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Sample records for polymer bound catalysts

  1. Synthesis and application of new polymer bound catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Fetterly, Brandon Michael

    2005-01-01

    Nitric acid has been shown to be a weak acid in acetonitrile. It is conceivable that a nitrate salt of a weakly Lewis acidic cation could furnish a ''naked'' nitrate anion as a basic catalyst in a variety of reactions in non-aqueous solvents. Such a nitrate salt could also be bound to a polymeric support via the cation, thereby allowing for reclamation and recycling of the nitrate ion. This subject is dealt with in Chapter 2, wherein my contributions consisted of performing all the reactions with the polymer supported catalyst and carrying out the experiments necessary to shed light on the reaction mechanisms. Chapter 3 contains a description of the structure and catalytic properties of an azidoproazaphosphatrane. This compound is an air-stable versatile catalyst that has proven useful not only homogeneously, but also when bound to a solid support. The synthesis of a polymer bound proazaphosphatrane containing a trivalent phosphorus is presented in Chapter 4. Such a compound has been sought after by our group for a number of years. Not only does the synthesis I have accomplished for it allow for easier separation of proazaphosphatrane catalysts from reaction mixtures, but recycling of the base is made much simpler. Proazaphosphatranes are useful homogeneous catalysts that activate atoms in other reagents, thus enhancing their reactivity. The next chapters deal with two such reactions with aldehydes and ketones, namely silylcyanations with trialkylsilylcyanides (Chapters 5 and 6) and reductions with poly(methylhydrosiloxane), in Chapter 7. In Chapter 5, Zhigang Wang performed the initial optimization and scoping of the reaction, while repetitions of the scoping experiments for reproducibility, determination of diastereomeric ratios, and experiments aimed at elucidating aspects of the mechanism were performed by me. The proazaphosphatrane coordinates to the silicon atom in both cases, thereby allowing the aforementioned reactions to proceed under much milder

  2. Reactivity of Metal Ions Bound to Water-Soluble Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, N.N.; Watkins, J.G.; Lin, M.; Birnbaum, E.R.; Robison, T.W.; Smith, B.F.; Gohdes, J.W.; McDonald, J.G.

    1999-06-29

    The intent of this work is to determine the effectiveness of catalysts covalently bound to polymers and to understand the consequences of supporting the catalysts on catalyst efficiency and selectivity. Rhodium phosphine complexes with functional groups for coupling to polymers were prepared. These catalyst precursors were characterized using standard techniques including IR, NMR, and elemental analysis. Studies on the modified catalysts showed that they were still active hydrogenation catalysts. However, tethering of the catalysts to polyamines gave systems with low hydrogenation activity. Analogous biphasic systems were also explored. Phosphine ligands with a surfactant-like structure have been synthesized and used to prepare catalytically active complexes of palladium. The palladium complexes were utilized in Heck-type coupling reactions (e.g. coupling of iodobenzene and ethyl acrylate to produce ethyl cinnamate) under vigorously stirred biphasic reaction conditions, and were found to offer superior performance over a standard water-soluble palladium catalyst under analogous conditions.

  3. Catalysts from synthetic genetic polymers

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alexander I.; Pinheiro, Vitor B.; Smola, Matthew J.; Morgunov, Alexey S.; Peak-Chew, Sew; Cozens, Christopher; Weeks, Kevin M.; Herdewijn, Piet; Holliger, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of catalysis in early genetic polymers like RNA is considered a key transition in the origin of life1, predating the appearance of protein enzymes. DNA also demonstrates the capacity to fold into three-dimensional structures and form catalysts in vitro2. However, to what degree these natural biopolymers comprise functionally privileged chemical scaffolds3 for folding or the evolution of catalysis is not known. The ability of synthetic genetic polymers (XNAs) with alternative backbone chemistries not found in nature to fold into defined structures and bind ligands4 raises the possibility that these too might be capable of forming catalysts (XNAzymes). Here we report the discovery of such XNAzymes, elaborated in four different chemistries (ANA (arabino nucleic acids)5, FANA (2′-fluoroarabino nucleic acids)6, HNA (hexitol nucleic acids) and CeNA (cyclohexene nucleic acids)7 directly from random XNA oligomer pools, exhibiting in trans RNA endonuclease and ligase activities. We also describe an XNA-XNA ligase metalloenzyme in the FANA framework, establishing catalysis in an entirely synthetic system and enabling the synthesis of FANA oligomers and an active RNA endonuclease FANAzyme from its constituent parts. These results extend catalysis beyond biopolymers and establish technologies for the discovery of catalysts in a wide range of polymer scaffolds not found in nature8. Evolution of catalysis independent of any natural polymer has implications for the definition of chemical boundary conditions for the emergence of life on earth and elsewhere in the universe9. PMID:25470036

  4. Catalysts from synthetic genetic polymers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alexander I; Pinheiro, Vitor B; Smola, Matthew J; Morgunov, Alexey S; Peak-Chew, Sew; Cozens, Christopher; Weeks, Kevin M; Herdewijn, Piet; Holliger, Philipp

    2015-02-19

    The emergence of catalysis in early genetic polymers such as RNA is considered a key transition in the origin of life, pre-dating the appearance of protein enzymes. DNA also demonstrates the capacity to fold into three-dimensional structures and form catalysts in vitro. However, to what degree these natural biopolymers comprise functionally privileged chemical scaffolds for folding or the evolution of catalysis is not known. The ability of synthetic genetic polymers (XNAs) with alternative backbone chemistries not found in nature to fold into defined structures and bind ligands raises the possibility that these too might be capable of forming catalysts (XNAzymes). Here we report the discovery of such XNAzymes, elaborated in four different chemistries (arabino nucleic acids, ANA; 2'-fluoroarabino nucleic acids, FANA; hexitol nucleic acids, HNA; and cyclohexene nucleic acids, CeNA) directly from random XNA oligomer pools, exhibiting in trans RNA endonuclease and ligase activities. We also describe an XNA-XNA ligase metalloenzyme in the FANA framework, establishing catalysis in an entirely synthetic system and enabling the synthesis of FANA oligomers and an active RNA endonuclease FANAzyme from its constituent parts. These results extend catalysis beyond biopolymers and establish technologies for the discovery of catalysts in a wide range of polymer scaffolds not found in nature. Evolution of catalysis independent of any natural polymer has implications for the definition of chemical boundary conditions for the emergence of life on Earth and elsewhere in the Universe.

  5. Bound zeolite catalyst and process for using the catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, J.L.; Poeppelmeier, K.R.; Funk, W.G.; Steger, J.J.; Fung, S.C.; Cross, V.R.

    1987-03-10

    A process is described for reforming naphtha. The process comprises (a) contacting the naphtha in the presence of hydrogen at elevated temperatures with a catalyst comprising a binder, a type L zeolite containing exchangeable cations of which at least 75% are selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, calcium and barium, at least one Group VIII noble metal, the particles of which are well dispersed over the surface of the catalyst and at least 90% of the noble metal associated with the zeolite is in the form of particles having a diameter of less than about 7 A; and (b) recovering reformed product.

  6. Method of making metal-polymer composite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Zelena, Piotr [Los Alamos, NM; Bashyam, Rajesh [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-06-23

    A metal-polymer-carbon composite catalyst for use as a cathode electrocatalyst in fuel cells. The catalyst includes a heteroatomic polymer; a transition metal linked to the heteroatomic polymer by one of nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus, and a recast ionomer dispersed throughout the heteroatomic polymer-carbon composite. The method includes forming a heteroatomic polymer-carbon composite and loading the transition metal onto the composite. The invention also provides a method of making a membrane electrode assembly for a fuel cell that includes the metal-polymer-carbon composite catalyst.

  7. Catalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Subban, Chinmayee; Zhou, Qin; Leonard, Brian; Ranjan, Chinmoy; Edvenson, Heather M; Disalvo, F J; Munie, Semeret; Hunting, Janet

    2010-07-28

    A major challenge in obtaining long-term durability in fuel cells is to discover catalyst supports that do not corrode, or corrode much more slowly than the current carbon blacks used in today's polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Such materials must be sufficiently stable at low pH (acidic conditions) and high potential, in contact with the polymer membrane and under exposure to hydrogen gas and oxygen at temperatures up to perhaps 120 degrees C. Here, we report the initial discovery of a promising class of doped oxide materials for this purpose: Ti(1-x)M(x)O(2), where M=a variety of transition metals. Specifically, we show that Ti(0.7)W(0.3)O(2) is electrochemically inert over the appropriate potential range. Although the process is not yet optimized, when Pt nanoparticles are deposited on this oxide, electrochemical experiments show that hydrogen is oxidized and oxygen reduced at rates comparable to those seen using a commercial Pt on carbon black support.

  8. Chalcogen catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Zelenay, Piotr; Choi, Jong-Ho; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas; Wieckowski, Andrzej; Cao, Dianxue

    2010-08-24

    A methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst and a membrane electrode assembly for fuel cells that includes such a cathode catalyst. The cathode catalyst includes a support having at least one transition metal in elemental form and a chalcogen disposed on the support. Methods of making the cathode catalyst and membrane electrode assembly are also described.

  9. Chalcogen catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Alonso-Vante, Nicolas [Buxerolles, FR; Zelenay, Piotr [Los Alamos, NM; Choi, Jong-Ho [Los Alamos, NM; Wieckowski, Andrzej [Champaign, IL; Cao, Dianxue [Urbana, IL

    2009-09-15

    A methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst and a membrane electrode assembly for fuel cells that includes such a cathode catalyst. The cathode catalyst includes a support having at least one transition metal in elemental form and a chalcogen disposed on the support. Methods of making the cathode catalyst and membrane electrode assembly are also described.

  10. Organic-inorganic hybrid polymer-encapsulated magnetic nanobead catalysts.

    PubMed

    Arai, Takayoshi; Sato, Toru; Kanoh, Hirofumi; Kaneko, Katsumi; Oguma, Koichi; Yanagisawa, Akira

    2008-01-01

    A new strategy for the encapsulation of magnetic nanobeads was developed by using the in situ self-assembly of an organic-inorganic hybrid polymer. The hybrid polymer of {[Cu(bpy)(BF(4))(2)(H(2)O)(2)](bpy)}(n) (bpy=4,4'-bipyridine) was constructed on the surface of amino-functionalized magnetic beads and the resulting hybrid-polymer-encapsulated beads were utilized as catalysts for the oxidation of silyl enolates to provide the corresponding alpha-hydroxy carbonyl compounds in high yield. After the completion of the reaction, the catalyst was readily recovered by magnetic separation and the recovered catalyst could be reused several times. Because the current method did not require complicated procedures for incorporating the catalyst onto the magnetic beads, the preparation and the application of various other types of organic-inorganic hybrid-polymer-coated magnetic beads could be possible.

  11. Polymer-Supported Raney Nickel Catalysts for Sustainable Reduction Reactions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haibin; Lu, Shuliang; Zhang, Xiaohong; Dai, Wei; Qiao, Jinliang

    2016-06-25

    Green is the future of chemistry. Catalysts with high selectivity are the key to green chemistry. Polymer-supported Raney catalysts have been found to have outstanding performance in the clean preparation of some chemicals. For example, a polyamide 6-supported Raney nickel catalyst provided a 100.0% conversion of n-butyraldehyde without producing any detectable n-butyl ether, the main byproduct in industry, and eliminated the two main byproducts (isopropyl ether and methyl-iso-butylcarbinol) in the hydrogenation of acetone to isopropanol. Meanwhile, a model for how the polymer support brought about the elimination of byproducts is proposed and confirmed. In this account the preparation and applications of polymer-supported Raney catalysts along with the corresponding models will be reviewed.

  12. Poly(fluoroalkyl acrylate)-bound ruthenium carbene complex: a fluorous and recyclable catalyst for ring-closing olefin metathesis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei; Zhang, Yiliang

    2004-01-14

    The synthesis of a fluorous olefin metathesis catalyst derived from the Grubbs second-generation ruthenium carbene complex is described. The air stable fluorous polymer-bound ruthenium carbene complex 1 shows high reactivity in effecting the ring-closing metathesis of a broad spectrum of diene and enyne substrates leading to the formation of di-, tri-, and tetrasubstituted cyclic olefins in minimally fluorous solvent systems (PhCF3/CH2Cl2, 1:9-1:49 v/v). The catalyst can be readily separated from the reaction mixture by fluorous extraction with FC-72 and repeatedly reused. The practical advantage offered by the fluorous catalyst is demonstrated by its sequential use in up to five different metathesis reactions.

  13. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li+Cl–), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li+Cl– catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA. PMID:24748912

  14. Graphitic Carbon Nitride Supported Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Mansor, Noramalina; Jorge, A Belen; Corà, Furio; Gibbs, Christopher; Jervis, Rhodri; McMillan, Paul F; Wang, Xiaochen; Brett, Daniel J L

    2014-04-03

    Graphitic carbon nitrides are investigated for developing highly durable Pt electrocatalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Three different graphitic carbon nitride materials were synthesized with the aim to address the effect of crystallinity, porosity, and composition on the catalyst support properties: polymeric carbon nitride (gCNM), poly(triazine) imide carbon nitride (PTI/Li(+)Cl(-)), and boron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (B-gCNM). Following accelerated corrosion testing, all graphitic carbon nitride materials are found to be more electrochemically stable compared to conventional carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) with B-gCNM support showing the best stability. For the supported catalysts, Pt/PTI-Li(+)Cl(-) catalyst exhibits better durability with only 19% electrochemical surface area (ECSA) loss versus 36% for Pt/Vulcan after 2000 scans. Superior methanol oxidation activity is observed for all graphitic carbon nitride supported Pt catalysts on the basis of the catalyst ECSA.

  15. Metal Containing Polymers as Fuel Cell Catalysts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-30

    AvjilLib:I:W. C, s IAvoi! ~ or Dist Spo.:11 TRLE OF CONTENTS Introduction 1 Results 3 Electrocatalyst Synthesis and Characterization 3 Rationale 3...collector may be effected by a number of mechanisms. � 3 ELECTRODECATALYST SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION Rational e The synthetic objectives of the...orometnyl polystyrene to yield a diketone contain- ing polymer. These 1 i:ter two polymers 3re particularly interesting in t, - tney pose in alternative to

  16. Fast Collisional Lipid Transfer Among Polymer-Bounded Nanodiscs.

    PubMed

    Cuevas Arenas, Rodrigo; Danielczak, Bartholomäus; Martel, Anne; Porcar, Lionel; Breyton, Cécile; Ebel, Christine; Keller, Sandro

    2017-04-05

    Some styrene/maleic acid (SMA) copolymers solubilise membrane lipids and proteins to form polymer-bounded nanodiscs termed SMA/lipid particles (SMALPs). Although SMALPs preserve a lipid-bilayer core, they appear to be more dynamic than other membrane mimics. We used time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer and small-angle neutron scattering to determine the kinetics and the mechanisms of phospholipid transfer among SMALPs. In contrast with vesicles or protein-bounded nanodiscs, SMALPs exchange lipids not only by monomer diffusion but also by fast collisional transfer. Under typical experimental conditions, lipid exchange occurs within seconds in the case of SMALPs but takes minutes to days in the other bilayer particles. The diffusional and second-order collisional exchange rate constants for SMALPs at 30 °C are kdif = 0.287 s(-1) and kcol = 222 M(-1)s(-1), respectively. Together with the fast kinetics, the observed invariability of the rate constants with probe hydrophobicity and the moderate activation enthalpy of ~70 kJ mol(-1) imply that lipids exchange through a "hydrocarbon continuum" enabled by the flexible nature of the SMA belt surrounding the lipid-bilayer core. Owing to their fast lipid-exchange kinetics, SMALPs represent highly dynamic equilibrium rather than kinetically trapped membrane mimics, which has important implications for studying protein/lipid interactions in polymer-bounded nanodiscs.

  17. Fast Collisional Lipid Transfer Among Polymer-Bounded Nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas Arenas, Rodrigo; Danielczak, Bartholomäus; Martel, Anne; Porcar, Lionel; Breyton, Cécile; Ebel, Christine; Keller, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    Some styrene/maleic acid (SMA) copolymers solubilise membrane lipids and proteins to form polymer-bounded nanodiscs termed SMA/lipid particles (SMALPs). Although SMALPs preserve a lipid-bilayer core, they appear to be more dynamic than other membrane mimics. We used time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer and small-angle neutron scattering to determine the kinetics and the mechanisms of phospholipid transfer among SMALPs. In contrast with vesicles or protein-bounded nanodiscs, SMALPs exchange lipids not only by monomer diffusion but also by fast collisional transfer. Under typical experimental conditions, lipid exchange occurs within seconds in the case of SMALPs but takes minutes to days in the other bilayer particles. The diffusional and second-order collisional exchange rate constants for SMALPs at 30 °C are kdif = 0.287 s−1 and kcol = 222 M−1s−1, respectively. Together with the fast kinetics, the observed invariability of the rate constants with probe hydrophobicity and the moderate activation enthalpy of ~70 kJ mol−1 imply that lipids exchange through a “hydrocarbon continuum” enabled by the flexible nature of the SMA belt surrounding the lipid-bilayer core. Owing to their fast lipid-exchange kinetics, SMALPs represent highly dynamic equilibrium rather than kinetically trapped membrane mimics, which has important implications for studying protein/lipid interactions in polymer-bounded nanodiscs. PMID:28378790

  18. Fast Collisional Lipid Transfer Among Polymer-Bounded Nanodiscs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuevas Arenas, Rodrigo; Danielczak, Bartholomäus; Martel, Anne; Porcar, Lionel; Breyton, Cécile; Ebel, Christine; Keller, Sandro

    2017-04-01

    Some styrene/maleic acid (SMA) copolymers solubilise membrane lipids and proteins to form polymer-bounded nanodiscs termed SMA/lipid particles (SMALPs). Although SMALPs preserve a lipid-bilayer core, they appear to be more dynamic than other membrane mimics. We used time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer and small-angle neutron scattering to determine the kinetics and the mechanisms of phospholipid transfer among SMALPs. In contrast with vesicles or protein-bounded nanodiscs, SMALPs exchange lipids not only by monomer diffusion but also by fast collisional transfer. Under typical experimental conditions, lipid exchange occurs within seconds in the case of SMALPs but takes minutes to days in the other bilayer particles. The diffusional and second-order collisional exchange rate constants for SMALPs at 30 °C are kdif = 0.287 s-1 and kcol = 222 M-1s-1, respectively. Together with the fast kinetics, the observed invariability of the rate constants with probe hydrophobicity and the moderate activation enthalpy of ~70 kJ mol-1 imply that lipids exchange through a “hydrocarbon continuum” enabled by the flexible nature of the SMA belt surrounding the lipid-bilayer core. Owing to their fast lipid-exchange kinetics, SMALPs represent highly dynamic equilibrium rather than kinetically trapped membrane mimics, which has important implications for studying protein/lipid interactions in polymer-bounded nanodiscs.

  19. Polyethylene-bound rhodium(I) hydrogenation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bergbreiter, D.E.; Chandran, R.

    1987-01-07

    Homogeneous, recoverable hydrogenation catalysts were prepared with use of functionalized ethylene oligomers as ligands. Phosphine groups were introduced onto ethylene oligomers following anionic oligomerization of ethylene. The product polyethylenediphenylphosphine ligands were then exchanged with triphenylphosphine or ethylene ligands to prepare ethylene oligomer ligated rhodium(I) complexes. These Rh(I) complexes had the solubility of polyethylene and dissolved at 90-110/sup 0/C in hydrocarbon solvents but quantitatively precipitated at 25/sup 0/C. Less than 0.1% of the charged rhodium was lost in each dissolution precipitation cycle. The rhodium(I) complexes so prepared were shown to have about 80% of the activity of tris(triphenylphosphine)rhodium chloride in hydrogenation of various alkenes including 1-octene, ..delta../sup 2/-cholestene, cyclooctene, cyclododecene, styrene, and ..cap alpha..-methylstyrene. /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy and reactivity studies were used to characterize these catalysts.

  20. Synthesis and electrocatalytic water oxidation by electrode-bound helical peptide chromophore-catalyst assemblies.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Derek M; Coggins, Michael K; Concepcion, Javier J; Ashford, Dennis L; Fang, Zhen; Alibabaei, Leila; Ma, Da; Meyer, Thomas J; Waters, Marcey L

    2014-08-04

    Artificial photosynthesis based on dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells requires the assembly of a chromophore and catalyst in close proximity on the surface of a transparent, high band gap oxide semiconductor for integrated light absorption and catalysis. While there are a number of approaches to assemble mixtures of chromophores and catalysts on a surface for use in artificial photosynthesis based on dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells, the synthesis of discrete surface-bound chromophore-catalyst conjugates is a challenging task with few examples to date. Herein, a versatile synthetic approach and electrochemical characterization of a series of oligoproline-based light-harvesting chromophore-water-oxidation catalyst assemblies is described. This approach combines solid-phase peptide synthesis for systematic variation of the backbone, copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) as an orthogonal approach to install the chromophore, and assembly of the water-oxidation catalyst in the final step. Importantly, the catalyst was found to be incompatible with the conditions both for amide bond formation and for the CuAAC reaction. The modular nature of the synthesis with late-stage assembly of the catalyst allows for systematic variation in the spatial arrangement of light-harvesting chromophore and water-oxidation catalyst and the role of intrastrand distance on chromophore-catalyst assembly properties. Controlled potential electrolysis experiments verified that the surface-bound assemblies function as water-oxidation electrocatalysts, and electrochemical kinetics data demonstrate that the assemblies exhibit greater than 10-fold rate enhancements compared to the homogeneous catalyst alone.

  1. Effects of a "bound" substrate layer on the dynamics of supported polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wengang; Douglas, Jack F.; Starr, Francis W.

    2017-07-01

    It is widely appreciated that an attractive polymer-substrate interaction can slow relaxation in thin supported polymer films and polymer nanocomposites. Recent measurements and simulations on nancomposites have indicated that this slowing of polymer dynamics occurs more strongly near a highly attractive particle surface where a "bound" layer having a much lower mobility can form, strongly influencing the thermodynamics and dynamics of the film. Here we use molecular simulations to show that a bound interfacial layer having a very similar nature arises in thin supported polymer films when the polymer-polymer attraction is stronger than the polymer-polymer interaction strength. This bound polymer layer effectively insulates the remainder of the film from the strong interfacial interactions, and the resulting thermodynamically determined Tg is relatively insensitive to the polymer-substrate interaction strength when it exceeds that of the polymer-polymer interactions. The presence of this layer gives rise to an additional relaxation process in the self-intermediate scattering function that is not observed in the bulk material and leads to a slowing down of the average relaxation time of the film as a whole. On the other hand, the average relaxation time of the film outside the bound layer does not grow in proportion to the strength of the substrate attraction due to the weak coupling of the substrate relaxation to the relaxation in the interior of the film. At large substrate attraction, the bound layer effectively "cloaks" the substrate, reducing the effect of the polymer-surface interaction on Tg.

  2. Influence of the bound polymer layer on nanoparticle diffusion in polymer melts

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Philip J.; Bocharova, Vera; Middleton, L. Robert; Composto, Russell J.; Clarke, Nigel; Schweizer, Kenneth S.; Winey, Karen I.

    2016-09-23

    We measure the center-of-mass diffusion of silica nanoparticles (NPs) in entangled poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP) melts using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. While these NPs are well within the size regime where enhanced, nonhydrodynamic NP transport is theoretically predicted and has been observed experimentally (2RNP/dtube ≈ 3, where 2RNP is the NP diameter and dtube is the tube diameter), we find that the diffusion of these NPs in P2VP is in fact well-described by the hydrodynamic Stokes–Einstein relation. The effective NP diameter 2Reff is significantly larger than 2RNP and strongly dependent on P2VP molecular weight, consistent with the presence of a bound polymer layer on the NP surface with thickness heff ≈ 1.1Rg. Our results show that the bound polymer layer significantly augments the NP hydrodynamic size in polymer melts with attractive polymer–NP interactions and effectively transitions the mechanism of NP diffusion from the nonhydrodynamic to hydrodynamic regime, particularly at high molecular weights where NP transport is expected to be notably enhanced. Lastly, these results provide the first experimental demonstration that hydrodynamic NP transport in polymer melts requires particles of size ≳5dtube, consistent with recent theoretical predictions.

  3. Influence of the bound polymer layer on nanoparticle diffusion in polymer melts

    DOE PAGES

    Griffin, Philip J.; Bocharova, Vera; Middleton, L. Robert; ...

    2016-09-23

    We measure the center-of-mass diffusion of silica nanoparticles (NPs) in entangled poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP) melts using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. While these NPs are well within the size regime where enhanced, nonhydrodynamic NP transport is theoretically predicted and has been observed experimentally (2RNP/dtube ≈ 3, where 2RNP is the NP diameter and dtube is the tube diameter), we find that the diffusion of these NPs in P2VP is in fact well-described by the hydrodynamic Stokes–Einstein relation. The effective NP diameter 2Reff is significantly larger than 2RNP and strongly dependent on P2VP molecular weight, consistent with the presence of a bound polymer layermore » on the NP surface with thickness heff ≈ 1.1Rg. Our results show that the bound polymer layer significantly augments the NP hydrodynamic size in polymer melts with attractive polymer–NP interactions and effectively transitions the mechanism of NP diffusion from the nonhydrodynamic to hydrodynamic regime, particularly at high molecular weights where NP transport is expected to be notably enhanced. Lastly, these results provide the first experimental demonstration that hydrodynamic NP transport in polymer melts requires particles of size ≳5dtube, consistent with recent theoretical predictions.« less

  4. Influence of the bound polymer layer on nanoparticle diffusion in polymer melts

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Philip J.; Bocharova, Vera; Middleton, L. Robert; Composto, Russell J.; Clarke, Nigel; Schweizer, Kenneth S.; Winey, Karen I.

    2016-09-23

    We measure the center-of-mass diffusion of silica nanoparticles (NPs) in entangled poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP) melts using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. While these NPs are well within the size regime where enhanced, nonhydrodynamic NP transport is theoretically predicted and has been observed experimentally (2RNP/dtube ≈ 3, where 2RNP is the NP diameter and dtube is the tube diameter), we find that the diffusion of these NPs in P2VP is in fact well-described by the hydrodynamic Stokes–Einstein relation. The effective NP diameter 2Reff is significantly larger than 2RNP and strongly dependent on P2VP molecular weight, consistent with the presence of a bound polymer layer on the NP surface with thickness heff ≈ 1.1Rg. Our results show that the bound polymer layer significantly augments the NP hydrodynamic size in polymer melts with attractive polymer–NP interactions and effectively transitions the mechanism of NP diffusion from the nonhydrodynamic to hydrodynamic regime, particularly at high molecular weights where NP transport is expected to be notably enhanced. Lastly, these results provide the first experimental demonstration that hydrodynamic NP transport in polymer melts requires particles of size ≳5dtube, consistent with recent theoretical predictions.

  5. Hydrogenation of furfural on polymer-containing catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Karakhanov, E.A.; Neimerovets, E.B.; Pshezhetskii, V.S.; Dedov, A.G.

    1986-09-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of furfural with molecular hydrogen has been investigated under mild conditions in the presence of metal complex catalysts with a polymeric macroligand. It has been shown that the reaction proceeds according to a consecutive scheme with the formation of furfuryl and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohols. The kinetics of furfural hydrogenation has been investigated and the order of the reaction established; the rate constants of the first and second stages have been determined. The influence of the solvent and of the metal-to-polymer ratio on the furfural conversion have been investigated.

  6. Efficient Pt catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, J.; Gaubert, G.; Tilquin, J.Y.

    1996-12-31

    Commercialization of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) requires an important decrease in their production cost. Cost reduction for the electrodes principally concerns the decrease in the amount of Pt catalyst necessary for the functioning of the PEFC without affecting cell performance. The first PEFCs used in the Gemini Space Program had a loading of 4-10 mg pt/cm{sup 2}. The cost of the electrodes was drastically reduced when pure colloidal Pt was replaced by Pt supported on carbon (Pt/C) with a Pt content of 0.4 Mg/cm{sup 2}. Since the occurrence of that breakthrough, many studies have been aimed at further lowering the Pt loading. Today, the lowest loadings reported for oxygen reduction are of the order of 0.05 mg pt/cm{sup 2}. The carbon support of commercial catalysts is Vulcan XC-72 from Cabot, a carbon black with a specific area of 254 m{sup 2}/g. Graphites with specific areas ranging from 20 to 305 m{sup 2}/g are now available from Lonza. The first aim of the present study was to determine the catalytic properties for 02 reduction of Pt supported on these high specific area graphites. The second aim was to use Pt inclusion synthesis on these high area graphites, and to measure the catalytic performances of these materials. Lastly, this same Pt-inclusion synthesis was extended even for use with Vulcan and Black Pearls as substrates (two carbon blacks from Cabot). All these catalysts have been labelled Pt-included materials to distinguish them from the Pt-supported ones. It will be shown that the reduced Pt content Pt-included materials obtained with high specific area substrates a are excellent catalysts for oxygen reduction, especially at high currents. Therefore, Pt inclusion synthesis appears to be a new method to decrease the cathodic Pt loading.

  7. Mathematical modelling of the catalyst layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, A. A.; Kim, Gwang-Soo; Promislow, K.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we derive a mathematical model for the cathode catalyst layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell. The model explicitly incorporates the restriction placed on oxygen in reaching the reaction sites, capturing the experimentally observed fall in the current density to a limiting value at low cell voltages. Temperature variations and interfacial transfer of O2 between the dissolved and gas phases are also included. Bounds on the solutions are derived from which we provide a rigourous proof that the model admits a solution. Of particular interest are the maximum and minimum attainable values. We perform an asymptotic analysis in several limits inherent in the problem by identifying important groupings of parameters. This analysis reveals a number of key relationships between the solutions, including the current density, and the composition of the layer. A comparison of numerically computed solutions and asymptotic solutions shows very good agreement. Implications of the results are discussed and future work is outlined.

  8. Immobilization of Carbonylcobalt Catalyst by Poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) through N→Co Coordination Bonds: The Promotional Effect of Pyridine and the Reusability of Polymer Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Bing; Wang, Yi-Ning; Lu, Hai-Meng; Liang, Shuang; Xu, Bo-Lian; Fan, Yi-Ning

    2016-11-22

    A carbonylcobalt catalyst, immobilized by poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) through N→Co coordination bonds, has been prepared by solvothermal method. It has been revealed that the pyridine fragments in the polymer catalyst act not only as promoters to improve the catalytic performance of the carbonylcobalt catalyst for alkoxycarbonylation of ethylene oxide to methyl 3-hydroxypropanoate but also as stabilizers to enhance the reusability of the polymer catalyst. Furthermore, the polymer catalyst could be easily separated by filtration and reused with only a slight loss of catalytic efficiency. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Redox electrodeposition polymers: adaptation of the redox potential of polymer-bound Os complexes for bioanalytical applications.

    PubMed

    Guschin, Dmitrii A; Castillo, John; Dimcheva, Nina; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2010-10-01

    The design of polymers carrying suitable ligands for coordinating Os complexes in ligand exchange reactions against labile chloro ligands is a strategy for the synthesis of redox polymers with bound Os centers which exhibit a wide variation in their redox potential. This strategy is applied to polymers with an additional variation of the properties of the polymer backbone with respect to pH-dependent solubility, monomer composition, hydrophilicity etc. A library of Os-complex-modified electrodeposition polymers was synthesized and initially tested with respect to their electron-transfer ability in combination with enzymes such as glucose oxidase, cellobiose dehydrogenase, and PQQ-dependent glucose dehydrogenase entrapped during the pH-induced deposition process. The different polymer-bound Os complexes in a library containing 50 different redox polymers allowed the statistical evaluation of the impact of an individual ligand to the overall redox potential of an Os complex. Using a simple linear regression algorithm prediction of the redox potential of Os complexes becomes feasible. Thus, a redox polymer can now be designed to optimally interact in electron-transfer reactions with a selected enzyme.

  10. Interplay of electron hopping and bounded diffusion during charge transport in redox polymer electrodes.

    PubMed

    Akhoury, Abhinav; Bromberg, Lev; Hatton, T Alan

    2013-01-10

    Redox polymer electrodes (RPEs) have been prepared both by attachment of random copolymers of hydroxybutyl methacrylate and vinylferrocene (poly(HBMA-co-VF)) to carbon substrates by grafting either "to" or "from" the substrate surfaces, and by impregnation of porous carbon substrates with redox polymer gels of similar composition. An observed linear dependence of peak current on the square root of the applied voltage scan rate in cyclic voltammetry (CV) led to the conclusion that the rate controlling step in the redox process was the diffusive transfer of electrons through the redox polymer layer. The variation in the peak current with increasing concentration of the redox species in the polymer indicated that the electron transport transitioned from bounded diffusion to electron hopping. A modified form of the Blauch-Saveant equation for apparent diffusivity of electrons through a polymer film indicated that bounded diffusion was the dominant mechanism of electron transport in RPEs with un-cross-linked polymer chains at low concentrations of the redox species, but, as the concentration of the redox species increased, electron hopping became more dominant, and was the primary mode of electron diffusion above a certain concentration level of redox species. In the cross-linked polymer gels, bounded diffusion was limited because of the restricted mobility of the polymer chains. Electron hopping was the primary mode of electron diffusion in such systems at all concentrations of the redox species.

  11. Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Electrolyzers Utilizing Non-precious Mo-based Hydrogen Evolution Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jia Wei Desmond; Hellstern, Thomas R; Kibsgaard, Jakob; Hinckley, Allison C; Benck, Jesse D; Jaramillo, Thomas F

    2015-10-26

    The development of low-cost hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts that can be readily integrated into electrolyzers is critical if H2 from renewable electricity-powered electrolysis is to compete cost effectively with steam reforming. Herein, we report three distinct earth-abundant Mo-based catalysts, namely those based on MoSx , [Mo3 S13 ](2-) nanoclusters, and sulfur-doped Mo phosphide (MoP|S), loaded onto carbon supports. The catalysts were synthesized through facile impregnation-sulfidization routes specifically designed for catalyst-device compatibility. Fundamental electrochemical studies demonstrate the excellent HER activity and stability of the Mo-sulfide based catalysts in an acidic environment, and the resulting polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) electrolyzers that integrate these catalysts exhibit high efficiency and durability. This work is an important step towards the goal of replacing Pt with earth-abundant catalysts for the HER in commercial PEM electrolyzers.

  12. Photoinduced charge separation by polymer-bound chromophores

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, M.A.J.

    1991-09-01

    This project has examined the photodynamic behavior of water-soluble polymers that have covalently linked hydrophobic chromophores spaced along the chains. These polymeric systems have been examined for photoinduced charge separation with electron-accepting ions having different total charge. Focus has been on the excited singlet (S{sub 1}) state formed by laser flash absorption. The effects of pH and ionic strength -- factors that govern the conformational nature of the polymer in solution -- have been studied. A second major effort has been to study photoinduced redox processes involving excited states of water-soluble variants of anthracene and acridine. 27 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Hyperbranched polymers with a degree of branching of 100% prepared by catalyst transfer Suzuki-Miyaura polycondensation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weiguo; Su, Linjie; Bo, Zhishan

    2009-08-05

    Hyperbranched polymers with a degree of branching of 100% were prepared by catalyst transfer Suzuki-Miyaura polymerization of AB(2) monomers carrying one boronic acid and two aromatic bromo functional groups; in contrast, Suzuki-Miyaura polymerization of the same AB(2) monomers using a traditional catalyst afforded hyperbranched polymers with a branching degree of only approximately 56%. This is a nice example of controlling the topology of hyperbranched polymers via the catalyst.

  14. Preparation of carbon alloy catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells from nitrogen-containing rigid-rod polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chokai, Masayuki; Taniguchi, Masataka; Moriya, Shogo; Matsubayashi, Katsuyuki; Shinoda, Tsuyoshi; Nabae, Yuta; Kuroki, Shigeki; Hayakawa, Teruaki; Kakimoto, Masa-aki; Ozaki, Jun-ichi; Miyata, Seizo

    'Carbon Alloy Catalysts' (CAC), non-precious metal catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), were prepared from various kinds of nitrogen-containing rigid-rod aromatic polymers, polyimides, polyamides and azoles, by carbonization at 900 °C under nitrogen flow. The catalytic activity for ORR was evaluated by the onset potential, which was taken at a current density of -2 μA cm -2. Carbonized polymers having high nitrogen content showed higher onset potential. In particular, CACs derived from azole (Az5) had an onset potential of 0.8 V, despite being was prepared without any metals.

  15. Titanium compounds as catalysts of higher alpha-olefin-based super-high-molecular polymers synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, K. B.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Manzhay, V. N.; Vetrova, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of polymers of 10 million or more molecular weight is a difficult task even in a chemical lab. Higher α-olefin-based polymer agents of such kind have found a narrow but quite important niche, the reduction of drag in the turbulent flow of hydrocarbon fluids such as oil and oil-products. In its turn, searching for a catalytic system capable to produce molecules of such a high length and to synthesize polymers of a low molecular-mass distribution is part of a global task of obtaining a high-quality product. In this paper we had observed a number of industrial catalysts with respect to their suitability for higher poly-α- olefins synthesis. A number samples representing copolymers of 1-hexene with 1-decene obtained on a previous generation catalyst, a microsphere titanium chloride catalytic agent had been compared to samples synthesized using a titanium-magnesium catalyst both in solution and in a polymer medium.

  16. Biomembrane Sensitivity to Structural Changes in Bound Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Yaroslavov, Alexander A.; Sitnikova, Tatiana A.; Rakhnyanskaya, Anna A.; Yaroslavova, Ekaterina G.; Davydov, Dmitry A.; Burova, Tatiana V.; Grinberg, Valery Ya.; Shi, Lei; Menger, Fredric M.

    2009-01-01

    Anionic liposomes containing a 4:1 molar ratio of neutral to anionic phospholipids were treated with an excess of five zwitterionic polymers differing only in the spacer-length separating their cationic and anionic moieties. Although the polymers do not disrupt the structural integrity of the liposomes, they can induce spacer-dependent molecular rearrangements within the liposomes. Thus, the following were observed: spacer-length = 1, no binding to the liposomes; spacer-length = 2, adsorption to the liposomes, but no molecular rearrangement; spacer-length = 3, lateral lipid segregation but little or no flip-flop; spacer-length = 4 or 5, lateral lipid segregation and flip-flop. These diverse behaviors are relevant to the use of biomedical formulations where polyelectrolytes play a role. PMID:19152326

  17. Method of making chalcogen catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jong-Ho; Zelenay, Piotr; Wieckowski, Andrzej; Cao, Dianxue

    2010-12-14

    A method of making an electrode catalyst material using aqueous solutions. The electrode catalyst material includes a support comprising at least one transition metal and at least one chalcogen disposed on a surface of the transition metal. The method includes reducing a metal powder, mixing the metal powder with an aqueous solution containing at least one inorganic compound of the chalcogen to form a mixture, and providing a reducing agent to the mixture to form nanoparticles of the electrode catalyst. The electrode catalyst may be used in a membrane electrode assembly for a fuel cell.

  18. Development and application of FI catalysts for olefin polymerization: unique catalysis and distinctive polymer formation.

    PubMed

    Makio, Haruyuki; Fujita, Terunori

    2009-10-20

    Catalysts contribute to the efficient production of chemicals and materials in almost all processes in the chemical industry. The polyolefin industry is one prominent example of the importance of catalysts. The discovery of Ziegler-Natta catalysts in the 1950s resulted in the production of high-density polyethylenes (PEs) and isotactic polypropylenes (iPPs). Since then, further catalyst development has led to the production of a new series of polyolefins, including linear low-density PEs, amorphous ethylene/1-butene copolymers, ethylene/propylene/diene elastomers, and syndiotactic PPs (sPPs). Polyolefins are now the most important and the most produced synthetic polymers. This Account describes a family of next-generation olefin polymerization catalysts (FI catalysts) that are currently being used in the commercial production of value-added olefin-based materials. An FI catalyst is a heteroatom-coordinated early transition metal complex that combines a pair of nonsymmetric phenoxy-imine [O(-), N] chelating ligands with a group 4 transition metal. The catalytically active species derived from FI catalysts is highly electrophilic and can assume up to five isomeric structures based on the coordination of the phenoxy-imine ligand. In addition, the accessibility of the ligands of the FI catalysts and their amenability to modification offers an opportunity for the design of diverse catalytic structures. FI catalysts exhibit many unique chemical characteristics: precise control over chain transfers (including highly controlled living ethylene and propylene polymerizations), extremely high selectivity for ethylene, high functional group tolerance, MAO- and borate-free polymerization catalysis, significant morphology polymer formation, controlled multimodal behavior, high incorporation ability for higher alpha-olefins and norbornene, and highly syndiospecific and isospecific polymerizations of both propylene and styrene. These reactions also occur with very high catalyst

  19. Polymer-supported Bis(oxazoline)-copper complexes as catalysts in cyclopropanation reactions

    PubMed

    Burguete; Fraile; Garcia; Garcia-Verdugo; Luis; Mayoral

    2000-11-30

    Bis(oxazolines) are easily immobilized by functionalization of the central methylene bridge with polymerizable groups and subsequent polymerization. Polymers are transformed into copper catalysts active in the cyclopropanation of styrene with ethyl diazoacetate. The results are similar or even better than those obtained with the similar homogeneous systems, and the catalysts can be easily recovered and reused. The substitution in the methylene bridge leads to a slight reduction in the enantioselectivity and an unexpected cis-preference.

  20. Kinetics of synthesizing polymer-supported quaternary ammonium catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ho-Shing; Lo, Chi-Wei

    2006-01-01

    This study attempted to synthesize the optimum quaterary ammonium poly(styrene-co-methylstyrene) catalyst using the combinatorial chemistry method. The catalyst was synthesized by a mix-split method. A phase-transfer catalyst library with 25 kinds of polystyrene-supported quaternary ammonium salt catalyst was the the result of the reaction of five kinds of chloromethylated crosslinked polystyrene with five tert-amines. The allylation of phenol and the oxidation of benzyl alcohol were used as the probing reaction to screen out the most active catalyst for the reaction using the iterative deconvolution method. The screening conditions included teritary amine and organic solvent. The structure of the most active catalyst in the allylation of phenol shows 20 mol % ring substitution and 0.177-0.25-mm pellet size activated with trihexylamine. For oxidation of benzyl alcohol, the reaction conditions of the most active catalyst included a resin of 20% ring substitution and pellet size of 0.177-0.25 mm, activated with triethylamine reacting in an organic solvent of n-hexane.

  1. Steric Pressure among Membrane-Bound Polymers Opposes Lipid Phase Separation.

    PubMed

    Imam, Zachary I; Kenyon, Laura E; Carrillo, Adelita; Espinoza, Isai; Nagib, Fatema; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2016-04-19

    Lipid rafts are thought to be key organizers of membrane-protein complexes in cells. Many proteins that interact with rafts have bulky polymeric components such as intrinsically disordered protein domains and polysaccharide chains. Therefore, understanding the interaction between membrane domains and membrane-bound polymers provides insights into the roles rafts play in cells. Multiple studies have demonstrated that high concentrations of membrane-bound polymeric domains create significant lateral steric pressure at membrane surfaces. Furthermore, our recent work has shown that lateral steric pressure at membrane surfaces opposes the assembly of membrane domains. Building on these findings, here we report that membrane-bound polymers are potent suppressors of membrane phase separation, which can destabilize lipid domains with substantially greater efficiency than globular domains such as membrane-bound proteins. Specifically, we created giant vesicles with a ternary lipid composition, which separated into coexisting liquid ordered and disordered phases. Lipids with saturated tails and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains conjugated to their head groups were included at increasing molar concentrations. When these lipids were sparse on the membrane surface they partitioned to the liquid ordered phase. However, as they became more concentrated, the fraction of GUVs that were phase-separated decreased dramatically, ultimately yielding a population of homogeneous membrane vesicles. Experiments and physical modeling using compositions of increasing PEG molecular weight and lipid miscibility phase transition temperature demonstrate that longer polymers are the most efficient suppressors of membrane phase separation when the energetic barrier to lipid mixing is low. In contrast, as the miscibility transition temperature increases, longer polymers are more readily driven out of domains by the increased steric pressure. Therefore, the concentration of shorter polymers required

  2. Alkaline polymer electrolyte fuel cells completely free from noble metal catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shanfu; Pan, Jing; Huang, Aibin; Zhuang, Lin; Lu, Juntao

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades, fuel cell technology has been undergoing revolutionary developments, with fundamental progress being the replacement of electrolyte solutions with polymer electrolytes, making the device more compact in size and higher in power density. Nowadays, acidic polymer electrolytes, typically Nafion, are widely used. Despite great success, fuel cells based on acidic polyelectrolyte still depend heavily on noble metal catalysts, predominantly platinum (Pt), thus increasing the cost and hampering the widespread application of fuel cells. Here, we report a type of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) employing a hydroxide ion-conductive polymer, quaternary ammonium polysulphone, as alkaline electrolyte and nonprecious metals, chromium-decorated nickel and silver, as the catalyst for the negative and positive electrodes, respectively. In addition to the development of a high-performance alkaline polymer electrolyte particularly suitable for fuel cells, key progress has been achieved in catalyst tailoring: The surface electronic structure of nickel has been tuned to suppress selectively the surface oxidative passivation with retained activity toward hydrogen oxidation. This report of a H2–O2 PEFC completely free from noble metal catalysts in both the positive and negative electrodes represents an important advancement in the research and development of fuel cells.

  3. Pseudohomogeneous catalyst layer model for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, T. E.; Gottesfeld, S.

    We have developed a relatively simple one-dimensional model for the cathode catalyst layer. This model explains certain observed polarization curve features at higher current densities. These features include a change in linear slope, instead of a sharp limiting current feature, and a lower than expected ratio of current density measured using O2 relative to air. Diffusional paths, ionic resistance, and catalyst sites are intimately coupled in a pseudohomogeneous layer using 'effective' parameters.

  4. Fundamental studies of the properties of photoresists based on resins containing polymer-bound photoacid generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheng-Tsung; Jarnagin, Nathan D.; Wang, Mingxing; Gonsalves, Kenneth E.; Robert, Jeanette M.; Yueh, Wang; Henderson, Clifford L.

    2006-03-01

    Conventional chemically amplified photoresist formulations are complex mixtures that include a protected polymer resin and a small molecule photoacid generator (PAG). The limited compatibility of the PAG with resist resin and the mobility of the small molecule additive can lead to problems including PAG phase separation, non-uniform initial PAG and photoacid distribution, and acid migration during the post-exposure baking (PEB) processes. The incorporation of PAG units into the main chain of the polymer resin is one possible method to alleviate these problems. Recently, we have investigated methacrylate based resists which incorporate novel PAG functional groups into the polymer main chain. These materials have demonstrated good resolution performance for both 193 nm and EUV exposure for sub-100 nm patterning. However, limited information is available on the effect of binding the PAG to the polymer on PAG photoreactivity and photoacid diffusivity. In this work, the photoacid generation rate constant (commonly referred to as the Dill C parameter for the PAG) of both triflate polymer-bound PAG and blended PAG photoresists based on poly(γ-butyrolactone methacrylate -co-2-ethyl-2-adamantyl methacrylate ) resists were determined by a new technique utilizing both quantitative FTIR spectroscopy and kinetic model fitting. The results indicate that the polymer-bound PAG resist has a lower photoacid generation rate constant (C=0.0122) than the blend PAG one (C=0.2647). This large difference in Dill C parameters would indicate that the sensitivity of the polymer-bound PAG resist is substantially lower than that of the analogous blended sample which is consistent with contrast curve data for these two samples.

  5. Logic-Controlled Radical Polymerization with Heat and Light: Multiple-Stimuli Switching of Polymer Chain Growth via a Recyclable, Thermally Responsive Gel Photoredox Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mao; Deng, Shihong; Gu, Yuwei; Lin, Jun; MacLeod, Michelle J; Johnson, Jeremiah A

    2017-02-15

    Strategies for switching polymerizations between "ON" and "OFF" states offer new possibilities for materials design and fabrication. While switching of controlled radical polymerization has been achieve using light, applied voltage, allosteric effects, chemical reagents, pH, and mechanical force, it is still challenging to introduce multiple external switches using the same catalyst to achieve logic gating of controlled polymerization reactions. Herein, we report an easy-to-synthesize thermally responsive organo-/hydro-gel that features covalently bound 10-phenylphenothiazine (PTH). With this "Gel-PTH", we demonstrate switching of controlled radical polymerization reactions using temperature "LOW"/"HIGH", light "ON"/"OFF", and catalyst presence "IN"/"OUT". Various iniferters/initiators and a wide range of monomers including acrylates, methacrylates, acrylamides, vinyl esters, and vinyl amides were polymerized by RAFT/iniferter and ATRP methods using Gel-PTH and a readily available compact fluorescent light (CFL) source. In all cases, polymer molar masses increased linearly with conversion, and narrow molar mass distributions were obtained. To further highlight the utility of Gel-PTH, we achieved "AND" gating of controlled radical polymerization wherein various combinations of three stimuli were required to induce polymer chain growth. Finally, block copolymer synthesis and catalyst recycling were demonstrated. Logic-controlled polymerization with Gel-PTH offers a straightforward approach to achieve multiplexed external switching of polymer chain growth using a single catalyst without the need for addition of exogenous reagents.

  6. Carbon dioxide-soluble polymers and swellable polymers for carbon dioxide applications

    DOEpatents

    DeSimone, Joseph M.; Birnbaum, Eva; Carbonell, Ruben G.; Crette, Stephanie; McClain, James B.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Powell, Kimberly R.; Romack, Timothy J.; Tumas, William

    2004-06-08

    A method for carrying out a catalysis reaction in carbon dioxide comprising contacting a fluid mixture with a catalyst bound to a polymer, the fluid mixture comprising at least one reactant and carbon dioxide, wherein the reactant interacts with the catalyst to form a reaction product. A composition of matter comprises carbon dioxide and a polymer and a reactant present in the carbon dioxide. The polymer has bound thereto a catalyst at a plurality of chains along the length of the polymer, and wherein the reactant interacts with the catalyst to form a reaction product.

  7. A direct borohydride fuel cell with a polymer fiber membrane and non-noble metal catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaodong; Liu, Yongning; Li, Sai; Wei, Xiaozhu; Wang, Li; Chen, Yuanzhen

    2012-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) and Pt-based catalysts are two crucial components which determine the properties and price of fuel cells. Even though, PEM faces problem of fuel crossover in liquid fuel cells such as direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) and direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC), which lowers power output greatly. Here, we report a DBFC in which a polymer fiber membrane (PFM) was used, and metal oxides, such as LaNiO3 and MnO2, were used as cathode catalysts, meanwhile CoO was used as anode catalyst. Peak power density of 663 mW·cm−2 has been achieved at 65°C, which increases by a factor of 1.7–3.7 compared with classic DBFCs. This fuel cell structure can also be extended to other liquid fuel cells, such as DMFC. PMID:22880160

  8. A direct borohydride fuel cell with a polymer fiber membrane and non-noble metal catalysts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodong; Liu, Yongning; Li, Sai; Wei, Xiaozhu; Wang, Li; Chen, Yuanzhen

    2012-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) and Pt-based catalysts are two crucial components which determine the properties and price of fuel cells. Even though, PEM faces problem of fuel crossover in liquid fuel cells such as direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) and direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC), which lowers power output greatly. Here, we report a DBFC in which a polymer fiber membrane (PFM) was used, and metal oxides, such as LaNiO₃ and MnO₂, were used as cathode catalysts, meanwhile CoO was used as anode catalyst. Peak power density of 663 mW·cm⁻² has been achieved at 65°C, which increases by a factor of 1.7-3.7 compared with classic DBFCs. This fuel cell structure can also be extended to other liquid fuel cells, such as DMFC.

  9. Porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts as efficient solid catalysts for the fixation of CO2 into cyclic carbonates.

    PubMed

    Cai, Sheng; Zhu, Dongliang; Zou, Yan; Zhao, Jing

    2016-12-01

    A series of porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts were solvothermally synthesized through the free radical copolymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) and functionalized quaternary ammonium salts. The obtained polymers feature highly cross-linked matrices, large surface areas, and abundant halogen anions. These polymers were evaluated as heterogeneous catalysts for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and CO2 in the absence of co-catalysts and solvents. The results revealed that the synergistic effect between the functional hydroxyl groups and the halide anion Br(-) afforded excellent catalytic activity to cyclic carbonates. In addition, the catalyst can be easily recovered and reused for at least five cycles without significant loss in activity.

  10. Porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts as efficient solid catalysts for the fixation of CO2 into cyclic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Sheng; Zhu, Dongliang; Zou, Yan; Zhao, Jing

    2016-07-01

    A series of porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts were solvothermally synthesized through the free radical copolymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) and functionalized quaternary ammonium salts. The obtained polymers feature highly cross-linked matrices, large surface areas, and abundant halogen anions. These polymers were evaluated as heterogeneous catalysts for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and CO2 in the absence of co-catalysts and solvents. The results revealed that the synergistic effect between the functional hydroxyl groups and the halide anion Br- afforded excellent catalytic activity to cyclic carbonates. In addition, the catalyst can be easily recovered and reused for at least five cycles without significant loss in activity.

  11. ATR-IR Investigation of Solvent Interactions with Surface-Bound Polymers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Solvent interactions with bulk and surface-bound polymer brushes are crucial for functionalities such as controlled friction and thermoresponsive adhesion. To study such interactions, the temperature-induced solvent-quality changes and the effect of surface tethering on the mechanical and tribological properties of poly(dodecyl methacrylate) (P12MA) brushes have been investigated by means of attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and lateral force microscopy (LFM). These results have been compared with temperature-dependent UV–visible spectrophotometry (UV–vis) data for the corresponding bulk polymer solutions. The ATR-IR results clearly show that increasing temperature enhances ethanol uptake in P12MA, which results in film swelling. This is accompanied by a marked increase in both adhesion and friction. We have also shown that a combination of solvents, such as toluene and ethanol, can lead to a temperature-dependent solvent partitioning within the polymer brush. To our knowledge this is the first time preferential solvent uptake in a grafted-from brush has been monitored via in situ ATR-IR. Moreover, we have observed remarkably different behavior for polymer chains in solution compared to the behavior of similar chains bound to a surface. The presented findings on the temperature-dependent solvent interactions of surface-grafted P12MA reveal previously unknown solvation phenomena and open up a range of possible applications in the area of stimuli-responsive materials. PMID:27397856

  12. Polymer Chromophore-Catalyst Assembly for Solar Fuel Generation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junlin; Sherman, Benjamin D; Zhao, Yan; He, Ru; Ghiviriga, Ion; Alibabaei, Leila; Meyer, Thomas J; Leem, Gyu; Schanze, Kirk S

    2017-06-14

    A polystyrene-based chromophore-catalyst assembly (poly-2) has been synthesized and assembled at a mesoporous metal oxide photoanode. The assembly contains water oxidation catalyst centers based on [Ru(trpy) (phenq)](2+) (Ru-Cat) and [Ru(bpy)3](2+) derivatives (Ru-C) as chromophores (trpy= 2,2';6,2″- terpyridine, phenq = 2-(quinol-8'-yl)-1,10-phenanthroline and bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine). The photophysical and electrochemical properties of the polychromophore-oxidation catalyst assembly were investigated in solution and at the surface of mesoporous metal oxide films. The layer-by-layer (LbL) method was utilized to construct multilayer films with cationic poly-2 and anionic poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) for light-driven photochemical oxidations. Photocurrent measurements of (PAA/poly-2)10 LbL films on mesoporous TiO2 demonstrate light-driven oxidation of phenol and benzyl alcohol in aqueous solution. Interestingly, illumination of (PAA/poly-2)5 LbL films on a fluorine doped SnO2/TiO2 core/shell photoanode in aqueous solution gives rise to an initial photocurrent (∼18.5 μA·cm(-2)) that is in part ascribed to light driven water oxidation.

  13. A facile route for preparing a mesoporous palladium coordination polymer as a recyclable heterogeneous catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyong; Liu, Qinghua; Shen, Ming; Hu, Bingwen; Chen, Qun; Li, Hexing; Amoureux, Jean-Paul

    2012-04-21

    To overcome the separation difficulty of the palladium-based homogeneous catalyst, the palladium complex can be anchored on various supports such as silica, polymers and nanoparticles. For the same purpose, we describe a general and facile method to immobilize palladium bis(phosphine) complexes on the basis of the technique widely used for metal-organic framework (MOF) synthesis, yielding a mesoporous coordination polymer palladium-CP1. Although palladium complexes are generally not stable enough to allow further manipulation, we succeeded in preparation of a palladium coordination polymer without by-product Pd clusters or nanoparticles. The fresh palladium-CP1 catalyst exhibits a yield close to 55% for tolane at room temperature and 24 h in Sonogashira coupling of iodobenzene and phenylacetylene, as compared with a yield of 89% for its homogeneous counterpart [Pd(PPh(3))(2)Cl(2)]. Furthermore, this catalyst is stable enough to be reused more than four times with no Pd and Zn leaching. Therefore this new immobilization method offers great promise for the produce of recyclable palladium heterogeneous catalysts with higher activity and higher thermal and chemical stability in the future.

  14. Recent applications of polymer supported organometallic catalysts in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kann, Nina

    2010-09-07

    Recent developments concerning the application of polymer supported organometallic reagents in solid phase synthesis are reviewed, with a special focus on methodology for carbon-carbon formation. Examples of reactions that are covered include the classical Suzuki, Sonogashira and Heck coupings, but also aryl amination, epoxide opening, rearrangements, metathesis and cyclopropanation. Applications in the field of asymmetric synthesis are also discussed.

  15. Polymer-bound meso-chlorin e6 for PDT (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinick, Nancy L.; Sun, Ying; Joyner, D. A.; Reed, R.; Spikes, John D.; Straight, Richard C.; Kopecek, Jindrich

    1992-06-01

    Two types of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer containing meso- chlorin e6 monoethylene diamine disodium salt (Mce6) were synthesized. The Mce6 was bound via pendant enzymatically degradable oligopeptide side chains (G-F-L-G) in one copolymer and was attached through noncleavable side chains (G) in the other. Preliminary experiments have been undertaken to compare their localization/retention behavior and their tumorcidal activity in vivo (A/J mice; C1300 neuroblastoma). Results of localization/retention experiments indicated that the Mce6 bound to the noncleavable copolymer was retained in the tumor and other tissues for a prolonged time period compared with free Mce6 or the Mce6 bound to the cleavable copolymer. Light activation of the Mce6 from the cleavable copolymer rendered a substantially more potent biological response in vivo than did the permanently bound Mce6. It is hypothesized and indirectly supported by photophysical data that both of the polymer-photosensitizer complexes are aggregated (or conformationally altered) under physiological conditions due to their hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties. In buffer at pH 7.4, the quantum yield of singlet oxygen generation by free Mce6 is three-fold higher than by the Mce6 bound to a noncleavable copolymer; adding detergent (CTAB), increased the quantum yield of singlet oxygen generation to a value consistent with that of the free Mce6. In vivo, if a sufficient time lag is allowed after drug administration for tumor cell lysosomal enzymes to cleave the Mce6 from the polymer containing degradable side chains, the Mce6 would be released in free form and behave with properties akin to the free drug. Due to the difference in cellular uptake mechanisms for free and bound drugs (and the targeting potential of the copolymer), a much higher local concentration in the tumor compared with surrounding tissue can be achieved with the polymer bound drug than the free photosensitizer. Side effects

  16. Water-soluble polymer exfoliated graphene: as catalyst support and sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Xia, Baoyu; Yan, Ya; Li, Nan; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Wang, Xin

    2013-05-09

    In this paper, we obtained various water-soluble polymer functionalized graphene in dimethyl sulfoxide under ultrasonication. The atomic force microscope analysis and control experiment shows the water-soluble polymer is the crucial part to help solvent molecules separate interlayer. Such polymer/graphene exhibits high conductivity and tunable surface property, as confirmed by the selected area electron diffraction and Raman and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. As a result, a catalyst based on polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP)/graphene shows better methanol oxidation performance than that based on PVP/reduced graphene oxide. By changing to another polymer, poly(4-vinylpyridine)/graphene shows a stable and reversible response to pH, and demonstrates its potential for sensor application.

