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Sample records for polymer liquid crystal

  1. Liquid crystal-templated conducting organic polymers

    DOEpatents

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Hulvat, James F.

    2004-01-20

    A method of preparing a conductive polymeric film, includes providing a liquid crystal phase comprising a plurality of hydrophobic cores, the phase on a substrate, introducing a hydrophobic component to the phase, the component a conductive polymer precursor, and applying an electric potential across the liquid crystal phase, the potential sufficient to polymerize the said precursor.

  2. Polymer's anchoring behavior in liquid crystal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yue

    The current dissertation mainly discusses about the polymers anchoring behavior in liquid crystal cells in two aspects: surface interaction and bulk interaction. The goal of the research is to understand the fundamental physics of anchoring strength and apply the knowledge to liquid crystal display devices. Researchers proposed two main contributors to the surface anchoring strength: the micro grooves generated by external force and the polymer chain's alignment. Both of them has experimental proofs. In the current study, explorations were made to understand the mechanisms of surface anchoring strength and easy axis of surface liquid crystal provided by rubbed polymer alignment layer. The work includes not only the variation of the alignment layer itself such as thickness(Chapter 3) and polymer side chain (Chapter 5), but also the variation of external conditions such as temperature (Chapter 4) and rubbing condition (Chapter 6). To determine the polar and azimuthal anchoring strengths, Rapini-Papoular's expression was applied. However, it was discovered that higher order terms may be required in order to fit the experimental result or theoretically predict unique anchoring behaviors (Chapter 2, Chapter 6). SEM and AFM technologies were introduced to gather the actual structures of polymer alignment layer and extrapolate the alignment of liquid crystal in a micro scale. The result shows that the anchoring strength can be adjusted by the layer thickness, side chain structure, while the easy axis direction can be adjusted by a second rubbing direction. In addition, different anchoring conditions combined with liquid crystal's elastic energy can generate quite different forms of liquid crystals (Chapter 7). In the study of bulk alignment, the main contrition from the current dissertation is applying the understanding of anchoring behavior to optimizing actual switchable devices. Conventional PDLC performance can be tuned with the knowledge of the polymer and the liquid

  3. Polymer Crystallization at Curved Liquid/Liquid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenda

    Liquid/liquid interface, either flat or curved, is a unique template for studying self-assembly of a variety of nanomaterials such as nanoparticles and nanorods. The resultant monolayer films can be ordered or disordered depending on the regularity of the nanomaterials. Integration of nanoparticles into two-dimensional structure leads to intriguing collective properties of the nanoparticles. Crystallization can also be guided by liquid/liquid interface. Due to the particular shape of the interface, crystallization can happen in a different manner comparing to the normal solution crystallization. In this dissertation, liquid/liquid interface is employed to guide the crystallization of polymers, mainly focusing on using curved liquid/liquid interface. Due to the unique shape of the interface and feasibility to control the curvature, polymer crystallization can take place in different manner and lead to the formation of curved or vesicular crystals. Curved liquid/liquid interface is typically created through o/w emulsions. With the presence of surfactant, the emulsions are controlled to be stable at least for the polymer crystallization periods. The difference to normal solution crystallization is: the nuclei will diffuse to the curved interface due to the Pickering effect and guide the crystallization along the curved liquid/liquid interface. If the supercooling can be controlled to be very small, crystal growth in the bulk droplets can be avoided. The advantages of this strategy are: 1) the formation process of vesicular type crystals can be monitored by controlling the polymer supply; 2) curved crystals, bowl-like structures and enclosed capsules can be easily obtained comparing to the self-assembly method for vesicle formation; 3) the obtained vesicles will be made of polymer crystals, which will possess the extraordinary mechanical properties. Based on the nucleation type, this dissertation is divided into two parts. The first part is focused on the self

  4. Polymer-dispersed liquid crystal elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rešetič, Andraž; Milavec, Jerneja; Zupančič, Blaž; Domenici, Valentina; Zalar, Boštjan

    2016-10-01

    The need for mechanical manipulation during the curing of conventional liquid crystal elastomers diminishes their applicability in the field of shape-programmable soft materials and future applications in additive manufacturing. Here we report on polymer-dispersed liquid crystal elastomers, novel composite materials that eliminate this difficulty. Their thermal shape memory anisotropy is imprinted by curing in external magnetic field, providing for conventional moulding of macroscopically sized soft, thermomechanically active elastic objects of general shapes. The binary soft-soft composition of isotropic elastomer matrix, filled with freeze-fracture-fabricated, oriented liquid crystal elastomer microparticles as colloidal inclusions, allows for fine-tuning of thermal morphing behaviour. This is accomplished by adjusting the concentration, spatial distribution and orientation of microparticles or using blends of microparticles with different thermomechanical characteristics. We demonstrate that any Gaussian thermomechanical deformation mode (bend, cup, saddle, left and right twist) of a planar sample, as well as beat-like actuation, is attainable with bilayer microparticle configurations.

  5. Shear-Sensitive Monomer/Polymer Liquid Crystal System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe; Parmar, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes preliminary investigation of new monomer/polymer liquid crystal system, thin film of shear-sensitive cholesteric monomer liquid crystal (TI 511) on Xydar (STR800) (or equivalent) liquid crystal polymer substrate. Monomer/polymer liquid crystal films applied to surfaces provide quantitative indications of shear stresses caused by winds blowing along surfaces. Effects of shear stresses reversible in new coating system. System provides quantitative data on flows in wind tunnels.

  6. Investigation of Polymer Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.

    1996-01-01

    The positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) using a low energy flux generator may provide a reasonably accurate technique for measuring molecular weights of linear polymers and characterization of thin polyimide films in terms of their dielectric constants and hydrophobity etc. Among the tested samples are glassy poly arylene Ether Ketone films, epoxy and other polyimide films. One of the proposed techniques relates the free volume cell size (V(sub f)) with sample molecular weight (M) in a manner remarkably similar to that obtained by Mark Houwink (M-H) between the inherent viscosity (eta) and molecular wieght of polymer solution. The PALS has also demonstrated that free-volume cell size in thermoset is a versatile, useful parameter that relates directly to the polymer segmental molecular weight, the cross-link density, and the coefficient of thermal expansion. Thus, a determination of free volume cell size provides a viable basis for complete microstructural characterization of thermoset polyimides and also gives direct information about the cross-link density and coefficient of expansion of the test samples. Seven areas of the research conducted are reported here.

  7. Partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystals for boundary layer investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, Devendra S.; Singh, Jag J.

    1992-01-01

    A new configuration termed partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystal in which the liquid crystal microdroplets dispersed in a rigid polymer matrix are partially entrapped on the free surface of the thin film deposited on a glass substrate is reported. Optical transmission characteristics of the partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystal thin film in response to an air flow induced shear stress field reveal its potential as a sensor for gas flow and boundary layer investigations.

  8. Methods of making composite optical devices employing polymer liquid crystal

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, S.D.; Marshall, K.L.; Cerqua, K.A.

    1991-10-08

    Composite optical devices are disclosed using polymer liquid crystal materials both as optical and adhesive elements. The devices are made by assembling a heated polymer liquid crystal compound, while in a low viscosity form between optically transparent substrates. The molecules of the polymer are oriented, while in the liquid crystalline state and while above the glass transition temperature (T[sub g]) of the polymer, to provide the desired optical effects, such as polarization, and selective reflection. The liquid crystal polymer cements the substrates together to form an assembly providing the composite optical device. 7 figures.

  9. Methods of making composite optical devices employing polymer liquid crystal

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Stephen D.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Cerqua, Kathleen A.

    1991-01-01

    Composite optical devices using polymer liquid crystal materials both as optical and adhesive elements. The devices are made by assembling a heated polymer liquid crystal compound, while in a low viscosity form between optically transparent substrates. The molecules of the polymer are oriented, while in the liquid crystalline state and while above the glass transition temperature (T.sub.g) of the polymer, to provide the desired optical effects, such as polarization, and selective reflection. The liquid crystal polymer cements the substrates together to form an assembly providing the composite optical device.

  10. Polymer-dispersed liquid crystal elastomers

    PubMed Central

    Rešetič, Andraž; Milavec, Jerneja; Zupančič, Blaž; Domenici, Valentina; Zalar, Boštjan

    2016-01-01

    The need for mechanical manipulation during the curing of conventional liquid crystal elastomers diminishes their applicability in the field of shape-programmable soft materials and future applications in additive manufacturing. Here we report on polymer-dispersed liquid crystal elastomers, novel composite materials that eliminate this difficulty. Their thermal shape memory anisotropy is imprinted by curing in external magnetic field, providing for conventional moulding of macroscopically sized soft, thermomechanically active elastic objects of general shapes. The binary soft-soft composition of isotropic elastomer matrix, filled with freeze-fracture-fabricated, oriented liquid crystal elastomer microparticles as colloidal inclusions, allows for fine-tuning of thermal morphing behaviour. This is accomplished by adjusting the concentration, spatial distribution and orientation of microparticles or using blends of microparticles with different thermomechanical characteristics. We demonstrate that any Gaussian thermomechanical deformation mode (bend, cup, saddle, left and right twist) of a planar sample, as well as beat-like actuation, is attainable with bilayer microparticle configurations. PMID:27713478

  11. Toughening Thermoplastics with Thermotropic Liquid Crystal Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiff, Donald

    1997-03-01

    Blends of thermotropic liquid crystalline and thermoplastic polymers have improvements in mechanical properties when high elongational flow provides LC needle shaped domains. This means the test sample must be a filament. Without elongational flow the LC domains are globular in shape and provide little or no mechanical property enhancement. One solution to this problem is to make the LC domains small enough so that their size approaches that of microvoids in the thermoplastic polymer system. Such an approach can potentially provide a pseudo-compatible blend. Thus if the thermoplastic matrix polymer is transparent, the nano size LC domains can provide reinforcement, modified optical properties, and still leave the bulk material transparent. This investigation focusses on the process and improvement in mechanical and fracture resistant properties.

  12. Theory of polymer-dispersed cholesteric liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2013-11-07

    A mean field theory is presented to describe cholesteric phases in mixtures of a polymer and a cholesteric liquid crystal. Taking into account an anisotropic coupling between a polymer and a liquid crystal, we examine the helical pitch, twist elastic constant, and phase separations. Analytical expressions of the helical pitch of a cholesteric phase and the twist elastic constant are derived as a function of the orientational order parameters of a polymer and a liquid crystal and two intermolecular interaction parameters. We also find isotropic-cholesteric, cholesteric-cholesteric phase separations, and polymer-induced cholesteric phase on the temperature-concentration plane. We demonstrate that an anisotropic coupling between a polymer and a liquid crystal can stabilize a cholesteric phase in the mixtures. Our theory can also apply to mixtures of a nematic liquid crystal and a chiral dopant. We discuss the helical twisting power, which depends on temperature, concentration, and orientational order parameters. It is shown that our theory can qualitatively explain experimental observations.

  13. Polymer Alignment Behavior with Molecular Switching of Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashige, Takeshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Sato, Hiroto; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Taiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the molecular alignment behavior of polymer networks with switching of a ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) in a molecularly aligned FLC/polymer composite film. The polymer alignment in the composite film, which was slowly formed by photopolymerization-induced phase separation of a heated nematic-phase solution of FLC and monomers, was observed by polarization Raman spectral microscopy. Raman peak intensities originating from the polymers were changed with those from the FLC, when the applied voltage polarity was changed. The trace patterns of the Raman peak intensity with in-plane rotation of the composite film indicated that the formed flexible polymers can follow FLC molecular switching.

  14. Morphology Tuning of Electrospun Liquid Crystal/Polymer Fibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junren; Jákli, Antal; West, John L

    2016-10-05

    This paper elucidates the means to control precisely the morphology of electrospun liquid crystal/polymer fibers formed by phase separation. The relative humidity, solution parameters (concentration, solvent), and the process parameter (feed rate) were varied systematically. We show that the morphology of the phase-separated liquid crystal can be continuously tuned from capsules to uniform fibers with systematic formation of beads-on-a-string structured fibers in the intermediate ranges. In all cases, the polymer forms a sheath around a liquid-crystal (LC) core. The width of the polymer sheath and the diameter of the LC core increase with increasing feed rates. This is similar to the results obtained by coaxial electrospinning. Because these fibers retain the responsive properties of liquid crystals and because of their large surface area, they have potential applications as thermo-, chemo-, and biosensors. Because the size and shape of the liquid-crystal domains will have a profound effect on the performance of the fibers, our ability to precisely control morphology will be crucial in developing these applications.

  15. Electrically tunable holographic polymer templated blue phase liquid crystal grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zheng-Hong; Chen, Chao-Ping; Zhu, Ji-Liang; Yuan, Ya-Chao; Li, Yan; Hu, Wei; Li, Xiao; Li, Hong-Jing; Lu, Jian-Gang; Su, Yi-Kai

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate an alternative approach to fabricating an electrically tunable holographic polymer templated blue phase liquid crystal grating. This grating is obtained by preforming a polymer template comprised of periodic fringes, and then refilling it with a blue phase liquid crystal. Compared with conventional holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal gratings, our grating can remarkably reduce its switching voltage from 200 V to 43 V while maintaining a sub-millisecond response time. The holographic polymer templated blue phase liquid crystal (HPTBPLC) grating is free from electrode patterning, thus leading to a lower cost and more flexible applications. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB328804), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61307028), the Funds from the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (Grant Nos. 11JC1405300, 13ZR1420000, and 14ZR1422300), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. XDJK 2011C047).

  16. LIQUID CRYSTAL POLYMERS (LCP) USED AS A MACHINING FLUID CD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This interactive CD was produced to present the science, research activities, and beneficial environmental and machining advantages for utilizing Liquid Crystal Polymers (LCPs) as a machine fluid in the manufacturing industry.

    In 1995, the USEPA funded a project to cut flu...

  17. Switchable Fresnel lens using polymer-stabilized liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yun-Hsing; Ren, Hongwen; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2003-11-17

    A switchable Fresnel zone plate lens is demonstrated using a polymer-stabilized liquid crystal. The fabrication process is relatively simple and the device can be operated below 10 volts with fast response time. Such a device works well for a linearly polarized light.

  18. Novel Microstructures for Polymer-Liquid Crystal Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magda, Jules J.

    2004-01-01

    There are a number of interface-dominated composite materials that contain a liquid crystalline (LC) phase in intimate contact with an isotropic phase. For example, polymer- dispersed liquid crystals, used in the fabrication of windows with switchable transparency, consist of micron size LC droplets dispersed in an isotropic polymer matrix. Many other types of liquid crystal composite materials can be envisioned that might have outstanding optical properties that could be exploited in novel chemical sensors, optical switches, and computer displays. This research project was based on the premise that many of these potentially useful LC composite materials can only be fabricated under microgravity conditions where gravity driven flows are absent. In the ground-based research described below, we have focused on a new class of LC composites that we call thermotropic- lyotropic liquid crystal systems (TLLCs). TLLCs consist of nanosize droplets of water dispersed in an LC matrix, with surfactants at the interface that stabilize the structure. By varying the type of surfactant one can access almost an infinite variety of unusual LC composite microstructures. Due to the importance of the interface in these types of systems, we have also developed molecular simulation models for liquid crystals at interfaces, and made some of the first measurements of the interfacial tension between liquid crystals and water.

  19. Interaction between lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xuxia; Park, Jung; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2010-03-01

    Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) consist of various dyes, drugs, etc., so their importance is self-evident. The interaction of chromonic molecules and polymers is involved in their real applications, such as the dyeing process of fibers, textiles and food, and the functionalization of drugs in vivo. In our research, polymer dispersed LCLC droplets and polymer coated LCLC cells have been fabricated. Effect of interaction was observed by optical texture of LCLCs, as the different polymers induce different director configuration of LCLCs. A textile dye-Benzopurpurine 4B, food dye-Sunset Yellow FCF, and drug-Disodium Cromoglycate mixed with water soluble polymers, proteins and textile polymers have been all studied and compared.

  20. Fluorinated Azobenzenes for Shape-Persistent Liquid Crystal Polymer Networks.

    PubMed

    Iamsaard, Supitchaya; Anger, Emmanuel; Aßhoff, Sarah Jane; Depauw, Alexis; Fletcher, Stephen P; Katsonis, Nathalie

    2016-08-16

    Liquid crystal polymer networks respond with an anisotropic deformation to a range of external stimuli. When doped with molecular photoswitches, these materials undergo complex shape modifications under illumination. As the deformations are reversed when irradiation stops, applications where the activated shape is required to have thermal stability have been precluded. Previous attempts to incorporate molecular switches into thermally stable photoisomers were unsuccessful at photogenerating macroscopic shapes that are retained over time. Herein, we show that to preserve photoactivated molecular deformation on the macroscopic scale, it is important not only to engineer the thermal stability of the photoswitch but also to adjust the cross-linking density in the polymer network and to optimize the molecular orientations in the material. Our strategy resulted in materials containing fluorinated azobenzenes that retain their photochemical shape for more than eight days, which constitutes the first demonstration of long-lived photomechanical deformation in liquid-crystal polymer networks.

  1. Interference forming of transmission by polymer dispersed liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimyak, P. P.; Nehrych, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    The methods of correlation optics are for the first time applied to study structure of liquid crystal (LC) - polymer (P) composites at various concentrations of LC and P. Their phase correlation function (PCF) was obtained considering LC-P composite as a random phase screen. The amplitude of PCF contains information about number of LC domains and structure of LC director inside of them, while a half-width of this function is connected with a size of these domains. We studied unpowered and powered composite layers with a thickness of 5 μm. As liquid crystal and polymer were used nematic LC E7 from Merck and photopolymer composition NOA65 from Norland. Concentration of polymer ϕP was varied in a range 10-55 vol. %. In good agreement with previous studies by SEM technique we detected monotone decrease of LC domains with concentration of polymer. With application of electric field, amplitude of PCF behaves differently for the samples with different polymer content. For the samples with ϕP<35 vol. % (samples having morphology of polymer dispersed LC), this dependence is monotonic. In turn, if ϕP<35 vol. % (samples with polymer network LC morphology), the amplitude of PCF non-monotonically depends on the applied voltage going through a maximum. The latter fact is explained by transformation of orientational defects of LC phase with the applied voltage.

  2. Correlation measurements of light transmittance in polymer dispersed liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimyak, P. P.; Nehrych, A. L.

    2015-11-01

    The methods of correlation optics are for the first time applied to study structure of liquid crystal (LC) - polymer (P) composites at various concentrations of LC and P. Their phase correlation function (PCF) was obtained considering LC-P composite as a random phase screen. The amplitude of PCF contains information about number of LC domains and structure of LC director inside of them, while a half-width of this function is connected with a size of these domains. We studied unpowered and powered composite layers with a thickness of 5 μm. As liquid crystal and polymer were used nematic LC E7 from Merck and photopolymer composition NOA65 from Norland. Concentration of polymer φP was varied in a range 10-55 vol. %. In good agreement with previous studies by SEM technique we detected monotone decrease of LC domains with concentration of polymer. With application of electric field, amplitude of PCF behaves differently for the samples with different polymer content. For the samples with φP>35 vol. % (samples having morphology of polymer dispersed LC), this dependence is monotonic. In turn, if φP<35 vol. % (samples with polymer network LC morphology), the amplitude of PCF non-monotonically depends on the applied voltage going through a maximum. The latter fact is explained by transformation of orientational defects of LC phase with the applied voltage.

  3. Novel Liquid Crystals - Polymers and Monomers - As Nonlinear Optical Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-31

    and pyridine N - oxides . Results of collaborative efforts in further characterization (electrooptic, dielectric, Langmuir-Blodgett films) are described...Polymalonate Liquid Crystals for Nonlinear Optics", A. C. Griffin, A. M. Bhatti and R. S. L. Hung, Mol Cryst LiS Cryst, 155, 129 (1988). " Pyridine N - oxides ... pyridine N - oxide based side chain polymers having a push-pull pi electronic structure, (d) generation of a series of copolymers involving both an nlo

  4. Photocontrol of fluid slugs in liquid crystal polymer microactuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jiu-An; Liu, Yuyun; Wei, Jia; Chen, Erqiang; Qin, Lang; Yu, Yanlei

    2016-09-01

    The manipulation of small amounts of liquids has applications ranging from biomedical devices to liquid transfer. Direct light-driven manipulation of liquids, especially when triggered by light-induced capillary forces, is of particular interest because light can provide contactless spatial and temporal control. However, existing light-driven technologies suffer from an inherent limitation in that liquid motion is strongly resisted by the effect of contact-line pinning. Here we report a strategy to manipulate fluid slugs by photo-induced asymmetric deformation of tubular microactuators, which induces capillary forces for liquid propulsion. Microactuators with various shapes (straight, ‘Y’-shaped, serpentine and helical) are fabricated from a mechanically robust linear liquid crystal polymer. These microactuators are able to exert photocontrol of a wide diversity of liquids over a long distance with controllable velocity and direction, and hence to mix multiphase liquids, to combine liquids and even to make liquids run uphill. We anticipate that this photodeformable microactuator will find use in micro-reactors, in laboratory-on-a-chip settings and in micro-optomechanical systems.

  5. Holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal Bragg grating integrated inside a solid core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Zito, Gianluigi; Pissadakis, Stavros

    2013-09-01

    A polymer/liquid crystal-based fiber Bragg grating (PLC-FBG) is fabricated with visible two-beam holography by photo-induced modulation of a prepolymer/liquid crystal solution infiltrated into the hollow channels of a solid core photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The fabrication process and effects related to the photonic bandgap guidance into the infiltrated PCF, and characterization of the PLC-FBG, are discussed. Experimental data presented here demonstrate that the liquid crystal inclusions of the PLC-FBG lead to high thermal and bending sensitivities. The microscopic behavior of the polymer/liquid crystal phase separation inside the PCF capillaries is examined using scanning electron microscopy, and is discussed further.

  6. Photorefractivity in liquid crystals doped with a soluble conjugated polymer.

    SciTech Connect

    Niemczyk, M. P.; Svec, W. A.; Wasielewski, M. R.; Wiederrecht, G. P.

    1999-07-07

    Photoconductive polymers are doped into liquid crystals to create a new mechanism for space-charge field formation in photorefractive liquid crystal composites. The composites contain poly(2,5-bis(2{prime}-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) (BEH-PPV) and the electron acceptor N,N{prime}-dioctyl-1,4:5,8-naphthalenediimide, NI. Using asymmetric energy transfer (beam coupling) measurements that are diagnostic for the photorefractive effect, the direction of beam coupling as a function of grating fringe spacing inverts at a spacing of 5.5 {micro}m. We show that the inversion is due to a change in the dominant mechanism for space-charge field formation. At small fringe spacings, the space-charge field is formed by ion diffusion in which the photogenerated anion is the more mobile species. At larger fringe spacings, the polarity of the space charge field inverts due to dominance of a charge transport mechanism in which photogenerated holes are the most mobile species due to hole migration along the BEH-PPV chains coupled with interchain hole hopping. Control experiments are presented, which use composites that can access only one of the two charge transport mechanisms. The results show that charge migration over long distances leading to enhanced photorefractive effects can be obtained using conjugated polymers dissolved in liquid crystals.

  7. Fast Switching of Vertical Alignment Liquid Crystal Cells with Liquid Crystalline Polymer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Jong-In; Kim, Ki-Han; Kim, Jae Chang; Yoon, Tae-Hoon; Woo, Hwa Sung; Shin, Sung Tae; Souk, Jun Hyung

    2009-05-01

    This paper reports on the electro-optic characteristics of vertical alignment (VA) liquid crystal (LC) cells with liquid crystalline polymer networks. Optical bouncing, that occurs during the turn-on of VA cells, can be eliminated by introducing in-cell polymer networks. Furthermore, the turn-off also becomes much faster because of the anchoring effect caused by the anisotropy in the molecular shape of the liquid crystalline polymers. These response times have been found to vary for different LC/prepolymer mixtures. When the concentration of the liquid crystalline prepolymer in the initial LC/prepolymer mixture was 3, 5, or 10 wt %, the response times were measured to be 34, 56, and 87% faster than those of a VA cell with pure LC. These switching behaviors of VA cells with liquid crystalline polymer networks are demonstrated and compared with those using pure LC and with polymer networks made of isotropic prepolymers.

  8. Mesogenic linear azobenzene polymer-stabilized nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Bagramyan, Arutyun; Thibault-Maheu, Olivier; Galstian, Tigran; Bessette, Andre; Zhao, Yue

    2011-03-15

    We describe the detailed study of a polymer stabilized liquid crystal compound, which was created by using a reactive (monofunctional) azobenzene mesogenic guest and a nematic liquid crystal host. The resonant interaction of light with the azobenzene segment of the guest and the mesogenic nature of the latter enable the optical alignment of host molecules and the permanent fixing of that orientation by means of UV polymerization of the guest. We use dynamic spectral, polarimetric, and scattering techniques to study the orientational ordering and interaction of the guest-host system. We show that the uniform UV polymerization of this compound results in a low scattering material system with dielectric and elastic properties that are relatively close to those of the host, while still providing the capacity for optical configuration of its morphology.

  9. Skin friction measurement with partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, D. S.; Holmes, H. K.

    1993-01-01

    Partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystal thin film (10-25 microns) deposited on a flat glass substrate has been used for the first time to measure skin friction. Utilizing the shear-stress-induced director reorientation in the partially exposed liquid-crystal droplets, optical transmission under crossed polarization has been measured as a function of the air flow differential pressure. Direct measurement of the skin friction with a skin friction drag balance, under the same aerodynamic conditions, lets us correlate the skin friction with optical transmission. This provides a unique technique for the direct measurement of skin friction from the transmitted light intensity. The results are in excellent agreement with the model suggested in this paper.

  10. Intrinsic response of polymer liquid crystals in photochemical phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Tomiki; Sasaki, Takeo; Kim, Haengboo )

    1991-01-24

    Time-resolved measurements were performed on the photochemically induced isothermal phase transition of polymer liquid crystals (PLC) with mesogenic side chains of phenyl benzoate (PAPB3) and cyanobiphenyl (PACB3) under conditions wherein the photochemical reaction of the doped photoresponsive molecule (4-butyl-4-{prime}-methoxyazobenzene, BMAB) was completed within {approximately} 10 ns, and the subsequent phase transition of the matrix PLC from nematic (N) to isotropic (I) state was followed by time-resolved measurements of the birefringence of the system. Formation of a sufficient amount of the cis isomer of BMAB with a single pulse of a laser lowered the N-I phase transition temperature of the mixture, inducing the N-I phase transition of PLCs isothermally in a time range of {approximately} 200 ms. This time range is comparable to that of low molecular weight liquid crystals, indicating that suppression in mobility of mesogens in PLCs does not affect significantly the thermodynamically controlled process.

  11. Physical studies of holographically-formed polymer dispersed liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowley, Christopher Chadwick

    2000-12-01

    Switchable gratings formed holographically in polymer dispersed liquid crystals are new soft-matter composite materials that show potential for numerous electro-optic device applications. Still in their infancy, the fundamental understanding of the factors dictating the electro-optic performance of these materials remains limited, and the challenges facing this technology are significant. Here, a detailed description of the formation, characterization, and evaluation of holographically- formed polymer dispersed liquid crystals (H-PDLCs) is given. Characterization methods used include visible reflection spectroscopy, electro-optic measurements, polarizing optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. All-optical methods are used to study the in situ holographic formation of gratings. Significant materials-based advances are reported. Drive- voltage improvements, through surfactant doping, are discussed. Also, increases in grating diffraction efficiency through the use of oligomer blends are observed. A phenomenological diffusion model and morphological studies suggest this is the result of a spatial composition modulation in the resulting polymer matrix. This discovery has important implications for future ``tailored'' H-PDLC materials sets. New techniques enhancing the optical properties of H- PDLCs are presented. Multiplexing methods allow the formation of multiple gratings in a single film. Emulsion prepolymers yielding `dual-domain' H-PDLCs are also discussed. An overview of potential H-PDLC applications, particularly as reflective flat panel displays, is presented. The performance issues and challenges associated with each application are discussed. Finally, new passive and opto-mechanical H-PDLC applications are mentioned, and directions for future work suggested.

  12. Molecular alignment enhancement phenomenon of polymer formed from a liquid crystal monomer in a liquid crystal solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikake, Hideo; Murashige, Takeshi; Sato, Hiroto; Kawakita, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Hiroshi

    2003-03-01

    We report an abnormal alignment enhancement phenomenon of polymer molecules. The alignment order of a rigid-skeleton polymer made from a liquid crystalline monomer in a low-molecular-weight liquid crystal solvent was drastically enhanced with increasing temperature, even though the alignment order of the solution of the liquid crystal and monomer decreased. From polymer molecular alignment observations using polarizing Raman scattering microscopy, it was found that the polymer alignment order was three times greater than that of the original aligned monomer and polymer. This super alignment technique of polymer using a molecular-scaled self-assembly mechanism is applicable to the formation of electrically and/or optically functional nanopolymer wires.

  13. Manufacturing, structure and properties of recycled polyethylene terephthalate /liquid crystal polymer/montmorillonite clay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japins, Guntis; Berzina, Rita; Zicans, Janis; Merijs Meri, Remo; Ivanova, Tatjana; Kalkis, Valdis; Reinholds, Ingars

    2013-12-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET)/liquid crystal polymer (LCP)/monthmorillonite clay (MMT) compositions were obtained by melt mixing. Their mechanical, structural, rheological and thermal properties were investigated.

  14. Electro-optical behavior of polymer dispersed blue phase liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemiklioglu, E.; Chien, L.-C.

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated a new form of polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDLC) electro-optical films comprised of blue phase liquid crystal and polymer prepared by the solvent evaporation method. In this method, polymer dispersed blue phase (PDBP) films, which were laminated between two indium-tin-oxidecoated conductive substrates, demonstrated two switching modes between light scattering and transparent states in response to an applied electric field across the film. The electro-optical properties of PDBP liquid crystals can be altered by changing the concentrations of liquid crystal and polymer. The compositions, film preparations, physical and morphological behaviors, and electro-optical properties of PDBP films are described.

  15. Polymer Stabilization of Liquid-Crystal Blue Phase II toward Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Jo, Seong-Yong; Jeon, Sung-Wook; Kim, Byeong-Cheon; Bae, Jae-Hyun; Araoka, Fumito; Choi, Suk-Won

    2017-03-15

    The temperature ranges where a pure simple-cubic blue phase (BPII) emerges are quite narrow compared to the body-centered-cubic BP (BPI) such that the polymer stabilization of BPII is much more difficult. Hence, a polymer-stabilized BPII possessing a wide temperature range has been scarcely reported. Here, we fabricate a polymer-stabilized BPII over a temperature range of 50 °C including room temperature. The fabricated polymer-stabilized BPII is confirmed via polarized optical microscopy, Bragg reflection, and Kossel diagram observations. Furthermore, we demonstrate reflective BP liquid-crystal devices utilizing the reflectance-voltage performance as a potential application of the polymer-stabilized BPII. Our work demonstrates the possibility of practical application of the polymer-stabilized BPII to photonic crystals.

  16. Thermal tunability of photonic bandgaps in liquid crystal filled polymer photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Doudou; Chen, Guoxiang; Wang, Lili

    2016-05-01

    A highly tunable bandgap-guiding polymer photonic crystal fiber is designed by infiltrating the cladding air holes with liquid crystal 5CB. Structural parameter dependence and thermal tunability of the photonic bandgaps, mode properties and confinement losses of the designed fiber are investigated. Bandgaps red shift as the temperature goes up. Average thermal tuning sensitivity of 30.9 nm/°C and 20.6 nm/°C is achieved around room temperature for the first and second photonic bandgap, respectively. Our results provide theoretical references for applications of polymer photonic crystal fiber in sensing and tunable fiber-optic devices.

  17. Ultra-fast solid state electro-optical modulator based on liquid crystal polymer and liquid crystal composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ouskova, Elena; Sio, Luciano De Vergara, Rafael; Tabiryan, Nelson; White, Timothy J.; Bunning, Timothy J.

    2014-12-08

    A different generation of polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (PDLCs) based on a liquid crystalline polymer host is reported wherein the fluid behavior of the reactive mesogenic monomer is an enabler to concentration windows (liquid crystal polymer/liquid crystal) (and subsequent morphologies) not previously explored. These liquid crystal (LC) polymer/LC composites, LCPDLCs, exhibit excellent optical and electro-optical properties with negligible scattering losses in both the ON and OFF states. These systems thus have application in systems where fast phase modulation of optical signal instead of amplitude control is needed. Polarized optical microscopy and high resolution scanning electron microscopy confirm a bicontinuous morphology composed of aligned LC polymer coexisting with a phase separated LC fluid. Operating voltages, switching times, and spectra of LCPDLCs compare favourably to conventional PDLC films. The LCPDLCs exhibit a low switching voltage (4–5 V/μm), symmetric and submillisecond (200 μs) on/off response times, and high transmission in both the as formed and switched state in a phase modulation geometry.

  18. Measurement of Aerodynamic Shear Stress Using Side Chain Liquid Crystal Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    A novel concept was proposed exploiting the optical property response of liquid crystalline materials to various external effects. This study determined the feasibility of using side chain liquid crystal polymers as aerodynamic shear sensors. A method was developed to

  19. Dynamics of polymer-dispersed cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitzerow, H.-S.; Rand, J.; Crooker, P. P.

    1992-02-01

    We have studied the electrooptic properties of droplets of cholesteric liquid crystal dispersed in a polymer. Application of AC electric fields to the droplets leads to a conversion of the droplet from a nonreflecting to a selectively reflecting appearance. When the field is suddenly switched on, the switching times are found to decrease strongly with increasing field strength, with increasing temperature and with decreasing drop size. For the switching off process, both switching times and microscopic textures indicate that two different relaxation processes can occur, depending on the applied voltage and on the drop size. Nous avons étudié les propriétés électro-optiques des cristaux liquides cholestériques dispersés dans un matériau polymère. L'application d'un champ électrique fait apparaître une forte réflection de Bragg. La vitesse d'apparition de cette réflection augmente avec l'amplitude du champ électrique, avec la température et avec la diminution du diamètre des gouttelettes. L'interruption du champ électrique cause deux réactions très différentes, dépendant du voltage et du diamètre des gouttes.

  20. Formation and performance of polymer dispersed liquid crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Philip Kwok-Kiou

    Polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDLC's) are novel composite materials consisting of micron-size liquid crystalline droplets dispersed uniformly in a solid polymer matrix. PDLC's are formed by spinodal decomposition induced by thermal quenching or polymerization. These materials have excellent magneto-optical properties, and have great potential in applications that require efficient light scattering. Present commercial applications include switchable windows for privacy control and large-scale billboards. The optical properties depend on the droplet size, shape and positional order, which are determined during the formation stage, and reorientation dynamics of the liquid crystalline molecules confined within the droplets which occurs during product use. In this thesis, new complex mathematical models that describe the formation and performance of PDLC's are successfully developed, implemented, solved and validated. The nonequilibrium thermodynamic formation model takes into account initial thermal fluctuations computed using Monte Carlo simulations and realistic arbitrary boundary conditions. The performance model is based on classical nematic liquid crystalline magneto-viscoelastic theories, and incorporates transient viscoelastic boundary conditions. The simulations are able to reproduce successfully all the experimentally observed significant dynamical and morphological features of film formation as well as all the dynamical stages observed during the use of these thin optical films. In addition, the sensitivity of the phase separating morphology to processing conditions and material parameters is elucidated. Furthermore, a new scaling method is introduced to describe the phase separation phenomena during the early and intermediate stages of spinodal decomposition induced by thermal quenching. The droplet size selection mechanism for the polymerization-induced phase separation method of forming PDLC films is identified and explained for the first time. Lastly

  1. Surface dynamics and mechanics in liquid crystal polymer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Danqing; Broer, Dirk J.

    2015-03-01

    Based on liquid crystal networks we developed `smart' coatings with responsive surface topographies. Either by prepatterning or by the formation of self-organized structures they can be switched on and off in a pre-designed manner. Here we provide an overview of our methods to generate coatings that form surface structures upon the actuation by light. The coating oscillates between a flat surface and a surface with pre-designed 3D micro-patterns by modulating a light source. With recent developments in solid state lighting, light is an attractive trigger medium as it can be integrated in a device for local control or can be used remotely for flood or localized exposure. The basic principle of formation of surface topographies is based on the change of molecular organization in ordered liquid crystal polymer networks. The change in order leads to anisotropic dimensional changes with contraction along the director and expansion to the two perpendicular directions and an increase in volume by the formation of free volume. These two effects work in concert to provide local expansion and contraction in the coating steered by the local direction of molecular orientation. The surface deformation, expressed as the height difference between the activated regions and the non-activated regions divided by the initial film thickness, is of the order of 20%. Switching occurs immediately when the light is switched `on' and `off' and takes several tens of seconds.

  2. Polymer-dispersed liquid crystal devices with graphene electrodes.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seok-Hwan; Noh, Hee Yeon

    2015-12-14

    Although polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) devices have considerable potential application in smart windows, the high material cost of the indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes conventionally used in these devices hinders their wide usage. In this work, we explore the use of graphene electrodes as a potential substitute for ITO electrodes in PDLC devices. The fabricated PDLC devices with graphene electrodes exhibit higher contrast and faster response than PDLC devices with ITO electrodes fabricated using the same chemical formulation and polymerization process. However, they also exhibit higher operation voltage and haze, which is primarily attributed to the inherently large resistance and inhomogeneity of the large-area graphene sheets initially transferred onto the transparent substrates. PDLC devices with graphene electrodes are robust under standard operating conditions and also have the advantage of flexibility and stretchability, unlike PDLCs with ITO electrodes.

  3. Broadband Wavelength Spanning Holographic Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Kashma; Shriyan, Sameet; Fontecchio, Adam

    2008-03-01

    Broadened interaction wavelength of holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystals (HPDLCs) have extensive applications in beam steering for instrument clusters, hyperspectral imaging, wavelength filtering and construction of lightweight optics. A novel simultaneous time and spatial multiplexing formation configuration is proposed here, to increase narrow wavelength reflecting notch to broad range wavelength spanning device. HPDLC films have electro-optic controllability by applying field. No moving parts, light weight, small footprint compared to prisms and lenses, high color purity make the broadband wavelength HPDLCs desirable for the above applications. Varying the incident laser beam exposure angles using motorized rotating stage, during formation is the key step here for their formation in a single medium. The fabricated broadband wavelength sensitive HPDLCs are characterized for the uniformity of the reflected peak and electro optic response. Their output wavefront is analyzed using wavefront analysis technique.

  4. Light Diffraction of Aligned Polymer Fibers Periodically Dispersed by Phase Separation of Liquid Crystal and Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashige, Takeshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Sato, Hiroto; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Taiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2004-12-01

    We have confirmed light diffraction of aligned polymer fibers obtained by a phase separation of an anisotropic-phase solution of liquid crystal and polymer. He—Ne laser light passing through the polymer fibers was scattered in the axis vertical to the fibers, and had two peaks of light intensity symmetrical to the center of the transmitting laser spot. The two peaks were found to be caused by light diffraction due to the periodic polymer-fiber dispersion because the peaks corresponded to values calculated by intervals between the fibers. The periodical fiber networks are considered to be formed by anisotropic spinodal decomposition. This effect can be used to measure the dispersion order of the polymer fibers.

  5. Polymer-stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal for flexible displays using plastic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikake, Hideo; Murashige, Takeshi; Sato, Hiroto; Iino, Yoshiki; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Kawakita, Masahiro; Tsuchiya, Yuzuru

    2001-12-01

    We have developed a ferroelectric liquid crystal device with a novel structure containing a polymer fiber network for flexible lightweight displays using thin plastic substrates. The aligned polymer fibers of sub-micrometers -diameter were formed under ultraviolet light irradiation in a heated nematic- phase solution consisting of liquid crystal and monofunctional acrylate monomer. The rigid polymer network was found to adhere to the two plastic substrates, and the uniform liquid crystal alignment provided a contrast ratio of 100:1 for a monomer concentration of 20 wt%. This device achieves a continuous grayscale capability as a result of change in the spatial distribution of small liquid crystal domains, and also exhibits a fast response time of 80 microsecond(s) due to high-purity separation of polymer and liquid crystal materials. It therefore has attractive features for flexible moving-image display applications.

  6. Liquid Crystal Alignment Control Using Polymer Filament and Polymer Layers Coated on Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashige, Takeshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Sato, Hiroto; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Taiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2005-04-01

    We investigated liquid crystal (LC) alignment in LC cells containing an aligned cellulose filament sandwiched by thin polymer layers coated on substrates. Three types of polymer material, namely polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polyimide (PI), were used as polymer layers. LC alignment areas induced on both sides of the filament were large in the order of PS, PVA and PI. In the case of the PS layer, the average LC alignment area reached approximately 100 μm in the direction perpendicular to the polymer filament. The molecular interaction between the LC and the PS layer is thought to be weak and it does not disturb the LC alignment due to the polymer filament. On the other hand, rubbed PS layers were used as polymer layers of the LC cell, where the LC alignment direction induced by the rubbed PS layer was perpendicular to the polymer filament. It was found that the LC alignment near the polymer filament gradually bent in the cell plane. The result suggests that various three-dimensional LC alignments can be realized by the combination of the polymer filament and substrate surface.

  7. Polarization Raman Spectral Microscopy of Polymer Fibers Formed in Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikake, Hideo; Murashige, Takeshi; Sato, Hiroto; Kawakita, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    This letter focuses on Raman spectral microscopy of polymer fiber networks, which are formed by the photopolymerization of liquid crystalline acrylate monomers in low-molecular-weight ferroelectric liquid crystal, using polarized infrared light to excite the polymer molecules. It was found that the tolane side-chain molecules of the polymer are significantly orientated with the liquid crystal alignment along the rubbing direction of the polyimide alignment layers that are coated on the substrates. A model is proposed for the formation of the polymer based on the alignment evaluation results.

  8. Analysis of thermoplastic polyimide + polymer liquid crystal blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalanarayanan, Bhaskar

    Thermoplastic polyimides (TPIs) exhibit high glass transition temperatures (Tsbgs), which make them useful in high performance applications. Amorphous and semicrystalline TPIs show sub-Tsbg relaxations, which can aid in improving strength characteristics through energy absorption. The alpha relaxation of both types of TPIs indicates a cooperative nature. The semicrystalline TPI shows thermo-irreversible cold crystallization phenomenon. The polymer liquid crystal (PLC) used in the blends is thermotropic and with longitudinal molecular structure. The small heat capacity change (Delta Csb{p}) associated with the glass transition indicates the PLC to be rigid rod in nature. The PLC shows a small endotherm associated with the melting. The addition of PLC to the semicrystalline TPI does not significantly affect the Tsbg or the melting point (Tsbm). The cold crystallization temperature (Tsbc) increases with the addition of the PLC, indicating channeling phenomenon. The addition of PLC also causes a negative deviation of the Delta Csb{p}, which is another evidence for channeling. The TPI, PLC and their blends show high thermal stability. The semicrystalline TPI absorbs moisture; this effect decreases with the addition of the PLC. The absorbed moisture does not show any effect on the degradation. The addition of PLC beyond 30 wt.% does not result in an improvement of properties. The amorphous TPI + PLC blends also show the negative deviation of Delta Csb{p} from linearity with composition. The addition of PLC causes a decrease in the thermal conductivity in the transverse direction to the PLC orientation. The thermomechanical analysis indicates isotropic expansivity for the amorphous TPI and a small anisotropy for the semicrystalline TPI. The PLC shows large anisotropy in expansivity. Even 5 wt.% concentration of PLC in the blend induces considerable anisotropy in the expansivity. Thus, blends show controllable expansivity through PLC concentration. Amorphous TPI + PLC

  9. Alignment mechanism of liquid crystal in a stretched porous polymer film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikake, Hideo; Kuboki, Masashi; Murashige, Takeshi; Sato, Hiroto; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Taiichiro

    2003-09-01

    This article discusses the mechanism of nematic liquid crystal alignment in stretched porous polymer films. The polymer films were formed by extreme stretching of an isotropic porous polyolefin, such that the draw ratio was 12:1. A 6-μm-thick porous film with a high porosity coefficient of 92% revealed fine string-shaped areas that exhibited optical anisotropy due to their possessing a high degree of molecular alignment. The porous film was filled with nematic liquid crystal and then the composite film was sandwiched between transparent electrodes coated onto glass substrates, without the use of conventional alignment layers. From polarizing microscopy observations it was found that the string-like polymer areas induce liquid crystal molecular alignment. The liquid crystal cells can exhibit an electrically controlled birefringence effect. This alignment technique enables us to realize three-dimensional control of liquid crystal alignment.

  10. Exploratory development of foams from liquid crystal polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. S.

    1985-01-01

    Two types of liquid crystal polymer (LCP) compositions were studied and evaluated as structural foam materials. One is a copolymer of 6-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, terephthalic acid, and p-acetoxyacetanilide (designed HNA/TA/AAA), and the other is a copolymer of p-hydroxybenzoic acid and 6-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (designated HBA/HNA). Experimental results showed that the extruded HNA/TA/AA foams have better mechanical quality and appearance than HBA/HNA foams. Heat treatment improved foam tensile strength and break elongation, but reduced their modulus. The injection molding results indicated that nitrogen foaming agents with a low-pressure process gave better void distribution in the injection molded LCP foams than those made by the conventional injection-molding machine and chemical blowing agents. However, in comparing LCP foams with other conventional plastic foams, HBA/HNA foams have better mechanical properties than foamed ABS and PS, but are comparable to PBT and inferior to polycarbonate foams, especially in heat-deflection temperature and impact resistance energy. These deficiencies are due to LCP molecules not having been fully oriented during the Union-Carbide low-pressure foaming process.

  11. Ultrasound visualization using polymer dispersed liquid crystal sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, R. S.; Trushkevych, O.; Eriksson, T. J. R.; Ramadas, S. N.; Dixon, S.

    2017-02-01

    The acousto-optic effect in liquid crystals (LCs) has previously been exploited to build large area acoustic sensors for visualising ultrasound fields, opening up the field of acoustography. There is an opportunity to simplify this technique and open new application areas by employing polymer dispersed LC (PDLC) thin films instead of aligned LC layers. In PDLCs, the normally opaque film becomes transparent under the influence of an acoustic field (e.g. when surface acoustic waves are propagating in the material under the film). This is called acoustic clearing and is visible by eye. There is potential for producing ultrasonic sensors which can be `painted on' to a component, giving direct visualisation of the ultrasonic field without requiring scanning. We demonstrate the effect by using PDLC films to characterise a resonant mode of a flexural air-coupled transducer. Visualisation was quick, with a switching time of a few seconds. The effect shows promise for ultrasound sensing applications for transducer characterisation and NDE.

  12. Switchable Solar Window Devices Based on Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Joseph; Ma, Dakang; Munday, Jeremy

    Windows are an interesting target for photovoltaics due to the potential for large area of deployment and because glass is already a ubiquitous component of solar cell devices. Many demonstrations of solar windows in recent years have used photovoltaic devices which are semitransparent in the visible region. Much research has focused on enhancing device absorption in the UV and IR ranges as a means to circumvent the basic tradeoff between efficiency and transparency to visible light. Use of switchable solar window is a less investigated alternative approach; these windows utilize the visible spectrum but can toggle between high transparency and high efficiency as needed. We present a novel switchable solar window device based on Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals (PDLC). By applying an electric field to the PDLC layer, the device can be switched from an opaque, light diffusing, efficient photovoltaic cell to a clear, transparent window. In the off state (i.e. scattering state), these devices have the added benefits of increased reflectivity for reduced lighting and cooling costs and haze for privacy. Further, we demonstrate that these windows have the potential for self-powering due to the very low power required to maintain the on, or high transparency, state. Support From: University of Maryland and Maryland Nano-center and its Fablab.

  13. Polymer Wall Formation Using Liquid-Crystal/Polymer Phase Separation Induced on Patterned Polyimide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashige, Takeshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Sato, Hiroto; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Taiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2004-12-01

    We could form lattice-shaped polymer walls in a liquid crystal (LC) layer through the thermal phase separation of an LC/polystyrene solution between substrates with polyimide films etched by short-wavelength ultraviolet irradiation using a photomask. The LC wetting difference between the polyimide and substrate surfaces caused the coalescence of growing LC droplets on patterned polyimide films with the progress of phase separation. Consequently, polymer walls were formed on substrate surface areas without polyimide films. The shape of the polymer wall formed became sharp with the use of rubbed polyimide films because the nucleation of growing LC droplets concentrated on the patterned polyimide films. It is thought that the increase in the alignment order of LC molecules in the solution near the rubbed polyimide films promotes the formation of LC molecular aggregation, which becomes the growth nuclei of LC droplets.

  14. Transient Current Behaviour of Poly (p-hydroxybenzoic acid-co-ethylene terephthalate) Liquid Crystal Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarramaneni, Sridharbabu; Sharma, Anu; Quamara, J. K.

    2011-07-01

    Transient current behaviour of pristine Poly (p-hydroxybenzoic acid-co-ethylene terephthalate) Liquid crystal polymer which is a copolymer of poly ethylene terephthalate and poly p-hydroxybenzoic acid referred as PET/x.PHB polymer liquid crystals have been studied at different biasing electric fields ranging from 13 kV/cm to 104.3 kV/cm and at temperatures 120° C and 250° C for molar ratio x =0.8.

  15. The Viscoelastic Properties of Nematic Monodomains Containing Liquid Crystal Polymers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Dongfeng

    The work presented here investigates the viscoelastic properties of nematic materials containing liquid crystal polymers (LCP). We focus on how the elastic constants and the viscosity coefficients of the mixture systems are influenced by polymer architectures. In dynamic light scattering studies of the relaxation of the director orientation fluctuations for the splay, twist, and bend deformation modes, decrease of the relaxation rates was observed when LCPs were dissolved into low molar mass nematics (LMMN). For the side-chain LCPs, the slowing down in the bend mode is comparable to or larger than those of the splay and twist modes. For main-chain LCPs, the relative changes in the relaxation rates for the twist and splay modes are about one order of magnitude larger than that for the bend mode. The results of light scattering under an electric field show that the decrease in the twist relaxation rate is due to a large increase in the twist viscosity and a minor decrease in the twist elastic constant. These changes were found to increase with decrease of the spacer length, with increase of molecular weight, and with decrease of the backbone flexibility. In Freedericksz transition measurements, the splay and bend elastic constants and the dielectric anisotropies of the nematic mixtures were determined and the values are 5~15% lower than those of the pure solvent. From the analysis of the results of Freedericksz transition and light scattering experiments, a complete set of the elastic constants and viscosity coefficients corresponding to the three director deformation modes were obtained for the LCP mixtures. The changes in the viscosity coefficients due to addition of LCPs were analysed to estimate the anisotropic shapes of the polymer backbone via a hydrodynamic model. The results suggest that an oblate backbone configuration is maintained by the side-chain LCPs and a prolate chain configuration appears for the main-chain LCPs. The rheological behavior of a side

  16. Effects of photocrosslinking on photorefractive properties in polymer-liquid crystal composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Hiroshi; Hasebe, Ryoya; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Noda, Kohei; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-03-01

    This article presents effects of photocrosslinking on photorefractive properties in polymer-liquid crystal composites doped with fullerene (C60) as a photoconductive agent. The efficiency of the photorefraction was improved by crosslinking the polymer network and reached near to the theoretical limit for the thin phase grating. The carrier conduction in the composite films was investigated and the high-performance photorefractivity of the photocrosslinked mesogenic composite was explained by low dark current and high photocurrent. The firm crosslinked polymer network in the polymer-liquid crystal composite has also employed for the stable photorefractive diffraction at elevated temperature and under a static dc field applied the mesogenic composite film.

  17. Multifunctional polymer nanocomposites with uniaxially aligned liquid crystal polymer fibrils and graphene nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, S. N.; Khan, M. O.; Naguib, H.; Dawson, F.

    2014-02-01

    Polymer nanocomposites have actively been studied to replace metals in different emerging applications because of their light weight, superior manufacturability, and low processing cost. For example, extensive research efforts have been made to develop advanced thermally conductive polymer nanocomposites, with good processability, for heat management applications. In this study, liquid crystal polymer (LCP)-based nanocomposites have shown to possess much higher effective thermal conductivity (keff) (i.e., as high as 2.58 W/m K) than neat polymers (i.e., ˜0.2-0.4 W/m K). The fibrillation of LCP in LCP-graphene nanoplatelet (GNP) nanocomposites also demonstrated more pronounced increase in keff than that of polyphenylene sulfide (PPS)-GNP nanocomposites. Furthermore, ultra-drawing of LCP-GNP nanocomposite led to additional increase in the nanocomposite's keff because of the alignments of LCP fibrils and the embedded GNP. Experimental results also revealed that, unlike keff, the electrical conductivity (σ) of nanocomposites was unaffected by the types of polymer matrix. This exhibited that the keff and σ were promoted by different mechanisms, suggesting a potential route to tailor polymer nanocomposite's keff and σ independently.

  18. Polymer stabilized liquid crystals: Topology-mediated electro-optical behavior and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Libo

    There has been a wide range of liquid crystal polymer composites that vary in polymer concentration from as little as 3 wt.% (polymer stabilized liquid crystal) to as high as 60 wt.% (polymer dispersed liquid crystals). In this dissertation, an approach of surface polymerization based on a low reactive monomer concentration about 1 wt.% is studied in various liquid crystal operation modes. The first part of dissertation describes the development of a vertical alignment (VA) mode with surface polymer stabilization, and the effects of structure-performance relationship of reactive monomers (RMs) and polymerization conditions on the electro-optical behaviors of the liquid crystal device has been explored. The polymer topography plays an important role in modifying and enhancing the electro-optical performance of stabilized liquid crystal alignment. The enabling surface-pinned polymer stabilized vertical alignment (PSVA) approach has led to the development of high-performance and fast-switching displays with controllable pretilt angle, increase in surface anchoring energy, high optical contrast and fast response time. The second part of the dissertation explores a PSVA mode with in-plane switching (IPS) and its application for high-efficiency and fast-switching phase gratings. The diffraction patterns and the electro-optical behaviors including diffraction efficiency and response time are characterized. The diffraction grating mechanism and performance have been validated by computer simulation. Finally, the advantages of surface polymerization approach such as good optical contrast and fast response time have been applied to the fringe-field switching (FFS) system. The concentration of reactive monomer on the electro-optical behavior of the FFS cells is optimized. The outstanding electro-optical results and mechanism of increase in surface anchoring strength are corroborated by the director field simulation. The density and topology of nanoscale polymer protrusions

  19. The effect of the temperature on the bandgaps based on the chiral liquid crystal polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianhua; Shi, Shuhui; Wang, Bainian

    2015-10-01

    Chiral side-chain liquid crystal polymer is synthesized from polysiloxanes and liqud crystal monomer 4-(Undecenoic-1- yloxybenzoyloxy)-4'-benzonitrile and 6-[4-(4- Undecenoic -1-yloxybenzoyloxy)- hydroxyphenyl] cholesteryl hexanedioate. The optical and thermal property of the monomer and polymer are shown by POM and DSC. As the unique optical property of the polymer, the bandgaps are shifted for heating temperature. The reflection bandgaps is shifted from 546nm to 429nm with temperature increase. As a photonic material, the chiral polymer which sensitive responses under the outfield is widely studied for reflection display, smart switchable reflective windows and defect model CLC laser etc.

  20. Electro-Optic Properties of Holographically Patterned, Polymer Stabilized Cholesteric Liquid Crystals (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Electro - optic properties of cholesteric liquid crystals with holographically patterned polymer stabilization were examined. It is hypothesized that...enhanced electro - optic properties of the final device. Prior to holographic patterning, polymer stabilization with large elastic memory was generated by way... electro - optic properties appear to stem from a single dimension domain size increase, which allows for a reduction in the LC/polymer interaction.

  1. Langmuir Films of Flexible Polymers Transferred to Aqueous/Liquid Crystal Interfaces Induce Uniform Azimuthal Alignment of the Liquid Crystal

    PubMed Central

    Kinsinger, Michael I.; Buck, Maren E.; Meli, Maria-Victoria; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Lynn, David M.

    2009-01-01

    We reported recently that amphiphilic polymers can be assembled at interfaces created between aqueous phases and thermotropic liquid crystals (LCs) in ways that (i) couple the organization of the polymer to the order of the LC and (ii) respond to changes in the properties of aqueous phases that can be characterized as changes in the optical appearance of the LC. This investigation sought to characterize the behavior of aqueous-LC interfaces decorated with uniaxially compressed thin films of polymers transferred by Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) transfer. Here, we report physicochemical characterization of interfaces created between aqueous phases and the thermotropic LC 4-cyano-4’-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) decorated with Langmuir films of a novel amphiphilic polymer (polymer 1), synthesized by the addition of hydrophobic and hydrophilic side chains to poly(2-vinyl-4,4’-dimethylazlactone). Initial characterization of this system resulted in the unexpected observation of uniform azimuthal alignment of 5CB after LS transfer of the polymer films to aqueous-5CB interfaces. This paper describes characterization of Langmuir films of polymer 1 hosted at aqueous-5CB interfaces as well as the results of our investigations into the origins of the uniform ordering of the LC observed upon LS transfer. Our results, when combined, support the conclusion that uniform azimuthal alignment of 5CB is the result of long-range ordering of polymer chains in the Langmuir films (in a preferred direction orthogonal to the direction of compression) that is generated during uniaxial compression of the films prior to LS transfer. Although past studies of Langmuir films of polymers at aqueous-air interfaces have demonstrated that in-plane alignment of polymer backbones can be induced by uniaxial compression, these past reports have generally made use of polymers with rigid backbones. One important outcome of this current study is thus the observation of anisotropy and long-range order in Langmuir films

  2. Retrieval of computer-generated holograms projected onto liquid crystal-photoconducting polymer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniewicz, Andrzej; Mysliwiec, Jaroslaw; Gryga, Lukasz; Kajzar, Francois

    2004-06-01

    Simple liquid crystal panel equipped with a polymeric photoconducting layer can be used for displaying dynamic holographic images. It is sufficient to compute the hologram of the object and reconstruct the wavefield optically. This can be done by projection of the binary hologram onto liquid crystal panel with the help of standard video-projector. Illumination of the photoconducting polymeric layer by a white light interferogram leads to tiny molecular rearrangements within the bulk of the liquid crystal layer which form a refractive index grating. They occur as a result of spatially modulated electric space charge field produced in a polymer. Short holographic films displayed at video-rates are achievable with the system based on PVK:TNF polymer and planar nematic liquid crystal mixture. The underlying electrical and optical processes as well as characteristics, performances and limitations of the system are discussed.

