQ, and duroquinone) observed in 3 different cellular models, HEK293E, T-REx™, and chondrocyte cell lines. Our results indicate that the effect is specific toward Nox4 versus Nox2. Furthermore, we showed that NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) may participate in this stimulation. Interestingly, Nox4 activity is also stimulated by reducing agents that possibly act by reducing the disulfide bridge (Cys226, Cys270) located in the extracellular E-loop of Nox4. Such model of Nox4 activity regulation could provide new insight into the understanding of the molecular mechanism of the electron transfer through the enzyme, i.e., its potential redox regulation, and could also define new therapeutic targets in diseases in which quinones and Nox4 are implicated. PMID:23583257

  1. Quinone-dependent proton transfer pathways in the photosynthetic cytochrome b6f complex.

    PubMed

    Hasan, S Saif; Yamashita, Eiki; Baniulis, Danas; Cramer, William A

    2013-03-12

    As much as two-thirds of the proton gradient used for transmembrane free energy storage in oxygenic photosynthesis is generated by the cytochrome b6f complex. The proton uptake pathway from the electrochemically negative (n) aqueous phase to the n-side quinone binding site of the complex, and a probable route for proton exit to the positive phase resulting from quinol oxidation, are defined in a 2.70-Å crystal structure and in structures with quinone analog inhibitors at 3.07 Å (tridecyl-stigmatellin) and 3.25-Å (2-nonyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide) resolution. The simplest n-side proton pathway extends from the aqueous phase via Asp20 and Arg207 (cytochrome b6 subunit) to quinone bound axially to heme c(n). On the positive side, the heme-proximal Glu78 (subunit IV), which accepts protons from plastosemiquinone, defines a route for H(+) transfer to the aqueous phase. These pathways provide a structure-based description of the quinone-mediated proton transfer responsible for generation of the transmembrane electrochemical potential gradient in oxygenic photosynthesis. PMID:23440205

  2. Mutagenicity of tocopheryl quinones: evolutionary advantage of selective accumulation of dietary alpha-tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, David G; Williams, Marshall V; Wani, Altaf A; Wani, Gulzar; Shen, Elaine; Jones, Kenneth H

    2002-01-01

    We have shown that phenolic antioxidant tocopherols are oxidized to nonarylating alpha-tocopheryl quinone (alpha-TQ) and arylating gamma- and delta-TQ electrophiles. The arylating quinones stimulate apoptosis and are highly cytotoxic in mammalian cells. Some xenobiotic phenolic antioxidants are mutagens, and it has been suggested that their arylating quinone metabolites are the active agents in mutagenesis related to carcinogenesis. We found that neither alpha- nor gamma-TQ was directly genotoxic in supercoiled-to-nicked circular DNA conversions, but these agents interacted with the cytomegalovirus reporter-driven plasmid and enhanced luciferase transfection, with gamma-TQ > alpha-TQ. The Ames test, using gamma-TQ and a number of Salmonella strains, showed no evidence of bacterial mutagenesis. gamma-TQ was highly cytotoxic and alpha-TQ slightly cytotoxic in eukaryocyte AS52 cells. A guanosine phosphoribosyltransferase gene assay showed that gamma-TQ was highly mutagenic and alpha-TQ slightly mutagenic in AS52 cells. A review of the literature identified associations where a decrease in dietary gamma-tocopherol (gamma-T) diminishes and an increase in dietary gamma-T and its quinone enhances carcinogenicity. Humans and other omnivores selectively accumulate alpha-tocopherol, even though gamma-T is their principal dietary tocopherol. We suggest that this selectivity confers an evolutionary advantage by limiting tissue gamma-T, a putative precursor of the mutagen gamma-TQ.

  3. Extraction methods determine the antioxidant capacity and induction of quinone reductase by soy products in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastrointestinal mimic (GI) and organic solvent extracts of whole soybean powder (WSP), soy protein concentrate (SPC), and soy protein isolate (SPI) as well as soy isoflavone concentrate (SIC) were analyzed for total phenols; quinone reductase (QR) induction in hepa1c1c7 cells; antioxidant scavengi...

  4. Modular, Metal-Catalyzed Cycloisomerization Approach to Angularly Fused Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Their Oxidized Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Paul F; Parrish, Damon; Pradhan, Padmanava; Lakshman, Mahesh K

    2015-08-01

    Palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of 2-bromobenzaldehyde and 6-bromo-2,3-dimethoxybenzaldehyde with 4-methyl-1-naphthaleneboronic acid and acenaphthene-5-boronic acid gave corresponding o-naphthyl benzaldehydes. Corey-Fuchs olefination followed by reaction with n-BuLi led to various 1-(2-ethynylphenyl)naphthalenes. Cycloisomerization of individual 1-(2-ethynylphenyl)naphthalenes to various benzo[c]phenanthrene (BcPh) analogues was accomplished smoothly with catalytic PtCl2 in PhMe. In the case of 4,5-dihydrobenzo[l]acephenanthrylene, oxidation with DDQ gave benzo[l]acephenanthrylene. The dimethoxy-substituted benzo[c]phenanthrenes were demethylated with BBr3 and oxidized to the o-quinones with PDC. Reduction of these quinones with NaBH4 in THF/EtOH in an oxygen atmosphere gave the respective dihydrodiols. Exposure of the dihydrodiols to N-bromoacetamide in THF-H2O led to bromohydrins that were cyclized with Amberlite IRA 400 HO(-) to yield the series 1 diol epoxides. Epoxidation of the dihydrodiols with mCPBA gave the isomeric series 2 diol epoxides. All of the hydrocarbons as well as the methoxy-substituted ones were crystallized and analyzed by X-ray crystallography, and these data are compared to other previously studied BcPh derivatives. The methodology described is highly modular and can be utilized for the synthesis of a wide variety of angularly fused polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their putative metabolites and/or other derivatives.

  5. Modular, Metal-Catalyzed Cycloisomerization Approach to Angularly Fused Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Their Oxidized Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Paul F.; Parrish, Damon; Pradhan, Padmanava; Lakshman, Mahesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of 2-bromobenzaldehyde and 6-bromo-2,3-dimethoxybenzaldehyde with 4-methyl-1-naphthaleneboronic acid and acenaphthene-5-boronic acid gave corresponding o-naphthyl benzaldehydes. Corey–Fuchs olefination followed by reaction with n-BuLi led to various 1-(2-ethynylphenyl)naphthalenes. Cycloisomerization of individual 1-(2-ethynylphenyl)naphthalenes to various benzo[c]phenanthrene (BcPh) analogues was accomplished smoothly with catalytic PtCl2 in PhMe. In the case of 4,5-dihydrobenzo[l]acephenanthrylene, oxidation with DDQ gave benzo[l]acephenanthrylene. The dimethoxy-substituted benzo[c]phenanthrenes were demethylated with BBr3 and oxidized to the ortho-quinones with PDC. Reduction of these quinones with NaBH4 in THF/EtOH in an oxygen atmosphere gave the respective dihydrodiols. Exposure of the dihydrodiols to N-bromoacetamide in THF-H2O led to bromohydrins that were cyclized with Amberlite IRA 400 HO− to yield the series 1 diol epoxides. Epoxidation of the dihydrodiols with mCPBA gave the isomeric series 2 diol epoxides. All of the hydrocarbons as well as the methoxy-substituted ones were crystallized and analyzed by X-ray crystallography, and these data are compared to other previously studied BcPh derivatives. The methodology described is highly modular and can be utilized for the synthesis of a wide variety of angularly fused polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their putative metabolites and/or other derivatives. PMID:26196673

  6. Photochemistry of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Cosmic Water Ice: The Role of PAH Ionization and Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Amanda M.; Ricca, Alessandra; Mattioda, Andrew L.; Bouwman, Jordy; Roser, Joseph; Linnartz, Harold; Bregman, Jonathan; Allamandola, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopic studies of ultraviolet (UV) irradiated, water-rich, cosmic ice analogs containing small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are described. The irradiation studies of anthracene:H2O, pyrene:H2O, and benzo[ghi]perylene:H2O ices (14 K) at various concentrations reported by Bouwman et al. are extended. While aromatic alcohols and ketones have been reported in residues after irradiated PAH:H2O ices were warmed to 270 K, it was not known if they formed during ice irradiation or during warm-up when reactants interact as H2O sublimes. Recent work has shown that they form in low temperature ice. Using DFT computed IR spectra to identify photoproducts and PAH cations, we tentatively identify the production of specific alcohols [PAH(OH) n ] and quinones [PAH(O) n ] for all PAH:H2O ices considered here. Little evidence is found for hydrogenation at 14 K, consistent with the findings of Gudipati & Yang. Addition of O and OH to the parent PAH is the dominant photochemical reaction, but PAH erosion to smaller PAHs (producing CO2 and H2CO) is also important. DFT spectra are used to assess the contribution of PAH-related species to interstellar absorption features from 5 to 9 μm. The case is made that PAH cations are important contributors to the C2 component and PAH(OH) n and PAH(O) n to the C5 component described by Boogert et al. Thus, interstellar ices should contain neutral and ionized PAHs, alcohols, ketones and quinones at the ~2%-4% level relative to H2O. PAHs, their photoproducts, and ion-mediated processes should therefore be considered when modeling interstellar ice processes.

  7. Identification of Anthraquinone-Degrading Bacteria in Soil Contaminated with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers-Vieira, Elyse A.; Zhang, Zhenfa; Adrion, Alden C.; Gold, Avram

    2015-01-01

    Quinones and other oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAHs) are toxic and/or genotoxic compounds observed to be cocontaminants at PAH-contaminated sites, but their formation and fate in contaminated environmental systems have not been well studied. Anthracene-9,10-dione (anthraquinone) has been found in most PAH-contaminated soils and sediments that have been analyzed for oxy-PAHs. However, little is known about the biodegradation of oxy-PAHs, and no bacterial isolates have been described that are capable of growing on or degrading anthraquinone. PAH-degrading Mycobacterium spp. are the only organisms that have been investigated to date for metabolism of a PAH quinone, 4,5-pyrenequinone. We utilized DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP) with [U-13C]anthraquinone to identify bacteria associated with anthraquinone degradation in PAH-contaminated soil from a former manufactured-gas plant site both before and after treatment in a laboratory-scale bioreactor. SIP with [U-13C]anthracene was also performed to assess whether bacteria capable of growing on anthracene are the same as those identified to grow on anthraquinone. Organisms closely related to Sphingomonas were the most predominant among the organisms associated with anthraquinone degradation in bioreactor-treated soil, while organisms in the genus Phenylobacterium comprised the majority of anthraquinone degraders in the untreated soil. Bacteria associated with anthracene degradation differed from those responsible for anthraquinone degradation. These results suggest that Sphingomonas and Phenylobacterium species are associated with anthraquinone degradation and that anthracene-degrading organisms may not possess mechanisms to grow on anthraquinone. PMID:25819957

  8. PHOTOCHEMISTRY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN COSMIC WATER ICE: THE ROLE OF PAH IONIZATION AND CONCENTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Amanda M.; Mattioda, Andrew L.; Roser, Joseph; Bregman, Jonathan; Bouwman, Jordy; Linnartz, Harold

    2015-01-20

    Infrared spectroscopic studies of ultraviolet (UV) irradiated, water-rich, cosmic ice analogs containing small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are described. The irradiation studies of anthracene:H{sub 2}O, pyrene:H{sub 2}O, and benzo[ghi]perylene:H{sub 2}O ices (14 K) at various concentrations reported by Bouwman et al. are extended. While aromatic alcohols and ketones have been reported in residues after irradiated PAH:H{sub 2}O ices were warmed to 270 K, it was not known if they formed during ice irradiation or during warm-up when reactants interact as H{sub 2}O sublimes. Recent work has shown that they form in low temperature ice. Using DFT computed IR spectra to identify photoproducts and PAH cations, we tentatively identify the production of specific alcohols [PAH(OH) {sub n} ] and quinones [PAH(O) {sub n} ] for all PAH:H{sub 2}O ices considered here. Little evidence is found for hydrogenation at 14 K, consistent with the findings of Gudipati and Yang. Addition of O and OH to the parent PAH is the dominant photochemical reaction, but PAH erosion to smaller PAHs (producing CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}CO) is also important. DFT spectra are used to assess the contribution of PAH-related species to interstellar absorption features from 5 to 9 μm. The case is made that PAH cations are important contributors to the C2 component and PAH(OH) {sub n} and PAH(O) {sub n} to the C5 component described by Boogert et al. Thus, interstellar ices should contain neutral and ionized PAHs, alcohols, ketones and quinones at the ∼2%-4% level relative to H{sub 2}O. PAHs, their photoproducts, and ion-mediated processes should therefore be considered when modeling interstellar ice processes.

  9. Cytochrome P450 isoforms catalyze formation of catechol estrogen quinones that react with DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Gaikwad, Nilesh W; Olson, Kevin; Zahid, Muhammad; Cavalieri, Ercole L; Rogan, Eleanor G

    2007-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that specific metabolites of estrogens, namely, catechol estrogen quinones, react with DNA to form adducts and generate apurinic sites, which can lead to the mutations that induce breast cancer. Oxidation of estradiol (E(2)) produces 2 catechol estrogens, 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE(2)) and 2-OHE(2) among the major metabolites. These, in turn, are oxidized to the quinones, E(2)-3,4-quinone (E(2)-3,4-Q) and E(2)-2,3-Q, which can react with DNA. Oxidation of E(2) to 2-OHE(2) is mainly catalyzed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, and CYP3A4, whereas oxidation of E(2) to 4-OHE(2) in extrahepatic tissues is mainly catalyzed by CYP1B1 as well as some CYP3As. The potential involvement of CYP isoforms in the further oxidation of catechols to semiquinones and quinones has, however, not been investigated in detail. In this project, to identify the potential function of various CYPs in oxidizing catechol estrogens to quinones, we used different recombinant human CYP isoforms, namely, CYP1A1, CYP1B1, and CYP3A4, with the scope of oxidizing the catechol estrogens 2-OHE(2) and 4-OHE(2) to their respective estrogen quinones, which then reacted with DNA. The depurinating adducts 2-OHE(2)-6-N3Ade, 4-OHE(2)-1-N3Ade, and 4-OHE(2)-1-N7Gua were observed in the respective reaction systems by ultraperformance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Furthermore, more than 100-fold higher levels of estrogen-glutathione (GSH) conjugates were detected in the reactions. Glutathione conjugates were observed, in much smaller amounts, when control microsomes were used. Depurinating adducts, as well as GSH conjugates, were obtained when E(2)-3,4-Q was incubated with CYP1B1 or control microsomes in a 30-minute reaction, further demonstrating that GSH is present in these recombinant enzyme preparations. These experiments demonstrated that CYP1A1, CYP1B1, and CYP3A4 are able to oxidize catechol estrogens to their respective quinones, which can further react with GSH

  10. Isolation and Cr(VI) reduction characteristics of quinone respiration in Mangrovibacter plantisponsor strain CR1.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jing; Li, Zifu; Xu, Zhifang; Guo, Jianbo; Hu, Zhenzhen; Guo, Yankai; Li, Min; Yang, Jingliang

    2016-07-01

    A Cr(VI)-reducing Mangrovibacter plantisponsor strain, CR1, was isolated from tannery effluent sludge and had quinone respiration characteristics. Its chromate (CrO4 (2-) ) resistance, quinone respiration characteristics, and Cr(VI) reduction efficiencies were evaluated in detail. Strain CR1 exhibited a high Cr(VI) resistance with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 32 mM in LB medium, and its quinone respiration could occur when an electron donor and strain CR1 both existed in the reaction system. Cr(VI) reduction by strain CR1 was significantly enhanced by a factor of 0.4-4.3 with five different quinone compounds: anthraquinone-2,7-disulfonate, anthraquinone-1-sulfonate, anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS), anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate, and anthraquinone-1,5-disulfonate. AQS was the best electron shuttle among them, and the greatest enhancement to the Cr(VI) bio-reduction was achieved with 0.96 mM AQS. The correlation between the reaction constant k (mg Cr(VI) g(-1) dry cell weight H(-1) ) and thermodynamic temperature T (K) was expressed as an Arrhenius equation lnk=-7662.9/T+27.931(R2=0.9486); the activation energy Ea was 63.71 kJ mol(-1) , and the pre-exponential factor A was 1.35 × 10(12)  mg Cr(VI) g(-1) dry cell weight H(-1) . During the Cr(VI) reduction process, the pH tended to become neutral, and the oxidation-reduction potential decreased to -440 mV. The efficient reduction of Cr(VI) mediated by a quinone respiration strain shows potential for the rapid anaerobic removal of Cr(VI).

  11. X-ray structural studies of quinone reductase 2 nanomolar range inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Pegan, Scott D; Sturdy, Megan; Ferry, Gilles; Delagrange, Philippe; Boutin, Jean A; Mesecar, Andrew D

    2011-01-01

    Quinone reductase 2 (QR2) is one of two members comprising the mammalian quinone reductase family of enzymes responsible for performing FAD mediated reductions of quinone substrates. In contrast to quinone reductase 1 (QR1) which uses NAD(P)H as its co-substrate, QR2 utilizes a rare group of hydride donors, N-methyl or N-ribosyl nicotinamide. Several studies have linked QR2 to the generation of quinone free radicals, several neuronal degenerative diseases, and cancer. QR2 has been also identified as the third melatonin receptor (MT3) through in cellulo and in vitro inhibition of QR2 by traditional MT3 ligands, and through recent X-ray structures of human QR2 (hQR2) in complex with melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin. Several MT3 specific ligands have been developed that exhibit both potent in cellulo inhibition of hQR2 nanomolar, affinity for MT3. The potency of these ligands suggest their use as molecular probes for hQR2. However, no definitive correlation between traditionally obtained MT3 ligand affinity and hQR2 inhibition exists limiting our understanding of how these ligands are accommodated in the hQR2 active site. To obtain a clearer relationship between the structures of developed MT3 ligands and their inhibitory properties, in cellulo and in vitro IC50 values were determined for a representative set of MT3 ligands (MCA-NAT, 2-I-MCANAT, prazosin, S26695, S32797, and S29434). Furthermore, X-ray structures for each of these ligands in complex with hQR2 were determined allowing for a structural evaluation of the binding modes of these ligands in relation to the potency of MT3 ligands. PMID:21538647

  12. Characterization of quinone derived protein adducts and their selective identification using redox cycling based chemiluminescence assay.

    PubMed

    Elgawish, Mohamed Saleh; Kishikawa, Naoya; Ohyama, Kaname; Kuroda, Naotaka

    2015-07-17

    The cytotoxic mechanism of many quinones has been correlated to covalent modification of cellular proteins. However, the identification of relevant proteins targets is essential but challenging goals. To better understand the quinones cytotoxic mechanism, human serum albumin (HSA) was incubated in vitro with different concentration of menadione (MQ). In this respect, the initial nucleophilic addition of proteins to quinone converts the conjugates to redox-cycling quinoproteins with altered conformation and secondary structure and extended life span than the short lived, free quinones. The conjugation of MQ with nucleophilic sites likewise, free cysteine as well as ɛ-amino group of lysine residue of HSA has been found to be in concentration dependent manner. The conventional methods for modified proteins identification in complex mixtures are complicated and time consuming. Herein, we describe a highly selective, sensitive, simple, and fast strategy for quinoproteins identification. The suggested strategy exploited the unique redox-cycling capability of quinoproteins in presence of a reductant, dithiothreitol (DTT), to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that gave sufficient chemiluminescence (CL) when mixed with luminol. The CL approach is highly selective and sensitive to detect the quinoproteins in ten-fold molar excess of native proteins without adduct enrichment. The approach was also coupled with gel filtration chromatography (GFC) and used to identify adducts in complex mixture of proteins in vitro as well as in rat plasma after MQ administration. Albumin was identified as the main protein in human and rat plasma forming adduct with MQ. Overall, the identification of quinoproteins will encourage further studies of toxicological impact of quinones on human health. PMID:26044383

  13. X-ray structural studies of quinone reductase 2 nanomolar range inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pegan, Scott D.; Sturdy, Megan; Ferry, Gilles; Delagrange, Philippe; Boutin, Jean A.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2011-09-06

    Quinone reductase 2 (QR2) is one of two members comprising the mammalian quinone reductase family of enzymes responsible for performing FAD mediated reductions of quinone substrates. In contrast to quinone reductase 1 (QR1) which uses NAD(P)H as its co-substrate, QR2 utilizes a rare group of hydride donors, N-methyl or N-ribosyl nicotinamide. Several studies have linked QR2 to the generation of quinone free radicals, several neuronal degenerative diseases, and cancer. QR2 has been also identified as the third melatonin receptor (MT3) through in cellulo and in vitro inhibition of QR2 by traditional MT3 ligands, and through recent X-ray structures of human QR2 (hQR2) in complex with melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin. Several MT3 specific ligands have been developed that exhibit both potent in cellulo inhibition of hQR2 nanomolar, affinity for MT3. The potency of these ligands suggest their use as molecular probes for hQR2. However, no definitive correlation between traditionally obtained MT3 ligand affinity and hQR2 inhibition exists limiting our understanding of how these ligands are accommodated in the hQR2 active site. To obtain a clearer relationship between the structures of developed MT3 ligands and their inhibitory properties, in cellulo and in vitro IC{sub 50} values were determined for a representative set of MT3 ligands (MCA-NAT, 2-I-MCANAT, prazosin, S26695, S32797, and S29434). Furthermore, X-ray structures for each of these ligands in complex with hQR2 were determined allowing for a structural evaluation of the binding modes of these ligands in relation to the potency of MT3 ligands.

  14. Availability and Utilization of Pigments from Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Begum, Hasina; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Khatoon, Helena; Shariff, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    Microalgae are the major photosynthesizers on earth and produce important pigments that include chlorophyll a, b and c, β-carotene, astaxanthin, xanthophylls, and phycobiliproteins. Presently, synthetic colorants are used in food, cosmetic, nutraceutical, and pharmaceutical industries. However, due to problems associated with the harmful effects of synthetic colorants, exploitation of microalgal pigments as a source of natural colors becomes an attractive option. There are various factors such as nutrient availability, salinity, pH, temperature, light wavelength, and light intensity that affect pigment production in microalgae. This paper reviews the availability and characteristics of microalgal pigments, factors affecting pigment production, and the application of pigments produced from microalgae. The potential of microalgal pigments as a source of natural colors is enormous as an alternative to synthetic coloring agents, which has limited applications due to regulatory practice for health reasons.

  15. Availability and Utilization of Pigments from Microalgae.

    PubMed

    Begum, Hasina; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Khatoon, Helena; Shariff, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    Microalgae are the major photosynthesizers on earth and produce important pigments that include chlorophyll a, b and c, β-carotene, astaxanthin, xanthophylls, and phycobiliproteins. Presently, synthetic colorants are used in food, cosmetic, nutraceutical, and pharmaceutical industries. However, due to problems associated with the harmful effects of synthetic colorants, exploitation of microalgal pigments as a source of natural colors becomes an attractive option. There are various factors such as nutrient availability, salinity, pH, temperature, light wavelength, and light intensity that affect pigment production in microalgae. This paper reviews the availability and characteristics of microalgal pigments, factors affecting pigment production, and the application of pigments produced from microalgae. The potential of microalgal pigments as a source of natural colors is enormous as an alternative to synthetic coloring agents, which has limited applications due to regulatory practice for health reasons. PMID:25674822

  16. Holographic films from carotenoid pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toxqui-López, S.; Lecona-Sánchez, J. F.; Santacruz-Vázquez, C.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2014-02-01

    Carotenoids pigments presents in pineapple can be more than just natural dyes, which is one of the applications that now at day gives the chemical industry. In this research shown that can be used in implementing of holographic recording Films. Therefore we describe the technique how to obtain this kind of pigments trough spay drying of natural pineapple juice, which are then dissolved with water in a proportion of 0.1g to 1mL. The obtained sample is poured into glass substrates using the gravity method, after a drying of 24 hours in laboratory normal conditions the films are ready. The films are characterized by recording transmission holographic gratings (LSR 445 NL 445 nm) and measuring the diffraction efficiency holographic parameter. This recording material has good diffraction efficiency and environmental stability.

  17. Birds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albers, P.H.

    2006-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are present throughout the global environment and are produced naturally and by activities of humans. Effects of PAH on birds have been determined by studies employing egg injection, egg immersion, egg shell application, single and multiple oral doses, subcutaneous injection, and chemical analysis of field-collected eggs and tissue. The four-to six-ring aromatic compounds are the most toxic to embryos, young birds, and adult birds. For embryos, effects include death, developmental abnormalities, and a variety of cellular and biochemical responses. For adult and young birds, effects include reduced egg production and hatching, increased clutch or brood abandonment, reduced growth, increased organweights, and a variety of biochemical responses. Trophic level accumulation is unlikely. Environmental exposure to PAH in areas of high human population or habitats affected by recent petroleum spills might be sufficient to adversely affect reproduction. Evidence of long-term effects of elevated concentrations of environmental PAH on bird populations is very limited and the mechanisms of effect are unclear.

  18. PROTONATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Ricca, Alessandra; Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr; Allamandola, Louis J. E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.gov

    2011-02-01

    We reconsider the contribution that singly protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; HPAH{sup +}s) might make to the Class A component of the 6.2 {mu}m interstellar emission feature in light of the recent experimental measurements of protonated naphthalene and coronene. Our calculations on the small HPAH{sup +}s have a band near 6.2 {mu}m, as found in experiment. While the larger HPAH{sup +}s still have emission near 6.2 {mu}m, the much larger intensity of the band near 6.3 {mu}m overwhelms the weaker band at 6.2 {mu}m, so that the 6.2 {mu}m band is barely visible. Since the large PAHs are more representative of those in the interstellar medium, our work suggests that large HPAH{sup +}s cannot be major contributors to the observed emission at 6.2 {mu}m (i.e., Class A species). Saturating large PAH cations with hydrogen atoms retains the 6.2 {mu}m Class A band position, but the rest of the spectrum is inconsistent with observed spectra.

  19. Cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gaitan-Gaona, Francisco; Said, Mirra C; Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman presented with a 3 cm black, ulcerated nodule located on the skin of the upper abdomen, just below the breast. The lesion was painful to the touch, but the patient reported no other associated symptoms and was otherwise healthy. A 4-mm punch biopsy of the affected skin was obtained and the histological diagnosis was cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma. PMID:27136637

  20. New group of ceramic pigments

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepanov, E.S.; Grum-Grzhimailo, O.S.; Belostotskaya, N.S.; Bibilashvili, M.S.

    1987-03-01

    The authors assess the corrosion resistance, crystal structure, chemical composition and color properties of a variety of zircon-based materials used as pigments and protective coatings for ceramic tiles. The constituents of these materials include, apart from zircon, iron oxides, vanadium oxides, and the sulfides, selenides and tellurides of cadmium. The effects of these constituents on the structural behavior of the zirconium silicate are investigated.

  1. Taming reactive phenol tautomers and o-quinone methides with transition metals: a structure-reactivity relationship.

    PubMed

    Amouri, Hani; Le Bras, Jean

    2002-07-01

    Quinone methides act as important intermediates in organic syntheses, as well as in chemical and biological processes; however, examples of such isolated species are scarce as a result of their high reactivity. Phenol tautomers (keto form of phenol) are also important intermediates in several organic and organometallic reactions; nevertheless, isolated complexes are rare. This Account reviews the recent progress on the synthesis and reactivity of iridium and rhodium o-quinone methide complexes as well as on iridium-mediated ortho functionalization of phenols. This reaction was at the origin of the discovery of a general synthetic procedure to prepare the first metal-stabilized o-quinone methide.

  2. Rates of primary electron transfer reactions in the photosystem I reaction center reconstituted with different quinones as the secondary acceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kumazaki, Shigeichi; Kandori, Hideki; Yoshihara, Keitaro ); Iwaki, Masayo; Itoh, Shigeru ); Ikegamu, Isamu )

    1994-10-27

    Rates of sequential electron transfer reactions from the primary electron donor chlorophyll dimer (P700) to the electron acceptor chlorophyll a-686 (A[sub 0]) and to the secondary acceptor quinone (Q[sub [phi

  3. Substrate-Protein Interactions of Type II NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Salewski, Johannes; Batista, Ana P; Sena, Filipa V; Millo, Diego; Zebger, Ingo; Pereira, Manuela M; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2016-05-17

    Type II NADH:quinone oxidoreductases (NDH-2s) are membrane proteins involved in respiratory chains and responsible for the maintenance of NADH/NAD(+) balance in cells. NDH-2s are the only enzymes with NADH dehydrogenase activity present in the respiratory chain of many pathogens, and thus, they were proposed as suitable targets for antimicrobial therapies. In addition, NDH-2s were also considered key players for the treatment of complex I-related neurodegenerative disorders. In this work, we explored substrate-protein interaction in NDH-2 from Escherichia coli (EcNDH-2) combining surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopic studies with electrochemical experiments, fluorescence spectroscopy assays, and quantum chemical calculations. Because of the specific stabilization of substrate complexes of EcNDH-2 immobilized on electrodes, it was possible to demonstrate the presence of two distinct substrate binding sites for NADH and the quinone and to identify a bound semiprotonated quinol as a catalytic intermediate. PMID:27109164

  4. Highly Efficient Catalysis of Retro-Claisen Reactions: From a Quinone Derivative to Functionalized Imidazolium Salts.

    PubMed

    Visbal, Renso; Laguna, Antonio; Gimeno, M Concepción

    2016-03-14

    A new and efficient method for the preparation of several imidazolium salts containing an ester group in the C4 position of the aromatic ring through a retro-Claisen reaction pathway between a quinone derivative and several alcohols is described. This new organic transformation proceeds in the absence of a catalyst, but it is greatly catalyzed by different Lewis acids, especially with AgOAc at a very low catalyst loading and in very short reaction times. The process takes place by the nucleophilic attack of the carbonyl groups by the alcohol functionality, thus promoting a double C-C bond cleavage and C-H and C-O bond formation. This reaction represents the first example of this type between a quinone derivative and alcohols.

  5. Ruthenium(II) complexes containing quinone based ligands: Synthesis, characterization, catalytic applications and DNA interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitha, P.; Manikandan, R.; Endo, A.; Hashimoto, T.; Viswanathamurthi, P.

    2012-12-01

    1,2-Naphthaquinone reacts with amines such as semicarbazide, isonicotinylhydrazide and thiosemicarbazide in high yield procedure with the formation of tridentate ligands HLn (n = 1-3). By reaction of ruthenium(II) starting complexes and quinone based ligands HLn (n = 1-3), a series of ruthenium complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental and spectroscopic methods (FT-IR, electronic, 1H, 13C, 31P NMR and ESI-MS). The ligands were coordinated to ruthenium through quinone oxygen, imine nitrogen and enolate oxygen/thiolato sulfur. On the basis of spectral studies an octahedral geometry may be assigned for all the complexes. Further, the catalytic oxidation of primary, secondary alcohol and transfer hydrogenation of ketone was carried out. The DNA cleavage efficiency of new complexes has also been tested.

  6. Ruthenium(II) complexes containing quinone based ligands: synthesis, characterization, catalytic applications and DNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Anitha, P; Manikandan, R; Endo, A; Hashimoto, T; Viswanathamurthi, P

    2012-12-01

    1,2-Naphthaquinone reacts with amines such as semicarbazide, isonicotinylhydrazide and thiosemicarbazide in high yield procedure with the formation of tridentate ligands HL(n) (n=1-3). By reaction of ruthenium(II) starting complexes and quinone based ligands HL(n) (n=1-3), a series of ruthenium complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental and spectroscopic methods (FT-IR, electronic, (1)H, (13)C, (31)P NMR and ESI-MS). The ligands were coordinated to ruthenium through quinone oxygen, imine nitrogen and enolate oxygen/thiolato sulfur. On the basis of spectral studies an octahedral geometry may be assigned for all the complexes. Further, the catalytic oxidation of primary, secondary alcohol and transfer hydrogenation of ketone was carried out. The DNA cleavage efficiency of new complexes has also been tested. PMID:23063861

  7. Recent progress in studies on the health benefits of pyrroloquinoline quinone.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Mitsugu; Nakano, Masahiko; Ikemoto, Kazuto

    2015-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), an aromatic tricyclic o-quinone, was identified initially as a redox cofactor for bacterial dehydrogenases. Although PQQ is not biosynthesized in mammals, trace amounts of PQQ have been found in human and rat tissues because of its wide distribution in dietary sources. Importantly, nutritional studies in rodents have revealed that PQQ deficiency exhibits diverse systemic responses, including growth impairment, immune dysfunction, and abnormal reproductive performance. Although PQQ is not currently classified as a vitamin, PQQ has been implicated as an important nutrient in mammals. In recent years, PQQ has been receiving much attention owing to its physiological importance and pharmacological effects. In this article, we review the potential health benefits of PQQ with a focus on its growth-promoting activity, anti-diabetic effect, anti-oxidative action, and neuroprotective function. Additionally, we provide an update of its basic pharmacokinetics and safety information in oral ingestion.

  8. Selective Alkylation of C-Rich Bulge Motifs in Nucleic Acids by Quinone Methide Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lönnberg, Tuomas; Hutchinson, Mark; Rokita, Steven

    2015-09-01

    A quinone methide precursor featuring a bis-cyclen anchoring moiety has been synthesized and its capacity to alkylate oligonucleotide targets quantified in the presence and absence of divalent metal ions (Zn(2+) , Ni(2+) and Cd(2+) ). The oligonucleotides were designed for testing the sequence and secondary structure specificity of the reaction. Gel electrophoretic analysis revealed predominant alkylation of C-rich bulges, regardless of the presence of divalent metal ions or even the bis-cyclen anchor. This C-selectivity appears to be an intrinsic property of the quinone methide electrophile as reflected by its reaction with an equimolar mixture of the 2'-deoxynucleosides. Only dA-N1 and dC-N3 alkylation products were detected initially and only the dC adduct persisted for detection under conditions of the gel electrophoretic analysis.

  9. Recent progress in studies on the health benefits of pyrroloquinoline quinone.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Mitsugu; Nakano, Masahiko; Ikemoto, Kazuto

    2015-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), an aromatic tricyclic o-quinone, was identified initially as a redox cofactor for bacterial dehydrogenases. Although PQQ is not biosynthesized in mammals, trace amounts of PQQ have been found in human and rat tissues because of its wide distribution in dietary sources. Importantly, nutritional studies in rodents have revealed that PQQ deficiency exhibits diverse systemic responses, including growth impairment, immune dysfunction, and abnormal reproductive performance. Although PQQ is not currently classified as a vitamin, PQQ has been implicated as an important nutrient in mammals. In recent years, PQQ has been receiving much attention owing to its physiological importance and pharmacological effects. In this article, we review the potential health benefits of PQQ with a focus on its growth-promoting activity, anti-diabetic effect, anti-oxidative action, and neuroprotective function. Additionally, we provide an update of its basic pharmacokinetics and safety information in oral ingestion. PMID:26168402

  10. Quinone exchange at the A{sub 1} site in photosystem I [PSI

    SciTech Connect

    Barkoff, A.; Brunkan, N.; Snyder, S.W.; Ostafin, A.; Werst, M.; Thurnauer, M.C.; Biggins, J.

    1995-12-31

    Quinones play an essential role in light-induced electron transport in photosynthetic reaction centers (RC). Study of quinone binding within the protein matrix of the RC is a focal point of understanding the biological optimization of photosynthesis. In plant and cyanobacterial PSI, phylloquinone (K{sub 1}) is believed to be the secondary electron acceptor, A{sub 1}, similar to Q{sub a} in the purple bacterial RC. Photoinduced electron transfer is initiated by reduction of the electron acceptor (A{sub 0}), a chlorophyll species, by the photoexcited primary donor *P{sub 700}. A{sub 1} acts as a transient redox intermediate between A{sub 0} and the iron-sulfur centers (FeS). We have examined the characteristic PSI electron spin polarized (ESP) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal as a marker of the interacting radical pairs developed during electron transfer.

  11. Induction of quinone reductase (QR) by withanolides isolated from Physalis angulata L. var. villosa Bonati (Solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Hu, Zhijuan; Yu, Liyan; Ma, Zhongjun; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Dan; Zhao, Xiaofeng

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, the EtOAc extract of the persistent calyx of Physalis angulata L. var. villosa Bonati (PA) was tested for its potential quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity with glutathione (GSH) as the substrate using an UPLC-ESI-MS method. The result revealed that the PA had electrophiles that could induce quinone reductase (QR) activity, which might be attributed to the modification of the highly reactive cysteine residues in Keap1. Herein, three new withanolides, compounds 3, 6 and 7, together with four known withanolides, compounds 1, 2, 4 and 5 were isolated from PA extract. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic techniques, including (1)H-, (13)C NMR (DEPT), and 2D-NMR (HMBC, HMQC, (1)H, (1)H-COSY, NOESY) experiments, as well as by HR-MS. All the seven compounds were tested for their QR induction activities towards mouse hepa 1c1c7 cells.

  12. Highly Efficient Catalysis of Retro-Claisen Reactions: From a Quinone Derivative to Functionalized Imidazolium Salts.

    PubMed

    Visbal, Renso; Laguna, Antonio; Gimeno, M Concepción

    2016-03-14

    A new and efficient method for the preparation of several imidazolium salts containing an ester group in the C4 position of the aromatic ring through a retro-Claisen reaction pathway between a quinone derivative and several alcohols is described. This new organic transformation proceeds in the absence of a catalyst, but it is greatly catalyzed by different Lewis acids, especially with AgOAc at a very low catalyst loading and in very short reaction times. The process takes place by the nucleophilic attack of the carbonyl groups by the alcohol functionality, thus promoting a double C-C bond cleavage and C-H and C-O bond formation. This reaction represents the first example of this type between a quinone derivative and alcohols. PMID:26864976

  13. Design, synthesis, biological and structural evaluation of functionalized resveratrol analogues as inhibitors of quinone reductase 2.

    PubMed

    St John, Sarah E; Jensen, Katherine C; Kang, Soosung; Chen, Yafang; Calamini, Barbara; Mesecar, Andrew D; Lipton, Mark A

    2013-10-01

    Resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxylstilbene) has been proposed to elicit a variety of positive health effects including protection against cancer and cardiovascular disease. The highest affinity target of resveratrol identified so far is the oxidoreductase enzyme quinone reductase 2 (QR2), which is believed to function in metabolic reduction and detoxification processes; however, evidence exists linking QR2 to the metabolic activation of quinones, which can lead to cell toxicity. Therefore, inhibition of QR2 by resveratrol may protect cells against reactive intermediates and eventually cancer. With the aim of identifying novel inhibitors of QR2, we designed, synthesized, and tested two generations of resveratrol analogue libraries for inhibition of QR2. In addition, X-ray crystal structures of six of the resveratrol analogues in the active site of QR2 were determined. Several novel inhibitors of QR2 were successfully identified as well as a compound that inhibits QR2 with a novel binding orientation.

  14. Dysideanones A-C, unusual sesquiterpene quinones from the South China Sea sponge Dysidea avara.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Wei-Hua; Xu, Ting-Ting; Yu, Hao-Bing; Chen, Guo-Dong; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Yang, Fan; Li, Yu-Shan; Han, Bing-Nan; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Lin, Hou-Wen

    2014-02-28

    Dysideanones A-C (1-3), three unusual sesquiterpene quinones with unprecedented carbon skeletons, were isolated from the South China Sea sponge Dysidea avara. Their structures including absolute configurations were determined by a combination of spectroscopic analyses and calculated ECD spectra. Within the sesquiterpene quinone structures, dysideanones A (1) and B (2) share an unprecedented 6/6/6/6-fused tetracyclic carbon skeleton, while dysideanone C (3) possesses an unusual 6/6/5/6-fused tetracyclic core. Dysideanone B (2) showed cytotoxicity against two human cancer cell lines, HeLa and HepG2, with IC50 values of 7.1 and 9.4 μM, respectively.

  15. Non-photosynthetic pigments as potential biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieterman, E. W.; Cockell, C. S.; Meadows, V. S.

    2014-03-01

    Photosynthetic organisms on Earth produce potentially detectable surface reflectance biosignatures due in part to the spectral location and strength of pigment absorption. However, life on Earth uses pigments for a multitude of purposes other than photosynthesis, including coping with extreme environments. Macroscopic environments exist on Earth where the surface reflectance is significantly altered by a nonphotosynthetic pigment, such as the case of hypersaline lakes and ponds (Oren et al. 1992). Here we explore the nature and potential detectability of non-photosynthetic pigments in disk-averaged planetary observations using a combination of laboratory measurements and archival reflectance spectra, along with simulated broadband photometry and spectra. The in vivo visible reflectance spectra of a cross section of pigmented microorganisms are presented to illustrate the spectral diversity of biologically produced pigments. Synthetic broadband colors are generated to show a significant spread in color space. A 1D radiative transfer model (Meadows & Crisp 1996; Crisp 1997) is used to approximate the spectra of scenarios where pigmented organisms are widespread on planets with Earth-like atmospheres. Broadband colors are revisited to show that colors due to surface reflectivity are not robust to the addition of scattering and absorption effects from the atmosphere. We consider a èbest case' plausible scenario for the detection of nonphotosynthetic pigments by using the Virtual Planetary Laboratory's 3D spectral Earth model (Robinson et al. 2011) to explore the detectability of the surface biosignature produced by pigmented halophiles that are widespread on an Earth-analog planet.

  16. Melanin pigmented solar absorbing surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gallas, J.M.; Eisner, M.

    1980-01-01

    Selectivity enhancement is shown to result for melanin, a black biopolymer pigment, for sufficiently low sample density. The effect is proposed to follow from a consideration of the evanescent waves associated with the total internal reflection phenomenon. A relationship is discussed among powder density, pH and the paramagnetic properties of melanin; this relationship is shown to be consistent with, and offer support to an amino-acid side group proposed earlier as part of the melanin structure. A brief discussion is also presented on the optical properties of melanin and the relative importance of quinhydrone, a change transfer complex believed to exist in the polymeric structure of melanin.

