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Sample records for polymer reinforced crc

  1. Carbon Nanofiber Reinforced Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    2006 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2006 to 00-00-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Carbon Nanofiber Reinforced Polymers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...REVIEW Carbon Nanofiber Reinforced Polymers J.N. Baucom, A. Rohatgi, W.R. Pogue III, and J.P. Thomas Materials Science and Technology Division...of mass-produced and inexpensive, discontinuous carbon nanofibers to create a percolated fiber network within a polymeric matrix that will result in

  2. Self reinforcing polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kenig, S.

    1993-12-31

    In the advent of liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs), self reinforcing polymer composites comprising a polymer matrix and an LCP reinforcement, have become a reality. The so called self reinforcement is due to the LCPs orientability characteristics resulting from their rigid molecular backbone and anisotropy structure in the fluid state. Orientation development takes place during melt processing of the LCP composite blends where shear as well as elongational flows occur prior to consolidation to the solid state. By proper flow control anisotropy develops and in-situ composites are obtained. Polymer composites comprising self-reinforcement by LCPs during processing induced flow, were analyzed and studied with respect to their orientation development and resultant mechanical properties. The analysis commenced with the hydrodynamics of immiscible fluids in shear and elongational flows. Based on the analysis, orientation and morphology development in capillary extrusion was studied, using a variety of thermoplastic polymer matrices like amorphous and crystalline polyamides, polycarbonate and polyester in conjunction of a naphthalene based thermotropic LCP. Based on the flow-morphology relationship the amorphous polyamide/LCP composite was further investigated as it exhibited enhanced properties. Laminated composites based on LCP/amorphous polyamide were developed composed of unidirectional extruded and drawn sheets that were subsequently compression molded. Unidirectional, +45/{minus}45 and quasi-isotropic laminates were prepared and analyzed as to their microstructure and mechanical properties.

  3. Sensored fiber reinforced polymer grate

    DOEpatents

    Ross, Michael P.; Mack, Thomas Kimball

    2017-08-01

    Various technologies described herein pertain to a sensored grate that can be utilized for various security fencing applications. The sensored grate includes a grate framework and an embedded optical fiber. The grate framework is formed of a molded polymer such as, for instance, molded fiber reinforced polymer. Further, the grate framework includes a set of elongated elements, where the elongated elements are spaced to define apertures through the grate framework. The optical fiber is embedded in the elongated elements of the grate framework. Moreover, bending or breaking of one or more of the elongated elements can be detected based on a change in a characteristic of input light provided to the optical fiber compared to output light received from the optical fiber.

  4. Process for preparing polymer reinforced silica aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Capadona, Lynn A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Process for preparing polymer-reinforced silica aerogels which comprises a one-pot reaction of at least one alkoxy silane in the presence of effective amounts of a polymer precursor to obtain a silica reaction product, the reaction product is gelled and subsequently subjected to conditions that promotes polymerization of the precursor and then supercritically dried to obtain the polymer-reinforced monolithic silica aerogels.

  5. Molecular and nanoscale reinforcement of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerda, Adam S.

    The reinforcement of polymers using additives of dimensions below one micrometer is presented: those acting at the molecular and nanometer scales. This thesis will describe new additives and morphologies exhibiting high levels of mechanical reinforcement. It is the focus of this work to chronicle the range of physical and material properties that are altered upon inclusion of these modifiers. Additionally, this thesis will establish how these physical-property changes affect the mechanical behavior of the resulting composite. In the area of molecular reinforcement, a new class of additive, the organophosphate, is shown here to enhance modulus and yield strength in epoxy polymers once cured. Initially, the effect on the physical and thermal properties of the polymer system is investigated as a function of additive molecular weight, solubility, and concentration. The altered properties include T g, density, thermal stability and initial epoxy viscosity. The mechanical properties of the modified epoxy are demonstrated to be a result of the physical changes made to the matrix polymer through the addition of the organophosphorous additive. By increasing the density of the polymer and reducing or eliminating sub-Tg relaxations, the modulus and yield strength of the polymer can be greatly enhanced. These property changes are investigated in a variety of epoxy polymer systems in order to elucidate the effects of both the additive and polymer chemical structure on final mechanical properties. Polymer modification using nanometer-scale additives and modifiers has been the focus of intense study recently. Heretofore, these studies have focused on the exfoliated, or delaminated, clay morphology to impart the property enhancements, effectively isolating the particulates within the matrix. This thesis focuses on polymer modification at the nanometer scale such that the added clays interact and positively change the composite fracture toughness. By introducing this clay

  6. Nano polypeptide particles reinforced polymer composite fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiashen; Li, Yi; Zhang, Jing; Li, Gang; Liu, Xuan; Li, Zhi; Liu, Xuqing; Han, Yanxia; Zhao, Zheng

    2015-02-25

    Because of the intensified competition of land resources for growing food and natural textile fibers, there is an urgent need to reuse and recycle the consumed/wasted natural fibers as regenerated green materials. Although polypeptide was extracted from wool by alkaline hydrolysis, the size of the polypeptide fragments could be reduced to nanoscale. The wool polypeptide particles were fragile and could be crushed down to nano size again and dispersed evenly among polymer matrix under melt extrusion condition. The nano polypeptide particles could reinforce antiultraviolet capability, moisture regain, and mechanical properties of the polymer-polypeptide composite fibers.

  7. Interface characteristics of nanorope reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Khondaker S.; Keng, Ang K.

    2013-09-01

    A shear-lag model is proposed to obtain interface characteristics of nanorope reinforced polymer composites using representative volume element (RVE) concept. In the axisymmetric RVE, the nanorope is modelled as a closed-packed cylindrical lattice consisting seven single-walled carbon nanotubes. In the model, rope is considered to be perfectly bonded with the polymer resin where the nanotubes are assumed to be chemically non-bonded with each other in the rope system. Since, nanotubes are considered to be non-bonded in the nanorope there must exist a van der Waals interaction in terms of Lennard-Jones potential. A separate model is also proposed to determine the cohesive stress caused by this interaction. Closed form analytical solutions are derived for stress components of rope, resin and individual carbon nanotubes in the rope system. Parametric study has also been conducted to investigate the influences of key composite factors involved at both perfectly bonded and non-bonded interfaces.

  8. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and

  9. Investigation of nanoscale reinforcement into textile polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mujibur Rahman

    A dual inclusion strategy for textile polymers has been investigated to increase elastic energy storage capacity of fibers used in high velocity impact applications. Commercial fibers such as Spectra and Dyneema are made from ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Dynamic elastic energy of these fibers is still low therefore limiting their wholesale application without a secondary metallic or ceramic component. The idea in this investigation is to develop methodologies so that the elastic energy of polyethylene based fibers can be increased by several folds. This would allow manufacturing of an all-fabric system for high impact applications. The dual inclusion consists of a polymer phase and a nanoscale inorganic phase to polyethylene. The polymer phase was nylon-6 and the inorganic phase was carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Nylon-6 was blended as a minor phase into UHMWPE and was chosen because of its large fracture strain -- almost one order higher than that of UHMWPE. On the other hand, CNTs with their very high strength, modulus, and aspect ratio, contributed to sharing of load and sliding of polymer interfaces as they aligned during extrusion and strain hardening processes. A solution spinning process was developed to produce UHMWPE filaments reinforced with CNTs and nylon-6. The procedure involved dispersing of CNTs into paraffin oil through sonication followed by dissolving polymers into paraffin-CNT solution using a homogenizer. The admixture was fed into a single screw extruder for melt mixing and extrusion through an orifice. The extrudate was rinsed via a hexane bath, stabilized through a heater, and then drawn into a filament winder with controlled stretching. In the next step, the as produced filaments were strain-hardened through repeated loading unloading cycles under tension. Neat and reinforced filaments were characterized through DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry), XRD (X-ray Diffraction), Raman Spectroscopy, SEM (Scanning Electron

  10. Synthesis of Reinforced Polyacrylate and Polyepoxide Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmi, Aicha; Meziani, Amina; Zahouily, Khalid; Benfarhi, Said

    Nanocomposite polymers have drawn increased attention over the two last decades because of their distinct characteristics in particular superior mechanical and barrier properties. In this paper we present our results on the synthesis and the biodegradability of nanocomposite materials, made of silicate platelets (montmorillonite and beidellite) dispersed in a crosslinked polyurethane -acrylate and polyepoxide matrix. The compatibility polymer-clay has been optimized by surface modification of clay. The treatment of clay was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The nanocomposite materials were synthetized by photoinduced polymerization (UV lamp and solar UV). The study of curing kinetics obtained show that the addition of organophilic clay has little effect on the conversion of acrylates while in the epoxyde, the effect is more pronounced because a some of the protons generated by the photo-initiator is neutralized by the negative charges dispersed onto clay surface. The polymer nanocomposites obtained are transparent, slightly or insoluble in organic solvents. Moreover we have demonstrated that the polyurethane -acrylate is biodegradable and the intimate association of the reinforcement and the organic matrix at the molecular level decrease this biodegradability.

  11. Modified glass fibre reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yumei

    A high ratio of strength to density and relatively low-cost are some of the significant features of glass fibre reinforced polymer composites (GFRPCs) that made them one of the most rapidly developed materials in recent years. They are widely used as the material of construction in the areas of aerospace, marine and everyday life, such as airplane, helicopter, boat, canoe, fishing rod, racket, etc. Traditionally, researchers tried to raise the mechanical properties and keep a high strength/weight ratio using all or some of the following methods: increasing the volume fraction of the fibre; using different polymeric matrix material; or changing the curing conditions. In recent years, some new techniques and processing methods were developed to further improve the mechanical properties of glass fibre (GF) reinforced polymer composite. For example, by modifying the surface condition of the GF, both the interface strength between the GF and the polymer matrix and the shear strength of the final composite can be significantly increased. Also, by prestressing the fibre during the curing process of the composite, the tensile, flexural and the impact properties of the composite can be greatly improved. In this research project, a new method of preparing GFRPCs, which combined several traditional and modern techniques together, was developed. This new method includes modification of the surface of the GF with silica particles, application of different levels of prestressing on the GF during the curing process, and the change of the fibre volume fraction and curing conditions in different sets of experiments. The results of the new processing were tested by the three-point bend test, the short beam shear test and the impact test to determine the new set of properties so formed in the composite material. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) was used to study the fracture surface of the new materials after the mechanical tests were performed. By taking advantages of the

  12. Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composite Materials Systems to Enhance Reinforced Concrete Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-01

    and low temperature evaluation of FRP performance. Field demonstrations included evaluation of carbon fiber reinforced polymer tendons for post...glass fiber reinforced polymer cables as tie back tension members, and a test fixture was designed and fabricated to evaluate post stressing tendon

  13. Peptide Nanotube Reinforced Polymers: A System for Tunable, Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-30

    mechanical reinforcement of polymeric materials used in the fabrication of implantable medical devices. Our results show that the high aspect ratio... polymers like poly-D,L-lactic acid (PDLLA), a common polymer used in resorbable load bearing 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Peptide nanotube reinforced polymers : A system for tunable, composite materials The

  14. Effective reinforcement in carbon nanotube-polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Ciselli, P; Kuznetsov, E; Peijs, T; Barber, A H

    2008-05-13

    Carbon nanotubes have mechanical properties that are far in excess of conventional fibrous materials used in engineering polymer composites. Effective reinforcement of polymers using carbon nanotubes is difficult due to poor dispersion and alignment of the nanotubes along the same axis as the applied force during composite loading. This paper reviews the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes and their polymer composites to highlight how many previously prepared composites do not effectively use the excellent mechanical behaviour of the reinforcement. Nanomechanical tests using atomic force microscopy are carried out on simple uniaxially aligned carbon nanotube-reinforced polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibres prepared using electrospinning processes. Dispersion of the carbon nanotubes within the polymer is achieved using a surfactant. Young's modulus of these simple composites is shown to approach theoretically predicted values, indicating that the carbon nanotubes are effective reinforcements. However, the use of dispersant is also shown to lower Young's modulus of the electrospun PVA fibres.

  15. Structural Behavior of Concrete Beams Reinforced with Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovitigala, Thilan

    The main challenge for civil engineers is to provide sustainable, environmentally friendly and financially feasible structures to the society. Finding new materials such as fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) material that can fulfill the above requirements is a must. FRP material was expensive and it was limited to niche markets such as space shuttles and air industry in the 1960s. Over the time, it became cheaper and spread to other industries such as sporting goods in the 1980-1990, and then towards the infrastructure industry. Design and construction guidelines are available for carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), aramid fiber reinforced polymer (AFRP) and glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) and they are currently used in structural applications. Since FRP is linear elastic brittle material, design guidelines for the steel reinforcement are not valid for FRP materials. Corrosion of steel reinforcement affects the durability of the concrete structures. FRP reinforcement is identified as an alternative to steel reinforcement in corrosive environments. Although basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) has many advantages over other FRP materials, but limited studies have been done. These studies didn't include larger BFRP bar diameters that are mostly used in practice. Therefore, larger beam sizes with larger BFRP reinforcement bar diameters are needed to investigate the flexural and shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams. Also, shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams was not yet studied. Experimental testing of mechanical properties and bond strength of BFRP bars and flexural and shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams are needed to include BFRP reinforcement bars in the design codes. This study mainly focuses on the use of BFRP bars as internal reinforcement. The test results of the mechanical properties of BFRP reinforcement bars, the bond strength of BFRP reinforcement bars, and the flexural and shear behavior of concrete beams

  16. Reinforcement effect of soy protein and carbohydrates in polymer composites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The modulus of soft polymer material can be increased by filler reinforcement. A review of using soy protein and carbohydrates as alternative renewable reinforcement material is presented here. Dry soy protein and carbohydrates are rigid and can form strong filler networks through hydrogen-bonding...

  17. Effects of the Reinforcement Morphology on the Fatigue Properties of Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Robert J.; Converse, Gabriel L.; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of the hydroxyapatite (HA) reinforcement morphology and content on the fatigue behavior of HA reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE). To this end, HDPE was reinforced with 20 and 40 vol% of either HA whiskers or an equiaxed HA powder, and tested in four-point bending fatigue under simulated physiological conditions. The fatigue life, mechanical property degradation and failure surfaces were compared between experimental groups. HDPE reinforced with HA whiskers exhibited a four- to five-fold increase (p < 0.001, T-test) in fatigue life compared to an equiaxed powder for either the 20 and 40 vol% reinforcement level. Composites containing 40 vol% HA exhibited decreased fatigue life compared to those with 20 vol% HA for either reinforcement morphology (p < 0.0001, ANOVA). HA whisker reinforced HDPE exhibited less stiffness loss, permanent deformation (creep) and energy dissipation at a given number of cycles compared to HA powder. Thus, HA whisker reinforced HDPE was more tolerant of fatigue damage due to either microcracking or polymer plasticity. Scanning electron microscopy of failure surfaces and surface microcracks showed evidence of toughening by uncracked ligaments, crack tip plasticity, polymer fibril bridging and HA whisker pullout. The results of this study suggest that the use of HA whiskers, in place of HA powder, is a straightforward means to improve the fatigue life and damage tolerance of HA reinforced polymers for synthetic bone substitutes. PMID:19578474

  18. Polymer concrete reinforced with recycled-tire fibers: Mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Cruz, E.; Martínez-Barrera, G.; Martínez-López, M.

    2013-06-01

    Polymer Concrete was reinforced with recycled-tire fibers in order to improve the compressive and flexural strength. Polymer concrete specimens were prepared with 70% of silicious sand, 30% of polyester resin and various fiber concentrations (0.3, 0.6, 0.9 and 1.2 vol%). The results show increment of 50% in average of the compressive and flexural strength as well as on the deformation when adding 1.2 vol% of recycled-fibers.

  19. Reinforcement and degradation mechanisms in polymer/inorganic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanova, Irina Rifkatovna

    This project accomplished the following goals: preparation of polymer/alumina nanocomposites using a single-screw extrusion approach, a systematic investigation of interfacial interactions, the mechanisms for reinforcement, and the thermal degradation and flame retardant mechanisms in polymer nanocomposites. In this work it was found that the stereochemistry of polymer macromolecules and the shapes of nanoparticles are extremely important in determining the interfacial interactions between them. Understanding of the nature of these interactions can result in a comprehensive understanding of reinforcement mechanisms in polymer nanocomposites. It was found that aromatic polymers such as polycarbonate and polystyrene have stronger interfacial interactions with needle or whisker-shaped nanoparticles than with spherical-shaped nanoparticles, while linear aliphatic polymers such as polymethylmethacrylate showed strong interactions with spherical nanoparticles. Other factors affecting the strength of interfacial interactions such as size, surface modification and concentration of nanoparticles were also studied. The thermal stability of polymer nanocomposites was studied to unravel the thermal degradation mechanisms. It was found that the chemical nature of nanoparticles plays a significant role in the thermal decomposition of polymer nanocomposites. For instance, SEM studies of polymer nanocomposites chars revealed that alumina nanoparticles moved to the surface of nanocomposites, while silica nanoparticles stayed in the body of the material, which enhances char formation. The mechanisms for the flammability in polymer/alumina nanocomposites were found to depend on the viscosity of the melt flow of nanocomposites. FT-IR, MS, and surface free energy characterization for modified alumina surfaces were done. The compatibility of polymer molecules and nanoparticles was studied on the basis of surface free energy. It was shown that modification of the alumina surface with

  20. Entanglement network in nanoparticle reinforced polymers.

    PubMed

    Riggleman, Robert A; Toepperwein, Gregory; Papakonstantopoulos, George J; Barrat, Jean-Louis; de Pablo, Juan J

    2009-06-28

    Polymer nanocomposites have been widely studied in efforts to engineer materials with mechanical properties superior to those of the pure polymer, but the molecular origins of the sought-after improved properties have remained elusive. An ideal polymer nanocomposite model has been conceived in which the nanoparticles are dispersed throughout the polymeric matrix. A detailed examination of topological constraints (or entanglements) in a nanocomposite glass provides new insights into the molecular origin of the improved properties in polymer nanocomposites by revealing that the nanoparticles impart significant enhancements to the entanglement network. Nanoparticles are found to serve as entanglement attractors, particularly at large deformations, altering the topological constraint network that arises in the composite material.

  1. Environmental Degradation of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Fasteners in Wood

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the durability of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) nails in treated wood. The FRP nails were exposed to four conditions: (1) accelerated weathering, consisting of exposure to ultraviolet light and condensation; (2) 100% relative humidity (RH); (3) being driven into untreated wood and exposed to 100% RH; and (4) being driven into wood treated with...

  2. Electron beam surface modifications in reinforcing and recycling of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czvikovszky, T.; Hargitai, H.

    1997-08-01

    Thermoplastic polymers can be fiber-reinforced in the recycling step through a reactive modification of the interface between the polymer matrix and fiber. Recollected automobile bumpers made of polypropylene copolymers have been reinforced during the reprocessing with eight different types of high-strength fibers, with waste cord-yarns of the tire industry. A thin layer reactive interface of acrylic oligomers has been applied and activated through low energy (175 keV) electron beam (EB). The upcycling (upgrading recycling) resulted in a series of extrudable and injection-mouldable, fiber-reinforced thermoplastic of enhanced bending strength, increased modulus of elasticity and acceptable impact strength. EB treatment has been compared with conventional methods.

  3. CO2-Laser Cutting Fiber Reinforced Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, R.; Nuss, Rudolf; Geiger, Manfred

    1989-10-01

    Guided by experimental investigations laser cutting of glass fiber reinforced reactive injection moulded (RRIM)-polyurethanes which are used e.g. in car industry for bumpers, spoilers, and further components is described. A Comparison with other cutting techniques as there are water jet cutting, milling, punching, sawing, cutting with conventional knife and with ultrasonic excited knife is given. Parameters which mainly influence cutting results e.g. laser power, cutting speed, gas nature and pressure will be discussed. The problematic nature in characterising micro and macro geometry of laser cut edges of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) is explained. The topography of cut edges is described and several characteristic values are introduced to specify the obtained working quality. The surface roughness of laser cut edges is measured by both, an optical and a mechanical sensor and their reliabilities are compared.

  4. Fibre reinforced CMC with polymer/filler derived matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Suttor, D.; Erny, T.; Greil, P.

    1995-09-01

    A ceramic matrix for carbon fibre reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC) has been developed from polysiloxane/boron mixtures. Complex geometries can be realized by using processing technologies of fibre reinforced polymer composites. Upon pyrolysis the polymer/filler mixture is converted into a ceramic matrix consisting of SiC, B{sub 4}C, BN and a Si-O-C-(N) glass, without reacting with the carbon fibre. Due to the large volume increase of the reactive boron filler upon nitridation (+142 vol%) no multiple reinfiltration of the structure is necessary in order to achieve a dense matrix. Thermodynamic modelling of the pyrolysis is a useful tool to estimate the qualitative and quantitative phase composition as a function of polymer, filler and gas atmospheres.

  5. Polymer blends with biodegradable components and reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartore, Luciana; Di Landro, Luca

    2014-05-01

    Polymeric blends based on ethylene vinyl acetate rubbers filled with high mol. wt. carboxymethyl cellulose were investigated in view of possible employment as biodegradable materials. The effect of vinyl acetate content and of addition of transesterification agent to increase interaction between EVA and cellulosic components was considered. Blends reinforced with cellulose microfibers in different amounts were also characterized in their mechanical, rheological and thermal behavior.

  6. Flexural retrofitting of reinforced concrete structures using Green Natural Fiber Reinforced Polymer plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes, Ignacio

    An experimental study will be carried out to determine the suitability of Green Natural Fiber Reinforced Polymer plates (GNFRP) manufactured with hemp fibers, with the purpose of using them as structural materials for the flexural strengthening of reinforced concrete (RC) beams. Four identical RC beams, 96 inches long, are tested for the investigation, three control beams and one test beam. The first three beams are used as references; one unreinforced, one with one layer of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP), one with two layers of CFRP, and one with n layers of the proposed, environmental-friendly, GNFRP plates. The goal is to determine the number of GNFRP layers needed to match the strength reached with one layer of CFRP and once matched, assess if the system is less expensive than CFRP strengthening, if this is the case, this strengthening system could be an alternative to the currently used, expensive CFRP systems.

  7. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Harik, Vasyl M.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a technique has been proposed for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Since the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties of the SWNT/polymer composites can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber retains the local molecular structure and bonding information and serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube sizes and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/polyethylene composite systems, one with continuous and aligned SWNT and the other with discontinuous and randomly aligned nanotubes.

  8. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Harik, Vasyl M.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a technique has been proposed for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Since the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties of the SWNT/polymer composites can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber retains the local molecular structure and bonding information and serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube sizes and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/polyethylene composite systems, one with continuous and aligned SWNT and the other with discontinuous and randomly aligned nanotubes.

  9. CO2 Laser Cutting of Glass Fiber Reinforce Polymer Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatimah, S.; Ishak, M.; Aqida, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    The lamination, matrix properties, fiber orientation, and relative volume fraction of matrix of polymer structure make this polymer hard to process. The cutting of polymer composite using CO2 laser could involve in producing penetration energy in the process. Identification of the dominant factors that significantly affect the cut quality is important. The objective of this experiment is to evaluate the CO2 spot size of beam cutting for Glass Fiber Reinforce Polymer Composite (GFRP). The focal length selected 9.5mm which gave smallest focus spot size according to the cutting requirements. The effect of the focal length on the cut quality was investigated by monitoring the surface profile and focus spot size. The beam parameter has great effect on both the focused spot size and surface quality.

  10. Rolling contact fatigue of various unfilled and fiber reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almajid, Abdulhakim; Friedrich, Klaus

    2012-07-01

    The wear behavior of Polyamide 6 (PA6), Polyoxymethylene (POM), Polyetheretherketone (PEEK), and Polyparaphenylene (PPP) materials under rolling contact was investigated. The ball on plate principle, i.e. a steel ball (as counterpart) rolls on a polymer plate specimen in rotational or linear motion, was used. The results are shown for different stress parameters which vary by load (50 N up to 300 N) and testing time (up to 50 hours). Differences in surface fatigue mechanisms were illustrated by microscopic methods. The best performance was found for PEEK. All the neat polymers were superior to any reinforced versions of them.