  3. Polarization Raman Microscopic Study of Molecular Alignment Behavior in Liquid Crystal/Polymer Composite Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashige, Takeshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Sato, Hiroto; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Taiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2005-12-01

    We clarified that the molecular alignment of aggregated polymers is partially synchronized with liquid crystal (LC) director reorientation in an LC/polymer composite film. The molecular alignment behavior in composite films with LC- and polymer-rich regions formed by photopolymerization-induced phase separation was investigated using polarization Raman spectral microscopy. Raman scattering intensity induced by aligned side chains of polymers in the LC-rich region changed with LC director reorientation when voltage was applied to the composite film. It was confirmed for the first time that polymers capable of movement are formed in the LC-rich region.

  4. Thermoplastic and thermoset main chain liquid crystal polymers prepared from biphenyl mesogen

    SciTech Connect

    Su, W.F.A.

    1993-12-31

    Main chain liquid crystal thermoplastic polyesters and thermosetting epoxy resins were prepared using biphenyl mesogen. The melting point of polyesters was effectively decreased by incorporating flexible methylene spacers into the polymer main chain. The liquid crystal epoxy resins exhibit high glass transition temperature, low thermal expansion coefficient, high dielectric strength and low dielectric loss. They are suitable for the preparation of self-reinforcing molecular composites.

  5. Impedance of Polymer-Dispersed Liquid Crystals with Carbon Nanofibers in Weak Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, K. R.; Romanenko, A. I.; Zharkova, G. M.; Podyacheva, O. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    Impedance of polymer-dispersed liquid crystals modified by carbon nanofibers is studied in fields lower than the threshold field of the director reorientation of a liquid crystal. It is shown that the real and imaginary parts of the impedance obey to the relationship (Zre - X0)2 + (Zim - Y0)2 = R 0 2 , where X0, Y0, and R0 are the fitting parameters depending on the frequency of the exciting electric field.

  6. Polymer-Layer-Free Alignment for Fast Switching Nematic Liquid Crystals by Multifunctional Nanostructured Substrate.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woo-Bin; Jeong, Hyeon Su; Jeon, Hwan-Jin; Kim, Yun Ho; Hwang, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2015-11-01

    A novel polymer-layer-free system for liquid-crystal alignment is demonstrated by various shaped indium tin oxide (ITO) patterns. Liquid crystals are aligned along the ITO line pattern and secondary sputtering lithography can change the shape of the ITO line pattern. Different shapes can control the direction and size of the pretilt angle. This effect eliminates defects and reduces the response time.

  7. Shape-Selectivity with Liquid Crystal and Side-Chain Liquid Crystalline Polymer SAW Sensor Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    FRYE-MASON,GREGORY CHARLES; OBORNY,MICHAEL C.; PUGH,COLEEN; RICCO,ANTONIO; THOMAS,ROSS C.; ZELLERS,EDWARD T.; ZHANG,GUO-ZHENG

    1999-09-23

    A liquid crystal (LC) and a side-chain liquid crystalline polymer (SCLCP) were tested as surface acoustic wave (SAW) vapor sensor coatings for discriminating between pairs of isomeric organic vapors. Both exhibit room temperature smectic mesophases. Temperature, electric-field, and pretreatment with self-assembled monolayers comprising either a methyl-terminated or carboxylic acid-terminated alkane thiol anchored to a gold layer in the delay path of the sensor were explored as means of affecting the alignment and selectivity of the LC and SCLCP films. Results for the LC were mixed, while those for the SCLCP showed a consistent preference for the more rod-like isomer of each isomer pair examined.

  8. Morphology effect on the light scattering and dynamic response of polymer network liquid crystal phase modulator.

    PubMed

    Xiangjie, Zhao; Cangli, Liu; Jiazhu, Duan; Jiancheng, Zeng; Dayong, Zhang; Yongquan, Luo

    2014-06-16

    Polymer network liquid crystal (PNLC) was one of the most potential liquid crystal for submillisecond response phase modulation, which was possible to be applied in submillisecond response phase only spatial light modulator. But until now the light scattering when liquid crystal director was reoriented by external electric field limited its phase modulation application. Dynamic response of phase change when high voltage was applied was also not elucidated. The mechanism that determines the light scattering was studied by analyzing the polymer network morphology by SEM method. Samples were prepared by varying the polymerization temperature, UV curing intensity and polymerization time. The morphology effect on the dynamic response of phase change was studied, in which high voltage was usually applied and electro-striction effect was often induced. The experimental results indicate that the polymer network morphology was mainly characterized by cross linked single fibrils, cross linked fibril bundles or even both. Although the formation of fibril bundle usually induced large light scattering, such a polymer network could endure higher voltage. In contrast, although the formation of cross linked single fibrils induced small light scattering, such a polymer network cannot endure higher voltage. There is a tradeoff between the light scattering and high voltage endurance. The electro-optical properties such as threshold voltage and response time were taken to verify our conclusion. For future application, the monomer molecular structure, the liquid crystal solvent and the polymerization conditions should be optimized to generate optimal polymer network morphology.

  9. Investigation of the structure and thermal behaviour of polymer liquid crystal / single wall carbon nanotubes nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exner, G.; Marinov, Y.; Perez, E.

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, nanocomposite of thermotropic polymer liquid crystal poly(heptane-1,7-dyil biphenyl-4,4’-dicarboxilate) and single wall carbon nanotubes was investigated. Nanocomposite films were casted from solution blended polymer liquid crystal and nanotubes. The structure and thermal behaviour of the nanocomposite were investigated by means of X-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry. The results show that there are two phase transitions on cooling and a single one on subsequent heating for both the neat polymer liquid crystal and nanocomposite. Hence, the smectic order of the polymer liquid crystal as well as its monotropic behaviour are preserved in the nanocomposite. The isotropic melt - smectic transition temperature in the nanocomposite is several degrees higher and the enthalpy of this process is much lower, suggesting heterogeneous nucleation of this phase on the surface of the nanotubes. The temperature of crystal structure formation during further cooling decreases in the nanocomposite showing a stabilization effect of the nanotubes on the smectic phase. Judging from the smaller enthalpy of the smectic-crystal phase transition and the new crystalline peak in the X-ray scattering patterns of the nanocomposite one could suggest a new crystalline form formation and this crystalline phase coexistence with smectic phases at lower temperatures.

  10. Liquid-Crystal Thermosets, a New Generation of High-Performance Liquid-Crystal Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingemans, Theo; Weiser, Erik; Hou, Tan; Jensen, Brian; St. Clair, Terry

    2004-01-01

    One of the major challenges for NASA's next-generation reusable-launch-vehicle (RLV) program is the design of a cryogenic lightweight composite fuel tank. Potential matrix resin systems need to exhibit a low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), good mechanical strength, and excellent barrier properties at cryogenic temperatures under load. In addition, the resin system needs to be processable by a variety of non-autoclavable techniques, such as vacuum-bag curing, resin-transfer molding (RTM), vacuum-assisted resin-transfer molding (VaRTM), resin-film infusion (RFI), pultrusion, and advanced tow placement (ATP). To meet these requirements, the Advanced Materials and Processing Branch (AMPB) at NASA Langley Research Center developed a new family of wholly aromatic liquid-crystal oligomers that can be processed and thermally cross-linked while maintaining their liquid-crystal order. All the monomers were polymerized in the presence of a cross-linkable unit by use of an environmentally benign melt-condensation technique. This method does not require hazardous solvents, and the only side product is acetic acid. The final product can be obtained as a powder or granulate and has an infinite shelf life. The obtained oligomers melt into a nematic phase and do not exhibit isotropization temperatures greater than the temperatures of decomposition (Ti > T(sub dec)). Three aromatic formulations were designed and tested and included esters, ester-amides, and ester-imides. One of the major advantages of this invention, named LaRC-LCR or Langley Research Center-Liquid Crystal Resin, is the ability to control a variety of resin characteristics, such as melting temperature, viscosity, and the cross-link density of the final part. Depending on the formulation, oligomers can be prepared with melt viscosities in the range of 10-10,000 poise (100 rad/s), which can easily be melt-processed using a variety of composite-processing techniques. This capability provides NASA with custom

  11. Optical reconfiguration by anisotropic diffraction in holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal memory.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Akifumi; Watanabe, Minoru

    2012-07-20

    Holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) memory is fabricated by a photoinduced phase separation comprised of polymer and liquid crystal (LC) phases using laser light interference exposures. The anisotropic diffraction induced by the alignment of LC in the periodic structure of the HPDLC memory is applied to reconstruct the configuration contexts for the optically reconfigurable gate arrays. Optical reconfiguration for various circuits under parallel programmability is implemented by switching the polarization state of incident light on the HPDLC memory using a spatial light modulator.

  12. Electrically Tunable Distributed Feedback Laser Emission from Scaffolding Morphologic Holographic Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystal Grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenbin; Diao, Zhihui; Yao, Lishuang; Cao, Zhaoliang; Liu, Yonggang; Ma, Ji; Xuan, Li

    2013-02-01

    Electrically tunable distributed feedback (DFB) laser emission from a dye-doped holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) transmission grating is demonstrated. The homogenously aligned liquid crystal (LC) in this polymer scaffolding morphologic grating enables a large refractive index (RI) change for the TM wave under applied electric field, which in turn leads to a red-shift of 8 nm in the output laser emission. The tuning behavior of the DFB laser is well explained on the basis of DFB waveguide theory and amount of phase-separated LCs.

  13. Electrically switchable Fresnel lenses in polymer-stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Hui-Chen; Ke, Ming-Wei; Liu, Yu-Mei

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the fabrication of an electrically switchable Fresnel lens based on surface-stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystals (SSFLCs) with polymer networks. The Fresnel lens was fabricated by injecting a monomer-doped ferroelectric liquid crystal into an extremely thin cell and exposing the cell to ultraviolet light through a Fresnel-zone-plate mask. The fabricated Fresnel lens consisted of the SSFLC and polymer-stabilized SSFLC structures. The focusing effect can be switched on by applying an appropriate voltage, and the characteristics of FLCs enable a rapid response on the order of milliseconds.

  14. Random lasing in dye-doped polymer dispersed liquid crystal film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Rina; Shi, Rui-xin; Wu, Xiaojiao; Wu, Jie; Dai, Qin

    2016-09-01

    A dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystal film was designed and fabricated, and random lasing action was studied. A mixture of laser dye, nematic liquid crystal, chiral dopant, and PVA was used to prepare the dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystal film by means of microcapsules. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that most liquid crystal droplets in the polymer matrix ranged from 30 μm to 40 μm, the size of the liquid crystal droplets was small. Under frequency doubled 532 nm Nd:YAG laser-pumped optical excitation, a plurality of discrete and sharp random laser radiation peaks could be measured in the range of 575-590 nm. The line-width of the lasing peak was 0.2 nm and the threshold of the random lasing was 9 mJ. Under heating, the emission peaks of random lasing disappeared. By detecting the emission light spot energy distribution, the mechanism of radiation was found to be random lasing. The random lasing radiation mechanism was then analyzed and discussed. Experimental results indicated that the size of the liquid crystal droplets is the decisive factor that influences the lasing mechanism. The surface anchor role can be ignored when the size of the liquid crystal droplets in the polymer matrix is small, which is beneficial to form multiple scattering. The transmission path of photons is similar to that in a ring cavity, providing feedback to obtain random lasing output. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61378042), the Colleges and Universities in Liaoning Province Outstanding Young Scholars Growth Plans, China (Grant No. LJQ2015093), and Shenyang Ligong University Laser and Optical Information of Liaoning Province Key Laboratory Open Funds, China.

  15. Liquid crystal alignment with a molecular template of imprinted polymer layer during phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hak-Rin; Jung, Jong-Wook; Lee, You-Jin; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2006-03-01

    We developed a liquid crystal (LC) alignment method using a molecular template of an imprinted polymer layer during polymerization-induced phase separation. Our results showed that the nematic ordering of LC is transferred to the polymer chain ordering during an anisotropic phase separation, which produces an anisotropic azimuthal surface anchoring. Using in-plane field treatment during phase separation, a twisted nematic cell is demonstrated.

  16. Effect of dopant nanoparticles on reorientation process in polymer-dispersed liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobov, K. V.; Zharkova, G. M.; Syzrantsev, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the experimental data of the nanoscale powders application for doping polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (PDLC) was represented in this work. A model based on the separation of the liquid crystals reorientation process on the surface mode and the volume mode was proposed and tested. In the research the wide-spread model mixture PDLC were used. But alumina nanoparticles were the distinctive ones obtained by electron beam evaporation. The proposed model allowed to conclude that the nanoparticles localization at the surface of the droplets (as in the Pickering emulsion) lead to the variation of the connection force between the liquid crystals and the polymer. The effect of nanoparticles resulted in an acceleration of the reorientation process near the surface when the control field is turned on and in a deceleration when it is turned off. The effect for the different size particles was confirmed.

  17. Phase diagrams of mixtures of a polymer and a cholesteric liquid crystal under an external field

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Akihiko

    2014-11-14

    We present a mean field theory to describe phase behaviors in mixtures of a polymer and a cholesteric liquid crystal under an external magnetic or electric field. Taking into account a chiral coupling between a polymer and a liquid crystal under the external field, we examine twist-untwist phase transitions and phase separations in the mixtures. It is found that a cholesteric-nematic phase transition can be induced by not only the external field but also concentration and temperature. Depending on the strength of the external field, we predict cholesteric-paranematic (Ch+pN), nematic-paranematic (N+pN), cholesteric-nematic (Ch+N) phase separations, etc., on the temperature-concentration plane. We also discuss mixtures of a non-chiral nematic liquid crystal and a chiral dopant.

  18. A shear sensitive monomer-polymer liquid crystal system for wind tunnel applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, D. S.; Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of a liquid crystal system, comprised of a shear-sensitive cholesteric-monomer liquid crystal thin-film coated on a liquid-crystal polymer substrate, are described. The system provides stable Grandjean texture, a desirable feature for shear-stress measurements using selective reflection from the monomer liquid-crystal helix structure. Impingement of gas or air flow on the monomer liquid-crystal free surface changes the wavelength of the selective reflection for an incident white light from red toward blue with increase in the rate of gas flow. The contrast of the selectively reflected light improves considerably by providing a thin black coating of about 5 microns at the monomer-polymer interface. The coating thickness is such that the steric interactions are still sufficiently strong to maintain Grandjean texture. For a small angle of incidence of a monochromatic light, the measurement of the reflected light intensity normal to the monomer-polymer liquid-crystal interface enables the determination of the wavelength for selective reflection as a function of the gas-flow differential pressure applied in the plane of the interface. The variation of the wavelength with the pressure is linear with a slope of about 2 nm/mmHg. Furthermore, the shear-stress effects are reversible unlike for monomer liquid crystal-metal systems used for flow visualization on wind-tunnel model surfaces. The present system offers a suitable method for direct on-line measurement of shear stress field from measurements of the wavelength for selective reflection for an incident white light.

  19. Complex Nanoscale-Ordered Liquid Crystal Polymer Film for High Transmittance Holographic Polarizer.

    PubMed

    Du, Tao; Fan, Fan; Tam, Alwin Ming Wai; Sun, Jiatong; Chigrinov, Vladimir G; Sing Kwok, Hoi

    2015-11-25

    A special design of a complex-ordered liquid crystal polymer film is developed into a holographic polarizer. The holographic polarizer shows over 90% transmittance, which provides a simple solution to make LEDs polarized. Furthermore, the holographic polarizer exhibits intensity and polarization maintenance properties, which could be further developed for photonics applications.

  20. Effect of liquid crystal concentration on electro-optical properties of polymer dispersed liquid crystal lens for smart electronic glasses with auto-shading and auto-focusing function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaeyong; Han, Jeong In

    2014-05-01

    Polymer dispersed liquid crystal lenses were prepared from a mixture of prepolymer (NOA 65) and E7 liquid crystal. The mixture of polymer dispersed liquid crystal was polymerized by ultraviolet (UV) curing in the polymerization induced phase separation process. With liquid crystal concentration, electro-optical properties of polymer dispersed liquid crystal lens devices including transmittance, driving voltage, response times, contrast ratio and slope of the linear region of the transmittance-voltage were measured and optimized for smart electronic glasses. The optimum concentration for polymer dispersed liquid crystal lens was NOA 65 of 40% and E7 liquid crystal concentration of 60%. This is the first report of the use of the polymer dispersed liquid crystal lens for smart electronic glasses with auto-shading and/or auto-focusing functions.

  1. Thermal Shock Tolerance of Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal Stabilized by Aligned Polymer Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikake, Hideo; Murashige, Takeshi; Sato, Hiroto; Fujisaki, Yoshihide; Kawakita, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Taiichiro

    2003-02-01

    In this paper, we report the marked enhancement of thermal shock tolerance of smectic layer structures of ferroelectric liquid crystal stabilized by aligned fine polymer fibers, which were formed by photopolymerization-induced phase separation. It was found that a smectic layer structure with such polymer fibers, which are aligned perpendicular to the smectic layer, generates no zigzag defects even after the composite film is cooled to -15°C, which is lower than the chiral smectic C-to-crystal phase-transition temperature, or heated to 100°C, which is above the chiral nematic-to-isotropic phase-transition temperature.

  2. Polymer-stabilized blue-phase liquid crystal grating cured with interfered visible light.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yachao; Li, Yan; Chen, Chao Ping; Liu, Shuxin; Rong, Na; Li, Weihuan; Li, Xiao; Zhou, Pengcheng; Lu, Jiangang; Liu, Ruili; Su, Yikai

    2015-07-27

    In this paper, we demonstrate a holographic polymer-stabilized blue-phase liquid crystal grating fabricated using a visible laser. As blue phase is stabilized by the interfered light, polymer-concentration gradient is achieved simultaneously. With the application of a uniform vertical electric field, periodic index distribution is obtained due to polymer-concentration gradient. The grating exhibits several attractive features such as polarization-independency, a broad temperature range, sub-millisecond response, simple fabrication, and low cost, thus holding great potential for photonics applications.

  3. θ-2θ diffractometry of anisotropic holographic gratings composed of liquid crystal and polymer phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakiuchida, Hiroshi; Tazawa, Masato; Yoshimura, Kazuki; Ogiwara, Akifumi

    2013-03-01

    We studied highly anisotropic periodic structure formed by liquid crystal and polymer phase separation, or holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC), by θ-2θ optical diffractometry particularly employing the high order Bragg diffractions. Then, we revealed the relationship between microscopic structure and diffraction properties of the HPDLCs prepared at several different conditions with regard to the compositional ratio of the raw materials and the exposure temperature. The high order Bragg diffractions are closely connected to periodic boundaries between LC droplets and polymer, and is potentially able to be designed by HPDLC fabrication processes. The analysis with the information from the higher order Bragg diffraction is expected to allow you to observe more detailed and quantitative HPDLC internal structure.

  4. Controlled thermal expansion printed wiring boards based on liquid crystal polymer dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, Thomas E.; Blizard, Kent; Jayaraj, K.; Rubin, Leslie S.

    1994-01-01

    Dielectric materials based on innovative Liquid Crystal Polymers (LCP's) have been used to fabricate surface mount printed wiring boards (PWB's) with a coefficient of thermal expansion matched to leadless ceramic chip carriers. Proprietary and patented polymer processing technology has resulted in self reinforcing material with balanced in-plane mechanical properties. In addition, LCP's possess excellent electrical properties, including a low dielectric constant (less than 2.9) and very low moisture absorption (less than 0.02%). LCP-based multilayer boards processed with conventional drilling and plating processes show improved performance over other materials because they eliminate the surface flatness problems of glass or aramid reinforcements. Laser drilling of blind vias in the LCP dielectric provides a very high density for use in direct chip attach and area array packages. The material is ideally suited for MCM-L and PCMCIA applications fabricated with very thin dielectric layers of the liquid crystal polymer.

  5. Dynamics of photoinduced processes in liquid-crystal polymer films containing azo compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Simonov, A N; Larichev, A V

    1999-07-31

    The photoinduced processes in azo-compound-containing side-chain polymer films with liquid-crystal properties are examined theoretically. A model is proposed whereby it is possible to consider the dynamics of the optical response of a medium taking into account the anisotropic saturation in the angular distribution of the azo-dye isomers as well as the intermolecular interaction. The influence of the liquid-crystal ordering in the polymer is taken into account by introducing a phenomenological mean-field factor. Analytical solutions describing changes in the optical properties of a polymer film during the initial illumination stages are in good agreement with experimental data. (this issue is dedicated to the memory of s a akhmanov)

  6. Field-induced Bragg diffraction in polymer stabilized cholesteric liquid crystal bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varanytsia, Andrii; Chien, Liang-Chy

    2015-03-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals (CLC) with a specific confinement conditions are known to form bubble domain (BD) texture. We have developed the CLC BD texture stabilized with a small amount of polymer. CLC bubbles of a BD texture self-assemble into domains with a hexagonal ordering and optically perform as a diffraction grating. By stabilization of the BD texture with a polymer we have improved optical quality of the diffractive CLC layer and have increased its mechanical stability. We discuss details about samples preparation, Bragg diffraction, electro-optical performance and present results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) morphological study of the polymer network formed in the bulk of the diffractive liquid crystal layer.

  7. Fundamental display properties of flexible devices containing polymer-stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal between plastic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikake, Hideo; Murashige, Takeshi; Sato, Hiroto; Iino, Yoshiki; Kawakita, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Hiroshi

    2002-09-01

    We describe several fundamental display properties of a flexible ferroelectric liquid crystal device containing polymer fibers between thin plastic substrates. The composite film of liquid crystal and polymer was created from a solution of liquid crystal and monomer materials between the plastic substrates under ultraviolet light irradiation. The dynamic electrooptic response to analog voltage pulses was examined with an incidence of laser beam light, and its light modulation property exhibited good linearity in continuous gray-scale capability. The excellent spatial uniformity of liquid crystal alignment formed between the flexible substrates resulted in high-contrast light modulation, although slight spontaneous bending of liquid crystal alignment in the device plane was recognized. When the laser light beam was obliquely incident on the flexible display device, the measured transmittance revealed that the device has a wide viewing angle of more than 100 deg without contrast reversal. This is considered to be caused by the molecular switching in the device plane and the thin electrooptic layer in the display device.

  8. Petascale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Polymers and Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Trung Dac; Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Brown, W. Michael

    2014-03-01

    The availability of faster and larger supercomputers and more efficient parallel algorithms now enable us to perform unprecedented simulations approaching experimental scales. Here we present two examples of our latest large-scale molecular dynamics simulations using the Titan supercomputer in the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). In the first study, we address the rupture origin of liquid crystal thin films wetting a solid substrate. Our simulations show the key signatures of spinodal instability in isotropic and nematic films on top of thermal nucleation. Importantly, we found evidence of a common rupture mechanism independent of initial thickness and LC orientational ordering. In the second study, we used coarse-grained molecular dynamics to simulate the thermal annealing of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blends in the presence of a silicon substrate found in organic solar cells. Our simulations show different phase segregated morphologies dependent on the P3HT chain length and PCBM volume fraction in the blend. Furthermore, the ternary blend of short and long P3HT chains with PCBM affects the vertical phase segregation of PCBM decreasing its concentration in the vicinity of the substrate. U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  9. Shear-induced surface alignment of polymer dispersed liquid crystal microdroplets on the boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, D. S.; Singh, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    Polymer dispersed liquid crystal thin films have been deposited on a glass substrate, utilizing the processes of polymerization and solvent evaporation induced phase separation. Liquid crystal microdroplets trapped on the upper surface of the thin film respond to the shear stress due to air or gas flow on the surface layer. Response to an applied step shear stress input on the surface layer has been measured by measuring the time response of the transmitted light intensity. Initial results on the measurements of the light transmission as a function of the air flow differential pressure indicate that these systems offer features suitable for boundary layer and gas flow sensors.

  10. Holographically formed, acoustically switchable gratings based on polymer-dispersed liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan Jun; Lu, Mengqian; Ding, Xiaoyun; Leong, Eunice S P; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Shi, Jinjie; Teng, Jing Hua; Wang, Lin; Bunning, Timothy J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-08-01

    We report holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (H-PDLC) gratings driven by surface acoustic waves (SAWs). Our experiments show that upon applying SAWs, the H-PDLC grating exhibited switchable properties: The diffraction of the H-PDLC grating decreased, whereas the transmission increased. This acoustically switchable behavior is due to the acoustic streaming-induced realignment of liquid crystals as well as absorption-resulted thermal diffusion. Such SAW-driven H-PDLC gratings are potentially useful in many photonic applications, such as optical switches, spatial light modulators, and switchable add/drop filters.

  11. Electro-optical investigations of holographic-polymer-dispersed ferroelectric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Woltman, Scott J; Eakin, James N; Crawford, Gregory P; Zumer, Slobodan

    2007-12-01

    Uniform alignment of ferroelectric liquid-crystal domains encapsulated by a polymer binder was established through a holographic exposure process. The refractive index modulation in these thin films is modeled as a phase grating that can be electrically addressed to erase the optical diffractive properties. A phenomenological model is developed to take into account a distribution of domain sizes and an effective field that stabilizes the ferroelectric liquid-crystal domains. A diffraction model successfully predicts changes in normalized intensities for first-order diffraction with applied field. These gratings demonstrate microsecond-scale response and relaxation times for various grating pitch sizes between approximately 3 and approximately 12 microm.

  12. Selective scattering polymer dispersed liquid crystal film for light enhancement of organic light emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinghua; McGraw, Greg; Ma, Ruiqing; Brown, Julie; Yang, Deng-Ke

    2017-02-20

    We developed a novel light enhancing film for an organic light emitting diode (OLED) based on polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC). In the film, the liquid crystal droplets are unidirectionally aligned along the film normal direction and exhibit selective scattering. The film scatters light emitted only in directions with large incident angles but not light emitted in directions with small incident angles. When the light is scattered, it changes propagation direction and exits the OLED. The PDLC film reduces the total internal reflection and thus can significantly increase the light efficiency of the OLED.

  13. Surface relief gratings on polymer dispersed liquid crystals by polarization holography

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzulla, A.; Pagliusi, P.; Provenzano, C.; Russo, G.; Carbone, G.; Cipparrone, G.

    2004-09-27

    We report the observation of surface relief gratings (SRGs) on polymer dispersed liquid crystal films after polarization holographic recording, demonstrating the formation of SRGs in systems without azo compounds, where photoisomerization and chromophore reorientation processes do not occur. Permanent SRGs, several hundred nanometers deep, are recorded on the surface of a polymeric material containing oriented liquid crystal droplets. The results suggest that SRG growth under uniform intensity irradiation is not exclusively related to the photoisomerization, but is a more general phenomenon which can involve different photoinduced chemical and physical mechanisms sensitive to the light polarization state. These effects contribute to the formation of anisotropic structures during the recording process.

  14. Bimesogen-enhanced flexoelectro-optic behavior of polymer stabilized cholesteric liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varanytsia, A.; Chien, L.-C.

    2016-01-01

    We explore flexoelectro-optic effect in polymer stabilized cholesteric liquid crystals (CLC) with uniform lying helix texture. A method to enlarge the flexoelectric response of the CLC mixture is demonstrated by mixing two nematic liquid crystal host materials with large and small effective flexoelastic coefficients. By a choice of material composition of CLC mixture, a large angle of flexoelectrically driven in-plane rotation of helical axis with a submillisecond response time is obtained. Our findings will be useful for material design of future CLC mixtures for applications in flexoelectro-optic displays.

  15. Preparation of a Thermally Light-Transmittance-Controllable Film from a Coexistent System of Polymer-Dispersed and Polymer-Stabilized Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shu-Meng; Liang, Xiao; Zhang, Cui-Hong; Chen, Mei; Shen, Chen; Zhang, Lan-Ying; Yuan, Xiao; He, Bao-Feng; Yang, Huai

    2017-01-25

    Polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) and polymer-stabilized liquid crystal (PSLC) systems are the two primary distinct systems in the field of liquid crystal (LC) technology, and they are differentiated by their unique microstructures. Here, we present a novel coexistent system of polymer-dispersed and polymer-stabilized liquid crystals (PD&SLCs), which forms a homeotropically aligned polymer network (HAPN) within the LC droplets after a microphase separation between the LC and polymer matrix and combines the advantages of both the PDLC and PSLC systems. Then, we prepare a novel thermally light-transmittance-controllable (TLTC) film from the PD&SLC system, where the transmittance can be reversibly changed through thermal control from a transparent to a light-scattering state. The film also combines the advantageous features of flexibility and a potential for large-scale manufacturing, and it shows significant promise in future applications from smart windows to temperature sensors.

  16. Extreme Nonlinear Optics With Liquid Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-31

    Photorefractive CdSe and gold nanowire -doped liquid crystals and polymer-dispersed-liquid-crystal photonic crystals,” Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. 446: 233...Mallouk, “ Photorefractive CdSe and gold nanowire -doped liquid crystals and polymer-dispersed-liquid-crystal photonic crystals,” Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst...Williams, B. Lewis and T. Mallouk, “Photorefractive CdSe and gold nanowire -doped liquid crystals and polymer-dispersed-liquid-crystal photonic

  17. Effects of Polymers on the Rotational Viscosities of Nematic Liquid Crystals and Dynamics of Field Alignment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Du-Rim

    Many of the important physical phenomena exhibited by the nematic phase, such as its unusual flow properties and its responses to the electric and the magnetic fields, can be discussed regarding it as a continuous medium. The Leslie-Erickson dynamic theory has the six dissipative coefficients from continuum model of liquid crystal. Parodi showed that only five of them are independent, when Onsagar's reciprocal relations are used. One of these, which has no counterpart in the isotropic liquids, is the rotational viscosity coefficient, gamma_1. The main objective of this project is to study the rotational viscosities of selected micellar nematic systems and the effect of dissolved polymers in micellar and thermotropic liquid crystals. We used rotating magnetic field method which allows one to determine gamma _1 and the anisotropic magnetic susceptibility, chi_{a}. For the ionic surfactant liquid crystals of SDS and KL systems used in this study, the rotational viscosity exhibited an extraordinary drop after reaching the highest value gamma_1 as the temperature was lowered. This behavior is not observed in normal liquid crystals. But this phenomena can be attributed to the existence of nematic biaxial phase below the rod-like nematic N_{c} phase. The pretransitional increase in gamma _1 near the disk-like nematic to smectic -A phase transition of the pure CsPFO H_2O systems are better understood with the help of mean-field models of W. L. McMillan. He predicted a critical exponent nu = -{1over 2} for the divergence of gamma_1. The polymer (PEO, molecular weight = 10 ^5) dissolved in CsPFO H_2O system (which has 0.6% critical polymer concentration), suppressed the nematic to lamellar smectic phase transition in concentrated polymer solutions (0.75% and higher). In dilute polymer solutions with lower than 0.3% polyethylene-oxide, a linear increase of gamma_1 is observed, which agrees with Brochard theory. The polymer solutions in thermotropic liquid crystal solvents

  18. Smectic Layer Deformation of Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal Sandwiched between Polymer Walls with Anchoring Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashige, Takeshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Ikehata, Seiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2002-05-01

    We studied smectic layer structures of ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) formed in elongated small spaces surrounded by molecule-aligned polymer walls and rubbed polyimide alignment layers. The polymer walls, which are parallel to the rubbing direction and vertical to the alignment layers, were formed by the photopolymerization of an aligned monomer under patterned ultraviolet light irradiation. From the observation of the alignment textures of the FLC between the polymer walls with a polarizing microscope, it was found that the smectic layer structure was changed from vertical plane bending alignment (chevron structure), as observed with a conventional surface-stabilized FLC, into horizontal plane bending, as the interval between the polymer walls decreased. It is thought that the smectic layer structure is governed by the competition between the anchoring effects of the alignment polyimide layers and the molecule-aligned polymer walls.

  19. Pattern Polymerization-Induced Phase Separation in a Polymer-Dispersed Liquid Crystal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyu, Thein

    2002-03-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)/polymer composite films have gained attention increasingly due to their applications in flat panel displays and shutters. Photopolymerization is a preferred method to produce LC/polymer composite films from mixtures of reactive monomers and LCs. On the basis of the combined Flory-Huggins free energy for isotropic mixing and Maier-Saupe free energy for nematic ordering along with the elastic free energy of the network, phase diagrams have been established by solving self-consistently. A theoretical simulation has been modeled by incorporating the kinetics of crosslinking reaction into the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL-model C) equations to elucidate the emergence of nematic domains during photopolymerization induced phase separation in electrically switchable holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (H-PDLC). The simulated morphological patterns in the concentration and orientation order parameter fields show discrete layers of liquid crystal droplets alternating periodically with polymer network-rich layers. Furthermore, we recognized the potential for producing electrically tunable microlens from PDLC systems through pattern-photopolymerization-induced phase separation by means of the interference of two horizontal waves and two vertical waves. Our simulation revealed that the emerged LC microlens are of the order of a few hundred nanometers. These LC microlens are not only uniformed in size, but also form in regular arrays, reminiscence of the compound eyes found in flies, ants, and wasps. Supported by ALCOM, NSF DMR 99-03519, and OBR.

  20. Photorefractive effects in polymer dissolved liquid crystal composites dopes with fullerene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Hiroshi; Hasebe, Ryoya; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Noda, Kohei; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the photorefractive performance of the polymer dissolved liquid crystalline composite (PDLCC), in which liquid crystalline polymer and low-molar-mass liquid crystal are miscible without phase separation, doped with three kinds of fullerene derivatives with different length of alkyl groups. The photorefractive performance was improved for the photorefractive PDLCC doped with fullerene derivatives with long length of alkyl groups. The photorefractive grating formation originates in the cooperative reorientation of the liquid crystalline director and the space charge field was estimated using the elastic continuum theory and the field for the PDLCC doped with the functionalized fullerene with longer alkyl side groups was larger than that for the PDLCC doped with conventional fullerene C60.

  1. New Insight into Photoalignment of Liquid Crystals on Coumarin-Containing Polymer Films

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.; Trajkovska, A.; Wallace, J.U.; Chen, S.H.

    2006-06-09

    Polymers containing 6- and 7-substituted coumarin moieties were prepared as photoalignment films through linearly polarized UV irradiation to a varying fluence for an investigation of liquid crystal orientation. Model coumarin monomers and dimers were also synthesized and characterized as part of a novel approach to the interpretation of liquid crystal orientation in terms of monomer conversion. The experimental results for monomer conversion as a function of fluence were used to validate the first-order kinetics with an exponentially decaying rate constant as the reaction proceeds. A kinetic model was constructed to describe the evolutions of the orientational order on the parts of the reacted and the unreacted coumarin moieties. The model was instrumental to the visualization of liquid crystal orientation on photoalignment films at the early and late stages of dimerization. Furthermore, the observed crossover in liquid crystal orientation on the polymer film comprising 7-substituted coumarin moieties was successfully interpreted by considering three factors: the relative abundance of the reacted and unreacted coumarin moieties, the degrees of their orientational order predicted by the kinetic model, and the energetics of molecular interaction.

  2. Dielectric and electro-optical properties of polymer-stabilized liquid crystal. II. Polymer PiBMA dispersed in MBBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Pankaj Kumar; Pande, Mukti; Singh, Shri

    2016-09-01

    In continuation of our earlier work (Pande et al. in Appl Phys A 122:217-226, 2016), we report the results of dielectric and electro-optical properties of pure MBBA and PSLC (polymer PiBMA dispersed in MBBA) systems. The polymer networks domains formed are found to be anisotropic and are oriented in the direction of electric field for both the planar and homeotropic alignment cells. The dielectric anisotropy, optical anisotropy, response time, threshold voltage, splay elastic constant and rotational viscosity were observed for both the LC and PSLC systems with electric field. The liquid crystal properties are affected significantly with increasing concentration of polymer in pure LC material. It has been observed that the polymer networks interaction plays a major role in changing the properties of PSLC system. The effect of dielectric loss and dielectric permittivity on both pure LC and PSLC systems is also discussed.

  3. Relationship of Polymer Molecular Weight and Cure Temperature in Photopolymerization-Induced Phase Separation of Liquid Crystal and Polymer Fiber Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashige, Takeshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Ikehata, Seiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2002-10-01

    We studied the dependence of polymer molecular weight on cure temperature in the photopolymerization-induced phase separation of liquid crystal and polymer fiber networks, using gel permeation chromatography. As the experimental result, it was found for the first time that the molecular weight of the polymer, which is segregated and aggregated in the solution of monomer and the liquid crystal, increases with decreasing the temperature. We considered that the spatial concentration of growing polymer density, which is induced by the phase separation with the temperature decrease, accelerates the chemical bonding of polymer molecules.

  4. Polarization independent blue phase liquid crystal gratings based on periodic polymer slices structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jing; Li, Qing; Hu, Kai

    2013-10-01

    A polarization independent switchable phase grating based on polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystal is proposed. A high efficiency of the phase grating has been achieved because of the sharp rectangular phase profile which shows good agreement with the simulation results. The diffraction efficiency of the 1st order is 38%, the response time is in the submillisecond range, and the phase grating is independent of the polarization of the incident light. The voltage-induced hysteresis characteristics are also investigated.

  5. Electrically switchable holographic liquid crystal/polymer Fresnel lens using a Michelson interferometer.

    PubMed

    Jashnsaz, Hossein; Mohajerani, Ezeddin; Nemati, Hossein; Razavi, Seyed Hossein; Alidokht, Isa Ahmad

    2011-06-10

    A holographic technique for fabricating an electrically switchable liquid crystal/polymer composite Fresnel lens is reported. A Michelson interferometer is used to produce the required Fresnel pattern, by placing a convex lens into one path of the interferometer. Simplicity of the method and the possibility of fabricating different focal length lenses in a single arrangement are advantages of the method. The performance of the fabricated lens was demonstrated and its electro-optical properties were investigated for its primary focal length.

  6. Highly robust crystalsome via directed polymer crystallization at curved liquid/liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenda; Qi, Hao; Zhou, Tian; Mei, Shan; Han, Lin; Higuchi, Takeshi; Jinnai, Hiroshi; Li, Christopher Y.

    2016-02-01

    Lipids and amphiphilic block copolymers spontaneously self-assemble in water to form a plethora of micelles and vesicles. They are typically fluidic in nature and often mechanically weak for applications such as drug delivery and gene therapeutics. Mechanical properties of polymeric materials could be improved by forming crystalline structures. However, most of the self-assembled micelles and vesicles have curved surfaces and precisely tuning crystallization within a nanoscale curved space is challenging, as the curved geometry is incommensurate with crystals having three-dimensional translational symmetry. Herein, we report using a miniemulsion crystallization method to grow nanosized, polymer single-crystal-like capsules. We coin the name crystalsome to describe this unique structure, because they are formed by polymer lamellar crystals and their structure mimics liposomes and polymersomes. Using poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) as the model polymer, we show that curved water/p-xylene interface formed by the miniemulsion process can guide the growth of PLLA single crystals. Crystalsomes with the size ranging from ~148 nm to over 1 μm have been formed. Atomic force microscopy measurement demonstrate a two to three orders of magnitude increase in bending modulus compared with conventional polymersomes. We envisage that this novel structure could shed light on investigating spherical crystallography and drug delivery.

  7. Highly robust crystalsome via directed polymer crystallization at curved liquid/liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenda; Qi, Hao; Zhou, Tian; Mei, Shan; Han, Lin; Higuchi, Takeshi; Jinnai, Hiroshi; Li, Christopher Y.

    2016-01-01

    Lipids and amphiphilic block copolymers spontaneously self-assemble in water to form a plethora of micelles and vesicles. They are typically fluidic in nature and often mechanically weak for applications such as drug delivery and gene therapeutics. Mechanical properties of polymeric materials could be improved by forming crystalline structures. However, most of the self-assembled micelles and vesicles have curved surfaces and precisely tuning crystallization within a nanoscale curved space is challenging, as the curved geometry is incommensurate with crystals having three-dimensional translational symmetry. Herein, we report using a miniemulsion crystallization method to grow nanosized, polymer single-crystal-like capsules. We coin the name crystalsome to describe this unique structure, because they are formed by polymer lamellar crystals and their structure mimics liposomes and polymersomes. Using poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) as the model polymer, we show that curved water/p-xylene interface formed by the miniemulsion process can guide the growth of PLLA single crystals. Crystalsomes with the size ranging from ∼148 nm to over 1 μm have been formed. Atomic force microscopy measurement demonstrate a two to three orders of magnitude increase in bending modulus compared with conventional polymersomes. We envisage that this novel structure could shed light on investigating spherical crystallography and drug delivery. PMID:26837260

  8. Theory and characteristics of holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal transmission grating with scaffolding morphology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenbin; Liu, Yonggang; Diao, Zhihui; Yang, Chengliang; Yao, Lishuang; Ma, Ji; Xuan, Li

    2012-06-20

    We have performed a detailed characterization of the optical properties of a holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (LC) transmission grating with polymer scaffolding morphology, which was fabricated with conventional high-functionality acrylate monomer under low curing intensity. Temporal evolution of the grating formation was investigated, and the amount of phase-separated LC was determined by birefringence investigation. A grating model combined with anisotropic coupled-wave theory yielded good agreement with experimental data without any fitting parameter. The results in this study demonstrate the non droplet scaffolding morphology grating is characterized by a high degree of phase separation (70%), high anisotropy, low scattering loss (<6%), and high diffraction efficiency (95%).

  9. Progress in the Development of Polymer Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Flakes for Display Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kosc, T.Z.; Marshall, K.L.; Trajkovska-Petkoska, A.; Kimball, E.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2004-12-31

    Polymer cholesteric liquid crystal (PCLC) flake technology is being developed as an alternative display technology for flexible, reflective particle displays. The motion of PCLC flakes suspended in a host fluid can be controlled with an electric field, creating means to electrically control for the flakes ability to brightly reflect light that is circularly polarized. The PCLC flake/host fluid dispersion has been successfully micro-encapsulated both in a polymer matrix and in gelatin micro-capsules. Micro-encapsulation will not only expand the applications scope of the technology, but also may aid in addressing some potential problem areas that are inherent to many forms of particle display technology.

  10. Nanoparticle free polymer blends for light scattering films in liquid crystal displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Satoshi; Mochiduki, Kazuhide; Kubo, Naoya; Yokoyama, Yoshiyuki

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports an approach using nanoparticle free polymer blends for light scattering films in liquid crystal displays. The ability to create the regularly structured circle of approximately 200 nm diameter in the light scattering film by blending two specified polymers with carboxylic acid groups and epoxy groups was demonstrated. The developed light scattering film based on thermosetting system indicated regularly structured nanomorphology, high light scattering rates of more than 3.9% at 300-600 nm of wavelength, and fast thermal cross-linking reaction at 150 °C and 60 s in thermosetting conditions for high productivity.

  11. Transient self-interaction of light in a liquid-crystal polymer film containing azodye molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Simonov, A N

    1999-07-31

    Transient self-interaction of low-power He - Ne laser radiation (1 < 50 mW cm{sup -2} ) in a liquid-crystal polymer film containing chemically bound azodye molecules was observed experimentally. The self-interaction occurred in the region of a temperature-induced phase transition in the polymer film and was accompanied by the formation of quasi-periodic ring-shaped structures in the distribution of the transmitted light intensity. (this issue is dedicated to the memory of s a akhmanov)

  12. Crystallization of Polymers at liquid/liquid interface templated by single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenda; Li, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    Nanosized single-walled carbon nanotube rings were fabricated by using a Pickering emulsion-based method. By tuning a water/oil/SWNT miniemulsion system, SWNT rings with a diameter of ˜200 nm can be readily achieved. The formation mechanism is attributed to the bending force induced by the curved liquid/liquid interface. Crystallization of polyethylene homo- and copolymers using this unique SWNT rings as the nucleation agent was conducted at the curved liquid/liquid interface. Crystal structure, hybrid morphology and crystallization kinetics were systematically studied. The structure of controlled alternating patterns on SWNT rings has great potential in various applications in large-scale integrated circuits and single-electron devices.

  13. Electroclinic effect in a chiral smectic-A liquid crystal stabilized by an anisotropic polymer network.

    PubMed

    Petit, Mohamed; Daoudi, Abdelylah; Ismaili, Mimoun; Buisine, Jean Marc

    2006-12-01

    We have studied the effect of an anisotropic polymer network on the coupling of molecular tilt to applied electric field in the chiral S{A} phase. The polymer network is formed from a photoreactive achiral monomer in a thin planar S{C}{*} cell. Experimental data, obtained from electro-optical measurements near to the S{A}-S{c}{*} transition temperature, T{c} , of the induced molecular tilt, switching time, as well as induced polarization as a function of temperature and electric field strength are presented. The results clearly show that, close to T{c} , the electroclinic effect is largely controlled by the polymer network. The experimental results are discussed in the framework of a simple phenomenological model, extended from the Landau model, which includes the bulk free energy arising from the anisotropic interaction between the polymer network and the liquid crystal director, and the elastic free energy resulting from the anchoring (supposed rigid) of the liquid crystal molecules at the polymer boundaries.

  14. In situ prepared polymer films as alignment layers for nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Pires, David; Galerne, Yves

    2006-12-15

    By means of UV-visible irradiations and convenient photoinitiators, we realize the cross-linked polymerization of a triacrylate monomer in solution in a nematic liquid crystal (p-pentyl-p{sup '}-cyanobiphenyl) at low concentrations (a few wt %), i.e., under conditions opposite to the synthesis of polymer-dispersed liquid crystals. As atomic force microscope measurements show, when operating close to, but below, the percolation transition, a thin polymer layer is synthesized in situ, directly covering and coating all the substrate. These observations therefore confirm that the properties of anchoring and of alignment memory previously observed in such nematic cells effectively originate from the synthesized polymer film. According to the photoinitiator used, bulk or surface polymerizations dominate and respectively produce continuous or discontinuous films (i.e., with separate clusters). In the former case, polymer aggregates are first synthesized. They then diffuse in the volume until they meet a surface, where they definitely stick if they are large enough. An estimate of the entropy and interaction energy differences between the two states, stuck or free, shows that the aggregates stick on the substrates if their size exceeds the length of about three monomers, i.e., if they contain more than 20-30 monomers. Interestingly, these films may be used to replicate nonuniform alignment patterns that are difficult to realize otherwise. The method may be considered as an imprinting method.

  15. Optical diffractometry of highly anisotropic holographic gratings formed by liquid crystal and polymer phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakiuchida, Hiroshi; Tazawa, Masato; Yoshimura, Kazuki; Ogiwara, Akifumi

    2012-12-01

    Optical diffractometry is proposed as a practical method of quantitatively analyzing the microscopic structural origins of a wide range of highly efficient and linearly polarized optical diffraction grating produced from holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal. The structure is organized by a spatially periodical distribution of submicrometer-scale liquid crystal (LC) droplets in a polymer matrix. Six independent Bragg diffraction spectra were obtained at two orthogonal polarization states at temperatures below, at, and above the nematic-to-isotropic phase transition point. These spectra were simultaneously analyzed by employing anisotropic diffraction theory under the restraint of a simple and widely useful structural model constructed on the basis of the previously reported microscopic observations. The refractive indices of spatially periodic LC- and polymer-rich phases were analyzed using Cauchy's equation as a function of optical wavelength. The present diffractometry was demonstrated for a variety of holographic structures, and the structural parameters were discussed such as the filling ratio of LC droplets to polymer matrix, the orientational order in the droplets, and the thermo-optic properties in the LC droplets. Furthermore, the higher order Bragg diffractions were measured and discussed. The proposed method was examined in consistency by comparisons with polarizing optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  16. Optical diffractometry of highly anisotropic holographic gratings formed by liquid crystal and polymer phase separation.

    PubMed

    Kakiuchida, Hiroshi; Tazawa, Masato; Yoshimura, Kazuki; Ogiwara, Akifumi

    2012-12-01

    Optical diffractometry is proposed as a practical method of quantitatively analyzing the microscopic structural origins of a wide range of highly efficient and linearly polarized optical diffraction grating produced from holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal. The structure is organized by a spatially periodical distribution of submicrometer-scale liquid crystal (LC) droplets in a polymer matrix. Six independent Bragg diffraction spectra were obtained at two orthogonal polarization states at temperatures below, at, and above the nematic-to-isotropic phase transition point. These spectra were simultaneously analyzed by employing anisotropic diffraction theory under the restraint of a simple and widely useful structural model constructed on the basis of the previously reported microscopic observations. The refractive indices of spatially periodic LC- and polymer-rich phases were analyzed using Cauchy's equation as a function of optical wavelength. The present diffractometry was demonstrated for a variety of holographic structures, and the structural parameters were discussed such as the filling ratio of LC droplets to polymer matrix, the orientational order in the droplets, and the thermo-optic properties in the LC droplets. Furthermore, the higher order Bragg diffractions were measured and discussed. The proposed method was examined in consistency by comparisons with polarizing optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  17. Electrically switchable polymer liquid crystal and polymer birefringent flake in fluid host systems and optical devices utilizing same

    DOEpatents

    Marshall, Kenneth L.; Kosc, Tanya Z.; Jacobs, Stephen D.; Faris, Sadeg M.; Li, Le

    2003-12-16

    Flakes or platelets of polymer liquid crystals (PLC) or other birefringent polymers (BP) suspended in a fluid host medium constitute a system that can function as the active element in an electrically switchable optical device when the suspension is either contained between a pair of rigid substrates bearing transparent conductive coatings or dispersed as microcapsules within the body of a flexible host polymer. Optical properties of these flake materials include large effective optical path length, different polarization states and high angular sensitivity in their selective reflection or birefringence. The flakes or platelets of these devices need only a 3-20.degree. rotation about the normal to the cell surface to achieve switching characteristics obtainable with prior devices using particle rotation or translation.

  18. Design and fabrication of a variable optical attenuator based on polymer-dispersed liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Jun; Xu, Su; Tao, Tao; Wang, Qian

    2005-02-01

    In order to obtain a low polarization dependent loss (PDL) and a large attenuation range simultaneously, an optimal design and fabrication of a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) based variable optical attenuator (VOA) is presented. First, an optimal diameter of the liquid crystal droplets is determined by the anomalous diffraction approach (ADA). This optimal diameter gives maximal scattering and thus a large attenuation range is achieved with a relatively thin liquid crystal cell. Secondly, the fabrication of PDLC cell is carried out. The influence of the ultraviolet (UV) curing condition on the morphology of the LC droplets is investigated. For a given liquid crystal concentration, the optimal UV curing power is obtained after a series of statistically designed experiments. Finally, an optical configuration of the PDLC based VOA is presented. Measurements of the attenuation and the PDL are carried out with this configuration. The measured results show that the device has a typical attenuation range of 25dB. The corresponding PDL is nearly 1dB and the insertion loss is 1.8dB. The threshold voltage is 8Vrms and the saturation voltage is 40Vrms. From these measured results, one can see that the fabricated VOA based on PDLC is much more practical for optical communications as compared to the existing ones.

  19. Photoluminescence properties of cadmium-selenide quantum dots embedded in a liquid-crystal polymer matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Tselikov, G. I. Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Plenge, J.; Ruehl, E.; Shatalova, A. M.; Shandryuk, G. A.; Merekalov, A. S.; Tal'roze, R. V.

    2013-05-15

    The photoluminescence properties of cadmium-selenide (CdSe) quantum dots with an average size of {approx}3 nm, embedded in a liquid-crystal polymer matrix are studied. It was found that an increase in the quantum-dot concentration results in modification of the intrinsic (exciton) photoluminescence spectrum in the range 500-600 nm and a nonmonotonic change in its intensity. Time-resolved measurements show the biexponential decay of the photoluminescence intensity with various ratios of fast and slow components depending on the quantum-dot concentration. In this case, the characteristic lifetimes of exciton photoluminescence are 5-10 and 35-50 ns for the fast and slow components, respectively, which is much shorter than the times for colloidal CdSe quantum dots of the same size. The observed features of the photoluminescence spectra and kinetics are explained by the effects of light reabsorption, energy transfer from quantum dots to the liquid-crystal polymer matrix, and the effect of the electronic states at the CdSe/(liquid crystal) interface.

  20. Immobilization of Polymer-Decorated Liquid Crystal Droplets on Chemically Tailored Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kinsinger, Michael I.; Buck, Maren E.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Lynn, David M.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that the assembly of an amphiphilic polyamine on the interfaces of micrometer-sized droplets of a thermotropic liquid crystal (LC) dispersed in aqueous solutions can be used to facilitate the immobilization of LC droplets on chemically functionalized surfaces. Polymer 1 was designed to contain both hydrophobic (alkyl-functionalized) and hydrophilic (primary and tertiary amine-functionalized) side chain functionality. The assembly of this polymer at the interfaces of aqueous dispersions of LC droplets was achieved by spontaneous adsorption of polymer from aqueous solution. Polymer adsorption triggered transitions in the orientational ordering of the LCs, as observed by polarized light and bright-field microscopy. We demonstrate that the presence of polymer 1 on the interfaces of these droplets can be exploited to immobilize LC droplets on planar solid surfaces through covalent bond formation (e.g., for surfaces coated with polymer multilayers containing reactive azlactone functionality) or through electrostatic interactions (e.g., for surfaces coated with multilayers containing hydrolyzed azlactone functionality). Characterization of immobilized LC droplets by polarized, fluorescence, and laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed the general spherical shape of the polymer-coated LC droplets to be maintained after immobilization, and that immobilization led to additional ordering transitions within the droplets that was dependent on the nature of the surfaces with which they were in contact. Polymer 1-functionalized LC droplets were not immobilized on polymer multilayers treated with poly(ethylene imine) (PEI). We demonstrate that the ability to design surfaces that promote or prevent the immobilization of polymer-functionalized LC droplets can exploited to pattern the immobilization of LC droplets on surfaces. The results of this investigation provide the basis of an approach that could be used to tailor the properties of dispersed LC emulsions and

  1. Single-mode lasing from dye-doped holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal transmission gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenbin; Liu, Quan; Xuan, Li; Chen, Linsen

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate single-mode laser operation in dye-doped holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) transmission gratings. The gratings are fabricated in cells made from specifically chosen glass substrates to decrease the refractive index difference between the waveguide core layer and cladding layer. The phase separation degree of liquid crystal after holographic recording is further optimized to confine only the lowest propagation mode in the device. The mode selection mechanism is explained under the framework of the waveguide distributed feedback (DFB) theory. The wavelength of single-mode lasing can be tuned between 620 and 660 nm by varying the grating period. Our results show the HPDLC technique could provide single-mode organic DFB lasers in a tunable, simple, and large-area manner.

  2. Electro-optic properties of switchable gratings made of polymer and nematic liquid-crystal slices.

    PubMed

    d'Alessandro, A; Asquini, R; Gizzi, C; Caputo, R; Umeton, C; Veltri, A; Sukhov, A V

    2004-06-15

    We report the diffraction properties at wavelengths of 632.8 and 1550 nm for volume transmission gratings made of a sequence of continuously aligned nematic liquid-crystal layers separated by isotropic polymer slices. The gratings are generated by holographically curing a solution of liquid crystal diluted in an isotropic prepolymer by means of a laser beam at a wavelength of 352 nm with a total intensity of approximately 10 mW/cm2. A diffraction efficiency of 98% was measured, and an electric field as low as 5 V/microm switches off the phase grating. Measured angular spectra are fitted by use of the modified coupled-mode theory including the effects of grating birefringence.

  3. Neutron scattering as a probe of liquid crystal polymer-reinforced composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelm, R.P.; Douglas, E.P.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Langlois, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This research project sought to obtain nanoscale and molecular level information on the mechanism of reinforcement in liquid crystal polymer (LCP)-reinforced composites, to realize molecular-reinforced LCP composites, and to test the validity of the concept of molecular reinforcement. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to study the structures in the ternary phase diagram of LCP with liquid crystal thermosets and solvent on length scales ranging from 1-100 nm. The goal of the scattering measurements is to understand the phase morphology and degree of segregation of the reinforcing and matrix components. This information helps elucidate the physics of self assembly in these systems. This work provides an experimental basis for a microengineering approach to composites of vastly improved properties.

  4. Effects of polymers on the rotational viscosities of nematic liquid crystals and dynamics of field alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.