  17. Pigmented Lesion of Buccal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Manas; Kumar, Malay; Kumar, Manish; Agarwal, Deshant

    2014-01-01

    Pigmented lesions are commonly found in the mouth. Such lesions represent a variety of clinical entities, ranging from physiologic changes to manifestation of systemic illness and malignant neoplasm. Diagnosis of such lesions requires a proper case history, extraoral and intraoral examination, and, in some cases, biopsy, aspiration cytology, and laboratory investigations. Here we present a case of purple lesion on the buccal mucosa of a 34-year-old male patient which was provisionally diagnosed as mucocele but on the basis of histopathological picture it was finally diagnosed as angiofibroma, and we also discuss the clinical and histopathological differential diagnosis. PMID:25161669

  18. Iris pigmentation and behavioral inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, A; Kagan, J

    1987-07-01

    Two independent investigations of the association between the temperamental dimensions of inhibition and lack of inhibition to the unfamiliar, on the one hand, and the degree of pigmentation of the iris, on the other, revealed a statistically significant relation in Caucasian children between behavioral inhibition to the unfamiliar and blue irises and uninhibited behavior and brown irises. Several biochemical interpretations of this association were discussed and it was suggested that these behavioral styles might be influenced by biological factors that are partially marked by eye color in Caucasian populations.

  19. A Catalyst-Controlled Aerobic Coupling of ortho-Quinones and Phenols Applied to the Synthesis of Aryl Ethers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zheng; Lumb, Jean-Philip

    2016-09-12

    ortho-Quinones are underutilized six-carbon-atom building blocks. We herein describe an approach for controlling their reactivity with copper that gives rise to a catalytic aerobic cross-coupling with phenols. The resulting aryl ethers are generated in high yield across a broad substrate scope under mild conditions. This method represents a unique example where the covalent modification of an ortho-quinone is catalyzed by a transition metal, creating new opportunities for their utilization in synthesis. PMID:27513295

  20. Enantioselective addition of boronates to o-quinone methides catalyzed by chiral biphenols.

    PubMed

    Luan, Yi; Schaus, Scott E

    2012-12-12

    Chiral biphenols were found to catalyze the enantioselective asymmetric addition of aryl- or alkenylboronates to o-quinone methides. Substituted 2-styryl phenols were obtained in good yields (up to 95%) with high enantiomeric ratios (up to 98:2) in the presence of 10 mol % 3,3'-Br(2)-BINOL. A two-step synthesis of (S)-4-methoxydalbergione in good yield and selectivity was achieved. PMID:23206197

  1. Enantioselective Addition of Boronates to Ortho-Quinone Methides Catalyzed by Chiral Biphenols

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Yi; Schaus, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Chiral biphenols were found to catalyze the enantioselective asymmetric addition of aryl- or alkenyl-boronates to ortho-quinone methides. Substituted 2-styryl phenols were obtained in good yields (up to 95%) and high enantiomeric ratios (up to 98:2) in presence of 10 mol % of 3,3′-Br2-BINOL. A two step synthesis of (S)-4-Methoxy-dalbergione is achieved in good yield and selectivity. PMID:23206197

  2. Modular o-quinone catalyst system for dehydrogenation of tetrahydroquinolines under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Wendlandt, Alison E; Stahl, Shannon S

    2014-08-27

    Quinolines are common pharmacophores present in numerous FDA-approved pharmaceuticals and other bioactive compounds. Here, we report the design and development of new o-quinone-based catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of tetrahydroquinolines to afford quinolines. Use of a Co(salophen) cocatalyst allows the reaction to proceed efficiently with ambient air at room temperature. The utility of the catalytic method is demonstrated in the preparation of a number of medicinally relevant quinolines. PMID:25109345

  3. Mechanistic studies of catechol generation from secondary quinone amines relevant to indole formation and tyrosinase activation.

    PubMed

    Land, Edward J; Ramsden, Christopher A; Riley, Patrick A; Yoganathan, Gnanamoly

    2003-08-01

    The biological significance of the spontaneous cyclization and redox reactions of ortho-quinone amines is that these appear to be the mechanism of formation of the indolic components of melanin and are also involved in the autoactivation of tyrosinase. We have previously shown that activation of tyrosinase is prevented by the formation of a cyclic betaine from a tertiary amine analogue. Evidence is presented to show that cyclization of ortho-quinones by Michael addition also occurs in the oxidation of secondary catecholamines. Three varieties of cyclic product have been detected and their formation is influenced by the nature of the N-substituent. Five-membered betaine rings form directly and, although six- and seven-membered rings also form, a transient spiro isomer of the ortho-quinone was in some cases detected as an intermediate. The heterocyclic products formed as betaines undergo redox exchange with residual quinone to form the corresponding aminochromes. We have established the kinetic constants of these reactions, either directly by pulse radiolysis measurements or by inference using a computer model of the reaction pathway to fit the observed data. To investigate the potential biological applications of this chemistry the system was also examined by tyrosinase-catalysed oxidation of the catecholamine substrates in which there is re-oxidation of the catechol formed by the redox exchange reaction and enables measurement of oxygen utilization stoichiometry. We show that the redox exchange reaction is unaffected by side-chain modification whereas cyclization is dependent on both electronic and steric factors. In the light of these studies we conclude that the failure of tertiary amine-derived betaines to undergo redox exchange, and thus block in vitro activation of tyrosinase, is due to the absence of a second exchangeable proton.

  4. Benzene and dopamine catechol quinones could initiate cancer or neurogenic disease.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Muhammad; Saeed, Muhammad; Rogan, Eleanor G; Cavalieri, Ercole L

    2010-01-15

    Catechol quinones of estrogens react with DNA by 1,4-Michael addition to form depurinating N3Ade and N7Gua adducts. Loss of these adducts from DNA creates apurinic sites that can generate mutations leading to cancer initiation. We compared the reactions of the catechol quinones of the leukemogenic benzene (CAT-Q) and N-acetyldopamine (NADA-Q) with 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG) or DNA. NADA was used to prevent intramolecular cyclization of dopamine quinone. Reaction of CAT-Q or NADA-Q with dG at pH 4 afforded CAT-4-N7dG or NADA-6-N7dG, which lost deoxyribose with a half-life of 3 h to form CAT-4-N7Gua or 4 h to form NADA-6-N7Gua. When CAT-Q or NADA-Q was reacted with DNA, N3Ade adducts were formed and lost from DNA instantaneously, whereas N7Gua adducts were lost over several hours. The maximum yield of adducts in the reaction of CAT-Q or NADA-Q with DNA at pH 4 to 7 was at pH 4. When tyrosinase-activated CAT or NADA was reacted with DNA at pH 5 to 8, adduct levels were much higher (10- to 15-fold), and the highest yield was at pH 5. Reaction of catechol quinones of natural and synthetic estrogens, benzene, naphthalene, and dopamine with DNA to form depurinating adducts is a common feature that may lead to initiation of cancer or neurodegenerative disease.

  5. Copper-Catalyzed Borylative Aromatization of p-Quinone Methides: Enantioselective Synthesis of Dibenzylic Boronates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we establish that DM-Segphos copper(I) complexes are efficient catalysts for the enantioselective borylation of para-quinone methides. This method provides straightforward access to chiral monobenzylic and dibenzylic boronic esters, with enantiomeric ratios up to 96:4, using a commercially available chiral phosphine. Standard manipulations of the C–B bond afford a variety of chiral diaryl derivatives. PMID:27088045

  6. Dysidavarones A-D, new sesquiterpene quinones from the marine sponge Dysidea avara.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Wei-Hua; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Yang, Ji-Si; Yang, Fan; Piao, Shu-Jian; Gao, Hao; Li, Jia; Ye, Wen-Cai; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Chen, Wan-Sheng; Lin, Hou-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Dysidavarones A-D (1-4), four new sesquiterpene quinones possessing the unprecedented "dysidavarane" carbon skeleton, were isolated from the South China Sea sponge Dysidea avara. The structures were established by spectroscopic methods, and the absolute configurations were determined using quantum mechanical calculation of the electronic circular dichroic (ECD) spectrum and exciton chirality CD method. Their cytotoxic activity against four human cancer cell lines and PTP1B inhibitory activity were also evaluated.

  7. Widespread ability of fungi to drive quinone redox cycling for biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Martin C; Bergmann, Michael; Schlosser, Dietmar

    2016-06-01

    Wood-rotting fungi possess remarkably diverse extracellular oxidation mechanisms, including enzymes, such as laccase and peroxidases, and Fenton chemistry. The ability to biologically drive Fenton chemistry by the redox cycling of quinones has previously been reported to be present in both ecologically diverging main groups of wood-rotting basidiomycetes. Therefore, we investigated whether it is even more widespread among fungal organisms. Screening of a diverse selection of a total of 18 ascomycetes and basidiomycetes for reduction of the model compound 2,6-dimethoxy benzoquinone revealed that all investigated strains were capable of reducing it to its corresponding hydroquinone. In a second step, depolymerization of the synthetic polymer polystyrene sulfonate was used as a proxy for quinone-dependent Fenton-based biodegradation capabilities. A diverse subset of the strains, including environmentally ubiquitous molds, white-rot fungi, as well as peatland and aquatic isolates, caused substantial depolymerization indicative for the effective employment of quinone redox cycling as biodegradation tool. Our results may also open up new paths to utilize diverse fungi for the bioremediation of recalcitrant organic pollutants. PMID:27190290

  8. Wolinella succinogenes quinol:fumarate reductase and its comparison to E. coli succinate:quinone reductase.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, C Roy D

    2003-11-27

    The three-dimensional structure of Wolinella succinogenes quinol:fumarate reductase (QFR), a dihaem-containing member of the superfamily of succinate:quinone oxidoreductases (SQOR), has been determined at 2.2 A resolution by X-ray crystallography [Lancaster et al., Nature 402 (1999) 377-385]. The structure and mechanism of W. succinogenes QFR and their relevance to the SQOR superfamily have recently been reviewed [Lancaster, Adv. Protein Chem. 63 (2003) 131-149]. Here, a comparison is presented of W. succinogenes QFR to the recently determined structure of the mono-haem containing succinate:quinone reductase from Escherichia coli [Yankovskaya et al., Science 299 (2003) 700-704]. In spite of differences in polypeptide and haem composition, the overall topology of the membrane anchors and their relative orientation to the conserved hydrophilic subunits is strikingly similar. A major difference is the lack of any evidence for a 'proximal' quinone site, close to the hydrophilic subunits, in W. succinogenes QFR.

  9. Induction of the anticarcinogenic marker enzyme, quinone reductase, in murine hepatoma cells in vitro by flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Uda, Y; Price, K R; Williamson, G; Rhodes, M J

    1997-12-01

    Some flavonoids induce phase II enzymes both in vivo and in vitro. We have determined the structural requirements for this activity by examining the ability of naturally-occurring flavonoids to induce the phase II enzyme, quinone reductase (NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase; EC 1.6.99.2), in murine Hepalclc7 cells. Hydroxylation of the B ring is not essential for induction, since galangin and kaempferol (with 0 and 1 hydroxyl in the B ring, respectively) are better inducers than quercetin (2 B ring hydroxyls). A 2,3 double bond in the C ring is essential for induction, since taxifolin, which has the same substitution pattern as quercetin but lacks the 2,3 double bond, is not an inducer. This is supported by catechin and epicatechin, which do not possess the 2,3 double bond and are also not inducers. A 3-hydroxyl group increases the activity but is not essential for induction, since apigenin is an inducer but kaempferol (which has the same structure as apigenin but possesses a 3-hydroxyl group) is more effective. The data show that, of the flavonoids, the flavonols are the most effective inducers of quinone reductase activity in Hepa1c1c7 cells (kaempferol approximately galangin > quercetin > myricetin approximately apigenin (a flavone)) and that flavanols and flavans are ineffective.

  10. Widespread ability of fungi to drive quinone redox cycling for biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Martin C; Bergmann, Michael; Schlosser, Dietmar

    2016-06-01

    Wood-rotting fungi possess remarkably diverse extracellular oxidation mechanisms, including enzymes, such as laccase and peroxidases, and Fenton chemistry. The ability to biologically drive Fenton chemistry by the redox cycling of quinones has previously been reported to be present in both ecologically diverging main groups of wood-rotting basidiomycetes. Therefore, we investigated whether it is even more widespread among fungal organisms. Screening of a diverse selection of a total of 18 ascomycetes and basidiomycetes for reduction of the model compound 2,6-dimethoxy benzoquinone revealed that all investigated strains were capable of reducing it to its corresponding hydroquinone. In a second step, depolymerization of the synthetic polymer polystyrene sulfonate was used as a proxy for quinone-dependent Fenton-based biodegradation capabilities. A diverse subset of the strains, including environmentally ubiquitous molds, white-rot fungi, as well as peatland and aquatic isolates, caused substantial depolymerization indicative for the effective employment of quinone redox cycling as biodegradation tool. Our results may also open up new paths to utilize diverse fungi for the bioremediation of recalcitrant organic pollutants.

  11. Potential gastroprotective effect of novel cyperenoic acid/quinone derivatives in human cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Theoduloz, Cristina; Carrión, Ivanna Bravo; Pertino, Mariano Walter; Valenzuela, Daniela; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2012-11-01

    The stem bark of Tabebuia species and the rhizomes of Jatropha isabelii are used in Paraguayan traditional medicine to treat gastric lesions and as anti-inflammatory agents. The sesquiterpene cyperenoic acid obtained from J. isabelii has been shown to display a gastroprotective effect in animal models of induced gastric ulcers while the quinone lapachol shows several biological effects associated with the use of the crude drug. The aim of this work was to prepare hybrid molecules presenting a terpene and a quinone moiety and to obtain an assessment of the gastroprotective activity of the new compounds using human cell cultures (MRC-5 fibroblasts and AGS epithelial gastric cells). Eight compounds, including the natural products and semisynthetic derivatives were assessed for proliferation of MRC-5 fibroblasts, protection against sodium taurocholate-induced damage, prostaglandin E2 content, and stimulation of cellular-reduced glutathione synthesis in AGS cells. The following antioxidant assays were performed: DPPH discoloration, scavenging of the superoxide anion, and inhibition of induced lipoperoxidation in erythrocyte membranes. 3-Hydroxy-β-lapachone (3) and cyperenoic acid (4) stimulated fibroblast proliferation. Lapachol (1), dihydroprenyl lapachol (2), 3-hydroxy-β-lapachone (3), and lapachoyl cyperenate (6) protected against sodium taurocholate-induced damage in AGS cells. Lapachol (1) and dihydroprenyl lapachoyl cyperenate (7) significantly stimulated prostaglandin E2 synthesis in AGS cells. Compounds 3, 4, and 7 raised reduced glutathione levels in AGS cells. The hybrid compounds presented activities different than those of the starting sesquiterpene or quinones.

  12. Potential gastroprotective effect of novel cyperenoic acid/quinone derivatives in human cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Theoduloz, Cristina; Carrión, Ivanna Bravo; Pertino, Mariano Walter; Valenzuela, Daniela; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2012-11-01

    The stem bark of Tabebuia species and the rhizomes of Jatropha isabelii are used in Paraguayan traditional medicine to treat gastric lesions and as anti-inflammatory agents. The sesquiterpene cyperenoic acid obtained from J. isabelii has been shown to display a gastroprotective effect in animal models of induced gastric ulcers while the quinone lapachol shows several biological effects associated with the use of the crude drug. The aim of this work was to prepare hybrid molecules presenting a terpene and a quinone moiety and to obtain an assessment of the gastroprotective activity of the new compounds using human cell cultures (MRC-5 fibroblasts and AGS epithelial gastric cells). Eight compounds, including the natural products and semisynthetic derivatives were assessed for proliferation of MRC-5 fibroblasts, protection against sodium taurocholate-induced damage, prostaglandin E2 content, and stimulation of cellular-reduced glutathione synthesis in AGS cells. The following antioxidant assays were performed: DPPH discoloration, scavenging of the superoxide anion, and inhibition of induced lipoperoxidation in erythrocyte membranes. 3-Hydroxy-β-lapachone (3) and cyperenoic acid (4) stimulated fibroblast proliferation. Lapachol (1), dihydroprenyl lapachol (2), 3-hydroxy-β-lapachone (3), and lapachoyl cyperenate (6) protected against sodium taurocholate-induced damage in AGS cells. Lapachol (1) and dihydroprenyl lapachoyl cyperenate (7) significantly stimulated prostaglandin E2 synthesis in AGS cells. Compounds 3, 4, and 7 raised reduced glutathione levels in AGS cells. The hybrid compounds presented activities different than those of the starting sesquiterpene or quinones. PMID:23047252

  13. Crystal structures of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 quinone oxidoreductase and its complex with NADPH

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Hongmei; Gao, Yu; Li, Mei; Chang, Wenrui

    2009-12-18

    Zeta-crystallin-like quinone oxidoreductase is NAD(P)H-dependent and catalyzes one-electron reduction of certain quinones to generate semiquinone. Here we present the crystal structures of zeta-crystallin-like quinone oxidoreductase from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (PtoQOR) and its complexes with NADPH determined at 2.4 and 2.01 A resolutions, respectively. PtoQOR forms as a homologous dimer, each monomer containing two domains. In the structure of the PtoQOR-NADPH complex, NADPH locates in the groove between the two domains. NADPH binding causes obvious conformational changes in the structure of PtoQOR. The putative substrate-binding site of PtoQOR is wider than that of Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus HB8. Activity assays show that PtoQOR has weak 1,4-benzoquinone catalytic activity, and very strong reduction activity towards large substrates such as 9,10-phenanthrenequinone. We propose a model to explain the conformational changes which take place during reduction reactions catalyzed by PtoQOR.

  14. Features of Idebenone and Related Short-Chain Quinones that Rescue ATP Levels under Conditions of Impaired Mitochondrial Complex I

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Michael; Hoffmann-Enger, Barbara; Deppe, Holger; Soeberdt, Michael; Haefeli, Roman H.; Rummey, Christian; Feurer, Achim; Gueven, Nuri

    2012-01-01

    Short-chain quinones have been investigated as therapeutic molecules due to their ability to modulate cellular redox reactions, mitochondrial electron transfer and oxidative stress, which are pathologically altered in many mitochondrial and neuromuscular disorders. Recently, we and others described that certain short-chain quinones are able to bypass a deficiency in complex I by shuttling electrons directly from the cytoplasm to complex III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain to produce ATP. Although this energy rescue activity is highly interesting for the therapy of disorders associated with complex I dysfunction, no structure-activity-relationship has been reported for short-chain quinones so far. Using a panel of 70 quinones, we observed that the capacity for this cellular energy rescue as well as their effect on lipid peroxidation was influenced more by the physicochemical properties (in particular logD) of the whole molecule than the quinone moiety itself. Thus, the observed correlations allow us to explain the differential biological activities and therapeutic potential of short-chain quinones for the therapy of disorders associated with mitochondrial complex I dysfunction and/or oxidative stress. PMID:22558363

  15. [How do transport and metabolism affect the biological effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons?].

    PubMed

    Bekki, Kanae; Toriba, Akira; Tang, Ning; Kameda, Takayuki; Takigami, Hidetaka; Suzuki, Go; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), some of which are carcinogenic/mutagenic, are generated by combustion of fossil fuels and also released through tanker or oilfield accident to cause a large scale environmental pollution. PAHs concentration in China is especially high in East Asia because of many kinds of generation sources such as coal heating systems, vehicles and factories without exhaust gas/particulate treatment systems. So, the atmospheric pollution caused by PAHs in China has been seriously concerned from the view point of health effects. Like yellow sand and sulfur oxide, PAHs exhausted in China are also transported to Japan. Additionally, strongly mutagenic nitrated PAHs (NPAHs), estrogenic/antiestrogenic PAH hydroxides (PAHOHs) and reactive oxygen species-producing PAH quinones (PAHQs) are formed from PAHs by the chemical reaction during the transport. Furthermore these PAHOHs and PAHQs are produced by the metabolism in animal body. In the biological activities caused by the above PAH derivatives, the structure-activity relationship was observed. In this review, our recent results on the generation of PAH derivatives by atmospheric transport and metabolism are reported. Also, the existing condition of PAHs as atmospheric pollutants is considered.

  16. Photoeffects of near ultraviolet light upon a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposed to mouse skin microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Peirano, W.B.

    1991-01-01

    Near ultraviolet (UV) light has been reported to both enhance and inhibit the tumor incidence in mice dermally exposed to benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) mixtures. Near UV light interacts with PAHs producing a variety of oxygenated products such as phenols, endoperoxides and quinones. However, little is known about BaP products formed from near UV irradiation of BaP-exposed mouse skin. Therefore, [sup 14]C-BaP was incubated with 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) induced C[sub 3]H/HeJ and DBA/2J mouse skin microsomes with or without a 365 nm light source. The results indicated that the concurrent 365 nm light irradiation of induced mouse skin microsomes and BaP greatly enhanced the total conversion of BaP to its products, approximately 3-fold for the C[sub 3]H/HeJ and approximately 7-fold for the DBA/2J mouse microsomes, compared to the induced mouse skin microsomes and BaP alone. HPLC analyses of organic extracts indicated a more than additive enhancement of the formation of most of the individual cochromatographed BaP metabolites due to the combined interaction of 365 nm light with BaP and skin microsomes. Similar interactions were observed using benz(a)anthracene (BaA) in this system. These data show that near UV light alters the metabolic profile of PAHs produced by mouse skin microsomes.

  17. Polycyclic musk fragrances in the aquatic environment.

    PubMed

    Rimkus, G G

    1999-12-20

    The polycyclic musk fragrances, mainly 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethylcyclopenta(g)-2-ben zopyrane (HHCB) and 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyltetrahydronaphthalene (AHTN) are synthetic musk fragrances which are used in almost all scented consumer products, such as perfumes, cosmetics and laundry detergents. Concerning their chemical structures the polycyclic musks are indane and tetraline derivatives highly substituted mainly by methyl groups. Their production has been increased continuously during the last years with a world-wide production volume today of about 6000 t/year. After their application in private households they are dumped via the sewage treatment plants into the aquatic environment. In this review the analysis of polycyclic musk compounds in environmental samples is shortly presented and all published data of polycyclic musk compounds in water, sediment, suspended particulate matter (SPM), sewage sludge, and biota are summarized and discussed. The highest HHCB and AHTN concentrations were analysed in water (maximum concentrations: 6 microg HHCB/l, 4.4 microg AHTN/1) and sludge (maximum concentrations: 63 mg HHCB/kg dry matter, 34 mg AHTN/kg dry matter) from sewage plants, and in fish (maximum concentrations: 159 mg HHCB/kg lipid, 58 mg AHTN/kg lipid) from sewage ponds. In all other samples from different aquatic ecosystems these chemicals were unequivocally detected in varying concentrations dependent on the distance to sewage treatment plants. Even in marine water samples from the German Bight HHCB and AHTN could be quantified at the lower ng/l level. Very often HHCB and AHTN formed the major organic contaminants, in all samples their concentrations exceeded those of musk xylene and musk ketone. Also several by-products and impurities of the commercial polycyclic musks were analysed in river and waste water samples in not negligible amounts. The apparently ubiquitous distribution of polycyclic musks in the aquatic environment

  18. DFT studies of the photophysical properties of fluorescent and semiconductor polycyclic benzimidazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Warde, Umesh; Rhyman, Lydia; Ramasami, Ponnadurai; Sekar, Nagaiyan

    2015-05-01

    The photophysical and electrochemical properties of eleven polycyclic benzimidazole fused organic pigments (four based on phthalic anhydride, four based on naphthalic anhydride and three based naphthalene tetra carboxylic acid dianhydride) were investigated using density functional theory and time dependent density functional theory methods (B3LYP/6-31G(d) and M06/6-31G(d)). The predicted geometries are comparable using both functionals. The electrochemical properties are in good agreement with the experimental results. However, the experimental absorption-emission properties are closer to the values computed using the M06/6-31G(d) method. Both the methods perform equally well in explaining the intramolecular charge transfer characteristics. This work can help to understand the modern age functional materials at molecular level and to design new molecules.

  19. The bioefficacy of microemulsified natural pigments in egg yolk pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Chow, P Y; Gue, S Z; Leow, S K; Goh, L B

    2014-01-01

    1. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that microemulsified carotenoid products show improved bioavailability over corresponding regular preparations, leading to greater yolk pigmentation at lower dosages. 2. The first trial was conducted using a maize-soya bean basal diet supplemented with either 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.25 g/kg of microemulsified Red or non-microemulsified Red. The second trial involved feeding microemulsified Yellow or non-microemulsified Yellow using a similar dosage range. The layers were divided into 4 replicates of 8 layers each (32 layers per treatment). The 8 cages of layers were fed from a single feed trough. Feed and water were provided ad libitum throughout the trial. Each week, the eggs were collected. The whole liquid egg colour was determined by means of a commercially available yolk colour fan. Where required, HPLC-(high-performance liquid chromatography) based analysis of trans-capsanthin or trans-lutein equivalents using the Association of Analytical Communities method was carried out. Data were statistically analysed by one-way ANOVA method using Statgraphics. 3. Results showed that the colour and carotenoid content of the egg yolk increased with increasing amount of carotenoids in the diet. The colour of egg yolks from layers fed similar concentrations of microemulsified versus the regular preparation was significantly different. At the commercial recommended dose of one g/kg regular Yellow or Red product, the microemulsified pigmenter is able to provide the equivalent yolk colour at a 20-30% lower dose. 4. In conclusion, the trial results supported the hypothesis that a desired yolk colour score is achievable at a significantly lower inclusion rate when carotenoid molecules are emulsified using the microemulsion nanotechnology.

  20. The spleen pigment cells in some amphibia.

    PubMed

    Scalia, Marina; Di Pietro, Cinzia; Poma, Mariangela; Ragusa, Marco; Sichel, Giovanni; Corsaro, Concetta

    2004-04-01

    It was demonstrated that the spleen pigment cells of Amphibia are macrophages: they show an ultrastructurally distinctive morphology, are able to phagocytose and react positively for non-specific esterases. These pigmented macrophages express mRNA for tyrosinase and also they show dopa oxidase activity; therefore they are able to synthesize melanins, as Kupffer cells do.

  1. Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) of Chlorophyll Pigments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Jerry

    1984-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, procedures used, and discussion of typical results are provided for an experiment on the thin layer chromatography of chlorophyll pigments. The experiment works well in high school, since the chemicals used are the same as those used in paper chromatography of plant pigments. (JN)

  2. Dermatoscopic findings of pigmented purpuric dermatosis*

    PubMed Central

    Ozkaya, Dilek Biyik; Emiroglu, Nazan; Su, Ozlem; Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Bahali, Anil Gulsel; Yildiz, Pelin; Demirkesen, Cuyan; Onsun, Nahide

    2016-01-01

    Background Pigmented purpuric dermatosis is a chronic skin disorder of unknown aetiology characterised by symmetrical petechial and pigmented macules, often confined to the lower limbs. The aetiology of pigmented purpuric dermatosis is unknown. Dermatoscopy is a non-invasive diagnostic technique that allows the visualisation of morphological features invisible to the naked eye; it combines a method that renders the corneal layer of the skin translucent with an optical system that magnifies the image projected onto the retina. Objectives The aim of this study is to investigate the dermatoscopic findings of pigmented purpuric dermatosis. Methods This study enrolled patients diagnosed histopathologically with pigmented purpuric dermatosis who had dermatoscopic records. We reviewed the dermatoscopic images of PPD patients who attended the outpatient clinic in the Istanbul Dermatovenereology Department at the Bezmialem Vakıf University Medical Faculty. Results Dermatoscopy showed: coppery-red pigmentation (97%, n = 31) in the background, a brown network (34%, n = 11), linear vessels (22%, n = 7), round to oval red dots, globules, and patches (69%, n = 22; 75%, n = 24; 34%, n = 11; respectively), brown globules (26%, n = 8) and dots (53%, n = 17), linear brown lines (22%, n = 7), and follicular openings (13%, n = 4). Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study to report the dermatoscopy of pigmented purpuric dermatosis. In our opinion, dermatoscopy can be useful in the diagnosis of pigmented purpuric dermatosis.

  3. Developing fungal pigments for "painting" vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sara C

    2012-02-01

    The use of fungal pigments as color additives to wood as a method to increase forest revenue is a relatively new, but quickly developing field. Sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is currently the primary utilized hardwood for spalting and appears to be the best suited North American hardwood for such purposes. The combination of Trametes versicolor and Bjerkandera adusta has been identified in several instances as a strong fungal pairing for zone line production; however, Xylaria polymorpha is capable of creating zone lines without the antagonism of a secondary fungus. Few fungal pigments have been developed for reliable use; Scytalidium cuboideum is capable of producing a penetrating pink/red stain, as well as a blue pigment after extended incubation, and Chlorociboria sp. produces a blue/green pigment if grown on aspen (Populus tremuloides). Several opportunities exist for stimulation of fungal pigments including the use of copper sulfate and changes in wood pH. PMID:22237673

  4. Structure of plant bile pigments

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenleber, R.W.

    1983-12-01

    Selective peptide cleavage has provided a general procedure for the study of the structure, including stereochemistry, of plant bile pigments. The information derived from the synthesis and spectral analysis of a series of 2,3-dihydrodioxobilins allows the determination of the trans relative stereochemistry for ring A of the ..beta../sub 1/-phycocyanobilin from C-phycocyanin as well as for ring A of phytochrome. A complete structure proof of the five phycoerythrobilins attached to the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of B-phycoerythrin is described. One of these tetrapyrroles is doubly-peptide linked to a single peptide chain through two thioethers at the C-3' and C-18' positions. The four remaining phycoerythrobilins are singly-linked to the protein through thioethers at the C-3' position and all possess the probable stereochemistry C-2(R), C-3(R), C-3'(R), and C-16(R).

  5. Monitoring of vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.

    2004-06-01

    An apparatus for monitoring vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a high-temperature environment has an excitation source producing electromagnetic radiation, an optical path having an optical probe optically communicating the electromagnetic radiation received at a proximal end to a distal end, a spectrometer or polychromator, a detector, and a positioner coupled to the first optical path. The positioner can slidably move the distal end of the optical probe to maintain the distal end position with respect to an area of a material undergoing combustion. The emitted wavelength can be directed to a detector in a single optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration, in a dual optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration or in a dual optical probe 90.degree. side scattered configuration. The apparatus can be used to monitor an emitted wavelength of energy from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon as it fluoresces in a high temperature environment.

  6. The Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator (SERM) Lasofoxifene Forms Reactive Quinones Similar to Estradiol

    PubMed Central

    Michalsen, Bradley T.; Gherezghiher, Teshome B.; Choi, Jaewoo; Esala, R.; Chandrasena, P.; Qin, Zhihui; Thatcher, Gregory R.J.; Bolton, Judy L.

    2012-01-01

    The bioactivation of both endogenous and equine estrogens to electrophilic quinoid metabolites has been postulated as a contributing factor in carcinogenic initiation and/or promotion in hormone sensitive tissues. Bearing structural resemblance to estrogens, extensive studies have shown that many selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are subject to similar bioactivation pathways. Lasofoxifene (LAS), a third generation SERM which has completed Phase III clinical trials for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, is currently approved in the European Union for this indication. Previously, Prakash et al. (Drug Metab. Dispos. 2008, 36, 1218-26) reported that similar to estradiol, two catechol regioisomers of LAS are formed as primary oxidative metabolites, accounting for roughly half of total LAS metabolism. However, the potential for further oxidation of these catechols to electrophilic o-quinones has not been reported. In the present study, LAS was synthesized and its oxidative metabolism investigated in vitro under various conditions. Incubation of LAS with tyrosinase, human liver microsomes, or rat liver microsomes in the presence of GSH as a trapping reagent resulted in formation of two mono-GSH and two di-GSH catechol conjugates which were characterized by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Similar conjugates were also detected in incubations with P450 3A4, P450 2D6, and P450 1B1 supersomes. Interestingly, these conjugates were also detected as major metabolites when compared to competing detoxification pathways such as glucuronidation and methylation. The 7-hydroxylasofoxifene (7-OHLAS) catechol regioisomer was also synthesized and oxidized either chemically or enzymatically to an o-quinone that was shown to form depurinating adducts with DNA. Collectively, these data show that analogous to estrogens, LAS is oxidized to catechols and o-quinones which could potentially contribute to in vivo toxicity for this SERM. PMID

  7. Selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) lasofoxifene forms reactive quinones similar to estradiol.

    PubMed

    Michalsen, Bradley T; Gherezghiher, Teshome B; Choi, Jaewoo; Chandrasena, R Esala P; Qin, Zhihui; Thatcher, Gregory R J; Bolton, Judy L

    2012-07-16

    The bioactivation of both endogenous and equine estrogens to electrophilic quinoid metabolites has been postulated as a contributing factor in carcinogenic initiation and/or promotion in hormone sensitive tissues. Bearing structural resemblance to estrogens, extensive studies have shown that many selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are subject to similar bioactivation pathways. Lasofoxifene (LAS), a third generation SERM which has completed phase III clinical trials for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, is currently approved in the European Union for this indication. Previously, Prakash et al. (Drug Metab. Dispos. (2008) 36, 1218-1226) reported that similar to estradiol, two catechol regioisomers of LAS are formed as primary oxidative metabolites, accounting for roughly half of the total LAS metabolism. However, the potential for further oxidation of these catechols to electrophilic o-quinones has not been reported. In the present study, LAS was synthesized and its oxidative metabolism investigated in vitro under various conditions. Incubation of LAS with tyrosinase, human liver microsomes, or rat liver microsomes in the presence of GSH as a trapping reagent resulted in the formation of two mono-GSH and two di-GSH catechol conjugates which were characterized by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Similar conjugates were also detected in incubations with P450 3A4, P450 2D6, and P450 1B1 supersomes. Interestingly, these conjugates were also detected as major metabolites when compared to competing detoxification pathways such as glucuronidation and methylation. The 7-hydroxylasofoxifene (7-OHLAS) catechol regioisomer was also synthesized and oxidized either chemically or enzymatically to an o-quinone that was shown to form depurinating adducts with DNA. Collectively, these data show that analogous to estrogens, LAS is oxidized to catechols and o-quinones which could potentially contribute to in vivo toxicity for this SERM

  8. A dual role for plant quinone reductases in host-fungus interaction.

    PubMed

    Heyno, Eiri; Alkan, Noam; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Quinone reductases (QR, EC 1.5.6.2) are flavoproteins that protect organisms from oxidative stress. The function of plant QRs has not as yet been addressed in vivo despite biochemical evidence for their involvement in redox reactions. Here, using knock-out (KO) and overexpressing lines, we studied the protective role of two groups of Arabidopsis thaliana cytosolic QRs, Nqr (NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase) and Fqr (flavodoxin-like quinone reductase), in response to infection by necrotrophic fungi. The KO lines nqr(-) and fqr1(-) displayed significantly slower development of lesions of Botrytis cinerea and Sclerotinia sclerotium in comparison to the wild type (WT). Consistent with this observation, the overexpressing line FQR1(+) was hypersensitive to the pathogens. Both the nqr(-) and fqr1(-) displayed increased fluorescence of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein,‬ a reporter for reactive oxygen species in response to B. cinerea. Infection by B. cinerea was accompanied with increased Nqr and Fqr1 protein levels in the WT as revealed by western blotting. In addition, a marked stimulation of salicylic acid-sensitive transcripts and suppression of jasmonate-sensitive transcripts was observed in moderately wounded QR KO mutant leaves, a condition mimicking the early stage of infection. In contrast to the above observations, germination of conidia was accelerated on leaves of QR KO mutants in comparison with the WT and FQR1(+). The same effect was observed in water-soluble leaf surface extracts. It is proposed that the altered interaction between B. cinerea and the QR mutants is a consequence of subtly altered redox state of the host, which perturbs host gene expression in response to environmental stress such as fungal growth.‬‬‬‬‬‬ PMID:23464356

  9. Exosomes released by keratinocytes modulate melanocyte pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Lo Cicero, Alessandra; Delevoye, Cédric; Gilles-Marsens, Floriane; Loew, Damarys; Dingli, Florent; Guéré, Christelle; André, Nathalie; Vié, Katell; van Niel, Guillaume; Raposo, Graça

    2015-01-01

    Cells secrete extracellular vesicles (EVs), exosomes and microvesicles, which transfer proteins, lipids and RNAs to regulate recipient cell functions. Skin pigmentation relies on a tight dialogue between keratinocytes and melanocytes in the epidermis. Here we report that exosomes secreted by keratinocytes enhance melanin synthesis by increasing both the expression and activity of melanosomal proteins. Furthermore, we show that the function of keratinocyte-derived exosomes is phototype-dependent and is modulated by ultraviolet B. In sum, this study uncovers an important physiological function for exosomes in human pigmentation and opens new avenues in our understanding of how pigmentation is regulated by intercellular communication in both healthy and diseased states.

  10. Amperometric electrochemical detection of pyrroloquinoline quinone in high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bergethon, P R

    1990-05-01

    The electrochemistry of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) enables its reduction and oxidation at a variety of electrode surfaces. Two methods of PQQ quantitation are described using amperometric electrochemical detection after HPLC separation. In one method a single electrode is used to reduce PQQ in the eluant stream and is sensitive to as little as 10 pmol of material. The second method is a dual electrode method that takes advantage of the reversible nature of the PQQ redox cycle and though only half as sensitive as the single electrode method, it is more specific. The advantages of the method lie in its simplicity, sensitivity, and low cost.

  11. Michael Additions of Highly Basic Enolates to ortho-Quinone Methides

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Robert S.; Garza, Christopher J.; Dang, Ann T.; Pedro, Te Kie A.; Chain, William J.

    2015-01-01

    A protocol by which ketone or ester enolates and ortho-quinone methides (o-QMs) are generated in situ in a single reaction flask from silylated precursors under the action of anhydrous fluoride is reported. The reaction partners are joined to give a variety of β-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-carbonyl compounds in 32–94% yield in a single laboratory operation. The intermediacy of o-QMs is supported by control experiments utilizing enolate precursors and conventional alkyl halides as competitive alkylating agents and the isolation of 1,5-dicarbonyl products resulting from conjugate additions that do not restore the aromatic system. PMID:25906358

  12. Total Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of an Antifungal Tricyclic o-Hydroxy-p-Quinone Methide Diterpenoid

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinhua; Foyle, Dylan; Lin, Xiaorong

    2013-01-01

    A convergent route has been developed to synthesize an antifungal tricyclic o-hydroxy-p-quinone methide diterpenoid and analogs. The Li/naphthalene mediated reductive alkylation was employed for coupling β-cyclocitral and the corresponding benzyl chloride while the BBr3–mediated one-pot bis-demethylation and intramolecular Friedel Crafts alkylation was used to assemble the tricyclic molecular skeleton. The structure-activity relationship of the diterpenoid was assessed based on anti-proliferation assays of the natural product and analogs against strains of pathogenic yeasts and filamentous fungi. PMID:23957833

  13. A quinone-assisted photoformation of energy-rich chemical bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Adachi, T.; Stillwell, W.

    1980-01-01

    In a study of biochemical means of solar energy conversion, ADP and inorganic phosphates were converted to ATP by white light in the nonaqueous solvent dimethylformamide in the presence of tetrachloro-p-quinone or ubiquinone. Conversion of ADP to ATP has been accomplished in aqueous suspension by the use of cell-like structures aggregated from poly(aspartic acid, glutamic acid, tyrosine). This is believed to occur through the formation of dopaquinone in the peptide structure during illumination. The way in which the quantitative yield of ATP has been influenced by pH and by added substances, such as FeCl2, was studied.

  14. High On/Off Conductance Switching Ratio via H-Tautomerization in Quinone.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Sherif Abdulkader; Cui, X Y; Ringer, S P; Stampfl, C

    2015-09-01

    Through first-principles electron transport simulations using the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism together with density functional theory, we show that, upon H-tautomerization, a simple derivative of quinone can act as a molecular switch with high ON/OFF ratio, up to 70 at low bias voltage. This switching behavior is explained by the quantum interference effect, where the positional change of hydrogen atoms causes the energies of the transmission channels to overlap. Our results suggest that this molecule could have potential applications as an effective switching device.

  15. Michael Additions of Highly Basic Enolates to ortho-Quinone Methides.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Robert S; Garza, Christopher J; Dang, Ann T; Pedro, Te Kie A; Chain, William J

    2015-05-01

    A protocol by which ketone or ester enolates and ortho-quinone methides (o-QMs) are generated in situ in a single reaction flask from silylated precursors under the action of anhydrous fluoride is reported. The reaction partners are joined to give a variety of β-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-carbonyl compounds in 32-94% yield in a single laboratory operation. The intermediacy of o-QMs is supported by control experiments utilizing enolate precursors and conventional alkyl halides as competitive alkylating agents and the isolation of 1,5-dicarbonyl products resulting from conjugate additions that do not restore the aromatic system.

  16. Diurnal variability of polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) concentrations: Relationship with meteorological conditions and inferred sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mohammed S.; Keyte, Ian J.; Yin, Jianxin; Stark, Christopher; Jones, Alan M.; Harrison, Roy M.