  17. Encapsulation of Homogeneous Catalysts in Porous Polymer Nanocapsules Produces Fast-Acting Selective Nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Dergunov, Sergey A; Khabiyev, Alibek T; Shmakov, Sergey N; Kim, Mariya D; Ehterami, Nasim; Weiss, Mary Clare; Birman, Vladimir B; Pinkhassik, Eugene

    2016-12-27

    Nanoreactors were created by entrapping homogeneous catalysts in hollow nanocapsules with 200 nm diameter and semipermeable nanometer-thin shells. The capsules were produced by the polymerization of hydrophobic monomers in the hydrophobic interior of the bilayers of self-assembled surfactant vesicles. Controlled nanopores in the shells of nanocapsules ensured long-term retention of the catalysts coupled with the rapid flow of substrates and products in and out of nanocapsules. The study evaluated the effect of encapsulation on the catalytic activity and stability of five different catalysts. Comparison of kinetics of five diverse reactions performed in five different solvents revealed the same reaction rates for free and encapsulated catalysts. Identical reaction kinetics confirmed that placement of catalysts in the homogeneous interior of polymer nanocapsules did not compromise catalytic efficiency. Encapsulated organometallic catalysts showed no loss of metal ions from nanocapsules suggesting stabilization of the complexes was provided by nanocapsules. Controlled permeability of the shells of nanocapsules enabled size-selective catalytic reactions.

  18. Evaluation of tungsten hexachloride as a ROMP active catalyst precursor for self-healing polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamphaus, Jason M.

    Self-healing polymers and composites have been demonstrated via a microencapsulated healing agent and catalytic trigger within the matrix material. The microcapsules are ruptured by a propagating crack and healing agent is released into the crack plane by capillary action. Contact with the catalyst initiates a chemical reaction and the resulting solid polymer bonds the crack faces together. Initial work using the microcapsule/catalytic trigger concept focused on the ring-opening-metathesis-polymerization (ROMP) of endo-dicyclopentadiene with Grubbs' catalyst. Monotonic fracture recovery in excess of 90% and extended fatigue life have been reported. A novel self-healing system based on the ROMP active catalyst tungsten (VI) chloride (WCl6) shows great promise for addressing the limitations of Grubbs' catalyst, specifically the high cost and low thermal stability. The healing chemistry utilizes WCl6 in solid phase and exo-dicyclopentadiene (exo-DCPD) monomer. The exo-DCPD monomer is the same molecule as used in previously self-healing materials, but is a different isomer and exhibits much higher ROMP reactivity and kinetics. The effect of two different initiators, phenylacetylene and 1-decyne, was explored, as well as an alternative monomer, 5-ethylidene-2-norbornene (ENB). Three catalyst forms (as-received, recrystallized, and wax-protected) were investigated to address the known sensitivity of WCl6 to moisture and amine curing agents. Fracture experiments were performed to evaluate the healing efficiency of each catalyst type. A tapered double cantilever beam (TDCB) specimen geometry was used to evaluate the virgin and healed fracture toughness of the material. Fracture recovery of ca. 90% was achieved in both the recrystallized and as-received WCl6 cases at 12 wt% catalyst loading. The wax-protected form of the catalyst gives healing efficiencies of ca. 50% at only 4 wt% overall catalyst loading. In situ samples achieved healing efficiencies of up to 30% for

  19. Protein immobilization onto various surfaces using a polymer-bound isocyanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun-Jin; Cha, Eun Ji; Park, Hee-Deung

    2015-01-01

    Silane coupling agents have been widely used for immobilizing proteins onto inorganic surfaces. However, the immobilization method using silane coupling agents requires several treatment steps, and its application is limited to only surfaces containing hydroxyl groups. The aim of this study was to develop a novel method to overcome the limitations of the silane-based immobilization method using a polymer-bound isocyanate. Initially, polymer-bound isocyanate was dissolved in organic solvent and then was used to dip-coat inorganic surfaces. Proteins were then immobilized onto the dip-coated surfaces by the formation of urea bonds between the isocyanate groups of the polymer and the amine groups of the protein. The reaction was verified by FT-IR in which NCO stretching peaks disappeared, and CO and NH stretching peaks appeared after immobilization. The immobilization efficiency of the newly developed method was insensitive to reaction temperatures (4-50 °C), but the efficiency increased with reaction time and reached a maximum after 4 h. Furthermore, the method showed comparable immobilization efficiency to the silane-based immobilization method and was applicable to surfaces that cannot form hydroxyl groups. Taken together, the newly developed method provides a simple and efficient platform for immobilizing proteins onto surfaces.

  20. Microbial bioavailability of covalently bound polymer coatings on model engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kirschling, Teresa L; Golas, Patricia L; Unrine, Jason M; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Gregory, Kelvin B; Lowry, Gregory V; Tilton, Robert D

    2011-06-15

    By controlling nanoparticle flocculation and deposition, polymer coatings strongly affect nanoparticle fate, transport, and subsequent biological impact in the environment. Biodegradation is a potential route to coating breakdown, but it is unknown whether surface-bound polymers are bioavailable. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that polymer coatings covalently bound to nanomaterials are bioavailable. Model poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) brush-coated nanoparticles (densely cross-linked bottle brush copolymers) with hydrophobic divinyl benzene cross-linked cores and hydrophilic PEO brush shells, having ~ 30 nm hydrodynamic radii, were synthesized to obtain a nanomaterial in which biodegradation was the only available coating breakdown mechanism. PEO-degrading enrichment cultures were supplied with either PEO homopolymer or PEO brush nanoparticles as the sole carbon source, and protein and CO₂ production were monitored as a measure of biological conversion. Protein production after 90 h corresponded to 14% and 8% of the total carbon available in the PEO homopolymer and PEO brush nanoparticle cultures, respectively, and CO₂ production corresponded to 37% and 3.8% of the carbon added to the respective system. These results indicate that the PEO in the brush is bioavailable. Brush biodegradation resulted in particle aggregation, pointing to the need to understand biologically mediated transformations of nanoparticle coatings in order to understand the fate and transport of nanoparticles in the environment.

  1. Role of bound polymer mobility on multiscale dynamics of PEO in attractive nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senses, Erkan; Faraone, Antonio; Akcora, Pinar

    We study intermediate and large scale chain dynamics in nanocomposites where particle-bound polymer (PMMA) and matrix (PEO) chains are chemically different, miscible, and have very large Tg difference (ΔTg ~ 200 K). These nanocomposites with dynamically asymmetric `polymer blend interphases' were shown to exhibit an unusual reversible thermal-stiffening accompanied by vitreous-to-rubbery transition of PMMA.* Using quasi-elastic neutron scattering, this work examines the impact of mobility of the bound-polymer on segmental and collective dynamics of the matrix chains at sub-ns to 100 ns range. While bare silica particles appear to slow down the segmental relaxation, in the composites with PMMA coated particles the Rouse dynamics of PEO is identical to its bulk behavior, possibly due to the negligible enthalpic interaction inherent to this blend system. On larger scale, we observed ~25% increase in the apparent tube diameter of PEO when PMMA is glassy. Remarkably, the tube size recovers its bulk value as PMMA softens at elevated temperatures. The resulting disentanglement-entanglement transition of PEO under hard and soft confinement well relates to the macroscopic softening-stiffening transition of these composites as evidenced from the bulk rheology. (*ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces ,2015, 7 (27), pp 14682-14689)

  2. Assessment of microcapsule—catalyst particles healing system in high performance fibre reinforced polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolimowski, P. A.; Wass, D. F.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-08-01

    Autonomous self-healing in carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) is demonstrated using epoxy resin filled microcapsules and a solid-state catalyst. Microcapsules filled with oligomeric epoxy resin (20-450 μm) and particles of Sc(OTf)3 are embedded in an interleave region of a unidirectional CFRP laminate and tested under mode I loading. Double cantilever beam (DCB) test specimens containing variable concentrations of microcapsules and catalyst were prepared, tested and compared to those healed by manual injection with corresponding healing resin formulation. The healing efficiency was evaluated by comparing the maximum peak load recorded on load-displacement curves for pristine and healed specimens. A 44% maximum recovery was observed for specimens containing 10 wt% of solid phase catalyst and 11 wt% of epoxy microcapsules. However, a significant (80%) decrease in initial strain energy release rate (G IC) was observed for specimens with the embedded healing chemistries.

  3. Facile one-pot synthesis of porphyrin based porous polymer networks (PPNs) as biomimetic catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, LF; Feng, DW; Liu, TF; Chen, YP; Fordham, S; Yuan, S; Tian, J; Zhou, HC

    2015-01-01

    Stable porphyrin based porous polymer networks, PPN-23 and PPN-24, have been synthesized through a facile one-pot approach by the aromatic substitution reactions of pyrrole and aldehydes. PPN-24(Fe) shows high catalytic efficiency as a biomimetic catalyst in the oxidation reaction of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) in the presence of H2O2.

  4. Multiple use of waste catalysts with and without regeneration for waste polymer cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Salmiaton, A.; Garforth, A.A.

    2011-06-15

    Waste plastics contain a substantial number of valuable chemicals. The wastes from post-consumer as well as from industrial production can be recycled to valuable chemical feedstock, which can be used in refineries and/or petrochemical industries. This chemical recycling process is an ideal approach in recycling the waste for a better environment. Polymer cracking using a laboratory fluidised bed reactor concentrated on the used highly contaminated catalyst, E-Cat 2. Even though E-Cat 2 had low activity due to fewer acid sites, the products yielded were similar with amorphous ASA and were far better than thermal cracking. The high levels of heavy metals, namely nickel and vanadium, deposited during their lifetime as an FCC catalyst, did not greatly affect on the catalyst activity. It was also shown that E-Cat 2 could be used with and without regeneration. Although there was more deactivation when there was no regeneration step, the yield of gases (C{sub 2}-C{sub 7}) remained fairly constant. For the first time, these results indicate that 'waste' FCC catalyst (E-Cat) is a good candidate for future feedstock recycling of polymer waste. The major benefits of using E-Cat are a low market price, the ability to tolerate reuse and regeneration capacity.

  5. Multiple use of waste catalysts with and without regeneration for waste polymer cracking.

    PubMed

    Salmiaton, A; Garforth, A A

    2011-06-01

    Waste plastics contain a substantial number of valuable chemicals. The wastes from post-consumer as well as from industrial production can be recycled to valuable chemical feedstock, which can be used in refineries and/or petrochemical industries. This chemical recycling process is an ideal approach in recycling the waste for a better environment. Polymer cracking using a laboratory fluidized bed reactor concentrated on the used highly contaminated catalyst, E-Cat 2. Even though E-Cat 2 had low activity due to fewer acid sites, the products yielded were similar with amorphous ASA and were far better than thermal cracking. The high levels of heavy metals, namely nickel and vanadium, deposited during their lifetime as an FCC catalyst, did not greatly affect on the catalyst activity. It was also shown that E-Cat 2 could be used with and without regeneration. Although there was more deactivation when there was no regeneration step, the yield of gases (C(2)-C(7)) remained fairly constant. For the first time, these results indicate that "waste" FCC catalyst (E-Cat) is a good candidate for future feedstock recycling of polymer waste. The major benefits of using E-Cat are a low market price, the ability to tolerate reuse and regeneration capacity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultrafast Transient Absorption Spectroscopy of Polymer-Based Organophotoredox Catalysts Mimicking Transition-Metal Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamhawi, Abdelqader; Paul, Anam C.; Smith, Justin D.; Handa, Sachin; Liu, Jinjun

    2017-06-01

    Transition-metal complexes of rare earth metals including ruthenium and iridium are most commonly employed as visible-light photocatalysts. Despite their highly important and broad applications, they have many disadvantages including high cost associated with low abundance in earth crust, potential toxicity, requirement of specialized ligands for desired activity, and difficulty in recycling of metal contents as well as associated ligands. Polymer-based organophotoredox catalysts are promising alternatives and possess unique advantages such as easier synthesis from inexpensive starting material, longer excited state life time, broad range of activity, sustainability, and recyclability. In this research talk, time-resolved photoluminescence and femtosecond transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy measurements of three novel polymer-based organophotoredox catalysts will be presented. By our synthetic team, their catalytic activity has been proven in some highly valuable chemical transformations, that otherwise require transition metal complexes. Time-resolved spectroscopic investigations have demonstrated that photoinduced processes in these catalysts are similar to the transition metal complexes. Especially, intramolecular vibrational relaxation, internal conversion, and intersystem crossing from the S1 state to the T1 state all occur on a sub-picosecond timescale. The long lifetime of the T1 state ( 2-3 microsecond) renders these polymers potent oxidizing and reducing agents. A spectroscopic and kinetic model has been developed for global fitting of TA spectra in both the frequency and time domains. Implication of the current ultrafast spectroscopy studies of these novel molecules to their roles in photocatalysis will be discussed.

  7. Methionine bound to Pd/γ-Al2O3 catalysts studied by solid-state (13)C NMR.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert L; Schwartz, Thomas J; Dumesic, James A; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2015-11-01

    The chemisorption and breakdown of methionine (Met) adsorbed on Pd/γ-Al2O3 catalysts were investigated by solid-state NMR. (13)C-enriched Met (ca. 0.4mg) impregnated onto γ-Al2O3 or Pd/γ-Al2O3 gives NMR spectra with characteristic features of binding to γ-Al2O3, to Pd nanoparticles, and oxidative or reductive breakdown of Met. The SCH3 groups of Met showed characteristic changes in chemical shift on γ-Al2O3 (13ppm) vs. Pd (19ppm), providing strong evidence for preferential binding to Pd, while the NC carbon generates a small resonance at 96ppm assigned to a distinct nonprotonated species bound to O or Pd. Additionally, NMR shows that the SCH3 groups of Met are mobile on γ-Al2O3 but immobilized by binding to Pd particles; on small Pd particles (ca. 4nm), the NCH groups undergo large-amplitude motions. In a reducing environment, Met breaks down by C-S bond cleavage followed by formation of C2-C4 organic acids. The SCH3 signal shifts to 22ppm, which is likely the signature of the principal species responsible for strong catalyst inhibition. These experiments demonstrate that solid-state magic-angle spinning NMR of (13)C-enriched Met can be a sensitive probe to investigate catalyst surfaces and characterize catalyst inhibition both before reaction and postmortem.

  8. Platinum oxidation responsible for degradation of platinum-cobalt alloy cathode catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidai, Shoichi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Niwa, Hideharu; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Nakamori, Yoji; Aoki, Tsutomu

    2012-10-01

    Platinum oxidation of Pt-Co alloy catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells was investigated for a series of Pt-Co alloy catalysts with different specification. The chemical state of platinum evaluated by soft X-ray photoemission spectroscopy was compared with the electrochemical properties to elucidate the origin of catalyst degradation. Increase in the particle size of Pt-Co alloy catalysts caused the decrease in the concentration of platinum hydroxide and improved the catalyst durability. Applying potential cycling below 1.0 V, only platinum hydroxide was observed, while platinum oxides, PtO and PtO2, appeared after potential cycling up to 1.2 V. The peak shift of Pt 4f spectra after the potential cycling implies that these platinum hydroxide and oxide are dissolved and deposited on another platinum catalyst in a reduced metallic state, which causes the catalyst degradation.

  9. Development of catalytically active and highly stable catalyst supports for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekeun; Xie, Tianyuan; Jung, Wonsuk; Gadala-Maria, Francis; Ganesan, Prabhu; Popov, Branko N.

    2015-01-01

    Novel procedures are developed for the synthesis of highly stable carbon composite catalyst supports (CCCS-800 °C and CCCS-1100 °C) and an activated carbon composite catalyst support (A-CCCS). These supports are synthesized through: (i) surface modification with acids and inclusion of oxygen groups, (ii) metal-catalyzed pyrolysis, and (iii) chemical leaching to remove excess metal used to dope the support. The procedure results in increasing carbon graphitization and inclusion of non-metallic active sites on the support surface. Catalytic activity of CCCS indicates an onset potential of 0.86 V for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with well-defined kinetic and mass-transfer regions and ∼2.5% H2O2 production in rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) studies. Support stability studies at 1.2 V constant potential holding for 400 h indicate high stability for the 30% Pt/A-CCCS catalyst with a cell potential loss of 27 mV at 800 mA cm-2 under H2-air, 32% mass activity loss, and 30% ECSA loss. Performance evaluation in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell shows power densities (rated) of 0.18 and 0.23 gPt kW-1 for the 30% Pt/A-CCCS and 30% Pt/CCCS-800 °C catalysts, respectively. The stabilities of various supports developed in this study are compared with those of a commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  10. Automated ARGET ATRP Accelerates Catalyst Optimization for the Synthesis of Thiol-Functionalized Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Siegwart, Daniel J.; Leiendecker, Matthias; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional synthesis of polymers by ATRP is relatively low throughput, involving iterative optimization of conditions in an inert atmosphere. Automated, high-throughput controlled radical polymerization was developed to accelerate catalyst optimization and production of disulfide-functionalized polymers without the need of an inert gas. Using ARGET ATRP, polymerization conditions were rapidly identified for eight different monomers, including the first ARGET ATRP of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate. In addition, butyl acrylate, oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate 300 and 475, 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate, styrene, and methyl methacrylate were polymerized using bis(2-hydroxyethyl) disulfide bis(2-bromo-2-methylpropionate) as the initiator, tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine as the ligand, and tin(II) 2-ethylhexanoate as the reducing agent. The catalyst and reducing agent concentration was optimized specifically for each monomer, and then a library of polymers was synthesized systematically using the optimized conditions. The disulfide-functionalized chains could be cleaved to two thiol-terminated chains upon exposure to dithiothreitol, which may have utility for the synthesis of polymer bioconjugates. Finally, we demonstrated that these new conditions translated perfectly to conventional batch polymerization. We believe the methods developed here may prove generally useful to accelerate the systematic optimization of a variety of chemical reactions and polymerizations. PMID:23599541

  11. Automated ARGET ATRP Accelerates Catalyst Optimization for the Synthesis of Thiol-Functionalized Polymers.

    PubMed

    Siegwart, Daniel J; Leiendecker, Matthias; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2012-02-14

    Conventional synthesis of polymers by ATRP is relatively low throughput, involving iterative optimization of conditions in an inert atmosphere. Automated, high-throughput controlled radical polymerization was developed to accelerate catalyst optimization and production of disulfide-functionalized polymers without the need of an inert gas. Using ARGET ATRP, polymerization conditions were rapidly identified for eight different monomers, including the first ARGET ATRP of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate. In addition, butyl acrylate, oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate 300 and 475, 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate, styrene, and methyl methacrylate were polymerized using bis(2-hydroxyethyl) disulfide bis(2-bromo-2-methylpropionate) as the initiator, tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine as the ligand, and tin(II) 2-ethylhexanoate as the reducing agent. The catalyst and reducing agent concentration was optimized specifically for each monomer, and then a library of polymers was synthesized systematically using the optimized conditions. The disulfide-functionalized chains could be cleaved to two thiol-terminated chains upon exposure to dithiothreitol, which may have utility for the synthesis of polymer bioconjugates. Finally, we demonstrated that these new conditions translated perfectly to conventional batch polymerization. We believe the methods developed here may prove generally useful to accelerate the systematic optimization of a variety of chemical reactions and polymerizations.

  12. Conductive polymer layers to limit transfer of fuel reactants to catalysts of fuel cells to reduce reactant crossover

    SciTech Connect

    Stanis, Ronald J.; Lambert, Timothy N.

    2016-12-06

    An apparatus of an aspect includes a fuel cell catalyst layer. The fuel cell catalyst layer is operable to catalyze a reaction involving a fuel reactant. A fuel cell gas diffusion layer is coupled with the fuel cell catalyst layer. The fuel cell gas diffusion layer includes a porous electrically conductive material. The porous electrically conductive material is operable to allow the fuel reactant to transfer through the fuel cell gas diffusion layer to reach the fuel cell catalyst layer. The porous electrically conductive material is also operable to conduct electrons associated with the reaction through the fuel cell gas diffusion layer. An electrically conductive polymer material is coupled with the fuel cell gas diffusion layer. The electrically conductive polymer material is operable to limit transfer of the fuel reactant to the fuel cell catalyst layer.

  13. Nitrogen enriched mesoporous organic polymer anchored copper(II) material: an efficient and reusable catalyst for the synthesis of esters and amides from aromatic systems.

    PubMed

    Molla, Rostam Ali; Iqubal, Md Asif; Ghosh, Kajari; Kamaluddin; Islam, Sk Manirul

    2015-04-14

    A new copper-grafted mesoporous poly-melamine-formaldehyde (Cu-mPMF) has been synthesized from melamine and paraformaldehyde in DMSO medium, followed by grafting of Cu(ii) at its surface. Cu-mPMF has been characterized by elemental analysis, powder XRD, HR TEM, FE-SEM, N2 adsorption study, FT-IR, UV-vis DRS, TGA-DTA, EPR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The Cu-grafted mesoporous material showed very good catalytic activity in methyl esterification of benzylic alcohols and amidation of nitriles. Moreover, the catalyst is easily recoverable and can be reused seven times without appreciable loss of catalytic activity in the above reactions. The highly dispersed and strongly bound Cu(ii) sites in the Cu-grafted mesoporous polymer could be responsible for the observed high activities of the Cu-mPMF catalyst. Due to strong binding with the functional groups of the polymer, no evidence of leached copper from the catalyst during the course of reaction emerged, suggesting true heterogeneity in the catalytic process.

  14. Linker-free, silica-bound olefin-metathesis catalysts: applications in heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, José; Padilla, Robin; Bru, Miriam; Lindner, Ronald; Kageyama, Takeharu; Wilckens, Kristina; Balof, Shawna L; Schanz, Hans-Jörg; Dehn, Richard; Teles, J Henrique; Deuerlein, Stephan; Müller, Kevin; Rominger, Frank; Limbach, Michael

    2012-11-12

    A set of heterogenized olefin-metathesis catalysts, which consisted of Ru complexes with the H(2)ITap ligand (1,3-bis(2',6'-dimethyl-4'dimethyl aminophenyl)-4,5-dihydroimidazol-2-ylidene) that had been adsorbed onto a silica support, has been prepared. These complexes showed strong binding to the solid support without the need for tethering groups on the complex or functionalized silica. The catalysts were tested in the ring-opening-ring-closing-metathesis (RO-RCM) of cyclooctene (COE) and the self-metathesis of methyl oleate under continuous-flow conditions. The best complexes showed a TON>4000, which surpasses the previously reported materials that were either based on the Grubbs-Hoveyda II complex on silica or on the classical heterogeneous Re(2)O(7)/B(2)O(3) catalyst.

  15. Ceria/POLYMER hybrid nanoparticles as efficient catalysts for the hydration of nitriles to amides.

    PubMed

    Mari, Margherita; Müller, Beate; Landfester, Katharina; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael

    2015-05-27

    We report the synthesis of ceria/polymer hybrid nanoparticles and their use as effective supported catalysts for the hydration of nitriles to amide, exemplified with the conversion of 2-cyanopiridine to 2-picolinamide. The polymeric cores, made of either polystyrene (PS) or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), are prepared by miniemulsion copolymerization in the presence of different functional comonomers that provide carboxylic or phosphate groups: acrylic acid, maleic acid, and ethylene glycol methacrylate phosphate. The functional groups of the comonomers generate a corona around the main polymer particle and serve as nucleating agents for the in situ crystallization of cerium(IV) oxide. The obtained hybrid nanoparticles can be easily redispersed in water or ethanol. The conversion of amides to nitriles was quantitative for most of the catalytic samples, with yields close to 100%. According to our experimental observations by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), no work up is needed to separate the product from unreacted substrate. The substrate remains absorbed on the catalyst surface, whereas the product can be easily separated. The catalysts are shown to be recyclable and can be reused for a large number of cycles without loss in efficiency.

  16. Iron-based cathode catalyst with enhanced power density in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Eric; Jaouen, Frédéric; Lefèvre, Michel; Larouche, Nicholas; Tian, Juan; Herranz, Juan; Dodelet, Jean-Pol

    2011-08-02

    H(2)-air polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells are electrochemical power generators with potential vehicle propulsion applications. To help reduce their cost and encourage widespread use, research has focused on replacing the expensive Pt-based electrocatalysts in polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells with a lower-cost alternative. Fe-based cathode catalysts are promising contenders, but their power density has been low compared with Pt-based cathodes, largely due to poor mass-transport properties. Here we report an iron-acetate/phenanthroline/zeolitic-imidazolate-framework-derived electrocatalyst with increased volumetric activity and enhanced mass-transport properties. The zeolitic-imidazolate-framework serves as a microporous host for phenanthroline and ferrous acetate to form a catalyst precursor that is subsequently heat treated. A cathode made with the best electrocatalyst from this work, tested in H(2)-O(2,) has a power density of 0.75 W cm(-2) at 0.6 V, a meaningful voltage for polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells operation, comparable with that of a commercial Pt-based cathode tested under identical conditions.

  17. Polybenzimidazole (PBI) functionalized nanographene as highly stable catalyst support for polymer Electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs)

    DOE PAGES

    Xin, Le; Yang, Fan; Qiu, Yang; ...

    2016-08-25

    Nanoscale graphenes were used as cathode catalyst supports in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Surface-initiated polymerization that covalently bonds polybenzimidazole (PBI) polymer on the surface of graphene supports enables the uniform distribution of the Pt nanoparticles, as well as allows the sealing of the unterminated carbon bonds usually present on the edge of graphene from the chemical reduction of graphene oxide. The nanographene effectively shortens the length of channels and pores for O2 diffusion/water dissipation and significantly increases the primary pore volume. Further addition of p-phenyl sulfonic functional graphitic carbon particles as spacers, increases the specific volume of themore » secondary pores and greatly improves O2 mass transport within the catalyst layers. The developed composite cathode catalyst of Pt/PBI-nanographene (50 wt%) + SO3H-graphitic carbon black demonstrates a higher beginning of life (BOL) PEMFC performance as compared to both Pt/PBI-nanographene (50 wt%) and Pt/PBI-graphene (50 wt%) + SO3H-graphitic carbon black (GCB). Accelerated stress tests show excellent support durability compared to that of traditional Pt/Vulcan XC72 catalysts, when subjected to 10,000 cycles from 1.0 V to 1.5 V. As a result, this study suggests the promise of using PBI-nanographene + SO3H-GCB hybrid supports in fuel cells to achieve the 2020 DOE targets for transportation applications.« less

  18. Polybenzimidazole (PBI) functionalized nanographene as highly stable catalyst support for polymer Electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs)

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Le; Yang, Fan; Qiu, Yang; Uzunoglu, Aytekin; Rockward, Tommy; Borup, Rodney L.; Stanciu, Lia A.; Li, Wenzhen; Xie, Jian

    2016-08-25

    Nanoscale graphenes were used as cathode catalyst supports in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Surface-initiated polymerization that covalently bonds polybenzimidazole (PBI) polymer on the surface of graphene supports enables the uniform distribution of the Pt nanoparticles, as well as allows the sealing of the unterminated carbon bonds usually present on the edge of graphene from the chemical reduction of graphene oxide. The nanographene effectively shortens the length of channels and pores for O2 diffusion/water dissipation and significantly increases the primary pore volume. Further addition of p-phenyl sulfonic functional graphitic carbon particles as spacers, increases the specific volume of the secondary pores and greatly improves O2 mass transport within the catalyst layers. The developed composite cathode catalyst of Pt/PBI-nanographene (50 wt%) + SO3H-graphitic carbon black demonstrates a higher beginning of life (BOL) PEMFC performance as compared to both Pt/PBI-nanographene (50 wt%) and Pt/PBI-graphene (50 wt%) + SO3H-graphitic carbon black (GCB). Accelerated stress tests show excellent support durability compared to that of traditional Pt/Vulcan XC72 catalysts, when subjected to 10,000 cycles from 1.0 V to 1.5 V. As a result, this study suggests the promise of using PBI-nanographene + SO3H-GCB hybrid supports in fuel cells to achieve the 2020 DOE targets for transportation applications.

  19. Effect of catalyst layer defects on local membrane degradation in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, Arash; Lim, Chan; Kolodziej, Joanna; Lauritzen, Michael; Knights, Shanna; Wang, G. Gary; Kjeang, Erik

    2016-08-01

    Aiming at durability issues of fuel cells, this research is dedicated to a novel experimental approach in the analysis of local membrane degradation phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, shedding light on the potential effects of manufacturing imperfections on this process. With a comprehensive review on historical failure analysis data from field operated fuel cells, local sources of iron oxide contaminants, catalyst layer cracks, and catalyst layer delamination are considered as potential candidates for initiating or accelerating the local membrane degradation phenomena. Customized membrane electrode assemblies with artificial defects are designed, fabricated, and subjected to membrane accelerated stress tests followed by extensive post-mortem analysis. The results reveal a significant accelerating effect of iron oxide contamination on the global chemical degradation of the membrane, but dismiss local traces of iron oxide as a potential stressor for local membrane degradation. Anode and cathode catalyst layer cracks are observed to have negligible impact on the membrane degradation phenomena. Notably however, distinct evidence is found that anode catalyst layer delamination can accelerate local membrane thinning, while cathode delamination has no apparent effect. Moreover, a substantial mitigating effect for platinum residuals on the site of delamination is observed.

  20. Effects of operating conditions on durability of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell Pt cathode catalyst layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohyagi, Shinsuke; Matsuda, Toshihiko; Iseki, Yohei; Sasaki, Tatsuyoshi; Kaito, Chihiro

    In this study, we investigated the effects of humidity and oxygen reduction on the degradation of the catalyst of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) in a voltage cycling test. To elucidate the effect of humidity on the voltage cycling corrosion of a carbon-supported Pt catalyst with 3 nm Pt particles, voltage cycling tests based on 10,000 cycles were conducted using 100% relative humidity (RH) hydrogen as anode gas and nitrogen of varying humidities as cathode gas. The degradation rate of an electrochemical surface area (ECSA) was almost 50% under 189% RH nitrogen atmosphere and the Pt average particle diameter after 10,000 cycles under these conditions was about 2.3 times that of a particle of fresh catalyst because of the agglomeration of Pt particles. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) that facilitated Pt catalyst agglomeration when oxygen was employed as the cathode gas also demonstrated that Pt agglomeration was prominent in higher concentrations of oxygen. The ECSA degradation figure in 100% RH oxygen was similar to that in 189% RH nitrogen. It was concluded that liquid water, which was dropped under a supersaturated condition or generated by ORR, accelerated Pt agglomeration. In this paper, we suggest that the Pt agglomeration degradation occurs in a flooding area in a cell plane.

  1. Recyclable porous polymer-supported copper catalysts for Glaser and Huisgen 1,3-diolar cycloaddition reactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Lv, Zhonfei; Du, Yuyang; Wu, Qinming; Wang, Liang; Zhu, Longfeng; Meng, Xiangju; Chen, Wanzhi; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2013-11-01

    A family of polymer-attached phenanthrolines was prepared from solvothermal copolymerization of divinylbenzene with N-(1,10-phenanthroline-5-yl)acrylamide in different ratios. The polymer-supported copper catalysts were obtained through typical impregnation with copper(II) salts. The polymers and supported copper catalysts have been characterized by N2 adsortion, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermogravimetric analysis (TG); they exhibit a high surface area, hierarchical porosity, large pore volume, and high thermal and chemical stabilities. The copper catalyst has proved to be highly active for Glaser homocoupling of alkynes and Huisgen 1,3-diolar cycloaddition of alkynes with benzyl azide under mild conditions at low catalyst loading. The heterogeneous copper catalyst is more active than commonly used homogeneous and nonporous polystyrene-supported copper catalysts. In particular, the catalyst is easily recovered and can be recycled at least ten times without any obvious loss in catalytic activity. Metal leaching was prevented due to the strong binding ability of phenanthroline and products were not contaminated with copper, as determined by ICP analysis.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of novel antibacterial polymers and clay delivery systems and polymeric phase transfer catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dizman, Bekir

    The research presented in this dissertation involves the syntheses of both novel antibacterial polymers and nanocomposites and polymeric phase transfer catalysts. The first section describes the synthesis, characterization, and antibacterial activities of new acrylate/methacrylate and acrylamide/methacrylamide polymers containing pendant quaternary ammonium compounds and norfloxacin. The first part of this section focuses on the syntheses and antibacterial activities of new water-soluble bis-quaternary ammonium methacrylate monomers and polymers (Chapter II). The monomers and polymers showed antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and the activity increased as the alkyl chain length in ammonium groups increased from 4 to 6 carbons. The results are very encouraging since polymers with quaternary ammonium compounds containing short alkyl chains are generally not active against bacteria. The second part of the first section involves the syntheses and antibacterial activities of various new monomers and polymers with amine and mono-quaternary ammonium groups on the side chain (Chapter III). The monomers were either the derivatives of 3-(acryloyloxy)-2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (AHM) or based on acrylamide and methacrylamide derivatives. All monomers were homopolymerized and copolymerized with 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA). Amine monomers, their homopolymers and copolymers did not show any antibacterial activity against S. aureus and E. coli while the quaternized AHM-3-(aminomethyl) pyridine monomer, its homopolymer and copolymer with HEMA showed antibacterial activities against both bacteria. It was also found that the antibacterial activity of the quaternized methacrylamide-3-(aminomethyl) pyridine monomers and polymers increased as the alkyl chain length in ammonium groups increased. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  3. Catalyst-free "click" functionalization of polymer brushes preserves antifouling properties enabling detection in blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Parrillo, Viviana; de Los Santos Pereira, Andres; Riedel, Tomas; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar

    2017-06-08

    Progress in biosensors for clinical detection critically relies on modifications of the transducer surface to prevent non-specific adsorption from matrix components (i.e. antifouling) while supporting biomolecular recognition elements to capture the analyte. Such combination of properties presents a significant challenge. Hierarchically structured polymer brushes comprising an antifouling polymer bottom block and a functionalizable top block are proposed as a promising strategy to achieve this goal. We employed the catalyst-free strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) "click" reaction to biofunctionalize antifouling polymer brushes without impairing their resistance to fouling. The functionalization was performed on the side chains along the top polymer block or only on the end-groups of the polymer brush. The immobilized amounts of bioreceptors (streptavidin followed by biotin-conjugated proteins) and the resistance to fouling from blood plasma of the surfaces obtained were evaluated via surface plasmon resonance. The end group functionalization approach resulted in very low immobilization of bioreceptor. On the other hand, the side group modification of a top polymer block led to immobilization of 83% of a monolayer of streptavidin. Following binding of a biotin-conjugated antibody (66 ng cm(-2)) the functionalized layer was able to reduce the fouling from undiluted human blood plasma by 89% in comparison with bare gold. Finally, the functionalized hierarchical polymer brushes were applied to the label-free detection of a model analyte in diluted human blood plasma, highlighting the potential for translation to medical applications. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Ability of polymer-bound P-glycoprotein inhibitor ritonavir to overcome multidrug resistance in various resistant neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Koziolová, Eva; Chytil, Petr; Etrych, Tomáš; Janoušková, Olga

    2017-09-08

    Polymer prodrugs can considerably improve the treatment of tumors with multidrug resistance, often caused by overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Here, we present the effect of the N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide-based polymer conjugate with P-gp inhibitor ritonavir (RIT) on the increase of free doxorubicin (DOX) and polymer-bound DOX cytotoxicity in the human neuroblastoma 4 cell line and its resistant clones to different cytostatics. The increase in cytotoxicity after polymer-RIT conjugate pretreatment was higher for the lines overexpressing P-gp and less pronounced for those with decreased P-gp levels. Moreover, the effect of polymer conjugate containing inhibitor and DOX on the same polymer chain was lower than that of two individual polymer conjugates used sequentially. In conclusion, the polymer-RIT conjugate can significantly increase the cytotoxicity of free DOX and polymer-DOX conjugates in cells with various multidrug resistance origins and can thus be considered a suitable therapeutic enhancer of polymer prodrugs.

  5. Conducting polymer-doped polyprrrole as an effective cathode catalyst for Li-O{sub 2} batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinqiang; Sun, Bing; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Wang, Chengyin; Wang, Guoxiu

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Doped polypyrrole as cathode catalysts for Li-O{sub 2} batteries. • Polypyrrole has an excellent redox capability to activate oxygen reduction. • Chloride doped polypyrrole demonstrated an improved catalytic performance in Li-O{sub 2} batteries. - Abstract: Polypyrrole conducting polymers with different dopants have been synthesized and applied as the cathode catalyst in Li-O{sub 2} batteries. Polypyrrole polymers exhibited an effective catalytic activity towards oxygen reduction in lithium oxygen batteries. It was discovered that dopant significantly influenced the electrochemical performance of polypyrrole. The polypyrrole doped with Cl{sup −} demonstrated higher capacity and more stable cyclability than that doped with ClO{sub 4}{sup −}. Polypyrrole conducting polymers also exhibited higher capacity and better cycling performance than that of carbon black catalysts.

  6. Development of polymer-bound fast-dissolving metformin buccal film with disintegrants.

    PubMed

    Haque, Shaikh Ershadul; Sheela, Angappan

    2015-01-01

    Fast-dissolving drug-delivery systems are considered advantageous over the existing conventional oral dosage forms like tablets, capsules, and syrups for being patient friendly. Buccal films are one such system responsible for systemic drug delivery at the desired site of action by avoiding hepatic first-pass metabolism. Metformin hydrochloride (Met), an antidiabetic drug, has poor bioavailability due to its high solubility and low permeability. The purpose of the study reported here was to develop a polymer-bound fast-dissolving buccal film of metformin to exploit these unique properties. In the study, metformin fast-dissolving films were prepared by the solvent-casting method using chitosan, a bioadhesive polymer. Further, starch, sodium starch glycolate, and microcrystalline cellulose were the disintegrants added to different ratios, forming various formulations (F1 to F7). The buccal films were evaluated for various parameters like weight variation, thickness, folding endurance, surface pH, content uniformity, tensile strength, and percentage of elongation. The films were also subjected to in vitro dissolution study, and the disintegration time was found to be less than 30 minutes for all formulations, which was attributed to the effect of disintegrants. Formulation F6 showed 92.2% drug release within 6 minutes due to the combined effect of sodium starch glycolate and microcrystalline cellulose.

  7. Development of polymer-bound fast-dissolving metformin buccal film with disintegrants

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Shaikh Ershadul; Sheela, Angappan

    2015-01-01

    Fast-dissolving drug-delivery systems are considered advantageous over the existing conventional oral dosage forms like tablets, capsules, and syrups for being patient friendly. Buccal films are one such system responsible for systemic drug delivery at the desired site of action by avoiding hepatic first-pass metabolism. Metformin hydrochloride (Met), an antidiabetic drug, has poor bioavailability due to its high solubility and low permeability. The purpose of the study reported here was to develop a polymer-bound fast-dissolving buccal film of metformin to exploit these unique properties. In the study, metformin fast-dissolving films were prepared by the solvent-casting method using chitosan, a bioadhesive polymer. Further, starch, sodium starch glycolate, and microcrystalline cellulose were the disintegrants added to different ratios, forming various formulations (F1 to F7). The buccal films were evaluated for various parameters like weight variation, thickness, folding endurance, surface pH, content uniformity, tensile strength, and percentage of elongation. The films were also subjected to in vitro dissolution study, and the disintegration time was found to be less than 30 minutes for all formulations, which was attributed to the effect of disintegrants. Formulation F6 showed 92.2% drug release within 6 minutes due to the combined effect of sodium starch glycolate and microcrystalline cellulose. PMID:26491321

  8. Microwave synthesis of polymer-embedded Pt-Ru catalyst for direct methanol fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Bensebaa, Farid; Farah, Abdiaziz A; Wang, Dashan; Bock, Christina; Du, Xiaomei; Kung, Judy; Le Page, Yvon

    2005-08-18

    Platinum-ruthenium nanoparticles stabilized within a conductive polymer matrix are prepared using microwave heating. Polypyrrole di(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate, or PPyDEHS, has been chosen for its known electrical conductivity, thermal stability, and solubility in polar organic solvents. A scalable and quick two-step process is proposed to fabricate alloyed nanoparticles dispersed in PPyDEHS. First a mixture of PPyDEHS and metallic precursors is heated in a microwave under reflux conditions. Then the nanoparticles are extracted by centrifugation. Physical characterization by TEM shows that crystalline and monodisperse alloyed nanoparticles with an average size of 2.8 nm are obtained. Diffraction data show that crystallite size is around 2.0 nm. Methanol electro-oxidation data allow us to propose these novel materials as potential candidates for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) application. The observed decrease in sulfur content in the polymer upon incorporation of PtRu nanoparticles may have adversely affected the measured catalytic activity by decreasing the conductivity of PPyDEHS. Higher concentration of polymer leads to lower catalyst activity. Design and synthesis of novel conductive polymers is needed at this point to enhance the catalytic properties of these hybrid materials.

  9. Photoactive Hybrid Catalysts Based on Natural and Synthetic Polymers: A Comparative Overview.

    PubMed

    Colmenares, Juan Carlos; Kuna, Ewelina

    2017-05-12

    In the present review, we would like to draw the reader's attention to the polymer-based hybrid materials used in photocatalytic processes for efficient degradation of organic pollutants in water. These inorganic-organic materials exhibit unique physicochemical properties due to the synergistic effect originating from the combination of individual elements, i.e., photosensitive metal oxides and polymeric supports. The possibility of merging the structural elements of hybrid materials allows for improving photocatalytic performance through (1) an increase in the light-harvesting ability; (2) a reduction in charge carrier recombination; and (3) prolongation of the photoelectron lifetime. Additionally, the great majority of polymer materials exhibit a high level of resistance against ultraviolet irradiation and improved corrosion resistance. Taking into account that the chemical and environmental stability of the hybrid catalyst depends, to a great extent, on the functional support, we highlight benefits and drawbacks of natural and synthetic polymer-based photocatalytic materials and pay special attention to the fact that the accessibility of synthetic polymeric materials derived from petroleum may be impeded due to decreasing amounts of crude oil. Thus, it is necessary to look for cheap and easily available raw materials like natural polymers that come from, for instance, lignocellulosic wastes or crustacean residues to meet the demand of the "plastic" market.

  10. Nanocasting Design and Spatially Selective Sulfonation of Polystyrene-Based Polymer Networks as Solid Acid Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Richter, Felix H; Sahraoui, Laila; Schüth, Ferdi

    2016-09-12

    Nanocasting is a general and widely applied method in the generation of porous materials during which a sacrificial solid template is used as a mold on the nanoscale. Ideally, the resulting structure is the inverse of the template. However, replication is not always as direct as anticipated, so the influences of the degree of pore filling and of potential restructuring processes after removal of the template need to be considered. These apparent limitations give rise to opportunities in the synthesis of poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) (PSD) polymer networks of widely varying porosities (BET surface area=63-562 m(2)  g(-1) ; Vtot =0.18-1.05 cm(3)  g(-1) ) by applying a single synthesis methodology. In addition, spatially selective sulfonation on the nanoscale seems possible. Together, nanocasting and sulfonation enable rational catalyst design. The highly porous nanocast and predominantly surface-sulfonated PSD networks approach the activity of the corresponding molecular catalyst, para-toluenesulfonic acid, and exceed those of commercial ion-exchange polymers in the depolymerization of macromolecular inulin.

  11. 3D polymer hydrogel for high-performance atomic iron-rich catalysts for oxygen reduction in acidic media

    DOE PAGES

    Qiao, Zhi; Zhang, Hanguang; Karakalos, Stavros; ...

    2017-08-03

    Current platinum group metal (PGM)-free carbon nanocomposite catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic electrolyte often suffer from rapid degradation associated with carbon corrosion due to the use of large amount of amorphoous carbon black supports. Here, we developed a new concept of using freestanding 3D hydrogel to design support-free Fe-N-C catalysts. A 3D polyaniline (PANI)-based hydrogel was used for preparing a new type of single atomic iron site-rich catalyst, which has exhibited exceptionally enhanced activity and stability compared to conventional Fe-N-C catalysts supported on amorphous carbon blacks. The achieved performance metric on the hydrogel PANI-Fe catalysts ismore » one of the best ever reported PGM-free catalysts, reaching a half-wave potential up to 0.83 V vs. RHE and only leaving 30 mV gap with Pt/C catalysts (60 μgPt/cm2) in challenging acidic media. Remarkable ORR stability was accomplished as well on the same catalyst evidenced by using harsh potential cycling tests. The well dispersion of atomic iron into partially graphitized carbon, featured with dominance of micropores and porous network structures, is capable of accommodating increased number of active sites, strengthening local bonding among iron, nitrogen and carbon, and facilitating mass transfer. The 3D polymer hydrogel approach would be a new pathway to advance PGM-free catalysts.« less

  12. Highly active multimetallic palladium nanoalloys embedded in conducting polymer as anode catalyst for electrooxidation of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Srabanti; Bera, Susmita; Bysakh, Sandip; Basu, Rajendra Nath

    2017-09-13

    Fabrication of multimetallic nanocatalysts with controllable composition remains a challenge for the development of low-cost electrocatalysts and incorporating metal-based catalysts into active carbon nanoarchitecture represents an emerging strategy to improve the catalytic performance of electrocatalysts. Herein, a facile method developed for Pd nanoparticles (NPs) based multimetallic alloys incorporated on polypyrrole (Ppy) nanofibers by in situ nucleation and growth of NPs using colloidal radiolytic technique. Electrochemical measurement suggests that the as-prepared catalysts demonstrate dramatically enhanced electrocatalytic activity for the ethanol oxidation in alkaline medium. The ultrasmall Pd30Pt29Au41/Ppy nanohybrids (8 nm) exhibit an excellent electrocatalytic activity which is 5.5 times higher than monometallic counter parts (12 A per mg Pd, 5 times higher activity compared to Pd/C catalyst). Most importantly, ternary nanocatalyst shows no obvious change in chemical structure and the long-term stability reflected with 2% lost in forward current density during 1000 cycling. The superior catalytic activity and durability of nanohybrids have been achieved due to the formation of Pt-Pd-Au heterojunctions with cooperative action of the three metals in the alloy composition, and the strong interactions between Ppy nanofibers support with metal NPs. The facile synthetic approach provides a new generation polymer supported metal alloy hybrid nanostructures as potential electrocatalysts with superior catalytic activity for fuel cell applications.

  13. Thermal conductivity of catalyst layer of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells: Part 1 - Experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahadi, Mohammad; Tam, Mickey; Saha, Madhu S.; Stumper, Jürgen; Bahrami, Majid

    2017-06-01

    In this work, a new methodology is proposed for measuring the through-plane thermal conductivity of catalyst layers (CLs) in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The proposed methodology is based on deconvolution of bulk thermal conductivity of a CL from measurements of two thicknesses of the CL, where the CLs are sandwiched in a stack made of two catalyst-coated substrates. Effects of hot-pressing, compression, measurement method, and substrate on the through-plane thermal conductivity of the CL are studied. For this purpose, different thicknesses of catalyst are coated on ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) and aluminum (Al) substrates by a conventional Mayer bar coater and measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The through-plane thermal conductivity of the CLs is measured by the well-known guarded heat flow (GHF) method as well as a recently developed transient plane source (TPS) method for thin films which modifies the original TPS thin film method. Measurements show that none of the studied factors has any effect on the through-plane thermal conductivity of the CL. GHF measurements of a non-hot-pressed CL on Al yield thermal conductivity of 0.214 ± 0.005 Wṡm-1ṡK-1, and TPS measurements of a hot-pressed CL on ETFE yield thermal conductivity of 0.218 ± 0.005 Wṡm-1ṡK-1.

  14. Highly durable Pt/graphene oxide and Pt/C hybrid catalyst for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Ju Hae; Park, Hyang Jin; Kim, Junbom; Hur, Seung Hyun

    2014-02-01

    We report a highly durable hybrid catalyst composed of Pt/graphene oxide (GO) and Pt/C catalyst for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The accelerated durability tests in half-cell and full cell systems shows that the addition of small amount of Pt/GO catalyst significantly enhances the durability of commercial Pt/C catalyst without sacrificing initial electrochemical active surface area (ECSA). The XRD and TEM analysis reveal that the GO not only exhibits the high resistance to Pt agglomeration but also prevents the Pt agglomeration in Pt/C catalyst by providing the anchoring sites of eluted metal ions. We believe that this simple and effective approach can open a new way to fabricate highly durable electrocatalyst for the commercialization of fuel cell vehicles.

  15. Self-Assembled Nanocomposite Organic Polymers with Aluminum and Scandium as Heterogeneous Water-Compatible Lewis Acid Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Miyamura, Hiroyuki; Sonoyama, Arisa; Hayrapetyan, Davit; Kobayashi, Shū

    2015-09-01

    While water-compatible Lewis acids have great potential as accessible and environmentally benign catalysts for various organic transformations, efficient immobilization of such Lewis acids while keeping high activity and without leaching of metals even under aqueous conditions is a challenging task. Self-assembled nanocomposite catalysts of organic polymers, carbon black, aluminum reductants, and scandium salts as heterogeneous water-compatible Lewis acid catalysts are described. These catalysts could be successfully applied to various C-C bond-forming reactions without leaching of metals. Scanning transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that the nanocomposite structure of Al and Sc was fabricated in these heterogeneous catalysts. It is noted that Al species, which are usually decomposed rapidly in the presence of water, are stabilized under aqueous conditions.

  16. Design of biomimetic catalysts by molecular imprinting in synthetic polymers: the role of transition state stabilization.

    PubMed

    Wulff, Günter; Liu, Junqiu

    2012-02-21

    The impressive efficiency and selectivity of biological catalysts has engendered a long-standing effort to understand the details of enzyme action. It is widely accepted that enzymes accelerate reactions through their steric and electronic complementarity to the reactants in the rate-determining transition states. Thus, tight binding to the transition state of a reactant (rather than to the corresponding substrate) lowers the activation energy of the reaction, providing strong catalytic activity. Debates concerning the fundamentals of enzyme catalysis continue, however, and non-natural enzyme mimics offer important additional insight in this area. Molecular structures that mimic enzymes through the design of a predetermined binding site that stabilizes the transition state of a desired reaction are invaluable in this regard. Catalytic antibodies, which can be quite active when raised against stable transition state analogues of the corresponding reaction, represent particularly successful examples. Recently, synthetic chemistry has begun to match nature's ability to produce antibody-like binding sites with high affinities for the transition state. Thus, synthetic, molecularly imprinted polymers have been engineered to provide enzyme-like specificity and activity, and they now represent a powerful tool for creating highly efficient catalysts. In this Account, we review recent efforts to develop enzyme models through the concept of transition state stabilization. In particular, models for carboxypeptidase A were prepared through the molecular imprinting of synthetic polymers. On the basis of successful experiments with phosphonic esters as templates to arrange amidinium groups in the active site, the method was further improved by combining the concept of transition state stabilization with the introduction of special catalytic moieties, such as metal ions in a defined orientation in the active site. In this way, the imprinted polymers were able to provide both an

  17. Polymer- and silica-supported iron BPMEN-inspired catalysts for C-H bond functionalization reactions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Moschetta, Eric G; Jones, Christopher W

    2014-11-01

    Direct catalytic C-H bond functionalization is a key challenge in synthetic chemistry, with many popular C-H activation methodologies involving precious-metal catalysts. In recent years, iron catalysts have emerged as a possible alternative to the more common precious-metal catalysts, owing to its high abundance, low cost, and low toxicity. However, iron catalysts are plagued by two key factors: the ligand cost and the low turnover numbers (TONs) typically achieved. In this work, two approaches are presented to functionalize the popular N(1),N(2)-dimethyl-N(1),N(2)-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine (BPMEN) ligand, so that it can be supported on porous silica or polymer resin supports. Four new catalysts are prepared and evaluated in an array of catalytic C-H functionalization reactions by using cyclohexane, cyclohexene, cyclooctane, adamantane, benzyl alcohol, and cumene with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. Catalyst recovery and recycling is demonstrated by using supported catalysts, which allows for a modest increase in the TON achieved with these catalysts. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Novel synthesis of highly durable and active Pt catalyst encapsulated in nitrogen containing carbon for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunjoon; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choi, Insoo; Lim, Taeho; Kwon, Oh Joong

    2017-09-01

    Novel synthesis of a Pt catalyst encapsulated in a N-containing carbon layer for use in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell is described in this study. A Pt-aniline complex, formed by mixing Pt precursor and aniline monomer, was used as the source of Pt, C, and N. Heat treatment of the Pt-aniline complex with carbon black yielded 5 nm Pt nanoparticles encapsulated by a N-containing carbon layer originating from aniline carbonization. The synthesized Pt catalyst exhibited higher mass specific activity to oxygen reduction reaction than that shown by conventional Pt/C catalyst because pyridinic N with graphitic carbon in the carbon layer provided active sites for oxygen reduction reaction in addition to those provided by Pt. In single cell testing, initial performance of the synthesized catalyst was limited because the thick catalyst layer increased resistance related to mass transfer. However, it was observed that the carbon layer successfully prevented Pt nanoparticles from growing via agglomeration and Ostwald ripening under fuel cell operation, thereby improving durability. Furthermore, a mass specific performance of the synthesized catalyst higher than that of a conventional Pt/C catalyst was achieved by modifying the synthesized catalyst's layer thickness.

  19. Active site formation mechanism of carbon-based oxygen reduction catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraike, Yusuke; Saito, Makoto; Niwa, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Masaki; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Kim, Jaehong; Nabae, Yuta; Kakimoto, Masa-aki

    2015-04-01

    Carbon-based cathode catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer (HB-FePc) were characterized, and their active-site formation mechanism was studied by synchrotron-based spectroscopy. The properties of the HB-FePc catalyst are compared with those of a catalyst with high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity synthesized from a mixture of iron phthalocyanine and phenolic resin (FePc/PhRs). Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the HB-FePc catalyst does not lose its ORR activity up to 900°C, whereas that of the FePc/PhRs catalyst decreases above 700°C. Hard X-ray photoemission spectra reveal that the HB-FePc catalysts retain more nitrogen components than the FePc/PhRs catalysts between pyrolysis temperatures of 600°C and 800°C. This is because the linked structure of the HB-FePc precursor has high thermostability against nitrogen desorption. Consequently, effective doping of active nitrogen species into the sp 2 carbon network of the HB-FePc catalysts may occur up to 900°C.

  20. Active site formation mechanism of carbon-based oxygen reduction catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer.

    PubMed

    Hiraike, Yusuke; Saito, Makoto; Niwa, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Masaki; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Kim, Jaehong; Nabae, Yuta; Kakimoto, Masa-Aki

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-based cathode catalysts derived from a hyperbranched iron phthalocyanine polymer (HB-FePc) were characterized, and their active-site formation mechanism was studied by synchrotron-based spectroscopy. The properties of the HB-FePc catalyst are compared with those of a catalyst with high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity synthesized from a mixture of iron phthalocyanine and phenolic resin (FePc/PhRs). Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the HB-FePc catalyst does not lose its ORR activity up to 900°C, whereas that of the FePc/PhRs catalyst decreases above 700°C. Hard X-ray photoemission spectra reveal that the HB-FePc catalysts retain more nitrogen components than the FePc/PhRs catalysts between pyrolysis temperatures of 600°C and 800°C. This is because the linked structure of the HB-FePc precursor has high thermostability against nitrogen desorption. Consequently, effective doping of active nitrogen species into the sp (2) carbon network of the HB-FePc catalysts may occur up to 900°C.

  1. Self-oscillation of polymer chains with an Fe(bpy)3 catalyst induced by the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yusuke; Fujimoto, Kenji; Mayama, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-16

    We successfully synthesized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) covalently bonded to a Fe(bpy)3 catalyst moiety for the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the polymer chain in the oxidized state had a slightly greater than that in the reduced state. This resulted in the polymer undergoing soluble-insoluble self-oscillation induced by the BZ reaction at constant temperatures. In addition, the period of the self-oscillation of the polymer chain shows a linear dependence on the temperature.

  2. Preferential positioning of a nanoparticle bound to a polymer: Exact enumeration of a self-avoiding walk chain model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, Andy; Iwaki, Takafumi; Shew, Chwen-Yang; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2009-09-01

    A lattice chain model is extended to investigate the preferential position of a sticky sphere bound to a polymer chain, motivated by wrapping one nanosize core-histone with DNA to form a nucleosome structure. It was shown that the single bound histone is populated in DNA chain ends from the experiment by T. Sakaue et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 078105 (2001)]. Here, the possible mechanisms are examined to elucidate such behavior. For neutral chains or ionic chains in high salt concentrations, spheres bound on the middle of chain may trigger conformational constraints to reduce conformational entropy. For ionic chains, the bound sphere can be driven to chain ends if its effective charge and the charge of chain monomers are of like charge. The two-dimensional chain is further studied to mimic the chromosome strongly adsorbed onto surfaces, of which behavior is similar to the three-dimensional case with minor difference due to surface confinement.

  3. Out-of-band insensitive polymer-bound PAG for EUV resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwashita, Jun; Hirayama, Taku; Matsuzawa, Kensuke; Utsumi, Yoshiyuki; Ohmori, Katsumi

    2012-03-01

    Out of band (OoB) radiation has been regarded as one of the key issues on Extreme Ultra Violet Lithography (EUVL). OoB light especially in the deep ultraviolet (DUV) region have a negative impact on image contrast and resist profile, since general photo acid generator (PAG) used in chemically amplified EUV resist are also sensitive for DUV. It is reported that a Spectral Purify Filter (SPF) would eliminate OoB radiation. However it expense a large reduction in EUV power and hence throughput, so it is reported that HVM EUV exposure tool would not employ SPF. Therefore, both EUV sensitive and DUV insensitive are required property to overcome OoB radiation issue by resist material itself. Consideration of PAG cation structure was proceeded to control absorption for DUV. Based on the concept, OoB insensitivity was investigated both on blend resist platform and Polymer Bound PAG (PBP) platform. OoB insensitive concept was confirmed with UV spectrum and sensitivity for KrF and ArF. The OoB insensitive PAG cation worked well on PBP, while dark loss are seen on blend resist platform due to lack of inhibition effect. Lithographic performance would be exhibited using Alpha Demo Tool (ADT) and NXE3100. Outgassing property on witness sample (WS) and Residual Gas Analysis (RGA ) will be also discussed.