    1993-12-31

    Many of the important physical phenomena exhibited by the nematic phase, such as its unusual flow properties and its responses to the electric and the magnetic fields, can be discussed regarding it as a continous medium. The Leslie-Erickson dynamic theory has the six dissipative coefficients from continuum model of liquid crystal. Parodi showed that only five of them are independent, when Onsagar`s reciprocal relations are used. One of these, which has no counterpart in the isotropic liquids, is the rotational viscosity co-efficient, {gamma}{sub 1}. The main objective of this project is to study the rotational viscosities of selected micellar nematic systems and the effect of dissolved polymers in micellar and thermotropic liqud crystals. We used rotating magnetic field method which allows one to determine {gamma}{sub 1} and the anisotropic magnetic susceptibility, {chi}{sub a}. For the ionic surfactant liquid crystals of SDS and KL systems used in this study, the rotational viscosity exhibited an extraordinary drop after reaching the highest values {gamma}{sub 1} as the temperature was lowered. This behavior is not observed in normal liquid crystals. But this phenomena can be attributed to the existence of nematic biaxial phase below the rod-like nematic N{sub c} phase. The pretransitional increase in {gamma}{sub 1} near the disk-like nematic to smectic-A phase transition of the pure CsPFO/H{sub 2}O systems are better understood with the help of mean-field models of W.L. McMillan. He predicted a critical exponent {nu} = {1/2} for the divergence of {gamma}{sub 1}. The polymer (PEO, molecular weight = 10{sup 5}) dissolved in CsPFO/H{sub 2}O system (which has 0.6% critical polymer concentration), suppressed the nematic to lamellar smectic phase transition in concentrated polymer solutions (0.75% and higher). In dilute polymer solutions with lower than 0.3% polyethylene-oxide, a linear increase of {gamma}{sub 1} is observed, which agrees with Brochard theory.

  5. Responsive ionic liquid-polymer 2D photonic crystal gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Natasha L; Hong, Zhenmin; Asher, Sanford A

    2014-12-21

    We developed novel air-stable 2D polymerized photonic crystal (2DPC) sensing materials for visual detection of gas phase analytes such as water and ammonia by utilizing a new ionic liquid, ethylguanidine perchlorate (EGP) as the mobile phase. Because of the negligible ionic liquid vapor pressure these 2DPC sensors are indefinitely air stable and, therefore, can be used to sense atmospheric analytes. 2D arrays of ~640 nm polystyrene nanospheres were attached to the surface of crosslinked poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA)-based polymer networks dispersed in EGP. The wavelength of the bright 2D photonic crystal diffraction depends sensitively on the 2D array particle spacing. The volume phase transition response of the EGP-pHEMA system to water vapor or gaseous ammonia changes the 2DPC particle spacing, enabling the visual determination of the analyte concentration. Water absorbed by EGP increases the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter, which shrinks the polymer network and causes a blue shift in the diffracted light. Ammonia absorbed by the EGP deprotonates the pHEMA-co-acrylic acid carboxyl groups, swelling the polymer which red shifts the diffracted light.

  6. Photomechanical bending mechanics of polydomain azobenzene liquid crystal polymer network films

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Liang; Torres, Yanira; Oates, William S.; Lee, Kyung Min; McClung, Amber J.; Baur, Jeffery; White, Timothy J.

    2012-07-01

    Glassy, polydomain azobenzene liquid crystal polymer networks (azo-LCNs) have been synthesized, characterized, and modeled to understand composition dependence on large amplitude, bidirectional bending, and twisting deformation upon irradiation with linearly polarized blue-green (440-514 nm) light. These materials exhibit interesting properties for adaptive structure applications in which the shape of the photoresponsive material can be rapidly reconfigured with light. The basis for the photomechanical output observed in these materials is absorption of actinic light by azobenzene, which upon photoisomerization dictates an internal stress within the local polymer network. The photoinduced evolution of the underlying liquid crystal microstructure is manifested as macroscopic deformation of the glassy polymer film. Accordingly, this work examines the polarization-controlled bidirectional bending of highly concentrated azo-LCN materials and correlates the macroscopic output (observed as bending) to measured blocked stresses upon irradiation with blue-green light of varying polarization. The resulting photomechanical output is highly dependent on the concentration of crosslinked azobenzene mesogens employed in the formulation. Experiments that quantify photomechanical bending and photogenerated stress are compared to a large deformation photomechanical shell model to quantify the effect of polarized light interactions with the material during static and dynamic polarized light induced deformation. The model comparisons illustrate differences in internal photostrain and deformation rates as a function of composition and external mechanical constraints.

  7. Photosensitivity of reflection notch tuning and broadening in polymer stabilized cholesteric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Min; Tondiglia, Vincent P; White, Timothy J

    2016-01-28

    The position or bandwidth of the selective reflection of polymer stabilized cholesteric liquid crystals (PSCLCs) prepared from negative dielectric anisotropy ("-Δε") liquid crystalline hosts can be shifted by applying a DC voltage. The underlying mechanism of the tuning or broadening of the reflection of PSCLCs detailed in these recent efforts is ion-facilitated, electromechanical deformation of the structurally chiral, polymer stabilizing network in the presence of a DC bias. Here, we show that these electro-optic responses can also be photosensitive. The photosensitivity is most directly related to the presence of photoinitiator, which is a known ionic contaminant to liquid crystal devices. Measurement of the ion density of a series of control compositions before, during, and after irradiation with UV light confirms that the ion density in compositions that exhibit photosensitivity is increased by irradiation and correlates to not only the concentration of the photoinitiator but also the type. Thus, the magnitude of the electrically tuned or broadened reflection of PSCLC of certain compositions when subjected to DC field is further increased in the presence of UV light. While interesting and potentially useful in applications such as architectural windows, the effect may be deleterious to some device implementations. Accordingly, compositions in which photosensitivity is not observed are identified.

  8. Faraday waves on finite thickness smectic A liquid crystal and polymer gel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ovando-Vazquez, C.; Rodriguez, O. Vazquez; Hernandez-Contreras, M.

    2008-11-13

    We studied with linear stability theory the Faraday waves on the surface of a smectic A liquid crystal and polymer gel-vapor systems of finite thicknesses. Model smectic A material exhibits alternating subharmonic-harmonic patterns of stability curves in a plot of driving acceleration versus wave number. For the case of highly viscoelastic gel media there are coexisting surface modes of harmonic and subharmonic types that correspond to peaks in the plot of the critical acceleration as a function of wave frequency. Larger frequencies lead to subsequent peaks of coexisting subharmonic waves only.

  9. Effect of polarization on dielectric behaviour of PET/0.8PHB polymer liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yarramaneni, Sridharbabu; Sharma, Anu; Quamara, J. K.

    2014-04-24

    Dielectric constant and loss behaviour of pristine and polarized samples of Poly (p-hydroxybenzoic acid-co-ethylene terephthalate) polymer liquid crystals were studied at continuous temperatures ranging from 20 °C to 250 °C, polarized at potentials 500V and 2000V with high precision d.c. power supply. Dielectric constant appears to be almost linearly dependent in the lower temperature region and is independent in the higher temperature region. Dielectric loss becomes approximately ten times lower at higher temperatures.

  10. A novel approach for normalizing the photoreflectance spectrum by using polymer-dispersed liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Liao, Y F; Chang, C C; Wang, D P; Tseng, B H; Liao, Y D; Lin, C H

    2012-10-01

    This study developed a novel type of normalization procedure for modulation reflectance spectroscopy experiments to obtain the relative change in the reflectance spectrum, ΔR/R. This technique uses a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal to ensure that the dc component of the signal from the detector remained constant by varying the intensity of the light striking the sample. This method is particularly useful for photoreflectance measurement, which may encounter background problems because of scattered pump light and/or photoluminescence. It does not require a change in the gain of the detector or the use of a variable neutral density filter mounted on a servo-motor.

  11. A novel approach for normalizing the photoreflectance spectrum by using polymer-dispersed liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Y. F.; Chang, C. C.; Wang, D. P.; Tseng, B. H.; Liao, Y. D.; Lin, C. H.

    2012-10-01

    This study developed a novel type of normalization procedure for modulation reflectance spectroscopy experiments to obtain the relative change in the reflectance spectrum, ΔR/R. This technique uses a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal to ensure that the dc component of the signal from the detector remained constant by varying the intensity of the light striking the sample. This method is particularly useful for photoreflectance measurement, which may encounter background problems because of scattered pump light and/or photoluminescence. It does not require a change in the gain of the detector or the use of a variable neutral density filter mounted on a servo-motor.

  12. Small-angle light scattering from polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal films

    SciTech Connect

    Loiko, V. A. Maschke, U.; Zyryanov, V. Ya.; Konkolovich, A. V.; Misckevich, A. A.

    2008-10-15

    A method is developed for modeling and computing the angular distribution of light scattered forward from a single-layer polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal (PDLC) film. The method is based on effective-medium approximation, anomalous diffraction approximation, and far-field single-scattering approximation. The angular distribution of forward-scattered light is analyzed for PDLC films with droplet size larger than the optical wavelength. The method can be used to study field-and temperature-induced phase transitions in LC droplets with cylindrical symmetry by measuring polarized scattered light intensity.

  13. Temperature-independent zero-birefringence polymer for liquid crystal displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikanai, M. D.; Tagaya, A.; Koike, Y.

    2016-03-01

    A polymer film that shows almost no orientational birefringence even when the polymer main chain is in an oriented state and almost no temperature dependence of orientational birefringence in the temperature range from around -40 to 85 °C was prepared. This temperature range is important because it is where in-car liquid crystal displays (LCDs) are generally used; therefore, it is desirable to have constant orientational birefringence over this range. We suggest a method to compensate for the intrinsic birefringence and temperature coefficient of intrinsic birefringence of individual polymers by copolymerizing monomers of homopolymers that display opposite signs of the two parameters described above. Analysis of four types of polymers, methyl methacrylate (MMA), 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate, benzyl methacrylate (BzMA), and phenyl methacrylate (PhMA), reveal that they possess both positive and negative signs of their temperature coefficient of intrinsic birefringence. Using this approach, we prepare P(MMA/PhMA/BzMA) (39:23:38 wt. %), which exhibits almost no intrinsic birefringence and almost no temperature dependence of intrinsic birefringence. The retardation of this polymer film when drawn uniaxially scarcely changed (between 0.3 and 0.8 nm) between 12 and 70 °C, which is small enough not to cause image degradation in LCDs.

  14. Direct Measurement of Electric-Field-Induced Birefringence in a Polymer-Stabilized Blue-Phase Liquid Crystal Composite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Wu, “Low voltage and high transmittance blue-phase liquid crystal displays with corrugated electrodes,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 96(1), 011102 (2010). 7. K...Cloud, Optical Methods of Engineering Analysis (Cambridge, New York, 1998). 1.Introduction Polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid crystal (PS-BPLC...with a large induced birefringence for lowering the operation voltage of display devices. 2. Experiment and theoretical analysis The PS-BPLC employed

  15. Long-term evaluation of a liquid crystal polymer (LCP)-based retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Joonsoo; Bae, So Hyun; Seo, Jong-Mo; Chung, Hum; Kim, Sung June

    2016-04-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to evaluate the long-term reliability of a recently presented liquid crystal polymer (LCP) -based retinal prosthesis in vitro as well as in vivo. Because an all-polymer implant introduces another intrinsic leak type due to gas permeation, for which the traditional helium leak test for metallic packages was not designed to quantify, a new method to investigate its durability is required. Approach. We designed and carried out a series of reliability tests specifically for all-polymer implants by quantitatively investigating moisture ingress through various pathways of the polymer surface, and the polymer-polymer and polymer-metal adhesions. Moisture permeation through the bulk material was estimated by analytic calculation, while water ingress through the adhesively sealed LCP-LCP and LCP-metal interfaces was investigated using the separate parts of an electrode array and a package in an accelerated aging condition. In vivo tests were done in rabbits to examine the long-term biocompatibility and implantation stability by fundus observation and optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Main results. The analytic calculation estimated good barrier properties of the LCP. Samples of the LCP-based electrode array failed after 114 days in 87 °C saline as a result of water penetration through the LCP-metal interface. An eye-conformable LCP package survived for 87 days in an accelerated condition at 87 °C. The in vivo results confirmed that no adverse effects were observed around the retina 2.5 years after the implantation of the device. Significance. These long-term evaluation results show the potential for the chronic use of LCP-based biomedical implants to provide an alternative to traditional metallic packages.

  16. Localised polymer networks in chiral nematic liquid crystals for high speed photonic switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartan, Chloe C.; Salter, Patrick S.; Booth, Martin J.; Morris, Stephen M.; Elston, Steve J.

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembled periodic structures based upon chiral liquid crystalline materials have significant potential in the field of photonics ranging from fast-switching optoelectronic devices to low-threshold lasers. The flexoelectro-optic effect, which is observed in chiral nematic liquid crystals (LCs) when an electric field is applied perpendicular to the helical axis, has significant potential as it exhibits analogue switching in 10-100 μs. However, the major technological barrier that prohibits the commercial realisation of this electro-optic effect is the requirement of a uniform, in-plane alignment of the helix axis between glass substrates. Here, it is shown that periodic polymer structures engineered in the nematic phase of a chiral nematic LC device using direct laser writing can result in the spontaneous formation of the necessary uniform lying helix (ULH) state. Specifically, two-photon polymerization is used in conjunction with a spatial light modulator so as to correct for aberrations introduced by the bounding glass substrates enabling the polymer structures to be fabricated directly into the device. The ULH state appears to be stable in the absence of an externally applied electric field, and the optimum contrast between the bright and dark states is obtained using polymer structures that have periodicities of the order of the device thickness.

  17. Control over Internal Structure of Liquid Crystal Polymer Nanofibers by Electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Keita; Tsuboi, Kazuma; Matsumoto, Hidetoshi; Ishige, Ryohei; Tokita, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Junji; Tanioka, Akihiko

    2010-09-15

    Liquid crystal polymer nanofibers with a diameter ranging from 0.13 to 4.71 µm were prepared by electrospinning from a main-chain liquid crystalline polyester, BB-5(3-Me). WAXD measurements showed that the formation and orientation of the ordered structure in the electrospun fibers were controlled by the fiber diameter formed during electrospinning. For BB-5(3-Me), the SmA structure with two layer spacings was formed in the fiber during the electrospinning. Under optimal spinning conditions, the SmA structure is highly oriented in the fiber. In addition, annealing transformed the metastable SmA structure in the BB-5(3-Me) fiber into stable SmCA one.

  18. Distortion and unwinding of the helical structure in polymer-stabilized short-pitch ferroelectric liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Petit, M; Daoudi, A; Ismaili, M; Buisine, J M

    2006-07-01

    We report the effect of an anisotropic polymer network formed from an achiral photoreactive monomer in a short-pitch chiral SmC* phase on the distortion and the unwinding of the helical structure of the ferroelectric phase. The electro-optical behaviour and ferroelectric properties were experimentally determined for films containing various polymer concentrations. The critical field, E(u), for the transition from the distorted structure to the homogeneous state was measured as a function of polymer concentration. A linear increase of E(u) versus polymer concentration was observed, showing that the helical structure of the short-pitch SmC* phase was stabilized by the polymer network. This behaviour was expected to be a consequence of the increase of the apparent elastic constants of the ferroelectric liquid crystal stabilized by the anisotropic polymer network films. The polymer network morphology was investigated using atomic-force microscopy, revealing a twisted structure of the polymer fibers. This twisted structure was transferred onto a polymer network during the polymerization process within a short-pitch SmC* phase. The increase of the apparent elasticity can then be interpreted by a strong interaction between polymer network and the liquid-crystal molecules. From our experimental data, the coupling coefficient, W(p), characterizing this interaction was evaluated for all studied polymer concentrations.

  19. Elongational perturbations on nematic liquid crystal polymers under a weak shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hong; Wang, Hongyun

    2007-10-01

    The two-dimensional Smoluchowski equation is employed to study the effect of elongational perturbations on nematic liquid crystal polymers under a weak shear. We use the multiscale asymptotic analysis to show that (1) when the elongational perturbation is small relative to the weak shear, the orientational probability density function (pdf) tumbles periodically only in an intermediate range of polymer concentration; outside this intermediate range (i.e., for very small and very large polymer concentration) the orientational pdf converges to a steady state and there is no tumbling. (2) When the elongational perturbation is about 20% of the shear rate or larger, the intermediate range of tumbling disappears and the orientational pdf always converges to a steady state regardless of the polymer concentration. Our theoretical predictions are consistent with various earlier results based on the Leslie-Ericksen theory [C. V. Chaubal and L. G. Leal, J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 82, 22 (1999)] or analogous 3D numerical simulations [M. G. Forest, R. Zhou, and Q. Wang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 088301 (2004); M. G. Forest, Q. Wang, R. Zhou, and E. Choate, J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 118, 17 (2004)].

  20. Effect of UV absorption anisotropy on hybrid aligned polymer stabilized liquid crystal cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, R.; Inoue, K.; Takasu, T.

    2016-09-01

    We have proposed a hybrid alignment nematic (HAN) liquid crystal cell using a polymer stabilized (PS) technology. The cell shows a reverse mode scattering property. The PS-HAN cell is transparent at any viewing angle in the off-state and has an asymmetrical scattering property at incident angles in the on-state. Applying the cell to a smart glass, it cell can selectively scatter a midday sunlight with a function of window blinds. In this study, two polymerization processes, an irradiation with UV light from planar and vertical aligned sides of the cell have been investigated. UV penetration depth has also been estimated from planar and vertical aligned sides of the cell. LC materials with different UV absorption spectra were prepared. A driving voltage, an optical property and a polymer morphology were measured in PS-HAN cells. The UV intensity profile have an effect on polymer density and particle size, which changed the driving voltage and the light scattering property in the PS-HAN cell. The study on the UV penetration in the polymer stabilized technology can improve their performance.

  1. Theory and computer simulation of photo induced deformations in liquid crystal azobenzene polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saphiannikova, Marina; Toshchevikov, Vladimir; Petrova, Tatiana; Ilnytskyi, Jaroslav

    2016-09-01

    Light-controllable azobenzene materials have a remarkable potential for micro- and nanotechnologies as patterning templates, sensors, micropumps and actuators. The photoisomerization between trans and cis states of azo-chromophores is the primary source of photodeformation in azo-polymers. The direction of deformation can be controlled by the light polarization. In our analytical and computer simulation studies, description of the light-induced anisotropy is simplified by applying effective orientation potential to the trans isomers orienting them perpendicular to the light polarization. Using coarse-grained modelling we proved that effective potential approximates well the reorientation of trans isomers under linearly polarized light. The proposed orientation approach is quite promising. It allows not only the explanation of the sign and magnitude of photodeformation in azo-polymers with diverse chemical architecture and topology, but also the prediction of new effects, such as appearance of biaxial deformation in liquid crystal (LC) azo-polymers. A rich behavior is predicted for two-component polymer networks containing azobenzenes and non-chromophoric LC mesogens. Whether such two-component network expands or contracts with respect to the light polarization, depends on the art of attachment of the mesogens to the network strands.

  2. Light transmission of polymer-dispersed liquid crystal layer composed of droplets with inhomogeneous surface anchoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiko, V. A.; Zyryanov, V. Ya.; Konkolovich, A. V.; Miskevich, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a model and realized an algorithm for the calculation of the coefficient of coherent (direct) transmission of light through a layer of liquid crystal (LC) droplets in a polymer matrix. The model is based on the Hulst anomalous diffraction approximation for describing the scattering by an individual particle and the Foldy-Twersky approximation for a coherent field. It allows one to investigate polymer dispersed LC (PDLC) materials with homogeneous and inhomogeneous interphase surface anchoring on the droplet surface. In order to calculate the configuration of the field of the local director in the droplet, the relaxation method of solving the problem of minimization of the free energy volume density has been used. We have verified the model by comparison with experiment under the inverse regime of the ionic modification of the LC-polymer interphase boundary. The model makes it possible to solve problems of optimization of the optical response of PDLC films in relation to their thickness and optical characteristics of the polymer matrix, sizes, polydispersity, concentration, and anisometry parameters of droplets. Based on this model, we have proposed a technique for estimating the size of LC droplets from the data on the dependence of the transmission coefficient on the applied voltage.

  3. Investigation of laser speckle noise suppression by using polymer-stabilized liquid crystals within twisted nematic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ja-Hon; Chang, Shu-Chun; Li, Yi-Han; Chien, Cheng-Yen; Chen, Chien-Hsing; Lin, Yi-Chin; Wu, Jin-Jei; Tsay, Shwu-Yun; Chen, Yao-Hui

    2017-03-01

    We propose a robust method to suppress laser speckle using a polymer-stabilized liquid crystal (PSLC) device with high initial transmittance. With applied voltage, a large modulation depth has been produced through light scattering because of the refractive index mismatch between the rotated nematic liquid crystals and the polymer networks. By using PSLCs with 5 wt % monomer, a speckle noise reduction rate of approximately 54.7% can be achieved with an applied voltage of 6 V. The lowest speckle contrast of approximately 0.025 with relatively high discrimination from the projected AF image has also been demonstrated through a wedge PSLC cell.

  4. Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Thermochromic liquid crystals, or TLCs, are a type of liquid crystals that react to changes in temperature by changing color. The Hallcrest/NASA collaboration involved development of a new way to visualize boundary layer transition in flight and in wind tunnel testing of aircraft wing and body surfaces. TLCs offered a new and potentially better method of visualizing the boundary layer transition in flight. Hallcrest provided a liquid crystal formulation technique that afforded great control over the sensitivity of the liquid crystals to varying conditions. Method is of great use to industry, government and universities for aerodynamic and hydrodynamic testing. Company's principal line is temperature indicating devices for industrial use, such as non-destructive testing and flaw detection in electric/electronic systems, medical application, such as diagnostic systems, for retail sale, such as room, refrigerator, baby bath and aquarium thermometers, and for advertising and promotion specials. Additionally, Hallcrest manufactures TLC mixtures for cosmetic applications, and liquid crystal battery tester for Duracell batteries.

  5. Polymers and Liquid Crystals Symposium held in Boston, Massachusetts on August 19-23, 2007 (Abstracts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-20

    SCLCPs Coleen Pugh, Anirudha Singh 4:35 PM 5 Morphology of side chain liquid crystalline block copolymers: Influence of liquid crystal content Eric...Anirudha Singh, Coleen Pugh 472 Preparation of supramolecular discotic liquid crystals containing hydrogen bonds Seung Jun Lee, Mikyung You, Jin Woo Kim

  6. Topological Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals with Bulk Nematic Defect Lines Pinned to Handlebody Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Michael G.; Tasinkevych, Mykola; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2014-05-01

    Polymer dispersed liquid crystals are a useful model system for studying the relationship between surface topology and defect structures. They are comprised of a polymer matrix with suspended spherical nematic drops and are topologically constrained to host defects of an elementary hedgehog charge per droplet, such as bulk or surface point defects or closed disclination loops. We control the genus of the closed surfaces confining such micrometer-sized nematic drops with tangential boundary conditions for molecular alignment imposed by the polymer matrix, allowing us to avoid defects or, on the contrary, to generate them in a controlled way. We show, both experimentally and through numerical modeling, that topological constraints in nematic microdrops can be satisfied by hosting topologically stable half-integer bulk defect lines anchored to opposite sides of handlebody surfaces. This enriches the interplay of topologies of closed surfaces and fields with nonpolar symmetry, yielding new unexpected configurations that cannot be realized in vector fields, having potential implications for topologically similar defects in cosmology and other fields.

  7. Temperature dependence of optical anisotropy of holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal transmission gratings.

    PubMed

    Drevensek-Olenik, I; Fally, M; Ellabban, M A

    2006-08-01

    We measured the angular dependence of the 0th, +/-1 st, and +/-2 nd optical diffraction orders from a 50 microm thick transmission grating recorded in a UV-curable holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) made from commercially available constituents. The analysis was performed for two orthogonal polarizations of the probe beams. The emphasis was laid on the temperature dependence of the grating anisotropy. Above the nematic-isotropic phase transition, the grating is optically isotropic. At lower temperatures the grating strength for the optical polarization perpendicular to the grating vector decreases with decreasing temperature, while for orthogonal polarization it increases with decreasing temperature. As a consequence, a regime of diffraction with strongly overmodulated gratings is observed. Our investigations indicate that the anisotropy of the refractive-index modulation scales with the optical anisotropy of the liquid crystal medium forming the phase-separated domains. We further demonstrate that light scattering effects, which are profound only in the nematic phase, must not be neglected and can be taken into account via a Lorentzian line-shape broadening of the probing wave vector directions in the framework of the diffraction theory for anisotropic optical phase gratings.

  8. Array of liquid crystal polymer-based Fabry-Perot resonators for image selection by polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, In-Ho; Yu, Eui-Sang; Kim, Se-Um; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate an array of the Fabry-Perot (FP) resonators with a liquid crystal polymer (LCP) layer inside each resonant cavity for image selection by polarization of the incident light. In our approach, the LCP molecules in the array of the FP resonators for different images are photo-aligned in different directions. Under unpolarized light, no image is observed. For the incident light polarized parallel to the photo-alignment direction, only the image corresponding to the polarization state among the recorded images is visible due to the difference in the effective refractive index between different image regions in the array of the FP resonators. Our approach based on anisotropic FP resonators will be useful for the realization of highly efficient and low-cost anti-counterfeiting systems and security labels.

  9. Fabrication of Microcapsules for Dye-Doped Polymer-Dispersed Liquid Crystal-Based Smart Windows.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mingyun; Park, Kyun Joo; Seok, Seunghwan; Ok, Jong Min; Jung, Hee-Tae; Choe, Jaehoon; Kim, Do Hyun

    2015-08-19

    A dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) is an attractive material for application in smart windows. Smart windows using a PDLC can be operated simply and have a high contrast ratio compared to those of other devices that employed photochromic or thermochromic material. However, in conventional dye-doped PDLC methods, dye contamination can cause problems and has a limited degree of commercialization of electric smart windows. Here, we report on an approach to resolve dye-related problems by encapsulating the dye in monodispersed capsules. By encapsulation, a fabricated dye-doped PDLC had a contrast ratio of >120 at 600 nm. This fabrication method of encapsulating the dye in a core-shell structured microcapsule in a dye-doped PDLC device provides a practical platform for dye-doped PDLC-based smart windows.

  10. Merged vector gratings recorded in a photocrosslinkable polymer liquid crystal film for polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Tomoyuki Wada, Takumi; Noda, Kohei; Ono, Hiroshi; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-14

    A merged vector grating, which is holographically fabricated in an anisotropic medium by irradiation with interference light with intensity modulation and polarization modulation, was designed to detect the polarization of light. The merged vector grating is recorded by the interference of two elliptically polarized beams with equal intensities, parallel azimuths, equal ellipticities, and different directions of rotation. We clarified theoretically that the Stokes parameters of the incident light beam are described by the diffraction efficiency of the merged vector grating. Also, to apply this property to formation of a polarimeter without any moving parts or mechanisms, two merged vector gratings with different grating vectors were recorded in a photocrosslinkable polymer liquid crystal film by angle-multiplexed holography. By investigation of the diffraction properties of the gratings obtained, we demonstrated the applicability of the merged vector gratings for use in polarimetry.

  11. Ultrasound sensing using the acousto-optic effect in polymer dispersed liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushkevych, O.; Eriksson, T. J. R.; Ramadas, S. N.; Dixon, S.; Edwards, R. S.

    2015-08-01

    Acousto-optic effects are demonstrated in polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) films, showing promise for applications in ultrasound sensing. The PDLC films are used to image two displacement profiles of air-coupled flexural transducers' resonant modes at 295 kHz and 730 kHz. Results are confirmed using laser vibrometry. The regions on the transducers with the largest displacements are clearly imaged by the PDLC films, with the resolution agreeing well with laser vibrometry scanning. Imaging takes significantly less time than a scanning system (switching time of a few seconds, as compared to 8 h for laser vibrometry). Heating effects are carefully monitored using thermal imaging and are found not to be the main cause of PDLC clearing.

  12. Dual-period tunable phase grating using polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Xing, Yufei; Li, Qing

    2015-10-01

    Dual-period tunable phase grating using polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystal is demonstrated by controlling its driving scheme. High efficiencies of 35.3% for the small-period phase grating and 28.7% for the large-period phase grating have been achieved because of the rectangular-like phase profile which shows good agreement with the simulation results. The diffraction angle can be alternatively tuned, as well as the diffraction efficiency. Moreover, this device also possesses polarization independency and fast response with a rise time of 826 μs and a decay time of 1.143 ms which shows great potential for diffractive optics.

  13. Electro-optical properties of low viscosity driven holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, K. R.; Bae, S. Y.; Kim, B. K.

    2015-04-01

    Relative diffraction efficiency (RDE), operating voltage, and response times are most important performance characteristics of holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystals (HPDLC). Two types of triallyl isocyanurate (TI) having different structures were incorporated into the conventional transmission grating of HPDLC. Premix viscosity decreased by 13-18% with up to 3% TI, beyond which it increased. TI eliminated induction period and augmented initial grating formation rate at all contents. Saturation RDE increased over 200% while threshold voltage and rise time decreased to about half and 2/3, respectively up to 3% TI, beyond which the tendencies were reversed. Among the two TIs, low viscosity monomer (TA) showed high RDE, while high miscibility monomer (TE) low characteristic voltages and short response times. It is concluded that grating formation is largely favored by low viscosity, while interface tensions and electro-optical performances by miscibility at similar viscosities.

  14. Fabrication of sisal fibers/epoxy composites with liquid crystals polymer grafted on sisal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Q. Y.; Lu, S. R.; Song, L. F.; Li, Y. Q.

    2016-07-01

    In this word, microcrystalline cellulose fibers (MCFs), extracted from sisal fibers, were treated with function end-group hyperbranched liquid crystals (HLP). This work brought some insights into the successful surface modification in epoxy composite with HLP. The HLP-MCFs/epoxy composites are studied systematically. The HLP - MCFs/epoxy composites were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), polarizing microscope (POM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and mechanical properties analysis. The results reveal that the reinforcement of EP composites was carried out by adding HLP-MCFs. In particular, with 1.0 wt% filler loading, the flexural strength, tensile strength, impact strength and flexural modulus of the HLP-MCFs/EP composites were increased by 60%, 69%, 130%, and 192%, respectively. It anticipates that our current work exploits more efficient methods to overcome the few nature fiber/polymer (NPC) adhesion in the interface region and provides implications for the engineering applications of the development of NPC.

  15. Organic holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal distributed feedback laser from different diffraction orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minghuan; Liu, Yonggang; Zhang, Guiyang; Peng, Zenghui; Li, Dayu; Ma, Ji; Xuan, Li

    2016-11-01

    Holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) based distributed feedback (DFB) lasers were prepared with poly (-methoxy-5-(2‧-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene-vinylene) (MEH-PPV) film as the active medium layer. The HPDLC grating film was fabricated via holographic induced photopolymerization. The pure film spectra of MEH-PPV and the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) spectrum were investigated. The laser device was single-longitudinal mode operation. The tunability of the HPDLC DFB laser was achieved by selecting different grating periods. The lasing performances were also characterized and compared from different diffraction orders. The lasing threshold increased with the diffraction order and the third order laser possessed the largest conversion efficiency in this device. The experimental results were in good agreement with the theoretical calculations.

  16. Refractive indices of polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal film materials: Epoxy-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Nuno A.; Montgomery, G. Paul, Jr.

    1987-10-01

    Polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) films are potentially useful in applications requiring electrically controllable light transmission. In these applications, both a high on-state transmittance and a strong off-state attenuation are often needed over a wide operating temperature range. These transmittance characteristics depend strongly on the refractive indices of the materials in the PDLC films. We have measured the temperature dependent refractive indices of typical PDLC film materials and the temperature dependent electro-optic transmittance of a PDLC film composed of liquid crystal microdroplets dispersed in an epoxy matrix. We show that our refractive index measurements can account for all the features in the measured transmittance characteristics and discuss several methods for controlling refractive indices to optimize electro-optic transmittance over an extended temperature range. We have also measured the room temperature refractive indices of mixtures of epoxy resins and hardeners as a function of composition. We discuss the problems associated with predicting the refractive indices of such mixtures in terms of either the volume fractions or mole fractions of the mixture components. These considerations are important in matching refractive indices of droplets and matrix materials to maximize on-state transmittance. The refractive indices of epoxy matrix materials increase monotonically with time during their chemical cure. The measured time dependence can be described by a simple model in which the concentrations of the reacting resin and hardener each decay exponentially in time with their own characteristic time constants while the concentration of the cured polymer increases. Finally, we relate the measured rates of index change with temperature to the coefficients of volume expansion of PDLC film materials; the results are used to discuss the mechanical stability of PDLC films.

  17. Large birefringence and polarization holographic gratings formed in photocross-linkable polymer liquid crystals comprising bistolane mesogenic side groups

    SciTech Connect

    Emoto, Akira; Matsumoto, Taro; Shioda, Tatsutoshi; Ono, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Ayumi; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro

    2009-10-01

    Polarization gratings with large birefringence are formed in photoreactive polymer liquid crystals with bistolane moiety and terminal cinnamic acid moiety by the use of polarized ultraviolet interference light and subsequent annealing. The polarized ultraviolet light causes the axis-selective photoreaction between the cinnamic acid groups and subsequent annealing induce the reorientation of peripheral molecules without cross-linking along the cross-linked groups. Long bistolane mesogenic moiety exhibits large birefringence in comparison with a biphenyl mesogenic moiety, the value of the induced birefringence in the bistolane mesogenic liquid crystalline (LC) polymer is strongly dependent on both the grating constant and the wavelength of the reconstruction light.

  18. Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars effects on the thermal-transport properties of polymer-dispersed liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Kuriakose, M; Longuemart, S; Depriester, M; Delenclos, S; Sahraoui, A Hadj

    2014-02-01

    We present the depolarization field effects (Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars effect) for the thermal transport properties of polymer dispersed liquid crystal composites under a frequency-dependent electric field. The experiments were conducted on polystyrene/4-Cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (PS/5CB) PDLCs of 73 vol.% and 85 vol.% liquid crystal (LC) concentrations. A self-consistent field approximation model is used to deduce the electrical properties of polymer and LC materials as well as the threshold electric field. Electric field-varying (at constant frequency) experiments were also conducted to calculate the interfacial thermal resistance between the LC droplets and polymer matrix as well as to find the elastic constant of LCs in droplet form.

  19. A flexible liquid crystal polymer MEMS pressure sensor array for fish-like underwater sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kottapalli, A. G. P.; Asadnia, M.; Miao, J. M.; Barbastathis, G.; Triantafyllou, M. S.

    2012-11-01

    In order to perform underwater surveillance, autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) require flexible, light-weight, reliable and robust sensing systems that are capable of flow sensing and detecting underwater objects. Underwater animals like fish perform a similar task using an efficient and ubiquitous sensory system called a lateral-line constituting of an array of pressure-gradient sensors. We demonstrate here the development of arrays of polymer microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors which are flexible and can be readily mounted on curved surfaces of AUV bodies. An array of ten sensors with a footprint of 60 (L) mm × 25 (W) mm × 0.4 (H) mm is fabricated using liquid crystal polymer (LCP) as the sensing membrane material. The flow sensing and object detection capabilities of the array are illustrated with proof-of-concept experiments conducted in a water tunnel. The sensors demonstrate a pressure sensitivity of 14.3 μV Pa-1. A high resolution of 25 mm s-1 is achieved in water flow sensing. The sensors can passively sense underwater objects by transducing the pressure variations generated underwater by the movement of objects. The experimental results demonstrate the array’s ability to detect the velocity of underwater objects towed past by with high accuracy, and an average error of only 2.5%.

  20. Influence of virtual surfaces on Frank elastic constants in a polymer-stabilized bent-core nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhuri, P. Lakshmi; Hiremath, Uma S.; Yelamaggad, C. V.; Madhuri, K. Priya; Prasad, S. Krishna

    2016-04-01

    Effect of a polymer network on the threshold voltage of the Fréedericksz transition, Frank elastic constants, switching speed, and the rotational viscosity are investigated in a polymer-stabilized bent-core nematic liquid crystal with different polymer concentrations. These polymer networks form virtual surfaces with a finite anchoring energy. The studies bring out several differences in comparison to similar studies with a calamitic liquid crystal as the nematic host. For example, on varying the polymer content the threshold voltage decreases initially, but exhibits a drastic increase above a critical concentration. A similar feature—reaching a minimum before rising—is seen for the bend elastic constant, which gets enhanced by an order of magnitude for a polymer content of 2.5 wt %. In contrast, the splay elastic constant has a monotonic variation although the overall enhancement is comparable to that of the bend elastic constant. The behavior changing at a critical concentration is also seen for the switching time and the associated rotational viscosity. The presence of the polymer also induces a shape change in the thermal dependence of the bend elastic constant. We explain the features observed here on the basis of images obtained from the optical and atomic force microscopy.

  1. Influence of virtual surfaces on Frank elastic constants in a polymer-stabilized bent-core nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Madhuri, P Lakshmi; Hiremath, Uma S; Yelamaggad, C V; Madhuri, K Priya; Prasad, S Krishna

    2016-04-01

    Effect of a polymer network on the threshold voltage of the Fréedericksz transition, Frank elastic constants, switching speed, and the rotational viscosity are investigated in a polymer-stabilized bent-core nematic liquid crystal with different polymer concentrations. These polymer networks form virtual surfaces with a finite anchoring energy. The studies bring out several differences in comparison to similar studies with a calamitic liquid crystal as the nematic host. For example, on varying the polymer content the threshold voltage decreases initially, but exhibits a drastic increase above a critical concentration. A similar feature-reaching a minimum before rising-is seen for the bend elastic constant, which gets enhanced by an order of magnitude for a polymer content of 2.5 wt %. In contrast, the splay elastic constant has a monotonic variation although the overall enhancement is comparable to that of the bend elastic constant. The behavior changing at a critical concentration is also seen for the switching time and the associated rotational viscosity. The presence of the polymer also induces a shape change in the thermal dependence of the bend elastic constant. We explain the features observed here on the basis of images obtained from the optical and atomic force microscopy.

  2. Development of an x-ray detector based on polymer- dispersed liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, K.; Hong, J.; Kim, G.; Park, S.; Min, B.; Yang, J.; Nam, S.

    2015-02-01

    The applications of active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) in large-area x-ray imaging systems have increased over time but are still severely limited owing to its pixel resolution, complex fabrication processes, and high cost. As a solution, x-ray light valve (XLV) technology was introduced and expected to have a better resolution and contrast ratio than those of AMFPI, owing to its micrometer level of the LC cells and signal amplification by an external light source. The twisting angle of the LC cells was changed by charge carrier signals created in a photoconductor layer against x-rays, and the diagnostic images from XLV were acquired from the transmittance of the external light source. However, there was a possibility that the photoconductor layer may be crystallized or degenerated due to the application of high temperatures for sealing the LC layer during the fabrication process. To solve such problems, polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (PDLCs), which do not need high temperature for the sealing process of the LC layer, are used in this study instead of typical LC cells. A photoconductor and PDLC are combined to develop an x-ray detector. An external light source and optical sensor are used to investigate the light transmission of the PDLC . The PDLCs used in this paper do not need polarizers and are self-adhesive. Hence, the transmittance is very high in the transparent state, which allows for a linear x-ray response and sufficient dynamic range in digital radiography.

  3. Pressure dependence of the electro-optic response function in partially exposed polymer dispersed ferroelectric liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, D. S.; Holmes, H. K.

    1993-01-01

    Ferroelectric liquid crystals in a new configuration, termed partially exposed polymer dispersed ferroelectric liquid crystal (PEPDFLC), respond to external pressures and demonstrate pressure-induced electro-optic switching response. When the PEPDFLC thin film is sandwiched between two transparent conducting electrodes, one a glass plate and the other a flexible sheet such as polyvenylidene fluoride, the switching characteristics of the thin film are a function of the pressure applied to the flexible transparent electrode and the bias voltage across the electrodes. Response time measurements reveal a linear dependence of the change in electric field with external pressure.

  4. Photopolymerization-Induced Phase Separation Process of Thin Composite Films of Liquid Crystal and Polymer Fiber Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashige, Takeshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Ikehata, Seiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2003-11-01

    It was clarified that a thin composite film of a liquid crystal (LC) and polymer fiber networks can be obtained through two phase separation processes: spinodal decomposition, and nucleation and growth. The phase separation phenomenon was observed using a polarizing microscope under ultraviolet irradiation. Results showed that spinodal decomposition initially occurred in the LC/polymer solution under photopolymerization of a monomer. The polymer fibers were then grown on a surface of solid materials (such as substrates and spacer particles) by the nucleation and growth process in the polymer-rich solution induced by the spinodal decomposition. It was found that the spatially noncyclic morphology of the polymer fibers dispersed in the LC was obtained by the intervention of the nucleation and growth process after the spinodal decomposition process.

  5. Thermo-driven light controller by using thermal modulation of diffraction wavelength in holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Akifumi; Kakiuchida, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    A microperiodic structure composed of polymer and liquid crystal (LC) phases, called holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC), was fabricated based on a photo-induced phase separation technique by laser interferometric exposure. The diffraction wavelength of HPDLC gratings formed by different LC composites and grating structures was experimentally investigated by spectroscopic measurements as a function of temperature at around 30 °C. The HPDLC gratings composed of nematic LC having low nematic to isotropic temperature (TNI) and film thickness of 25 μm showed the switch of diffraction wavelength between visible and infrared lights by the change of temperature. The optical characteristics achieved in HPDLC gratings are expected to be applicable for the basis of diffractive type of thermodriven light controller which can supply visibility constantly for solar-ray control windows.

  6. Thermally stimulated polarization currents of pristine poly (p-hydroxybenzoic acid - co - ethylene terephthalate) polymer liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarramaneni, Sridharbabu; Anu, Sharma; Quamara, J. K.

    2016-05-01

    Thermally stimulated polarization currents (TSPC) of pristine PET/0.8PHB polymer liquid crystals have been studied at various polarizing fields ranging from 38.5 kV/cm to 153.8 kV/cm at continuous temperatures ranging from 20 °C to 250 °C. The charge transport phenomena, responsible mechanisms can be investigated by studying TSP current spectra of these polymer liquid crystals. The TSP current spectra consists of two maxima one at low temperature region and the other at high temperature region and a linear variation in the temperature region from 70°C to 190°C. The relaxation behaviour of this PLC is results from various mechanisms associated with crystalline and amorphous phases.

  7. Polarization-independent holographic gratings based on azo-dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal films.

    PubMed

    Fuh, Andy Ying-Guey; Chen, Che-Chang; Cheng, Ko-Ting; Liu, Cheng-Kai; Chen, Wei-Ko

    2010-01-10

    We demonstrate polarization-independent holographic gratings (PIHGs) based on azo-dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystal films. The PIHGs are recorded by irradiation under an intensity-modulated interference field, generated by two linearly polarized green optical beams, and by simultaneously applying a suitable AC voltage to the sample. The photoexcited azo dyes are adsorbed onto the UV-cured polymer film with their long axes parallel to the normal of the substrate. When the applied voltage is switched off, the PIHGs are generated with periodic modulation of liquid-crystal structures with transparently homeotropic and randomly scattered alignments. Additionally, the generated PIHGs can be completely switched off by an applied voltage.

  8. Effect of UV intensity on the electro-optical properties of polymer dispersed liquid crystal lens for smart electronic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaeyong; Han, Jeong In

    2014-05-01

    Polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) lenses were made from a mixture of prepolymer (NOA 65) and E7 liquid crystal (LC). The mixture of polymer dispersed in LC was polymerized by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in the polymerization induced phase separation process. With varying UV curing intensity in this process, the electrooptical properties of PDLC lens device such as transmittance, driving voltage, response times, contrast ratio (C/R) and slope of the linear region of the transmittance-voltage were measured and optimized for application to smart electronic glasses with auto-shading and auto-focusing functions. The optimum UV intensity for the PDLC lenses was more than 580 µW/cm2. These results were improved compared to our previously reported data[1] for the application of these PDLC lenses to smart electronic glasses with auto-shading and/or auto-focusing functions.

  9. Effect of cell gap on electro-optical properties of polymer dispersed liquid crystal lens for smart electronic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaeyong; Han, Jeong In

    2014-07-01

    Polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) lenses with a cell gap of 11 μm and 30 μm were made from a uniformly dispersed mixture of 40% prepolymer (NOA 65, Norland optical adhesive 65) and 60% E7 liquid crystal. PDLC's mixture between two ITO coated glasses was polymerized by UV (ultraviolet) curing in the polymerization induced phase separation (PIPS) process. Decline of cell gap is a physical approach to improve the electrooptical properties, while cooling or doping of SiO2 nanoparticles is the microstructural approach to enhance the properties, because the electric field applied to the liquid crystal molecules in LC droplets is inversely proportional to the cell gap. A smaller cell gap significantly and effectively increases the electric field applied to PDLCD devices. The driving voltages and slope for the sample with a cell gap of 11 μm and 30 μm were drastically improved. The driving voltage and the slope of the linear region of PDLC lens with narrow cell gap of 11 μm were drastically enhanced compared to those of the samples with 30 μm cell gap and the cooled and doped samples. These improvements were due to the increase of the applied electric field. However, the response time and contrast ratio were deteriorated. It seems that this deterioration was caused by the sticking or fixing of liquid crystal molecules in LC (liquid crystal) droplets by the intensive electric field applied to the PDLC device.

  10. Liquid crystal alignment at macroscopically isotropic polymer surfaces: Effect of an isotropic-nematic phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryasova, Natalie; Reznikov, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    We study the effect of an isotropic-nematic (I -N ) phase transition on the liquid crystal alignment at untreated polymer surfaces. We demonstrate that the pattern at the untreated substrate in the planar cell where the other substrate is uniformly rubbed strongly depends on the temperature gradient across the cell during the I -N phase transition, being macroscopically isotropic if the untreated substrate is cooled faster, but becoming almost homogeneous along the rubbing direction in the opposite temperature gradient. We interpret the observed effect using complementary models of heat transfer and nematic elasticity. Based on the heat transfer model we show that the asymmetric temperature conditions in our experiments provide unidirectional propagation of the I -N interface during the phase transition and determine the initial director orientation pattern at the test's untreated surface. Using the Frank-Oseen model of nematic elasticity, we represent the three-dimensional director field in the nematic cell as a two-dimensional (2D) pattern at the untreated surface and perform 2D numeric simulations. The simulations explain the experimental results: Different initial director orientations at the untreated surface evolve into different stationary patterns.

  11. Optical Vectorial Vortex Coronagraphs using Liquid Crystal Polymers: theory, manufacturing and laboratory demonstration.

    PubMed

    Mawet, D; Serabyn, E; Liewer, K; Hanot, Ch; McEldowney, S; Shemo, D; O'Brien, N

    2009-02-02

    In this paper, after briefly reviewing the theory of vectorial vortices, we describe our technological approach to generating the necessary phase helix, and report results obtained with the first optical vectorial vortex coronagraph (OVVC) in the laboratory. To implement the geometrical phase ramp, we make use of Liquid Crystal Polymers (LCP), which we believe to be the most efficient technological path to quickly synthesize optical vectorial vortices of virtually any topological charge. With the first prototype device of topological charge 2, a maximum peak-to-peak attenuation of 1.4x10(-2) and a residual light level of 3x10(-5) at an angular separation of 3.5 lambda/d (at which point our current noise floor is reached) have been obtained at a wavelength of 1.55 microm. These results demonstrate the validity of using space-variant birefringence distributions to generate a new family of coronagraphs usable in natural unpolarized light, opening a path to high performance coronagraphs that are achromatic and have low-sensitivity to low-order wavefront aberrations.

  12. Infrared reflector based on liquid crystal polymers and its impact on thermal comfort conditions in buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Hitesh; Roberz, Franziska; Loonen, Roel C. G. M.; Hensen, Jan L. M.; Bastiaansen, Cees W. M.; Broer, Dick J.; Debije, Michael G.; Schenning, Albert P. H. J.

    2014-10-01

    There has been a huge increase in the global demand of energy over the last few years. One of the main contributors to energy consumption in buildings, cars, greenhouses and indoor spaces is the cooling devices needed to maintain the indoor temperature at comfortable levels. To reduce the energy used by cooling devices, we need improved light control in transparent building elements, such as windows. Infrared (IR) reflectors applied to the windows for rejection of infrared light would be very attractive, especially if they do not affect light in the visible region. A method to selectively and precisely control infrared transmission is via the use of cholesteric liquid crystal (Ch-LC) polymer reflectors. Ch-LCs, also known as chiral-nematic LCs, reflect circularly polarized light as a result of their self-organizing molecular helices. The pitch of the helix in these networks determines the wavelength of reflection. In contrast to existing alternatives, they are characterized by a very sharp cut-off between the transmissive and the reflective state enabling exact tailoring of the heat reflection. In this article we have focused on fabrication of infrared reflectors using Ch-LCs and a computational model was used to predict the energy savings of this IR-reflector in an office building in Abu Dhabi which indicated that 6 % energy savings can be realized.

  13. Direct induction of molecular alignment in liquid crystal polymer network film by photopolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisano, K.; Aizawa, M.; Ishizu, M.; Kurata, Y.; Shishido, A.

    2016-09-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) is the promising material for the fabrication of high-performance soft, flexible devices. The fascinating and useful properties arise from their cooperative effect that inherently allows the macroscopic integration and control of molecular alignment through various external stimuli. To date, light-matter interaction is the most attractive stimuli and researchers developed photoalignment through photochemical or photophysical reactions triggered by linearly polarized light. Here we show the new choice based on molecular diffusion by photopolymerization. We found that photopolymerization of a LC monomer and a crosslinker through a photomask enables to direct molecular alignment in the resultant LC polymer network film. The key generating the molecular alignment is molecular diffusion due to the difference of chemical potentials between irradiated and unirradiated regions. This concept is applicable to various shapes of photomask and two-dimensional molecular alignments can be fabricated depending on the spatial design of photomask. By virtue of the inherent versatility of molecular diffusion in materials, the process would shed light on the fabrication of various high-performance flexible materials with molecular alignment having controlled patterns.

  14. Electric field induced rotation of polymer cholesteric liquid crystal flakes: mechanisms and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosc, Tanya Z.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Jacobs, Stephen D.; Lambropoulos, John C.

    2002-12-01

    Electric fields can induce motion of polymer cholesteric liquid crystal (pCLC) flakes suspended in a fluid medium. The platelet-shaped pCLC flakes with a Grandjean texture show strong selective reflection when lying flat in the plane of a conventional cell. As their orientation with respect to normally incident light changes, their selective reflection color shifts toward the blue and diminishes until the flakes are no longer easily visible beyond 7-12° of rotation. Reproducibility and control of motion has been observed in moderately conductive host fluid. Flakes in such hosts do not respond to a DC electric field, but they rotate 90° in an AC field within a given frequency band. The response times and frequency regions for motion depend partially on the field magnitude, the dielectric properties of the host fluid and the flake geometry. We observe flakes reorienting in less than 500 ms in an electric field of 0.17 Vrms/μm, while sub-second reorientation is seen in fields as low as 5x10-2 Vrms/μm. This response time is comparable with typical electronic-paper applications, but with a significantly lower electric field. Displays using pCLC flakes would not require backlighting, sheet polarizers, color filters or alignment layers. Numerous additional applications for pCLC flakes are envisioned, including filters, polarizers, and spatial light modulators.

  15. Embedded Ag mesh electrodes for polymer dispersed liquid crystal devices on flexible substrate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhua; Shen, Su; Hu, Jin; Chen, Linsen

    2016-10-31

    An embedded Ag mesh transparent conductive electrode (TCE) on flexible substrate, which is suitable for polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) device, is demonstrated. With the combination of soft ultra-violet nanoimprinting lithography and scrape technique, it offers parallel processing with high resolution (10000dpi), as well as remarkable simplicity and fully controllable flexibility to tailor the transmittance and sheet resistance. While being able to achieve maximum transmittance 60% in the on state and the minimum 0.1% in the off state, the PDLC smart window displays low sheet resistance (5.58 Ω/sq.) under low driven voltage (30V) safe for human. The main advantage of adoption of PDLC as an optically scattering element lies in the fact that there needs no mechanical part for in situ tunability. An enhancement factor of 50 of the diffraction intensity is observed experimentally. The embedded Ag mesh TCE for PDLC device has an environmentally-friendly additive manufacturing process inherently. Compared to existing solutions, the fabricated sample shows superior performance in both optoelectronic and mechanic characteristics. We envision that the embedded Ag mesh TCE will enable economically widen application of PDLC devices on flexible substrate.

  16. Orientations of Chromonic Liquid Crystals by Imprinted or Rubbed Polymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Youngwoo; McGuire, Aya; Clark, Noel

    2014-03-01

    A variety of novel alignment effects of chromonic liquid crystal phases of sunset yellow (SSY)/water, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG)/water, and their mixtures by thiol-ene polymer films topographically imprinted with linear channels are observed using polarizing optical microscopy. Nematic DSCG and SSY at low concentration and their nematic mixtures orient with the long axes of stacked chromonic aggregates on average parallel to the channels, that is, with the molecular planes normal to the channel axis. On the contrary, nematic SSY in contact with the rubbed polyimide films orients with the long axes on average in-plane perpendicular to the rubbing direction, arguably, due to a tongue-groove interaction between SSY and the stretched PI chains. Furthermore, multi-stable alignments are observed in SSY solutions of sufficiently high concentration, including preferential in-plane orientation of the long axes of the aggregates parallel to, perpendicular to, and 45° rotated from the channels. This work was supported by NSF grant DMR 1207606, NSF MRSEC grant DMR 0820579, and NSF Research Experience for Undergraduate programs.

  17. Novel liquid crystals-polymers and monomers: As nonlinear optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Anselm C., III

    1987-12-01

    Progress is reviewed on research into the design, synthesis and characterization of, primarily, side chain liquid crystalline polymers for nonlinear optics. Materials described are polyesters and vinyl polymers and copolymers having push-pull pi-electronic nonlinear optically active structures as pendant groups. Chiral derivatives have also been prepared. The nonlinear optically active species employed have been nitroaromatics and pyridine N-oxides. Results of collaborative efforts in further characterization (electrooptic, dielectric, Langmuir-Blodgett films) are described.

  18. Effect of Dielectric Titanium, Yttrium, and Silicon Oxide Nanoparticles on Electro-Optical Characteristics of Polymer-Dispersed Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, K. R.; Romanenko, A. I.; Zharkova, G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Electro-optical characteristics of composite polymer-dispersed liquid crystals doped (implanted) with inorganic SiO2, TiO2, and Y2O3 nanoparticles in strong electric fields are studied. The composites were obtained by the method of phase separation of liquid crystals (5CB) and polymer (polyvinyl acetate). It is revealed that implantation of up to 1 wt.% of nanoparticles does not noticeably affect the morphology of the composites. The implanted particles change the mismatch between the refractive indices of the polymer and the liquid crystal, and the strong particle aggregation increases the light scattering that can improve the electrooptical contrast of the composites. Changes of the dielectric permittivity with the field are correlated with the light transmittance. It is found that the yttrium and silicon oxides decrease and the titanium oxides increase the Fredericks threshold field. The titanium oxides and to a greater extent the silicon oxides decrease the dependence of the light transmittance on the changes in the dielectric permittivity.

  19. A High-Retardation Polymer Film for Viewing Liquid Crystal Displays through Polarized Sunglasses without Chromaticity Change in the Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Tagaya, Akihiro; Koike, Yasuhiro

    2011-04-01

    We describe a high-retardation polymer film (HRPF) that enables liquid crystal displays (LCDs) to be viewed through polarized sunglasses at all rotation angles without any chromaticity changes in the image. We investigated the relationship between retardation and polymer interference color after developing a program that simulates the interference colors of polymers taking into consideration the polymer birefringence dispersion and LCD emission light spectrum. As a result, we confirmed that the retardation value required for our HRPF made of polyethylene terephthalate and applied to an LCD with white LED backlight was not less than 7832 nm. We also confirmed that the image quality was not degraded by attaching the HRPF to the LCD, and chromaticity change in the image observed through HRPF and polarized sunglasses was negligible compared to the LCD image.

  20. Light scattering study of director fluctuations in a polymer-stabilized “fingerprint” state of a cholesteric liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kyongok; Chien, L. C.; Sprunt, Samuel

    2002-03-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals stabilized in various states by low concentration polymer networks are finding increasing application in electro-optic displays, wavelength tunable reflectors, and electrically-controllable diffraction gratings. Polymer-stabilized planar grating or “fingerprint” states also provide a unique template for forming a periodically-spaced array of polymer walls in the liquid crystal interior. The anchoring properties of these walls and specifically their effects on the director dynamics are the object of our investigation. In a chiral-doped sample of the commercial nematic mixture E44, stabilized with 3 wtnematic diacrylate RM257, we have detected the expected two director modes and one very slow polymer mode. Two of these modes require a stretched exponential to describe the measured decay. We have also observed the clear impact of anchoring at the polymer interfaces on the director fluctuations with wavevector perpendicular to the walls, consistent with a long wavelength cutoff equal to twice the wall spacing. Fluctuations with wavevector along the walls have normal dispersion. We will report the effects of varying the monomer type and concentration. In particular, we will compare the nematic monomer, which forms walls with embedded orientational order templated on the host, with an isotropic monomer that does not. Supported by Office of Naval Research grant no. N00014-99-1-0899.