    2015-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their nitro and oxy derivatives have been sampled every three hours over one week in winter at two sites in Birmingham UK. One site is heavily influenced by road traffic and is close to residential dwellings, while the other site is a background urban location at some distance from both sources of emission. The time series of concentrations has been examined along with the ratio of concentrations between the two sampling sites. A comparison of averaged diurnal profiles has shown different patterns of behaviour which has been investigated through calculating ratios of concentration at 18:00-21:00 h relative to that at 06:00-09:00 h. This allows identification of those compounds with a strong contribution to a traffic-related maximum at 06:00-09:00 h which are predominantly the low molecular weight PAHs, together with a substantial group of quinones and nitro-PAHs. Changes in partitioning between vapour and particulate forms are unlikely to influence the ratio as the mean temperature at both times was almost identical. Most compounds show an appreciable increase in concentrations in the evening which is attributed to residential heating emissions. Compounds dominated by this source show high ratios of 18:00-21:00 concentrations relative to 06:00-09:00 concentrations and include higher molecular weight PAH and a substantial group of both quinones and nitro-PAH. The behaviour of retene, normally taken as an indicator of biomass burning, is suggestive of wood smoke only being one contributor to the evening peak in PAH and their derivatives, with coal combustion presumably being the other main contributor. Variations of PAH concentrations with wind speed show a dilution behaviour consistent with other primary pollutants, and high concentrations of a range of air pollutants were observed in an episode of low temperatures and low wind speeds towards the end of the overall sampling period consistent with poor local dispersion

  17. Alkaptonuric ochronosis presenting as palmoplantar pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Vijaikumar, M; Thappa, D M; Srikanth, S; Sethuraman, G; Nadarajan, S

    2000-06-01

    We describe a 37-year-old woman who presented with palmoplantar pigmentation, thickening and pitting of 4 years duration. Bluish pigmented patches were seen over the sclera of her eyes. Her lumbar spine showed typical calcification of the intervertebral discs. Addition of Benedict's reagent to a urine sample of the patient gave rise to greenish brown precipitate and brownish black supernatant. Alkalinization of urine turned it black. A biopsy of the palmar lesion demonstrated irregular breaking up, swelling and homogenization of collagen bundles in the reticular dermis. Yellow-brown (ochre coloured) pigment was seen lying within the collagen bundles and also freely in the deeper dermis confirming our clinical diagnosis of alkaptonuric ochronosis. To the best of our knowledge this is probably the second report of alkaptonuria presenting with palmoplantar pigmentation. PMID:10971492

  18. Pleiotropic effects of pigmentation genes in horses.

    PubMed

    Bellone, R R

    2010-12-01

    Horses are valued for the beauty and variety of colouration and coat patterning. To date, eleven different genes have been characterized that contribute to the variation observed in the horse. Unfortunately, mutations involving pigmentation often lead to deleterious effects in other systems, some of which have been described in the horse. This review focuses on six such pleiotropic effects or associations with pigmentation genes. These include neurological defects (lethal white foal syndrome and lavender foal syndrome), hearing defects, eye disorders (congenital stationary night blindness and multiple congenital ocular anomalies), as well as horse-specific melanoma. The pigmentation phenotype, disorder phenotype, mode of inheritance, genetic or genomic methods utilized to identify the genes involved and, if known, the causative mutations, molecular interactions and other susceptibility loci are discussed. As our understanding of pigmentation in the horse increases, through the use of novel genomic tools, we are likely to unravel yet unknown pleiotropic effects and determine additional interactions between previously discovered loci.

  19. Conservation of the chromatophore pigment response.

    PubMed

    Dukovcic, Stephanie R; Hutchison, Janine R; Trempy, Janine E

    2010-08-01

    Toxicant sensing technology has evolved to include biological sensors, such as cell-based biosensors, which rely on viable cells to convey a measurable physiological signal. Chromatophores are a class of pigment cells that have been investigated as cell-based biosensors. We report the characterization of Oncorhynchus tshawytscha melanophores and describe the melanophore pigment response to neurotransmitters in terms of pigment area occupied. Compared with the previously described model, Betta splendens erythrophores, O. tshawytscha melanophores responded similarly, indicating that pigment responses are biologically conserved between these two species. Additionally, melanophores responded to mercuric chloride and sodium arsenite, similar to B. splendens erythrophores, suggesting that melanophores can be used as detectors for environmental toxicants. This report highlights the potential of O. tshawytscha melanophores to be used as cell-based biosensors to address environmental toxicity, and warrants a continued investigation to strengthen this technology and its applications. PMID:20809546

  20. Pseudoephedrine may cause "pigmenting" fixed drug eruption.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Esen; Elinç-Aslan, Meryem Sevinç

    2011-05-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a distinctive drug eruption characterized by recurrent well-defined lesions in the same location each time the responsible drug is taken. Two different clinical forms have been described: the common classic pigmenting form and the rare nonpigmenting form. Nonpigmenting FDE is mainly characterized by symmetrical large erythematous plaques and the dermal histopathologic reaction pattern. Pseudoephedrine is known as the major inducer of nonpigmenting FDE. Pigmenting FDE from pseudoephedrine has not been reported previously. Here, the first case of pseudoephedrine-induced pigmenting FDE is reported, showing the characteristic features of classic pigmenting FDE such as asymmetry, normal-sized lesions, and the epidermodermal histopathologic reaction pattern. Moreover, a positive occlusive patch-test reaction to pseudoephedrine could be demonstrated on postlesional FDE skin for the first time.

  1. Diagnosis and management of facial pigmented macules.

    PubMed

    Lallas, Aimilios; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Moscarella, Elvira; Longo, Caterina; Simonetti, Vito; Zalaudek, Iris

    2014-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of pigmented macules on the mottled chronic sun-damaged skin of the face is challenging and includes lentigo maligna (LM), pigmented actinic (solar) keratosis, solar lentigo, and lichen-planus-like keratosis. Although dermatoscopy improves the diagnostic accuracy of the unaided eye, the accurate diagnosis and management of pigmented facial macules remains one of the most challenging scenarios in daily practice. This is related to the fact that pigmented actinic (solar) keratosis, lichen-planus-like keratosis, and LM may reveal overlapping criteria, making their differential diagnosis clinically difficult. For this reason, practical rules have been introduced, which should help to minimize the risk for inappropriate diagnosis and management of LM.

  2. Measuring protection of aromatic wine thiols from oxidation by competitive reactions vs wine preservatives with ortho-quinones.

    PubMed

    Nikolantonaki, Maria; Magiatis, Prokopios; Waterhouse, Andrew L

    2014-11-15

    Quinones are central intermediates in wine oxidation that can degrade the quality of wine by reactions with varietal thiols, such as 3-sulfanylhexanol, decreasing desirable aroma. Protection by wine preservatives (sulphur dioxide, glutathione, ascorbic acid and model tannin, phloroglucinol) was assessed by competitive sacrificial reactions with 4-methyl-1,2-benzoquinone, quantifying products and ratios by HPLC-UV-MS. Regioselectivity was assessed by product isolation and identification by NMR spectroscopy. Nucleophilic addition reactions compete with two electron reduction of quinones by sulphur dioxide or ascorbic acid, and both routes serve as effective quenching pathways, but minor secondary products from coupled redox reactions between the products and reactants are also observed. The wine preservatives were all highly reactive and thus all very protective against 3-sulfanylhexanol loss to the quinone, but showed only additive antioxidant effects. Confirmation of these reaction rates and pathways in wine is needed to assess the actual protective action of each tested preservative.

  3. New Directions in Phthalocyanine Pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandemark, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives were the following: (1) investigation of the synthesis of new phthalocyanines; (2) characterization of the new phthalocyanines synthesized; (3) investigate the properties of the newly synthesized phthalocyanines with emphasis on UV protection of plastics and coatings; and (4) utilize quantum mechanics to evaluate the structural relationships with possible properties and synthetic approaches. The proposed research targeted the synthesis of phthalocyanines containing an aromatic bridge between two phthalocyanine rings. The goal was to synthesize pigments which would protect plastics when exposed to the photodegradation effects of the sun in space. The stability and extended conjugation of the phthalocyanines offer a unique opportunity for energy absorption and numerous radiative and non-radiative energy loss mechanisms. Although the original targeted phthalocyanines were changed early in the project, several new and unique phthalocyanine compounds were prepared. The basic goals of this work were met and some unique and unexpected outcomes of the work were the result of the integral use of quantum mechanics and molecular modeling with the synthetic effort.

  4. [Bacterial pigment prodigiosin and its genotoxic effects].

    PubMed

    Gur'ianov, I D; Karamova, N S; Iusupova, D V; Gnezdilov, O I; Koshkarova, L A

    2013-01-01

    The prodigiosin preparation was isolated and purified from Serratia marcescens ATCC 9986, using chromatographic methods. The analysis of the preparation by TLC, NMR-spectrometry and mass-spectrometry allowed to confirm the red pigment fraction as the prodigiosin and detect its purity. Originally, the specific features of the toxic and genotoxic effects of prodigiosin and the possibility of induction of mutations by pigment in the cells of Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 (Ames test) and chromosome damage of mammalian erythroblasts have been determined.

  5. Calcium mobilization by quinones and other free radical generating systems in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.C.; Chan, T.M.

    1987-05-01

    Using isolated rat hepatocytes, sublethal concentrations of quinones and other free radical generating systems were used to test the role of extracellular calcium (Ca) in activating glycogen phosphorylase and intracellular Ca mobilization. The ..cap alpha..-agonist phenylephrine (Phe) was used for comparison. The EC50's were: Phe = 2.6 x 10/sup -7/M, menadione (K/sub 3/) = 4.5 x 10/sup -5/M, dicumarol = 2 x 10/sup -5/M. In normal Ca buffer, activation by K/sub 3/ was slower than Phe, being maximal at 2' but more sustained. Dicumarol and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BH) activated phosphorylase similarly. The xanthine-xanthine oxidase (X-XO) system stimulated activation similar to K/sub 3/. Dicumarol greatly augmented phosphorylase activation by K/sub 3/ but had no effect on Phe action. Depletion of extracellular Ca abolished Phe action, markedly diminished t-BH and dicumarol, but had no effect on K/sub 3/ or X-XO activation of phosphorylase. Ca efflux exchange measured in /sup 45/Ca preloaded cells were stimulated equally by Phe, K/sub 3/, dicumarol, or K/sub 3/+ dicumarol in the presence of extracellular Ca. Absence of extracellular Ca abolished Phe effect but minimally affected stimulation by K/sub 3/ or K/sub 3/+ dicumarol. These data suggest that activation of glycogen phosphorylase by sublethal doses of quinones may not reflect the degree and the mechanism of intracellular Ca mobilization.

  6. Identification of lactate dehydrogenase as a mammalian pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Mitsugu; Minematsu, Kenji; Shibata, Takahiro; Kondo, Tatsuhiko; Ishii, Takeshi; Uchida, Koji

    2016-05-27

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a redox-active o-quinone, is an important nutrient involved in numerous physiological and biochemical processes in mammals. Despite such beneficial functions, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be established. In the present study, using PQQ-immobilized Sepharose beads as a probe, we examined the presence of protein(s) that are capable of binding PQQ in mouse NIH/3T3 fibroblasts and identified five cellular proteins, including l-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) A chain, as potential mammalian PQQ-binding proteins. In vitro studies using a purified rabbit muscle LDH show that PQQ inhibits the formation of lactate from pyruvate in the presence of NADH (forward reaction), whereas it enhances the conversion of lactate to pyruvate in the presence of NAD(+) (reverse reaction). The molecular mechanism underlying PQQ-mediated regulation of LDH activity is attributed to the oxidation of NADH to NAD(+) by PQQ. Indeed, the PQQ-bound LDH oxidizes NADH, generating NAD(+), and significantly catalyzes the conversion of lactate to pyruvate. Furthermore, PQQ attenuates cellular lactate release and increases intracellular ATP levels in the NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. Our results suggest that PQQ, modulating LDH activity to facilitate pyruvate formation through its redox-cycling activity, may be involved in the enhanced energy production via mitochondrial TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation.

  7. Effect of the Antioxidant Supplement Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Disodium Salt (BioPQQ™) on Cognitive Functions.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yuji; Hine, Kyoko; Miura, Hiroshi; Uetake, Tatsuo; Nakano, Masahiko; Takemura, Naohiro; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a quinone compound first identified in 1979. It has been reported that rats fed a PQQ-supplemented diet showed better learning ability than controls, suggesting that PQQ may be useful for improving memory in humans. In the present study, a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study to examine the effect of PQQ disodium salt (BioPQQ™) on cognitive functions was conducted with 41 elderly healthy subjects. Subjects were orally given 20 mg of BioPQQ™ per day or placebo, for 12 weeks. For cognitive functions, selective attention by the Stroop and reverse Stroop test, and visual-spatial cognitive function by the laptop tablet Touch M, were evaluated. In the Stroop test, the change of Stroop interference ratios (SIs) for the PQQ group was significantly smaller than for the placebo group. In the Touch M test, the stratification analyses dividing each group into two groups showed that only in the lower group of the PQQ group (initial score<70), did the score significantly increase. Measurements of physiological parameters indicated no abnormal blood or urinary adverse events, nor adverse internal or physical examination findings at any point in the study. The preliminary experiment using near-infrared spectrometry (NIRS) suggests that cerebral blood flow in the prefrontal cortex was increased by the administration of PQQ. The results suggest that PQQ can prevent reduction of brain function in aged persons, especially in attention and working memory.

  8. Distinct promoters affect pyrroloquinoline quinone production in recombinant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiguo; Han, Zengye; Ge, Xizhen; Tian, Pingfang

    2014-10-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a versatile quinone cofactor participating in numerous biological processes. Klebsiella pneumoniae can naturally synthesize PQQ for harboring intact PQQ synthesis genes. Previous metabolic engineering of K. pneumoniae failed to overproduce PQQ due to the employment of strong promoter in expression vector. Here we report that a moderate rather than strong promoter is efficient for PQQ production. To screen an appropriate promoter, a total of four distinct promoters-lac promoter, pk promoter of glycerol dehydratase gene (dhaB1), promoter of kanamycin resistance gene, and T7 promoter (as the control)-were individually used for overexpressing the endogenous PQQ genes in K. pneumoniae along with heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. We found that all recombinant K. pneumoniae strains produced more PQQ than recombinant E. coli strains that carried corresponding vectors, indicating that K. pneumoniae is superior to E. coli for the production of PQQ. Particularly, the recombinant K. pneumoniae recruiting the promoter of kanamycin resistance gene produced the highest PQQ (1,700 nmol), revealing that a moderate rather than strong promoter is efficient for PQQ production. Furthermore, PQQ production was roughly proportional to glucose concentration increasing from 0.5 to 1.5 g/L, implying the synergism between PQQ biosynthesis and glucose utilization. This study not only provides a feasible strategy for production of PQQ in K. pneumoniae, but also reveals the exquisite synchronization among PQQ biosynthesis, glucose metabolism, and cell proliferation.

  9. Quinone-rich poly(dopamine) magnetic nanoparticles for biosensor applications.

    PubMed

    Martín, Miriam; González Orive, Alejandro; Lorenzo-Luis, Pablo; Hernández Creus, Alberto; González-Mora, José Luis; Salazar, Pedro

    2014-12-01

    Novel core-shell quinone-rich poly(dopamine)-magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were prepared by using an in situ polymerization method. Catechol groups were oxidized to quinone by using a thermal treatment. MNPs were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, UV/Vis, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and electrochemical techniques. The hybrid nanomaterial showed an average core diameter of 17 nm and a polymer-film thickness of 2 nm. The core-shell nanoparticles showed high reactivity and were used as solid supports for the covalent immobilization of glucose oxidase (Gox) through Schiff base formation and Michael addition. The amount of Gox immobilized onto the nanoparticle surface was almost twice that of the nonoxidized film. The resulting biofunctionalized MNPs were used to construct an amperometric biosensor for glucose. The enzyme biosensor has a sensitivity of 8.7 mA M(-1)  cm(-2) , a low limit of detection (0.02 mM), and high stability for 45 days. Finally, the biosensor was used to determine glucose in blood samples and was checked against a commercial glucometer. PMID:25196141

  10. Effect of the Antioxidant Supplement Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Disodium Salt (BioPQQ™) on Cognitive Functions.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yuji; Hine, Kyoko; Miura, Hiroshi; Uetake, Tatsuo; Nakano, Masahiko; Takemura, Naohiro; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a quinone compound first identified in 1979. It has been reported that rats fed a PQQ-supplemented diet showed better learning ability than controls, suggesting that PQQ may be useful for improving memory in humans. In the present study, a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study to examine the effect of PQQ disodium salt (BioPQQ™) on cognitive functions was conducted with 41 elderly healthy subjects. Subjects were orally given 20 mg of BioPQQ™ per day or placebo, for 12 weeks. For cognitive functions, selective attention by the Stroop and reverse Stroop test, and visual-spatial cognitive function by the laptop tablet Touch M, were evaluated. In the Stroop test, the change of Stroop interference ratios (SIs) for the PQQ group was significantly smaller than for the placebo group. In the Touch M test, the stratification analyses dividing each group into two groups showed that only in the lower group of the PQQ group (initial score<70), did the score significantly increase. Measurements of physiological parameters indicated no abnormal blood or urinary adverse events, nor adverse internal or physical examination findings at any point in the study. The preliminary experiment using near-infrared spectrometry (NIRS) suggests that cerebral blood flow in the prefrontal cortex was increased by the administration of PQQ. The results suggest that PQQ can prevent reduction of brain function in aged persons, especially in attention and working memory. PMID:26782228

  11. Identifying the Tautomeric Form of a Deoxyguanosine-Estrogen Quinone Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Stack, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanistic insights into the reaction of an estrogen o-quinone with deoxyguanosine has been further investigated using high level density functional calculations in addition to the use of 4-hyroxycatecholestrone (4-OHE1) regioselectivity labeled with deuterium at the C1-position. Calculations using the M06-2X functional with large basis sets indicate the tautomeric form of an estrogen-DNA adduct present when glycosidic bonds cleavage occurs is comprised of an aromatic A ring structure. This tautomeric form was further verified by use of deuterium labelling of the catechol precursor use to form the estrogen o-quinone. Regioselective deuterium labelling at the C1-position of the estrogen A ring allows discrimination between two tautomeric forms of a reaction intermediate either of which could be present during glycosidic bond cleavage. HPLC-MS analysis indicates a reactive intermediate with a m/z of 552.22 consistent with a tautomeric form containing no deuterium. This intermediate is consistent with a reaction mechanism that involves: (1) proton assisted Michael addition; (2) re-aromatization of the estrogen A ring; and (3) glycosidic bond cleavage to form the known estrogen-DNA adduct, 4-OHE1-1-N7Gua. PMID:26378590

  12. Direct and quinone-mediated palladium reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens: mechanisms and modeling.

    PubMed

    Pat-Espadas, Aurora M; Razo-Flores, Elías; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Palladium(II) reduction to Pd(0) nanoparticles by Geobacter sulfurreducens was explored under conditions of neutral pH, 30 °C and concentrations of 25, 50, and 100 mg of Pd(II)/L aiming to investigate the effect of solid species of palladium on their microbial reduction. The influence of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate was reported to enhance the palladium reaction rate in an average of 1.7-fold and its addition is determining to achieve the reduction of solid species of palladium. Based on the obtained results two mechanisms are proposed: (1) direct, which is fully described considering interactions of amide, sulfur, and phosphoryl groups associated to proteins from bacteria on palladium reduction reaction, and (2) quinone-mediated, which implies multiheme c-type cytochromes participation. Speciation analysis and kinetic results were considered and integrated into a model to fit the experimental data that explain both mechanisms. This work provides elements for a better understanding of direct and quinone-mediated palladium reduction by G. sulfurreducens, which could facilitate metal recovery with concomitant formation of valuable palladium nanoparticles in industrial processes.

  13. Xanthones with quinone reductase-inducing activity from the fruits of Garcinia mangostana (Mangosteen).

    PubMed

    Chin, Young-Won; Jung, Hyun-Ah; Chai, Heebyung; Keller, William J; Kinghorn, A Douglas

    2008-02-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of a dichloromethane-soluble extract of Garcinia mangostana fruits has led to the isolation and identification of five compounds, including two xanthones, 1,2-dihydro-1,8,10-trihydroxy-2-(2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)-9-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)furo[3,2-a]xanthen-11-one (1) and 6-deoxy-7-demethylmangostanin (2), along with three known compounds, 1,3,7-trihydroxy-2,8-di-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)xanthone (3), mangostanin (4), and alpha-mangostin (5). The structures of compounds 1 and 2 were determined from analysis of their spectroscopic data. All isolated compounds in the present study together with eleven other compounds previously isolated from the pericarp of mangosteen, were tested in an in vitro quinone reductase-induction assay using murine hepatoma cells (Hepa 1c1c7) and an in vitro hydroxyl radical antioxidant assay. Of these, compounds 1-4 induced quinone reductase (concentration to double enzyme induction, 0.68-2.2microg/mL) in Hepa 1c1c7 cells and gamma-mangostin (6) exhibited hydroxyl radical-scavenging activity (IC50, 0.20microg/mL).

  14. Determination of total proteins: a study of reaction between quinones and proteins.

    PubMed

    Zaia, D A; Verri, W A; Zaia, C T

    1999-06-14

    A previous study was undertaken to test the reaction of several quinones (p-benzoquinone; 2,5-dichloro and 2,6-dichloro p-benzoquinone; tetrachloro-p-benzoquinone; tetrachloro-o-benzoquinone; 2,5-dichloro-3,6-dihydroxy-p-benzoquinone; benz[a]anthracene-7,12-dione) with bovine serum albumin (BSA). From this study, we have devised a spectrophotometric method for determination of total proteins. The quinone, tetrachloro-p-benzoquinone (p-chloranil), showed the best result. The product of reaction between proteins and p-chloranil absorbed at 360 nm and Beer's law was followed up to 200 mug ml(-1) of BSA. The product of reaction of BSA/p-chloranil was stable for 30 min, after that the absorbance increased 16% and kept stable for 24 h. The p-chloranil method showed a limit of detection (1.25 mug ml(-1)) lower than the biuret method (52.0 mug ml(-1)) or p-benzoquinone (PBQ) method (2.6-4.0 mug ml(-1)). The method was applied to spectrophotometric determination of total proteins in blood plasma; the results were compared with the biuret method that is widely used in clinical analysis.

  15. Structure of the V. cholerae Na+-pumping NADH:quinone oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Steuber, Julia; Vohl, Georg; Casutt, Marco S; Vorburger, Thomas; Diederichs, Kay; Fritz, Günter

    2014-12-01

    NADH oxidation in the respiratory chain is coupled to ion translocation across the membrane to build up an electrochemical gradient. The sodium-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR), a membrane protein complex widespread among pathogenic bacteria, consists of six subunits, NqrA, B, C, D, E and F. To our knowledge, no structural information on the Na(+)-NQR complex has been available until now. Here we present the crystal structure of the Na(+)-NQR complex at 3.5 Å resolution. The arrangement of cofactors both at the cytoplasmic and the periplasmic side of the complex, together with a hitherto unknown iron centre in the midst of the membrane-embedded part, reveals an electron transfer pathway from the NADH-oxidizing cytoplasmic NqrF subunit across the membrane to the periplasmic NqrC, and back to the quinone reduction site on NqrA located in the cytoplasm. A sodium channel was localized in subunit NqrB, which represents the largest membrane subunit of the Na(+)-NQR and is structurally related to urea and ammonia transporters. On the basis of the structure we propose a mechanism of redox-driven Na(+) translocation where the change in redox state of the flavin mononucleotide cofactor in NqrB triggers the transport of Na(+) through the observed channel.

  16. Polyketide Quinones Are Alternate Intermediate Electron Carriers during Mycobacterial Respiration in Oxygen-Deficient Niches.

    PubMed

    Anand, Amitesh; Verma, Priyanka; Singh, Anil Kumar; Kaushik, Sandeep; Pandey, Rajesh; Shi, Ce; Kaur, Harneet; Chawla, Manbeena; Elechalawar, Chandra Kumar; Kumar, Dhirendra; Yang, Yong; Bhavesh, Neel S; Banerjee, Rajkumar; Dash, Debasis; Singh, Amit; Natarajan, Vivek T; Ojha, Anil K; Aldrich, Courtney C; Gokhale, Rajesh S

    2015-11-19

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) adaptation to hypoxia is considered crucial to its prolonged latent persistence in humans. Mtb lesions are known to contain physiologically heterogeneous microenvironments that bring about differential responses from bacteria. Here we exploit metabolic variability within biofilm cells to identify alternate respiratory polyketide quinones (PkQs) from both Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msmeg) and Mtb. PkQs are specifically expressed in biofilms and other oxygen-deficient niches to maintain cellular bioenergetics. Under such conditions, these metabolites function as mobile electron carriers in the respiratory electron transport chain. In the absence of PkQs, mycobacteria escape from the hypoxic core of biofilms and prefer oxygen-rich conditions. Unlike the ubiquitous isoprenoid pathway for the biosynthesis of respiratory quinones, PkQs are produced by type III polyketide synthases using fatty acyl-CoA precursors. The biosynthetic pathway is conserved in several other bacterial genomes, and our study reveals a redox-balancing chemicocellular process in microbial physiology. PMID:26585386

  17. Identification of lactate dehydrogenase as a mammalian pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Akagawa, Mitsugu; Minematsu, Kenji; Shibata, Takahiro; Kondo, Tatsuhiko; Ishii, Takeshi; Uchida, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a redox-active o-quinone, is an important nutrient involved in numerous physiological and biochemical processes in mammals. Despite such beneficial functions, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be established. In the present study, using PQQ-immobilized Sepharose beads as a probe, we examined the presence of protein(s) that are capable of binding PQQ in mouse NIH/3T3 fibroblasts and identified five cellular proteins, including l-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) A chain, as potential mammalian PQQ-binding proteins. In vitro studies using a purified rabbit muscle LDH show that PQQ inhibits the formation of lactate from pyruvate in the presence of NADH (forward reaction), whereas it enhances the conversion of lactate to pyruvate in the presence of NAD+ (reverse reaction). The molecular mechanism underlying PQQ-mediated regulation of LDH activity is attributed to the oxidation of NADH to NAD+ by PQQ. Indeed, the PQQ-bound LDH oxidizes NADH, generating NAD+, and significantly catalyzes the conversion of lactate to pyruvate. Furthermore, PQQ attenuates cellular lactate release and increases intracellular ATP levels in the NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. Our results suggest that PQQ, modulating LDH activity to facilitate pyruvate formation through its redox-cycling activity, may be involved in the enhanced energy production via mitochondrial TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:27230956

  18. The relationship between electron flux and the redox poise of the quinone pool in plant mitochondria. Interplay between quinol-oxidizing and quinone-reducing pathways.

    PubMed

    Van den Bergen, C W; Wagner, A M; Krab, K; Moore, A L

    1994-12-15

    The dependence of electron flux through quinone-reducing and quinol-oxidizing pathways on the redox state of the ubiquinone (Q) pool was investigated in plant mitochondria isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum cv. Bintje, fresh tissue and callus), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and Arum italicum. We have determined the redox state of the Q pool with two different methods, the Q-electrode and Q-extraction techniques. Although results from the two techniques agree well, in all tissues tested (with the exception of fresh potato) an inactive pool of QH2 was detected by the extraction technique that was not observed with the electrode. In potato callus mitochondria, an inactive Q pool was also found. An advantage of the extraction method is that it permits determination of the Q redox state in the presence of substances that interfere with the Q-electrode, such as benzohydroxamate and NADH. We have studied the relation between rate and Q redox state for both quinol-oxidizing and quinone-reducing pathways under a variety of metabolic conditions including state 3, state 4, in the presence of myxothiazol, and benzohydroxamate. Under state 4 conditions or in the presence of myxothiazol, a non-linear dependence of the rate of respiration on the Q-redox state was observed in potato callus mitochondria and in sweet potato mitochondria. The addition of benzohydroxamate, under state 4 conditions, removed this non-linearity confirming that it is due to activity of the cyanide-resistant pathway. The relation between rate and Q redox state for the external NADH dehydrogenase in potato callus mitochondria was found to differ from that of succinate dehydrogenase. It is suggested that the oxidation of cytoplasmic NADH in vivo uses the cyanide-resistant pathway more than the pathway involving the oxidation of succinate. A model is used to predict the kinetic behaviour of the respiratory network. It is shown that titrations with inhibitors of the alternative oxidase cannot be used to

  19. Zeo-pigment for traditional ceramic industry

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, J.J.P.; Rodriguez, A.V.; Caraballo, M.M.

    1996-12-31

    In the present work the possibility of using natural zeolites mixed with soluble salts for ceramic pigment elaboration (further named zeo-pigment) is studied. The mixture of zeolite with salts is thermally treated to produce the pigment, this procedure was followed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The obtained zeo-pigments were used to colour the porcelanized ceramic stoneware tiles at the experimental production. As it is known, it is possible to prepare a wide range of colours in these type of tiles by adding specific stains to the mixture of raw materials during grinding in the amount of 0.5 to 5 %, in this way any product called marbleized, mottled, granite, etc. ware is obtained. It is important to remember that when stains are added to the basic white body in order to produce one-color porcelanized ceramic stoneware, this does not involve great problems for the production. The physical properties of experimental produced ceramics, coloured by zeo-pigments, were studied according to European standard test. The present work is intended to be useful from the point of view of pollution prevention and waste minimization, regarding the utilization of soluble salts contained in some industrial wastes for the elaboration of ceramic pigments.

  20. FTIR study of primate color visual pigments

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Kota; Kandori, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    How do we distinguish colors? Humans possess three color pigments; red-, green-, and blue-sensitive proteins, which have maximum absorbance (λmax) at 560, 530, and 420 nm, respectively, and contribute to normal human trichromatic vision (RGB). Each color pigments consists of a different opsin protein bound to a common chromophore molecule, 11-cis-retinal, whereas different chromophore-protein interactions allow preferential absorption of different colors. However, detailed experimental structural data to explain the molecular basis of spectral tuning of color pigments are lacking, mainly because of the difficulty in sample preparation. We thus started structural studies of primate color visual pigments using low-temperature Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, which needs only 0.3 mg protein for a single measurement. Here we report the first structural data of monkey red- (MR) and green- (MG) sensitive pigments, in which the information about the protein, retinal chromophore, and internal water molecules is contained. Molecular mechanism of color discrimination between red and green pigments will be discussed based on the structural data by FTIR spectroscopy. PMID:27493516

  1. Microspectrophotometry of Arthropod Visual Screening Pigments

    PubMed Central

    Strother, G. K.; Casella, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Absorption spectra of visual screening pigments obtained in vitro with a microspectrophotometer using frozen sections are given for the insects Musca domestica, Phormia regina, Libellula luctuosa, Apis mellifera (worker honeybee only), Drosophila melanogaster (wild type only) and the arachnids Lycosa baltimoriana and Lycosa miami. The spectral range covered is 260–700 nm for Lycosa and Drosophila and 310–700 nm for the remainder of the arthropods. A complete description of the instrumentation is given. For the flies, Phormia and Musca, light absorption by the yellow and red pigments is high from 310 to about 610 nm. This implies that for these insects there should be no wavelength shift in electroretinogram (ERG) results due to light leakage among neighboring ommatidia for this wavelength range. The same comment applies to Calliphora erythrocephala, which is known to have similar screening pigments. For some of the insects studied a close correspondence is noted between screening pigment absorption spectra and spectral sensitivity curves for individual photoreceptors, available in the literature. In some cases the screening pigment absorption spectra can be related to chemical extraction results, with the general observation that some of the in vitro absorption peaks are shifted to the red. The Lycosa, Apis, and Libellula dark red pigments absorb strongly over a wide spectral range and therefore prevent chemical identification. PMID:4623852

  2. FTIR study of primate color visual pigments.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Kota; Kandori, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    How do we distinguish colors? Humans possess three color pigments; red-, green-, and blue-sensitive proteins, which have maximum absorbance (λmax) at 560, 530, and 420 nm, respectively, and contribute to normal human trichromatic vision (RGB). Each color pigments consists of a different opsin protein bound to a common chromophore molecule, 11-cis-retinal, whereas different chromophore-protein interactions allow preferential absorption of different colors. However, detailed experimental structural data to explain the molecular basis of spectral tuning of color pigments are lacking, mainly because of the difficulty in sample preparation. We thus started structural studies of primate color visual pigments using low-temperature Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, which needs only 0.3 mg protein for a single measurement. Here we report the first structural data of monkey red- (MR) and green- (MG) sensitive pigments, in which the information about the protein, retinal chromophore, and internal water molecules is contained. Molecular mechanism of color discrimination between red and green pigments will be discussed based on the structural data by FTIR spectroscopy.

  3. Monitoring of BHT-quinone and BHT-CHO in the gas of capsules of Asclepias physocarpa.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bing-Ji; Peng, Hua; Liu, Ji-Kai

    2006-01-01

    Three volatile components, namely benzoic acid ethyl ester (1), 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-benzoquinone (BHT-quinone) (2), and 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (BHT-CHO) (3), were detected from the gas in the capsules of Asclepias physocarpa by means of GC/MS analysis. BHT-quinone and BHT-CHO as organic pollutants are the degradation products of the antioxidant 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT). Ground water, lake water and/or rain water are a source of BHT metabolites in the plant Asclepias physocarpa. PMID:16869508

  4. Hydroquinone-quinone oxidation by molecular oxygen: a simple tool for signal amplification through auto-generation of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Sella, Eran; Shabat, Doron

    2013-08-21

    Signal amplification methods are of obvious importance for various diagnostic assays. We have developed a new small-molecule-based probe that, upon activation with sub-stoichiometric amounts of hydrogen peroxide, produces an auto-inductive amplification reaction. The signal is produced through the oxidation reaction of hydroquinone to the corresponding quinone derivative by molecular oxygen. This oxidation is accompanied by the formation of hydrogen peroxide, which can enter the amplification sequence and initiate a new diagnostic cycle. The generated quinone is composed of a donor-acceptor conjugated pair and fluoresces at a distinct wavelength, allowing the formation to be monitored by a convenient fluorescence assay.

  5. Structure-function studies of the photosynthetic reaction center using herbicides that compete for the quinone binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Bylina, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    Certain classes of herbicides act as competitive inhibitors of the photosynthetic reaction center. Genetic engineering techniques can be used to generate photosynthetic reaction centers which contain altered quinone binding sites. A genetic system for rapidly screening herbicides developed in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus has been used to examine the effect of different s-triazine herbicides on the growth of bacteria containing reaction centers with altered quinone binding sites. Structural insights into herbicide binding have been obtained by determining the level of resistance or sensitivity to structurally related herbicides in these modified reaction centers.

  6. Monitoring of BHT-quinone and BHT-CHO in the gas of capsules of Asclepias physocarpa.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bing-Ji; Peng, Hua; Liu, Ji-Kai

    2006-01-01

    Three volatile components, namely benzoic acid ethyl ester (1), 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-benzoquinone (BHT-quinone) (2), and 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (BHT-CHO) (3), were detected from the gas in the capsules of Asclepias physocarpa by means of GC/MS analysis. BHT-quinone and BHT-CHO as organic pollutants are the degradation products of the antioxidant 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT). Ground water, lake water and/or rain water are a source of BHT metabolites in the plant Asclepias physocarpa.

  7. Investigating the thermostability of succinate: quinone oxidoreductase enzymes by direct electrochemistry at SWNTs-modified electrodes and FTIR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Melin, Frederic; Noor, Mohamed R.; Pardieu, Elodie; Boulmedais, Fouzia; Banhart, Florian; Cecchini, Gary; Soulimane, Tewfik

    2015-01-01

    Succinate Quinone reductases (SQRs) are the enzymes which couple the oxidation of succinate and the reduction of quinones in the respiratory chain of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We compare herein the temperature-dependent activity and structural stability of two SQRs, the first one from the mesophilic bacterium E. coli and the second one from the thermophilic bacterium T. thermophilus by a combined electrochemical and infrared spectroscopy approach. Direct electron transfer was achieved with the full membrane protein complexes at SWNTs-modified electrodes. The possible structural factors which contribute to the temperature-dependent activity of the enzymes and to the thermostability of the T. thermophiles SQR in particular, are discussed. PMID:25139263

  8. New prodigiosin-like pigment from Alteromonas rubra.

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, N N; Gauthier, M J

    1979-01-01

    The red prodigiosin-like pigment from Alteromonas rubra was shown to be a mixture of prodigiosin (pigment 1) and a new cyclic isomer (pigment 2). The new structure was elucidated by mass and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. Careful examinations of the prodigiosins produced by Serratia marcescens, Vibrio psychoerythrus, and an unidentified red bacterium (LL-100-6) failed to disclose any of the new pigment, pigment 2. PMID:384909

  9. Antineoplastic agents 552. Oxidation of combretastatin A-1: Trapping the o-Quinone intermediate considered metabolic product of the corresponding phosphate prodrug

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The very unstable (< 10 min at rt) o-quinone derived from the vicinol diphenol anticancer drug combretastatin A-1 has been obtained by careful oxidation with NaIO4 employing tetrabutylammonium bromide in water/dichloromethane. Immediate reaction with phenylenediamine allowed o-quinone 5 to be trapp...

  10. Proton uptake associated with the reduction of the primary quinone Q(A) influences the binding site of the secondary quinone Q(B) in Rhodopseudomonas viridis photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Zachariae, U; Lancaster, C R

    2001-06-01

    Previously, two binding sites for the secondary quinone Q(B) in the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodopseudomonas viridis were identified by X-ray crystallography, a 'proximal' binding site close to the non-heme iron, and a 'distal' site, displaced by 4.2 A along the path of the isoprenoid tail [C.R.D. Lancaster and H. Michel, Structure 5 (1997) 1339-1359]. The quinone ring planes in the two sites differ by roughly a 180 degrees rotation around the isoprenoid tail. Here we present molecular dynamics simulations, which support the theory of a spontaneous transfer of Q(B) between the distal site and the proximal site. In contrast to earlier computational studies on RCs, the molecular dynamics simulations of Q(B) migration resulted in a proximal Q(B) binding pattern identical to that of the crystallographic findings. Also, we demonstrate that the preference towards the proximal Q(B) location is not necessarily attributed to reduction of Q(B) to the semiquinone, but already to the preceding reduction of the primary quinone Q(A) and resulting protonation changes in the protein. Energy mapping of the Q(B) binding pocket indicates that the quinone ring rotation required for completion of the transfer between the two sites is improbable at the distal or proximal binding sites due to high potential barriers, but may be possible at a newly identified position near the distal binding site.

  11. Betalain: a particular class of antioxidant pigment.

    PubMed

    El Gharras, Hasna

    2011-10-01

    We have analyzed the stability of betalains in juices prepared from Moroccan yellow cactus pears (Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill.) as a function of temperature and pH. The experiments were carried out at temperatures ranging from 80 to 100 degrees C with juices at pH 3.5, 5 and 6.5. The degree of pigment retention decreased when the temperature increased. The degradation constant rates were determined for thermal degradation rates of pseudo-first order. The Arrhenius plot obtained for the degradation of betaxanthin from the yellow fruits was not linear. Regardless of the temperature of treatment, the lowest degradation was obtained for pH 5. When some stabilizers were tested for the protection of pigments, the results showed that ascorbic acid was a better protective agent at pH 3.5, increasing the protection by 40%. The inhibitive action of betalain pigments extracted from cactus pears towards corrosion of stainless steel in phosphoric acid was investigated using electrochemical polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods. It was found that the presence of natural pigments reduces the corrosion rate of the tested metal, especially on addition of the red pigments (97%). The inhibition efficiency increases as the pigment concentration of extracts increases. It was also found that the pigments tested act as mixed inhibitors. The inhibitive action of the extracts is discussed in term of adsorption and that such adsorption follows a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The calculated values of the free energy of adsorption indicated that the adsorption process is spontaneous.

  12. Polycyclic Polyprenylated Acylphloroglucinol Congeners from Hypericum scabrum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wan; Hou, Wei-Zhen; Zhao, Jun; Xu, Fang; Li, Li; Xu, Fang; Sun, Hua; Xing, Jian-Guo; Peng, Ying; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Ji, Teng-Fei; Gu, Zheng-Yi

    2016-06-24

    Twenty polycyclic polyprenylated acylphloroglucinols (PPAPs), including the new compounds hyperscabrones A-I (1-9), were isolated from the air-dried aerial parts of Hypericum scabrum. These compounds comprise seven different structural types. All structures were determined by NMR spectroscopic methods and both experimental and calculated electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra. The evaluation of their neuroprotective effects on glutamate-induced toxicity in SK-N-SH cells showed that compounds 4-7 exhibited significant neuroprotection at 10 μM. Additionally, compounds 3, 4, 7, and 9 showed moderate hepatoprotective activities against paracetamol-induced HepG2 cell damage at 10 μM. PMID:27280968

  13. Cytotoxic polycyclic polyprenylated acylphloroglucinols from Hypericum attenuatum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhong-bo; Zhang, Yang-mei; Pan, Ke; Luo, Jian-guang; Kong, Ling-yi

    2014-06-01

    Six new polycyclic polyprenylated acylphloroglucinols, attenuatumiones A-F (1-6), together with twelve known analogs (7-18) were isolated from the whole plant of Hypericum attenuatum. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, and the absolute configuration of C-13 in attenuatumione C (3) was deduced via the circular dichroism datum of the in situ formed [Rh2(OCOCF3)4] complexes. All isolates were evaluated for the cytotoxic activities on three human cancer cell lines. Compound 3 showed moderate cytotoxic activities with IC50 values of 10.12 and 10.56 μM against SMMC7721 and U2OS, respectively. PMID:24603092

  14. The fate of airborne polycyclic organic matter.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, T; Ramdahl, T; Bjørseth, A

    1983-01-01

    Biological tests have shown that a significant part of the mutagenicity of organic extracts of collected airborne particulate matter is not due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). It is possible that part of these unknown compounds are transformation products of PAH. This survey focuses on the reaction of PAH in the atmosphere with other copollutants, such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, ozone and free radicals and their reaction products. Photochemically induced reactions of PAH are also included. The reactivity of particle-associated PAH is discussed in relation to the chemical composition and the physical properties of the carrier. Recommendations for future work are given. PMID:6825615

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons profile of kitchen dusts.