  11. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Gates, T. S.; Wise, K. E.; Park, C.; Siochi, E. J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique is presented for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Because the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated by using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube lengths, concentrations, and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/polyimide composite systems.

  12. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Gates, T. S.; Wise, K. E.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique is presented for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Because the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated by using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube shapes, sizes, concentrations, and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/LaRC-SI (with a PmPV interface) composite systems, one with aligned SWNTs and the other with three-dimensionally randomly oriented SWNTs. The Young's modulus and shear modulus have been calculated for the two systems for various nanotube lengths and volume fractions.

  13. Rate dependent constitutive models for fiber reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.

    1990-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to assess the state-of-the-art in rate dependent constitutive models for continuous fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials. Several recent models which include formulations for describing plasticity, viscoelasticity, viscoplasticity, and rate-dependent phenomenon such as creep and stress relaxation are outlined and compared. When appropriate, these comparisons include brief descriptions of the mathematical formulations, the test procedures required for generating material constants, and details of available data comparing test results to analytical predictions.

  14. Microscopic mechanism of reinforcement and conductivity in polymer nanocomposite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tae-Eun

    Modification of polymers by adding various nano-particles is an important method to obtain effective enhancement of materials properties. Within this class of materials, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are among the most studied materials for polymer reinforcement due to their extraordinary mechanical properties, superior thermal and electronic properties, and high aspect ratio. However, to unlock the potential of CNTs for applications, CNTs must be well dispersed in a polymer matrix and the microscopic mechanism of polymer reinforcement by CNTs must be understood. In this study, single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) composites with polypropylene (PP)-SWNT and polystyrene (PS)-SWNT were prepared and analyzed. Microscopic study of the mechanism of reinforcement and conductivity by SWNT included Raman spectroscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and dielectric measurement. For PP-SWNT composites, tensile tests show a three times increase in the Young's modulus with addition of only 1 wt% SWNT, and much diminished increase of modulus with further increase in SWNT concentration. For PS-SWNT composites, well-dispersed SWNT/PS composite has been produced, using initial annealing of SWNT and optimum sonication conditions. The studies on the tangential mode in the Raman spectra and TEM indicated well-dispersed SWNTs in a PS matrix. We show that conductivity appears in composites already at very low concentrations, hinting at the formation of a 'percolative' network even below 0.5% of SWNT. The Raman studies for both composites show good transfer of the applied stress from the polymer matrices to SWNTs. However, no significant improvement of mechanical property is observed for PS-SWNT composites. The reason for only a slight increase of mechanical property remains unknown.

  15. Investigation of rectangular concrete columns reinforced or prestressed with fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) bars or tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Ching Chiaw

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites have been increasingly used in concrete construction. This research focused on the behavior of concrete columns reinforced with FRP bars, or prestressed with FRP tendons. The methodology was based the ultimate strength approach where stress and strain compatibility conditions and material constitutive laws were applied. Axial strength-moment (P-M) interaction relations of reinforced or prestressed concrete columns with FRP, a linearly-elastic material, were examined. The analytical results identified the possibility of premature compression and/or brittle-tension failure occurring in FRP reinforced and prestressed concrete columns where sudden and explosive type failures were expected. These failures were related to the rupture of FRP rebars or tendons in compression and/or in tension prior to concrete reaching its ultimate strain and strength. The study also concluded that brittle-tension failure was more likely to occur due to the low ultimate tensile strain of FRP bars or tendons as compared to steel. In addition, the failures were more prevalent when long term effects such as creep and shrinkage of concrete, and creep rupture of FRP were considered. Barring FRP failure, concrete columns reinforced with FRP, in some instances, gained significant moment resistance. As expected the strength interaction of slender steel or FRP reinforced concrete columns were dependent more on column length rather than material differences between steel and FRP. Current ACI minimum reinforcement ratio for steel (rhomin) reinforced concrete columns may not be adequate for use in FRP reinforced concrete columns. Design aids were developed in this study to determine the minimum reinforcement ratio (rhof,min) required for rectangular reinforced concrete columns by averting brittle-tension failure to a failure controlled by concrete crushing which in nature was a less catastrophic and more gradual type failure. The proposed method using rhof

  16. Fracture behavior of glass fiber reinforced polymer composite

    SciTech Connect

    Avci, A.; Arikan, H.; Akdemir, A

    2004-03-01

    Chopped strand glass fiber reinforced particle-filled polymer composite beams with varying notch-to-depth ratios and different volume fractions of glass fibers were investigated in Mode I fracture using three-point bending tests. Effects of polyester resin content and glass fiber content on fracture behavior was also studied. Polyester resin contents were used 13.00%%, 14.75%, 16.50%, 18.00% and 19.50%, and glass fiber contents were 1% and 1.5% of the total weight of the polymer composite system. Flexural strength of the polymer composite increases with increase in polyester and fiber content. The critical stress intensity factor was determined by using several methods such as initial notch depth method, compliance method and J-integral method. The values of K{sub IC} obtained from these methods were compared.

  17. Flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC) Beams Retrofitted with Corrugated Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravind, N.; Samanta, Amiya K.; Roy, Dilip Kr. Singha; Thanikal, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Strengthening the structural members of old buildings using advanced materials is a contemporary research in the field of repairs and rehabilitation. Many researchers used plain Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) sheets for strengthening Reinforced Concrete (RC) beams. In this research work, rectangular corrugated GFRP laminates were used for strengthening RC beams to achieve higher flexural strength and load carrying capacity. Type and dimensions of corrugated profile were selected based on preliminary study using ANSYS software. A total of twenty one beams were tested to study the load carrying capacity of control specimens and beams strengthened with plain sheets and corrugated laminates using epoxy resin. This paper presents the experimental and theoretical study on flexural strengthening of Reinforced Concrete (RC) beams using corrugated GFRP laminates and the results are compared. Mathematical models were developed based on the experimental data and then the models were validated.

  18. Fatigue fracture of fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich structures for gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikhamkin, Mikhail; Sazhenkov, Nikolai; Samodurov, Danil

    2017-05-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich structures are commonly used in different industries. In particular, they are used in the manufacture of gas turbine engines. However, fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich structures often have a manufacturing flaw. In theory, such flaws due to their rapid propagation reduce the durability of fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich structures. In this paper, bending fatigue tests of fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich structures with manufacturing flaws were conducted. Comparative analysis of fatigue fracture of fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich specimens was conducted before and after their bending fatigue tests. The analysis was based on the internal damage X-ray observation of fiber reinforced polymer honeycomb composite sandwich specimens.

  19. New generation fiber reinforced polymer composites incorporating carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Eslam

    The last five decades observed an increasing use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites as alternative construction materials for aerospace and infrastructure. The high specific strength of FRP attracted its use as non-corrosive reinforcement. However, FRP materials were characterized with a relatively low ductility and low shear strength compared with steel reinforcement. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been introduced in the last decade as a material with minimal defect that is capable of increasing the mechanical properties of polymer matrices. This dissertation reports experimental investigations on the use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to produce a new generation of FRP composites. The experiments showed significant improvements in the flexure properties of the nanocomposite when functionalized MWCNTs were used. In addition, MWCNTs were used to produce FRP composites in order to examine static, dynamic, and creep behavior. The MWCNTs improved the off-axis tension, off-axis flexure, FRP lap shear joint responses. In addition, they reduced the creep of FRP-concrete interface, enhanced the fracture toughness, and altered the impact resistance significantly. In general, the MWCNTs are found to affect the behaviour of the FRP composites when matrix failure dominates the behaviour. The improvement in the mechanical response with the addition of low contents of MWCNTs would benefit many industrial and military applications such as strengthening structures using FRP composites, composite pipelines, aircrafts, and armoured vehicles.

  20. Tungsten disulfide nanotubes reinforced biodegradable polymers for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Henslee, Allan M; Farshid, Behzad; Parmar, Priyanka; Lin, Liangjun; Qin, Yi-Xian; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we have investigated the efficacy of inorganic nanotubes as reinforcing agents to improve the mechanical properties of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) composites as a function of nanomaterial loading concentration (0.01-0.2 wt.%). Tungsten disulfide nanotubes (WSNTs) were used as reinforcing agents in the experimental group. Single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) were used as positive controls, and crosslinked PPF composites were used as the baseline control. Mechanical testing (compression and three-point bending) shows a significant enhancement (up to 28-190%) in the mechanical properties (compressive modulus, compressive yield strength, flexural modulus and flexural yield strength) of WSNT-reinforced PPF nanocomposites compared to the baseline control. In comparison to the positive controls, significant improvements in the mechanical properties of WSNT nanocomposites were also observed at various concentrations. In general, the inorganic nanotubes (WSNTs) showed mechanical reinforcement better than (up to 127%) or equivalent to that of carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs). Sol fraction analysis showed significant increases in the crosslinking density of PPF in the presence of WSNTs (0.01-0.2 wt.%). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis on thin sections of crosslinked nanocomposites showed the presence of WSNTs as individual nanotubes in the PPF matrix, whereas SWCNTs and MWCNTs existed as micron-sized aggregates. The trend in the surface area of nanostructures obtained by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis was SWCNTs>MWCNTs>WSNTs. The BET surface area analysis, TEM analysis and sol fraction analysis results taken together suggest that chemical composition (inorganic vs. carbon nanomaterials), the presence of functional groups (such as sulfide and oxysulfide) and individual dispersion of the nanomaterials in the polymer matrix (absence of aggregation of the reinforcing agent) are the key parameters

  1. Studies on natural fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Kapatel, P. M.; Machchhar, A. D.; Kapatel, Y. A.

    2016-05-01

    Natural fiber reinforced composites show increasing importance in day to days applications because of their low cost, lightweight, easy availability, non-toxicity, biodegradability and environment friendly nature. But these fibers are hydrophilic in nature. Thus they have very low reactivity and poor compatibility with polymers. To overcome these limitations chemical modifications of the fibers have been carried out. Therefore, in the present work jute fibers have chemically modified by treating with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions. These treated jute fibers have been used to fabricate jute fiber reinforced epoxy composites. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, flexural strength and impact strength have been found out. Alkali treated composites show better properties compare to untreated composites.

  2. Interface Characterization in Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naya, F.; Molina-Aldareguía, J. M.; Lopes, C. S.; González, C.; LLorca, J.

    2017-01-01

    A novel methodology is presented and applied to measure the shear interface strength of fiber-reinforced polymers. The strategy is based in fiber push-in tests carried out on the central fiber of highly-packed fiber clusters with hexagonal symmetry, and it is supported by a detailed finite element analysis of the push-in test to account for the influence of hygrothermal residual stresses, fiber constraint and fiber anisotropy on the interface strength. Examples of application are presented to determine the shear interface strength in carbon and glass fiber composites reinforced with either thermoset or thermoplastic matrices. In addition, the influence of the environment (either dry or wet conditions) on the interface strength in C/epoxy composites is demonstrated.

  3. Defect depth measurement of carbon fiber reinforced polymers by thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Terry Y.; Chen, Jian-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers has been widely used in all kind of the industries. However the internal defects can result in the change of material or mechanical properties, and cause safety problem. In this study, step-heating thermography is employed to measure the time series temperature distribution of composite plate. The principle of heat conduction in a flat plate with defect inside is introduced. A temperature separation criterion to determine the depth of defect inside the specimen is obtained experimentally. Applying this criterion to CFRP specimens with embedded defects, the depth of embedded defect in CFRP can be determined quite well from the time series thermograms obtained experimentally.

  4. Reinforcement of bacterial cellulose aerogels with biocompatible polymers

    PubMed Central

    Pircher, N.; Veigel, S.; Aigner, N.; Nedelec, J.M.; Rosenau, T.; Liebner, F.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) aerogels, which are fragile, ultra-lightweight, open-porous and transversally isotropic materials, have been reinforced with the biocompatible polymers polylactic acid (PLA), polycaprolactone (PCL), cellulose acetate (CA), and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), respectively, at varying BC/polymer ratios. Supercritical carbon dioxide anti-solvent precipitation and simultaneous extraction of the anti-solvent using scCO2 have been used as core techniques for incorporating the secondary polymer into the BC matrix and to convert the formed composite organogels into aerogels. Uniaxial compression tests revealed a considerable enhancement of the mechanical properties as compared to BC aerogels. Nitrogen sorption experiments at 77 K and scanning electron micrographs confirmed the preservation (or even enhancement) of the surface-area-to-volume ratio for most of the samples. The formation of an open-porous, interpenetrating network of the second polymer has been demonstrated by treatment of BC/PMMA hybrid aerogels with EMIM acetate, which exclusively extracted cellulose, leaving behind self-supporting organogels. PMID:25037381

  5. Flexural properties of acrylic resin polymers reinforced with unidirectional and woven glass fibers.

    PubMed

    Vallittu, P K

    1999-03-01

    Fiber-reinforced plastics for dental applications have been under development for some time. A major difficulty in using reinforcing fibers with multiphase acrylic resins, such as powderliquid resins, has been improper impregnation of fibers with the resin. The aim of this study was to describe and test a novel system to use polymer-preimpregnated reinforcing fibers with commonly used multiphase acrylic resins. Continuous unidirectional and woven preimpregnated glass fiber reinforcements (Stick and Stick Net) were used to reinforce heat-curing denture base and autopolymerizing denture base polymers. A temporary fixed partial denture polymer was also reinforced with Stick reinforcement material. Five test specimens were fabricated for unreinforced control groups and for Stick- and Stick Net-reinforced groups. A 3-point loading test was used to measure transverse strength and flexural modulus of the materials and ultimate strain at fracture was calculated. Cross-sections of test specimens were examined with a SEM to evaluate degree of impregnation of fibers with polymer matrix. Quantity of fibers in test specimens was determined by combustion analysis. Transverse strength of heat-curing denture base polymer was 76 MPa, Stick reinforcement increased it to 341 MPa, and flexural modulus increased from 2550 to 19086 MPa. Stick Net reinforcement increased transverse strength of heat-curing denture base polymer to 99 MPa and flexural modulus to 3530 MPa. Transverse strength of autopolymerizing denture base polymer was 71 MPa; Stick increased it to 466 MPa; and flexural modulus increased from 2418 to 16749 MPa. Stick Net increased the transverse strength of autopolymerizing denture base polymer to 96 MPa and flexural modulus to 3573 MPa. Transverse strength of temporary fixed partial denture polymer increased from 58 to 241 MPa and flexural modulus from 1711 to 7227 MPa. ANOVA showed that reinforcement type and polymer brand affected transverse strength and modulus (P <.001

  6. Investigating Filler Reinforcement and Nonlinear Viscoelastic Behavior in Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhiyong; Wang, Shi-Qing; von Meerwall, Ernst

    2004-03-01

    Solid fillers have been known to enhance the linear viscoelastic responses of polymer melts and elastomers. Nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of such systems is closely related to the reinforcement of the linear viscoelascity. Understanding such phenomena as the Payne effect (where the storage modulus is measured to decrease in oscillatory shear with the amplitude of the oscillation and with time for a fixed amplitude) requires a better understanding of the filler reinforcement mechanism. Recent publications, from two different groups (a) (b) prompted our present study. Using monodisperse 1,4-polybutadiene melts as the matrix and nano-silicon oxide particles of 15 nm diameter as the fillers, we carried out a variety of viscoelastic and NMR-spin-echo diffusion measurements to elucidate the important role of the filler-filler networking in controlling the observed linear and nonlinear behavior at temperatures over 100 degrees above the glass transition temperature of PBD. (a)S.S. Sternstein and A. Zhu, Macromolecules 35, 7262 (2002); Composites Sci. and Techn. 63, 1113 (2003). This work claims that the reinforcement arises primarily from the entrapped chain entanglement due to chain adsorption on filler surfaces instead of the filler-filler networking. (b) H. Montes, F. Lequeux and J. Berriot, Macromolecules, 36, 8107 (2003). This work advocates that a glassy layer formed around each filler is responsible for the enhanced linear viscoelascity and for the observed nonlinear viscoelastic behavior such as the Payne effect.

  7. Nondestructive testing of externally reinforced structures for seismic retrofitting using flax fiber reinforced polymer (FFRP) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Sfarra, S.; Paoletti, D.; Bendada, A.; Maldague, X.

    2013-05-01

    Natural fibers constitute an interesting alternative to synthetic fibers, e.g. glass and carbon, for the production of composites due to their environmental and economic advantages. The strength of natural fiber composites is on average lower compared to their synthetic counterparts. Nevertheless, natural fibers such as flax, among other bast fibers (jute, kenaf, ramie and hemp), are serious candidates for seismic retrofitting applications given that their mechanical properties are more suitable for dynamic loads. Strengthening of structures is performed by impregnating flax fiber reinforced polymers (FFRP) fabrics with epoxy resin and applying them to the component of interest, increasing in this way the load and deformation capacities of the building, while preserving its stiffness and dynamic properties. The reinforced areas are however prompt to debonding if the fabrics are not mounted properly. Nondestructive testing is therefore required to verify that the fabric is uniformly installed and that there are no air gaps or foreign materials that could instigate debonding. In this work, the use of active infrared thermography was investigated for the assessment of (1) a laboratory specimen reinforced with FFRP and containing several artificial defects; and (2) an actual FFRP retrofitted masonry wall in the Faculty of Engineering of the University of L'Aquila (Italy) that was seriously affected by the 2009 earthquake. Thermographic data was processed by advanced signal processing techniques, and post-processed by computing the watershed lines to locate suspected areas. Results coming from the academic specimen were compared to digital speckle photography and holographic interferometry images.

  8. In situ reinforced polymers using low molecular weight compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordem, Onur Sinan

    2011-12-01

    The primary objective of this research is to generate reinforcing domains in situ during the processing of polymers by using phase separation techniques. Low molecular weight compounds were mixed with polymers where the process viscosity is reduced at process temperatures and mechanical properties are improved once the material system is cooled or reacted. Thermally induced phase separation and thermotropic phase transformation of low molar mass compounds were used in isotactic polypropylene (iPP) and poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) resins. Reaction induced phase separation was utilized in thermosets to generate anisotropic reinforcements. A new strategy to increase fracture toughness of materials was introduced. Simultaneously, enhancement in stiffness and reduction in process viscosity were also attained. Materials with improved rheological and mechanical properties were prepared by using thermotropic phase transformations of metal soaps in polymers (calcium stearate/iPP). Morphology and thermal properties were studied using WAXS, DSC and SEM. Mechanical and rheological investigation showed significant reduction in process viscosity and substantial improvement in fracture toughness were attained. Effects of molecular architecture of metal soaps were investigated in PEEK (calcium stearate/PEEK and sodium stearate/PEEK). The selected compounds reduced the process viscosity due to the high temperature co-continuous morphology of metal soaps. Unlike the iPP system that incorporates spherical particles, interaction between PEEK and metal soaps resulted in two discrete and co-continuous phases of PEEK and the metal stearates. DMA and melt rheology exhibited that sodium stearate/PEEK composites are stiffer. Effective moduli of secondary metal stearate phase were calculated using different composite theories, which suggested bicontinuous morphology to the metal soaps in PEEK. Use of low molecular weight crystallizable solvents was investigated in reactive systems

  9. A self-sensing fiber reinforced polymer composite using mechanophore-based smart polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jin; Liu, Yingtao; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Dai, Lenore

    2015-04-01

    Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) are ubiquitous in engineering applications due to their superior mechanical properties at low weight. However, they are susceptible to damage due to their low interlaminar mechanical properties and poor heat and charge transport in the transverse direction to the laminate. Moreover, methods to inspect and ensure the reliability of composites are expensive and labor intensive. Recently, mechanophore-based smart polymer has attracted significant attention, especially for self-sensing of matrix damage in PMCs. A cyclobutane-based self-sensing approach using 1,1,1-tris (cinnamoyloxymethyl) ethane (TCE) and poly (vinyl cinnamate) (PVCi) has been studied in this paper. The self-sensing function was investigated at both the polymer level and composite laminate level. Fluorescence emissions were observed on PMC specimens subjected to low cycle fatigue load, indicating the presence of matrix cracks. Results are presented for graphite fiber reinforced composites.

  10. Behaviour of fibre reinforced polymer confined reinforced concrete columns under fire condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Ershad Ullah

    In recent years, fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) materials have demonstrated enormous potential as materials for repairing and retrofitting concrete bridges that have deteriorated from factors such as electro-chemical corrosion and increased load requirements. However, concerns associated with fire remain an obstacle to applications of FRP materials in buildings and parking garages due to FRP's sensitivity to high temperatures as compared with other structural materials and to limited knowledge on their thermal and mechanical behaviour in fire. This thesis presents results from an ongoing study on the fire performance of FRP materials, fire insulation materials and systems, and FRP wrapped reinforced concrete columns. The overall goal of the study is to understand the fire behaviour of FRP materials and FRP strengthened concrete columns and ultimately, provide rational fire safety design recommendations and guidelines for FRP strengthened concrete columns. A combined experimental and numerical investigation was conducted to achieve the goals of this research study. The experimental work consisted of both small-scale FRP material testing at elevated temperatures and full-scale fire tests on FRP strengthened columns. A numerical model was developed to simulate the behaviour of unwrapped reinforced concrete and FRP strengthened reinforced concrete square or rectangular columns in fire. After validating the numerical model against test data available in literature, it was determined that the numerical model can be used to analyze the behaviour of concrete axial compressive members in fire. Results from this study also demonstrated that although FRP materials experience considerable loss of their mechanical and bond properties at temperatures somewhat below the glass transition temperature of the resin matrix, externally-bonded FRP can be used in strengthening concrete structural members in buildings, if appropriate supplemental fire protection system is provided over

  11. Nano-Fiber Reinforced Enhancements in Composite Polymer Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2009-01-01

    Nano-fibers are used to reinforce polymer matrices to enhance the matrix dependent properties that are subsequently used in conventional structural composites. A quasi isotropic configuration is used in arranging like nano-fibers through the thickness to ascertain equiaxial enhanced matrix behavior. The nano-fiber volume ratios are used to obtain the enhanced matrix strength properties for 0.01,0.03, and 0.05 nano-fiber volume rates. These enhanced nano-fiber matrices are used with conventional fiber volume ratios of 0.3 and 0.5 to obtain the composite properties. Results show that nano-fiber enhanced matrices of higher than 0.3 nano-fiber volume ratio are degrading the composite properties.

  12. Objective Surface Evaluation of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Stuart; Hall, Wayne

    2013-08-01

    The mechanical properties of advanced composites are essential for their structural performance, but the surface finish on exterior composite panels is of critical importance for customer satisfaction. This paper describes the application of wavelet texture analysis (WTA) to the task of automatically classifying the surface finish properties of two fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite construction types (clear resin and gel-coat) into three quality grades. Samples were imaged and wavelet multi-scale decomposition was used to create a visual texture representation of the sample, capturing image features at different scales and orientations. Principal components analysis was used to reduce the dimensionality of the texture feature vector, permitting successful classification of the samples using only the first principal component. This work extends and further validates the feasibility of this approach as the basis for automated non-contact classification of composite surface finish using image analysis.

  13. Flexural analysis of palm fiber reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Raghav, Dasarath; Santhosh Kiran, R.; Mahesh, Bhargav; Kumar, Krishna

    2015-07-01

    Uncertainty in availability of fossil fuels in the future and global warming increased the need for more environment friendly materials. In this work, an attempt is made to fabricate a hybrid polymer matrix composite. The blend is a mixture of General Purpose Resin and Cashew Nut Shell Liquid, a natural resin extracted from cashew plant. Palm fiber, which has high strength, is used as reinforcement material. The fiber is treated with alkali (NaOH) solution to increase its strength and adhesiveness. Parametric study of flexure strength is carried out by varying alkali concentration, duration of alkali treatment and fiber volume. Taguchi L9 Orthogonal array is followed in the design of experiments procedure for simplification. With the help of ANOVA technique, regression equations are obtained which gives the level of influence of each parameter on the flexure strength of the composite.