  1. Synthesis of Side Chain Liquid Crystal Polymers by Living Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization. 4. Synthesis of Amorphous and Side Chain Liquid Crystal AB Block Copolymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    Metathesis Polymerization. 4. Synthesis of C N00014-89-JI542 Amorphous and Side Chain Liquid Crystal AB Block Copolym rs 6. AUTHOR(S) Zen Komiya, Coleen ...Liquid Crystal AB Block Copolymers by Zen Komiya, Coleen Pugh: and Richard R. Schrock* Submitted to Macromolecules F r fCarnegie Mellon University...Amorphous and Side Chain Liquid Crystal AB Block Copolymers by Zen Komiya, Coleen Pught, and Richard R. Schrock* Contribution from Department of Chemistry 6

  2. Liquid Crystal Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Madeline J.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of liquid crystals and several important liquid crystal devices are described. Ideas for practical experiments to illustrate the properties of liquid crystals and their operation in devices are also described. (Author/JN)

  3. Liquid Crystal Inquiries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marroum, Renata-Maria

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the properties and classification of liquid crystals. Presents a simple experiment that illustrates the structure of liquid crystals and the differences between the various phases liquid crystals can assume. (JRH)

  4. Modeling liquid crystal polymeric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez Pinto, Vianney Karina

    The main focus of this work is the theoretical and numerical study of materials that combine liquid crystal and polymer. Liquid crystal elastomers are polymeric materials that exhibit both the ordered properties of the liquid crystals and the elastic properties of rubbers. Changing the order of the liquid crystal molecules within the polymer network can induce shape change. These materials are very valuable for applications such as actuators, sensors, artificial muscles, haptic displays, etc. In this work we apply finite element elastodynamics simulations to study the temperature induced shape deformation in nematic elastomers with complex director microstructure. In another topic, we propose a novel numerical method to model the director dynamics and microstructural evolution of three dimensional nematic and cholesteric liquid crystals. Numerical studies presented in this work are in agreement with experimental observations and provide insight into the design of application devices.

  5. Nanotube liquid crystal elastomers: photomechanical response and flexible energy conversion of layered polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaoming; King, Benjamin C.; Loomis, James; Campo, Eva M.; Hegseth, John; Cohn, Robert W.; Terentjev, Eugene; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2014-09-01

    Elastomeric composites based on nanotube liquid crystals (LCs) that preserve the internal orientation of nanotubes could lead to anisotropic physical properties and flexible energy conversion. Using a simple vacuum filtration technique of fabricating nanotube LC films and utilizing a transfer process to poly (dimethyl) siloxane wherein the LC arrangement is preserved, here we demonstrate unique and reversible photomechanical response of this layered composite to excitation by near infra-red (NIR) light at ultra-low nanotube mass fractions. On excitation by NIR photons, with application of small or large pre-strains, significant expansion or contraction of the sample occurs, respectively, that is continuously reversible and three orders of magnitude larger than in pristine polymer. Schlieren textures were noted in these LC composites confirming long range macroscopic nematic order of nanotubes within the composites. Order parameters of LC films ranged from Soptical = 0.51-0.58 from dichroic measurements. Film concentrations, elastic modulus and photomechanical stress were all seen to be related to the nematic order parameter. For the same nanotube concentration, the photomechanical stress was almost three times larger for the self-assembled LC nanotube actuator compared to actuator based on randomly oriented carbon nanotubes. Investigation into the kinetics of photomechanical actuation showed variation in stretching exponent β with pre-strains, concentration and orientation of nanotubes. Maximum photomechanical stress of ˜0.5 MPa W-1 and energy conversion of ˜0.0045% was achieved for these layered composites. The combination of properties, namely, optical anisotropy, reversible mechanical response to NIR excitation and flexible energy conversion all in one system accompanied with low cost makes nanotube LC elastomers important for soft photochromic actuation, energy conversion and photo-origami applications.

  6. Nanotube liquid crystal elastomers: photomechanical response and flexible energy conversion of layered polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoming; King, Benjamin C; Loomis, James; Campo, Eva M; Hegseth, John; Cohn, Robert W; Terentjev, Eugene; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2014-09-05

    Elastomeric composites based on nanotube liquid crystals (LCs) that preserve the internal orientation of nanotubes could lead to anisotropic physical properties and flexible energy conversion. Using a simple vacuum filtration technique of fabricating nanotube LC films and utilizing a transfer process to poly (dimethyl) siloxane wherein the LC arrangement is preserved, here we demonstrate unique and reversible photomechanical response of this layered composite to excitation by near infra-red (NIR) light at ultra-low nanotube mass fractions. On excitation by NIR photons, with application of small or large pre-strains, significant expansion or contraction of the sample occurs, respectively, that is continuously reversible and three orders of magnitude larger than in pristine polymer. Schlieren textures were noted in these LC composites confirming long range macroscopic nematic order of nanotubes within the composites. Order parameters of LC films ranged from S(optical) = 0.51-0.58 from dichroic measurements. Film concentrations, elastic modulus and photomechanical stress were all seen to be related to the nematic order parameter. For the same nanotube concentration, the photomechanical stress was almost three times larger for the self-assembled LC nanotube actuator compared to actuator based on randomly oriented carbon nanotubes. Investigation into the kinetics of photomechanical actuation showed variation in stretching exponent β with pre-strains, concentration and orientation of nanotubes. Maximum photomechanical stress of ∼ 0.5 MPa W(-1) and energy conversion of ∼ 0.0045% was achieved for these layered composites. The combination of properties, namely, optical anisotropy, reversible mechanical response to NIR excitation and flexible energy conversion all in one system accompanied with low cost makes nanotube LC elastomers important for soft photochromic actuation, energy conversion and photo-origami applications.

  7. Characterization of submillisecond response optical addressing phase modulator based on low light scattering polymer network liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Xiangjie, Zhao E-mail: zxjdouble@gmail.com; Cangli, Liu; Jiazhu, Duan; Dayong, Zhang; Yongquan, Luo

    2015-01-07

    Optically addressed conventional nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulator has attracted wide research interests. But the slow response speed limited its further application. In this paper, polymer network liquid crystal (PNLC) was proposed to replace the conventional nematic liquid crystal to enhance the response time to the order of submillisecond. The maximum light scattering of the employed PNLC was suppressed to be less than 2% at 1.064 μm by optimizing polymerization conditions and selecting large viscosity liquid crystal as solvent. The occurrence of phase ripple phenomenon due to electron diffusion and drift in photoconductor was found to deteriorate the phase modulation effect of the optical addressed PNLC phase modulator. The wavelength effect and AC voltage frequency effect on the on state dynamic response of phase change was investigated by experimental methods. These effects were interpreted by electron diffusion and drift theory based on the assumption that free electron was inhomogeneously distributed in accordance with the writing beam intensity distribution along the incident direction. The experimental results indicated that the phase ripple could be suppressed by optimizing the wavelength of the writing beam and the driving AC voltage frequency when varying the writing beam intensity to generate phase change in 2π range. The modulation transfer function was also measured.

  8. Tunable liquid crystal lens array by encapsulation with a photo-reactive polymer for short focal length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se-Um; Lee, Sanghun; Na, Jun-Hee; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrated an electrically tunable liquid crystal (LC) lens array with a short focal length by self-encapsulation with a polymer layer of photo-reactive mesogens (RMs). The underlying concept relies primarily on the encapsulation of the LC with a thin curvilinear polymer layer in contact with air for the reduction of the focal length. The polymer-encapsulated (PE)-LC lens array was produced on a patterned substrate by selective wetting inscription through the phase separation of the LC and the RMs. In the field-off state, the focal length of the PE-LC lens was measured to be about 3 mm which is shorter than a conventional case by a factor of three (about 9 mm). The wettability inscription by ultraviolet light enables to build up any size of the LC lens in array over large-area without using a wet-chemical etching process for flexible optoelectronic and photonic applications.

  9. Dielectric properties of liquid-crystal azomethine polymer with a side alkyl-substituted chain, doped with fullerene C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, D. S.; Kostromin, S. V.; Musteaţa, V.; Cozan, V.; Bronnikov, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    We studied the actual and imaginary components of the dielectric constant of liquid-crystal azomethine polymer with a side chain, doped with 0.5 wt % of fullerene C60, over a wide range of temperatures and frequencies; measurements were made by means of dielectric spectroscopy. By analyzing the frequency dependence of the dielectric constant, we detected the relaxation processes (α, β1, and β2) in the nanocomposite, corresponding to certain modes of molecular motion and described them by the Arrhenius equations (β1- and β2-processes) and the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman equation (α-process). An antiplasticization effect is discovered after doping the polymer with fullerene C60, which manifests itself in increasing the glass transition temperature of the nanocomposite compared to this parameter typical of pure polymer.

  10. Molecular Engineering of Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-27

    INTRODUCTION TO LIQUID CRYSTALS 14.2.1 Introduction to Low Molar Mass Liquid Crystals and Definitions 14.2.2 Liquid Crystalline Polymers 14.3 ISOMORPHISM...Crystals and Definitions A liquid crystalline or mesomorphic phase or mesophase refers to a state of matter in which the degree of order is between...monotropic, the definition of Gkc being apparent from Figure 7. It is easily seen how crystal perfectioning on annealing can lead to a "conversion" of an

  11. Liquid crystals in tribology.

    PubMed

    Carrión, Francisco-José; Martínez-Nicolás, Ginés; Iglesias, Patricia; Sanes, José; Bermúdez, María-Dolores

    2009-09-18

    Two decades ago, the literature dealing with the possible applications of low molar mass liquid crystals, also called monomer liquid crystals (MLCs), only included about 50 references. Today, thousands of papers, conference reports, books or book chapters and patents refer to the study and applications of MLCs as lubricants and lubricant additives and efforts are made to develop new commercial applications. The development of more efficient lubricants is of paramount technological and economic relevance as it is estimated that half the energy consumption is dissipated as friction. MLCs have shown their ability to form ordered boundary layers with good load-carrying capacity and to lower the friction coefficients, wear rates and contact temperature of sliding surfaces, thus contributing to increase the components service life and to save energy. This review includes the use of MLCs in lubrication, and dispersions of MLCs in conventional polymers (PDMLCs). Finally, new lubricating system composed of MLC blends with surfactants, ionic liquids or nanophases are considered.

  12. An Alignment Medium for Measuring Residual Dipolar Couplings in Pure DMSO: Liquid Crystals from Graphene Oxide Grafted with Polymer Brushes.

    PubMed

    Zong, Wen; Li, Gao-Wei; Cao, Jiang-Ming; Lei, Xinxiang; Hu, Mao-Lin; Sun, Han; Griesinger, Christian; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2016-03-07

    Residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) have attracted attention in light of their great impact on the structural elucidation of organic molecules. However, the effectiveness of RDC measurements is limited by the shortage of alignment media compatible with widely used organic solvents, such as DMSO. Herein, we present the first liquid crystal (LC) based alignment medium that is compatible with pure DMSO, thus enabling RDC measurements of polar and intermediate polarity molecules. The liquid crystals were obtained by grafting polymer brushes onto graphene oxide (GO) using free radical polymerization. The resulting new medium offers several advantages, such as absence of background signals, narrow line shapes, and tunable alignment. Importantly, this medium is compatible with π-conjugated molecules. Moreover, sonication-induced fragmentation can reduce the size of GO sheets. The resulting anisotropic medium has moderate alignment strength, which is a prerequisite for an accurate RDC measurement.

  13. Polymer Crystallization under Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floudas, George

    Recent efforts indicated that polymer crystallization under confinement can be substantially different from the bulk. This can have important technological applications for the design of polymeric nanofibers with tunable mechanical strength, processability and optical clarity. However, the question of how, why and when polymers crystallize under confinement is not fully answered. Important studies of polymer crystallization confined to droplets and within the spherical nanodomains of block copolymers emphasized the interplay between heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation. Herein we report on recent studies1-5 of polymer crystallization under hard confinement provided by model self-ordered AAO nanopores. Important open questions here are on the type of nucleation (homogeneous vs. heterogeneous), the size of critical nucleus, the crystal orientation and the possibility to control the overall crystallinity. Providing answers to these questions is of technological relevance for the understanding of nanocomposites containing semicrystalline polymers. In collaboration with Y. Suzuki, H. Duran, M. Steinhart, H.-J. Butt.

  14. Programmable and adaptive mechanics with liquid crystal polymer networks and elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Timothy J.; Broer, Dirk J.

    2015-11-01

    Liquid crystals are the basis of a pervasive technology of the modern era. Yet, as the display market becomes commoditized, researchers in industry, government and academia are increasingly examining liquid crystalline materials in a variety of polymeric forms and discovering their fascinating and useful properties. In this Review, we detail the historical development of liquid crystalline polymeric materials, with emphasis on the thermally and photogenerated macroscale mechanical responses -- such as bending, twisting and buckling -- and on local-feature development (primarily related to topographical control). Within this framework, we elucidate the benefits of liquid crystallinity and contrast them with other stimuli-induced mechanical responses reported for other materials. We end with an outlook of existing challenges and near-term application opportunities.

  15. All-optical switchable holographic Fresnel lens based on azo-dye-doped polymer-dispersed liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Jashnsaz, Hossein; Nataj, Nahid Hosain; Mohajerani, Ezeddin; Khabbazi, Amir

    2011-08-01

    Fabrication of an all-optical switchable holographic liquid crystal (LC) Fresnel lens based on azo-dye-doped polymer-dispersed LCs is reported using a Michelson interferometer. It is found that, upon circularly polarized photoirradiation, the diffraction efficiency of the fabricated Fresnel lens was increased significantly in a reversible manner. We believe this is due to the anisotropy induced by reorientation of the LC molecules coupled with azo-dye molecule orientation due to trans-cis-trans photoisomerization, which modulates the refractive index of the LC-rich regions. We also studied the effect of azo dye on the polarization dependency of the fabricated lens.

  16. In Situ Liquid-Crystal-Polymer Fiber Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composite.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    Prepared for B U NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND (AIR-51412) Washington, DC 20361-0001 9182600991-08867 NOTICES REPORT NUMBERING SYSTEM - The numbering of...the twentieth Center report for the year 1988 and prepared by the Air Vehicle and Crew Systems Technology Department. The numerical codes are as...examined in this research were prepared from commercially pure aluminum and Vectra, a wholly aromatic, thermotropic, liquid-crystal copolyester (LCPE). The

  17. A biosensor of high-density lipoprotein of human serum on a liquid crystal and polymer composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Hsin; Chang, Kai-Han; Chu, Wei-Lin; Tsou, Yu-Shih; Wu, Li-Ching; Li, Chien-Feng

    2013-10-01

    A biosensor for the concentration of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in human serum on a liquid crystal and polymer composite film (LCPCF) is demonstrated. The sensing mechanism is based on a polar-polar interaction between orientation of LC directors and HDL in human serum. The concentration of polar HDL in human serum affects the orientations of LC directors at the interface between LCPCF and the human serum. In addition, the surface free energy of LCPCF changes with the applied voltage due to the electrically tunable orientations of LC directors anchored among the polymer grains of LCPCF. As a result, the droplet motion of human serum on LCPCF under applied voltages can sense the concentration of HDL in human serum.

  18. Gradient polymer-disposed liquid crystal single layer of large nematic droplets for modulation of laser light.

    PubMed

    Hadjichristov, Georgi B; Marinov, Yordan G; Petrov, Alexander G

    2011-06-01

    The light modulating ability of gradient polymer-disposed liquid crystal (PDLC) single layer of large droplets formed by nematic E7 in UV-cured polymer NOA65 is studied. Operating at relatively low voltages, such PDLC film with a of thickness 10-25 μm and droplet size up to 50 μm exhibits a good contrast ratio and is capable of producing a large phase shift for the propagating coherent light. For a linearly polarized He-Ne laser (λ=633 nm), an electrically commanded phase shift as large as π/2 can be obtained by the large-droplet region of the film. The electrically produced phase shift and its spatial profile controlled by the thickness of the gradient PDLC single layers of large nematic droplets can be useful for tunable spatial light modulators and other devices for active control of laser light.

  19. Pressure sensor using liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, Devendra S. (Inventor); Holmes, Harlan K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A pressure sensor includes a liquid crystal positioned between transparent, electrically conductive films (18 and 20), that are biased by a voltage (V) which induces an electric field (E) that causes the liquid crystal to assume a first state of orientation. Application of pressure (P) to a flexible, transparent film (24) causes the conductive film (20) to move closer to or farther from the conductive film (18), thereby causing a change in the electric field (E'(P)) which causes the liquid crystal to assume a second state of orientation. Polarized light (P.sub.1) is directed into the liquid crystal and transmitted or reflected to an analyzer (A or 30). Changes in the state of orientation of the liquid crystal induced by applied pressure (P) result in a different light intensity being detected at the analyzer (A or 30) as a function of the applied pressure (P). In particular embodiments, the liquid crystal is present as droplets (10) in a polymer matrix (12) or in cells (14) in a polymeric or dielectric grid (16) material in the form of a layer (13) between the electrically conductive films (18 and 20). The liquid crystal fills the open wells in the polymer matrix (12) or grid (16) only partially.

  20. Dynamical studies of gratings formed in polymer-dispersed liquid crystal films doped with a guest-host dye

    PubMed

    Fuh; Tsai; Lee; Fan

    2000-09-01

    This study investigated the dynamic behavior of the first-order diffraction efficiency of gratings formed in polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) films doped with a guest-host dye. PDLC films were fabricated using various LC-polymer mixing ratios, and written with various powers. Experimental results indicated that several peaks appeared in the curve of the first-order diffraction efficiency versus time. According to the light scattering study, we believe that the first peak was due to the superposition of density and absorption gratings. The density grating was associated with the spatially varied molecular weight of polymer molecules across the sample, and the absorption grating resulted from the spatially varied density of free electrons. The other peaks were caused by the superposition of the absorption and phase gratings. The phase grating was generated by the formation of a periodic structure of polymer-rich and LC-rich regions in the sample. This study also proposes a model to explain these experimental results. Moreover, the theory derived from this model correlates well with the experimental results, allowing us to determine the amplitude of the final grating.

  1. Development of system level integration of compact RF components on multilayer liquid crystal polymer (LCP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, David

    The objective of this research is to optimize compactness for reconfigurable wireless communication systems by integrating Radio Frequency (RF) components on a multilayer Liquid Crystal Polymer (LCP) package while minimizing the size and interconnection of each component. To achieve this goal, various RF/microwave components have been integrated on LCP with the design, fabrication, and testing results to explore the feasibility of the designs for RF applications. The first chapter of this research focuses on the characterization of via interconnects for 3D system designs. As a crucial component for achieving compact multilayer designs, various transition designs are explored from DC to 110 GHz. In particular, High Density Interconnects (HDI) are investigated to achieve low loss performance at mm-wave frequencies. An example of accessing the input and output of a LCP packaged device using via interconnects is included. In addition, a heat sink using via technology is presented for active cooling of heat generating embedded devices. Chapters 3, 4, and 5 demonstrate the results of RF Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) switches integrated on LCP to create compact reconfigurable devices. RF MEMS switches are essential for designing compact multi-functional devices. A pattern reconfigurable antenna with monolithically integrated RF MEMS switches is presented. In addition, a compact 3D phase shifter using RF MEMS switches for a 2 x 2 phased antenna array is also presented in this work. To create a phased antenna array that is more compatible with Integrated Circuits (IC), Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) RF MEMS switches are used to make a low voltage phase shifter. The actuation voltage is under 10 V, which is more easily achievable in a integrated system compared to commonly used electrostatic actuated RF MEMS switches that required at least 30 V. In Chapter 6, an expandable, low cost, and conformal multilayer phased antenna array is presented. Starting with a 4 x 8

  2. Three-Dimensional Large Screen Display Using Polymer-Dispersed Liquid-Crystal Light Valves and a Schlieren Optical System: Proposal and Basic Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Kuniharu

    A novel three-dimensional (3-D) projection display used with polarized eyeglasses is proposed. It consists of polymer-dispersed liquid crystal-light valves that modulate the illuminated light based on light scattering, a polarization beam splitter, and a Schlieren projection system. The features of the proposed display include a 3-D image display with a single projector, half size and half power consumption compared with a conventional 3-D projector with polarized glasses. Measured electro-optic characteristics of a polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal cell inserted between crossed polarizers suggests that the proposed display achieves small cross talk and high-extinction ratio.

  3. Dye-sensitized nanoarrays with discotic liquid crystals as interlayer for high-efficiency inverted polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yueqin; Tan, Licheng; Chen, Yiwang

    2014-10-22

    The well-aligned and highly uniform one-dimensional ZnO with organic dyes core/shell (ZNs) and ZnO with dyes and liquid crystals core/double-shells nanoarrays (ZNLs) with controllable lengths were fabricated as electron transport layers (ETLs) in inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs). Ditetrabutylammonium cis-bis(isothiocyanato)bis(2,2'-bipyridyl-4,4'-dicarboxylato) ruthenium(II) dye (N719) was presented to reduce the surface defects of ZnO nanoarrays (NAs). In addition, the shell modification could decrease the electron injection barrier between ZnO and active layer, thereby facilitating electron injection effectively and forming a direct electron transport channel into the cathode. Due to the orientation of nanoarrays and the self-organization of 3,6,7,10,11-pentakis(hexyloxy)-2-hydroxytriphenylene liquid crystals (LCs) in liquid crystalline mesophase and isotropic phase transition, the components of active layer would be driven rearrange and infiltrate among the interspaces of nanoarrays more orderly. The increased interfacial contact between cathode and active layer would benefit charge generation, transportation and collection. On the basis of these advantages, it was found the N719 shell and N719/LCs double-shells modifications of ZnO NAs could boost the photovoltaic performance of PSCs with the best power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.3% and 8.0%, respectively.

  4. Effect of dielectric permittivity on the performance of polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) electrolyte dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamarudin, Muhammad A. A.; Khan, Ammar A.; Qasim, Malik M.; Wilkinson, Timothy D.

    2016-09-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are a type of organic solar cell often cited for their high efficiency and easy fabrication. Recent studies have shown that modification of the standard liquid electrolyte DSSC architecture by the changing one of the components or the addition of additives often results in the improvement in one of the photovoltaic parameters and hence the overall efficiency. Here we explore a dielectric liquid crystal material which is a known insulator but possesses a high degree of order and optical anisotropy. In the presence of an applied electric field, the equilibrium of positive and negative charges are displaced in opposite directions. In this work, different mixtures with different dielectric anisotropies ranging from negative, zero and positive are formulated. These mixtures are then used to prepare polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) electrolytes and subsequently DSSC devices based on these PDLC electrolytes are fabricated. The morphology of the PDLC is observed through polarizing optical microscopy (POM) and the electrical/photovoltaic characterizations are performed through current density-voltage (J-V) measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  5. Development of Multifunctional Ultra-Nonlinear Liquids and Liquid Crystals for Sensor Protection Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    13. I. C. Khoo, Yana Zhang Williams, B. Lewis and T. Mallouk, "Photorefractive CdSe and gold nanowire -doped liquid crystals and polymer-dispersed...34Photorefractive CdSe and gold nanowire -doped liquid crystals and polymer-dispersed-liquid-crystal photonic crystals," Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. 446: 233...Nonlinear nematic liquid crystals - Enhanced photorefractivity of CdSe nano-rod doped nematic liquid crystal--------------- 5 2.3 Extremely nonlinear

  6. A miniaturized, eye-conformable, and long-term reliable retinal prosthesis using monolithic fabrication of liquid crystal polymer (LCP).

    PubMed

    Jeong, Joonsoo; Bae, So Hyun; Min, Kyou Sik; Seo, Jong-Mo; Chung, Hum; Kim, Sung June

    2015-03-01

    A novel retinal prosthetic device was developed using biocompatible liquid crystal polymer (LCP) to address the problems associated with conventional metal- and polymer-based devices: the hermetic metal package is bulky, heavy, and labor-intensive, whereas a thin, flexible, and MEMS-compatible polymer-based system is not durable enough for chronic implantation. Exploiting the advantageous properties of LCP such as a low moisture absorption rate, thermobonding, and thermoforming, we fabricate a small, light-weight, long-term reliable retinal prosthesis that can be conformally attached on the eye-surface. A LCP fabrication process using monolithic integration and conformal deformation was established enabling miniaturization and a batch manufacturing process as well as eliminating the need for feed-through technology. The functionality of the fabricated device was tested through wireless operation in saline solution. Its efficacy and implantation stability were verified through in vivo animal tests by measuring the cortical potential and monitoring implanted dummy devices for more than a year, respectively.

  7. Investigation of the Effect of Yttrium Oxide Nanoparticles Doped with Cerium and Neodymium on Electro-Optics of Liquid Crystal Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, G. M.; Osipov, V. V.; Platonov, V. V.; Podkin, A. V.; Strel'tsov, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Morphology and properties of liquid crystal polymer composites doped with inorganic nanoparticles are described. These composites comprised nematic liquid crystal 5CB, polyvinyl acetate, and nanoparticles of oxides (Y2O3, CeO2:Y2O3, and Nd2O3:Y2O3). Nanopowders were synthesized by the laser method of vaporization of a solid target under CO2-laser or fiber ytterbium laser irradiation. The effect of oxides on the electro-optical properties of the composites and times of response to an electrical pulse is investigated. It is shown that incorporation of CeO2:Y2O3 nanopowder in liquid crystal polymer composites affects the decrease of the control field and the increase of light transmission in an electric field stronger than incorporation of Nd2O3:Y2O3 nanoparticles.

  8. Visible and near-infrared characterization and modeling of nanosized holographic-polymer-dispersed liquid crystal gratings.

    PubMed

    Vita, Francesco; Marino, Antigone; Tkachenko, Volodymyr; Abbate, Giancarlo; Lucchetta, Daniele E; Criante, Luigi; Simoni, Francesco

    2005-07-01

    We have studied the electro-optical and angular behavior of holographic-polymer-dispersed liquid crystal gratings at different wavelengths, in the visible and in the near-infrared range. As usual in these kinds of materials, a strong polarization dependent behavior was observed. Our samples showed very high diffraction efficiency for p-polarized radiation at 1.55 microm, which is very interesting for many possible applications in the telecom field. However, we also observed a very unusual behavior for visible p-polarized light and we try to suggest some explanation for that. By analyzing the angular dependence of the diffraction efficiency, we could measure the components of the permittivity modulation tensor and infer important information about the main parameters involved in the grating structure: the degree of phase separation and the anisotropy in the liquid crystal droplet distribution. In our opinion, this simple and nondestructive methodology can be very useful for studying these kinds of materials and getting information on their morphology, in view of optimizing their properties. Finally, we discuss the role of the refractive index optical dispersion in order to describe the behavior of these materials at different wavelengths. These remarks are especially important when properties in the infrared range are extrapolated from measurements in the visible.

  9. Photoinduced changes of surface order in coumarin side-chain polymer films used for liquid crystal photoalignment

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, G.; Jackson, P.O.; Hogg, J.H.C.; Stirner, T.; O'Neill, M.; Duffy, W.L.; Kelly, S.M.; Clark, G.F.

    2005-08-08

    Specular x-ray reflectivity probes morphological changes in a crosslinkable coumarin photoalignment polymer film resulting from ultraviolet irradiation. An ordered surface layer with density oscillations compatible with planar side-chain alignment is obtained before irradiation. The ordering is enhanced in the early stages of crosslinking. This is attributed to the photoinduced increase of mobility of the side-chains resulting from the creation of free volume by the crosslinking process. The expansion of the thin film confirms that free volume is created. The surface ordering decreases with prolonged ultraviolet irradiation because of increased material viscosity resulting from a high crosslinked density. The implications of surface ordering on liquid crystal photoalignment are discussed.

  10. Sensor for monitoring the vibration of a laser beam based on holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal films.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming Shian; Wu, Shing Trong; Fuh, Andy Ying-Guey

    2010-12-06

    A continuous multiple exposure diffraction grating (CMEDG) is fabricated holographically on polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) films using two-beam interference with multiple exposures. The grating is fabricated by exposing a PDLC film to 18 repeated exposure/non-exposure cycles with an angular step of ~10°/10° while it revolves a circle on a rotation stage. The structure of the sample thus formed is analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and shows arc-ripples around the center. From the diffraction patterns of the formed grating obtained using a normally incident laser beam, some or all of the 18 recorded arc beams can be reconstructed, as determined by the probing location. Thus, it can be applied for use as a beam-vibration sensor for a laser.

  11. In vivo silicon-based flexible radio frequency integrated circuits monolithically encapsulated with biocompatible liquid crystal polymers.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Geon-Tae; Im, Donggu; Lee, Sung Eun; Lee, Jooseok; Koo, Min; Park, So Young; Kim, Seungjun; Yang, Kyounghoon; Kim, Sung June; Lee, Kwyro; Lee, Keon Jae

    2013-05-28

    Biointegrated electronics have been investigated for various healthcare applications which can introduce biomedical systems into the human body. Silicon-based semiconductors perform significant roles of nerve stimulation, signal analysis, and wireless communication in implantable electronics. However, the current large-scale integration (LSI) chips have limitations in in vivo devices due to their rigid and bulky properties. This paper describes in vivo ultrathin silicon-based liquid crystal polymer (LCP) monolithically encapsulated flexible radio frequency integrated circuits (RFICs) for medical wireless communication. The mechanical stability of the LCP encapsulation is supported by finite element analysis simulation. In vivo electrical reliability and bioaffinity of the LCP monoencapsulated RFIC devices are confirmed in rats. In vitro accelerated soak tests are performed with Arrhenius method to estimate the lifetime of LCP monoencapsulated RFICs in a live body. The work could provide an approach to flexible LSI in biointegrated electronics such as an artificial retina and wireless body sensor networks.

  12. Gas flow-field induced director alignment in polymer dispersed liquid crystal microdroplets deposited on a glass substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, D. S.; Singh, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    Polymer dispersed liquid crystal thin films have been deposited on glass substrates by the processes of polymerization and solvent evaporation induced phase separation. The electron and the optical polarization microscopies of the films reveal that PDLC microdroplets formed during the process of phase separation near the top surface of the film remain exposed and respond to shear stress due to air or gas flow on the surface. Optical response of the film to an air flow-induced shear stress input on the free surface has been measured. Director orientation in the droplets changes with the applied shear stress leading to time varying transmitted light intensity. Director dynamics of the droplet for an applied step shear stress has been discussed from free energy considerations. Results on the measurement of light transmission as a function of the gas flow parameter unambiguously demonstrate the potential of these systems for use as boundary layer and gas flow sensors.

  13. Electrohydrodynamic Behaviors in the Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Doped Optically Compensated Bend Polymer-Dispersed Nematic Liquid Crystal Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Ning; Wu, Jin-Jei; Ke, Hung-Lin

    2008-11-01

    We fabricated three optically compensated bend (OCB) polymer-dispersed nematic liquid crystal (PDLC) cells doped with a minute amount of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and observed the eletrohydrodynamic (EHD) behaviors of LCs in these three MWCNT-doped OCB PDLC cells at 5 or 12 V AC voltage with a frequency of 1 kHz or 60 Hz, respectively. Using the polarizing microscope, we discovered many kinds of domain patterns, including the fingerprint-like domain pattern, the uniform domain pattern, the bean-like domain pattern, the irregular big spot domain pattern, the hexagonal short period lattice domain pattern, and the rectangular period lattice domain pattern. This suggests that some domain patterns differ from the Kapustin-William's domain pattern while others were somewhat similar to the Kapustin-William's domain pattern.

  14. Multi-imaging characteristics of electrically controlled on-axis holographic polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal Fresnel lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaopeng; Zheng, Jihong; Wang, Yanan; Gao, Zheng; Sun, Lijia; Lu, Yang; Zhuang, Songlin

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the investigation of the electrically controlled multifocus, multi-imaging characteristics of an on-axis holographic polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal (H-PDLC) Fresnel lens. The Fresnel lens is examined within a PDLC cell through the analysis of interference fringes generated by on-axis plane and spherical waves. Experiments are conducted to investigate the multifocus and multi-imaging phenomena of the H-PDLC Fresnel lens, and a corresponding geometrical optical analysis is also provided. It is then demonstrated that the H-PDLC Fresnel lens is a plane-surface diffractive optical device which modulates the phase of incident light through a periodic change of refractive index and forms multiple symmetrical images. Its diffraction properties, which can be controlled electrically, have further potential applications in this field.

  15. Influence of Substrate Surfaces on Thermal Behavior of Photopolymerization-Induced Phase Separation of Liquid Crystal and Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashige, Takeshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Ikehata, Seiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2003-01-01

    We studied photopolymerization-induced phase separation (P-PIPS) of polymer fibers and liquid crystal (LC) formed at various thicknesses between glass substrates using a differential scanning calorimeter to find the influence of substrates on the P-PIPS phenomenon. In this case, the energy of ultraviolet light adsorbed by the solution film of the LC and monomer was kept constant in a unit area even when the solution thickness was changed. As an experimental result, the thermal phase-transition sequence behavior of the LC component in the formed composite film of smaller thickness approached that of the original pure LC. The total reaction heat for the polymerization in any thickness solutions did not make meaningful difference. These indicate that the phase separation can be promoted by decreasing the distance between the substrates even under constant polymerization degree, which depends on the polymerization reaction.

  16. Holographic storage of three-dimensional image and data using photopolymer and polymer dispersed liquid crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hong-Yue; Liu, Pan; Zeng, Chao; Yao, Qiu-Xiang; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Liu, Jicheng; Zheng, Huadong; Yu, Ying-Jie; Zeng, Zhen-Xiang; Sun, Tao

    2016-09-01

    We present holographic storage of three-dimensional (3D) images and data in a photopolymer film without any applied electric field. Its absorption and diffraction efficiency are measured, and reflective analog hologram of real object and image of digital information are recorded in the films. The photopolymer is compared with polymer dispersed liquid crystals as holographic materials. Besides holographic diffraction efficiency of the former is little lower than that of the latter, this work demonstrates that the photopolymer is more suitable for analog hologram and big data permanent storage because of its high definition and no need of high voltage electric field. Therefore, our study proposes a potential holographic storage material to apply in large size static 3D holographic displays, including analog hologram displays, digital hologram prints, and holographic disks. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474194, 11004037, and 61101176) and the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai, China (Grant No. 14ZR1415500).

  17. Erasable thin-film optical diode based on a photoresponsive liquid crystal polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinping; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Yujian; Yang, Huai; Yu, Haifeng

    2014-03-01

    We report a thin-film optical diode written into thin films of a liquid-crystalline polymer (LCP), which is based on the photoinduced LC-to-isotropic phase transition of LCPs. The interference pattern between a collimated and a focused UV laser beam is imprinted as chirped volume-phase gratings in photoresponsive LCP films and no further processing steps like development or liftoff are required for the fabrication. The resultant thin-film device not only possesses the fundamental functions of an optical lens for laser beam focusing, but also shows diode effects with the focusing/defocusing function dependent on the direction of light incidence and orientation of the device. Furthermore, this photonic thin-film lens exhibits a spatially tunable spectroscopic response, revealing a unique physics of secondary excitations of resonance modes of the single-layer LCP waveguide grating structures. This reveals the mechanisms for the focusing/defocusing of laser beams by chirped grating structures. Erasability and reconstructibility of the photoresponsive LCPs guarantee rewritability of the thin-film diode lens.We report a thin-film optical diode written into thin films of a liquid-crystalline polymer (LCP), which is based on the photoinduced LC-to-isotropic phase transition of LCPs. The interference pattern between a collimated and a focused UV laser beam is imprinted as chirped volume-phase gratings in photoresponsive LCP films and no further processing steps like development or liftoff are required for the fabrication. The resultant thin-film device not only possesses the fundamental functions of an optical lens for laser beam focusing, but also shows diode effects with the focusing/defocusing function dependent on the direction of light incidence and orientation of the device. Furthermore, this photonic thin-film lens exhibits a spatially tunable spectroscopic response, revealing a unique physics of secondary excitations of resonance modes of the single-layer LCP

  18. Liquid Crystals in Tribology

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Francisco-José; Martínez-Nicolás, Ginés; Iglesias, Patricia; Sanes, José; Bermúdez, María-Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Two decades ago, the literature dealing with the possible applications of low molar mass liquid crystals, also called monomer liquid crystals (MLCs), only included about 50 references. Today, thousands of papers, conference reports, books or book chapters and patents refer to the study and applications of MLCs as lubricants and lubricant additives and efforts are made to develop new commercial applications. The development of more efficient lubricants is of paramount technological and economic relevance as it is estimated that half the energy consumption is dissipated as friction. MLCs have shown their ability to form ordered boundary layers with good load-carrying capacity and to lower the friction coefficients, wear rates and contact temperature of sliding surfaces, thus contributing to increase the components service life and to save energy. This review includes the use of MLCs in lubrication, and dispersions of MLCs in conventional polymers (PDMLCs). Finally, new lubricating system composed of MLC blends with surfactants, ionic liquids or nanophases are considered. PMID:19865534

  19. Erasable thin-film optical diode based on a photoresponsive liquid crystal polymer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinping; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Yujian; Yang, Huai; Yu, Haifeng

    2014-04-07

    We report a thin-film optical diode written into thin films of a liquid-crystalline polymer (LCP), which is based on the photoinduced LC-to-isotropic phase transition of LCPs. The interference pattern between a collimated and a focused UV laser beam is imprinted as chirped volume-phase gratings in photoresponsive LCP films and no further processing steps like development or liftoff are required for the fabrication. The resultant thin-film device not only possesses the fundamental functions of an optical lens for laser beam focusing, but also shows diode effects with the focusing/defocusing function dependent on the direction of light incidence and orientation of the device. Furthermore, this photonic thin-film lens exhibits a spatially tunable spectroscopic response, revealing a unique physics of secondary excitations of resonance modes of the single-layer LCP waveguide grating structures. This reveals the mechanisms for the focusing/defocusing of laser beams by chirped grating structures. Erasability and reconstructibility of the photoresponsive LCPs guarantee rewritability of the thin-film diode lens.

  20. Fabrication of micro- and nanometre-scale polymer structures in liquid crystal devices for next generation photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartan, Chloe C.; Salter, Patrick S.; Booth, Martin J.; Morris, Stephen M.; Elston, Steve J.

    2016-09-01

    Direct Laser Writing (DLW) by two-photon photopolymerization (TPP) enables the fabrication of micron-scale polymeric structures in soft matter systems. The technique has implications in a broad range of optics and photonics; in particular fast-switching liquid crystal (LC) modes for the development of next generation display technologies. In this paper, we report two different methodologies using our TPP-based fabrication technique. Two explicit examples are provided of voltage-dependent LC director profiles that are inherently unstable, but which appear to be promising candidates for fast-switching photonics applications. In the first instance, 1 μm-thick periodic walls of polymer network are written into a planar aligned (parallel rubbed) nematic pi-cell device containing a nematic LC-monomer mixture. The structures are fabricated when the device is electrically driven into a fast-switching nematic LC state and aberrations induced by the device substrates are corrected for by virtue of the adaptive optics elements included within the DLW setup. Optical polarizing microscopy images taken post-fabrication reveal that polymer walls oriented perpendicular to the rubbing direction promote the stability of the so-called optically compensated bend mode upon removal of the externally applied field. In the second case, polymer walls are written in a nematic LC-optically adhesive glue mixture. A polymer- LCs-polymer-slices or `POLICRYPS' template is formed by immersing the device in acetone post-fabrication to remove any remaining non-crosslinked material. Injecting the resultant series of polymer microchannels ( 1 μm-thick) with a short-pitch, chiral nematic LC mixture leads to the spontaneous alignment of a fast-switching chiral nematic mode, where the helical axis lies parallel to the glass substrates. Optimal contrast between the bright and dark states of the uniform lying helix alignment is achieved when the structures are spaced at the order of the device thickness

  1. Shape-responsive actuator from a single layer of a liquid-crystal polymer.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Tahseen; Park, Soo-young

    2014-10-22

    Actuation of various shape changes, including bending, helical twisting, and reversible hinging, has been achieved from a single-layer sheet of poly(1,4-di(4-(3-acryloyloxypropyloxy)benzoyloxy)-2-methylbenzene) [poly(RM257)]. This actuator was developed through photopolymerization of a reactive liquid-crystal (LC) monomer (RM257) mixed with 4-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB, nematic LC at room temperature) in a planar polyimide-coated LC cell. The UV beam perpendicular to one side of the LC cell produced an asymmetric phase separation between the poly(RM257) network and 5CB that resulted in an asymmetric porous structure along the thickness direction when the 5CB was extracted, in which the UV-exposed surface was pore-free and compact while the opposite surface was highly porous. As a result of this structure, the dry and curled poly(RM257) film exhibits actuation behavior when placed in acetone because of a difference in swelling between the two morphologically different sides, the film UV-exposed and nonexposed sides. The actuation of a three-dimensional tetrahedron (pyramidal) structure is also demonstrated for the first time by using a simple photopatterning technique to selectively control its asymmetric morphology at specific locations.

  2. Effect of carbon derivatives in sulfonated poly(etherimide) - liquid crystal polymer composite for methanol vapor sensing.

    PubMed

    Bag, Souvik; Rathi, Keerti; Pal, Kaushik

    2017-03-14

    A class of highly sensitive chemiresistive sensors are developed for methanol (MeOH) vapor detection in ambient atmosphere by introducing conductive nanofillers like carbon black (CB), multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs),and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) into sulfonated poly(etherimide) (PEI)/liquid crystal polymer (LCP) composite (sPEI-LCP). Polar composites are prepared by sulfonation process for instantaneous enhancement in adsorption capability of the sensing films to the target analyte (MeOH). Sensing properties exhibit that polymer composite based fabricated sensors are efficient for detection of different concentration methanol vapor from 300 to 1200 parts-per-million (ppm) at room temperature. The incorporation of nanofiller induces the dramatic change in sensing behavior of base composite film (sPEI-LCP). Thus, less mass fraction of nanofillers (i.e. 2 wt%) influence the nonlinear sensing behavior for the entire range of methanol vapor. The way of simplicity and low fabrication cost of the prepared sensor persuade as a suitable methanol vapor sensor for environmental monitoring.

  3. Power generating reflective-type liquid crystal displays using a reflective polariser and a polymer solar cell.

    PubMed

    Ho Huh, Yoon; Park, Byoungchoo

    2015-06-23

    We herein report the results of a study of a power generating reflective-type liquid crystal display (LCD), composed of a 90° twisted nematic (TN) LC cell attached to the top of a light-absorbing polymer solar cell (PSC), i.e., a Solar-LCD. The PSC consisted of a polymer bulk-heterojunction photovoltaic (PV) layer of poly[[9-(1-octylnonyl)-9H-carbazole-2,7-diyl]-2,5-thiophenediyl-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole-4,7-diyl-2,5-thiophenediyl] and [6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PCDTBT:PCBM70), and showed a high power conversion efficiency of about 5%. In order to improve the visibility of the Solar-LCD, between the TN-LC and the PV cells we inserted a reflective polariser of a giant birefringent optical (GBO) film. The reflectivity from the Solar-LCD was observed to be considerably increased by more than 13-15% under illumination by visible light. The Solar-LCD also exhibited a significantly improved contrast ratio of more than 17-19. We believe there is a clear case for using such Solar-LCDs in new power-generating reflective-type displays; taken as a whole these results also demonstrate the possibility of their application in a number of energy-harvesting opto-electrical display devices.

  4. Charge carrier transport properties in polymer liquid crystals containing oxadiazole and amine moieties in the same side chain.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Masuki; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Tomiki; Iino, Hiroaki; Hanna, Jun-ichi

    2005-05-19

    Steady-state and transient photocurrent measurements were carried out to study the charge carrier transport properties of polymer liquid crystal (LC) containing oxadiazole (OXD) and amine moieties in the same side chain. The steady-state photocurrent measurement with asymmetric electrodes of ITO and Al and a short penetration depth of the illumination light indicated that both electrons and holes can be transported in this film. The transient hole photocurrent observed by time-of-flight (TOF) experiments was dispersive at room temperature. The hole drift mobility significantly depended on temperature and electric field and was determined to be 6.1 x 10(-8) cm2/Vs at a field of 9.1 x 10(5) V/cm. According to the disorder formalism, the Gaussian width of the density of states was determined to be 170 meV for holes. Despite the indication of possible electron transport in this film, we could not determine the electron mobility by TOF experiments due to strong dispersive photocurrent. We discuss the present charge transport properties of the film in relation to a large dipole attributed to an electrical push-pull structure of p-dimethylaminophenyl-substitited OXD moiety in polymer LC and its electroluminescent properties.

  5. Effects of multi-context information recorded at different regions in holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal on optical reconfiguration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, Akifumi; Watanabe, Minoru

    2016-08-01

    A holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) memory to record multi-context information for an optically reconfigurable gate array is formed by constructing a laser illumination system to implement successive laser exposures at different small regions in a glass cell filled with LC composites. The context pattern arrangements for circuit information are designed in a 3 × 3 in.2 photomask by electron beam lithography, and they are recorded as laser interference patterns at nine regions separated in an HPDLC sample by a laser interferometer composed of movable pinhole and photomask plates placed on motorized stages. The multi-context information reconstructed from the different regions in the HPDLC is written to a photodiode array in a gate-array VLSI by switching only the position of laser irradiation using the displacement of the pinhole plate under the control of a personal computer (PC). The effects of multi-context information recorded at different regions in the HPDLC on optical reconfiguration are discussed in terms of the optical system composed of ORGA VLSI and HPDLC memory. The internal structures in the HPDLC memory formed by multi-context recording are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation, and the configurations composed of LC and polymer phases are revealed at various regions in the HPDLC memory.

  6. Power generating reflective-type liquid crystal displays using a reflective polariser and a polymer solar cell

    PubMed Central

    Ho Huh, Yoon; Park, Byoungchoo

    2015-01-01

    We herein report the results of a study of a power generating reflective-type liquid crystal display (LCD), composed of a 90° twisted nematic (TN) LC cell attached to the top of a light-absorbing polymer solar cell (PSC), i.e., a Solar-LCD. The PSC consisted of a polymer bulk-heterojunction photovoltaic (PV) layer of poly[[9-(1-octylnonyl)-9H-carbazole-2,7-diyl]-2,5-thiophenediyl-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole-4,7-diyl-2,5-thiophenediyl] and [6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PCDTBT:PCBM70), and showed a high power conversion efficiency of about 5%. In order to improve the visibility of the Solar-LCD, between the TN-LC and the PV cells we inserted a reflective polariser of a giant birefringent optical (GBO) film. The reflectivity from the Solar-LCD was observed to be considerably increased by more than 13–15% under illumination by visible light. The Solar-LCD also exhibited a significantly improved contrast ratio of more than 17–19. We believe there is a clear case for using such Solar-LCDs in new power-generating reflective-type displays; taken as a whole these results also demonstrate the possibility of their application in a number of energy-harvesting opto-electrical display devices. PMID:26101099

  7. Effects of conducting polymer poly(3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanotubes on the electro-optical and dielectric properties of a nematic liquid crystal 4-n-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sharmistha; Nayek, Prasenjit; Roy, Subir Kr.; Gangopadhyay, Rupali; Molla, Mijanur Rahaman; Dabrowski, Roman

    2010-02-01

    We report the results of the optical transmission and the capacitance behavior as a function dc electric field of a pristine liquid crystal and conducting polymer nanotube-liquid crystal composite measured in twisted nematic cells. The threshold and driving voltages have been determined from transmission-voltage curve. There is remarkable reduction in the threshold and driving voltage in the polymer nanotube doped liquid crystal cell which is good from application point of view. The residual dc is also reduced significantly in the doped cell and the reduction is even more than that observed in the carbon nanotube doped same liquid crystal system.

  8. Liquid Crystal Optofluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Cuennet, J. G.; Psaltis, D.

    2012-10-11

    By employing anisotropic fluids and namely liquid crystals, fluid flow becomes an additional degree of freedom in designing optofluidic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate optofluidic liquid crystal devices based on the direct flow of nematic liquid crystals in microfluidic channels. Contrary to previous reports, in the present embodiment we employ the effective phase delay acquired by light travelling through flowing liquid crystal, without analysing the polarisation state of the transmitted light. With this method, we demonstrate the variation in the diffraction pattern of an array of microfluidic channels acting as a grating. We also discuss our recent activities in integrating mechanical oscillators for on-chip peristaltic pumping.

  9. Liquid crystal optofluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasdekis, A. E.; Cuennet, J. G.; Psaltis, D.

    2012-10-01

    By employing anisotropic fluids and namely liquid crystals, fluid flow becomes an additional degree of freedom in designing optofluidic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate optofluidic liquid crystal devices based on the direct flow of nematic liquid crystals in microfluidic channels. Contrary to previous reports, in the present embodiment we employ the effective phase delay acquired by light travelling through flowing liquid crystal, without analysing the polarisation state of the transmitted light. With this method, we demonstrate the variation in the diffraction pattern of an array of microfluidic channels acting as a grating. We also discuss our recent activities in integrating mechanical oscillators for on-chip peristaltic pumping.

  10. Development of dye-sensitized solar cells composed of liquid crystal embedded, electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) nanofibers as polymer gel electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Kwang; Ban, Taewon; Sakthivel, P; Lee, Jae Wook; Gal, Yeong-Soon; Lee, Jin-Kook; Kim, Mi-Ra; Jin, Sung-Ho

    2012-04-01

    In order to overcome the problems associated with the use of liquid electrolytes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), a new system composed of liquid crystal embedded, polymer electrolytes has been developed. For this purpose, three types of DSSCs have been fabricated. The cells contain electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (e-PVdF-co-HFP) polymer gel electrolyte, with and without doping with the liquid crystal E7 and with a liquid electrolyte. The morphologies of the newly prepared DSSCs were explored using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Analysis of the FE-SEM images indicate that the DSSC composed of E7 embedded on e-PVdF-co-HFP polymer gel electrolyte has a greatly regular morphology with an average diameter. The ionic conductivity of E7 embedded on e-PVdF-co-HFP polymer gel electrolyte was found to be 2.9 × 10(-3) S/cm at room temperature, a value that is 37% higher than that of e-PVdF-co-HFP polymer gel electrolyte. The DCCS containing the E7 embedded, e-PVdF-co-HFP polymer gel electrolyte was observed to possess a much higher power conversion efficiency (PCE = 6.82%) than that of an e-PVdF-co-HFP nanofiber (6.35%). In addition, DSSCs parameters of the E7 embedded, e-PVdF-co-HFP polymer gel electrolyte (V(oc) = 0.72 V, J(sc) = 14.62 mA/cm(2), FF = 64.8%, and PCE = 6.82% at 1 sun intensity) are comparable to those of a liquid electrolyte (V(oc) = 0.75 V, J(sc) = 14.71 mA/cm(2), FF = 64.9%, and PCE = 7.17%, both at a 1 sun intensity).

  11. Hierarchical assemblies of soft matters from polymers and liquid crystals on structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honglawan, Apiradee

    Hierarchical, multifunctional materials hold important keys to numerous advanced technologies, including electronics, optics, and medicine. This thesis encompasses generation of hierarchical structures with novel morphologies and functions through self-assembly directed by lithographically fabricated templates. Here, two soft materials, amphiphilic random copolymers of photopolymerized acryloyl chloride (ranPAC) and smectic-A liquid crystal (SmA-LC) molecule, 4'(5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,9,9,10,10,11,11,12,12,12-heptadecaflu-orododecyloxy)-biphenyl-4-carboxylic acid ethyl ester, are synthesized as model systems to investigate the governing principles at the topographic surface/interface. The ranPAC can self-organize into nanomicelles with high regularity and stability, typically not possible in random copolymer systems. The morphology can be controlled by the photopolymerization conditions and solvent; the crosslinked shell makes the micelles robust against drying and storage. Using SU-8 micropillar arrays with spatially controlled surface chemistry as templates, we construct hierarchical microporous structures with tunable pore size and symmetry (e.g. square array), and uncover a new evaporative assembly method. By functionalizing the ranPAC nanovesicles with cationic poly(ethyleneimines), we encapsulate the anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and mRNA at a high payload, which are delivered to HEK 293T cells in vitro at a low cytotoxicity level. SmA-LC are characterized by arrangement of molecules into thin layers with the long molecular axis parallel to the layer normal, forming a close-packed hexagonal array of topological defects known as focal conic domains (FCDs) in a thin film. Using a series of SU-8 micropillar arrays with different size, shape, height, and symmetry as topological templates, we investigate the epitaxial and hierarchical assemblies of FCDs; whether the system favors confinement or "pillar edge-pinning" depends on balance of the elastic energy

  12. Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-28

    Liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs); fibers ; thermotropic; lyotropic; processing; rheology; nonlinear optical (4L-" properties* blends* Q2 P- USTRACT...CowMnue on reverse if , cevwy and identify by block number) The remarkable mechanical properties and thermal stability of fibers fabricated from liquid...control of orientation falls short of allowing manipula- tion of macroscopic orientation (except for the case of uniaxial fibers ). This report

  13. Dichroic Liquid Crystal Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    * Effect of Thickness * Impact of Order Parameter * Impact of the Host * Impact of Polarizer * Colour Applications * Multiplexing * QUARTER WAVE PLATE DICHROIC DISPLAYS * Operational Principle and Display Configuration11-13 * Electro-Optical Performance * DYE-DOPED TN DISPLAYS * Threshold Characteristic, Contrast Ratio and Switching Speed * PHASE CHANGE EFFECT DICHROIC LCDs * Theoretical Background * Threshold Characteristic and Molecular Orientation * MOLECULAR ORIENTATION DURING FIELD-INDUCED PHASE TRANSITION WITH HOMOGENEOUS WALL ALIGNMENT * MOLECULAR ORIENTATION DURING FIELD-INDUCED PHASE TRANSITION WITH HOMEOTROPIC WALL ALIGNMENT * Contrast Ratio, Transmission, Brightness and Switching Speed3,7,10,198-214 * Memory or Reminiscent Contrast * Electro-optical Performance vs. Temperature * Multiplexing Phase Change Dichroic LCDs * DOUBLE CELL DICHROIC LCDs3,9,14-17,232-234 * Double Cell Nematic Dichroic LCD3,8,9,14,15,233 * Double Cell One Pitch Cholesteric LCD16,17 * Double Cell Phase Change Dichroic LCD214,232 * POSITIVE MODE DICHROIC LCDS3,8,9 * Positive Mode Heilmeier Cells3,8,9,43,77,78,235-238 * USING PLEOCHROIC DYES3,8,9,43,235-238 * USING NEGATIVE DICHROIC DYES3,8,9,63,77,78156 * DUAL FREQUENCY ADDRESSED DICHROIC DISPLAYS75,238 * Positive Mode Dichroic LCDs Using λ/4 Plate * Positive Mode Double Cell Dichroic LCD * Positive Mode Dichroic LCDs Using Special Electrode patterns7,8,239-241 * Positive Mode Phase Change Dichroic LCDs3,8,9,230,243-248 * Dichroic LCDs Using an Admixture of Pleochroic and Negative Dichroic Dyes78,118 * SUPERTWIST DICHROIC EFFECT (SDE) DISPLAYS21-23 * FERROELECTRIC DICHROIC LCDs24-27 * Devices Using A Single Polarizer * Devices Using No Polarizer24-27 * POLYMER DISPERSED DICHROIC LCDs28-30,252-259 * DICHROIC POLYMER LIQUID CRYSTAL DISPLAYS * Heilmeier Type Displays * Guest-Host Cell Using an Admixture Of L.C. Polymer and Low Molecular Weight Liquid Crysta As Host * Polymeric Ferroelectric Dichroic LCDs * SMECTIC A DICHROIC LCDs * Laser

  14. Electro-optical response of polymer-dispersed liquid crystal single layers of large nematic droplets oriented by rubbed teflon nanolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Y. G.; Hadjichristov, G. B.; Petrov, A. G.; Marino, S.; Versace, C.; Scaramuzza, N.

    2013-02-01

    The surface orienting effect of rubbed teflon nanolayers on the morphology and electro-optical (EO) response of polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) single layers of large nematic droplets was studied experimentally. In PDLC composites of the nematic liquid crystal (LC) E7 and NOA65 polymer, single droplets of LC with diameters as larger as 10 μm were confined in layers with a thickness of 10 μm, and the nematic director field was efficiently modified by nanostructuring teflon rubbing of the glass plates of the PDLC cell. For layered PDLCs arranged and oriented in this way, the modulated EO response by the dielectric oscillations of the nematic director exhibits a selective amplitude-frequency modulation controllable by both temperature and voltage applied, and is simply related to the LC droplet size. That may be of practical interest for PDLC-based modulators operating in the infrasound frequency range.

  15. Quantitative Assessment of Coumarin-Containing Polymer Film's Capability for Photoalignment of Liquid Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.; Wallace, J.U.; Trajkovska, A.; Ou, J.J.; Chen, S.H.

    2007-12-12

    The photoalignment of a nematic fluid, E-7, and a glassy-nematic oligofluorene, F(MB)5, was investigated on films of Polymers 1 and 2 in the parallel regime. Polarized absorption spectroscopy and computational chemistry were employed to characterize coumarin monomer's and dimer's molar extinction coefficients and to locate absorption dipoles as parallel to their long molecular axes. Moreover, their orientational order parameters, S_m and S_d, were experimentally determined as functions of the extent of dimerization. Higher S_d and Y_d, coumarin dimer's mole fraction, were achieved in films of Polymer 1 than in Polymer 2 because of the greater coumarin mobility of the former. The ability of a coumarin-containing photoalignment film to orient a spin-cast F(MB)5 film was found to improve with increasing Y_d S_d to an extent comparable to that of a rubbed polyimide film. Because of the relatively short lengths of its constituent molecules, E-7 was oriented equally well on both polymer films regardless of the Y_d S_d values.

  16. Photovoltaic properties and morphology of organic solar cells based on liquid-crystal semiconducting polymer with additive

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Zushi, Masahito; Suzuki, Hisato; Ogahara, Shinichi; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Oku, Takeo

    2014-02-20

    Bulk heterojunction organic solar cell based on liquid crystal semiconducting polymers of poly[9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-bithiophene] (F8T2) as p-type semiconductors and fullerenes (C{sub 60}) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as electron donor and acceptor has been fabricated and characterized for improving photovoltaic and optical properties. The photovoltaic performance including current voltage curves in the dark and illumination of the F8T2/C{sub 60} conventional and inverted bulk heterojunction solar cells were investigated. Relationship between the photovoltaic properties and morphological behavior was focused on tuning for optimization of photo-voltaic performance under annealing condition near glass transition temperature. Additive-effect of diiodooctane (DIO) and poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) on the photovoltaic performance and optical properties was investigated. Mechanism of the photovoltaic properties of the conventional and inverted solar cells will be discussed by the experimental results.