  4. Synthesis of nano-bound microsphere Co3O4 by simple polymer-assisted sol-gel technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthick, S. N.; Hemalatha, K. V.; Justin Raj, C.; Kim, Hee Je; Yi, Moonsuk

    2013-03-01

    Nano-bound Co3O4 microspheres and molten Co3O4 microspheres were synthesized for the first time by a simple polymer (poly-(vinylpyrrolidone))-assisted sol-gel and sol-gel technique, respectively. Thermal decomposition of the precursor samples of both polymer-assisted sol-gel and sol-gel technique were studied by thermogravimetric analysis. In both techniques, the material was calcined at different temperatures for the formation of phase pure Co3O4. X-ray diffraction confirmed the formation of phase pure cubic spinel structured Co3O4 at 400 and 500 °C for the polymer-assisted sol-gel and sol-gel technique, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the vibrational assignments of functional groups associated with the cubic spinel structure of Co3O4. Scanning electron microscopy of all samples showed clear microsphere sizes ranging from 1 to 4 μm. Both techniques allowed the formation of spherical-shaped microspheres by a simple process. Nano-bound microspheres were observed from the polymer-assisted sol-gel technique because the decomposition of PVP at 400 °C is the main reason for the formation of nano-bound microspheres. The nanoparticle size of the nano-bound microsphere measured by transmission electron microscopy was 40 nm. Therefore, PVP is an essential compound for the formation of nano-bound microspheres. This very simple and inexpensive technique is suitable for the formation of spherical-shaped microspheres.

  5. Carbon xerogels as Pt catalyst supports for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel-cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing; Creager, Stephen

    Carbon xerogels prepared by the resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) sol-gel method with ambient-pressure drying were explored as Pt catalyst supports for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Carbon xerogel samples without Pt catalyst (CX) were characterized by the N 2 sorption method (BET, BJH, others), and carbon xerogel samples with supported Pt catalyst (Pt/CX) were characterized by thermogravimetry (TGA), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and ex situ cyclic voltammetry for thin-film electrode samples supported on glassy carbon and studied in a sulfuric acid electrolyte. Experiments on Pt/CX were made in comparison with commercially obtained samples of Pt catalyst supported on a Vulcan XC-72R carbon black support (Pt/XC-72R). CX samples had high BET surface area with a relatively narrow pore size distribution with a peak pore size near 14 nm. Pt contents for both Pt/CX and Pt/XC-72R were near 20 wt % as determined by TGA. Pt catalyst particles on Pt/CX had a mean diameter near 3.3 nm, slightly larger than for Pt/XC-72R which was near 2.8 nm. Electrochemically active surface areas (ESA) for Pt as determined by ex situ CV measurements of H adsorption/desorption were similar for Pt/XC-72R and Pt/CX but those from CO stripping were slightly higher for Pt/XC-72R than for Pt/CX. Membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs) were fabricated from both Pt/CX and Pt/XC-72R on Nafion 117 membranes using the decal transfer method, and MEA characteristics and single-cell performance were evaluated via in situ cyclic voltammetry, polarization curve, and current-interrupt and high-frequency impedance methods. In situ CV yielded ESA values for Pt/XC-72R MEAs that were similar to those obtained by ex situ CV in sulfuric acid, but those for Pt/CX MEAs were smaller (by 13-17%), suggesting that access of Nafion electrolyte to Pt particles in Pt/CX electrodes is diminished relative to that for Pt/XC-72R electrodes. Polarization curve analysis at low current

  6. Examining Rhodium Catalyst complexes for Use with Conducting Polymers Designed for Fuel Cells in Preparing Biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Carpio, M.M.; Kerr, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Biosensing devices are important because they can detect, record, and transmit information regarding the presence of, or physiological changes in, different chemical or biological materials in the environment. The goal of this research is to prepare a biosensing device that is effective, quick, and low cost. This is done by examining which chemicals will work best when placed in a biosensor. The first study involved experimenting on a rhodium catalyst complexed with ligands such as bipyridine and imidazole. The rhodium catalyst is important because it is reduced from RhIII to RhI, forms a hydride by reaction with water and releases the hydride to react with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to selectively produce 1,4-NADH, the reduced form of NAD+. The second study looked at different types of ketones and enzymes for the enzyme-substrate reaction converting a ketone into an alcohol. Preliminary results showed that the rhodium complexed with bipyridine was able to carry out all the reactions, while the rhodium complexed with imidazole was not able to produce and release hydrides. In addition, the most effective ketone to use is benzylacetone with the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase from baker’s yeast. Future work includes experimenting with bis-imidazole, which mimics the structure of bipyridine to see if it has the capability to reduce and if the reduction rate is comparable to the bipyridine complex. Once all testing is completed, the fastest catalysts will be combined with polymer membranes designed for fuel cells to prepare biosensing devices that can be used in a variety of applications including ones in the medical and environmental fields.

  7. Enhanced stability of multilayer graphene-supported catalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinkas, A.; Hempelmann, R.; Heinzel, A.; Peinecke, V.; Radev, I.; Natter, H.

    2015-11-01

    One of the biggest challenges in the field of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is to enhance the lifetime and the long-term stability of PEMFC electrodes, especially of cathodes, furthermore, to reduce their platinum loading, which could lead to a cost reduction for efficient PEMFCs. These demands could be achieved with a new catalyst support architecture consisting of a composite of carbon structures with significant different morphologies. A highly porous cathode catalyst support layer is prepared by addition of various carbon types (carbon black particles, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)) to multilayer graphene (MLG). The reported optimized cathodes shows extremely high durability and similar performance to commercial standard cathodes but with 89% lower Pt loading. The accelerated aging protocol (AAP) on the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) shows that the presence of MLG increases drastically the durability and the Pt-extended electrochemical surface area (ECSA). In fact, after the AAP slightly enhanced performance can be observed for the MLG-containing cathodes instead of a performance loss, which is typical for the commercial carbon-based cathodes. Furthermore, the presence of MLG drastically decreases the ECSA loss rate. The MLG-containing cathodes show up to 6.8 times higher mass-normalized Pt-extended ECSA compared to the commercial standard systems.

  8. Creep properties of catalyst coated membranes for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi Alavijeh, Alireza; Khorasany, Ramin M. H.; Habisch, Aronne; Wang, G. Gary; Kjeang, Erik

    2015-07-01

    Creep as a time-dependent mechanical damage acting either independently or in conjunction with other degradation mechanisms is known to reduce the membrane durability of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Due to the important ionomer coupling of membrane and catalyst layers in PEFCs, the present work evaluates membrane creep when constrained within a catalyst coated membrane (CCM). Three key factors dominating creep life in commonly used perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer membranes, including creep stress, temperature, and relative humidity, were investigated by applying ex-situ creep loading and unloading experiments under controlled temperature and humidity conditions. The creep strain and recovery of the CCM were found to be highly dependent on the environmental conditions and applied stress levels, where the temperature effect on creep strain was the most significant. Repetitive creep - recovery cycles revealed that significant creep damage can accumulate in the material over time. This accumulated creep damage was found to be independent of the loading frequency while both peak strain and permanent deformation increased with the stress duration. Based on the present findings, it is recommended to reduce the operating temperature and ensure adequate membrane hydration in order to mitigate harmful creep effects in PEFCs.

  9. An acetate bound cobalt oxide catalyst for water oxidation: role of monovalent anions and cations in lowering overpotential.

    PubMed

    Dey, Subal; Mondal, Biswajit; Dey, Abhishek

    2014-06-28

    A homogeneous solution of Co(II) in acetate buffer at pH 7 is found to be an efficient water oxidation catalyst (WOC) showing significantly greater current density than Co(II) in phosphate buffer (Co-Pi) under identical conditions owing to the higher solubility of the former. When electrodeposited on ITO/FTO electrodes it forms acetate bound cobalt(II)-oxide materials (Co-Ac-WOC) showing a catalytic current density of 0.1 mA cm(-2) at 830 mV and 1 mA cm(-2) at 1 V in a pH 7 buffer solution. The morphology of Co-Ac-WOC and its evolution with time and deposition potential is investigated with AFM, HR-TEM and SEM. The chemical composition of Co-Ac-WOC is investigated using XPS, EDX, ATR-FTIR and combustion analysis which indicate that this material has a CoO core with chloride and acetate anions bound to the Co center. Sodium is found to be integrated in the Co-Ac-WOC. The presence of the sodium and chloride ions lowers the onset potential for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) by 240 mV relative to the classic Co-Pi at pH 7. The lower onset potential and higher OER current lowers the exchange current density to 10(-6.7) A cm(-2) in Co-Ac-WOC relative to 10(-8)-10(-10) A cm(-2) in Co-Pi and its derivatives.

  10. Novel carbon nanostructures as catalyst support for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Sadesh Kumar

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology has advanced rapidly in recent years, with one of active area focused on improving the long-term performance of carbon supported catalysts, which has been recognized as one of the most important issues to be addressed for the commercialization of PEMFCs. The central part of a PEMFC is the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) which consists of two electrodes (anode and cathode) and a cation exchange membrane. These electrodes are commonly made of carbon black (most often, Vulcan XC-72) supported on carbon paper or carbon cloth backings. It is the primary objective of this thesis to prepare and investigate carbon nanostructures (CNS, licensed to Hydrogen Research Institute -- IRH, Quebec, Canada), the carbon material with more graphite component like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for use as catalyst support in PEMFCs. High energy ball-milling of activated carbon along with transition metal catalysts under hydrogen atmosphere, followed by heat-treatment leads to nanocrystalline structures of carbon called CNS. However, CNS formed in the quartz tube after heat-treatment is inevitably accompanied by many impurities such as metal particles, amorphous carbon and other carbon nanoparticules. Such impurities are a serious impediment to detailed characterization of the properties of nanostructures. In addition, since the surface of CNS is itself rather inert, it is difficult to control the homogeneity and size distribution of Pt nanoparticules. In this thesis work, we demonstrated a novel mean to purify and functionalize CNS via acid-oxidation under reflux conditions. To investigate and quantify these nanostructures X-ray diffraction, electrical conductivity measurements, specific surface area measurements, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies were used. Cyclic voltammetry studies were performed on different samples to derive estimates for the relationship

  11. Peroxidases Bound to the Growing Lignin Polymer Produce Natural Like Extracellular Lignin in a Cell Culture of Norway Spruce

    PubMed Central

    Warinowski, Tino; Koutaniemi, Sanna; Kärkönen, Anna; Sundberg, Ilari; Toikka, Merja; Simola, Liisa Kaarina; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka; Teeri, Teemu H.

    2016-01-01

    Lignin, an important component of plant cell walls, is a polymer of monolignols derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. Monolignols are oxidized in the cell wall by oxidative enzymes (peroxidases and/or laccases) to radicals, which then couple with the growing lignin polymer. We have investigated the characteristics of the polymerization reaction by producing lignin polymers in vitro using different oxidative enzymes and analyzing the structures formed with NMR. The ability of the enzymes to oxidize high-molecular-weight compounds was tested using cytochrome c as a substrate. The results support an idea that lignin structure is largely determined by the concentration ratios of the monolignol (coniferyl alcohol) and polymer radicals involved in the coupling reaction. High rate of the lignin polymer oxidation compared to monolignol oxidation leads to a natural-like structure. The high relative rate can be achieved by an open active site of the oxidative enzyme, close proximity of the enzyme with the polymeric substrate or simply by high enzymatic activity that consumes monolignols rapidly. Monolignols, which are oxidized efficiently, can be seen as competitive inhibitors of polymer oxidation. Our results indicate that, at least in a Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) cell culture, a group of apoplastic, polymer-oxidizing peroxidases bind to the lignin polymer and are responsible for production of natural-like lignin in cell suspension cultures in vivo, and also in vitro. The peroxidases bound to the extracellular lignin had the highest ability to bind to various cell wall polymers in vitro. Extracellular lignin contains pectin-type sugars, making them possible attachment points for these cationic peroxidases. PMID:27803704

  12. The roles of loosely-bound and tightly-bound extracellular polymer substances in enhanced biological phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Long, Xiangyu; Tang, Ran; Fang, Zhendong; Xie, Chaoxin; Li, Yongqin; Xian, Guang

    2017-09-22

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) have be founded to participate in the process of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR), but the exact role of EPS in EBPR process is unclear. In this work, the roles of loosely-bound EPS (LB-EPS), tightly-bound EPS (TB-EPS) and microbial cell in EBPR were explored, taking the activated sludge from 4 lab-scale A/O-SBR reactors with different temperatures and organic substrates as objects. It was founded that the P of EBPR activated sludge was mainly stored in TB-EPS, but the P of non-EBPR activated sludge was primarily located in microbial cell. The P release and uptake of EBPR activated sludge was attributed to the combined action of TB-EPS and microbial cell. Furthermore, TB-EPS played an more important role than microbial cell in EBPR process. With the analysis of (31)P NMR spectroscopy, both polyP and orthoP were the main phosphorus species of TB-EPS in EBPR sludge, but only orthoP was the main phosphorus species of LB-EPS and microbial cell. During the anaerobic-aerobic cycle, the roles of LB-EPS, TB-EPS and microbial cell in transfer and transformation of P in EBPR sludge were obviously different. LB-EPS transported and retained orthoP, and microbial cell directly anaerobically released or aerobically absorbed orthoP. Importantly, TB-EPS not only transported and retained orthoP, but also participated in biological phosphorus accumulation. The EBPR performance of sludge was closely related with the polyp in TB-EPS, which might be synthesized and decomposed by extracellular enzyme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel (ex situ) method to quantify oxygen diffusion coefficient of polymer fuel cells backing and catalyst layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baricci, Andrea; Casalegno, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Limiting current density of oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte fuel cells is determined by several mass transport resistances that lower the concentration of oxygen on the catalyst active site. Among them, diffusion across porous media plays a significant role. Despite the extensive experimental activity documented in PEMFC literature, only few efforts have been dedicated to the measurement of the effective transport properties in porous layers. In the present work, a methodology for ex situ measurement of the effective diffusion coefficient and Knudsen radius of porous layers for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (gas diffusion layer, micro porous layer and catalyst layer) is described and applied to high temperature polymer fuel cells State of Art materials. Regression of the measured quantities by means of a quasi 2D physical model is performed to quantify the Knudsen effect, which is reported to account, respectively, for 30% and 50% of the mass transport resistance in micro porous layer and catalyst layer. On the other side, the model reveals that pressure gradient consequent to permeation in porous layers of high temperature polymer fuel cells has a negligible effect on oxygen concentration in relevant operating conditions.

  14. Nanostructured catalyst materials for next generation polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudhayer, Wisam J.

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are electrochemical energy conversion devices which have demonstrated great promise as future energy sources for electric vehicles, as they convert chemical energy to electrical energy with a significantly higher efficiency and lower environmental impact than in standard combustion processes. However, the commercialization of PEM fuel cells for transportation applications has been hindered by several factors such as high cost of Pt, low Pt utilization, poor long-term durability of the conventional PEM fuel cell catalyst (Pt nanoparticels supported on carbon black; Pt/C), and poor thermal and chemical stability of the electrocatalyst supports (carbon black). The goal of this research was to fabricate high performance, durable, carbon-free, controllable porosity, and low cost (low Pt loading) sputtered-nanostructured electrocatalysts and investigate their morphologies, crystal properties, and electrocatalytic activities. First, the electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of vertically-aligned solid Pt nanorods was evaluated. A glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique was used to fabricate Pt nanorod arrays directly on glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. It was found that Pt-nanorod electrocatalysts exhibit higher area-specific activity, greater electrochemical stability, higher electron-transfer rate constant, and comparable activation energy for ORR than those of Pt/C due to their larger crystallite size, single-crystal property, and dominance of the preferred crystal orientations (Pt[110]) for ORR. However, Pt nanorods show lower mass specific activity than that of Pt/C electrocatalyst due to the large diameter of nanorods. Second, to further enhance the mass-specific activity of solid GLAD Pt nanorods, the GLAD chromium (Cr) nanorods were used as low-cost catalyst supports for conformal Pt thin film coating achieved by a small angle deposition (SAD) technique as a potential catalyst electrode for oxygen

  15. Co-Pt core-shell nanostructured catalyst prepared by selective chemical vapor pulse deposition of Pt on Co as a cathode in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Sang-Joon; Chung, Ho-Kyoon; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Chae, Heeyeop; Seo, Seung-Woo; Min Cho, Sung

    2014-01-15

    A new type of PtCo/C catalyst for use as a cathode in polymer electrolyte fuel cells was prepared by selective chemical vapor pulse deposition (CVPD) of Pt on the surface of Co. The activity of the prepared catalyst for oxygen reduction was higher than that of a catalyst prepared by sequential impregnation (IMP) with the two metallic components. This catalytic activity difference occurs because the former catalyst has smaller Pt crystallites that produce stronger Pt-Co interactions and have a larger Pt surface area. Consequently, the CVPD catalyst has a great number of Co particles that are in close contact with the added Pt. The Pt surface was also electronically modified by interactions with Co, which were stronger in the CVPD catalyst than in the IMP catalyst, as indicated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry measurements of the catalysts.

  16. Main-chain NHC-palladium polymer as a recyclable self-supported catalyst in the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of aryl chlorides in water.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Babak; Akhavan, Pari Fadavi

    2009-07-07

    We have demonstrated an efficient and reusable NHC-palladium polymer self-supported catalyst for the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction, which even works for deactivated aryl chlorides and aryl fluorides in water.

  17. Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling reaction of 1-aryltriazenes with arylboronic acids catalyzed by a recyclable polymer-supported N-heterocyclic carbene–palladium complex catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Guangming; Ren, Fang

    2010-01-01

    Summary The Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling reaction of 1-aryltriazenes with arylboronic acids catalyzed by a recyclable polymer-supported Pd–NHC complex catalyst has been realized for the first time. The polymer-supported catalyst can be re-used several times still retaining high activity for this transformation. Various aryltriazenes were investigated as electrophilic substrates at room temperature to give biaryls in good to excellent yields and showed good chemoselectivity over aryl halides in the reactions. PMID:20703375

  18. Polymer- and dendrimer-coated magnetic nanoparticles as versatile supports for catalysts, scavengers, and reagents.

    PubMed

    Kainz, Quirin M; Reiser, Oliver

    2014-02-18

    magnetic supports in different solvents, we can introduce dendrimers and polymers on Co/C and Fe/C platforms by various synthetic strategies. While dendrimers have the advantage of being able to array all functional groups on the surface, polymers need fewer synthetic steps and higher molecular weight analogues are easily accessible. We present the application of these promising hybrid materials for the extraction of analytes or contaminates from complex aqueous solutions (e.g. waste water treatments or blood analytics), for metal-, organo-, and biocatalysis, and in organic synthesis. In addition, we describe advanced concepts like magnetic protecting groups, a multistep synthesis solely applying magnetic reagents and scavengers, and thermoresponsive self-separating magnetic catalysts. We also discuss the first examples of the use of magnetic scaffolds manipulated by external magnetic fields in flow reactors on the laboratory scale. These hold promise for future applications of magnetic hybrid materials in continuous flow or highly parallelized syntheses with rapid magnetic separation of the applied resins.

  19. Enhanced cooperativity through design: pendant Co(III)--salen polymer brush catalysts for the hydrolytic kinetic resolution of epichlorohydrin (salen=N,N'-bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine dianion).

    PubMed

    Gill, Christopher S; Venkatasubbaiah, Krishnan; Phan, Nam T S; Weck, Marcus; Jones, Christopher W

    2008-01-01

    The Co(III)--salen-catalyzed (salen=N,N'-bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine dianion) hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of racemic epoxides has emerged as a highly attractive and efficient method of synthesizing chiral C(3) building blocks for intermediates in larger, more complex molecules. HKR reaction rates have displayed a second order dependency on the concentration of active sites, and thus researchers have proposed a bimetallic transition state for the HKR mechanism. Here we report the utilization of pendant Co(III)--salen catalysts on silica supported polymer brushes as a catalyst for the HKR of epichlorohydrin. The novel polymer brush architecture provided a unique framework for promoting site-site interactions as required in the proposed bimetallic transition state of the HKR mechanism. Furthermore, the polymer brushes mimic the environment of soluble polymer-based catalysts, whereas the silica support permitted facile recovery and reuse of the catalyst. The polymer brush catalyst displayed increased activities over the soluble Jacobsen Co--salen catalyst and was observed to retain its high enantioselectivities (>99 %) after each of five reactions despite decreasing activities. Analysis indicated decomposition of the salen ligand as an underlying cause of catalyst deactivation.

  20. Enantioselective synthesis of binaphthyl polymers using chiral asymmetric phenolic coupling catalysts: oxidative coupling and tandem glaser/oxidative coupling.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Barbara J; Xie, Xu; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Kozlowski, Marisa C

    2007-08-03

    A series of functionalized and optically active polybinaphthyls have been synthesized from achiral substrates by asymmetric oxidative phenolic coupling using a chiral 1,5-diaza-cis-decalin copper catalyst. In most cases, a copper tetrafluoroborate catalyst was found to be superior to the copper iodide catalyst, as ortho-iodination of the substrates could be prevented. Three methods for the formation of chiral polymers are described. In the first method, two 2-naphthols linked together at C-6 are subjected to the optimized asymmetric oxidative phenolic coupling conditions to form chiral polynaphthyls. A combination of NMR and HPLC measurements secured the selectivity of the asymmetric coupling. In the second method, substrates containing only one naphthalene were utilized. By incorporating a 2-naphthol and a terminal alkyne, the chiral copper catalysts effect both Glaser-Hay coupling of the alkyne and oxidative asymmetric coupling of the 2-naphthol with remarkable chemoselectivity. The relative reaction rates of various moieties with the chiral catalysts follows the order: benzyl cyanides > aryl alkynes > electron-rich 2-naphthols > electron-deficient 2-naphthols > alkyl alkynes. Because of high chemoselectivity, this approach is useful for the organized assembly of multifunctional substrates in a single operation. In all cases, no cross-coupling is observed between the alkyne and the 2-naphthol. This approach was thus applied to a set of highly functionalized precursors. In this third case, the biaryl coupling was performed first and a Glaser-Hay coupling was performed in a separate step to generate a highly functionalized polymer. In some cases, the resultant chiral polymers exhibit very large optical rotations.

  1. Comment on 'Novel synthesis of highly durable and active Pt catalyst encapsulated in nitrogen containing carbon for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollet, Bruno G.

    2017-09-01

    I read with interest the manuscript entitled 'Novel synthesis of highly durable and active Pt catalyst encapsulated in nitrogen containing carbon for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell' by Lee et al. recently published in your journal [1] describing a one-step process for fabricating a Pt catalyst encapsulated with N-containing carbon by using ultrasound (20 kHz).

  2. Operando 3D Visualization of Migration and Degradation of a Platinum Cathode Catalyst in a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hirosuke; Ishiguro, Nozomu; Uruga, Tomoya; Sekizawa, Oki; Higashi, Kotaro; Maejima, Naoyuki; Tada, Mizuki

    2017-08-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) distribution and oxidation state of a Pt cathode catalyst in a practical membrane electrode assembly (MEA) were visualized in a practical polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) under fuel-cell operating conditions. Operando 3D computed-tomography imaging with X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy (CT-XANES) clearly revealed the heterogeneous migration and degradation of Pt cathode catalyst in an MEA during accelerated degradation test (ADT) of PEFC. The degradative Pt migration proceeded over the entire cathode catalyst layer and spread to MEA depth direction into the Nafion membrane. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The potential of model studies for the understanding of catalyst poisoning and temperature effects in polymer electrolyte fuel cell reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, R. J.; Jusys, Z.

    In this contribution we demonstrate the potential of model studies for the understanding of electrocatalytic reactions in low-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) operated by H 2-rich anode feed gas, in particular of the role of temperature effects and catalyst poisoning. Reviewing previous work from our laboratory and, for better comparison, focussing on carbon-supported Pt catalysts, the important role of using fuel cell relevant reaction and mass transport conditions will be outlined. The latter conditions include continuous reaction, elevated temperatures, realistic supported catalyst materials and controlled mass transport. The data show the importance of combining electrochemical techniques such as rotating disc electrode (RDE), wall-jet and flow cell measurements, and on-line differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) under controlled mass transport conditions.

  4. Discovery of highly selective alkyne semihydrogenation catalysts based on first-row transition-metallated porous organic polymers.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Kristine K; Ferrandon, Magali S; Siladke, Nathan A; Kraft, Steven J; Zhang, Guanghui; Niklas, Jens; Poluektov, Oleg G; Lopykinski, Susan J; Bunel, Emilio E; Krause, Theodore R; Miller, Jeffrey T; Hock, Adam S; Nguyen, SonBinh T

    2014-11-03

    Five different first-row transition metal precursors (V(III), Cr(III), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II)) were successfully incorporated into a catechol porous organic polymer (POP) and characterized using ATR-IR and XAS analysis. The resulting metallated POPs were then evaluated for catalytic alkyne hydrogenation using high-throughput screening techniques. All POPs were unexpectedly found to be active and selective catalysts for alkyne semihydrogenation. Three of the metallated POPs (V, Cr, Mn) are the first of their kind to be active single-site hydrogenation catalysts. These results highlight the advantages of using a POP platform to develop new catalysts which are otherwise difficult to achieve through traditional heterogeneous and homogeneous routes.

  5. First high thermally stable organo-inorganic 3D polymer scandium derivative as a heterogeneous Lewis acid catalyst.

    PubMed

    Perles, Josefina; Iglesias, Marta; Ruiz-Valero, Caridad; Snejko, Natalia

    2003-02-07

    Sc2(OOCC2H4COO)2.5(OH), a new hybrid organic-inorganic polymer, has been hydrothermally obtained; the crystal structure of this material has been established by single crystal X-ray diffraction; having high thermal stability it can be used as an effective Lewis acid catalyst and can be easily recycled and reused without any appreciable loss in activity.

  6. In situ control of polymer helicity with a non-covalently bound photoresponsive molecular motor dopant.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Thomas; Heideman, G Henrieke; Zhao, Depeng; Wezenberg, Sander J; Feringa, Ben L

    2017-06-13

    The transfer of chirality from a molecular motor to a dynamic helical polymer via ionic interactions was investigated. A dopant with photoswitchable chirality was able to induce a preferred helicity in a poly(phenylacetylene) polymer and the helicity is inverted upon irradiation. The findings described herein will advance the development of functional and responsive polymeric systems.

  7. Supramolecular organization in organic-inorganic heterogeneous hybrid catalysts formed from polyoxometalate and poly(ampholyte) polymer.

    PubMed

    Raj, Gijo; Swalus, Colas; Guillet, Alain; Devillers, Michel; Nysten, Bernard; Gaigneaux, Eric M

    2013-04-02

    Hybridization of polyoxometalates (POMs) via the formation of an organic-inorganic association constitutes a new route to develop a heterogeneous POM catalyst with tunable functionality imparted through supramolecular assembly. Herein, we report on strategies to obtain tunable well-defined supramolecular architectures of an organic-inorganic heterogeneous hybrid catalyst formed by the association of a hydrophobically substituted polyampholyte copolymer (poly N, N-diallyl-N-hexylamine-alt-maleic acid) and phosphotungstic acid (H3PW12O40) POMs. The self-assembling property of the initial polyampholyte copolymer matrix is modulated by controlling the pH of the hybridization solution. When deposited on a mica surface, isolated, long and extended polymer chains are formed under basic conditions (pH 7.9), while globular or coiled structures are formed under acidic conditions (pH 2). The supramolecular assembly of the POM-polymer hybrid is found to be directed by the type and quantities of charges present on the polyampholyte copolymer, which themselves depend on the pH conditions. The hypothesis is that the Keggin type [PW12O40](3-) anions, which have a size of ~1 nm, electrostatically bind to the positive charge sites of the polymer backbone. The hybrid material stabilized at pH 5.3 consists of POM-decorated polymer chains. Statistical analysis of distances between pairs of POM entities show narrow density distributions, suggesting that POM entities are attached to the polymer chains with a high level of order. Conversely, under acidic conditions (pH 2), the hybrid shows the formation of a core-shell type of structure. The strategies reported here, to tune the supramolecular assembly of organic-inorganic hybrid materials, are highly valuable for the design and a more rational utilization of POM heterogeneous catalysts in several chemical transformations.

  8. Thermal conductivity of catalyst layer of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells: Part 2 - Analytical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahadi, Mohammad; Putz, Andreas; Stumper, Jürgen; Bahrami, Majid

    2017-06-01

    In this work, a closed form expression is derived to describe thermal conductivity of dry catalyst layers (CLs) used in automotive polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). This expression is based on a new geometrical description of the CL which features: i) overlapping agglomerates, and ii) four main scales of pores: macropores between the agglomerate clusters, mesopores between the agglomerates, micropores between the carbon particles inside the agglomerates, and sub-nanometer pores inside the carbon particles. Under certain simplifying assumptions, this leads to a three-scale unit cell model which can be solved analytically for the effective thermal conductivity. The model predictions agree well with experimental data for a dry CL. Based on the developed model, shares of different resistances inside the CL are calculated for a reference design and compared to one another, and a comprehensive parametric study is performed to assess the effects of different design parameters of the CL. In addition, based on the results of the parametric study, some design guidelines are provided for designing CLs with optimum transport properties.

  9. Theoretical studies on membranes and non-platinum catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ushiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-12-31

    Mechanism of proton transfer among high-density acid groups in the interface between organic and inorganic materials for polymer electrolyte fuel cells has been theoretically examined. It has been clearly shown that the interactions between the phosphate groups at the surface of the inorganic material, zirconium phosphate (ZrP), and the adsorbed water molecules are relatively large and a strong hydrogen-bond network is generated locally. Because of the strong interactions, water molecules can be attached to ZrP and the O–O distance becomes shorter than that in bulk water systems. Because of the short O–O distances and the delocalized charge of each atom, the activation energy of proton transfer at the ZrP surface decreases and causes high proton conductivity even under conditions of high temperature and low humidity. Based on the above studies, the origin of the high proton conductivity of hybrid electrolytes is also discussed. We will also discuss the mechanism of oxygen reduction reaction on non-platinum catalysts such as Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}.

  10. Polymer-supported CuPd nanoalloy as a synergistic catalyst for electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to methane

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Kang, Peng; Bakir, Mohammed; Lapides, Alexander M.; Dares, Christopher J.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Developing sustainable energy strategies based on CO2 reduction is an increasingly important issue given the world’s continued reliance on hydrocarbon fuels and the rise in CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. An important option is electrochemical or photoelectrochemical CO2 reduction to carbon fuels. We describe here an electrodeposition strategy for preparing highly dispersed, ultrafine metal nanoparticle catalysts on an electroactive polymeric film including nanoalloys of Cu and Pd. Compared with nanoCu catalysts, which are state-of-the-art catalysts for CO2 reduction to hydrocarbons, the bimetallic CuPd nanoalloy catalyst exhibits a greater than twofold enhancement in Faradaic efficiency for CO2 reduction to methane. The origin of the enhancement is suggested to arise from a synergistic reactivity interplay between Pd–H sites and Cu–CO sites during electrochemical CO2 reduction. The polymer substrate also appears to provide a basis for the local concentration of CO2 resulting in the enhancement of catalytic current densities by threefold. The procedure for preparation of the nanoalloy catalyst is straightforward and appears to be generally applicable to the preparation of catalytic electrodes for incorporation into electrolysis devices. PMID:26668386

  11. Comparing Gene Silencing and Physiochemical Properties in siRNA Bound Cationic Star-Polymer Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dearnley, Megan; Reynolds, Nicholas P; Cass, Peter; Wei, Xiaohu; Shi, Shuning; Mohammed, A Aalam; Le, Tam; Gunatillake, Pathiraja; Tizard, Mark L; Thang, San H; Hinton, Tracey M

    2016-11-14

    The translation of siRNA into clinical therapies has been significantly delayed by issues surrounding the delivery of naked siRNA to target cells. Here we investigate siRNA delivery by cationic acrylic polymers developed by Reversible Addition-Fragmentation chain Transfer (RAFT) mediated free radical polymerization. We investigated cell uptake and gene silencing of a series of siRNA-star polymer complexes both in the presence and absence of a protein "corona". Using a multidisciplinary approach including quantitative nanoscale mechanical-atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering and nanoparticle tracking analysis we have characterized the nanoscale morphology, stiffness, and surface charge of the complexes with and without the protein corona. This is one of the first examples of a comprehensive physiochemical analysis of siRNA-polymer complexes being performed alongside in vitro biological assays, allowing us to describe a set of desirable physical features of cationic polymer complexes that promote gene silencing. Multifaceted studies such as this will improve our understanding of structure-function relationships in nanotherapeutics, facilitating the rational design of polymer-mediated siRNA delivery systems for novel treatment strategies.

  12. Partitioning of dissolved organic matter-bound mercury between a hydrophobic surface and polysulfide-rubber polymer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Ah

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the role of dissolved organic matter on mercury partitioning between a hydrophobic surface (polyethylene, PE) and a reduced sulfur-rich surface (polysulfide rubber, PSR). Comparative sorption studies employed polyethylene and polyethylene coated with PSR for reactions with DOM-bound mercuric ions. These studies revealed that PSR enhanced the Hg-DOM removal from water when DOM was Suwannee River natural organic matter (NOM), fulvic acid (FA), or humic acid (HA), while the same amount of 1,3-propanedithiol-bound mercuric ion was removed by both PE and PSR-PE. The differences for Hg-DOM removal efficiencies between PE and PSR-PE varied depending on which DOM was bound to mercuric ion as suggested by the PE/water and PSR-PE/water partition coefficients for mercury. The surface concentrations of mercury on PE and PSR-PE with the same DOM measured by x-ray – photoelectron spectroscopy were similar, which indicated the comparable amounts of immobilized mercury on PE and PSR-PE being exposed to the aqueous phase. With these observations, two major pathways for the immobilization reactions between PSR-PE and Hg- DOM were examined: 1) adsorption of Hg-DOM on PE by hydrophobic interactions between DOM and PE, and 2) addition reaction of Hg-DOM onto PSR by a complexation reaction between Hg and PSR. The percent contribution of each pathway was derived from a mass balance and the ratios among aqueous mercury, PE-bound Hg-DOM, and PSR-bound Hg-DOM concentrations. The results indicate strong binding of mercuric ion with both dissolved organic matter and PSR polymer. The FT-IR examination of Hg-preloaded-PSR-PEs after the reaction with DOM corroborated a strong interaction between mercuric ion and 1,3-propanedithiol compared to Hg-HA, Hg-FA, or Hg-NOM interactions. PMID:21872900

  13. Particle size dependence of CO tolerance of anode PtRu catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Toshiro; Takeguchi, Tatsuya; Wang, Guoxiong; Muhamad, Ernee Noryana; Ueda, Wataru

    An anode catalyst for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell must be CO-tolerant, that is, it must have the function of hydrogen oxidation in the presence of CO, because hydrogen fuel gas generated by the steam reforming process of natural gas contains a small amount of CO. In the present study, PtRu/C catalysts were prepared with control of the degree of Pt-Ru alloying and the size of PtRu particles. This control has become possible by a new method of heat treatment at the final step in the preparation of catalysts. The CO tolerances of PtRu/C catalysts with the same degree of Pt-Ru alloying and with different average sizes of PtRu particles were thus compared. Polarization curves were obtained with pure H 2 and CO/H 2 (CO concentrations of 500-2040 ppm). It was found that the CO tolerance of highly dispersed PtRu/C (high dispersion (HD)) with small PtRu particles was much higher than that of poorly dispersed PtRu/C (low dispersion (LD)) with large metal particles. The CO tolerance of PtRu/C (HD) was higher than that of any commercial PtRu/C. The high CO tolerance of PtRu/C (HD) is thought to be due to efficient concerted functions of Pt, Ru, and their alloy.

  14. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy analysis of N-containing carbon-based cathode catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwa, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Masaki; Horiba, Koji; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Terakura, Kiyoyuki; Ikeda, Takashi; Koshigoe, Yuka; Ozaki, Jun-ichi; Miyata, Seizo; Ueda, Shigenori; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Kobayashi, Keisuke

    We report on the electronic structure of three different types of N-containing carbon-based cathode catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells observed by hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Prepared samples are derived from: (1) melamine and poly(furfuryl alcohol), (2) nitrogen-doped carbon black and (3) cobalt phthalocyanine and phenolic resin. C 1 s spectra show the importance of sp 2 carbon network formation for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity. N 1 s spectra of the carbon-based cathode catalysts are decomposed into four components identified as pyridine-like, pyrrole- or cyanide-like, graphite-like, and oxide nitrogen. Samples having high oxygen reduction reaction activity in terms of oxygen reduction potential contain high concentration of graphite-like nitrogen. O 1 s spectra are similar among carbon-based cathode catalysts of different oxygen reduction reaction activity. There is no correlation between the ORR activity and oxygen content. Based on a quantitative analysis of our results, the oxygen reduction reaction activity of the carbon-based cathode catalysts will be improved by increasing concentration of graphite-like nitrogen in a developed sp 2 carbon network.

  15. Metallosalen-Based Ionic Porous Polymers as Bifunctional Catalysts for the Conversion of CO2 into Valuable Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rongchang; Chen, Yaju; He, Qian; Lin, Xiaowei; Xu, Qihang; He, Xiaohui; Zhang, Wuying; Zhou, Xiantai; Ji, Hongbing

    2016-12-31

    A series of new metallosalen-based ionic porous organic polymers (POPs) were synthesized for the first time using a simple unique strategy based on the free-radical copolymerization reaction. Various techniques were used to characterize the physicochemical properties of these catalysts. These well-designed materials endowed high surface area, hierarchical porous structures, and enhanced CO2 /N2 adsorptive selectivity. Moreover, these POPs having both metal centers (Lewis acid) and ionic units (nucleophile) could serve as bifunctional catalysts in the catalytic conversion of CO2 into high value-added chemicals without any additional co-catalyst under mild and solvent-free conditions, for example, CO2 /epoxides cycloaddition and Nformylation of amines from CO2 and hydrosilanes. The results demonstrated that the irregular porous structure was very favorable for the diffusion of substrates and products, and the microporous structural property resulted in the enrichment of CO2 near the catalytic centers in the CO2 -involved transformations. Additionally, the superhydrophobic property could not only enhance the chemoselectivity of products but also promote the stability and recyclability of catalysts.

  16. Beads on a string: structure of bound aggregates of globular particles and long polymer chains.

    PubMed

    Souslov, Anton; Curtis, Jennifer E; Goldbart, Paul M

    2015-11-07

    Macroscopic properties of suspensions, such as those composed of globular particles (e.g., colloidal or macromolecular), can be tuned by controlling the equilibrium aggregation of the particles. We examine how aggregation - and, hence, macroscopic properties - can be controlled in a system composed of both globular particles and long, flexible polymer chains that reversibly bind to one another. We base this on a minimal statistical mechanical model of a single aggregate in which the polymer chain is treated either as ideal or self-avoiding, and, in addition, the globular particles are taken to interact with one another via excluded volume repulsion. Furthermore, each of the globular particles is taken to have one single site to which at most one polymer segment may bind. Within the context of this model, we examine the statistics of the equilibrium size of an aggregate and, thence, the structure of dilute and semidilute suspensions of these aggregates. We apply the model to biologically relevant aggregates, specifically those composed of macromolecular proteoglycan globules and long hyaluronan polymer chains. These aggregates are especially relevant to the materials properties of cartilage and the structure-function properties of perineuronal nets in brain tissue, as well as the pericellular coats of mammalian cells.

  17. New Bounds for the Free Energy of Directed Polymers in Dimension 1 + 1 and 1 + 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoin, Hubert

    2010-03-01

    We study the free energy of the directed polymer in a random environment model in dimension 1 + 1 and 1 + 2. For dimension one, we improve the statement of Comets and Vargas in [8] concerning very strong disorder by giving sharp estimates on the free energy at high temperature. In dimension two, we prove that very strong disorder holds at all temperatures, thus solving a long standing conjecture in the field.

  18. Effects of microstructure on carbon support in the catalyst layer on the performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Makoto; Fukuoka, Yuko; Sugawara, Yasushi

    1996-12-31

    In the case of the Polymer-electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), the reaction sites exist on the platinum (Pt) surface covered with PFSI. Though PFSI membrane is used as an electrolyte of the PEFC, the membrane does not soak deeply into the electrodes as a liquid electrolyte does. Therefore, PFSI solution was impregnated into the catalyst layers to increase the contact areas between Pt and PFSI. In our previous work we proposed a new preparation method of the M&E assembly which emphasized the colloid formation of the PFSI to optimize the network of PFSIs in the catalyst layer and also to simplify the fabrication process of the M&E assembly. Following this work, we focused on the microstructure of the catalyst layer. The importance of the morphological properties of the gas-diffusion electrodes on performance has been reported in several papers. The catalyst layer was claimed to have had two distinctive pore distributions with a boundary of ca. 0.1 {mu}m. The smaller pore (primary pore) was identified with the space in and between the primary particles in the agglomerate of the carbon support and the larger one (secondary pore) was that between the agglomerates. In our recent work, we reported that the PFSI was distributed only in the secondary pores, and the reaction sites were therefore limited to that location. The results indicated that the PEFC system required a particular design rather than a conventional one for the fuel cells with liquid electrolytes. We proposed that novel structure and/or preparation methods of the catalyst layer were keys to higher utilization of Pt.

  19. Gold Nanoparticles on Polymer-Wrapped Carbon Nanotubes: An Efficient and Selective Catalyst for the Electroreduction of CO2.

    PubMed

    Jhong, Huei-Ru Molly; Tornow, Claire E; Kim, Chaerin; Verma, Sumit; Oberst, Justin L; Anderson, Paul S; Gewirth, Andrew A; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakashima, Naotoshi; Kenis, Paul

    2017-10-06

    Multiple approaches will be needed to reduce the atmospheric CO2 levels which has been linked to the undesirable effects of global climate change. The electroreduction of CO2 driven by renewable energy is one approach to reduce CO2 emissions while producing chemical building blocks, but current electrocatalysts exhibit low activity and selectivity. Here we report the structural and electrochemical characterization of a promising catalyst for the electroreduction of CO2 to CO: Au nanoparticles supported on polymer-wrapped multiwall carbon nanotubes. This catalyst exhibits high selectivity for CO over H2: 80-92% CO, as well as high activity: partial current density for CO as high as 160 mA/cm2. The observed high activity, originating from a high electrochemically active surface area (23 m2/g Au), in combination with the low loading (0.17 mg/cm2) of the highly-dispersed Au nanoparticles underscores the promise of this catalyst for efficient electroreduction of CO2. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Advanced cathode materials for polymer electrolyte fuel cells based on pt/ metal oxides: from model electrodes to catalyst systems.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Emiliana; Pătru, Alexandra; Rabis, Annett; Kötz, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    The development of stable catalyst systems for application at the cathode side of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) requires the substitution of the state-of-the-art carbon supports with materials showing high corrosion resistance in a strongly oxidizing environment. Metal oxides in their highest oxidation state can represent viable support materials for the next generation PEFC cathodes. In the present work a multilevel approach has been adopted to investigate the kinetics and the activity of Pt nanoparticles supported on SnO2-based metal oxides. Particularly, model electrodes made of SnO2 thin films supporting Pt nanoparticles, and porous catalyst systems made of Pt nanoparticles supported on Sb-doped SnO2 high surface area powders have been investigated. The present results indicate that SnO2-based supports do not modify the oxygen reduction reaction mechanism on the Pt nanoparticle surface, but rather lead to catalysts with enhanced specific activity compared to Pt/carbon systems. Different reasons for the enhancement in the specific activity are considered and discussed.

  1. Metalloporphyrin-Based Hypercrosslinked Polymers Catalyze Hetero-Diels-Alder Reactions of Unactivated Aldehydes with Simple Dienes: A Fascinating Strategy for the Construction of Heterogeneous Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Dou, Zhiyu; Xu, Li; Zhi, Yongfeng; Zhang, Yuwei; Xia, Hong; Mu, Ying; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-07-11

    We describe a novel and intriguing strategy for the construction of efficient heterogeneous catalysts by hypercrosslinking catalyst molecules in a one-pot Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction. The new hypercrosslinked polymers (HCPs) as porous solid catalysts exhibit the combined advantages of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, owing to their high surface area, good stability, and tailoring of catalytic centers on the frameworks. Indeed, a new class of metalloporphyrin-based HCPs were successfully synthesized using modified iron(III) porphyrin complexes as building blocks, and the resulting networks were found to be excellent recyclable heterogeneous catalysts for the hetero-Diels-Alder reaction of unactivated aldehydes with 1,3-dienes. Moreover, this new strategy showed wide adaptability, and many kinds of homogeneous-like solid-based catalysts with high catalytic performance and excellent recyclability were also constructed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Alkene epoxidations catalysed by Mo(VI) supported on imidazole-containing polymers I. Synthesis, characterisation, and activity of catalysts in the epoxidation of cyclohexene

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.M.; Sherrington, D.C.

    1995-04-01

    Polystyrene resins functionalised with hydroxylpropyl aminomethyl pyridine, pyridyl imidazole, and carboxybenzimidazole, polyglycidyl methacrylate resins functionalised with aminomethyl pyridine and pyridyl imidazole, and polybenzimidazole resin have all been loaded with Mo(VI). The resulting polymer metal complexes have been activated by treatment with t-butylhydroperoxide, then used as catalysts in the liquid-phase epoxidation of cyclohexene using t-butylhydroperoxide. Polymers containing the imidazole group were particularly active, and unlike the other species did not require preactivation to induce high activity. The complexes formed with the imidazole-containing polymers appear to be monometallic species, whereas the other polymer ligands yield oxybridged bimetallic species. This accounts for the major difference in activity recorded. Possible structures for the catalysts are proposed based on information in the literature. 30 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Polymer-based catalysts. Progress report, July 1, 1980-June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Regen, S. L.

    1981-02-01

    Research carried out under this contract period has centered around the following: (1) developing methods for probing active site mobility, macroenvironment, microenvironment and efficiency of triphase catalysts, (2) preparing and evaluating a variety of polyether-based triphase catalysts, (3) synthesizing key monomers from which sequestered ligands are to be prepared, and (4) demonstrating the synthetic utility of simple poly(acrylamide) gels as solid phase cosolvents.

  4. Oxygen reduction reaction on palladium-cobalt alloy catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Kentaro

    The Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) activity in acid medium on Pd-Co was studied in this work. The catalysts were synthesized by two techniques; physical vapor deposition technique and ultrasonic spray reaction technique. The last technique was developed for the first time in our laboratory for the supported electro catalyst preparation and direct deposition onto the carbon paper or gas diffusion electrode the for PEMFC applications. The electrochemical properties such as the amount of hydrogen adsorption/desorption, the oxide formation/reduction of Pd-Co alloy catalyst have not been sufficiently studied before. Therefore these electrochemical properties were investigated by using the Pd-Co thin films prepared by sputtering method. A thin film catalyst cannot be directly used as an electrode of working PEMFCs, however the sputtering method is very useful since the chemical composition of alloy and surface area of the electrode can be controlled easily. Thus the fundamental electrochemical properties such as the amount of hydrogen adsorption/desorption, oxide formation/reduction and oxide reduction peak position on thin films of Pd-Co alloy, Pd and Pt catalysts were determined and their correlations to ORR catalytic activities in acid medium were studied. Enhancements of the catalytic activities for ORR by Pd-Co binary alloys were found to be in agreement with results obtained in previous studies. Ultrasonic spray reaction method was developed for the first time in our laboratory for carbon supported nano-scale catalyst for PEMFC application. Fine catalyst particles supported on high surface area carbon powder are required to apply the catalyst as the PEMFC cathode materials for the commercialization, but none of the studies done before were able to successfully obtain the Pd-Co fine particles which are comparable with the existing carbon supported platinum catalyst (ϕ2-4nm). Therefore the establishment of the catalyst synthesis method for Pd-Co fine particles are

  5. Preparation of hyperstar polymers with encapsulated Au25(SR)18 clusters as recyclable catalysts for nitrophenol reduction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Daqiao; Jin, Shan; Shi, Yi; Wang, Xiaofeng; Graff, Robert W; Liu, Wenqi; Zhu, Manzhou; Gao, Haifeng

    2017-03-09

    A robust approach is developed to prepare hyperstar polymer-Au25(SR)18 nanocomposites for catalysis. The synthesis started with atom transfer radical copolymerization of an inimer with a cyclic disulfide-containing methacrylate monomer in a microemulsion to produce hyperbranched copolymers with high molar mass, low polydispersity, and a vital fraction of dangling disulfide groups. The core-shell structured hyperstar polymers were then prepared using hyperbranched copolymers as macroinitiators to polymerize oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (Mn = 500) and grow the radiating arms. The hyperstar polymers with disulfide groups were proved to efficiently encapsulate Au25(SR)18 nanoclusters through ligand exchange without destroying the fine structure of the Au25(SR)18 clusters. The obtained hyperstar-Au25(SR)18 nanocomposites showed great stability with no size change after a three-month shelf storage. They were used as efficient catalysts for the catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol by NaBH4, showing convenient recovery and reuse without losing catalytic efficiency.

  6. Electronic materials high-T(sub c) superconductivity polymers and composites structural materials surface science and catalysts industry participation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The fifth year of the Center for Advanced Materials was marked primarily by the significant scientific accomplishments of the research programs. The Electronics Materials program continued its work on the growth and characterization of gallium arsenide crystals, and the development of theories to understand the nature and distribution of defects in the crystals. The High Tc Superconductivity Program continued to make significant contributions to the field in theoretical and experimental work on both bulk materials and thin films and devices. The Ceramic Processing group developed a new technique for cladding YBCO superconductors for high current applications in work with the Electric Power Research Institute. The Polymers and Composites program published a number of important studies involving atomistic simulations of polymer surfaces with excellent correlations to experimental results. The new Enzymatic Synthesis of Materials project produced its first fluorinated polymers and successfully began engineering enzymes designed for materials synthesis. The structural Materials Program continued work on novel alloys, development of processing methods for advanced ceramics, and characterization of mechanical properties of these materials, including the newly documented characterization of cyclic fatigue crack propagation behavior in toughened ceramics. Finally, the Surface Science and Catalysis program made significant contributions to the understanding of microporous catalysts and the nature of surface structures and interface compounds.

  7. Electronic materials high-T(sub c) superconductivity polymers and composites structural materials surface science and catalysts industry participation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The fifth year of the Center for Advanced Materials was marked primarily by the significant scientific accomplishments of the research programs. The Electronics Materials program continued its work on the growth and characterization of gallium arsenide crystals, and the development of theories to understand the nature and distribution of defects in the crystals. The High Tc Superconductivity Program continued to make significant contributions to the field in theoretical and experimental work on both bulk materials and thin films and devices. The Ceramic Processing group developed a new technique for cladding YBCO superconductors for high current applications in work with the Electric Power Research Institute. The Polymers and Composites program published a number of important studies involving atomistic simulations of polymer surfaces with excellent correlations to experimental results. The new Enzymatic Synthesis of Materials project produced its first fluorinated polymers and successfully began engineering enzymes designed for materials synthesis. The structural Materials Program continued work on novel alloys, development of processing methods for advanced ceramics, and characterization of mechanical properties of these materials, including the newly documented characterization of cyclic fatigue crack propagation behavior in toughened ceramics. Finally, the Surface Science and Catalysis program made significant contributions to the understanding of microporous catalysts and the nature of surface structures and interface compounds.

  8. Solar-Driven Hydrogen Peroxide Production Using Polymer-Supported Carbon Dots as Heterogeneous Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Satyabrat; Karak, Niranjan

    2017-10-01

    Safe, sustainable, and green production of hydrogen peroxide is an exciting proposition due to the role of hydrogen peroxide as a green oxidant and energy carrier for fuel cells. The current work reports the development of carbon dot-impregnated waterborne hyperbranched polyurethane as a heterogeneous photo-catalyst for solar-driven production of hydrogen peroxide. The results reveal that the carbon dots possess a suitable band-gap of 2.98 eV, which facilitates effective splitting of both water and ethanol under solar irradiation. Inclusion of the carbon dots within the eco-friendly polymeric material ensures their catalytic activity and also provides a facile route for easy catalyst separation, especially from a solubilizing medium. The overall process was performed in accordance with the principles of green chemistry using bio-based precursors and aqueous medium. This work highlights the potential of carbon dots as an effective photo-catalyst.

  9. An Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Synthesis of Well-Defined Polymers by Low-Catalyst-Concentration ATRP and Postpolymerization Modification to Fluorescent Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsarevsky, Nicolay V.; Woodruf, Shannon R.; Wisian-Neilson, Patty J.

    2016-01-01

    A two-session experiment is designed to introduce undergraduate students to concepts in catalysis, transition metal complexes, polymer synthesis, and postpolymerization modifications. In the first session, students synthesize poly(glycidyl methacrylate) via low-catalyst-concentration atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The…

  10. An Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Synthesis of Well-Defined Polymers by Low-Catalyst-Concentration ATRP and Postpolymerization Modification to Fluorescent Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsarevsky, Nicolay V.; Woodruf, Shannon R.; Wisian-Neilson, Patty J.

    2016-01-01

    A two-session experiment is designed to introduce undergraduate students to concepts in catalysis, transition metal complexes, polymer synthesis, and postpolymerization modifications. In the first session, students synthesize poly(glycidyl methacrylate) via low-catalyst-concentration atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The…

  11. Polymer nanocomposite membranes with hierarchically structured catalysts for high throughput dehalogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crock, Christopher A.

    Halogenated organics are categorized as primary pollutants by the Environmental Protection Agency. Trichloroethylene (TCE), which had broad industrial use in the past, shows persistence in the environment because of its chemical stability. The large scale use and poor control of TCE resulted in its prolonged release into the environment before the carcinogenic risk associated with TCE was fully understood. TCE pollution stemmed from industrial effluents and improper disposal of solvent waste. Membrane reactors are promising technology for treating TCE polluted groundwater because of the high throughput, relatively low cost of membrane fabrication and facile retrofitting of existing membrane based water treatment facilities with catalytic membrane reactors. Compared to catalytic fluidized or fixed bed reactors, catalytic membrane reactors feature minimal diffusional limitation. Additionally, embedding catalyst within the membrane avoids the need for catalyst recovery and can prevent aggregation of catalytic nanoparticles. In this work, Pd/xGnP, Pd-Au/xGnP, and commercial Pd/Al2O3 nanoparticles were employed in batch and flow-through membrane reactors to catalyze the dehalogenation of TCE in the presence of dissolved H2. Bimetallic Pd-Au/xGnP catalysts were shown to be more active than monometallic Pd/xGnP or commercial Pd/Al 2O3 catalysts. In addition to synthesizing nanocomposite membranes for high-throughput TCE dehalogenation, the membrane based dehalogenation process was designed to minimize the detrimental impact of common catalyst poisons (S2-, HS-, and H2S -) by concurrent oxidation of sulfide species to gypsum in the presence of Ca2+ and removal of gypsum through membrane filtration. The engineered membrane dehalogenation process demonstrated that bimetallic Pd-Au/xGnP catalysts resisted deactivation by residual sulfide species after oxidation, and showed complete removal of gypsum during membrane filtration.

  12. Effects of Membrane- and Catalyst-layer-thickness Nonuniformitiesin Polymer-electrolyte Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Adam Z.; Newman, John

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, results from mathematical, pseudo 2-D simulations are shown for four different along-the-channel thickness distributions of both the membrane and cathode catalyst layer. The results and subsequent analysis clearly demonstrate that for the membrane thickness distributions, cell performance is affected a few percent under low relative-humidity conditions and that the position along the gas channel is more important than the local thickness variations. However, for the catalyst-layer thickness distributions, global performance is not impacted, although for saturated conditions there is a large variability in the local temperature and performance depending on the thickness.

  13. One pot aqueous synthesis of nanoporous Au85Pt15 material with surface bound Pt islands: an efficient methanol tolerant ORR catalyst.

    PubMed

    Anandha Ganesh, P; Jeyakumar, D

    2014-11-07

    For the first time, we are reporting the synthesis of Au100-xPtx nanoporous materials in the size range of 7-10 nm through the galvanic replacement of Ag by Pt from Au100-xAg2x spherical nano-alloys (x = 20, 15, 10 and 5) in an aqueous medium. The galvanic replacement reaction follows the 'Volmer-Weber' growth mode, resulting in the formation of surface bound platinum islands on a nanoporous gold surface. The high angle annular dark field image and low angle X-ray diffraction studies confirm the presence of nanoporous Au100-xPtx NPs. The electrochemical studies using the Au85Pt15/C catalyst show excellent methanol tolerance behaviour and better performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in terms of high mass activity, mass-specific activity and figure of merit (FOM) when compared to HiSPEC Pt/C commercial catalyst. Preliminary studies on a full cell using nanoporous Au85Pt15/C (loading 1.0 mg cm(-2)) as the cathode material and Pt-Ru/C (loading: 0.5 mg cm(-2)) as the anode material performed better (38 mW cm(-2)) than the HiSPEC Pt/C cathode material (16 mW cm(-2)).

  14. Polymer versus phosphine stabilized Rh nanoparticles as components of supported catalysts: implication in the hydrogenation of cyclohexene model molecule.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M; Garcia, M A S; Vono, L L R; Guerrero, M; Lecante, P; Rossi, L M; Philippot, K

    2016-11-28

    The solution synthesis of rhodium nanoparticles (Rh NPs) was achieved from the organometallic complex [Rh(η(3)-C3H5)3] under mild reaction conditions in the presence of a polymer (PVP), a monophosphine (PPh3) and a diphosphine (dppb) as a stabilizer, leading to very small Rh NPs of 2.2, 1.3 and 1.7 nm mean size, with PVP, PPh3 and dppb, respectively. The surface properties of these nanoparticles were compared using a model catalysis reaction namely, hydrogenation of cyclohexene, first under colloidal conditions and then under supported conditions after their immobilization onto an amino functionalized silica-coated magnetite support. PVP-stabilized Rh NPs were the most active catalyst whatever the catalytic conditions as a result of a strong coordination of the phosphine ligands at the metal surface that blocks some surface atoms even after several recycles of the supported nanocatalysts and limit the reactivity of the metallic surface.

  15. Preparation of polymer-supported Ru-TsDPEN catalysts and use for enantioselective synthesis of (S)-fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Li, Yangzhou; Li, Zhiming; Li, Feng; Wang, Quanrui; Tao, Fanggang

    2005-07-21

    Polymer-supported chiral ligands 9 and 17 were prepared based on Noyori's (1S,2S)- or (1R,2R)-N-(p-tolylsulfonyl)-1,2-diphenylethylenediamine. The combination with [RuCl2(p-cymene)]2 has been shown to exhibit high activities and enantioselectivities for heterogeneous asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of aromatic ketones (19a-c) with formic acid-triethylamine azeotrope as the hydrogen donor, whereby affording the respective optically active alcohols 20a-c, the key precursors of chiral fluoxetine. As exemplified by ligand 17 for substrate 19c, the catalysts can be recovered and reused in three consecutive runs with no significant decline in enantioselectivity. The procedure avoids the plausible contamination of fluoxetine by the toxic transition metal species.