    PubMed

    Iwegbue, Chukwujindu M A

    2011-03-01

    Concentrations and profiles of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in thirty dust samples collected from kitchens that use wood cook system (WCS), kerosene stove cook system (KSCS) and butane gas cook system (BGCS). The total PAHs concentrations ranged from 52 to 497, 39 to 96 and 37 to 155 μg kg(-1) for WCS, KSCS and BGCS respectively. The results indicate predominance of lower molecular weight (2-3 rings) over higher molecular weight PAHs and users of wood cook system are more exposed to higher levels of PAHs than the users of either kerosene cook system or butane gas cook system.

  16. Pigmented pleomorphic adenoma, a novel melanin-pigmented benign salivary gland tumor.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yasunori; Satoh, Masanobu; Nakamura, Shin-ichi

    2004-08-01

    This paper reports a pleomorphic adenoma with grossly visible pigmentation resulting in the macroscopic appearance of melanotic lesion in a 33-year-old Japanese male. In addition to the characteristic histopathological features of a benign pleomorphic adenoma, variously formed and -sized cells, many of which were considered to be melanocytes, containing melanin pigment in their cytoplasm, were distributed in the epithelial component. In addition, melanin pigment was deposited in tumor cells of duct structures. Furthermore, condensed secretory substances with marked pigmentation were frequently seen in the tubular lumina. Perusal of the English language literature revealed only two cases of parenchymal pigmentation of salivary gland tumors: both were mucoepidermoid carcinoma. The possible histogenesis of melanocytes in the salivary gland lesions is discussed, though no firm conclusion could be drawn.

  17. Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces endoplasmic reticulum stress, unfolded protein response, and calcium release.

    PubMed

    Xu, Demei; Su, Chuanyang; Song, Xiufang; Shi, Qiong; Fu, Juanli; Hu, Lihua; Xia, Xiaomin; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang

    2015-06-15

    Organisms are able to respond to environmental insult to maintain cellular homeostasis, which include the activation of a wide range of cellular adaptive responses with tightly controlled mechanisms. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an organelle responsible for protein folding and calcium storage. ER stress leads to the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER lumen. To be against or respond to this effect, cells have a comprehensive signaling system, called unfolded protein response (UPR), to restore homeostasis and normal ER function or activate the cell death program. Therefore, it is critical to understand how environmental insult regulates the ingredients of ER stress and UPR signalings. Previously, we have demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) quinone caused oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Here, we investigated the role of a PCB quinone, PCB29-pQ on ER stress, UPR, and calcium release. PCB29-pQ markedly increased the hallmark genes of ER stress, namely, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), GRP94, and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) on both protein and mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. We also confirmed PCB29-pQ induced ER morphological defects by using transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, PCB29-pQ induced intracellular calcium accumulation and calpain activity, which were significantly inhibited by the pretreatment of BAPTA-AM (Ca(2+) chelator). These results were correlated with the outcome that PCB29-pQ induces ER stress-related apoptosis through caspase family gene 12, while salubrinal and Z-ATAD-FMK (a specific inhibitor of caspase 12) partially ameliorated this effect, respectively. N-Acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) scavenged ROS formation and consequently alleviated PCB29-pQ-induced expression of ER stress-related genes. In conclusion, our result demonstrated for the first time that PCB quinone leads to ROS-dependent induction of ER stress, and UPR and calcium release in HepG2 cells, and the

  18. Iris pigment epithelial cysts in a newborn

    PubMed Central

    Zargar, Shabnam; Prendiville, Kevin John; Martinez, Eladio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We report a case of iris pigment epithelial cysts in a newborn and discuss the importance of an accurate diagnosis for prevention of amblyopia. Methods: We describe a case of an abnormal red reflex seen on a newborn exam. Results: A full-term female born via normal spontaneous vaginal delivery without any complications was seen in the newborn nursery. She was noted to have an abnormal eye exam. Pupils were large with circular dark excrescences of the iris pigment epithelium. She was referred to a pediatric ophthalmologist where she was noted to fixate and follow faces. No afferent pupillary defect was seen. OD red reflex was normal whereas OS red reflex was blocked mostly by dark excrescences. A 2–3 mm dark brown lesion was seen in the OD iris and a 3–5 mm dark brown lesion was seen in the OS iris, consistent with a pupillary iris pigment epithelial cyst. Central visual axis was clear OU. Glaucoma was not present and patching was not performed. Observations and clinical photographs were recommended with follow-up in three months. Conclusion: Iris pigment epithelial cysts are uncommonly seen in children. The primary care provider first seeing a newborn must be aware of lesions obscuring a red reflex with appropriate follow-up. Follow-up in three months with IOP measurements is recommended. Iris pigment epithelial cysts in children may be a cause of amblyopia, thus prompt evaluation is important for prognostic purposes and the prevention of amblyopia. PMID:27625966

  19. Synchrotron powder diffraction on Aztec blue pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Del Río, M.; Gutiérrez-León, A.; Castro, G. R.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Solís, C.; Sánchez-Hernández, R.; Robles-Camacho, J.; Rojas-Gaytán, J.

    2008-01-01

    Some samples of raw blue pigments coming from an archaeological rescue mission in downtown Mexico City have been characterized using different techniques. The samples, some recovered as a part of a ritual offering, could be assigned to the late Aztec period (XVth century). The striking characteristic of these samples is that they seem to be raw pigments prior to any use in artworks, and it was possible to collect a few μg of pigment after manual grain selection under a microscopy monitoring. All pigments are made of indigo, an organic colorant locally known as añil or xiuhquilitl. The colorant is always found in combination with an inorganic matrix, studied by powder diffraction. In one case the mineral base is palygorskite, a rare clay mineral featuring micro-channels in its structure, well known as the main ingredient of the Maya blue pigment. However, other samples present the minerals sepiolite (a clay mineral of the palygorskite family) and calcite. Another sample contains barite, a mineral never reported in prehispanic paints. We present the results of characterization using high resolution powder diffraction recorded at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BM25A, SpLine beamline) complemented with other techniques. All of them gave consistent results on the composition. A chemical test on resistance to acids was done, showing a high resistance for the palygorskite and eventually sepiolite compounds, in good agreement with the excellent resistance of the Maya blue.

  20. Pigmented eccrine poroma: dermoscopic and confocal features.

    PubMed

    Bombonato, Caterina; Piana, Simonetta; Moscarella, Elvira; Lallas, Aimillios; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Longo, Caterina

    2016-07-01

    Eccrine poroma is a rare benign adnexal tumor of epithelial cells originating from the terminal ductal portion of the sweat glands that is typically located on palms and soles, although other cutaneous sites can be affected [1]. It is usually nonpigmented even if there is a pigmented variant that corresponds to 17% of cases and it is usually underdiagnosed, since it is mistakenly confused with other pigmented tumors [2,3]. Dermoscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) may assist in the correct diagnosis of this tumor. Herein, we report one case of pigmented eccrine poroma (PEP) that simulated clinically a cutaneous melanoma or a basal cell carcinoma. Dermoscopy and RCM excluded the possibilities of those two diagnoses; the overall confocal findings were suggestive for a benign epithelial tumor. Histology was fundamental to diagnose this lesion as a pigmented eccrine poroma. Even if the diagnosis of eccrine poroma remains histopathological still, as in this case report, noninvasive tools such as dermoscopy and RCM examinations can be of help to rule out the diagnosis of melanoma. Larger studies on this rare pigmented variant of eccrine poroma could shed new light on the identification of specific diagnostic dermoscopic and confocal features. PMID:27648386

  1. Pigments in avocado tissue and oil.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Ofelia B O; Wong, Marie; McGhie, Tony K; Vather, Rosheila; Wang, Yan; Requejo-Jackman, Cecilia; Ramankutty, Padmaja; Woolf, Allan B

    2006-12-27

    Pigments are important contributors to the appearance and healthful properties of both avocado fruits and the oils extracted from these fruits. This study determined carotenoid and chlorophyll pigment concentrations in the skin and three sections of the flesh (outer dark green, middle pale green, and inner yellow flesh-nearest the seed) and anthocyanin concentrations in the skin of Hass avocado during ripening at 20 degrees C. Pigments were extracted from frozen tissue with acetone and measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. Pigments were also measured in the oil extracted from freeze-dried tissue sections by an accelerated solvent extraction system using hexane. Carotenoids and chlorophylls identified in the skin, flesh, and oil were lutein, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, neoxanthin, violaxanthin, zeaxanthin, antheraxanthin, chlorophylls a and b, and pheophytins a and b with the highest concentrations of all pigments in the skin. Chlorophyllides a and b were identified in the skin and flesh tissues only. As the fruit ripened and softened, the skin changed from green to purple/black, corresponding to changes in skin hue angle, and a concomitant increase in cyanidin 3-O-glucoside and the loss of chlorophyllide a. In flesh tissue, chroma and lightness values decreased with ripening, with no changes in hue angle. The levels of carotenoids and chlorophylls did not change significantly during ripening. As fruit ripened, the total chlorophyll level in the oil from the flesh sections remained constant but declined in the oil extracted from the skin.

  2. Pigmented eccrine poroma: dermoscopic and confocal features

    PubMed Central

    Bombonato, Caterina; Piana, Simonetta; Moscarella, Elvira; Lallas, Aimillios; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Longo, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Eccrine poroma is a rare benign adnexal tumor of epithelial cells originating from the terminal ductal portion of the sweat glands that is typically located on palms and soles, although other cutaneous sites can be affected [1]. It is usually nonpigmented even if there is a pigmented variant that corresponds to 17% of cases and it is usually underdiagnosed, since it is mistakenly confused with other pigmented tumors [2,3]. Dermoscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) may assist in the correct diagnosis of this tumor. Herein, we report one case of pigmented eccrine poroma (PEP) that simulated clinically a cutaneous melanoma or a basal cell carcinoma. Dermoscopy and RCM excluded the possibilities of those two diagnoses; the overall confocal findings were suggestive for a benign epithelial tumor. Histology was fundamental to diagnose this lesion as a pigmented eccrine poroma. Even if the diagnosis of eccrine poroma remains histopathological still, as in this case report, noninvasive tools such as dermoscopy and RCM examinations can be of help to rule out the diagnosis of melanoma. Larger studies on this rare pigmented variant of eccrine poroma could shed new light on the identification of specific diagnostic dermoscopic and confocal features. PMID:27648386

  3. On the evolution of the photosynthetic pigments.

    PubMed

    Evstigneev, V B

    1975-07-01

    During the course of terrestrial evolution, some organisms developed the capability of capturing and utilizing solar radiation. Colored compounds were undoubtedly incorporated within living forms from the earliest times, but during the transition from heterotrophic to a photoautotrophic metabolism only those pigments were selected that were components of the evolving photosynthetic apparatus and were able to catalyze reactions involving storage of light energy in chemical bonds. In this communication, some properties of tetrapyrroles with a closed porphyrin ring containing a metal ion in the center are discussed. These compounds are present in all principal contemporary photosynthetic pigments, and their synthesis has been demonstrated from simpler compounds under prebiotic conditions. It is probable that during intermediate stages in the evolution of photosynthesis, pigments with oxidizing potentials lower than that of chlorophyll were utilized to store light energy although they were not capable of removing electrons from water. The evolution and function of multiple forms of a given photosynthetic pigment in vivo are discussed. 'Accessory' pigments may be regarded as rudiments of the evolutionary development of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  4. Pigmented eccrine poroma: dermoscopic and confocal features

    PubMed Central

    Bombonato, Caterina; Piana, Simonetta; Moscarella, Elvira; Lallas, Aimillios; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Longo, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Eccrine poroma is a rare benign adnexal tumor of epithelial cells originating from the terminal ductal portion of the sweat glands that is typically located on palms and soles, although other cutaneous sites can be affected [1]. It is usually nonpigmented even if there is a pigmented variant that corresponds to 17% of cases and it is usually underdiagnosed, since it is mistakenly confused with other pigmented tumors [2,3]. Dermoscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) may assist in the correct diagnosis of this tumor. Herein, we report one case of pigmented eccrine poroma (PEP) that simulated clinically a cutaneous melanoma or a basal cell carcinoma. Dermoscopy and RCM excluded the possibilities of those two diagnoses; the overall confocal findings were suggestive for a benign epithelial tumor. Histology was fundamental to diagnose this lesion as a pigmented eccrine poroma. Even if the diagnosis of eccrine poroma remains histopathological still, as in this case report, noninvasive tools such as dermoscopy and RCM examinations can be of help to rule out the diagnosis of melanoma. Larger studies on this rare pigmented variant of eccrine poroma could shed new light on the identification of specific diagnostic dermoscopic and confocal features.

  5. Recreating a functional ancestral archosaur visual pigment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Belinda S W; Jönsson, Karolina; Kazmi, Manija A; Donoghue, Michael J; Sakmar, Thomas P

    2002-09-01

    The ancestors of the archosaurs, a major branch of the diapsid reptiles, originated more than 240 MYA near the dawn of the Triassic Period. We used maximum likelihood phylogenetic ancestral reconstruction methods and explored different models of evolution for inferring the amino acid sequence of a putative ancestral archosaur visual pigment. Three different types of maximum likelihood models were used: nucleotide-based, amino acid-based, and codon-based models. Where possible, within each type of model, likelihood ratio tests were used to determine which model best fit the data. Ancestral reconstructions of the ancestral archosaur node using the best-fitting models of each type were found to be in agreement, except for three amino acid residues at which one reconstruction differed from the other two. To determine if these ancestral pigments would be functionally active, the corresponding genes were chemically synthesized and then expressed in a mammalian cell line in tissue culture. The expressed artificial genes were all found to bind to 11-cis-retinal to yield stable photoactive pigments with lambda(max) values of about 508 nm, which is slightly redshifted relative to that of extant vertebrate pigments. The ancestral archosaur pigments also activated the retinal G protein transducin, as measured in a fluorescence assay. Our results show that ancestral genes from ancient organisms can be reconstructed de novo and tested for function using a combination of phylogenetic and biochemical methods. PMID:12200476

  6. Recreating a functional ancestral archosaur visual pigment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Belinda S W; Jönsson, Karolina; Kazmi, Manija A; Donoghue, Michael J; Sakmar, Thomas P

    2002-09-01

    The ancestors of the archosaurs, a major branch of the diapsid reptiles, originated more than 240 MYA near the dawn of the Triassic Period. We used maximum likelihood phylogenetic ancestral reconstruction methods and explored different models of evolution for inferring the amino acid sequence of a putative ancestral archosaur visual pigment. Three different types of maximum likelihood models were used: nucleotide-based, amino acid-based, and codon-based models. Where possible, within each type of model, likelihood ratio tests were used to determine which model best fit the data. Ancestral reconstructions of the ancestral archosaur node using the best-fitting models of each type were found to be in agreement, except for three amino acid residues at which one reconstruction differed from the other two. To determine if these ancestral pigments would be functionally active, the corresponding genes were chemically synthesized and then expressed in a mammalian cell line in tissue culture. The expressed artificial genes were all found to bind to 11-cis-retinal to yield stable photoactive pigments with lambda(max) values of about 508 nm, which is slightly redshifted relative to that of extant vertebrate pigments. The ancestral archosaur pigments also activated the retinal G protein transducin, as measured in a fluorescence assay. Our results show that ancestral genes from ancient organisms can be reconstructed de novo and tested for function using a combination of phylogenetic and biochemical methods.

  7. Inadvertent polychlorinated biphenyls in commercial paint pigments.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dingfei; Hornbuckle, Keri C

    2010-04-15

    A polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) that was not produced as part of the Aroclor mixtures banned in the 1980s was recently reported in air samples collected in Chicago, Philadelphia, the Arctic, and several sites around the Great Lakes. In Chicago, the congener 3,3'-dichlorobiphenyl or PCB11 was found to be the fifth most concentrated congener and ubiquitous throughout the city. The congener exhibited strong seasonal concentration trends that suggest volatilization of this compound from common outdoor surfaces. Due to these findings and also the compound's presence in waters that received waste from paint manufacturing facilities, we hypothesized that PCB11 may be present in current commercial paint. In this study we measured PCBs in paint sold on the current retail market. We tested 33 commercial paint pigments purchased from three local paint stores. The pigment samples were analyzed for all 209 PCB congeners using gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). More than 50 PCB congeners including several dioxin-like PCBs were detected, and the PCB profiles varied due to different types of pigments and different manufacturing processes. PCB congeners were detected in azo and phthalocyanine pigments which are commonly used in paint but also in inks, textiles, paper, cosmetics, leather, plastics, food and other materials. Our findings suggest several possible mechanisms for the inadvertent production of specific PCB congeners during the manufacturing of paint pigments.

  8. Investigations of biomimetic light energy harvesting pigments

    SciTech Connect

    Van Patten, P.G.; Donohoe, R.J.; Lindsey, J.S.; Bocian, D.F.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Nature uses chlorophyll and other porphyrinic pigments to capture and transfer light energy as a preliminary step in photosynthesis. The design of synthetic assemblies of light harvesting and energy directing pigments has been explored through synthesis and characterization of porphyrin oligomers. In this project, pigment electronic and vibrational structures have been explored by electrochemistry and dynamic and static optical measurements. Transient absorption data reveal energy transfer between pigments with lifetimes on the order of 20--200 picoseconds, while Raman data reveal that the basic porphyrin core structure is unperturbed relative to the individual monomer units. These two findings, along with an extensive series of experiments on the oxidized oligomers, reveal that coupling between the pigments is fundamentally weak, but sufficient to allow facile energy transfer as the predominant excited state process. Modeling of the expected quantum yields for energy transfer within a variety of arrays was accomplished, thereby providing a tool to guide synthetic goals.

  9. Coupling of cytochrome and quinone turnovers in the photocycle of reaction centers from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Osváth, S; Maróti, P

    1997-08-01

    A minimal kinetic model of the photocycle, including both quinone (Q-6) reduction at the secondary quinone-binding site and (mammalian) cytochrome c oxidation at the cytochrome docking site of isolated reaction centers from photosynthetic purple bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides, was elaborated and tested by cytochrome photooxidation under strong continuous illumination. The typical rate of photochemical excitation by a laser diode at 810 nm was 2.200 s-1, and the rates of stationary turnover of the reaction center (one-half of that of cytochrome photooxidation) were 600 +/- 70 s-1 at pH 6 and 400 +/- 50 s-1 at pH 8. The rate of turnover showed strong pH dependence, indicating the contribution of different rate-limiting processes. The kinetic limitation of the photocycle was attributed to the turnover of the cytochrome c binding site (pH < 6), light intensity and quinone/quinol exchange (6 < pH < 8), and proton-coupled second electron transfer in the quinone acceptor complex (pH > 8). The analysis of the double-reciprocal plot of the rate of turnover versus light intensity has proved useful in determining the light-independent (maximum) turnover rate of the reaction center (445 +/- 50 s-1 at pH 7.8).

  10. Celeribacter persicus sp. nov., a polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium isolated from mangrove soil.

    PubMed

    Jami, Mansooreh; Lai, Qiliang; Ghanbari, Mahdi; Moghadam, Mohsen Shahriari; Kneifel, Wolfgang; Domig, Konrad J

    2016-04-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, mesophilic bacterial strain, designated SBU1T, which degrades polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was isolated from the sediments of the mangrove forests of Nayband Bay in the Iranian Persian Gulf during a bioremediation experiment. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain SBU1T exhibited highest similarities with Celeribacter indicus P73T (98.52%) and Celeribacter neptunius H 14T (97.05%). Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, demonstrated that strain SBU1T fell within a cluster consisting of the type strains of species of the genus Celeribacter and formed a stable clade with C. indicus P73T in trees generated with three algorithms. The fatty acid profile of strain SBU1T consisted of the major fatty acids C18:1ω7c/ω6c and C18:1ω7c 11-methyl. The major compounds in the polar lipid profile were one phosphatidylglycerol and four unidentified phospholipids. The quinone system exclusively comprised ubiquinone (Q-10). The DNA G+C content was 60.4 mol%. A combination of phylogenetic analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization estimation, average nucleotide identity results and differential phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics demonstrated that strain SBU1T could be distinguished from its close relatives. Therefore, strain SBU1T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Celeribacter for which the name Celeribacter persicus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SBU1T (=MCCC 1A00672T=DSM 100434T). PMID:26867899

  11. Crystal Structure of ChrR -- A Quinone Reductase with the Capacity to Reduce Chromate

    SciTech Connect

    Eswaramoorthy S.; Poulain, S.; Hienerwadel, R.; Bremond, N.; Sylvester, M. D.; Zhang, Y.-B.; Berthomieu, C.; van der Lelie, D.; Matin, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Escherichia coli ChrR enzyme is an obligatory two-electron quinone reductase that has many applications, such as in chromate bioremediation. Its crystal structure, solved at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, shows that it belongs to the flavodoxin superfamily in which flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is firmly anchored to the protein. ChrR crystallized as a tetramer, and size exclusion chromatography showed that this is the oligomeric form that catalyzes chromate reduction. Within the tetramer, the dimers interact by a pair of two hydrogen bond networks, each involving Tyr128 and Glu146 of one dimer and Arg125 and Tyr85 of the other; the latter extends to one of the redox FMN cofactors. Changes in each of these amino acids enhanced chromate reductase activity of the enzyme, showing that this network is centrally involved in chromate reduction.

  12. Pyrroloquinoline quinone prevents MK-801-induced stereotypical behavior and cognitive deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xingqin; Chen, Quancheng; Hu, Xindai; Mao, Shishi; Kong, Yanyan

    2014-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), an essential nutrient, antioxidant, redox modulator, and nerve growth factor, prevents cognitive deficits associated with oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration. Previous molecular imaging studies also demonstrate that PQQ binds to N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. In this study, we investigated the effects of PQQ on stereotypical behaviors and cognitive deficits induced by MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA antagonist used to model schizophrenia. Mice were given repeated injections of MK-801 (0.5mg/kg/d) and PQQ (0.2, 2.0, or 20 μg/kg/d) for 60 days. Behavior was evaluated using a variety of motor, social, and cognitive tests. We found that PQQ administration significantly attenuated MK-801-induced increases in stereotypical behavior and ataxia, suggesting a protective role of PQQ against MK-801-induced neuronal dysfunction and psychiatric disorders. Future studies are necessary to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of PQQ.

  13. Anti-inflammatory and Quinone Reductase Inducing Compounds from Fermented Noni (Morinda citrifolia) Juice Exudates.

    PubMed

    Youn, Ui Joung; Park, Eun-Jung; Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Sang-Ngern, Mayuramas; Wall, Marisa M; Wei, Yanzhang; Pezzuto, John M; Chang, Leng Chee

    2016-06-24

    A new fatty acid ester disaccharide, 2-O-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)-1-O-(2E,4Z,7Z)-deca-2,4,7-trienoyl-β-d-glucopyranose (1), a new ascorbic acid derivative, 2-caffeoyl-3-ketohexulofuranosonic acid γ-lactone (2), and a new iridoid glycoside, 10-dimethoxyfermiloside (3), were isolated along with 13 known compounds (4-16) from fermented noni fruit juice (Morinda citrifolia). The structures of the new compounds, together with 4 and 5, were determined by 1D and 2D NMR experiments, as well as comparison with published values. Compounds 2 and 7 showed moderate inhibitory activities in a TNF-α-induced NF-κB assay, and compounds 4 and 6 exhibited considerable quinone reductase-1 (QR1) inducing effects.

  14. Crystal Structure of ChrR—A Quinone Reductase with the Capacity to Reduce Chromate

    PubMed Central

    Hienerwadel, Rainer; Bremond, Nicolas; Sylvester, Matthew D.; Zhang, Yian-Biao; Berthomieu, Catherine; Van Der Lelie, Daniel; Matin, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Escherichia coli ChrR enzyme is an obligatory two-electron quinone reductase that has many applications, such as in chromate bioremediation. Its crystal structure, solved at 2.2 Å resolution, shows that it belongs to the flavodoxin superfamily in which flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is firmly anchored to the protein. ChrR crystallized as a tetramer, and size exclusion chromatography showed that this is the oligomeric form that catalyzes chromate reduction. Within the tetramer, the dimers interact by a pair of two hydrogen bond networks, each involving Tyr128 and Glu146 of one dimer and Arg125 and Tyr85 of the other; the latter extends to one of the redox FMN cofactors. Changes in each of these amino acids enhanced chromate reductase activity of the enzyme, showing that this network is centrally involved in chromate reduction. PMID:22558308

  15. Molecular cloning and sequencing of zeta-crystallin/quinone reductase cDNA from human liver.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, P; Rao, P V; Zigler, J S

    1993-03-31

    Zeta-crystallin is an enzyme-crystallin highly expressed in the lens of some hystricomorph rodents and camels. It has been shown to have a novel NADPH: quinone oxidoreductase activity and is present at enzymatic levels in a variety of tissues from various mammals. We report here the cDNA cloning of zeta-crystallin from a human liver library. One clone with the complete open reading frame was obtained. Ten nucleotides of the 5' and 796 of the 3' nontranslated regions are present in the clone including two possible polyadenylation signals. The deduced amino acid sequence is 328 residues long with a calculated molecular mass of 34910 daltons and isoelectric point of 8.73. It shows 84% identity with the guinea pig protein.

  16. Characterization and analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, G.M.; Smith, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Sampling and analytical procedures were developed for determining the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in animal-exposure chambers during studies on exposure to diesel exhaust, coal dust, or mixtures of these two pollutants. Fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(e)pyrene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene were used as representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. High-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection was used for analysis. Coal-dust only samples revealed a broad, rising background in the chromatogram with small peaks superimposed corresponding to fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo(a)anthracene, diesel exhaust only samples showed many peaks on a flat baseline including those corresponding to fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene. In general, no polynuclear aromatics were noted in the clean air samples. The authors note that relatively minor changes in air/fuel ratio, lubricant, fuel, and load may have substantial effects on very minor components of the exhaust emission.

  17. Effects of Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Disodium Salt Intake on the Serum Cholesterol Levels of Healthy Japanese Adults.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masahiko; Kawasaki, Yuuki; Suzuki, Naoko; Takara, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a water-soluble quinone compound that has a strong anti-oxidant capacity. A previous study in rats fed a PQQ-depleted diet showed that elevated levels of serum triglyceride (TG) decreased after PQQ supplementation. However, there is only one study reporting the effects of PQQ on serum lipid levels, such as those of TG and cholesterol, in humans. In this study, the effects of PQQ disodium salt (BioPQQ™) on serum TG and cholesterol levels in humans after 6 and 12 wk of treatment at an oral dosage of 20 mg/d were examined. This trial was conducted according to a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded protocol. A total of 29 healthy Japanese adults, ranging from 40 to 57 y old, with normal to moderately high TG levels (110-300 mg/dL) as measured by a recent blood examination, were included in this study. In eleven volunteers out of 29, serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-chol) levels at baseline were high (≥140 mg/dL). After 12 wk, the mean serum TG levels had not changed; however, a marginally significant decrease in the mean LDL-chol (from 136.1 to 127.0 mg/dL) was observed in the PQQ group. In the stratification analysis of the high LDL-chol subgroup (baseline LDL-chol level ≥140 mg/dL), the mean LDL-chol levels decreased significantly from the baseline values in the PQQ group compared to the placebo group. Our study findings suggest that PQQ suppressed the LDL-chol level, which is an important finding, because a high level of this lipid is a risk factor for various lifestyle-related diseases.

  18. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Delivery of Quinone Warheads to DNA Triggering Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Kuan-wei; Wang, Huali; Qin, Zhihui; Wijewickrama, Gihani T.; Lu, Meiling; Wang, Zhican; Bolton, Judy L.; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.

    2009-01-01

    Estrogen exposure is a risk factor for breast cancer and estrogen oxidative metabolites have been implicated in chemical carcinogenesis. Oxidation of the catechol metabolite of estrone (4-OHE) and the β-naphthohydroquinone metabolite of equilenin (4-OHEN) gives o-quinones that produce ROS and damage DNA by adduction and oxidation. To differentiate hormonal and chemical carcinogensis pathways in estrogen receptor positive ER(+) cells, catechol or β-naphthohydroquinone warheads were conjugated to the selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) desmethylarzoxifene (DMA). ER binding was retained in the DMA conjugates; both were antiestrogens with submicromolar potency in mammary and endometrial cells. Cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and caspase-3/7 activation were compared in ER(+) and ER(−)MDA-MB-231 cells, and production of ROS was detected using a fluorescent reporter. Comparison was made to DMA, isolated warheads, and a DMA-mustard. Conjugation of warheads to DMA increased cytotoxicity accompanied by induction of apoptosis and activation of caspase-3/7. Activation of caspase-3/7, induction of apoptosis, and cytotoxicity were all increased significantly in ER(+) cells for the DMA conjugates. ROS production was localized in the nucleus for conjugates in ER(+) cells. Observations are compatible with β-naphthohydroquinone and catechol groups being concentrated in the nucleus by ER binding, where oxidation and ROS production result, concomitant with caspase-dependent apoptosis. The results suggest DNA damage induced by catechol estrogen metabolites can be amplified in ER(+) cells independent of hormonal activity. The novel conjugation of quinone warheads to an ER-targeting SERM gives ER-dependent, enhanced apoptosis in mammary cancer cells of potential application in cancer therapy. PMID:19839584

  19. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1998-09-22

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

  20. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, Paul H.

    1998-01-01

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

  1. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-12-16

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation.

  2. In vivo and in vitro polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degradation by Lentinus (Panus) tigrinus CBS 577.79.

    PubMed

    Covino, Stefano; Svobodová, Katerina; Kresinová, Zdena; Petruccioli, Maurizio; Federici, Federico; D'Annibale, Alessandro; Cvancarová, Monika; Cajthaml, Tomás

    2010-05-01

    The ability of stationary and shaken Lentinus tigrinus CBS 577.79 liquid cultures to degrade a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in N-rich (i.e., malt extract glucose, MEG) and in N-limited (low-N Kirk's medium, LNKM) media was investigated. Best results were obtained in shaken cultures where PAHs were degraded by 91% and 97% in MEG and LNKM, respectively; in stationary cultures, on the contrary, the degradation was never higher than 50%. Laccase activity was predominant on MEG while Mn-peroxidase (MnP) was preferentially produced in LNKM. The identification of degradation products showed the presence of several PAH derivatives, such as quinones, dicarboxylated and ring fission derivatives, presumably derived from the action of lignin-modifying enzymes. The presence of some degradation products (e.g., hydroxylated derivatives of anthrone and phenanthrene 9,10-dihydrodiol) suggested the possible involvement of cytochrome P-450-epoxide hydrolase system, the active form of which was found in 7-day-old cultures on MEG. In vitro experiments showed that the MnP from L. tigrinus had wider PAH substrate range and higher oxidation ability than the laccase produced by the same strain. PMID:20056409

  3. Photo-oxidative stress in the eye: role of retinal pigment epithelial pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Dontsov, Alexander E.; Ostrovsky, Michail A.; Kumar, Neeru; Vendal, Meena; Gonzales, Mary A.

    1999-09-01

    The pigments of the retinal pigment epithelium, i.e. the intracellular granules of melanin, lipofuscin, and melanolipofuscin, have been shown to catalyze free radical activity, especially when illuminated with visible or ultraviolet light. An important question is whether these reactions are sufficient to produce oxidative damage in the eye. To address this question, the relative photoreactivity of isolated RPE pigment granules towards polyunsaturated fatty acids has been determined, including the dark as well as the light-stimulated reactions. Hydroperoxide derivatives of docosahexaenoic acid were produced by irradiation with short wavelength (< 550 nm) visible light when RPE pigments were present. Although melanosomes exhibited the greatest light-induced activity in these reactions, lipofuscin granules induced peroxidation of fatty acids in the dark. In intact, cultured RPE cells, the existence of pigment-medicated photo-reactions were demonstrated with a fluorescent indicator probe of oxidation, 2',7'- dichlorofluorescein, that was photooxidized in probe-labeled cells in a wavelength dependence fashion with peak activity in the 450 to 500 nm region. This behavior resembled the action spectrum for melanin reactivity. These findings support the hypotheses that the RPE pigments contribute to general photooxidative stress in ocular tissue, and that accumulation of lipofuscin pigment contributes to age-related oxidative stress in the RPE.

  4. Green pigments of the Pompeian artists' palette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliatis, Irene; Bersani, Danilo; Campani, Elisa; Casoli, Antonella; Lottici, Pier Paolo; Mantovan, Silvia; Marino, Iari-Gabriel; Ospitali, Francesca

    2009-08-01

    Green colored samples on wall paintings and green powder from a pigment pot found in Pompeii area are investigated by micro-Raman, FT-IR and, for one sample, SEM-EDX. To obtain the green color, green earths and malachite were used, together with mixture of Egyptian blue and yellow ochre. The mineralogical identification of the green earths has been attempted through the comparison of the vibrational features, discriminating between celadonite and glauconite spectra. Traces of a modern synthetic pigment containing copper phthalocyanine were found in a fresco fragment.

  5. Pseudoepitheliomatous Hyperplasia in a Red Pigment Tattoo

    PubMed Central

    Kazlouskaya, Viktoryia

    2015-01-01

    Red pigment tattoos are known to cause pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in the skin, frequently simulating squamous cell carcinoma or keratoacanthoma. Herein, the authors present two additional cases of red pigment tattoo pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in which they noted a lichenoid tissue reaction. They reviewed the previously published cases and observed a lichenoid reaction in the histopathological images similar to hypertrophic lichen planus. The authors suggest that these reactions might best be referred to as “lichenoid reaction with pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia” or “hypertrophic lichen planus-like reaction.” Accordingly, recognition of an inflammatory component may allow additional treatment options. PMID:26705448

  6. Synthetic polycyclic musks in Hong Kong sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Shek, W M; Murphy, M B; Lam, James C W; Lam, Paul K S

    2008-04-01

    Synthetic polycyclic musks [Cashmeran (DPMI), Celestolide (ADBI), Phantolide (AHMI), Traseolide (ATII), Tonalide (AHTN), and Galaxolide (HHCB)] were determined in dewatered sludge samples from 10 major sewage treatment plants in Hong Kong using primary treatment (PT), secondary treatment (SecT) or chemical-enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) methods. The concentrations of HHCB, AHTN, AHMI and ADBI ranged from below detection limits to 78.6mg/kg dry weight. HHCB and AHTN were the two predominant polycyclic musks in sludge samples, suggesting the extensive use of these two polycyclic musks in Hong Kong. Polycyclic musk levels in CEPT sludge were significantly higher than those in SecT and PT sludge, suggesting that CEPT sludge has a higher ability to retain polycyclic musks. Comparisons to global concentrations revealed that HHCB and AHTN concentrations detected in Hong Kong sludge ranked first and second respectively. However, the estimated levels of HHCB and AHTN in the discharged effluent from sewage treatment plants may pose low potential risks to aquatic organisms according to the threshold effect levels derived for fish. Nevertheless, the polycyclic musks released in sewage treatment plant effluents may bioconcentrate and bioaccumulate in the marine environment in Hong Kong. Therefore, monitoring studies in marine ecosystems, particularly on the two prevailing polycyclic musks, are necessary. PMID:18267326

  7. Synthetic polycyclic musks in Hong Kong sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Shek, W M; Murphy, M B; Lam, James C W; Lam, Paul K S

    2008-04-01

    Synthetic polycyclic musks [Cashmeran (DPMI), Celestolide (ADBI), Phantolide (AHMI), Traseolide (ATII), Tonalide (AHTN), and Galaxolide (HHCB)] were determined in dewatered sludge samples from 10 major sewage treatment plants in Hong Kong using primary treatment (PT), secondary treatment (SecT) or chemical-enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) methods. The concentrations of HHCB, AHTN, AHMI and ADBI ranged from below detection limits to 78.6mg/kg dry weight. HHCB and AHTN were the two predominant polycyclic musks in sludge samples, suggesting the extensive use of these two polycyclic musks in Hong Kong. Polycyclic musk levels in CEPT sludge were significantly higher than those in SecT and PT sludge, suggesting that CEPT sludge has a higher ability to retain polycyclic musks. Comparisons to global concentrations revealed that HHCB and AHTN concentrations detected in Hong Kong sludge ranked first and second respectively. However, the estimated levels of HHCB and AHTN in the discharged effluent from sewage treatment plants may pose low potential risks to aquatic organisms according to the threshold effect levels derived for fish. Nevertheless, the polycyclic musks released in sewage treatment plant effluents may bioconcentrate and bioaccumulate in the marine environment in Hong Kong. Therefore, monitoring studies in marine ecosystems, particularly on the two prevailing polycyclic musks, are necessary.

  8. Studies using structural analogs and inbred strain differences to support a role for quinone methide metabolites of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in mouse lung tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J A; Carlson, T J; Sun, Y; Dwyer-Nield, L D; Malkinson, A M

    2001-03-01

    Chronic treatment of BALB and GRS mice with BHT (2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol) following a single urethane injection increases lung tumor multiplicity, but this does not occur in CXB4 mice. Previous data suggest that promotion requires the conversion of BHT to a tert-butyl-hydroxylated metabolite (BHTOH) in lung and the subsequent oxidation of this species to an electrophilic quinone methide. To obtain additional evidence for the importance of quinone methide formation, structural analogs that form less reactive quinone methides were tested and found to lack promoting activity in BHT-responsive mice. The possibility that promotion-unresponsive strains are unable to form BHTOH was tested by substituting this compound for BHT in the promotion protocol using CXB4 mice. No promotion occurred, and in-vitro work demonstrated that CXB4 mice are, in fact, capable of producing BHTOH and its quinone methide, albeit in smaller quantities. Incubations with BALB lung microsomes and radiolabeled substrates confirmed that more covalent binding to protein occurs with BHTOH than with BHT and, in addition, BHTOH quinone methide is considerably more toxic to mouse lung epithelial cells than BHT quinone methide. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that a two-step oxidation process, i.e. hydroxylation and quinone methide formation, is required for the promotion of mouse lung tumors by BHT.

  9. Separation of Chloroplast Pigments Using Reverse Phase Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, R. Neil

    1997-01-01

    Presents a protocol that uses reverse phase chromatography for the separation of chloroplast pigments. Provides a simple and relatively safe procedure for use in teaching laboratories. Discusses pigment extraction, chromatography, results, and advantages of the process. (JRH)

  10. Pigment oligomers as natural and artificial photosynthetic antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    Green photosynthetic bacteria contain antenna complexes known as chlorosomes. These complexes are appressed to the cytoplasmic side of the inner cell membrane and function to absorb light and transfer the energy to the photochemical reaction center, where photochemical energy storage takes place. Chlorosomes differ from all other known photosynthetic antenna complexes in that the geometrical arrangement of pigments is determined primarily by pigment-pigment interactions instead of pigment-protein interactions. The bacteriochlorophyll c, d or e pigments found in chlorosomes form large oligomers with characteristic spectral properties significantly perturbed from those exhibited by monomeric pigments. Because of their close spatial interaction, the pigments are thought to be strongly coupled electronically, and many of the optical properties result from exciton interactions. This presentation will summarize existing knowledge on the chemical composition and properties of chlorosomes, the evidence for the oligomeric nature of chlorosome pigment organization and proposed structures for the oligomers, and the kinetics and mechanisms of energy transfer in chlorosomes.

  11. The peripheral clock regulates human pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Jonathan A; Tobin, Desmond J; Haslam, Iain S; Farjo, Nilofer; Farjo, Bessam; Al-Nuaimi, Yusur; Grimaldi, Benedetto; Paus, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Although the regulation of pigmentation is well characterized, it remains unclear whether cell-autonomous controls regulate the cyclic on-off switching of pigmentation in the hair follicle (HF). As human HFs and epidermal melanocytes express clock genes and proteins, and given that core clock genes (PER1, BMAL1) modulate human HF cycling, we investigated whether peripheral clock activity influences human HF pigmentation. We found that silencing BMAL1 or PER1 in human HFs increased HF melanin content. Furthermore, tyrosinase expression and activity, as well as TYRP1 and TYRP2 mRNA levels, gp100 protein expression, melanocyte dendricity, and the number gp100+ HF melanocytes, were all significantly increased in BMAL1 and/or PER1-silenced HFs. BMAL1 or PER1 silencing also increased epidermal melanin content, gp100 protein expression, and tyrosinase activity in human skin. These effects reflect direct modulation of melanocytes, as BMAL1 and/or PER1 silencing in isolated melanocytes increased tyrosinase activity and TYRP1/2 expression. Mechanistically, BMAL1 knockdown reduces PER1 transcription, and PER1 silencing induces phosphorylation of the master regulator of melanogenesis, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, thus stimulating human melanogenesis and melanocyte activity in situ and in vitro. Therefore, the molecular clock operates as a cell-autonomous modulator of human pigmentation and may be targeted for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25310406

  12. "Dry-column" chromatography of plant pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.; Lehwalt, M. F.; Oyama, V. I.

    1973-01-01

    Separation of plant pigments which can be accomplished on thin-layer silica plates with mixture of petroleum ether, halocarbon, acetone, and polar solvent can be readily translated into dry-column technique that yields reproducible chromatograms after elution in fashion of liquid chromatography with fluorimeter as detector. Best solvent system was found to be mixture of petroleum ether, dichloromethane, acetone, and ethyl acetate.

  13. Molecular evolution of vertebrate visual pigments.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, S

    2000-07-01

    Dramatic improvement of our understanding of the genetic basis of vision was brought by the molecular characterization of the bovine rhodopsin gene and the human rhodopsin and color opsin genes (Nathans and Hogness, 1983; Nathans et al., 1984, 1986a,b). The availability of cDNA clones from these studies has facilitated the isolation of retinal and nonretinal opsin genes and cDNA clones from a large variety of species. Today, the number of genomic and cDNA clones of opsin genes isolated from different vertebrate species exceeds 100 and is increasing rapidly. The opsin gene sequences reveal the importance of the origin and differentiation of various opsins and visual pigments. To understand the molecular genetic basis of spectral tuning of visual pigments, it is essential to establish correlations between a series of the sequences of visual pigments and their lambda(max) values. The potentially important amino acid changes identified in this way have to be tested whether they are in fact responsible for the lambda(max)-shifts using site-directed mutagenesis and cultured cells. A major goal of molecular evolutionary genetics is to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in functional adaptations of organisms to different environments, including the mechanisms of the regulation of the spectral absorption. Therefore, both molecular evolutionary analyses of visual pigments and vision science have an important common goal.