  17. NIR-Vis-UV Light-Responsive Actuator Films of Polymer-Dispersed Liquid Crystal/Graphene Oxide Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhangxiang; Wang, Tianjie; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Yihe; Yu, Haifeng

    2015-12-16

    To take full advantage of sunlight for photomechanical materials, NIR-vis-UV light-responsive actuator films of polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC)/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites were fabricated. The strategy is based on phase transition of LCs from nematic to isotropic phase induced by combination of photochemical and photothermal processes in the PDLC/GO nanocomposites. Upon mechanical stretching of the film, both topological shape change and mesogenic alignment occurred in the separated LC domains, enabling the film to respond to NIR-vis-UV light. The homodispersed GO flakes act as photoabsorbent and nanoscale heat source to transfer NIR or VIS light into thermal energy, heating the film and photothermally inducing phase transition of LC microdomains. By utilizing photochemical phase transition of LCs upon UV-light irradiation, one azobenzene dye was incorporated into the LC domains, endowing the nanocomposite films with UV-responsive property. Moreover, the light-responsive behaviors can be well-controlled by adjusting the elongation ratio upon mechanical treatment. The NIR-vis-UV light-responsive PDLC/GO nanocomposite films exhibit excellent properties of easy fabrication, low-cost, and good film-forming and mechanical features, promising their numerous applications in the field of soft actuators and optomechanical systems driven directly by sunlight.

  18. Effects of monomer functionality on performances of scaffolding morphologic transmission gratings recorded in polymer dispersed liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenbin; Pu, Donglin; Shen, Su; Wei, Guojun; Xuan, Li; Chen, Linsen

    2015-09-01

    The effects of monomer functionality on performances of holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) transmission gratings are systematically investigated. Acrylate monomers with an average functionality ranging from 2.0 to 5.0 are used to prepare these samples. We find scaffolding morphologic transmission gratings (characterized by a high phase separation degree, a well alignment of LCs and low scattering loss) can be obtained irrespective of the monomer functionality, although the exact optimal curing intensity varies. The temporal evolution of the grating formation is studied and the onset time of the LC phase separation decreases significantly with the increase in average monomer functionality. It is also shown that the gratings prepared from low average functionality monomers require a comparatively low switch-off electric field (~8 V μm-1) whilst suffering from mechanical fragility and long-term instability. Our results not only provide a complete understanding of scaffolding morphologic gratings in terms of the material composition effect, but also provide insight into the formation mechanisms of non-droplet morphologic HPDLC gratings.

  19. Self-assembly of amphiphilic liquid crystal polymers obtained from a cyclopropane-1,1-dicarboxylate bearing a cholesteryl mesogen.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lin; Liu, Ming; Di Cicco, Aurélie; Albouy, Pierre-Antoine; Brissault, Blandine; Penelle, Jacques; Boileau, Sylvie; Barbier, Valessa; Li, Min-Hui

    2012-07-31

    We study the self-assembly of a new family of amphiphilic liquid crystal (LC) copolymers synthesized by the anionic ring-opening polymerization of a new cholesterol-based LC monomer, 4-(cholesteryl)butyl ethyl cyclopropane-1,1-dicarboxylate. Using the t-BuP(4) phosphazene base and thiophenol or a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) functionalized with thiol group to generate in situ the initiator during the polymerization, LC homopolymer and amphiphilic copolymers with narrow molecular weight distributions were obtained. The self-assemblies of the LC monomer, homopolymer, and block copolymers in bulk and in solution were studied by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polarizing optical microscopy (POM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). All polymers exhibit in bulk an interdigitated smectic A (SmA(d)) phase with a lamellar period of 4.6 nm. The amphiphilic copolymers self-organize in solution into vesicles with wavy membrane and nanoribbons with twisted and folded structures, depending on concentration and size of LC hydrophobic block. These new morphologies will help the comprehension of the fascinating organization of thermotropic mesophase in lyotropic structures.

  20. Modeling the Effects of Microencapsulation on the Electro-Optic Behavior of Polymer Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Flakes

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, G.P.; Marshall, K.L.; Lambropoulos, J.C.; Leitch, M.; Fromen, C.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2010-01-10

    A method for modeling the effect of microencapsulation on the electro-optical behavior of polymer cholesteric liquid crystal (PCLC) flakes suspended in a host fluid is introduced. Several microencapsulation configurations in an applied ac electric field are investigated using COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS software in combination with an analytical model. The field acting on the flakes is significantly altered as various encapsulant materials and boundary conditions are explored. The modeling predicts that test cells with multiple materials in the electric field path can have a wide range of electro-optic responses in ac electric fields. Both theoretical predictions and experimental evidence show that for PCLC flake reorientation to occur due to Maxwell–Wagner polarization, a reasonably strong electric field must be present along with at least moderately dissimilar PCLC flake and host fluid material dielectric constants and conductivities. For materials with low dielectric constants, electrophoretic behavior is observed under dc drive conditions at high field strengths for all evaluated microencapsulation configurations. This modeling method is shown to be a useful predictive tool for developing switchable particle devices that use microencapsulated dielectric particles in a host fluid medium.

  1. Multi-wavelength sensitive holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal grating applied within image splitter for autostereoscopic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jihong; Wang, Kangni; Gao, Hui; Lu, Feiyue; Sun, Lijia; Zhuang, Songlin

    2016-09-01

    Multi-wavelength sensitive holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (H-PDLC) grating and its application within image splitter for autostereoscopic display are reported in this paper. Two initiator systems consisting of photoinitiator, Methylene Blue and coinitiator, p-toluenesulfonic acid as well as photoinitiator, Rose Bengal and coinitiator, Nphenylglycine are employed. We demonstrate that Bragg gratings can be formed in this syrup polymerized under three lasers simultaneously including 632.8nm from He-Ne laser, 532nm from Verdi solid state laser, and 441.6nm from He- Cd laser. The diffraction efficiency of three kinds of gratings with different exposure wavelength are 57%, 75% and 33%, respectively. The threshold driving voltages of those gratings are 2.8, 3.05, and 2.85 V/μm, respectively. We also present the results for the feasibility of this proposed H-PDLC grating applied into image splitter without color dispersion for autostereoscopic display according to experimental splitting effect.

  2. Bichromatic coherent random lasing from dye-doped polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystals controlled by pump light polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Meng; Yang, Mingchao; Shi, Li-Jie; Deng, Luogen; Yang, Huai

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the bichromatic coherent random lasing actions from the dye-doped polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystals. Two groups of lasing peaks, of which the full widith at half maximum is about 0.3 nm, are clearly observed. The shorter- and longer-wavelength modes are associated with the excitation of the single laser dye (DCM) monomers and dimers respectively. The experimental results show that the competition between the two groups of the lasing peaks can be controlled by varying the polarization of the pump light. When the polarization of the pump light is rotated from 0° to 90°, the intensity of the shorter-wavelength lasing peak group reduces while the intensity of the longer-wavelength lasing peak group increases. In addition, a red shift of the longer-wavelength modes is also observed and the physical mechanisms behind the red-shift phenomenon are discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474021 and 51333001), the Key Program for International S&T Cooperation Projects of China (Grant No. 2013DFB50340), the Issues of Priority Development Areas of the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120001130005), and the Key (Key Grant) Project of Chinese Ministry of Education (Grant No. 313002).

  3. Frustrated polymer crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, B.; Strasbourg, 67083

    1997-03-01

    Several crystal structures or polymorphs of chiral or achiral polymers and biopolymers with three fold conformation of the helix have been found to conform to a common and -with one exception(Puterman, M. et al, J. Pol. Sci., Pol. Phys. Ed., 15, 805 (1977))- hitherto unsuspected packing scheme. The trigonal unit-cell contains three isochiral helices; the azimuthal setting of one helix differs significantly from that of the other two, leading to a so-called frustrated packing scheme, in which the environment of conformationally identical helices differs. Two variants of the frustrated scheme are analyzed. Similarities with frustrated two dimensional magnetic systems are underlined. Various examples of frustration in polymer crystallography are illustrated via the elucidation or reinterpretation of crystal phases or polymorphs of polyolefins, polyesters, cellulose derivatives and polypeptides. Structural manifestations (including AFM evidence) and morphological consequences of frustration are presented, which help diagnose the existence of this original packing of polymers.(Work done with L. Cartier, D. Dorset, S. Kopp, T. Okihara, M. Schumacher, W. Stocker.)

  4. Novel Interphases: Synthesis, Molecular Orientation and Grafting of Liquid Crystal Polymers on Carbon Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    rigid molecules into an anisotropic phase have been reported. Lars Onsager (13) showed that steric interactions between rigid rods can lead to...will eventually undergo an Onsager orientational transition. From a properties point of view the occurrence of a high density surface layer with...Plate’, N. A., Adv. in Polym. Sci., 1984, 173. (12) Flory, P. J., Proc. Royal Soc. London, 1956, A234, 73. (13) Onsager , L., Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci

  5. Dynamics of a director reorientation and optical response of polymer films filled with a liquid crystal under strong electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasechnik, S. V.; Shmeleva, D. V.; Chopik, A. P.; Vakulenko, A. A.; Zakharov, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of the director reorientation in nematic liquid crystals (NLC) confined by cylindrical cavities of porous polymeric films under strong electric field E with has been investigated theoretically. The main attention was paid to the specific mode of field application characterized by abrupt changes of the applied voltage's polarity. In experiments with porous films filled with a liquid crystal 5CB such mode resulted in appearance of strong peak -like decreasing of an optical transparence of the films. Two mechanisms of such unusual response based on assumption of electrically induced motion of ions and overall motion of a liquid were considered and applied to explain experimental results.

  6. Liquid crystalline polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties and thermal stability of fibers fabricated from liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) have led to the use of these materials in structural applications where weight savings are critical. Advances in processing of LCPs could permit the incorporation of these polymers into other than uniaxial designs and extend their utility into new areas such as nonlinear optical devices. However, the unique feature of LCPs (intrinsic orientation order) is itself problematic, and current understanding of processing with control of orientation falls short of allowing manipulation of macroscopic orientation (except for the case of uniaxial fibers). The current and desirable characteristics of LCPs are reviewed and specific problems are identified along with issues that must be addressed so that advances in the use of these unique polymers can be expedited.

  7. Thermodynamic and structure investigations of new side-chain liquid crystal polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danch, A.; Laggner, Peter; Degovics, G.; Sek, D.; Stelzer, F.

    1998-01-01

    Bis [((omega) -(4'-cyanobiphenyl)-4-yl)oxy-n- alkyl]norborn-5-ene-2,3-dicarboxylate was polymerized via ring opening metathesis polymerization. Two distributed polynorbornene derivatives, both of cis configuration, with different length of side-chain were studied. The influence of thermal history on the smectic phase stabilization, position and shape of the glass transition with temperature and on the relaxation process is shown. Glass transition temperatures enthalpies of isotropization and average layer spacing were calculated. Although, the rather flexible spacer between the mesogenic group and the main chain seems to be sufficient to partially decouple the mobility of the main chain from that of the mesogenic group, the influence of a backbone chain structure is still significant for polymer properties, especially in bulk. The measured layer spacing doe not correspond to double length of the side chain which suggests that either the side chains are not fully extended or some overlapping of CN tails occurs.

  8. Liquid Crystal Airborne Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    81/2X 11- 10 -9 .8 display using a large advertising alphanimeric ( TCI ) has been added to the front of the optical box used in the F-4 aircraft for HUD...properties over a wide range of tempera - tures, including normal room temperature. What are Liquid Crystals? Liquid crystals have been classified in three...natic fanctions and to present data needed for the semi- automatic and manual control of system functions. Existing aircraft using CRT display

  9. Photoalignment of a Nematic Liquid Crystal Fluid and Glassy-Nematic Oligofluorenes on Coumarin-Containing Polymer Films

    SciTech Connect

    Trajkovska, A.; Kim, C.; Marshall, K.L.; Mourey, T.H.; Chen, S.H.

    2007-03-19

    The orientations of both a nematic liquid crystal fluid and a series of monodisperse glassy-nematic oligofluorenes were investigated on photoalignment films comprising a polymethacrylate backbone with 7-benzoyloxycoumarin pendants. Both classes of liquid crystalline material were found to undergo a transition from a parallel to a perpindicular orientation with reference to the polarization axis of UV-irradiation at a sufficiently high extent of dimerization.

  10. Chem I Supplement: Liquid Crystals--The Chameleon Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Glenn H.

    1983-01-01

    Presents information relevant to everyday life so as to stimulate student interest in the properties of the two basic types of liquid crystals: thermotropic and lyotropic. Describes the applications of liquid crystals to electronics, biomedicine, and polymer science and appraises the future of liquid crystal research. (JM)

  11. Nanoparticles and networks created within liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Shin-Wong; Kundu, Sudarshan

    We report the in situ creation of growing polymer nanoparticles and resulting polymer networks formed in liquid crystals. Depending on the concentration of monomer, polymerization-induced phase separation proceeds in two distinct regimes. For a high monomer concentration with a good miscibility, phase separation is initiated through the nucleation and growth mechanism in the binodal decomposition regime and rapidly crosses over to the spinodal decomposition process, consequently resulting in interpenetrating polymer networks. For a dilute system, however, the phase separation mainly proceeds and completes in the binodal decomposition regime. The system resembles the aggregation process of colloidal particles. For a dilute system, the reaction kinetics is limited by the reaction between in situ created polymer aggregates and hence the network morphologies are greatly inuenced by the diffusion of reactive growing polymer particles. The thin polymer layers localized at the surface of substrate are frequently observed and can be comprehended by the interfacial adsorption and further cross-linking reaction of in situ created polymer aggregates at the interface. This process provides a direct perception on understanding polymer stabilized liquid crystals accomplished by the interfacial polymer layer formed by polymerization of dilute reactive monomers in liquid crystal (LC) host.

  12. Effects of the vertically switching electric field on the photoelectric properties of polymer-stabilized blue-phase liquid crystal cells using the director model.

    PubMed

    Chi, Cheng-Yu; Qiu, Shi-Hao; Lin, Guan-Jhong; Chen, Tien-Jung; Yang, Yin-Jay; Wu, Jin-Jei

    2017-03-20

    This study uses the director model to analyze the optoelectronic properties of polymer-stabilized blue-phase liquid crystal (PS-BPLC). The director model revealed a linear relationship of refractive index change and the cosine squared of the angle between the LCs and the direction of the electric field. Moreover, we employed simulations based on the Kerr effect and compared the results with those of the director model. The simulation results also show high consistency with real circumstances. Consequently, it can be of great help to design BPLC displays that can be applied to adopting better strategies for developing next-generation LCD devices.

  13. Effect of Ion Trapping Films on the Electrooptic Characteristics of Polymer-Stabilized Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal Display Exhibiting V-Shaped Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuichi, Keiji; Xu, Jun; Inoue, Masaru; Furuta, Hirokazu; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Tounai, Atsushi; Tanaka, Yoshiki; Mochizuki, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Shunsuke

    2003-07-01

    Ion trapping films TOP-COAT TA606B20 are installed beneath the polyimide alignment films, which are coated over the ITO electrode films, in a polymer-stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal display exhibiting V-shaped switching. The ion trapping films are shown to play the following two roles: one is to remove zigzag-defects owing to their planarizing function and the other is to remove mobile ions. The latter effect gives rise to the reduction of the operational voltage and an increase of the voltage holding ratio owing to the removal of the depolarization field.

  14. Electric and Magnetic Field-Assisted Orientational Transitions in the Ensembles of Domains in a Nematic Liquid Crystal on the Polymer Surface

    PubMed Central

    Parshin, Alexander M.; Gunyakov, Vladimir A.; Zyryanov, Victor Y.; Shabanov, Vasily F.

    2014-01-01

    Using electro- and magneto-optical techniques, we investigated orientational transitions in the ensembles of domains in a nematic liquid crystal on the polycarbonate film surface under the conditions of competing surface forces that favor radial and uniform planar alignment of nematic molecules. Having analyzed field dependences of the intensity of light passed through a sample, we established the threshold character of the orientational effects, plotted the calculated intensity versus magnetic coherence length, and compared the latter with the equilibrium length that characterizes the balance of forces on the polymer surface. PMID:25279586

  15. Nonlinear optical properties of new photosensitive smart materials based on nematic liquid crystal with H-bonded dye-polymer complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uklein, A. V.; Vasko, A. A.; Ouskova, E. V.; Brodyn, M. S.; Gayvoronsky, V. Ya.

    2013-06-01

    The nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of the new photosensitive heterogeneous systems based on nematic liquid crystal (LC) doped with H-bonded polymer-azo-dye complex were studied. The excitation of the heterosystem by continuous laser irradiation at 532 nm produces the refractive index variation up to 10-2 measured within the spatial profile analysis in the far field. The phenomenon could be attributed to the photoinduced transformation of the azo dye from trans to cis form that reduces the order parameter of the LC in the vicinity of the complex.

  16. Effect of conducting polymer poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanotubes on electro-optical and dielectric properties of a ferroelectric liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Nayek, P; Roy, S K; Gangopadhyay, R; Rahaman Molla, M; Majumder, T P

    2011-04-01

    A detailed comparative study of the dielectric and electro-optical properties of a ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) and FLC after having doped with conducting polymer Poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanotubes is done. The electro-optic study reveals a lower electrical response time, rotational viscosity and spontaneous polarization in the FLC/PEDOT nanocomposite system. By fitting the capacitance with voltage in a Preisach model, four dipolar species in both FLC and composites system have been obtained. The orientation of the four dipolar species in the composites system is such that the effective dipole moment in the transverse direction of the FLC molecule is less than that in FLC compound.

  17. A droplet manipulation on a liquid crystal and polymer composite film as a concentrator and a sun tracker for a concentrating photovoltaic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, Yu-Shih; Chang, Kai-Han; Lin, Yi-Hsin

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate a droplet manipulation on a liquid crystal and polymer composite film (LCPCF) as a concentrator and a sun tracker for a concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) system with a steady output electric power. The CPV system adopts a liquid lens on LCPCF whose curvature is not only tunable but position is also bistably switchable based on liquid crystal orientations on LCPCF. The change of curvature of the liquid lens results in a tunable concentration ratio which helps to increase photocurrent at a low illumination and prevent the effect of the series resistance at a high illumination. Moreover, the change of the position of the liquid lens helps to track sun owing to sun movement. Therefore, the output power of such a system is steady no matter the sunlight condition and the angle of incident light. The operating principles and experiments are investigated. The concept in this paper can be extended to design optical components for obtaining steady output power of the solar cell at indoor or outdoor use and also tracking sunlight.

  18. Polymerizable ionic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Jazkewitsch, Olga; Ritter, Helmut

    2009-09-17

    Polymerizable vinylimidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) that contain mesogenic coumarin and biphenyl units, respectively, have been synthesized. The N-alkylation of N-vinylimidazole with bromoalkylated mesogenic units 7-(6-bromohexyloxy)coumarin (1) and 4,4'-bis(6-bromohexyloxy)biphenyl (2) was then carried out. The thermal behavior of the obtained ILs 3 and 4 was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and polarizing optical microscopy. These measurements showed that the attached mesogenic units induce the self-assembly of ILs and, therefore, the occurrence of liquid crystalline phases. Subsequently, the ionic liquid crystals (ILCs) 3 and 4 were polymerized by a free-radical mechanism.

  19. Ferroelectric liquid crystal display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Paul K. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A ferroelectric liquid crystal display device employs capacitance spoiling layers to minimize unneeded capacitances created by crossovers of X and Y address lines and to accurately define desired capacitances. The spoiler layers comprise low dielectric constant layers which space electrodes from the ferroelectric at crossover points where capacitance is not needed for device operation.

  20. Stimuli-responsive photoluminescent liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Shogo; Tanabe, Kana; Sagara, Yoshimitsu; Kato, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    We describe mechanochromic and thermochromic photoluminescent liquid crystals. In particular, mechanochromic photoluminescent liquid crystals found recently, which are new stimuli-responsive materials are reported. For example, photoluminescent liquid crystals having bulky dendritic moieties with long alkyl chains change their photoluminescent colors by mechanical stimuli associated with isothermal phase transitions. The photoluminescent properties of molecular assemblies depend on their assembled structures. Therefore, controlling the structures of molecular assemblies with external stimuli leads to the development of stimuli-responsive luminescent materials. Mechanochromic photoluminescent properties are also observed for a photoluminescent metallomesogen and a liquid-crystalline polymer. We also show thermochromic photoluminescent liquid crystals based on origo-(p-phenylenevinylene) and anthracene moieties and a thermochromic photoluminescent metallocomplex.

  1. Polymer stabilization of the smectic C-alpha* liquid crystal phase—Over tenfold thermal stabilization by confining networks of photo-polymerized reactive mesogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labeeb, A.; Gleeson, H. F.; Hegmann, T.

    2015-12-01

    The smectic C*-alpha (SmCα*) phase is one of the sub-phases of ferroelectric liquid crystals that has drawn much interest due to its electro-optical properties and ultrafast switching. Generally observed above the ferroelectric SmC* phase in temperature, the SmCα* commonly shows only very narrow phase temperature range of a few degree Celsius. To broaden the SmCα* phase, polymer stabilization was investigated for thermal phase stabilization. Two different reactive monomers were tested in three mixtures, and all three broadened the temperature range of the SmCα* phase from 3 °C to 39 °C. The current reversal method was used to determine the phase existence versus temperature. Moreover, the texture and network structure was studied by polarized optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, with the latter revealing the confinement of the smectic layer structure within the porous polymer network.

  2. Liquid Crystalline Phases of Polymer Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Kiana; Abukhdeir, Nasser; Matsen, Mark

    The phase behavior of liquid-crystal polymeric brushes in solvent are investigated using self-consistent field theory. The polymers are modeled as freely-jointed chain consisting of N rigid segments. The isotropic interactions between the polymer and the solvent are treated using the standard Flory-Huggins theory, while the anisotropic liquid-crystalline (LC) interactions between rigid segments are taken into account using the Mayer-Saupe theory. For weak LC interactions, the brush exhibits the conventional parabolic-like profile, while for strong LC interactions, the polymers crystallize into a dense brush with a step-like profile. At intermediate interaction strengths, we find the microphase-segregated phase observed previously for lattice-model calculations. In this phase, the brush exhibits a crystalline layer next to the grafting surface with an external layer similar to the conventional brush. This work was supported by NSERC of Canada.

  3. Morphological instabilities of polymer crystals.

    PubMed

    Grozev, N; Botiz, I; Reiter, G

    2008-09-01

    We present experimental observations at comparatively low supercooling of morphology transitions from dendritic to faceted structures in polymer crystals growing in thin films of a poly-2-vinylpyridine-block-polyethyleneoxid copolymer. Our results are compared with theoretical concepts describing morphological instabilities of single crystals. Although these concepts originally were not developed for polymers, they allow to describe and interpret our experimental results quite well. In particular, the measured temperature dependence of the width W and frequency of dendritic side branches and the radius of curvature p of the growth tips of the crystals follow these concepts. We present preliminary evidence for the influence of polymer attachment kinetics and reorganisation processes behind the growth front. Polymer thin films provide valuable model systems for studying general concepts of crystallisation and allow to distinguish at which point the connectivity of the crystallising units within chain-like molecules starts to play a measurable role.

  4. Hierarchical Thin Film Architectures for Enhanced Sensor Performance: Liquid Crystal-Mediated Electrochemical Synthesis of Nanostructured Imprinted Polymer Films for the Selective Recognition of Bupivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Suriyanarayanan, Subramanian; Nawaz, Hazrat; Ndizeye, Natacha; Nicholls, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured bupivacaine-selective molecularly imprinted 3-aminophenylboronic acid-p-phenylenediamine co-polymer (MIP) films have been prepared on gold-coated quartz (Au/quartz) resonators by electrochemical synthesis under cyclic voltammetric conditions in a liquid crystalline (LC) medium (triton X-100/water). Films prepared in water and in the absence of template were used for control studies. Infrared spectroscopic studies demonstrated comparable chemical compositions for LC and control polymer films. SEM studies revealed that the topologies of the molecularly imprinted polymer films prepared in the LC medium (LC-MIP) exhibit discernible 40 nm thick nano-fiber structures, quite unlike the polymers prepared in the absence of the LC-phase. The sensitivity of the LC-MIP in a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor platform was 67.6 ± 4.9 Hz/mM under flow injection analysis (FIA) conditions, which was ≈250% higher than for the sensor prepared using the aqueous medium. Detection was possible at 100 nM (30 ng/mL), and discrimination of bupivacaine from closely related structural analogs was readily achieved as reflected in the corresponding stability constants of the MIP-analyte complexes. The facile fabrication and significant enhancement in sensor sensitivity together highlight the potential of this LC-based imprinting strategy for fabrication of polymeric materials with hierarchical architectures, in particular for use in surface-dependent application areas, e.g., biomaterials or sensing. PMID:25587412

  5. Syntheses and crystal structures of benzene-sulfonate and -carboxylate copper polymers and their application in the oxidation of cyclohexane in ionic liquid under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Susanta; Ribeiro, Ana P C; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Nieto de Castro, Carlos A; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2016-09-21

    The syntheses, crystal structures and catalytic activities of the polymers derived from 2-(2-pyridylmethyleneamino)benzenesulfonic acid (HL), viz. [CuL(H2tma)]n (1) and [{Cu2L2(H2pma)}·(8H2O)]n (2) [H3tma = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic (trimesic) acid and H4pma = benzene-1,2,4,5-tetracarboxylic (pyromellitic) acid], are presented. Despite the comparable combinations and compositions of ligands (sulfonate and carboxylate) in these two polymers the bridging moiety in 1 is sulfonate while in 2 it is carboxylate. Complexes 1 and 2 act as catalysts in the peroxidative oxidation of cyclohexane under mild conditions using either the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [bmim][PF6] or acetonitrile as the solvent. The ionic liquid medium leads to increases in the yields and in the turnover numbers, achieved in shorter reaction times in comparison with those when using the conventional acetonitrile solvent. A simple recycling of the catalysts in the ionic liquid medium is achieved without loss of activity and selectivity.

  6. Continuum theory of polymer crystallization.

    PubMed

    Kundagrami, Arindam; Muthukumar, M

    2007-04-14

    We present a kinetic model of crystal growth of polymers of finite molecular weight. Experiments help to classify polymer crystallization broadly into two kinetic regimes. One is observed in melts or in high molar mass polymer solutions and is dominated by nucleation control with G approximately exp(1/TDeltaT), where G is the growth rate and DeltaT is the supercooling. The other is observed in low molar mass solutions (as well as for small molecules) and is diffusion controlled with G approximately DeltaT, for small DeltaT. Our model unifies these two regimes in a single formalism. The model accounts for the accumulation of polymer chains near the growth front and invokes an entropic barrier theory to recover both limits of nucleation and diffusion control. The basic theory applies to both melts and solutions, and we numerically calculate the growth details of a single crystal in a dilute solution. The effects of molecular weight and concentration are also determined considering conventional polymer dynamics. Our theory shows that entropic considerations, in addition to the traditional energetic arguments, can capture general trends of a vast range of phenomenology. Unifying ideas on crystallization from small molecules and from flexible polymer chains emerge from our theory.

  7. Nematic liquid crystal bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, Susannah; Ellis, Perry; Vallamkondu, Jayalakshmi; Danemiller, Edward; Vernon, Mark; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    We study the effects of confining a nematic liquid crystal between two parallel glass plates with homeotropic boundary conditions for the director at all bounding surfaces. We find that the free surface of the nematic bridge is a surface of constant mean curvature. In addition, by changing the distance between the plates and the contact angle with the glass plates, we transition between loops and hedgehogs that can be either radial or hyperbolic.

  8. Pyrrolidinium ionic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Karel; Lava, Kathleen; Nockemann, Peter; Van Hecke, Kristof; Van Meervelt, Luc; Driesen, Kris; Görller-Walrand, Christiane; Binnemans, Koen; Cardinaels, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    N-alkyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium cations have been used for the design of ionic liquid crystals, including a new type of uranium-containing metallomesogen. Pyrrolidinium salts with bromide, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, tetrafluoroborate, hexafluorophosphate, thiocyanate, tetrakis(2- thenoyltrifluoroacetonato)europate(III) and tetrabromouranyl counteranions were prepared. For the bromide salts and tetrabromouranyl compounds, the chain length of the alkyl group C(n)H(2n+1) was varied from eight to twenty carbon atoms (n = 8, 10-20). The compounds show rich mesomorphic behaviour: highly ordered smectic phases (the crystal smectic E phase and the uncommon crystal smectic T phase), smectic A phases, and hexagonal columnar phases were observed, depending on chain length and anion. This work gives better insight into the nature and formation of the crystal smectic T phase, and the molecular requirements for the appearance of this highly ordered phase. This uncommon tetragonal mesophase is thoroughly discussed on the basis of detailed powder X-ray diffraction experiments and in relation to the existing literature. Structural models are proposed for self-assembly of the molecules within the smectic layers. In addition, the photophysical properties of the compounds containing a metal complex anion were investigated. For the uranium-containing mesogens, luminescence can be induced by dissolving them in an ionic liquid matrix. The europium-containing compound shows intense red photoluminescence with high colour purity.

  9. Enhanced dual-frequency operation of a polymerized liquid crystal microplate by liquid crystal infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Takayuki; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2017-04-01

    The electric-field-induced switching behavior of a polymer microplate is investigated. A microplate fabricated with a photopolymerizable dual-frequency liquid crystal was surrounded by an unpolymerized photopolymerizable dual-frequency liquid crystal in the isotropic phase. As an electric field was applied along the plane of the microplate, the microplate switched to set its interior molecular orientation to be either parallel or perpendicular to the field, depending on the frequency. Analysis of the rotational behavior, as well as numerical calculations, showed that the surrounding unpolymerized photopolymerizable dual-frequency liquid crystal infiltrated into the microplate, which enhanced the dielectric properties of the microplate. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an enhanced dual-frequency dielectric response of a polymer microplate induced by liquid crystal infiltration.

  10. Liquid/Liquid interfacial polymerization to grow single crystalline nanoneedles of various conducting polymers.

    PubMed

    Nuraje, Nurxat; Su, Kai; Yang, Nan-Loh; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    Single crystalline nanoneedles of polyaniline (PANI) and polypyrrole (PPY) were synthesized using an interfacial polymerization for the first time. The interfacial crystallization of conductive polymers at the liquid/liquid interface allowed PANI and PPY polymers to form single crystalline nanocrystals in a rice-like shape in the dimensions of 63 nm x 12 nm for PANI and 70 nm x 20 nm for PPY. Those crystalline nanoneedles displayed a fast conductance switching in the time scale of milliseconds. An important growth condition necessary to yield highly crystalline conductive polymers was the extended crystallization time at the liquid/liquid interfaces to increase the degree of crystallization. As compared to other interfacial polymerization methods, lower concentrations of monomer and oxidant solutions were employed to further extend the crystallization time. While other interfacial growth of conducting polymers yielded noncrystalline polymer fibers, our interfacial method produced single crystalline nanocrystals of conductive polymers. We recently reported the liquid/liquid interfacial synthesis of conducting PEDOT nanocrystals; however, this liquid/liquid interfacial method needs to be extended to other conductive polymer nanocrystal syntheses in order to demonstrate that our technique could be applied as the general fabrication procedure for the single crystalline conducting polymer growth. In this report, we showed that the liquid/liquid interfacial crystallization could yield PANI nanocrystals and PPY nanocrystals, other important conductive polymers, in addition to PEDOT nanocrystals. The resulting crystalline polymers have a fast conductance switching time between the insulating and conducting states on the order of milliseconds. This technique will be useful to synthesize conducting polymers via oxidative coupling processes in a single crystal state, which is extremely difficult to achieve by other synthetic methods.

  11. Effects of Dilution, Polarization Ratio, and Energy Transfer on Photoalignment of Liquid Crystals Using Coumarin-Containing Polymer Films

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.; Wallace, J.U.; Chen, S.H.; Merkel, P.B.

    2008-05-27

    Orientation of a nematic liquid crystal, E-7, was investigated using coumarin-containing polymethacrylates to elucidate the roles played by the dilution of coumarin and the polarization ratio of irradiation. Dilution of coumarin by inert moieties had adverse effects on a nematic cell’s number density of disclinations and its orientational order parameter in the parallel but not the perpendicular regime. In addition, both dilution of coumarin and a decreasing polarization ratio resulted in a lower extent of coumarin dimerization at crossover, Xc. The significantly reduced Xc in a homopolymer comprising triphenylamine and coumarin was attributed to the dilution of coumarin and the diminished polarization ratio caused by competing absorption with simultaneous triplet energy transfer from triphenylamine to coumarin moieties.

  12. Cholesterol-Based Grafted Polymer Brushes as Alignment Coating with Temperature-Tuned Anchoring for Nematic Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Stetsyshyn, Yurij; Raczkowska, Joanna; Budkowski, Andrzej; Awsiuk, Kamil; Kostruba, Andriy; Nastyshyn, Svyatoslav; Harhay, Khrystyna; Lychkovskyy, Edward; Ohar, Halyna; Nastishin, Yuriy

    2016-10-11

    Novel alignment coating with temperature-tuned anchoring for nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) was successfully fabricated in three step process, involving polymerization of poly(cholesteryl methacrylate) (PChMa) from oligoproxide grafted to the glass surface premodified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. Molecular composition, thickness, wettability of the PChMa coating and its alignment action for a NLC were examined with time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry, ellipsometry, contact angle measurements, polarization optical microscopy and commercially produced PolScope technique allowing for mapping of the optic axis and optical retardance within the microscope field view. We find that the PChMa coating provides a specific monotonous increase (decrease) in the tilt angle of the NLC director with respect to the substrates normal upon heating (cooling) referred to as anchoring tuning.

  13. Holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) transmission gratings formed by visible light initiated thiol-ene photopolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wofford, Jeremy M.; Natarajan, Lalgudi V.; Tondiglia, Vincent P.; Sutherland, Richard L.; Lloyd, Pamela F.; Siwecki, Stephen A.; Bunning, Timothy J.

    2006-08-01

    We report on the initial development of a visible initiator for thiol-ene photopolymerization using the 647 nm radiation from a Krypton ion laser. The photoinitiator system consists of the dye oxazine 170 perchlorate and the co-initiator benzoyl peroxide. Electron transfer occurs between the singlet excited state of the oxazine dye and benzoyl peroxide with subsequent decomposition of the peroxide yielding benzoyl oxy radicals capable of free radical initiation. We demonstrate that this photoinitiation system enables holographic patterning of HPDLC gratings as initial Bragg transmission gratings with a periodicity less than one micron using 647 nm radiation. These gratings were electrically switchable between a diffractive and transmissive state. Morphology studies using bright field transmission electron microscopy (BFTEM) indicate the phase separation of nearly spherical shaped nematic liquid crystal droplets of several hundred nanometers in diameter. This demonstration suggests that reflection gratings can be written using this photoinitiator system and 647 nm radiation which have switchable notch wavelengths approaching 2 microns.

  14. Rotationally Molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Martin; Scribben, Eric; Baird, Donald; Hulcher, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Rotational molding is a unique process for producing hollow plastic parts. Rotational molding offers low cost tooling and can produce very large parts with complicated shapes. Products made by rotational molding include water tanks with capacities up to 20,000 gallons, truck bed liners, playground equipment, air ducts, Nylon fuel tanks, pipes, toys, stretchers, kayaks, pallets, and many others. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers are an important class of engineering resins employed in a wide variety of applications. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers resins are composed of semirigid, nearly linear polymeric chains resulting in an ordered mesomorphic phase between the crystalline solid and the isotropic liquid. Ordering of the rigid rod-like polymers in the melt phase yields microfibrous, self-reinforcing polymer structures with outstanding mechanical and thermal properties. Rotational molding of liquid crystalline polymer resins results in high strength and high temperature hollow structures useful in a variety of applications. Various fillers and reinforcements can potentially be added to improve properties of the hollow structures. This paper focuses on the process and properties of rotationally molded liquid crystalline polymers. This paper will also highlight the interactions between academia and small businesses in developing new products and processes.

  15. Rotationally Molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Martin; Stevenson, Paige; Scribben, Eric; Baird, Donald; Hulcher, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Rotational molding is a unique process for producing hollow plastic parts. Rotational molding offers advantages of low cost tooling and can produce very large parts with complicated shapes. Products made by rotational molding include water tanks with capacities up to 20,000 gallons, truck bed liners, playground equipment, air ducts, Nylon fuel tanks, pipes, toys, stretchers, kayaks, pallets, and many others. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers are an important class of engineering resins employed in a wide variety of applications. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers resins are composed of semi-rigid, nearly linear polymeric chains resulting in an ordered mesomorphic phase between the crystalline solid and the isotropic liquid. Ordering of the rigid rod-like polymers in the melt phase yields microfibrous, self-reinforcing polymer structures with outstanding mechanical and thermal properties. Rotational molding of liquid crystalline polymer resins results in high strength and high temperature hollow structures useful in a variety of applications. Various fillers and reinforcements can potentially be added to improve properties of the hollow structures. This paper focuses on the process and properties of rotationally molded liquid crystalline polymers.

  16. Adaptive liquid crystal iris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zuowei; Ren, Hongwen; Nah, Changwoon

    2014-09-01

    We report an adaptive iris using a twisted nematic liquid crystal (TNLC) and a hole-patterned electrode. When an external voltage is applied to the TNLC, the directors of the LC near the edge of the hole are unwound first. Increasing the voltage can continuously unwind the LC toward the center. When the TNLC is sandwiched between two polarizers, it exhibits an iris-like character. Either a normal mode or a reverse mode can be obtained depending on the orientations of the transmission axes of the two polarizers. In contrast to liquid irises, the aperture of the LC iris can be closed completely. Moreover, it has the advantages of large variability of the aperture diameter, good stability, and low power consumption. Applications of the device for controlling the laser energy and correcting optical aberration are foreseeable.

  17. Generation of Pretilt Angle for Nematic Liquid Crystal Using the Photodimerization Method on Various New Photo-Crosslinkable Polyimide Based Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jeoung-Yeon; Seo, Dae-Shik; Son, Jong-Ho; Suh, Dong Hack

    2001-07-01

    We synthesized the various new photo-crosslinkable polyimide based polymers and generation of pretilt angle for a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) using a photodimerization method on the photopolymers was studied. A good thermal stability of the photopolymers was measured by thermogravimatric analysis (TGA) measurement until 450°C. The NLC pretilt angle generated was about 2.5°-3.0° by polarized UV exposure on the photopolymers containing a biphenyl (BP), decyl (De), and cholesteryl(chol), chalcone(Chal) group, respectively. However, low pretilt angle of the NLC was measured by polarized UV exposure on the photopolymers containing the fluorine and chalcone group. The NLC pretilt angle generated is attributed to the biphenyl and alkyl moieties, and the photo-dimerized chalcone group of the photopolymer.

  18. Liquid crystals for photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniewicz, A.; Gniewek, A.; Parka, J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we describe application of liquid crystals in optical imaging and processing. Electrically and optically addressed liquid crystal spatial light modulators are key elements in real-time holographic devices. Their implementation for beam steering and hologram formation is briefly discussed. The Joint Fourier transform optical correlator for pattern recognition is presented as well as the use of liquid crystals for the adaptive optics purposes is discussed.

  19. Optical Properties of Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Samriti; Lal, Suman; Tripathi, S. K.; Sood, Nitin; Singh, Darshan

    2011-12-01

    The linking of liquid crystals polymer chains together into gel network fixes their topology, and melt becomes an elastic solid. These materials are called liquid crystals elastomers. Liquid crystal elastomers possess properties of soft elasticity and spontaneous shape change. The constituent molecules of LCEs are orientationally ordered and there exist a strong coupling between the orientational order and mechanical strain. In LCEs the molecules start elongate when their component rods orient and reversibly contract when the order is lost (typically by heating). So there is a change of average molecular shape from spherical to spheroidal. These unique properties make these materials suitable for future biological applications. Various research groups have studied different properties of LCEs in which optical properties are predominant. LCE has been synthesized in our laboratory. In this paper, we report on the optical behavior of this material.

  20. Morphological appearances and photo-controllable coloration of dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal/polymer coaxial microfibers fabricated by coaxial electrospinning technique.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-De; Chen, Che-Pei; Chen, Lin-Jer; Chuang, Yu-Chou; Huang, Shuan-Yu; Lee, Chia-Rong

    2016-02-08

    This study systematically investigates the morphological appearance of azo-chiral dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal (DDCLC)/polymer coaxial microfibers obtained through the coaxial electrospinning technique and examines, for the first time, their photocontrollable reflection characteristics. Experimental results show that the quasi-continuous electrospun microfibers can be successfully fabricated at a high polymer concentration of 17.5 wt% and an optimum ratio of 2 for the feeding rates of sheath to core materials at 25 °C and a high humidity of 50% ± 2% in the spinning chamber. Furthermore, the optical controllability of the reflective features for the electrospun fibers is studied in detail by changing the concentration of the azo-chiral dopant in the core material, the UV irradiation intensity, and the core diameter of the fibers. Relevant mechanisms are addressed to explain the optical-control behaviors of the DDCLC coaxial fibers. Considering the results, optically controllable DDCLC coaxial microfibers present potential applications in UV microsensors and wearable smart textiles or swabs.

  1. Polymer stabilization of the smectic C-alpha* liquid crystal phase—Over tenfold thermal stabilization by confining networks of photo-polymerized reactive mesogens

    SciTech Connect

    Labeeb, A.; Gleeson, H. F.; Hegmann, T.

    2015-12-07

    The smectic C*-alpha (SmC{sub α}*) phase is one of the sub-phases of ferroelectric liquid crystals that has drawn much interest due to its electro-optical properties and ultrafast switching. Generally observed above the ferroelectric SmC* phase in temperature, the SmC{sub α}* commonly shows only very narrow phase temperature range of a few degree Celsius. To broaden the SmC{sub α}* phase, polymer stabilization was investigated for thermal phase stabilization. Two different reactive monomers were tested in three mixtures, and all three broadened the temperature range of the SmC{sub α}* phase from 3 °C to 39 °C. The current reversal method was used to determine the phase existence versus temperature. Moreover, the texture and network structure was studied by polarized optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, with the latter revealing the confinement of the smectic layer structure within the porous polymer network.

  2. Photochemical on-off switching of structural color of a multi-bilayered film consisting of azobenzene-polymer liquid crystal and polyvinylalcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Seiji; Moritsugu, Masaki; Kuwahara, Yutaka; Ogata, Tomonari

    2011-10-01

    Photo-responsive multi-bilayered film consisting of azobenzene polymer liquid crystals (PAzo) and polyvinylalcohol (PVA) was prepared on a glass substrate by spin coating of the polymer solutions alternately. The reflectivity of the multi-bilayered film disappeared by annealing at 80 °C. The disappearance of the reflection by the annealing was related to the thermal out-of-plane molecular orientation of PAzo even in the multi-bilayered film, leading to a very small difference in refractive indices between PAzo and PVA. The reflectance of the multi-bilayered film was increased again by UV irradiation because of the transformation from the out-of-plane orientation to the in-plane random orientation, resulting in the restoration of difference in the refractive indices. In this way, the on-off switching of the reflection was achieved by combination of the thermally spontaneous out-of-plane molecular orientation and following photoisomerization of PAzo comprising the multi-bilayered film.

  3. Thermal and Photochemical Control of Molecular Orientation of Azo-Functionalized Polymer Liquid Crystals and Application for Photo-Rewritable Paper.

    PubMed

    Moritsugu, Masaki; Ishikawa, Takeru; Kawata, Tetsuro; Ogata, Tomonari; Kuwahara, Yutaka; Kurihara, Seiji

    2011-10-04

    A photo-responsive multi-bilayered film consisting of azobenzene polymer liquid crystals (PA6Az1) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) has been prepared on a glass substrate by alternate spin coating of the polymer solutions. The reflectivity of the multi-bilayered film disappears by annealing at 80 °C. The disappearance of the reflection by the annealing is related to the thermal out-of-plane molecular orientation of PA6Az1 even in the multi-bilayered film, which leads to a very small difference in refractive indices between PA6Az1 and PVA. The reflectance of the multi-bilayered film is increased again by UV irradiation because of the transformation from the out-of-plane orientation to an in-plane random orientation. In this way, on-off switching of the reflection is achieved by combination of the thermally spontaneous out-of-plane molecular orientation and following photoisomerization of PA6Az1 comprising the multi-bilayered film.

  4. Voxelated liquid crystal elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Taylor H.; McConney, Michael E.; Wie, Jeong Jae; Tondiglia, Vincent P.; White, Timothy J.

    2015-02-01

    Dynamic control of shape can bring multifunctionality to devices. Soft materials capable of programmable shape change require localized control of the magnitude and directionality of a mechanical response. We report the preparation of soft, ordered materials referred to as liquid crystal elastomers. The direction of molecular order, known as the director, is written within local volume elements (voxels) as small as 0.0005 cubic millimeters. Locally, the director controls the inherent mechanical response (55% strain) within the material. In monoliths with spatially patterned director, thermal or chemical stimuli transform flat sheets into three-dimensional objects through controlled bending and stretching. The programmable mechanical response of these materials could yield monolithic multifunctional devices or serve as reconfigurable substrates for flexible devices in aerospace, medicine, or consumer goods.

  5. Initiatorless Photopolymerization of Liquid Crystal Monomers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Min; Ware, Taylor H; Tondiglia, Vincent P; McBride, Matthew K; Zhang, Xinpeng; Bowman, Christopher N; White, Timothy J

    2016-10-04

    Liquid crystal monomers are widely employed in industry to prepare optical compensating films as well as extend or enhance the properties of certain display modes. Because of the thermotropic nature of liquid crystalline materials, polymerization of liquid crystalline monomers (sometimes referred to as reactive mesogens) is often initiated by radical photoinitiation (photopolymerization) of (meth)acrylate functional groups. Here, we report on the initiatorless photopolymerization of commercially available liquid crystalline monomers upon exposure to 365 nm UV light. Initiatorless polymerization is employed to prepare thin films as well as polymer stabilizing networks in mixtures with low-molar-mass liquid crystals. EPR and FTIR confirm radical generation upon exposure to 365 nm light and conversion of the acrylate functional groups. A potential mechanism is proposed, informed by control experiments that indicate that the monomers undergo a type II Norrish mechanism. The initiatorless polymerization of the liquid crystalline monomers yield liquid crystalline polymer networks with mechanical properties that can be equal to those prepared with conventional radical photoinitiators. We demonstrate that initiatorless polymerization of display modes significantly increases the voltage holding ratio, which could result in a reduction in drive voltages in flat-panel televisions and hand-held devices, extending battery life and reducing power consumption.

  6. Color-Tunable Mirrors Based on Electrically Regulated Bandwidth Broadening in Polymer-Stabilized Cholesteric Liquid Crystals (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Experimentation reported herein focuses on the contribution of structural chirality , viscoelastic properties of the polymer network architecture, and...role of structural chirality as well as the impact of cross-linking of the polymer stabilizing network on the threshold voltage and relative change in

  7. Nanotube networks in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanski, Martin; Lagerwall, Jan Peter F.; Scalia, Giusy

    2016-03-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) are very attractive hosts for the organization of anisotropic nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) because of the macroscopic organization resulting in properties of nanoparticles manifest at a macroscopic scale. Different types of LCs have demonstrated the ability to organize nanotubes, showing the generality of the approach, i.e., that the liquid crystallinity per se is the driving factor for the organization. Compared to standard nanotube composites (e.g. with disordered polymer hosts) the introduction of carbon nanotubes into an LC allows not only the transfer of the outstanding CNT properties to the macroscopic phase, providing strength and conductivity, but these properties also become anisotropic, following the transfer of the orientational order from the LC to the CNTs. The LC molecular structure plays an important even if ancillary role since it enters in the surface interactions, fulfilling a mediating action between the particle and the bulk of the LC. Isolated nanotubes can be obtained by optimized dispersions at lower concentrations and this process requires the use or development of tailored strategies like using solvents or even another LC for pre-dispersing CNTs. Aggregates or networks can be observed in poor dispersions and at higher nanoparticle concentrations. In those, due to surface interactions, the LC behaviour can be strongly affected with changes in phase sequences or transition temperatures and the effect is expected to be more pronounced as the concentration of nanotubes increases. We present preliminary investigations and observations on nanotube - LC systems based on a smectic LC host.

  8. Liquid crystals for holographic optical data storage.

    PubMed

    Matharu, Avtar S; Jeeva, Shehzad; Ramanujam, P S

    2007-12-01

    A tutorial review is presented to inform and inspire the reader to develop and integrate strong scientific links between liquid crystals and holographic data storage, from a materials scientist's viewpoint. The principle of holographic data storage as a means of providing a solution to the information storage demands of the 21st century is detailed. Holography is a small subset of the much larger field of optical data storage and similarly, the diversity of materials used for optical data storage is enormous. The theory of polarisation holography which produces holograms of constant intensity, is discussed. Polymeric liquid crystals play an important role in the development of materials for holographic storage and photoresponsive materials based on azobenzene are targeted for discussion due to their ease of photo-reversion between trans- and cis-states. Although the final polymer may not be liquid crystalline, irradiation can induce ordered domains. The mesogens act in a co-operative manner, enhancing refractive indices and birefringences. Surface relief gratings are discussed as a consequence of holographic storage. Cholesteric polymers comprising azobenzene are briefly highlighted. Irradiation causing cis-trans-isomerisation can be used to control helix pitch. A brief mention of liquid crystals is also made since these materials may be of future interest since they are optically transparent and amenable to photo-induced anisotropy.

  9. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M.; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter. PMID:27561545

  10. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M.; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-08-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter.

  11. Liquid Crystals for Nondestructive Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    Temperatures TI > T2 > - > TS defects was possible using the liquid crystal. are the Average TemperatursI Thes Resptivegi. Kapfer , Burns, Salvo, and Doyle...Means of Liquid Crystals,’ J. 38 .1; .1 of Sound and Vibration, Vol. 36, No. 3, pp. 407- 65. V.C. Kapfer , D.J. Bums, C.J. Salvo, and E.A. 15, Oct. 1974

  12. Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, Bahman; Bodnar, Volodymyr

    2011-12-31

    Energy consumption by private and commercial sectors in the U.S. has steadily grown over the last decade. The uncertainty in future availability of imported oil, on which the energy consumption relies strongly, resulted in a dramatic increase in the cost of energy. About 20% of this consumption are used to heat and cool houses and commercial buildings. To reduce dependence on the foreign oil and cut down emission of greenhouse gases, it is necessary to eliminate losses and reduce total energy consumption by buildings. To achieve this goal it is necessary to redefine the role of the conventional windows. At a minimum, windows should stop being a source for energy loss. Ideally, windows should become a source of energy, providing net gain to reduce energy used to heat and cool homes. It is possible to have a net energy gain from a window if its light transmission can be dynamically altered, ideally electronically without the need of operator assistance, providing optimal control of the solar gain that varies with season and climate in the U.S. In addition, the window must not require power from the building for operation. Resolution of this problem is a societal challenge and of national interest and will have a broad global impact. For this purpose, the year-round, allclimate window solution to provide an electronically variable solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) with a wide dynamic range is needed. AlphaMicron, Inc. (AMI) developed and manufactured 1ft × 1ft prototype panels for the world’s first auto-adjusting Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows (ALCWs) that can operate from sunlight without the need for external power source and demonstrate an electronically adjustable SHGC. This novel windows are based on AlphaMicron’s patented e-Tint® technology, a guesthost liquid crystal system implemented on flexible, optically clear plastic films. This technology is suitable both for OEM and aftermarket (retro-fitting) lamination to new and existing windows. Low level of

  13. One-dimensional ion-conductive polymer films: alignment and fixation of ionic channels formed by self-organization of polymerizable columnar liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Yoshio, Masafumi; Kagata, Takayoshi; Hoshino, Koji; Mukai, Tomohiro; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Kato, Takashi

    2006-04-26

    We have prepared two types of one-dimensional ion-conductive polymer films containing ion nanochannels that are both perpendicular and parallel to the film surface. These films have been obtained by photopolymerization of aligned columnar liquid crystals of a fan-shaped imidazolium salt having acrylate groups at the periphery. In the columnar structure, the ionic part self-assembles into the inner part of the column. The column is oriented macroscopically in two directions by different methods: orientation perpendicular to the modified surfaces of glass and indium tin oxide with 3-(aminopropyl)triethoxysilane and orientation parallel to a glass surface by mechanical shearing. Ionic conductivities have been measured for the films with columnar orientation vertical and parallel to the surface. Anisotropic ionic conductivities are observed for the oriented films fixed by photopolymerization. The ionic conductivities parallel to the columnar axis are higher than those perpendicular to the columnar axis because the lipophilic part functions as an ion-insulating part. The film with the columns oriented vertically to the surface shows an anisotropy of ionic conductivities higher than that of the film with the columns aligned parallel to the surface.

  14. Development and evaluation of surface treatments to enhance the fiber-matrix adhesion in PAN-based carbon fiber/liquid crystal polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Various amine and electrochemical polymerization treatments were applied to comingled as-received AS4 carbon fiber/Liquid Crystal Polymer (LCP) fibers, and unidirectional composite plates were fabricated. Short beam shear (SBS) tests were conducted to determine the level of AS4 carbon fiber-LCP matrix adhesion present. The shear strength of the as-received AS4/LCP system was approximately 49 MPa (7.1 ksi). The as-received AS4 fiber-LCP matrix adhesion was determined to be reasonably good, at approximately 85 to 90% of a perfect bond as determined by micromechanics analyses. Several di/triamine treatments yielded approximately a 10 to 15% increase in fiber-matrix adhesion relative to the as-received AS4/LCP system. The electropolymerization of a polyphenylene oxide (PPO) coating on the AS4 surface enhanced the fiber-matrix adhesion by 14% relative to the as-received AS4/LCP system. Apparently, a good bond was established between the AS4 fiber, the PPO coating, and the LCP matrix. After these treatments, SEM observations of the shear failure surfaces indicated that a perfect fiber-matrix bond was obtained. That is, the failure location was in the LCP matrix material. A two-dimensional finite element analysis also supported this result. Thus, in order to improve the shear strength of the AS4/LCP system further, the shear strength of the LCP matrix material must be increased.

  15. All-optically controllable distributed feedback laser in a dye-doped holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal grating with a photoisomerizable dye.

    PubMed

    Tong, Huai-Pei; Li, Yu-Ren; Lin, Jia-De; Lee, Chia-Rong

    2010-02-01

    This work demonstrates, for the first time, an all-optically controllable distributed feedback (DFB) laser based on a dye-doped holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (DDHPDLC) grating with a photoisomerizable dye. Intensity of the lasing emission can be reduced and increased by raising the irradiation intensity of one CW circularly-polarized green beam and the irradiation time of one CW circularly-polarized red beam, respectively. The all-optical controllability of the lasing emission is owing to the green-beam-induced isothermal nematic-->isotropic and red-beam-induced isothermal isotropic-->nematic phase transitions of the LCs via trans-->cis and cis-->trans back isomerizations of the azo-dye, respectively, in the LC-droplet-rich regions of the grating. The former (latter) mechanism can reduce (increase) the index modulation and thereby the coupling strength in the DFB grating, resulting in the decay (rise) of the lasing emission. Thermal effect is excluded from possible mechanisms causing such an optical controllability of the lasing emission.

  16. Liquid Crystals for Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Mary; Kelly, Stephen M.

    As discussed in Chaps. 2 (10.1007/978-90-481-2873-0_2), 3 (10.1007/978-90-481-2873-3), 5 (10.1007/978-90-481-2873-5) and 6 (10.1007/978-90-481-2873-6), columnar, smectic and, more recently, nematic liquid crystals are widely recognized as very promising charge-transporting organic semiconductors due to their ability to spontaneously self-assemble into highly ordered domains in uniform thin films over large areas. This and their broad absorption spectra make them suitable as active materials for organic photovoltaic devices. In this chapter, we discuss the use of liquid crystals in such devices. Firstly, we examine the principle of power generation via the photovoltaic effect in organic materials and the various device configurations that can optimise efficiency. Then we discuss photovoltaic devices incorporating columnar liquid crystals combined with electron accepting materials based on either perylene or fullerene. The use of nematic and sanditic liquid crystals in photovoltaics is investigated as well as a novel solar cell concentrator incorporating liquid crystals. Finally, we analyse the benefits and limitations of liquid-crystal-based photovoltaics in the context of the state-of-the-art for organics photovoltaics.

  17. Continuous preparation of polymer coated drug crystals by solid hollow fiber membrane-based cooling crystallization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dengyue; Singh, Dhananjay; Sirkar, Kamalesh K; Pfeffer, Robert

    2016-02-29

    A facile way to continuously coat drug crystals with a polymer is needed in controlled drug release. Conventional polymer coating methods have disadvantages: high energy consumption, low productivity, batch processing. A novel method for continuous polymer coating of drug crystals based on solid hollow fiber cooling crystallization (SHFCC) is introduced here. The drug acting as the host particle and the polymer for coating are Griseofulvin (GF) and Eudragit RL100, respectively. The polymer's cloud point temperature in its acetone solution was determined by UV spectrophotometry. An acetone solution of the polymer containing the drug in solution as well as undissolved drug crystals in suspension were pumped through the tube side of the SHFCC device; a cold liquid was circulated in the shell side to rapidly cool down the feed solution-suspension in the hollow-fiber lumen. The polymer precipitated from the solution and coated the suspended crystals due to rapid temperature reduction and heterogeneous nucleation; crystals formed from the solution were also coated by the polymer. Characterizations by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, laser diffraction spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and dissolution tests show that a uniformly coated, free-flowing drug/product can be obtained under appropriate operating conditions without losing the drug's pharmaceutical properties and controlled release characteristics.