  16. Stable and catalytically active iron porphyrin-based porous organic polymer: Activity as both a redox and Lewis acid catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Oveisi, Ali R.; Zhang, Kainan; Khorramabadi-zad, Ahmad; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    A new porphyrin-based porous organic polymer (POP) with BET surface area ranging from 780 to 880 m2/g was synthesized in free-base form via the reaction of meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl) porphyrin and a rigid trigonal building block, hexahydroxytriphenylene. The material was then metallated with Fe(III) imparting activity for Lewis acid catalysis (regioselective methanolysis ring-opening of styrene oxide), oxidative cyclization catalysis (conversion of bis(2-hydroxy-1-naphthyl)methanes to the corresponding spirodienone), and a tandem catalytic processes: an in situ oxidation-cyclic aminal formation-oxidation sequence, which selectively converts benzyl alcohol to 2-phenyl-quinazolin-4(3H)-one. Notably, the catalyst is readily recoverable and reusable, with little loss in catalytic activity. PMID:26177563

  17. Synthesis of polymer-supported dendritic palladium nanoparticle catalysts for Suzuki coupling reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Eagambaram; Jebaranjitham, J. Nimita; Usha, A.

    2012-09-01

    New bead-shaped heterogeneous nanoparticle catalysts viz., amino-terminated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) grafted on poly(styrene)-co-Poly(vinylbenzylchloride) (PS-Poly(VBC)) matrices immobilized/stabilized with palladium nanoparticle were prepared by simplified procedure. The first step is the preparation of PS-Poly(VBC) beads by suspension polymerization method. Second, the PAMAM G(0) G(1) and G(2) dendrimers were grafted individually onto the PS-Poly(VBC) matrices via divergent method by repeating two reactions, i.e., Michael addition of methyl acrylate to surface amino groups of aminomethylated PS-Poly(VBC) matrixes followed by amidation of the resulting esters with ethylene diamine. The resulting three types of PAMAM G(0), G(1) and G(2) grafted on PS-Poly(VBC) matrices were complexed individually with PdCl2 and thus yielded the corresponding new bead-shaped heterogeneous nanoparticle catalyst immobilized with PdNPs. The appearance of surface plasmon resonance band noticed at 547 nm in UV confirms the formation of PdNPs. The SEM result shows that the intensity of white patches due to immobilization of PdNPs increases with generation number and XRD reveals that the crystalline nature was decreased against generation number of the PAMAM. The catalytic efficiency of PS-Poly(VBC)-NH2-PdNPs-G(0), G(1) and G(2) catalysts were examined by Suzuki coupling reaction performed in mixture of water/ethanol. The observed reaction yield reveals that the activity was proportional to the generation number of PAMAM grafted onto the PS-Poly(VBC) matrices. The percentage of reaction yield (biphenyl) is sustained to ≈70 % even up to five cycles and this in turn confirms the stability of the catalysts. These catalysts can be used to conduct the Suzuki-coupling reaction in continuous mode operation in industrial scale.

  18. Oxidative degradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol in contaminated soil suspensions using a supramolecular catalyst of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (p-hydroxyphenyl)porphine-iron(III) bound to humic acid via formaldehyde polycondensation.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Masami; Shigematsu, Satoko; Nagao, Seiya

    2009-09-01

    A supramolecular catalyst consisting of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(p-hydroxyphenyl)porphine-iron(III) (FeTPP(OH)(4)) bound to humic acid (HA) was synthesized via formaldehyde polycondensation. The catalytic system, which included the synthesized catalyst (resol) and an oxygen donor (KHSO(5)), was applied to the oxidative degradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TrCP) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) in contaminated soil suspensions. The optimal conditions (catalyst, KHSO(5) and substrate concentrations) were investigated. In both FeTPP(OH)(4) and resol catalytic systems, more than 95% of TrCP (100 microM) and PCP (25 microM) degraded at pH 4, [catalyst] 20 microM and [KHSO(5)] 1 mM. When initial concentrations of TrCP and PCP were increased to [TrCP](0) 200 micro M and [PCP](0) 50 micro M, the percent degradation of the CPs and the levels of dechlorination in the resol catalytic system were significantly greater than the values obtained using the FeTPP(OH)(4) system. These results show that the synthesized resol catalyst effectively enhances oxidative degradation of TrCP and PCP in contaminated soil suspensions. The resol catalysts adsorbed to contaminated soils were at levels that were significantly greater than those of FeTPP(OH)(4). Therefore, the enhanced degradation of CPs by resol catalysts can be attributed to the interactions between adsorbed CPs on the soil surface and the catalytic center of the resol catalysts.

  19. Porous coordination polymers of diverse topologies based on a twisted tetrapyridylbiaryl: application as nucleophilic catalysts for acetylation of phenols.

    PubMed

    Seth, Saona; Venugopalan, Paloth; Moorthy, Jarugu Narasimha

    2015-01-26

    Porous coordination polymers (CPs) with partially uncoordinated pyridyl rings based on rationally designed polypyridyl linkers are appealing from the point of view of their application as nucleophilic catalysts. A D2d -symmetric tetradentate organic linker L, that is, 2,2',6,6'-tetramethoxy-3,3',5,5'-tetrakis(4-pyridyl)biphenyl, was designed and synthesized for metal-assisted self-assembly aimed at porous CPs. Depending on the nature of the metal ion and the counter anion, the ligand L is found to function as a 3- or 4-connecting building block leading to porous CPs of diverse topologies. The reaction of L with Zn(NO3 )2 and Cd(NO3 )2 yields porous 2 D CPs of "fes" topology, in which the tetrapyridyl linker L serves as a 3-connecting unit with its free pyridyl rings well exposed into the pores. The functional utility of these porous CPs containing uncoordinated pyridyl rings is demonstrated by employing them as efficient heterogeneous nucleophilic catalysts for acetylation of a number of phenols with varying electronic properties and reactivities.

  20. One pot aqueous synthesis of nanoporous Au85Pt15 material with surface bound Pt islands: an efficient methanol tolerant ORR catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandha Ganesh, P.; Jeyakumar, D.

    2014-10-01

    For the first time, we are reporting the synthesis of Au100-xPtx nanoporous materials in the size range of 7-10 nm through the galvanic replacement of Ag by Pt from Au100-xAg2x spherical nano-alloys (x = 20, 15, 10 and 5) in an aqueous medium. The galvanic replacement reaction follows the `Volmer-Weber' growth mode, resulting in the formation of surface bound platinum islands on a nanoporous gold surface. The high angle annular dark field image and low angle X-ray diffraction studies confirm the presence of nanoporous Au100-xPtx NPs. The electrochemical studies using the Au85Pt15/C catalyst show excellent methanol tolerance behaviour and better performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in terms of high mass activity, mass-specific activity and figure of merit (FOM) when compared to HiSPEC Pt/C commercial catalyst. Preliminary studies on a full cell using nanoporous Au85Pt15/C (loading 1.0 mg cm-2) as the cathode material and Pt-Ru/C (loading: 0.5 mg cm-2) as the anode material performed better (38 mW cm-2) than the HiSPEC Pt/C cathode material (16 mW cm-2).For the first time, we are reporting the synthesis of Au100-xPtx nanoporous materials in the size range of 7-10 nm through the galvanic replacement of Ag by Pt from Au100-xAg2x spherical nano-alloys (x = 20, 15, 10 and 5) in an aqueous medium. The galvanic replacement reaction follows the `Volmer-Weber' growth mode, resulting in the formation of surface bound platinum islands on a nanoporous gold surface. The high angle annular dark field image and low angle X-ray diffraction studies confirm the presence of nanoporous Au100-xPtx NPs. The electrochemical studies using the Au85Pt15/C catalyst show excellent methanol tolerance behaviour and better performance towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in terms of high mass activity, mass-specific activity and figure of merit (FOM) when compared to HiSPEC Pt/C commercial catalyst. Preliminary studies on a full cell using nanoporous Au85Pt15/C (loading 1.0 mg

  1. Influence of supports on gas-phase olefin polymerization over polymer-supported (n-BuCp)2-zirconium chloride/MAO catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammawa, Hassan

    The influence of support properties on gas-phase olefin polymerization over polymer-supported (n-BuCp)2ZrCl2/MAO catalysts were investigated in a newly fabricated polymerization reactor with enhanced cooling. Inserting Kenics type static mixers into channels used for coolant flow enhanced the cooling efficiency of the new reactor; the coolant channels are drilled along the reactor wall. Good gas-phase temperature control was achieved in polymerization runs with maximum instantaneous rates up to 100 g-PE per hour. Polymerizations were typically run for 1 h at 80°C, 1.4 MPa and, for some runs, gas samples from the reactor were analyzed at 3 min intervals. The polymerization rate profiles are typically acceleration-decay type. Residual aluminum alkyls in the reactor suppressed the initial polymerization rates, but average activities often increased due to broadening of the activity profiles. This effect increased with the amount of aluminum alkyl and decreasing alkyl size as follows: TEA > TIBA > TNOA. Polymer-supported catalysts were prepared by sequentially contacting thermally treated supports with MAO and metallocene solutions followed by vacuum drying the suspensions. Low fragility supports resulted in catalysts that homopolymerized ethylene with low activity due to poor catalyst fragmentation. The product particles consisted of unfragmented catalyst core surrounded by loose polyethylene layer. The average ethylene homopolymerization activity of these catalysts 10--50 g PE/(g cat·h) increased 5--20 times when about 15 mol/m3 1-hexene was initially present in the gas-phase; the catalysts were completely fragmented during the copolymerization. Catalysts made with highly friable supports showed high activity during both ethylene, and ethylene/alpha-olefin polymerizations. 1-Hexene had less significant influence on activity than with the low friability supports under similar polymerization conditions. The presence of 7.5 mol/m3 1-hexene resulted in copolymers of

  2. Water balance model for polymer electrolyte fuel cells with ultrathin catalyst layers.

    PubMed

    Chan, Karen; Eikerling, Michael

    2014-02-07

    We present a water balance model of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) with ultrathin catalyst layers (UTCLs). The model treats the catalyst layers in an interface approximation and the gas diffusion layers as linear transmission lines of water fluxes. It relates current density, pressure distribution, and water fluxes in the different functional layers of the assembly. The optimal mode of operation of UTCLs is in a fully flooded state. The main challenge for MEAs with UTCLs is efficient liquid water removal, to avoid flooding of the gas diffusion layers. The model provides strategies for increasing the critical current density for the onset of flooding, via liquid permeabilities, vaporization areas, and gas pressure differentials. Finally, we discuss methods to identify regimes of transport via water flux measurements.

  3. Influence of Belousov-Zhabotinsky substrate concentrations on autonomous oscillation of polymer chains with Fe(bpy)3 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yusuke; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Kenji

    2014-06-19

    We studied the effect of initial substrate concentrations in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction on the optical transmittance self-oscillation behavior of a polymer chain consisting of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and a Fe catalyst ([Fe(bpy)3]). The driving force of this transmittance self-oscillation was the solubility difference between the reduced and oxidized states of the [Fe(bpy)3] moiety in the polymer chain. The amplitude of the soluble-insoluble self-oscillation of poly(NIPAAm-co-[Fe(bpy)3]) was significantly smaller than that of poly(NIPAAm-co-[Ru(bpy)3]). Theoretical simulation results attributed this behavior to the small difference in the solvent qualities, C*, of the reduced and oxidized states. Furthermore, we clarified that poly(NIPAAm-co-[Fe(bpy)3]) required a narrower concentration range of HNO3 to exhibit self-oscillation than poly(NIPAAm-co-[Ru(bpy)3]), since transmittance self-oscillation occurred only for [HNO3] = 0.3 M. The period of self-oscillation of poly(NIPAAm-co-[Fe(bpy)3]) in solution was controlled mainly by NaBrO3 concentration and was hardly influenced by the initial concentration of malonic acid.

  4. B-N polymer embedded iron(0) nanoparticles as highly active and long lived catalyst in the dehydrogenation of ammonia borane.

    PubMed

    Duman, Sibel; Metin, Onder; Ozkar, Saim

    2013-07-01

    B-N polymer embedded iron(0) nanoparticles (NPs) were in-situ generated from the reduction of iron(III) acetylacetonate during the dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (AB) in THF solution at 40.0 +/- 0.5 degrees C. The iron(0) NPs could be isolated as powder from the reaction solution by centrifugation and characterized by UV-Vis, TEM, and XRD. They are redispersible in polar solvent such as THF and yet highly active catalysts in the dehydrogenation of AB providing a TOF value of 202 h(-1) at 40.0 +/- 0.5 degrees C. The catalytic activity of iron(0) NPs compare well with those of the known homogenous and heterogeneous precious metal catalysts reported so far. They are also long-life catalysts in the dehydrogenation of AB providing 1410 turnovers over 18 h at 40.0 +/- 0.5 degrees C. The poisoning experiments using carbon disulfide show that the dehydrogenation of AB catalyzed by iron(0) NPs is a heterogeneous catalysis. The catalytic dehydrogenation of AB in the presence of iron(0) NPs was followed by measuring the volume of hydrogen generated and by 11B-NMR spectroscopy. Our report also includes the results of a detailed kinetic study on the catalytic dehydrogenation of AB depending on the catalyst concentration, substrate concentration, and temperature. The dehydrogenation of AB produces sparingly soluble B-N polymers which provide just enough stability to the iron(0) NPs. The co-precipitation of some iron(0) NPs with the sparingly soluble polymers causes a slight decrease in the catalytic activity toward the end of dehydrogenation. However, iron(0) NPs embedded in B-N polymers appear to be an efficient catalyst in hydrogen generation from ammonia borane at moderate temperature.

  5. Determination of catalyst metal residues in polymers by X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bichinho, Kátia M.; Pires, Gilvan Pozzobon; Stedile, Fernanda C.; dos Santos, João Henrique Z.; Wolf, Carlos Rodolfo

    2005-06-01

    Commercial polyethylenes produced by Ziegler-Natta, Philips and metallocene technology were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Synthetic standards using wax matrix was shown to be suitable for the calibration curve in comparison to those prepared by milling and grinding virgin polymer mixed with standard metal oxide as matrix. The detection limits obtained for the studied metal in the different polymers were: 12 mg kg -1 for Mg, 0.8 mg kg -1 for Ti, 1.6 mg kg -1 for Cr, 1.2 mg kg -1 for Zr and 1.9 mg kg -1 for V. For comparative reasons, the determination of residual metal content by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) is also discussed.

  6. Photocatalytic Water Reduction Using a Polymer Coated Carbon Quantum Dot Sensitizer and a Nickel Nanoparticle Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Virca, C; Winter, H; Goforth, A; Mackiewicz, M; McCormick, Theresa M

    2017-04-03

    Hydrogen gas is produced photocatalytically using 470 nm light, PVP-coated carbon quantum dots (CQDs) as the photosensitizer, and nickel nanoparticles (NiNPs) as the catalyst. The effect of the amount of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on the ability of the CQD/NiNP composites to catalyze proton reduction was studied. A maximum of 330 mmols H2/g CQD is produced using 68 μg/mL of CQDs and 6 μg/mL of NiNPs, with activity persisting for 4 hours when 20 wt%-PVP-coated CQDs were used. The H2 production quantum yield under these conditions is 6%. It was found that composites having higher weight percent PVP had decreased rates of H2 production, but increased duration. Increasing the weight percent of PVP coating also increases the fluorescence quantum yield of CQDs. Fluorescence quenching titrations reveal that H2 production could occur by either a reductive or oxidative quenching mechanism. The nano-materials, prepared using simple methods, are demonstrated to both effective as both the photosensitizer and catalyst a proton reduction system that operates using visible light.

  7. Same-View Nano-XAFS/STEM-EDS Imagings of Pt Chemical Species in Pt/C Cathode Catalyst Layers of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Takao, Shinobu; Sekizawa, Oki; Samjeské, Gabor; Nagamatsu, Shin-ichi; Kaneko, Takuma; Yamamoto, Takashi; Higashi, Kotaro; Nagasawa, Kensaku; Uruga, Tomoya; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2015-06-04

    We have made the first success in the same-view imagings of 2D nano-XAFS and TEM/STEM-EDS under a humid N2 atmosphere for Pt/C cathode catalyst layers in membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) with Nafion membrane to examine the degradation of Pt/C cathodes by anode gas exchange cycles (start-up/shut-down simulations of PEFC vehicles). The same-view imaging under the humid N2 atmosphere provided unprecedented spatial information on the distribution of Pt nanoparticles and oxidation states in the Pt/C cathode catalyst layer as well as Nafion ionomer-filled nanoholes of carbon support in the wet MEA, which evidence the origin of the formation of Pt oxidation species and isolated Pt nanoparticles in the nanohole areas of the cathode layer with different Pt/ionomer ratios, relevant to the degradation of PEFC catalysts.

  8. Palladium-Mediated Surface-Initiated Kumada Catalyst Polycondensation: A Facile Route Towards Oriented Conjugated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Huddleston, N Eric; Sontag, S Kyle; Bilbrey, Jenna A; Sheppard, Gareth R; Locklin, Jason

    2012-12-21

    Palladium-mediated surface-initiated Kumada catalyst transfer polycondensation is used to generate poly(3-methyl thiophene) films with controlled thickness up to 100 nm. The palladium initiator density is measured using cyclic voltammetry and a ferrocene-capping agent, where the surface density is found to be 55% (1.1 × 10(14) molecules per cm(2)). UV-Vis spectroscopy and AFM show increased aggregation in palladium-initiated films due to the higher grafting density of palladium initiators on the surface. The anisotropy of the P3MT films is determined using polarized UV-Vis spectroscopy, which indicates a degree of orientation perpendicular to the substrate. Evidence that palladium can maintain π-complexation even at elevated temperatures, is also shown through the exclusive intramolecular coupling of both a phenyl and thiophene-based magnesium bromide with different dihaloarenes.

  9. Insights into the asymmetric heterogeneous catalysis in porous organic polymers: constructing a TADDOL-embedded chiral catalyst for studying the structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    An, Wan-Kai; Han, Man-Yi; Wang, Chang-An; Yu, Si-Min; Zhang, Yuan; Bai, Shi; Wang, Wei

    2014-08-25

    Construction of porous organic polymers (POPs) as asymmetric catalysts remains as an important but challenging task. Herein, we exploit the "bottom-up" strategy to facilely synthesize an α,α,α',α'-tetraaryl-1,3-dioxolane-4,5-dimethanol (TADDOL)-based chiral porous polymer (TADDOL-CPP) for highly efficient asymmetric catalysis. Constructed through the covalent linkages among the three-dimensional rigid monomers, TADDOL-CPP possesses hierarchical porous structure, high Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, together with abundant and uniformly-distributed chiral sites. In the presence of [Ti(OiPr)4], TADDOL-CPP acts as a highly efficient and recyclable catalyst in the asymmetric addition of diethylzinc (Et2Zn) to aromatic aldehydes. Based on the direct observation of the key intermediates, the reaction mechanism has been revealed by solid-state (13)C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. In combination with the catalytic testing results, characterization on the working catalyst provides further information for understanding the structure-activity relationship. We suggest that the catalytic activity of TADDOL-CPP is largely affected by the structural rigidity, cooperative catalysis, local chiral environment, and hierarchical porous framework. We expect that the information obtained herein will benefit to the designed synthesis of robust POP catalysts toward practical applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. The synthesis of comb polymers containing helical polyisocyanate segments using a macromolecular titanium(IV) catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, T.E.; Novak, B.M.

    1993-12-31

    CpTiCl{sub 2}(OMMA), 1, [-OMMA = alkoxide of methyl {alpha}-(hydroxymethyl)acrylate] was synthesized from CpTiCl{sub 3} and methyl {alpha}-(hydroxymethyl)acrylate and used in the synthesis of a poly(n-hexyl isocynate) segments attached to a poly(methyl methacrylate) backbone. Methyl methacrylate and 1 were copolymerized (5% titanium containing monomer feed) using AIBN initiator at 80{degrees}C to yield a copolymer with pendant titanium alkoxide groups. Treatment of this copolymer with n-hexyl isocyanate produced the title comb polymer.

  11. Preparative size-exclusion chromatography for purification and characterization of colloidal quantum dots bound by chromophore-labeled polymers and low-molecular-weight chromophores.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingfeng; Bardajee, Ghasem Rezanejade; Kumar, Sandeep; Nitz, Mark; Scholes, Gregory D; Winnik, Mitchell A

    2009-06-19

    We explore the use of preparative size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to purify quantum dots (QDs) after surface modification. In one example, in which Bio-Beads (S-X1) were used as the packing material for the preparative SEC column, CdSe QDs treated with a functional coumarin dye could be separated from the excess free dye by using tetrahydrofuran (THF) as the mobile phase. This column was unable to separate polymer-coated QDs from free polymer (M approximately 8000) because of the relatively low cutoff mass of the column. Here a preparative HPLC column packed with TOYOPEARL gel allowed the effective separation of polymer-bound QDs from the excess free polymer by using N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) as the mobile phase. When other solvents such as absolute ethanol, acetonitrile, THF, and THF-triethylamine mixtures were used as the eluent, QDs stuck to the column. While NMP was an effective medium to remove excess free polymer from the QDs, it was difficult to transfer the purified QDs to more volatile solvents and maintain colloidal stability.

  12. Ionic Polymer Microspheres Bearing a Co(III) -Salen Moiety as a Bifunctional Heterogeneous Catalyst for the Efficient Cycloaddition of CO2 and Epoxides.

    PubMed

    Leng, Yan; Lu, Dan; Zhang, Chenjun; Jiang, Pingping; Zhang, Weijie; Wang, Jun

    2016-06-06

    We report a unique strategy to obtain the bifunctional heterogeneous catalyst TBB-Bpy@Salen-Co (TBB=1,2,4,5-tetrakis(bromomethyl)benzene, Bpy=4,4'-bipyridine, Salen-Co=N,N'-bis({4-dimethylamino}salicylidene)ethylenediamino cobalt(III) acetate) by combining a cross-linked ionic polymer with a Co(III) -salen Schiff base. The catalyst showed extra high activity for CO2 fixation under mild, solvent-free reaction conditions with no requirement for a co-catalyst. The synthesized catalyst possessed distinctive spherical structural features, abundant halogen Br(-) anions with good leaving group ability, and accessible Lewis acidic Co metal centers. These unique features, together with the synergistic role of the Co and Br(-) functional sites, allowed TBB-Bpy@Salen-Co to exhibit enhanced catalytic conversion of CO2 into cyclic carbonates relative to the corresponding monofunctional analogues. This catalyst can be easily recovered and recycled five times without significant leaching of Co or loss of activity. Moreover, based on our experimental results and previous work, a synergistic cycloaddition reaction mechanism was proposed.

  13. Deoxyribonucleic acid directed metallization of platinum nanoparticles on graphite nanofibers as a durable oxygen reduction catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peera, S. Gouse; Sahu, A. K.; Arunchander, A.; Nath, Krishna; Bhat, S. D.

    2015-11-01

    Effective surface functionalization to the hydrophobic graphite nanofibers (GNF) is performed with the biomolecule, namely deoxy-ribo-nucleic-acid (DNA) via π-π interactions. Pt nanoparticles are impregnated on GNF-DNA composite by ethylene glycol reduction method (Pt/GNF-DNA) and its effect on electro catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is systemically studied. Excellent dispersion of Pt nanoparticles over GNF-DNA surfaces with no evidence on particle aggregation is a remarkable achievement in this study. This result in higher electro chemical surface area of the catalyst, enhanced ORR behavior with significant enhancement in mass activity. The catalyst is validated in H2-O2 polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) and a peak power density of 675 mW cm-2 is achieved at a load current density of 1320 mA cm-2 with a minimal catalyst loading of 0.1 mg cm-2 at a cell temperature of 70 °C and 2 bar absolute pressure. Repeated potential cycling up to 10000 cycles in acidic media is also performed for this catalyst and found excellent stability with only 60 mV drop in the ORR half wave potential. The superior behavior of Pt/GNF-DNA catalyst is credited to the robust fibrous structure of GNF and its effective surface functionalization process via π-π interaction.

  14. Polyaniline-derived non-precious catalyst for the polymer electrolyte fuel cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Gang; Chen, Zhongwei; Garzon, Fernando; Zelenay, Piotr

    2008-01-01

    A novel polyaniline (PANI)-derived non-precious cathode catalyst was developed in this work, exhibiting remarkable activity (onset potential: 0.9 V, half-wave potential: 0.77 V) and selectivity (0.4 % H20 2 at 0.4 V). As a result, the generated current densities at high voltages associated with electrochemically kinetic activity can be achieved to 0.04 Acm-2 for 0.80V and 0.21 Acm-2 for 0.6 V, when air was used in fuel cell tests. MEA life test at a constant voltage of 0.4 V demonstrated a promising stability up to 450 hours, without obvious degradation. The current density during the test was measured around 0.32 A cm-2, a respectable performance for a cell with non-precious cathode, operated on air rather than oxygen. The possible active sites, related to pyridine- and pyrrole-like metal species were discussed according to presented XPS and XRD analysis.

  15. Effect of adherent bacteria and bacterial extracellular polymers upon assimilation by Macoma balthica of sediment-bound Cd, Zn and Ag

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, Ronald W.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of adherent bacteria and bacterial extracellular polymer (exopolymer) upon uptake of particle-bound Cd, Zn and Ag by the deposit-feeding clam Macoma balthica were studied in the laboratory. Amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and unaltered and alkaline-extracted sediments were used as model particulates in separate, controlled deposit-feeding experiments. In general, amounts of metal taken up from ingested particles varied dramatically with the nature of the particle surface. Ingestion of contaminated iron oxide particles did not contribute to overall uptake of Cd and Ag in feeding clams, but accounted for 89 to 99% of total Zn uptake. Exopolymer adsorbed on iron oxide particles caused an increase in the biological availability of particle-bound metals in the order Ag>Cd>Zn, whereas adherent bacteria up to 3.2 X 1011 g-1 had no effect upon amounts of metal taken up from ingested particulates. At the higher Cd and Ag concentrations employed (3.6 X 10-7M), feeding rates declined with increasing amounts of iron oxide-bound exopolymer, suggesting behavioral avoidance due to increased metal availability. Much of the Cd (57 %) taken up by clams feeding on unaltered estuarine sediments originated from particulates, even though particle/solute distribution of Cd (86%) was similar to that in experiments with iron oxide particles. Uptake of Cd from alkalineextracted sediments was insignificant, as it was from unamended iron oxide. However, addition of exopolymer (10 mgg-1 sediment) caused a restoration nn bioavailability of sediment-bound Cd.

  16. Nitrogen-doped graphene-rich catalysts derived from heteroatom polymers for oxygen reduction in nonaqueous lithium-O2 battery cathodes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang; Mack, Nathan H; Gao, Wei; Ma, Shuguo; Zhong, Ruiqin; Han, Jiantao; Baldwin, Jon K; Zelenay, Piotr

    2012-11-27

    In this work, we present a synthesis approach for nitrogen-doped graphene-sheet-like nanostructures via the graphitization of a heteroatom polymer, in particular, polyaniline, under the catalysis of a cobalt species using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) as a supporting template. The graphene-rich composite catalysts (Co-N-MWNTs) exhibit substantially improved activity for oxygen reduction in nonaqueous lithium-ion electrolyte as compared to those of currently used carbon blacks and Pt/carbon catalysts, evidenced by both rotating disk electrode and Li-O(2) battery experiments. The synthesis-structure-activity correlations for the graphene nanostructures were explored by tuning their synthetic chemistry (support, nitrogen precursor, heating temperature, and transition metal type and content) to investigate how the resulting morphology and nitrogen-doping functionalities (e.g., pyridinic, pyrrolic, and quaternary) influence the catalyst activity. In particular, an optimal temperature for heat treatment during synthesis is critical to creating a high-surface-area catalyst with favorable nitrogen doping. The sole Co phase, Co(9)S(8), was present in the catalyst but plays a negligible role in ORR. Nevertheless, the addition of Co species in the synthesis is indispensable for achieving high activity, due to its effects on the final catalyst morphology and structure, including surface area, nitrogen doping, and graphene formation. This new route for the preparation of a nitrogen-doped graphene nanocomposite with carbon nanotube offers synthetic control of morphology and nitrogen functionality and shows promise for applications in nonaqueous oxygen reduction electrocatalysis for Li-O(2) battery cathodes.

  17. Organometallic polymerization catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Waymouth, R.M.

    1993-12-31

    Well-defined transition metal catalysts have resulted in exciting new opportunities in polymer synthesis. The stereochemistry of vinyl polymers can be rationally controlled with choice of the appropriate catalysts. Studies with optically active catalyst precursors have revealed considerable information on the absolute stereochemistry of olefin polymerization and have led to the synthesis of novel chiral polyolefins. The development of homogeneous olefin metathesis catalysts has also led to a variety of well-defined new polymer structures with controlled molecular weight and molecular weight distribution. Recent advances in understanding the mechanisms and stereochemistry of homogeneous transition metal catalyzed polymerization will be discussed. The ability to control polymer structure through catalyst design presents exciting opportunities in the synthesis of {open_quotes}tailor-made{close_quotes} macromolecules.

  18. Development of Hierarchical Polymer@Pd Nanowire‐Network: Synthesis and Application as Highly Active Recyclable Catalyst and Printable Conductive Ink

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Sajjad Husain

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A facile one‐pot approach for preparing hierarchical nanowire‐networks of hollow polymer@Pd nanospheres is reported. First, polymer@Pd hollow nanospheres were produced through metal‐complexation‐induced phase separation with functionalized graft copolymers and subsequent self‐assembly of PdNPs. The nanospheres hierarchically assembled into the nanowire‐network upon drying. The Pd nanowire‐network served as an active catalyst for Mizoroki–Heck and Suzuki–Miyaura coupling reactions. As low as 500 μmol % Pd was sufficient for quantitative reactions, and the origin of the high activity is ascribed to the highly active sites originating from high‐index facets, kinks, and coalesced structures. The catalyst can be recycled via simple filtration and washing, maintaining its high activity owing to the micrometer‐sized hierarchical structure of the nanomaterial. The polymer@Pd nanosphere also served as a printable conductive ink for a translucent grid pattern with excellent horizontal conductivity (7.5×105 S m−1). PMID:27551657

  19. Development of Hierarchical Polymer@Pd Nanowire-Network: Synthesis and Application as Highly Active Recyclable Catalyst and Printable Conductive Ink.

    PubMed

    Mir, Sajjad Husain; Ochiai, Bungo

    2016-06-01

    A facile one-pot approach for preparing hierarchical nanowire-networks of hollow polymer@Pd nanospheres is reported. First, polymer@Pd hollow nanospheres were produced through metal-complexation-induced phase separation with functionalized graft copolymers and subsequent self-assembly of PdNPs. The nanospheres hierarchically assembled into the nanowire-network upon drying. The Pd nanowire-network served as an active catalyst for Mizoroki-Heck and Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reactions. As low as 500 μmol % Pd was sufficient for quantitative reactions, and the origin of the high activity is ascribed to the highly active sites originating from high-index facets, kinks, and coalesced structures. The catalyst can be recycled via simple filtration and washing, maintaining its high activity owing to the micrometer-sized hierarchical structure of the nanomaterial. The polymer@Pd nanosphere also served as a printable conductive ink for a translucent grid pattern with excellent horizontal conductivity (7.5×10(5) S m(-1)).

  20. In-plane and through-plane non-uniform carbon corrosion of polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathode catalyst layer during extended potential cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sourov; Ohashi, Hidenori; Tabata, Hiroshi; Hashimasa, Yoshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2017-09-01

    The impact of electrochemical carbon corrosion via potential cycling durability tests mimicking start-stop operation events on the microstructure of the cathode catalyst layer in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) is investigated using focused ion beam (FIB) fabrication without/with the pore-filling technique and subsequent scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations. FIB/SEM investigations without pore-filling reveals that the durability test induces non-uniform cathode shrinking across the in-plane direction; the thickness of the catalyst layer decreases more under the gas flow channel compared to the area under the rim of the flow field. Furthermore, FIB/SEM investigations with the pore-filling technique reveal that the durability test also induces non-uniform cathode shrinking in the through-plane direction; the pores in the area close to the membrane are more shrunken compared with those close to the microporous layer. In particular, a thin area (1-1.5 μm) close to the membrane is found to be severely damaged; it includes closed pores that hinder mass transport through the catalyst layer. It is suggested that uneven carbon corrosion and catalyst layer compaction are responsible for the performance loss during potential cycling operation of PEFCs.

  1. Activities and Stabilities of Au-Modified Stepped-Pt Single-Crystal Electrodes as Model Cathode Catalysts in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Kensaku; Jinnouchi, Ryosuke; Takahashi, Naoko; Murata, Hajime; Morimoto, Yu

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this study is to test the concept of protecting vulnerable sites on cathode catalysts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Pt single-crystal surfaces were modified by depositing Au atoms selectively on (100) step sites and their electrocatalytic activities for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and stabilities against potential cycles were examined. The ORR activities were raised by 70% by the Au modifications, and this rise in the activity was ascribed to enhanced local ORR activities on Pt(111) terraces by the surface Au atoms. The Au modifications also stabilized the Pt surfaces against potential cycles by protecting the low-coordinated (100) step sites from surface reorganizations. Thus, the surface modification by selective Au depositions on vulnerable sites is a promising method to enhance both the ORR activity and durability of the catalysts.

  2. Performance and durability of Pt/C cathode catalysts with different kinds of carbons for polymer electrolyte fuel cells characterized by electrochemical and in situ XAFS techniques.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Kensaku; Takao, Shinobu; Higashi, Kotaro; Nagamatsu, Shin-ichi; Samjeské, Gabor; Imaizumi, Yoshiaki; Sekizawa, Oki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Uruga, Tomoya; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2014-06-07

    The electrochemical activity and durability of Pt nanoparticles on different kinds of carbon supports in oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) were investigated using rotating disc electrodes (RDE) and the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC). The mass activity of Pt/C catalysts (ORR activity per 1 mg of Pt) at the RDE decreased, according to the type of carbon support, in the following order; Ketjenblack (KB) > acetylene black (AB) > graphene > multiwall carbon nanotube (MW-CNT) > carbon black (CB), whereas the average size of the Pt nanoparticles and the surface specific activity (ORR activity per electrochemical surface area) did not vary significantly between these carbon supports. These results indicate that the different mass activities of the Pt/C catalysts may originate from the differences in the fraction of Pt on the carbon supports which is available for utilization. The durability of the MEAs of the top two active catalysts Pt/KB and Pt/AB among the five catalysts was examined based on ORR performance, TEM and in situ XAFS. It was found that the performance of the Pt/KB cathode catalyst in PEFC MEA decreased significantly over 500 accelerated durability test (ADT) cycles, whereas the performance of the Pt/AB cathode catalyst in PEFC MEA did not decrease significantly during 500 ADT cycles, it was also found that the Pt/AB possesses 8 times higher durability compared with the Pt/KB. In situ Pt LIII-edge XAFS data in the ADT cycles and stepwise potential operations revealed the different oxidation-reduction behaviors of the Pt nanoparticles on the KB and AB supports. The Pt/KB was oxidized to form surface PtO layers more easily than the Pt/AB in the increasing potential operation from 0.4 VRHE to 1.4 VRHE, and the surface PtO layers of the Pt/AB were reduced to the metallic Pt state more readily than those of the Pt/KB in the decreasing potential operation from 1.4 VRHE to 0.4 VRHE. The XAFS analysis for the Pt valences

  3. Polyolefin-supported recoverable/reusable Cr(III)-salen catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bergbreiter, David E; Hobbs, Christopher; Hongfa, Chayanant

    2011-01-21

    The design of functional soluble polyolefins for use as supports for salen ligands and metal complexes is described. Examples and applications that use both polyisobutylene (PIB)- and polyethylene (PE(Olig))-bound recoverable/recyclable salen ligands/metal complexes are detailed. In the case of using PIB as a support, the polymer-bound complexes can be recovered through the use of latent biphasic or a thermomorphic mixed solvent systems. In the case of PE(Olig)-supported complexes, the thermomorphic PE(Olig)-bound salen species can be dissolved in "hot" solvents and quantitatively recovered as solids upon cooling to room temperature. Both the PIB- and PE(Olig)-bound salen catalysts were shown to catalyze the ring-opening of epoxides with various nucleophiles. Both sorts of polyolefin-bound catalysts can be recycled and reused with no observed loss in activity. However, limitations of catalyst concentration make chiral versions of these complexes uncompetitive in comparison to conventional chiral salen catalysts that can be used in neat substrate at higher concentration to produce high enantioselectivity in the ring-opening products. The preparation of a PIB-bound "half-salen" catalyst was also briefly examined.

  4. High pressure pyrolyzed non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts for alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Sanetuntikul, Jakkid; Shanmugam, Sangaraju

    2015-05-07

    Non-precious metal catalysts, such as metal-coordinated to nitrogen doped-carbon, have shown reasonable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performances in alkaline fuel cells. In this report, we present the development of a highly active, stable and low-cost non-precious metal ORR catalyst by direct synthesis under autogenic-pressure conditions. Transmission electron microscopy studies show highly porous Fe-N-C and Co-N-C structures, which were further confirmed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurements. The surface areas of the Fe-N-C and Co-N-C catalysts were found to be 377.5 and 369.3 m(2) g(-1), respectively. XPS results show the possible existence of N-C and M-Nx structures, which are generally proposed to be the active sites in non-precious metal catalysts. The Fe-N-C electrocatalyst exhibits an ORR half-wave potential 20 mV higher than the reference Pt/C catalyst. The cycling durability test for Fe-N-C over 5000 cycles shows that the half-wave potential lost only 4 mV, whereas the half-wave potential of the Pt/C catalyst lost about 50 mV. The Fe-N-C catalyst exhibited an improved activity and stability compared to the reference Pt/C catalyst and it possesses a direct 4-electron transfer pathway for the ORR process. Further, the Fe-N-C catalyst produces extremely low HO2(-) content, as confirmed by the rotating ring-disk electrode measurements. In the alkaline fuel single cell tests, maximum power densities of 75 and 80 mW cm(-2) were observed for the Fe-N-C and Pt/C cathodes, respectively. Durability studies (100 h) showed that decay of the fuel cell current was more prominent for the Pt/C cathode catalyst compared to the Fe-N-C cathode catalyst. Therefore, the Fe-N-C catalyst appears to be a promising new class of non-precious metal catalysts prepared by an autogenic synthetic method.

  5. A facile synthetic strategy for iron, aniline-based non-precious metal catalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunjoon; Kim, Min Jeong; Lim, Taeho; Sung, Yung-Eun; Kim, Hyun-Jong; Lee, Ho-Nyun; Kwon, Oh Joong; Cho, Yong-Hun

    2017-07-14

    The development of a low cost and highly active alternative to the commercial Pt/C catalysts used in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) requires a facile and environmentally-friendly synthesis process to facilitate large-scale production and provide an effective replacement. Transition metals, in conjunction with nitrogen-doped carbon, are among the most promising substitute catalysts because of their high activity, inexpensive composition, and high carbon monoxide tolerance. We prepared a polyaniline-derived Fe-N-C catalyst for oxygen reduction using a facile one-pot process with no additional reagents. This process was carried out by ultrasonicating a mixture containing an iron precursor, an aniline monomer, and carbon black. The half-wave potential of the synthesized Fe-N-C catalyst for the ORR was only 10 mV less than that of a commercial Pt/C catalyst. The optimized Fe-N-C catalyst showed outstanding performance in a practical anion exchange membrane fuel cell (AEMFC), suggesting its potential as an alternative to commercial Pt/C catalysts for the ORR.

  6. High pressure pyrolyzed non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts for alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanetuntikul, Jakkid; Shanmugam, Sangaraju

    2015-04-01

    Non-precious metal catalysts, such as metal-coordinated to nitrogen doped-carbon, have shown reasonable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performances in alkaline fuel cells. In this report, we present the development of a highly active, stable and low-cost non-precious metal ORR catalyst by direct synthesis under autogenic-pressure conditions. Transmission electron microscopy studies show highly porous Fe-N-C and Co-N-C structures, which were further confirmed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurements. The surface areas of the Fe-N-C and Co-N-C catalysts were found to be 377.5 and 369.3 m2 g-1, respectively. XPS results show the possible existence of N-C and M-Nx structures, which are generally proposed to be the active sites in non-precious metal catalysts. The Fe-N-C electrocatalyst exhibits an ORR half-wave potential 20 mV higher than the reference Pt/C catalyst. The cycling durability test for Fe-N-C over 5000 cycles shows that the half-wave potential lost only 4 mV, whereas the half-wave potential of the Pt/C catalyst lost about 50 mV. The Fe-N-C catalyst exhibited an improved activity and stability compared to the reference Pt/C catalyst and it possesses a direct 4-electron transfer pathway for the ORR process. Further, the Fe-N-C catalyst produces extremely low HO2- content, as confirmed by the rotating ring-disk electrode measurements. In the alkaline fuel single cell tests, maximum power densities of 75 and 80 mW cm-2 were observed for the Fe-N-C and Pt/C cathodes, respectively. Durability studies (100 h) showed that decay of the fuel cell current was more prominent for the Pt/C cathode catalyst compared to the Fe-N-C cathode catalyst. Therefore, the Fe-N-C catalyst appears to be a promising new class of non-precious metal catalysts prepared by an autogenic synthetic method.Non-precious metal catalysts, such as metal-coordinated to nitrogen doped-carbon, have shown reasonable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performances in alkaline fuel cells. In

  7. Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an open-ended experiment which has students exploring polymer chemistry and reverse osmosis. This activity involves construction of a polymer membrane, use of it in a simple osmosis experiment, and application of its principles in solving a science-technology-society problem. (ML)

  8. Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an open-ended experiment which has students exploring polymer chemistry and reverse osmosis. This activity involves construction of a polymer membrane, use of it in a simple osmosis experiment, and application of its principles in solving a science-technology-society problem. (ML)

  9. S-Doping of an Fe/N/C ORR Catalyst for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells with High Power Density.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Cheng; Lai, Yu-Jiao; Song, Lin; Zhou, Zhi-You; Liu, Jian-Guo; Wang, Qiang; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Chi; Shi, Wei; Zheng, Yan-Ping; Rauf, Muhammad; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2015-08-17

    Fe/N/C is a promising non-Pt electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), but its catalytic activity is considerably inferior to that of Pt in acidic medium, the environment of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). An improved Fe/N/C catalyst (denoted as Fe/N/C-SCN) derived from Fe(SCN)3, poly-m-phenylenediamine, and carbon black is presented. The advantage of using Fe(SCN)3 as iron source is that the obtained catalyst has a high level of S doping and high surface area, and thus exhibits excellent ORR activity (23 A g(-1) at 0.80 V) in 0.1 M H2SO4 solution. When the Fe/N/C-SCN was applied in a PEMFC as cathode catalyst, the maximal power density could exceed 1 W cm(-2). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. PRELIMINARY IN-SITU X-RAY ABSORPTION FINE STRUCTURE EXAMINATION OF PT/C AND PTCO/C CATHODE CATALYSTS IN AN OPERATIONAL POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, B.T.; Myers, D.J.; Smith, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    State-of-the-art polymer electrolyte fuel cells require a conditioning period to reach optimized cell performance. There is insuffi cient understanding about the behavior of catalysts during this period, especially with regard to the changing environment of the cathode electrocatalyst, which is typically Pt nanoparticles supported on high surface area Vulcan XC-72 carbon (Pt/C). The purpose of this research was to record preliminary observations of the changing environment during the conditioning phase using X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XAFS was recorded for a Pt/C cathode at the Pt L3-edge and a PtCo/C cathode at both the Pt L3-edge and Co K-edge. Using precision machined graphite cell-blocks, both transmission and fl uorescence data were recorded at Sector 12-BM-B of Argonne National Laboratory’s Advanced Photon Source. The fl uorescence and transmission edge steps allow for a working description of the changing electrocatalyst environment, especially water concentration, at the anode and cathode as functions of operating parameters. These features are discussed in the context of how future analysis may correlate with potential, current and changing apparent thickness of the membrane electrode assembly through loss of catalyst materials (anode, cathode, carbon support). Such direct knowledge of the effect of the conditioning protocol on the electrocatalyst may lead to better catalyst design. In turn, this may lead to minimizing, or even eliminating, the conditioning period.

  11. Optimization of the performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cell membrane-electrode assemblies : roles of curing parameters on the catalyst and ionomer structures and morphology.

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, A. B.; Shaik, R.; Mawdsley, J.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Northern Illinois Univ.

    2008-07-15

    In order to understand the origin of performance variations in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), a series of membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs) with identical electrode layer compositions were prepared using different electrode curing conditions, their performances were evaluated, and their morphologies determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The polarization curves varied markedly primarily due to differences in morphologies of electrodes, which were dictated by the curing processes. The highest performing MEAs (1.46 W cm{sup -2} peak power density at 3.2 A cm{sup -2} and 80 C) were prepared using a slow curing process at a lower temperature, whereas those MEAs prepared using a faster curing process performed poorly (0.1948 W cm{sup -2} peak power density at 440 mA cm{sup -2} and 80 C). The slowly cured MEAs showed uniform electrode catalyst and ionomer distributions, as revealed in SEM images and elemental maps. The relatively faster cured materials exhibited uneven distribution of ionomer with significant catalyst clustering. Collectively, these results indicate that to achieve optimal performance, factors that affect the dynamics of the curing process, such as rate of solvent evaporation, must be carefully controlled to avoid solvent trapping, minimize catalyst coagulation, and promote even distribution of ionomer.

  12. Polymer Activated Catalysts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    dorhodiun(I) carbonyltris(triphenylphosphine), chlororhodium(I) ethylene - 20, U. RACY (Ce1n ate en m eld. side Nea~ 019140 IdAW7 141f OFeUs ma.) Three...CpTi (Cp) Cl2 RCH2CH-CH2 , RCH=CHCH3 (mainly E.) (2)R’MgBr ization was successful with 1-butene, 1-pentene, and 1- octene . In- ternal alkenes such as 2... octene apparently do not further react. Similar behavior was noted in hydrogenation reactions. In long term experiments in which fresh charges of

  13. Nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Nalini P.; Li, Xuguang; Nallathambi, Vijayadurda; Kumaraguru, Swaminatha P.; Colon-Mercado, Hector; Wu, Gang; Lee, Jong-Won; Popov, Branko N.

    Nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalysts for oxygen reduction were synthesized by modifying carbon black with nitrogen-containing organic precursors. The electrocatalytic properties of catalysts were studied as a function of surface pre-treatments, nitrogen and oxygen concentrations, and heat-treatment temperatures. On the optimum catalyst, the onset potential for oxygen reduction is approximately 0.76 V (NHE) and the amount of hydrogen peroxide produced at 0.5 V (NHE) is approximately 3% under our experimental conditions. The characterization studies indicated that pyridinic and graphitic (quaternary) nitrogens may act as active sites of catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction. In particular, pyridinic nitrogen, which possesses one lone pair of electrons in addition to the one electron donated to the conjugated π bond, facilitates the reductive oxygen adsorption.

  14. Platinum and palladium nano-structured catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Nguyen Viet; Thi, Cao Minh; Yong, Yang; Nogami, Masayuki; Ohtaki, Michitaka

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we present the synthesis and characterization of Pt, Pd, Pt based bimetallic and multi-metallic nanoparticles with mixture, alloy and core-shell structure for nano-catalysis, energy conversion, and fuel cells. Here, Pt and Pd nanoparticles with modified nanostructures can be controllably synthesized via chemistry and physics for their uses as electro-catalysts. The cheap base metal catalysts can be studied in the relationship of crystal structure, size, morphology, shape, and composition for new catalysts with low cost. Thus, Pt based alloy and core-shell catalysts can be prepared with the thin Pt and Pt-Pd shell, which are proposed in low and high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). We also present the survey of the preparation of Pt and Pd based catalysts for the better catalytic activity, high durability, and stability. The structural transformations, quantum-size effects, and characterization of Pt and Pd based catalysts in the size ranges of 30 nm (1-30 nm) are presented in electro-catalysis. In the size range of 10 nm (1-10 nm), the pure Pt catalyst shows very large surface area for electro-catalysis. To achieve homogeneous size distribution, the shaped synthesis of the polyhedral Pt nanoparticles is presented. The new concept of shaping specific shapes and morphologies in the entire nano-scale from nano to micro, such as polyhedral, cube, octahedra, tetrahedra, bar, rod, and others of the nanoparticles is proposed, especially for noble and cheap metals. The uniform Pt based nanosystems of surface structure, internal structure, shape, and morphology in the nanosized ranges are very crucial to next fuel cells. Finally, the modifications of Pt and Pd based catalysts of alloy, core-shell, and mixture structures lead to find high catalytic activity, durability, and stability for nano-catalysis, energy conversion, fuel cells, especially the next large-scale commercialization of next

  15. Impact of Polymer-bound Iodine on Fibronectin Adsorption and Osteoblast Cell Morphology Radiopaque Medical Polymers: Tyrosine-derived Polycarbonate Blends as a Model System

    PubMed Central

    Aamer, Khaled A.; Genson, Kirsten L.; Kohn, Joachim; Becker, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging of polymer implants during surgical implantations is challenging in that most materials lack sufficient X-ray contrast. Synthetic derivatization with iodine serves to increase the scattering contrast but results in distinct physico-chemical properties in the material which influence subsequent protein adsorption and cell morphology behavior. Herein we report the impact of increasing iodine inclusion on the cell morphology (cell area and shape) of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts on a series of homopolymers and discrete blend thin films of poly(desaminotyrosyl tyrosine ethyl ester carbonate), poly(DTE carbonate) and an iodinated analogue poly(I2-DTE carbonate). Cell morphology is correlated to film chemical composition via measuring Fibronectin (FN) adhesion protein adsorption profile on these films. FN exhibits up to 2 fold greater adsorption affinity for poly(I2-DTE carbonate) than (poly(DTE carbonate)). A correlation was established between cell area, roundness and the measured FN adsorption profile on the blend films up to 75 % by mass poly(I2-DTE carbonate). Data suggest that incorporation of iodine within the polymer backbone has a distinct impact on the way FN proteins adsorb to the surface and within the studied blend systems; the effect is composition dependent. PMID:19645443

  16. Measurement of a new parameter representing the gas transport properties of the catalyst layers of polymer electrolyte fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Iden, Hiroshi; Ohma, Atsushi; Tokunaga, Tomomi; Yokoyama, Kouji; Shinohara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-14

    The optimization of the catalyst layers is necessary for obtaining a better fuel cell performance and reducing fuel cell cost. Although the ionomer coverage of the Pt catalyst is said to be a key parameter in this regard, the proportion of Pt either directly or indirectly covered by the ionomer is thought to be an important parameter with regard to gas transport (indirectly covered Pt: its gas transport paths are completely blocked by the ionomer even if it does not directly cover Pt). In this study, a new technique has been developed for evaluating the proportion of Pt covered indirectly or directly by the ionomer, which is defined as the "capped proportion", based on the carbon monoxide (CO) adsorption properties at different temperatures. The validity of the method was thoroughly examined by identifying the CO adsorption properties of the components of the catalyst layers. The capped proportion and oxygen transport resistance in the catalyst layers showed a good correlation, indicating that the capped proportion is a dominant factor of oxygen transport resistance. This technique thus enables the evaluation of the dominant factor of the gas transport properties of the catalyst layers. The method has another significant advantage in that it does not require a membrane electrode assembly, let alone electrochemical measurement, which should be helpful for catalyst layer optimization.

  17. A silica nanoparticle-based sensor for selective fluorescent detection of homocysteine via interaction differences between thiols and particle-surface-bound polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Changmin; Zeng, Fang; Luo, Ming; Wu, Shuizhu

    2012-08-01

    Biothiols play crucial roles in maintaining biological systems; among them, homocysteine (Hcy) has received increasing attention since elevated levels of Hcy have been implicated as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Hence, the selective detection of this specific biothiol, which is a disease-associated biomarker, is very important. In this paper, we demonstrate a new mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based sensor for selective detection of homocysteine from biothiols and other common amino acids. In this fluorescent sensing system, an anthracene nitroolefin compound was placed inside the mesopores of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) and used as a probe for thiols. The hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG 5000) molecules were covalently bound to the MSN surface and used as a selective barrier for Hcy detection via different interactions between biothiols and the PEG polymer chains. The sensor can discriminate Hcy from the two low-molecular mass biothiols (GSH and Cys) and other common amino acids in totally aqueous media as well as in serum, with a detection limit of 0.1 μM. This strategy may offer an approach for designing other MSN-based sensing systems by using polymers as diffusion regulators in sensing assays for other analytes.

  18. Preparation of Carbazole Polymer Thin Films Chemically Bound to Substrate Surface by Physical Vapor Deposition Combined with Self-Assembled Monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuki, Kiyoi; Bekku, Hiroshi; Kawakami, Akira; Locklin, Jason; Patton, Derek; Tanaka, Kuniaki; Advincula, Rigoberto; Usui, Hiroaki

    2005-01-01

    Vinyl polymer thin films having carbazole units were prepared by a new method combining physical vapor deposition and self-assembled monolayer (SAM) techniques. 3-(N-carbazolyl)propyl acrylate monomer was evaporated onto a gold substrate that had a VAZO 56 (DuPont) initiator attached as a SAM. The VAZO initiator was activated by irradiating ultraviolet light after depositing the monomer. Although the polymerization reaction can proceed even without the surface initiator, the SAM was effective in improving the surface smoothness, thermal stability, and film-substrate adhesion as a consequence of the formation of covalent chemical bonds between the film and the substrate. Thermal activation of the initiator was examined for the deposition polymerization of 9-H-carbazole-9-ethylmethacryrate. Substrate heating during the evaporation was not effective for accumulating thin films. On the other hand, performing postdeposition annealing on the film after deposition at room temperature resulted in the formation of a polymer thin film chemically bound to the substrate.

  19. Comparison of Pt-based binary and ternary alloy anode catalysts for polymer electrolyte direct methanol fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, R.; Ley, K.L.; Pu, C.

    1996-12-31

    As an anode catalyst, Pt is highly active for the adsorption and dehydrogenation of methanol, however, the surface is poisoned by CO. To oxidize CO to CO{sub 2}, a second oxygen atom is required from an adjacent adsorbed water molecule. Bifunctional alloys composed of Pt and a second metal M, able to activate H{sub 2}O (forming -OH{sub ads}) at low potentials, are candidate materials for methanol electro-oxidation catalysts A proposed mechanism is: Figure 2 shows that metals which enhance methanol oxidation activity when alloyed with Pt have similar M-O bond strengths (see bold print), suggesting that the best binary alloy catalysts have second metals that are optimized with respect to the ability to oxidatively adsorb water. and the ability to dissociate M-O bonds to yield CO{sub 2}.

  20. Influence of the microporous layer on carbon corrosion in the catalyst layer of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spernjak, Dusan; Fairweather, Joseph; Mukundan, Rangachary; Rockward, Tommy; Borup, Rodney L.

    2012-09-01

    Corrosion of the catalyst support reduces PEM fuel cell performance via catalyst layer (CL) degradation (loss of porosity, catalyst connectivity, and active catalyst surface area). Carbon corrosion was investigated in a segmented cell for cathode gas diffusion layers (GDLs) with and without a microporous layer (MPL) to investigate the spatial aspects of GDL effect on corrosion. The cells were aged in situ using an accelerated stress test (AST) for carbon-support corrosion consisting of consecutive holds at 1.3 V. Carbon corrosion was quantified by measuring CO2 evolution during the AST. Performance degradation was substantial both with and without cathode MPL, but the degradation of the CL after prolonged corrosion was lower in the presence of an MPL. This was corroborated by better cell performance, higher remaining Pt active area, lower kinetic losses and smaller Pt particle size. The cell with an MPL showed increasingly nonuniform current distribution with corrosion time, which is correlated to the distribution of the Pt particle growth across the active area. This cell also showed an increase in mass-transport resistance due to MPL degradation. Without an MPL, GDL carbon fibers caused localized thinning in the cathode CL, originating from the combined effects of compression and corrosion.

  1. Electrochemical and fuel cell evaluation of Co based catalyst for oxygen reduction in anion exchange polymer membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamlouk, M.; Kumar, S. M. Senthil; Gouerec, Pascal; Scott, Keith

    Co based catalyst were evaluated for oxygen reduction (ORR) in liquid KOH and alkaline anion exchange membrane fuel cells (AAEMFCs). In liquid KOH solution the catalyst exhibited good performance with an onset potential 120 mV more negative than platinum and a Tafel slope of ca. 120 mV dec -1. The hydrogen peroxide generated, increased from 5 to 50% as the electrode potential decreased from 175 to -300 mV vs. SHE. In an AAEMFC environment, one catalyst (GP2) showed promising performance for ORR, i.e. at 50 mA cm -2 the differences in cell potential between the stable performance for platinum (more positive) and cobalt cathodes with air and oxygen, were only 45 and 67 mV respectively. The second catalyst (GP4) achieved the same stable power density as with platinum, of 200 and 145 mW cm -2, with air at 1 bar (gauge) pressure and air (atm) cathode feed (60 °C), respectively. However the efficiency was lower (i.e. cell voltage was lower) i.e. 40% in comparison to platinum 47.5%.

  2. Solvent-free synthesis of novel para-menthane-3,8-diol ester derivatives from citronellal using a polymer-supported scandium triflate catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Mafu, Lubabalo; Zeelie, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Summary The use of natural resources as a chemical feedstock for the synthesis of added-value products is gaining interest; as such we report an environmentally friendly method for the synthesis of para-menthane-3,8-diol from natural citronellal oil in 96% yield, under solvent free aqueous conditions. The acylation of para-menthane-3,8-diol with various acid anhydrides over polymer-supported scandium triflate (PS-Sc(OTf)3) catalyst was subsequently developed, where both hydroxy groups of para-menthane-3,8-diol could be simultaneous acylated under mild reaction conditions to form the corresponding diesters in good yields. The advantages of this method include a simple procedure from natural resources, using solvent-free reaction conditions. PMID:27829910

  3. The effects of hydrogen sulfide on the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell anode catalyst: H2S-Pt/C interaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Thiago; Paganin, Valdecir A.; Gonzalez, Ernesto R.

    2011-08-01

    The performance of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) operating on a simulated hydrocarbon reformate is described. The anode feed stream consisted of 80% H2, ∼20% N2, and 8 ppm hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Cell performance losses are calculated by evaluating cell potential reduction due to H2S contamination through lifetime tests. It is found that potential, or power, loss under this condition is a result of platinum surface contamination with elemental sulfur. Electrochemical mass spectroscopy (EMS) and electrochemical techniques are employed, in order to show that elemental sulfur is adsorbed onto platinum, and that sulfur dioxide is one of the oxidation products. Moreover, it is demonstrated that a possible approach for mitigating H2S poisoning on the PEMFC anode catalyst is to inject low levels of air into the H2S-contaminated anode feeding stream.