  14. 21 CFR 73.352 - Paracoccus pigment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Paracoccus pigment. 73.352 Section 73.352 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR... accepted stability testing methods), other information required by § 70.25 of this chapter, and...

  15. Retinal pigment epithelial hamartoma--unusual manifestations.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, P. R.; Walsh, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    Hamartoma of the retinal pigment epithelium is an uncommon tumour of young adults. We have seen 2 patients with this clinical diagnosis, both with unusual manifestations. In one patient growth of the tumour was observed over a 5-year period. In the second patient arterial-arterial anastomoses were detected at a site distal to the tumour. Images PMID:6722077

  16. [Pigmented villonodular synovitis: apropos of 3 cases].

    PubMed

    Mullier, J; Beauvois, S; Gebhart, M; Roelandts, M; Van Houtte, P

    2001-04-01

    Three cases of pigmented villonodular synovitis treated in recent years are described. One case presents a malignant transformation and raises the question of the benign character of these lesions. The therapeutic options are considered as well as the need for a larger series of patients to define therapeutic strategy.

  17. The peripheral clock regulates human pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Jonathan A; Tobin, Desmond J; Haslam, Iain S; Farjo, Nilofer; Farjo, Bessam; Al-Nuaimi, Yusur; Grimaldi, Benedetto; Paus, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Although the regulation of pigmentation is well characterized, it remains unclear whether cell-autonomous controls regulate the cyclic on-off switching of pigmentation in the hair follicle (HF). As human HFs and epidermal melanocytes express clock genes and proteins, and given that core clock genes (PER1, BMAL1) modulate human HF cycling, we investigated whether peripheral clock activity influences human HF pigmentation. We found that silencing BMAL1 or PER1 in human HFs increased HF melanin content. Furthermore, tyrosinase expression and activity, as well as TYRP1 and TYRP2 mRNA levels, gp100 protein expression, melanocyte dendricity, and the number gp100+ HF melanocytes, were all significantly increased in BMAL1 and/or PER1-silenced HFs. BMAL1 or PER1 silencing also increased epidermal melanin content, gp100 protein expression, and tyrosinase activity in human skin. These effects reflect direct modulation of melanocytes, as BMAL1 and/or PER1 silencing in isolated melanocytes increased tyrosinase activity and TYRP1/2 expression. Mechanistically, BMAL1 knockdown reduces PER1 transcription, and PER1 silencing induces phosphorylation of the master regulator of melanogenesis, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, thus stimulating human melanogenesis and melanocyte activity in situ and in vitro. Therefore, the molecular clock operates as a cell-autonomous modulator of human pigmentation and may be targeted for future therapeutic strategies.

  18. Pigment patterns in adult fish result from superimposition of two largely independent pigmentation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ceinos, Rosa M; Guillot, Raúl; Kelsh, Robert N; Cerdá-Reverter, José M; Rotllant, Josep

    2015-03-01

    Dorso-ventral pigment pattern differences are the most widespread pigmentary adaptations in vertebrates. In mammals, this pattern is controlled by regulating melanin chemistry in melanocytes using a protein, agouti-signalling peptide (ASIP). In fish, studies of pigment patterning have focused on stripe formation, identifying a core striping mechanism dependent upon interactions between different pigment cell types. In contrast, mechanisms driving the dorso-ventral countershading pattern have been overlooked. Here, we demonstrate that, in fact, zebrafish utilize two distinct adult pigment patterning mechanisms - an ancient dorso-ventral patterning mechanism, and a more recent striping mechanism based on cell-cell interactions; remarkably, the dorso-ventral patterning mechanism also utilizes ASIP. These two mechanisms function largely independently, with resultant patterns superimposed to give the full pattern.

  19. Ultrasound induced aqueous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon reactivity.

    PubMed

    Wheat, P E; Tumeo, M A

    1997-01-01

    An investigation to determine the ability of ultrasonic radiation to chemically alter polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aqueous solution has been conducted. The data indicate that chemical alteration of PAHs can be induced under intense ultrasonic treatment. The extent and outcome of reaction is a function of irridation time and aqueous solution parameters. Reaction products were analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Reaction products from ultrasonic treatment of aqueous solutions of biphenyl include ortho, meta, and para-1,1 biphenols. The principal product from ultrasonic treatment of aqueous phenanthrene solutions appears to be a phenanthrene-diol. The number and composition of reaction products for both PAHs tested suggest that a free radical mechanism is likely during aqueous high intensity ultrasonic treatment. The use of ultrasound to treat PAH contaminated aqueous solutions in tandem with other methodologies appears promising. However, the toxicity of reaction products produced by treatment remains to be determined. PMID:11233926

  20. Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds and Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, thanks to significant, parallel advancements in observational, experimental, and theoretical techniques, tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of the role polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC) in the interstellar medium (ISM). Twenty years ago, the notion of an abundant population of large, carbon rich molecules in the ISM was considered preposterous. Today, the unmistakable spectroscopic signatures of PAC - shockingly large molecules by previous interstellar chemistry standards - are recognized throughout the Universe. In this paper, we will examine the interstellar PAC model and its importance to astrophysics, including: (1) the evidence which led to inception of the model; (2) the ensuing laboratory and theoretical studies of the fundamental spectroscopic properties of PAC by which the model has been refined and extended; and (3) a few examples of how the model is being exploited to derive insight into the nature of the interstellar PAC population.

  1. Structural Evolution of Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammonds, Mark; Candian, Alessandra; Mori, Tamami; Usui, Fumihiko; Onaka, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important reservoir for molecular carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM), and investigations into their chemistry and behaviour may be important to the understanding of how carbon is processed from simple forms into complex prebiotic molecules such as those detected in chondritic meteorites. In this study, infrared astronomical data from AKARI and other observatories are used together with laboratory and theoretical data to study variations in the structure of emitting PAHs in interstellar environments using spectroscopic decomposition techniques and bands arising from carbon-hydrogen bond vibrations at wavelengths from 3 - 14 microns. Results and inferences are discussed in terms of the processing of large carbonaceous molecules in astrophysical environments.

  2. Risk assessment of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, L. ); Lax, I. ); Torndal, U.B.; Eriksson, L.C. )

    1993-06-01

    Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs) constitute a group of substances formed during incomplete combustion. Sources include diesel vehicles, heating, smoking, certain types of food-processing, and incomplete combustion in general. 2-Nitrofluorene (NF) represents a model substance for the nitro-PAHs. An attempt has been made to estimate the lifetime human cancer risk due to background exposure to nitro-PAHs by two different models. The first model is based on genotoxic lesions produced by gamma-irradiation and the second model is based on an earlier published mega study (24,000 animals) on the carcinogenicity of the major metabolite of NF. Both models agreed well -- representing a yearly human cancer risk in the range of 0.15--49 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] for an urban citizen. The weaknesses and strengths of the models are discussed. 55 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in yogurt samples.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Chiara; Girelli, Anna Maria; Tarola, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    The concentrations and distributions of major polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in 20 kinds of yogurt specimens collected from Italian supermarkets using reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography equipped with fluorescence detection. The method was validated by determination of recovery percentages, precision (repeatability) and sensitivity (limits of detection) with yogurt samples fortified at 0.25, 0.5 and 1 µg/kg concentration levels. The recovery of 13 PAHs, with the exception of naphthalene and acenaphthene, ranged from 61% to 130% and from 60% to 97% at all the levels for yogurts with low (0.1%) and high (3.9%) fat content, respectively. The method is repeatable with relative standard deviation values <20% for all analytes. The results obtained demonstrate that acenaphthene, fluorantene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene were found in all samples with a similar distribution, but different content when yogurts with low and high fats were compared.

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and cancer in man

    SciTech Connect

    Mastrangelo, G.; Marzia, V.; Fadda, E.

    1996-11-01

    Various substances and industrial processes, surrogates of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), are currently classified as human carcinogens. This paper reviews recent epidemiological studies reporting direct evidence of the carcinogenic effects of PAHs in occupationally exposed subjects. Risks of lung and bladder cancer were dose dependent when PAHs were measured quantitatively and truly nonexposed groups were chosen for comparison. These new findings suggest that the current threshold limit value of 0.2 mg/m{sup 3} of benzene soluble matter (which indicates PAH exposure) is unacceptable because, after 40 years of exposure, it involves a relative risk of 1.2-1.4 for lung cancer and 2.2 for bladder cancer. 33 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Quinone-induced protein modifications: Kinetic preference for reaction of 1,2-benzoquinones with thiol groups in proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuting; Jongberg, Sisse; Andersen, Mogens L; Davies, Michael J; Lund, Marianne N

    2016-08-01

    Oxidation of polyphenols to quinones serves as an antioxidative mechanism, but the resulting quinones may induce damage to proteins as they react through a Michael addition with nucleophilic groups, such as thiols and amines to give protein adducts. In this study, rate constants for the reaction of 4-methylbenzoquinone (4MBQ) with proteins, thiol and amine compounds were determined under pseudo first-order conditions by UV-vis stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The chemical structures of the adducts were identified by LC-ESI-MS/MS. Proteins with free thiols were rapidly modified by 4MBQ with apparent second order rate constants, k2 of (3.1±0.2)×10(4)M(-1)s(-1) for bovine serum albumin (BSA) and (4.8±0.2)×10(3)M(-1)s(-1) for human serum albumin at pH 7.0. These values are at least 12-fold greater than that for α-lactalbumin (4.0±0.2)×10(2)M(-1)s(-1), which does not contain any free thiols. Reaction of Cys-34 of BSA with N-ethylmaleimide reduced the thiol concentration by ~59%, which resulted in a decrease in k2 by a similar percentage, consistent with rapid adduction at Cys-34. Reaction of 4MBQ with amines (Gly, Nα-acetyl-l-Lys, Nε-acetyl-l-Lys and l-Lys) and the guanidine group of Nα-acetyl-l-Arg was at least 5×10(5) slower than with low-molecular-mass thiols (l-Cys, Nα-acetyl-l-Cys, glutathione). The thiol-quinone interactions formed colorless thiol-phenol products via an intermediate adduct, while the amine-quinone interactions generated colored amine-quinone products that require oxygen involvement. These data provide strong evidence for rapid modification of protein thiols by quinone species which may be of considerable significance for biological and food systems. PMID:27212016

  6. Rethinking the history of artists' pigments through chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Berrie, Barbara H

    2012-01-01

    Following a brief overview of the history of analysis of artists' pigments, I discuss the illustrative example of lead-tin yellow. Recent advances in our knowledge of artists' use of red lakes, glassy pigments, and metallic pigments in works of cultural heritage, particularly European paintings, as determined from chemical analyses are described. PMID:22708904

  7. Rethinking the History of Artists' Pigments Through Chemical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrie, Barbara H.

    2012-07-01

    Following a brief overview of the history of analysis of artists' pigments, I discuss the illustrative example of lead-tin yellow. Recent advances in our knowledge of artists' use of red lakes, glassy pigments, and metallic pigments in works of cultural heritage, particularly European paintings, as determined from chemical analyses are described.

  8. The determination and optimization of (rutile) pigment particle size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    A light scattering particle size test which can be used with materials having a broad particle size distribution is described. This test is useful for pigments. The relation between the particle size distribution of a rutile pigment and its optical performance in a gray tint test at low pigment concentration is calculated and compared with experimental data.

  9. Pigment chemistry: the red sweat of the hippopotamus.

    PubMed

    Saikawa, Yoko; Hashimoto, Kimiko; Nakata, Masaya; Yoshihara, Masato; Nagai, Kiyoshi; Ida, Motoyasu; Komiya, Teruyuki

    2004-05-27

    Within a few minutes of perspiration, the colourless, viscous sweat of the hippopotamus gradually turns red, and then brown as the pigment polymerizes. Here we isolate and characterize the pigments responsible for this colour reaction. The unstable red and orange pigments turn out to be non-benzenoid aromatic compounds that are unexpectedly acidic and have antibiotic as well as sunscreen activity.

  10. Pigment chemistry: the red sweat of the hippopotamus.

    PubMed

    Saikawa, Yoko; Hashimoto, Kimiko; Nakata, Masaya; Yoshihara, Masato; Nagai, Kiyoshi; Ida, Motoyasu; Komiya, Teruyuki

    2004-05-27

    Within a few minutes of perspiration, the colourless, viscous sweat of the hippopotamus gradually turns red, and then brown as the pigment polymerizes. Here we isolate and characterize the pigments responsible for this colour reaction. The unstable red and orange pigments turn out to be non-benzenoid aromatic compounds that are unexpectedly acidic and have antibiotic as well as sunscreen activity. PMID:15164051

  11. Neurotized congenital melanocytic nevus resembling a pigmented neurofibroma.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nidhi; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Kar, Rakhee; Sylvia, Mary Theresa; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Neurotized congenital melanocytic nevus and pigmented neurofibroma (PNF) are close mimics and pose a clinicopathological challenge. We present a case of pigmented hypertrichotic plaque over lumbosacral region and discuss the differential diagnosis and its clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemistry features which may aid in differentiation. We highlight the difficulties faced in differentiating neurotized congenital melanocytic nevus from pigmented neurofibroma.

  12. Overview of Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds (PAC)

    PubMed Central

    Achten, Christine; Andersson, Jan T.

    2015-01-01

    The chemical group of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC), including the better-known subgroup of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and the heterocyclic aromatic compounds (NSO-PAC, heterocycles), comprise several thousand individual compounds. It is hard to find a comprehensive overview in the literature of these PACs that includes a substantial amount of relevant properties. Here an attempt is made to summarize the most studied but also some less well-known PACs. In addition to basic data such as recommended names, abbreviations, CAS numbers, molecular formulas, chemical structures, and exact mono-isotopic molecular weights, physico-chemical properties taken from the literature like boiling points, vapor pressures, water solubilities, Henry's Law constants, n-octanol-water partition coefficients (log KOW), and pKa are summarized. Selected toxicological data are listed indicating carcinogenic and mutagenic activity or effects on different organisms. PAC nomenclature is a complex topic, so suggestions for practical use are made. Regarding available data, estimated (instead of measured) values should be used with caution because considerable deviations from experimentally determined values can occur. For an enhanced understanding of the behavior of single PACs in comparison with each other, some of the properties mentioned above are plotted vs. the number of rings or the degree of alkylation. Also, some physico-chemical data are correlated with different functional groups as substituents of the PAHs. This article reveals that rather little is known about the less common PACs, e.g., higher molecular weight compounds, alkylated or otherwise substituted aromatics, for instance, keto-, oxo-, amino-, nitro-, cyano-PAHs, or some heterocyclic aromatic compounds, including their derivatives. It mirrors the limited state of knowledge about the variety of PACs that do not belong to the 16 EPA PAHs. PMID:26823644

  13. Amino acid residues interacting with both the bound quinone and coenzyme, pyrroloquinoline quinone, in Escherichia coli membrane-bound glucose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Golam; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Migita, Catharina T; Elias, M D; Nakamura, Satsuki; Tagawa, Seiichi; Yamada, Mamoru

    2008-08-01

    The Escherichia coli membrane-bound glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH) as the primary component of the respiratory chain possesses a tightly bound ubiquinone (UQ) flanking pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) as a coenzyme. Several mutants for Asp-354, Asp-466, and Lys-493, located close to PQQ, that were constructed by site-specific mutagenesis were characterized by enzymatic, pulse radiolysis, and EPR analyses. These mutants retained almost no dehydrogenase activity or ability of PQQ reduction. CD and high pressure liquid chromatography analyses revealed that K493A, D466N, and D466E mutants showed no significant difference in molecular structure from that of the wild-type mGDH but showed remarkably reduced content of bound UQ. A radiolytically generated hydrated electron (e(aq)(-)) reacted with the bound UQ of the wild enzyme and K493R mutant to form a UQ neutral semiquinone with an absorption maximum at 420 nm. Subsequently, intramolecular electron transfer from the bound UQ semiquinone to PQQ occurred. In K493R, the rate of UQ to PQQ electron transfer is about 4-fold slower than that of the wild enzyme. With D354N and D466N mutants, on the other hand, transient species with an absorption maximum at 440 nm, a characteristic of the formation of a UQ anion radical, appeared in the reaction of e(aq)(-), although the subsequent intramolecular electron transfer was hardly affected. This indicates that D354N and D466N are prevented from protonation of the UQ semiquinone radical. Moreover, EPR spectra showed that mutations on Asp-466 or Lys-493 residues changed the semiquinone state of bound UQ. Taken together, we reported here for the first time the existence of a semiquinone radical of bound UQ in purified mGDH and the difference in protonation of ubisemiquinone radical because of mutations in two different amino acid residues, located around PQQ. Furthermore, based on the present results and the spatial arrangement around PQQ, Asp-466 and Lys-493 are suggested to interact both

  14. The Timing of Pigmentation Lightening in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Beleza, Sandra; Santos, António M.; McEvoy, Brian; Alves, Isabel; Martinho, Cláudia; Cameron, Emily; Shriver, Mark D.; Parra, Esteban J.; Rocha, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The inverse correlation between skin pigmentation and latitude observed in human populations is thought to have been shaped by selective pressures favoring lighter skin to facilitate vitamin D synthesis in regions far from the equator. Several candidate genes for skin pigmentation have been shown to exhibit patterns of polymorphism that overlap the geospatial variation in skin color. However, little work has focused on estimating the time frame over which skin pigmentation has changed and on the intensity of selection acting on different pigmentation genes. To provide a temporal framework for the evolution of lighter pigmentation, we used forward Monte Carlo simulations coupled with a rejection sampling algorithm to estimate the time of onset of selective sweeps and selection coefficients at four genes associated with this trait in Europeans: KITLG, TYRP1, SLC24A5, and SLC45A2. Using compound haplotype systems consisting of rapidly evolving microsatellites linked to one single-nucleotide polymorphism in each gene, we estimate that the onset of the sweep shared by Europeans and East Asians at KITLG occurred approximately 30,000 years ago, after the out-of-Africa migration, whereas the selective sweeps for the European-specific alleles at TYRP1, SLC24A5, and SLC45A2 started much later, within the last 11,000–19,000 years, well after the first migrations of modern humans into Europe. We suggest that these patterns were influenced by recent increases in size of human populations, which favored the accumulation of advantageous variants at different loci. PMID:22923467

  15. Dimerization of visual pigments in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Cao, Li-Hui; Kumar, Sandeep; Enemchukwu, Nduka O; Zhang, Ning; Lambert, Alyssia; Zhao, Xuchen; Jones, Alex; Wang, Shixian; Dennis, Emily M; Fnu, Amrita; Ham, Sam; Rainier, Jon; Yau, King-Wai; Fu, Yingbin

    2016-08-01

    It is a deeply engrained notion that the visual pigment rhodopsin signals light as a monomer, even though many G protein-coupled receptors are now known to exist and function as dimers. Nonetheless, recent studies (albeit all in vitro) have suggested that rhodopsin and its chromophore-free apoprotein, R-opsin, may indeed exist as a homodimer in rod disk membranes. Given the overwhelmingly strong historical context, the crucial remaining question, therefore, is whether pigment dimerization truly exists naturally and what function this dimerization may serve. We addressed this question in vivo with a unique mouse line (S-opsin(+)Lrat(-/-)) expressing, transgenically, short-wavelength-sensitive cone opsin (S-opsin) in rods and also lacking chromophore to exploit the fact that cone opsins, but not R-opsin, require chromophore for proper folding and trafficking to the photoreceptor's outer segment. In R-opsin's absence, S-opsin in these transgenic rods without chromophore was mislocalized; in R-opsin's presence, however, S-opsin trafficked normally to the rod outer segment and produced functional S-pigment upon subsequent chromophore restoration. Introducing a competing R-opsin transmembrane helix H1 or helix H8 peptide, but not helix H4 or helix H5 peptide, into these transgenic rods caused mislocalization of R-opsin and S-opsin to the perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum. Importantly, a similar peptide-competition effect was observed even in WT rods. Our work provides convincing evidence for visual pigment dimerization in vivo under physiological conditions and for its role in pigment maturation and targeting. Our work raises new questions regarding a potential mechanistic role of dimerization in rhodopsin signaling. PMID:27462111

  16. PHOTOTOXICITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN COASTAL GREAT LAKES WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photoinduced toxicity is the exacerbated toxicity of environmental contaminants by UV radiation. Photoinduced toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been well established in the laboratory for numerous aquatic species including larval fish. The contaminants sub-p...

  17. ADSORPTION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN AGED HARBOR SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of hydrophobic organic contaminants which have low aqueous solubilities and are common pollutants in harbor sediments. Adsorption and desorption isotherms for PAHs are conducted to study the abiotic sorption of PAHs in uncontami...

  18. Metal-catalyzed annulation reactions for π-conjugated polycycles.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tienan; Zhao, Jian; Asao, Naoki; Yamamoto, Yoshinori

    2014-03-24

    The progress of the metal-catalyzed annulation reactions toward construction of various π-conjugated polycyclic cores with high conjugation extension is described. This article gives a brief overview of various annulation reactions promoted by metal catalysts including C-H bond functionalization, [2+2+2] cycloaddition, cascade processes, ring closing metathesis, electrophilic aromatization, and various cross-coupling reactions. A variety of conjugated polycycles with planar, bowl-shaped, and helical structures have been constructed in high efficiency and selectivity.

  19. Bioactivation of Nevirapine to a Reactive Quinone Methide: Implications for Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Nevirapine (NVP) treatment is associated with a significant incidence of liver injury. We developed an anti-NVP antiserum to determine the presence and pattern of covalent binding of NVP to mouse, rat, and human hepatic tissues. Covalent binding to hepatic microsomes from male C57BL/6 mice and male Brown Norway rats was detected on Western blots; the major protein had a mass of ∼55 kDa. Incubation of NVP with rat CYP3A1 and 2C11 or human CYP3A4 also led to covalent binding. Treatment of female Brown Norway rats or C57BL/6 mice with NVP led to extensive covalent binding to a wide range of proteins. Co-treatment with 1-aminobenzotriazole dramatically changed the pattern of binding. The covalent binding of 12-hydroxy-NVP, the pathway that leads to a skin rash, was much less than that of NVP, both in vitro and in vivo. An analogue of NVP in which the methyl hydrogens were replaced by deuterium also produced less covalent binding than NVP. These data provide strong evidence that covalent binding of NVP in the liver is due to a quinone methide formed by oxidation of the methyl group. Attempts were made to develop an animal model of NVP-induced liver injury in mice. There was a small increase in ALT in some NVP-treated male C57BL/6 mice at 3 weeks that resolved despite continued treatment. Male Cbl-b–/– mice dosed with NVP had an increase in ALT of >200 U/L, which also resolved despite continued treatment. Liver histology in these animals showed focal areas of complete necrosis, while most of the liver appeared normal. This is a different pattern from the histology of NVP-induced liver injury in humans. This is the first study to report hepatic covalent binding of NVP and also liver injury in mice. It is likely that the quinone methide metabolite is responsible for NVP-induced liver injury. PMID:22793666

  20. Inhibition of the Water Oxidizing Complex of Photosystem II and the Reoxidation of the Quinone Acceptor QA− by Pb2+

    PubMed Central

    Belatik, Ahmed; Hotchandani, Surat; Carpentier, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The action of the environmental toxic Pb2+ on photosynthetic electron transport was studied in thylakoid membranes isolated from spinach leaves. Fluorescence and thermoluminescence techniques were performed in order to determine the mode of Pb2+ action in photosystem II (PSII). The invariance of fluorescence characteristics of chlorophyll a (Chl a) and magnesium tetraphenylporphyrin (MgTPP), a molecule structurally analogous to Chl a, in the presence of Pb2+ confirms that Pb cation does not interact directly with chlorophyll molecules in PSII. The results show that Pb interacts with the water oxidation complex thus perturbing charge recombination between the quinone acceptors of PSII and the S2 state of the Mn4Ca cluster. Electron transfer between the quinone acceptors QA and QB is also greatly retarded in the presence of Pb2+. This is proposed to be owing to a transmembrane modification of the acceptor side of the photosystem. PMID:23861859

  1. Successful removal of p-quinone with chitosan in an aqueous phase in relation to degree of deacetylation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tomoki; Imai, Masanao; Suzuki, Isao

    2004-01-01

    Phenol oxidant is successfully removed by using chitosan particles in the aqueous phase. Removal of p-quinone by chitosan from crab shells was investigated kinetically from molecular weight (MW) of chitosan, deacetylation degree (DD) and reaction temperature. The rate constant assuming first-ordered reaction on removal of p-quinone in aqueous phase primarily depended on the MW of chitosan, not on the DD. Quantities of chitosan exceeding 5 x 10(5) MW are able to obtain a sufficiently high rate constant (10(-3) s(-1)). At higher temperatures, higher rate constants were obtained in the entire experimental MW and DD. The activation energy obtained was 43.8 kJ x mol(-1).

  2. Challenges of identifying eczema in darkly pigmented skin.

    PubMed

    Myers, Joan

    2015-07-01

    There is a paucity of information about the difference in the presentation of eczema in darkly pigmented skin compared to children with fair or white skin. This article describes the possible challenges of diagnosing eczema in children with darkly pigmented skin. The physiological difference in darkly pigmented skin compared with fair or white skin is explored, and how eczema may be manifested and identified in darkly pigmented skin. The author uses the term darkly pigmented skin to describe children of black Caribbean, African or Asian descent.

  3. Novel synthesis of 3-substituted 2,3-dihydrobenzofurans via ortho-quinone methide intermediates generated in situ.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Abdul kadar; Varvounis, George

    2014-03-01

    A new method is presented for the regioselective one-pot synthesis of 3-substituted 2,3-dihydrobenzofurans from 2-bromo-1-{2-[(triisopropylsilyl)oxy]phenyl}ethyl nitrate by fluoride-induced desilylation leading to o-quinone methide generation, Michael addition of different C, N, O, and S nucleophiles, and intramolecular 5-exo-tet elimination of a bromide anion. The method has potential synthetic applications in drug discovery.

  4. Reaction-diffusion models of within-feather pigmentation patterning.

    PubMed

    Prum, Richard O; Williamson, Scott

    2002-04-22

    Feathers are complex, branched keratin structures that exhibit a diversity of pigmentation patterns. Feather pigments are transferred into developing feather keratinocytes from pigment cells that migrate into the tubular feather germ from the dermis. Within-feather pigment patterns are determined by differential pigmentation of keratinocytes within independent barb ridges during feather development. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms that determine which keratinocytes receive pigment. We apply reaction-diffusion models to the growth of within-feather pigment patterns based on a realistic model of feather growth. These models accurately simulate the growth of a diversity of the within-feather pigmentation patterns found in real feathers, including a central patch, a 'hollow' central patch, concentric central patches, bars, chevrons, a central circular spot, rows of paired spots, and arrays of offset dots. The models can also simulate the complex transitions between distinct pigmentation patterns among feathers observed in real avian plumages, including transitions from bars to chevrons, bars to paired dots, and bars to arrays of dots. The congruence between the developmental dynamics of the simulated and observed feather patterns indicates that the reaction-diffusion models provide a realistic and accurate description of the determination of pigment pattern within avian feather follicles. The models support the hypothesis that within-feather pigmentation patterning is determined by antagonistic interactions among molecular expression gradients within the tubular follicle and feather germ.

  5. [Spectral analysis of ceramic-painting pigments from Taosi site].

    PubMed

    Li, Nai-Sheng; Yang, Yi-Min; He, Nu; Mao, Zhen-Wei

    2008-04-01

    Based on the analysis of Raman, IR spectroscopy and XRD methods, the structure of the different pigments and bond in red pigment in the ceramic from Taosi site in Xiangfeng county, Shanxi province was analyzed. It is very prominent that both red and white pigments have been well preserved. The red pigment was identified as HgS, while white pigment is CaCO3, and the bond in red pigment is CaCO3, which was made from white lime, and the reasons for its formation is because of carbon dioxide in air, which was absorbed by white lime over long history. Moreover, it was indicated that the Raman and IR spectra are more effective for identifying the ancient pigments in very few quantities than XRD. Furthermore, the fact that quartz was unfound in vermilion, suggested that the technique for synthetic vermilion might have been known in 4 000 years ago in Taosi site.

  6. Color me bad: microbial pigments as virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, George Y.; Nizet, Victor

    2009-01-01

    A hallmark feature of several pathogenic microbes is the distinctive color of their colonies when propagated in the clinical laboratory. Such pigmentation comes in a variety of hues, and has often proven useful in presumptive clinical diagnosis. Recent advances in microbial pigment biochemistry and the genetic basis of pigment production has sometimes revealed a more sinister aspect to these curious materials that change the color of reflected light by selective light absorbance. In many cases, the microbial pigment contributes to disease pathogenesis by interfering with host immune clearance mechanisms or by exhibiting pro-inflammatory or cytotoxic properties. Here, we review several examples of pigments that promote microbial virulence, including the golden staphyloxanthin of Staphylococcus aureus, the blue-green pyocyanin of Pseudomonas spp., and the dark brown or black melanin pigments of Cryptococcus neoformans and Aspergillus spp. Targeted pigment neutralization may represent a viable concept to enhance treatment of certain difficult infectious disease conditions. PMID:19726196

  7. Pigmented Pindborg tumor of the maxilla: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Priya, Subashchandrabose; Madanagopaal, Lakshmikanth Ramiah; Sarada, Venkaterwaran

    2016-01-01

    The calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), also known as the Pindborg tumor, is a benign locally invasive neoplasm. Common variants of CEOT include noncalcifying, Langerhans cell, bone and cementum forming and clear cell, which have a prognostic significance. Pigmented variants are known to occur in other odontogenic tumors. However, a definitive pigmented variant of CEOT has not been reported in literature so far. Here, we report the first case of pigmented Pindborg tumor arising from the maxilla in a young female. The pigment was demonstrated as melanin by staining and confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The pigmented variant of CEOT did not recur within 18 months postsurgery. Our report indicates that it is essential to recognize the pigmented variant. We discuss the common variants of CEOT and potential histogenesis of the pigmented variant. Further studies are required to reveal the histogenesis of melanocytes and their pathological significance in the odontogenic tumors. PMID:27721633

  8. pyewacket, a new zebrafish fin pigment pattern mutant.

    PubMed

    Mellgren, Eve M; Johnson, Stephen L

    2006-06-01

    Many mutants that disrupt zebrafish embryonic pigment pattern have been isolated, and subsequent cloning of the mutated genes causing these phenotypes has contributed to our understanding of pigment cell development. However, few mutants have been identified that specifically affect development of the adult pigment pattern. Through a mutant screen for adult pigment pattern phenotypes, we identified pyewacket (pye), a novel zebrafish mutant in which development of the adult caudal fin pigment pattern is aberrant. Specifically, pye mutants have fin melanocyte pigment pattern defects and fewer xanthophores than wild-type fins. We mapped pye to an interval where a single gene, the zebrafish ortholog of the human gene DHRSX, is present. pye will be an informative mutant for understanding how xanthophores and melanocytes interact to form the pigment pattern of the adult zebrafish fin.

  9. Quinone-reactive proteins devoid of haem b form widespread membrane-bound electron transport modules in bacterial respiration.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jörg; Kern, Melanie

    2008-10-01

    Many quinone-reactive enzyme complexes that are part of membrane-integral eukaryotic or prokaryotic respiratory electron transport chains contain one or more haem b molecules embedded in the membrane. In recent years, various novel proteins have emerged that are devoid of haem b but are thought to fulfil a similar function in bacterial anaerobic respiratory systems. These proteins are encoded by genes organized in various genomic arrangements and are thought to form widespread membrane-bound quinone-reactive electron transport modules that exchange electrons with redox partner proteins located at the outer side of the cytoplasmic membrane. Prototypic representatives are the multihaem c-type cytochromes NapC, NrfH and TorC (NapC/NrfH family), the putative iron-sulfur protein NapH and representatives of the NrfD/PsrC family. Members of these protein families vary in the number of their predicted transmembrane segments and, consequently, diverse quinone-binding sites are expected. Only a few of these enzymes have been isolated and characterized biochemically and high-resolution structures are limited. This mini-review briefly summarizes predicted and experimentally demonstrated properties of the proteins in question and discusses their role in electron transport and bioenergetics of anaerobic respiration.

  10. Insight into the kinetics and thermodynamics of the hydride transfer reactions between quinones and lumiflavin: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Clorice R; Jaglinski, Tanner C; Kastenschmidt, Ashly M; Song, Eun H; Gross, Adam K; Krause, Alyssa J; Gollmar, Jonathan M; Meise, Kristin J; Stenerson, Zachary S; Weibel, Tyler J; Dison, Andrew; Finnegan, Mackenzie R; Griesi, Daniel S; Heltne, Michael D; Hughes, Tom G; Hunt, Connor D; Jansen, Kayla A; Xiong, Adam H; Hati, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Sudeep

    2016-09-01

    The kinetics and equilibrium of the hydride transfer reaction between lumiflavin and a number of substituted quinones was studied using density functional theory. The impact of electron withdrawing/donating substituents on the redox potentials of quinones was studied. In addition, the role of these substituents on the kinetics of the hydride transfer reaction with lumiflavin was investigated in detail under the transition state (TS) theory assumption. The hydride transfer reactions were found to be more favorable for an electron-withdrawing substituent. The activation barrier exhibited a quadratic relationship with the driving force of these reactions as derived under the formalism of modified Marcus theory. The present study found a significant extent of electron delocalization in the TS that is stabilized by enhanced electrostatic, polarization, and exchange interactions. Analysis of geometry, bond-orders, and energetics revealed a predominant parallel (Leffler-Hammond) effect on the TS. Closer scrutiny reveals that electron-withdrawing substituents, although located on the acceptor ring, reduce the N-H bond order of the donor fragment in the precursor complex. Carried out in the gas-phase, this is the first ever report of a theoretical study of flavin's hydride transfer reactions with quinones, providing an unfiltered view of the electronic effect on the nuclear reorganization of donor-acceptor complexes.

  11. Insight into the kinetics and thermodynamics of the hydride transfer reactions between quinones and lumiflavin: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Clorice R; Jaglinski, Tanner C; Kastenschmidt, Ashly M; Song, Eun H; Gross, Adam K; Krause, Alyssa J; Gollmar, Jonathan M; Meise, Kristin J; Stenerson, Zachary S; Weibel, Tyler J; Dison, Andrew; Finnegan, Mackenzie R; Griesi, Daniel S; Heltne, Michael D; Hughes, Tom G; Hunt, Connor D; Jansen, Kayla A; Xiong, Adam H; Hati, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Sudeep

    2016-09-01

    The kinetics and equilibrium of the hydride transfer reaction between lumiflavin and a number of substituted quinones was studied using density functional theory. The impact of electron withdrawing/donating substituents on the redox potentials of quinones was studied. In addition, the role of these substituents on the kinetics of the hydride transfer reaction with lumiflavin was investigated in detail under the transition state (TS) theory assumption. The hydride transfer reactions were found to be more favorable for an electron-withdrawing substituent. The activation barrier exhibited a quadratic relationship with the driving force of these reactions as derived under the formalism of modified Marcus theory. The present study found a significant extent of electron delocalization in the TS that is stabilized by enhanced electrostatic, polarization, and exchange interactions. Analysis of geometry, bond-orders, and energetics revealed a predominant parallel (Leffler-Hammond) effect on the TS. Closer scrutiny reveals that electron-withdrawing substituents, although located on the acceptor ring, reduce the N-H bond order of the donor fragment in the precursor complex. Carried out in the gas-phase, this is the first ever report of a theoretical study of flavin's hydride transfer reactions with quinones, providing an unfiltered view of the electronic effect on the nuclear reorganization of donor-acceptor complexes. PMID:27491848

  12. NAD(P)H:quinone acceptor oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), a multifunctional antioxidant enzyme and exceptionally versatile cytoprotector

    PubMed Central

    Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Talalay, Paul

    2010-01-01

    NAD(P)H:quinone acceptor oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) is a widely-distributed FAD-dependent flavoprotein that promotes obligatory 2-electron reductions of quinones, quinoneimines, nitroaromatics, and azo dyes, at rates that are comparable with NADH or NADPH. These reductions depress quinone levels and thereby minimize opportunities for generation of reactive oxygen intermediates by redox cycling, and for depletion of intracellular thiol pools. NQO1 is a highly-inducible enzyme that is regulated by the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway. Evidence for the importance of the antioxidant functions of NQO1 in combating oxidative stress is provided by demonstrations that induction of NQO1 levels or their depletion (knockout, or knockdown) are associated with decreased and increased susceptibilities to oxidative stress, respectively. Furthermore, benzene genotoxicity is markedly enhanced when NQO1 activity is compromised. Not surprisingly, human polymorphisms that suppress NQO1 activities are associated with increased predisposition to disease. Recent studies have uncovered protective roles for NQO1 that apparently are unrelated to its enzymatic activities. NQO1 binds to and thereby stabilizes the important tumor suppressor p53 against proteasomal degradation. Indeed, NQO1 appears to regulate the degradative fate of other proteins. These findings suggest that NQO1 may exercise a selective “gatekeeping” role in regulating the proteasomal degradation of specific proteins, thereby broadening the cytoprotective role of NQO1 far beyond its highly effective antioxidant functions. PMID:20361926

  13. First-Principles Density Functional Theory Modeling of Li Binding: Thermodynamics and Redox Properties of Quinone Derivatives for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Chul; Liu, Tianyuan; Lee, Seung Woo; Jang, Seung Soon

    2016-02-24

    The Li-binding thermodynamics and redox potentials of seven different quinone derivatives are investigated to determine their suitability as positive electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries. First, using density functional theory (DFT) calculations on the interactions between the quinone derivatives and Li atoms, we find that the Li atoms primarily bind with the carbonyl groups in the test molecules. Next, we observed that the redox properties of the quinone derivatives can be tuned in the desired direction by systematically modifying their chemical structures using electron-withdrawing functional groups. Further, DFT-based investigations of the redox potentials of the Li-bound quinone derivatives provide insights regarding the changes induced in their redox properties during the discharging process. The redox potential decreases as the number of bound Li atoms is increased. However, we found that the functionalization of the quinone derivatives with carboxylic acids can improve their redox potential as well as their charge capacity. Through this study, we also determined that the cathodic activity of quinone derivatives during the discharging process relies strongly on the solvation effect as well as on the number of carbonyl groups available for further Li binding. PMID:26824616

  14. Cytotoxicity of a Quinone-containing Cockroach Sex Pheromone in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bennett; Carr, Brian A; Krolikowski, Paul; Chang, Frank N

    2007-01-01

    The cytotoxic effects of blattellaquinone (BTQ), a sex pheromone produced by adult female German cockroaches, have been studied using human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. 1,4-Benzoquinone (BQ), a toxic chemical implicated in benzene toxicity, was used as a reference compound. Both BQ and BTQ showed comparable toxicity toward A549 cells, with LD50 values estimated to be 14 and 19 microM, respectively. These two compounds increased the formation of an oxidized fluorescent probe, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein, but had no effect on the cellular GSSG level. Interestingly, BTQ increased the level of 8-epi-prostaglandin F2alpha and was 4-fold more efficient in depleting cellular GSH content than BQ. Of the five GSH adducts of BTQ isolated, three were identified as mono-GSH conjugates, and the other two were di-conjugates. Mass spectrometric and NMR analyses of the di-conjugates showed that the second GSH molecule displaced the isovaleric acid moiety, potentially via a nucleophilic substitution reaction. The ability of BTQ to conjugate a second GSH molecule without quinone regeneration indicated that it may be a more effective cross-linking agent than BQ. Future experiments may be needed to evaluate the overall safety of BTQ before the commercialization of the compound as a cockroach attractant.

  15. Lipoprotein-like particles in a prokaryote: quinone droplets of Thermoplasma acidophilum.

    PubMed

    Nagy, István; Knispel, Roland Wilhelm; Kofler, Christine; Orsini, Massimiliano; Boicu, Marius; Varga, Sándor; Weyher-Stingl, Elisabeth; Sun, Na; Fernandez-Busnadiego, Ruben; Kukolya, József; Nickell, Stephan; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Cytosolic, globular droplets with an average diameter of 50 nm were observed in vitrified Thermoplasma acidophilum cells by means of cryo-electron tomography. These droplets were isolated by column chromatography and immunoprecipitation protein purification methods. Subsequent chemical and biochemical analyses identified lipid and protein components, respectively. Two major lipid components, comigrating menaquinones at the solvent front and the slower migrating Thermoplasma polar lipid U4, were detected by TLC experiments. The major protein component was identified as the 153 amino acid long Ta0547 vitellogenin-N domain protein. This domain has been found so far exclusively in large lipid transport proteins of vertebrates and non-vertebrates. Blast protein database homology searches with Ta0547 did not return any eukaryal hits; homologous sequences were found only in thermo-acidophilic archaeons. However, a profile-sequence domain search performed with the vitellogenin-N domain (PF01347) hmm-profile against the T. acidophilum proteome returned Ta0547 as hit. Electron microscopy appearance of isolated droplets resembled to lipoprotein particles. However, no (tetraether) lipid layer could be detected on the droplets surface, rather hydrophobic compounds of the electron dense lumen were surrounded by a denser discontinuous protein boundary. Based on described features, these particles qualify for a novel lipoprotein particle category, what we nominated Thermoplasma Quinone Droplet.