  18. Carbon nanotubes dispersed in liquid crystal elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Ji, Yan

    Liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs), as the name indicates, unite the anisotropic order of liquid crystals and rubber elasticity of elastomers into polymer networks. One of the most notable features of LCEs is that properly aligned LCEs exhibit dramatic and reversible shape deformation (e.g. elongation-contraction) in response to various stimuli. In recent years, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were introduced into LCEs. Besides enabling remote and spatial control of the actuation via light and electronic field, CNTs are also utilized to align mesogens as well as to improve the mechanical and electronic property of the composites. Some potential applications of CNT-LCE nanocomposites have been demonstrated. This chapter describes the preparation of CNT dispersed LCEs, new physical properties resulted from CNTs, their actuation and their proposed applications.

  19. Computer Modeling of Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Rauzah

    This chapter outlines the methodologies and models which are commonly used in the simulation of liquid crystals. The approach in the simulation of liquid crystals has always been to understand the nature of the phase and to relate this to fundamental molecular features such as geometry and intermolecular forces, before important properties related to certain applications are elucidated. Hence, preceding the description of the main "molecular-based" models for liquid crystals, a general but brief outline of the nature of liquid crystals and their historical development is given. Three main model classes, namely the coarse-grained single-site lattice and Gay-Berne models and the full atomistic model will be described here where for each a brief review will be given followed by assessment of its application in describing the phase phenomena with an emphasis on understanding the molecular organization in liquid crystal phases and the prediction of their bulk properties. Variants and hybrid models derived from these classes and their applications are given.

  20. Artificial muscles based on liquid crystal elastomers.

    PubMed

    Li, Min-Hui; Keller, Patrick

    2006-10-15

    This paper presents our results on liquid crystal (LC) elastomers as artificial muscle, based on the ideas proposed by de Gennes. In the theoretical model, the material consists of a repeated series of main-chain nematic LC polymer blocks, N, and conventional rubber blocks, R, based on the lamellar phase of a triblock copolymer RNR. The motor for the contraction is the reversible macromolecular shape change of the chain, from stretched to spherical, that occurs at the nematic-to-isotropic phase transition in the main-chain nematic LC polymers. We first developed a new kind of muscle-like material based on a network of side-on nematic LC homopolymers. Side-on LC polymers were used instead of main-chain LC polymers for synthetic reasons. The first example of these materials was thermo-responsive, with a typical contraction of around 35-45% and a generated force of around 210 kPa. Subsequently, a photo-responsive material was developed, with a fast photochemically induced contraction of around 20%, triggered by UV light. We then succeeded in preparing a thermo-responsive artificial muscle, RNR, with lamellar structure, using a side-on nematic LC polymer as N block.Micrometre-sized artificial muscles were also prepared. This paper illustrates the bottom-up design of stimuli-responsive materials, in which the overall material response reflects the individual macromolecular response, using LC polymer as building block.

  1. Carbon nanotubes as liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanju; Kumar, Satish

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are the best of known materials with a combination of excellent mechanical, electronic, and thermal properties. To fully exploit individual nanotube properties for various applications, the grand challenge is to fabricate macroscopic ordered nanotube assemblies. Liquid-crystalline behavior of the nanotubes provides a unique opportunity toward reaching this challenge. In this Review, the recent developments in this area are critically reviewed by discussing the strategies for fabricating liquid-crystalline phases, addressing the solution properties of liquid-crystalline suspensions, and exploiting the practical techniques of liquid-crystal routes to prepare macroscopic nanotube fibers and films.

  2. Liquid crystal thermometry during anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Lacoumenta, S; Hall, G M

    1984-01-01

    The use of cutaneous liquid crystal thermometry (EZ Temp) as an estimate of core temperature during routine surgery was investigated in 20 patients. Seventeen per cent of the recordings made with the EZ Temp were more than 1 degree C different from oesophageal temperature. There was a poor correlation between EZ Temp values and both oesophageal and aural temperatures (r = 0.54 for both sites). We conclude that liquid crystal thermometry of the forehead is not sufficiently accurate to be used as an indicator of core temperature during routine surgery.

  3. Liquid crystal Fresnel lens display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Qian; Abhishek Kumar, Srivastava; Alwin Tam, Ming-Wai; Zheng, Zhi-Gang; Shen, Dong; Vladimir, Chigrinov G.; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2016-09-01

    A novel see-through display with a liquid crystal lens array was proposed. A liquid crystal Fresnel lens display (LCFLD) with a holographic screen was demonstrated. The proposed display system has high efficiency, simple fabrication, and low manufacturing cost due to the absence of a polarizer and color filter. Project supported by Partner State Key Laboratory on Advanced Displays and Optoelectronics Technologies HKUST, China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61435008 and 61575063), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. WM1514036).

  4. A liquid crystal adaptive lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowel, S. T.; Cleverly, D.

    1981-01-01

    Creation of an electronically controlled liquid crystal lens for use as a focusing mechanism in a multi-element lens system or as an adaptive optical element is analyzed. Varying the index of refraction is shown to be equivalent to the shaping of a solid refracting material. Basic characteristics of liquid crystals, essential for the creation of a lens, are reviewed. The required variation of index of refraction is provided by choosing appropriate electrode voltages. The configuration required for any incoming polarization is given and its theoretical performance in terms of modulation transfer function derived.

  5. Ionic Liquid Crystals: Versatile Materials.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Karel; Lava, Kathleen; Bielawski, Christopher W; Binnemans, Koen

    2016-04-27

    This Review covers the recent developments (2005-2015) in the design, synthesis, characterization, and application of thermotropic ionic liquid crystals. It was designed to give a comprehensive overview of the "state-of-the-art" in the field. The discussion is focused on low molar mass and dendrimeric thermotropic ionic mesogens, as well as selected metal-containing compounds (metallomesogens), but some references to polymeric and/or lyotropic ionic liquid crystals and particularly to ionic liquids will also be provided. Although zwitterionic and mesoionic mesogens are also treated to some extent, emphasis will be directed toward liquid-crystalline materials consisting of organic cations and organic/inorganic anions that are not covalently bound but interact via electrostatic and other noncovalent interactions.

  6. Liquid-Crystal Optical Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1989-01-01

    Optical correlator uses commercially-available liquid-crystal television (LCTV) screen as spatial light modulator. Correlations with this device done at video frame rates, making such operations as bar-code recognition possible at reasonable cost. With further development, such correlator useful in automation, robotic vision, and optical image processing.

  7. Experiments with Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fergason, James L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes laboratory experiments designed to demonstrate (1) the properties of cholesteric liquid crystals, (2) thermal mapping, (3) thermal diffusivity, (4) adiabatic expansion of rubber, and (5) measurement of radiated energy by a point source. Contains all of the information on materials and apparatus needed to perform the experiments.…

  8. Copper sulfate: Liquid or crystals?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two separate experiments were conducted to evaluate copper toxicity to channel catfish and free-swimming Ichthyophthirius multifiliis or Ich (the stage of Ich that can be treated); the compounds we used were CuSO4 crystals and a non-chelated liquid CuSO4 product. In 96 hr tests conducted in aquaria...

  9. Orthoconic liquid crystals--a case study.

    PubMed

    Lagerwall, Sven T

    2014-06-01

    Since the early investigations on liquid crystals it was realized how the confining surfaces often determine the textures and even properties of the material. This influence is particularly complex and important for chiral materials. When we come to chiral smectics the surfaces may have dramatic effects. These are illustrated on the ferroelectric liquid crystals; they then again increase in importance for the antiferroelectric liquid crystals where the most recent example is given by the orthoconic liquid crystals.

  10. Liquid crystal polyester thermosets

    DOEpatents

    Benicewicz, Brian C.; Hoyt, Andrea E.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides (1) curable liquid crystalline polyester monomers represented by the formula: R.sup.1 --A.sup.1 --B.sup.1 --A.sup.2 --B.sup.2 --A.sup.3 --R.sup.2 where R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 are radicals selected from the group consisting of maleimide, substituted maleimide, nadimide, substituted naimide, ethynyl, and (C(R.sup.3).sub.2).sub.2 where R.sup.3 is hydrogen with the proviso that the two carbon atoms of (C(R.sup.3).sub.2).sub.2 are bound on the aromatic ring of A.sup.1 or A.sup.3 to adjacent carbon atoms, A.sup.1 and A.sup.3 are 1,4-phenylene and the same where said group contains one or more substituents selected from the group consisting of halo, e.g., fluoro, chloro, bromo, or iodo, nitro lower alkyl, e.g., methyl, ethyl, or propyl, alkoxy, e.g., methoxy, ethoxy, or propoxy, and fluoroalkyl, e.g., trifluoromethyl, pentafluoroethyl and the like, A.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of 1,4-phenylene, 4,4'-biphenyl, 2,6-naphthylene and the same where said groups contain one or more substituents selected from the group consisting of halo, e.g., fluoro, chloro, bromo, or iodo, nitro, lower alkyl, e.g., methyl, ethyl, and propyl, lower alkoxy, e.g., methoxy, ethoxy, or propoxy, and fluoroalkyl or fluoroalkoxy, e.g., trifluoromethyl, pentafluoroethyl and the like, and B.sup.1 and B.sup.2 are selected from the group consisting of --C(O)--O-- and --O--C(O)--, (2) thermoset liquid crystalline polyester compositions comprised of heat-cured segments derived from monomers represented by the formula: R.sup.1 --A.sup.1 --B.sup.1 --A.sup.2 --B.sup.2 --A.sup.3 --R.sup.2 as described above, (3) curable blends of at least two of the polyester monomers and (4) processes of preparing the curable liquid crystalline polyester monomers.

  11. Liquid Crystals: The Phase of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ondris-Crawford, Renate; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Liquid crystal displays are currently utilized to convey information via graphic displays. Presents experiments and explanations that employ the concept of liquid crystals to learn concepts related to the various states of matter, electric and magnetic forces, refraction of light, and optics. Discusses applications of liquid crystal technology.…

  12. Liquid film/polymer interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Allara, David L.

    2003-06-12

    The objectives were: (1) Through experimental studies, advance the fundamental understanding of the principles that govern adsorption and wetting phenomena at polymer and organic surfaces. (2) Establish a firm scientific basis for improving the design of coatings for metal fin cooling surfaces used to control the wetting of water condensate for optimum energy efficiency. Several important findings were: (1) water adsorbed at hydrophobic surfaces has a liquid-like structure, in contrast to the generally held view of an ordered structure; (2) Correlations of large amounts of contact angle wetting data of grafted alkyl chain compounds showed a distinct link between the contact angle and the conformational ordering of the chains; (3) water adsorption at long chain alkysiloxane films showed a strong pH dependence on the film stability, which can be attributed to interfacial chemical effects on the siloxane network.

  13. Inorganic nanotubes and nanorods in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena

    Research efforts that focus on possible improvement of the physical properties of thermotropic liquid crystals by addition of inorganic 1D nanoparticles (inorganic nanotubes, nanorods, etc.) are reviewed. The emphasis is on modification of electro-optic switching characteristics relevant for display-related applications. In most cases the dopants generate a decrease of the threshold voltage for electrooptic switching and also a decrease of the corresponding switching times. We discuss various possible reasons for the observed effects and point out specific characteristics related to 1D nature of the dopants. We also describe investigations of inclusion of 1D nanoparticles into photo-polymerizable nematic liquid crystalline materials. Photo-polymerization in the aligned nematic phase provides a convenient way to fabricate solid polymer films with strongly anisotropic angular distribution of the nanoparticles. Investigations of structural and optical properties of some selected systems are surveyed.

  14. Fullerene solar cells with cholesteric liquid crystal doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lulu; Jiang, Yurong; Zhang, Congcong; Chen, Zezhang; Qin, Ruiping; Ma, Heng

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports the doping effect of cholesteric liquid crystal 3β-Hydroxy-5-cholestene 3-oleate on polymer solar cells composed of the poly 3-hexyl thiophene and the fullerene derivative. With a doping ratio of 0.3 wt%, the device achieves an ideal improvement on the shunt resistor and the fill factor. Compared with the reference cell, the power conversion efficiency of the doped cell is improved 24%. The photoelectric measurement and the active layer characterization indicate that the self-assembly liquid crystal can improve the film crystallization and reduce the membrane defect. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61540016).

  15. Function Spaces for Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    We consider the relationship between three continuum liquid crystal theories: Oseen-Frank, Ericksen and Landau-de Gennes. It is known that the function space is an important part of the mathematical model and by considering various function space choices for the order parameters s, n, and Q, we establish connections between the variational formulations of these theories. We use these results to justify a version of the Oseen-Frank theory using special functions of bounded variation. This proposed model can describe both orientable and non-orientable defects. Finally we study a number of frustrated nematic and cholesteric liquid crystal systems and show that the model predicts the existence of point and surface discontinuities in the director.

  16. Substrate-induced gliding in a nematic liquid crystal layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mema, E.; Kondic, L.; Cummings, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    We consider the interaction between nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) and polymer substrates. Such substrates can interact with NLCs, exhibiting a phenomenon known as director gliding: the preferred orientation of the NLC molecules at the interface changes on time scales that are slow relative to the elastic relaxation time scale of the NLC. We present two models for gliding, inspired by experiments that investigate the interaction between the NLC and a polymer substrate. These models, though simple, lead to nontrivial results, including loss of bistability under gliding. Perhaps surprisingly, we find that externally imposed switching between the steady states of a bistable system may reverse the effect of gliding, preventing loss of bistability if switching is sufficiently frequent. Our findings may be of relevance to a variety of technological applications involving liquid crystal devices, and particularly to a new generation of flexible liquid crystal displays that implement polymeric substrates.

  17. Swimming bacteria in liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Zhou, Shuang; Aranson, Igor; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Dynamics of swimming bacteria can be very complex due to the interaction between the bacteria and the fluid, especially when the suspending fluid is non-Newtonian. Placement of swimming bacteria in lyotropic liquid crystal produces a new class of active materials by combining features of two seemingly incompatible constituents: self-propelled live bacteria and ordered liquid crystals. Here we present fundamentally new phenomena caused by the coupling between direction of bacterial swimming, bacteria-triggered flows and director orientations. Locomotion of bacteria may locally reduce the degree of order in liquid crystal or even trigger nematic-isotropic phase transition. Microscopic flows generated by bacterial flagella disturb director orientation. Emerged birefringence patterns allow direct optical observation and quantitative characterization of flagella dynamics. At high concentration of bacteria we observed the emergence of self-organized periodic texture caused by bacteria swimming. Our work sheds new light on self-organization in hybrid bio-mechanical systems and can lead to valuable biomedical applications. Was supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under the Contract No. DE AC02-06CH11357.

  18. Thermally switchable flexible liquid crystal devices in prepolymer-doped cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuh, A. Y.-G.; Li, J.-H.; Cheng, K.-T.

    2010-10-01

    This work describes an approach for fabricating thermally switchable flexible liquid crystal devices in prepolymer-doped cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs). The roughness of the UV-cured polymer film eliminates the stability of planar CLCs, allowing the textures in the UV-cured regions to be changed from planar to focal conic. Impurities associated with doping with prepolymers cause the clearing temperature of LCs in the UV-cured regions to differ from that in the uncured regions as the prepolymers are polymerized. Therefore, the textures in these two regions can be switched by controlling the temperature. Thermally switchable flexible LC devices, such as optically addressed smart cards, light valves, and others, can be realized using this approach.

  19. Liquid Crystals for Laser Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    carbon black ( CB ) dopants into the films. A photoreaction between the additive and the cholesteryl groups of the liquid crystalline polymer could be...initiated above a threshold intensity of 7 x 10-9 W/gm2 (350 nm, cw, BP) or a threshold energy of 2.54 x 10-9 J/pgm 2 (1064-nm,10-ns single pulse, CB ). The...nonlinear U optics: Mesophases formed by push-pull stilbenes and diacetylenes, J. Chem. Soc., Chem. Commun., 19, 1424-1426, 1987. 276. Walba, D. M

  20. Controlled Synthesis of Polymer Brushes via Polymer Single Crystal Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tian

    A novel synthetic method of polymer brushes using polymer single crystals (PSCs) as solid-state templates is introduced in this study. PSC has a quasi-2D lamellae structure with polymer chains fold back-and-forth perpendicular to the lamellae surfaces. During crystallization, the chain ends are excluded from the unit cell onto the lamellae surfaces, which makes the material extremely versatile in its functionality. Such structure holds the unique capability to harvest nanoparticles, or being immobilized onto macroscopic flat surfaces. After dissolving PSCs in good solvent, polymer brushes are chemically tethered on either nanoparticles or flat macroscopic surfaces. Because the chain-folding structure can be conveniently tailored by changing the molecular weight of polymer and the crystallization temperature, the thickness, grafting density and morphology of resulted polymer brushes can be precisely controlled. As a model system, poly(?-caprolactone) with thiol or alkoxysilane terminal groups was used, and polymer brushes were successfully prepared on both nanoparticles and glass/Au flat surfaces. The structure-property relationships of the as-prepared polymer brushes were studied in detail using multiple characterization techniques. First of all, when functionalizing nanoparticles, by engineering the chain-folding structure of the PSCs, interesting complex nanostructures can be formed by nanoparticles including Janus nanoparticles and nanoparticle dimers. These unique structures render hybrid nanoparticles very interesting responsive behavior which have been studied in detail in this dissertation. When grafted onto a flat surface on the other hand, not only the molecular weight and grafting density can be precisely controlled, the tethering points of a single polymer chain can also be conveniently tailored, resulting polymer brushes with either tail or loop structures. Such difference in brush structure can significantly alter the properties of functional surface

  1. Polymer-directed crystallization of atorvastatin.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Hyeseung; Lee, Min Kyung; Lee, Jonghwi

    2012-08-01

    Living organisms secrete minerals composed of peptides and proteins, resulting in "mesocrystals" of three-dimensional-assembled composite structures. Recently, this biomimetic polymer-directed crystallization technique has been widely applied to inorganic materials, although it has seldom been used with drugs. In this study, the technique was applied to the drowning-out crystallization of atorvastatin using various polymers. Nucleation and growth at optimized conditions successfully produced composite crystals with significant polymer contents and unusual characteristics. Atorvastatin composite crystals containing polyethylene glycol, polyacrylic acid, polyethylene imine, and chitosan showed a markedly decreased melting point and heat of fusion, improved stability, and sustained-release patterns. The use of hydroxypropyl cellulose yielded a unique combination of enhanced in vitro release and improved drug stability under a forced degradation condition. The formation hypothesis of unique mesocrystal structures was strongly supported by an X-ray diffraction pattern and substantial melting point reduction. This polymer-directed crystallization technique offers a novel and effective way, different from the solid dispersion approach, to engineer the release, stability, and processability of drug crystals.

  2. Novel Side-Chain Liquid Cyrstalline Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    chloride was added, and the mixture was acidified with formic acid . The organic layer ..as separated, dried over anhydrous MgSO4, filtered and the...Polymers and Sequential Copolymers by Phase Transfer Catalysis , 29. Synthesis of Thermotropic Side-Chain Liquid Crystalline Polymers Containing a Poly(2,6...Western Reserve University) 00 6. C. Pugh and V. Percec Functional Polymers and Sequential Copolymers by Phase Transfer Catalysis . 30.-Synthesis of

  3. Optical Anisotropy and Four Possible Orientations of a Nematic Liquid Crystal on the Same Film of a Photochromic Chiral Smectic Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, Lev M.; Barberi, Riccardo; Kozlovsky, Mikhail V.; Lazarev, Vladimir V.; de Santo, Maria P.

    Spin coated films of a chiral comb-like liquid crystalline copolymer containing azobenzene chromophores in its side chains are optically isotropic in their twisted smectic-like glassy state. In contact with a nematic liquid crystal (5CB, E7, MBBA) they provide a degenerate planar orientation. When irradiated by unpolarized UV light, they orient the same nematics homeotropically. Treated with linearly polarized UV light they orient nematics homogeneously with the director along the electric vector of the exciting light. After a combined irradiation first with unpolarized UV light and then with linearly polarized visible light, the films again provide a homogeneous liquid crystal orientation, this time with the director perpendicular to the visible light electric vector. The phenomena observed are related to the light induced optical anisotropy. Two main processes are responsible for the anisotropy (1) a UV light depletion of trans-isomers of the azobenzene chromophores from the chosen direction and (2) a reorientation of the chromophores by polarized visible light.

  4. Substrate induced gliding for a nematic liquid crystal layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mema, Ensela; Cummings, Linda; Kondic, Lou

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between nematic liquid crystals (NLC) and polymer substrates is of current industrial interest, due to a desire to manufacture a new generation of flexible Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs) for use in portable electronic devices. Polymer substrates present challenges because they can interact with the NLC, exhibiting a phenomenon known as gliding: the preferred orientation of the NLC molecules at the interface changes over timescales of minutes to hours. We present two models for gliding, inspired by the physics and chemistry of the interaction between the NLC and polymer substrate. These models, though simple, lead to non-trivial results, including loss of bistability, a finding that may have implications for display devices. Supported by NSF Grant No. DMS-1211713.

  5. Nanostructuring lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Tod L.

    Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals (LCLCs) are an interesting and little known family of liquid crystals. Although materials such as Disodium Cromoglycate have been studied in depth for their phase behavior for use as antiasthmatic drugs, practical applications had yet to emerge. The focus of this work was to provide new applications for LCLC materials. The three most important results are: the uniform alignment of dried LCLC films, a new type of Langmuir Blodgett molecular monolayer or stack of molecular monolayers with long-range in-plane orientational order, and the use of LCLCs as an amplifying medium of antibody-antigen binding for the purpose of biodetection. To uniformly align LCLC materials, a diblock copolymer additive was used to reduce or eliminate tiger-stripe defects in the films. Uniformly aligned LCLC films can be useful as polarizing, compensating, or alignment layers in liquid crystal displays. In-plane oriented molecular monolayers were created using the method electrostatic self assembled monolayers and allowed for interesting experiments such as imaging individual LCLC aggregates via Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Controlling the in-plane long-range ordering one monolayer at a time allows for the creation of novel integrated optical systems. Finally, LCLCs are biocompatible and can be used to detect specific antibody-antigen binding events through the formation of immune complexes. Once the immune complex becomes larger than a critical size (determined by the elastic and surface properties of the LCLC-immune complex), the LCLC becomes distorted around the complex and can be optically detected.

  6. From polymer latexes to multifunctional liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ana M; Mantione, Daniele; Gracia, Raquel; Leiza, Jose R; Paulis, Maria; Mecerreyes, David

    2015-02-25

    A simple method to prepare multifunctional liquid marbles and dry water with magnetic, color, and fluorescent properties is presented. Multifunctional liquid marbles were prepared by encapsulation of water droplets using flocculated polymer latexes. First, the emulsion polymerization reaction of polystyrene and poly(benzyl methacrylate) was carried out using cheap and commercially available cationic surfactants. Subsequently, flocculation of the latex was provoked by an anion-exchange reaction of the cationic surfactant by the addition of lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide salt. The flocculated polymer latex was filtered and dried, leading to very hydrophobic micronanoparticulated powders. These powders showed a great ability to stabilize the air/water interface. Stable liquid marbles were obtained by rolling water droplets onto the hydrophobic powders previously prepared. The use of very small polystyrene nanoparticles led us to the preparation of very stable and the biggest known liquid marbles up to 2.5 mL of water. Furthermore, the introduction of fluorescent comonomer dyes into the polymer powders allowed us to obtain new morphological images and new knowledge about the structure of liquid marbles by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, the introduction of magnetic nanoparticles into the polymer latex led to magnetic responsive liquid marbles, where the iron oxide nanoparticles are protected within a polymer. Altogether this method represents an accessible and general platform for the preparation of multifunctional liquid marbles and dry water, which may contribute to extending of their actual range of applications.

  7. Spreading of Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulard, Christophe

    2004-11-01

    A cyanobiphenyl liquid crystal drop in the nematic phase should spread on a silicon wafer. In fact, the drop hardly spreads due to the strong antagonist anchoring on the substrate and at the free surface. In a humidity controlled box at high RH and on a hydrophilic substrate, the friction is considerably reduced and the drop spreads easily. A well defined instability develops at the contact line, with two characteristic wavelengths, associated with a modulation of the drop thickness. A theoretical analysis, made by M. Ben Amar and L. Cummings, allows to understand one of the wavelength by an elastic approach and gives a wavelength proportionnal to the local drop's thickness.

  8. Perspectives in active liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Apala; Cristina, Marchetti M; Virga, Epifanio G

    2014-11-28

    Active soft matter is a young, growing field, with potential applications to a wide variety of systems. This Theme Issue explores this emerging new field by highlighting active liquid crystals. The collected contributions bridge theory to experiment, mathematical theories of passive and active nematics, spontaneous flows to defect dynamics, microscopic to continuum levels of description, spontaneous activity to biological activation. While the perspectives offered here only span a small part of this rapidly evolving field, we trust that they might provide the interested reader with a taste for this new class of non-equilibrium systems and their rich behaviour.

  9. Liquid crystals in nondestructive testing.

    PubMed

    Fergason, J L

    1968-09-01

    The cholesteric phase is associated with scattering effects that give rise to iridescent colors, the dominant wavelength being influenced by very small changes in temperature, which can be as large as 1000 A shift per degree. This unusually high temperature sensitivity has given rise to the use of the cholesteric phase as a sensitive thermometer and thermal mapping media. This paper reviews the optical effects in the cholesteric phase with some new additions that are particularly relevant to thermal mapping. An attempt has been made to give a complete picture of the cholesteric liquid crystal as applied to nondestructive testing, rather than to review the work actually being done in this field.

  10. Ferroelectric Liquid Crystals In Aerodynamic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, Devendra S.; Holmes, Harlan K.

    1994-01-01

    The process of simultaneous optical visualization and quantitative measurement of aerodynamic boundary layer parameters requires new concepts, materials and utilization methods. Measurement of shear stress in terms of the transmitted or the reflected light intensity from an aligned ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) thin (approx. 1 micron) film deposited on a glass substrate has been the first step in this direction. In this paper, recent progress in utilization of FLC thin films for skin friction measurement and for studying the state of the boundary layer in a wind tunnel environment is reviewed. The switching characteristics of FLCs have been used to measure pressure from the newly devised system of partially exposed polymer dispersed ferroelectric liquid crystals (PEPDFLCs). In this configuration, a PEPDFLC thin film (approx. 10-25 microns) is sandwiched between two transparent conducting electrodes, one a rigid surface and the other a flexible sheet such as polyvinylidene fluoride or mylar. The switching characteristics of the film are a function of the pressure applied to the flexible transparent electrode and a predetermined bias voltage across the two electrodes. The results, considering the dielectrics of composite media, are discussed.

  11. Observation of large nematic domains of discotic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Abhijeet; Wang, Xuezhen; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2015-03-01

    Discotic liquid crystals are commonly found in nature in the form of clay, nacre. They are technologically important in applications such as conductive polymers, semiconductors and photovoltaics. Size and its distribution play an important role in their self-assemblies. Here we observed large nematic domains of discotic liquid crystals grown on a time scale of months. The development of such domains is observed to be faster for nanodisks that relatively smaller in size. The orientation of nanodisks is affected by gravity and inter-particle interactions which are yet to be fully understood.

  12. Thermo - optical studies of nematic liquid crystal elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharde, Rita A.; Mani, Santosh A.; Lal, Suman; Tripathi, S. K.; Khosla, Samriti

    2014-10-01

    The influences of structural parameter on thermo - optical properties of Nematic Liquid Crystal Elastomer (NLCE) were studied using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy and Polarizing Microscopy Studies (PMS). Dielectric Measurement was also performed in addition to these measurements. The NLCE used in the present study were synthesized, has a unique coupling between anisotropic order of Liquid crystal component and elasticity of polymer network. The investigations were performed as function of temperature during heating and cooling processes. The study revealed the correlation of thermo - optical behavior of NLCE with the crosslinking agent and temperature.

  13. Nanoscopic Manipulation and Imaging of Liquid Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblatt, Charles S.

    2014-02-04

    This is the final project report. The project’s goals centered on nanoscopic imaging and control of liquid crystals and surfaces. We developed and refined techniques to control liquid crystal orientation at surfaces with resolution as small as 25 nm, we developed an optical imaging technique that we call Optical Nanotomography that allows us to obtain images inside liquid crystal films with resolution of 60 x 60 x 1 nm, and we opened new thrust areas related to chirality and to liquid crystal/colloid composites.

  14. Liquid crystal composites doped with inorganic nanoparticles for recording of polarization holographic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, G. M.; Strel'tsov, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    The properties of polarization holographic gratings formed in liquid crystal polymer composites doped with inorganic nanoparticles (SiO2, ZnO, Al2O3, and Y2O3) are considered. The effect of these additives on the phase transition temperature of liquid crystals of polarization gratings, diffraction efficiency, and driving voltage is demonstrated.

  15. Polymer photonic crystal fibre for sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, David J.

    2010-04-01

    Polymer photonic crystal fibres combine two relatively recent developments in fibre technology. On the one hand, polymer optical fibre has very different physical and chemical properties to silica. In particular, polymer fibre has a much smaller Young's modulus than silica, can survive higher strains, is amenable to organic chemical processing and, depending on the constituent polymer, may absorb water. All of these features can be utilised to extend the range of applications of optical fibre sensors. On the other hand, the photonic crystal - or microstructured - geometry also offers advantages: flexibility in the fibre design including control of the dispersion properties of core and cladding modes, the possibility of introducing minute quantities of analyte directly into the electric field of the guided light and enhanced pressure sensitivity. When brought together these two technologies provide interesting possibilities for fibre sensors, particularly when combined with fibre Bragg or long period gratings. This paper discusses the features of polymer photonic crystal fibre relevant to sensing and provides examples of the applications demonstrated to date.

  16. 3D interconnected ionic nano-channels formed in polymer films: self-organization and polymerization of thermotropic bicontinuous cubic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Takahiro; Yoshio, Masafumi; Hamasaki, Atsushi; Kagimoto, Junko; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Kato, Takashi

    2011-02-23

    Thermotropic bicontinuous cubic (Cub(bi)) liquid-crystalline (LC) compounds based on a polymerizable ammonium moiety complexed with a lithium salt have been designed to obtain lithium ion-conductive all solid polymeric films having 3D interconnected ionic channels. The monomer shows a Cub(bi) phase from -5 to 19 °C on heating. The complexes retain the ability to form the Cub(bi) LC phase. They also form hexagonal columnar (Col(h)) LC phases at temperatures higher than those of the Cub(bi) phases. The complex of the monomer and LiBF(4) at the molar ratio of 4:1 exhibits the Cub(bi) and Col(h) phases between -6 to 19 °C and 19 to 56 °C, respectively, on heating. The Cub(bi) LC structure formed by the complex has been successfully preserved by in situ photopolymerization through UV irradiation in the presence of a photoinitiator. The resultant nanostructured film is optically transparent and free-standing. The X-ray analysis of the film confirms the preservation of the self-assembled nanostructure. The polymer film with the Cub(bi) LC nanostructure exhibits higher ionic conductivities than the polymer films obtained by photopolymerization of the complex in the Col(h) and isotropic phases. It is found that the 3D interconnected ionic channels derived from the Cub(bi) phase function as efficient ion-conductive pathways.

  17. Modeling of Crystallizing Polymer Melts in Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhmayev, Eduard; Joo, Yong Lak

    2008-07-01

    In electrospinning, applied electric field elongates a charged fluid jet to produce nanofibers. While most polymer melts result in highly-aligned amorphous structures, some fast-crystallizing polymers such as Nylon can produce semi-crystalline fibers, and by controlling this crystallinity the mechanical properties of electrospun fibers can be tailored. Short inflight residence times, high extensional forces, and radially-uniform stress distributions in electrospinning result in the dominance of flow induced crystallization (FIC) and a nearly 1D microstructure. We present our FIC model based on Kolmogoroff's equation, Hoffman-Lauritzen theory, and key modifications from molecular scale insights to account for flow effects. The model behavior is compared to the conventional Ziabicki FIC model using Nylon-6,6 as the model polymer.

  18. What makes polymer crystallization depend on time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccarolo, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    Here we report a series of objections to the mechanism of polymer crystallization by secondary nucleation plausible for very mild cooling conditions, i.e. when solidification time is long enough or when the molecular weight, M, is not too large, conditions not preventing segregation at the growth front to take place. With a manichean approach, if otherwise time is controlling, e.g. in polymer processing, or M is large, segregation is precluded and accumulation of topological defects takes place in the amorphous phase preventing sequential growth of crystalline domains. A non crystalline phase forms very much departed from equilibrium, constrained by the crystalline domains and frozen to an extent dependent on the morphology developed. Consequences are discussed, themselves a proof that segregation simplifies topology when crystallization conditions are mild. A situation responsible for the often reported memory effects as well as for mechanical and rheological properties. Results collected from our own experimental evidence by the originally developed Continuous Cooling Transformation are discussed within this framework and related to the broad, albeit often overlooked, literature on subjects intimately connected to crystallization and therefore spanning different fields of polymer science. We focus our attention on two recent results opening the way to this new perspective on polymer crystallization: the onset of the nodular morphology in iPP also in the presence of the stable a-monoclinic phase and the extended crystallization behaviour of polyester blends once local mobility is enhanced. Observing that demixing at the growth front controls crystallization under processing conditions we speculate that the high cooling rate solidification experiment is but a peculiar transient rheological measurement. Implications of this view are far reaching as the crucial role of the melt before solidification is evident.

  19. Nucleation and Crystallization in nucleated Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schick, Christoph; Zhuravlev, Evgeny; Wurm, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Crystallization is commonly considered as nucleation followed by a growth process. Here we apply the recently developed technique, differential fast scanning calorimetry (DFSC), for a unique, new look at the crystal growth of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) and PCL carbon nanotube composites from 185 K, below the glass transition temperature, to 330 K, close to the equilibrium melting temperature. The DFSC allows temperature control of the sample and determination of its heat capacity during temperature treatments by employing cooling and heating rates from 50 to 50,000 K/s. First, the crystal nucleation and overall crystallization half times were determined simultaneously in the range of temperatures where crystallization of PCL occurs. After attempting to analyze the experiments with the classical nucleation and growth model a new methodology is described, which addresses the specific problems of crystallization of flexible linear macromolecules. The structures seem to range from having practically unmeasurable latent heats of ordering (nuclei) to being clearly-recognizable, ordered species with rather sharp disordering endotherms at temperatures from the glass transition to equilibrium melting (increasingly perfect and larger crystals). The mechanisms and kinetics of growth (if any) involve a detailed understanding of the interaction with the surrounding rigid amorphous fraction (RAF) in dependence of crystal size and perfection. E. Zhuravlev, J.W.P. Schmelzer, B. Wunderlich and C. Schick, Kinetics of nucleation and crystallization in poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), Polymer 52 (2011) 1983-1997.

  20. Alignment Layers for Ferro and Antiferroelectric Liquid Crystal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negi, Yuvraj Singh; Yamamoto, Norio; Suzuki, Yoshiichi; Kawamura, Ichiro; Yamada, Yuichiro; Kakimoto, Masa-aki; Imai, Yoshio

    1992-12-01

    Aromatic fluorine and nonfluorine containing polyimides, polyamide-imides and polyamides were developed and utilized as alignment layers in ferroelectric (FLC) and antiferroelectric liquid crystal (AFLC) cells. The FLC and AFLC blend (AFLCB-1) of liquid crystals used in the experiment were CS-1011 and [S(-)4-(1-methylheptyloxycarbonyl) phenyl-4-octyloxybiphenyl-4-carboxylate (MHPOBC), R(+)4-(1-trifluoromethylheptyloxy carbonyl)phenyl-4-octyloxybiphenyl-4-carboxylate (TFMHPOBC), and other homologues, [AFLCB-1], respectively. The alignment layer deposited over an ITO-coated glass electrode plate with 2 μm cell gap showed good or random alignment of liquid crystal in FLC and AFLC cells. The AFLC cells exhibited contrast ratio values greater than 10:1 depending on the molecular structure of the alignment layer. The alignment quality of FLC and AFLC cells was also compared by using different molecular structure of polymer alignment layers.

  1. Effects of the mixture composition on the microstructure of polymer matrix and light scattering properties of liquid crystal/photo-polymerizable monomers composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenbo; Cheng, Zihui; Pan, Guohui; Liu, Huijing; Cao, Hui; Yang, Zhou; Yang, Huai

    2008-10-01

    The microstructure and electro-optical effects based on light scattering have been investigated for nematic liquid crystal (LC)/photo-polymerizable monomers composites. It was demonstrated that the optimum electro-optical properties of the composites were obtained when the LC content was between 60 and 70 wt%. Furthermore, the variety of the light scattering intensity for the composites in the wavelength region of 300-2500 nm was studied experimentally and theoretically with the combination of three kinds of classical light scattering theories: the Rayleigh-Gans (RG) approach, the anomalous diffraction (AD) approach, and the geometrical optics (GO) approach. Then a simple mathematic simulation was established to describe the relationship between the transmittance and the incident wavelength in this wavelength region.

  2. Demonstrations with a Liquid Crystal Shutter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    The experiments presented show the response of a liquid crystal shutter to applied electric voltages and the delay of the operations. Both properties are important for liquid crystal displays of computers and television sets. Two characteristics of the shutter are determined: (i) the optical transmittance versus applied voltage of various…

  3. Liquid Crystals in Education--The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cepic, Mojca

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of teaching about liquid crystals is discussed from several points of view: the rationale why to teach them, the basics about liquid crystals or what the teacher should teach about them, the fundamental pre-knowledge of students required, the set of experiments accompanying the teaching and the brief report on the already…

  4. Liquid-Crystal Point-Diffraction Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.

    1996-01-01

    Liquid-crystal point-diffraction interferometer (LCPDI) invented to combine flexible control of liquid-crystal phase-shifts with robustness of point-diffraction interferometers. Produces interferograms indicative of shapes of wavefronts of laser beams having passed through or reflected from objects of interest. Interferograms combined in computers to produce phase maps describing wavefronts.

  5. Liquid crystal tunable metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Shrekenhamer, David; Chen, Wen-Chen; Padilla, Willie J

    2013-04-26

    We present an experimental demonstration of electronically tunable metamaterial absorbers in the terahertz regime. By incorporation of active liquid crystal into strategic locations within the metamaterial unit cell, we are able to modify the absorption by 30% at 2.62 THz, as well as tune the resonant absorption over 4% in bandwidth. Numerical full-wave simulations match well to experiments and clarify the underlying mechanism, i.e., a simultaneous tuning of both the electric and magnetic response that allows for the preservation of the resonant absorption. These results show that fundamental light interactions of surfaces can be dynamically controlled by all-electronic means and provide a path forward for realization of novel applications.

  6. Chemical and biological sensing using liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Rebecca J.; Hunter, Jacob T.; Miller, Daniel S.; Abbasi, Reza; Mushenheim, Peter C.; Tan, Lie Na; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    The liquid crystalline state of matter arises from orientation-dependent, non-covalent interaction between molecules within condensed phases. Because the balance of intermolecular forces that underlies formation of liquid crystals is delicate, this state of matter can, in general, be easily perturbed by external stimuli (such as an electric field in a display). In this review, we present an overview of recent efforts that have focused on exploiting the responsiveness of liquid crystals as the basis of chemical and biological sensors. In this application of liquid crystals, the challenge is to design liquid crystalline systems that undergo changes in organization when perturbed by targeted chemical and biological species of interest. The approaches described below revolve around the design of interfaces that selectively bind targeted species, thus leading to surface-driven changes in the organization of the liquid crystals. Because liquid crystals possess anisotropic optical and dielectric properties, a range of different methods can be used to read out the changes in organization of liquid crystals that are caused by targeted chemical and biological species. This review focuses on principles for liquid crystal-based sensors that provide an optical output. PMID:24795857

  7. Liquid crystal device and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Shiyanovskii, Sergij V; Gu, Mingxia; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2012-10-23

    The invention provides a liquid crystal device and method thereof. Subsequent to applying a first electrical voltage on a liquid crystal to induce a reorientation of the liquid crystal, a second electrical voltage with proper polarity is applied on the liquid crystal to assist the relaxation of the reorientation that was induced by the first electrical voltage. The "switch-off" phase of the liquid crystal can therefore be accelerated or temporally shortened, and the device can exhibit better performance such as fast response to on/off signals. The invention can be widely used LCD, LC shutter, LC lens, spatial light modulator, telecommunication device, tunable filter, beam steering device, and electrically driven LC device, among others.

  8. Periodic Modification of Nanofibers by Polymer Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; Li, Christopher

    2008-03-01

    Electrospinning polymer nanofibers are one of the most useful 1D nanometer-scaled materials that have numerous potential applications in the fields of filter applications, and templates for tissue engineering. Herein we show that polymer nanofibers can also be used as 1D nucleation agents to induce polymer crystallization. Poly(ethylene oxide) was electrospun into nanofibers which was used to induce PEO crystallization in solution. Shish kebab morphology was observed with the nanofiber as the shish and the PEO lamellar crystals as the kebabs. This unique morphology was named as nano fiber shish kebabs (NFSKs). We demonstrated that the structural parameters of the NSFK such as the fiber diameter, periods, the kebab size etc. could be readily controlled by the electrospinning and crystallization conditions. This NSFK also renders 3D features to the otherwise 1D nanofibers. It also serves as a vehicle for incorporating a variety of functional groups to the nanofiber systems, which, in turn, leads to numerous biomedical as well as electronic applications.

  9. Phototropic liquid crystals comprising one component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolewska, Anna; Zawada, Joanna; Bartkiewicz, Stanislaw; Galewski, Zbigniew

    2013-09-01

    Phototropic liquid crystals (PtLC), in which the phase transition can be controlled by the light, are a new class of liquid crystal materials possessing number of potential applications, especially in photonic devices. So far a significant majority of PtLC materials has been realized by the doping a classical liquid crystal with a photochromic dye. Here we report PtLCs comprising a single compound. Liquid-crystalline and photochromic properties have been accomplished in alkylo-alkoxy derivatives of azobenzene. Such compounds show a rich polymorphism which can be controlled by the light. The phenomenon of the photochemical phase transition has been investigated by means of holographic grating recording.

  10. Patterned liquid crystal order on the micro-, meso-, and nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Matthew E.

    Liquid crystals are a unique class of material with many intriguing physical properties, which enable them for use in a variety of applications. The orientation of these anisotropic molecules can be controlled using external forces and surfaces, which ultimately enables the manipulation of their electrical, mechanical and optical properties. The overreaching theme of this thesis is the spatial patterning of these materials. Using these techniques for establishing and capturing patterned liquid crystalline order a variety of unique structures were fabricated. Lyotropic discotic liquid crystals as well as discotic mesophase pitch materials can be patterned and thermally polymerized in porous templates to produce arrays of carbon nanostructures. Alignment layers can be used in order to tune the orientation of the graphene planes of these structures such they are oriented either orthogonal or parallel to the long axis of the nanostructures. The combination of printing and alignment techniques open the exciting possibility of creating property patterns in nanostructure arrays, in which the graphene orientation varies systematically and periodically across the surface. Polymer networks within a liquid crystal host were fabricated using a holographic exposure process. Using a simple model and optical polarizing microscopy for verification, the effective thickness of the polymer planes in these structures was successfully predicted. A combination of factors, such as the low switching voltage, relatively fast response time, and polarization selectivity or non-selectivity make the reverse-mode structures attractive for many applications requiring diffractive optical elements. Polymeric liquid crystals, also known as reactive mesogens, are low molecular weight liquid crystalline monomers that can be photopolymerized in order to form well-organized, high-molecular weight structures. The molecular order and orientation of these materials can be controlled using a variety of

  11. Liquid crystals for organic transistors (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Jun-ichi; Iino, Hiroaki

    2016-09-01

    Liquid crystals are a new type of organic semiconductors exhibiting molecular orientation in self-organizing manner, and have high potential for device applications. In fact, various device applications have been proposed so far, including photosensors, solar cells, light emitting diodes, field effect transistors, and so on.. However, device performance in those fabricated with liquid crystals is less than those of devices fabricated with conventional materials in spite of unique features of liquid crystals. Here we discuss how we can utilize the liquid crystallinity in organic transistors and how we can overcome conventional non-liquid crystalline organic transistor materials. Then, we demonstrate high performance organic transistors fabricated with a smectic E liquid crystal of Ph-BTBT-10, which show high mobility of over 10cm2/Vs and high thermal durability of over 200oC in OFETs fabricated with its spin-coated polycrystalline thin films.

  12. Flow induced/ refined solution crystallization of a semiconducting polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Ngoc A.

    Organic photovoltaics, a new generation of solar cells, has gained scientific and economic interests due to the ability of solution-processing and potentially low-cost power production. Though, the low power conversion efficiency of organic/ plastic solar cells is one of the most pertinent challenges that has appealed to research communities from many different fields including materials science and engineering, electrical engineering, chemical engineering, physics and chemistry. This thesis focuses on investigating and controlling the morphology of a semi-conducting, semi-crystalline polymer formed under shear-flow. Molecular structures and processing techniques are critical factors that significantly affect the morphology formation in the plastic solar cells, thus influencing device performance. In this study, flow-induced solution crystallization of poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) in a poor solvent, 2-ethylnapthalene (2-EN) was utilized to make a paint-like, structural liquid. The polymer crystals observed in this structured paint are micrometers long, nanometers in cross section and have a structure similar to that formed under quiescent conditions. There is pi-pi stacking order along the fibril axis, while polymer chain folding occurs along the fibril width and the order of the side-chain stacking is along fibril height. It was revealed that shear-flow not only induces P3HT crystallization from solution, but also refines and perfects the P3HT crystals. Thus, a general strategy to refine the semiconducting polymer crystals from solution under shear-flow has been developed and employed by simply tuning the processing (shearing) conditions with respect to the dissolution temperature of P3HT in 2-EN. The experimental results demonstrated that shear removes defects and allows more perfect crystals to be formed. There is no glass transition temperature observed in the crystals formed using the flow-induced crystallization indicating a significantly different

  13. Localized soft elasticity in liquid crystal elastomers (POSTPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-23

    elastomers. J. Phys. II 1, 1253–1261 (1991). 15. Liu, D. & Broer, D. J. Liquid crystal polymer networks: preparation, properties, and applications of films...continued on page 2) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 4348 5e. TASK NUMBER 0026 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER X0V5 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 1) AFRL/RX Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 2) University of Texas at Dallas

  14. Fast Response and Low Voltage Dual Frequency Liquid Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-24

    mixtures, 2) submillisecond-response and scattering-free polymer network liquid crystals for IR laser beam steering, and 3) low absorption loss nematic...favorable. 3.2.3 High birefringence DFLC using 3- ring NCS tolane compounds High n DFLC materials are equally favoured from fast response time and...and synthesized 3- ring NCS tolane compounds with a structure shown in Fig.1 (b). In the structure, lateral difluoro on the middle ring of the

  15. Bistable liquid crystal device fabricated via microscale liquid crystal alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Michinori; Toyoshima, Wataru; Nose, Toshiaki

    2016-10-01

    Bistable liquid crystal (LC) molecular orientation properties in micropatterned LC cells were investigated experimentally and theoretically. When an LC cell was heated to the phase-transition temperature and then cooled, an LC orientation with ±π/2-twist domains (±π/2-twist mode) was obtained. Furthermore, a different LC orientation with ±π-twist domains (±π-twist mode) was observed when a 10-V potential was applied across a sample LC cell. Both orientation states were stably retained over a long period. Herein, cross-sectional LC orientation models in the ±π/2- and ±π-twist modes are proposed to explain the generation and behavior of two different disclination lines. The total energies within one period in the ±π/2- and ±π-twist modes (F±π/2 and F±π, respectively) were estimated theoretically. These energies were found to depend on the LC layer thickness and to cross over at a certain thickness; this indicates that F±π is equal to F±π/2 at this equilibrium thickness. The best temporal stability is likely attained at this equilibrium thickness. We demonstrated a bistable color-switching device by combining a full-wave plate and crossed polarizers. When these optical components were configured properly, stable bistable switching between two colors was achieved.

  16. Influence of Polymers on the Crystal Growth Rate of Felodipine: Correlating Adsorbed Polymer Surface Coverage to Solution Crystal Growth Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Schram, Caitlin J; Taylor, Lynne S; Beaudoin, Stephen P

    2015-10-20

    The bioavailability of orally administered drugs that exhibit poor aqueous solubility can be enhanced with the use of supersaturating dosage forms. Stabilization of these forms by preventing or inhibiting crystallization in solution is an important area of study. Polymers can be used to stabilize supersaturated systems; however, the properties that impact their effectiveness as crystal growth rate inhibitors are not yet fully understood. In this study, the impact of various polymers on the crystal growth rate of felodipine and the conformation of these polymers adsorbed to crystalline felodipine was investigated in order to gain a mechanistic understanding of crystal growth inhibition. It was determined that polymer hydrophobicity impacted polymer adsorption as well as adsorbed polymer conformation. Polymer conformation impacts its surface coverage, which was shown to directly correlate to the polymer's effectiveness as a growth rate inhibitor. By modeling this correlation, it is possible to predict polymer effectiveness given the surface coverage of the polymer.

  17. Blue phase liquid crystals stabilized by linear photo-polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Daming; Yuan, Jiamin; Schadt, Martin; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2014-08-01

    Stabilizing a photopolymer-embedded blue phase liquid crystal precursor with linearly polarized UV light is investigated experimentally. When the UV polarization axis is perpendicular to the stripe electrodes of an in-plane-switching cell, anisotropic polymer networks are formed through the linear photo-polymerization process and the electrostriction effect is suppressed. As a result, the measured hysteresis is dramatically reduced from 6.95% to 0.36% and the response time shortened by ˜2× compared to unpolarized UV exposure. To induce larger anisotropy in polymer networks for mitigating the electrostriction effect, high-intensity linearly polarized UV exposure is preferred.

  18. Temperature sensing with thermochromic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. R.; Sabatino, D. R.; Praisner, T. J.

    A review of the most recent developments in the application of thermochromic liquid crystals to fluid flow temperature measurement is presented. The experimental aspects including application, illumination, recording, and calibration of liquid crystals on solid surfaces, as well as in fluid suspensions, are discussed. Because of the anisotropic optical properties of liquid crystals, on-axis lighting/viewing arrangements, combined with in-situ calibration techniques, generally provide the most accurate temperature assessments. However, where on-axis viewing is not possible, calibration techniques can be employed, which reduce the uncertainty associated with off-axis viewing and lighting arrangements. It has been determined that the use of hue definitions that display a linear trend across the color spectrum yield the most accurate correlation with temperature. The uncertainty of both wide-band and narrow-band thermochromic liquid crystal calibration techniques can be increased due to hysteresis effects, which occur when the temperature of the liquid crystals exceeds their maximum activation temperature. Although liquid crystals are commonly used to provide time-mean temperature measurements, techniques are available which allow the monitoring of temporal changes. Selected examples illustrating the use of thermochromic liquid crystals are shown, and a survey of reported temperature measurement uncertainties is presented.

  19. A swing driven by liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng

    Angular momentum in liquid crystals exists as flow, director reorientation, etc. However, it is hard to observe and measure angular momentum in liquid crystals by a direct mechanical approach. Torsion pendulum is a general tool to measure angular momentum by torque balance. Our torsion pendulum can harvest the angular momentum in liquid crystals to make it observable. The oscillation of the pendulum keeps increasing by constructively adding a small angular momentum of liquid crystals each period at the resonant frequency of the pendulum. Its similar to a swing driven by a force at its resonant frequency. For the torsion pendulum, a cage made of two aluminum discs, in which a liquid crystal cell is placed, is suspended between two thin tungsten wires. A gold mirror, which is a part of the optical lever system, is attached on one tungsten wire. As first demonstration, we fabricate a circular hybrid liquid crystal cell, which can induce concentric backflows to generate angular momentum. The alignment on the planar substrate is concentric and tangential. Due to the coupling between director rotation and flow, the induced backflow goes around the cell when we add electrical pulses between top and bottom substrates. The oscillation is observed by a position sensitive detector and analyzed on the basis of Eriksen-Leslie theory. With vacuum condition and synchronous driving system, the oscillation signal is improved. We demonstrate that this torsion pendulum can sensitively detect the angular momentum in liquid crystals.

  20. Defects and order in liquid crystal phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Shilpa

    This thesis investigates the partial destruction of ordering in liquid crystalline systems due to the influence of defects and thermal fluctuations. The systems under consideration are hexagonal columnar crystals with crystalline order perpendicular to the columns, and two-dimensional smectics with order perpendicular to the layers. We first study the possibility of reentrant melting of a hexagonal columnar crystal of flexible charged polymers at high enough densities. The Lindemann criterion is employed in determining the melting point. Lattice fluctuations are calculated in the Debye model, and an analogy with the Abrikosov vortex lattice in superconductors is exploited in estimating both the elastic constants of the hexagonal lattice, and the appropriate Lindemann constant. We also discuss the unusual functional integral describing the statistical mechanics of a single polymer in an Einstein cage model using the path-integral formulation. A crossover as a function of an external field along the column axis is discussed as well. Next, we study defects in a columnar crystal in the form of vacancy/interstitial loops or strings of vacancies and interstitials bounded by column "heads" and "tails". These defect strings are oriented by the columnar lattice and can change size and shape by movement of the ends and forming kinks along the length. Hence an analysis in terms of directed living polymers is appropriate to study their size and shape distribution, volume fraction, etc. If the entropy of transverse fluctuations overcomes the string line tension in the crystalline phase, a string proliferation transition occurs, leading to a "supersolid" phase with infinitely long vacancy or interstitial strings. We estimate the wandering entropy and examine the behaviour in the transition regime. We also calculate numerically the line tension of various species of vacancies and interstitials in a triangular lattice for power-law potentials as well as for a modified Bessel

  1. Liquid Crystal Research Shows Deformation By Drying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    These images, from David Weitz's liquid crystal research, show ordered uniform sized droplets (upper left) before they are dried from their solution. After the droplets are dried (upper right), they are viewed with crossed polarizers that show the deformation caused by drying, a process that orients the bipolar structure of the liquid crystal within the droplets. When an electric field is applied to the dried droplets (lower left), and then increased (lower right), the liquid crystal within the droplets switches its alignment, thereby reducing the amount of light that can be scattered by the droplets when a beam is shone through them.

  2. Photorefractive effect in ferroelectric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Takeo; Naka, Yumiko

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we review recent progress of research on the photorefractive effect of ferroelectric liquid crystals. The photorefractive effect is a phenomenon that forms a dynamic hologram in a material. The interference of two laser beams in a photorefractive material establishes a refractive index grating. This phenomenon is applicable to a wide range of devices related to diffraction optics including 3D displays, optical amplification, optical tomography, novelty filters, and phase conjugate wave generators. Ferroelectric liquid crystals are considered as a candidate for practical photorefractive materials. A refractive index grating formation time of 8-10 ms and a large gain coefficient are easily obtained in photorefractive ferroelectric liquid crystals.

  3. Nanoparticles in discotic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep

    The self-assembly of disc-shaped molecules creates discotic liquid crystals (DLCs). These nanomaterials of the sizes ranging from 2-6 nm are emerging as a new class of organic semiconducting materials. The unique geometry of columnar mesophases formed by discotic molecules is of great importance to study the one-dimensional charge and energy migration in organized systems. A number of applications of DLCs, such as, one-dimensional conductor, photoconductor, photovoltaic solar cells, light emitting diodes and gas sensors have been reported. The conductivity along the columns in columnar mesophases has been observed to be several orders of magnitude greater than in perpendicular direction and, therefore, DLCs are described as molecular wires. On the other hand, the fields of nanostructured materials, such as gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes and graphene, have received tremendous development in the past decade due to their technological and fundamental interest. Recently the hybridization of DLCs with various metallic and semiconducting nanoparticles has been realized to alter and improve their properties. These nanocomposites are not only of basic science interest but also lead to novel materials for many device applications. This article provides an overview on the development in the field of newly immersed discotic nanoscience. After a brief introduction of DLCs, the article will cover the inclusion of various zero-, one- and two-dimensional nanoparticles in DLCs. Finally, an outlook into the future of this newly emerging intriguing field of discotic nanoscience research will be provided.

  4. Tactoids of chiral liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacio-Betancur, Viviana; Villada-Gil, Stiven; Zhou, Ye; Armas-Pérez, Julio C.; de Pablo, Juan José; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan Pablo

    The phase diagram of chiral liquid crystals confined in ellipsoids is obtained, by following a theoretically informed Monte Carlo relaxation of the tensor alignment field Q. The free energy of the system is described by a functional in the framework of the Landau-de Gennes formalism. This study also includes the effect of anchoring strength, curvature, and chirality of the system. In the low chirality region of the phase diagram we found the twist bipolar (BS) phase and some cholesteric phases such as the radial spherical structure (RSS), twist cylinder (TC) and double twist cylinder (DTC) whose axis of rotation is not necessarily aligned with the major axis of the geometry. For high chirality scenarios, the disclination lines are twisted or bent near the surface preventing the formation of symmetric networks of defects, although an hexagonal pattern is formed on the surface which might serve as open sites for collocation of colloids. By analyzing the free energies of isochoric systems, prolate geometries tend to be more favorable for high chirality and low anchoring conditions. Universidad Nacional de Colombia Ph.D. grant and COLCIENCIAS under the Contract No. 110-165-843-748. CONACYT for Postdoctoral Fellowships Nos. 186166 and 203840.