  4. Surface-Regulated Nano-SnO2/Pt3Co/C Cathode Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Fabricated by a Selective Electrochemical Sn Deposition Method.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Kensaku; Takao, Shinobu; Nagamatsu, Shin-ichi; Samjeské, Gabor; Sekizawa, Oki; Kaneko, Takuma; Higashi, Kotaro; Yamamoto, Takashi; Uruga, Tomoya; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2015-10-14

    We have achieved significant improvements for the oxygen reduction reaction activity and durability with new SnO2-nanoislands/Pt3Co/C catalysts in 0.1 M HClO4, which were regulated by a strategic fabrication using a new selective electrochemical Sn deposition method. The nano-SnO2/Pt3Co/C catalysts with Pt/Sn = 4/1, 9/1, 11/1, and 15/1 were characterized by STEM-EDS, XRD, XRF, XPS, in situ XAFS, and electrochemical measurements to have a Pt3Co core/Pt skeleton-skin structure decorated with SnO2 nanoislands at the compressive Pt surface with the defects and dislocations. The high performances of nano-SnO2/Pt3Co/C originate from efficient electronic modification of the Pt skin surface (site 1) by both the Co of the Pt3Co core and surface nano-SnO2 and more from the unique property of the periphery sites of the SnO2 nanoislands at the compressive Pt skeleton-skin surface (more active site 2), which were much more active than expected from the d-band center values. The white line peak intensity of the nano-SnO2/Pt3Co/C revealed no hysteresis in the potential up-down operations between 0.4 and 1.0 V versus RHE, unlike the cases of Pt/C and Pt3Co/C, resulting in the high ORR performance. Here we report development of a new class of cathode catalysts with two different active sites for next-generation polymer electrolyte fuel cells.

  5. High-performance, low Pt content catalysts for the electroreduction of oxygen in polymer-electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, J.; Faubert, G.; Tilquin, J.Y.; Cote, R.; Guay, D.; Dodelet, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Pt-included and Pt-supported catalysts have been synthesized using graphite and carbon black supports of various specific areas. The graphites are KS6 (20 m{sup 2}/g), HS100 (110 m{sup 2}/g), and HS300 (305 m{sup 2}/g) from Lonza, and the carbon blacks are Vulcan (254 m{sup 2}/g) and Black Pearls (1475 m{sup 2}/g) from Cabot. The Pt-included and Pt-supported catalysts were used at the cathode of a H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} fuel cell, and their polarization curves were compared to each other and to those of various Pt-supported catalysts from E-TEK. In the high current region of interest to fuel cell developers, it is shown that Pt-supported catalysts perform better than Pt-included ones when the specific area of the support is small. The contrary is true when the specific area of the support is large. The best catalysts are HS300-Pti [8.3 weight percent (w/o) Pt included in HS300 graphite] and Vu-Pti (6.1 w/o Pt included in Vulcan XC-72R). These catalysts display very high mass and specific activities for O{sub 2} reduction. Furthermore, the iR-corrected polarization curves of both HS300-Pti (with a Pt loading of 0.110 mg/cm{sup 2}) and Vu-Pti (with a Pt loading of 0.070 mg/cm{sup 2}) cross at high current the polarization curve of the electrode prepared with E-TEK20 (20 w/o of supported Pt, with a Pt loading of 0.287 mg/cm{sup 2}). Pt inclusion in graphite or carbon black is therefore an interesting way of reducing the Pt loading of fuel cell cathodes without lowering electrochemical performance. HS300-Pti have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These analyses indicate that they both contain metallic Pt and Pt(II and IV) oxides and/or hydroxides.

  6. Preparation of uniform magnetic recoverable catalyst microspheres with hierarchically mesoporous structure by using porous polymer microsphere template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lianbing; Teng, Chao; Zhu, Lili; He, Jie; Wang, You; Zuo, Xinbing; Hong, Mei; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Biwang; Zhao, Jing

    2014-04-01

    Merging nanoparticles with different functions into a single microsphere can exhibit profound impact on various applications. However, retaining the unique properties of each component after integration has proven to be a significant challenge. Our previous research demonstrated a facile method to incorporate magnetic nanoparticles into porous silica microspheres. Here, we report the fabrication of porous silica microspheres embedded with magnetic and gold nanoparticles as magnetic recoverable catalysts. The as-prepared multifunctional composite microspheres exhibit excellent magnetic and catalytic properties and a well-defined structure such as uniform size, high surface area, and large pore volume. As a result, the very little composite microspheres show high performance in catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol, special convenient magnetic separability, long life, and good reusability. The unique nanostructure makes the microspheres a novel stable and highly efficient catalyst system for various catalytic industry processes.

  7. Preparation of uniform magnetic recoverable catalyst microspheres with hierarchically mesoporous structure by using porous polymer microsphere template

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Merging nanoparticles with different functions into a single microsphere can exhibit profound impact on various applications. However, retaining the unique properties of each component after integration has proven to be a significant challenge. Our previous research demonstrated a facile method to incorporate magnetic nanoparticles into porous silica microspheres. Here, we report the fabrication of porous silica microspheres embedded with magnetic and gold nanoparticles as magnetic recoverable catalysts. The as-prepared multifunctional composite microspheres exhibit excellent magnetic and catalytic properties and a well-defined structure such as uniform size, high surface area, and large pore volume. As a result, the very little composite microspheres show high performance in catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol, special convenient magnetic separability, long life, and good reusability. The unique nanostructure makes the microspheres a novel stable and highly efficient catalyst system for various catalytic industry processes. PMID:24708885

  8. Development of a titanium dioxide-supported platinum catalyst with ultrahigh stability for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-Yang; Ganesan, Prabhu; Park, Sehkyu; Popov, Branko N

    2009-10-07

    A significant decrease in performance was observed for commercial Pt/C due to electrochemical oxidation of the carbon support and subsequent detachment and agglomeration of Pt particles. The Pt/TiO(2) cathode catalyst exhibited excellent fuel cell performance and ultrahigh stability under accelerated stress test conditions and can be considered as a promising alternative for improving the reliability and durability of PEMFCs.

  9. A series of phenyl sulfonate metal coordination polymers as catalysts for one-pot Biginelli reactions under solvent-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Hua; Tang, Gui-Mei; Wang, Yong-Tao; Cui, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Jun-Jie; Ng, Seik Weng

    2015-10-28

    Three new metal coordination polymers, namely, [Co(DPP)2(H2O)2]·(BS)2·2H2O (1), [Co(DPP)2(H2O)2]·(ABS)2·2H2O (2) and [Co(DPP)2(MBS)2] (3) [DPP = 1,3-di(pyridin-4-yl)propane, BS = phenyl sulfonic acid, ABS = p-aminobenzene sulfonic acid, MBS = p-methylbenzene sulfonic acid] were obtained under hydrothermal conditions. Complexes 1-3 were structurally characterized using X-ray single-crystal diffraction, XRD and IR spectroscopy. Both complexes 1 and 2 display a 1D tape structure. Meanwhile, complex 3 exhibits a 2D layer and further stacks via C-Hπ interactions to generate a three-dimensional supramolecular architecture. These three metal coordination polymers have been applied as catalysts for the green synthesis of a variety of 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-ones under solvent-free conditions through the Biginelli reaction. Interestingly, the catalysis products have been obtained in high yields under eco-friendly synthesis conditions.

  10. Cross-sectional observation of nanostructured catalyst layer of polymer electrolyte fuel cell using FIB/SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayanagi, Yuta; Shimizu, Takahiro; Hashimasa, Yoshiyuki; Matsushita, Nobuhiro; Yamazaki, Yohtaro; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2015-04-01

    The catalyst layer structure of a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) affects fuel cell performance. Cross-sectional observation is the most simple and effective way to evaluate the catalyst layer structure. Although focused ion beam (FIB) is a common tool for cross-sectional observation, sputtering of the ion beam causes heat damage to the MEA sample, which in previous studies was mitigated by sample cooling using liquid nitrogen. In this study, the sample holder and FIB stage were newly developed for cross-sectional observation of MEA catalyst layers, which suppressed heat damage by thermoelectric cooling using Peltier elements. Two types of degradation mode tests, load cycle and startup-shutdown cycle, were conducted on the MEA sample and their cross-sectional observations were performed using newly developed scanning electron microscope stages, which can mount the sample holder directly. The growth of platinum nanoparticles corresponding to the degradation of the active surface area was clearly observed for the sample subjected to the load cycle test. On the other hand, the corrosion of carbon particles was observed for the startup-shutdown sample. Since the cross-sectional samples were fabricated without heat damage by FIB with the newly developed stage, the difference in microstructure for these modes could be clearly distinguished.

  11. Catalyst assisted synthesis of initiator attached silica monolith particles via isocyanate-hydroxyl reaction for production of polystyrene bound chromatographic stationary phase of excellent separation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ali, Faiz; Kim, Yune Sung; Lee, Jin Wook; Cheong, Won Jo

    2014-01-10

    Dibutyltin dichloride (DBTDC) was used as a catalyst to chemically bind 4-chloromehtylphenylisocynate (4-CPI) to porous monolithic silica particles via isocyanate-hydroxyl reaction, and the reaction product was reacted with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (SDDC) to yield initiator attached silica monolith particles. Reversible addition-fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization was taken place on them to result in polystyrene attached silica particles that showed excellent separation efficiency when packed in a chromatographic column (1.0 mm × 300 mm). The numbers of theoretical plates (N) of 56,500 is better than those of any commercially available HPLC or UHPLC column yet.

  12. Recent Advances in the Application of Magnetic Nanoparticles as a Support for Homogeneous Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Govan, Joseph; Gun’ko, Yurii K.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are a highly valuable substrate for the attachment of homogeneous inorganic and organic containing catalysts. This review deals with the very recent main advances in the development of various nanocatalytic systems by the immobilisation of homogeneous catalysts onto magnetic nanoparticles. We discuss magnetic core shell nanostructures (e.g., silica or polymer coated magnetic nanoparticles) as substrates for catalyst immobilisation. Then we consider magnetic nanoparticles bound to inorganic catalytic mesoporous structures as well as metal organic frameworks. Binding of catalytically active small organic molecules and polymers are also reviewed. After that we briefly deliberate on the binding of enzymes to magnetic nanocomposites and the corresponding enzymatic catalysis. Finally, we draw conclusions and present a future outlook for the further development of new catalytic systems which are immobilised onto magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:28344220

  13. Electrochemical stability and postmortem studies of Pt/SiC catalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Stamatin, Serban N; Speder, Jozsef; Dhiman, Rajnish; Arenz, Matthias; Skou, Eivind M

    2015-03-25

    In the presented work, the electrochemical stability of platinized silicon carbide is studied. Postmortem transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to document the change in the morphology and structure upon potential cycling of Pt/SiC catalysts. Two different potential cycle aging tests were used in order to accelerate the support corrosion, simulating start-up/shutdown and load cycling. On the basis of the results, we draw two main conclusions. First, platinized silicon carbide exhibits improved electrochemical stability over platinized active carbons. Second, silicon carbide undergoes at least mild oxidation if not even silicon leaching.

  14. Load cycle durability of a graphitized carbon black-supported platinum catalyst in polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Chikara; Kakinuma, Katsuyoshi; Kawashima, Kazuhito; Tashiro, Keisuke; Watanabe, Masahiro; Uchida, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    We focus on Pt degradation occurring during fuel cell vehicle (FCV) combined drive cycles involving load and open circuit voltage (OCV) just after startup and during idling. Load cycle durability is evaluated as a function of OCV/load holding time, load rate and relative humidity (RH) with a graphitized carbon black-supported platinum catalyst (Pt/GCB) in the cathode. The degradation of Pt/GCB is suppressed for shorter OCV holding times, lower load rates and lower RH. Scanning ion microscopy (SIM) images of membrane cross-sections indicate that the amount of Pt deposited in the membrane decreases during drive cycles involving load with short OCV holding times. Investigations of the Pt distribution in the cathode catalyst layer (CL) by using scanning TEM-EDX show that the dissolution of Pt is suppressed on the membrane side in the CL. The Pt dissolution is accelerated by the high Pt oxidation due to the long OCV holding time. A load cycle with both long OCV holding time and low load inhibits the Pt2+ migration into the membrane but accelerates the Pt particle growth due to electrochemical Ostwald ripening; meanwhile, a load cycle with long OCV holding time at lower RH prevents both the Pt dissolution and particle growth.

  15. Effect of mechanical vibration on platinum particle agglomeration and growth in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell catalyst layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diloyan, Georgiy; Sobel, Marcus; Das, Kiranmoy; Hutapea, Parsaoran

    2012-09-01

    The effect of mechanical vibration on Platinum (Pt) particle agglomeration and growth in the catalyst layer of a Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) for a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) was investigated. A series of experiments were conducted using a 300-h accelerated test with potential cycling and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Each of the 300-h accelerated tests used different constant mechanical vibration conditions (frequency and acceleration). It was observed that the average diameter of Pt particles under vibration is 10% smaller than the ones that were under no vibration conditions. The Pt particles in the order of 2-2.5 nm in the pristine state have grown to approximately 6 nm (after 300-h accelerated test without vibration condition) and to approximately 5.47 nm (after 300 h accelerated test under 1 g 20 Hz vibration condition).

  16. Effect of water sorption on the electronic conductivity of porous polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell catalyst layers.

    PubMed

    Morris, David R P; Liu, Selina P; Villegas Gonzalez, David; Gostick, Jeff T

    2014-11-12

    A method is described for measuring the effective electronic conductivity of porous fuel cell catalyst layers (CLs) as a function of relative humidity (RH). Four formulations of CLs with different carbon black (CB) contents and ionomer equivalent weights (EWs) were tested. The van der Pauw method was used to measure the sheet resistance (RS), which increased with RH for all samples. The increase was attributed to ionomer swelling upon water uptake, which affects the connectivity of CB aggregates. Greater increases in RS were observed for samples with lower EW, which uptake more water on a mass basis per mass ionomer. Transient RS measurements were taken during absorption and desorption, and the resistance kinetics were fit using a double exponential decay model. No hysteresis was observed, and the absorption and desorption kinetics were virtually symmetric. Thickness measurements were attempted at different RHs, but no discernible changes were observed. This finding led to the conclusion that the conducting Pt/C volume fraction does not change with RH, which suggests that effective medium theory models that depend on volume fraction alone cannot explain the reduction in conductivity with RH. The merits of percolation-based models were discussed. Optical micrographs revealed an extensive network of "mud cracks" in some samples. The influence of water sorption on CL conductivity is primarily explained by ionomer swelling, and its effects on the quantity and quality of interaggregate contacts were discussed.

  17. Oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  18. Synthetic hydrophilic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekharan Pillai, V. N.; Mutter, Manfred

    1981-11-01

    Synthetic hydrophilic polymers find promising applications in pharmacology, biotechnology and chemistry. The biocompatibility, biodegradability and pharmacological activity of these polymers depend much on their hydrophilic nature. This article summarizes the recent developments in the utilization of the different classes of these hydrophilic polymers as pharmacologically active agents, for enzyme modification and as catalysts and supports for chemical reactions.

  19. A selective glucose sensor based on direct oxidation on a bimetal catalyst with a molecular imprinted polymer.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seong Je; Noh, Hui-Bog; Won, Mi-Sook; Cho, Chul-Ho; Kim, Kwang Bok; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2018-01-15

    A selective nonenzymatic glucose sensor was developed based on the direct oxidation of glucose on hierarchical CuCo bimetal-coated with a glucose-imprinted polymer (GIP). Glucose was introduced into the GIP composed of Nafion and polyurethane along with aminophenyl boronic acid (APBA), which was formed on the bimetal electrode formed on a screen-printed electrode. The extraction of glucose from the GIP allowed for the selective permeation of glucose into the bimetal electrode surface for oxidation. The GIP-coated bimetal sensor probe was characterized using electrochemical and surface analytical methods. The GIP layer coated on the NaOH pre-treated bimetal electrode exhibited a dynamic range between 1.0µM and 25.0mM with a detection limit of 0.65±0.10µM in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4). The anodic responses of uric acid, acetaminophen, dopamine, ascorbic acid, L-cysteine, and other saccharides (monosaccharides: galactose, mannose, fructose, and xylose; disaccharides: sucrose, lactose, and maltose) were not detected using the GIP-coated bimetal sensor. The reliability of the sensor was evaluated by the determination of glucose in artificial and whole blood samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. H2O2 detection analysis of oxygen reduction reaction on cathode and anode catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishi, Akira; Shironita, Sayoko; Umeda, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    The generation percentage of H2O2 during oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at practical powder electrocatalysts was evaluated using a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM). We employed a porous microelectrode that contains electrocatalysts, namely, Pt/C, Pt-Co/C, and Pt-Ru/C as the oxygen reduction electrode of the SECM, and the Pt microelectrode was used as the H2O2 detector. First, the H2O2 generation amount at Pt/Cs was measured by changing the Pt loading amount. A Pt/C with a higher Pt loading has a higher ORR activity and generates a larger amount of H2O2. However, the percentage of H2O2 generated with respect to the ORR is the same regardless of the Pt loading amount. Next, H2O2 generation is markedly suppressed at the Pt-Co/C and Pt-Ru/C in the potential ranges of practical fuel cell cathode and anode, respectively. This explains that the Pt-Co/C is effective when used as a cathode, and the anode Pt-Ru/C enables the reduction of the H2O2 generation even if O2 crossleak occurs in the practical polymer electrolyte fuel cell.

  1. A Tungsten Complex with a Bidentate, Hemilabile N-Heterocyclic Carbene Ligand, Facile Displacement of the Weakly Bound W-(C=C) Bond, and the Vulnerability of the NHC Ligand Toward Catalyst Deactivation During Ketone Hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Fan; Dioumaev, Vladimir K; Szalda, David J; Hanson, Jonathan; Bullock, R Morris

    2007-09-24

    The initial reaction observed between N-heterocyclic carbene IMes (IMes = 1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)-imidazol-2-ylidene) and molybdenum and tungsten hydride complexes CpM(CO)2(PPh3)H (M = Mo, W) is deprotonation of the metal hydride by IMes, giving [(IMes)H]+[CpM(CO)2(PPh3)] . At longer reaction times and higher temperatures, the reaction of IMes with CpM(CO)2(PR3)H (M = Mo, W; R = Me, Ph) produces CpM(CO)2(IMes)H. Hydride transfer from CpW(CO)2(IMes)H to Ph3C+B(C6F5)4- gives CpW(CO)2(IMes)+B(C6F5)4- which was crystallographically characterized using x-ray radiation from a synchrotron. The IMes is bonded as a bidentate ligand, through the carbon of the carbene as well as forming a weak bond from the metal to a C=C bond of one mesityl ring. The weakly bound C=C ligand is hemilabile, being readily displaced by H2, THF, ketones or alcohols. Reaction of CpW(CO)2(IMes)+ with H2 gives the dihydride complex [CpW(CO)2(IMes)(H)2]+. Addition of Et2CH–OH to CpW(CO)2(IMes)+B(C6F5)4- gives the alcohol complex [CpM(CO)2(IMes)(Et2CH–OH)]+[B(C6F5)4] which was characterized by crystallography and exhibits no evidence for hydrogen bonding of the bound OH group. Addition of H2 to the ketone complex [CpW(CO)2(IMes)(Et2C=O)]+[B(C6F5)4] produces an equilibrium with the dihydride [CpW(CO)2(IMes)(H)2]+ (Keq = 1.1 x 103 at 25 °C). The tungsten

  2. A Tungsten Complex with a Bidentate, Hemilabile N-Heterocyclic Carbene Ligand, Facile Displacement of the Weakly Bound W-(C=C) Bond, and the Vulnerability of the NHC Ligand Towards Catalyst Deactivation During Ketone Hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu,F.; Dioumaev, V.; Szalda, D.; Hanson, J.; Bullock, R.

    2007-01-01

    The initial reaction observed between the N-heterocyclic carbene IMes (IMes = 1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene) and molybdenum and tungsten hydride complexes CpM(CO){sub 2}(PPh{sub 3})H (M = Mo, W) is deprotonation of the metal hydride by IMes, giving [(IMes)H]{sup +}[CpM(CO){sub 2}(PPh{sub 3})]{sup -}. At longer reaction times and higher temperatures, the reaction of IMes with CpM(CO){sub 2}(PR{sub 3})H (M = Mo, W; R = Me, Ph) produces CpM(CO){sub 2}(IMes)H. Hydride transfer from CpW(CO)2(IMes)H to Ph{sub 3}C{sub +}B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}{sup -} gives CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes){sup +}B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}{sup -}, which was crystallographically characterized using X-ray radiation from a synchrotron. The IMes is bonded as a bidentate ligand, through the carbon of the carbene as well as forming a weak bond from the metal to a C=C bond of one mesityl ring. The weakly bound C=C ligand is hemilabile, being readily displaced by H{sub 2}, THF, ketones, or alcohols. Reaction of CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes){sup +} with H{sub 2} gives the dihydride complex [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(H){sub 2}]{sup +}. Addition of Et{sub 2}CH-OH to CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes){sup +}B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}{sup -} gives the alcohol complex [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(Et{sub 2}CH-OH)]{sup +}[B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}]{sup -}, which was characterized by crystallography and exhibits no evidence for hydrogen bonding of the bound OH group. Addition of H{sub 2} to the ketone complex [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(Et{sub 2}C=O)]{sup +}[B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}]{sup -} produces an equilibrium with the dihydride [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(H){sub 2}]{sup +} (K{sub eq} = 1.1 x 10{sup 3} at 25 {sup o}C). The tungsten ketone complex [CpW(CO){sub 2}(IMes)(Et{sub 2}C=O)]{sup +}[B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}]{sup -}- serves as a modest catalyst for hydrogenation of Et{sub 2}C=O to Et{sub 2}CH-OH in neat ketone solvent. Decomposition of the catalyst produces [H(IMes)]{sup +}B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}{sup -}, indicating that these

  3. Pyrazolylcyclotriphosphazene containing pendant polymers: synthesis, characterization, and phosphate ester hydrolysis using a Cu(II)-metalated cross-linked polymeric catalyst.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli; Athimoolam, Arunachalampillai; Srivatsan, S G; Sundaram, P Shanmuga; Verma, Sandeep; Steiner, Alexander; Zacchini, Stefano; Butcher, Raymond

    2002-10-07

    A multi-pyrazolyl cyclotriphosphazene containing polymerizable group N(3)P(3)(3,5-Me(2)Pz)(5)(O-C(6)H(4)-p-C(6)H(4)-p-CH=CH(2)) (2) has been prepared from the corresponding chloro derivative N(3)P(3)Cl(5)(O-C(6)H(4)-p-C(6)H(4)-p-CH=CH(2)) (1). The X-ray structures of 1 and 2 have been determined. Compound 2 undergoes ready metalation with CuCl(2) to afford N(3)P(3)(3,5-Me(2)Pz)(5)(O-C(6)H(4)-p-C(6)H(4)-p-CH=CH(2)).CuCl(2) (3). Model compound N(3)P(3)(3,5-Me(2)Pz)(5)(O-C(6)H(4)-p-CHO).CuCl(2) (6) has been prepared and characterized by spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. In this compound, the coordination around copper is distorted trigonal bipyramidal, and the cyclotriphosphazene coordinates in a non-gem N(3) mode. Compound 2 has been copolymerized with divinylbenzene to afford cross-linked multisite coordinating polymer CPPL which is readily metalated with CuCl(2) to afford copper-containing polymer CPPL-Cu. The coordination environment around copper in CPPL-Cu has been evaluated by obtaining its EPR, optical, and IR spectra and comparing them with those of model compounds 3 and 6. The utility of CPPL-Cu as a heterogeneous catalyst has been demonstrated in the phosphate ester hydrolysis involving three model phosphate esters: p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP), bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate (bNPP), and 2-(hydroxypropyl)-p-nitrophenyl phosphate (hNPP). In all of these reactions, a significant rate enhancement of ester hydrolysis is observed. Detailed kinetic analyses to evaluate Michaelis-Menten parameters have also been carried out along with experiments to elucidate the effect of pH, solvent, and temperature on the rate of hydrolysis. Recycling experiments on the hydrolysis of pNPP with CPPL-Cu shows that it can be recycled several times over without affecting the rates.

  4. High Temperature Membrane & Advanced Cathode Catalyst Development

    SciTech Connect

    Protsailo, Lesia

    2006-04-20

    Current project consisted of three main phases and eighteen milestones. Short description of each phase is given below. Table 1 lists program milestones. Phase 1--High Temperature Membrane and Advanced Catalyst Development. New polymers and advanced cathode catalysts were synthesized. The membranes and the catalysts were characterized and compared against specifications that are based on DOE program requirements. The best-in-class membranes and catalysts were downselected for phase 2. Phase 2--Catalyst Coated Membrane (CCM) Fabrication and Testing. Laboratory scale catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) were fabricated and tested using the down-selected membranes and catalysts. The catalysts and high temperature membrane CCMs were tested and optimized. Phase 3--Multi-cell stack fabrication. Full-size CCMs with the down-selected and optimized high temperature membrane and catalyst were fabricated. The catalyst membrane assemblies were tested in full size cells and multi-cell stack.

  5. Highly-dispersed Ta-oxide catalysts prepared by electrodeposition in a non-aqueous plating bath for polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathodes.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeongsuk; Cha, Dongkyu; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Kubota, Jun; Domen, Kazunari

    2012-09-18

    The Ta-oxide cathode catalysts were prepared by electrodeposition in a non-aqueous solution. These catalysts showed excellent catalytic activity and have an onset potential of 0.92 V(RHE) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The highly-dispersed Ta species at the nanometer scale on the carbon black was an important contributor to the high activity.

  6. Poly-L-aspartic acid as a carrier for doxorubicin: a comparative in vivo study of free and polymer-bound drug.

    PubMed Central

    Pratesi, G.; Savi, G.; Pezzoni, G.; Bellini, O.; Penco, S.; Tinelli, S.; Zunino, F.

    1985-01-01

    The synthetic polypeptide, poly-L-aspartic acid (PAA, mol. wt = 20,000) has been used as a macromolecular carrier for doxorubicin. The drug may be released in vivo through hydrolysis of the ester linkage formed between the carboxyl groups of the polymer and the drug side chain. PAA has been found to be a suitable carrier since it is a soluble, biodegradable, multivalent and nontoxic polymer. The toxicity and the therapeutic efficacy of free and polymer-linked doxorubicin have been evaluated in normal and tumour-bearing mice, using a variety of experimental tumour systems. In studies on single and multiple drug administration, the results indicated that the polymeric derivative of doxorubicin had approximately 3-fold lower toxicity than did free drug. In addition, the severity of specific toxic effects, including cardio- and vesicant toxicity, were appreciably reduced following conjugation to PAA. The doxorubicin-PAA conjugate gave similar or rather greater therapeutic effects than free drug at less toxic doses. This effect, more evident in the highly sensitive tumours, suggests an improvement of the therapeutic index of the polymer-linked drug. PMID:4074638

  7. Ex situ testing method to characterize cathode catalysts degradation under simulated start-up/shut-down conditions - A contribution to polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, A.; Toth, G.; Kundu, S.; Colmenares, L. C.; Behm, R. J.

    2012-10-01

    The paper introduces a novel ex situ test procedure that was developed to quantify the ageing of catalyst layers under critical automotive fuel cell conditions during start-up/shut-down phases. It is based on liquid electrolyte measurements, using a thin film catalyst electrode. The overall degradation under start-up/shut-down conditions is assessed by the decay in electrochemically active surface area. Furthermore, contributions from different processes leading to catalyst degradation such as Pt dissolution and Pt particle growth/agglomeration can be separated. Finally, using a differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) set-up, also the extent and role of carbon corrosion under these conditions is accessible. The potential of this, compared to in situ fuel cell stack tests, rather fast and less costly ex situ test procedure is demonstrated in measurements using a commercial, graphitized carbon-supported Pt catalyst. The results of the degradation test and in particular the contributions from different degradation processes such as Pt dissolution, Pt particle growth/agglomeration and carbon corrosion during different stages of catalyst ageing are discussed.

  8. Outward Bound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outward Bound, Inc., Andover, MA.

    The Outward Bound concept was developed in Germany and Great Britain with the saving of human life as the ultimate goal. Courses are designed to help students discover their true physical and mental limits through development of skills including emergency medical aid, firefighting, search and rescue, mountaineering, and sailing. Five Outward Bound…

  9. Electrophoretic characterization of the Mammalian nuclear matrix proteome, nuclear envelope, nucleoli and covalently bound ADP-ribose polymers: potential applications to cancer.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Xavier G; Racho, Ronald G; Pacheco-Rodríguez, Gustavo; Alvarez-González, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid metabolism is biochemically compartmentalized to the nucleus. Thus, it is necessary to define the proteome of the various macromolecular structures within this organelle. We isolated the nuclear matrix (NM) fraction from rat liver by sequential centrifugation steps at 13,000 rpm, staggered between endogenous nuclease treatment for 2 h at 37°C, followed by high-salt (H.S.; 2.0 M NaCl) and non-ionic detergent extractions (0.1%- or 1.0% Triton X-100) to eliminate the bulk of chromosomal DNA/RNA, histone proteins and the nuclear envelope (NE). Integrity of the NM and NE structures was confirmed by electron microscopy. Next, we analyzed the NM proteome on a 20% polyacrylamide gel using the PhastSystem. We observed the absence of histone proteins and the characteristic presence of the lamins by Coomassie blue staining. By contrast, upon silver staining, following electrophoretic separation with a Tris-Borate-EDTA buffer, we observed the NM-associated nucleic RNA and protein-free ADP-ribose polymers. While polymers are found in much lower concentration than RNA in NM, they were purified by affinity chromatography on boronate resin prior to electrophoresis. We observed the electrophoretic resolution of free ADP-ribose chains (5-25 units) by silver staining. The significance of our observations to cancer studies and carcinogenesis is discussed. Copyright© 2014, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  10. A Facile Strategy for Catalyst Separation and Recycling Suitable for ATRP of Hydrophilic Monomers Using a Macroligand.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaowu; Wu, Jian; Zhang, Lifen; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhu, Xiulin

    2016-01-01

    How to simply and efficiently separate and recycle catalyst has still been a constraint for the wide application of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), especially for the polymerization systems with hydrophilic monomers because the polar functional groups may coordinate with transition metal salts, resulting in abundant catalyst residual in the resultant water-soluble polymers. In order to overcome this problem, a latent-biphasic system is developed, which can be successfully used for ATRP catalyst separation and recycling in situ for various kinds of hydrophilic monomers for the first time, such as poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), N,N-dimethyl acrylamide (DMA), and N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM). Herein, random copolymer of octadecyl acrylate (OA), MA-Ln (2-(bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino)ethyl acrylate), and POA-ran-P(MA-Ln) is designed as the macroligand, and heptane/ethanol is selected as the biphasic solvent. Copper(II) bromide (CuBr2 ) is employed as the catalyst, PEG-bound 2-bromo-2-methylpropanoate (PEG350 -Br) as the water-soluble ATRP initiator and 2,2'-azobis(isobutyronitrile) (AIBN) as the azo-initiator to establish an ICAR (initiators for continuous activator regeneration) ATRP system. Importantly, well-defined water-soluble polymers are obtained even though the recyclable catalyst is used for sixth times. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    DOEpatents

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  12. Core-double-shell Fe3O4@carbon@poly(In(III)-carboxylate) microspheres: cycloaddition of CO2 and epoxides on coordination polymer shells constituted by imidazolium-derived Al(III)-Salen bifunctional catalysts.

    PubMed

    An, Qiao; Li, Zifeng; Graff, Robert; Guo, Jia; Gao, Haifeng; Wang, Changchun

    2015-03-04

    A hydrid microsphere Fe3O4@carbon@poly(In(III)-carboxylate) consisting of a cluster of Fe3O4 nanoparticles as the core, a carbon layer as the inner shell and a porous In(III)-carboxylate coordination polymer as the outer shell was prepared and applied as a recyclable catalyst for the cycloaddition reaction of CO2 and epoxides. Construction of this hybrid microsphere was achieved in the two steps, including (1) the one-pot solvothermal synthesis of Fe3O4@C particles with the abundant carboxylic groups on the carbon surface and (2) the subsequent growth of the outer shell polymers based on the precipitation coordination polymerization. Imidazolium-substituted Salen ligands were synthesized and chelated with the In(III) ions using the terminal carboxylic groups. The coordination polymer shell was formed on the Fe3O4@C particles, and the structures including shell thickness, surface area and porosity could be varied by tuning the feeding ratios of the In(III) ions and the ligands. The optimal structure of the coordination polymers showed a shell thickness of ca. 45 nm with ∼5 nm of mesopore, 174.7 m(2)/g of surface area and 0.2175 cm(3)/g of pore volume. In light of gas uptake capability, catalytic activity and magnetic susceptibility, cycloaddition of CO2 with a series of epoxides were studied by using Al-complexed Fe3O4@C@In(III)-[IL-Salen] microspheres. The results validated that the self-supporting catalytic layer with high surface area was of remarkable advantages, which were attributed from great increment of effective active sites and combination of nucleophilic/electrophilic synergistic property and CO2 uptake capability. Therefore, these hybrid microspheres provided excellent catalytic activity, prominent selectivity to cyclic carbonates and outstanding recyclability with the assistance of an applied magnetic field.

  13. Carboranylmethylene-substituted phosphazenes and polymers thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allcock, H. R.; Scopelianos, A. G. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Carboranylmethylene-substituted cyclophosphazenes are described which can be thermally polymerized into carboranylmethylene-substituted phosphazene polymers. The polymers are useful as thermally stable coatings. Also, due to the characteristics of these polymers in acting as a ligand for transition metals, metalocarboranylmethylene phosphazene polymers are described which can act as immobilized catalyst systems, and are electrically conductive and superconductive.

  14. bis-Nitrile and bis-Dialkylcyanamide Platinum(II) Complexes as Efficient Catalysts for Hydrosilylation Cross-Linking of Siloxane Polymers.

    PubMed

    Islamova, Regina M; Dobrynin, Mikhail V; Ivanov, Daniil M; Vlasov, Andrey V; Kaganova, Elena V; Grigoryan, Galina V; Kukushkin, Vadim Yu

    2016-03-05

    cis- and trans-Isomers of the platinum(II) nitrile complexes [PtCl2(NCR)2] (R = NMe2, N(C₅H10), Ph, CH2Ph) were examined as catalysts for hydrosilylation cross-linking of vinyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane and trimethylsilyl-terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane-co-ethylhydrosiloxane) producing high quality silicone rubbers. Among the tested platinum species the cis-complexes are much more active catalysts than their trans-congeners and for all studied platinum complexes cis-[PtCl2(NCCH2Ph)2] exhibits the best catalytic activity (room temperature, c = 1.0 × 10(-4) mol/L, τpot-life 60 min, τcuring 6 h). Although cis-[PtCl₂(NCCH2Ph)2] is less active than the widely used Karstedt's catalyst, its application for the cross-linking can be performed not only at room temperature (c = 1.0 × 10(-4) mol/L), but also, more efficiently, at 80 °C (c = 1.0 × 10(-4)-1.0 × 10(-5) mol/L) and it prevents adherence of the formed silicone rubbers to equipment. The usage of the cis- and trans-[PtCl2(NCR)2] complexes as the hydrosilylation catalysts do not require any inhibitors and, moreover, the complexes and their mixtures with vinyl- and trimethylsilyl terminated polysiloxanes are shelf-stable in air. Tested catalysts do not form colloid platinum particles after the cross-linking.

  15. Reforming catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Givens, E.N.; Plank, C.J.; Rosinski, E.J.

    1980-03-04

    Crystalline aluminosilicate zeolites are mixed with conventional reforming catalysts to produce new catalytic compositions with high catalytic activity and selectivity and excellent aging characteristics. These new catalytic compositions may be utilized alone or in conjunction with conventional reforming catalysts. The acidic activity of the total catalyst system is controlled within defined limits. When so controlled the utility of these catalyst systems in reforming hydrocarbon mixtures is to reduce the C1 and C2 concentrations in reformer gas product, while increasing the C3 and C4 concentrations and maintaining high liquid yield at high octane numbers.

  16. Magnetic Resonance of Polymers at Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-28

    POLYMERS AT SOLID SURFACES Random and Homopolymers Loop Tail Tail Train Train Terminally Attached Polymers Block Copolymers Brushes Mushrooms... random copolymers . These polymers can be prepared so they have little affinity for the surface except at the terminal group where they may be bound... polymers , it is convenient to to divide the polymers into three major classes: (i) homopolymers and random copolymers , (ii)

  17. Shape Fixing via Salt Recrystallization: A Morphology-Controlled Approach To Convert Nanostructured Polymer to Carbon Nanomaterial as a Highly Active Catalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Li, Li; Xiong, Kun; Wang, Yao; Li, Wei; Nie, Yao; Chen, Siguo; Qi, Xueqiang; Wei, Zidong

    2015-04-29

    Herein, we report a "shape fixing via salt recrystallization" method to efficiently synthesize nitrogen-doped carbon material with a large number of active sites exposed to the three-phase zones, for use as an ORR catalyst. Self-assembled polyaniline with a 3D network structure was fixed and fully sealed inside NaCl via recrystallization of NaCl solution. During pyrolysis, the NaCl crystal functions as a fully sealed nanoreactor, which facilitates nitrogen incorporation and graphitization. The gasification in such a closed nanoreactor creates a large number of pores in the resultant samples. The 3D network structure, which is conducive to mass transport and high utilization of active sites, was found to have been accurately transferred to the final N-doped carbon materials, after dissolution of the NaCl. Use of the invented cathode catalyst in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell produces a peak power of 600 mW cm(-2), making this among the best nonprecious metal catalysts for the ORR reported so far. Furthermore, N-doped carbon materials with a nanotube or nanoshell morphology can be realized by the invented method.

  18. Bimetallic Catalysts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinfelt, John H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical reaction rates can be controlled by varying composition of miniscule clusters of metal atoms. These bimetallic catalysts have had major impact on petroleum refining, where work has involved heterogeneous catalysis (reacting molecules in a phase separate from catalyst.) Experimentation involving hydrocarbon reactions, catalytic…

  19. Bimetallic Catalysts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinfelt, John H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical reaction rates can be controlled by varying composition of miniscule clusters of metal atoms. These bimetallic catalysts have had major impact on petroleum refining, where work has involved heterogeneous catalysis (reacting molecules in a phase separate from catalyst.) Experimentation involving hydrocarbon reactions, catalytic…

  20. Oxyhydrochlorination catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    An improved catalyst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HCl and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride.

  1. Synthesis of Thermally Stable Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-07-01

    LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1 Effect of Catalysts on the Polymerization of Diepoxides and Diisocyanates 11 2 Model Compound Studies 14 3 Polymerization of...Alkynyl-Substituted Polyurethanes 21 6 Effect of Temperature on the Hot Pressing of Polymer 67 24 x SECTION I INTRODUCTION The major objective of this...applying a high-temperature adhesive. Hence, a search for more effective catalysts was carried out. The third approach involved the synthesis of polymers

  2. Polyionic polymers – heterogeneous media for metal nanoparticles as catalyst in Suzuki–Miyaura and Heck–Mizoroki reactions under flow conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mennecke, Klaas

    2009-01-01

    Summary The preparation of monolithic polyionic supports which serve as efficient heterogeneous supports for palladium(0) nanoparticles is described. These functionalized polymers were incorporated inside a flow reactor and employed in Suzuki–Miyaura and Heck cross couplings under continuous flow conditions. PMID:19590749

  3. Report of the Polymer Core Course Committee: Inclusion of Polymer Topics into Undergraduate Inorganic Chemistry Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Norman E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Suggests polymer topics for study in inorganic chemistry courses. Commercial materials (including list of inorganic compounds utilized in polymer industry), anchored metal catalysis, polymers modified or formed by coordination, polysiloxanes, phosphazene or phosphonitrilic halide polymers, and hetergeneous polymerization catalysts are considered.…

  4. Report of the Polymer Core Course Committee: Inclusion of Polymer Topics into Undergraduate Inorganic Chemistry Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Norman E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Suggests polymer topics for study in inorganic chemistry courses. Commercial materials (including list of inorganic compounds utilized in polymer industry), anchored metal catalysis, polymers modified or formed by coordination, polysiloxanes, phosphazene or phosphonitrilic halide polymers, and hetergeneous polymerization catalysts are considered.…

  5. Positive Root Bounds and Root Separation Bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Aaron Paul

    In this thesis, we study two classes of bounds on the roots of a polynomial (or polynomial system). A positive root bound of a polynomial is an upper bound on the largest positive root. A root separation bound of a polynomial is a lower bound on the distance between the roots. Both classes of bounds are fundamental tools in computer algebra and computational real algebraic geometry, with numerous applications. In the first part of the thesis, we study the quality of positive root bounds. Higher quality means that the relative over-estimation (the ratio of the bound and the largest positive root) is smaller. We find that all known positive root bounds can be arbitrarily bad. We then show that a particular positive root bound is tight for certain important classes of polynomials. In the remainder of the thesis, we turn to root separation bounds. We observe that known root separation bounds are usually very pessimistic. To our surprise, we also find that known root separation bounds are not compatible with the geometry of the roots (unlike positive root bounds). This motivates us to derive new root separation bounds. In the second part of this thesis, we derive a new root separation for univariate polynomials by transforming a known bound into a new improved bound. In the third part of this thesis, we use a similar strategy to derive a new improved root separation bound for polynomial systems.

  6. Materials chemistry: Organic polymers form fuel from water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Vijay S.; Lotsch, Bettina V.

    2015-05-01

    Porous polymers have joined the ranks of light-activated catalysts that split water into hydrogen, a carbon-free alternative to fossil fuels. Their properties are easily tuned -- a big plus for the development of practically useful catalysts.

  7. Catalyst mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Masel, Richard I.; Rosen, Brian A.

    2017-02-14

    Catalysts that include at least one catalytically active element and one helper catalyst can be used to increase the rate or lower the overpotential of chemical reactions. The helper catalyst can simultaneously act as a director molecule, suppressing undesired reactions and thus increasing selectivity toward the desired reaction. These catalysts can be useful for a variety of chemical reactions including, in particular, the electrochemical conversion of CO.sub.2 or formic acid. The catalysts can also suppress H.sub.2 evolution, permitting electrochemical cell operation at potentials below RHE. Chemical processes and devices using the catalysts are also disclosed, including processes to produce CO, OH.sup.-, HCO.sup.-, H.sub.2CO, (HCO.sub.2).sup.-, H.sub.2CO.sub.2, CH.sub.3OH, CH.sub.4, C.sub.2H.sub.4, CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH, CH.sub.3COO.sup.-, CH.sub.3COOH, C.sub.2H.sub.6, O.sub.2, H.sub.2, (COOH).sub.2, or (COO.sup.-).sub.2, and a specific device, namely, a CO.sub.2 sensor.

  8. Applications of functionalized polymers in catalysis. Progress report 3, July 15, 1979-July 1, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Bergbreiter, D.E.

    1980-07-01

    Research on applications of polymers in catalysis has encompassed three areas: the use of functionalized polymers to detect soluble intermediates in heterogeneous Group VIII metal catalyzed arene hydrogenations; a study of olefin isomerization and hydrogenations catalyzed by polystyrene supported bis(cyclopentadienyl)titanium dichloride and an alkylmagnesium halide; and the acceleration in rate of an olefin hydrogenation catalyzed by homogeneous rhodium and ruthenium complexes as a result of absorption of triphenylphosphine by silver (I) polystyrenesulfonate. The first project found that polymer bound trapping agents were unable to detect soluble intermediates such as dienes, free radicals, or reducing agents in platinum-catalyzed benzene hydrogenation at 60 psi H/sub 2/ and 30/sup 0/C. The inability to detect diene intermediates was shown to be the result of the lower reactivity of the polymeric reagent versus an active catalyst. The polymer-supported titanium catalysts studied were unusual in that immobilization of a catalyst in this case altered the catalyst's specificity relative to its homogeneous counterpart. Preliminary results from the third project demonstrate the potential of simple functionalized polymers to improve existing homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Rate increases for olefin hydrogenations using C1Rh(Ph/sub 3/P)/sub 3/, HRh(CO)(Ph/sub 3/)/sub 3/, HRu(OAc)(Ph/sub 3/P), H/sub 2/Ru(Ph/sub 3/P)/sub 4/, Cl/sub 2/Ru(Ph/sub 3/P)/sub 3/, and Cl/sub 2/Ru(Ph/sub 3/P)/sub 4/ ranged from 25 to 3000%.

  9. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping; Smith, R. Davis

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  10. Highly dispersed metal catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Xiao, Xin; West, William L.; Rhodes, William D.

    2016-11-08

    A supported catalyst having an atomic level single atom structure is provided such that substantially all the catalyst is available for catalytic function. A process of forming a single atom catalyst unto a porous catalyst support is also provided.

  11. Syntheses and reactions of polymer-bound molybdenum complexes and hydrogenolyses of an alkynyl cobalt carbonyl cluster. [Co/sub 3/(CO)/sub 9/CCH/sub 2/CCH/sub 2/C(CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/; cyclopentadienyl-(tricarbonyl) hydridomolybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Frommer, J.E.

    1980-08-01

    Co/sub 3/(CO)/sub 9/CCH/sub 2/C(CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/ reacted with hydrogen in aromatic solvents to yield 3,3-dimethylbutene, 2,2-dimethylbutane, and 4,4-dimethylpentanal. First order decomposition of starting material and a hydrogen pressure dependence for the rate of appearance of total products were indicated. The hydrogenation was inhibited in the presence of carbon monoxide (CO:H/sub 2/, 3.7:3.7 atm, 60/sup 0/C), but at 85/sup 0/ under the same CO/H/sub 2/ atmosphere, aldehyde production became the predominant reaction pathway at the expense of earlier-formed olefin. Incorporation of independently added olefins in the hydrogenation suggested the intermediacy of olefin aldehyde ad alkane production. A polystyrene-attached n/sup 5/-cyclopentadienyl(tricarbonyl)-hydridomolybdenum complex was prepared and its reactions with several THF-soluble bases were investigated. Enolates of ..beta..-dicarbonyl compounds quantitatively deprotonated this complex, giving polymer-bound salts of the corresponding anion. Little change in pKa in THF was induced by binding the molybdenum hydride to the polymer. Even though the polymer-supported partners rendered the reactions heterogeneous, the systems adhered reasonably well to conventional equilibrium behavior. A polymer-bound carboxylic acid and its conjugate base also displayed essentially conventional equilibrium dynamics.

  12. Photocatalysis in organic and polymer synthesis.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Nathaniel; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Xu, Jiangtao; Boyer, Cyrille

    2016-11-07

    This review, with over 600 references, summarizes the recent applications of photoredox catalysis for organic transformation and polymer synthesis. Photoredox catalysts are metallo- or organo-compounds capable of absorbing visible light, resulting in an excited state species. This excited state species can donate or accept an electron from other substrates to mediate redox reactions at ambient temperature with high atom efficiency. These catalysts have been successfully implemented for the discovery of novel organic reactions and synthesis of added-value chemicals with an excellent control of selectivity and stereo-regularity. More recently, such catalysts have been implemented by polymer chemists to post-modify polymers in high yields, as well as to effectively catalyze reversible deactivation radical polymerizations and living polymerizations. These catalysts create new approaches for advanced organic transformation and polymer synthesis. The objective of this review is to give an overview of this emerging field to organic and polymer chemists as well as materials scientists.

  13. Reforming catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, W.C. Jr.; Swan, G.A.

    1991-11-19

    This patent describes a catalyst useful for reforming a naphtha feed at high severity reforming conditions. It comprises the metals, platinum, rhenium and iridium on a refractory porous inorganic oxide support, the support consisting essentially of alumina, wherein the concentration by weight of each of the metals platinum and rhenium is at least 0.1 percent and iridium at least 0.15 percent and at least one of the metals is present in a concentration of at least 0.3 percent, and the sum-total; concentration of the metals is greater than 0.9 percent, and wherein each catalyst particle contains all three of the metals platinum, rhenium and iridium. This patent also describes this composition wherein the catalyst contains from about 0.1 percent to about 3 percent of a halogen and from about 0.05 percent to about 0.02 percent sulfur.

  14. Authors' reply to the comment on 'Novel synthesis of highly durable and active Pt catalyst encapsulated in nitrogen containing carbon for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunjoon; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choi, Insoo; Lim, Taeho; Kwon, Oh Joong

    2017-09-01

    The key point of our study is the pyrolisis of a Pt-aniline complex. During pyrolysis, Pt ions are reduced while aniline is forming a carbon shell around the metal particles, simultaneously, yielding Pt nanoparticle encapsulated by carbon shell. We have shown these results in the manuscript. The ultrasound treatment introduced in our study has nothing to do with the above-mentioned mechanism. It was performed only for the improvement of dispersion and mixing of Pt-aniline and carbon support, not for the synthesis of the Pt-aniline complex. Pt-aniline complexes and Pt encapsulated by carbon shell are formed even without ultrasonic irradiation. Therefore, we did not pay much attention to the ultrasonic parameters used in this study. Making a Pt catalyst encapsulated by carbon shell originated from Pt-aniline complex is still investigated in various aspects and shows outstanding enhancement in activity and durability. The effect of ultrasound on the synthesis of Pt nanoparticle encapsulated by carbon shell will be also investigated in detail to properly address the comments of Dr. Pollet.

  15. Room temperature sputter deposited catalyst-free nanowires with wurtzite/zinc blende ZnO superstructure and their application in electromechanical nanogenerators on polymer and paper substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borysiewicz, M. A.; Gryglas-Borysiewicz, M.; Masłyk, M.; Wojciechowski, T.; Wzorek, M.; Kaczmarski, J.; Wojtowicz, T.; Kamińska, E.

    2017-02-01

    Catalyst-free growth of ZnO nanowires using reactive magnetron sputtering at room temperature is reported. We discuss the growth of the nanowires using reactive magnetron sputtering as a function of argon and oxygen flow values changing at a set ratio of 10:2. A transition from nanostructured Zn to nanowire ZnO growth is observed at 20 sccm Ar and 4 sccm O2. Densification and improved alignment of the nanowires is visible for increasing flow values up to 50 sccm Ar and 10 sccm O2. Nanowires exhibit stacking fault regions of zinc blende ZnO in wurtzite ZnO. The regions encompass the whole width of the nanowires and their quantum well behavior is manifested in the photoluminescence spectra. The nanowires were subsequently deposited on paper and PET substrates and electromechanical nanogenerators were fabricated. Manual pressing and depressing of the devices induced voltages of 50 μV and 2 μV for the devices on PET and paper substrates, respectively.

  16. Room temperature sputter deposited catalyst-free nanowires with wurtzite/zinc blende ZnO superstructure and their application in electromechanical nanogenerators on polymer and paper substrates.

    PubMed

    Borysiewicz, M A; Gryglas-Borysiewicz, M; Masłyk, M; Wojciechowski, T; Wzorek, M; Kaczmarski, J; Wojtowicz, T; Kamińska, E

    2017-02-24

    Catalyst-free growth of ZnO nanowires using reactive magnetron sputtering at room temperature is reported. We discuss the growth of the nanowires using reactive magnetron sputtering as a function of argon and oxygen flow values changing at a set ratio of 10:2. A transition from nanostructured Zn to nanowire ZnO growth is observed at 20 sccm Ar and 4 sccm O2. Densification and improved alignment of the nanowires is visible for increasing flow values up to 50 sccm Ar and 10 sccm O2. Nanowires exhibit stacking fault regions of zinc blende ZnO in wurtzite ZnO. The regions encompass the whole width of the nanowires and their quantum well behavior is manifested in the photoluminescence spectra. The nanowires were subsequently deposited on paper and PET substrates and electromechanical nanogenerators were fabricated. Manual pressing and depressing of the devices induced voltages of 50 μV and 2 μV for the devices on PET and paper substrates, respectively.

  17. Catalyst activator

    DOEpatents

    McAdon, Mark H.; Nickias, Peter N.; Marks, Tobin J.; Schwartz, David J.

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  18. Neutral bimetallic transition metal phenoxyiminato catalysts and related polymerization methods

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J [Evanston, IL; Rodriguez, Brandon A [Evanston, IL; Delferro, Massimiliano [Chicago, IL

    2012-08-07

    A catalyst composition comprising a neutral bimetallic diphenoxydiiminate complex of group 10 metals or Ni, Pd or Pt is disclosed. The compositions can be used for the preparation of homo- and co-polymers of olefinic monomer compounds.

  19. Synthesis and Properties of a Novel Pyridineoxazoline Containing Optically Active Helical Polymer as a Catalyst Ligand for Asymmetric Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng; Li, Na; Zhang, Jie; Wan, Xinhua

    2015-08-01

    A novel pyridineoxazoline (PyOx) containing helical polymer, poly{(-)-(S)-4-tert-butyl-2-[5-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-3-vinylpyridin-2-yl]-oxazoline} (PA), was designed and synthesized to approach the effect of chain conformation on the catalytic property. Its complex with Cu(OTf)(2) , i.e., Cu(II)-PA, was employed to catalyze the homogeneous Diels-Alder (D-A) reaction of alkenoyl pyridine N-oxides with cyclopentadiene in tetrahydrofuran. Compared with the previously reported copper complex, Cu(II)-P1 (RSC Advances, 2015, 5, 2882), which was derived from a nonhelical poly[(-)-(S)-4-tert-butyl-2-(3-vinylpyridin-2-yl)-oxazoline], Cu(II)-PA exhibited a remarkably enhanced enantioselectivity and reaction rate. However, its enantioselectivity was lower than the Cu(II) complex of (-)-(S)-4-tert-butyl-2-[5-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-3-vinylpyridin-2-yl]-oxazoline (Cu(II)-A), a low molar mass model compound.

  20. Hyper-crosslinked β-cyclodextrin porous polymer: an adsorption-facilitated molecular catalyst support for transformation of water-soluble aromatic molecules.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiying; Meng, Bo; Chai, Song-Hai; Liu, Honglai; Dai, Sheng

    2016-02-01

    A hyper-crosslinked β-cyclodextrin porous polymer (BnCD-HCPP) was designed and synthesized facilely by β-cyclodextrin benzylation and subsequent crosslinking via a Friedel-Crafts alkylation route. The BnCD-HCPP shows an extremely high BET surface area, large pore volume, and high thermal stability, making it a highly efficient adsorbent for removal of aromatic pollutants from water. The adsorption efficiency in terms of distribution coefficient, defined as the ratio of adsorption capacity to equilibrium adsorbate concentration, ranged from 10(3) to 10(6) mL g(-1) within a concentration of 0-100 ppm, one order of magnitude higher than that of other β-cyclodextrin-based adsorbents reported previously. The molar percentage of adsorbate to β-cyclodextrin exceeded 300%, suggesting that the adsorption occurred not only in the cyclodextrin cavities via a 1 : 1 complexation, but also in the nanopores of the BnCD-HCPP created during the hyper-crosslinking. The BnCD-HCPP can be further functionalized by incorporation of gold nanoparticles for catalytic transformation of adsorbed phenolic compounds such as 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol.

  1. The organotin coordination polymer [(n-Bu3Sn)4Fe(CN)6H2O] as effective catalyst towards the oxidative degradation of methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Etaiw, S E H; Saleh, Dalia I

    2014-01-03

    The structure of the supramolecular coordination polymer SCP 1; [(n-Bu3Sn)4Fe(CN)6H2O] consists of octahedral [Fe(CN)6](4-) building blocks which are connected by the TBPY-5 configured n-Bu3Sn(CN..)2 fragments creating 3D-network structure. Fenton and photo-Fenton oxidative discoloration of Methylene Blue (MB) has been investigated by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed with the SCP 1. The reaction exhibited pseudo first-order kinetics with respect to each of MB and H2O2. The irradiation of the reaction with UV-light enhanced the rate of MB mineralization, Kobs=0.76 h(-1). Mineralization of MB was investigated by FT-IR spectra. Disodium salt of terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing technology was carried out to identify the reactive oxygen species. The different parameters that affect MB degradation rate were evaluated. Moreover, the efficiency of recycled the SCP 1 and the mechanism of degradation of MB dye were investigated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Spectroscopic and kinetic studies on the degradation of methylene blue using the supramolecular coordination polymer [(Ph3Sn)4FeCN(6)] as catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Amany M A; Al-Ashqar, Sawsan M A

    2012-06-15

    The structure of the supramolecular coordination polymer (SCP), [(Ph(3)Sn)(4)Fe(CN)(6)], 1, consists of octahedral [Fe(CN)(6)](4-) building blocks which are connected by the TBPY-5 configured Ph(3)Sn(CN…)(2) fragments creating 3D-network structure that contains terminal cyanide groups. The catalytic behavior of the SCP 1 was utilized for Fenton and photo-Fenton degradation of methylene blue dye (MB). The plot of kinetic degradation indicates pseudo first-order rate with respect to the MB dye concentration, K(obs.)=0.071 min(-1). On the other hand, the observed rate constant of the photo catalytic degradation of MB equals to 1.45 min(-1) indicating that irradiation enhances, significantly, the rate of degradation of MB dye. Discoloration of the dye was obtained in less than 3h. Meanwhile, the conjugated structure and the phenyl rings of the MB molecule were destroyed or even broken down into small organic acids and inorganic ions, as indicated by FT-IR spectra. Disodium salt of terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing technology and radical scavenging measurements were carried out to identify the reactive oxygen species. The different parameters that affect MB degradation rate were evaluated. Moreover, the efficiency of recycled the SCP 1 and the mechanism of degradation of MB dye was investigated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The organotin coordination polymer [(n-Bu3Sn)4Fe(CN)6H2O] as effective catalyst towards the oxidative degradation of methylene blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etaiw, S. E. H.; Saleh, Dalia I.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of the supramolecular coordination polymer SCP 1; [(n-Bu3Sn)4Fe(CN)6H2O] consists of octahedral [Fe(CN)6]4- building blocks which are connected by the TBPY-5 configured n-Bu3Sn(CN..)2 fragments creating 3D-network structure. Fenton and photo-Fenton oxidative discoloration of Methylene Blue (MB) has been investigated by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed with the SCP 1. The reaction exhibited pseudo first-order kinetics with respect to each of MB and H2O2. The irradiation of the reaction with UV-light enhanced the rate of MB mineralization, Kobs = 0.76 h-1. Mineralization of MB was investigated by FT-IR spectra. Disodium salt of terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing technology was carried out to identify the reactive oxygen species. The different parameters that affect MB degradation rate were evaluated. Moreover, the efficiency of recycled the SCP 1 and the mechanism of degradation of MB dye were investigated.

  4. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Bercaw, John E.; Herzog, Timothy A.

    1998-01-01

    A metallocene catalyst system for the polymerization of .alpha.-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula ##STR1## wherein: R.sup.1, R.sup.2, and R.sup.3 are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyls as a substituent, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R.sup.8).sub.3 where R.sup.8 is selected from the group consisting of C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; R.sup.4 and R.sup.6 are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R.sup.1 and R.sup.3 ; R.sup.5 is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E.sup.1, E.sup.2 are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Si(R.sup.9).sub.2 --Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Ge(R.sup.9).sub.2, Sn(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2 --C(R.sup.9).sub.2, where R.sup.9 is C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C.sub.S or C.sub.1 -symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from .alpha.-olefin monomers.

  5. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Bercaw, J.E.; Herzog, T.A.

    1998-01-13

    A metallocene catalyst system is described for the polymerization of {alpha}-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula shown wherein: R{sup 1}, R{sup 2}, and R{sup 3} are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyls as a substituent, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R{sup 8}){sub 3} where R{sup 8} is selected from the group consisting of C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; R{sup 4} and R{sup 6} are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R{sup 1} and R{sup 3}; R{sup 5} is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E{sup 1}, E{sup 2} are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Ge(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Sn(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, where R{sup 9} is C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C{sub S} or C{sub 1}-symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from {alpha}-olefin monomers.