  16. Ebselen: A thioredoxin reductase-dependent catalyst for {alpha}-tocopherol quinone reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Jianguo; Zhong Liangwei; Zhao Rong; Holmgren, Arne . E-mail: arne.holmgren@mbb.ki.se

    2005-09-01

    The thioredoxin system, composed of thioredoxin (Trx), thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), and NADPH, is a powerful protein disulfide reductase system with a broad substrate specificity. Recently the selenazol drug ebselen was shown to be a substrate for both mammalian TrxR and Trx. We examined if {alpha}-tocopherol quinone (TQ), a product of {alpha}-tocopherol oxidation, is reduced by ebselen in the presence of TrxR, since TQ was not a substrate for the enzyme itself. Ebselen reduction of TQ in the presence of TrxR was caused by ebselen selenol, generated from fast reduction of ebselen by the enzyme. TQ has no intrinsic antioxidant activity, while the product of reduction of TQ, {alpha}-tocopherolhydroquinone (TQH{sub 2}), is a potent antioxidant. The thioredoxin system dependence of ebselen to catalyze reduction of other oxidized species, such as hydrogen peroxide, dehydroascorbate, and peroxynitrite, is discussed. The ability of ebselen to reduce TQ via the thioredoxin system is a novel mechanism to explain the effects of the drug as an antioxidant in vivo.

  17. A subchronic oral toxicity study on pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) disodium salt in rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chunlai; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Wei; Song, Yan; Jia, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    A subchronic oral toxicity study on pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) disodium salt was performed in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (10 rats/sex/group) and administered with PQQ disodium salt at doses of 0 (control), 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg bw/day by gavage for 13 weeks. Daily clinical observations and weekly measurement of body weights and food consumption were conducted. Blood samples were obtained on day 46 and day 91 for measurement of hematology and serum biochemical parameters. Animals were euthanized for necropsy, selected organs were weighted and recorded. Histological examination was performed on all tissues from animals in the control and PQQ disodium salt treatment groups. No mortality or toxicologically significant changes in clinical signs, body weight, food consumption, necropsy findings or organ weights was observed. Differences between treated and control groups in some hematological and serum biochemical examinations and histopathological examination were not considered treatment-related. The no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) of PQQ disodium salt in rats was considered to be 400 mg/kg bw/day for both sexes, the highest dose tested.

  18. Intestinal absorption and tissue distribution of ( sup 14 C)pyrroloquinoline quinone in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Smidt, C.R.; Unkefer, C.J.; Houck, D.R.; Rucker, R.B. )

    1991-05-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) functions as a cofactor for prokaryotic oxidoreductases, such as methanol dehydrogenase and membrane-bound glucose dehydrogenase. In animals fed chemically defined diets, PQQ improves reproductive outcome and neonatal growth. Consequently, the present study was undertaken to determine the extent to which PQQ is absorbed by the intestine, its tissue distribution, and route of excretion. About 28 micrograms of PQQ (0.42 microCi/mumol), labeled with {sup 14}C derived from L-tyrosine, was administered orally to Swiss-Webster mice (18-20 g) to estimate absorption. PQQ was readily absorbed (62%, range 19-89%) in the lower intestine, and was excreted by the kidneys (81% of the absorbed dose) within 24 hr. The only tissues that retained significant amounts of ({sup 14}C)PQQ at 24 hr were skin and kidney. For kidney, it was assumed that retention of ({sup 14}C)PQQ represented primarily PQQ destined for excretion. For skin, the concentration of ({sup 14}C)PQQ increased from 0.3% of the absorbed dose at 6 hr to 1.3% at 24 hr. Furthermore, most of the ({sup 14}C)PQQ in blood (greater than 95%) was associated with the blood cell fraction, rather than plasma.

  19. Pyrroloquinoline quinone-conferred neuroprotection in rotenone models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jiaojiao; Wu, Meilong; Yu, Shu; Gao, Xiaorong; Zhang, Jingjing; Dong, Xingyue; Ji, Jinyan; Zhang, Yuxi; Zhou, Lin; Zhang, Qi; Ding, Fei

    2015-11-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a redox cofactor in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, has proven to protect neurons against glutamate-induced damage both in vitro and in vivo. This study was aimed to investigate the possible neuroprotective effects of PQQ in rotenone-induced Parkinson's disease (PD) model. Pre-treatment with PQQ prevented cultured SH-SY5Y cells from rotenone-induced apoptosis, accompanied by modulation of apoptosis-related proteins (Bcl-2, Bax and Smac), restoration of the mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibition of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, suppression of tyrosine residues nitration, and dopamine redistribution. PQQ also exerted protective effects in an in vivo PD model, which was created by rotenone injection into the medial forebrain bundle of rats. Co-injection with PQQ and rotenone improved the apomorphine-evoked rotation, decreased neuronal loss, increased the ROS-scavenging ability, regulated intracellular expressions of mitochondrial complex subunits (Ndufs1-4), tyrosine hydroxylase, and vesicular monoamine transporter 2. Taken together, our results collectively suggest that PQQ confers neuroprotection in rotenone-induced PD model probably through complex and multifaceted mechanisms, at least involving oxidative stress, mitochondrial integrity, and dopamine functions.

  20. Pyrroloquinoline quinone ameliorates l-thyroxine-induced hyperthyroidism and associated problems in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Narendra; Kar, Anand; Panda, Sunanda

    2014-08-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is believed to be a strong antioxidant. In this study, we have evaluated its hitherto unknown role in l-thyroxin (L-T4 )-induced hyperthyroidism considering laboratory rat as a model. Alterations in the serum concentration of thyroxin (T4 ) and triiodothyronine (T3 ); lipid peroxidation (LPO) of liver, kidney, heart, muscles and brain; in the endogenous antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione and in serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotien, triglycerides, serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT) and urea were evaluated. Administration of l-T4 (500-µg kg(-1) body weight) enhanced not only the serum T3 and T4 levels but also the tissue LPO, serum SGOT, SGPT and urea with a parallel decrease in the levels of antioxidants and serum lipids. However, on simultaneous administration of PQQ (5 mg kg(-1) for 6 days), all these adverse effects were ameliorated, indicating the potential of PQQ in the amelioration of hyperthyroidism and associated problems. Possibly, the curative effects were mediated through inhibition of oxidative stress. We suggest that PQQ may be considered for therapeutic use for hyperthyroidism after dose standardization.

  1. Pyrroloquinoline quinone against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in cultured neural stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shui; Xu, Jianqiang; Guo, Yifu; Ge, Dan; Liu, Tianqing; Ma, Xuehu; Cui, Zhanfeng

    2015-05-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), as a well-known redox enzyme cofactor, has been proven to play important roles in the regulation of cellular growth and development in mammals. Numerous physiological and medicinal functions of PQQ have so far been reported although its effect on neural stem and progenitor cells (NS/PCs) and the potential mechanism were even rarely investigated. In this study, the neuroprotective effects of PQQ were observed by pretreatment of NS/PCs with PQQ before glutamate injury, and the possible mechanisms were examined. PQQ stimulated cell proliferation and markedly attenuated glutamate-induced cell damage in a dose-dependent manner. By observing the nuclear morphological changes and flow cytometric analysis, PQQ pretreatment showed its significant effect on protecting NS/PCs against glutamate-induced apoptosis/necrosis. PQQ neuroprotection was associated with the decrease of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, the increase of glutathione (GSH) levels, and the decrease of caspase-3 activity. In addition, pretreatment with PQQ also significantly enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the NS/PCs exposed to glutamate. These results suggest that PQQ can protect NS/PCs against glutamate toxicity associated with ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway, indicating a useful chemical for the clinical application of NS/PCs.

  2. Acute and subchronic toxicity studies of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) disodium salt (BioPQQ™) in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masahiko; Takahashi, Hisaaki; Koura, Seiko; Chung, Catherine; Tafazoli, Shahrzad; Roberts, Ashley

    2014-10-01

    The potential use of pyrroloquinoline quinone disodium salt (BioPQQ™), as a supplemental food ingredient, was evaluated in a range of oral toxicity studies in rats including an acute study, a 14-day preliminary and a 28-day repeated-dose study, and a 13-week subchronic study. The median lethal dose of BioPQQ™ was shown to be 1000-2000mg/kg body weight (bw) in male and 500-1000mg/kgbw in female rats. In the 14-day study, high doses of BioPQQ™ resulted in increases in relative kidney weights with associated histopathology in female rats only, while a follow-up 28-day study in female animals resulted in increases in urinary protein and crystals. These findings were reversible, and resolved during the recovery period. In the 13-week study, a number of clinical chemistry findings and histopathological changes were noted, which were deemed to be of no toxicological significance, as the levels were within the historical control range, were not dose-dependent, occurred at a similar frequency in control groups, or only occurred in the control group. Based on these findings, a no-observed-adverse-effect level of 100mg/kgbw/day was determined for BioPQQ™ in rats, the highest dose tested in the 13-week study.

  3. Protective Effect of Pyrroloquinoline Quinone (PQQ) in Rat Model of Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongjian; Shen, Jiabing; Song, Xinjian; Ge, Jianbin; Cai, Rixin; Dai, Aihua; Jiang, Zhongli

    2015-10-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) has invoked considerable interest because of its presence in foods, antioxidant properties, cofactor of dehydrogenase, and amine oxidase. Protective roles of PQQ in central nervous system diseases, such as experimental stroke and spinal cord injury models have been emerged. However, it is unclear whether intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), as an acute devastating disease, can also benefit from PQQ in experimental conditions. Herein, we examined the possible effect of PQQ on neuronal functions following ICH in the adult rats. The results showed that rats pretreated with PQQ at 10 mg/kg effectively improved the locomotor functions, alleviated the hematoma volumes, and reduced the expansion of brain edema after ICH. Also, pretreated rats with PQQ obviously reduced the production of reactive oxygen species after ICH, probably due to its antioxidant properties. Further, we found that, Bcl-2/Bax, the important indicator of oxidative stress insult in mitochondria after ICH, exhibited increasing ratio in PQQ-pretreated groups. Moreover, activated caspase-3, the apoptotic executor, showed coincident alleviation in PQQ groups after ICH. Collectively, we speculated that PQQ might be an effective and potential neuroprotectant in clinical therapy for ICH.

  4. Pyrroloquinoline quinone, a method for its isolation and identification by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Buffoni, F; Cambi, S; Moneti, G

    1992-06-12

    Procedures for the unambiguous detection and for the isolation and mass spectrometric identification of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) are presented. The procedure involved acid hydrolysis of protein in the presence of phenylhydrazine and successive isolation and identification of the formed adduct using mass spectrometry. In HPLC the phenylhydrazone of PQQ gave many methylated products, of which the predominant compound was the pentamethylated derivative. After reaction of the phenylhydrazone derivative of PQQ (PHPQQ) with ammonia, a product was obtained which did not contain phenylhydrazine and which formed a pentamethylated derivative as the main methylation product. The HPLC profiles of the methylated products of PHPQQ and of its ammonia derivative were very characteristic and could be used for identification in addition to mass spectrometry. However, prolonged treatment of proteins with phenylhydrazine during hydrolysis can result in the formation of a material that resembles PQQ in some aspects of its behaviour. Thus, analysis by MS is essential for unambiguous identification. This analytical procedure was applied to pig plasma benzylamine oxidase, pig aorta lysyl oxidase, pig kidney diamine oxidase and bovine serum albumin with negative results. However, samples of pronase contained variable quantities of non-covalently bound PQQ: this can lead to erroneous identification of PQQ in enzyme after pronase digestion.

  5. Dopamine quinone modifies and decreases the abundance of the mitochondrial selenoprotein glutathione peroxidase 4.

    PubMed

    Hauser, David N; Dukes, April A; Mortimer, Amanda D; Hastings, Teresa G

    2013-12-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are known to contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Dopaminergic neurons may be more sensitive to these stressors because they contain dopamine (DA), a molecule that oxidizes to the electrophilic dopamine quinone (DAQ) which can covalently bind nucleophilic amino acid residues such as cysteine. The identification of proteins that are sensitive to covalent modification and functional alteration by DAQ is of great interest. We have hypothesized that selenoproteins, which contain a highly nucleophilic selenocysteine residue and often play vital roles in the maintenance of neuronal viability, are likely targets for the DAQ. Here we report the findings of our studies on the effect of DA oxidation and DAQ on the mitochondrial antioxidant selenoprotein glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4). Purified GPx4 could be covalently modified by DAQ, and the addition of DAQ to rat testes lysate resulted in dose-dependent decreases in GPx4 activity and monomeric protein levels. Exposing intact rat brain mitochondria to DAQ resulted in similar decreases in GPx4 activity and monomeric protein levels as well as detection of multiple forms of DA-conjugated GPx4 protein. Evidence of both GPx4 degradation and polymerization was observed following DAQ exposure. Finally, we observed a dose-dependent loss of mitochondrial GPx4 in differentiated PC12 cells treated with dopamine. Our findings suggest that a decrease in mitochondrial GPx4 monomer and a functional loss of activity may be a contributing factor to the vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. PMID:23816523

  6. Catalytic reaction of cytokinin dehydrogenase: preference for quinones as electron acceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Frébortová, Jitka; Fraaije, Marco W; Galuszka, Petr; Sebela, Marek; Pec, Pavel; Hrbác, Jan; Novák, Ondrej; Bilyeu, Kristin D; English, James T; Frébort, Ivo

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic reaction of cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (EC 1.5.99.12) was studied in detail using the recombinant flavoenzyme from maize. Determination of the redox potential of the covalently linked flavin cofactor revealed a relatively high potential dictating the type of electron acceptor that can be used by the enzyme. Using 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol, 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone or 1,4-naphthoquinone as electron acceptor, turnover rates with N6-(2-isopentenyl)adenine of approx. 150 s(-1) could be obtained. This suggests that the natural electron acceptor of the enzyme is quite probably a p-quinone or similar compound. By using the stopped-flow technique, it was found that the enzyme is rapidly reduced by N6-(2-isopentenyl)adenine (k(red)=950 s(-1)). Re-oxidation of the reduced enzyme by molecular oxygen is too slow to be of physiological relevance, confirming its classification as a dehydrogenase. Furthermore, it was established for the first time that the enzyme is capable of degrading aromatic cytokinins, although at low reaction rates. As a result, the enzyme displays a dual catalytic mode for oxidative degradation of cytokinins: a low-rate and low-substrate specificity reaction with oxygen as the electron acceptor, and high activity and strict specificity for isopentenyladenine and analogous cytokinins with some specific electron acceptors. PMID:14965342

  7. Identification of quinones as HER2 inhibitors for the treatment of trastuzumab resistant breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Jayalakshmi; Sfondouris, Mary E; Bratton, Melyssa R; Nguyen, Thuy-Linh K; Townley, Ian; Klein Stevens, Cheryl L; Jones, Frank E

    2014-01-01

    HER2 overexpression is associated with aggressive breast cancer with high recurrence rate and poor patient prognosis. Treatment of HER2 overexpressing patients with the HER2 targeting therapy trastuzumab results in acquired resistance within a year. The HER2/EGFR dual kinase inhibitor lapatinib was shown to inhibit some trastuzumab resistant breast cancer cell lines and is currently in clinical trials. Our group has found two new quinone compounds that show excellent inhibition of breast tumor cells expressing HER2 or the trastuzumab resistant HER2 oncogenic isoform, HER2Δ16. Compound 4 ((1R,2S,3S)-1,2,3,5,8-pentahydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroanthracene-9,10-dione) and compound 5 (5,8-dihydroxy-2,3-bis(hydroxymethyl)naphthalene-1,4-dione) showed sub-micromolar inhibition potency against these cell lines. These compounds also inhibit auto-phosphorylation of the Y1248 and Y1068 residues of HER2 and EGFR, respectively.

  8. Quinone-formaldehyde polymer as an active material in Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirnat, Klemen; Mali, Gregor; Gaberscek, Miran; Dominko, Robert

    2016-05-01

    A benzoquinone polymer is synthesized by the polymerisation of hydrobenzoquinone and formaldehyde, followed by oxidation process using a hydrogen peroxide to convert hydroquinone to quinone. As prepared materials are characterized with FTIR, 1H-13C CPMAS NMR, pyrolysis coupled with gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectrometer (MS), TGA-MS analysis, EDX, elemental analysis, XRD, SEM and TEM microscopies and BET nitrogen adsorption. The benzoquinone polymer shows an excellent electrochemical performance when used as a positive electrode material in Li-ion secondary batteries. Using an electrolyte consisting 1 M bis(trifluoromethane)-sulfonimide lithium salt dissolved in 1,3-dioxolane and dimethoxyethane in a vol. ratio 1:1 (1 M LiTFSI/DOL + DME = 1:1) a stable capacity close to 150 mAh/g can be obtained. Compared to other electroactive materials based on benzoquinones it has a supreme capacity stability and is prepared by a simple synthesis using easily accessible starting materials. Further improvements in the capacity value (up to the theoretical value of 406 mAh/g) can be foreseen by achieving a higher degree of oxidation and by modification of polymerization process to enhance the electronic and ionic conductivity.

  9. Quinone Methide Signal Amplification: Covalent Reporter Labeling of Cancer Epitopes using Alkaline Phosphatase Substrates.

    PubMed

    Polaske, Nathan W; Kelly, Brian D; Ashworth-Sharpe, Julia; Bieniarz, Christopher

    2016-03-16

    Diagnostic assays with the sensitivity required to improve cancer therapeutics depend on the development of new signal amplification technologies. Herein, we report the development and application of a novel amplification system which utilizes latent quinone methides (QMs) activated by alkaline phosphatase (AP) for signal amplification in solid-phase immunohistochemical (IHC) assays. Phosphate-protected QM precursor substrates were prepared and conjugated to either biotin or a fluorophore through an amine-functionalized linker group. Upon reaction with AP, the phosphate group is cleaved, followed by elimination of the leaving group and formation of the highly reactive and short-lived QM. The QMs either react with tissue nucleophiles in close proximity to their site of generation, or are quenched by nucleophiles in the reaction media. The reporter molecules that covalently bind to the tissue were then detected visually by fluorescence microscopy in the case of fluorophore reporters, or brightfield microscopy using diaminobenzidine (DAB) in the case of biotin reporters. With multiple reporters deposited per enzyme, significant signal amplification was observed utilizing QM precursor substrates containing either benzyl difluoro or benzyl monofluoro leaving group functionalities. However, the benzyl monofluoro leaving group gave superior results with respect to both signal intensity and discretion, the latter of which was found to be imperative for use in diagnostic IHC assays. PMID:26731201

  10. Origin of the Giant Honeycomb Network of Quinones on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einstein, T. L.; Kim, Kwangmoo; Wyrick, Jon; Cheng, Zhihai; Bartels, Ludwig; Berland, Kristian; Hyldgaard, Per

    2011-03-01

    We discuss the factors that lead to the amazing regular giant honeycomb network formed by quinones on Cu(111). Using a related lattice gas model with many characteristic energies, we can reproduce many experimental features. These models require a long-range attraction, which can be attributed to indirect interactions mediated by the Shockley surface state of Cu(111). However, Wyrick's preceding talk gave evidence that the network self-selects for the size of the pore rather than for the periodicity of the superstructure, suggesting that confined states are the key ingredient. We discuss this phenomenon in terms of the magic numbers of 2D quantum dots. We also report calculations of the effects of anthraquinones (AQ) in modifying the surface states by considering a superlattice of AQ chains with various separations. We discuss implications of these results for tuning the electronic states and, thence, superstructures. Supported by (TLE) NSF CHE 07-50334 & UMD MRSEC DMR 05-20471, (JW & LB) NSF CHE NSF CHE 07-49949, (KB & PH) Swedish Vetenskapsrådet VR 621-2008-4346.

  11. Limonin Methoxylation Influences Induction of Glutathione S-Transferase and Quinone Reductase

    PubMed Central

    PEREZ, JOSE LUIS; JAYAPRAKASHA, G. K.; VALDIVIA, VIOLETA; MUNOZ, DIANA; DANDEKAR, DEEPAK V.; AHMAD, HASSAN; PATIL, BHIMANAGOUDA S.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated the chemoprevention potential of citrus limonoids due to the induction of phase II detoxifying enzymes. In the present study, three citrus limonoids were purified and identified from sour orange seeds as limonin, limonin glucoside (LG), deacetylnomilinic acid glucoside (DNAG). In addition, limonin was modified to defuran limonin and limonin 7-methoxime. The structures of these compounds were confirmed by NMR studies. These five compounds were used to investigate the influence of Phase II enzymes in female A/J mice. Our results indicated that the highest induction of Glutathione S-Transferase (GST) activity against 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) by DNAG (67%) in lung homogenates followed by limonin-7-methoxime (32%) in treated liver homogenates. Interestingly, the limonin-7-methoxime showed the highest GST activity (270%) in liver against 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO), while the same compound in stomach induced GST by 51% compared to the control. DNAG treated group induced 55% in stomach homogenates. Another Phase II enzyme, quinone reductase (QR), was significantly induced by limonin-7-methoxime by 65 and 32% in liver and lung homogenates, respectively. Defuran limonin, induced QR in lung homogenates by 45%. Our results indicated that modification of the limonin have differential induction of phase II enzymes. These findings are indicative of a possible mechanism for the prevention of cancer by aiding in detoxification of xenobiotics. PMID:19480426

  12. Structural effects on photoinduced electron transfer in carotenoid-porphyrin-quinone triads

    SciTech Connect

    Kuciauskas, D.; Liddell, P.A.; Hung, S.C.; Lin, S.; Stone, S.; Seely, G.R.; Moore, A.L.; Moore, T.A.; Gust, D.

    1997-01-16

    meso-Polyarylporphyrins are often used as components of molecules that mimic photosynthetic reaction centers by carrying out photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. Studies of these systems have raised questions concerning the role of alkyl substituents at the `{beta}-pyrrolic` positions on the porphyrin periphery in limiting {pi}-{pi} overlap between the macrocycle and the aryl rings. The degree of overlap affects electronic coupling and, therefore, the rates of electron-transfer reactions. There is also evidence that when the linkages joining porphyrins to electron-acceptor or -donor moieties contain amide bonds, the sense of the amide linkage may strongly affect electron-transfer rate constants. In this study, three carotenoid-porphyrin-quinone molecular triads and various model compounds have been prepared, and electron-transfer has been studied using time-resolved emission and absorption techniques. The results show that steric hindrance due to methyl groups at the {beta}-pyrrolic positions reduces electron-transfer rate constants by a factor of approximately 1/5. In addition, amide-containing donor-acceptor linkages having the nitrogen atom attached to the porphyrin meso-aryl ring demonstrate electron-transfer rate constants approximately 30 times larger than those for similar linkages with the amide reversed, after correction for thermodynamic effects. 52 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Hydrolysis of the quinone methide of butylated hydroxytoluene in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Willcockson, Maren Gulsrud; Toteva, Maria M; Stella, Valentino J

    2013-10-01

    Butylated hydroxytoluene or BHT is an antioxidant commonly used in pharmaceutical formulations. BHT upon oxidation forms a quinone methide (QM). QM is a highly reactive electrophilic species that can undergo nucleophilic addition. Here, the kinetic reactivity of QM with water at various apparent pH values in a 50% (v/v) water-acetonitrile solution at constant ionic strength of I = 0.5 (NaCl)4 , was studied. The hydrolysis of QM in the presence of added acid, base, sodium chloride, and phosphate buffer resulted in the formation of only one product--the corresponding 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol (BA). The rate of BA formation was catalyzed by the addition of acid and base, but not chloride and phosphate species. Nucleophilic excipients, used in the pharmaceutical formulation, or nucleophilic groups on active pharmaceutical ingredient molecule may form adducts with QM, the immediate oxidative product of BHT degradation, thus having implications for drug product impurity profiles. Because of these considerations, BHT should be used with caution in formulations containing drugs or excipients capable of acting as nucleophiles.

  14. Overexpression of quinone reductase from Salix matsudana Koidz enhances salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Song, Xixi; Fang, Jie; Han, Xiaojiao; He, Xuelian; Liu, Mingying; Hu, Jianjun; Zhuo, Renying

    2016-01-15

    Quinone reductase (QR) is an oxidative-related gene and few studies have focused on its roles concerning salt stress tolerance in plants. In this study, we cloned and analyzed the QR gene from Salix matsudana, a willow with tolerance of moderate salinity. The 612-bp cDNA corresponding to SmQR encodes 203 amino acids. Expression of SmQR in Escherichia coli cells enhanced their tolerance under salt stress. In addition, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines overexpressing SmQR exhibited higher salt tolerance as compared with WT, with higher QR activity and antioxidant enzyme activity as well as higher chlorophyll content, lower methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) content and electric conductivity under salt stress. Nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) staining also indicated that the transgenic plants accumulated less reactive oxygen species compared to WT when exposed to salt stress. Overall, our results suggested that SmQR plays a significant role in salt tolerance and that this gene may be useful for biotechnological development of plants with improved tolerance of salinity.

  15. Lipoprotein-like particles in a prokaryote: quinone droplets of Thermoplasma acidophilum.

    PubMed

    Nagy, István; Knispel, Roland Wilhelm; Kofler, Christine; Orsini, Massimiliano; Boicu, Marius; Varga, Sándor; Weyher-Stingl, Elisabeth; Sun, Na; Fernandez-Busnadiego, Ruben; Kukolya, József; Nickell, Stephan; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Cytosolic, globular droplets with an average diameter of 50 nm were observed in vitrified Thermoplasma acidophilum cells by means of cryo-electron tomography. These droplets were isolated by column chromatography and immunoprecipitation protein purification methods. Subsequent chemical and biochemical analyses identified lipid and protein components, respectively. Two major lipid components, comigrating menaquinones at the solvent front and the slower migrating Thermoplasma polar lipid U4, were detected by TLC experiments. The major protein component was identified as the 153 amino acid long Ta0547 vitellogenin-N domain protein. This domain has been found so far exclusively in large lipid transport proteins of vertebrates and non-vertebrates. Blast protein database homology searches with Ta0547 did not return any eukaryal hits; homologous sequences were found only in thermo-acidophilic archaeons. However, a profile-sequence domain search performed with the vitellogenin-N domain (PF01347) hmm-profile against the T. acidophilum proteome returned Ta0547 as hit. Electron microscopy appearance of isolated droplets resembled to lipoprotein particles. However, no (tetraether) lipid layer could be detected on the droplets surface, rather hydrophobic compounds of the electron dense lumen were surrounded by a denser discontinuous protein boundary. Based on described features, these particles qualify for a novel lipoprotein particle category, what we nominated Thermoplasma Quinone Droplet. PMID:27405311

  16. Flavin adenine dinucleotide content of quinone reductase 2: analysis and optimization for structure-function studies.

    PubMed

    Leung, Kevin Ka Ki; Litchfield, David W; Shilton, Brian H

    2012-01-01

    Quinone reductase 2 (NQO2) is a broadly expressed enzyme implicated in responses to a number of compounds, including protein kinase inhibitors, resveratrol, and antimalarial drugs. NQO2 includes a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor, but X-ray crystallographic analysis of human NQO2 expressed in Escherichia coli showed that electron density for the isoalloxazine ring of FAD was weak and there was no electron density for the adenine mononucleotide moiety. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the NQO2 preparation indicated that FAD was not present and only 38% of the protomers contained flavin mononucleotide (FMN), explaining the weak electron density for FAD in the crystallographic analysis. A method for purifying NQO2 and reconstituting with FAD such that the final content approaches 100% occupancy with FAD is presented here. The enzyme prepared in this manner has a high specific activity, and there is strong electron density for the FAD cofactor in the crystal structure. Analysis of NQO2 crystal structures present in the Protein Data Bank indicates that many may have sub-stoichiometric cofactor content and/or contain FMN rather than FAD. This method of purification and reconstitution will help to optimize structural and functional studies of NQO2 and possibly other flavoproteins.

  17. NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 inducer activity of some novel anilinoquinazoline derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Ghorab, Mostafa M; Alsaid, Mansour S; Higgins, Maureen; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Shahat, Abdelaaty A; Elghazawy, Nehal H; Arafa, Reem K

    2016-01-01

    The Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1)/nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response elements pathway enables cells to survive oxidative stress conditions through regulating the expression of cytoprotective enzymes such as NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). This work presents the design and synthesis of novel anilinoquinazoline derivatives (2–16a) and evaluation of their NQO1 inducer activity in murine cells. Molecular docking of the new compounds was performed to assess their ability to inhibit Keap1–Nrf2 protein–protein interaction through occupying the Keap1–Nrf2-binding domain, which leads to Nrf2 accumulation and enhanced gene expression of NQO1. Docking results showed that all compounds can potentially interact with Keap1; however, 1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-4-(2-phenylquinazolin-4-ylamino)-1,2-dihydropyrazol-3-one (9), the most potent inducer, showed the largest number of interactions with key amino acids in the binding pocket (Arg483, Tyr525, and Phe478) compared to the native ligand or any other compound in this series. PMID:27540279

  18. All-solid-state lithium organic battery with composite polymer electrolyte and pillar[5]quinone cathode.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiqiang; Hong, Meiling; Guo, Dongsheng; Shi, Jifu; Tao, Zhanliang; Chen, Jun

    2014-11-26

    The cathode capacity of common lithium ion batteries (LIBs) using inorganic electrodes and liquid electrolytes must be further improved. Alternatively, all-solid-state lithium batteries comprising the electrode of organic compounds can offer much higher capacity. Herein, we successfully fabricated an all-solid-state lithium battery based on organic pillar[5]quinone (C35H20O10) cathode and composite polymer electrolyte (CPE). The poly(methacrylate) (PMA)/poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-LiClO4-3 wt % SiO2 CPE has an optimum ionic conductivity of 0.26 mS cm(-1) at room temperature. Furthermore, pillar[5]quinine cathode in all-solid-state battery rendered an average operation voltage of ∼2.6 V and a high initial capacity of 418 mAh g(-1) with a stable cyclability (94.7% capacity retention after 50 cycles at 0.2C rate) through the reversible redox reactions of enolate/quinonid carbonyl groups, showing favorable prospect for the device application with high capacity.

  19. Organization of the human [zeta]-crystallin/quinone reductase gene (CRYZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, P.; Rao, P.V.; Zigler, J.S. Jr. )

    1994-05-15

    [zeta]-Crystallin is a protein highly expressed in the lens of guinea pigs and camels, where it comprises about 10% of the total soluble protein. It has recently been characterized as a novel quinone oxidoreductase present in a variety of mammalian tissues. The authors report here the isolation and characterization of the human [zeta]-crystallin gene (CRYZ) and its processed pseudogene. The functional gene is composed of nine exons and spans about 20 kb. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene is rich in G and C (58%) and lacks TATA and CAAT boxes. Previous analysis of the guinea pig gene revealed the presence of two different promoters, one responsible for the high lens-specific expression and the other for expression at the enzymatic level in numerous tissues. Comparative analysis with the guinea pig gene shows that a region of [approximately]2.5 kb that includes the promoter responsible for the high expression in the lens in guinea pig is not present in the human gene. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Biological effects of pyrroloquinoline quinone on liver damage in Bmi-1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YUANQING; CHEN, NING; MIAO, DENGSHUN

    2015-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) has been demonstrated to function as an antioxidant by scavenging free radicals and subsequently protecting the mitochondria from oxidative stress-induced damage. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether PQQ is able to rescue premature senescence in the liver, induced by the deletion of B cell-specific Moloney MLV insertion site-1 (Bmi-1), by inhibiting oxidative stress. In vivo, the mice were allocated into three groups that underwent the following treatment protocols. WT mice received a normal diet, while BKO mice also received a normal diet. An additional group of BKO mice were fed a PQQ-supplemented diet (BKO + PQQ; 4 mg PQQ/kg in the normal diet). The results indicated that PQQ partially rescued the liver damage induced by the deletion of Bmi-1. PQQ was demonstrated to exhibit these therapeutic effects on liver damage through multiple aspects, including the promotion of proliferation, antiapoptotic effects, the inhibition of senescence, the upregulation of antioxidant ability, the downregulation of cell cycle protein expression, the scavenging of reactive oxygen species and the reduction of DNA damage. The results of these experiments indicated that treatment of BKO mice with a moderate dose of PQQ significantly protected the liver from deleterious effects by inhibiting oxidative stress and participating in DNA damage repair. Therefore, PQQ has great potential as a therapeutic agent against oxidative stress during liver damage. PMID:26622336

  1. Cone visual pigments of monotremes: filling the phylogenetic gap.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Matthew J; Anderson, Mark; Chang, Ellen; Wei, Ke-Jun; Kaul, Rajinder; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall; Grützner, Frank; Deeb, Samir S

    2008-01-01

    We have determined the sequence and genomic organization of the genes encoding the cone visual pigment of the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and the echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus), and inferred their spectral properties and evolutionary pathways. We prepared platypus and echidna retinal RNA and used primers of the middle-wave-sensitive (MWS), long-wave-sensitive (LWS), and short-wave sensitive (SWS1) pigments corresponding to coding sequences that are highly conserved among mammals; to PCR amplify the corresponding pigment sequences. Amplification from the retinal RNA revealed the expression of LWS pigment mRNA that is homologous in sequence and spectral properties to the primate LWS visual pigments. However, we were unable to amplify the mammalian SWS1 pigment from these two species, indicating this gene was lost prior to the echidna-platypus divergence (21 MYA). Subsequently, when the platypus genome sequence became available, we found an LWS pigment gene in a conserved genomic arrangement that resembles the primate pigment, but, surprisingly we found an adjacent (20 kb) SWS2 pigment gene within this conserved genomic arrangement. We obtained the same result after sequencing the echidna genes. The encoded SWS2 pigment is predicted to have a wavelength of maximal absorption of about 440 nm, and is paralogous to SWS pigments typically found in reptiles, birds, and fish but not in mammals. This study suggests the locus control region (LCR) has played an important role in the conservation of photo receptor gene arrays and the control of their spatial and temporal expression in the retina in all mammals. In conclusion, a duplication event of an ancestral cone visual pigment gene, followed by sequence divergence and selection gave rise to the LWS and SWS2 visual pigments. So far, the echidna and platypus are the only mammals that share the gene structure of the LWS-SWS2 pigment gene complex with reptiles, birds and fishes.

  2. Cone visual pigments of monotremes: filling the phylogenetic gap.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Matthew J; Anderson, Mark; Chang, Ellen; Wei, Ke-Jun; Kaul, Rajinder; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall; Grützner, Frank; Deeb, Samir S

    2008-01-01

    We have determined the sequence and genomic organization of the genes encoding the cone visual pigment of the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and the echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus), and inferred their spectral properties and evolutionary pathways. We prepared platypus and echidna retinal RNA and used primers of the middle-wave-sensitive (MWS), long-wave-sensitive (LWS), and short-wave sensitive (SWS1) pigments corresponding to coding sequences that are highly conserved among mammals; to PCR amplify the corresponding pigment sequences. Amplification from the retinal RNA revealed the expression of LWS pigment mRNA that is homologous in sequence and spectral properties to the primate LWS visual pigments. However, we were unable to amplify the mammalian SWS1 pigment from these two species, indicating this gene was lost prior to the echidna-platypus divergence (21 MYA). Subsequently, when the platypus genome sequence became available, we found an LWS pigment gene in a conserved genomic arrangement that resembles the primate pigment, but, surprisingly we found an adjacent (20 kb) SWS2 pigment gene within this conserved genomic arrangement. We obtained the same result after sequencing the echidna genes. The encoded SWS2 pigment is predicted to have a wavelength of maximal absorption of about 440 nm, and is paralogous to SWS pigments typically found in reptiles, birds, and fish but not in mammals. This study suggests the locus control region (LCR) has played an important role in the conservation of photo receptor gene arrays and the control of their spatial and temporal expression in the retina in all mammals. In conclusion, a duplication event of an ancestral cone visual pigment gene, followed by sequence divergence and selection gave rise to the LWS and SWS2 visual pigments. So far, the echidna and platypus are the only mammals that share the gene structure of the LWS-SWS2 pigment gene complex with reptiles, birds and fishes. PMID:18598396

  3. Animal pigment bilirubin discovered in plants.

    PubMed

    Pirone, Cary; Quirke, J Martin E; Priestap, Horacio A; Lee, David W

    2009-03-01

    The bile pigment bilirubin-IXalpha is the degradative product of heme, distributed among mammals and some other vertebrates. It can be recognized as the pigment responsible for the yellow color of jaundice and healing bruises. In this paper we present the first example of the isolation of bilirubin in plants. The compound was isolated from the brilliant orange-colored arils of Strelitzia nicolai, the white bird of paradise tree, and characterized by HPLC-ESMS, UV-visible, (1)H NMR, and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, as well as comparison with an authentic standard. This discovery indicates that plant cyclic tetrapyrroles may undergo degradation by a previously unknown pathway. Preliminary analyses of related plants, including S. reginae, the bird of paradise, also revealed bilirubin in the arils and flowers, indicating that the occurrence of bilirubin is not limited to a single species or tissue type. PMID:19206232

  4. The histopathology of subcutaneous minocycline pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Anneli Ririe; McCalmont, Timothy H

    2007-11-01

    Hyperpigmentation associated with prolonged minocycline use is well documented. The histopathology of cutaneous minocycline pigment is characterized by deposition of brown/black, Fontana-Masson, and Perls' positive granules deposited along elastic fibers in the papillary dermis and occurring within macrophages along vessels and eccrine units in the dermis. The subcutis may also be involved; however, the specific subcutaneous findings associated with minocycline hyperpigmentation have not been well established. We present the histopathologic findings of 4 cases of minocycline hyperpigmentation with subcutaneous involvement. Green-gray, flocculent, nonrefractile globules within macrophages were found in the subcutis of all patients. Two of 4 cases exhibited lipomembraneous changes that were also associated with pigment. These distinctive findings may provide additional clues to enable a diagnosis of drug-induced hyperpigmentation to be offered, even in the absence of a clear clinical history. PMID:17939935

  5. Inhibitory effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on photosynthetic performance are not related to their aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Jajoo, Anjana; Mekala, Nageswara Rao; Tomar, Rupal Singh; Grieco, Michele; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2014-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are very toxic and highly persistent environmental pollutants which accumulate in soil and affect growth of the plants adversely. This study aims to investigate inhibitory effects of 3 major PAH particularly on photosynthetic processes in Arabidopsis thaliana grown in soil treated with PAH. The 3 PAH chosen differ from each other in aromaticity (number of rings) comprising their structure (2 rings: naphthalene, 3 rings: anthracene and 4 rings: pyrene). Several growth parameters and Chlorophyll a fluorescence was monitored in PAH treated plants. BN-PAGe analysis was done in order to get information about change in the protein conformation. PAH treatment led to increased value of Fo which collaborated with increase in the amount of free LHC as seen through BN-Page analysis. Thus PAH were found to inhibit PS II photochemistry and caused distinct change in pigment composition. However the results led us to infer that 3-ring anthracence is more inhibitory as compared to 2-ring naphthalene and 4-ring pyrene. This indicates that aromaticity of PAH is unrelated to their response on photosynthetic processes.

  6. Practice and Educational Gaps in Abnormal Pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Tasneem F; Hamzavi, Iltefat H

    2016-07-01

    Dyschromia refers to abnormal pigmentation and is one of the most common diagnoses in dermatology. However, there are many educational and practice gaps in this area, specifically in melasma, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, and vitiligo. This article aims to review the gold standard of care for these conditions as well as highlight common educational and practice gaps in these areas. Finally, possible solutions to these gaps are addressed. PMID:27363886

  7. [Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase of pigmented yeasts].

    PubMed

    Mushi, N Iu; Kupletskaia, M B; Bab'eva, I P; Egorov, N S

    1980-01-01

    116 pigmented yeast cultures were tested for the presence of L-phenylalanine-ammonia lyase transforming L-phenylalanine into trans-cinnamic acid. The enzyme was found in 54 strains. Most of these strains belonged to the genera Rhodotorula and Sporobolomyces. Toluene, along with acetone, was successfully used to increase cellular permeability of the yeast cultures while determining the activity of phenylalanine-ammonia lyase.

  8. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04543.001 PMID:25513726

  9. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation. PMID:25513726

  10. The photochromic effect of bismuth vanadate pigments. Part I: Synthesis, characterization and lightfastness of pigment coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tuecks, A.; Beck, H.P. . E-mail: hp.beck@mx.uni-saarland.de

    2005-04-15

    We report on investigations of the photochromic effect of BiVO{sub 4} pigments. Emphasis is placed on an approach widely used in industrial color testing. By means of colorimetry {delta}E{sub ab}*-values, which measure the perceived color difference, can be calculated from reflectance spectra of non-illuminated and illuminated pigment coatings. Pigments were prepared by either wet-chemical precipitation or solid-state reactions. Depending on the choice of starting compounds, lightfastness was found to vary significantly. Small amounts of impurity phases do not seem to affect photochromism. In contrast, impurities like Fe and Pb cause intense photochromism. The role of Fe is suggested by trace analyses, which (in case of pigments synthesized by precipitation reactions) reveal a correlation between concentration and {delta}E{sub ab}*. Indications are found that other effects like pigment-lacquer interactions might also be of importance. Difference reflectance spectra turn out to vary in shape depending on the type and concentration of impurities or dopants. For BiVO{sub 4} at least three different mechanisms of photochromism can be assumed.