  14. Polymer microcapsules with a fiber-reinforced nanocomposite shell.

    PubMed

    Sagis, Leonard M C; Ruiter, Riëlle de; Miranda, Francisco J Rossier; Ruiter, Jolet de; Schroën, Karin; Aelst, Adriaan C van; Kieft, Henk; Boom, Remko; Linden, Erik van der

    2008-03-04

    Polymer microcapsules can be used as controlled release systems in drugs or in foods. Using layer-by-layer adsorption of common food proteins and polysaccharides, we produced a new type of microcapsule with tunable strength and permeability. The shell consists of alternating layers of pectin and whey protein fibrils, yielding a fiber-reinforced nanocomposite shell. The strength can be tightly controlled by varying the number of layers or the density and length of the fibrils in the protein layers. The mechanical stability of these microcapsules appears to be superior to that of currently available multilayer capsules. The method involves only standard unit operations and has the potential for scaling up to industrial production volumes.

  15. Durability Studies on Confined Concrete using Fiber Reinforced Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponmalar, V.; Gettu, R.

    2014-06-01

    In this study, 24 concrete cylinders with a notch at the centre were prepared. Among them six cylinders were wrapped using single and double layers of fiber reinforced polymer; six cylinders were coated with epoxy resin; the remaining cylinders were used as a control. The cylinders were exposed to wet and dry cycling and acid (3 % H2SO4) solution for the period of 120 days. Two different concrete strengths M30 and M50 were considered for the study. It is found that the strength, ductility and failure mode of wrapped cylinders depend on number of layers and the nature of exposure conditions. It was noticed that the damage due to wet and dry cycling and acid attack was severe in control specimen than the epoxy coated and wrapped cylinders.

  16. Tapered Polymer Fiber Sensors for Reinforced Concrete Beam Vibration Detection

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dong; Ibrahim, Zainah; Ma, Jianxun; Ismail, Zubaidah; Iseley, David Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In this study, tapered polymer fiber sensors (TPFSs) have been employed to detect the vibration of a reinforced concrete beam (RC beam). The sensing principle was based on transmission modes theory. The natural frequency of an RC beam was theoretically analyzed. Experiments were carried out with sensors mounted on the surface or embedded in the RC beam. Vibration detection results agreed well with Kistler accelerometers. The experimental results found that both the accelerometer and TPFS detected the natural frequency function of a vibrated RC beam well. The mode shapes of the RC beam were also found by using the TPFSs. The proposed vibration detection method provides a cost-comparable solution for a structural health monitoring (SHM) system in civil engineering. PMID:27999245

  17. Bioinspired assembly of nanoplatelets for reinforced polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Han; Dou, Xuan; Jiang, Peng

    2011-04-01

    Bio-inspired assembly of platelet particles and polyelectrolytes into ordered layered nanocomposites, which mimic the brick-and-mortar nanostructure found in the nacreous layer of mollusk shells, is of great technological importance in developing light-weight reinforced materials, separation membranes, and gas-barrier coatings. Unfortunately, the widely utilized layer-by-layer self-assembly technology is tedious in creating thick multilayered coatings. Here we report a simple filtration technology that enables the scalable production of inorganic nanoplatelets-polymer nanocomposites with layered structures. Water suspended montmorillonite (MTM) nanoclay platelets are pre-mixed with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) aqueous solution to make stable colloidal suspensions. By using a simple vacuum filtration setup, ordered layered MTM nanoclay-PVA nanocomposites with controlled thickness can be easily prepared. The resulting selfstanding films exhibit higher tensile strength and toughness than those of natural inorganic-organic nanocomposites including nacre, bone, and dentin.

  18. Tapered Polymer Fiber Sensors for Reinforced Concrete Beam Vibration Detection.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dong; Ibrahim, Zainah; Ma, Jianxun; Ismail, Zubaidah; Iseley, David Thomas

    2016-12-16

    In this study, tapered polymer fiber sensors (TPFSs) have been employed to detect the vibration of a reinforced concrete beam (RC beam). The sensing principle was based on transmission modes theory. The natural frequency of an RC beam was theoretically analyzed. Experiments were carried out with sensors mounted on the surface or embedded in the RC beam. Vibration detection results agreed well with Kistler accelerometers. The experimental results found that both the accelerometer and TPFS detected the natural frequency function of a vibrated RC beam well. The mode shapes of the RC beam were also found by using the TPFSs. The proposed vibration detection method provides a cost-comparable solution for a structural health monitoring (SHM) system in civil engineering.

  19. Synthesis And Characterization Of Reduced Size Ferrite Reinforced Polymer Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Borah, Subasit; Bhattacharyya, Nidhi S.

    2008-04-24

    Small sized Co{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite particles are synthesized by chemical route. The precursor materials are annealed at 400, 600 and 800 C. The crystallographic structure and phases of the samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The annealed ferrite samples crystallized into cubic spinel structure. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) micrographs show that the average particle size of the samples are <20 nm. Particulate magneto-polymer composite materials are fabricated by reinforcing low density polyethylene (LDPE) matrix with the ferrite samples. The B-H loop study conducted at 10 kHz on the toroid shaped composite samples shows reduction in magnetic losses with decrease in size of the filler sample. Magnetic losses are detrimental for applications of ferrite at high powers. The reduction in magnetic loss shows a possible application of Co-Ni ferrites at high microwave power levels.

  20. On Healable Polymers and Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Christian Eric

    Polymeric materials capable of healing damage would be valuable in structural applications where access for repair is limited. Approaches to creating such materials are reviewed, with the present work focusing on polymers with thermally reversible covalent cross-links. These special cross-links are Diels-Alder (DA) adducts, which can be separated and re-formed, enabling healing of mechanical damage at the molecular level. Several DA-based polymers, including 2MEP4FS, are mechanically and thermally characterized. The polymerization reaction of 2MEP4FS is modeled and the number of established DA adducts is associated with the glass transition temperature of the polymer. The models are applied to concentric cylinder rotational measurements of 2MEP4FS prepolymer at room and elevated temperatures to describe the viscosity as a function of time, temperature, and conversion. Mechanical damage including cracks and scratches are imparted in cured polymer samples and subsequently healed. Damage due to high temperature thermal degradation is observed to not be reversible. The ability to repair damage without flowing polymer chains makes DA-based healable polymers particularly well-suited for crack healing. The double cleavage drilled compression (DCDC) fracture test is investigated as a useful method of creating and incrementally growing cracks in a sample. The effect of sample geometry on the fracture behavior is experimentally and computationally studied. Computational and empirical models are developed to estimate critical stress intensity factors from DCDC results. Glass and carbon fiber-reinforced composites are fabricated with 2MEP4FS as the matrix material. A prepreg process is developed that uses temperature to control the polymerization rate of the monomers and produce homogeneous prepolymer for integration with a layer of unidirectional fiber. Multiple prepreg layers are laminated to form multi-layered cross-ply healable composites, which are characterized in

  1. Release of chlorhexidine digluconate and flexural properties of glass fibre reinforced provisional fixed partial denture polymer.

    PubMed

    Lahdenperä, Milla S; Puska, Mervi A; Alander, Pasi M; Waltimo, Tuomas; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2004-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the flexural properties and the release of chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) of CHX laced unidirectional E-glass fibre reinforced provisional fixed partial denture polymer. Bar shaped test specimens (3.3 x 10.0 x 65.0 mm) were fabricated from provisional fixed partial denture polymer (mixture of poly[ethylmethacrylate] powder and n-poly[butyl methacrylate] monomer liquid) with E-glass fibre reinforcements. Poly(methyl methacrylate) preimpregnated continuous unidirectional glass fibre reinforcement was laced with CHX. The glass fibre reinforcements were incorporated into the polymer and the polymerised to the form of test specimens. In addition test specimens without CHX in glass fibre reinforcement were made for comparison. Control specimens did not contain glass fibres in the test specimens. Flexural strength and modulus of test specimens (n = 6) was tested with three-point bending test after storing the specimens dry or in water (two weeks). Released CHX was determined with high performance liquid chromatography during 180 days water immersion. In dry conditions, the flexural strength and the modulus of the polymer was 43 MPa and 1.7 GPa, and with glass fibre reinforcement 96 MPa and 3.5 GPa. With the reinforcement laced with CHX, the strength was 92 MPa and the modulus was 3.2 GPa. The water storage of test specimens did not weaken the reinforced polymer. The majority of the CHX released from the glass fibre reinforced polymer during the first days of storage in water. Flexural properties of provisional fixed partial denture polymer were increased using glass fibre reinforcement. The fibre reinforcement that was laced with CHX resulted in similar reinforcing effect.

  2. Polymer-Reinforced, Non-Brittle, Lightweight Cryogenic Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The primary application for cryogenic insulating foams will be fuel tank applications for fueling systems. It is crucial for this insulation to be incorporated into systems that survive vacuum and terrestrial environments. It is hypothesized that by forming an open-cell silica-reinforced polymer structure, the foam structures will exhibit the necessary strength to maintain shape. This will, in turn, maintain the insulating capabilities of the foam insulation. Besides mechanical stability in the form of crush resistance, it is important for these insulating materials to exhibit water penetration resistance. Hydrocarbon-terminated foam surfaces were implemented to impart hydrophobic functionality that apparently limits moisture penetration through the foam. During the freezing process, water accumulates on the surfaces of the foams. However, when hydrocarbon-terminated surfaces are present, water apparently beads and forms crystals, leading to less apparent accumulation. The object of this work is to develop inexpensive structural cryogenic insulation foam that has increased impact resistance for launch and ground-based cryogenic systems. Two parallel approaches will be pursued: a silica-polymer co-foaming technique and a post foam coating technique. Insulation characteristics, flexibility, and water uptake can be fine-tuned through the manipulation of the polyurethane foam scaffold. Silicate coatings for polyurethane foams and aerogel-impregnated polyurethane foams have been developed and tested. A highly porous aerogel-like material may be fabricated using a co-foam and coated foam techniques, and can insulate at liquid temperatures using the composite foam

  3. Flexural strength,water sorption and solubility of a methylmethacrylate-free denture base polymer reinforced with glass fibre reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Mutluay, M M; Tezvergil-Mutluay, A; Vallittu, P; Lassila, L

    2013-12-01

    A methylmethacrylate-free denture base polymer (Eclipse) in comparison to a conventional denture base polymer (Palapress vario) was evaluated after water saturation and Stick glass fibre reinforcement. The data were analysed with ANOVA at a = 0.05. Water-storage caused a decrease in the flexural strength and stiffness of the materials (p > 0.05). Conventional denture base material with fibre reinforcement gave highest flexural strength (201.1 MPa) compared to fibre reinforced Eclipse (79.1 MPa) (p < 0.05). Water sorption after 76 days was 2.08% (Palapress vario) and 1.55% (Eclipse). Fibre-reinforcement of methylmethacrylate-free material was not as successful as conventional denture base and needs to be further optimized.

  4. Tensile properties of glass/natural jute fibre-reinforced polymer bars for concrete reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J. W.; Lee, S. K.; Kim, K. W.; Park, C. G.

    2015-12-01

    The tensile performance of glass/natural jute fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) bar, intended for concrete reinforcement was evaluated as a function of volume fraction of natural jute fibre. Natural jute fibre, mixed at a ratio of 7:3 with vinyl ester, was surface-treated with a silane coupling agent and used to replaced glass fibre in the composite in volume fractions of 0%, 30%, 50%, 70%, and 100%. The tensile load-displacement curve showed nearly linear elastic behaviour up to 50% natural jute fibre, but was partially nonlinear at a proportion of 70%. However, the glass/natural jute FRP bars prepared using 100% natural jute fibre showed linear elastic behaviour. Tensile strength decreased as the natural jute fibre volume fraction increased because the tensile strength of natural jute fibre is much lower than that of glass fibre (about 1:8.65). The degree of reduction was not proportional to the natural jute fibre volume fraction due to the low density of natural jute fibre (1/2 that of glass fibre). Thus, as the mix proportion of natural jute fibre increased, the amount (wt%) and number of fibres used also increased.

  5. A review on the cords & plies reinforcement of elastomeric polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, S. S.; Husin, H.; Mat-Shayuti, M. S.; Hassan, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Steel, polyester, nylon and rayon are the main materials of cords & plies that have been reinforced in the natural rubber to produce quality tyres but there is few research reported on cord and plies reinforcement in silicone rubber. Taking the innovation of tyres as inspiration, this review's first objective is to compile the comprehensive studies about the cords & plies reinforcement in elastomeric polymer matrix. The second objective is to gather information about silicone rubber that has a high potential as a matrix phase for cords and plies reinforcement. All the tests and findings are gathered and compiled in sections namely processing preparation, curing, physical and mechanical properties, and adhesion between cords-polymer.

  6. Aramid nanofiber-functionalized graphene nanosheets for polymer reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jinchen; Shi, Zixing; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Jialiang; Yin, Jie

    2012-10-01

    Aramid macroscale fibers, also called Kevlar fibers, exhibit extremely high mechanical performance. Previous studies have demonstrated that bulk aramid macroscale fibers can be effectively split into aramid nanofibers (ANFs) by dissolution in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in the presence of potassium hydroxide (KOH). In this paper, we first introduced the ANFs into the structure of graphene nanosheets through non-covalent functionalization through π-π stacking interactions. Aramid nanofiber-functionalized graphene sheets (ANFGS) were successfully obtained by adding the graphene oxide (GO)/DMSO dispersion into the ANFs/DMSO solution followed by reduction with hydrazine hydrate. The ANFGS, with ANFs absorbed on the surface of the graphene nanosheets, can be easily exfoliated and dispersed in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). Through a combination of these two ultra-strong materials, ANFs and graphene nanosheets (GS), the resultant ANFGS can act as novel nanofillers for polymer reinforcement. We used the ANFGS as an additive for reinforcing the mechanical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). With a loading of 0.7 wt% of the ANFGS, the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the ANFGS/PMMA composite film approached 63.2 MPa and 3.42 GPa, which are increases of ~84.5% and ~70.6%, respectively. The thermal stabilities of ANFGS/PMMA composite films were improved by the addition of ANFGS. Additionally, the transparencies of the ANFGS/PMMA composite films have a degree of UV-shielding due to the ultraviolet light absorption of the ANFs in the ANFGS.Aramid macroscale fibers, also called Kevlar fibers, exhibit extremely high mechanical performance. Previous studies have demonstrated that bulk aramid macroscale fibers can be effectively split into aramid nanofibers (ANFs) by dissolution in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in the presence of potassium hydroxide (KOH). In this paper, we first introduced the ANFs into the structure of graphene nanosheets through non

  7. Aramid nanofiber-functionalized graphene nanosheets for polymer reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinchen; Shi, Zixing; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Jialiang; Yin, Jie

    2012-11-21

    Aramid macroscale fibers, also called Kevlar fibers, exhibit extremely high mechanical performance. Previous studies have demonstrated that bulk aramid macroscale fibers can be effectively split into aramid nanofibers (ANFs) by dissolution in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in the presence of potassium hydroxide (KOH). In this paper, we first introduced the ANFs into the structure of graphene nanosheets through non-covalent functionalization through π-π stacking interactions. Aramid nanofiber-functionalized graphene sheets (ANFGS) were successfully obtained by adding the graphene oxide (GO)/DMSO dispersion into the ANFs/DMSO solution followed by reduction with hydrazine hydrate. The ANFGS, with ANFs absorbed on the surface of the graphene nanosheets, can be easily exfoliated and dispersed in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). Through a combination of these two ultra-strong materials, ANFs and graphene nanosheets (GS), the resultant ANFGS can act as novel nanofillers for polymer reinforcement. We used the ANFGS as an additive for reinforcing the mechanical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). With a loading of 0.7 wt% of the ANFGS, the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the ANFGS/PMMA composite film approached 63.2 MPa and 3.42 GPa, which are increases of ∼84.5% and ∼70.6%, respectively. The thermal stabilities of ANFGS/PMMA composite films were improved by the addition of ANFGS. Additionally, the transparencies of the ANFGS/PMMA composite films have a degree of UV-shielding due to the ultraviolet light absorption of the ANFs in the ANFGS.

  8. Nondestructive Evaluation of Advanced Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites: A Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yolken, H. Thomas; Matzkanin, George A.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their increasing utilization in structural applications, the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites continues to receive considerable research and development attention. Due to the heterogeneous nature of composites, the form of defects is often very different from a metal and fracture mechanisms are more complex. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview and technology assessment of the current state-of-the-art with respect to NDE of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  9. Thermal diffusivity measurements on porous carbon fiber reinforced polymer tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Jürgen; Gresslehner, Karl Heinz; Mayr, Günther; Hendorfer, Günther

    2017-02-01

    This work presents the application of methods for the determination of the thermal diffusivity well suited for flat bodies adapted to cylindrical bodies. Green's functions were used to get the temperature time history for small and large times, for the approach of intersecting these two straight lines. To verify the theoretical considerations noise free data are generated by finite element simulations. Furthermore effects of inhomogeneous excitation and the anisotropic heat conduction of carbon fiber reinforced polymers were taken into account in these numerical simulations. It could be shown that the intersection of the two straight lines is suitable for the determination of the thermal diffusivity, although the results have to be corrected depending on the ratio of the cylinders inner and outer radii. Inhomogeneous excitation affects the results of this approach as it lead to multidimensional heat flux. However, based on the numerical simulations a range of the azimuthal angle exists, where the thermal diffusivity is nearly independent of the angle. The method to determine the thermal diffusivity for curved geometries by the well suited Thermographic Signal Reconstruction method and taking into account deviations from the slab by a single correction factor has great advantages from an industrial point of view, just like an easy implementation into evaluation software and the Thermographic Signal Reconstruction methods rather short processing time.

  10. Life Cycle Assessment of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sujit

    2011-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites is gaining momentum with the pressure to lightweight vehicles, however energy-intensity and cost remain some of the major barriers before this material could be used in large-scale automotive applications. A representative automotive part, i.e., a 30.8 kg steel floor pan having a 17% weight reduction potential with stringent cash performance requirements has been considered for the life cycle energy and emissions analysis based on the latest developments occurring in the precursor type (conventional textile-based PAN vs. renewable-based lignin), part manufacturing (conventional SMC vs. P4) and fiber recycling technologies. Carbon fiber production is estimated to be about 14 times more energy-intensive than conventional steel production, however life cycle primary energy use is estimated to be quite similar to the conventional part, i.e., 18,500 MJ/part, especially when considering the uncertainty in LCI data that exists from using numerous sources in the literature. Lignin P4 technology offers the most life cycle energy and CO2 emissions benefits compared to a conventional stamped steel technology. With a 20% reduction in energy use in the lignin conversion to carbon fiber and free availability of lignin as a by-product of ethanol and wood production, a 30% reduction in life cycle energy use could be obtained. A similar level of life cycle energy savings could also be obtained with a higher part weight reduction potential of 43%.

  11. The grindability of glass fibre reinforced polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chockalingam, P.

    The use of glass fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite materials is extensive due to their favourable mechanical properties and near net shape production. However, almost all composite structures require post-processing operations such as grinding to meet surface finish requirements during assembly. Unlike that of conventional metal, grinding of GFRP composite needs special tools and parameters due to the abrasive nature of fibres and the delamination of the workpiece. Therefore, proper selection of the tools and parameters is important. This research aims to investigate the effects of wheel speed, feed, depth of cut, grinding wheel and coolant on the grindability of chopped strand mat (CSM) GFRP. Grinding was carried out in a precision CNC (Master-10HVA) high-speed machining centre under three conditions, namely dry, and wet conditions with synthetic coolant and emulsion coolant, using alumina wheel (OA46QV) and CBN wheel (B46QV). The grinding experiments were conducted per the central composite design of design of experiments. The grindability aspects investigated were surface area roughness (Sa) and cutting force ratio (µ). The responses were analyzed by developing fuzzy logic models. The surface area roughness and cutting force ratio values predicted by the fuzzy logic models are mostly in good agreement with experimental data, and hence conclusion was made that these models were reliable.

  12. Structure-processing-property relationships for polymer interphases in fiber reinforced composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drzal, L.T.

    1995-12-31

    When polymer matrix composite materials are fabricated, polymers are processed to surround each reinforcing element while they are fluid and then they solidify in intimate contact with the reinforcement surface. For thermoset matrices, chemisorption of constituents, segregation of components. and processing constraints all can influence the resulting structure of the polymer in its solidified state. For thermoplastic matrices, segregation by molecular weight, morphological changes resulting from crystallization or additive segregation can also control the final matrix structure. In addition the surface of the fibers is coated with chemical agents that can also interact with the polymer. Examples will be given to illustrate the effect of the structure of this polymer interphase on adhesion. It will be shown that in some cases if the resulting polymer structure is known, adhesion and composite properties can be predicted.

  13. Unraveling the Mechanism of Nanoscale Mechanical Reinforcement in Glassy Polymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shiwang; Bocharova, Vera; Belianinov, Alex; Xiong, Shaomin; Kisliuk, Alexander; Somnath, Suhas; Holt, Adam P.; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Jesse, Stephen; Martin, Halie J.; Etampawala, Thusitha N.; Dadmun, Mark D.; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2016-05-20

    The mechanical reinforcement of polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) above the glass transition temperature, Tg, has been extensively researched. However, not much is known about the origin of this effect below Tg. In this paper, we unravel the mechanism of PNC reinforcement within the glassy state by directly probing nanoscale mechanical properties with atomic force microscopy and macroscopic properties with Brillouin light scattering. Our results unambiguously show that the "glassy" Young's modulus in the interfacial polymer layer of PNCs is two-times higher than in the bulk polymer, which results in significant reinforcement below Tg. We ascribe this phenomenon to a high stretching of the chains within the interfacial layer. Since the interfacial chain packing is essentially temperature independent, these findings provide a new insight into the mechanical reinforcement of PNCs also above Tg.

  14. Unraveling the Mechanism of Nanoscale Mechanical Reinforcement in Glassy Polymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shiwang; Bocharova, Vera; Belianinov, Alex; Xiong, Shaomin; Kisliuk, Alexander; Somnath, Suhas; Holt, Adam P.; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Jesse, Stephen; Martin, Halie J.; Etampawala, Thusitha N.; Dadmun, Mark D.; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2016-05-20

    The mechanical reinforcement of polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) above the glass transition temperature, Tg, has been extensively researched. However, not much is known about the origin of this effect below Tg. In this paper, we unravel the mechanism of PNC reinforcement within the glassy state by directly probing nanoscale mechanical properties with atomic force microscopy and macroscopic properties with Brillouin light scattering. Our results unambiguously show that the "glassy" Young's modulus in the interfacial polymer layer of PNCs is two-times higher than in the bulk polymer, which results in significant reinforcement below Tg. We ascribe this phenomenon to a high stretching of the chains within the interfacial layer. Since the interfacial chain packing is essentially temperature independent, these findings provide a new insight into the mechanical reinforcement of PNCs also above Tg.

  15. Unraveling the Mechanism of Nanoscale Mechanical Reinforcement in Glassy Polymer Nanocomposites

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Shiwang; Bocharova, Vera; Belianinov, Alex; ...