  6. Photochemical preparation of olefin addition catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Harry B. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Gupta, Amitava (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Novel polymer supported catalysts are prepared by photo-irradiation of low valent transition metal compounds such as Co.sub.2 (CO).sub.8, Rh.sub.4 (CO).sub.12 or Ru.sub.3 (CO).sub.12 in the presence of solid polymers containing amine ligands such as polyvinyl pyridine. Hydroformylation of olefins to aldehydes at ambient conditions has been demonstrated.

  7. Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Even, Jr., William R.

    2000-01-01

    A novel method for preparing a hydrogenation composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon--carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces and particularly from atmospheres within enclosed spaces that contain air, water vapor, oxygen, carbon dioxide or ammonia. The organic polymers molecules containing carbon--carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble noble metal catalyst composition. High molecular weight polymers may be added to the organic polymer/catalyst mixture in order to improve their high temperature performance. The hydrogenation composition is prepared by dispersing the polymers in a suitable solvent, forming thereby a solution suspension, flash-freezing droplets of the solution in a liquid cryogen, freeze-drying the frozen droplets to remove frozen solvent incorporated in the droplets, and recovering the dried powder thus formed.

  8. Iron complex-catalyzed ammonia-borane dehydrogenation. A potential route toward B-N-containing polymer motifs using earth-abundant metal catalysts.

    PubMed

    Baker, R Tom; Gordon, John C; Hamilton, Charles W; Henson, Neil J; Lin, Po-Heng; Maguire, Steven; Murugesu, Muralee; Scott, Brian L; Smythe, Nathan C

    2012-03-28

    Ammonia-borane (NH(3)BH(3), AB) has garnered interest as a hydrogen storage material due to its high weight percent hydrogen content and ease of H(2) release relative to metal hydrides. As a consequence of dehydrogenation, B-N-containing oligomeric/polymeric materials are formed. The ability to control this process and dictate the identity of the generated polymer opens up the possibility of the targeted synthesis of new materials. While precious metals have been used in this regard, the ability to construct such materials using earth-abundant metals such as Fe presents a more economical approach. Four Fe complexes containing amido and phosphine supporting ligands were synthesized, and their reactivity with AB was examined. Three-coordinate Fe(PCy(3))[N(SiMe(3))(2)](2) (1) and four-coordinate Fe(DEPE)[N(SiMe(3))(2)](2) (2) yield a mixture of (NH(2)BH(2))(n) and (NHBH)(n) products with up to 1.7 equiv of H(2) released per AB but cannot be recycled (DEPE = 1,2-bis(diethylphosphino)ethane). In contrast, Fe supported by a bidentate P-N ligand (4) can be used in a second cycle to afford a similar product mixture. Intriguingly, the symmetric analogue of 4 (Fe(N-N)(P-P), 3), only generates (NH(2)BH(2))(n) and does so in minutes at room temperature. This marked difference in reactivity may be the result of the chemistry of Fe(II) vs Fe(0).

  9. Tapered Bottlebrush Polymers: A New Polymer Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-30

    Scheme 2). The DBU was paired with benzoic acid to control the kinetics of the polymerization (Table 3, Mn MM and Đ MM columns) Scheme 2...Synthesis of bottlebrush polymers in one pot using ROP and ROMP. In the second step, trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) was added along with Grubbs 3rd...generation catalyst. TFA was added to quench the ROP reaction and was chosen after screening several different types of acid additives. Most appeared to be

  10. Catalyst suppliers consolidate further, offer more catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1995-10-02

    The list of suppliers of catalysts to the petroleum refining industry has decreased by five since Oil and Gas Journal`s survey of refining catalysts and catalytic additives was last published. Despite the consolidation, the list of catalyst designations has grown to about 950 in this latest survey, compared to 820 listed in 1993. The table divides the catalysts by use and gives data on their primary differentiating characteristics, feedstock, products, form, bulk density,catalyst support, active agents, availability, and manufactures.

  11. Platinum nanoparticles on carbon-nanotube support prepared by room-temperature reduction with H2 in ethylene glycol/water mixed solvent as catalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuying; Dou, Zhengjie; Fang, Yanxiong; Li, Muwu; Wu, Xin; Zeng, Jianhuang; Hou, Zhaohui; Liao, Shijun

    2016-02-01

    Polyol approach is commonly used in synthesizing Pt nanoparticles in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. However, the application of this process consumes a great deal of time and energy, as the reduction of precursors requires elevated temperatures and several hours. Moreover, the ethylene glycol and its oxidizing products bound to Pt are difficult to remove. In this work, we utilize the advantages of ethylene glycol and prepare Pt nanoparticles through a room-temperature hydrogen gas reduction in an ethylene glycol/water mixed solvent, which is followed by subsequent harvesting by carbon nanotubes as electrocatalysts. This method is simple, facile, and time-efficient, as the entire room-temperature reduction process is completed in a few minutes. As the solvent changes from water to an ethylene glycol/water mix, the size of Pt nanoparticles varies from 10 to 3 nm and their shape transitions from polyhedral to spherical. Pt nanoparticles prepared in a 1:1 volume ratio mixture of ethylene glycol/water are uniformly dispersed with an average size of ∼3 nm. The optimized carbon nanotube-supported Pt electrocatalyst exhibits excellent methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction activities. This work demonstrates the potential use of mixed solvents as an approach in materials synthesis.

  12. Functional porous organic polymers for heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yugen; Riduan, Siti Nurhanna

    2012-03-21

    Porous organic polymers (POPs), a class of highly crosslinked amorphous polymers possessing nano-pores, have recently emerged as a versatile platform for the deployment of catalysts. The bottom-up approach for porous organic polymer synthesis provides the opportunity for the design of polymer frameworks with various functionalities, for their use as catalysts or ligands. This tutorial review focuses on the framework structures and functionalities of catalytic POPs. Their structural design, functional framework synthesis and catalytic reactions are discussed along with some of the challenges.

  13. Hydrocracking catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, B.; Galiasso, R.; Kum, H.

    1985-02-12

    The invention relates to a particular method for the preparation of a hydrocracking catalyst, using a high iron content bauxite as a basis. This bauxite is ground and screened to a specific size and mixed with three types of additives: a promoter additive of the P, Mo, Co, Ni, W type. A hardener additive of the phosphoric acid type, ammonium phosphate. And a lubricant and pore-generating additive of the polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene-glycol, starch type. The particularity consists in that the three additives are added simultaneously during the extrusion of the sample. That way, a particular surface composition is obtained which allows for the activity of the catalyst. Extruded products are obtained in sizes of 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32'' and submitted to drying and calcination programs for their activation. The obtained catalyst offers a good mechanical strength, a high content in macropores and a high activity, specifically for the hydrocracking of heavy Venezuelan crudes or residues.

  14. Surface-initiated poly(3-methylthiophene) as a hole-transport layer for polymer solar cells with high performance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liqiang; Sontag, S Kyle; LaJoie, Travis W; Li, Wentao; Huddleston, N Eric; Locklin, Jason; You, Wei

    2012-10-24

    In this work, uniform poly(3-methylthiophene) (P3MT) films are fabricated on indium-tin oxide (ITO) surfaces using surface-initiated Kumada catalyst-transfer polycondensation (SI-KCTP) from surface-bound arylnickel(II) bromide initiators. The P3MT interfacial layer is covalently bound to the ITO surface, thereby preventing possible delamination during the processing of additional layers. These surface-bound P3MT layers successfully serve as the hole-transport layer for solution-processed bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells. Efficiencies greater than 5% have been achieved on devices based on doped thin P3MT interfacial layers. Moreover, because of the excellent stability of the covalently immobilized P3MT on ITO substrates, devices based on reused P3MT/ITO substrates extracted from old devices exhibit efficiencies similar to those of the original devices.

  15. Membrane catalyst layer for fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1993-01-01

    A gas reaction fuel cell incorporates a thin catalyst layer between a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) membrane and a porous electrode backing. The catalyst layer is preferably less than about 10 .mu.m in thickness with a carbon supported platinum catalyst loading less than about 0.35 mgPt/cm.sup.2. The film is formed as an ink that is spread and cured on a film release blank. The cured film is then transferred to the SPE membrane and hot pressed into the surface to form a catalyst layer having a controlled thickness and catalyst distribution. Alternatively, the catalyst layer is formed by applying a Na.sup.+ form of a perfluorosulfonate ionomer directly to the membrane, drying the film at a high temperature, and then converting the film back to the protonated form of the ionomer. The layer has adequate gas permeability so that cell performance is not affected and has a density and particle distribution effective to optimize proton access to the catalyst and electronic continuity for electron flow from the half-cell reaction occurring at the catalyst.

  16. Catalyst design for biorefining.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F

    2016-02-28

    The quest for sustainable resources to meet the demands of a rapidly rising global population while mitigating the risks of rising CO2 emissions and associated climate change, represents a grand challenge for humanity. Biomass offers the most readily implemented and low-cost solution for sustainable transportation fuels, and the only non-petroleum route to organic molecules for the manufacture of bulk, fine and speciality chemicals and polymers. To be considered truly sustainable, biomass must be derived from resources which do not compete with agricultural land use for food production, or compromise the environment (e.g. via deforestation). Potential feedstocks include waste lignocellulosic or oil-based materials derived from plant or aquatic sources, with the so-called biorefinery concept offering the co-production of biofuels, platform chemicals and energy; analogous to today's petroleum refineries which deliver both high-volume/low-value (e.g. fuels and commodity chemicals) and low-volume/high-value (e.g. fine/speciality chemicals) products, thereby maximizing biomass valorization. This article addresses the challenges to catalytic biomass processing and highlights recent successes in the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts facilitated by advances in nanotechnology and the synthesis of templated porous materials, as well as the use of tailored catalyst surfaces to generate bifunctional solid acid/base materials or tune hydrophobicity.

  17. Prelife catalysts and replicators

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Nowak, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    Life is based on replication and evolution. But replication cannot be taken for granted. We must ask what there was prior to replication and evolution. How does evolution begin? We have proposed prelife as a generative system that produces information and diversity in the absence of replication. We model prelife as a binary soup of active monomers that form random polymers. ‘Prevolutionary’ dynamics can have mutation and selection prior to replication. Some sequences might have catalytic activity, thereby enhancing the rates of certain prelife reactions. We study the selection criteria for these prelife catalysts. Their catalytic efficiency must be above certain critical values. We find a maintenance threshold and an initiation threshold. The former is a linear function of sequence length, and the latter is an exponential function of sequence length. Therefore, it is extremely hard to select for prelife catalysts that have long sequences. We compare prelife catalysis with a simple model for replication. Assuming fast template-based elongation reactions, we can show that replicators have selection thresholds that are independent of their sequence length. Our calculation demonstrates the efficiency of replication and provides an explanation of why replication was selected over other forms of prelife catalysis. PMID:19692408

  18. Application of a mixed metal oxide catalyst to a metallic substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevener, Kathleen M. (Inventor); Lohner, Kevin A. (Inventor); Mays, Jeffrey A. (Inventor); Wisner, Daniel L. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for applying a mixed metal oxide catalyst to a metallic substrate for the creation of a robust, high temperature catalyst system for use in decomposing propellants, particularly hydrogen peroxide propellants, for use in propulsion systems. The method begins by forming a prepared substrate material consisting of a metallic inner substrate and a bound layer of a noble metal intermediate. Alternatively, a bound ceramic coating, or frit, may be introduced between the metallic inner substrate and noble metal intermediate when the metallic substrate is oxidation resistant. A high-activity catalyst slurry is applied to the surface of the prepared substrate and dried to remove the organic solvent. The catalyst layer is then heat treated to bind the catalyst layer to the surface. The bound catalyst layer is then activated using an activation treatment and calcinations to form the high-activity catalyst system.

  19. Green polymer chemistry: enzyme catalysis for polymer functionalization.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sanghamitra; Puskas, Judit E

    2015-05-21

    Enzyme catalyzed reactions are green alternative approaches to functionalize polymers compared to conventional methods. This technique is especially advantageous due to the high selectivity, high efficiency, milder reaction conditions, and recyclability of enzymes. Selected reactions can be conducted under solventless conditions without the application of metal catalysts. Hence this process is becoming more recognized in the arena of biomedical applications, as the toxicity created by solvents and metal catalyst residues can be completely avoided. In this review we will discuss fundamental aspects of chemical reactions biocatalyzed by Candida antarctica lipase B, and their application to create new functionalized polymers, including the regio- and chemoselectivity of the reactions.

  20. Entropy Bounds and Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Zachary

    The generalized covariant entropy bound, or Bousso bound, is a holographic bound on the entropy of a region of space in a gravitational theory. It bounds the entropy passing through certain null surfaces. The bound remains non-trivial in the weak-gravity limit, and provides non-trivial constraints on the entropy of ordinary quantum states even in a regime where gravity is negligible. In the first half of this thesis, we present a proof of the Bousso bound in the weak-gravity regime within the framework of quantum field theory. The bound uses techniques from quantum information theory which relate the energy and entropy of quantum states. We present two proofs of the bound in free and interacting field theory. In the second half, we present a generalization of the Bousso bound called the quantum focussing conjecture. Our conjecture is a bound on the rate of entropy generation in a quantum field theory coupled semiclassically to gravity. The conjecture unifies and generalizes several ideas in holography. In particular, the quantum focussing conjecture implies a bound on entropies which is similar to, but subtly different from, the Bousso bound proven in the first half. The quantum focussing conjecture implies a novel non-gravitational energy condition, the quantum null energy condition, which gives a point-wise lower bound on the null-null component of the stress tensor of quantum matter. We give a proof of this bound in the context of free and superrenormalizable bosonic quantum field theory.

  1. An Overview of Recent Development in Composite Catalysts from Porous Materials for Various Reactions and Processes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zaiku; Liu, Zhicheng; Wang, Yangdong; Yang, Qihua; Xu, Longya; Ding, Weiping

    2010-01-01

    Catalysts are important to the chemical industry and environmental remediation due to their effective conversion of one chemical into another. Among them, composite catalysts have attracted continuous attention during the past decades. Nowadays, composite catalysts are being used more and more to meet the practical catalytic performance requirements in the chemical industry of high activity, high selectivity and good stability. In this paper, we reviewed our recent work on development of composite catalysts, mainly focusing on the composite catalysts obtained from porous materials such as zeolites, mesoporous materials, carbon nanotubes (CNT), etc. Six types of porous composite catalysts are discussed, including amorphous oxide modified zeolite composite catalysts, zeolite composites prepared by co-crystallization or overgrowth, hierarchical porous catalysts, host-guest porous composites, inorganic and organic mesoporous composite catalysts, and polymer/CNT composite catalysts. PMID:20559508

  2. Thermal properties of freezing bound water restrained by polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tatsuko; Tanaka, Masaru; Hatakeyama, Hyoe

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the thermal properties of bound water restrained by various kinds of polysaccharides and several synthetic polymers. The characteristic features of freezing bound water which is closely related with biocompatibility of polymers are summarized based on results obtained by differential scanning calorimetry. Glass transition, cold crystallization and melting of water-polysaccharide systems were observed. Three kinds of water, non-freezing, freezing bound and free water, were quantified from the enthalpy of melting of water in the system. Freezing bound water restrained by polysaccharides is in a metastable state. The equilibrium melting temperature of freezing bound water is lower than 0°C and the temperature decreases with decreasing water content. Nucleation and growth rate of freezing bound water were calculated from isothermal crystallization and the values were compared with those of free water.

  3. Viscosity bound versus the universal relaxation bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2017-10-01

    For gauge theories with an Einstein gravity dual, the AdS/CFT correspondence predicts a universal value for the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density, η / s = 1 / 4 π. The holographic calculations have motivated the formulation of the celebrated KSS conjecture, according to which all fluids conform to the lower bound η / s ≥ 1 / 4 π. The bound on η / s may be regarded as a lower bound on the relaxation properties of perturbed fluids and it has been the focus of much recent attention. In particular, it was argued that for a class of field theories with Gauss-Bonnet gravity dual, the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, η / s, could violate the conjectured KSS bound. In the present paper we argue that the proposed violations of the KSS bound are strongly constrained by Bekenstein's generalized second law (GSL) of thermodynamics. In particular, it is shown that physical consistency of the Gauss-Bonnet theory with the GSL requires its coupling constant to be bounded by λGB ≲ 0 . 063. We further argue that the genuine physical bound on the relaxation properties of physically consistent fluids is ℑω(k > 2 πT) > πT, where ω and k are respectively the proper frequency and the wavenumber of a perturbation mode in the fluid.

  4. Cracking catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Otterstedt, J. E. A.; Jaras, S. G.; Pudas, R.; Upson, L. L.

    1985-05-07

    A cracking catalyst having good resistance to metal poisoning has at least two particle fractions of different particle sizes, the cracking catalyzing zeolite material being concentrated to the coarser particle size fractions, and the finer particle size fractions being formed from material having relatively lower or no or insignificant cracking catalyzing activity. The particles of the finer particle size fractions have a matrix of kaolin and amorphous alumina--silica and may contain for example, an SO /SUB x/ eliminating additive such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, CaO and/or MgO. The coarser particle size fractions having cracking catalyzing effect have a mean particle size of from 80 to 125 ..mu..m and the finer particle size fractions a mean particle size of from 30 to 75 ..mu..m. The coarser particle size fractions have a zeolite content of at least 20 weight % and may have a zeolite content of up to 100 weight %, the remainder consisting essentially of material which has relatively lower or no or insignificant cracking-catalyzing activity and which consists of kaolin and amorphous alumina-silica. The catalyst mass as a whole may have a zeolite content of up to 50 weight %.

  5. Adsorbent key to polypropylene catalyst activity

    SciTech Connect

    Detrait, J.C.; Grootjans, J.F. )

    1994-10-10

    Propylene streams from the refinery fluid catalytic cracking unit and delayed coker contain contaminants that are poisons to polymerization catalysts. A new sorbent catalyst, called Prosorb, allows petrochemical producers to clean up these dirty'' propylene streams to a level adequate for use with the new high-yielded polymerization catalysts. The process, called Triple P'' (propylene polishing process), eliminates all common contaminants, including COS, H[sub 2]S, mercaptans, AsH[sub 3], and SbH[sub 3]. Commercial trials have taken place at two Fina refineries and at a joint venture petrochemical plant. The refineries used the process to upgrade propylene feed from gasoline value to nearly polymer-grade value. The petrochemical producer was able to increase the activity of its polymerization catalyst and the consistency of the process.

  6. Nuclearity and cooperativity effects in binuclear catalysts and cocatalysts for olefin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbo; Marks, Tobin J

    2006-10-17

    A series of bimetallic organo-group 4 "constrained geometry" catalysts and binuclear bisborane and bisborate cocatalysts have been synthesized to probe catalyst center-catalyst center cooperativity effects on olefin enchainment in homogenous olefin polymerization and copolymerization processes. Significant nuclearity effects are found versus mononuclear controls, and the effect can be correlated with metal-metal approach distances and ion pairing effects. Novel polymer structures can be obtained by using such binuclear catalyst/cocatalyst systems.

  7. Polymers for metal extractions in carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    DeSimone, Joseph M.; Tumas, William; Powell, Kimberly R.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Romack, Timothy J.; McClain, James B.; Birnbaum, Eva R.

    2001-01-01

    A composition useful for the extraction of metals and metalloids comprises (a) carbon dioxide fluid (preferably liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide); and (b) a polymer in the carbon dioxide, the polymer having bound thereto a ligand that binds the metal or metalloid; with the ligand bound to the polymer at a plurality of locations along the chain length thereof (i.e., a plurality of ligands are bound at a plurality of locations along the chain length of the polymer). The polymer is preferably a copolymer, and the polymer is preferably a fluoropolymer such as a fluoroacrylate polymer. The extraction method comprises the steps of contacting a first composition containing a metal or metalloid to be extracted with a second composition, the second composition being as described above; and then extracting the metal or metalloid from the first composition into the second composition.

  8. Tools for fluorescent molecularly imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Rathbone, Daniel L; Bains, Ajeet

    2005-01-15

    A linear co-polymer of hexyl acrylate and quinine acrylate was prepared anchored to cellulose filtration membranes. These were used to probe quenching of the tethered fluorophore by test compounds in solution for the validation of imprinted polymer fluorescence studies. The results are compared with simple solution phase quenching studies and also for two membrane-bound imprinted polymers containing the same fluorophore.

  9. Bound states and the Bekenstein bound

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael

    2003-10-16

    We explore the validity of the generalized Bekenstein bound, S<= pi M a. We define the entropy S as the logarithm of the number of states which have energy eigenvalue below M and are localized to a flat space region of width alpha. If boundary conditions that localize field modes are imposed by fiat, then the bound encounters well-known difficulties with negative Casimir energy and large species number, as well as novel problems arising only in the generalized form. In realistic systems, however, finite-size effects contribute additional energy. We study two different models for estimating such contributions. Our analysis suggests that the bound is both valid and nontrivial if interactions are properly included, so that the entropy S counts the bound states of interacting fields.

  10. Topologically unique heterometallic Cu(II)/Li coordination polymers self-assembled from N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid biobuffer: versatile catalyst precursors for mild hydrocarboxylation of alkanes to carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Kirillova, Marina V; Kirillov, Alexander M; Martins, André N C; Graiff, Claudia; Tiripicchio, Antonio; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2012-05-07

    The facile aqueous medium reactions of copper(II) nitrate with BES biobuffer [(HOCH(2)CH(2))(2)N(CH(2)CH(2)SO(3)H), hereinafter referred as H(3)bes] in the presence of various benzenecarboxylic acids [benzoic (Hba), 3-hydroxybenzoic (Hhba), and 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic (Hdhba) acid] and lithium hydroxide gave rise to the self-assembly generation of three new heterometallic Cu(II)/Li materials, [Li(H(2)O)(4)][Cu(4)(μ(2)-Hbes)(4)(μ(2)-ba)]·H(2)O (1) and [Cu(4)(μ(3)-Hbes)(4)(L){Li(H(2)O)(2)}](n)·3nH(2)O {L = μ(2)-hba (2) and μ(2)-dhba (3)}. They were isolated as air-stable crystalline solids and fully characterized by infrared (IR) and UV-vis spectroscopy and electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS(±), elemental, thermal, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. The latter revealed that 1-3 have comparable packing patterns and unit cell parameters, being composed of similar [Cu(4)(μ-Hbes)(4)(μ-carboxylate)](-) cores and [Li(H(2)O)(4)](+) cations (in 1) or [μ-Li(H(2)O)(2)](+) groups (in 2 and 3), which are arranged into discrete 0D aggregates in 1 or infinite 3D noninterpenetrating metal-organic networks in 2 and 3. The topological analysis of the coordination polymers 2 and 3 disclosed the trinodal 3,3,4-connected underlying nets with an unprecedented topology defined by the point symbol of (4.6.8)(4)(4(2).6)(2)(6(2).16(2).18(2)), further simplification of which resulted in the binodal 4,4-connected nets with the pts (PtS) topology. Apart from representing very rare examples of coordination compounds derived from H(3)bes, 1-3 feature solubility in water and were applied as efficient and versatile catalyst precursors for the mild (60 °C) single-pot hydrocarboxylation, by CO and H(2)O, of various gaseous, linear, and cyclic C(n) (n = 2-9) alkanes into the corresponding C(n+1) carboxylic acids, in H(2)O/MeCN medium under homogeneous conditions and in the presence of potassium peroxodisulfate. Total yields (based on alkane) of carboxylic acids up to 78% were

  11. Polystyrene bound oxidovanadium(IV) and dioxidovanadium(V) complexes of histamine derived ligand for the oxidation of methyl phenyl sulfide, diphenyl sulfide and benzoin.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Mannar R; Arya, Aarti; Kumar, Amit; Pessoa, João Costa

    2009-03-28

    Ligand Hsal-his (I) derived from salicylaldehyde and histamine has been covalently bound to chloromethylated polystyrene cross-linked with 5% divinylbenzene. Upon treatment with [VO(acac)(2)] in DMF, the polystyrene-bound ligand (abbreviated as PS-Hsal-his, II) gave the stable polystyrene-bound oxidovanadium(iv) complex PS-[V(IV)O(sal-his)(acac)] , which upon oxidation yielded the dioxidovanadium(v) PS-[V(V)O(2)(sal-his)] complex. The corresponding non polymer-bound complexes [V(IV)O(sal-his)(acac)] and [V(V)O(2)(sal-his)] have also been obtained. These complexes have been characterised by IR, electronic, (51)V NMR and EPR spectral studies, and thermal as well as scanning electron micrograph studies. Complexes and have been used as a catalyst for the oxidation of methyl phenyl sulfide, diphenyl sulfide and benzoin with 30% H(2)O(2) as oxidant. Under the optimised reaction conditions, a maximum of 93.8% conversion of methyl phenyl sulfide with 63.7% selectivity towards methyl phenyl sulfoxide and 36.3% towards methyl phenyl sulfone has been achieved in 2 h with 2 . Under similar conditions, diphenyl sulfide gave 83.4% conversion where selectivity of reaction products varied in the order: diphenyl sulfoxide (71.8%) > diphenyl sulfone (28.2%). A maximum of 91.2% conversion of benzoin has been achieved within 6 h, and the selectivities of reaction products are: methylbenzoate (37.0%) > benzil (30.5%) > benzaldehyde-dimethylacetal (22.5%) > benzoic acid (8.1%). The PS-bound complex, 1 exhibits very comparable catalytic potential. These polymer-anchored heterogeneous catalysts do not leach during catalytic action, are recyclable and show higher catalytic activity and turnover frequency than the corresponding non polymer-bound complexes. EPR and (51)V NMR spectroscopy was used to characterise methanolic solutions of 3 and 4 and to identify species formed upon addition of H(2)O(2) and/or acid and/or methyl phenyl sulfide.

  12. The Development and Study of Surface Bound Ruthenium Organometallic Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Geoffrey Reuben

    The focus of this project has been on the use of mono-diimine ruthenium organometallic complexes, of the general structure [H(Ru)(CO)(L)2(L') 2][PF6] (L=PPh3, DPPENE and L'=Bpy, DcBpy, MBpyC, Phen, AminoPhen) bound to surfaces as luminescent probes. Both biological and inorganic/organic hybrid surfaces have been studied. The complexes were characterized both bound and unbound using standard analytical techniques such as NMR, IR and X-ray crystallography, as well as through several photophysical methods as well. Initially the study focused on how the photophyscial properties of the complexes were affected by incorporation into biological membranes. It was found that by conjugating the probes to a more rigid cholesterol moiety that luminescence was conserved, compared to conjugation with a far more flexible lipid moiety, where luminescence was either lost or reduced. Both the cholesterol and lipid conjugates were able to insert into a lipid membrane, and in the more rigid environment some of the lipid conjugates regained some of their luminescence, but often blue shifted and reduced, depending on the conjugation site. Silica Polyamine Composites (SPCs) were a hybrid material developed in the Rosenberg Lab as useful metal separation materials, that could be easily modified, and had several benefits over current commercially available polymers, or inorganic materials. These SPCs also provided an opportunity for the development of a heterogeneous platform for luminescent complexes as either catalysts or sensors. Upon binding of the luminescent Ru complexes to the surface no loss, or major change in luminescence was seen, however, when bound to the rigid surface a significant increase in excited state lifetime was measured. It is likely that through binding and interacting with the surface that the complexes lost non-radiative decay pathways, resulting in the increase in lifetime, however, these interactions do not seem to affect the energy level of the MLCT band in a

  13. Metal phthalocyanine polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achar, B. N.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Metal 4, 4', 4", 4"'=tetracarboxylic phthalocyanines (MPTC) are prepared by reaction of trimellitic anhydride, a salt or hydroxide of the desired metal (or the metal in powdered form), urea and a catalyst. A purer form of MPTC is prepared than heretofore. These tetracarboxylic acids are then polymerized by heat to sheet polymers which have superior heat and oxidation resistance. The metal is preferably a divalent metal having an atomic radius close to 1.35A.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of Pd-poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)/KIT-5 nanocomposite as a polymer-inorganic hybrid catalyst for the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kalbasi, Roozbeh Javad; Mosaddegh, Neda

    2011-11-15

    Composite poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)/KIT-5 (PVP/KIT-5) was prepared by in situ polymerization method and used as a support for palladium nanoparticles obtained through the reduction of Pd(OAc){sub 2} by hydrazine hydrate. The physical and chemical properties of the catalyst were investigated by XRD, FT-IR, UV-vis, TG, BET, SEM, and TEM techniques. The catalytic performance of this novel heterogeneous catalyst was determined for the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction between aryl halides and phenylboronic acid in the presence of water at room temperature. The stability of the nanocomposite catalyst was excellent and could be reused 8 times without much loss of activity in the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction. - Graphical Abstract: Pd-poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)/KIT-5 was prepared as an organic-inorganic hybrid catalyst for the Suzuki-Miyaura reaction. The stability of the catalyst was excellent and could be reused 8 times in the Suzuki-Miyaura reaction. Highlights: > Pd-poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)/KIT-5 was prepared as a novel nanocomposite. > Nanocomposite was prepared based on a cage-type mesoporous system. > Catalyst showed excellent activity for Suzuki-Miyaura reaction in water. > Stability of the catalyst was excellent and could be reused 8 times.

  15. Electronic and Ionic Transport in Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-09

    3,4-blnaphthalene-9,1 1-diyl) and related systems. Very high molecular weight, low polydispersity, polymers such as poly(octaxnethylene sulfide) have... themodynamically prohibited, we have found that added catalysts such as tetrahydrothiophene, permit very high molecular weight polymers to form, Mn approximately 1 x

  16. Catalyst for Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Patricia; Brown, Kenneth; VanNorman, John; Brown, David; Upchurch, Billy; Schryer, David; Miller, Irvin

    2010-01-01

    In many applications, it is highly desirable to operate a CO2 laser in a sealed condition, for in an open system the laser requires a continuous flow of laser gas to remove the dissociation products that occur in the discharge zone of the laser, in order to maintain a stable power output. This adds to the operating cost of the laser, and in airborne or space applications, it also adds to the weight penalty of the laser. In a sealed CO2 laser, a small amount of CO2 gas is decomposed in the electrical discharge zone into corresponding quantities of CO and O2. As the laser continues to operate, the concentration of CO2 decreases, while the concentrations of CO and O2 correspondingly increase. The increasing concentration of O2 reduces laser power, because O2 scavenges electrons in the electrical discharge, thereby causing arcing in the electric discharge and a loss of the energetic electrons required to boost CO2 molecules to lasing energy levels. As a result, laser power decreases rapidly. The primary object of this invention is to provide a catalyst that, by composition of matter alone, contains chemisorbed water within and upon its structure. Such bound moisture renders the catalyst highly active and very long-lived, such that only a small quantity of it needs to be used with a CO2 laser under ambient operating conditions. This object is achieved by a catalyst that consists essentially of about 1 to 40 percent by weight of one or more platinum group metals (Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os, Pt being preferred); about 1 to 90 percent by weight of one or more oxides of reducible metals having multiple valence states (such as Sn, Ti, Mn, Cu, and Ce, with SnO2 being preferred); and about 1 to 90 percent by weight of a compound that can bind water to its structure (such as silica gel, calcium chloride, magnesium sulfate, hydrated alumina, and magnesium perchlorate, with silica gel being preferred). Especially beneficial results are obtained when platinum is present in the

  17. Polymer films

    DOEpatents

    Granick, Steve; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.

    2008-12-30

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.

  18. Polymer films

    DOEpatents

    Granick, Steve; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.

    2004-05-25

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.

  19. Conformational phases of membrane bound cytoskeletal filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quint, David A.; Grason, Gregory; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2013-03-01

    Membrane bound cytoskeletal filaments found in living cells are employed to carry out many types of activities including cellular division, rigidity and transport. When these biopolymers are bound to a membrane surface they may take on highly non-trivial conformations as compared to when they are not bound. This leads to the natural question; What are the important interactions which drive these polymers to particular conformations when they are bound to a surface? Assuming that there are binding domains along the polymer which follow a periodic helical structure set by the natural monomeric handedness, these bound conformations must arise from the interplay of the intrinsic monomeric helicity and membrane binding. To probe this question, we study a continuous model of an elastic filament with intrinsic helicity and map out the conformational phases of this filament for various mechanical and structural parameters in our model, such as elastic stiffness and intrinsic twist of the filament. Our model allows us to gain insight into the possible mechanisms which drive real biopolymers such as actin and tubulin in eukaryotes and their prokaryotic cousins MreB and FtsZ to take on their functional conformations within living cells.

  20. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Laura J.; Bray, Lane A.

    1995-01-01

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications.

  1. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, L.J.; Bray, L.A.

    1995-05-30

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: (a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; (b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; (c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and (d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications. 3 figs.

  2. Neutral nickel ethylene oligo- and polymerization catalysts: towards computational catalyst prediction and design.

    PubMed

    Heyndrickx, Wouter; Occhipinti, Giovanni; Jensen, Vidar R

    2014-06-23

    DFT calculations have been used to elucidate the chain termination mechanisms for neutral nickel ethylene oligo- and polymerization catalysts and to rationalize the kind of oligomers and polymers produced by each catalyst. The catalysts studied are the (κ(2)-O,O)-coordinated (1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-acetylacetonato)nickel catalyst I, the (κ(2)-P,O)-coordinated SHOP-type nickel catalyst II, the (κ(2)-N,O)-coordinated anilinotropone and salicylaldiminato nickel catalysts III and IV, respectively, and the (κ(2)-P,N)-coordinated phosphinosulfonamide nickel catalyst V. Numerous termination pathways involving β-H elimination and β-H transfer steps have been investigated, and the most probable routes identified. Despite the complexity and multitude of the possible termination pathways, the information most critical to chain termination is contained in only few transition states. In addition, by consideration of the propagation pathway, we have been able to estimate chain lengths and discriminate between oligo- and polymerization catalysts. In agreement with experiment, we found the Gibbs free energy difference between the overall barrier for the most facile propagation and termination pathways to be close to 0 kcal mol(-1) for the ethylene oligomerization catalysts I and V, whereas values of at least 7 kcal mol(-1) in favor of propagation were determined for the polymerization catalysts III and IV. Because of the shared intermediates between the termination and branching pathways, we have been able to identify the preferred cis/trans regiochemistry of β-H elimination and show that a pronounced difference in σ donation of the two bridgehead atoms of the bidentate ligand can suppress hydride formation and thus branching. The degree of rationalization obtained here from a handful of key intermediates and transition states is promising for the use of computational methods in the screening and prediction of new catalysts of the title class.

  3. Long-Life Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STC Catalysts, Inc. (SCi) manufactures a noble metal reducible oxide catalyst consisting primarily of platinum and tin dioxide deposited on a ceramic substrate. It is an ambient temperature oxidation catalyst that was developed primarily for Carbon Dioxide Lasers.The catalyst was developed by the NASA Langley Research Center for the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder Program (LAWS) which was intended to measure wind velocity on a global basis. There are a number of NASA owned patents covering various aspects of the catalyst.

  4. Functionalized Polymers-Emerging Versatile Tools for Solution-Phase Chemistry and Automated Parallel Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kirschning, Andreas; Monenschein, Holger; Wittenberg, Rüdiger

    2001-02-16

    As part of the dramatic changes associated with the need for preparing compound libraries in pharmaceutical and agrochemical research laboratories, industry searches for new technologies that allow for the automation of synthetic processes. Since the pioneering work by Merrifield polymeric supports have been identified to play a key role in this field however, polymer-assisted solution-phase synthesis which utilizes immobilized reagents and catalysts has only recently begun to flourish. Polymer-assisted solution-phase synthesis has various advantages over conventional solution-phase chemistry, such as the ease of separation of the supported species from a reaction mixture by filtration and washing, the opportunity to use an excess of the reagent to force the reaction to completion without causing workup problems, and the adaptability to continuous-flow processes. Various strategies for employing functionalized polymers stoichiometrically have been developed. Apart from reagents that are covalently or ionically attached to the polymeric backbone and which are released into solution in the presence of a suitable substrate, scavenger reagents play an increasingly important role in purifying reaction mixtures. Employing functionalized polymers in solution-phase synthesis has been shown to be extremely useful in automated parallel synthesis and multistep sequences. So far, compound libraries containing as many as 88 members have been generated by using several polymer-bound reagents one after another. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that complex natural products like the alkaloids (+/-)-oxomaritidine and (+/-)-epimaritidine can be prepared by a sequence of five and six consecutive polymer-assisted steps, respectively, and the potent analgesic compound (+/-)-epibatidine in twelve linear steps ten of which are based on functionalized polymers. These developments reveal the great future prospects of polymer-assisted solution-phase synthesis.

  5. A clamp-like biohybrid catalyst for DNA oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dongen, Stijn F. M.; Clerx, Joost; Nørgaard, Kasper; Bloemberg, Tom G.; Cornelissen, Jeroen J. L. M.; Trakselis, Michael A.; Nelson, Scott W.; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Rowan, Alan E.; Nolte, Roeland J. M.

    2013-11-01

    In processive catalysis, a catalyst binds to a substrate and remains bound as it performs several consecutive reactions, as exemplified by DNA polymerases. Processivity is essential in nature and is often mediated by a clamp-like structure that physically tethers the catalyst to its (polymeric) template. In the case of the bacteriophage T4 replisome, a dedicated clamp protein acts as a processivity mediator by encircling DNA and subsequently recruiting its polymerase. Here we use this DNA-binding protein to construct a biohybrid catalyst. Conjugation of the clamp protein to a chemical catalyst with sequence-specific oxidation behaviour formed a catalytic clamp that can be loaded onto a DNA plasmid. The catalytic activity of the biohybrid catalyst was visualized using a procedure based on an atomic force microscopy method that detects and spatially locates oxidized sites in DNA. Varying the experimental conditions enabled switching between processive and distributive catalysis and influencing the sliding direction of this rotaxane-like catalyst.

  6. Physical Uncertainty Bounds (PUB)

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, Diane Elizabeth; Preston, Dean L.

    2015-03-19

    This paper introduces and motivates the need for a new methodology for determining upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulations of engineered systems due to limited fidelity in the composite continuum-level physics models needed to simulate the systems. We show that traditional uncertainty quantification methods provide, at best, a lower bound on this uncertainty. We propose to obtain bounds on the simulation uncertainties by first determining bounds on the physical quantities or processes relevant to system performance. By bounding these physics processes, as opposed to carrying out statistical analyses of the parameter sets of specific physics models or simply switching out the available physics models, one can obtain upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulated quantities of interest.

  7. Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, T.J.; Whinnery, L.L.

    1998-11-17

    A novel composition is described comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen. 1 fig.

  8. Polymer system for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy Jon; Whinnery, LeRoy L.

    2000-01-01

    A novel composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

  9. Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy Jon; Whinnery, LeRoy L.

    1998-11-17

    A novel composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

  10. Cyclic polymers from alkynes.

    PubMed

    Roland, Christopher D; Li, Hong; Abboud, Khalil A; Wagener, Kenneth B; Veige, Adam S

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic polymers have dramatically different physical properties compared with those of their equivalent linear counterparts. However, the exploration of cyclic polymers is limited because of the inherent challenges associated with their synthesis. Conjugated linear polyacetylenes are important materials for electrical conductivity, paramagnetic susceptibility, optical nonlinearity, photoconductivity, gas permeability, liquid crystallinity and chain helicity. However, their cyclic analogues are unknown, and therefore the ability to examine how a cyclic topology influences their properties is currently not possible. We have solved this challenge and now report a tungsten catalyst supported by a tetraanionic pincer ligand that can rapidly polymerize alkynes to form conjugated macrocycles in high yield. The catalyst works by tethering the ends of the polymer to the metal centre to overcome the inherent entropic penalty of cyclization. Gel-permeation chromatography, dynamic and static light scattering, viscometry and chemical tests are all consistent with theoretical predictions and provide unambiguous confirmation of a cyclic topology. Access to a wide variety of new cyclic polymers is now possible by simply choosing the appropriate alkyne monomer.

  11. Cyclic polymers from alkynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Christopher D.; Li, Hong; Abboud, Khalil A.; Wagener, Kenneth B.; Veige, Adam S.

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic polymers have dramatically different physical properties compared with those of their equivalent linear counterparts. However, the exploration of cyclic polymers is limited because of the inherent challenges associated with their synthesis. Conjugated linear polyacetylenes are important materials for electrical conductivity, paramagnetic susceptibility, optical nonlinearity, photoconductivity, gas permeability, liquid crystallinity and chain helicity. However, their cyclic analogues are unknown, and therefore the ability to examine how a cyclic topology influences their properties is currently not possible. We have solved this challenge and now report a tungsten catalyst supported by a tetraanionic pincer ligand that can rapidly polymerize alkynes to form conjugated macrocycles in high yield. The catalyst works by tethering the ends of the polymer to the metal centre to overcome the inherent entropic penalty of cyclization. Gel-permeation chromatography, dynamic and static light scattering, viscometry and chemical tests are all consistent with theoretical predictions and provide unambiguous confirmation of a cyclic topology. Access to a wide variety of new cyclic polymers is now possible by simply choosing the appropriate alkyne monomer.

  12. Method for producing iron-based catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Farcasiu, Malvina; Kaufman, Phillip B.; Diehl, J. Rodney; Kathrein, Hendrik

    1999-01-01

    A method for preparing an acid catalyst having a long shelf-life is provided comprising doping crystalline iron oxides with lattice-compatible metals and heating the now-doped oxide with halogen compounds at elevated temperatures. The invention also provides for a catalyst comprising an iron oxide particle having a predetermined lattice structure, one or more metal dopants for said iron oxide, said dopants having an ionic radius compatible with said lattice structure; and a halogen bound with the iron and the metal dopants on the surface of the particle.

  13. Method for producing iron-based catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Farcasiu, M.; Kaufman, P.B.; Diehl, J.R.; Kathrein, H.

    1999-09-07

    A method for preparing an acid catalyst having a long shelf-life is provided comprising doping crystalline iron oxides with lattice-compatible metals and heating the now-doped oxide with halogen compounds at elevated temperatures. The invention also provides for a catalyst comprising an iron oxide particle having a predetermined lattice structure, one or more metal dopants for said iron oxide, said dopants having an ionic radius compatible with said lattice structure; and a halogen bound with the iron and the metal dopants on the surface of the particle.

  14. Metal supports for exhaust gas catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Nonnenmann, M.

    1985-01-01

    Since 1979, metal supports as pre-catalysts have been mass-produced and installed in export models of German automobiles bound for the United States and Japan. The close-to-engine installation directly behind the exhaust manifold places specially high demands on the thermal and mechanical durability of the metal supports. Sueddeutsche Kuehlerfabrik Behr produces these metal supports under the name of ''Metalit''. The development, properties and special advantages of these metal supports are covered. The successful use of hundreds of thousands of metal supports, a number of automobile manufacturers are working on programs to employ the Metalit concept for primary catalysts.

  15. Nanoscale Catalysts for NMR Signal Enhancement by Reversible Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two types of nanoscale catalysts were created to explore NMR signal enhancement via reversible exchange (SABRE) at the interface between heterogeneous and homogeneous conditions. Nanoparticle and polymer comb variants were synthesized by covalently tethering Ir-based organometallic catalysts to support materials composed of TiO2/PMAA (poly(methacrylic acid)) and PVP (polyvinylpyridine), respectively, and characterized by AAS, NMR, and DLS. Following parahydrogen (pH2) gas delivery to mixtures containing one type of “nano-SABRE” catalyst particle, a target substrate, and ethanol, up to ∼(−)40-fold and ∼(−)7-fold 1H NMR signal enhancements were observed for pyridine substrates using the nanoparticle and polymer comb catalysts, respectively, following transfer to high field (9.4 T). These enhancements appear to result from intact particles and not from any catalyst molecules leaching from their supports; unlike the case with homogeneous SABRE catalysts, high-field (in situ) SABRE effects were generally not observed with the nanoscale catalysts. The potential for separation and reuse of such catalyst particles is also demonstrated. Taken together, these results support the potential utility of rational design at molecular, mesoscopic, and macroscopic/engineering levels for improving SABRE and HET-SABRE (heterogeneous-SABRE) for applications varying from fundamental studies of catalysis to biomedical imaging. PMID:26185545

  16. Understanding ``grafting through'' polymerization reactions involving surface-bound monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Preeta; Genzer, Jan

    2015-03-01

    ``Grafting through'' polymerization is based on a bulk radical polymerization reaction utilizing a self-assembled monolayer that contain polymerizable units. Free polymer chains formed in solution can incorporate the surface-bound monomers, and thereby, get covalently bonded to the surface. As more growing chains attach to the surface-bound monomers, an immobilized polymer layer is formed on the surface. We use a combination of computer simulation and experiments to comprehend this process. Specifically, we report on the effect of spatial density of the surface-monomers on the formation of the surface-bound polymers. We use a lattice-based bond fluctuation model with periodic boundary conditions to simulate such systems. For experimental validation, we create gradients of density of methacrylate units on flat Si wafers using silane chemistry. The proximity of the surface-bound polymerizable units promotes the ``grafting through'' process but prevents more free growing chains to ``graft to'' the polymerizable units. Our studies indicate that these two counter-active effects balance each other and do not affect the overall density of the surface-bound polymer layer, except in case of the highest theoretical packing density of surface-bound monomers.

  17. Catalyst system for the polymerization of alkenes to polyolefins

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Stephen A.; Bercaw, John E.

    2002-01-01

    The invention provides metallocene catalyst systems for the controlled polymerization of alkenes to a wide variety of polyolefins and olefin coplymers. Catalyst systems are provided that specifically produce isotactic, syndiotactic and steroblock polyolefins. The type of polymer produced can be controlled by varying the catalyst system, specifically by varying the ligand substituents. Such catalyst systems are particularly useful for the polymerization of polypropylene to give elastomeric polypropylenes. The invention also provides novel elastomeric polypropylene polymers characterized by dyad (m) tacticities of about 55% to about 65%, pentad (mmmm) tacticities of about 25% to about 35%, molecular weights (M.sub.w)in the range of about 50,000 to about 2,000,000, and have mmrm+rrmr peak is less than about 5%.

  18. Catalyst system for the polymerization of alkenes to polyolefins

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Stephen A.; Bercaw, John E.

    2004-02-17

    The invention provides metallocene catalyst systems for the controlled polymerization of alkenes to a wide variety of polyolefins and olefin coplymers. Catalyst systems are provided that specifically produce isotactic, syndiotactic and steroblock polyolefins. The type of polymer produced can be controlled by varying the catalyst system, specifically by varying the ligand substituents. Such catalyst systems are particularly useful for the polymerization of polypropylene to give elastomeric polypropylenes. The invention also provides novel elastomeric polypropylene polymers characterized by dyad (m) tacticities of about 55% to about 65%, pentad (mmmm) tacticities of about 25% to about 35%, molecular weights (M.sub.W) in the range of about 50,000 to about 2,000,000, and have mmrm+rrmr peak is less than about 5%.

  19. Protein cages and synthetic polymers: a fruitful symbiosis for drug delivery applications, bionanotechnology and materials science.

    PubMed

    Rother, Martin; Nussbaumer, Martin G; Renggli, Kasper; Bruns, Nico

    2016-11-07

    Protein cages are hollow protein nanoparticles, such as viral capsids, virus-like particles, ferritin, heat-shock proteins and chaperonins. They have well-defined capsule-like structures with a monodisperse size. Their protein subunits can be modified by genetic engineering at predetermined positions, allowing for example site-selective introduction of attachment points for functional groups, catalysts or targeting ligands on their outer surface, in their interior and between subunits. Therefore, protein cages have been extensively explored as functional entities in bionanotechnology, as drug-delivery or gene-delivery vehicles, as nanoreactors or as templates for the synthesis of organic and inorganic nanomaterials. The scope of functionalities and applications of protein cages can be significantly broadened if they are combined with synthetic polymers on their surface or within their interior. For example, PEGylation reduces the immunogenicity of protein cage-based delivery systems and active targeting ligands can be attached via polymer chains to favour their accumulation in diseased tissue. Polymers within protein cages offer the possibility of increasing the loading density of drug molecules, nucleic acids, magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents or catalysts. Moreover, the interaction of protein cages and polymers can be used to modulate the size and shape of some viral capsids to generate structures that do not occur with native viruses. Another possibility is to use the interior of polymer cages as a confined reaction space for polymerization reactions such as atom transfer radical polymerization or rhodium-catalysed polymerization of phenylacetylene. The protein nanoreactors facilitate a higher degree of control over polymer synthesis. This review will summarize the hybrid structures that have been synthesized by polymerizing from protein cage-bound initiators, by conjugating polymers to protein cages, by embedding protein cages into bulk polymeric

  20. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  1. Bounding species distribution models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Jarnevich, C.S.; Esaias, W.E.; Morisette, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used. ?? 2011 Current Zoology.

  2. Causality and Tsirelson's bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Buhrman, H.; Massar, S.

    2005-11-15

    We study the properties of no-signaling correlations that cannot be reproduced by local measurements on entangled quantum states. We say that such correlations violate Tsirelson bounds. We show that if these correlations are obtained by some reversible unitary quantum evolution U, then U cannot be written in the product form U{sub A}xU{sub B}. This implies that U can be used for signaling and for entanglement generation. This result is completely general and in fact can be viewed as a characterization of Tsirelson bounds. We then show how this result can be used as a tool to study Tsirelson bounds and we illustrate this by rederiving the Tsirelson bound of 2{radical}(2) for the Clauser-Horn-Shimony-Holt inequality, and by deriving a new Tsirelson bound for qutrits.

  3. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  4. Polymer blend compositions and methods of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2016-09-27

    A polymer blend material comprising: (i) a first polymer containing hydrogen bond donating groups having at least one hydrogen atom bound to a heteroatom selected from oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur, or an anionic version of said first polymer wherein at least a portion of hydrogen atoms bound to a heteroatom is absent and replaced with at least one electron pair; (ii) a second polymer containing hydrogen bond accepting groups selected from nitrile, halogen, and ether functional groups; and (iii) at least one modifying agent selected from carbon particles, ether-containing polymers, and Lewis acid compounds; wherein, if said second polymer contains ether functional groups, then said at least one modifying agent is selected from carbon particles and Lewis acid compounds. Methods for producing the polymer blend, molded forms thereof, and articles thereof, are also described.

  5. Lewis Base Catalysts 6: Carbene Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The use of N-heterocyclic carbenes as catalysts for organic transformations has received increased attention in the past 10 years. A discussion of catalyst development and nucleophilic characteristics precedes a description of recent advancements and new reactions using N-heterocyclic carbenes in catalysis. PMID:21494949

  6. The S-Layer Proteins of Two Bacillus stearothermophilus Wild-Type Strains Are Bound via Their N-Terminal Region to a Secondary Cell Wall Polymer of Identical Chemical Composition

    PubMed Central

    Egelseer, Eva Maria; Leitner, Karl; Jarosch, Marina; Hotzy, Christoph; Zayni, Sonja; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit

    1998-01-01

    Two Bacillus stearothermophilus wild-type strains were investigated regarding a common recognition and binding mechanism between the S-layer protein and the underlying cell envelope layer. The S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 has a molecular weight of 130,000 and assembles into a hexagonally ordered lattice. The S-layer from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 shows oblique lattice symmetry and is composed of subunits with a molecular weight of 122,000. Immunoblotting, peptide mapping, N-terminal sequencing of the whole S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 and of proteolytic cleavage fragments, and comparison with the S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 revealed that the two S-layer proteins have identical N-terminal regions but no other extended structurally homologous domains. In contrast to the heterogeneity observed for the S-layer proteins, the secondary cell wall polymer isolated from peptidoglycan-containing sacculi of the different strains showed identical chemical compositions and comparable molecular weights. The S-layer proteins could bind and recrystallize into the appropriate lattice type on native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi from both organisms but not on those extracted with hydrofluoric acid, leading to peptidoglycan of the A1γ chemotype. Affinity studies showed that only proteolytic cleavage fragments possessing the complete N terminus of the mature S-layer proteins recognized native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi as binding sites or could associate with the isolated secondary cell wall polymer, while proteolytic cleavage fragments missing the N-terminal region remained unbound. From the results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that S-layer proteins from B. stearothermophilus wild-type strains possess an identical N-terminal region which is responsible for anchoring the S-layer subunits to a secondary cell wall polymer of identical chemical composition. PMID:9515918

  7. Deactivation of Oxidation Catalysts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    the fresh catalyst . The loss in chromium may be related to the formation of volatile chromium oxychlorde which vaporizes from the catalyst . It is...CeO2 only marginally improved the thtrmal stability. The addition of 2% water vapor inhibited the oxidation of ethanol for all three copper catalysts ...original activity. Field tests of a copper chromite catalyst on process gas containing H2S, methyl mercaptan, n-aldehydes, and furfural showed

  8. Organically bound tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Diabate, S.; Strack, S. )

    1993-12-01

    Tritium released into the environment may be incorporated into organic matter. Organically bound tritium in that case will show retention times in organisms that are considerably longer than those of tritiated water which has significant consequences on dose estimates. This article reviews the most important processes of organically bound tritium production and transport through food networks. Metabolic reactions in plant and animal organisms with tritiated water as a reaction partner are of great importance in this respect. The most important production process, in quantitative terms, is photosynthesis in green plants. The translocation of organically bound tritium from the leaves to edible parts of crop plants should be considered in models of organically bound tritium behavior. Organically bound tritium enters the human body on several pathways, either from the primary producers (vegetable food) or at a higher tropic level (animal food). Animal experiments have shown that the dose due to ingestion of organically bound tritium can be up to twice as high as a comparable intake of tritiated water in gaseous or liquid form. In the environment, organically bound tritium in plants and animals is often found to have higher specific tritium concentrations than tissue water. This is not due to some tritium enrichment effects but to the fact that no equilibrium conditions are reached under natural conditions. 66 refs.

  9. Formation of a catalyst for methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Plyasova, L.M.; Yur`eva, T.M.; Kriger, T.A.

    1995-05-01

    Formation of the structure in a copper-zinc catalyst for methanol synthesis is analyzed at each step of its preparation including hydrogen activation at which catalytically active species are formed. The necessary interaction of the catalyst components in fresh precipitates is provided by formation of mixed copper-zinc hydroxocarbonates. On low-temperature calcination, the interaction is preserved due to the formation of mixed copper-zinc oxides modified by OH{sup -} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} anions with copper ions distributed as clusters in a zinc oxide-type structure. The activation with hydrogen results in formation of a proton-stabilized system of zinc oxide with epitaxially bound metallic copper. Both the chemical bond cleavage and spatial phase segregation at any step of the catalyst preparation result in the loss of its catalytic activity.

  10. Scoping economics for the commercial manufacture of metallocene catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmeier, N.F.

    1994-05-26

    This study assumes that commercial-scale production of propylene-based isotactic polymers with metallocene catalyst systems will become a reality. The challenge that must be overcome for commercial success with these propylene polymers is to discover a metallocene system recipe that will give sufficient catalyst activity along with the requisite stereo-selectivity at reasonable cost. Anticipating such a discovery, it is assumed here that the economics are well-represented by a catalyst system that consists in part of a silylene-bridged cyclopentadienyl zirconocene made in a batchwise process having an annual capacity of 15,000 pounds. Activation will be achieved with a cocatalyst such as methylaluminoxane (MAO), coated in conjunction with the catalyst on a support such as silica. The MAO at an estimated $100/lb contributes $1800/lb cost to the finished catalyst with an assumed recipe of 18:1 mass ratio of MAO to zirconocene. Based on a 20% return on investment, the selling price for the supported zirconocene system is estimated to be $2915/lb. The required capital investment to make 735,000 lb/yr of the total supported system is 9 million dollars. These estimates have {plus_minus}50% range of uncertainty. Payback period for this plant in a sold-out condition is three years. The catalyst system cost in ethylene-propylene copolymer is 3.9 cents per pound with a productivity of 75,000 lb polymer/lb of zirconocene. An Appendix includes some economic details.

  11. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chunshan; Schobert, H.H.

    1993-02-01

    Development of new catalysts is a promising approach to more efficient coal liquefaction. It has been recognized that catalysts are superior to supported catalysts for primary liquefaction of coals, because the control of initial coal dissolution or depolymerization requires intimate contact between the catalyst and coal. This research is a fundamental and exploratory study on catalytic coal liquefaction, with the emphasis on the development of novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed liquefaction. The ultimate goal of the present research is to develop novel catalytic hydroliquefaction process using highly active dispersed catalysts. The primary objective of this research is to develop novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts from organometallic molecular that can be used in low precursors concentrations (< 1 %) but exhibit high activity for efficient hydroliquefaction of coals under temperature-programmed conditions. The major technical approaches are, first, to prepare the desired heteronuclear organometallic molecules as catalyst precursors that contain covalently bound, two different metal atoms and sulfur in a single molecule. Such precursors will generate finely dispersed bimetallic catalysts such as Fe-Mo, Co-Mo and Ni-Mo binary sulfides upon thermal decomposition. The second major technical approach is to perform the liquefaction of coals unpregnated with the organometallic precursors under temperature-programmed conditions, where the programmed heat-up serves as a step for both catalyst activation and coal pretreatment or preconversion. Two to three different complexes for each of the Fe-Mo, Co-Mo, and Ni-Mo combinations will be prepared. Initial catalyst screening tests will be conducted using a subbituminous coal and a bituminous coal. Effects of coal rank and solvents will be examined with the selected bimetallic catalysts which showed much higher activity than the dispersed catalysts from conventional precursors.

  12. Catalysts for CO2/epoxide ring-opening copolymerization

    PubMed Central

    Trott, G.; Saini, P. K.; Williams, C. K.

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes and reviews recent progress in the development of catalysts for the ring-opening copolymerization of carbon dioxide and epoxides. The copolymerization is an interesting method to add value to carbon dioxide, including from waste sources, and to reduce pollution associated with commodity polymer manufacture. The selection of the catalyst is of critical importance to control the composition, properties and applications of the resultant polymers. This review highlights and exemplifies some key recent findings and hypotheses, in particular using examples drawn from our own research. PMID:26755758

  13. Preparation of arrays of long carbon nanotubes using catalyst structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yuntian T.; Arendt, Paul; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Xiefie

    2016-03-22

    A structure for preparing an substantially aligned array of carbon nanotubes include a substrate having a first side and a second side, a buffer layer on the first side of the substrate, a catalyst on the buffer layer, and a plurality of channels through the structure for allowing a gaseous carbon source to enter the substrate at the second side and flow through the structure to the catalyst. After preparing the array, a fiber of carbon nanotubes may be spun from the array. Prior to spinning, the array can be immersed in a polymer solution. After spinning, the polymer can be cured.

  14. Self-encapsulation of homogeneous catalyst species into polymer gel leading to a facile and efficient separation system of amine products in the Ru-catalyzed reduction of carboxamides with polymethylhydrosiloxane (PMHS).

    PubMed

    Motoyama, Yukihiro; Mitsui, Kaoru; Ishida, Toshiki; Nagashima, Hideo

    2005-09-28

    A practical procedure for production of amines is offered by the ruthenium-catalyzed reduction of carboxamides with polymethylhydrosiloxane, in which encapsulation of the catalyst species into the formed insoluble siloxane resins contributes to the separation of both metallic and siloxane residues from the product.