  11. Dual reactivity of hydroxy- and methoxy- substituted o-quinone methides in aqueous solutions: hydration versus tautomerization.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Selvanathan; Popik, Vladimir V

    2010-11-01

    4-Hydroxy-6-methylene-2,4-cyclohexadien-1-one (1) and 4-methoxy-6-methylene-2,4-cyclohexadien-1-one (2) were generated by efficient (Φ = 0.3) photodehydration of 2-(hydroxymethyl)benzene-1,4-diol (3a) and 2-(hydroxymethyl)-4-methoxyphenol (4a), respectively. o-Quinone methides 1 and 2 can be quantitatively trapped as Diels-Alder adducts with ethyl vinyl ether or intercepted by good nucleophiles, such as azide ion (k(N3)(1) = 3.15 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and k(N3)(2) = 3.30 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)). In aqueous solution, o-quinone methide 2 rapidly adds water to regenerate starting material (τ(H(2)O)(2) = 7.8 ms at 25 °C). This reaction is catalyzed by specific acid (k(H(+))(2) = 8.37 × 10(3) s(-1) M(-1)) and specific base (k(OH(-))(2) = 1.08 × 10(4) s(-1) M(-1)) but shows no significant general acid/base catalysis. In sharp contrast, o-quinone methide 1 decays (τ(H(2)O)(1) = 3.3 ms at 25 °C) via two competing pathways: nucleophilic hydration to form starting material 3a and tautomerization to produce methyl-p-benzoquinone. The disappearance of 1 shows not only specific acid (k(H(+))(1) = 3.30 × 10(4) s(-1) M(-1)) and specific base catalysis (k(OH(-))(1) = 3.51 × 10(4) s(-1) M(-1)) but pronounced catalysis by general acids and bases as well. The o-quinone methides 1 and 2 were also generated by the photolysis of 2-(ethoxymethyl)benzene-1,4-diol (3b) and 2-(ethoxymethyl)-4-methoxyphenol (4b), as well as from (2,5-dihydroxy-1-phenyl)methyl- (3c) and (2-hydroxy-5-methoxy-1-phenyl)methyltrimethylammonium iodides (4c). Short-lived (τ(25°)(C) ≈ 20 μs) precursors of o-quinone methides 1 and 2 were detected in the laser flash photolysis of 3a,b and 4a,b. On the basis of their reactivity, benzoxete structures have been assigned to these intermediates. PMID:20925363

  12. Sampling of airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Otson, R.; Leach, J.M.; Chung, L.T.K.

    1987-07-01

    Limitations of NIOSH sampling method P and CAM 183 were defined for airborne standard mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) generated as vapors in a flow-through apparatus. The PAH fell into three categories: those that were too volatile to be collected by the NIOSH filtration method at normal ambient temperatures and were best sampled with Tenax or XAD-2 sorbent (i.e., indane, naphthalene, biphenyl, acenaphthene, fluorene, 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene, phenathrene, and anthracene); those that were quantitatively collected by filters, even after a brief airborne residence time (i.e., benz(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(a)pyrene, dibenz(a,h)anthracene, and benzo(ghi)perylene); and those that partitioned between filter and sorbent (i.e., fluoranthene and pyrene). A combination glass fiber/silver membrane filter backed by two sorbent tubes in series gave overall mean recoveries of 94-96% for the 15 PAH studied at total concentrations of, nominally, 0.2 and 0.02 mg/m/sup 3/. Individual PAH concentrations were 0.03-0.05 and 0.003-0.005 mg/m/sup 3/, respectively.

  13. Hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions of polycyclic aromatics

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, R.P.; Schobert, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    An understanding of the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of polycyclic aromatic compounds is an important step in producing cycloalkanes from coal. Coal fragments released during depolymerization of coal tend to be aromatic in nature and therefore they need to be hydrogenated to produce desirable compounds. If these compounds can be hydrogenated to some extent during the depolymerization stage, a more efficient liquefaction process can be achieved. Studies at Penn State and other laboratories have shown that coal can be converted to over 95% oils. If the reaction conditions can be fine-tuned, a better quality product can be obtained. To obtain an understanding of how coal fragments would behave under various conditions, model compounds have been used in this investigation. Naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene and chrysene were subjected to various catalytic hydrogenation conditions. These included three temperatures and reaction times varying from 1 minute to 2 hours. Trends in the product compositions were analyzed and kinetic/thermodynamic data were compared for the various compounds. Once hydrogenation of the compounds has been optimized, the next most important factor that needs to be addressed is how do we avoid dehydrogenation reactions taking place. To understand this, some of the products from each compound that were hydrogenated were subjected to dehydrogenation conditions. This was achieved by heating the compounds under nitrogen for various reaction times and temperatures. Trends in the product composition were followed and analyzed, along with comparisons of kinetic data for each of the hydroaromatic dehydrogenations.

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Parisa; Peters, Kamau O; Bidad, Katayoon; Strickland, Paul T

    2015-02-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic illness in children living in developed countries and the leading cause of childhood hospitalization and school absenteeism. Prevalence rates of asthma are increasing and show disparities across gender, geographic regions, and ethnic/racial groups. Common risk factors for developing childhood asthma include exposure to tobacco smoke, previous allergic reactions, a family history of asthma, allergic rhinitis or eczema, living in an urban environment, obesity and lack of physical exercise, severe lower respiratory tract infections, and male gender. Asthma exacerbation in children can be triggered by a variety of factors, including allergens (e.g., pollen, dust mites, and animal dander), viral and bacterial infections, exercise, and exposure to airway irritants. Recent studies have shown that exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a major component of fine particulate matter from combustion sources, is also associated with onset of asthma, and increasing asthmatic symptoms. In this paper, we review sources of childhood PAH exposure and the association between airborne PAH exposure and childhood asthma prevalence and exacerbation.

  15. [Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure and birth defects].

    PubMed

    Lin, S S; Huang, Y; Wang, C Y; Ren, A G

    2016-06-01

    Birth defects are one of the most common adverse birth outcomes, which create a heavy economic burden to the country, society and family. And they are also one of the biggest problems facing public health today. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of toxic pollutants existing in the environment widely, resulting from incomplete organic matter combustion, and can be taken into the body through various ways including the digestive tract, respiratory tract and so on. Recent researches suggest that the exposure of PAHs may be associated with various birth defects, while the special mechanism isn't very clear. This paper is a review of the relationship between PAHs and birth defects from the aspects of epidemiological data, experimental evidence on animals, which indicates that exposure of PAHs during pregnancy may be associated with birth defects including congenital heart defects, neural tube defects and cleft lip/plate. Furthermore, we explored the possible mechanism, including oxidative stress, oxidative damage and the changes of signal transduction pathway in order to provide some recommendations and suggestions on the future work.

  16. Emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in China

    SciTech Connect

    Shanshan Xu; Wenxin Liu; Shu Tao

    2006-02-01

    Emission of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) listed as U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) priority pollutants from major sources in China were compiled. Geographical distribution and temporal change of the PAH emission, as well as emission profiles, are discussed. It was estimated that the total PAH emission in China was 25,300 tons in 2003. The emission profile featured a relatively higher portion of high molecular weight (HMW) species with carcinogenic potential due to large contributions of domestic coal and coking industry. Among various sources, biomass burning, domestic coal combustion, and the coking industry contributed 60%, 20%, and 16% of the total emission, respectively. Total emission, emission density, emission intensity, and emission per capita showed geographical variations. In general, the southeastern provinces were characterized by higher emission density, while those in western and northern China featured higher emission intensity and population-normalized emission. Although energy consumption in China went up continuously during the past two decades, annual emission of PAHs fluctuated depending on the amount of domestic coal consumption, coke production, and the efficiency of energy utilization. 47 refs., 6 figs.

  17. High-contrast enzymatic immunohistochemistry of pigmented tissues

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Sara M.; Seigel, Gail M.

    2016-01-01

    Historically, standard enzyme immunohistochemistry has been accomplished with brown (DAB, diaminobenzidine) substrate. This can become problematic in pigmented tissues, such as the retina, where brown pigment of retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells can be easily confounded with brown substrate. Although immunofluorescence detection methods can overcome this challenge, fluorescence may fade over a period of weeks, while enzyme substrates allow for more long-lasting, archival results. In this report, we will describe a high-contrast enzyme immunohistochemistry method ideal for pigmented tissues that utilizes purple (VIP) substrate. We compared brown (DAB) and purple (VIP) substrates in enzyme immunohistochemistry experiments using human retina (paraffin sections) and monkey retinal pigmented epithelial cells (frozen sections), both containing brown pigmented cells. We compared substrates using several primary antibodies against markers that can be detected in the retina, including GFAP, VEGF, CD147 (EMMPRIN), RHO (rhodopsin) and PAX6. Methyl green was used as a counterstain for paraffin sections. A side-by-side comparison between DAB and VIP immunohistochemistry showed excellent contrast between pigmented cells and the purple VIP substrate in both human retinal tissue and monkey pigmented epithelial cells for all of the markers tested. This was a marked improvement over DAB staining in pigmented cells and tissues. For both paraffin sections and frozen sections of pigmented tissues, purple VIP substrate is an excellent alternative to brown DAB substrate and non-permanent immunofluorescence methods. PMID:27660801

  18. Interaction between Vaccinium bracteatum Thunb. leaf pigment and rice proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Xu, Yuan; Zhou, Sumei; Qian, Haifeng; Zhang, Hui; Qi, Xiguang; Fan, Meihua

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the interaction of Vaccinium bracteatum Thunb. leaf (VBTL) pigment and rice proteins. In the presence of rice protein, VBTL pigment antioxidant activity and free polyphenol content decreased by 67.19% and 68.11%, respectively, and L(∗) of the protein-pigment complex decreased significantly over time. L(∗) values of albumin, globulin and glutelin during 60-min pigment exposure decreased by 55.00, 57.14, and 54.30%, respectively, indicating that these proteins had bound to the pigment. A significant difference in protein surface hydrophobicity was observed between rice proteins and pigment-protein complexes, indicating that hydrophobic interaction is a major binding mechanism between VBTL pigment and rice proteins. A significant difference in secondary structures between proteins and protein-pigment complexes was also uncovered, indicating that hydrogen bonding may be another mode of interaction between VBTL pigment and rice proteins. Our results indicate that VBTL pigment can stain rice proteins with hydrophobic and hydrogen interactions. PMID:26471554

  19. Origins of adult pigmentation: diversity in pigment stem cell lineages and implications for pattern evolution

    PubMed Central

    Spiewak, Jessica E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Teleosts comprise about half of all vertebrate species and exhibit an extraordinary diversity of adult pigment patterns that function in shoaling, camouflage and mate choice and have played important roles in speciation. Here, we review recent studies that have identified several distinct neural crest lineages, with distinct genetic requirements, that give rise to adult pigment cells in fishes. These lineages include post-embryonic, peripheral nerve associated stem cells that generate black melanophores and iridescent iridophores, cells derived directly from embryonic neural crest cells that generate yellow-orange xanthophores, and bipotent stem cells that generate both melanophores and xanthophores. This complexity in adult chromatophore lineages has implications for our understanding of adult traits, melanoma, and the evolutionary diversification of pigment cell lineages and patterns. PMID:25421288

  20. Origins of adult pigmentation: diversity in pigment stem cell lineages and implications for pattern evolution.

    PubMed

    Parichy, David M; Spiewak, Jessica E

    2015-01-01

    Teleosts comprise about half of all vertebrate species and exhibit an extraordinary diversity of adult pigment patterns that function in shoaling, camouflage, and mate choice and have played important roles in speciation. Here, we review studies that have identified several distinct neural crest lineages, with distinct genetic requirements, that give rise to adult pigment cells in fishes. These lineages include post-embryonic, peripheral nerve-associated stem cells that generate black melanophores and iridescent iridophores, cells derived directly from embryonic neural crest cells that generate yellow-orange xanthophores, and bipotent stem cells that generate both melanophores and xanthophores. This complexity in adult chromatophore lineages has implications for our understanding of adult traits, melanoma, and the evolutionary diversification of pigment cell lineages and patterns.

  1. Crystal Structure and Function of PqqF Protein in the Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Biosynthetic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiaoe; Ran, Tingting; Ma, Chencui; He, Jianhua; Xu, Dongqing; Wang, Weiwu

    2016-07-22

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) has received considerable attention due to its numerous important physiological functions. PqqA is a precursor peptide of PQQ with two conserved residues: glutamate and tyrosine. After linkage of the Cγ of glutamate and Cϵ of tyrosine by PqqE, these two residues are hypothesized to be cleaved from PqqA by PqqF. The linked glutamate and tyrosine residues are then used to synthesize PQQ. Here, we demonstrated that the pqqF gene is essential for PQQ biosynthesis as deletion of it eliminated the inhibition of prodigiosin production by glucose. We further determined the crystal structure of PqqF, which has a closed clamshell-like shape. The PqqF consists of two halves composed of an N- and a C-terminal lobe. The PqqF-N and PqqF-C lobes form a chamber with the volume of the cavity of ∼9400 Å(3) The PqqF structure conforms to the general structure of inverzincins. Compared with the most thoroughly characterized inverzincin insulin-degrading enzyme, the size of PqqF chamber is markedly smaller, which may define the specificity for its substrate PqqA. Furthermore, the 14-amino acid-residue-long tag formed by the N-terminal tag from expression vector precisely protrudes into the counterpart active site; this N-terminal tag occupies the active site and stabilizes the closed, inactive conformation. His-48, His-52, Glu-129 and His-14 from the N-terminal tag coordinate with the zinc ion. Glu-51 acts as a base catalyst. The observed histidine residue-mediated inhibition may be applicable for the design of a peptide for the inhibition of M16 metalloproteases.

  2. Dietary pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) alters indicators of inflammation and mitochondrial-related metabolism in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Harris, Calliandra B; Chowanadisai, Winyoo; Mishchuk, Darya O; Satre, Mike A; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Rucker, Robert B

    2013-12-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) influences energy-related metabolism and neurologic functions in animals. The mechanism of action involves interactions with cell signaling pathways and mitochondrial function. However, little is known about the response to PQQ in humans. Using a crossover study design, 10 subjects (5 females, 5 males) ingested PQQ added to a fruit-flavored drink in two separate studies. In study 1, PQQ was given in a single dose (0.2 mg PQQ/kg). Multiple measurements of plasma and urine PQQ levels and changes in antioxidant potential [based on total peroxyl radical-trapping potential and thiobarbituric acid reactive product (TBAR) assays] were made throughout the period of 48 h. In study 2, PQQ was administered as a daily dose (0.3 mg PQQ/kg). After 76 h, measurements included indices of inflammation [plasma C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL)-6 levels], standard clinical indices (e.g., cholesterol, glucose, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, etc.) and (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance estimates of urinary metabolites related in part to oxidative metabolism. The standard clinical indices were normal and not altered by PQQ supplementation. However, dietary PQQ exposure (Study 1) resulted in apparent changes in antioxidant potential based on malonaldehyde-related TBAR assessments. In Study 2, PQQ supplementation resulted in significant decreases in the levels of plasma C-reactive protein, IL-6 and urinary methylated amines such as trimethylamine N-oxide, and changes in urinary metabolites consistent with enhanced mitochondria-related functions. The data are among the first to link systemic effects of PQQ in animals to corresponding effects in humans.

  3. A novel pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent 2-keto-D-glucose dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aureofaciens.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Kiwamu; Takeda, Kouta; Ishida, Takuya; Sunagawa, Naoki; Makabe, Akiko; Isobe, Kazuo; Koba, Keisuke; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Samejima, Masahiro; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Yoshida, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    A gene encoding an enzyme similar to a pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent sugar dehydrogenase from filamentous fungi, which belongs to new auxiliary activities (AA) family 12 in the CAZy database, was cloned from Pseudomonas aureofaciens. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cloned enzyme showed only low homology to previously characterized PQQ-dependent enzymes, and multiple-sequence alignment analysis showed that the enzyme lacks one of the three conserved arginine residues that function as PQQ-binding residues in known PQQ-dependent enzymes. The recombinant enzyme was heterologously expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system for further characterization. The UV-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectrum of the oxidized form of the holoenzyme, prepared by incubating the apoenzyme with PQQ and CaCl2, revealed a broad peak at approximately 350 nm, indicating that the enzyme binds PQQ. With the addition of 2-keto-d-glucose (2KG) to the holoenzyme solution, a sharp peak appeared at 331 nm, attributed to the reduction of PQQ bound to the enzyme, whereas no effect was observed upon 2KG addition to authentic PQQ. Enzymatic assay showed that the recombinant enzyme specifically reacted with 2KG in the presence of an appropriate electron acceptor, such as 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol, when PQQ and CaCl2 were added. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) analysis of reaction products revealed 2-keto-d-gluconic acid (2KGA) as the main product, clearly indicating that the recombinant enzyme oxidizes the C-1 position of 2KG. Therefore, the enzyme was identified as a PQQ-dependent 2KG dehydrogenase (Pa2KGDH). Considering the high substrate specificity, the physiological function of Pa2KGDH may be for production of 2KGA.

  4. Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Slows Down the Progression of Osteoarthritis by Inhibiting Nitric Oxide Production and Metalloproteinase Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ran; Wang, Shitao; Xia, Xiaopeng; Wang, Youhua; Cao, Yi; Huang, Yuejiao; Xu, Xinbao; Liu, Zhongbing; Liu, Peichao; Tang, Xiaohang; Liu, Chun; Shen, Gan; Zhang, Dongmei

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common arthritis and also one of the major causes of joint pain in elderly people. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) on degenerated-related changes in osteoarthritis (OA). SW1353 cells were stimulated with IL-1β to establish the chondrocyte injury model in vitro. PQQ was administrated into SW1353 cultures 1 h before IL-1β treatment. Amounts of MMP-1, MMP-13, P65, IκBα, ERK, p-ERK, P38, and p-P38 were measured via western blot. The production of NO was determined by Griess reaction assay and reflected by the iNOS level. Meniscal-ligamentous injury (MLI) was performed on 8-week-old rats to establish the OA rat model. PQQ was injected intraperitoneally 3 days before MLI and consecutively until harvest, and the arthritis cartilage degeneration level was assessed. The expressions of MMP-1 and MMP-13 were significantly downregulated after PQQ treatment compared with that in IL-1β alone group. NO production and iNOS expression were decreased by PQQ treatment compared with control group. Amounts of nucleus P65 were upregulated in SW1353 after stimulated with IL-1β, while PQQ significantly inhibited the translocation. In rat OA model, treatment with PQQ markedly decelerated the degeneration of articular cartilage. These findings suggested that PQQ could inhibit OA-related catabolic proteins MMPs expression, NO production, and thus, slow down the articular cartilage degeneration and OA progression. Owing to its beneficial effects, PQQ is expected to be a novel pharmacological application in OA clinical prevention and treatment in the near future.

  5. Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Biogenesis: Demonstration that PqqE from Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Radical SAM Enzyme†

    PubMed Central

    Wecksler, Stephen R.; Stoll, Stefan; Tran, Ha; Magnusson, Olafur T.; Wu, Shu-pao; King, David; Britt, R. David; Klinman, Judith P.

    2009-01-01

    Biogenesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) in Klebsiella pneumoniae requires the expression of six genes (pqqA-F). One of these genes (pqqE) encodes a 43 kDa protein (PqqE) that plays a role in the initial steps in PQQ formation (Veletrop et al. (1995) J. Bacteriol. 177, 5088-5098). PqqE contains two highly conserved cysteine motifs at the N and C-termini, with the N-terminal motif comprised of a consensus sequence of CX3CX2C that is unique to a family of proteins known as radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzymes (Sofia et al. (2001) Nucleic Acids Res. 29, 1097-1106). PqqE from K. pneumoniae was cloned into E. coli and expressed as the native protein and with an N-terminal His6-tag. Anaerobic expression and purification of the His6-tag PqqE results in an enzyme with a brownish-red hue indicative of Fe-S cluster formation. Spectroscopic and physical analyses indicate that PqqE contains a mixture of Fe-S clusters, with the predominant form of the enzyme containing two [4Fe-4S] clusters. PqqE isolated anaerobically yields active enzyme capable of cleaving SAM to methionine and 5′-deoxyadenosine in an uncoupled reaction (kobs = 0.011 ± 0.001 min-1). In this reaction, the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical either abstracts a hydrogen atom from a solvent accessible position in the enzyme or obtains a proton and electron from buffer. The putative PQQ substrate PqqA has not yet been shown to be modified by PqqE, implying either that PqqA must be modified before becoming the substrate for PqqE and/or that another protein in the biosynthetic pathway is critical for the initial steps in PQQ biogenesis. PMID:19746930

  6. A Novel Pyrroloquinoline Quinone-Dependent 2-Keto-d-Glucose Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aureofaciens

    PubMed Central

    Umezawa, Kiwamu; Takeda, Kouta; Ishida, Takuya; Sunagawa, Naoki; Makabe, Akiko; Isobe, Kazuo; Koba, Keisuke; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Samejima, Masahiro; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Igarashi, Kiyohiko

    2015-01-01

    A gene encoding an enzyme similar to a pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent sugar dehydrogenase from filamentous fungi, which belongs to new auxiliary activities (AA) family 12 in the CAZy database, was cloned from Pseudomonas aureofaciens. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cloned enzyme showed only low homology to previously characterized PQQ-dependent enzymes, and multiple-sequence alignment analysis showed that the enzyme lacks one of the three conserved arginine residues that function as PQQ-binding residues in known PQQ-dependent enzymes. The recombinant enzyme was heterologously expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system for further characterization. The UV-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectrum of the oxidized form of the holoenzyme, prepared by incubating the apoenzyme with PQQ and CaCl2, revealed a broad peak at approximately 350 nm, indicating that the enzyme binds PQQ. With the addition of 2-keto-d-glucose (2KG) to the holoenzyme solution, a sharp peak appeared at 331 nm, attributed to the reduction of PQQ bound to the enzyme, whereas no effect was observed upon 2KG addition to authentic PQQ. Enzymatic assay showed that the recombinant enzyme specifically reacted with 2KG in the presence of an appropriate electron acceptor, such as 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol, when PQQ and CaCl2 were added. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) analysis of reaction products revealed 2-keto-d-gluconic acid (2KGA) as the main product, clearly indicating that the recombinant enzyme oxidizes the C-1 position of 2KG. Therefore, the enzyme was identified as a PQQ-dependent 2KG dehydrogenase (Pa2KGDH). Considering the high substrate specificity, the physiological function of Pa2KGDH may be for production of 2KGA. PMID:25645559

  7. Hydroxyphenylation of Histone Lysines: Post-translational Modification by Quinone Imines.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Kodihalli C; Trudel, Laura J; Wishnok, John S; Wogan, Gerald N; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Skipper, Paul L

    2016-05-20

    Monocyclic aromatic amines are widespread environmental contaminants with multiple sources such as combustion products, pharmaceuticals, and pesticides. Their phenolic metabolites are converted intracellularly to electrophilic quinone imines upon autoxidation and can embed in the cellular matrix through a transimination reaction that leaves a redox-active residue as a substituent of lysine side-chain amino groups. To demonstrate the occurrence of this process within the cellular nucleus, Chinese hamster ovary AA8 cells were treated with the para-phenol of 3,5-dimethylamine, after which the histone proteins were isolated, derivatized, and subjected to tryptic digestion. The resulting peptides were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry to determine which lysines were modified. Nine residues in histones H2A, H2B, and H4 were identified; these were located in histone tails, close to where DNA makes contact with the nuclear core particle, elsewhere on the protein surface, and deep within the core. Kinetics of disappearance of the modified lysines in cultured cells was determined using isotope-dilution mass spectrometry. AA8 cells were also transfected with the genetically encoded hydrogen peroxide biosensor HyPer in constructs that lead to expression of HyPer in different cellular compartments. Challenging the resulting cells with the dimethylaminophenol resulted in sustained fluorescence emission in each of the compartments, demonstrating ongoing production of H2O2. The kinetics of modified lysine loss determined by mass spectrometry was consistent with persistence of HyPer fluorescence emission. We conclude that the para-phenol of 3,5-dimethylamine can become stably integrated into the histone proteins, which are minimally repaired, if at all, and function as a persistent source of intracellular H2O2. PMID:26866676

  8. Exogenous methyl jasmonate treatment increases glucosinolate biosynthesis and quinone reductase activity in kale leaf tissue.

    PubMed

    Ku, Kang-Mo; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Juvik, John A

    2014-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) spray treatments were applied to the kale varieties 'Dwarf Blue Curled Vates' and 'Red Winter' in replicated field plantings in 2010 and 2011 to investigate alteration of glucosinolate (GS) composition in harvested leaf tissue. Aqueous solutions of 250 µM MeJA were sprayed to saturation on aerial plant tissues four days prior to harvest at commercial maturity. The MeJA treatment significantly increased gluconasturtiin (56%), glucobrassicin (98%), and neoglucobrassicin (150%) concentrations in the apical leaf tissue of these genotypes over two seasons. Induction of quinone reductase (QR) activity, a biomarker for anti-carcinogenesis, was significantly increased by the extracts from the leaf tissue of these two cultivars. Extracts of apical leaf tissues had greater MeJA mediated increases in phenolics, glucosinolate concentrations, GS hydrolysis products, and QR activity than extracts from basal leaf tissue samples. The concentration of the hydrolysis product of glucoraphanin, sulforphane was significantly increased in apical leaf tissue of the cultivar 'Red Winter' in both 2010 and 2011. There was interaction between exogenous MeJA treatment and environmental conditions to induce endogenous JA. Correlation analysis revealed that indole-3-carbanol (I3C) generated from the hydrolysis of glucobrassicin significantly correlated with QR activity (r = 0.800, P<0.001). Concentrations required to double the specific QR activity (CD values) of I3C was calculated at 230 µM, which is considerably weaker at induction than other isothiocyanates like sulforphane. To confirm relationships between GS hydrolysis products and QR activity, a range of concentrations of MeJA sprays were applied to kale leaf tissues of both cultivars in 2011. Correlation analysis of these results indicated that sulforaphane, NI3C, neoascorbigen, I3C, and diindolylmethane were all significantly correlated with QR activity. Thus, increased QR activity may be due to combined

  9. Water oxidation chemistry of a synthetic dinuclear ruthenium complex containing redox-active quinone ligands.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Koji; Shen, Jian-Ren; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2014-04-21

    We investigated theoretically the catalytic mechanism of electrochemical water oxidation in aqueous solution by a dinuclear ruthenium complex containing redox-active quinone ligands, [Ru2(X)(Y)(3,6-tBu2Q)2(btpyan)](m+) [X, Y = H2O, OH, O, O2; 3,6-tBu2Q = 3,6-di-tert-butyl-1,2-benzoquinone; btpyan =1,8-bis(2,2':6',2″-terpyrid-4'-yl)anthracene] (m = 2, 3, 4) (1). The reaction involves a series of electron and proton transfers to achieve redox leveling, with intervening chemical transformations in a mesh scheme, and the entire molecular structure and motion of the catalyst 1 work together to drive the catalytic cycle for water oxidation. Two substrate water molecules can bind to 1 with simultaneous loss of one or two proton(s), which allows pH-dependent variability in the proportion of substrate-bound structures and following pathways for oxidative activation of the aqua/hydroxo ligands at low thermodynamic and kinetic costs. The resulting bis-oxo intermediates then undergo endothermic O-O radical coupling between two Ru(III)-O(•) units in an anti-coplanar conformation leading to bridged μ-peroxo or μ-superoxo intermediates. The μ-superoxo species can liberate oxygen with the necessity for the preceding binding of a water molecule, which is possible only after four-electron oxidation is completed. The magnitude of catalytic current would be limited by the inherent sluggishness of the hinge-like bending motion of the bridged μ-superoxo complex that opens up the compact, hydrophobic active site of the catalyst and thereby allows water entry under dynamic conditions. On the basis of a newly proposed mechanism, we rationalize the experimentally observed behavior of electrode kinetics with respect to potential and discuss what causes a high overpotential for water oxidation by 1.

  10. Hydroxyphenylation of Histone Lysines: Post-translational Modification by Quinone Imines.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Kodihalli C; Trudel, Laura J; Wishnok, John S; Wogan, Gerald N; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Skipper, Paul L

    2016-05-20

    Monocyclic aromatic amines are widespread environmental contaminants with multiple sources such as combustion products, pharmaceuticals, and pesticides. Their phenolic metabolites are converted intracellularly to electrophilic quinone imines upon autoxidation and can embed in the cellular matrix through a transimination reaction that leaves a redox-active residue as a substituent of lysine side-chain amino groups. To demonstrate the occurrence of this process within the cellular nucleus, Chinese hamster ovary AA8 cells were treated with the para-phenol of 3,5-dimethylamine, after which the histone proteins were isolated, derivatized, and subjected to tryptic digestion. The resulting peptides were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry to determine which lysines were modified. Nine residues in histones H2A, H2B, and H4 were identified; these were located in histone tails, close to where DNA makes contact with the nuclear core particle, elsewhere on the protein surface, and deep within the core. Kinetics of disappearance of the modified lysines in cultured cells was determined using isotope-dilution mass spectrometry. AA8 cells were also transfected with the genetically encoded hydrogen peroxide biosensor HyPer in constructs that lead to expression of HyPer in different cellular compartments. Challenging the resulting cells with the dimethylaminophenol resulted in sustained fluorescence emission in each of the compartments, demonstrating ongoing production of H2O2. The kinetics of modified lysine loss determined by mass spectrometry was consistent with persistence of HyPer fluorescence emission. We conclude that the para-phenol of 3,5-dimethylamine can become stably integrated into the histone proteins, which are minimally repaired, if at all, and function as a persistent source of intracellular H2O2.

  11. Characterization of Sorolla's gouache pigments by means of spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán, Clodoaldo; Juanes, David; Ferrazza, Livio; Carballo, Jorgelina

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the characterization of the Joaquín Sorolla's gouache sketches for the oil on canvas series "Vision of Spain" commissioned by A. M. Huntington to decorate the library of the Hispanic Society of America in New York. The analyses were focused on the identification of the elemental composition of the gouache pigments by means of portable EDXRF spectrometry in a non-destructive mode. Additionally, SEM-EDX and FTIR analyses of a selected set of micro-samples were carried out to identify completely the pigments, the paint technique and the binding media. The obtained results have confirmed the identification of lead and zinc white, vermillion, earth pigments, ochre, zinc yellow, chrome yellow, ultramarine, Prussian blue, chromium based and copper-arsenic based green pigments, bone black and carbon based black pigments, and the use of gum arabic as binding media in the gouache pigments.

  12. Analytical Raman spectroscopic discrimination between yellow pigments of the Renaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Howell G. M.

    2011-10-01

    The Renaissance represented a major advance in painting techniques, subject matter, artistic style and the use of pigments and pigment mixtures. However, most pigments in general use were still mineral-based as most organic dyes were believed to be fugitive; the historical study of artists' palettes and recipes has assumed importance for the attribution of art works to the Renaissance period. Although the application of diagnostic elemental and molecular spectroscopic techniques play vital and complementary roles in the analysis of art works, elemental techniques alone cannot definitively provide the data needed for pigment identification. The advantages and limitations of Raman spectroscopy for the definitive diagnostic characterisation of yellow pigments that were in use during the Renaissance is demonstrated here in consideration of heavy metal oxides and sulphides; these data will be compared with those obtained from analyses of synthetic yellow pigments that were available during the eighteenth and nineteenth Centuries which could have been used in unrecorded restorations of Renaissance paintings.

  13. Analytical Raman spectroscopic discrimination between yellow pigments of the Renaissance.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Howell G M

    2011-10-01

    The Renaissance represented a major advance in painting techniques, subject matter, artistic style and the use of pigments and pigment mixtures. However, most pigments in general use were still mineral-based as most organic dyes were believed to be fugitive; the historical study of artists' palettes and recipes has assumed importance for the attribution of art works to the Renaissance period. Although the application of diagnostic elemental and molecular spectroscopic techniques play vital and complementary roles in the analysis of art works, elemental techniques alone cannot definitively provide the data needed for pigment identification. The advantages and limitations of Raman spectroscopy for the definitive diagnostic characterisation of yellow pigments that were in use during the Renaissance is demonstrated here in consideration of heavy metal oxides and sulphides; these data will be compared with those obtained from analyses of synthetic yellow pigments that were available during the eighteenth and nineteenth Centuries which could have been used in unrecorded restorations of Renaissance paintings.

  14. Mapping pigment distribution in mud samples through hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrübeoglu, Mehrube; Nicula, Cosmina; Trombley, Christopher; Smith, Shane W.; Smith, Dustin K.; Shanks, Elizabeth S.; Zimba, Paul V.

    2015-09-01

    Mud samples collected from bodies of water reveal information about the distribution of microorganisms in the local sediments. Hyperspectral imaging has been investigated as a technology to identify phototropic organisms living on sediments collected from the Texas Coastal Bend area based on their spectral pigment profiles and spatial arrangement. The top pigment profiles identified through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) have been correlated with spectral signatures extracted from the hyperspectral data of mud using fast Fourier transform (FFT). Spatial distributions have also been investigated using 2D hyperspectral image processing. 2D pigment distribution maps have been created based on the correlation with pigment profiles in the FFT domain. Among the tested pigments, the results show match among four out of five pigment distribution trends between HPLC and hyperspectral data analysis. Differences are attributed mainly to the difference between area and volume of scale between the HPLC analysis and area covered by hyperspectral imaging.

  15. Oral pigmented lesions: Clinicopathologic features and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    da Silva-Jorge, Rogério; Jorge, Jacks; Lopes, Márcio A.; Vargas, Pablo A.

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis of pigmented lesions of the oral cavity and perioral tissues is challenging. Even though epidemiology may be of some help in orientating the clinician and even though some lesions may confidently be diagnosed on clinical grounds alone, the definitive diagnosis usually requires histopathologic evaluation. Oral pigmentation can be physiological or pathological, and exogenous or endogenous. Color, location, distribution, and duration as well as drugs use, family history, and change in pattern are important for the differential diagnosis. Dark or black pigmented lesions can be focal, multifocal or diffuse macules, including entities such as racial pigmentation, melanotic macule, melanocytic nevus, blue nevus, smoker’s melanosis, oral melanoacanthoma, pigmentation by foreign bodies or induced by drugs, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Addison´s disease and oral melanoma. The aim of this review is to present the main oral black lesions contributing to better approach of the patients. Key words:Pigmentation, melanin, oral, diagnosis, management. PMID:22549672

  16. Remote sensing of ocean chlorophyll: consequence of nonuniform pigment profile.

    PubMed

    Sathyendranath, S; Platt, T

    1989-02-01

    Remote sensing of ocean color, applied to the estimation of chlorophyll biomass, is discussed for the case where the vertical distribution of phytoplankton pigments is nonuniform. Using a spectral model of reflectance, the consequences of vertical structure are evaluated by sensitivity analysis on a generalized pigment profile. It is shown that the assumption of a vertically homogeneous chlorophyll distribution can lead to significant errors (relative error exceeding 100%) in the estimation from satellite data of photic depth and total pigment content in the photic zone. The errors are shown to be functions of the parameters of the pigment profile. It is further shown that, if the shape of the pigment profile is known from independent data, the entire pigment profile may be recovered from the satellite data by making slight changes in the existing algorithms for chlorophyll retrieval.

  17. BASIS FOR ENHANCED BARRIER FUNCTION OF PIGMENTED SKIN

    PubMed Central

    Man, Mao-Qiang; Lin, Tzu-Kai; Santiago, Juan Luis; Celli, Anna; Zhong, Lily; Huang, Zhi-Ming; Roelandt, Truus; Hupe, Melanie; Sundberg, John P.; Silva, Kathleen A.; Crumrine, Debra; Martin-Ezquerra, Gemma; Trullas, Carles; Sun, Richard; Wakefield, Joan S.; Wei, Maria L.; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Mauro, Theodora M.; Elias, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Humans with darkly-pigmented skin display superior permeability barrier function in comparison to humans with lightly-pigmented skin. The reduced pH of the stratum corneum (SC) of darkly-pigmented skin could account for enhanced function, because acidifying lightly-pigmented human SC resets barrier function to darkly-pigmented levels. In SKH1 (non-pigmented) vs. SKH2/J (pigmented) hairless mice, we evaluated how a pigment-dependent reduction in pH could influence epidermal barrier function. Permeability barrier homeostasis is enhanced in SKH2/J vs. SKH1 mice, correlating with a reduced pH in the lower SC that co-localizes with the extrusion of melanin granules. Darkly-pigmented human epidermis also shows substantial melanin extrusion in the outer epidermis. Both acute barrier disruption and topical basic pH challenges accelerate re-acidification of SKH2/J (but not SKH1) SC, while inducing melanin extrusion. SKH2/J mice also display enhanced expression of the SC acidifying enzyme, secretory phospholipase A2f (sPLA2f). Enhanced barrier function of SKH2/J mice could be attributed to enhanced activity of two acidic pH-dependent, ceramide-generating enzymes, β-glucocerebrosidase and acidic sphingomyelinase, leading to accelerated maturation of SC lamellar bilayers. Finally, organotypic cultures of darkly-pigmented-bearing human keratinocytes display enhanced barrier function in comparison to lightly-pigmented cultures. Together, these results suggest that the superior barrier function of pigmented epidermis can be largely attributed to the pH-lowering impact of melanin persistence/extrusion and enhanced sPLA2f expression. PMID:24732399

  18. Atmospheric effects in the remote sensing of phytoplankton pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, H. R.; Clark, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    The accuracy with which relevant atmospheric parameters must be estimated to derive photoplankton pigment concentrations of a given accuracy, from measurements of the ocean's apparent spectral radiance at satellite altitudes, is examined. A phytoplankton pigment algorithm is developed which relates the pigment concentration (c) to the three ratios of upwelling radiance just beneath the sea surface which can be formed from wavelengths (lambda) 440, 520 and 550 nm.

  19. Pigmentation in basal cell carcinoma involves enhanced endothelin-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Lan, Cheng-Che E; Wu, Ching-Shuang; Cheng, Chiu-Min; Yu, Chia-Li; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2005-07-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most prevalent malignant skin tumor. In Asian patients, marked pigmentation in BCC lesions is often observed. Recently, endothelins (ETs) have been implicated to participate in the pigmentation process of BCC. Therefore, we set out to investigate the involvement of ET in the pigmentation process of BCC and the potential regulators in the pigmentation pathway. We explored the effects of an established BCC cell line on melanocytes. The growth factor profiles of BCC culture supernatant and effects of supernatant on melanocytes were documented. Potential regulators involved in the pigmentation pathway were also studied. The immunohistochemical staining of pigmented and non-pigmented BCC specimens was performed to confirm our in vitro findings. Our results showed that BCC supernatant contained significant amount of ET-1, basic fibroblast growth factor, and nerve growth factor. Furthermore, BCC supernatant stimulated melanin formation of cultured melanocytes. Addition of ET-receptor antagonist abrogated the melanogenic effect of BCC supernatant on melanocytes. Introduction of UVB irradiation decreased the ET-1 secretion by BCC cells. Immunohistochemical staining of the pigmented facial BCC specimens showed prominent expression of ET-1 on pigmented BCC, while the non-pigmented facial BCC specimens showed little ET-1 reactivity. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) staining showed little expression on BCC specimens, regardless of pigmentation status. In summary, our results indicate that enhanced ET-1 expression in pigmented BCC plays an important role in the hyperpigmentation of this tumor. Moreover, this enhanced ET-1 cascade showed little correlation with UV irradiation and TNF-alpha expression in our study.

  20. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from motorcycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hsi-Hsien; Hsieh, Lien-Te; Liu, Hsu-Chung; Mi, Hsiao-Hsuan

    Emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, 2-7 ring) and regulated air pollutants (CO, HC, NO x, PM) from 2-stroke carburetor (2-Stk/Cb), 4-stroke carburetor (4-Stk/Cb) and 4-stroke fuel injection (4-Stk/FI) motorcycles were investigated by testing these vehicles on a chassis dynamometer. Exhaust samplings were carried out on diluted exhausts in a dilution tunnel connected to a constant volume sampling system. Measurements were performed on a standard driving cycle. The results reveal that low molecular weight PAHs (especially naphthalene) dominated in the exhaust gas. The averages of soluble organic fractions were 86.4%, 46.3% and 48.9% for the 2-Stk/Cb, 4-Stk/Cb and 4-Stk/FI motorcycles, respectively. PAH emissions are greater from cold-start driving than those from hot-start driving cycle for all these three kinds of motorcycles. Total PAH emission factors were 8320, 5990 and 3390 μg km -1 for the in-used 2-Stk/Cb, 4-Stk/Cb and 4-Stk/FI motorcycles, respectively. PAH emission factors were the largest for the 2-Stk/Cb motorcycles. Besides, the 2-Stk/Cb motorcycle had the largest total BaP equivalent emission factor of 10.8 μg km -1, indicating that the emission exhaust from the 2-Stk/Cb motorcycle was most carcinogenic. HC, PM and PAH emissions were the lowest for the 4-Stk/FI motorcycles. The correlation coefficient between CO and total PAH emissions for all the test motorcycles was 0.51, indicating that CO and PAH emissions are not highly correlated.

  1. Relationship of Gingival Pigmentation with Passive Smoking in Women

    PubMed Central

    Moravej-Salehi, Elahe; Moravej-Salehi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral mucosal pigmentation is among the most common findings in smokers, affecting smile esthetics. Passive smoking significantly compromises the health of non-smoker individuals particularly women. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of passive smoking with oral pigmentation in non-smoker women. Materials and Methods: This historical-cohort study was conducted on a case group of 50 married women who were unemployed, not pregnant, non-smoker, had no systemic condition causing cutaneous or mucosal pigmentation, were not taking any medication causing cutaneous or mucosal pigmentation and had a heavy smoker husband. The control group comprised of 50 matched females with no smoker member in the family. Both groups were clinically examined for presence of gingival pigmentation and the results were analyzed using chi-square and logistic regression tests. Results: Gingival pigmentation was found in 27 (54%) passive smokers and 14 (28%) controls (P=0.01). The odds ratio (OR) of gingival pigmentation in women exposed to secondhand smoke of their husbands (adjusted for education and having a smoker parent at childhood) was 3 (95% confidence interval; CI: 1.26 – 7.09). House floor area was correlated with gingival pigmentation in female passive smokers (P=0.025). Conclusion: This study was the first to describe the relationship between secondhand smoke and gingival pigmentation in women and this effect was magnified in smaller houses. PMID:26528364

  2. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: A complication of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Sarah; Heath, Rebecca; Shah, Mamta

    2012-01-01

    Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutaneous scars. Pigment production is complex and under the control of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors and patterns of scar repigmentation are unpredictable. This article gives an overview of human skin pigmentation, repigmentation following wounding and current treatment options. PMID:23162241

  3. Intra-Articular Pigmentation of Synovium: An Unusual Cause

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Steven; Liew, Sue M

    2016-01-01

    An unusual grayish brown discoloration of the synovium was found during a knee arthroscopy of a 72-year-old man. He also had similar pigmentation affecting the skin on the legs, arms, hands, and face. It was found he had been taking 400 mg of amiodarone hydrochloride daily for last 7 years. Amiodarone is known to cause a slate grey pigmentation of skin and cornea, but we believe this is the first report of amiodarone-induced pigmentation of the synovium. The arthroscopist should be aware of the possibility of drug-related synovial pigmentation and include this in differential diagnosis. PMID:27583118

  4. Neodymium-YAG transscleral cyclophotocoagulation. The role of pigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Cantor, L.B.; Nichols, D.A.; Katz, L.J.; Moster, M.R.; Poryzees, E.; Shields, J.A.; Spaeth, G.L. )

    1989-08-01

    Using a rabbit model we investigated the role of pigmentation of the ciliary body in obtaining ciliodestruction by neodymium-YAG transscleral cyclophotocoagulation. There was marked destruction of the ciliary body in pigmented rabbit eyes, but no histologic effect was observed in albino rabbit eyes. These findings suggest that pigmentation of the ciliary body is important for obtaining the desired response from neodymium-YAG transscleral cyclophotocoagulation in rabbit eyes by our technique. Further study is necessary to define the role of pigmentation in human eyes in this treatment modality.