    2016-05-20

    The mechanical reinforcement of polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) above the glass transition temperature, Tg, has been extensively researched. However, not much is known about the origin of this effect below Tg. In this paper, we unravel the mechanism of PNC reinforcement within the glassy state by directly probing nanoscale mechanical properties with atomic force microscopy and macroscopic properties with Brillouin light scattering. Our results unambiguously show that the "glassy" Young's modulus in the interfacial polymer layer of PNCs is two-times higher than in the bulk polymer, which results in significant reinforcement below Tg. We ascribe this phenomenon to a high stretchingmore » of the chains within the interfacial layer. Since the interfacial chain packing is essentially temperature independent, these findings provide a new insight into the mechanical reinforcement of PNCs also above Tg.« less

  16. Health monitoring of precast bridge deck panels reinforced with glass fiber reinforced polymer bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, James Mcdaniel

    The Beaver Creek Bridge on US highway 6 is the pilot project for Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) bridge decks and posttensioned bridge decks in the state of Utah. The bridge was built in 2009, using accelerated bridge construction practices, including the use of precast prestressed girders, as well as precast decking. The westbound bridge decking was composed of 12 precast panels each measuring 41'-5" long, 6'-10" wide, and 9¼" thick, and weighing approximately 33 kips. At the time, these panels were the longest GFRP panels in the United States. The Utah Department of Transportation has decided to evaluate GFRP reinforcing bars as an alternative to steel rebar in this bridge deck. The hope is to increase the lifespan of bridge decks to match the service life of the entire bridge. Due to the nature of the GFRP bars, the panels were lifted at four points using straps instead of imbedded anchors. During the four-point lifting, the panels exhibited small deflections and strains; furthermore, no cracks larger than hairline cracks were found in the panels after lifting. The Beaver Creek Bridge deck is the first precast deck in the state of Utah to be posttensioned in the direction of traffic. Posttensioning bridge decks is expected to become the norm in the state of Utah. The posttensioning resulted in increased continuity between panels. In order to quantify the expected performance of the bridge during its service life, a truck load test was performed. The truck load test was comprised of a static and dynamic test. During the truck load test, the bridge experienced deflections in the panels which were 93% below design values. Girder deflections were also small. The use of GFRP bars has the potential to extend the life of bridge decks exposed to deicing salts from 45 years to 100 years, while only requiring an increased capital cost in the bridge of 8%. Furthermore, the use of GFRP bars in conjunction with accelerated building practices has the potential to

  17. Design guidelines for steel-reinforced polymer concrete using resins based on recycled PET

    SciTech Connect

    Rebeiz, K.S.; Fowler, D.W.

    1996-10-01

    Very little research has been done on the structural behavior of steel-reinforced polymer concrete (PC). In all the previous studies, it was generally assumed that the structural behavior of reinforced PC is similar to the structural behavior of reinforced portland cement concrete because both are composite materials consisting of a binder and inorganic aggregates. However, the design equations developed for steel-reinforced portland cement concrete yield very conservative results when applied to reinforced PC. The objective of this paper is to recommend simple, yet effective design guidelines in shear and flexure for steel-reinforced PC. The recommended design procedures are mostly based on test results performed on PC beams using resins based on recycled poly(ethyleneterephthalate), PET, plastic waste (the PET waste is mainly recovered from used beverage bottles). Previous studies have shown that polyester resins based on recycled PET can produce very good quality PC at a potentially lower cost.

  18. Development of wind turbine towers using fiber reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungkurapinan, Nibong

    With an ongoing trend in the wind turbine market, the size of wind turbines has been increasing continuously. Larger wind turbines imply an increase in size, weight, and loads acting on the wind turbine tower. This requires towers to be stronger and stiffer, and consequently leads to bigger tower diameters. Because of their size and weight, transportation and erection require heavy equipment that makes the use of such towers prohibitive in remote communities. To tackle this problem, a research program was initiated at the University of Manitoba to develop the technology required for the fabrication of wind turbine towers constructed of fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) for use in remote communities in Canada. The research program was carried out in stages. During the first stage, a feasibility study and an analytical investigation on various shapes of FRP towers were conducted. The concept of a multi-cellular composite tower was examined in great detail and the finite element results showed that such a tower could result in almost 45 percent reduction in weight. In the second stage of this research program, a robotic filament winding machine was designed and constructed in the Composites Laboratory of the University of Manitoba. It was used to fabricate the multi-cell tower specimens for testing. The third stage of the research program involved the experimental investigation, which was carried out in three phases. In the first phase, two single cell specimens were tested to failure under lateral loading. The specimens were 8 ft (2.44 m) long. The second phase involved the testing of two single cells loaded in compression. The third phase of the experimental investigation involved the testing of two eight-cell jointed tower specimens. The specimens were octagonal and tapered, with a diameter of 21.4 in (543 mm) at the base and 17.4 in (441 mm) at the top. They were 16 ft (4.88 m) in height and tested as cantilever under static loading. Local buckling was the dominant

  19. Evaluation of post-fire strength of concrete flexural members reinforced with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Devon S.

    Owing to their corrosion resistance and superior strength to weight ratio, there has been, over the past two decades, increased interest in the use of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) reinforcing bars in reinforced concrete structural members. The mechanical behavior of FRP reinforcement differs from that of steel reinforcement. For example, FRP reinforcement exhibit a linear stress-strain behavior until the bar ruptures and the strength, stiffness and bond properties of FRP reinforcement are affected more adversely by elevated temperatures. All structures are subject to the risk of damage by fire and fires continue to be a significant cause of damage to structures. Many structures do not collapse after being exposed to fire. The safety of the structure for any future use is dependent on the ability to accurately estimate the post-fire load capacity of the structure. Assuming that the changes, due to fire exposure, in the mechanical behavior of the GFRP reinforcing bar and concrete, and the bond between the reinforcing bar and the concrete are understood, an analytical procedure for estimating the post-fire strength of GFRP reinforced concrete flexural elements can be developed. This thesis investigates the changes in: a) tensile properties and bond of GFRP bars; and b) the flexural behavior of GFRP reinforced concrete beams flexural after being exposed to elevated temperatures up to 400°C and cooled to ambient temperature. To this end, twelve tensile tests, twelve pullout bond tests and ten four-point beam tests were performed. The data from the tests were used to formulate analytical procedures for evaluating the post-fire strength of GFRP reinforced concrete beams. The procedure produced conservative results when compared with the experimental data. In general, the residual tensile strength and modulus of elasticity of GFRP bars decrease as the exposure temperature increases. The loss in properties is however, smaller than that observed by other researchers when

  20. Mechanical reinforcement and segmental dynamics of polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Shushan

    The addition of nanofiller into a polymer matrix will dramatically change the physical properties of polymer. The introduction of nanofiller makes the polymer more applicable in many industries, such as automobile tires, coatings, semiconductors, and packaging. The altered properties are not the simple combination of the characters from the two components. The interactions in polymer nanocomposites play an important role in determining the physical properties. This dissertation focuses on the mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites (silica/poly-2-vinylpyridine) above their glass transition temperature Tg, as a model for automobile tires, which utilize small silica particles in crosslinked rubber far above Tg. We also investigate the impacts of the interaction between particle filler and polymer matrix on the altered mechanical properties. Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS) is used to study the glassy bound polymer layers formed around the particles. The results show evidence of the existence of immobilized polymer layers at the surface of each nanoparticle. At the same time, the thickness of the immobilized polymer layers is quantified and formed to be around 2 nm. Then we consider particles with glassy bound polymer layers are bridged together (either rubbery bridge or glassy bridge) by polymer chains and form small clusters. Clusters finally percolate to form a particle-polymer network as loading fraction increases. Rheology is used to study the network formation, and to predict the boundary of rubbery bridge and glassy bridge regimes. The distance between particles determines the type of polymer bridging. The particle spacing larger than Kuhn length makes flexible (rubbery) bridge with rheology described by a flexible Rouse model for percolation. When the spacing is shorter than the Kuhn length (~ 1nm), stiffer bridge forms instead, which is called glassy bridge. The mechanical differences between rubbery bridge and glassy bridge, and the effect of

  1. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of CNT and CNF Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadek, M.; Le Foulgoc, B.; Coleman, J. N.; Barron, V.; Sandler, J.; Shaffer, M. S. P.; Fonseca, A.; van Es, M.; Schulte, K.; Blau, W. J.

    2002-10-01

    In this research study carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibres were investigated as possible reinforcements to improve the mechanical and thermal properties of several polymer matrix systems. A range of polymer matrices were examined and include polyvinyl alcohol, poly(9-vinyl carbazole) and polyamide. To compare production methods, polymer composite films and fibres were produced. It was found by adding various mass fractions of nanofillers, that both the Young's modulus and hardness increased dramatically for both films and fibres. In addition, the thermal behaviour was seen to be strongly dependent on the nanofillers added to the polymer matrices.

  2. Flexural properties of glass fibre reinforced acrylic resin polymers.

    PubMed

    Tacir, I H; Kama, J D; Zortuk, M; Eskimez, S

    2006-03-01

    In recent years, glass fibres have been used to strengthen denture base resins. A major difficulty in using reinforcing fibres with multiphase acrylic resins, such as powder liquid resins, is inadequate impregnation of the fibres with the resin. This investigation examined the reinforcing effect of glass fibres on the fracture resistance and flexural strength of acrylic denture base resins. Eighty identical specimens were formed in specially designed moulds in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. The four experimental groups were prepared and these consisted of conventional acrylic resin and the same resin reinforced with glass fibres. Ten specimens were fabricated in a standardized fashion for each experimental group. Flexural strength was tested using a 3-point universal testing machine. In this study, statistically significant differences were found in the flexural strength of the specimens (P < 0.05). The injection-moulded, fibre-reinforced group had significantly lower flexural strength than the injection-moulded group (P < 0.001), strength than the microwave-moulded, fibre-reinforced group (P < 0.001), and the microwave-moulded, fibre-reinforced group had lower flexural strength than the microwave-moulded group. The fracture resistance was significantly higher in the injection-moulded, fibre-reinforced group than in the injection-moulded group (P < 0.05), and the fracture resistance was significantly higher in the microwave-moulded, fibre-reinforced group than in the microwave-moulded group. Within the limitations of this study, the flexural strength of heat-polymerized PMMA denture resin was improved after reinforcement with glass fibres. It may be possible to apply these results to distal extension partial and complete denture bases.

  3. Extraordinary synergy in the mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites reinforced with 2 nanocarbons.

    PubMed

    Prasad, K Eswar; Das, Barun; Maitra, Urmimala; Ramamurty, Upadrasta; Rao, C N R

    2009-08-11

    One of the applications of nanomaterials is as reinforcements in composites, wherein small additions of nanomaterials lead to large enhancements in mechanical properties. There have been extensive studies in the literature on composites where a polymer matrix is reinforced by a single nanomaterial such as carbon nanotubes. In this article, we examine the significant synergistic effects observed when 2 different types of nanocarbons are incorporated in a polymer matrix. Thus, binary combinations of nanodiamond, few-layer graphene, and single-walled nanotubes have been used to reinforce polyvinyl alcohol. The mechanical properties of the resulting composites, evaluated by the nanoindentation technique, show extraordinary synergy, improving the stiffness and hardness by as much as 400% compared to those obtained with single nanocarbon reinforcements. These results suggest a way of designing advanced materials with extraordinary mechanical properties by incorporating small amounts of 2 nanomaterials such as graphene plus nanodiamond or nanodiamond plus carbon nanotube.

  4. Extraordinary synergy in the mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites reinforced with 2 nanocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, K. Eswar; Das, Barun; Maitra, Urmimala; Ramamurty, Upadrasta; Rao, C. N. R.

    2009-01-01

    One of the applications of nanomaterials is as reinforcements in composites, wherein small additions of nanomaterials lead to large enhancements in mechanical properties. There have been extensive studies in the literature on composites where a polymer matrix is reinforced by a single nanomaterial such as carbon nanotubes. In this article, we examine the significant synergistic effects observed when 2 different types of nanocarbons are incorporated in a polymer matrix. Thus, binary combinations of nanodiamond, few-layer graphene, and single-walled nanotubes have been used to reinforce polyvinyl alcohol. The mechanical properties of the resulting composites, evaluated by the nanoindentation technique, show extraordinary synergy, improving the stiffness and hardness by as much as 400% compared to those obtained with single nanocarbon reinforcements. These results suggest a way of designing advanced materials with extraordinary mechanical properties by incorporating small amounts of 2 nanomaterials such as graphene plus nanodiamond or nanodiamond plus carbon nanotube. PMID:19651605

  5. Low-Cost Nanocellulose-Reinforced High-Temperature Polymer Composites for Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, Soydan; Tekinalp, Halil L.; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Nelson, Kim

    2016-07-13

    ORNL worked with American Process Inc. to demonstrate the potential use of bio-based BioPlus® lignin-coated cellulose nanofibrils (L-CNF) as a reinforcing agent in the development of polymer feedstock suitable for additive manufacturing. L-CNF-reinforced polylactic acid (PLA) testing coupons were prepared and up to 69% increase in tensile strength and 133% increase in elastic modulus were demonstrated.

  6. Neutron scattering as a probe of liquid crystal polymer-reinforced composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelm, R.P.; Douglas, E.P.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Langlois, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This research project sought to obtain nanoscale and molecular level information on the mechanism of reinforcement in liquid crystal polymer (LCP)-reinforced composites, to realize molecular-reinforced LCP composites, and to test the validity of the concept of molecular reinforcement. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to study the structures in the ternary phase diagram of LCP with liquid crystal thermosets and solvent on length scales ranging from 1-100 nm. The goal of the scattering measurements is to understand the phase morphology and degree of segregation of the reinforcing and matrix components. This information helps elucidate the physics of self assembly in these systems. This work provides an experimental basis for a microengineering approach to composites of vastly improved properties.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation for insight into microscopic mechanism of polymer reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Wu, Sizhu; Zhang, Liqun; Wang, Wenchuan; Cao, Dapeng

    2011-01-14

    By employing an idealized model of a polymer network and filler, we have investigated the stress-strain behavior by tuning the filler loading and polymer-filler interaction in a broad range. The simulated results indicate that there actually exists an optimal filler volume fraction (between 23% and 32%) for elastomer reinforcement with attractive polymer-filler interaction. To realize this reinforcement, the rubber-filler interaction should be slightly stronger than the rubber-rubber interaction, while excessive chemical couplings are harmful to mechanical properties. Meanwhile, our simulated results qualitatively reproduce the experimental data of Bokobza. By introducing enough chemical coupling between the rubber and the filler, an upturn in the modulus at large deformation is observed in the Mooney-Rivlin plot, attributed to the limited chain extensibility at large deformation. Particularly, the filler dispersion state in the polymer networks is also characterized in detail. It is the first demonstration via simulation that the reinforcement mechanism stems from the nanoparticle-induced chain alignment and orientation, as well as the limited extensibility of chain bridges formed between neighboring nanoparticles at large deformation. The former is influenced by the filler amount, filler size and filler-rubber interaction, and the latter becomes more obvious by strengthening the physical and chemical interactions between the rubber and the filler. Remarkably, the reason for no obvious reinforcing effect in filled glassy or semi-crystalline matrices is also demonstrated. It is expected that this preliminary study of nanoparticle-induced mechanical reinforcement will provide a solid basis for further insightful investigation of polymer reinforcement.

  8. Influence of cyclic freeze-thaw on the parameters of the electric response to the pulse mechanical excitation of concrete reinforced by glass fibre reinforced polymer bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fursa, T. V.; Petrov, M. V.; Korzenok, I. N.

    2016-02-01

    Studies of the influence of cyclic freeze-thaw on the parameters of electric response from samples of concrete reinforced by glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars were conducted. It is found that an increase in the number of freeze-thaw cycles increases the attenuation coefficient of energy of electric responses and moves the centre of gravity of spectrum to the low-frequency area. The results can be used to develop a method of nondestructive testing of reinforced concrete.

  9. Elastic behavior of CNT-reinforced polymer composites with discontinuities in CNT configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Puneet; Srinivas, J., Dr.

    2017-02-01

    A numerical study has been made towards the effective elastic properties estimation of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube reinforced composite using finite element modelling (FEM). First, the elastic properties of Carbon nanotube (CNT) were predicted by considering that carbon atoms as nodes and carbon-carbon bonds as beam elements with linear and isotropic behaviour. It was observed that elastic properties of CNT predicted by FE analysis were in good agreement with previous data. Carbon atom vacancy defects were also included to investigate the adverse effect on elastic modulus of SWCNTs. To explore the macroscopic elastic behaviour of CNT in a finite densely packed polymer resin, a representative volume element (RVE) was selected instead of whole composite material in which the polymer resin was modelled as continuum material while CNT as an equivalent long fibre. FE results of RVE manifest that the CNT volume fraction and waviness have significant effect on elastic modulus of CNT reinforced polymer composite. An analytical formulation in terms of elastic properties and waviness ratio was also introduced in this study for waviness analysis. Moreover, the elastic properties of wavy CNT reinforced composite was compared with analytical outcomes. We extended present RVE model to incorporate the effects of CNTs agglomeration on the elastic behaviour of CNT-reinforced polymer composites. It was observed that anticipated elastic results not only depended on the volume fraction of CNTs, but also on the CNTs geometry, waviness and agglomeration.

  10. Preparation and characterization of glass fibers - polymers (epoxy) bars (GFRP) reinforced concrete for structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkjk, Saeed; Jabra, Rafee; Alkhater, Salem

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents some of the results from a large experimental program undertaken at the Department of Civil Engineering of Damascus University. The project aims to study the ability to reinforce and strengthen the concrete by bars from Epoxy polymer reinforced with glass fibers (GFRP) and compared with reinforce concrete by steel bars in terms of mechanical properties. Five diameters of GFRP bars, and steel bars (4mm, 6mm, 8mm, 10mm, 12mm) tested on tensile strength tests. The test shown that GFRP bars need tensile strength more than steel bars. The concrete beams measuring (15cm wide × 15cm deep × and 70cm long) reinforced by GFRP with 0.5 vol.% ratio, then the concrete beams reinforced by steel with 0.89 vol.% ratio. The concrete beams tested on deflection test. The test shown that beams which reinforced by GFRP has higher deflection resistance, than beams which reinforced by steel. Which give more advantage to reinforced concrete by GFRP.

  11. Nanostructure enhanced ionic transport in fullerene reinforced solid polymer electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Che-Nan; Zawodzinski, Thomas A; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E; Ren, Fei; Keum, Jong Kahk; Bi, Sheng; Li, Dawen; Ahn, Suk-Kyun; Hong, Kunlun; Rondinone, Adam J; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y; Do, Changwoo; Sumpter, Bobby G; Chen, Jihua

    2015-03-28

    Solid polymer electrolytes, such as polyethylene oxide (PEO) based systems, have the potential to replace liquid electrolytes in secondary lithium batteries with flexible, safe, and mechanically robust designs. Previously reported PEO nanocomposite electrolytes routinely use metal oxide nanoparticles that are often 5-10 nm in diameter or larger. The mechanism of those oxide particle-based polymer nanocomposite electrolytes is under debate and the ion transport performance of these systems is still to be improved. Herein we report a 6-fold ion conductivity enhancement in PEO/lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (LiTFSI)-based solid electrolytes upon the addition of fullerene derivatives. The observed conductivity improvement correlates with nanometer-scale fullerene crystallite formation, reduced crystallinities of both the (PEO)6:LiTFSI phase and pure PEO, as well as a significantly larger PEO free volume. This improved performance is further interpreted by enhanced decoupling between ion transport and polymer segmental motion, as well as optimized permittivity and conductivity in bulk and grain boundaries. This study suggests that nanoparticle induced morphological changes, in a system with fullerene nanoparticles and no Lewis acidic sites, play critical roles in their ion conductivity enhancement. The marriage of fullerene derivatives and solid polymer electrolytes opens up significant opportunities in designing next-generation solid polymer electrolytes with improved performance.

  12. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, which allows a shape to be formed prior to the cure, and is then pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Basalt fibers are used for the reinforcement in the composite system. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material.

  13. Filler-polymer bonding and its role in elastomer reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ping, Mark, J.E.

    1993-12-31

    Iron oxide particles were blended into samples of cis-1,4-polybutadiene and polyisobutylene, and both the unfilled polymers and the resulting polymer-filler mixture were cured with benzoyl peroxide. The filled networks were cloudy, but strips extracted using a toluene-hydrochloric acid mixture became as clear as the unfilled networks, suggesting removal of the filler particles. Equilibrium swelling and stress-strain measurements in elongation were carried out the unfilled elastomer and on the filled ones, both before and after extraction. There were no significant differences between the stress-strain isotherms and degrees of equilibrium swelling of the unfilled networks and the corresponding properties of the previously-filled networks after the filler particles were removed. This suggests that for these systems, the bonding between the filler particles and the polymer chains is physical rather than chemical.

  14. Polymer reinforcement using liquid-exfoliated boron nitride nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Umar; May, Peter; O'Neill, Arlene; Bell, Alan P.; Boussac, Elodie; Martin, Arnaud; Semple, James; Coleman, Jonathan N.

    2012-12-01

    We have exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride by ultrasonication in solutions of polyvinylalcohol in water. The resultant nanosheets are sterically stabilised by adsorbed polymer chains. Centrifugation-based size-selection was used to give dispersions of nanosheets with aspect ratio (length/thickness) of ~1400. Such dispersions can be used to produce polyvinylalcohol-BN composite films. Helium ion microscopy of fracture surfaces shows the nanosheets to be well dispersed and the composites to fail by pull-out. We find both modulus, Y, and strength, σB, of these composites to increase linearly with volume fraction, Vf, up to Vf ~ 0.1 vol% BN before falling off. The rates of increase are extremely high; dY/dVf = 670 GPa and dσB/dVf = 47 GPa. The former value matches theory based on continuum mechanics while the latter value is consistent with remarkably high polymer-filler interfacial strength. However, because the mechanical properties increase over such a narrow volume fraction range, the maximum values of both modulus and strength are only ~40% higher than the pure polymer. This phenomenon has also been observed for graphene-filled composites and represents a serious hurdle to the production of high performance polymer-nanosheet composites.We have exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride by ultrasonication in solutions of polyvinylalcohol in water. The resultant nanosheets are sterically stabilised by adsorbed polymer chains. Centrifugation-based size-selection was used to give dispersions of nanosheets with aspect ratio (length/thickness) of ~1400. Such dispersions can be used to produce polyvinylalcohol-BN composite films. Helium ion microscopy of fracture surfaces shows the nanosheets to be well dispersed and the composites to fail by pull-out. We find both modulus, Y, and strength, σB, of these composites to increase linearly with volume fraction, Vf, up to Vf ~ 0.1 vol% BN before falling off. The rates of increase are extremely high; dY/dVf = 670 GPa and d

  15. Further weight reduction of applications in long glass reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanev, A.; Schijve, W.; Martin, C.; Brands, D.

    2014-05-01

    Long glass reinforced materials are broadly used in the automotive industry due to their good mechanical performance, competitive price and options for functional integration in order to reduce weight. With rapidly changing environmental requirements, a demand for further weight reduction is growing constantly. Designs in LGF-PP can bring light weight solutions in combination with system cost improvement. There are quite some possibilities for applying weight reduction technologies nowadays. These technologies have to be evaluated based on weight reduction potential, but also on mechanical performance of the end application, where the latter is often the key to success. Different weight reduction technologies are applied to SABIC®STAMAX{trade mark, serif} material, a long glass fiber reinforced polypropylene (LGF-PP), in order to investigate and define best application performance. These techniques include: chemical foaming, physical foaming and thin wall applications. Results from this research will be presented, giving a guideline for your development.

  16. Evaluation of tensile strength of hybrid fiber (jute/gongura) reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Vijay, Kumar V.; Chandan, Byral R.; Prabaharan, G. P.; Raghav, Dasarath

    2015-07-01

    The polymer matrix composites attract many industrial applications due to its light weight, less cost and easy for manufacturing. In this paper, an attempt is made to prepare and study of the tensile strength of hybrid (two natural) fibers reinforced hybrid (Natural + Synthetic) polymer matrix composites. The samples were prepared with hybrid reinforcement consists of two different fibers such as jute and Gongura and hybrid polymer consists of polyester and cashew nut shell resins. The hybrid composites tensile strength is evaluated to study the influence of various fiber parameters on mechanical strength. The parameters considered here are the duration of fiber treatment, the concentration of alkali in fiber treatment and nature of fiber content in the composites.