  5. Liquid crystal television spatial light modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    1989-01-01

    The spatial light modulation characteristics and capabilities of the liquid crystal television (LCTV) spatial light modulators (SLMs) are discussed. A comparison of Radio Shack, Epson, and Citizen LCTV SLMs is made.

  6. Liquid crystal on subwavelength metal gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Palto, S. P.; Barnik, M. I.; Artemov, V. V.; Shtykov, N. M.; Geivandov, A. R.; Yudin, S. G.; Gorkunov, M. V.

    2015-06-14

    Optical and electrooptical properties of a system consisting of subwavelength metal gratings and nematic liquid crystal layer are studied. Aluminium gratings that also act as interdigitated electrodes are produced by focused ion beam lithography. It is found that a liquid crystal layer strongly influences both the resonance and light polarization properties characteristic of the gratings. Enhanced transmittance is observed not only for the TM-polarized light in the near infrared spectral range but also for the TE-polarized light in the visible range. Although the electrodes are separated by nanosized slits, and the electric field is strongly localized near the surface, a pronounced electrooptical effect is registered. The effect is explained in terms of local reorientation of liquid crystal molecules at the grating surface and propagation of the orientational deformation from the surface into the bulk of the liquid crystal layer.

  7. Rapid leak detection with liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.; Ruppe, E. P.

    1978-01-01

    Small leaks in vacuum lines are detected by applying liquid-crystal coating, warming suspected area, and observing color change due to differential cooling by leak jet. Technique is used on inside or outside walls of vacuum-jacketed lines.

  8. Thermal Conductivity and Liquid Crystal Thermometers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, R. D., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    Describes using stock liquid crystal postcards as inexpensive classroom thermometers. Also suggests using these postcards as a good visual temperature indicator for classroom demonstrations such as temperature gradients. One such activity is provided. (MVL)

  9. Formation of a crystal nucleus from liquid

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Crystallization is one of the most fundamental nonequilibrium phenomena universal to a variety of materials. It has so far been assumed that a supercooled liquid is in a “homogeneous disordered state” before crystallization. Contrary to this common belief, we reveal that a supercooled colloidal liquid is actually not homogeneous, but has transient medium-range structural order. We find that nucleation preferentially takes place in regions of high structural order via wetting effects, which reduce the crystal–liquid interfacial energy significantly and thus promotes crystal nucleation. This novel scenario provides a clue to solving a long-standing mystery concerning a large discrepancy between the rigorous numerical estimation of the nucleation rate on the basis of the classical nucleation theory and the experimentally observed ones. Our finding may shed light not only on the mechanism of crystal nucleation, but also on the fundamental nature of a supercooled liquid state. PMID:20663951

  10. Liquid crystal interfaces: Experiments, simulations and biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Piotr

    Interfacial phenomena are ubiquitous and extremely important in various aspects of biological and industrial processes. For example, many liquid crystal applications start by alignment with a surface. The underlying mechanisms of the molecular organization of liquid crystals at an interface are still under intensive study and continue to be important to the display industry in order to develop better and/or new display technology. My dissertation research has been devoted to studying how complex liquid crystals can be guided to organize at an interface, and to using my findings to develop practical applications. Specifically, I have been working on developing biosensors using liquid-crystal/surfactant/lipid/protein interactions as well as the alignment of low-symmetry liquid crystals for potential new display and optomechanical applications. The biotechnology industry needs better ways of sensing biomaterials and identifying various nanoscale events at biological interfaces and in aqueous solutions. Sensors in which the recognition material is a liquid crystal naturally connects the existing knowledge and experience of the display and biotechnology industries together with surface and soft matter sciences. This dissertation thus mainly focuses on the delicate phenomena that happen at liquid interfaces. In the introduction, I start by defining the interface and discuss its structure and the relevant interfacial forces. I then introduce the general characteristics of biosensors and, in particular, describe the design of biosensors that employ liquid crystal/aqueous solution interfaces. I further describe the basic properties of liquid crystal materials that are relevant for liquid crystal-based biosensing applications. In CHAPTER 2, I describe the simulation methods and experimental techniques used in this dissertation. In CHAPTER 3 and CHAPTER 4, I present my computer simulation work. CHAPTER 3 presents insight of how liquid crystal molecules are aligned by

  11. Optofluidics based on liquid crystal microflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasdekis, A. E.; Cuennet, J. G.; De Sio, L.; Psaltis, D.

    2011-10-01

    By replacing common buffers with anisotropic liquids in microfluidics, an enhanced range of optofluidic functionalities is enabled. Such an anisotropic liquid is nematic liquid crystals (NLC), which exhibits optical properties that can be tuned by optical, electrical or mechanical fields, such as flow. We demonstrate an optofluidic modulator based on direct flow of nematic liquid crystals in microfluidic channels. We discuss this optofluidic paradigm both under steady state conditions, and under flow. Rapid pulsatile flows are detrimental towards more compact and ultra-fast devices. These were enabled via peristaltic pumps, demonstrating liquid crystal modulators operating above the limit of 3 kHz. We discuss the latter results, but also assess the feasibility of performing ultra-fast optics and additional functionalities for on- and off-chip imaging.

  12. Vacuum pyrolysis characteristics and kinetic analysis of liquid crystal from scrap liquid crystal display panels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya; Zhang, Lingen; Xu, Zhenming

    2017-04-05

    Recycling of waste liquid crystal display (LCD) panels is an urgent task with the rapid expanding LCD market. However, as important composition of LCD panels, the treatment of liquid crystal is seldom concerned for its low concentration. In present study, a stripping product enriched liquid crystal and indium is gained by mechanical stripping process, in which liquid crystal is enriched from 0.3wt.% to 53wt.% and indium is enriched from 0.02wt.% to 7.95wt.%. For the stripping product, liquid crystal should be removed before indium recovery because (a) liquid crystal will hinder indium recycling; (b) liquid crystal is hazardous waste. Hence, an effective and green approach by vacuum pyrolysis is proposed to treat liquid crystal in the stripping product. The results are summarized as: (i) From the perspective of apparent activation energy, the advantages of vacuum pyrolysis is expounded according to kinetic analysis. (ii) 89.10wt.% of liquid crystal is converted and the content of indium in residue reaches 14.18wt.% under 773K, 15min and system pressure of 20Pa. This study provides reliable information for further industrial application and an essential pretreatment for the next step of indium recycling.

  13. Liquid crystal optical fibers for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, P. K.

    2013-09-01

    Propagation characteristics of optical fibers are greatly dependent on materials, which the guides are comprised of. Varieties of materials have been developed and investigated for their usage in fabricating optical fibers for specific applications. Within the context, a liquid crystal medium is both inhomogeneous and optically anisotropic, and fibers made of such mediums are greatly useful. Also, liquid crystals exhibit strong electro-optic behavior, which allows alternation in their optical properties under the influence of external electric fields. These features make liquid crystal fibers greatly important for optical applications. The present communication is aimed at providing a glimpse of the efficacy of liquid crystals and/or fibers made of liquid crystals, followed by the analytical investigation of wave propagation through such guides. The sustainment of modes is explored in these fibers under varying fiber dimensions, and the novelty is discussed. The case of tapered liquid crystal fibers is also briefly discussed highlighting the usefulness. Control on the dispersion characteristics of such fibers may be imposed by making the guide even more complex; the possibility of devising such options is also touched upon.

  14. Molecular Models of Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajshekhar

    Liquid crystal elastomers combine the elastic properties of conventional rubbers with the optical properties of liquid crystals. This dual nature gives rise to unusual physical properties, including the stress induced transition from a polydomain state, consisting of multiple nematic regions with independent orientations, to a monodomain state consisting of a single nematic region with a uniform director. We propose several molecular-scale coarse-grained models of liquid crystal elastomers with varying degrees of resolution. The models employ the Gay-Berne soft potential, and exhibit the chain connectivity of a diamond network. Simulation results show that these models are able to capture the polydomain state exhibited by liquid crystal elastomers in the absence of any external stress. When subjected to uniaxial stress, our models exhibit a polydomain to monodomain transition. We explain that the polydomain state occurs through the aggregation of liquid crystal molecules assisted by crosslinking sites, and conclude that the transition mechanism to the monodomain state is based on the reorientation of nematic domains along the direction of applied stress. Our modeling efforts are primarily focused on three models. The first two models consider the effects of rigid and flexible crosslinkers in liquid crystal elastomers with a diamond topology for chain connectivity. The third model deviates from the diamond network topology and adopts a random network topology.

  15. Liquid crystal polyester-carbon fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. S.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid crystal polymers (LCP) have been developed as a thermoplastic matrix for high performance composites. A successful melt impregnation method has been developed which results in the production of continuous carbon fiber (CF) reinforced LCP prepreg tape. Subsequent layup and molding of prepreg into laminates has yielded composites of good quality. Tensile and flexural properties of LCP/CF composites are comparable to those of epoxy/CF composites. The LCP/CF composites have better impact resistance than the latter, although epoxy/CF composites possess superior compression and shear strength. The LCP/CF composites have good property retention until 200 F (67 % of room temperature value). Above 200 F, mechanical properties decrease significantly. Experimental results indicate that the poor compression and shear strength may be due to the poor interfacial adhesion between the matrix and carbon fiber as adequate toughness of the LCP matrix. Low mechanical property retention at high temperatures may be attributable to the low beta-transition temperature (around 80 C) of the LCP matrix material.

  16. 21 CFR 880.6970 - Liquid crystal vein locator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Liquid crystal vein locator. 880.6970 Section 880... Devices § 880.6970 Liquid crystal vein locator. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal vein locator is a... skin by displaying the color changes of heat sensitive liquid crystals (cholesteric esters)....

  17. Semiconductor liquid crystal composition and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Li, Liang-shi

    2005-04-26

    Semiconductor liquid crystal compositions and methods for making such compositions are disclosed. One embodiment of the invention is directed to a liquid crystal composition including a solvent and semiconductor particles in the solvent. The solvent and the semiconductor particles are in an effective amount in the liquid crystal composition to form a liquid crystal phase.

  18. 21 CFR 880.6970 - Liquid crystal vein locator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Liquid crystal vein locator. 880.6970 Section 880... Devices § 880.6970 Liquid crystal vein locator. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal vein locator is a... skin by displaying the color changes of heat sensitive liquid crystals (cholesteric esters)....

  19. 21 CFR 880.6970 - Liquid crystal vein locator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Liquid crystal vein locator. 880.6970 Section 880... Devices § 880.6970 Liquid crystal vein locator. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal vein locator is a... skin by displaying the color changes of heat sensitive liquid crystals (cholesteric esters)....

  20. 21 CFR 880.6970 - Liquid crystal vein locator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Liquid crystal vein locator. 880.6970 Section 880... Devices § 880.6970 Liquid crystal vein locator. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal vein locator is a... skin by displaying the color changes of heat sensitive liquid crystals (cholesteric esters)....

  1. 21 CFR 880.6970 - Liquid crystal vein locator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Liquid crystal vein locator. 880.6970 Section 880... Devices § 880.6970 Liquid crystal vein locator. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal vein locator is a... skin by displaying the color changes of heat sensitive liquid crystals (cholesteric esters)....

  2. Electro-osmosis in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovkach, O. M.; Calderer, M. Carme; Golovaty, Dmitry; Lavrentovich, Oleg; Walkington, Noel J.

    2016-07-01

    We derive a mathematical model of a nematic electrolyte based on a variational formulation of nematodynamics. We verify the model by comparing its predictions to the results of the experiments on the substrate-controlled liquid-crystal-enabled electrokinetics. In the experiments, a nematic liquid crystal confined to a thin planar cell with surface-patterned anchoring conditions exhibits electro-osmotic flows along the "guiding rails" imposed by the spatially varying director. Extending our previous work, we consider a general setup which incorporates dielectric anisotropy of the liquid-crystalline matrix and the full set of nematic viscosities.

  3. Atomic force microscopy on liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Christian; Schulz, Benjamin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the atomic force microscopy (AFM) on thermotropic liquid crystals. We first give a general introduction to the technique of AFM and then describe the special requirements that have to be met for the imaging of liquid-crystalline surfaces. We also discuss the relation between the quality or reliability of the imaging results and various parameters of the scanning conditions. We briey review the existing work on AFM on liquid crystals and finally describe applications beyond the imaging, such as molecular force spectroscopy or manipulation of surface structures.

  4. Electro-osmosis in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovkach, O. M.; Carme Calderer, M.; Golovaty, Dmitry; Lavrentovich, Oleg; Walkington, Noel J.

    2016-04-01

    We derive a mathematical model of a nematic electrolyte based on a variational formulation of nematodynamics. Extending our previous work, we consider a general setup which incorporates dielectric anisotropy of the liquid-crystalline matrix and the full set of nematic viscosities. We verify the model by comparing its predictions to the results of the experiments on the substrate-controlled liquid-crystal-enabled electrokinetics. In the experiments a nematic liquid crystal confined to a thin planar cell with surface-patterned anchoring conditions exhibit electro-osmotic flows along the "guiding rails" imposed by the spatially varying director.

  5. Solid microparticles in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muševič, Igor

    A brief historic overview of colloidal experiments in the 1990's is given in the introduction. These experiments have later inspired research on nematic colloids, after the technique of laser tweezers manipulation of particles was introduced to this field. Basic topological properties of colloidal inclusions in the nematic liquid crystals are discussed and the nematic-mediated forces between dipolar and quadrupolar colloidal particles in bulk nematic are explained. Structural and topological properties of 2D and 3D colloidal crystals and superstructures made of colloidal particles of different size and symmetry in bulk nematic liquid crystal are described. Laser-tweezer manipulation and rewiring of topological defect loops around colloidal particles is introduced. This results in the colloidal entanglement, as well as knotting and linking of defect loops of the order parameter field. Shape and size-dependent colloidal interactions in the nematic liquid crystals are reviewed. The chapter concludes with the discussion of bulk chiral nematic and blue phase colloids.

  6. Liquid nitrogen dewar for protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Gaseous Nitrogen Dewar apparatus developed by Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine for use aboard Mir and the International Space Station allows large quantities of protein samples to be crystallized in orbit. The specimens are contained either in plastic tubing (heat-sealed at each end). Biological samples are prepared with a precipitating agent in either a batch or liquid-liquid diffusion configuration. The samples are then flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen before crystallization can start. On orbit, the Dewar is placed in a quiet area of the station and the nitrogen slowly boils off (it is taken up by the environmental control system), allowing the proteins to thaw to begin crystallization. The Dewar is returned to Earth after one to four months on orbit, depending on Shuttle flight opportunities. The tubes then are analyzed for crystal presence and quality

  7. Liquid crystal quantitative temperature measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Wu, Zongshan

    2001-10-01

    Quantitative temperature measurement using wide band thermochromic liquid crystals is an “area” thermal measurement technique. This technique utilizes the feature that liquid crystal changes its reflex light color with variation of temperature and applies an image capturing and processing system to calibrate the characteristic curve of liquid crystal’s color-temperature. Afterwards, the technique uses this curve to measure the distribution of temperature on experimental model. In this paper, firstly, each part of quantitative temperature measurement system using liquid crystal is illustrated and discussed. Then the technique is employed in a long duration hypersonic wind tunnel, and the quantitative result of the heat transfer coefficient along laminar plate is obtained. Additionally, some qualitative results are also given. In the end, comparing the experimental results with reference enthalpy theoretical results, a conclusion of thermal measurement accuracy is drawn.

  8. Key Developments in Ionic Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Fernandez, Alexandra; Kouwer, Paul H J

    2016-05-16

    Ionic liquid crystals are materials that combine the classes of liquid crystals and ionic liquids. The first one is based on the multi-billion-dollar flat panel display industry, whilst the latter quickly developed in the past decades into a family of highly-tunable non-volatile solvents. The combination yields materials with a unique set of properties, but also with many challenges ahead. In this review, we provide an overview of the key concepts in ionic liquid crystals, particularly from a molecular perspective. What are the important molecular parameters that determine the phase behavior? How should they be introduced into the molecules? Finally, which other tools does one have to realize specific properties in the material?

  9. Key Developments in Ionic Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez Fernandez, Alexandra; Kouwer, Paul H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquid crystals are materials that combine the classes of liquid crystals and ionic liquids. The first one is based on the multi-billion-dollar flat panel display industry, whilst the latter quickly developed in the past decades into a family of highly-tunable non-volatile solvents. The combination yields materials with a unique set of properties, but also with many challenges ahead. In this review, we provide an overview of the key concepts in ionic liquid crystals, particularly from a molecular perspective. What are the important molecular parameters that determine the phase behavior? How should they be introduced into the molecules? Finally, which other tools does one have to realize specific properties in the material? PMID:27196890

  10. Molecular composites from liquid crystalline polymers and liquid crystalline thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Benicewicz, B.C.; Douglas, E.P.; Hjelm, R.P. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    We propose a new approach to molecular composites. This approach uses a mixture of a liquid crystalline polymer and a liquid crystalline thermoset to enhance the miscibility. Preliminary neutron scattering data is presented on a system of short and long rod aromatic amides. The data is interpreted using the interpenetrating phase model of Debye and Bueche. The analysis indicates that the scattering is consistent with this model and shows a characteristic length scale in the range of 70 to 80 A. The intensity of the scattering is lower than calculated for the strong segregation limit, suggesting that there is some intermixing of the components.

  11. Versatile alignment layer method for new types of liquid crystal photonic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Finnemeyer, V.; Bryant, D.; Lu, L.; Bos, P.; Reich, R.; Clark, H.; Berry, S.; Bozler, C.; Yaroshchuk, O.

    2015-07-21

    Liquid crystal photonic devices are becoming increasingly popular. These devices often present a challenge when it comes to creating a robust alignment layer in pre-assembled cells. In this paper, we describe a method of infusing a dye into a microcavity to produce an effective photo-definable alignment layer. However, previous research on such alignment layers has shown that they have limited stability, particularly against subsequent light exposure. As such, we further describe a method of utilizing a pre-polymer, infused into the microcavity along with the liquid crystal, to provide photostability. We demonstrate that the polymer layer, formed under ultraviolet irradiation of liquid crystal cells, has been effectively localized to a thin region near the substrate surface and provides a significant improvement in the photostability of the liquid crystal alignment. This versatile alignment layer method, capable of being utilized in devices from the described microcavities to displays, offers significant promise for new photonics applications.

  12. The Study of Hypersonic Heat Transfer by Liquid Crystals Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovrizhina, V. N.; Kharitonov, A. M.; Petrov, A. P.; Schpack, S. I.; Zharkova, G. M.; Zvegintsev, V. I.

    2009-01-01

    The results of experimental application of the Liquid Crystal Thermography in short-duration facility AT-303 of ITAM Novosibirsk (Russia) are presented. Experiments were carried out at free stream Mach number M∞ ≍ 10.9, unit Reynolds number Re1≍2.9*106M-1, run duration 350 MC and temperature factor Tw/To ≍ 0.2 on a semi-spherically blunted cone. Polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDLC), developed at ITAM, have been used as thermosensitive coating. Transient technique and color pattern video acquisition was realized at different framing rates. It was obtained that high temperature sensitivity of PDLC allows visualize the fine features of the temperature field on the model surface. The heat flux in comparison with semi- empirical estimation are presented and discussed too.

  13. Charge transfer reactions in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederrecht, G.P.; Wasielewski, M.R. |; Galili, T.; Levanon, H.

    1998-07-01

    Ultrafast transient absorption studies of intramolecular photoinduced charge separation and thermal charge recombination were carried out on a molecule consisting of a 4-(N-pyrrolidino)naphthalene-1,8-imide donor (PNI) covalently attached to a pyromellitimide acceptor (PI) dissolved in the liquid crystal 4{prime}-(n-pentyl)-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB). The temperature dependencies of the charge separation and recombination rates were obtained at temperatures above the nematic-isotropic phase transition of 5CB, where ordered microdomains exist and scattering of visible light by these domains is absent. The authors show that excited state charge separation is dominated by molecular reorientation of 5CB perpendicular to the director within the liquid crystal microdomains. They also show that charge recombination is adiabatic and is controlled by the comparatively slow collective reorientation of the liquid crystal microdomains relative to the orientation of PNI{sup +}-PI{sup {minus}}. They also report the results of time resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TREPR) studies of photoinduced charge separation in a series of supramolecular compounds dissolved in oriented liquid crystal solvents. These studies permit the determination of the radical pair energy levels as the solvent reorganization energy increases from the low temperature crystalline phase, through the soft glass phase, to the nematic phase of the liquid crystal.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Spinodal-Assisted Polymer Crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, R H; Lacevic, N M; Fried, L

    2005-07-08

    Large scale molecular dynamics simulations of bulk melts of polar (poly(vinylidene fluoride) (pVDF)) polymers are utilized to study chain conformation and ordering prior to crystallization under cooling. While the late stages of polymer crystallization have been studied in great detail, recent theoretical and experimental evidence indicates that there are important phenomena occurring in the early stages of polymer crystallization that are not understood to the same degree. When the polymer melt is quenched from a temperature above the melting temperature to the crystallization temperature, crystallization does not occur instantaneously. This initial interval without crystalline order is characterized as an induction period. It has been thought of as a nucleation period in the classical theories of polymer crystallization, but recent experiments, computer simulations, and theoretical work suggest that the initial period in polymer crystallization is assisted by a spinodal decomposition type mechanism. In this study we have achieved physically realistic length scales to study early stages of polymer ordering, and show that spinodal-assisted ordering prior to crystallization is operative in polar polymers suggesting general applicability of this process.

  15. Engineered complex molecular order in liquid crystals towards unusual optics and responsive mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Somolinos, Carlos; de Haan, Laurens T.; Schenning, Albert P. H. J.; Bastiaansen, Cees W. M.; Broer, Dirk J.

    2013-03-01

    Defects in liquid crystals have been studied over decades to disclose information and knowledge on the structure of LC phases. More recently, LC defects have been identified as a tool to implement new physical functions useful in optical films for polarization conversion or mechanical actuators able to adopt novel exotic shapes. In the present paper we describe a general methodology to engineer different defect patterns by combining the use of linear photopolymerizable polymers and liquid crystals.

  16. Polymer-mediated growth of crystals and mesocrystals.

    PubMed

    Cölfen, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Polymers are important additives for the control of mineralization reactions in both biological and bioinspired mineralization. The reason is that they allow for a number of interactions with the growing crystals and even amorphous minerals. These can substantially influence the way the mineral grows on several levels. Already in the prenucleation phase, polymers can control the formation of prenucleation clusters and subsequently the nucleation event. Also, polymers can control whether the further crystallization follows a classical or nonclassical particle-mediated growth path. In this chapter, the main ways in which polymers can be used to control a crystallization reaction will be highlighted. In addition, polymers that are useful for this purpose and the experimental conditions suitable for directing a crystallization reaction into the desired direction through the use of polymers will be described.

  17. Low-concentration polymers inhibit and accelerate crystal growth in organic glasses in correlation with segmental mobility.

    PubMed

    Powell, C Travis; Cai, Ting; Hasebe, Mariko; Gunn, Erica M; Gao, Ping; Zhang, Geoff; Gong, Yuchuan; Yu, Lian

    2013-09-05

    Crystal growth in organic glasses has been studied in the presence of low-concentration polymers. Doping the organic glass nifedipine (NIF) with 1 wt % polymer has no measurable effect on the glass transition temperature Tg of host molecules, but substantially alters the rate of crystal growth, from a 10-fold reduction to a 30% increase at 12 °C below the host Tg. Among the polymers tested, all but polyethylene oxide (PEO) inhibit growth. The inhibitory effects greatly diminish in the liquid state (at Tg + 38 °C), but PEO persists to speed crystal growth. The crystal growth rate varies exponentially with polymer concentration, in analogy with the polymer effect on solvent mobility, though the effect on crystal growth can be much stronger. The ability to inhibit crystal growth is not well ordered by the strength of host-polymer hydrogen bonds, but correlates remarkably well with the neat polymer's Tg, suggesting that the mobility of polymer chains is an important factor in inhibiting crystal growth in organic glasses. The polymer dopants also affect crystal growth at the free surface of NIF glasses, but the effect is attenuated according to the power law us ∝ ub(0.35), where us and ub are the surface and bulk growth rates.

  18. A Finsler Geometry Modeling of the Liquid Crystal Elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koibuchi, Hiroshi; Shobukhov, Andrey

    2015-09-01

    Liquid crystal elastomer (LCE) is a rubbery material composed of polymer chains and liquid crystals (LC). LCE is well known to undergo a shape transformation from the isotropic to the anisotropic phase. This shape transformation is caused by the nematic transition of the LC included in the LCE. However, the mechanism of this transformation is unknown because the interaction of LC with the bulk polymers is too complex. In this presentation, we extend the two-dimensional Finsler geometry model for membranes to a three-dimensional model for LCE. The Finsler geometry model for LCE is a coarse grained one: the Guassian bond potential S1 is obtained by extending the one for membranes, which is originally obtained by a simple extension of the Guassian bond potential for the linear chain polymer model. The continuous Hamiltonian, which contains S1 and the curvature energy S2, is discretized using a three-dimensional rigid sphere composed of tetrahedrons. We study the shape transformation as a phase transition between the isotropic and anisotropic phases and report the results of the transition order, obtained by the Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Characterising laser beams with liquid crystal displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, Angela; Naidoo, Darryl; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    We show how one can determine the various properties of light, from the modal content of laser beams to decoding the information stored in optical fields carrying orbital angular momentum, by performing a modal decomposition. Although the modal decomposition of light has been known for a long time, applied mostly to pattern recognition, we illustrate how this technique can be implemented with the use of liquid-crystal displays. We show experimentally how liquid crystal displays can be used to infer the intensity, phase, wavefront, Poynting vector, and orbital angular momentum density of unknown optical fields. This measurement technique makes use of a single spatial light modulator (liquid crystal display), a Fourier transforming lens and detector (CCD or photo-diode). Such a diagnostic tool is extremely relevant to the real-time analysis of solid-state and fibre laser systems as well as mode division multiplexing as an emerging technology in optical communication.

  20. Liquid Crystals for Organic Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Mary; Kelly, Stephen M.

    Columnar, smectic and lamellar polymeric liquid crystals are widely recognized as very promising charge-transporting organic semiconductors due to their ability to spontaneously self-assemble into highly ordered domains in uniform thin films over large areas. The transport properties of smectic and columnar liquid crystals are discussed in Chaps. 2 (10.1007/978-90-481-2873-0_2) and 3 (10.1007/978-90-481-2873-0_3). Here we examine their application to organic field-effect transistors (OFETs): after a short introduction in Sect. 9.1 we introduce the OFET configuration and show how the mobility is measured in Sect. 9.2. Section 9.3 discusses polymeric liquid crystalline semiconductors in OFETs. We review research that shows that annealing of polymers in a fluid mesophase gives a more ordered microcrystalline morphology on cooling than that kinetically determined by solution processing of the thin film. We also demonstrate the benefits of monodomain alignment and show the application of liquid crystals in light-emitting field-effect transistors. Some columnar and smectic phases are highly ordered with short intermolecular separation to give large π-π coupling. We discuss their use in OFETs in Sects. 9.4, and 9.5 respectively. Section 9.6 summarises the conclusions of the chapter.

  1. Defects in liquid crystal nematic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Nieves, A.; Utada, A. S.; Vitelli, V.; Link, D. R.; Nelson, D. R.; Weitz, D. A.

    2006-03-01

    We generate water/liquid crystal (LC)/water double emulsions via recent micro-capillary fluidic devices [A. S. Utada, et.al. Science 308, 537 (2005)]. The resultant objects are stabilized against coalescence by using surfactants or adequate polymers; these also fix the boundary conditions for the director field n. We use 4-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB) and impose tangential boundary conditions at both water/LC interfaces by having polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) dispersed in the inner and outer water phases. We confirm recent predictions [D. R. Nelson, NanoLetters 2, 1125 (2002)] and find that four strength s=+1/2 defects are present; this is in contrast to the two s=+1 defect bipolar configuration observed for bulk spheres [A. Fernandez-Nieves, et.al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 105503 (2004)]. However, these defects do not lie in the vertices of a tetrahedron but are pushed towards each other until certain equilibration distance is reached. In addition to the four defect shells, we observe shells with two s=+1 defects and even with three defects, a s=+1 and two s=+1/2. We argue these configurations arise from nematic bulk distortions that become important as the shell thickness increases. Finally, by adding a different surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), to the outer phase, we can change the director boundary conditions at the outermost interface from parallel to homeotropic, to induce coalescing of the two pair of defects in the four defect shell configuration to yield two defect bipolar shells.

  2. Multiple liquid crystal phases of DNA at high concentrations.

    PubMed

    Strzelecka, T E; Davidson, M W; Rill, R L

    1988-02-04

    DNA packaging in vivo is very tight, with volume concentrations approaching 70% w/v in sperm heads, virus capsids and bacterial nucleoids. The packaging mechanisms adopted may be related to the natural tendency of semi-rigid polymers to form liquid crystalline phases in concentrated solutions. We find that DNA forms at least three distinct liquid crystalline phases at concentrations comparable to those in vivo, with phase transitions occurring over relatively narrow ranges of DNA concentration. A weakly birefringent, dynamic, 'precholesteric' mesophase with microscopic textures intermediate between those of a nematic and a true cholesteric phase forms at the lowest concentrations required for phase separation. At slightly higher DNA concentrations, a second mesophase forms which is a strongly birefringent, well-ordered cholesteric phase with a concentration-dependent pitch varying from 2 to 10 micron. At the highest DNA concentrations, a phase forms which is two-dimensionally ordered and resembles smectic phases of thermotropic liquid crystals observed with small molecules.

  3. Hydrodynamics and Rheology of Active Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhenlu

    2012-02-01

    Active liquid crystals such as swimming bacteria, active gels and assemblies of motors and filaments are active complex fluids. Such systems differ from their passive counterparts in that particles absorb energy and generate motion. They are interesting from a more fundamental perspective as their dynamic phenomenons are both physically fascinating and potentially of great biological significance. In this talk, I will present a continuum model for active liquid crystals and analyze the behavior of a suspension subjected to a weak Poiseuille flow. Hydrodynamics, stability and rheology will also be discussed.

  4. Chirality and biaxiality in cholesteric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Subas; Selinger, Jonathan V

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the statistical mechanics of chirality and biaxiality in liquid crystals through a variety of theoretical approaches, including Monte Carlo simulations, lattice mean-field theory, and Landau theory. All of these calculations show that there is an important interaction between cholesteric twist and biaxial order: The twist acts as a field on the biaxial order, and conversely, the biaxial order increases the twist, that is, reduces the pitch. We model the behavior of chiral biaxial liquid crystals as a function of temperature and discuss how the predictions can be tested in experiments.

  5. Statistical foundations of liquid-crystal theory

    PubMed Central

    Seguin, Brian; Fried, Eliot

    2013-01-01

    Working on a state space determined by considering a discrete system of rigid rods, we use nonequilibrium statistical mechanics to derive macroscopic balance laws for liquid crystals. A probability function that satisfies the Liouville equation serves as the starting point for deriving each macroscopic balance. The terms appearing in the derived balances are interpreted as expected values and explicit formulas for these terms are obtained. Among the list of derived balances appear two, the tensor moment of inertia balance and the mesofluctuation balance, that are not standard in previously proposed macroscopic theories for liquid crystals but which have precedents in other theories for structured media. PMID:23554513

  6. Crystals, liquid crystals and superfluid helium on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelli, Vincenzo

    In this thesis we study the ground state of ordered phases grown as thin layers on substrates with smooth spatially varying Gaussian curvature. The Gaussian curvature acts as a source for a one body potential of purely geometrical origin that controls the equilibrium distribution of the defects in liquid crystal layers, thin films of He4 and two dimensional crystals on a frozen curved surface. For superfluids, all defects are repelled (attracted) by regions of positive (negative) Gaussian curvature. For liquid crystals, charges between 0 and 4pi are attracted by regions of positive curvature while all other charges are repelled. As the thickness of the liquid crystal film increases, transitions between two and three dimensional defect structures are triggered in the ground state of the system. Thin spherical shells of nematic molecules with planar anchoring possess four short 12 disclination lines but, as the thickness increases, a three dimensional escaped configuration composed of two pairs of half-hedgehogs becomes energetically favorable. Finally, we examine the static and dynamical properties that distinguish two dimensional crystals constrained to lie on a curved substrate from their flat space counterparts. A generic mechanism of dislocation unbinding in the presence of varying Gaussian curvature is presented. We explore how the geometric potential affects the energetics and dynamics of dislocations and point defects such as vacancies and interstitials.

  7. Single Molecule Studies on Dynamics in Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Täuber, Daniela; von Borczyskowski, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Single molecule (SM) methods are able to resolve structure related dynamics of guest molecules in liquid crystals (LC). Highly diluted small dye molecules on the one hand explore structure formation and LC dynamics, on the other hand they report about a distortion caused by the guest molecules. The anisotropic structure of LC materials is used to retrieve specific conformation related properties of larger guest molecules like conjugated polymers. This in particular sheds light on organization mechanisms within biological cells, where large molecules are found in nematic LC surroundings. This review gives a short overview related to the application of highly sensitive SM detection schemes in LC. PMID:24077123

  8. The electro-optical and electrochromic properties of electrolyte-liquid crystal dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cupelli, Daniela; De Filpo, Giovanni; Chidichimo, Giuseppe; Nicoletta, Fiore Pasquale

    2006-07-01

    Liquid crystals are known to exhibit a reversible color change by applying a direct current electric field, if a small amount of quaternary ammonium salts is dissolved into them. Applications of such an electrochromic liquid crystal cell have been proposed as interesting laser-addressed writing and image storage devices. Liquid crystal dispersions are composite materials formed by liquid crystal droplets embedded in either a polymer or a monomer matrix. Thin films of liquid crystal dispersions can be turned from an opaque to a transparent state by application of a suitable alternating current electric field. Herein, we report our investigations on electrolyte-liquid crystal dispersions, which show independent electro-optical and electrochromic properties characterized by fast bleaching times. This cell involves the reorientation of liquid crystal molecules, trapped in droplets, for the electro-optical changes from the opaque to transparent state and the formation of complexes at the cathode, between the positive ions of electrolyte and liquid crystal dispersed in the matrix, for the electrochromic changes from the bleached to colored state. The device is able to change its electro-optical transmittance within few milliseconds and its color within few seconds.

  9. Semiconducting polymer single crystals and devices (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Huanli

    2016-11-01

    Highly ordered organic semiconductors in solid state with optimal molecular packing are critical to their electrical performance. Single crystals with long-range molecular orders and nearly perfect molecular packing are the best candidates, which already have been verified to exhibit the highest performance whether based on inorganic or small organic materials. However, in comparison, preparing high quality polymer crystals remains a big challenge in polymer science because of the easy entanglements of the long and flexible polymer chains during self-assembly process, which also significantly limits the development of their crystalline polymeric electronic devices. Here we have carried out systematical investigations to prepare high quality semiconducting polymers and high performance semiconducting polymer crystal optoelectronic devices have been successfully fabricated. The semiconducting polymeric devices demonstrate significantly enhanced charge carreir transport compared to their thin films, and the highest carreir mobiltiy could be approcahing 30 cm2 V-1s-1, one of the highest mobiltiy values for polymer semiconductors.

  10. Investigations into complex liquid crystal mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhoff, Jennifer

    Liquid crystal phases exhibit physical characteristics that lie between those of liquid and crystal phases. The many liquid crystal sub-phases are defined based on the degree of positional and orientational ordering the molecules have and the materials that make up these liquid crystal phases. This thesis presents a study of the molecular packing and physical properties of complex liquid crystal phases using dopants to better examine the stability and packing mechanisms of these phases. It also looks at the dispersion of quantum dots in liquid crystal materials, examining the electro-optical properties of the mixtures. The main goal of this thesis is to examine the effects of dopants on the properties of liquid crystal phases using optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, electro-optical measurements, and X-ray scattering. For those mixtures with quantum dots fluorescence microscopy and photoluminescence measurements were also conducted. Rod-like liquid crystals are commonly used in display applications when the material is in a nematic liquid crystal phase, which is the least ordered phase exhibiting no positional ordering. The more complicated chiral smectic liquid crystal phases, which have a one dimensional layer structure, show potential for faster and tri-stable switching. A chiral rod-like liquid crystal material is doped with both chiral and achiral rod-like liquid crystals to examine the stability of one of the chiral smectic sub-phase, the SmC* FI1 phase. This phase consists of tilted molecules rotating about the cone defined by the tilt angle with a periodicity of three layers and an overall helical structure. The SmC*FI1 phase is stabilized by the competition between antiferroelectric and ferroelectric interactions, and small amounts of the achiral dopant broadens the range of this phase by almost 5°C. Higher dopant concentrations of the achiral material result in the destabilization of not just the SmC*FI1 phase but all tilted sub

  11. Inexpensive Electrooptic Experiments on Liquid Crystal Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciferno, Thomas M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an electrooptic apparatus that can be incorporated into the classroom to test liquid crystal displays (LCDs) and introduce students to experiments of an applied physics nature with very practical implications. Presents experiments that give students hands-on experience with technologies of current interest to…

  12. Helmet-Mounted Liquid-Crystal Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steve; Plough, Alan; Clarke, Robert; Mclean, William; Fournier, Joseph; Marmolejo, Jose A.

    1991-01-01

    Helmet-mounted binocular display provides text and images for almost any wearer; does not require fitting for most users. Accommodates users from smallest interpupillary distance to largest. Two liquid-crystal display units mounted in helmet. Images generated seen from any position head can assume inside helmet. Eyes directed to position for best viewing.

  13. Fluctuation and dissipation in liquid crystal electroconvection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldburg, Walter I.; Goldschmidt, Yadin Y.; Kellay, Hamid

    2002-11-01

    The power dissipation P( t) was measured in a liquid crystal (MBBA) driven by an ac voltage into the chaotic electroconvective state. In that state, the power fluctuates about its mean value < P>. The quantity measured, and compared with the fluctuation theorem of Gallavotti and Cohen, is the dimensionless standard deviation of the fluctuations, σP/< P>.

  14. Infrared diagnosis using liquid crystal detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hugenschmidt, M.; Vollrath, K.

    1986-01-01

    The possible uses of pulsed carbon dioxide lasers for analysis of plasmas and flows need appropriate infrared image converters. Emphasis was placed on liquid crystal detectors and their operational modes. Performance characterstics and selection criteria, such as high sensitivity, short reaction time, and high spatial resolution are discussed.

  15. Diffraction from a liquid crystal phase grating.

    PubMed

    Kashnow, R A; Bigelow, J E

    1973-10-01

    The diffraction of light by a sinusoidal perturbation of the optic axis in a nematic liquid crystal is discussed. This corresponds to experiments at the electrohydrodynamic instability thresholds. An interesting qualitative feature appears: The diffraction pattern exhibits a contribution at half of the expected spatial frequency, corresponding to nonorthogonal traversals of the thick phase grating.

  16. Liquid-Crystal Thermal-Control Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehaye, R. F.; Edge, T. M.; Feltner, W. R.

    1987-01-01

    Radiative temperature regulators have no moving parts. Conceptual temperature-regulating system proposed for spacecraft useful in automatic or remotely controlled regulation of solar heating in buildings, provided cost reduced sufficiently. System consists of liquid-crystal panels made to absorb or reflect sunlight.

  17. Atomistic Simulation of Polymer Crystallization at Realistic Length Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, R H; Fried, L E

    2005-01-28

    Understanding the dynamics of polymer crystallization during the induction period prior to crystal growth is a key goal in polymer physics. Here we present the first study of primary crystallization of polymer melts via molecular dynamics simulations at physically realistic (about 46 nm) length scales. Our results show that the crystallization mechanism involves a spinodal decomposition microphase separation caused by an increase in the average length of rigid trans segments along the polymer backbone during the induction period. Further, the characteristic length of the growing dense domains during the induction period is longer than predicted by classical nucleation theory. These results indicate a new 'coexistence period' in the crystallization, where nucleation and growth mechanisms coexist with a phase separation mechanism. Our results provide an atomistic verification of the fringed micelle model.

  18. Randomized Grain Boundary Liquid Crystal Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Wang, H.; Li, M.; Glaser, M.; Maclennan, J.; Clark, N.

    2012-02-01

    The formation of macroscopic, chiral domains, in the B4 and dark conglomerate phases, for example, is a feature of bent-core liquid crystals resulting from the interplay of chirality, molecular bend and molecular tilt. We report a new, chiral phase observed in a hockey stick-like liquid crystal molecule. This phase appears below a smectic A phase and cools to a crystal phase. TEM images of the free surface of the chiral phase show hundreds of randomly oriented smectic blocks several hundred nanometers in size, similar to those seen in the twist grain boundary (TGB) phase. However, in contrast to the TGB phase, these blocks are randomly oriented. The characteristic defects in this phase are revealed by freeze-fracture TEM images. We will show how these defects mediate the randomized orientation and discuss the intrinsic mechanism driving the formation of this phase. This work is supported by NSF MRSEC Grant DMR0820579 and NSF Grant DMR0606528.

  19. 21 CFR 880.2200 - Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. 880... Personal Use Monitoring Devices § 880.2200 Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal forehead temperature strip is a device applied to the forehead that is used to...

  20. 21 CFR 880.2200 - Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. 880... Personal Use Monitoring Devices § 880.2200 Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal forehead temperature strip is a device applied to the forehead that is used to...

  1. 21 CFR 880.2200 - Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. 880... Personal Use Monitoring Devices § 880.2200 Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal forehead temperature strip is a device applied to the forehead that is used to...

  2. 21 CFR 880.2200 - Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. 880... Personal Use Monitoring Devices § 880.2200 Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal forehead temperature strip is a device applied to the forehead that is used to...

  3. 21 CFR 880.2200 - Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. 880... Personal Use Monitoring Devices § 880.2200 Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal forehead temperature strip is a device applied to the forehead that is used to...

  4. Liquid crystal assemblies in biologically inspired systems

    PubMed Central

    Safinya, Cyrus R.; Deek, Joanna; Beck, Roy; Jones, Jayna B.; Leal, Cecilia; Ewert, Kai K.; Li, Youli

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, which is part of a collection in honor of Noel Clark's remarkable career on liquid crystal and soft matter research, we present examples of biologically inspired systems, which form liquid crystal (LC) phases with their LC nature impacting biological function in cells or being important in biomedical applications. One area focuses on understanding network and bundle formation of cytoskeletal polyampholytes (filamentous-actin, microtubules, and neurofilaments). Here, we describe studies on neurofilaments (NFs), the intermediate filaments of neurons, which form open network nematic liquid crystal hydrogels in axons. Synchrotron small-angle-x-ray scattering studies of NF-protein dilution experiments and NF hydrogels subjected to osmotic stress show that neurofilament networks are stabilized by competing long-range repulsion and attractions mediated by the neurofilament's polyampholytic sidearms. The attractions are present both at very large interfilament spacings, in the weak sidearm-interpenetrating regime, and at smaller interfilament spacings, in the strong sidearm-interpenetrating regime. A second series of experiments will describe the structure and properties of cationic liposomes (CLs) complexed with nucleic acids (NAs). CL-NA complexes form liquid crystalline phases, which interact in a structure-dependent manner with cellular membranes enabling the design of complexes for efficient delivery of nucleic acid (DNA, RNA) in therapeutic applications. PMID:24558293

  5. Reflective and transflective liquid crystal displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fushan

    Recently transflective liquid crystal displays (LCD) received a lot of attention. A transflective display has a transmissive mode and a reflective mode. It combines the high contrast, high brightness of the transmissive mode with energy-saving of reflective mode and has good performance in various illumination conditions. However, state-of-the-art transflective displays have problems such as different electro-optical properties, difficulty in compatibility and optimization of both modes, low efficiency of light utilization, and complexity in structure. This dissertation focuses on finding new designs of transflective displays that address those problems. One way to do this is to study film compensation of LCD. We first studied film compensation of bistable twisted nematic (BTN) LCD. Starting form the reduced (3x3) Mueller matrices, we derived and simplified the conditions that film compensated BTN can be optimized. Based on these relations, electro-optical properties of some particular configurations, and designs of transflective BTN with high brightness and contrast were given. To confirm and get a better understanding of the results, we use the Poincare sphere to analyze film compensated BTN. The key to this approach is the existence of "fixed points". Compared with the matrix approach, this approach is more simple, elegant, and efficient. We then generalized the Poincare sphere approach to a universal approach of LCD. We applied the universal approach to film compensation of ECB and IPS, and the design of achromatic birefringent filters. We also give two more new designs of transflective displays. In the first design, a dichroic mirror is used to split the visible spectrum into two parts used in transmissive and reflective modes, respectively. Both modes can be optimized. It has a simple structure and good light utilization. A design for a full-color transflective display with good performance is also given. In the second design, each pixel is divided into two

  6. Zeolite-like liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, Silvio; Lehmann, Anne; Scholte, Alexander; Prehm, Marko; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ungar, Goran; Tschierske, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Zeolites represent inorganic solid-state materials with porous structures of fascinating complexity. Recently, significant progress was made by reticular synthesis of related organic solid-state materials, such as metal-organic or covalent organic frameworks. Herein we go a step further and report the first example of a fluid honeycomb mimicking a zeolitic framework. In this unique self-assembled liquid crystalline structure, transverse-lying π-conjugated rod-like molecules form pentagonal channels, encircling larger octagonal channels, a structural motif also found in some zeolites. Additional bundles of coaxial molecules penetrate the centres of the larger channels, unreachable by chains attached to the honeycomb framework. This creates a unique fluid hybrid structure combining positive and negative anisotropies, providing the potential for tuning the directionality of anisotropic optical, electrical and magnetic properties. This work also demonstrates a new approach to complex soft-matter self-assembly, by using frustration between space filling and the entropic penalty of chain extension. PMID:26486751

  7. Zeolite-like liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, Silvio; Lehmann, Anne; Scholte, Alexander; Prehm, Marko; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ungar, Goran; Tschierske, Carsten

    2015-10-01

    Zeolites represent inorganic solid-state materials with porous structures of fascinating complexity. Recently, significant progress was made by reticular synthesis of related organic solid-state materials, such as metal-organic or covalent organic frameworks. Herein we go a step further and report the first example of a fluid honeycomb mimicking a zeolitic framework. In this unique self-assembled liquid crystalline structure, transverse-lying π-conjugated rod-like molecules form pentagonal channels, encircling larger octagonal channels, a structural motif also found in some zeolites. Additional bundles of coaxial molecules penetrate the centres of the larger channels, unreachable by chains attached to the honeycomb framework. This creates a unique fluid hybrid structure combining positive and negative anisotropies, providing the potential for tuning the directionality of anisotropic optical, electrical and magnetic properties. This work also demonstrates a new approach to complex soft-matter self-assembly, by using frustration between space filling and the entropic penalty of chain extension.

  8. Frustration of crystallisation by a liquid-crystal phase.

    PubMed

    Syme, Christopher D; Mosses, Joanna; González-Jiménez, Mario; Shebanova, Olga; Walton, Finlay; Wynne, Klaas

    2017-02-17

    Frustration of crystallisation by locally favoured structures is critically important in linking the phenomena of supercooling, glass formation, and liquid-liquid transitions. Here we show that the putative liquid-liquid transition in n-butanol is in fact caused by geometric frustration associated with an isotropic to rippled lamellar liquid-crystal transition. Liquid-crystal phases are generally regarded as being "in between" the liquid and the crystalline state. In contrast, the liquid-crystal phase in supercooled n-butanol is found to inhibit transformation to the crystal. The observed frustrated phase is a template for similar ordering in other liquids and likely to play an important role in supercooling and liquid-liquid transitions in many other molecular liquids.

  9. Liquid crystal display for phase shifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos-Mendoza, B.; Granados-Agustín, F. S.; Aguirre-Aguirre, D.; Cornejo-Rodríguez, A.

    2013-11-01

    This work arises based on the idea proposed by Millered et al. in 2004, where they show how to get in one shot interferograms with phase shift using a mask with micro-polarizers, in this work we pretend to obtain phase shift in localized areas of an interferogram using the properties of polarization and the pixelated configuration of a liquid crystal display (LCD) for testing optical surfaces. In this work we describes the process of characterization of a liquid crystal display CRL Opto and XGA2P01 model, which is introduced in one arm of a Twyman Green interferometer. Finally we show the experimental interferograms with phase shifts which are caused by different gray levels displayed in the LCD.

  10. Phototunable reflection notches of cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrozhyk, Uladzimir A.; Serak, Svetlana V.; Tabiryan, Nelson V.; Bunning, Timothy J.

    2008-09-01

    The reflection notch of cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) formed from highly photosenstive azobenzene nematic liquid crystals doped with light-insensitive, large helical twisting power chiral dopants is shown to be widely phototunable by green laser beams. The nonlinear transmission properties of these materials were studied. We have shown that the relative shift in Bragg wavelength is independent of the chiral dopant concentration and develop a predictive theory of such behavior. The theory describes the dynamics of phototuning as well. Reflection shifts greater than 150 nm were driven with low power, cw of 532 nm in these photosensitive CLCs, previously attainable only through UV pre-exposure. A nonlinear feedback mechanism was demonstrated for CLCs of left, right, and both handedness upon laser-induced blueshifting of the reflection notch from a red wavelength using a green cw laser.

  11. Angular effects on thermochromic liquid crystal thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodzwa, Paul M.; Eaton, John K.

    2007-12-01

    This paper directly discusses the effects of lighting and viewing angles on liquid crystal thermography. This is because although thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCs) are a widely-used and accepted tool in heat transfer research, little effort has been directed to analytically describing these effects. Such insight is invaluable for the development of effective mitigation strategies. Using analytical relationships that describe the perceived color shift, a systematic manner of improving the performance of a TLC system is presented. This is particularly relevant for applications where significant variations in lighting and/or viewing angles are expected (such as a highly curved surface). This discussion includes an examination of the importance of the definition of the hue angle used to calibrate the color of a TLC-painted surface. The theoretical basis of the validated high-accuracy calibration approach reported by Kodzwa et al. (Exp Fluids s00348-007-0310-6, 2007) is presented.

  12. Errors in thermochromic liquid crystal thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiberg, Roland; Lior, Noam

    2004-09-01

    This article experimentally investigates and assesses the errors that may be incurred in the hue-based thermochromic liquid crystal thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) method, and their causes. The errors include response time, hysteresis, aging, surrounding illumination disturbance, direct illumination and viewing angle, amount of light into the camera, TLC thickness, digital resolution of the image conversion system, and measurement noise. Some of the main conclusions are that: (1) The 3×8 bits digital representation of the red green and blue TLC color values produces a temperature measurement error of typically 1% of the TLC effective temperature range, (2) an eight-fold variation of the light intensity into the camera produced variations, which were not discernable from the digital resolution error, (3) this temperature depends on the TLC film thickness, and (4) thicker films are less susceptible to aging and thickness nonuniformities.

  13. Phototunable reflection notches of cholesteric liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hrozhyk, Uladzimir A.; Serak, Svetlana V.; Tabiryan, Nelson V.; Bunning, Timothy J.

    2008-09-15

    The reflection notch of cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) formed from highly photosenstive azobenzene nematic liquid crystals doped with light-insensitive, large helical twisting power chiral dopants is shown to be widely phototunable by green laser beams. The nonlinear transmission properties of these materials were studied. We have shown that the relative shift in Bragg wavelength is independent of the chiral dopant concentration and develop a predictive theory of such behavior. The theory describes the dynamics of phototuning as well. Reflection shifts greater than 150 nm were driven with low power, cw of 532 nm in these photosensitive CLCs, previously attainable only through UV pre-exposure. A nonlinear feedback mechanism was demonstrated for CLCs of left, right, and both handedness upon laser-induced blueshifting of the reflection notch from a red wavelength using a green cw laser.

  14. Errors in thermochromic liquid crystal thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wiberg, Roland; Lior, Noam

    2004-09-01

    This article experimentally investigates and assesses the errors that may be incurred in the hue-based thermochromic liquid crystal thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) method, and their causes. The errors include response time, hysteresis, aging, surrounding illumination disturbance, direct illumination and viewing angle, amount of light into the camera, TLC thickness, digital resolution of the image conversion system, and measurement noise. Some of the main conclusions are that: (1) The 3x8 bits digital representation of the red green and blue TLC color values produces a temperature measurement error of typically 1% of the TLC effective temperature range, (2) an eight-fold variation of the light intensity into the camera produced variations, which were not discernable from the digital resolution error, (3) this temperature depends on the TLC film thickness, and (4) thicker films are less susceptible to aging and thickness nonuniformities.

  15. Nanoparticle interfacial assembly in liquid crystal droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Mohammad; Roberts, Tyler; Armas-Perez, Julio; Wang, Xiaoguang; Bukusoglu, Emre; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-03-01

    Controlled assembly of nanoparticles at liquid crystal interfaces could lead to easily manufacturable building blocks for assembly of materials with tunable mechanical, optical, and electronic properties. Past work has examined nanoparticle assembly at planar liquid crystal interfaces. In this work we show that nanoparticle assembly on curved interfaces is drastically different, and arises for conditions under which assembly is too weak to occur on planar interfaces. We also demonstrate that LC-mediated nanoparticle interactions are strong, are remarkably sensitive to surface anchoring, and lead to hexagonal arrangements that do not arise in bulk systems. All these elements form the basis for a highly tunable, predictable, and versatile platform for hierarchical materials assembly. National Science Foundation through the UW MRSEC.

  16. Ultrabroadband terahertz spectroscopy of a liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Vieweg, N; Fischer, B M; Reuter, M; Kula, P; Dabrowski, R; Celik, M A; Frenking, G; Koch, M; Jepsen, P U

    2012-12-17

    Liquid crystals (LCs) are becoming increasingly important for applications in the terahertz frequency range. A detailed understanding of the spectroscopic parameters of these materials over a broad frequency range is crucial in order to design customized LC mixtures for improved performance. We present the frequency dependent index of refraction and the absorption coefficients of the nematic liquid crystal 5CB over a frequency range from 0.3 THz to 15 THz using a dispersion-free THz time-domain spectrometer system based on two-color plasma generation and air biased coherent detection (ABCD). We show that the spectra are dominated by multiple strong spectral features mainly at frequencies above 4 THz, originating from intramolecular vibrational modes of the weakly LC molecules.

  17. Passive Sensor Materials Based on Liquid Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-12

    Templating Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Capsules”, Chemistry of Materials, 20(6), 2063-2065, 2008. S.S. Sridharamurthy, K. D. Cadwell, N. L. Abbott... Templating Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Capsules, filed with USPTO, 2008. Immobilization of Droplets of Liquid Crystals on Surfaces, filed with USPTO, 2009...chemical species (see above). The methodology is based on templating PEM capsules formed by the layer-by-layer (LbL) adsorption of polyelectrolytes on

  18. Liquid crystal formation in supercoiled DNA solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Svetlana S; Jesse, Wim; Backendorf, Claude; van der Maarel, Johan R C

    2002-01-01

    The critical concentrations pertaining to the liquid crystal formation of pUC18 plasmid in saline solutions were obtained from (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance, polarized light microscopy, and phase equilibrium experiments. The transition is strongly first order with a broad gap between the isotropic and anisotropic phase. The critical boundaries are strongly and reversibly dependent on temperature and weakly dependent on ionic strength. With polarized light microscopy on magnetically oriented samples, the liquid crystalline phase is assigned cholesteric with a pitch on the order of 4 microm. Preliminary results show that at higher concentrations a true crystal is formed. The isotropic-cholesteric transition is interpreted with lyotropic liquid crystal theory including the effects of charge, orientation entropy, and excluded volume effects. It was found that the molecular free energy associated with the topology of the superhelix is of paramount importance in controlling the width of the phase gap. The theoretical results compare favorably with the critical boundary pertaining to the disappearance of the isotropic phase, but they fail to predict the low concentration at which the anisotropic phase first appears. PMID:12124291

  19. Nanoparticle guests in lyotropic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dölle, Sarah; Park, Ji Hyun; Schymura, Stefan; Jo, Hyeran; Scalia, Giusy; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    In this chapter we discuss the benefits, peculiarities and main challenges related to nanoparticle templating in lyotropic liquid crystals. We first give a brief bird's-eye view of the field, discussing different nanoparticles as well as different lyotropic hosts that have been explored, but then quickly focus on the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in surfactant-based lyotropic nematic phases. We discuss in some detail how the transfer of orientational order from liquid crystal host to nanoparticle guest can be verified and which degree of ordering can be expected, as well as the importance of choosing the right surfactant and its concentration for the stability of the nanoparticle suspension. We introduce a method for dispersing nanoparticles with an absolute minimum of stabilizing surfactant, based on dispersion below the Krafft temperature, and we discuss the peculiar phenomenon of filament formation in lyotropic nematic phases with a sufficient concentration of well-dispersed carbon nanotubes. Finally, we describe how the total surfactant concentration in micellar nematics can be greatly reduced by combining cat- and anionic surfactants, and we discuss how nanotubes can help in inducing the liquid crystal phase close to the isotropic-nematic boundary.

  20. Orientational transitions in antiferromagnetic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhlevnykh, A. N.; Petrov, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    The orientational phases in an antiferromagnetic liquid crystal (ferronematic) based on the nematic liquid crystal with the negative anisotropy of diamagnetic susceptibility are studied in the framework of the continuum theory. The ferronematic was assumed to be compensated; i.e., in zero field, impurity ferroparticles with the magnetic moments directed parallel and antiparallel to the director are equiprobably distributed in it. It is established that under the action of a magnetic field the ferronematic undergoes orientational transitions compensated (antiferromagnetic) phase-non-uniform phase-saturation (ferrimagnetic) phase. The analytical expressions for threshold fields of the transitions as functions of material parameters are obtained. It is shown that with increasing magnetic impurity segregation parameter, the threshold fields of the transitions significantly decrease. The bifurcation diagram of the ferronematic orientational phases is built in terms of the energy of anchoring of magnetic particles with the liquid-crystal matrix and magnetic field. It is established that the Freedericksz transition is the second-order phase transition, while the transition to the saturation state can be second- or first-order. In the latter case, the suspension exhibits orientational bistability. The orientational and magnetooptical properties of the ferronematic in different applied magnetic fields are studied.