  5. Intra-Articular Pigmentation of Synovium: An Unusual Cause.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shobhit; Hamilton, Steven; Liew, Sue M

    2016-09-01

    An unusual grayish brown discoloration of the synovium was found during a knee arthroscopy of a 72-year-old man. He also had similar pigmentation affecting the skin on the legs, arms, hands, and face. It was found he had been taking 400 mg of amiodarone hydrochloride daily for last 7 years. Amiodarone is known to cause a slate grey pigmentation of skin and cornea, but we believe this is the first report of amiodarone-induced pigmentation of the synovium. The arthroscopist should be aware of the possibility of drug-related synovial pigmentation and include this in differential diagnosis. PMID:27583118

  6. Corrosion-Indicating Pigment And Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Attia, Alan I.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed hydrogen-sensitive paint for metal structures changes color at onset of corrosion, involving emission of hydrogen as result of electrochemical reactions. Pigment of suitable paint includes rhodium compound RhCl(PPh3)3, known as Wilkinson's catalyst. As coating on critical parts of such structures as bridges and aircraft, paint gives early warning of corrosion, and parts thus repaired or replaced before failing catastrophically. Reveals corrosion before it becomes visible to eye. Inspection for changes in color not ordinarily necessitate removal of structure from service, and costs less than inspection by x-ray or thermal neutron radiography, ultrasonic, eddy-current, or acoustic-emission techniques.

  7. A golden age of human pigmentation genetics.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Richard A

    2006-09-01

    The zebrafish golden mutation is characterized by the production of small and irregular-shaped melanin granules, resulting in a lightening of the pigmented lateral stripes of the animal. The recent positional cloning and localization of the golden gene, combined with genotype-phenotype correlations of alleles of its human orthologue (SLC24A5) in African-American and African-Caribbean populations, provide insights into the genetic and molecular basis of human skin colour. SLC24A5 promotes melanin deposition through maturation of the melanosome, highlighting the importance of ion-exchange in the function of this organelle.

  8. Method of preparing zinc orthotitanate pigment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, D. W.; Harada, Y.; Logan, W. R.; Gilligan, J. E. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Zinc orthotitanate suitable for use as a pigment for spacecraft thermal control coatings is prepared by heating a slightly zinc deficient reaction mixture of precipitated oxalates of zinc and titanium. The reaction mixture can be formed by coprecipitation of zinc and titanium oxalates from chloride solution or by mixing separately precipitated oxalates. The mixture is first heated to 400 to 600 C to remove volatiles and is then rapidly heated at 900 to 1200 C. Zinc orthotitanate produced by this method exhibits the very fine particle size needed for thermal control coatings as well as stability in a space environment.

  9. LOCALIZED PIGMENTED VILLONODULAR SYNOVITIS: CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Carvalho Godoy, Fabiola Andrea de; Faustino, Carlos Alberto Cury; Meneses, Cláudio Santos; Nishi, Sergio Tadao; Góes, César Eduardo Giancoli; Canto, Abaeté Leite do

    2011-01-01

    This case concerned a female patient with a complaint of pain in the anterior region of her left knee during and after sports activities, followed by joint blockage three months ago. From imaging examinations, simple radiography of the knee was normal and magnetic resonance showed a solid expansive mass, possibly corresponding to soft-tissue chondroma or focal nodular synovitis. Arthroscopic resection of the lesion was performed, and the diagnosis of diffuse giant cell tumor resembling localized pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) was made from the result of the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of symptoms and return to physical activities.

  10. Dermatoscopic features of pigmented and non-pigmented basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kiladze, N; Shulaia, T; Bulinska, A; Abrahamovych, L

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors, which accounts for about 75% of all skin cancers, its early diagnosis is crucial for proper treatment. In recent years, an increasingly important role in the early and differential diagnosis of skin tumors plays dermatoscopy, making possible to improve the diagnosis of pigmented and nonpigmented skin lesions, especially in the early stages of development. The aim of this work is to study the dermatoscopic criteria for pigmented and nonpigmented BCC using the algorithm of H. Kittler. Were studied 78 cases of different clinical types of BCC, diagnosis was based on clinical and dermatoscopic picture with further confirmation by cytology. The obtained data show that for pigmented BCC are characteristic five major signs of dermatoscopy - lines, dots, clods, circles and pseudopodia, whereas for non-pigmented form - pattern of blood vessels and, as an additional feature, structureless areas. Further studies are needed to evaluate specific dermoscopic hallmarks regarding different categories of BCC and sensitivity of these dermatoscopic features. PMID:25693214

  11. Mutations in CTNNA1 cause butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy and perturbed retinal pigment epithelium integrity

    PubMed Central

    Saksens, Nicole T.M.; Krebs, Mark P.; Schoenmaker-Koller, Frederieke E.; Hicks, Wanda; Yu, Minzhong; Shi, Lanying; Rowe, Lucy; Collin, Gayle B.; Charette, Jeremy R.; Letteboer, Stef J.; Neveling, Kornelia; van Moorsel, Tamara W.; Abu-Ltaif, Sleiman; De Baere, Elfride; Walraedt, Sophie; Banfi, Sandro; Simonelli, Francesca; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Boon, Camiel J.F.; Roepman, Ronald; Leroy, Bart P.; Peachey, Neal S.; Hoyng, Carel B.; Nishina, Patsy M.; den Hollander, Anneke I.

    2015-01-01

    Butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy is an eye disease characterized by lesions in the macula that can resemble the wings of a butterfly. Here, we report the identification of heterozygous missense mutations in the α-catenin 1 (CTNNA1) gene in three families with butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy. In addition, we identified a Ctnna1 missense mutation in a chemically induced mouse mutant, tvrm5. Parallel clinical phenotypes were observed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of individuals with butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy and in tvrm5 mice, including pigmentary abnormalities, focal thickening and elevated lesions, and decreased light-activated responses. Morphological studies in tvrm5 mice revealed increased cell shedding and large multinucleated RPE cells, suggesting defects in intercellular adhesion and cytokinesis. This study identifies CTNNA1 gene variants as a cause of macular dystrophy, suggests that CTNNA1 is involved in maintaining RPE integrity, and suggests that other components that participate in intercellular adhesion may be implicated in macular disease. PMID:26691986

  12. Aromaticity Competition in Differentially Fused Borepin-Containing Polycyclic Aromatics.

    PubMed

    Messersmith, Reid E; Siegler, Maxime A; Tovar, John D

    2016-07-01

    This report describes the synthesis and characterization of a series of borepin-based polycyclic aromatics bearing two different arene fusions. The borepin synthesis features streamlined Ti-mediated alkyne reduction, leading to Z-olefins, followed by direct lithiation and borepin formation. These molecules allow for an assessment of aromatic competition between the fused rings and the central borepin core. Crystallographic, magnetic, and computational studies yielded insights about the aromaticity of novel, differentially fused [b,f]borepins and allowed for comparison to literature compounds. Multiple borepin motifs were also incorporated into polycyclic aromatics with five or six rings in the main backbone, and their properties were also evaluated.

  13. Kinetic, thermodynamic and X-ray structural insights into the interaction of melatonin and analogues with quinone reductase 2

    PubMed Central

    CALAMINI, Barbara; SANTARSIERO, Bernard D.; BOUTIN, Jean A.; MESECAR, Andrew D.

    2011-01-01

    Melatonin exerts its biological effects through at least two transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors, MT1 and MT2, and a lower-affinity cytosolic binding site, designated MT3. MT3 has recently been identified as QR2 (quinone reductase 2) (EC 1.10.99.2) which is of significance since it links the antioxidant effects of melatonin to a mechanism of action. Initially, QR2 was believed to function analogously to QR1 in protecting cells from highly reactive quinones. However, recent studies indicate that QR2 may actually transform certain quinone substrates into more highly reactive compounds capable of causing cellular damage. Therefore it is hypothesized that inhibition of QR2 in certain cases may lead to protection of cells against these highly reactive species. Since melatonin is known to inhibit QR2 activity, but its binding site and mode of inhibition are not known, we determined the mechanism of inhibition of QR2 by melatonin and a series of melatonin and 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) analogues, and we determined the X-ray structures of melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin in complex with QR2 to between 1.5 and 1.8 Å (1 Å =0.1 nm) resolution. Finally, the thermodynamic binding constants for melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin were determined by ITC (isothermal titration calorimetry). The kinetic results indicate that melatonin is a competitive inhibitor against N-methyldihydronicotinamide (Ki = 7.2 μM) and uncompetitive against menadione (Ki = 92 μM), and the X-ray structures shows that melatonin binds in multiple orientations within the active sites of the QR2 dimer as opposed to an allosteric site. These results provide new insights into the binding mechanisms of melatonin and analogues to QR2. PMID:18254726

  14. Kinetic, thermodynamic and X-ray structural insights into the interaction of melatonin and analogues with quinone reductase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Calamini, Barbara; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Boutin, Jean A.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2008-09-12

    Melatonin exerts its biological effects through at least two transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors, MT1 and MT2, and a lower-affinity cytosolic binding site, designated MT3. MT3 has recently been identified as QR2 (quinone reductase 2) (EC 1.10.99.2) which is of significance since it links the antioxidant effects of melatonin to a mechanism of action. Initially, QR2 was believed to function analogously to QR1 in protecting cells from highly reactive quinones. However, recent studies indicate that QR2 may actually transform certain quinone substrates into more highly reactive compounds capable of causing cellular damage. Therefore it is hypothesized that inhibition of QR2 in certain cases may lead to protection of cells against these highly reactive species. Since melatonin is known to inhibit QR2 activity, but its binding site and mode of inhibition are not known, we determined the mechanism of inhibition of QR2 by melatonin and a series of melatonin and 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) analogues, and we determined the X-ray structures of melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin in complex with QR2 to between 1.5 and 1.8 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm) resolution. Finally, the thermodynamic binding constants for melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin were determined by ITC (isothermal titration calorimetry). The kinetic results indicate that melatonin is a competitive inhibitor against N-methyldihydronicotinamide (K{sub i} = 7.2 {mu}M) and uncompetitive against menadione (K{sub i} = 92 {mu}M), and the X-ray structures shows that melatonin binds in multiple orientations within the active sites of the QR2 dimer as opposed to an allosteric site. These results provide new insights into the binding mechanisms of melatonin and analogues to QR2.

  15. The structure of Aquifex aeolicus sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase, a basis to understand sulfide detoxification and respiration

    PubMed Central

    Marcia, Marco; Ermler, Ulrich; Peng, Guohong; Michel, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    Sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) is a flavoprotein with homologues in all domains of life except plants. It plays a physiological role both in sulfide detoxification and in energy transduction. We isolated the protein from native membranes of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus, and we determined its X-ray structure in the “as-purified,” substrate-bound, and inhibitor-bound forms at resolutions of 2.3, 2.0, and 2.9 Å, respectively. The structure is composed of 2 Rossmann domains and 1 attachment domain, with an overall monomeric architecture typical of disulfide oxidoreductase flavoproteins. A. aeolicus SQR is a surprisingly trimeric, periplasmic integral monotopic membrane protein that inserts about 12 Å into the lipidic bilayer through an amphipathic helix–turn–helix tripodal motif. The quinone is located in a channel that extends from the si side of the FAD to the membrane. The quinone ring is sandwiched between the conserved amino acids Phe-385 and Ile-346, and it is possibly protonated upon reduction via Glu-318 and/or neighboring water molecules. Sulfide polymerization occurs on the re side of FAD, where the invariant Cys-156 and Cys-347 appear to be covalently bound to polysulfur fragments. The structure suggests that FAD is covalently linked to the polypeptide in an unusual way, via a disulfide bridge between the 8-methyl group and Cys-124. The applicability of this disulfide bridge for transferring electrons from sulfide to FAD, 2 mechanisms for sulfide polymerization and channeling of the substrate, S2−, and of the product, Sn, in and out of the active site are discussed. PMID:19487671

  16. All Three Endogenous Quinone Species of Escherichia coli Are Involved in Controlling the Activity of the Aerobic/Anaerobic Response Regulator ArcA.

    PubMed

    van Beilen, Johan W A; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2016-01-01

    The enteron Escherichia coli is equipped with a branched electron transfer chain that mediates chemiosmotic electron transfer, that drives ATP synthesis. The components of this electron transfer chain couple the oxidation of available electron donors from cellular metabolism (e.g., NADH, succinate, lactate, formate, etc.) to the reduction of electron acceptors like oxygen, nitrate, fumarate, di-methyl-sulfoxide, etc. Three different quinones, i.e., ubiquinone, demethyl-menaquinone and menaquinone, couple the transfer of electrons between the dehydrogenases and reductases/oxidases that constitute this electron transfer chain, whereas, the two-component regulation system ArcB/A regulates gene expression, to allow the organism to adapt itself to the ambient conditions of available electron donors and acceptors. Here, we report that E. coli can grow and adjust well to transitions in the availability of oxygen, with any of the three quinones as its single quinone. In all three 'single-quinone' E. coli strains transitions in the activity of ArcB are observed, as evidenced by changes in the level of phosphorylation of the response regulator ArcA, upon depletion/readmission of oxygen. These results lead us to conclude that all quinol species of E. coli can reduce (i.e., activate) the sensor ArcB and all three quinones oxidize (i.e., de-activate) it. These results also confirm our earlier conclusion that demethyl-menaquinone can function in aerobic respiration.

  17. All Three Endogenous Quinone Species of Escherichia coli Are Involved in Controlling the Activity of the Aerobic/Anaerobic Response Regulator ArcA.

    PubMed

    van Beilen, Johan W A; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2016-01-01

    The enteron Escherichia coli is equipped with a branched electron transfer chain that mediates chemiosmotic electron transfer, that drives ATP synthesis. The components of this electron transfer chain couple the oxidation of available electron donors from cellular metabolism (e.g., NADH, succinate, lactate, formate, etc.) to the reduction of electron acceptors like oxygen, nitrate, fumarate, di-methyl-sulfoxide, etc. Three different quinones, i.e., ubiquinone, demethyl-menaquinone and menaquinone, couple the transfer of electrons between the dehydrogenases and reductases/oxidases that constitute this electron transfer chain, whereas, the two-component regulation system ArcB/A regulates gene expression, to allow the organism to adapt itself to the ambient conditions of available electron donors and acceptors. Here, we report that E. coli can grow and adjust well to transitions in the availability of oxygen, with any of the three quinones as its single quinone. In all three 'single-quinone' E. coli strains transitions in the activity of ArcB are observed, as evidenced by changes in the level of phosphorylation of the response regulator ArcA, upon depletion/readmission of oxygen. These results lead us to conclude that all quinol species of E. coli can reduce (i.e., activate) the sensor ArcB and all three quinones oxidize (i.e., de-activate) it. These results also confirm our earlier conclusion that demethyl-menaquinone can function in aerobic respiration. PMID:27656164

  18. Distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Osaka Bay, Japan.

    PubMed

    Miki, Shizuho; Uno, Seiichi; Ito, Kazuki; Koyama, Jiro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    2014-08-30

    Contaminations in sediments by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkylated PAHs were investigated at 44 sites in Osaka Bay, Japan. Concentrations of total PAHs and alkylated PAHs were in the range 6.40-7800 ng/g dry weights and 13.7-1700 ng/g dry weights, respectively. The PAH concentrations tended to be higher along the shoreline in the vicinities of big ports, industrialized areas, and densely populated regions such as the cities of Osaka and Kobe. The major sources appeared to be pyrogenic or both pyrogenic and petrogenic at most of the sites. PAH concentrations were remarkably high at a site near Kobe, where the concentrations of dibenzo(a,h)anthracene and benzo(g,h,i)perylene exceeded the effects-range-medium concentration and eight PAHs were above the corresponding effects-range-low concentrations. Those PAHs may have been derived from the great fire associated with the large earthquake in 1995.

  19. Boronic Acid-Catalyzed, Highly Enantioselective Aza-Michael Additions of Hydroxamic Acid to Quinone Imine Ketals.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takuya; Gálvez, Alberto Osuna; Maruoka, Keiji

    2015-12-30

    Boronic acid is one of the most versatile organic molecules in chemistry. Its uses include organic reactions, molecular recognition, assembly, and even medicine. While boronic acid catalysis, which utilizes an inherent catalytic property, has become an important research objective, it still lags far behind other boronic acid chemistries. Here, we report our discovery of a new boronic acid catalysis that enables the aza-Michael addition of hydroxamic acid to quinone imine ketals. By using 3-borono-BINOL as a chiral boronic acid catalyst, this reaction could be implemented in a highly enantioselective manner, paving the way to densely functionalized cyclohexanes.

  20. Time-resolved electrochromism associated with the formation of quinone anions in the rhodobacter sphaeroides R26 reaction center

    SciTech Connect

    Tiede, D.M.; Vazquez, J.; Cordova, J.; Marone, P.A.

    1996-08-20

    The bacterial photosynthetic reaction center contains bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) and bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) and bacteriopheophytin (Bph) cofactors that provide natural probes of electrostatic fields within this protein. We have examined the electrochromic responses of these cofactors, resolved during the lifetimes of the quinone anion states, P{sup +}Q{sub A}{sup -Q}{sub B} and P{sup +}Q{sub A}Q{sub B}{sup -}, and measured as a function of temperature. These measurements provide information on the time-dependent variation in electrostatic field strength on the Bchl and Bph cofactors. Measurements in the near-infrared absorbance bands are described. 60 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Biosynthesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone. 1. Identification of biosynthetic precursors using /sup 13/C labeling and NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, D.R.; Hanners, J.L.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1988-09-28

    The biosynthesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) in the methylotropic bacterium methylobacterium AM1 has been investigated using /sup 13/C-labelling of the products and NMR spectroscopy. The data indicated that the quinoline portion of PQQ is formed by a novel condensation of N-1, C-2, -3, and -4 of glutamate with a symmetrical six-carbon ring derived from the shikimate pathway. It is postulated that tyrosine is the shikimate-derived percursor, since pyrrole could be formed by the internal cyclization of the amino acid backbone. 18 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  2. [3 + 2]-Annulations of N-alkyl-3-substituted indoles with quinone monoketals catalysed by Brønsted acids.

    PubMed

    Chai, Zhuo; Chen, Jia-Nan; Liu, Zhen; Li, Xue-Fei; Yang, Pei-Jun; Hu, Ji-Ping; Yang, Gaosheng

    2016-01-21

    An organocatalytic dearomative [3 + 2]-annulation of N-alkyl-3-alkylindoles with quinone monoketals is developed. The reaction provides a mild and straightforward way to various benzofuro[2,3-b]indolines of potential biological and pharmaceutical interest in moderate to good yields. Moreover, when 3-phenylindole, a problematic substrate in previous relevant studies, was used as the substrate under the otherwise same reaction conditions, a novel 1,2-shift of the phenyl group occurred followed by aromatization to provide 2,3-diaryl indoles useful for cancer therapy studies in moderate yields.

  3. Computation of the Redox and Protonation Properties of Quinones: Towards the Prediction of Redox Cycling Natural Products.

    SciTech Connect

    Cape, Jonathan L.; Bowman, Michael K.; Kramer, David M.

    2006-08-01

    Quinone metabolites perform a variety of key functions in plants, including pathogen protection, oxidative phosphorylation, and redox signaling. Many of these structurally diverse compounds have been shown to exhibit potent antimicrobial, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory properties, although the exact mechanisms of action are far from understood. Redox cycling has been proposed as a possible mechanism of action for many quinine species. Experimental determination of the essential thermodynamic data (i.e. electrochemical and pKa values) required to predict the propensity towards redox cycling is often difficult or impossible to obtain due to the experimental limitations. We demonstrate a practical computational approach to obtain reasonable estimates of these parameters.

  4. Sphingobium barthaii sp. nov., a high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium isolated from cattle pasture soil.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Allyn H; Kunihiro, Marie; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Nogi, Yuichi; Kanaly, Robert A

    2015-09-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, yellow, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain KK22(T), was isolated from a microbial consortium that grew on diesel fuel originally recovered from cattle pasture soil. Strain KK22(T) has been studied for its ability to biotransform high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogeny, strain KK22(T) was affiliated with the genus Sphingobium in the phylum Proteobacteria and was most closely related to Sphingobium fuliginis TKP(T) (99.8%) and less closely related to Sphingobium quisquiliarum P25(T) (97.5%). Results of DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) revealed relatedness values between strain KK22(T) and strain TKP(T) and between strain KK22(T) and strain P25(T) of 21 ± 4% (reciprocal hybridization, 27 ± 2%) and 15 ± 2% (reciprocal hybridization, 17 ± 1%), respectively. Chemotaxonomic analyses of strain KK22(T) showed that the major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone Q-10, that the polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidyl-N-methylethylethanolamine and sphingoglycolipid, and that C18 : 1ω7c and C14 : 0 2-OH were the main fatty acid and hydroxylated fatty acids, respectively. This strain was unable to reduce nitrate and the genomic DNA G+C content was 64.7 mol%. Based upon the results of the DDH analyses, the fact that strain KK22(T) was motile, and its biochemical and physiological characteristics, strain KK22(T) could be separated from recognized species of the genus Sphingobium. We conclude that strain KK22(T) represents a novel species of this genus for which the name Sphingobium barthaii sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is KK22(T) ( = DSM 29313(T) = JCM 30309(T)). PMID:26012583

  5. Marinobacter nanhaiticus sp. nov., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium isolated from the sediment of the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Cui, Zhisong; Li, Qian; Xu, Guangsu; Jia, Xingjun; Zheng, Li

    2013-03-01

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, slightly halophilic and facultatively anaerobic bacterium, designated strain D15-8W(T), was isolated from the sediment of the South China Sea. Growth was found to occur optimally at 25 °C, between pH 7.0 and 8.0 and with 1-5 % (w/v) NaCl. The strain was observed to utilize a variety of organic substrates and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as sole carbon sources. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was determined to be 58.7 %. The predominant respiratory quinone was found to be Q-9. The significant fatty acids were determined to be C(16:0), C(16:1) ω9c, C(18:1) ω9c, C(12:0) and C(14:0) 3OH. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain D15-8W(T) fits within the phylogenetic cluster of the genus Marinobacter and is most closely related to Marinobacter segnicrescens CGMCC 1.6489(T), Marinobacter bryozoorum DSM 15401(T), Marinobacter lacisalsi CECT 7297(T) and Marinobacter daqiaonensis CGMCC1.9167(T). The DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain D15-8W(T) and the type strains of the most closely related species were 42.3 % (CGMCC 1.6489(T)), 39.8 % (DSM 15401(T)), 37.3 % (CECT 7297(T)) and 35.2 % (CGMCC1.9167(T)). The results of this polyphasic study indicate that strain D15-8W(T) represents a novel species of the genus Marinobacter, for which the name Marinobacter nanhaiticus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is D15-8W(T) (=CGMCC 1.11019(T)=KCTC 23749(T)).

  6. Allicin attenuates H₂O₂-induced cytotoxicity in retinal pigmented epithelial cells by regulating the levels of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tu, Gerile; Zhang, Yu-Feng; Wei, Wei; Li, Langen; Zhang, Yanmei; Yang, Jia; Xing, Yiqiao

    2016-03-01

    Retinal pigmented epithelial cell (RPE) oxidative stress is known to have a vital role in the etiology of age‑related macular degeneration (AMD). The present study aimed to investigate whether allicin, a natural product with antioxidant activity, was able to protect RPEs (ARPE‑19) from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)‑induced damage, and to determine the underlying mechanisms. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5‑diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay was used to determine cellular viability, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected using a ROS Assay kit. The results demonstrated that allicin was able to protect ARPE‑19 cells from H2O2‑induced damage in a dose‑dependent manner. In addition, allicin attenuated oxidative stress by reducing the levels of intracellular ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA), and enhancing the glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) ratio. With regards to the underlying mechanism, allicin was able to markedly modulate the expression levels of ROS‑associated enzymes, including superoxide dismutase, NADPH oxidase 4 and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1, and elevate the activity of nuclear factor erythroid 2‑related factor 2 in the H2O2‑stimulated ARPE‑19 cells. These results suggested that allicin may exert protective effects against H2O2‑induced cytotoxicity in RPEs via ROS regulation. PMID:26781848

  7. Photoinduced changes in photosystem II pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Atanaska S.; Busheva, Mira C.; Stoitchkova, Katerina V.; Tzonova, Iren K.

    2010-11-01

    The photosynthetic apparatus in higher plants performs two seemingly opposing tasks: efficient harvest of sunlight, but also rapid and harmless dissipation of excess light energy as heat to avoid deleterious photodamage. In order to study this process in pigment-protein supercomplexes of photosystem II (PSII), 77 K fluorescence and room temperature resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy were applied to investigate the changes in structure and spectral properties of the pigments in spinach PSII membranes. The high-light treatment results in a strong quenching of the fluorescence (being largest when the excitation is absorbed by carotenoids) and a red-shift of the main maximum. Decomposition of the fluorescence spectra into four bands revealed intensive quenching of F685 and F695 bands, possible bleaching of chlorophyll a, enhanced extent of light harvesting complexes (LHCII) aggregation and increased energy transfer to aggregated LHCII. The analysis of RR spectra revealed the predominant contribution of ß-carotene (ß-Car) upon 457.8 and 488 nm excitations and lutein (Lut) at 514.5 nm. During prolonged exposure to strong light no significant bleaching of ß-Car and weak photobleaching of Lut is observed. The results will contribute to the efforts to produce more efficient and robust solar cells when exposed to fluctuations in light intensity.

  8. Dispelling myths concerning pigmented skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Piccolo, V; Russo, T; Giacomel, J; Lallas, A; Alfano, R; Argenziano, G

    2016-06-01

    The history of medicine is replete with examples of debunked myths, and in daily clinical dermatological practice, we must still counter many misconceptions regarding pigmented lesions, both with patients and other medical practitioners. Debunking myths and attempting to explain the reasons for these erroneous beliefs are the purposes of this review. The literature review has been partially guided by the results obtained from an online questionnaire conducted on an Italian website (www.vediamocichiara.it) from February 15, 2015 to March 15, 2015. The remaining discussed were selected on the basis of the existing literature and our personal experience. In order to explore these misconceptions, the following are the seven most salient questions that require investigation: (i) Is it dangerous to excise moles?; (ii) Is it dangerous to traumatize moles?; (iii) Are plantar moles worrisome?; (iv) Is it necessary to selectively apply sunscreen to moles?; (v) Is it inadvisable to partially biopsy a melanoma?; (vi) Do moles turn into melanoma?; and (vii) Is it necessary to perform sentinel lymph node biopsy for thin melanomas and for atypical Spitz naevi? Myths are ubiquitous, being prevalent in dermatological practice, with many of them concerning pigmented skin lesions. By encouraging critical analysis by patients and medical practitioners, the birth and perpetuation of myths can potentially be minimized, for the ultimate benefit of patients. This requires a scientific approach to be rigorously applied to dermatology, with critical questioning of unsubstantiated hypotheses including those emanating from the mass media as well as from respected sources. PMID:26840917

  9. Chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments of prochloron (prochlorophyta)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paerl, H. W.; Lewin, R. A.; Cheng, L.

    1983-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a gradient-elution technique was utilized to separate and quantify chlorophylls a and b as well as major carotenoid pigments present in freeze-dried preprations of prochloron-didemnid associations and in Prochloron cells separated from host colonies. Results confirm earlier spectrophotometric evidence for both chlorophylls a and b in this prokaryote. Chlorophyll a:b ratios range from 4.14 to 19.71; generally good agreement was found between ratios determined in isolated cell preprations and in symbiotic colonies (in hospite). These values are 1.5 to 5-fold higher than ratios determined in a variety of eukaryotic green plants. The carotenoids in Prochloron are quantitatively and qualitatively similar to those found in various freshwater and marine blue-green algae (cyanopbytes) from high-light environments. However, Prochloron differs from cyanophytes by the absence of myxoxanthophyll and related glycosidic carotenoids. It pigment characteristics are considered sufficiently different from those of cyanophytes to justify its assignment to a separate algal division.

  10. Fruit flesh betacyanin pigments in hylocereus cacti.

    PubMed

    Wybraniec, Sławomir; Mizrahi, Yosef

    2002-10-01

    Determination of profiles and total contents of betacyanins in cactus fruits of Hylocereus species using chromatographic and spectrophotometric method is described. The investigated species were H. polyrhizus, H. purpusii, H. costaricensis, H. sp. 487 (all red-flesh species and hybrids made among them), and the white- or red-flesh species H. undatus. Hybrids included hybrid 1 (H. undatus white-flesh clone and H. sp. 487), hybrid 35 (H. sp. 487 and H. polyrhizus), and the reciprocal hybrid hybrid 95 (H. polyrhizus and H. sp. 487). Fruits of H. polyrhizus exhibited the highest relative concentration (expressed as percentage of the total HPLC peak area) of hylocerenin, a recently discovered pigment, and a high relative concentration of phyllocactin. Hylocerenin and isohylocerenin, present in fruits at relative concentrations of 11.7 and 5.8%, respectively, are probably responsible for the fluorescent color of the fruit pulp. H. costaricensis fruits have a much higher content of phyllocactin (63.9%), which is almost 4 times higher than the betanin content. These differences in pigment concentrations might explain the differences in red hues of the flesh of these fruits. PMID:12358484

  11. Construction of artificial pigment-protein antennae

    SciTech Connect

    Sibbald, J.

    1997-01-10

    Photosynthesis is a complex process which results in the conversion of solar radiation into chemical energy. This chemical energy is then used as the free energy source for all living organisms. In its basic form, photosynthesis can be described as the light-activated synthesis of carbohydrates from the simple molecules of water and carbon dioxide: 6H{sub 2}O + 6 CO{sub 2} light C{sub 6}H{sub 12}O{sub 6} + 6 O{sub 2} This basic mechanism actually requires numerous reaction steps. The two primary steps being: the capture of light by pigment molecules in light-harvesting antenna complexes and the transfer of this captured energy to the so-called photochemical reaction center. While the preferred pathway for energy absorbed by the chromophores in the antenna complexes is transfer to the reaction center, energy can be lost to competing processes such as internal conversion or radiative decay. Therefore, the energy transfer must be rapid, typically on the order of picoseconds, to successfully compete. The focus of the present work is on the construction of light-harvesting antenna complexes incorporating modular pigment-proteins.

  12. Fruit flesh betacyanin pigments in hylocereus cacti.

    PubMed

    Wybraniec, Sławomir; Mizrahi, Yosef

    2002-10-01

    Determination of profiles and total contents of betacyanins in cactus fruits of Hylocereus species using chromatographic and spectrophotometric method is described. The investigated species were H. polyrhizus, H. purpusii, H. costaricensis, H. sp. 487 (all red-flesh species and hybrids made among them), and the white- or red-flesh species H. undatus. Hybrids included hybrid 1 (H. undatus white-flesh clone and H. sp. 487), hybrid 35 (H. sp. 487 and H. polyrhizus), and the reciprocal hybrid hybrid 95 (H. polyrhizus and H. sp. 487). Fruits of H. polyrhizus exhibited the highest relative concentration (expressed as percentage of the total HPLC peak area) of hylocerenin, a recently discovered pigment, and a high relative concentration of phyllocactin. Hylocerenin and isohylocerenin, present in fruits at relative concentrations of 11.7 and 5.8%, respectively, are probably responsible for the fluorescent color of the fruit pulp. H. costaricensis fruits have a much higher content of phyllocactin (63.9%), which is almost 4 times higher than the betanin content. These differences in pigment concentrations might explain the differences in red hues of the flesh of these fruits.

  13. Exogenous Methyl Jasmonate Treatment Increases Glucosinolate Biosynthesis and Quinone Reductase Activity in Kale Leaf Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Kang-Mo; Jeffery, Elizabeth H.; Juvik, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) spray treatments were applied to the kale varieties ‘Dwarf Blue Curled Vates’ and ‘Red Winter’ in replicated field plantings in 2010 and 2011 to investigate alteration of glucosinolate (GS) composition in harvested leaf tissue. Aqueous solutions of 250 µM MeJA were sprayed to saturation on aerial plant tissues four days prior to harvest at commercial maturity. The MeJA treatment significantly increased gluconasturtiin (56%), glucobrassicin (98%), and neoglucobrassicin (150%) concentrations in the apical leaf tissue of these genotypes over two seasons. Induction of quinone reductase (QR) activity, a biomarker for anti-carcinogenesis, was significantly increased by the extracts from the leaf tissue of these two cultivars. Extracts of apical leaf tissues had greater MeJA mediated increases in phenolics, glucosinolate concentrations, GS hydrolysis products, and QR activity than extracts from basal leaf tissue samples. The concentration of the hydrolysis product of glucoraphanin, sulforphane was significantly increased in apical leaf tissue of the cultivar ‘Red Winter’ in both 2010 and 2011. There was interaction between exogenous MeJA treatment and environmental conditions to induce endogenous JA. Correlation analysis revealed that indole-3-carbanol (I3C) generated from the hydrolysis of glucobrassicin significantly correlated with QR activity (r = 0.800, P<0.001). Concentrations required to double the specific QR activity (CD values) of I3C was calculated at 230 µM, which is considerably weaker at induction than other isothiocyanates like sulforphane. To confirm relationships between GS hydrolysis products and QR activity, a range of concentrations of MeJA sprays were applied to kale leaf tissues of both cultivars in 2011. Correlation analysis of these results indicated that sulforaphane, NI3C, neoascorbigen, I3C, and diindolylmethane were all significantly correlated with QR activity. Thus, increased QR activity may be due to

  14. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Far-infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersma, C.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Ricca, A.; Mattioda, A. L.; Peeters, E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2011-03-01

    The far-IR characteristics of astrophysically relevant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) averaging in size around 100 carbon atoms have been studied using the theoretical spectra in the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. These spectra were calculated using density functional theory. Selections of PAH species are made, grouped together by common characteristics or trends, such as size, shape, charge, and composition, and their far-IR spectra compared. The out-of-plane modes involving the entire molecule are explored in detail, astronomical relevance is assessed, and an observing strategy is discussed. It is shown that PAHs produce richer far-IR spectra with increasing size. PAHs also produce richer far-IR spectra with increasing number of irregularities. However, series of irregular-shaped PAHs with the same compact core have common "Jumping-Jack" modes that "pile up" at specific frequencies in their average spectrum. For the PAHs studied here, around 100 carbon atoms in size, this band falls near 50 μm. PAH charge and nitrogen inclusion affect band intensities but have little effect on far-IR band positions. Detailed analysis of the two-dimensional, out-of-plane bending "drumhead" modes in the coronene and pyrene "families" and the one-dimensional, out-of-plane bending "bar" modes in the acene "family" show that these molecular vibrations can be treated as classical vibrating sheets and bars of graphene, respectively. The analysis also shows that the peak position of these modes is very sensitive to the area of the emitting PAH and does not depend on the particular geometry. Thus, these longest wavelength PAH bands could provide a unique handle on the size of the largest species in the interstellar PAH family. However, these bands are weak. Observing highly excited regions showing the mid-IR bands in which the emission from classical dust peaks at short wavelengths offers the best chance of detecting PAH emission in the far-IR. For these regions

  15. New sterically-hindered o-quinones annelated with metal-dithiolates: regiospecificity in oxidative addition reactions of a bifacial ligand to the Pd and Pt complexes.

    PubMed

    Martyanov, K A; Cherkasov, V K; Abakumov, G A; Samsonov, M A; Khrizanforova, V V; Budnikova, Y H; Kuropatov, V A

    2016-04-25

    An unusual reactivity of sterically hindered o-quinones with an annelated dithiete ring towards coordination at a dithiolene site has been discovered. New Pd and Pt dithiolate complexes have been synthesized. The reaction proceeds regioselectively, and the quinone site of the parent ligand is not affected even while using an excess of the metal complex. Both Pt and Pd complexes display a square planar surrounding for the metal ion and have very similar NMR, IR and UV/Vis spectra. Surprisingly, being coordinated at the dithiolene site to the metal, the ligand exhibits activity like an o-quinone, it could be reduced with different metals resulting in the corresponding o-semiquinonates which were confirmed by EPR spectroscopy. It was shown that an unpaired electron exhibits HFC with the phosphorus nuclei of phosphine ligands coordinated to the metal ions at the dithiolene site of the molecule.

  16. SKIN AS A LIVING COLORING BOOK: HOW EPITHELIAL CELLS CREATE PATTERNS OF PIGMENTATION

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Lorin; Fu, Wenyu; Chirico, William J.; Brissette, Janice L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The pigmentation of mammalian skin and hair develops through the interaction of two basic cell types — pigment donors and recipients. The pigment donors are melanocytes, which produce and distribute melanin through specialized structures. The pigment recipients are epithelial cells, which acquire melanin and put it to use, collectively yielding the pigmentation visible to the eye. This review will focus on the pigment recipients, the historically less understood cell type. These end-users of pigment are now known to exert a specialized control over the patterning of pigmentation, as they identify themselves as melanocyte targets, recruit pigment donors, and stimulate the transfer of melanin. As such, this review will discuss the evidence that the skin is like a coloring book: the pigment recipients create a “picture,” a blueprint for pigmentation, which is colorless initially but outlines where pigment should be placed. Melanocytes then melanize the recipients and “color in” the picture. PMID:25104547

  17. Skin as a living coloring book: how epithelial cells create patterns of pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Lorin; Fu, Wenyu; Chirico, William J; Brissette, Janice L

    2014-11-01

    The pigmentation of mammalian skin and hair develops through the interaction of two basic cell types - pigment donors and recipients. The pigment donors are melanocytes, which produce and distribute melanin through specialized structures. The pigment recipients are epithelial cells, which acquire melanin and put it to use, collectively yielding the pigmentation visible to the eye. This review will focus on the pigment recipients, the historically less understood cell type. These end-users of pigment are now known to exert a specialized control over the patterning of pigmentation, as they identify themselves as melanocyte targets, recruit pigment donors, and stimulate the transfer of melanin. As such, this review will discuss the evidence that the skin is like a coloring book: the pigment recipients create a 'picture,' a blueprint for pigmentation, which is colorless initially but outlines where pigment should be placed. Melanocytes then melanize the recipients and 'color in' the picture.

  18. Hemozoin Pigment: An Important Tool for Low Parasitemic Malarial Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Sarita; Ghosh, Arnab; Singh, Ruchi; Singh, Dhirendra Pratap; Sharma, Bhawna; Samantaray, Jyotish Chandra; Deb, Manorama; Gaind, Rajni

    2016-01-01

    Low parasitemic condition in malaria remains a diagnostic challenge; as the available diagnostic methods failed to detect. Currently, hemozoin (Hz) pigment is gaining attention in the diagnosis of malaria. The major drawback is ease of detection of Hz in routine practice. A pilot study was conducted to evaluate the role of Hz pigment and to compare the performance of quantitative buffy coat assay (QBC) and PCR in such conditions. Clinically suspected cases of malaria were examined by both Giemsa stain and immunochromatographic test (ICT). Samples positive by ICT and negative by Giemsa stain were further examined by nested PCR targeting 18S rRNA and QBC for the presence of malaria parasites and pigments. Thirty blood samples fulfilled the inclusion criteria out of which 23 were Plasmodium vivax (Pv), 4 Plasmodium falciparum (Pf), and 3 mixed (Pv and Pf) by immunochromatographic test. Twenty-one out of 30 (70%) were positive by nested PCR in comparison to 25/30 (83%) by QBC. Samples containing both malaria parasites and Hz pigment by QBC completely showed concordance with the PCR result. However, 61% of total samples containing only Hz pigment were observed positive by PCR. Hz pigment remains an important tool for malaria diagnosis. Identification of leukocytes containing pigments by QBC not only indicates recent malarial infections but also puts light on severity of the disease. QBC assay is a rapid, highly sensitive, and cost-effective method to detect malaria parasites and Hz pigment especially in low parasitemic conditions. PMID:27658589

  19. Stabilized pigment and method for producing the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Stanley Roy (Inventor); Freund, Thomas (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A chemical species, present in two oxidation states which differ from one another by one equivalent, is added to pigment materials to serve as a recombination center for alternately capturing electrons and holes produced by the pigment materials when they are subjected to ultraviolet light exposure.

  20. Passivation of pigment particles for thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sancier, K. M.; Morrison, S. R.; Farley, E. P.

    1975-01-01

    The preparation of a matrix of 48 samples consisting of pigments and pigmented paints is described. The results obtained from testing these samples by electron spin resonance and by in situ spectral reflectance measurements in space simulation tests are presented. Conclusions and recommendations for further research are given.