  17. Electron beam irradiation in natural fibres reinforced polymers (NFRP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kechaou, B.; Salvia, M.; Fakhfakh, Z.; Juvé, D.; Boufi, S.; Kallel, A.; Tréheux, D.

    2008-11-01

    This study focuses on the electric charge motion in unsatured polyester and epoxy composites reinforced by natural fibres of Alfa type, treated by different coupling agents. The electric charging phenomenon is studied by scanning electron microscopy mirror effect (SEMME) coupled with the induced current method (ICM). Previously, using the same approach, glass fibre reinforced epoxy (GFRE) was studied to correlate mechanical [B. Kchaou, C. Turki, M. Salvia, Z. Fakhfakh, D. Tréheux, Composites Science and Technology 64 (2004) 1467], or tribological [B. Kchaou, C. Turki, M. Salvia, Z. Fakhfakh, D. Tréheux, Dielectric and friction behaviour of unidirectionalglass fibre reinforced epoxy (GFRE), Wear, 265 (2008) 763.] properties and dielectric properties. It was shown that the dielectric properties of the fibre-matrix interfaces play a significant role in the optimization of the composite. This result seems to be the same for natural fibre composites: the fibre-matrix interfaces allow a diffusion of the electric charges which can delocalize the polarization energy and consequently delay the damage of the composite. However, a non-suited sizing can lead to a new trapping of electric charges along these same interfaces with, as a consequence, a localization of the polarisation energy. The optimum composite is obtained for one sizing which helps, at the same time, to have a strong fibre-matrix adhesion and an easy flow of the electric charges along the interface.

  18. Polymer reinforcement using liquid-exfoliated boron nitride nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Khan, Umar; May, Peter; O'Neill, Arlene; Bell, Alan P; Boussac, Elodie; Martin, Arnaud; Semple, James; Coleman, Jonathan N

    2013-01-21

    We have exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride by ultrasonication in solutions of polyvinylalcohol in water. The resultant nanosheets are sterically stabilised by adsorbed polymer chains. Centrifugation-based size-selection was used to give dispersions of nanosheets with aspect ratio (length/thickness) of ∼1400. Such dispersions can be used to produce polyvinylalcohol-BN composite films. Helium ion microscopy of fracture surfaces shows the nanosheets to be well dispersed and the composites to fail by pull-out. We find both modulus, Y, and strength, σ(B), of these composites to increase linearly with volume fraction, V(f), up to V(f)∼ 0.1 vol% BN before falling off. The rates of increase are extremely high; dY/dV(f) = 670 GPa and dσ(B)/dV(f) = 47 GPa. The former value matches theory based on continuum mechanics while the latter value is consistent with remarkably high polymer-filler interfacial strength. However, because the mechanical properties increase over such a narrow volume fraction range, the maximum values of both modulus and strength are only ∼40% higher than the pure polymer. This phenomenon has also been observed for graphene-filled composites and represents a serious hurdle to the production of high performance polymer-nanosheet composites.

  19. Fibre Reinforced Polymers (FRP) as Reinforcement for Concrete According to German Approvals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alex, R.

    2015-11-01

    This article demonstrates the possibility of the application of joint principles to develop test programs for national approval or European Technical Assessments of FRP reinforcement for concrete. The limits of different systems are shown, which until now have been approved in Germany.

  20. Stainless and Galvanized Steel, Hydrophobic Admixture and Flexible Polymer-Cement Coating Compared in Increasing Durability of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittarelli, Francesca; Giosuè, Chiara; Mobili, Alessandra

    2017-08-01

    The use of stainless or galvanized steel reinforcements, a hydrophobic admixture or a flexible polymer-cement coating were compared as methods to improve the corrosion resistance of sound or cracked reinforced concrete specimens exposed to chloride rich solutions. The results show that in full immersion condition, negligible corrosion rates were detected in all cracked specimens, except those treated with the flexible polymer-cement mortar as preventive method against corrosion and the hydrophobic concrete specimens. High corrosion rates were measured in all cracked specimens exposed to wet-dry cycles, except for those reinforced with stainless steel, those treated with the flexible polymer-cement coating as restorative method against reinforcement corrosion and for hydrophobic concrete specimens reinforced with galvanized steel reinforcements.

  1. Size effect of concrete column retrofitted by fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Xu, Xinsheng

    2017-04-01

    At present, the research on the size effect of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) reinforced concrete members is not enough, besides the conclusions about size effect are different. It is of great theoretical significance and engineering application value to study the size effect of FRP reinforced concrete members in this field. In this paper, the study status from two aspects containing plain concrete columns and reinforced concrete columns for the retrofitted effect were analyzed and some new problems were put forward in this field. Also the paper mainly discussed the size effect of FRP constraint ratio and column slenderness ratio on FRP retrofitted concrete columns, and the effects of different load forms of FRP reinforced concrete columns under eccentric loading, repeated loading and unloading, and horizontal cyclic loading on the size effect of FRP reinforced concrete columns, and the influence of the single factor change of FRP paste way, type, package type and the concrete strength on the FRP reinforced concrete column. Besides, the changing tendency and regularity of the size effect of FRP strengthened concrete columns under the condition of muti-factors were given.

  2. EB treatment of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebényi, G.; Romhány, G.; Vajna, B.; Czvikovszky, T.

    2012-09-01

    A small amount — less than 0.5% — carbon nanotube reinforcement may improve the mechanical properties of epoxy based composite materials significantly. The basic technical problem on one side is the dispersion of the nanotubes into the viscous matrix resin, namely, the fine powder-like — less than 100 nanometer diameter — nanotubes are prone to form aggregates. On the other side, the good connection between the nanofiber and matrix, which is determining the success of the reinforcement, requires some efficient adhesion promoting treatment. The goal of our research was to give one such treatment capable of industrial size application. A two step curing epoxy/vinylester resin process technology has been developed where the epoxy component has been cured conventionally, while the vinylester has been cured by electron treatment afterwards. The sufficient irradiation dose has been selected according to Raman spectroscopy characterization. Using the developed hybrid resin system hybrid composites containing carbon fibers and multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been prepared. The effect of the electron beam induced curing of the vinylester resin on the mechanical properties of the composites has been characterized by three point bending and interlaminar shear tests, which showed clearly the superiority of the developed resin system. The results of the mechanical tests have been supported by AFM studies of the samples, which showed that the difference in the viscoelastic properties of the matrix constituents decreased significantly by the electron beam treatment.

  3. Resorbable continuous-fibre reinforced polymers for osteosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Dauner, M; Planck, H; Caramaro, L; Missirlis, Y; Panagiotopoulos, E

    1998-03-01

    Four institutes from three countries in the European Union have collaborated under the BRITE-EURAM framework programme for the development of processing technologies for resorbable osteosynthesis devices. The devices should be continuous-fibre reinforced, and the technology should offer the possibility of orienting the fibres in the main trajectories. Poly-L-lactide and poly-L-DL-lactides have been synthesized for reinforcement fibres and matrix material, respectively. Melt-spun P-L-LA fibres of a strength of 800 MPa have been embedded in an amorphous P-L-DL-LA 70 : 30 matrix by compression moulding. Ethyleneoxide sterilized samples have been tested in vitro and in vivo. A satisfying bending modulus has been reached (6 GPa). Yet with 50% strength retention after ten weeks, fast degradation occurred that could be related to residual monomers. By this fast degradation 70% resorption after one year could be observed in the non-functional animal studies in rabbits. There was only a mild inflammatory reaction, which confirmed the good biocompatibility of the materials even during the resorption period. Further effort has to concentrate on the reduction of initial monomer content. The great advantage of the processing method to orient fibres in the device will be utilized in prototype samples, e.g. an osteosynthesis plate with fixation holes. Copyright 1998 Chapman & Hall

  4. Thermo-oxidative stability studies of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the thermo-oxidative stability of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various fibers and to observe differences in the way they degrade in air. The fibers that were studied included graphite and the thermally stable Nicalon and Nextel ceramic fibers. Weight loss rates for the different composites were assessed as a function of mechanical properties, specimen geometry, fiber sizing, and interfacial bond strength. Differences were observed in rates of weight loss, matrix cracking, geometry dependency, and fiber-sizing effects. It was shown that Celion 6000 fiber-reinforced composites do not exhibit a straight-line Arrhenius relationship at temperatures above 316 C.

  5. Development of a 3D polymer reinforced calcium phosphate cement scaffold for cranial bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alge, Daniel L.

    The repair of critical-sized cranial bone defects represents an important clinical challenge. The limitations of autografts and alloplastic materials make a bone tissue engineering strategy desirable, but success depends on the development of an appropriate scaffold. Key scaffold properties include biocompatibility, osteoconductivity, sufficient strength to maintain its structure, and resorbability. Furthermore, amenability to rapid prototyping fabrication methods is desirable, as these approaches offer precise control over scaffold architecture and have the potential for customization. While calcium phosphate cements meet many of these criteria due to their composition and their injectability, which can be leveraged for scaffold fabrication via indirect casting, their mechanical properties are a major limitation. Thus, the overall goal of this work was to develop a 3D polymer reinforced calcium phosphate cement scaffold for use in cranial bone tissue engineering. Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) setting cements are of particular interest because of their excellent resorbability. We demonstrated for the first time that DCPD cement can be prepared from monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM)/hydroxyapatite (HA) mixtures. However, subsequent characterization revealed that MCPM/HA cements rapidly convert to HA during degradation, which is undesirable and led us to choose a more conventional formulation for scaffold fabrication. In addition, we developed a novel method for calcium phosphate cement reinforcement that is based on infiltrating a pre-set cement structure with a polymer, and then crosslinking the polymer in situ. Unlike prior methods of cement reinforcement, this method can be applied to the reinforcement of 3D scaffolds fabricated by indirect casting. Using our novel method, composites of poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) reinforced DCPD were prepared and demonstrated as excellent candidate scaffold materials, as they had increased strength and ductility

  6. Processing of continuous fiber reinforced ceramic composites for ultra high temperature applications using organosilicon polymer precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, James Robert

    The current work is on the development of continuous fiber reinforced ceramic materials (CFCCs) for use in ultra high temperature applications. These applications subject materials to extremely high temperatures(> 2000°C). Monolithic ceramics are currently being used for these applications, but the tendency to fail catastrophically has driven the need for the next generation of material. Reinforcing with continuous fibers significantly improves the toughness of the monolithic materials; however, this is a manufacturing challenge. The development of commercial, low-viscosity preceramic polymers provides new opportunities to fabricate CFCCs. Preceramic polymers behave as polymers at low temperatures and are transformed into ceramics upon heating to high temperatures. The polymer precursors enable the adaptation of well-established polymer processing techniques to produce high quality materials at relatively low cost. In the present work, SMP-10 from Starfire Systems, and PURS from KiON Corp. were used to manufacture ZrB2-SiC/SiC CFCCs using low cost vacuum bagging process in conjunction with the polymer infiltration and pyrolysis process. The microstructure was investigated using scanning electron microscopy and it was determined that the initial greenbody cure produced porosity of both closed and open pores. The open pores were found to be more successfully re-infiltrated using neat resin compared to slurry reinfiltrate; however, the closed pores were found to be impenetrable during subsequent reinfiltrations. The mechanical performance of the manufactured samples was evaluated using flexure tests and found the fiber reinforcement prevented catastrophic failure behavior by increasing fracture toughness. Wedge sample were fabricated and evaluated to demonstrate the ability to produce CFCC of complex geometry.

  7. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats revealed far-reaching significant osseoconductivity increases from bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber composites when compared to state-of-the-art titanium-6-4 alloy controls. Midtibial percent bone area measured from the implant surface increased when comparing the titanium alloy to the polymer composite from 10.5% to 41.6% at 0.8 mm, P < 10−4, and 19.3% to 77.7% at 0.1 mm, P < 10−8. Carbon-fiber fragments planned to occur in the test designs, instead of producing an inflammation, stimulated bone formation and increased bone integration to the implant. In addition, low-thermal polymer processing allows incorporation of minerals and pharmaceuticals for future major tissue-engineering potential. PMID:25553057

  8. Mussel-inspired catecholamine polymers as new sizing agents for fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonoh; Lee, Jea Uk; Byun, Joon-Hyung

    2015-04-01

    Mussel-inspired catecholamine polymers (polydopamine and polynorepinephrine) were coated on the surface of carbon and glass fibers in order to increase the interfacial shear strength between fibers and polymer matrix, and consequently the interlaminar shear strength of fiber-reinforced composites. By utilizing adhesive characteristic of the catecholamine polymer, fiber-reinforced composites can become mechanically stronger than conventional composites. Since the catecholamine polymer is easily constructed on the surface by the simultaneous polymerization of its monomer under a weak basic circumstance, it can be readily coated on micro-fibers by a simple dipping process without any complex chemical treatments. Also, catecholamines can increase the surface free energy of micro-fibers and therefore, can give better wettability to epoxy resin. Therefore, catecholamine polymers can be used as versatile and effective surface modifiers for both carbon and glass fibers. Here, catecholamine-coated carbon and glass fibers exhibited higher interfacial shear strength (37 and 27% increases, respectively) and their plain woven composites showed improved interlaminar shear strength (13 and 9% increases, respectively) compared to non-coated fibers and composites.

  9. Bisphenyl-Polymer/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Compared to Titanium Alloy Bone Implant.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Richard C

    2011-05-03

    Aerospace/aeronautical thermoset bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites are considered as new advanced materials to replace metal bone implants. In addition to well-recognized nonpolar chemistry with related bisphenol-polymer estrogenic factors, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites can offer densities and electrical conductivity/resistivity properties close to bone with strengths much higher than metals on a per-weight basis. In vivo bone-marrow tests with Sprague-Dawley rats revealed far-reaching significant osseoconductivity increases from bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber composites when compared to state-of-the-art titanium-6-4 alloy controls. Midtibial percent bone area measured from the implant surface increased when comparing the titanium alloy to the polymer composite from 10.5% to 41.6% at 0.8 mm, P < 10(-4), and 19.3% to 77.7% at 0.1 mm, P < 10(-8). Carbon-fiber fragments planned to occur in the test designs, instead of producing an inflammation, stimulated bone formation and increased bone integration to the implant. In addition, low-thermal polymer processing allows incorporation of minerals and pharmaceuticals for future major tissue-engineering potential.

  10. Environmental Durability of Materials and Bonded Joints Involving Fiber Reinforced Polymers and Concerte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavari, Mahdi Mansouri; rad, A. Yazdi; Gavari, Mohsen Mansouri

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes the research work undertaken to evaluate the performance of materials and bonded joints involving Fibre Reinforced Polymers (FRPs) and concrete. Experimental variables ncluded polymer composite materials, test methods and environmental test conditions. Tensile and flexural tests were carried out to determine short term and long term environmental durability of composite materials. Single lap shear, a modified wedge cleavage and pull-off adhesion tests were used to study the performance of bonded joints. It is shown the tensile strength of composite materials can be affected after exposure to hot/humid conditions. The performance of stressed single lap joints was also affected by hot/humid conditions.

  11. Experimental research on continuous basalt fiber and basalt-fibers-reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueyi; Zou, Guangping; Shen, Zhiqiang

    2008-11-01

    The interest for continuous basalt fibers and reinforced polymers has recently grown because of its low price and rich natural resource. Basalt fiber was one type of high performance inorganic fibers which were made from natural basalt by the method of melt extraction. This paper discusses basic mechanical properties of basalt fiber. The other work in this paper was to conduct tensile testing of continuous basalt fiber-reinforced polymer rod. Tensile strength and stress-strain curve were obtained in this testing. The strength of rod was fairly equal to rod of E-glass fibers and weaker than rod of carbon fibers. Surface of crack of rod was studied. An investigation of fracture mechanism between matrix and fiber was analyzed by SEM (Scanning electron microscopy) method. A poor adhesion between the matrix and fibers was also shown for composites analyzing SEM photos. The promising tensile properties of the presented basalt fibers composites have shown their great potential as alternative classical composites.

  12. Behavior of Concrete Beams with Peel-Plied Aramid-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungnam; Park, Sun-Kyu

    2016-03-01

    The effect of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) plates, to which a peel-ply was fastened to increase their bonding area, on the behavior of strengthened concrete beams was investigated. A total of six concrete beams were tested. For the FRP plates, aramid-fiber-reinforced polymer (AFRP) ones were used. The test variables included their surface treatment (smooth and deformed), the depth of removal of concrete cover (0 and 10 mm), and the number of the plates. Each beam was tested in four-point bending under displacement control up to failure. Based on the experimental results obtained, the effect of the peel-plied AFRP plates on the flexural behavior of the concrete beams was evaluated.

  13. Reinforcing polymer composites with epoxide-grafted carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiren; Liang, Richard; Wang, Ben; Zhang, Chuck

    2008-02-27

    An in situ functionalization method was used to graft epoxide onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and improve the integration of SWNTs into epoxy polymer. The characterization results of Raman, FT-IR and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) validated the successful functionalization with epoxide. These functionalized SWNTs were used to fabricate nanocomposites, resulting in uniform dispersion and strong interfacial bonding. The mechanical test demonstrated that, with only 1 wt% loading of functionalized SWNTs, the tensile strength of nanocomposites was improved by 40%, and Young's modulus by 60%.These results suggested that efficient load transfer has been achieved through epoxide-grafting. This investigation provided an efficient way to improve the interfacial bonding of multifunctional high-performance nanocomposites for lightweight structure material applications.

  14. Bioinspired design and assembly of platelet reinforced polymer films.

    PubMed

    Bonderer, Lorenz J; Studart, André R; Gauckler, Ludwig J

    2008-02-22

    Although strong and stiff human-made composites have long been developed, the microstructure of today's most advanced composites has yet to achieve the order and sophisticated hierarchy of hybrid materials built up by living organisms in nature. Clay-based nanocomposites with layered structure can reach notable stiffness and strength, but these properties are usually not accompanied by the ductility and flaw tolerance found in the structures generated by natural hybrid materials. By using principles found in natural composites, we showed that layered hybrid films combining high tensile strength and ductile behavior can be obtained through the bottom-up colloidal assembly of strong submicrometer-thick ceramic platelets within a ductile polymer matrix.

  15. A Fully Contained Resin Infusion Process for Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composite Fabrication and Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Assisted Resin Transfer Molding ( VARTM ) process is applicable for fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite fabrication and repair. However, VARTM in...scenario is a fully enclosed VARTM system that limits the need for laboratory or manufacturing equipment. The Bladder-Bag VARTM (BBVARTM) technique...composite fabrication, VARTM , composite repair, in-field repair 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER

  16. The reflectivity of carbon fiber reinforced polymer short circuit illuminated by guided microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojovschi, A.; Scott, J.; Ghorbani, K.

    2013-09-01

    An investigation of the interaction between guided electromagnetic waves and carbon fibre reinforced polymer waveguide short circuits is presented. To determine the electromagnetic response of the composite waveguide short circuit, its anisotropic characteristics are considered. The reflection coefficients of the short circuit, at the reference plane, are about 0.98 over the whole 8 GHz to 12 GHz band. The results indicate the viability of carbon fiber based short circuits for lightweight waveguides.

  17. Interlaminar damage of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite laminate under continuous wave laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan-Chi; Wu, Chen-Wu; Huang, Yi-Hui; Song, Hong-Wei; Huang, Chen-Guang

    2017-01-01

    The interlaminar damages were investigated on the carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite laminate under laser irradiation. Firstly, the laminated T700/BA9916 composites were exposed to continuous wave laser irradiation. Then, the interface cracking patterns of such composite laminates were examined by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Finally, the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was performed to compute the interface stress of the laminates under laser irradiation. And the effects of the laser parameters on the interlaminar damage were discussed.

  18. Fatigue Micromechanism Characterization in Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers Using Synchrotron Radiation Computed Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-18

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Carbon fiber reinforced polymers ( CFRPs ) are well established as an important weight-reducing structural technology...particularly within the aerospace sector due to their high specific stiffness and strength. CFRPs are widely identified as being very fatigue resistant, but...M.N. Mavrogordato, A.E. Scott, I. Sinclair, S.M. Spearing, “Synchrotron computed tomography of fatigue micromechanisms in CFRP ”, Proceeding of 19th

  19. Ablation behaviors of carbon reinforced polymer composites by laser of different operation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chen-Wu; Wu, Xian-Qian; Huang, Chen-Guang

    2015-10-01

    Laser ablation mechanism of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composite is of critical meaning for the laser machining process. The ablation behaviors are investigated on the CFRP laminates subject to continuous wave, long duration pulsed wave and short duration pulsed wave lasers. Distinctive ablation phenomena have been observed and the effects of laser operation modes are discussed. The typical temperature patterns resulted from laser irradiation are computed by finite element analysis and thereby the different ablation mechanisms are interpreted.

  20. Investigation of Creep Rupture Phenomenon in Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) Stirrups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johal, Kanwardeep Singh

    Glass Fibre-Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) bars offer a feasible alternative to typical steel reinforcement in concrete structures where there are concerns of corrosion or magnetic interference. In order to design safe structures for a service life of 50 to 100 years, the long-term material properties of GFRP must be understood. Thirty GFRP stirrups of three types were tested under sustained loading to investigate creep rupture and modulus degradation behaviour. The time to failure under varying sustained loads was used to extrapolate the safe design load for typical service lives. It was found that shear critical beams with shear reinforcement designed in accordance with CSA-S806 and ACI-440 provisions may be at risk of premature failure under sustained design loads. Analysis was based on finite element modelling and previously tested beams. Additionally, no moduli degradation was observed in this study. A cumulative weakening model was developed to potentially take into account fatigue loading.

  1. Mechanical characterization and structural analysis of recycled fiber-reinforced-polymer resin-transfer-molded beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Eugene Wie Loon

    1999-09-01

    The present investigation was focussed on the mechanical characterization and structural analysis of resin-transfer-molded beams containing recycled fiber-reinforced polymers. The beams were structurally reinforced with continuous unidirectional glass fibers. The reinforcing filler materials consisted entirely of recycled fiber-reinforced polymer wastes (trim and overspray). The principal resin was a 100-percent dicyclo-pentadiene unsaturated polyester specially formulated with very low viscosity for resin transfer molding. Variations of the resin transfer molding technique were employed to produce specimens for material characterization. The basic materials that constituted the structural beams, continuous-glass-fiber-reinforced, recycled-trim-filled and recycled-overspray-filled unsaturated polyesters, were fully characterized in axial and transverse compression and tension, and inplane and interlaminar shear, to ascertain their strengths, ultimate strains, elastic moduli and Poisson's ratios. Experimentally determined mechanical properties of the recycled-trim-filled and recycled-overspray-filled materials from the present investigation were superior to those of unsaturated polyester polymer concretes and Portland cement concretes. Mechanical testing and finite element analyses of flexure (1 x 1 x 20 in) and beam (2 x 4 x 40 in) specimens were conducted. These structurally-reinforced specimens were tested and analyzed in four-point, third-point flexure to determine their ultimate loads, maximum fiber stresses and mid-span deflections. The experimentally determined load capacities of these specimens were compared to those of equivalent steel-reinforced Portland cement concrete beams computed using reinforced concrete theory. Mechanics of materials beam theory was utilized to predict the ultimate loads and mid-span deflections of the flexure and beam specimens. However, these predictions proved to be severely inadequate. Finite element (fracture propagation

  2. Sensing uniaxial tensile damage in fiber-reinforced polymer composites using electrical resistance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestari, Wahyu; Pinto, Brian; La Saponara, Valeria; Yasui, Jennifer; Loh, Kenneth J.

    2016-08-01

    This work describes the application of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) in sensing damage in fiber-reinforced polymer composites under uniaxial quasi-static tension. Damage is manifested as numerous matrix cracks which are distributed across the composite volume and which eventually coalesce into intralayer cracks. Hence, tensile damage is distributed throughout the volume, and could be more significant outside the sensor area. In this work, tensile damage of unidirectional glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites (GFRP) and plain weave carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRP) is sensed by utilizing a spray-on nanocomposite sensor, which is then instrumented by boundary electrodes. The resistance change distribution within the sensor area is reconstructed from a series of boundary voltage measurements, and ERT is implemented using a maximum a posteriori approach and assumptions on the type of noise in the reconstruction. Results show that this technique has promise in tracking uniaxial damage in composites. The different fiber architectures (unidirectional GFRP, plain weave CFRP) give distinct features in the ERT, which are consistent with the physical behavior of the tested samples.