  15. Polymer Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, E.; Chacón-Acosta, G.

    2013-05-01

    In this work we analyze a non-interacting one-dimensional polymer Bose-Einstein condensate in a harmonic trap within the semiclassical approximation. We use an effective Hamiltonian coming from the polymer quantization that arises in loop quantum gravity. We calculate the number of particles in order to obtain the critical temperature. The Bose-Einstein functions are replaced by series, whose high order terms are related to powers of the polymer length. It is shown that the condensation temperature presents a shift respect to the standard case, for small values of the polymer scale. In typical experimental conditions, it is possible to establish a bound for λ2 up to ≲10-16 m2. To improve this bound we should decrease the frequency of the trap and also decrease the number of particles.

  16. Nano-catalysts: Key to the Greener Pathways Leading to Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synthetic processes using alternative energy input in combination with nano-catalysts shorten the reaction time that eliminate or minimize side product formation. This concept is already finding acceptance in the syntheses of pharmaceuticals, fine chemicals, and polymers and may ...

  17. Nano-catalysts: Key to the Greener Pathways Leading to Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synthetic processes using alternative energy input in combination with nano-catalysts shorten the reaction time that eliminate or minimize side product formation. This concept is already finding acceptance in the syntheses of pharmaceuticals, fine chemicals, and polymers and may ...

  18. A Demonstration of Polymer Crosslinking and Gel Formation Without Heating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Joseph H.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate experiment in which Gantrez AN polymer chains are crosslinked at the anhydride groups by the addition of the hydroxyl groups of triethanolamine, which also acts as a basic catalyst. (MLH)

  19. Matchmaking in Catalyst-Transfer Polycondensation: Optimizing Catalysts based on Mechanistic Insight.

    PubMed

    Leone, Amanda K; McNeil, Anne J

    2016-12-20

    Catalyst-transfer polycondensation (CTP) has emerged as a useful living, chain-growth polymerization method for synthesizing conjugated (hetero)arene-based polymers with targetable molecular weights, narrow dispersities, and controllable copolymer sequences-all properties that significantly influence their performance in devices. Over the past decade, several phosphine- and carbene-ligated Ni- and Pd-based precatalysts have been shown to be effective in CTP. One current limitation is that these traditional CTP catalysts lead to nonliving, non-chain-growth behavior when complex monomer scaffolds are utilized. Because these monomers are often found in the highest-performing materials, there is a significant need to identify alternative CTP catalysts. Recent mechanistic insight into CTP has laid the foundation for designing new catalysts to expand the CTP monomer scope. Building off this insight, we have designed and implemented model systems to identify effective catalysts by understanding their underlying mechanistic behaviors and systematically modifying catalyst structures to improve their chain-growth behavior. In this Account, we describe how each catalyst parameter-the ancillary ligand(s), reactive ligand(s), and transition metal-influences CTP. As an example, ancillary ligands often dictate the turnover-limiting step of the catalytic cycle, and perhaps more importantly, they can be used to promote the formation of the key intermediate (a metal-arene associative complex) and its subsequent reactivity. The fidelity of this intermediate is central to the mechanism for the living, chain-growth polymerization. Reactive ligands, on the other hand, can be used to improve catalyst solubility and accelerate initiation. Additional advantages of the reactive ligand include providing access points for postpolymerization modification and synthesizing polymers directly off surfaces. While the most frequently used CTP catalysts contain nickel, palladium-based catalysts

  20. Characteristics of polyaniline cobalt supported catalysts for epoxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Grzegorz; Pielichowski, Jan; Grzesik, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    A study of polyaniline (PANI) doping with various cobalt compounds, that is, cobalt(II) chloride, cobalt(II) acetate, and cobalt(II) salen, is presented. The catalysts were prepared by depositing cobalt compounds onto the polymer surface. PANI powders containing cobalt ions were obtained by one- or two-step method suspending PANI in the following acetonitrile/acetic acid solution or acetonitrile and then acetic acid solution. Moreover different ratios of Co(II) : PANI were studied. Catalysts obtained with both methods and at all ratios were investigated using various techniques including AAS and XPS spectroscopy. The optimum conditions for preparation of PANI/Co catalysts were established. Catalytic activity of polyaniline cobalt(II) supported catalysts was tested in dec-1-ene epoxidation with molecular oxygen at room temperature. The relationship between the amount of cobalt species, measured with both AAS and XPS techniques, and the activity of PANI-Co catalysts has been established.

  1. Characteristics of Polyaniline Cobalt Supported Catalysts for Epoxidation Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Grzegorz; Pielichowski, Jan; Grzesik, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    A study of polyaniline (PANI) doping with various cobalt compounds, that is, cobalt(II) chloride, cobalt(II) acetate, and cobalt(II) salen, is presented. The catalysts were prepared by depositing cobalt compounds onto the polymer surface. PANI powders containing cobalt ions were obtained by one- or two-step method suspending PANI in the following acetonitrile/acetic acid solution or acetonitrile and then acetic acid solution. Moreover different ratios of Co(II) : PANI were studied. Catalysts obtained with both methods and at all ratios were investigated using various techniques including AAS and XPS spectroscopy. The optimum conditions for preparation of PANI/Co catalysts were established. Catalytic activity of polyaniline cobalt(II) supported catalysts was tested in dec-1-ene epoxidation with molecular oxygen at room temperature. The relationship between the amount of cobalt species, measured with both AAS and XPS techniques, and the activity of PANI-Co catalysts has been established. PMID:24701183

  2. Catalyst by Design

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; DeBusk, Melanie Moses

    2014-01-01

    The development of new catalytic materials is still dominated by trial and error methods. Although it has been successful, the empirical development of catalytic materials is time consuming and expensive with no guarantee of success. In our laboratories, we are developing a comprehensive catalysts by design that involves state-of-the-art first principle density functional theory calculations, experimental design of catalyst sites, and sub- ngstr m resolution imaging with an aberration-corrected electron microscope to characterize the microstructure. In this chapter, we focus on supported platinum cluster catalyst systems which are one of the most important industrial catalysts and attempt to demonstrate the feasibility of the catalyst by design concept.

  3. The morphology of electroless Ni deposition on a colloidal Pd(II) catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Brandow, S.L.; Dressick, W.J.; Marrian, C.R.K.; Chow, G.M.; Calvert, J.M.

    1995-07-01

    The surface morphology of a surface-bound colloidal Pd(II) catalyst and its effect on the particle sizes with the largest particles reaching approximately 50 nm in diameter. Catalyst surface coverages as low as 20% are found to be sufficient to initiate complete and homogeneous metallization. The distribution of particle sizes for the electroless metal deposit, found to be a function of plating time, is broad with the maximum Ni particle size exceeding 120 nm. Results indicate controlling the size of the bound catalyst is the principal determining factor in controlling the particle size of the electroless deposit. Modification of the surface by depleting the concentration of surface functional groups capable of binding catalyst is used to shift the size distribution of bound catalyst to smaller values. A resulting three-to fourfold reduction in the particle size of the electroless deposit is demonstrated.

  4. Virial Expansion Bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Stephen James

    2013-10-01

    In the 1960s, the technique of using cluster expansion bounds in order to achieve bounds on the virial expansion was developed by Lebowitz and Penrose (J. Math. Phys. 5:841, 1964) and Ruelle (Statistical Mechanics: Rigorous Results. Benjamin, Elmsford, 1969). This technique is generalised to more recent cluster expansion bounds by Poghosyan and Ueltschi (J. Math. Phys. 50:053509, 2009), which are related to the work of Procacci (J. Stat. Phys. 129:171, 2007) and the tree-graph identity, detailed by Brydges (Phénomènes Critiques, Systèmes Aléatoires, Théories de Jauge. Les Houches 1984, pp. 129-183, 1986). The bounds achieved by Lebowitz and Penrose can also be sharpened by doing the actual optimisation and achieving expressions in terms of the Lambert W-function. The different bound from the cluster expansion shows some improvements for bounds on the convergence of the virial expansion in the case of positive potentials, which are allowed to have a hard core.

  5. System for reactivating catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2010-03-02

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  6. Structural and Electronic Transformations of Pt/C, Pd@Pt(1 ML)/C and Pd@Pt(2 ML)/C Cathode Catalysts in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells during Potential-step Operating Processes Characterized by In-situ Time-resolved XAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamatsu, Shin-ichi; Takao, Shinobu; Samjeské, Gabor; Nagasawa, Kensaku; Sekizawa, Oki; Kaneko, Takuma; Higashi, Kotaro; Uruga, Tomoya; Gayen, Sirshendu; Velaga, Srihari; Saniyal, Milan K.; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic structural and electronic transformations of Pt/C, Pd@Pt(1 ML)/C, Pd@Pt(2 ML)/C cathode catalysts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) during the potential-step operating processes between 0.4 and 1.4 VRHE (potential vs RHE) were characterized by in-situ (operando) time-resolved Pt LIII-edge quick-XAFS at 100 ms time-resolution. Potential-dependent surface structures and oxidation states of Pt, Pd@Pt(1 ML) and Pd@Pt(2 ML) nanoparticles on carbon at 0.4 and 1.4 VRHE were also analyzed by in-situ Pt LIII-edge and Pd K-edge quick-XAFS. The Pt, Pd@Pt(1 ML) and Pd@Pt(2 ML) nanoparticle surfaces were restructured and disordered at 1.4 VRHE, which were induced by strong Pt-O bonds as well as alloying effects. The rate constants for the changes of Pt valence, CN(Pt-Pt), CN(Pt-Pd) and CN(Pt-O) (CN: coordination number) in the potential-step operating processes were also determined and discussed in relation to the origin of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities of the Pt/C, Pd@Pt(1 ML)/C and Pd@Pt(2 ML)/C cathode catalysts.

  7. The use of azide-alkyne click chemistry in recent syntheses and applications of polytriazole-based nanostructured polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yi; Cao, Xiaosong; Gao, Haifeng

    2016-02-01

    The rapid development of efficient organic click coupling reactions has significantly facilitated the construction of synthetic polymers with sophisticated branched nanostructures. This Feature Article summarizes the recent progress in the application of efficient copper-catalyzed and copper-free azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC and CuFAAC) reactions in the syntheses of dendrimers, hyperbranched polymers, star polymers, graft polymers, molecular brushes, and cyclic graft polymers. Literature reports on the interesting properties and functions of these polytriazole-based nanostructured polymers are also discussed to illustrate their potential applications as self-healing polymers, adhesives, polymer catalysts, opto-electronic polymer materials and polymer carriers for drug and imaging molecules.

  8. Thermally Stable, Latent Olefin Metathesis Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Renee M.; Fedorov, Alexey; Keitz, Benjamin K.

    2011-01-01

    Highly thermally stable N-aryl,N-alkyl N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ruthenium catalysts were designed and synthesized for latent olefin metathesis. These catalysts showed excellent latent behavior toward metathesis reactions, whereby the complexes were inactive at ambient temperature and initiated at elevated temperatures, a challenging property to achieve with second generation catalysts. A sterically hindered N-tert-butyl substituent on the NHC ligand of the ruthenium complex was found to induce latent behavior toward cross-metathesis reactions, and exchange of the chloride ligands for iodide ligands was necessary to attain latent behavior during ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). Iodide-based catalysts showed no reactivity toward ROMP of norbornene-derived monomers at 25 °C, and upon heating to 85 °C gave complete conversion of monomer to polymer in less than 2 hours. All of the complexes were very stable to air, moisture, and elevated temperatures up to at least 90 °C, and exhibited a long catalyst lifetime in solution at elevated temperatures. PMID:22282652

  9. Friction between Polymer Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoloff, Jeffrey

    2006-03-01

    A polymer brush consists of a surface with a fairly concentrated coating of polymer chains, each one of which has one of its ends tightly bound to the surface. They serve as extremely effective lubricant, producing friction coefficients as low as 0.001 or less! Polymer brushes are a promising way to reduce friction to extremely low values. They have the disadvantage, however, that they must be immersed in a liquid solvent in order to function as a lubricant. The presence of a solvent is believed to result in osmotic pressure which partially supports the load. The density profile of a polymer brush (i.e., the density of monomers as a function of distance from the surface to which the polymers are attached) is well established. What is not understood is how the interaction of polymer brush coated surfaces in contact with each other is able to account for the details of the observed low friction. For example, molecular dynamics studies generally do not predict static friction, whereas surface force apparatus measurements due to Tadmor, et. al., find that there is static friction. This is the topic of the present presentation.

  10. Catalyst patterning for nanowire devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nanowire devices may be provided that are based on carbon nanotubes or single-crystal semiconductor nanowires. The nanowire devices may be formed on a substrate. Catalyst sites may be formed on the substrate. The catalyst sites may be formed using lithography, thin metal layers that form individual catalyst sites when heated, collapsible porous catalyst-filled microscopic spheres, microscopic spheres that serve as masks for catalyst deposition, electrochemical deposition techniques, and catalyst inks. Nanowires may be grown from the catalyst sites.

  11. Microgravity Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A one-day, interactive workshop considering the effects of gravity on polymer materials science was held in Cleveland, Ohio, on May 9, 1985. Selected programmatic and technical issues were reviewed to introduce the field to workshop participants. Parallel discussions were conducted in three disciplinary working groups: polymer chemistry, polymer physics, and polymer engineering. This proceedings presents summaries of the workshop discussions and conclusions.

  12. Biodegradable Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Vroman, Isabelle; Tighzert, Lan

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradable materials are used in packaging, agriculture, medicine and other areas. In recent years there has been an increase in interest in biodegradable polymers. Two classes of biodegradable polymers can be distinguished: synthetic or natural polymers. There are polymers produced from feedstocks derived either from petroleum resources (non renewable resources) or from biological resources (renewable resources). In general natural polymers offer fewer advantages than synthetic polymers. The following review presents an overview of the different biodegradable polymers that are currently being used and their properties, as well as new developments in their synthesis and applications.

  13. Textured catalysts and methods of making textured catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong; Zacher, Alan H.

    2007-03-06

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  14. Cross-linked polyvinyl polymers versus polyureas as designed supports for catalytically active M(0) nanoclusters. Part III. Nanometer scale structure of the cross-linked polyurea support EnCat 30 and of the Pd(II)/EnCat 30 and Pd(0)/EnCat 30NP catalysts.

    PubMed

    Centomo, P; Zecca, M; Zoleo, A; Maniero, A L; Canton, P; Jerábek, K; Corain, B

    2009-05-28

    The cross-linked polyurea support EnCat 30, its related macromolecular complex Pd(II)/EnCat 30 and its related Pd(0)/EnCat 30NP nanocomposite are thoroughly investigated with SEM, TEM, ISEC and ESR in the solid state (SEM and TEM) and swollen state in THF (ISEC and ESR). Pd(II)/EnCat 30 and its related Pd(0)/EnCat 30NP are obtained by microencapsulation of palladium acetate in a polyurea framework, which is formed upon hydrolysis/condensation of mixtures of multi-functional oligo-arylisocyanates in dichloroethane. Most remarkably, both Pd(II)/EnCat and Pd(0)/EnCat 30NP turn out to be far more (nano)porous and swellable materials than the blank polyurea matrix (EnCat 30). It is proposed that there is a strong nanostructural effect exerted by Pd(II) species due to its interaction with functional groups (amines stemming from the hydrolysis of the isocyanato groups or ureido groups belonging to the polymer chains) during the growth of the cross-linked polymer framework. As a consequence, the catalytic species in both Pd(II)/EnCat 30 and Pd(0)/EnCat 30NP are much more accessible to molecules diffusing from liquid phases in contact with the materials and, hence, are better catalysts than expected from the morphology of blank polyurea EnCat 30.

  15. Constrained Geometry Organotitanium Catalysts Supported on Nanosized Silica for Ethylene (co)Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuo-Tseng; Wu, Ling-Huey

    2017-05-05

    Supported olefin polymerization catalysts can prevent reactor-fouling problems and produce uniform polymer particles. Constrained geometry complexes (CGCs) have less sterically hindered active sites than bis-cyclopentadienyl metallocene catalysts. In the literature, micrometer-sized silica particles were used for supporting CGC catalysts, which might have strong mass transfer limitations. This study aims to improve the activity of supported CGC catalysts by using nanometer-sized silica. Ti[(C₅Me₄)SiMe₂(N(t)Bu)]Cl₂, a "constrained-geometry" titanium catalyst, was supported on MAO-treated silicas (nano-sized and micro-sized) by an impregnation method. Ethylene homo-polymerization and co-polymerization with 1-octene were carried out in a temperature range of 80-120 °C using toluene as the solvent. Catalysts prepared and polymers produced were characterized. For both catalysts and for both reactions, the maximum activities occurred at 100 °C, which is significantly higher than that (60 °C) reported before for supported bis-cyclopentadienyl metallocene catalysts containing zirconium, and is lower than that (≥140 °C) used for unsupported Ti[(C₅Me₄)SiMe₂(N(t)Bu)]Me₂ catalyst. Activities of nano-sized catalyst were 2.6 and 1.6 times those of micro-sized catalyst for homopolymerization and copolymerization, respectively. The former produced polymers with higher crystallinity and melting point than the latter. In addition, copolymer produced with nanosized catalyst contained more 1-octene than that produced with microsized catalyst.

  16. Validation of EMP bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, L.K.; Merewether, K.O.; Chen, K.C.; Jorgenson, R.E.; Morris, M.E.; Solberg, J.E.; Lewis, J.G.; Derr, W.

    1996-07-01

    Test data on canonical weapon-like fixtures are used to validate previously developed analytical bounding results. The test fixtures were constructed to simulate (but be slightly worse than) weapon ports of entry but have known geometries (and electrical points of contact). The exterior of the test fixtures exhibited exterior resonant enhancement of the incident fields at the ports of entry with magnitudes equal to those of weapon geometries. The interior consisted of loaded transmission lines adjusted to maximize received energy or voltage but incorporating practical weapon geometrical constraints. New analytical results are also presented for bounding the energies associated with multiple bolt joints and for bounding the exterior resonant enhancement of the exciting fields.

  17. Methods of making textured catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd [West Richland, WA; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Zacher, Alan H [Kennewick, WA

    2010-08-17

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  18. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  19. Polymers containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications

    DOEpatents

    Bowen, III, Daniel E.; Eastwood, Eric A [Raymore, MO

    2012-06-05

    Polymers comprising residues of borane and/or carborane cage compound monomers having at least one polyalkoxy silyl substituent. Such polymers can further comprise one or more reactive matrices and/or co-monomers covalently bound with the cage compound monomer residues. Methods of making and applications for using such polymers are also disclosed.

  20. Crystal structure of product-bound complex of UDP-N-acetyl-D-mannosamine dehydrogenase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    SciTech Connect

    Pampa, K.J.; Lokanath, N.K.; Girish, T.U.; Kunishima, N.; Rai, V.R.

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Determined the structure of UDP-D-ManNAcADH to a resolution of 1.55 Å. • First complex structure of PhUDP-D-ManNAcADH with UDP-D-ManMAcA. • The monomeric structure consists of three distinct domains. • Cys258 acting as catalytic nucleophilic and Lys204 acts as acid/base catalyst. • Oligomeric state plays an important role for the catalytic function. - Abstract: UDP-N-acetyl-D-mannosamine dehydrogenase (UDP-D-ManNAcDH) belongs to UDP-glucose/GDP-mannose dehydrogenase family and catalyzes Uridine-diphospho-N-acetyl-D-mannosamine (UDP-D-ManNAc) to Uridine-diphospho-N-acetyl-D-mannosaminuronic acid (UDP-D-ManNAcA) through twofold oxidation of NAD{sup +}. In order to reveal the structural features of the Pyrococcus horikoshii UDP-D-ManNAcADH, we have determined the crystal structure of the product-bound enzyme by X-ray diffraction to resolution of 1.55 Å. The protomer folds into three distinct domains; nucleotide binding domain (NBD), substrate binding domain (SBD) and oligomerization domain (OD, involved in the dimerization). The clear electron density of the UDP-D-ManNAcA is observed and the residues binding are identified for the first time. Crystal structures reveal a tight dimeric polymer chains with product-bound in all the structures. The catalytic residues Cys258 and Lys204 are conserved. The Cys258 acts as catalytic nucleophile and Lys204 as acid/base catalyst. The product is directly interacts with residues Arg211, Thr249, Arg244, Gly255, Arg289, Lys319 and Arg398. In addition, the structural parameters responsible for thermostability and oligomerization of the three dimensional structure are analyzed.

  1. METHOD OF PURIFYING CATALYSTS

    DOEpatents

    Joris, G.G.

    1958-09-01

    It has been fuund that the presence of chlorine as an impurity adversely affects the performance of finely divided platinum catalysts such as are used in the isotopic exchange process for the production of beavy water. This chlorine impurity may be removed from these catalysts by treating the catalyst at an elevated temperature with dry hydrogen and then with wet hydrogen, having a hydrogen-water vapor volume of about 8: 1. This alternate treatment by dry hydrogen and wet hydrogen is continued until the chlorine is largely removed from the catalyst.

  2. Polyolefin catalyst manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Inkrott, K.E.; Scinta, J.; Smith, P.D. )

    1989-10-16

    Statistical process control (SPC) procedures are absolutely essential for making new-generation polyolefin catalysts with the consistent high quality required by modern polyolefin processes. Stringent quality assurance is critical to the production of today's high-performance catalysts. Research and development efforts during the last 20 years have led to major technological improvements in the polyolefin industry. New generation catalysts, which once were laboratory curiosities, must now be produced commercially on a regular and consistent basis to meet the increasing requirements of the plastics manufacturing industry. To illustrate the more stringent requirements for producing the new generation polyolefin catalysts, the authors compare the relatively simple, first-generation polypropylene catalyst production requirements with some of the basic requirements of manufacturing a more complex new-generation catalyst, such as Catalyst Resources Inc.'s LYNX 900. The principles which hold true for the new-generation catalysts such as LYNX 900 are shown to apply equally to the scale-up of other advanced technology polyolefin catalysts.

  3. Liquefaction with microencapsulated catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Sol W.

    1985-01-01

    A method of dispersing a liquefaction catalyst within coal or other carbonaceous solids involves providing a suspension in oil of microcapsules containing the catalyst. An aqueous solution of a catalytic metal salt is emulsified in the water-immiscible oil and the resulting minute droplets microencapsulated in polymeric shells by interfacial polycondensation. The catalyst is subsequently blended and dispersed throughout the powdered carbonaceous material to be liquefied. At liquefaction temperatures the polymeric microcapsules are destroyed and the catalyst converted to minute crystallites in intimate contact with the carbonaceous material.

  4. Optimal size for emergence of self-replicating polymer system.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Yoshiya J; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-03-01

    A biological system consists of a variety of polymers that are synthesized from monomers by catalysis, which exists only for some long polymers. It is important to elucidate the emergence and sustenance of such autocatalytic polymerization. We analyze here the stochastic polymerization reaction dynamics to investigate the transition time from a state with almost no catalysts to a state with sufficient catalysts. We found an optimal volume that minimizes this transition time, which agrees with the inverse of the catalyst concentration at the unstable fixed point that separates the two states, as is theoretically explained. Relevance to the origin of life is also discussed.

  5. Computing Graphical Confidence Bounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezzacappa, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Approximation for graphical confidence bounds is simple enough to run on programmable calculator. Approximation is used in lieu of numerical tables not always available, and exact calculations, which often require rather sizable computer resources. Approximation verified for collection of up to 50 data points. Method used to analyze tile-strength data on Space Shuttle thermal-protection system.

  6. Born Level Bound States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Paul

    2017-05-01

    Bound state poles in the S-matrix of perturbative QED are generated by the divergence of the expansion in α . The perturbative corrections are necessarily singular when expanding around free, {O}( α ^0 ) in and out states that have no overlap with finite-sized atomic wave functions. Nevertheless, measurables such as binding energies do have well-behaved expansions in powers of α (and log α ). It is desirable to formulate the concept of "lowest order" for gauge theory bound states such that higher order corrections vanish in the α → 0 limit. This may allow to determine a lowest order term for QCD hadrons which incorporates essential features such as confinement and chiral symmetry breaking, and thus can serve as the starting point of a useful perturbative expansion. I discuss a "Born" (no loop, lowest order in \\hbar ) approximation. Born level states are bound by gauge fields which satisfy the classical field equations. Gauss' law determines a distinct field A^0({\\varvec{x}}) for each instantaneous position of the charges. A Poincaré covariant boundary condition for the gluon field leads to a confining potential for q\\bar{q} and qqq states. In frames where the bound state is in motion the classical gauge field is obtained by a Lorentz boost of the rest frame field.

  7. Computing Graphical Confidence Bounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezzacappa, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Approximation for graphical confidence bounds is simple enough to run on programmable calculator. Approximation is used in lieu of numerical tables not always available, and exact calculations, which often require rather sizable computer resources. Approximation verified for collection of up to 50 data points. Method used to analyze tile-strength data on Space Shuttle thermal-protection system.

  8. Ethynyl terminated ester oligomers and polymers therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); hesives and composite matrices. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A new class of ethynyl-terminated oligomers and the process for preparing same are disclosed. Upon the application of heat, with or without a catalyst, the ethynyl groups react to provide crosslinking and chain extension to increase the polymer use temperature and improve the polymer solvent resistance. These improved polyesters are potentially useful in packaging, magnetic tapes, capacitors, industrial belting, protective coatings, structural adhesives and composite matrices.

  9. Computationally Probing the Performance of Hybrid, Heterogeneous, and Homogeneous Iridium-Based Catalysts for Water Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    García-Melchor, Max; Vilella, Laia; López, Núria; Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2016-04-29

    An attractive strategy to improve the performance of water oxidation catalysts would be to anchor a homogeneous molecular catalyst on a heterogeneous solid surface to create a hybrid catalyst. The idea of this combined system is to take advantage of the individual properties of each of the two catalyst components. We use Density Functional Theory to determine the stability and activity of a model hybrid water oxidation catalyst consisting of a dimeric Ir complex attached on the IrO2(110) surface through two oxygen atoms. We find that homogeneous catalysts can be bound to its matrix oxide without losing significant activity. Hence, designing hybrid systems that benefit from both the high tunability of activity of homogeneous catalysts and the stability of heterogeneous systems seems feasible.

  10. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    DOEpatents

    Beckham, Gregg T.; Biddy, Mary J.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-04-25

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  11. A New Approach to Prepare Vegetable Oil-Based Polymers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polymers from vegetable oils, such as soybean oil, were prepared by cationic polymerization in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) medium. Boron trifluoride diethyl etherate (BF3.OEt2) was selected as catalyst. The resulting polymers have molecular weight ranging from 21,842 to 118,300 g/mol. Nu...

  12. Polymetallic reforming catalysts and their preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, W.C. Jr.

    1989-03-14

    This patent describes a catalyst useful for reforming a naphtha feed at reforming conditions comprising an iridium component in concentration ranging from about 0.001 percent to about 2 percent dispersed throughout, and bound within an alumina support matrix by calcining the iridium-alumina composite at temperature ranging from about 370/sup 0/C to about 700/sup 0/C for a period ranging from about 1 hour to about 72 hours. It also has a platinum component, in concentration ranging from about 0.001 percent to about 2 percent, dispersed upon the iridium-containing alumina support; and a halogen component dispersed thereon in concentration ranging from about 0.01 percent to about 2 percent, based on the total weight of the catalyst. The iridium component is dispersed throughout and bound within the alumina support even when the composition is subjected to temperatures ranging above about 426.7/sup 0/C at oxygen concentrations ranging above about 0.1 percent, based on the volume of the gas contacted with the catalyst, for periods ranging from about 1 hour to about 48 hours.

  13. Crystalline CO2-based polycarbonates prepared from racemic catalyst through intramolecularly interlocked assembly

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ye; Ren, Wei-Min; Zhang, Wei-Ping; Zhao, Rong-Rong; Lu, Xiao-Bing

    2015-01-01

    The crystalline stereocomplexed polycarbonates can be prepared by mixing enantiopure polymers with opposite configuration, which derived from the asymmetric copolymerization with CO2 using enantiopure catalyst or/and chiral epoxides. Herein, we develop a powerful strategy for producing crystalline intramolecular stereocomplexed polycarbonates from racemic catalysts, which possess similar thermal stability and crystalline behaviour in comparison with the stereocomplexes by mixing opposite enantiopure polymers. Living polymer chains shuttle between catalyst molecules with different configurations to produce diastereomeric active species which is suggested to be responsible for the formation of isotactic multiblock polycarbonates in racemic bimetallic cobalt catalyst-mediated stereoselective copolymerization of CO2 and meso-epoxides. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy study suggests that the interaction in the carbonyl and methine regions is responsible for the strong crystallization capacity and compact package structure in the crystalline polycarbonates. PMID:26469884

  14. Chain-growth click polymerization of AB2 monomers for the formation of hyperbranched polymers with low polydispersities in a one-pot process.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yi; Graff, Robert W; Cao, Xiaosong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Gao, Haifeng

    2015-06-22

    Hyperbranched polymers are important soft nanomaterials but robust synthetic methods with which the polymer structures can be easily controlled have rarely been reported. For the first time, we present a one-pot one-batch synthesis of polytriazole-based hyperbranched polymers with both low polydispersity and a high degree of branching (DB) using a copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) polymerization. The use of a trifunctional AB2 monomer that contains one alkyne and two azide groups ensures that all Cu catalysts are bound to polytriazole polymers at low monomer conversion. Subsequent CuAAC polymerization displayed the features of a "living" chain-growth mechanism with a linear increase in molecular weight with conversion and clean chain extension for repeated monomer additions. Furthermore, the triazole group in a linear (L) monomer unit complexed Cu(I) , which catalyzed a faster reaction of the second azide group to quickly convert the L unit into a dendritic unit, producing hyperbranched polymers with DB=0.83.

  15. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  16. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2015-09-29

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  17. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  18. Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, James H. (Inventor); Taylor, Jesse W. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Catalyst compositions and methods for F-T synthesis which exhibit high CO conversion with minor levels (preferably less than 35% and more preferably less than 5%) or no measurable carbon dioxide generation. F-T active catalysts are prepared by reduction of certain oxygen deficient mixed metal oxides.

  19. Chain Growth Cross Coupling Polymerizations Towards Chiral and Ladder Main Chain Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-20

    high degree of unsaturation of the polymer. Furthermore, frustrated packing of rigid ladder chains resulted in large intrinsic porosity with the...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We developed a new method to synthesize rigid ladder polymers using efficient, clean palladium catalyzed annulation...reactions with low catalyst loading (1 mol%). Rigid ladder polymers with benzocyclobutene backbone linkages can be synthesized from copolymerization of

  20. Piezoelectric Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, J. S.; Ounaies, Z.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to detail the current theoretical understanding of the origin of piezoelectric and ferroelectric phenomena in polymers; to present the state-of-the-art in piezoelectric polymers and emerging material systems that exhibit promising properties; and to discuss key characterization methods, fundamental modeling approaches, and applications of piezoelectric polymers. Piezoelectric polymers have been known to exist for more than forty years, but in recent years they have gained notoriety as a valuable class of smart materials.

  1. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  2. Toward efficient asymmetric carbon-carbon bond formation: continuous flow with chiral heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Tsubogo, Tetsu; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Shū

    2012-10-22

    A chiral Ca catalyst based on CaCl(2) with a chiral ligand was developed and applied to the asymmetric 1,4-addition of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds to nitroalkenes as a model system. To address product inhibition issues, the Ca catalyst was applied to continuous flow with a chiral heterogeneous catalyst. The continuous flow system using a newly synthesized, polymer-supported Pybox was successfully employed, and the TON was improved 25-fold compared with those of the previous Ca(OR)(2) catalysts.

  3. Preparation and characterization of organotin-oxomolybdate coordination polymers and their use in sulfoxidation catalysis.

    PubMed

    Abrantes, Marta; Valente, Anabela A; Pillinger, Martyn; Gonçalves, Isabel S; Rocha, João; Romão, Carlos C

    2003-06-16

    The organotin-oxomolybdates [(R(3)Sn)(2)MoO(4)].n H(2)O (R=methyl, n-butyl, cyclohexyl, phenyl, benzyl) have been prepared and tested as catalysts for the oxidation of benzothiophene with aqueous hydrogen peroxide, at 35 degrees C and atmospheric pressure. In all cases, the 1,1-dioxide was the only observed product. The kinetic profiles depend on the nature of the tin-bound R group and also on the addition of a co-solvent. For the tribenzyltin derivative, the apparent activation energies for sulfoxidation as a function of the co-solvent are in the order 1,2-dichloroethane (5 kcal mol(-1))catalyst was reused in a second reaction cycle with no significant loss of activity. Increasing the oxidant/substrate ratio from 2:1 to 6:1 allows the corresponding sulfone to be obtained in quantitative yield within 24 h. Changing the nature of the tin-bound R group in the catalyst precursors modifies their physical properties and hence their catalytic performance. The variation in hydrophobic/hydrophilic character is important, since the Me, nBu and Cy derivatives crystallize as anhydrous compounds, whereas the other two derivatives are hydrates. The polymers also have different structures, as evidenced by Xray powder diffraction. Mo K-edge and Sn K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy confirmed that the structures arise from the self-assembly of tetrahedral [MoO(4)](2-) subunits and [R(3)Sn](+) spacers. The Mo...Sn separation in the trimethyltin derivative is a uniform 3.84 A. By contrast, the EXAFS results revealed the coexistence of short (3.67-3.79 A) and long (3.93-4.07 A) Mo.Sn separations in the other coordination polymers. The catalyst precursors were also characterized in the solid state by thermogravimetric analysis, FTIR, and Raman spectroscopy, and MAS NMR ((13)C, (119)Sn) spectroscopy.

  4. Evolution of a Fourth Generation Catalyst for the Amination and Thioetherification of Aryl Halides

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Conspectus Synthetic methods to form the carbon-nitrogen bonds in aromatic amines are fundamental enough to be considered part of introductory organic courses. Arylamines are important because they are common precursors to or substructures within active pharmaceutical ingredients and herbicides produced on ton scales, as well as conducting polymers and layers of organic light-emitting diodes produced on small scale. For many years, this class of compound was prepared from classical methods, such as nitration, reduction and reductive alkylation, copper-mediated chemistry at high temperatures, addition to benzyne intermediates, or direct nucleophilic substitution on particularly electron-poor aromatic or heteroaromatic halides. During the past decade, these methods to form aromatic amines have been largely supplanted by palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions of amines with aryl halides. The scope and efficiency of the palladium-catalyzed processes has gradually improved with successive generations of catalysts to the point of being useful for the synthesis of both milligrams and kilograms of product. This Account describes the conceptual basis and utility of our latest, “fourth-generation” catalyst for the coupling of amines and related reagents with aryl halides. The introductory sections of this account describe the progression of catalyst development from the first-generation to current systems and the motivation for selection of the components of the fourth-generation catalyst. This progression began with catalysts containing palladium and sterically hindered monodentate aromatic phosphines used initially for coupling of tin amides with haloarenes in the first work on C-N coupling. A second generation of catalysts was then developed based on the combination of palladium and aromatic bisphosphines. These systems were then followed by third-generation systems catalysts on the combination of palladium and a sterically hindered alkylmonophosphine or N

  5. Reversible Thermal-Stiffening in Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senses, Erkan; Akcora, Pinar

    2015-03-01

    Silica nanoparticles adsorbed with a high glass-transition temperature polymer, PMMA (Tg: 130 °C) are shown to uniformly disperse in a low-Tg polymer matrix, PEO (Tg: -60 °C). These nanocomposites exhibit an unusual reversible liquid-to-solid transition at temperatures above Tg's of both polymers. Mechanical adaptivity of PEO nanocomposites to temperatures underlies the existence of dynamically asymmetric bound layers on particles, and more importantly their impact on mechanical behavior, which sets these materials apart from conventional polymer composites that soften upon heating. Moreover, the growth rate of elastic moduli at temperatures above Tg of PMMA presents an Arrhenius-type relaxation with activation energy well-matching with the α- β merging region of PMMA. These results suggest that the mobility of the surface-bound polymer is essential for reinforcement contrary to commonly accepted glassy-layer hypothesis.

  6. A Homogeneous, Recyclable Polymer Support for Rh(I)-Catalyzed C-C Bond Formation

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Ranjan; Tunge, Jon A.

    2011-01-01

    A robust and practical polymer-supported, homogeneous, recyclable biphephos rhodium(I) catalyst has been developed for C-C bond formation reactions. Control of polymer molecular weight allowed tuning of the polymer solubility such that the polymer-supported catalyst is soluble in nonpolar solvents and insoluble in polar solvents. Using the supported rhodium catalysts, addition of aryl and vinylboronic acids to the electrophiles such as enones, aldehydes, N-sulfonyl aldimines, and alkynes occurs smoothly to provide products in high yields. Additions of terminal alkynes to enones and industrially relevant hydroformylation reactions have also been successfully carried out. Studies show that the leaching of Rh from the polymer support is low and catalyst recycle can be achieved by simple precipitation and filtration. PMID:21895010

  7. Hydrocarbon fuel reforming catalyst and use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Ming, Qimin; Healey, Todd; Irving, Patricia Marie

    2006-06-27

    The subject invention is a catalyst consisting of an oxide or mixed oxide support and bimetallic catalytically active compounds. The supporting oxide can be a single oxide, such as Al.sub.2O.sub.3; it also can be a mixture of oxides, such as Y.sub.2O.sub.3 stabilized ZrO.sub.2 (YSZ), Al.sub.2O.sub.3 with CeO.sub.2, Al.sub.2O.sub.3 with YSZ and others. The bimetallic compounds, acting as active components, are selected from platinum, and ruthenium, prepared in an appropriate ratio. The catalyst is used in the steam reforming of hydrocarbons to produce hydrogen for applications such as polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  8. Thiazolothiazole-linked porous organic polymers

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Xiang; Tian, Chengcheng; Jin, Tian; ...

    2014-10-07

    In this study, thiazolothiazole-linked porous organic polymers have been synthesized from a facile catalyst-free condensation reaction between aldehydes and dithiooxamide under solvothermal conditions. The resultant porous frameworks exhibit a highly selective uptake of CO2 over N2 under ambient conditions.

  9. Thiazolothiazole-linked porous organic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiang; Tian, Chengcheng; Jin, Tian; Wang, Jitong; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Mei, Wenwen; Xiong, Yan; Hu, Jun; Feng, Xinliang; Liu, Honglai; Dai, Sheng

    2014-10-07

    In this study, thiazolothiazole-linked porous organic polymers have been synthesized from a facile catalyst-free condensation reaction between aldehydes and dithiooxamide under solvothermal conditions. The resultant porous frameworks exhibit a highly selective uptake of CO2 over N2 under ambient conditions.

  10. The generation of efficient supported (Heterogeneous) olefin metathesis catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Grubbs, Robert H

    2013-04-05

    Over the past decade, a new family of homogeneous metathesis catalysts has been developed that will tolerate most organic functionalities as well as water and air. These homogeneous catalysts are finding numerous applications in the pharmaceutical industry as well as in the production of functional polymers. In addition the catalysts are being used to convert seed oils into products that can substitute for those that are now made from petroleum products. Seed oils are unsaturated, contain double bonds, and are a ready source of linear hydrocarbon fragments that are specifically functionalized. To increase the number of applications in the area of biomaterial conversion to petrol chemicals, the activity and efficiency of the catalysts need to be as high as possible. The higher the efficiency of the catalysts, the lower the cost of the conversion and a larger number of practical applications become available. Active supported catalysts were prepared and tested in the conversion of seed oils and other important starting materials. The outcome of the work was successful and the technology has been transferred to a commercial operation to develop viable applications of the discovered systems. A biorefinery that converts seed oils is under construction in Indonesia. The catalysts developed in this study will be considered for the next generation of operations.

  11. Surface complexes of acrolein on oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, G.Ya.; Davydov, A.A.; Andrushkevich, T.V.; Zakharov, I.I.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that acrolein can be adsorbed by different mechanisms on the surface of oxide catalysts with the formation of {sigma}- and {pi}-complexes, H-complexes with surface OH groups; a species bound via the carbonyl group (the dissociative form of adsorption); and oxidized fragments, such as surface acrylates, carboxylates, formylacetates, and malonates. On the basis of the quantum-chemical analysis of the acrolein interaction with the surface of oxide catalysts in combination with IR-spectroscopic, thermodesorption, and catalytic studies, a conclusion has been drawn that the formation of a certain surface species and its reactivity are determined by the nature of an adsorption site and by the reactivity of surface oxygen.

  12. EXAFS study of Cu/C catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriventsov, V. V.; Klimov, O. V.; Kikhtyanin, O. V.; Ione, K. G.; Kochubey, D. I.

    2000-06-01

    A local arrangement of copper in Cu/C catalysts for dimethylcarbonate synthesis was studied by EXAFS. The samples with various Cu content were prepared by impregnating of carbon carrier "Sibunit" with the alcohol solution of CuCl 2. It was determined, that the oxygen atoms from surface groups of carrier always enter into copper surrounding and the relative content of oxygen drops with the increase of Cu content in the samples. The structure of surface copper compounds for initial catalysts was proposed. Thus, samples with low Cu content (9×10 -4 mol/g-cat) possess surface compounds [carrier-COO-CuCl] or [carrier-CO-CuCl], further, by increasing copper content a second surface layer consisting of hydrated CuCl 2 non-bounded with carrier is formed.

  13. Universal bounds on current fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2016-05-01

    For current fluctuations in nonequilibrium steady states of Markovian processes, we derive four different universal bounds valid beyond the Gaussian regime. Different variants of these bounds apply to either the entropy change or any individual current, e.g., the rate of substrate consumption in a chemical reaction or the electron current in an electronic device. The bounds vary with respect to their degree of universality and tightness. A universal parabolic bound on the generating function of an arbitrary current depends solely on the average entropy production. A second, stronger bound requires knowledge both of the thermodynamic forces that drive the system and of the topology of the network of states. These two bounds are conjectures based on extensive numerics. An exponential bound that depends only on the average entropy production and the average number of transitions per time is rigorously proved. This bound has no obvious relation to the parabolic bound but it is typically tighter further away from equilibrium. An asymptotic bound that depends on the specific transition rates and becomes tight for large fluctuations is also derived. This bound allows for the prediction of the asymptotic growth of the generating function. Even though our results are restricted to networks with a finite number of states, we show that the parabolic bound is also valid for three paradigmatic examples of driven diffusive systems for which the generating function can be calculated using the additivity principle. Our bounds provide a general class of constraints for nonequilibrium systems.

  14. Kinetics of Polymer Interfacial Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuo; Koberstein, Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    Germanium crystals modified with high quality azide functional monolayers are used to directly monitor in situ the kinetics of interfacial ``click'' reactions with complementary alkyne end-functional poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PnBA) and polystyrene (PS) by attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). In the presence of copper (I), the azide-modified Ge substrates react quantitatively with PnBA and PS via a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Time-resolved ATR-IR measurements show two regimes of kinetic behavior, as predicted by theory. In the first regime the rate is rapid and is controlled by diffusion of the polymer through the solvent, scaling with the square root of time. The rate slows considerably in the second regime, limited by penetration of the reacting polymer through the covalently bound polymer brush layer, scaling with the natural logarithm of time. The influence of polymer size and solvent quality are reported.

  15. Nanostructures and dynamics of macromolecules bound to attractive filler surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Tad; Barkley, Deborah; Jiang, Naisheng; Endoh, Maya; Masui, Tomomi; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Nagao, Michihiro; Satija, Sushil; Taniguchi, Takashi

    We report in-situ nanostructures and dynamics of polybutadiene (PB) chains bound to carbon black (CB) fillers (the so-called ``bound polymer layer (BPL)'') in a good solvent. The BPL on the CB fillers were extracted by solvent leaching of a CB-filled PB compound and subsequently dispersed in deuterated toluene to label the BPL for small-angle neutron scattering and neutron spin echo techniques. Intriguingly, the results demonstrate that the BPL is composed of two regions regardless of molecular weights of PB: the inner unswollen region of ~ 0.5 nm thick and outer swollen region where the polymer chains display a parabolic profile with a diffuse tail. This two-layer formation on the filler surface is similar to that reported for polymer chains adsorbed on planar substrates from melts. In addition, the results show that the dynamics of the swollen bound chains can be explained by the so-called ``breathing mode'' and is generalized with the thickness of the swollen BPL. Furthermore, we will discuss how the breathing collective dynamics is affected by the presence of polymer chains in a matrix solution. We acknowledge the financial support from NSF Grant No. CMMI-1332499.

  16. Formation of Platinum Catalyst on Carbon Black Using an In-Liquid Plasma Method for Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Show, Yoshiyuki; Ueno, Yutaro

    2017-01-01

    Platinum (Pt) catalyst was formed on the surface of carbon black using an in-liquid plasma method. The formed Pt catalyst showed the average particle size of 4.1 nm. This Pt catalyst was applied to a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The PEMFC showed an open voltage of 0.85 V and a maximum output power density of 216 mW/cm2. PMID:28336864

  17. Formation of Platinum Catalyst on Carbon Black Using an In-Liquid Plasma Method for Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Show, Yoshiyuki; Ueno, Yutaro

    2017-01-31

    Platinum (Pt) catalyst was formed on the surface of carbon black using an in-liquid plasma method. The formed Pt catalyst showed the average particle size of 4.1 nm. This Pt catalyst was applied to a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The PEMFC showed an open voltage of 0.85 V and a maximum output power density of 216 mW/cm2.

  18. Lightweight polymer concrete composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, J.J.; Steinberg, M.; Reams, W.

    1985-08-01

    Lightweight polymer concrete composites have been developed with excellent insulating properties. The composites consist of lightweight aggregates such as expanded perlites, multicellular glass nodules, or hollow alumina silicate microspheres bound together with unsaturated polyester or epoxy resins. These composites, known as Insulating Polymer Concrete (IPC), have thermal conductivites from 0.09 to 0.19 Btu/h-ft-/sup 0/F. Compressive strengths, dependent upon the aggregates used, range from 1000 to 6000 psi. These materials can be precast or cast-in-place on concrete substrates. Recently, it has been demonstrated that these materials can also be sprayed onto concrete and other substrates. An overlay application of IPC is currently under way as dike insulation at an LNG storage tank facility. The composites have numerous potentials in the construction industry such as insulating building blocks or prefabricated insulating wall panels.

  19. Single domain PEMFC model based on agglomerate catalyst geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, N. P.; Ellis, M. W.; Nelson, D. J.; von Spakovsky, M. R.

    A steady two-dimensional computational model for a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is presented. The model accounts for species transport, electrochemical kinetics, energy transport, current distribution, and water uptake and release in the catalyst layer. The governing differential equations are solved over a single computational domain, which consists of a gas channel, gas diffusion layer, and catalyst layer for both the anode and cathode sides of the cell as well as the solid polymer membrane. The model for the catalyst regions is based on an agglomerate geometry, which requires water species to exist in both dissolved and gaseous forms simultaneously. Data related to catalyst morphology, which was required by the model, was obtained via a microscopic analysis of a commercially available membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The coupled set of differential equations is solved with the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver, CFDesign™, and is readily adaptable with respect to geometry and material property definitions. The results show that fuel cell performance is highly dependent on catalyst structure, specifically the relative volume fractions of gas pores and polymer membrane contained within the active region as well as the geometry of the individual agglomerates.

  20. Multifunctions of bounded variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinter, R. B.

    2016-02-01

    Consider control systems described by a differential equation with a control term or, more generally, by a differential inclusion with velocity set F (t , x). Certain properties of state trajectories can be derived when it is assumed that F (t , x) is merely measurable w.r.t. the time variable t. But sometimes a refined analysis requires the imposition of stronger hypotheses regarding the time dependence. Stronger forms of necessary conditions for minimizing state trajectories can be derived, for example, when F (t , x) is Lipschitz continuous w.r.t. time. It has recently become apparent that significant addition properties of state trajectories can still be derived, when the Lipschitz continuity hypothesis is replaced by the weaker requirement that F (t , x) has bounded variation w.r.t. time. This paper introduces a new concept of multifunctions F (t , x) that have bounded variation w.r.t. time near a given state trajectory, of special relevance to control. We provide an application to sensitivity analysis.

  1. Membrane-bound selenoproteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2015-10-01

    Selenoproteins employ selenium to supplement the chemistry available through the common 20 amino acids. These powerful enzymes are affiliated with redox biology, often in connection with the detection, management, and signaling of oxidative stress. Among them, membrane-bound selenoproteins play prominent roles in signaling pathways, Ca(2+) regulation, membrane complexes integrity, and biosynthesis of lipophilic molecules. The number of selenoproteins whose physiological roles, protein partners, expression, evolution, and biosynthesis are characterized is steadily increasing, thus offering a more nuanced view of this specialized family. This review focuses on human membrane selenoproteins, particularly the five least characterized ones: selenoproteins I, K, N, S, and T. Membrane-bound selenoproteins are the least understood, as it is challenging to provide the membrane-like environment required for their biochemical and biophysical characterization. Hence, their studies rely mostly on biological rather than structural and biochemical assays. Another aspect that has not received much attention is the particular role that their membrane association plays in their physiological function. Findings cited in this review show that it is possible to infer the structure and the membrane-binding mode of these lesser-studied selenoproteins and design experiments to examine the role of the rare amino acid selenocysteine.

  2. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Sopchak, David A [Livermore, CA; Upadhye, Ravindra S [Pleasanton, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA; Satcher, Joseph H [Patterson, CA; Gash, Alex E [Brentwood, CA

    2011-11-15

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  3. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Sopchak, David A [Livermore, CA; Upadhye, Ravindra S [Pleasanton, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA; Satcher, Joseph H [Patterson, CA; Gash, Alex E [Brentwood, CA

    2010-06-29

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  4. Crystal structure of a DNA catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Salvatierra, Almudena; Wawrzyniak-Turek, Katarzyna; Steuerwald, Ulrich; Höbartner, Claudia; Pena, Vladimir

    2016-01-14

    Catalysis in biology is restricted to RNA (ribozymes) and protein enzymes, but synthetic biomolecular catalysts can also be made of DNA (deoxyribozymes) or synthetic genetic polymers. In vitro selection from synthetic random DNA libraries identified DNA catalysts for various chemical reactions beyond RNA backbone cleavage. DNA-catalysed reactions include RNA and DNA ligation in various topologies, hydrolytic cleavage and photorepair of DNA, as well as reactions of peptides and small molecules. In spite of comprehensive biochemical studies of DNA catalysts for two decades, fundamental mechanistic understanding of their function is lacking in the absence of three-dimensional models at atomic resolution. Early attempts to solve the crystal structure of an RNA-cleaving deoxyribozyme resulted in a catalytically irrelevant nucleic acid fold. Here we report the crystal structure of the RNA-ligating deoxyribozyme 9DB1 (ref. 14) at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure captures the ligation reaction in the post-catalytic state, revealing a compact folding unit stabilized by numerous tertiary interactions, and an unanticipated organization of the catalytic centre. Structure-guided mutagenesis provided insights into the basis for regioselectivity of the ligation reaction and allowed remarkable manipulation of substrate recognition and reaction rate. Moreover, the structure highlights how the specific properties of deoxyribose are reflected in the backbone conformation of the DNA catalyst, in support of its intricate three-dimensional organization. The structural principles underlying the catalytic ability of DNA elucidate differences and similarities in DNA versus RNA catalysts, which is relevant for comprehending the privileged position of folded RNA in the prebiotic world and in current organisms.

  5. Catalysts and method

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    An improved catlayst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HC1 and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride.

  6. Epoxidation catalyst and process

    DOEpatents

    Linic, Suljo; Christopher, Phillip

    2010-10-26

    Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

  7. Reclaim spent catalysts properly

    SciTech Connect

    Lassner, J.A.; Lasher, L.B.; Koppel, R.L.; Hamilton, J.N.

    1994-08-01

    Treatment of spent catalysts and metallic by products has become increasingly more complex over the last couple of years, due to tightening environmental concerns. Three options are available: (1) Reclaiming the metals and either reusing them to make new catalyst or recycling them for other uses. This is now the preferred option. A reclaiming firm is generally employed to handle the task. (2) Regeneration and reuse. While this generally is the preferred option, few commercial catalysts can be regenerated effectively and economically. (3) Landfilling. This has been the traditional route. However, stricter environmental regulations have made landfilling unattractive. To maximize the reclamation both economically and environmentally, five factors should be addressed: (1) proper planning and physical handling; (2) transportation of materials; (3) environmental concerns; (4) end uses of the catalyst; and (5) choosing the proper reclamation partner. These factors are discussed.

  8. A Literature Review on the Study of Moisture in Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Trautschold, Olivia Carol

    2016-05-25

    This literature review covers the main chemical and physical interactions between moisture and the polymer matrix. Fickian versus Non-Fickian diffusion behaviors are discussed in approximating the characteristics of moisture sorption. Also, bound water and free water sorbed in polymers are distinguished. Methods to distinguish between bound and free water include differential scanning calorimetry, infrared spectroscopy, and time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The difference between moisture sorption and water sorption is considered, as well as the difficulties associated with preventing moisture sorption. Furthermore, specific examples of how moisture sorption influences polymers include natural fiber-polymer composites, starch-based biodegradable thermoplastics, and thermoset polyurethane and epoxies.

  9. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, Rayford G.; Dosch, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  10. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1993-01-05

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  11. Catalytic reforming catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, W.C.; Kluksdahl, H.E.

    1980-12-09

    An improved catalyst, having a reduced fouling rate when used in a catalytic reforming process, said catalyst comprising platinum disposed on an alumina support wherein the alumina support is obtained by removing water from aluminum hydroxide produced as a by-product from a ziegler higher alcohol synthesis reaction, and wherein the alumina is calcined at a temperature of 1100-1400/sup 0/F so as to have a surface area of 165 to 215 square meters per gram.

  12. Plasmatron-catalyst system

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander; Alexeev, Nikolai

    2007-10-09

    A plasmatron-catalyst system. The system generates hydrogen-rich gas and comprises a plasmatron and at least one catalyst for receiving an output from the plasmatron to produce hydrogen-rich gas. In a preferred embodiment, the plasmatron receives as an input air, fuel and water/steam for use in the reforming process. The system increases the hydrogen yield and decreases the amount of carbon monoxide.

  13. Plasmatron-catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander; Alexeev, Nikolai

    2004-09-21

    A plasmatron-catalyst system. The system generates hydrogen-rich gas and comprises a plasmatron and at least one catalyst for receiving an output from the plasmatron to produce hydrogen-rich gas. In a preferred embodiment, the plasmatron receives as an input air, fuel and water/steam for use in the reforming process. The system increases the hydrogen yield and decreases the amount of carbon monoxide.

  14. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, Kurt P. C.; Perkins, Patrick

    1980-01-01

    Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula: PS --R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS --H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS --Br; treating said PS --Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS --Li; substituting said PS-- Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  15. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, Kurt P. C.; Perkins, Patrick

    1981-01-01

    Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula: PS --R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS --H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS --Br; treating said PS --Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS --Li; substituting said PS-- Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  16. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, Kurt P. C.; Perkins, Patrick

    1981-01-01

    Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula PS -R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS -H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS -Br; treating said PS -Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS -Li; substituting said PS - Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  17. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, Robert J.; Gao, Hanrong

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilation, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical.

  18. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, R.J.; Gao, H.

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilication, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanidation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical. 2 figs.

  19. Polymer adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joanny, Jean-Francois

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this talk is to review Pierre-Gilles deGennes' work on polymer adsorption and the impact that it has now in our understanding of this problem. We will first present the self-consistent mean-field theory and its applications to adsorption and depletion. De Gennes most important contribution is probably the derivation of the self-similar power law density profile for adsorbed polymer layers that we will present next, emphasizing the differences between the tail sections and the loop sections of the adsorbed polymers. We will then discuss the kinetics of polymer adsorption and the penetration of a new polymer chain in an adsobed layer that DeGennes described very elegantly in analogy with a quantum tunneling problem. Finally, we will discuss the role of polymer adsorption for colloid stabilization.

  20. A Langevin dynamics simulation study of the tribology of polymer loop brushes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fang; Bedrov, Dmitry; Smith, Grant D; Kilbey, S Michael

    2007-08-28

    The tribology of surfaces modified with doubly bound polymer chains (loops) has been investigated in good solvent conditions using Langevin dynamics simulations. The density profiles, brush interpenetration, chain inclination, normal forces, and shear forces for two flat substrates modified by doubly bound bead-necklace polymers and equivalent singly bound polymers (twice as many polymer chains of 12 the molecular weight of the loop chains) were determined and compared as a function of surface separation, grafting density, and shear velocity. The doubly bound polymer layers showed less interpenetration with decreasing separation than the equivalent singly bound layers. Surprisingly, this difference in interpenetration between doubly bound polymer and singly bound polymer did not result in decreased friction at high shear velocity possibly due to the decreased ability of the doubly bound chains to deform in response to the applied shear. However, at lower shear velocity, where deformation of the chains in the flow direction is less pronounced and the difference in interpenetration is greater between the doubly bound and singly bound chains, some reduction in friction was observed.

  1. Culture-bound syndromes.

    PubMed

    Levine, R E; Gaw, A C

    1995-09-01

    Since its inception, scholars have struggled with the concept of CBSs. This struggle is reflected in the continuing use of a term that is confusing and inaccurate. Most authors would agree that the term "culture-bound syndrome" was intended to describe forms of otherwise common mental illness that are rendered unusual because of the pathoplastic influence of culture. It was intended not only to describe specific syndromes, but also meanings of illness and non-Western notions of disease causation. The term has become an anachronism, for the word, "syndrome," implies specific disease entities, not illnesses of attribution of idioms of distress. Furthermore, the word "bound" implies that the entities described are restricted to a single culture. Close examination reveals that many of the so-called "culture-bound" syndromes are found in multiple cultures that have in common only that they are "non-Western." It may be unreasonable to expect one term to describe these different concepts. The most accurate of the designations offered might be "folk diagnostic categories." Perhaps the most difficult question remaining is "How can we understand (and classify) these phenomena in such a way that highlights their uniqueness but does not dismiss them as too rare and exotic to warrant attention?" The first step is to recognize that the CBSs are a heterogeneous group of conditions. We must next acknowledge that the concepts represented may be difficult for the average Western clinician to recognize but, in their respective cultures, are neither rare nor unusual. With 80% of our increasingly shrinking world coming from "non-Western" cultures, a familiarity with non-Western notions of disease causation is particularly important for modern clinicians. Many authors have recommended that those CBSs that are "true" syndromes be classified together with their Western counterparts. In order to do this, the folk labels need to be put aside and the fundamental components of each disorder

  2. Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing M; McKenzie, Thomas G; Fu, Qiang; Wong, Edgar H H; Xu, Jiangtao; An, Zesheng; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Davis, Thomas P; Boyer, Cyrille; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-06-22

    Recent advances in controlled/living polymerization techniques and highly efficient coupling chemistries have enabled the facile synthesis of complex polymer architectures with controlled dimensions and functionality. As an example, star polymers consist of many linear polymers fused at a central point with a large number of chain end functionalities. Owing to this exclusive structure, star polymers exhibit some remarkable characteristics and properties unattainable by simple linear polymers. Hence, they constitute a unique class of technologically important nanomaterials that have been utilized or are currently under audition for many applications in life sciences and nanotechnologies. This article first provides a comprehensive summary of synthetic strategies towards star polymers, then reviews the latest developments in the synthesis and characterization methods of star macromolecules, and lastly outlines emerging applications and current commercial use of star-shaped polymers. The aim of this work is to promote star polymer research, generate new avenues of scientific investigation, and provide contemporary perspectives on chemical innovation that may expedite the commercialization of new star nanomaterials. We envision in the not-too-distant future star polymers will play an increasingly important role in materials science and nanotechnology in both academic and industrial settings.