  1. High-efficiency and fast-response tunable phase grating using a blue phase liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin; Li, Yan; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2011-04-15

    We demonstrate a tunable phase grating using a polymer-stabilized blue phase liquid crystal. Because of the electric-field-induced rectangularlike phase profile, a high diffraction efficiency of 40% is achieved. Moreover, this device shows submillisecond response time. The proposed tunable phase grating holds great potential for photonics and display applications.

  2. Self-organization and electrooptical characteristics of a nematic liquid crystal-cellulose diacetate composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovoy, A. V.; Shipovskaya, A. B.; Nazvanov, V. F.

    2008-12-01

    Stable self-organization process has been observed during the formation of thin films of a composite based on a nematic liquid crystal and a cellulose acetate polymer matrix. Optical transmission characteristics and electrooptical response time of the composite have been theoretically calculated and experimentally studied.

  3. Anchoring Strength of Thin Aligned-Polymer Films Formed by Liquid Crystalline Monomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashige, Takeshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Ikehata, Seiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2003-04-01

    We have evaluated the polar anchoring strength of a thin molecule-aligned polymer film formed by a liquid crystalline monomer. The polymer film was obtained by photopolymerization of the monomer oriented by a rubbed polyimide alignment layer in a chamber filled with N2 gas. We fabricated a nematic liquid crystal cell using the thin aligned-polymer films as alignment layers, and then evaluated the anchoring strength of the polymer by measuring the optical retardation curve of the cell driven by voltages. The experimental result showed that the anchoring strength was one order of magnitude lower than that of a conventional rubbed polyimide alignment layer, and decreased with increasing the cure temperature of the monomer film.

  4. Graphene liquid crystal retarded percolation for new high-k materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinkai; Luna, Alan; Neri, Wilfrid; Zakri, Cécile; Schilling, Tanja; Colin, Annie; Poulin, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Graphene flakes with giant shape anisotropy are extensively used to establish connectedness electrical percolation in various heterogeneous systems. However, the percolation behaviour of graphene flakes has been recently predicted to be far more complicated than generally anticipated on the basis of excluded volume arguments. Here we confirm experimentally that graphene flakes self-assemble into nematic liquid crystals below the onset of percolation. The competition of percolation and liquid crystal transition provides a new route towards high-k materials. Indeed, near-percolated liquid-crystalline graphene-based composites display unprecedented dielectric properties with a dielectric constant improved by 260-fold increase as compared with the polymer matrix, while maintaining the loss tangent as low as 0.4. This performance is shown to depend on the structure of monodomains of graphene liquid-crystalline phases. Insights into how the liquid crystal phase transition interferes with percolation transition and thus alters the dielectric constant are discussed.

  5. Graphene liquid crystal retarded percolation for new high-k materials

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jinkai; Luna, Alan; Neri, Wilfrid; Zakri, Cécile; Schilling, Tanja; Colin, Annie; Poulin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Graphene flakes with giant shape anisotropy are extensively used to establish connectedness electrical percolation in various heterogeneous systems. However, the percolation behaviour of graphene flakes has been recently predicted to be far more complicated than generally anticipated on the basis of excluded volume arguments. Here we confirm experimentally that graphene flakes self-assemble into nematic liquid crystals below the onset of percolation. The competition of percolation and liquid crystal transition provides a new route towards high-k materials. Indeed, near-percolated liquid-crystalline graphene-based composites display unprecedented dielectric properties with a dielectric constant improved by 260-fold increase as compared with the polymer matrix, while maintaining the loss tangent as low as 0.4. This performance is shown to depend on the structure of monodomains of graphene liquid-crystalline phases. Insights into how the liquid crystal phase transition interferes with percolation transition and thus alters the dielectric constant are discussed. PMID:26567720

  6. Structures of cyano-biphenyl liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Yuan-Chao; Tsang, Tung; Rahimzadeh, E.; Yin, L.

    1989-01-01

    The structures of p-alkyl- p'-cyano- bicyclohexanes, C(n)H(2n+1) (C6H10)(C6H10) CN (n-CCH), and p-alkyl- p'-cyano- biphenyls, C(n)H(2n+1) (C6H4)(C6H4) CN (n-CBP), were studied. It is convenient to use an x ray image intensification device to search for symmetric x ray diffraction patterns. Despite the similarities in molecular structures of these compounds, very different crystal structures were found. For the smectic phase of 2CCH, the structure is close to rhombohedral with threefold symmetry. In contrast, the structure is close to hexagonal close-packed with two molecules per unit cell for 4CCH. Since intermolecular forces may be quite weak for these liquid crystals systems, it appears that crystal structures change considerably when the alkyl chain length is slightly altered. Different structures were also found in the crystalline phase of n-CBP for n = 6 to 9. For n = 7 to 9, the structures are close to monclinic. The structures are reminiscent of the smectic-A liquid crystal structures with the linear molecules slightly tilted away from the c-axis. In contrast, the structure is quite different for n = 6 with the molecules nearly perpendicular to the c-axis.

  7. A Physical Chemistry Experiment in Polymer Crystallization Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singfield, Kathy L.; Chisholm, Roderick A.; King, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment currently used in an undergraduate physical chemistry lab to investigate the rates of crystallization of a polymer is described. Specifically, the radial growth rates of typical disc-shaped crystals, called spherulites, growing between microscope glass slides are measured and the data are treated according to polymer…

  8. Synthesis and structural characterization of a single-crystal to single-crystal transformable coordination polymer.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuyang; Allan, Phoebe K; Renouf, Catherine L; He, Xiang; McCormick, Laura J; Morris, Russell E

    2014-01-28

    A single-crystal to single-crystal transformable coordination polymer compound was hydrothermally synthesized. The structural rearrangement is induced by selecting a ligand that contains both strong and weaker coordinating groups. Both hydrated and dehydrated structures were determined by single crystal X-ray analysis.

  9. Silylene-diethynyl-arylene polymers having liquid crystalline properties

    DOEpatents

    Barton, T.J.; Yiwei Ding.

    1993-09-07

    The present invention provides linear organosilicon polymers including diethynyl-(substituted)arylene units, and a process for their preparation. These novel polymers possess useful properties including electrical conductivity, liquid crystallinity, and/or photoluminescence. These polymers possess good solubility in organic solvents. A preferred example is produced according to the following reaction scheme. ##STR1## These polymers can be solvent-cast to yield excellent films and can also be pulled into fibers from concentrated solutions. All possess substantial crystallinity as revealed by DSC analysis and observation through a polarizing microscope, and possess liquid crystalline properties.

  10. Phase-Shifting Liquid Crystal Interferometers for Microgravity Fluid Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, DeVon W.; Marshall, Keneth L.

    2002-01-01

    The initial focus of this project was to eliminate both of these problems in the Liquid Crystal Point-Diffraction Interferometer (LCPDI). Progress toward that goal will be described, along with the demonstration of a phase shifting Liquid Crystal Shearing Interferometer (LCSI) that was developed as part of this work. The latest LCPDI, other than a lens to focus the light from a test section onto a diffracting microsphere within the interferometer and a collimated laser for illumination, the pink region contained within the glass plates on the rod-mounted platform is the complete interferometer. The total width is approximately 1.5 inches with 0.25 inches on each side for bonding the electrical leads. It is 1 inch high and there are only four diffracting microspheres within the interferometer. As a result, it is very easy to align, achieving the first goal. The liquid crystal electro-optical response time is a function of layer thickness, with thinner devices switching faster due to a reduction in long-range viscoelastic forces between the LC molecules. The LCPDI has a liquid crystal layer thickness of 10 microns, which is controlled by plastic or glass microspheres embedded in epoxy 'pads' at the corners of the device. The diffracting spheres are composed of polystyrene/divinyl benzene polymer with an initial diameter of 15 microns. The spheres deform slightly when the interferometer is assembled to conform to the spacing produced by the microsphere-filled epoxy spacer pads. While the speed of this interferometer has not yet been tested, previous LCPDIs fabricated at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics switched at a rate of approximately 3.3 Hz, a factor of 10 slower than desired. We anticipate better performance when the speed of these interferometers is tested since they are approximately three times thinner. Phase shifting in these devices is a function of the AC voltage level applied to the liquid crystal. As the voltage increases, the dye in the liquid crystal

  11. Synthesis of Side Chain Liquid Crystal Polymers by Living Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization. 3. Influence of Molecular Weight, Interconnecting Unit and Substituent on the Mesomorphic behavior of Polymers with Laterally Attached Mesogens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-08

    Metathesis Polymerization. 3. In- fluence of Molecular Weight, Interconnecting Unit ... 6. AUTHOR(S) Coleen Pugh and Richard R. Schrock 7. PERFORMING...Unit and Substituent on the Mesomorphic Behavior of Polymers with Laterally Attached Mesogens. by Coleen Pugh t and Richard R. Schrock Submitted to...Mesogens. by Coleen Pugh+ and Richard R. Schrock* Contribution from Department of Chemistry 6-331 Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge

  12. Monte Carlo simulations of single crystals from polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianing; Muthukumar, M.

    2007-06-01

    A novel "anisotropic aggregation" model is proposed to simulate nucleation and growth of polymer single crystals as functions of temperature and polymer concentration in dilute solutions. Prefolded chains in a dilute solution are assumed to aggregate at a seed nucleus with an anisotropic interaction by a reversible adsorption/desorption mechanism, with temperature, concentration, and seed size being the control variables. The Monte Carlo results of this model resolve the long-standing dilemma regarding the kinetic and thermal roughenings, by producing a rough-flat-rough transition in the crystal morphology with increasing temperature. It is found that the crystal growth rate varies nonlinearly with temperature and concentration without any marked transitions among any regimes of polymer crystallization kinetics. The induction time increases with decreasing the seed nucleus size, increasing temperature, or decreasing concentration. The apparent critical nucleus size is found to increase exponentially with increasing temperature or decreasing concentration, leading to a critical nucleus diagram composed in the temperature-concentration plane with three regions of different nucleation barriers: no growth, nucleation and growth, and spontaneous growth. Melting temperatures as functions of the crystal size, heating rate, and concentration are also reported. The present model, falling in the same category of small molecular crystallization with anisotropic interactions, captures most of the phenomenology of polymer crystallization in dilute solutions.

  13. Encapsulated liquid crystals as probes for remote thermometry.

    PubMed

    Franklin, K J; Buist, R J; den Hartog, J; McRae, G A; Spencer, D P

    1992-01-01

    A temperature probe based on the magnetic resonance properties of an encapsulated liquid crystal has been investigated. Large changes in magnetic resonance signals occur as the liquid crystal undergoes a phase transition from an anisotropic (nematic) state to the isotropic liquid. The low latent heat of such phase transitions allows for rapid phase changes during a hyperthermia treatment. Transition temperatures can be tailored by adding suitable compounds such as analogues of the liquid crystal or various solvents. Encapsulation is required to maintain the integrity of the liquid crystal, particularly for applications in vivo. Results of preliminary studies designed to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the concept are presented.

  14. Synthesis of Side Chain Liquid Crystal Polymers by Living Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization. 1. Influence of Molecular Weight, Polydispersity, and Flexible Spacer Length (n=2-8) on the Thermotropic behavior of the Resulting Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-31

    Budget. Paperwork peduc t ~O l~oect(0104. 01111). Wasnhinqtol Dic 20oi 4- TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ap.i FUNIN N92_UMBcncaRpotS1 Synthesis of Side Chain...metathesis polymerization of 5-carbo(n-[(4’-methoxy-4- biphenylyl)oxy]alkyl)bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-ene (1-n, n=2-8) by Mo(CH- t -Bu)(NAr) (0- t -Bu)2(Ar=2,6...C6H3- t -Pr 2) is described. Polymers with degrees of polymeri- zation from 5 to 100 and narrow molecular weight distributions (Mw/Mnz1.05-1.24) were

  15. Liquid-crystal blazed grating with azimuthally distributed liquid-crystal directors.

    PubMed

    Honma, Michinori; Nose, Toshiaki

    2004-09-20

    We propose a novel formation method of arbitrary phase profiles of circular light by controlling azimuthal angles of liquid-crystal directors; its principle is described theoretically. A new liquid-crystal blazed grating is demonstrated by use of the proposed method. It is revealed that the first-order diffraction efficiency reaches the maximum value (theoretically 100%, experimentally approximately 90%) at an optimum applied voltage when the phase difference between the extraordinary and ordinary rays agrees with one-half the wavelength. Furthermore, the polarization states of the diffracted light beams are analyzed by Stokes parameter measurements, and unique polarization-splitting properties are revealed.

  16. Liquid crystal-ZnO nanoparticle photovoltaics: Role of nanoparticles in ordering the liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Miranda, L. J.; Traister, Kaitlin M.; Melendez-Rodriguez, Iriselies; Salamanca-Riba, Lourdes

    2010-11-29

    We investigate the role that order plays in the transfer of charges in the ZnO nano-particle-octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB) liquid crystal system, considered for photovoltaic applications. We have changed the concentration of ZnO nanoparticles in 8CB from 1.18 to 40 wt %. Our results show an improvement in the alignment of the liquid crystal with increasing weight percentage of ZnO nanoparticles, up to a concentration of 30 wt %. In addition, the current generated by the system increases by three orders of magnitude.

  17. Perdeuterated liquid crystals for near infrared applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kula, P.; Bennis, N.; Marć, P.; Harmata, P.; Gacioch, K.; Morawiak, P.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.

    2016-10-01

    For majority of Liquid Crystalline compounds the absorption occurs at two spectral regions: ultraviolet UV (due to electronic excitations) and infrared IR (caused by molecular vibrations). Both cause the absorption which deteriorates electro-optical modulation abilities of LC. In the MWIR and LWIR regions, there are many fundamental molecular vibration bands. The most intense are the ones with high anharmonicity, which in the case of LCs corresponds to the Csbnd H bonds, especially present in the aliphatic chains. In the NIR region, overtone molecular vibration bands derived from IR region begin to appear. In the case of Csbnd H bond system, the first overtones are present at 1.6-1.7 μm. To reduce NIR absorptions, perdeuterated Liquid crystal has been proposed. In this paper, we report the physical and optical properties of liquid crystals based on polarimetry measurements method. We also provide a polar decomposition of experimentally measured Mueller matrix in order to determine polarization properties of the device such as depolarization and diattenuation which cannot be obtained from absorption spectra.

  18. A nanoporous two-dimensional polymer by single-crystal-to-single-crystal photopolymerization.

    PubMed

    Kissel, Patrick; Murray, Daniel J; Wulftange, William J; Catalano, Vincent J; King, Benjamin T

    2014-09-01

    In contrast to the wide number and variety of available synthetic routes to conventional linear polymers, the synthesis of two-dimensional polymers and unambiguous proof of their structure remains a challenge. Two-dimensional polymers-single-layered polymers that form a tiling network in exactly two dimensions-have potential for use in nanoporous membranes and other applications. Here, we report the preparation of a fluorinated hydrocarbon two-dimensional polymer that can be exfoliated into single sheets, and its characterization by high-resolution single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The procedure involves three steps: preorganization in a lamellar crystal of a rigid monomer bearing three photoreactive arms, photopolymerization of the crystalline monomers by [4 + 4] cycloaddition, and isolation of individual two-dimensional polymer sheets. This polymer is a molecularly thin (~1 nm) material that combines precisely defined monodisperse pores of ~9 Å with a high pore density of 3.3 × 10(13) pores cm(-2). Atomic-resolution single-crystal X-ray structures of the monomer, an intermediate dimer and the final crystalline two-dimensional polymer were obtained and prove the single-crystal-to-single-crystal nature and molecular precision of the two-dimensional photopolymerization.

  19. Facilitated Ion Transport in Smectic Ordered Ionic Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hong; Han, Kee Sung; Lee, Je Seung; Lee, Albert S; Park, Seo Kyung; Hong, Sung Yun; Lee, Jong-Chan; Mueller, Karl T; Hong, Soon Man; Koo, Chong Min

    2016-11-01

    A novel ionic mixture of an imidazolium-based room-temperature ionic liquid containing ethylene-oxide-functionalized phosphite anions is fabricated, which, when doped with lithium salt, self-assembles into a smectic-ordered ionic liquid crystal through Coulombic interactions between the ion species. Interestingly, the smectic order in the ionic-liquid-crystal ionogel facilitates ionic transport.

  20. Liquid crystal devices for photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigrinov, Vladimir G.

    2007-11-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) devices for Photonics applications is a hot topic of research. Such elements begin to appear in Photonics market. Passive elements for fiber optical communication systems (DWDM components) based on LC cells can successfully compete with the other elements used for the purpose, such as micro electromechanical (MEM), thermo-optical, opto-mechanical or acousto-optical devices. Application of nematic and ferroelectric LC for high speed communication systems, producing elements that are extremely fast, stable, durable, of low loss, operable over a wide temperature range, and that require small operating voltages and extremely low power consumption. The known LC applications in fiber optics enable to produce switches, filters, attenuators, equalizers, polarization controllers, phase emulators and other fiber optical components. Good robustness due to the absence of moving parts and compatibility with VLSI technology, excellent parameters in a large photonic wavelength range, whereas the complexity of the design and the cost of the device are equivalent to regular passive matrix LC displays makes LC fiber optical devices very attractive for mass production. We have already successfully fabricated certain prototypes of the optical switches based on ferroelectric and nematic LC materials. The electrooptical modes used for the purpose included the light polarization rotation, voltage controllable diffraction and fast switching of the LC refractive index. We used the powerful software to optimize the LC modulation characteristics. Use of photo-alignment technique pioneered by us makes it possible to develop new LC fiber components. Almost all the criteria of perfect LC alignment are met in case of azo-dye layers. We have already used azo-dye materials to align LC in superthin photonic holes, curved and 3D surfaces and as cladding layers in microring silicon based resonators. The prototypes of new LC efficient Photonics devices are envisaged. Controllable

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Homogeneous Crystallization in Polymer Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Molecular mechanisms of homogeneous nucleation and crystal growth from the melt of polyethylene-like polymer were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The crystallinity was determined by using the site order parameter method (SOP), which described local order degree around an atom. Snapshots of the simulations showed evolution of the nucleation and the crystal growth through SOP images clearly. The isothermal crystallization kinetics was determined at different temperatures. The rate of crystallization, Kc, and the Avrami exponents, n, were determined as a function of temperature. The forming of nucleis was traced to reveal that the nucleis were formed with more ordered cores and less ordered shells. A detailed statistical analysis of the MD snapshots and trajectories suggested conformations of the polymer chains changed smoothly from random coil to chain folded lamella in the crystallization processes.

  2. Liquid-crystal-anchoring transitions at surfaces created by polymerization-induced phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amundson, Karl R.; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    1998-08-01

    A surface anchoring transition of a nematic at polymer surfaces created by polymerization-induced phase separation is presented. This transition is unusual in that it occurs far from bulk nematic phase transitions and it is tunable across nearly the entire nematic temperature range by modification of the polymer side group. Anchoring behavior is qualitatively understood by considerating enthalpic and entropic contributions to surface energy. Interesting behavior of some polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal films is explained, and observations provide a pathway to control properties.

  3. Biomedical spectroscopy in clinical applications and implications of liquid crystal filter technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurdy, John W.

    This dissertation discusses two related clinical applications of visible regime diffuse reflectance spectroscopy as well as two new configurations of liquid crystal microspectrometer suitable in these applications. Total hemoglobin concentration can be determined, and thus anemia diagnosed, using diffuse reflectance signals from the inner lining of the eyelid, the palpebral conjunctiva. Alternative technologies for anemia detection are explored, a theoretical model for light diffusion through the conjunctiva is presented, and predictive models are established relating spectral signatures to hemoglobin concentration. Two separate clinical trials were conducted showing accuracy of hemoglobin determination with respect to invasive determination of 5% and 8% of mean hemoglobin concentration, respectively. Local hemoglobin concentration can also be determined in vivo at individual vessels using a single fiber which is directly applicable in endoscopic and laparoscopic surgery. Clinical trials showed signal differentiation of different hemoglobin levels in laparoscopic cases when pressing the single fiber against an individual vessel, and donor/recipient differentiation in fetal endoscopy cases of twin to twin transfusion syndrome. Liquid crystal technologies can be used to create integrated chip-scale microspectrometers. In one configuration, analog tunable ferroelectric liquid crystals are applied to create a tunable filter spectrometer with resolution from 15-30 nm. In a second configuration, stressed liquid crystal polymer composites are used to create large phase modulators, subsequently applied as single panel Fourier transform spectrometers. Proof of concept studies show a 100 microm stressed liquid crystal polymer in double pass mode is capable of 60 nm resolving power.

  4. Self-Restoration by Smectic Layer Structures of Monostable Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal in Flexible Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikake, Hideo; Sato, Hiroto; Isaka, Fumito; Murashige, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Taiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss a self-restoration phenomenon affecting smectic layer deformation and molecular alignment in monostable ferroelectric liquid crystals used for flexible displays. First, the mechanical stability of tilted ‘bookshelf’ structures of smectic layers anchored on substrates using alignment layers was examined by precisely shearing two substrates. The microscopic texture of a monostable ferroelectric liquid crystal showed tolerance to shearing and the self-restoration was thought to be due to a smectic layer reconnection phenomenon, whereas a conventional bistable ferroelectric liquid crystal film generated alignment defects due to the tilting of the stable molecular direction. We then fabricated a flexible monostable device containing fine polymer fiber networks, where anchoring of molecularly aligned polymer fibers led to the observation of monostable liquid crystal switching. A uniform liquid crystal alignment was maintained in a 100 mm× 100 mm device even after bending more than 10000 times at a minimum radius of curvature of 20 mm, due to the enhanced shearing tolerance of the smectic layer structure.

  5. Crystallization Response of Hydrous Granitic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    London, D.; Morgan, G. B.; Evensen, J. M.

    2006-05-01

    Preconditioning of hydrous haplogranite liquid (200 MPa eutectic composition Ab38Or28Qz34) at 100° C above the liquidus temperature for 72 hr is sufficient to eliminate any vestiges of the initial structural states of vitreous or crystalline starting materials. Experimental crystallization of this composition in the presence of aqueous vapor begins by nucleation in the vapor space, following which crystal growth advances into supercooled melt. The minimum in nucleation delay (~ 200 hrs) and maximum in nucleation density and growth rate occur at liquidus undercooling (ΔT) of 200° C. Crystallization does not exceed 10% in experiments up to 600 hrs at any value of ΔT, and no crystallization occurs within 50° C of the liquidus up to 700 hrs. Though the melt composition is invariant (eutectic), and no compositional gradients are discernable by EMPA in quenched glasses, the crystallization response is sequential: at ΔT = 200° C, coarsely skeletal K-feldspar nucleates and grows first, followed by graphic to spherulitic quartz-sodic alkali feldspar intergrowths, and lastly in some experiments, monophase quartz blebs. Once formed, crystals or clusters tend not to grow larger, but rather, new centers of nucleation and growth appear. The result is a sequential history of uniform crystal texture (size and habit). At comparable ΔT, the nucleation delay decreases as the bulk composition is displaced (by choosing a composition) farther from the eutectic. At comparable ΔT, fluxes (P, F) serve to increase the nucleation delay and decrease the nucleation density but do not notably change either growth rates or crystal habits. Diffusion of alkalis through melt is rapid, such that any gradients in alkalis that should result from non-eutectic crystallization are erased in minutes or hours over distances of 5 mm and down to ΔT = 350° C, in the field of glass. These relations of undercooling (ΔT) to time (t) apply only to H2O-oversaturated systems. We do not have data for the

  6. Field-Effects in Large Axial Ratio Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonberg, Franklin J.

    This paper consists of an introduction and four chapters, the abstracts of which are presented below. Chapter 2. The subject of this chapter is the dynamic periodic structures which are observed in the twist Frederiks transition. It is found that, for fields above a material dependent level, a transient periodic distortion is observed. The wave vector is parallel to the unperturbed director and increases with increasing field. A theoretical model and experimental data are presented. Chapter 3. The subject of this chapter is the discovery of a new equilibrium structure in the splay Frederiks transition. Experimental observation has shown that the imposition of a field, just above the critical strength, produces a periodic distortion in the polymer liquid crystal PBG. This periodic state is not dynamic in origin but it is a true ground state. An analysis of the energy of a liquid crystal, in the splay Frederiks transition geometry, shows that in materials with K(,1)/K(,3) > 3.3 the periodic distortion will have a lower critical field than the uniform distortion. Chapter 4. The subject of this chapter is the dynamics of the bend Frederiks transition in large axial ratio nematics. Experimental evidence is presented to show that there is a distortion mode which occurs at field greater than 2H(,c), which is very fast and does not grow exponentially. An analysis of the equations of motion shows that a mode with wave length half that of the static equilibrium mode will have these properties. Chapter 5. The bend Frederiks transition is use to show that the bend and splay elastic constants are linear in concentration in PBG. Interpretation of this result is made in connection with models of the elastic energy in liquid crystal made of semi-flexible partiles.

  7. Piperidinium, piperazinium and morpholinium ionic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Lava, Kathleen; Binnemans, Koen; Cardinaels, Thomas

    2009-07-16

    Piperidinium, piperazinium and morpholinium cations have been used for the design of ionic liquid crystals. These cations were combined with several types of anions, namely bromide, tetrafluoroborate, hexafluorophosphate, dodecylsulfate, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, dioctylsulfosuccinate, dicyclohexylsulfosuccinate, and dihexylsulfosuccinate. For the bromide salts of piperidinium containing one alkyl chain, the chain length was varied, ranging from 8 to 18 carbon atoms (n = 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18). The compounds show a rich mesomorphic behavior. High-ordered smectic phases (crystal smectic E and T phases), smectic A phases, and hexagonal columnar phases were observed, depending on the type of cation and anion. The morpholinium compounds with sulfosuccinate anions showed hexagonal columnar phases at room temperature and a structural model for the self-assembly of these morpholinium compounds into hexagonal columnar phases is proposed.

  8. New triazolium based ionic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Stappert, Kathrin; Unal, Derya; Mallick, Bert; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2014-01-01

    A set of novel 1,2,3-triazolium based ionic liquid crystals was synthesized and their mesomorphic behaviour studied by DSC (differential scanning calorimetry), POM (polarizing optical microscopy) and SAXS (small angle X-ray scattering). Beside the variation of the chain length (C10, C12 and C14) at the 1,2,3-triazolium cation also the anion has been varied (Br-, I-, I3-, BF4-, SbF6-, N(CN)2-, Tf2N-) to study the influence of ion size, symmetry and H-bonding capability on the mesophase formation. Interestingly, for the 1,3-didodecyl-1,2,3-triazolium cation two totally different conformations were found in the crystal structure of the bromide (U-shaped) and the triiodide (rod shaped).

  9. Wide Angle Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xing-Hua; Wang, Bin; Bos, Philip J.; Anderson, James E.; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.; McManamon, Paul F.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate modeling of a high resolution, liquid crystal (LC) based, optical phased array (OPA) is shown. The simulation shows excellent agreement with a test 2-D LC OPA. The modeling method is extendable to cases where the array element size is close to the wavelength of light. The fringing fields of such a device are first studied, and subsequently reduced. This results in a device that demonstrates plus or minus 7.4 degrees of continuous beam steering at a wavelength of 1550 nm, and a diffraction efficiency (DE) higher than 72%.

  10. Liquid crystal temperature monitoring for microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Sudarsky, L A; Salomon, J

    1991-01-01

    Postoperative monitoring of free tissue transfers remains a problem for the microsurgeon. Liquid crystal temperature probes (LCT) are used by anesthesiologists to monitor patient core temperature and to indicate changes in temperature trends as an indicator of pending malignant hyperthermia. By placing an LCT monitor on the flap and adjacent tissue at the completion of surgery, temperature differentials can be reliably monitored. If the temperature differential exceeds 2 degrees C, the flap is re-explored. The LCT readout resembles a standard thermometer and can easily be recorded by even inexperienced personnel. LCTs are a convenient, inexpensive, and easy method to monitor both free muscle and free fasciocutaneous flaps.

  11. Liquid crystal-based hydrophone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzeli, Zourab; Silvestri, Leonardo; Michie, Andrew; Chigrinov, Vladimir G.; Guo, Qi; Pozhidaev, Eugene P.; Kiselev, Alexei D.; Ladouceur, Francois

    2012-09-01

    We describe a fiber optic hydrophone array system that could be used for underwater acoustic surveillance applications (e.g. military, counter terrorist, and customs authorities in protecting ports and harbors), offshore production facilities or coastal approaches as well as various marine applications. In this paper, we propose a new approach to underwater sonar systems using the voltage-controlled liquid crystals and simple multiplexing method. The proposed method permits measurement of sound under water at multiple points along an optical fiber using the low cost components and standard single mode fiber, without complex interferometric measurement techniques, electronics or demodulation software.

  12. Conformation and chirality in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, John L.; Zhao, Lei

    2013-09-01

    High helical twisting powerchiral additives are required for an expanding variety of liquid crystal displays and devices. Molecular conformation plays a critical role in determining the helical twisting power, HTP, of chiral additives. We studied additives based on an isosorbide benzoate ester core. Molecular modeling revealed two low energy states with very different conformations for this core The ultra-violet absorption and NMR spectra show two stable isosorbide conformers These spectra reveal how the relative populations of these two conformations change with temperature and how this is related to the helical twisting power. Conformation changes can explain many of the observed anomalous responses of HPT to temperature.

  13. Stochastic rotation dynamics for nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kuang-Wu Mazza, Marco G.

    2015-04-28

    We introduce a new mesoscopic model for nematic liquid crystals (LCs). We extend the particle-based stochastic rotation dynamics method, which reproduces the Navier-Stokes equation, to anisotropic fluids by including a simplified Ericksen-Leslie formulation of nematodynamics. We verify the applicability of this hybrid model by studying the equilibrium isotropic-nematic phase transition and nonequilibrium problems, such as the dynamics of topological defects and the rheology of sheared LCs. Our simulation results show that this hybrid model captures many essential aspects of LC physics at the mesoscopic scale, while preserving microscopic thermal fluctuations.

  14. Laser damage resistant nematic liquid crystal cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raszewski, Z.; Piecek, W.; Jaroszewicz, L.; Soms, L.; Marczak, J.; Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, E.; Perkowski, P.; Kedzierski, J.; Miszczyk, E.; Olifierczuk, M.; Morawiak, P.; Mazur, R.

    2013-08-01

    There exists a problem in diagnostics of a dense plasma (so-called Thomson diagnostics). For this purpose, the plasma is illuminated by series of high energy laser pulses. Such pulses are generated by several independent lasers operating sequentially, and these pulses are to be directed along an exactly the same optical path. In this case, the energy of each separate pulse is as large as 3 J, so it is impossible to generate a burst of such pulses by a single laser. In this situation, several independent lasers have to be used. To form optical path with λ = 1.064 μm and absolute value of the energy of laser pulse through of 3 J, a special refractive index matched twisted Nematic Liquid Crystal Cell (NLCC) of type LCNP2 with switching on time τON smaller than 5 μs might be applied. High laser damage resistance of NLCC and short τON can be fulfilled by preparation of liquid crystal cells with Liquid Crystal Mixture (LCM), well tuned to twisted nematic electro-optical effect, and well tuned all optical interfaces (Air - Antireflection - Quartz Plate - Electrode - Blocking Film - Aligning Layer - LCM - Aligning Layer - Blocking Film - Electrode - Quartz Plate - Antireflection - Air). In such LCNP2 cell, the transmission is higher than 97% at λ = 1.064 μm, as it is presented by Gooch and Tarry [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 8, 1575 (1975)]. The safe laser density energy is about 0.6 J/cm2 for a train of laser pulses (λ = 1.064 μm, pulse duration 10 ns FWHM, pulse repetition rate 100 pps, train duration 10 s), so the area of liquid crystal cell tolerating 3 J through it shall be as large as 5 cm2. Due to the presence of two blocking film layers between electrodes, LCNP2 can be driven by high voltages. Switching on time smaller than τON = 5 μs was obtained under 200 V switching voltage.

  15. Optical vortices from liquid crystal droplets.

    PubMed

    Brasselet, Etienne; Murazawa, Naoki; Misawa, Hiroaki; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2009-09-04

    We report on the generation of mono- and polychromatic optical phase singularities from micron-sized birefringent droplets. This is done experimentally by using liquid crystal droplets whose three dimensional architecture of the optical axis is controlled within the bulk by surfactant agents. Because of its microscopic size these optical vortex generators are optically trapped and manipulated at will, thus realizing a robust self-aligned micro-optical device for orbital angular momentum conversion. Experimental observations are supported by a simple model of optical spin-orbit coupling in uniaxial dielectrics that emphasizes the prominent role of the transverse optical anisotropy with respect to the beam propagation direction.

  16. UV sensors based on liquid crystals mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanishvili, Andro; Petriashvili, Gia; Chilaya, Guram; Barberi, Riccardo; De Santo, Maria P.; Matranga, Mario A.; Ciuchi, F.

    2006-04-01

    The Erythemal Response Spectrum is a scientific expression that describes the sensitivity of the skin to the ultraviolet radiation. The skin sensitivity strongly depends on the UV wavelength: a long exposition to UV radiation causes erythema once a threshold dose has been exceeded. In the past years several devices have been developed in order to monitor the UV exposure, most of them are based on inorganic materials that are able to mimic the human skin behaviour under UV radiation. We present a new device based on liquid crystals technology. The sensor is based on a liquid crystalline mixture that absorbs photons at UV wavelength and emits them at a longer one. This system presents several innovative features: the absorption range of the mixture can be varied to be sensitive to different wavelengths, the luminescence intensity can be tuned, the system can be implemented on flexible devices.

  17. 1,10-Phenanthrolinium ionic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Cardinaels, Thomas; Lava, Kathleen; Goossens, Karel; Eliseeva, Svetlana V; Binnemans, Koen

    2011-03-01

    The 1,10-phenanthrolinium cation is introduced as a new building block for the design of ionic liquid crystals. 1,10-Phenanthroline, 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline, 5-chloro-1,10-phenanthroline, and 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline were quaternized by reaction with 1,3-dibromopropane or 1,2-dibromoethane. The resulting cations were combined with dodecyl sulfate or dioctyl sulfosuccinate anions. The influence of both the cation and anion type on the thermal behavior was investigated. Several of the complexes exhibit mesomorphic behavior, with smectic E phases for the dodecyl sulfate salts and smectic A phases for the dioctyl sulfosuccinate salts. Structural models for the packing of the 1,10-phenanthrolinium and anionic moieties in the liquid-crystalline phases are presented. The ionic compounds show fluorescence in the solid state and in solution.

  18. Ionic liquid crystals derived from amino acids.

    PubMed

    Mansueto, Markus; Frey, Wolfgang; Laschat, Sabine

    2013-11-18

    Novel chiral amino acid derived ionic liquid crystals with amine and amide moieties as spacers between the imidazolium head group and the alkyl chain were synthesised. The key step in the synthesis utilised the relatively uncommon SO3 leaving group in a microwave-assisted reaction. The mesomorphic properties of the mesogens were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polarising optical microscopy (POM) and X-ray diffraction. All liquid crystalline salts exhibit a smectic A mesophase geometry with strongly interdigitated bilayer structures. An increase of the steric bulk of the stereogenic centre hindered the formation of mesophases. In case of phenylalanine-derived derivatives a mesomorphic behaviour was observed for shorter alkyl chains as compared to other amino acid derivatives indicating an additional stabilising effect by the phenyl moiety.

  19. Tuning Fluidic Resistance via Liquid Crystal Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Anupam

    2013-01-01

    Flow of molecularly ordered fluids, like liquid crystals, is inherently coupled with the average local orientation of the molecules, or the director. The anisotropic coupling—typically absent in isotropic fluids—bestows unique functionalities to the flowing matrix. In this work, we harness this anisotropy to pattern different pathways to tunable fluidic resistance within microfluidic devices. We use a nematic liquid crystalline material flowing in microchannels to demonstrate passive and active modulation of the flow resistance. While appropriate surface anchoring conditions—which imprint distinct fluidic resistances within microchannels under similar hydrodynamic parameters—act as passive cues, an external field, e.g., temperature, is used to actively modulate the flow resistance in the microfluidic device. We apply this simple concept to fabricate basic fluidic circuits, which can be hierarchically extended to create complex resistance networks, without any additional design or morphological patterning of the microchannels. PMID:24256819

  20. Fast Electromechanical Response in Liquid Crystal Elastomer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verduzco, Rafael; Agrawal, Aditya; Jacot, Jeff; Adetiba, Tomi

    2014-03-01

    Liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) combine the elasticity of polymer networks with the fluidity and responsiveness of liquid crystals. LCEs can respond to a variety of external stimuli - heat, light, electric and magnetic fields - with large and reversible shape-changes. However, the response can be slow and/or require large external fields. Here, we present our recent work with LCE bilayers and LCE composite materials that demonstrates LCEs can respond quickly and with 3-D shape changes. Nematic LCE bilayers are prepared by depositing a PS film on top of a nematic LCE, and the bilayers exhibit reversible wrinkling, folding, and curling with temperature. The shape change of LCE bilayers is quantitatively predicted using finite-element modeling. Next, we show that a fast response to an electric field is achieved in nematic LCE composites. While typical nematic LCEs are relatively unresponsive to electric fields, LCE composites with 2 wt % carbon black can reversibly contract and expand in response to a 40 V electric field. The response time (0.1 - 10 Hz) and amplitude of shape change (1 - 20 %) depends on the external field and carbon black content. These composites may be useful for biomedical applications, such as substrates for dynamic cell culture and biocompatible scaffolds for heart tissue regeneration. Neonatal rat ventricular myocytes remain viable on LCE-carbon black bilayer substrates, and aligned myocyte cell sheets were successfully grown on LCE-composite bilayers.

  1. Enhanced Alignment of Water-Soluble Polythiophene Using Cellulose Nanocrystals as a Liquid Crystal Template.

    PubMed

    Risteen, Bailey E; Blake, Alyssa; McBride, Michael A; Rosu, Cornelia; Park, Jung Ok; Srinivasarao, Mohan; Russo, Paul S; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2017-03-15

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are bio-derived, rodlike particles that form a chiral nematic liquid crystal (LC) in water. In this work, CNCs were used to induce long-range order in a semiconducting polymer, poly[3-(potassium-4-butanoate) thiophene-2,5-diyl] (PPBT). It was found that PPBT, when mixed with CNCs, was incorporated into the liquid crystal "template" to form ordered structures with highly birefringent domains, as observed under polarized light. We show that the π-π interactions between polymer chains, which contribute considerably to the energetics of the semiconducting system, are directly influenced by the presence and packing of the liquid crystal phase. Upon increasing the concentration of CNCs from the isotropic to chiral nematic regime, we observe a bathochromic shift in the UV-vis spectra and the emergence of the 0-0 vibrational peak, suggesting enhanced π-π stacking leading to chain co-planarization. Furthermore, the chiral nature of the PPBT/CNC mixture was evidenced by a negative peak in circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, promoting the notion that the polymer chains followed the helicoidal twist of the chiral nematic liquid crystal host. At high temperatures, the peak height ratios and overall intensities of the UV-vis and CD spectra associated with PPBT decreased as the chiral nematic pitch grew larger in size.

  2. Carbon nanotubes in thermotropic low molar mass liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schymura, Stefan; Park, Ji Hyun; Dierking, Ingo; Scalia, Giusy

    Carbon nanotubes constitute a highly anisotropic form of carbon with outstanding mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Their dispersion and organization are important but challenging and this chapter describes the advantages of using thermotropic liquid crystals as host for nanotube dispersion and ordering. The self organization of LCs is an attractive way to manipulate nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes or graphene akes. Compared to standard carbon nanotube composites (e.g. with disordered polymer hosts) the introduction of the nanotubes into an LC allows not only the transfer of the outstanding nanotube properties to the oscopic phase, providing strength and conductivity, but these properties also become anisotropic, following the transfer of the orientational order from the LC to the CNTs...

  3. Parity breaking in nematic tactoids of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, Luana; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2011-03-01

    In many colloidal systems, an orientationally ordered nematic phase emerges from the isotropic melt in the form of spindle-like birefringent tactoids. In cases studied so far, the tactoids always reveal a mirror-symmetric non-chiral structure, even when the building units are chiral, as in the case of tobacco mosaic virus and fd virus. We report on parity breaking in the nematic tactoids formed in molecularly non-chiral polymer-crowded solutions of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals. The effect is manifested by twist of the director and optical activity. Fluorescent confocal polarizing microscopy reveals that the tactoids nucleate at boundaries of cells. We explain the chirality induction by the effect of geometrical anchoring and by increase of the splay elastic constant in condensed nematic regions of crowded solutions. NSF DMR MWN 0710544.

  4. Asymmetric polymerisation in liquid crystals and resultant electro-chiroptical effect: Structure organising polymerisation and chiral charge carrier "chiralion"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Hiromasa

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical synthesis in liquid crystal (LC) affords conducting polymers having LC molecular order and electro-activity. The polymerisation method can be referred to as structure organising polymerisation (SOP). The optical textures of the polymers thus prepared appear very similar to that of the LC electrolyte solution used for the polymerisation. Especially, polymers prepared in cholesteric LC (chiral LC) having structural chirality show doping-dedoping (redox) driven change in chiroptical activity (controllable circular dichroism and optical rotation), as "electro-chiroptical effect". The polymer films exhibit interference colour and electrochemically driven refractive index modulations. The chiroptical activity of the polymer prepared in cholesteric LC comes from axial chirality of the helical structure.

  5. Dynamic Photonic Materials Based on Liquid Crystals (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2015-0059 DYNAMIC PHOTONIC MATERIALS BASED ON LIQUID CRYSTALS (POSTPRINT) Luciano De Sio and Cesare Umeton University...ON LIQUID CRYSTALS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) (see back...10.1016/B978-0-444-62644-8.00001-7. 14. ABSTRACT Liquid crystals, combining optical non-linearity and self-organizing properties with fluidity, and being

  6. Giant Flexoelectro-optic Effect with Liquid Crystal Dimer CB7CB

    PubMed Central

    Varanytsia, Andrii; Chien, Liang-Chy

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a giant flexoelectro-optic behavior of liquid crystal dimer CB7CB. Flexoelectric properties of CB7CB experimentally characterized by measured angle of an in-plane rotation of helical axis (HA) in polymer stabilized uniform lying helix cholesteric liquid crystal. The 45° rotation of HA providing full intensity modulation of transmitted through a pair of crossed polarizers light, is achieved with 4.5 V/μm with a sub-millisecond electro-optic switching time. Reported properties enable application of CB7CB in applications of the flexoelectric effect in fast switching photonic and electro-optic devices. PMID:28117429

  7. Giant Flexoelectro-optic Effect with Liquid Crystal Dimer CB7CB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varanytsia, Andrii; Chien, Liang-Chy

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a giant flexoelectro-optic behavior of liquid crystal dimer CB7CB. Flexoelectric properties of CB7CB experimentally characterized by measured angle of an in-plane rotation of helical axis (HA) in polymer stabilized uniform lying helix cholesteric liquid crystal. The 45° rotation of HA providing full intensity modulation of transmitted through a pair of crossed polarizers light, is achieved with 4.5 V/μm with a sub-millisecond electro-optic switching time. Reported properties enable application of CB7CB in applications of the flexoelectric effect in fast switching photonic and electro-optic devices.

  8. Stabilization of nematic liquid crystal dispersions with acrylamide copolymers and their electrooptical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soo-Jin; Seo, Min-Kang; Han, Mijeong; Lee, Jae-Rock

    2003-01-01

    This study reports the observation of electrooptical properties in polymer-dispersed liquid crystal films during the formation of a copolymerization of hydrophilic acrylamide with hydrophobic monomers (styrene and methyl methacrylate). According to the interfacial tension and coalescence time measurements, it is proposed that the presence of hydrophobic moieties onto nematic liquid crystal (NLC) droplet surface leads to a steric stabilization of the dispersion, due to increasing interfacial tension of NLC, decreasing NLC droplet size, and finally reducing anchoring effect between NLC and polymeric wall.

  9. Tailoring liquid crystals to become fast and efficient terahertz devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickwell-MacPherson, E.; Parrott, E. P. J.; Park, H.; Fan, F.; Chigrinov, V. G.

    2012-10-01

    Liquid crystals have been employed for several decades in devices such as phase shifters, Fabry-Perot filters, polarizers, phase gratings, and Bragg switches at optical frequencies. However it is only recently that such devices have been demonstrated at terahertz frequencies. This is because of several fundamental frequency dependent relationships between device properties and frequency of operation. When designing liquid crystal devices, we need to find liquid crystals with high birefringence, low viscosity and low absorption at terahertz frequencies. In this paper we will present some measurements and simulations of potentially suitable liquid crystal mixtures.

  10. Handbook of Liquid Crystals, Handbook of Liquid Crystals: Four Volume Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demus, Dietrich; Goodby, John W.; Gray, George W.; Spiess, Hans W.; Vill, Volkmar

    1998-06-01

    The Handbook of Liquid Crystals is a unique compendium of knowledge on all aspects of liquid crystals. In over 2000 pages the Handbook provides detailed information on the basic principles of both low- and high-molecular weight materials, as well as the synthesis, characterization, modification, and applications (such as in computer displays or as structural materials) of all types of liquid crystals. The five editors of the Handbook are internationally renowned experts from both industry and academia and have drawn together over 70 leading figures in the field as authors. The four volumes of the Handbook are designed both to be used together or as stand-alone reference sources. Some users will require the whole set, others will be best served with a selection of the volumes. Volume 1 deals with the basic physical and chemical principles of liquid crystals, including structure-property relationships, nomenclature, phase behavior, characterization methods, and general synthesis and application strategies. As such this volume provides an excellent introduction to the field and a powerful learning and teaching tool for graduate students and above. Volume 2 concentrates on low-molecular weight materials, for example those typically used in display technology. A high quality survey of the literature is provided along with full details of molecular design strategies, phase characterization and control, and applications development. This volume is therefore by far the most detailed reference source on these industrially very important materials, ideally suited for professionals in the field. Volume 3 concentrates on high-molecular weight, or polymeric, liquid crystals, some of which are found in structural applications and others occur as natural products of living systems. A high-quality literature survey is complemented by full detail of the synthesis, processing, analysis, and applications of all important materials classes. This volume is the most comprehensive

  11. Dispersive shock waves in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Noel F.

    2016-10-01

    The propagation of coherent light with an initial step intensity profile in a nematic liquid crystal is studied using modulation theory. The propagation of light in a nematic liquid crystal is governed by a coupled system consisting of a nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the light beam and an elliptic equation for the medium response. In general, the intensity step breaks up into a dispersive shock wave, or undular bore, and an expansion fan. In the experimental parameter regime for which the nematic response is highly nonlocal, this nematic bore is found to differ substantially from the standard defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation structure due to the effect of the nonlocality of the nematic medium. It is found that the undular bore is of Korteweg-de Vries equation-type, consisting of bright waves, rather than of nonlinear Schrödinger equation-type, consisting of dark waves. In addition, ahead of this Korteweg-de Vries bore there can be a uniform wavetrain with a short front which brings the solution down to the initial level ahead. It is found that this uniform wavetrain does not exist if the initial jump is below a critical value. Analytical solutions for the various parts of the nematic bore are found, with emphasis on the role of the nonlocality of the nematic medium in shaping this structure. Excellent agreement between full numerical solutions of the governing nematicon equations and these analytical solutions is found.

  12. Particles and curvatures in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Francesca; Luo, Yimin; Yang, Shu; Kamien, Randall D.; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    Elastic interactions in anisotropic fluids can be harnessed to direct particle interactions. A strategy to smoothly manipulate the director field in nematic liquid crystals is to vary the topography of the bounding surfaces. A rugged landscape with peaks and valleys create local deformations of the director field which can interact with particles in solution. We study this complex interaction in two different settings. The first consists of an array of shallow pores in a poly-dimethyl-siloxane (PDMS) membrane, whose curvature can be tuned either by swelling the PDMS membrane or by mechanical stretching. The second is a set of grooves with wavy walls, fabricated by photolithography, with various parameters of curvature and shapes. In this contexts we study how the motion of colloidal particles in nematic liquid crystals can be influenced by their interaction with the peaks and valleys of the bottom substrate or of the side walls. Particles with different associated topological defects (hedgehogs or Saturn rings) behave differently as they interact with the topographical features, favoring the docking on peaks or valleys. These experimental systems are also ideal to study the ``lock and key'' mechanism of particles in holes and to investigate a possible route for particle sorting.

  13. Ferromagnetic and ferroelectric nanoparticles in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznikov, Yuriy; Glushchenko, Anatoliy; Garbovskiy, Yuriy

    This chapter introduces the basic principles of physics of magnetic and ferroelectric nanoparticles suspensions in thermotropic liquid crystals (LCs). It also covers the main features of such suspensions along with the look at the challenges that researchers in the field are facing today. Special attention is paid to understanding of major physical mechanisms responsible for the inuence of nanoparticles on the properties of LCs. In the case of magnetic nanoparticles, their dipole moments are aligned by an external magnetic field that, in turn, results in a reorientation of the LC due to the surface anchoring between the nanoparticles and the LC. This mechanical coupling between the LC and the magnetic particles determines the unique sensitivity of the suspension to magnetic fields. In regard to the ferroelectric particles, their effect on LCs is due to a strong electric field by the permanent electric dipoles of the particles. This field is strong enough to change the orientational ordering of the LC surrounding the particle. In addition, the above-mentioned mechanism of the surface anchoring may also take place. The ongoing scientific and technological problems related to the suspensions are discussed. Among such problems are the stability of the suspensions, selection of the proper surfactants, formation of the particle chains, and the effect of the electric charges on the properties of the ferroelectric liquid crystal suspensions.

  14. Microfluidic Crystal Engineering of π-Conjugated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Persson, Nils; Chu, Ping-Hsun; Kleinhenz, Nabil; Fu, Boyi; Chang, Mincheol; Deb, Nabankur; Mao, Yimin; Wang, Hongzhi; Grover, Martha A; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2015-08-25

    Very few studies have reported oriented crystallization of conjugated polymers directly in solution. Here, solution crystallization of conjugated polymers in a microfluidic system is found to produce tightly π-stacked fibers with commensurate improved charge transport characteristics. For poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films, processing under flow caused exciton bandwidth to decrease from 140 to 25 meV, π-π stacking distance to decrease from 3.93 to 3.72 Å and hole mobility to increase from an average of 0.013 to 0.16 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), vs films spin-coated from pristine, untreated solutions. Variation of the flow rate affected thin-film structure and properties, with an intermediate flow rate of 0.25 m s(-1) yielding the optimal π-π stacking distance and mobility. The flow process included sequential cooling followed by low-dose ultraviolet irradiation that promoted growth of conjugated polymer fibers. Image analysis coupled with mechanistic interpretation supports the supposition that "tie chains" provide for charge transport pathways between nanoaggregated structures. The "microfluidic flow enhanced semiconducting polymer crystal engineering" was also successfully applied to a representative electron transport polymer and a nonhalogenated solvent. The process can be applied as a general strategy and is expected to facilitate the fabrication of high-performance electrically active polymer devices.

  15. Electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olausson, Christina B.; Scolari, Lara; Wei, Lei; Noordegraaf, Danny; Weirich, Johannes; Alkeskjold, Thomas T.; Hansen, Kim P.; Bjarklev, Anders

    2010-02-01

    We demonstrate electrical tunability of a fiber laser using a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber. Tuning of the laser is achieved by combining the wavelength filtering effect of a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device with an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. We fabricate an all-spliced laser cavity based on a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber mounted on a silicon assembly, a pump/signal combiner with single-mode signal feed-through and an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. The laser cavity produces a single-mode output and is tuned in the range 1040- 1065 nm by applying an electric field to the silicon assembly.

  16. Molecular dynamics modeling of polymer crystallization; from simple polymers to helical ones.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Orimi, Naohiko; Urakami, Naohiko; Sawada, Kaoru

    2005-01-01

    Crystallization of helical polymers is a very big challenge for molecular simulation. It involves many significant issues, such as folding in biomolecules and molecular recognition during crystal growth. Though direct molecular simulations of the process still involve very difficult problems, we here report our recent efforts toward better understanding of the crystallization in helical polymers. We begin with a brief review of our former studies on simple polyethylene-like polymers, and then we introduce several helical polymer models which are systematically made more complicated. We have already reported that a simple polyethylene-like polymer crystallizes very fast into chain folded lamellae from the melt. A slight modification of this simple polymer model by introducing proper bond angle and dihedral angle potentials gives one of the present models of the helical polymer. This helical polymer model is devised to be relatively rigid but mobile, to show easy helix-reversals, and to have a definite preference for gauche bonds. We find that this highly mobile helical polymer shows quick chain folded crystallization and forms approximate 4/1 helical structure. The intra- and the intermolecular order grow quite simultaneously suggesting highly cooperative nature of the phenomena. Further elaboration of the helical model, giving pendant side groups and higher energy barrier to the helix reversals, leads us to a realistic united atom model of iPP. The conventional and the multi-canonical Monte Carlo simulations are applied to find probable modes of chain folding and the ground state conformations. Though a very short chain readily forms a regular 3/1 helix of alternating trans and gauche bonds, much longer chains of 30- and 50-propylene units are not found to have energetic ground states in the regularly folded conformations.

  17. Resolving the mystery of the chain friction mechanism in polymer liquids.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Alexei P; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2009-06-19

    We propose an explanation for the long-standing puzzles of the microscopic mechanism of chain friction and the failure of time-temperature superposition in polymer melts based on decoupling of macromolecular scale diffusion from local structural relaxation due to spatially heterogeneous dynamics. The proposed physical picture is also relevant for understanding some aspects of dynamic fluctuation and decoupling phenomena in nonpolymeric glass-forming liquids, crystal growth rates, and protein activity in viscous solvents.

  18. Dispersion properties of transverse anisotropic liquid crystal core photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasawa, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    The dispersion properties of liquid crystal core photonic crystal fibers for different core diameters have been calculated by a full vectorial finite difference method. In calculations, air holes are assumed to be arranged in a regular hexagonal array in fused silica and a central hole is filled with liquid crystal to create a core. In this study, three types of transverse anisotropic configurations, where liquid crystal molecules are oriented in a transverse plane, and a planar configuration, where liquid crystal molecules are oriented in a propagation direction, are considered. The large changes of the dispersion properties are found when the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules is changed from a planar configuration to a uniform configuration, where all molecules are oriented in the same direction in a transverse plane. Since the orientation of liquid crystal molecules may be controlled by applying an electric field, it could be utilized for various applications including the spectral control of supercontinuum generation.

  19. Orientational relaxation in a discotic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Dwaipayan; Jana, Biman; Bagchi, Biman

    2007-06-01

    We investigate orientational relaxation of a model discotic liquid crystal, consisting of disclike molecules, by molecular dynamics simulations along two isobars starting from the high temperature isotropic phase. The two isobars have been so chosen that (a) the phase sequence isotropic- (I-) nematic- (N-) columnar (C) appears upon cooling along one of them and (b) the sequence isotropic- (I-) columnar- (C) along the other. While the orientational relaxation in the isotropic phase near the I-N phase transition in system (a) shows a power law decay at short to intermediate times, such power law relaxation is not observed in the isotropic phase near the I-C phase boundary in system (b). In order to understand this difference (the existence or the absence of the power law decay), we calculated the growth of the orientational pair distribution functions (OPDFs) near the I-N phase boundary and also near the I-C phase boundary. We find that the OPDF shows a marked growth in long range correlation as the I-N phase boundary is approached in the I-N-C system (a), but such a growth is absent in the I-C system, which appears to be consistent with the result that I-N phase transition in the former is weakly first order while the I-C phase transition in the latter is not weak. As the system settles into the nematic phase, the decay of the single-particle second-rank orientational time correlation function follows a pattern that is similar to what is observed with calamitic liquid crystals and supercooled molecular liquids.

  20. Isotropization of nematic liquid crystals by TMDSC

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Dadmun, M.; Zhang, Ge; Boller, A.; Wunderlich, B. |

    1997-12-01

    Temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) and traditional DSC are used to study the transition between the nematic liquid crystalline state and the isotropic liquid for two small molecules [4,4{prime}-azoxyanisole and N,N`-bis(4-n-octyloxybenzal)-1,4-phenylenediamine] and one macromolecule (4,4{prime}-dihydroxy-{alpha}-methylstilbene copolymerized with a 1:1 molar mixture of 1,7-dibromoheptane and 1,9-dibromononane). The DSC measurements with 4,4{prime}-azoxyanisole were used for temperature calibration with varying heating and cooling rates. Quasi-isothermal TMDSC with small temperature amplitude and standard TMDSC with underlying heating and cooling rates were utilized to analyze the breadth of the transitions. It could be verified that the isotropization transition of a nematic liquid crystal is, indeed, reversible for all three molecules. The nature of the transition changes, however, from relatively sharp, for small, rigid molecules, to about three kelvins wide for the small molecule with flexible ends, to as broad as 20 K for the macromolecule. It was also demonstrated that quantitative heats of fusion of sharp transitions can be extracted from TMDSC, but only from the time-domain heat-flow signal.