  3. Manufacturing Energy Intensity and Opportunity Analysis for Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites and Other Lightweight Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liddell, Heather; Brueske, Sabine; Carpenter, Alberta; Cresko, Joseph

    2016-09-22

    With their high strength-to-weight ratios, fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are important materials for lightweighting in structural applications; however, manufacturing challenges such as low process throughput and poor quality control can lead to high costs and variable performance, limiting their use in commercial applications. One of the most significant challenges for advanced composite materials is their high manufacturing energy intensity. This study explored the energy intensities of two lightweight FRP composite materials (glass- and carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers), with three lightweight metals (aluminum, magnesium, and titanium) and structural steel (as a reference material) included for comparison. Energy consumption for current typical and state-of-the-art manufacturing processes were estimated for each material, deconstructing manufacturing process energy use by sub-process and manufacturing pathway in order to better understand the most energy intensive steps. Energy saving opportunities were identified and quantified for each production step based on a review of applied R&D technologies currently under development in order to estimate the practical minimum energy intensity. Results demonstrate that while carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites have the highest current manufacturing energy intensity of all materials considered, the large differences between current typical and state-of-the-art energy intensity levels (the 'current opportunity') and between state-of-the-art and practical minimum energy intensity levels (the 'R&D opportunity') suggest that large-scale energy savings are within reach.

  4. Effect of fiber reinforcements on thermo-oxidative stability and mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated the thermo-oxidative behavior of polymer matrix composites. Two significant observations have been made from these research efforts: (1) fiber reinforcement has a significant effect on composite thermal stability; and (2) geometric effects must be considered when evaluating thermal aging data. A compilation of some results from these studies is presented, and this information shows the influence of the reinforcement fibers on the oxidative degradation of various polymer matrix composites. The polyimide PMR-15 was the matrix material that was used in these studies. The control composite material was reinforced with Celion 6000 graphite fiber. T-40R graphite fibers, along with some very stable ceramic fibers were selected as reinforcing fibers because of their high thermal stability. The ceramic fibers were Nicalon (silicon carbide) and Nextel 312 (alumina-silica-boron oxide). The mechanical properties of the two graphite fiber composites were significantly different, probably owing to variations in interfacial bonding between the fibers and the polyimide matrix. The Celion 6000/PMR-15 bond is very tight but the T-40/PMR-15 bond is less tight. Three oxidation mechanisms were observed: (1) the preferential oxidation of the Celion 6000 fiber ends at cut surfaces, leaving a surface of matrix material with holes where the fiber ends were originally situated; (2) preferential oxidation of the composite matrix; and (3) interfacial degradation by oxidation. The latter two mechanisms were also observed on fiber end cut surfaces. The fiber and interface attacks appeared to initiate interfiber cracking along these surfaces.

  5. Effect of fabric structure and polymer matrix on flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress, and energy dissipation of glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We report the effect of glass fiber structure and the epoxy polymer system on the flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress (ILSS), and energy absorption properties of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. Four different GFRP composites were fabricated from two glass fiber textiles of...

  6. Comparison of flexural strength between fiber-reinforced polymer and high-impact strength resin.

    PubMed

    Vojvodic, Denis; Matejicek, Franjo; Loncar, Ante; Zabarovic, Domagoj; Komar, Dragutin; Mehulic, Ketij

    2008-10-01

    Fractures of polymer material are one of the most frequent reasons for the repair of removable dental prostheses. Therefore, there is a constant endeavor to strengthen them, and polymer materials with high resistance to fracture are being developed. The aim of this study was to determine the flexural strength of polymer materials and their reinforcements and thus give preference to their clinical use. Specimens with dimensions 18 x 10 x 3 mm were tested after polymerization, immersion in water at a temperature 37 degrees C for 28 days, and thermocycling by using the "short-beam" method to determine the flexural strength. Microscopic examination was performed to determine the quality of bonding between the glass fibers and matrix. Common polymer materials (control group) demonstrated the lowest flexural strength, although, when reinforced with fibers they showed higher flexural strength, matching that of the tested high-impact strength resin. Thermocycled specimens had the highest flexural strength, whereas there was no difference (p > 0.05) between specimens tested after polymerization and immersion in water.

  7. Mechanical and thermal properties of carbon-nanotube-reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadek, Martin; Coleman, Jonathan N.; Barron, Valerie; Hedicke, Katrin; Blau, Werner J.

    2003-03-01

    In this research study carbon nanotubes were investigated as possible reinforcement agents to improve the mechanical and thermal properties of two different polymer matrix systems. The polymer matrices systems examined were polyvinyl alcohol and poly(9-vinyl cabazole). It was found by adding a range of mass fractions of carbon nanotubes that both Young's modulus and hardness as measured by nano-indentation increased dramatically for both matrices. Thermal properties were examined using differential scanning calorimetry and thermo gravimetric analysis. An increase of 82% in Young's modulus and 63% in hardness was observed for polyvinyl alcohol while adding approximately 1% by weight of multi walled carbon nanotubes. In the case of poly(9-vinyl cabazole) an increase of 200% in Young's modulus and 100% in hardness was achieved, by adding only 8% by weight of nanotubes. As far as the authors are aware this is the highest increase of mechanical properties observed when using carbon nanotube as a reinforcing agent. In addition the thermal properties varied significatly on introduction of the nanotubes. An increase of crystallinity was found for the semi-crystalline matrix, while a second phase appeared for the amorphous polymer when increasing the amount of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Mechanical and thermal properties of the used polymer matrices could be significantly increased.

  8. Fatigue behavior and modeling of short fiber reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavian, Seyyedvahid

    This study investigates uniaxial fatigue behavior of two short glass fiber polymer composites including 30 wt% short glass fiber polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) and 35 wt% short glass fiber polyamide-6 (PA6) under a number of load and environmental conditions. The main objectives are to evaluate the behavior of these materials under monotonic and cyclic loadings and present fatigue life prediction methodologies to reduce their development expenses and time. The considered environmental effects include those of low and elevated temperatures as well as moisture (or water absorption) effect. Fatigue behavior is also explored under the action of nonzero mean stress (or R ratio) as well as various cyclic loading frequencies. Material anisotropy and geometrical discontinuity effects (i.e. stress concentration) are also considered in this study. Microscopic failure analysis is also performed, when necessary, to identify failure mechanisms. Tensile tests were performed in various mold flow directions and with two thicknesses at a range of temperatures and strain rates. A shell-core morphology resulting from orientation distribution of fibers influenced the degree of anisotropy. Tensile strength and elastic modulus nonlinearly decreased with specimen angle and Tsai-Hill criterion was found to correlate variation of these properties with the fiber orientation. Kinetics of water absorption was studied and found to follow the Fick's law. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature with specimens in the longitudinal and transverse directions and with various degrees of water absorption. Mathematical relations were developed to represent tensile properties as a function of water content. Mathematical relationships were developed to represent the stress-strain response, as well as tensile properties in terms of strain rate and temperature. Time-temperature superposition principle was also employed to superimpose the effect of temperature and strain rate on tensile strength

  9. Multi-Scale CNT-Based Reinforcing Polymer Matrix Composites for Lightweight Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberly, Daniel; Ou, Runqing; Karcz, Adam; Skandan, Ganesh; Mather, Patrick; Rodriguez, Erika

    2013-01-01

    Reinforcing critical areas in carbon polymer matrix composites (PMCs), also known as fiber reinforced composites (FRCs), is advantageous for structural durability. Since carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have extremely high tensile strength, they can be used as a functional additive to enhance the mechanical properties of FRCs. However, CNTs are not readily dispersible in the polymer matrix, which leads to lower than theoretically predicted improvement in mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of CNT composites. The inability to align CNTs in a polymer matrix is also a known issue. The feasibility of incorporating aligned CNTs into an FRC was demonstrated using a novel, yet commercially viable nanofiber approach, termed NRMs (nanofiber-reinforcing mats). The NRM concept of reinforcement allows for a convenient and safe means of incorporating CNTs into FRC structural components specifically where they are needed during the fabrication process. NRMs, fabricated through a novel and scalable process, were incorporated into FRC test panels using layup and vacuum bagging techniques, where alternating layers of the NRM and carbon prepreg were used to form the reinforced FRC structure. Control FRC test panel coupons were also fabricated in the same manner, but comprised of only carbon prepreg. The FRC coupons were machined to size and tested for flexural, tensile, and compression properties. This effort demonstrated that FRC structures can be fabricated using the NRM concept, with an increased average load at break during flexural testing versus that of the control. The NASA applications for the developed technologies are for lightweight structures for in-space and launch vehicles. In addition, the developed technologies would find use in NASA aerospace applications such as rockets, aircraft, aircraft/spacecraft propulsion systems, and supporting facilities. The reinforcing aspect of the technology will allow for more efficient joining of fiber composite parts, thus offering

  10. Self-diagnosis of structures strengthened with hybrid carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. S.; Yang, C. Q.; Harada, T.; Ye, L. P.

    2005-06-01

    The correlation of mechanical and electrical properties of concrete beams strengthened with hybrid carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (HCFRP) sheets is studied in this paper. Two types of concrete beams, with and without reinforcing bars, are strengthened with externally bonded HCFRP sheets, which have a self-structural health monitoring function due to the electrical conduction and piezoresistivity of carbon fibers. Parameters investigated include the volume fractions and types of carbon fibers. According to the investigation, it is found that the hybridization of uniaxial HCFRP sheets with several different types of carbon fibers is a viable method for enhancing the mechanical properties and obtaining a built-in damage detection function for concrete structures. The changes in electrical resistance during low strain ranges before the rupture of carbon fibers are generally smaller than 1%. Nevertheless, after the gradual ruptures of carbon fibers, the electrical resistance increases remarkably with the strain in a step-wise manner. For the specimens without reinforcing bars, the electrical behaviors are not stable, especially during the low strain ranges. However, the electrical behaviors of the specimens with reinforcing bars are relatively stable, and the whole range of self-sensing function of the HCFRP-strengthened RC structures has realized the conceptual design of the HCFRP sensing models and is confirmed by the experimental investigations. The relationships between the strain/load and the change in electrical resistance show the potential self-monitoring capacity of HCFRP reinforcements used for strengthening concrete structures.

  11. A Testing Platform for Durability Studies of Polymers and Fiber-reinforced Polymer Composites under Concurrent Hygrothermo-mechanical Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Antonio; Pires, Robert; Yambao, Alyssa; La Saponara, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    The durability of polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer composites under service condition is a critical aspect to be addressed for their robust designs and condition-based maintenance. These materials are adopted in a wide range of engineering applications, from aircraft and ship structures, to bridges, wind turbine blades, biomaterials and biomedical implants. Polymers are viscoelastic materials, and their response may be highly nonlinear and thus make it challenging to predict and monitor their in-service performance. The laboratory-scale testing platform presented herein assists the investigation of the influence of concurrent mechanical loadings and environmental conditions on these materials. The platform was designed to be low-cost and user-friendly. Its chemically resistant materials make the platform adaptable to studies of chemical degradation due to in-service exposure to fluids. An example of experiment was conducted at RT on closed-cell polyurethane foam samples loaded with a weight corresponding to ~50% of their ultimate static and dry load. Results show that the testing apparatus is appropriate for these studies. Results also highlight the larger vulnerability of the polymer under concurrent loading, based on the higher mid-point displacements and lower residual failure loads. Recommendations are made for additional improvements to the testing apparatus. PMID:25548950

  12. A testing platform for durability studies of polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer composites under concurrent hygrothermo-mechanical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Antonio; Pires, Robert; Yambao, Alyssa; La Saponara, Valeria

    2014-12-11

    The durability of polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer composites under service condition is a critical aspect to be addressed for their robust designs and condition-based maintenance. These materials are adopted in a wide range of engineering applications, from aircraft and ship structures, to bridges, wind turbine blades, biomaterials and biomedical implants. Polymers are viscoelastic materials, and their response may be highly nonlinear and thus make it challenging to predict and monitor their in-service performance. The laboratory-scale testing platform presented herein assists the investigation of the influence of concurrent mechanical loadings and environmental conditions on these materials. The platform was designed to be low-cost and user-friendly. Its chemically resistant materials make the platform adaptable to studies of chemical degradation due to in-service exposure to fluids. An example of experiment was conducted at RT on closed-cell polyurethane foam samples loaded with a weight corresponding to ~50% of their ultimate static and dry load. Results show that the testing apparatus is appropriate for these studies. Results also highlight the larger vulnerability of the polymer under concurrent loading, based on the higher mid-point displacements and lower residual failure loads. Recommendations are made for additional improvements to the testing apparatus.

  13. Biological and physicochemical properties of carbon-graphite fibre-reinforced polymers intended for implant suprastructures.

    PubMed

    Segerström, Susanna; Sandborgh-Englund, Gunilla; Ruyter, Eystein I

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine water sorption, water solubility, dimensional change caused by water storage, residual monomers, and possible cytotoxic effects of heat-polymerized carbon-graphite fibre-reinforced composites with different fibre loadings based on methyl methacrylate/poly(methyl methacrylate) (MMA/PMMA) and the copolymer poly (vinyl chloride-co-vinyl acetate). Two different resin systems were used. Resin A contained ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) and 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate (1,4-BDMA); the cross-linker in Resin B was diethylene glycol dimethacrylate (DEGDMA). The resin mixtures were reinforced with 24, 36 and 47 wt% surface-treated carbon-graphite fibres. In addition, polymer B was reinforced with 58 wt% fibres. Water sorption was equal to or below 3.34±1.18 wt%, except for the 58 wt% fibre loading of polymer B (5.27±1.22 wt%). Water solubility was below 0.36±0.015 wt%, except for polymer B with 47 and 58 wt% fibres. For all composites, the volumetric increase was below 0.01±0.005 vol%. Residual MMA monomer was equal to or below 0.68±0.05 wt% for the fibre composites. The filter diffusion test and the (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay demonstrated no cytotoxicity for the carbon-graphite fibre-reinforced composites, and residual cross-linking agents and vinyl chloride were not detectable by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis.

  14. Mechanical and physical properties of carbon-graphite fiber-reinforced polymers intended for implant suprastructures.

    PubMed

    Segerström, Susanna; Ruyter, I Eystein

    2007-09-01

    Mechanical properties and quality of fiber/matrix adhesion of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based materials, reinforced with carbon-graphite (CG) fibers that are able to remain in a plastic state until polymerization, were examined. Tubes of cleaned braided CG fibers were treated with a sizing resin. Two resin mixtures, resin A and resin B, stable in the fluid state and containing different cross-linking agents, were reinforced with CG fiber loadings of 24, 36, and 47 wt% (20, 29, and 38 vol.%). In addition, resin B was reinforced with 58 wt% (47 vol.%). After heat-polymerization, flexural strength and modulus were evaluated, both dry and after water storage. Coefficient of thermal expansion, longitudinally and in the transverse direction of the specimens, was determined. Adhesion between fibers and matrix was evaluated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexural properties and linear coefficient of thermal expansion were similar for both fiber composites. With increased fiber loading, flexural properties increased. For 47 wt% fibers in polymer A the flexural strength was 547.7 (28.12) MPa and for polymer B 563.3 (89.24) MPa when water saturated. Linear coefficient of thermal expansion was for 47 wt% CG fiber-reinforced polymers; -2.5 x 10(-6) degrees C-1 longitudinally and 62.4 x 10(-6) degrees C-1 in the transverse direction of the specimens. SEM revealed good adhesion between fibers and matrix. More porosity was observed with fiber loading of 58 wt%. The fiber treatment and the developed resin matrices resulted in good adhesion between CG fibers and matrix. The properties observed indicate a potential for implant-retained prostheses.

  15. Acoustic emission monitoring of concrete columns and beams strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Gao; Li, Hui; Zhou, Wensong; Xian, Guijun

    2012-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique is an effective method in the nondestructive testing (NDT) field of civil engineering. During the last two decades, Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) has been widely used in repairing and strengthening concrete structures. The damage state of FRP strengthened concrete structures has become an important issue during the service period of the structure and it is a meaningful work to use AE technique as a nondestructive method to assess its damage state. The present study reports AE monitoring results of axial compression tests carried on basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) confined concrete columns and three-point-bending tests carried on BFRP reinforced concrete beams. AE parameters analysis was firstly utilized to give preliminary results of the concrete fracture process of these specimens. It was found that cumulative AE events can reflect the fracture development trend of both BFRP confined concrete columns and BFRP strengthened concrete beams and AE events had an abrupt increase at the point of BFRP breakage. Then the fracture process of BFRP confined concrete columns and BFRP strengthened concrete beams was studied through RA value-average frequency analysis. The RA value-average frequency tendencies of BFRP confined concrete were found different from that of BFRP strengthened concrete beams. The variation tendency of concrete crack patterns during the loading process was revealed.

  16. Low Velocity Impact Behavior of Basalt Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishevan, Farzin Azimpour; Akbulut, Hamid; Mohtadi-Bonab, M. A.

    2017-06-01

    In this research, we studied low velocity impact response of homogenous basalt fiber-reinforced polymer (BFRP) composites and then compared the impact key parameters with carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) homogenous composites. BFRPs and CFRPs were fabricated by vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) method. Fabricated composites included 60% fiber and 40% epoxy matrix. Basalt and carbon fibers used as reinforcement materials were weaved in 2/2 twill textile tip in the structures of BFRP and CFRP composites. We also utilized the energy profile method to determine penetration and perforation threshold energies. The low velocity impact tests were carried out in 30, 60, 80, 100, 120 and 160 J energy magnitudes, and impact response of BFRPs was investigated by related force-deflection, force-time, deflection-time and absorbed energy-time graphics. The related impact key parameters such as maximum contact force, absorbed energy, deflection and duration time were compared with CFRPs for various impact energy levels. As a result, due to the higher toughness of basalt fibers, a better low velocity impact performance of BFRP than that of CFRP was observed. The effects of fabrication parameters, such as curing process, were studied on the low velocity impact behavior of BFRP. The results of tested new fabricated materials show that the change of fabrication process and curing conditions improves the impact behavior of BFRPs up to 13%.

  17. Studies on Effective Elastic Properties of CNT/Nano-Clay Reinforced Polymer Hybrid Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Arvind Kumar; Kumar, Puneet; Srinivas, J.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a computational approach to predict elastic propertiesof hybrid nanocomposite material prepared by adding nano-clayplatelets to conventional CNT-reinforced epoxy system. In comparison to polymers alone/single-fiber reinforced polymers, if an additional fiber is added to the composite structure, it was found a drastic improvement in resultant properties. In this regard, effective elastic moduli of a hybrid nano composite are determined by using finite element (FE) model with square representative volume element (RVE). Continuum mechanics based homogenization of the nano-filler reinforced composite is considered for evaluating the volumetric average of the stresses and the strains under different periodic boundary conditions.A three phase Halpin-Tsai approach is selected to obtain the analytical result based on micromechanical modeling. The effect of the volume fractions of CNTs and nano-clay platelets on the mechanical behavior is studied. Two different RVEs of nano-clay platelets were used to investigate the influence of nano-filler geometry on composite properties. The combination of high aspect ratio of CNTs and larger surface area of clay platelets contribute to the stiffening effect of the hybrid samples. Results of analysis are validated with Halpin-Tsai empirical formulae.

  18. Alignment of carbon nanotubes and reinforcing effects in nylon-6 polymer composite fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangari, Vijaya K.; Yousuf, Mohammed; Jeelani, Shaik; Pulikkathara, Merlyn X.; Khabashesku, Valery N.

    2008-06-01

    Alignment of pristine carbon nanotubes (P-CNTs) and fluorinated carbon nanotubes (F-CNTs) in nylon-6 polymer composite fibers (PCFs) has been achieved using a single-screw extrusion method. CNTs have been used as filler reinforcements to enhance the mechanical and thermal properties of nylon-6 composite fibers. The composites were fabricated by dry mixing nylon-6 polymer powder with the CNTs as the first step, then followed by the melt extrusion process of fiber materials in a single-screw extruder. The extruded fibers were stretched to their maxima and stabilized using a godet set-up. Finally, fibers were wound on a Wayne filament winder machine and tested for their tensile and thermal properties. The tests have shown a remarkable change in mechanical and thermal properties of nylon-6 polymer fibers with the addition of 0.5 wt% F-CNTs and 1.0 wt% of P-CNTs. To draw a comparison between the improvements achieved, the same process has been repeated with neat nylon-6 polymer. As a result, tensile strength has been increased by 230% for PCFs made with 0.5% F-CNTs and 1% P-CNTs as additives. These fibers have been further characterized by DSC, Raman spectroscopy and SEM which confirm the alignment of CNTs and interfacial bonding to nylon-6 polymer matrix.

  19. Alignment of carbon nanotubes and reinforcing effects in nylon-6 polymer composite fibers.

    PubMed

    Rangari, Vijaya K; Yousuf, Mohammed; Jeelani, Shaik; Pulikkathara, Merlyn X; Khabashesku, Valery N

    2008-06-18

    Alignment of pristine carbon nanotubes (P-CNTs) and fluorinated carbon nanotubes (F-CNTs) in nylon-6 polymer composite fibers (PCFs) has been achieved using a single-screw extrusion method. CNTs have been used as filler reinforcements to enhance the mechanical and thermal properties of nylon-6 composite fibers. The composites were fabricated by dry mixing nylon-6 polymer powder with the CNTs as the first step, then followed by the melt extrusion process of fiber materials in a single-screw extruder. The extruded fibers were stretched to their maxima and stabilized using a godet set-up. Finally, fibers were wound on a Wayne filament winder machine and tested for their tensile and thermal properties. The tests have shown a remarkable change in mechanical and thermal properties of nylon-6 polymer fibers with the addition of 0.5 wt% F-CNTs and 1.0 wt% of P-CNTs. To draw a comparison between the improvements achieved, the same process has been repeated with neat nylon-6 polymer. As a result, tensile strength has been increased by 230% for PCFs made with 0.5% F-CNTs and 1% P-CNTs as additives. These fibers have been further characterized by DSC, Raman spectroscopy and SEM which confirm the alignment of CNTs and interfacial bonding to nylon-6 polymer matrix.

  20. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed, to be cured, and be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000degC. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200degC, -SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Testing for this included thermal and mechanical testing per ASTM standard tests.

  1. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200C, beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  2. Processing and Material Characterization of Continuous Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Polymer Derived Ceramics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    The need for high performance vehicles in the aerospace industry requires materials which can withstand high loads and high temperatures. New developments in launch pads and infrastructure must also be made to handle this intense environment with lightweight, reusable, structural materials. By using more functional materials, better performance can be seen in the launch environment, and launch vehicle designs which have not been previously used can be considered. The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer matrix composites can be used for temperatures up to 260C. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in the composites. In this study, continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. The oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing have been performed on test panels and the test results are presented.

  3. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Wang, Xin; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000 deg C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200 deg C, Beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  4. Evaluation of RC Bridge Piers Retrofitted using Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (FRP)

    SciTech Connect

    Shayanfar, M. A.; Zarrabian, M. S.

    2008-07-08

    For many long years, steel reinforcements have been considered as the only tool for concrete confinements and studied widely, but nowadays application of Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) as an effective alternative is well appreciated. Many bridges have been constructed in the past that are necessary to be retrofitted for resisting against the earthquake motions. The objective of this research is evaluation of nonlinear behavior of RC bridge piers. Eight RC bridge piers have been modeled by ABAQUS software under micromechanical model for homogeneous anisotropic fibers. Also the Bilinear Confinement Model by Nonlinear Transition Zone of Mirmiran has been considered. Then types and angles of fibers and their effects on the final responses were evaluated. Finally, effects of retrofitting are evaluated and some suggestions presented.