  3. Polymer Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallinan, Daniel T.; Balsara, Nitash P.

    2013-07-01

    This review article covers applications in which polymer electrolytes are used: lithium batteries, fuel cells, and water desalination. The ideas of electrochemical potential, salt activity, and ion transport are presented in the context of these applications. Potential is defined, and we show how a cell potential measurement can be used to ascertain salt activity. The transport parameters needed to fully specify a binary electrolyte (salt + solvent) are presented. We define five fundamentally different types of homogeneous electrolytes: type I (classical liquid electrolytes), type II (gel electrolytes), type III (dry polymer electrolytes), type IV (dry single-ion-conducting polymer electrolytes), and type V (solvated single-ion-conducting polymer electrolytes). Typical values of transport parameters are provided for all types of electrolytes. Comparison among the values provides insight into the transport mechanisms occurring in polymer electrolytes. It is desirable to decouple the mechanical properties of polymer electrolyte membranes from the ionic conductivity. One way to accomplish this is through the development of microphase-separated polymers, wherein one of the microphases conducts ions while the other enhances the mechanical rigidity of the heterogeneous polymer electrolyte. We cover all three types of conducting polymer electrolyte phases (types III, IV, and V). We present a simple framework that relates the transport parameters of heterogeneous electrolytes to homogeneous analogs. We conclude by discussing electrochemical stability of electrolytes and the effects of water contamination because of their relevance to applications such as lithium ion batteries.

  4. Polymer Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  5. Formation of "bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, K.; Kästner, M.; Miltner, A.

    2009-04-01

    During degradation of organic pollutants in soil, metabolites, microbial biomass, CO2and "bound" residues ("non-extractable" residues in soil organic matter) are formed. Enhanced transformation of these contaminants into "bound" residues has been proposed as an alternative remediation method for polluted soils. However, this kind of residues may pose a potential risk for the environment due to their chemical structure and possible remobilization under different conditions. Therefore particular attention is given actually to "bound" residues. Part of these non-extractable residues may be "biogenic," because microorganisms use the carbon from the pollutant to form their biomass components (fatty acids, amino acids, amino sugars), which subsequently may be incorporated into soil organic matter. Furthermore, the CO2 originating from mineralization of xenobiotics, can be re-assimilated by microorganisms and also incorporated into "biogenic residue". The hazard posed by "bound" residues may be overestimated because they are "biogenic" (contain microbial fatty acids and amino acids). The knowledge about the pathways of "biogenic residue" formation is necessary for a proper assessment of the fate of tested pollutants and their turnover in the soil environment. Moreover, these data are needed to establish the realistic degradation rates of the contaminants in soil. The main objectives of this study are: to quantify the extent of "biogenic residue" (fatty acids, amino acids, amino sugars) formation during the degradation of a model pollutant (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid = 2,4-D) and during CO2 assimilation by microorganisms and to evaluate which components are mainly incorporated into "bound" residues. To investigate the extent of "biogenic residue" formation in soil during the degradation of 2,4-D, experiments with either 14C-U-ring and 13C6-2,4-D or carboxyl-14C 2,4-D were performed. The incubation experiments were performed according to OECD test guideline 307, in the

  6. Reversible Thermal Stiffening in Polymer Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Senses, Erkan; Isherwood, Andrew; Akcora, Pinar

    2015-07-15

    Miscible polymer blends with different glass transition temperatures (Tg) are known to create confined interphases between glassy and mobile chains. Here, we show that nanoparticles adsorbed with a high-Tg polymer, poly(methyl methacrylate), and dispersed in a low-Tg matrix polymer, poly(ethylene oxide), exhibit a liquid-to-solid transition at temperatures above Tg's of both polymers. The mechanical adaptivity of nanocomposites to temperature underlies the existence of dynamically asymmetric bound layers on nanoparticles and more importantly reveals their impact on macroscopic mechanical response of composites. The unusual reversible stiffening behavior sets these materials apart from conventional polymer composites that soften upon heating. The presented stiffening mechanism in polymer nanocomposites can be used in applications for flexible electronics or mechanically induced actuators responding to environmental changes like temperature or magnetic fields.

  7. Use of polymer-bound Schiff base as a new liquid binding agent of diffusive gradients in thin-films for the measurement of labile Cu²⁺, Cd²⁺ and Pb²⁺.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hong-Tao; Liu, Jin-Xiu; Sui, Dian-Peng; Yao, Hui; Yan, Feng; Sun, Ting

    2013-09-15

    A new diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) device with solution of polymer-bound Schiff base (Py-PEI) derived from poly(ethyleneimine) and 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde as the binding agent (Py-PEI DGT) was developed for measuring labile Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) in waters. In synthetic solution, uptake percentages of Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) by Py-PEI DGT were 99.2 ± 4.4%, 103.7 ± 4.8% and 98.7 ± 5.5% of the total metals, respectively. Performance of Py-PEI DGT was independent of pH 4-8.5 and ionic strength 1 × 10(-4)-0.1 mol L(-1). The uptake of labile metals showed agreement with the theoretical values of free ions in EDTA solution, and decreased with increase of humic acid (HA) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contents in water due to the complexation of HA and DOC with metals. DGT devices containing different liquid binding agents (Py-PEI, polyacrylate (PA) and poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS)) were deployed in the same solution. The higher uptake percentages of Py-PEI DGT (13.2 ± 1.1, 26.5 ± 2.4 and 62.7 ± 3.2% of total Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+)) were obtained with respective to PSS DGT (6.7 ± 0.6, 9.2 ± 0.9 and 29.6 ± 2.7% of total above metals) and PA DGT (8.9 ± 0.9 and 16.2 ± 1.1% of total Cu(2+) and Cd(2+)) due to its relatively strong binding affinity with metals.

  8. Magnetic and dendritic catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Deraedt, Christophe; Ruiz, Jaime; Astruc, Didier

    2015-07-21

    The recovery and reuse of catalysts is a major challenge in the development of sustainable chemical processes. Two methods at the frontier between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis have recently emerged for addressing this problem: loading the catalyst onto a dendrimer or onto a magnetic nanoparticle. In this Account, we describe representative examples of these two methods, primarily from our research group, and compare them. We then describe new chemistry that combines the benefits of these two methods of catalysis. Classic dendritic catalysis has involved either attaching the catalyst covalently at the branch termini or within the dendrimer core. We have used chelating pyridyltriazole ligands to insolubilize catalysts at the termini of dendrimers, providing an efficient, recyclable heterogeneous catalysts. With the addition of dendritic unimolecular micelles olefin metathesis reactions catalyzed by commercial Grubbs-type ruthenium-benzylidene complexes in water required unusually low amounts of catalyst. When such dendritic micelles include intradendritic ligands, both the micellar effect and ligand acceleration promote faster catalysis in water. With these types of catalysts, we could carry out azide alkyne cycloaddition ("click") chemistry with only ppm amounts of CuSO4·5H2O and sodium ascorbate under ambient conditions. Alternatively we can attach catalysts to the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), essentially magnetite (Fe3O4) or maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), offering the opportunity to recover the catalysts using magnets. Taking advantage of the merits of both of these strategies, we and others have developed a new generation of recyclable catalysts: dendritic magnetically recoverable catalysts. In particular, some of our catalysts with a γ-Fe2O3@SiO2 core and 1,2,3-triazole tethers and loaded with Pd nanoparticles generate strong positive dendritic effects with respect to ligand loading, catalyst loading, catalytic activity and

  9. Static electricity of polymers reduced by treatment with iodine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermann, A. M.; Landel, R. F.; Rembaum, A.

    1967-01-01

    Treating organic polymers with iodine improves the electrical conductivity. Diffusion enables products of desired properties to be custom formulated. This eliminates a buildup of static electricity and the need for fillers or bound metal salts.

  10. Polymers & People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lentz, Linda; Robinson, Thomas; Martin, Elizabeth; Miller, Mary; Ashburn, Norma

    2004-01-01

    Each Tuesday during the fall of 2002, teams of high school students from three South Carolina counties conducted a four-hour polymer institute for their peers. In less than two months, over 300 students visited the Charleston County Public Library in Charleston, South Carolina, to explore DNA, nylon, rubber, gluep, and other polymers. Teams of…

  11. Polymers & People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lentz, Linda; Robinson, Thomas; Martin, Elizabeth; Miller, Mary; Ashburn, Norma

    2004-01-01

    Each Tuesday during the fall of 2002, teams of high school students from three South Carolina counties conducted a four-hour polymer institute for their peers. In less than two months, over 300 students visited the Charleston County Public Library in Charleston, South Carolina, to explore DNA, nylon, rubber, gluep, and other polymers. Teams of…

  12. Process to prepare stable trifluorostyrene containing compounds grafted to base polymers using a solvent/water mixture

    DOEpatents

    Roelofs, Mark Gerrit; Yang, Zhen-Yu; Han, Amy Qi

    2010-06-15

    A fluorinated ion exchange polymer is prepared by grafting at least one grafting monomer derived from trifluorostyrene on to at least one base polymer in a organic solvent/water mixture. These ion exchange polymers are useful in preparing catalyst coated membranes and membrane electrode assemblies used in fuel cells.

  13. Copper catalysts for soot oxidation: alumina versus perovskite supports.

    PubMed

    López-Suárez, F E; Bueno-López, A; Illán-Gómez, M J; Adamski, A; Ura, B; Trawczynski, J

    2008-10-15

    Copper catalysts prepared using four supports (Mg- and Sr-modified Al2O3 and MgTiO3 and SrTiO3 perovskites) have been tested for soot oxidation by 02 and NOx/O2. Among the catalysts studied, Cu/SrTiO3 is the most active for soot oxidation by NOx/O2 and the support affects positively copper activity. With this catalyst, and under the experimental conditions used, the soot combustion by NOx/O2 presents a considerable rate from 500 degrees C (100 degrees C below the uncatalysed reaction). The Cu/ SrTiO3 catalyst is also the most effective for NOx chemisorption around 425 degrees C. The best activity of Cu/SrTiO3 can be attributed to the improved redox properties of copper originated by Cu-support interactions. This seems to be related to the presence of weakly bound oxygen on this sample. The copper species present in the catalyst Cu/SrTiO3 can be reduced more easily than those in other supports, and for this reason, this catalyst seems to be the most effective to convert NO into NO2, which explains its highest activity for soot oxidation.

  14. Characterisation of gold catalysts.

    PubMed

    Villa, Alberto; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Chan-Thaw, Carine E; Hammond, Ceri; Veith, Gabriel M; Wang, Di; Manzoli, Maela; Prati, Laura; Hutchings, Graham J

    2016-09-21

    Au-based catalysts have established a new important field of catalysis, revealing specific properties in terms of both high activity and selectivity for many reactions. However, the correlation between the morphology and the activity of the catalyst is not always clear although much effort has been addressed to this task. To some extent the problem relates to the complexity of the characterisation techniques that can be applied to Au catalyst and the broad range of ways in which they can be prepared. Indeed, in many reports only a few characterization techniques have been used to investigate the potential nature of the active sites. The aim of this review is to provide a critical description of the techniques that are most commonly used as well as the more advanced characterization techniques available for this task. The techniques that we discuss are (i) transmission electron microscopy methods, (ii) X-ray spectroscopy techniques, (iii) vibrational spectroscopy techniques and (iv) chemisorption methods. The description is coupled with developing an understanding of a number of preparation methods. In the final section the example of the supported AuPd alloy catalyst is discussed to show how the techniques can gain an understanding of an active oxidation catalyst.

  15. Microscopic Chain Motion in Polymer Nanocomposites with Dynamically Asymmetric Interphases

    PubMed Central

    Senses, Erkan; Faraone, Antonio; Akcora, Pinar

    2016-01-01

    Dynamics of the interphase region between matrix and bound polymers on nanoparticles is important to understand the macroscopic rheological properties of nanocomposites. Here, we present neutron scattering investigations on nanocomposites with dynamically asymmetric interphases formed by a high-glass transition temperature polymer, poly(methyl methacrylate), adsorbed on nanoparticles and a low-glass transition temperature miscible matrix, poly(ethylene oxide). By taking advantage of selective isotope labeling of the chains, we studied the role of interfacial polymer on segmental and collective dynamics of the matrix chains from subnanoseconds to 100 nanoseconds. Our results show that the Rouse relaxation remains unchanged in a weakly attractive composite system while the dynamics significantly slows down in a strongly attractive composite. More importantly, the chains disentangle with a remarkable increase of the reptation tube size when the bound polymer is vitreous. The glassy and rubbery states of the bound polymer as temperature changes underpin the macroscopic stiffening of nanocomposites. PMID:27457056

  16. Microscopic Chain Motion in Polymer Nanocomposites with Dynamically Asymmetric Interphases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senses, Erkan; Faraone, Antonio; Akcora, Pinar

    2016-07-01

    Dynamics of the interphase region between matrix and bound polymers on nanoparticles is important to understand the macroscopic rheological properties of nanocomposites. Here, we present neutron scattering investigations on nanocomposites with dynamically asymmetric interphases formed by a high-glass transition temperature polymer, poly(methyl methacrylate), adsorbed on nanoparticles and a low-glass transition temperature miscible matrix, poly(ethylene oxide). By taking advantage of selective isotope labeling of the chains, we studied the role of interfacial polymer on segmental and collective dynamics of the matrix chains from subnanoseconds to 100 nanoseconds. Our results show that the Rouse relaxation remains unchanged in a weakly attractive composite system while the dynamics significantly slows down in a strongly attractive composite. More importantly, the chains disentangle with a remarkable increase of the reptation tube size when the bound polymer is vitreous. The glassy and rubbery states of the bound polymer as temperature changes underpin the macroscopic stiffening of nanocomposites.

  17. Supported Dendrimer-Encapsulated Metal Clusters: Toward Heterogenizing Homogeneous Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ye, Rong; Zhukhovitskiy, Aleksandr V; Deraedt, Christophe V; Toste, F Dean; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2017-08-15

    Recyclable catalysts, especially those that display selective reactivity, are vital for the development of sustainable chemical processes. Among available catalyst platforms, heterogeneous catalysts are particularly well-disposed toward separation from the reaction mixture via filtration methods, which renders them readily recyclable. Furthermore, heterogeneous catalysts offer numerous handles-some without homogeneous analogues-for performance and selectivity optimization. These handles include nanoparticle size, pore profile of porous supports, surface ligands and interface with oxide supports, and flow rate through a solid catalyst bed. Despite these available handles, however, conventional heterogeneous catalysts are themselves often structurally heterogeneous compared to homogeneous catalysts, which complicates efforts to optimize and expand the scope of their reactivity and selectivity. Ongoing efforts in our laboratories are aimed to address the above challenge by heterogenizing homogeneous catalysts, which can be defined as the modification of homogeneous catalysts to render them in a separable (solid) phase from the starting materials and products. Specifically, we grow the small nanoclusters in dendrimers, a class of uniform polymers with the connectivity of fractal trees and generally radial symmetry. Thanks to their dense multivalency, shape persistence, and structural uniformity, dendrimers have proven to be versatile scaffolds for the synthesis and stabilization of small nanoclusters. Then these dendrimer-encapsulated metal clusters (DEMCs) are adsorbed onto mesoporous silica. Through this method, we have achieved selective transformations that had been challenging to accomplish in a heterogeneous setting, e.g., π-bond activation and aldol reactions. Extensive investigation into the catalytic systems under reaction conditions allowed us to correlate the structural features (e.g., oxidation states) of the catalysts and their activity. Moreover, we have

  18. Nafion induced surface confinement of oxygen in carbon-supported oxygen reduction catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Chlistunoff, Jerzy; Sansinena, Jose -Maria

    2016-11-17

    We studied the surface confinement of oxygen inside layers of Nafion self-assembled on carbon-supported oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts. It is demonstrated that oxygen accumulates in the hydrophobic component of the polymer remaining in contact with the carbon surface. Furthermore, the amount of surface confined oxygen increases with the degree of carbon surface graphitization, which promotes the self-assembly of the polymer. Planar macrocyclic ORR catalysts possessing a delocalized system of π electrons such as Co and Fe porphyrins and phthalocyanines have virtually no effect on the surface confinement of oxygen, in accordance with their structural similarity to graphitic carbon surfaces where they adsorb. Platinum particles in carbon-supported ORR catalysts with high metal contents (20%) disrupt the self-assembly of Nafion and virtually eliminate the oxygen confinement, but the phenomenon is still observed for low Pt loading (4.8%) catalysts.

  19. Nafion induced surface confinement of oxygen in carbon-supported oxygen reduction catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Chlistunoff, Jerzy; Sansinena, Jose -Maria

    2016-11-17

    We studied the surface confinement of oxygen inside layers of Nafion self-assembled on carbon-supported oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts. It is demonstrated that oxygen accumulates in the hydrophobic component of the polymer remaining in contact with the carbon surface. Furthermore, the amount of surface confined oxygen increases with the degree of carbon surface graphitization, which promotes the self-assembly of the polymer. Planar macrocyclic ORR catalysts possessing a delocalized system of π electrons such as Co and Fe porphyrins and phthalocyanines have virtually no effect on the surface confinement of oxygen, in accordance with their structural similarity to graphitic carbon surfacesmore » where they adsorb. Platinum particles in carbon-supported ORR catalysts with high metal contents (20%) disrupt the self-assembly of Nafion and virtually eliminate the oxygen confinement, but the phenomenon is still observed for low Pt loading (4.8%) catalysts.« less

  20. An Evaluation of Dropouts from Outward Bound Programs for the Unemployed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Robert; Perry, Martin; Martin, Andrew John

    2008-01-01

    Outward Bound New Zealand provides 21-day residential motivational intervention courses (Catalyst courses) to long-term unemployed clients approved by the Ministry of Social Development. During the period 2002/03, 20% of participants starting the course dropped out before course completion; which was double the contracted acceptable level set by…

  1. Imaging and controlling intracellular reactions: Lysosome transport as a function of diameter and the intracellular synthesis of conducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Christine

    2014-03-01

    Eukaryotic cells are the ultimate complex environment with intracellular chemical reactions regulated by the local cellular environment. For example, reactants are sequestered into specific organelles to control local concentration and pH, motor proteins transport reactants within the cell, and intracellular vesicles undergo fusion to bring reactants together. Current research in the Payne Lab in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Georgia Tech is aimed at understanding and utilizing this complex environment to control intracellular chemical reactions. This will be illustrated using two examples, intracellular transport as a function of organelle diameter and the intracellular synthesis of conducting polymers. Using single particle tracking fluorescence microscopy, we measured the intracellular transport of lysosomes, membrane-bound organelles, as a function of diameter as they underwent transport in living cells. Both ATP-dependent active transport and diffusion were examined. As expected, diffusion scales with the diameter of the lysosome. However, active transport is unaffected suggesting that motor proteins are insensitive to cytosolic drag. In a second example, we utilize intracellular complexity, specifically the distinct micro-environments of different organelles, to carry out chemical reactions. We show that catalase, found in the peroxisomes of cells, can be used to catalyze the polymerization of the conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS. More importantly, we have found that a range of iron-containing biomolecules are suitable catalysts with different iron-containing biomolecules leading to different polymer properties. These experiments illustrate the advantage of intracellular complexity for the synthesis of novel materials.

  2. Bound Rationality and Organizational Learning.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-23

    8217 . 90 0 8 0.. O 4 BOUNDED RATIONALITY AND ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING Technical Report AlP - 107 Herbert A. Simon Department of Psychology Carnegie Mellon...ACCESSION No N/A N/A N/A N/A 1 1 TITLE (include Security Classificarnon) Bounded rationality and organizational learning 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) HretA io 13a...organizations organizational psychology organizational learning bounded rationality cognitive psychology 𔄃 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary

  3. Nuclear alkylated pyridine aldehyde polymers and conductive compositions thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Singer, S. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    A thermally stable, relatively conductive polymer was disclosed. The polymer was synthesized by condensing in the presence of catalyst a 2, 4, or 6 nuclear alklylated 2, 3, or 4 pyridine aldehyde or quaternary derivatives thereof to form a polymer. The pyridine groups were liked by olefinic groups between 2-4, 2-6, 2-3, 3-4, 3-6 or 4-6 positions. Conductive compositions were prepared by dissolving the quaternary polymer and an organic charge transfer complexing agent such as TCNQ in a mutual solvent such as methanol.

  4. Chemical anchoring of organic conducting polymers to semiconducting surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Arthur J.; Honda, Kenji

    1984-01-01

    According to the present invention, an improved method of coating electrodes with conductive polymer films and/or preselected catalysts is provided. The charge-conductive polymer is covalently or coordinatively attached to the electrode surface to strengthen the adhesion characteristics of the polymer to the electrode surface or to improve charge-conductive properties between the conductive polymer and the electrode surface. Covalent or coordinative attachment is achieved by a number of alternative methods including covalently or coordinatively attaching the desired monomer to the electrode by means of a suitable coupling reagent and, thereafter, electrochemically polymerizing the monomer in situ.

  5. Chemical anchoring of organic conducting polymers to semiconducting surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Frank, A.J.; Honda, K.

    1984-01-01

    According to the present invention, an improved method of coating electrodes with conductive polymer films and/or preselected catalysts is provided. The charge conductive polymer is covalently or coordinatively attached to the electrode surface to strengthen the adhesion characteristics of the polymer to the electrode surface or to improve charge conductive properties between the conductive polymer and the electrode surface. Covalent or coordinative attachment is achieved by a number of alternative methods including covalently or coordinatively attaching the desired monomer to the electrode by means of a suitable coupling reagent and, thereafter, electrochemically polymerizing the monomer in situ.

  6. End-functionalized ROMP polymers for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Ahmad E.; Koch, Amelie H. R.; Lienkamp, Karen; Tew, Gregory N.

    2010-01-01

    We present two novel allyl-based terminating agents that can be used to end-functionalize living polymer chains obtained by ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) using Grubbs’ third generation catalyst. Both terminating agents can be easily synthesized and yield ROMP polymers with stable, storable activated ester groups at the chain-end. These end-functionalized ROMP polymers are attractive building blocks for advanced polymeric materials, especially in the biomedical field. Dye-labeling and surface-coupling of antimicrobially active polymers using these end-groups were demonstrated. PMID:21499549

  7. End-functionalized ROMP polymers for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Madkour, Ahmad E; Koch, Amelie H R; Lienkamp, Karen; Tew, Gregory N

    2010-05-25

    We present two novel allyl-based terminating agents that can be used to end-functionalize living polymer chains obtained by ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) using Grubbs' third generation catalyst. Both terminating agents can be easily synthesized and yield ROMP polymers with stable, storable activated ester groups at the chain-end. These end-functionalized ROMP polymers are attractive building blocks for advanced polymeric materials, especially in the biomedical field. Dye-labeling and surface-coupling of antimicrobially active polymers using these end-groups were demonstrated.

  8. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  9. Catalyst reforming process

    SciTech Connect

    Swan, G.A. III

    1989-05-23

    This patent describes a process for catalytically reforming a gasoline boiling range naphtha, with hydrogen, in a semi-regenerative or semi-cyclic reforming process unit comprised of serially connected reactors, inclusive of a lead reactor and one or more downstream reactors, the last of which is the tail reactor, each of which contains a halogenated reforming catalyst comprised of a halide, a Group VIII noble metal, and an inorganic oxide support, the improvement which comprises continuously injecting into each downstream reactor a mixture of water and halide at a water to halide ratio from about 20:1 to about 60:1 wherein the specific ratio of water to halide for each individual downstream reactor is chosen so as to maintain the level of halide on catalyst in each downstream reactor from about 0.5 to 1.5 wt. % based on the total weight of the catalyst.

  10. Oxide Nanocrystal Model Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weixin

    2016-03-15

    Model catalysts with uniform and well-defined surface structures have been extensively employed to explore structure-property relationships of powder catalysts. Traditional oxide model catalysts are based on oxide single crystals and single crystal thin films, and the surface chemistry and catalysis are studied under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. However, the acquired fundamental understandings often suffer from the "materials gap" and "pressure gap" when they are extended to the real world of powder catalysts working at atmospheric or higher pressures. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis have realized controlled synthesis of catalytic oxide nanocrystals with uniform and well-defined morphologies. These oxide nanocrystals consist of a novel type of oxide model catalyst whose surface chemistry and catalysis can be studied under the same conditions as working oxide catalysts. In this Account, the emerging concept of oxide nanocrystal model catalysts is demonstrated using our investigations of surface chemistry and catalysis of uniform and well-defined cuprous oxide nanocrystals and ceria nanocrystals. Cu2O cubes enclosed with the {100} crystal planes, Cu2O octahedra enclosed with the {111} crystal planes, and Cu2O rhombic dodecahedra enclosed with the {110} crystal planes exhibit distinct morphology-dependent surface reactivities and catalytic properties that can be well correlated with the surface compositions and structures of exposed crystal planes. Among these types of Cu2O nanocrystals, the octahedra are most reactive and catalytically active due to the presence of coordination-unsaturated (1-fold-coordinated) Cu on the exposed {111} crystal planes. The crystal-plane-controlled surface restructuring and catalytic activity of Cu2O nanocrystals were observed in CO oxidation with excess oxygen. In the propylene oxidation reaction with O2, 1-fold-coordinated Cu on Cu2O(111), 3-fold-coordinated O on Cu2O(110), and 2-fold-coordinated O on Cu2O(100) were identified

  11. Partial oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    2000-01-01

    A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  12. Catalyst, method of making, and reactions using the catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA

    2009-03-03

    The present invention includes a catalyst having a layered structure with, (1) a porous support, (2) a buffer layer, (3) an interfacial layer, and optionally (4) a catalyst layer. The invention also provides a process in which a reactant is converted to a product by passing through a reaction chamber containing the catalyst.

  13. Catalyst, Method Of Making, And Reactions Using The Catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y.; Wang, Yong; Gao, Yufei

    2004-07-13

    The present invention includes a catalyst having a layered structure with, (1) a porous support, (2) a buffer layer, (3) an interfacial layer, and optionally (4) a catalyst layer. The invention also provides a process in which a reactant is converted to a product by passing through a reaction chamber containing the catalyst.

  14. Catalyst, method of making, and reactions using the catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA

    2002-08-27

    The present invention includes a catalyst having a layered structure with, (1) a porous support, (2) a buffer layer, (3) an interfacial layer, and optionally (4) a catalyst layer. The invention also provides a process in which a reactant is converted to a product by passing through a reaction chamber containing the catalyst.

  15. Characterization of a model Phillips catalyst by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Di Croce, Pascal Gabriel; Aubriet, Frédéric; Chéty-Gimondo, Rachel; Muller, Jean-François; Grange, Paul

    2004-01-01

    A model Phillips catalyst for ethylene polymerization, prepared by spin coating a Cr(III)(Cr(acac)3) precursor on a silicon wafer, was submitted to an oxidative activation. Laser ablation Fourier transform mass spectrometry provided direct information on molecular species at the silicon wafer surface during activation. At 350 degrees C the chromium precursor was degraded, while chromium oxide species were formed. The chromium concentration decreased with temperature. The activated model catalyst was active for ethylene polymerization. Using complementary techniques (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry), the polymer was identified as crystalline polyethylene. After 1 h of polymerization at 160 degrees C, dome-like structures were observed by atomic force microscopy. Their morphologies were constituted of regions of parallel aligned lamellae of polymer.

  16. Competition between model protocells driven by an encapsulated catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamala, Katarzyna; Szostak, Jack W.

    2013-06-01

    The advent of Darwinian evolution required the emergence of molecular mechanisms for the heritable variation of fitness. One model for such a system involves competing protocell populations, each consisting of a replicating genetic polymer within a replicating vesicle. In this model, each genetic polymer imparts a selective advantage to its protocell by, for example, coding for a catalyst that generates a useful metabolite. Here, we report a partial model of such nascent evolutionary traits in a system that consists of fatty-acid vesicles containing a dipeptide catalyst, which catalyses the formation of a second dipeptide. The newly formed dipeptide binds to vesicle membranes, which imparts enhanced affinity for fatty acids and thus promotes vesicle growth. The catalysed dipeptide synthesis proceeds with higher efficiency in vesicles than in free solution, which further enhances fitness. Our observations suggest that, in a replicating protocell with an RNA genome, ribozyme-catalysed peptide synthesis might have been sufficient to initiate Darwinian evolution.

  17. Iridium-Doped Ruthenium Oxide Catalyst for Oxygen Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Narayan, Sri R.; Billings, Keith J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA requires a durable and efficient catalyst for the electrolysis of water in a polymer-electrolyte-membrane (PEM) cell. Ruthenium oxide in a slightly reduced form is known to be a very efficient catalyst for the anodic oxidation of water to oxygen, but it degrades rapidly, reducing efficiency. To combat this tendency of ruthenium oxide to change oxidation states, it is combined with iridium, which has a tendency to stabilize ruthenium oxide at oxygen evolution potentials. The novel oxygen evolution catalyst was fabricated under flowing argon in order to allow the iridium to preferentially react with oxygen from the ruthenium oxide, and not oxygen from the environment. Nanoparticulate iridium black and anhydrous ruthenium oxide are weighed out and mixed to 5 18 atomic percent. They are then heat treated at 300 C under flowing argon (in order to create an inert environment) for a minimum of 14 hours. This temperature was chosen because it is approximately the creep temperature of ruthenium oxide, and is below the sintering temperature of both materials. In general, the temperature should always be below the sintering temperature of both materials. The iridium- doped ruthenium oxide catalyst is then fabricated into a PEM-based membrane- electrode assembly (MEA), and then mounted into test cells. The result is an electrolyzer system that can sustain electrolysis at twice the current density, and at the same efficiency as commercial catalysts in the range of 100-200 mA/sq cm. At 200 mA/sq cm, this new system operates at an efficiency of 85 percent, which is 2 percent greater than commercially available catalysts. Testing has shown that this material is as stable as commercially available oxygen evolution catalysts. This means that this new catalyst can be used to regenerate fuel cell systems in space, and as a hydrogen generator on Earth.

  18. Nitrogen-doped carbon-supported cobalt-iron oxygen reduction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Zelenay, Piotr; Wu, Gang

    2014-04-29

    A Fe--Co hybrid catalyst for oxygen reaction reduction was prepared by a two part process. The first part involves reacting an ethyleneamine with a cobalt-containing precursor to form a cobalt-containing complex, combining the cobalt-containing complex with an electroconductive carbon supporting material, heating the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material under conditions suitable to convert the cobalt-containing complex and carbon supporting material into a cobalt-containing catalyst support. The second part of the process involves polymerizing an aniline in the presence of said cobalt-containing catalyst support and an iron-containing compound under conditions suitable to form a supported, cobalt-containing, iron-bound polyaniline species, and subjecting said supported, cobalt-containing, iron bound polyaniline species to conditions suitable for producing a Fe--Co hybrid catalyst.

  19. Secret Lives of Catalysts Revealed

    SciTech Connect

    Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor

    2008-01-01

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division discuss the first-ever glimpse of nanoscale catalysts in action. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2008/10/21/catalysts/

  20. Environmental durability of polymer concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Palmese, G.R.; Chawalwala, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    Over the past two decades, polymer concrete has increasingly been used for a number of applications including piping, machine bases, chemically resistant flooring, and bridge overlays. Currently, the use of polymer concrete as a wear surface for polymeric composite bridge decks is being investigated. Polymer concrete is a particulate composite comprised of mineral aggregate bound by a polymeric matrix. Such materials possess significantly higher mechanical properties than Portland cement concrete. However, the mechanical characteristics and environmental durability of polymer concrete are influenced by a number of factors. Among these are the selection of aggregate and resin, surface treatment, and cure conditions. In this work the influence of matrix selection and cure history on the environmental durability of polymer concrete was investigated. Particular attention was given to the effects of water on composite properties and to the mechanisms by which degradation occurs. The basalt-based polymer concrete systems investigated were susceptible to attack by water. Furthermore, results suggest that property loss associated with water exposure was primarily a result of interfacial weakening.

  1. Process of making supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, James A.; Subramanian, Somasundaram

    1992-01-01

    Oxide supported metal catalysts have an additional metal present in intimate association with the metal catalyst to enhance catalytic activity. In a preferred mode, iridium or another Group VIII metal catalyst is supported on a titania, alumina, tungsten oxide, silica, or composite oxide support. Aluminum ions are readsorbed onto the support and catalyst, and reduced during calcination. The aluminum can be added as aluminum nitrate to the iridium impregnate solution, e.g. chloroiridic acid.

  2. Multicomponent redox catalysts for reduction of large biological molecules using molecular hydrogen as the reductant

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, S.; Simon, R.A.; Mallouk, T.E.; Wrighton, M.S.

    1988-03-30

    One-electron reduction of the large biological molecules horse heart cytochrome c, sperm whale myoglobin, and horseradish peroxidase using H/sub 2/ as the reductant can be catalyzed by two-component, high surface area heterogeneous catalysts. The catalysts can be prepared by first functionalizing high surface area SiO/sub 2/ with a polycationic polymer into which is dispersed MCl/sub 4//sup 2 -/ (M = Pd, Pt). Reduction with H/sub 2/ yields elemental Pd or Pt dispersed in the polymer. The particles are finally functionalized with a redox polymer derived from hydrolysis of Si(OR)/sub 3/ groups of an N,N'-dialkyl-4,4'-bipyridinium- or from a cobalticenium-based monomer. The two components of the heterogeneous catalysts are the buried noble metal capable of activating the H/sub 2/ and the redox polymer, which can equilibrate both with the noble metal and with the large biological molecule. Reduction of the large biological molecules in aqueous solution can be effected at room temperature and 1 atm H/sub 2/ using the catalysts under conditions where the biological materials would not be reducible with H/sub 2/ alone or when the noble metal alone would be used as the catalyst.

  3. New Iron Polyoxometalate - Based Catalysts for Decontamination of HD and G Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-11-19

    New iron polyoxometalate - based catalysts for decontamination of HD and G agents Nelya Okun, Chris Tarr, Lei Zhang and Craig Hill... polyoxometalate - based catalysts for decontamination of HD and G agents 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Si/AlO2n+. Catalytic activity of iron POMs bound to Si/AlO2n+. New iron containing POMs Recently developed iron containing polyoxometalates (POMs

  4. Fuel cell applications for novel metalloporphyrin catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ryba, G.; Shelnutt, J.; Doddapaneni, N.; Zavadil, K.

    1997-04-01

    This project utilized Computer-Aided Molecular Design (CAMD) to develop a new class of metalloporphyrin materials for use as catalysts for two fuel cell reactions. The first reaction is the reduction of oxygen at the fuel cell cathode, and this reaction was the main focus of the research. The second reaction we attempted to catalyze was the oxidation of methanol at the anode. Two classes of novel metalloporphyrins were developed. The first class comprised the dodecaphenylporphyrins whose steric bulk forces them into a non-planar geometry having a pocket where oxygen or methanol is more tightly bound to the porphyrin than it is in the case of planar porphyrins. Significant improvements in the catalytic reduction of oxygen by the dodecaphenyl porphyrins were measured in electrochemical cells. The dodecaphenylporphyrins were further modified by fluorinating the peripheral phenyl groups to varying degrees. The fluorination strongly affected their redox potential, but no effect on their catalytic activity towards oxygen was observed. The second class of porphyrin catalysts was a series of hydrogen-bonding porphyrins whose interaction with oxygen is enhanced. Enhancements in the interaction of oxygen with the porphyrins having hydrogen bonding groups were observed spectroscopically. Computer modeling was performed using Molecular Simulations new CERIUS2 Version 1.6 and a research version of POLYGRAF from Bill Goddard`s research group at the California Institute of Technology. We reoptimized the force field because of an error that was in POLYGRAF and corrected a problem in treatment of the metal in early versions of the program. This improved force field was reported in a J. Am. Chem. Soc. manuscript. Experimental measurements made on the newly developed catalysts included the electrochemical testing in a fuel cell configuration and spectroscopic measurements (UV-Vis, Raman and XPS) to characterize the catalysts.

  5. Anaphoric Pronouns and Bound Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasow, Thomas

    1975-01-01

    Deals with certain problems inherent in deriving anaphoric pronouns from bound variables. Syntactic rules applied to determine anaphora relations cannot be applied if anaphoric pronouns and their antecedents have identical underlying forms. An approach to anaphora which preserves some advantages of the bound-variable theory without the problems is…

  6. Northwest Outward Bound Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Outward Bound School, Portland, OR.

    Instructor responsibilities, procedures for completing activities safely, and instructional methods and techniques are outlined to assist instructors in the Northwest Outward Bound School (Portland, Oregon) as they strive for teaching excellence. Information is organized into six chapters addressing: history and philosophy of Outward Bound; course…

  7. Bounds for Asian basket options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deelstra, Griselda; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vanmaele, Michèle

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we propose pricing bounds for European-style discrete arithmetic Asian basket options in a Black and Scholes framework. We start from methods used for basket options and Asian options. First, we use the general approach for deriving upper and lower bounds for stop-loss premia of sums of non-independent random variables as in Kaas et al. [Upper and lower bounds for sums of random variables, Insurance Math. Econom. 27 (2000) 151-168] or Dhaene et al. [The concept of comonotonicity in actuarial science and finance: theory, Insurance Math. Econom. 31(1) (2002) 3-33]. We generalize the methods in Deelstra et al. [Pricing of arithmetic basket options by conditioning, Insurance Math. Econom. 34 (2004) 55-57] and Vanmaele et al. [Bounds for the price of discrete sampled arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 185(1) (2006) 51-90]. Afterwards we show how to derive an analytical closed-form expression for a lower bound in the non-comonotonic case. Finally, we derive upper bounds for Asian basket options by applying techniques as in Thompson [Fast narrow bounds on the value of Asian options, Working Paper, University of Cambridge, 1999] and Lord [Partially exact and bounded approximations for arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Finance 10 (2) (2006) 1-52]. Numerical results are included and on the basis of our numerical tests, we explain which method we recommend depending on moneyness and time-to-maturity.

  8. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE PAGES

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; ...

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  9. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    SciTech Connect

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; Gunzburger, Max Donald; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  10. Northwest Outward Bound Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Outward Bound School, Portland, OR.

    Instructor responsibilities, procedures for completing activities safely, and instructional methods and techniques are outlined to assist instructors in the Northwest Outward Bound School (Portland, Oregon) as they strive for teaching excellence. Information is organized into six chapters addressing: history and philosophy of Outward Bound; course…

  11. Methods for polymer synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Scott D.; Simoneau, Christopher A.; Keefe, William D.; Conuel, Jeff R.

    2016-12-06

    The present invention provides methods for reducing induction periods in epoxide-CO.sub.2 copolymerizations. In certain embodiments, the methods include the step of contacting an epoxide with CO.sub.2 in the presence of two catalysts: an epoxide hydrolysis catalyst and an epoxide CO.sub.2 copolymerization catalyst. In another aspect, the invention provides catalyst compositions comprising a mixture of an epoxide hydrolysis catalyst and an epoxide CO.sub.2 copolymerization catalyst.

  12. Preparation, characterization, and activity of α-Ti(HPO4)2 supported metallocene catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yasai; Yuan, Yuan; Xu, Qinghong; Yi, Jianjun

    2016-10-01

    A series of heterogeneous catalysts by loading metallocenes on surface of α-Ti(HPO4)2, a kind of solid acid, has been synthesized. Polymerization of alkenes, including ethylene and propylene, based on participation of the heterogeneous catalysts were studied and the results were compared to metallocenes supported on silica gel, α-Zr(HPO4)2 and clay. Higher catalytic activity, larger polymer molecular weight and narrow distribution of polymer molecular weight were obtained. Acidic strength of the support and its influence to metallocenes were studied to discover intrinsic factors in the polymerizations.

  13. Porous polymers based on aryleneethynylene building blocks.

    PubMed

    Bunz, Uwe H F; Seehafer, Kai; Geyer, Florian L; Bender, Markus; Braun, Ingo; Smarsly, Emanuel; Freudenberg, Jan

    2014-09-01

    Porous conjugated polymers are synthesized by metal-catalyzed coupling reactions. The progress for porous polymers when planar or tetrahedral building blocks are connected by alkyne units into novel materials is highlighted. The most prominent reaction for the buildup of the microporous alkyne-bridged polymers is the Sonogashira reaction, connecting alkynes to aromatic iodides or bromides. The availability of the building blocks and the potency of the Sonogashira reaction allow preparing a large variety of intrinsically porous polymeric materials, in which rigid struts connect multipronged centers. The microporous polymers are used as catalysts and as storage materials for gases and sensors. Postfunctionalization schemes, understanding of structure-property relationships, and the quest for high porosity are pertinent.

  14. Wind effects on bounding flight.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2013-01-07

    The effects of the wind on the energy expenditure of bounding flight and on the travelling speed are dealt with. For this purpose, a mathematical model of bounding flight in moving air is developed. Introducing an appropriate non-dimensionalization, results and findings of generally valid nature are derived. It is shown that bounding flight yields a flight mechanical advantage in headwinds when compared with continuous flapping flight. This is because the minimum energy expenditure is lower and the associated travelling speed is higher. The body lift in the bound phase has an advantageous influence. The effects of tailwinds yield less differences between bounding flight and continuous flapping flight. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Metabolism of organically bound tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    The classic methodology for estimating dose to man from environmental tritium ignores the fact that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs may be directly assimilated in the bound compartment of tissues without previous oxidation. We propose a four-compartment model consisting of a free body water compartment, two organic compartments, and a small, rapidly metabolizing compartment. The utility of this model lies in the ability to input organically bound tritium in foodstuffs directly into the organic compartments of the model. We found that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs can increase cumulative total body dose by a factor of 1.7 to 4.5 times the free body water dose alone, depending on the bound-to-loose ratio of tritium in the diet. Model predictions are compared with empirical measurements of tritium in human urine and tissue samples, and appear to be in close agreement. 10 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  16. Porphyrin coordination polymer nanospheres and nanorods

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhongchun; Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.

    2013-09-10

    A porphyrin coordination polymer nanostructure comprising a network of pyridyl porphyrin molecules and coordinating metal ions coordinatively bound through the pyridyl groups. In some embodiments, the porphyrins are metalloporphyrins. A variety of nanostructures are formed by the network polymer, including nanospheres, polygonal nanostructures, nanorods, and nanofibers, depending on a variety of factors including coordination metal ion, porphyrin type, metal of the metalloporphyrin, and degree of agitation during nanostructure formation. Reduction of coordinating metal ions may be used to form metal nanoparticles on the coordination polymer nanostructure.

  17. Porphyrin coordination polymer nanospheres and nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhongchun; Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.

    2012-12-04

    A porphyrin coordination polymer nanostructure comprising a network of pyridyl porphyrin molecules and coordinating metal ions coordinatively bound through the pyridyl groups. In some embodiments, the porphyrins are metalloporphyrins. A variety of nanostructures are formed by the network polymer, including nanospheres, polygonal nanostructures, nanorods, and nanofibers, depending on a variety of factors including coordination metal ion, porphyrin type, metal of the metalloporphyrin, and degree of agitation during nanostructure formation. Reduction of coordinating metal ions may be used to form metal nanoparticles on the coordination polymer nanostructure.

  18. Reforming with polymetallic catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, W.C. Jr.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a process for catalytically reforming, with hydrogen, a hydrocarbon naphtha feed at reforming conditions, the improvement comprising contacting the naphtha feed, and hydrogen, with a halogenated, supported platinum-rhenium catalyst promoted with iridium agglomerated to exhibit a crystallinity greater than 50 percent, as measured by X-ray.

  19. Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar

    1984-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

  20. Catalyst, 2000-01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Barbara E., Ed.

    2001-01-01

    "Catalyst" is a publication designed to assist higher education in developing alcohol and other drug prevention polices and programs that will foster students' academic and social development and promote campus and community safety. Issue 1 of volume 6 introduces a series of "Presidential Profiles" in which university presidents describe their…

  1. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  2. Sabatier Catalyst Poisoning Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallette, Tim; Perry, Jay; Abney, Morgan; Knox, Jim; Goldblatt, Loel

    2013-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) on the International Space Station (ISS) has been operational since 2010. The CRA uses a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane by reaction of the metabolic CO2 scrubbed from the cabin air and the hydrogen byproduct from the water electrolysis system used for metabolic oxygen generation. Incorporating the CRA into the overall air revitalization system has facilitated life support system loop closure on the ISS reducing resupply logistics and thereby enhancing longer term missions. The CRA utilizes CO2 which has been adsorbed in a 5A molecular sieve within the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, CDRA. There is a potential of compounds with molecular dimensions similar to, or less than CO2 to also be adsorbed. In this fashion trace contaminants may be concentrated within the CDRA and subsequently desorbed with the CO2 to the CRA. Currently, there is no provision to remove contaminants prior to entering the Sabatier catalyst bed. The risk associated with this is potential catalyst degradation due to trace organic contaminants in the CRA carbon dioxide feed acting as catalyst poisons. To better understand this risk, United Technologies Aerospace System (UTAS) has teamed with MSFC to investigate the impact of various trace contaminants on the CRA catalyst performance at relative ISS cabin air concentrations and at about 200/400 times of ISS concentrations, representative of the potential concentrating effect of the CDRA molecular sieve. This paper summarizes our initial assessment results.

  3. Salesperson, Catalyst, Manager, Leader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worth, Michael J.; Asp, James W., II

    1996-01-01

    This article examines four roles of the college or university development officer: salesperson (when direct solicitation is seen as the officer's primary role); catalyst (or sales manager, adviser, expert, facilitator); manager (stressing the importance of the overall office functioning); and leader (who exerts a leadership role in the…

  4. Polymer flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Littmann, W.

    1988-01-01

    This book covers all aspects of polymer flooding, an enhanced oil recovery method using water soluble polymers to increase the viscosity of flood water, for the displacement of crude oil from porous reservoir rocks. Although this method is becoming increasingly important, there is very little literature available for the engineer wishing to embark on such a project. In the past, polymer flooding was mainly the subject of research. The results of this research are spread over a vast number of single publications, making it difficult for someone who has not kept up-to-date with developments during the last 10-15 years to judge the suitability of polymer flooding to a particular field case. This book tries to fill that gap. An indispensable book for reservoir engineers, production engineers and lab. technicians within the petroleum industry.

  5. Semiconducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, A. M.

    A review is presented of the electrical properties of those polymers whose conductivities occupy the middle ground between polymeric insulators and polymeric superconductors. Attention is confined to polymers in which conduction occurs through electronic, rather than ionic, transport. Four classes of semiconductors are discussed: (1) highly-conjugated polymers, including those formed by pyrolysis; (2) polymeric charge-transfer complexes and radical-ion salts; (3) organometallic polymeric semiconductors; and (4) composite polymer systems containing carbon or other highly conducting media. The possible applications discussed include cathodes in solid-state metal/halogen primary batteries, cathodes in lithium/poly-p-phenylene or polyacetylene secondary batteries, conductive coatings and epoxies, and chemical sensing agents. Other applications are Peltier cooling devices, pressure transducers, photovoltaic devices, infrared radiation detectors, and switches and resistors.

  6. Organometallic Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carraher, Charles E., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Reactions utilized to incorporate a metal-containing moiety into a polymer chain (addition, condensation, and coordination) are considered, emphasizing that these reactions also apply to smaller molecules. (JN)

  7. Polymers All Around You!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gertz, Susan

    Background information on natural polymers, synthetic polymers, and the properties of polymers is presented as an introduction to this curriculum guide. Details are provided on the use of polymer products in consumer goods, polymer recycling, polymer densities, the making of a polymer such as GLUEP, polyvinyl alcohol, dissolving plastics, polymers…

  8. Polymers All Around You!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gertz, Susan

    Background information on natural polymers, synthetic polymers, and the properties of polymers is presented as an introduction to this curriculum guide. Details are provided on the use of polymer products in consumer goods, polymer recycling, polymer densities, the making of a polymer such as GLUEP, polyvinyl alcohol, dissolving plastics, polymers…

  9. Nanofiltration of rhodium tris(triphenylphosphine) catalyst in ethyl acetate solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaharun, Maizatul S.; Mustafa, Ahmad K.; Taha, Mohd F.

    2012-09-01

    Solvent resistant nanofiltration (SRNF) using polymer membranes has recently received enhanced attention due to the search for cleaner and more energy-efficient technologies. The large size of the rhodium tris(triphenylphosphine) [HRh(CO)(PPh3)3] catalyst (>400 Da) - relative to other components of the hydroformylation reaction provides the opportunity for a membrane separation based on retention of the catalyst species while permeating the solvent. The compatibility of the solvent-polyimide membrane (DuraMem{trade mark, serif} 200 and DuraMem{trade mark, serif} 500) combinations was assessed in terms of the membrane stability in solvent plus non-zero solvent flux at 2.0 MPa. Good HRh(CO)(PPh3)3 rejection (>0.95) and solvent fluxes of 9.9 L/m2ṡh1 at 2.0 MPa were obtained in the catalyst-ethyl acetate-DuraMem 500 system. The effect of pressure and catalyst concentration on the solvent flux and catalyst rejection was conducted on the catalyst-ethyl acetate-membrane systems. Increasing pressure substantially improved both solvent flux and catalyst rejection, while increasing catalyst concentration was found to be beneficial in terms of substantial increases in catalyst rejection without significantly affecting solvent flux.

  10. Heterogeneous catalyst for the production of ethylidene diacetate from acetic anhydride

    DOEpatents

    Ramprasad, Dorai; Waller, Francis Joseph

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for producing ethylidene diacetate by the reaction of acetic anhydride, acetic acid, hydrogen and carbon monoxide at elevated temperatures and pressures in the presence of an alkyl halide and a heterogeneous, bifunctional catalyst that is stable to hydrogenation and comprises an insoluble polymer having pendant quaternized heteroatoms, some of which heteroatoms are ionically bonded to anionic Group VIII metal complexes, the remainder of the heteroatoms being bonded to iodide. In contrast to prior art processes, no accelerator (promoter) is necessary to achieve the catalytic reaction and the products are easily separated from the catalyst by filtration. The catalyst can be recycled without loss in activity.

  11. Heterogeneous catalyst for the production of ethylidene diacetate from acetic anhydride

    DOEpatents

    Ramprasad, D.; Waller, F.J.

    1998-06-16

    This invention relates to a process for producing ethylidene diacetate by the reaction of acetic anhydride, acetic acid, hydrogen and carbon monoxide at elevated temperatures and pressures in the presence of an alkyl halide and a heterogeneous, bifunctional catalyst that is stable to hydrogenation and comprises an insoluble polymer having pendant quaternized heteroatoms, some of which heteroatoms are ionically bonded to anionic Group VIII metal complexes, the remainder of the heteroatoms being bonded to iodide. In contrast to prior art processes, no accelerator (promoter) is necessary to achieve the catalytic reaction and the products are easily separated from the catalyst by filtration. The catalyst can be recycled without loss in activity.

  12. Z-Selective Ruthenium Metathesis Catalysts: Comparison of Nitrate and Nitrite X-type Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Pribisko, Melanie A.; Ahmed, Tonia S.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Two new Ru-based metathesis catalysts, 3 and 4, have been synthesized for the purpose of comparing their catalytic properties to those of their cis-selective nitrate analogues, 1 and 2. Although catalysts 3 and 4 exhibited slower initiation rates than 1 and 2, they maintained high cis-selectivity in homodimerization and ring-opening metathesis polymerization reactions. Furthermore, the nitrite catalysts displayed higher cis-selectivity than 2 for ring-opening metathesis polymerizations, and 4 delivered higher yields of polymer. PMID:25484484

  13. Membrane-electrode structures for molecular catalysts for use in fuel cells and other electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Kerr, John B.; Zhu, Xiaobing; Hwang, Gi Suk; Martin, Zulima; He, Qinggang; Driscoll, Peter; Weber, Adam; Clark, Kyle

    2016-09-27

    Water soluble catalysts, (M)meso-tetra(N-Methyl-4-Pyridyl)Porphinepentachloride (M=Fe, Co, Mn & Cu), have been incorporated into the polymer binder of oxygen reduction cathodes in membrane electrode assemblies used in PEM fuel cells and found to support encouragingly high current densities. The voltages achieved are low compared to commercial platinum catalysts but entirely consistent with the behavior observed in electroanalytical measurements of the homogeneous catalysts. A model of the dynamics of the electrode action has been developed and validated and this allows the MEA electrodes to be optimized for any chemistry that has been demonstrated in solution. It has been shown that improvements to the performance will come from modifications to the structure of the catalyst combined with optimization of the electrode structure and a well-founded pathway to practical non-platinum group metal catalysts exists.

  14. High-throughput approaches for the discovery and optimization of new olefin polymerization catalysts.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Vince; Bei, Xiaohong; Boussie, Thomas R; Brümmer, Oliver; Diamond, Gary M; Goh, Christopher; Hall, Keith A; Lapointe, Anne M; Leclerc, Margarete; Longmire, James M; Shoemaker, James A W; Turner, Howard; Weinberg, W Henry

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of new olefin polymerization catalysts is currently a time-intensive trial-and-error process with no guarantee of success. A fully integrated high-throughput screening workflow for the discovery of new catalysts for polyolefin production has been implemented at Symyx Technologies. The workflow includes the design of the metal-ligand libraries using custom-made computer software, automated delivery of metal precursors and ligands into the reactors using a liquid-handling robot, and a rapid primary screen that serves to assess the potential of each metalligand-activator combination as an olefin polymerization catalyst. "Hits" from the primary screen are subjected to secondary screens using a 48-cell parallel polymerization reactor. Individual polymerization reactions are monitored in real time under conditions that provide meaningful information about the performance capabilities of each catalyst. Rapid polymer characterization techniques support the primary and secondary screens. We have discovered many new and interesting catalyst classes using this technology.

  15. Recent Progress on Transition Metal Catalyst Separation and Recycling in ATRP.

    PubMed

    Ding, Mingqiang; Jiang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Lifen; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhu, Xiulin

    2015-10-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) is a versatile and robust tool to synthesize a wide spectrum of monomers with various designable structures. However, it usually needs large amounts of transition metal as the catalyst to mediate the equilibrium between the dormant and propagating species. Unfortunately, the catalyst residue may contaminate or color the resultant polymers, which limits its application, especially in biomedical and electronic materials. How to efficiently and economically remove or reduce the catalyst residue from its products is a challenging and encouraging task. Herein, recent advances in catalyst separation and recycling are highlighted with a focus on (1) highly active ppm level transition metal or metal free catalyzed ATRP; (2) post-purification method; (3) various soluble, insoluble, immobilized/soluble, and reversible supported catalyst systems; and (4) liquid-liquid biphasic catalyzed systems, especially thermo-regulated catalysis systems. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Dizinc Lactide Polymerization Catalysts: Hyperactivity by Control of Ligand Conformation and Metallic Cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Thevenon, Arnaud; Romain, Charles; Bennington, Michael S.; White, Andrew J. P.; Davidson, Hannah J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Understanding how to moderate and improve catalytic activity is critical to improving degradable polymer production. Here, di‐ and monozinc catalysts, coordinated by bis(imino)diphenylamido ligands, show remarkable activities and allow determination of the factors controlling performance. In most cases, the dizinc catalysts significantly out‐perform the monozinc analogs. Further, for the best dizinc catalyst, the ligand conformation controls activity: the catalyst with “folded” ligand conformation shows turnover frequency (TOF) values up to 60 000 h−1 (0.1 mol % loading, 298 K, [LA]=1 m), whilst that with a “planar” conformation is much slower, under similar conditions (TOF=30 h−1). Dizinc catalysts also perform very well under immortal conditions, showing improved control, and are able to tolerate loadings as low as 0.002 mol % whilst conserving high activity (TOF=12 500 h−1). PMID:27295339

  17. Polymers containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications

    DOEpatents

    Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

    2013-04-23

    Polymers comprising residues of cage compound monomers having at least one polyalkoxy silyl substituent are provided. The cage compound monomers are selected from borane cage compound monomers comprising at least 7 cage atoms and/or carborane cage compound monomers comprising 7 to 11 cage compound monomers. Such polymers can further comprise one or more reactive matrices and/or co-monomers covalently bound with the cage compound monomer residues. Articles of manufacture comprising such polymers are also disclosed.

  18. Homogeneous and Supported Niobium Catalysts as Lewis Acid and Radical Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Tikkanen

    2006-12-31

    The synthesis of tetrachlorotetraphenylcyclopentadienyl group 5 metal complexes has been accomplished through two routes, one a salt metathesis with lithiumtetraphenylcyclopentadiende and the other, reaction with trimethyltintetraphenylcyclopentadiene. The reactants and products have been characterized by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) NMR spectroscopy. The niobium complex promotes the silylcyanation of butyraldehyde. The grafting of metal complexes to silica gel surfaces has been accomplished using tetrakisdimethylamidozirconium as the metal precursor. The most homogeneous binding as determined by CP-MAS {sup 13}C NMR and infrared spectroscopy was obtained with drying at 500 C at 3 mtorr vacuum. The remaining amido groups can be replaced by reaction with alcohols to generate surface bound metal alkoxides. These bound catalysts promote silylcyanation of aryl aldehydes and can be reused three times with no loss of activity.

  19. Hydroprocessing catalyst composition

    SciTech Connect

    Apelian, M.R.; Degnan, T.F. Jr.; Marler, D.O.; Mazzone, D.N.

    1993-07-13

    A bifunctional hydroprocessing catalyst is described which comprises a metal component having hydrogenation/dehydrogenation functionality and a support component comprising an inorganic, non-layered, porous, crystalline phase material having pores with diameters of at least about 13 [angstrom] and exhibiting, after calcination, an X-ray diffraction pattern with at least one peak with a relative intensity of 100 at a d-spacing greater than about 18 [angstrom], the catalyst having a surface area S, where S, expressed in m[sup 2].g[sup [minus]1], is defined by the equation: S[ge]600-13.3X where X is the total metals loading in weight percent and is least 12 weight percent. A second hydroprocessing catalyst is described according to claim 1 in which the crystalline phase has a composition expressed as follows: M[sub n/q](W[sub a]X[sub b]Y[sub c]Z[sub d]O[sub h]) wherein M is one or more ions; n is the charge of the composition excluding M expressed as oxides; q is the weighted molar average valence of M; n/q is the number of moles or mole fraction of M; W is one or more divalent elements; X is one or more trivalent elements; Y is one or more tetravalent elements; Z is one or more pentavalent elements; a, b, c, and d are mole fraction of W, X, Y, and Z, respectively, h is a number of from 1 to 2.5; and (a+b+c+d) = 1. A third hydroprocessing catalyst is described according to claim 1 in which the catalyst is at least one base metal of Group VIA, VIIA or VIIIA of the Periodic Table.

  20. Catalyst support structure, catalyst including the structure, reactor including a catalyst, and methods of forming same

    DOEpatents

    Van Norman, Staci A.; Aston, Victoria J.; Weimer, Alan W.

    2017-05-09

    Structures, catalysts, and reactors suitable for use for a variety of applications, including gas-to-liquid and coal-to-liquid processes and methods of forming the structures, catalysts, and reactors are disclosed. The catalyst material can be deposited onto an inner wall of a microtubular reactor and/or onto porous tungsten support structures using atomic layer deposition techniques.