  5. Investigation of Polymer Resin/Fiber Compatibility in Natural Fiber Reinforced Composite Automotive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Huang, Cheng; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2010-01-01

    Natural fibers represent a lower density and potentially lower cost alternative to glass fibers for reinforcement of polymers in automotive composites. The high specific modulus and strength of bast fibers make them an attractive option to replace glass not only in non-structural automotive components, but also in semi-structural and structural components. Significant barriers to insertion of bast fibers in the fiber reinforced automotive composite market include the high moisture uptake of this lignocellulosic material relative to glass and the weak inherent interface between natural fibers and automotive resins. This work seeks to improve the moisture uptake and resin interfacing properties of natural fibers through improved fundamental understanding of fiber physiochemical architecture and development of tailored fiber surface modification strategies.

  6. Smart fiber-reinforced polymer rods featuring improved ductility and health monitoring capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belarbi, Abdeldjelil; Watkins, Steve E.; Chandrashekhara, K.; Corra, Josh; Konz, Bethany

    2001-06-01

    The strain-measuring capability of fiber optic strain gages in fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) rebars was investigated for failure-inducing loads. Fiber optic interferometric sensors were embedded in a pultruded carbon fiber core and then another layer of carbon fibers were filament wound around the core to form a shell. Pultrusion and filament winding techniques protect the fiber optic strain gages from the concrete environment while providing a secure bond to the core and additional ductility to the overall FRP rebar. Tests of coupon FRP rebar and of FRP-rebar-reinforced concrete beams show that the fiber optic strain gages can read internal strain through failure and can duplicate data from conventional linear variable differential transformers and electrical resistance strain gages. Also, the shell of the FRP rebar inside the concrete beams failed before the rebar core providing pseudo-ductility.

  7. Characteristics of fatigue life and damage accumulation of short fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yokobori, A.T. Jr.; Takeda, Hidetoshi; Adachi, Takeshi; Ha, J.C.; Yokobori, Takeo

    1996-12-31

    The relation between fatigue life and damage accumulation of fiber-reinforced polymer composite (FRP) is not yet clarified. For practical use of FRP, it is necessary to relate the fatigue life to the mechanism of damage accumulation. Damage formation is controlled by the mechanical behavior of the interface between the matrix and fiber. The authors used short glass fiber-reinforced polycarbonate composite in the experiments. By using an in situ (real time) observational fatigue testing machine, they investigated the relationship between fatigue life and damage accumulation. From these results, the fatigue life of this material was found to be dominated by damage accumulation which results from microfracture at the interface between the matrix and fiber. This microfracture is controlled by a cycle-dependent mechanism.

  8. Experimental data on the properties of natural fiber particle reinforced polymer composite material.

    PubMed

    Chandramohan, D; Presin Kumar, A John

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on the development of polymer bio-composites. The powdered coconut shell, walnut shells and Rice husk are used as reinforcements with bio epoxy resin to form hybrid composite specimens. The fiber compositions in each specimen are 1:1 while the resin and hardener composition 10:1 respectively. The fabricated composites were tested as per ASTM standards to evaluate mechanical properties such as tensile strength, flexural strength, shear strength and impact strength are evaluated in both with moisture and without moisture. The result of test shows that hybrid composite has far better properties than single fibre glass reinforced composite under mechanical loads. However it is found that the incorporation of walnut shell and coconut shell fibre can improve the properties.

  9. Space environmental effects on LDEF low Earth orbit exposed graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Pete

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was deployed on April 7, 1984 in low earth orbit (LEO) at an altitude of 482 kilometers. On board experiments experienced the harsh LEO environment including atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet radiation (UV), and thermal cycling. During the 5.8 year mission, the LDEF orbit decayed to 340 kilometers where significantly higher AO concentrations exist. LDEF was retrieved on January 12, 1990 from this orbit. One experiment on board LDEF was M0003, Space Effects on Spacecraft Materials. As a subset of M0003 nearly 500 samples of polymer, metal, and glass matrix composites were flown as the Advanced Composites Experiment M0003-10. The Advanced Composites Experiment is a joint effort between government and industry with the Aerospace Corporation serving as the experiment integrator. A portion of the graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites were furnished by the Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, Washington. Test results and discussions for the Boeing portion of M0003-10 are presented. Experiment and specimen location on the LDEF are presented along with a quantitative summary of the pertinent exposure conditions. Matrix materials selected for the test were epoxy, polysulfone, and polyimide. These composite materials were selected due to their suitability for high performance structural capability in spacecraft applications. Graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites offer higher strength to weight ratios along with excellent dimensional stability. The Boeing space exposed and corresponding ground control composite specimens were subjected to post flight mechanical, chemical, and physical testing in order to determine any changes in critical properties and performance characteristics. Among the more significant findings are the erosive effect of atomic oxygen on leading edge exposed specimens and microcracking in non-unidirectionally reinforced flight specimens.

  10. Effects of interface treatment on the fatigue behaviour of shape memory alloy reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiremath, S. R.; Harish, K.; Vasireddi, Ramakrishna; Benal, M. M.; Mahapatra, D. R.

    2015-04-01

    Interfacial properties of Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) reinforced polymer matrix composites can be enhanced by improving the interfacial bonding. This paper focuses on studying the interfacial stresses developed in the SMAepoxy interface due to various laser shot penning conditions. Fiber-pull test-setup is designed to understand the role of mechanical bias stress cycling and thermal actuation cycling. Phase transformation is tracked over mechanical and thermal fatigue cycles. A micromechanics based model developed earlier based on shear lag in SMA and energy based consistent homogenization is extended here to incorporate the stress-temperature phase diagram parameters for modeling fatigue.

  11. Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites Using Reflective Terahertz Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Li, Wei; Cui, Hong-Liang; Shi, Changcheng; Han, Xiaohui; Ma, Yuting; Chen, Jiandong; Chang, Tianying; Wei, Dongshan; Zhang, Yumin; Zhou, Yufeng

    2016-06-14

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) imaging is considered a nondestructive evaluation method for composite materials used for examining various defects of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites and fire-retardant coatings in the reflective imaging modality. We demonstrate that hidden defects simulated by Teflon artificial inserts are imaged clearly in the perpendicular polarization mode. The THz TDS technique is also used to measure the thickness of thin fire-retardant coatings on CFRP composites with a typical accuracy of about 10 micrometers. In addition, coating debonding is successfully imaged based on the time-delay difference of the time-domain waveforms between closely adhered and debonded sample locations.

  12. Functionalization of Natural Graphite for Use as Reinforcement in Polymer Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Rafael; Marques, Maria F V; Jonas, Renato; Grafova, Iryna; Grafov, Andriy

    2015-08-01

    Graphite is a naturally abundant material that has been used as reinforcing filler to produce polymeric nanocomposites for various applications including automotive, aerospace and electric-electronic. The objective of this study was to develop methodologies of graphite nanosheets preparation and for incorporation into polymer matrices. By means of different chemical and physical treatments, natural graphite was modified and subsequently characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetry (TGA) and the particle size determination. The results obtained clearly show that after the treatments employed, polar chemical groups were inserted on the natural graphite surface. Nanosized graphite particles of high aspect ratio were obtained.

  13. A Smart Eddy Current Sensor Dedicated to the Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fibers Reinforced Polymers.

    PubMed

    Naidjate, Mohammed; Helifa, Bachir; Feliachi, Mouloud; Lefkaier, Iben-Khaldoun; Heuer, Henning; Schulze, Martin

    2017-08-31

    This paper propose a new concept of an eddy current (EC) multi-element sensor for the characterization of carbon fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP) to evaluate the orientations of plies in CFRP and the order of their stacking. The main advantage of the new sensors is the flexible parametrization by electronical switching that reduces the effort for mechanical manipulation. The sensor response was calculated and proved by 3D finite element (FE) modeling. This sensor is dedicated to nondestructive testing (NDT) and can be an alternative for conventional mechanical rotating and rectangular sensors.

  14. A Smart Eddy Current Sensor Dedicated to the Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fibers Reinforced Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Naidjate, Mohammed; Helifa, Bachir; Feliachi, Mouloud; Lefkaier, Iben-Khaldoun; Heuer, Henning; Schulze, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This paper propose a new concept of an eddy current (EC) multi-element sensor for the characterization of carbon fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP) to evaluate the orientations of plies in CFRP and the order of their stacking. The main advantage of the new sensors is the flexible parametrization by electronical switching that reduces the effort for mechanical manipulation. The sensor response was calculated and proved by 3D finite element (FE) modeling. This sensor is dedicated to nondestructive testing (NDT) and can be an alternative for conventional mechanical rotating and rectangular sensors. PMID:28858230

  15. Microwave detection of delaminations between fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite and hardened cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, D.; Kazemi, M.; Marler, K.; Zoughi, R.; Myers, J.; Nanni, A.

    2002-05-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are increasingly being used for the rehabilitation of concrete structures. Detection and characterization of delaminations between an FRP composite and a concrete surface are of paramount importance. Consequently, the development of a one sided, non-contact, real time and rapid nondestructive testing (NDT) technique for this purpose is of great interest. Near-field microwave NDT techniques, using open-ended rectangular waveguide probes, have shown great potential for detecting delaminations in layered composite structures such as these. The results of some theoretical and experimental investigations on a specially prepared cement paste specimen are presented here.

  16. Ferroelectret transducers for air-coupled ultrasonic testing of fiber-reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaal, M.; Döring, J.; Bartusch, J.; Lange, T.; Hillger, W.; Brekow, G.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2013-01-01

    Ferroelectrets are promising materials for air-coupled ultrasonic transducers. A transducer made of polarized cellular polypropylene, including its electronic interface, was developed and compared with conventional air-coupled probes. Test pieces of fiber-reinforced polymer containing impact flaws and flat-bottom holes were inspected in transmission. The ferroelectret transducers achieved a considerably higher signal-to-noise ratio. The impacts were clearly visible with all transducers, but less noisy with ferroelectret transducers. The flat-bottom holes were better detectable than with a conventional probe with about the same focus size.

  17. Determination of Material Parameters for Microbuckling Analysis of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, M.

    2015-05-01

    This research focuses on studying the effect of the constitutive law adopted for a matrix material on the compressive response of a unidirectional fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite. To investigate this effect, a periodic unit cell model of a unidirectional composite with an initial fiber waviness and inelastic behavior of the matrix was used. The sensitivity of the compressive strength to the hydrostatic pressure, the flow rule and the fiber misalignment angle were presented. The model was verified against an analytical solution and experimental data. Results of this study indicate that a micromechanical model with correctly identified material parameters provides a useful alternative to theoretical models and experimentation.

  18. Thermographic inspection of bond defects in Fiber Reinforced Polymer applied to masonry structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masini, N.; Aiello, M. A.; Capozzoli, L.; Vasanelli, E.

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays, externally bonded Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) are extensively used for strengthening and repairing masonry and reinforced concrete existing structures; they have had a rapid spread in the area of rehabilitation for their many advantages over other conventional repair systems, such as lightweight, excellent corrosion and fatigue resistance, high strength, etc. FRP systems applied to masonry or concrete structures are typically installed using a wet-layup technique.The method is susceptible to cause flaws or defects in the bond between the FRP system and the substrate, which may reduce the effectiveness of the reinforcing systems and the correct transfer of load from the structure to the composite. Thus it is of primary importance to detect the presence of defects and to quantify their extension in order to eventually provide correct repair measurements. The IR thermography has been cited by the several guidelines as a good mean to qualitatively evaluate the presence of installation defects and to monitor the reinforcing system with time.The method is non-destructive and does not require contact with the composite or other means except air to detect the reinforcement. Some works in the literature have been published on this topic. Most of the researches aim at using the IR thermography technique to characterize quantitatively the defects in terms of depth, extension and type in order to have an experimental database on defect typology to evaluate the long term performances of the reinforcing system. Nevertheless, most of the works in the literature concerns with FRP applied to concrete structures without considering the case of masonry structures. In the present research artificial bond defects between FRP and the masonry substrate have been reproduced in laboratory and the IR multi temporal thermography technique has been used to detect them. Thermographic analysis has been carried out on two wall samples having limited dimensions (100 x 70 cm) both

  19. Morphological and mechanical properties of carbon-nanotube-reinforced semicrystalline and amorphous polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadek, M.; Coleman, J. N.; Barron, V.; Hedicke, K.; Blau, W. J.

    2002-12-01

    In this work, multiwalled carbon nanotubes were investigated as potential mechanical reinforcement agents in two hosts, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and poly(9-vinyl carbazole) (PVK). It was found that, by adding various concentrations of nanotubes, both Young's modulus and hardness increased by factors of 1.8 and 1.6 at 1 wt % in PVA and 2.8 and 2.0 at 8 wt % in PVK, in reasonable agreement with the Halpin-Tsai theory. Furthermore, the presence of the nanotubes was found to nucleate crystallization of the PVA. This crystal growth is thought to enhance matrix-nanotube stress transfer. In addition, microscopy studies suggest extremely strong interfacial bonding in the PVA-based composite. This is manifested by the fracture of the polymer rather that the polymer-nanotube interface.

  20. Nanomechanics and the viscoelastic behavior of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Frank Thomas

    Recent experimental results demonstrate that substantial improvements in the mechanical behavior of polymers can be attained using small amounts of carbon nanotubes as a reinforcing phase. While this suggests the potential use of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymers (NRPs) for structural applications, the development of predictive models describing NRP effective behavior will be critical in the development and ultimate employment of such materials. To date many researchers have simply studied the nanoscale behavior of NRPs using techniques developed for traditional composite materials. While such studies can be useful, this dissertation seeks to extend these traditional theories to more accurately model the nanoscale interaction of the NRP constituent phases. Motivated by micrographs showing that embedded nanotubes often exhibit significant curvature within the polymer, in the first section of this dissertation a hybrid finite element-micromechanical model is developed to incorporate nanotube waviness into micromechanical predictions of NRP effective modulus. While also suitable for other types of wavy inclusions, results from this model indicate that moderate nanotube waviness can dramatically decrease the effective modulus of these materials. The second portion of this dissertation investigates the impact of the nanotubes on the overall NRP viscoelastic behavior. Because the nanotubes are on the size scale of the individual polymer chains, nanotubes may alter the viscoelastic response of the NRP in comparison to that of the pure polymer; this behavior is distinctly different from that seen in traditional polymer matrix composites. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results for each of three modes of viscoelastic behavior (glass transition temperature, relaxation spectrum, and physical aging) are all consistent with the hypothesis of a reduced mobility, non-bulk polymer phase in the vicinity of the embedded nanotubes. These models represent initial efforts to

  1. Durability of carbon fiber reinforced shape memory polymer composites in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Joon Hyeok; Hong, Seok Bin; Ahn, Yong San; Kim, Jin-Gyun; Nam, Yong-Youn; Lee, Geun Ho; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory polymer (SMP) is one of smart polymers which exhibit shape memory effect upon external stimuli. Recently, shape memory polymer composites (SMPCs) have been considered for space structure instead of shape memory alloys due to their deformability, lightweight and large recovery ratio, requiring characterization of their mechanical properties against harsh space environment and further prediction of the durability of SMPCs in space. As such, the durability of carbon fiber reinforced shape memory polymer composites (CF-SMPCs) was investigated using accelerated testing method based on short-term testing of CF-SMPCs in harsh condition. CF-SMPCs were prepared using woven carbon fabrics and a thermoset SMP via vacuum assisted resin transfer molding process. Bending tests with constant strain rate of CF-SMPCs were conducted using universal tensile machine (UTM) and Storage modulus test were conducted using dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). Using the results, a master curve based on time-temperature superposition principle was then constructed, through which the mechanical properties of CF-SMPCs at harsh temperature were predicted. CF-SMPCs would be exposed to simulated space environments under ultra-violet radiations at various temperatures. The mechanical properties including flexural and tensile strength and shape memory properties of SMPCs would be measured using UTM before and after such exposures for comparison. Finally, the durability of SMPCs in space would be assessed by developing a degradation model of SMPC.

  2. Titanate nanotubes for reinforcement of a poly(ethylene oxide)/chitosan polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, R.; Bavykin, D. V.; Zekonyte, J.; Walsh, F. C.; Wood, R. J.

    2016-05-01

    Soft polyethylene oxide (PEO)/chitosan mixtures, reinforced with hard titanate nanotubes (TiNTs) by co-precipitation from aqueous solution, have been used to produce compact coatings by the ‘drop-cast’ method, using water soluble PEO polymer and stable, aqueous colloidal solutions of TiNTs. The effects of the nanotube concentration and their length on the hardness and modulus of the prepared composite have been studied using nanoindentation and nanoscratch techniques. The uniformity of TiNT dispersion within the polymer matrix has been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A remarkable increase in hardness and reduced Young’s modulus of the composites, compared to pure polymer blends, has been observed at a TiNT concentration of 25 wt %. The short (up to 30 min) ultrasound treatment of aqueous solutions containing polymers and a colloidal TiNT mixture prior to drop casting has resulted in some improvements in both hardness and reduced Young’s modulus of dry composite films, probably due to a better dispersion of ceramic nanotubes within the matrix. However, further (more than 1 h) treatment of the mixture with ultrasound resulted in a deterioration of the mechanical properties of the composite accompanied by a shortening of the nanotubes, as observed by the TEM.

  3. Characterization of a new natural fiber from Arundo donax L. as potential reinforcement of polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Fiore, V; Scalici, T; Valenza, A

    2014-06-15

    The aim of this paper is to study the possibility of using of Arundo donax L. fibers as reinforcement in polymer composites. The fibers are extracted from the outer part of the stem of the plant, which widely grows in Mediterranean area and is diffused all around the world. To use these lignocellulosic fibers as reinforcement in polymer composites, it is necessary to investigate their microstructure, chemical composition and mechanical properties. Therefore, the morphology of A. donax L. fibers was investigated through electron microscopy, the thermal behavior through thermogravimetric analysis and the real density through a helium pycnometer. The chemical composition of the natural fibers in terms of cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and ash contents was determinated by using standard test methods. The mechanical characterization was carried out through single fiber tensile tests and a reliability analysis of the experimental data was performed. Furthermore, a mathematical model was applied to investigate the relation between the transverse dimension of the fibers and the mechanical properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fiber reinforced shape-memory polymer composite and its application in a deployable hinge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Xin; Liu, Yanju; Lv, Haibao; Wang, Xiaohua; Leng, Jinsong; Du, Shanyi

    2009-02-01

    This paper investigates the shape recovery behavior of thermoset styrene-based shape-memory polymer composite (SMPC) reinforced by carbon fiber fabrics, and demonstrates the feasibility of using an SMPC hinge as a deployable structure. The major advantages of shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are their extremely high recovery strain, low density and low cost. However, relatively low modulus and low strength are their intrinsic drawbacks. A fiber reinforced SMPC which may overcome the above-mentioned disadvantages is studied here. The investigation was conducted by three types of test, namely dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), a shape recovery test, and optical microscopic observations of the deformation mechanism for an SMPC specimen. Results reveal that the SMPC exhibits a higher storage modulus than that of a pure SMP. At/above Tg, the shape recovery ratio of the SMPC upon bending is above 90%. The shape recovery properties of the SMPC become relatively stable after some packaging/deployment cycles. Additionally, fiber microbuckling is the primary mechanism for obtaining a large strain in the bending of the SMPC. Moreover, an SMPC hinge has been fabricated, and a prototype of a solar array actuated by the SMPC hinge has been successfully deployed.

  5. Nanoscale damping characteristics of boron nitride nanotubes and carbon nanotubes reinforced polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Richa; Nieto, Andy; Chen, Han; Mora, Maria; Agarwal, Arvind

    2013-11-27

    This study compares the damping behavior of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as reinforcement in PLC, a biodegradable copolymer. The damping behavior of PLC composites reinforced with 2 wt % or 5 wt % nanotube filler is evaluated by nanodynamic mechanical analysis (NanoDMA). The addition of 2 wt % CNT leads to the greatest enhancement in damping (tan δ) behavior. This is attributed to pullout in CNTs because of lower interfacial shear strength with the polymer matrix and a more effective sword-in-sheath mechanism as opposed to BNNTs which have bamboo-like nodes. BNNTs however have a superior distribution in the PLC polymer matrix enabling higher contents of BNNT to further enhance the damping behavior. This is in contrast with CNTs which agglomerate at higher concentrations, thus preventing further improvement at higher concentrations. It is observed that for different compositions, tan δ values show no significant changes over varying dynamic loads or prolonged cycles. This shows the ability of nanotube mechanisms to function at varying strain rates and to survive long cycles.

  6. Thermal and Mechanical Behavior of Hybrid Polymer Nanocomposite Reinforced with Graphene Nanoplatelets

    PubMed Central

    Le, Minh-Tai; Huang, Shyh-Chour

    2015-01-01

    In the present investigation, we successfully fabricate a hybrid polymer nanocomposite containing epoxy/polyester blend resin and graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) by a novel technique. A high intensity ultrasonicator is used to obtain a homogeneous mixture of epoxy/polyester resin and graphene nanoplatelets. This mixture is then mixed with a hardener using a high-speed mechanical stirrer. The trapped air and reaction volatiles are removed from the mixture using high vacuum. The hot press casting method is used to make the nanocomposite specimens. Tensile tests, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) are performed on neat, 0.2 wt %, 0.5 wt %, 1 wt %, 1.5 wt % and 2 wt % GNP-reinforced epoxy/polyester blend resin to investigate the reinforcement effect on the thermal and mechanical properties of the nanocomposites. The results of this research indicate that the tensile strength of the novel nanocomposite material increases to 86.8% with the addition of a ratio of graphene nanoplatelets as low as 0.2 wt %. DMA results indicate that the 1 wt % GNP-reinforced epoxy/polyester nanocomposite possesses the highest storage modulus and glass transition temperature (Tg), as compared to neat epoxy/polyester or the other nanocomposite specimens. In addition, TGA results verify thethermal stability of the experimental specimens, regardless of the weight percentage of GNPs. PMID:28793521

  7. Investigating the Suitability of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polymer in Transcatheter Valve Applications.

    PubMed

    Rozeik, Monica M; Wheatley, David J; Gourlay, Terence

    2017-06-16

    The current delivery size of transcatheter aortic valves, limited by the thickness of their pericardial leaflets, correlates with a high prevalence of major vascular complications. Polyurethane valves can be developed to a fraction of the thickness of pericardial valves through the addition of carbon nanotubes to reinforce their leaflets. This study investigates the suitability of a novel carbon nanotube reinforced leaflet to reduce the delivery profile of transcatheter aortic valves. Carbon nanotube polyurethane composites were developed with thicknesses of 50 μm and their mechanical properties were determined in relation to various environmental effects. The composites demonstrated improvements to the material stiffness, particularly at increasing strain rates compared to the neat polymer. However, increasing nanotube concentrations significantly decreased the fatigue life of the composites. Key findings highlighted a potential for carbon nanotube reinforcement in valve replacement which experience very high strain rates during the cardiac cycle. Further testing is needed to achieve a strong nanotube-matrix interface which will prolong the cyclic fatigue life and further strengthen tensile properties. Testing on the durability and haemocompatibility of these composite heart valves are ongoing.

  8. On Complexities of Impact Simulation of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites: A Simplified Modeling Framework

    PubMed Central

    Alemi-Ardakani, M.; Milani, A. S.; Yannacopoulos, S.

    2014-01-01

    Impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites is a complex and challenging task, in particular for practitioners with less experience in advanced coding and user-defined subroutines. Different numerical algorithms have been developed over the past decades for impact modeling of composites, yet a considerable gap often exists between predicted and experimental observations. In this paper, after a review of reported sources of complexities in impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites, two simplified approaches are presented for fast simulation of out-of-plane impact response of these materials considering four main effects: (a) strain rate dependency of the mechanical properties, (b) difference between tensile and flexural bending responses, (c) delamination, and (d) the geometry of fixture (clamping conditions). In the first approach, it is shown that by applying correction factors to the quasistatic material properties, which are often readily available from material datasheets, the role of these four sources in modeling impact response of a given composite may be accounted for. As a result a rough estimation of the dynamic force response of the composite can be attained. To show the application of the approach, a twill woven polypropylene/glass reinforced thermoplastic composite laminate has been tested under 200 J impact energy and was modeled in Abaqus/Explicit via the built-in Hashin damage criteria. X-ray microtomography was used to investigate the presence of delamination inside the impacted sample. Finally, as a second and much simpler modeling approach it is shown that applying only a single correction factor over all material properties at once can still yield a reasonable prediction. Both advantages and limitations of the simplified modeling framework are addressed in the performed case study. PMID:25431787

  9. On complexities of impact simulation of fiber reinforced polymer composites: a simplified modeling framework.

    PubMed

    Alemi-Ardakani, M; Milani, A S; Yannacopoulos, S

    2014-01-01

    Impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites is a complex and challenging task, in particular for practitioners with less experience in advanced coding and user-defined subroutines. Different numerical algorithms have been developed over the past decades for impact modeling of composites, yet a considerable gap often exists between predicted and experimental observations. In this paper, after a review of reported sources of complexities in impact modeling of fiber reinforced polymer composites, two simplified approaches are presented for fast simulation of out-of-plane impact response of these materials considering four main effects: (a) strain rate dependency of the mechanical properties, (b) difference between tensile and flexural bending responses, (c) delamination, and (d) the geometry of fixture (clamping conditions). In the first approach, it is shown that by applying correction factors to the quasistatic material properties, which are often readily available from material datasheets, the role of these four sources in modeling impact response of a given composite may be accounted for. As a result a rough estimation of the dynamic force response of the composite can be attained. To show the application of the approach, a twill woven polypropylene/glass reinforced thermoplastic composite laminate has been tested under 200 J impact energy and was modeled in Abaqus/Explicit via the built-in Hashin damage criteria. X-ray microtomography was used to investigate the presence of delamination inside the impacted sample. Finally, as a second and much simpler modeling approach it is shown that applying only a single correction factor over all material properties at once can still yield a reasonable prediction. Both advantages and limitations of the simplified modeling framework are addressed in the performed case study.

  10. Corrosion of steel members strengthenened with carbon fiber reinforced polymer sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumadian, Ibrahim

    Due to many years of service at several cases of exposure at various environments there are many of steel bridges which are in need of rehabilitation. The infrastructure needs upgrading, repair or maintenance, and also strengthening, but by using an alternative as retrofits methods. The alternative retrofit method, which used fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials which their strength materials comes largely from the fiber such as carbon, glass, and aramid fiber. Of the most important materials used in the rehabilitation of infrastructure is a composite material newly developed in bonded externally carbon fiber and polymer (CFRP) sheets, which has achieved remarkable success in the rehabilitation and upgrading of structural members. This technique has many disadvantages one of them is galvanic corrosion. This study presents the effect of galvanic corrosion on the interfacial strength between carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets and a steel substrate. A total of 35 double-lap joint specimens and 19 beams specimens are prepared and exposed to an aggressive service environment in conjunction with an electrical potential method accelerating corrosion damage. Six test categories are planned at a typical exposure interval of 12 hours, including five specimens per category for double-lap joint specimens. And six test categories are planned at a typical exposure interval of 12 hours, including three specimens per category for Beam section specimens. In addition one beam section specimen is control. The degree of corrosion is measured. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy has been used to monitor and confirm the proposed corrosion mechanisms on the surface of CFRP. In this study we are using FTIR-spectroscopic measurement systems in the mid infrared (MIR) wavelength region (4000 - 400) cm-1 to monitor characteristic spectral features. Upon completion of corrosion processes, all specimens are monotonically loaded until failure

  11. In-vitro MRI detectability of interbody test spacers made of carbon fibre-reinforced polymers, titanium and titanium-coated carbon fibre-reinforced polymers.

    PubMed

    Ernstberger, Thorsten; Buchhorn, Gottfried; Baums, Mike Herbert; Heidrich, Gabert

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how different materials affect the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detectability of interbody test spacers (ITS). We evaluated the post-implantation MRI scans with T1 TSE sequences for three different ITS made of titanium, carbon fibre-reinforced polymers (CFRP) and titanium-coated CFRP, respectively. The main target variables were total artefact volume (TAV) and median artefact area (MAA). Additionally, implant volume (IV)/TAV and cross section (CS)/MAA ratio were determined. The t test and Newman-Keuls test for multiple comparisons were used for statistical analysis. TAV and MAA did not differ significantly between CFRP and titanium-coated CFRP, but were approximately twice as high for the titanium ITS (p < 0.001). MRI detectability was optimum for CFRP and titanium-coated CFRP, but was limited at the implant-bone interface of the titanium ITS. The material's susceptibility and the implant's dimensions affected MRI artefacting. Based on TAV, the volume of titanium surface coating in the ITS studied has no influence on susceptibility in MRI scans with T1 TSE sequences.

  12. Electrical and Mechanical Performance of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Used as the Impressed Current Anode Material

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ji-Hua; Zhu, Miaochang; Han, Ningxu; Liu, Wei; Xing, Feng

    2014-01-01

    An investigation was performed by using carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) as the anode material in the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) system of steel reinforced concrete structures. The service life and performance of CFRP were investigated in simulated ICCP systems with various configurations. Constant current densities were maintained during the tests. No significant degradation in electrical and mechanical properties was found for CFRP subjected to anodic polarization with the selected applied current densities. The service life of the CFRP-based ICCP system was discussed based on the practical reinforced concrete structure layout. PMID:28788137

  13. Electrical and Mechanical Performance of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Used as the Impressed Current Anode Material.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ji-Hua; Zhu, Miaochang; Han, Ningxu; Liu, Wei; Xing, Feng

    2014-07-24

    An investigation was performed by using carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) as the anode material in the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) system of steel reinforced concrete structures. The service life and performance of CFRP were investigated in simulated ICCP systems with various configurations. Constant current densities were maintained during the tests. No significant degradation in electrical and mechanical properties was found for CFRP subjected to anodic polarization with the selected applied current densities. The service life of the CFRP-based ICCP system was discussed based on the practical reinforced concrete structure layout.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polymer-Stabilized Liquid Crystal Device: Lowered and Thermally Invariant Threshold with Accelerated Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Krishna Prasad, S; Baral, Marlin; Murali, Adhigan; Jaisankar, Sellamuthu N

    2017-08-09

    Polymer-stabilized liquid crystal (PSLC) devices comprise a polymer matrix in an otherwise continuous phase of liquid crystal. The fibrils of the polymer provide, even in the bulk, virtual surfaces with finite anchoring energy resulting in attractive electro-optic properties. Here, we describe a novel variation of the PSLC device fabricated by reinforcing the polymer matrix with polymer-capped single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The most important outcome of this strengthening of the polymer strands is that the threshold voltage associated with the electro-optic switching becomes essentially temperature independent in marked contrast to the significant thermal variation seen in the absence of the nanotubes. The reinforcement reduces the magnitude of the threshold voltage, and notably accelerates the switching dynamics and the effective splay elasticity. Each of these attributes is quite attractive from the device operation point of view, especially the circuit design of the required drivers. The amelioration is caused by the polymer decorating CNTs being structurally identical to that of the matrix. The resulting good compatibility between CNTs and the matrix prevents the CNTs from drifting away from the matrix polymer, a lacuna in previous attempts to have CNTs in PSLC systems. The difference in the morphology, perhaps the primary cause for the effects seen, is noted in the electron microscopy images of the films.

  15. Novel hybrid columns made of ultra-high performance concrete and fiber reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohrevand, Pedram

    The application of advanced materials in infrastructure has grown rapidly in recent years mainly because of their potential to ease the construction, extend the service life, and improve the performance of structures. Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) is one such material considered as a novel alternative to conventional concrete. The material microstructure in UHPC is optimized to significantly improve its material properties including compressive and tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, durability, and damage tolerance. Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite is another novel construction material with excellent properties such as high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios and good corrosion resistance. Considering the exceptional properties of UHPC and FRP, many advantages can result from the combined application of these two advanced materials, which is the subject of this research. The confinement behavior of UHPC was studied for the first time in this research. The stress-strain behavior of a series of UHPC-filled fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) tubes with different fiber types and thicknesses were tested under uniaxial compression. The FRP confinement was shown to significantly enhance both the ultimate strength and strain of UHPC. It was also shown that existing confinement models are incapable of predicting the behavior of FRP-confined UHPC. Therefore, new stress-strain models for FRP-confined UHPC were developed through an analytical study. In the other part of this research, a novel steel-free UHPC-filled FRP tube (UHPCFFT) column system was developed and its cyclic behavior was studied. The proposed steel-free UHPCFFT column showed much higher strength and stiffness, with a reasonable ductility, as compared to its conventional reinforced concrete (RC) counterpart. Using the results of the first phase of column tests, a second series of UHPCFFT columns were made and studied under pseudo-static loading to study the effect of column

  16. BMP and Notch interaction in CRC subtypes.

    PubMed

    Irshad, Shazia; Bansal, Mukesh; Guarnieri, Paolo; Davis, Hayley; Zen, Ayman Al Haj; Baran, Brygida; Pinna, Claudia Maria Assunta; Rahman, Haseeb; Biswas, Sujata; Bardella, Chiara; Jeffery, Rosemary; Wang, Lai Mun; East, James Edward; Lewis, Annabelle; Tomlinson, Ian; Leedham, Simon John

    2017-03-15

    The functional role of Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signalling in colorectal cancer (CRC) is poorly defined, with contradictory results in cancer cell line models reflecting the inherent difficulties of assessing a signalling pathway that is context dependent and subject to genetic constraints. By assessing the transcriptional response of a diploid human colonic epithelial cell line to BMP ligand stimulation we generated a prognostic BMP signalling signature, which was applied to multiple CRC datasets to investigate BMP heterogeneity across CRC molecular subtypes. We linked BMP and Notch signalling pathway activity and function in human colonic epithelial cells, and normal and neoplastic tissue. BMP induced Notch through a γ-secretase independent interaction, regulated by the SMAD proteins. In homeostasis, BMP/Notch co-localisation was restricted to cells at the top of the intestinal crypt, with more widespread interaction in some human CRC samples. BMP signalling was downregulated in the majority of CRC, but was conserved specifically in mesenchymal subtype tumours, where it interacts with Notch to induce an EMT phenotype. In intestinal homeostasis, BMP-Notch pathway crosstalk is restricted to differentiating cells through stringent pathway segregation. Conserved BMP activity and loss of signalling stringency in mesenchymal subtype tumours promotes synergistic BMP/Notch interaction, and this correlates with poor patient prognosis. BMP signalling heterogeneity across CRC subtypes and cell lines can account for previous experimental contradictions. Crosstalk between the BMP and Notch pathways will render mesenchymal subtype CRC insensitive to γ-secretase inhibition unless BMP activation is concomitantly addressed.

  17. In situ compatibilizer-reinforced interface between a flexible polymer (a functionalized polypropylene) and a rodlike polymer (a thermotropic liquid crystalline polymer).

    PubMed

    Seo, Yongsok; Ninh, Tran Hai; Hong, Soon Man; Kim, Sehyun; Kang, Tae Jin; Kim, Hansung; Kim, Jinyeol

    2006-03-28

    We present an investigation of the interfacial reinforcement between a flexible folded-chain polymer (functionalized polypropylene-maleic anhydride-grafted polypropylene, MAPP) and a rodlike polymer (a themotropic liquid crystalline polymer, TCLP - poly(ester amide)). Fracture toughness was measured using an asymmetric double-cantilever beam test (ADCB). High fracture toughness at the bonding temperature of 200 degrees C indicates that a chemical reaction has occurred at the interface to provide a strong interaction between MAPP and TLCP. Despite the higher modulus of TLCP, the fracture was propagated in the TLCP phase because of inherent TLCP domain structure. An analysis on the locus of failure revealed that at constant bonding temperature the fracture toughness between MAPP and TLCP was influenced not only by the bonding temperature but also by the bonding time. The fracture toughness increased with the bonding temperature until 200 degrees C was reached and then decreased at higher bonding temperature. The fracture toughness increased with annealing time until it reached a plateau value. We ascribe the dependence of the fracture toughness on the bonding time to the progressive occurrence of two different failure mechanisms, adhesive failure and cohesive failure. The adhesive strength increased with bonding temperature whereas the cohesive strength decreased because of weaker adhesion between TLCP crystalline domains. The dependence of fracture toughness on bonding time was explained in terms of the TLCP crystalline domain structure.

  18. Cellulose Nanocrystals vs. Cellulose Nanofibrils: A Comparative study on Their Microstructures and Effects as Polymer Reinforcing Agents

    Treesearch

    Xuezhu Xu; Fei Liu; Long Jiang; J.Y. Zhu; Darrin Haagenson; Dennis P. Wiesenborn

    2013-01-01

    Both cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) are nanoscale cellulose fibers that have shown reinforcing effects in polymer nanocomposites. CNCs and CNFs are different in shape, size and composition. This study systematically compared their morphologies, crystalline structure, dispersion properties in polyethylene oxide (PEO) matrix, interactions...

  19. Water sorption and dimensional changes of denture base polymer reinforced with glass fibers in continuous unidirectional and woven form.

    PubMed

    Cal, N E; Hersek, N; Sahin, E

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the dimensional accuracy and water sorption of a denture base polymer that was reinforced with glass fibers in continuous unidirectional and woven form in different weight fractions. Ten rhombic brass plates were prepared with reference points, and 70 heat-cured denture base polymer specimens were produced using these brass models. Ten of 70 were used for controls, and 60 were reinforced with glass fibers in continuous parallel and woven form. The dimensional changes of polymer and fiber-reinforced composite specimens after processing, drying for 4 days at 37 degrees C, and storage in 37 degrees C water for 90 days were calculated by the change of the distance vector. The measurements were made between the reference points on the specimens and were compared with those on the brass model at 4 different stages. The water sorption calculations were made at 10 different time intervals on 70 specimens, which were immersed in a 37 degrees C distilled water bath and weighed. The polymerization shrinkage and water sorption of denture base polymers is lower when the specimens are reinforced with glass fibers in continuous unidirectional and woven form. The highest fiber content showed the smallest dimensional change (0.069 mm, or 0.25%), and the unreinforced group showed the largest change (0.139 mm, or 0.54%). Water sorption occurred mainly during the first 14 days. As the fiber content increases, the dimensional change and water sorption decrease.

  20. A complex reinforced polymer interposer with ordered Ni grid and SiC nano-whiskers polyimide composite based on micromachining technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanmei; Sun, Yunna; Wang, Yan; Ding, Guifu; Sun, Bin; Zhao, Xiaolin

    2017-01-01

    A complex reinforced polymer interposer comprised with conductive Ni cylinders, ordered Ni grid and SiC nano-whiskers/Polyimide (PI) composite was proposed. The conductive Ni cylinders distributing in the middle of each Ni grid unite designed as the supporting structure were used as electric connecting component for the interposer and were insulated by the SiC nano-whiskers/PI composite. The comprehensive properties of the complex reinforced polymer interposer were improved by a complex reinforced mechanism: the improved thermal conductivity and mechanical strength by the Ni supporting structure and the reduced metal/polymer interfacial mismatch due to the SiC nano-whiskers/PI composite with the optimized mixture ratio. The above complex reinforced polymer interposer and a traditional reinforced polymer interposer only with Ni grid were fabricated using micro-machining technology for comparative analysis. The comprehensive properties of these two polymer interposers were analyzed respectively. Compared with the traditional design, the comprehensive properties of the proposed complex reinforced polymer interposer were improved further, such as, 21.3% increase for the Young modulus, 10.1% decrease for the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and 54.9% increase for the thermal conductivity. Such complex reinforced mechanism based on the metal ordered grid and random nano-whiskers has potential to expand the applications of the polymer interposer. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. First light with a carbon fiber reinforced polymer 0.4 meter telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Christopher C.; Santiago, Freddie; Jungwirth, Matthew E.; Martinez, Ty; Restaino, Sergio R.; Bagwell, Brett; Romeo, Robert

    2014-03-01

    For the passed several years, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has been investigating the use of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) material in the construction of a telescope assembly including the optical components. The NRL, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Composite Mirror Applications, Inc. (CMA) have jointly assembled a prototype telescope and achieved "first light" images with a CFRP 0.4 m aperture telescope. CFRP offers several advantages over traditional materials such as creating structures that are lightweight and low coefficient of thermal expansion and conductivity. The telescope's primary and secondary mirrors are not made from glass, but CFRP, as well. The entire telescope weighs approximately 10 kg while a typical telescope of this size would weigh quite a bit more. We present the achievement of "first light" with this telescope demonstrating the imaging capabilities of this prototype and the optical surface quality of the mirrors with images taken during a day's quiescent periods.

  2. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) Optics Quality Assessment for Lightweight Deployable Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, J.; Martinez, T.; Restaino, S.; Santiago, F.; Wilcox, C.; Teare, S.; Romeo, R.; Martin, R.

    2010-09-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory and Composite Mirror Applications (CMA) have been working together for several years on the development of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) optics and telescopes. We have documented the potential advantages of this technology in several other publications, including structural, thermal and weight advantages over traditional steel and glass optical systems. In this paper we present results of a battery of optical tests done on various CFRP replicated mirrors. Our goal is to demonstrate not only the optical quality of such mirrors but also their reproducibility and stability. We show test results on a sample of four mirrors. We performed extensive optical tests and also stability and repeatability tests. These tests are geared towards proving the use of this technology for a variety of optical applications including use in our CFRP telescopes.

  3. Low-velocity impact damage characterization of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yin; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Zheng-wei; Zhang, Jin-yu; Tao, Sheng-jie

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) after low-velocity impact is detected using infrared thermography, and different damages in the impacted composites are analyzed in the thermal maps. The thermal conductivity under pulse stimulation, frictional heating and thermal conductivity under ultrasonic stimulation of CFRP containing low-velocity impact damage are simulated using numerical simulation method. Then, the specimens successively exposed to the low-velocity impact are respectively detected using the pulse infrared thermography and ultrasonic infrared thermography. Through the numerical simulation and experimental investigation, the results obtained show that the combination of the above two detection methods can greatly improve the capability for detecting and evaluating the impact damage in CFRP. Different damages correspond to different infrared thermal images. The delamination damage, matrix cracking and fiber breakage are characterized as the block-shape hot spot, line-shape hot spot, and

  4. Influence of attenuation on acoustic emission signals in carbon fiber reinforced polymer panels.

    PubMed

    Asamene, Kassahun; Hudson, Larry; Sundaresan, Mannur

    2015-05-01

    Influence of attenuation on acoustic emission (AE) signals in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) crossply and quasi-isotropic panels is examined in this paper. Attenuation coefficients of the fundamental antisymmetric (A0) and symmetric (S0) wave modes were determined experimentally along different directions for the two types of CFRP panels. In the frequency range from 100 kHz to 500 kHz, the A0 mode undergoes significantly greater changes due to material related attenuation compared to the S0 mode. Moderate to strong changes in the attenuation levels were noted with propagation directions. Such mode and frequency dependent attenuation introduces major changes in the characteristics of AE signals depending on the position of the AE sensor relative to the source. Results from finite element simulations of a microscopic damage event in the composite laminates are used to illustrate attenuation related changes in modal and frequency components of AE signals.

  5. Recycling carbon fibre reinforced polymers for structural applications: technology review and market outlook.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Soraia; Pinho, Silvestre T

    2011-02-01

    Both environmental and economic factors have driven the development of recycling routes for the increasing amount of carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) waste generated. This paper presents a review of the current status and outlook of CFRP recycling operations, focusing on state-of-the-art fibre reclamation and re-manufacturing processes, and on the commercialisation and potential applications of recycled products. It is shown that several recycling and re-manufacturing processes are reaching a mature stage, with implementations at commercial scales in operation, production of recycled CFRPs having competitive structural performances, and demonstrator components having been manufactured. The major challenges for the sound establishment of a CFRP recycling industry and the development of markets for the recyclates are summarised; the potential for introducing recycled CFRPs in structural components is discussed, and likely promising applications are investigated.

  6. Laser Cutting of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers using Highly Brilliant Laser Beam Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotzbach, Annett; Hauser, Markus; Beyer, Eckhard

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) are applied more and more in the aircraft industry as well as in the automobile industry. The principal reason is the highly mechanical load capacity along with the low density. Moreover, the corrosion resistance plus the damping behavior of the material can be utilized fully in highly stressed structures. However, the concept of manufacture CFRP-parts close to the final contour does not substitute the need of cutting them. The different properties of fiberand matrix-material constitute an ambitious challenge while cutting CFRP using a laser beam. This paper deals with elementary analysis of the laser remote cutting process and the gas assisted laser cutting of CFRP.

  7. Reinforcement of polyetheretherketone polymer with titanium for improved mechanical properties and in vitro biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun-Do; Park, Hui-Sun; Kang, Min-Ho; Li, Yuanlong; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Koh, Young-Hag; Estrin, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Blends of ductile Ti metal with polyetheretherketone (PEEK) polymer were studied with regard to their mechanical properties and in vitro biocompatibility. PEEK/Ti composites with various Ti contents, ranging from 0 vol % to 60 vol %, were produced by compression molding at 370°C. In all composites produced, regardless of the initial Ti content, Ti particles were well distributed in the PEEK matrix. Addition of Ti led to a significant increase in mechanical properties of PEEK. Specifically, an increase in Ti content enhanced compressive strength and stiffness, while preserving ductile fracture behavior. In addition, the use of Ti for reinforcement of PEEK provided the composites with improved in vitro biocompatibility in terms of the attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Study on acoustic emission of carbon fiber reinforced polymer fracture under noisy environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Deng; Jianhui, Lin; Yan, Huang

    2017-05-01

    A new method of High Speed Train Fiber Reinforced Polymer AE signal extraction based on Modified Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (MEEMD) was presented here. Because EMD acts as a dyadic filter bank, in this method, amplitude of the added noise in accordance with a Linear-Sinusoidal (L-S) spectrum, and expound how to assemble the noise. The sifting number was set by frequency from high to low. Calculate IMF's Segment sample entropy along the timeline, which take a larger proportion was identified as an AE events. The experimental result shows that the L-S noise spectrum and sifting number could restrain the mode mixing and the little wave vanish. MEEMD obtains a tangible physical meaning and improved results compared with the original EEMD. Segment sample entropy could captured the AE events in a continuous monitoring data. The AE signals was intuitive reflect in the Hilbert spectrogram.

  9. A Lamb waves based statistical approach to structural health monitoring of carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Carboni, Michele; Gianneo, Andrea; Giglio, Marco

    2015-07-01

    This research investigates a Lamb-wave based structural health monitoring approach matching an out-of-phase actuation of a pair of piezoceramic transducers at low frequency. The target is a typical quasi-isotropic carbon fibre reinforced polymer aeronautical laminate subjected to artificial, via Teflon patches, and natural, via suitable low velocity drop weight impact tests, delaminations. The performance and main influencing factors of such an approach are studied through a Design of Experiment statistical method, considering both Pulse Echo and Pitch Catch configurations of PZT sensors. Results show that some factors and their interactions can effectively influence the detection of a delamination-like damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites Using Reflective Terahertz Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Li, Wei; Cui, Hong-Liang; Shi, Changcheng; Han, Xiaohui; Ma, Yuting; Chen, Jiandong; Chang, Tianying; Wei, Dongshan; Zhang, Yumin; Zhou, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) imaging is considered a nondestructive evaluation method for composite materials used for examining various defects of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites and fire-retardant coatings in the reflective imaging modality. We demonstrate that hidden defects simulated by Teflon artificial inserts are imaged clearly in the perpendicular polarization mode. The THz TDS technique is also used to measure the thickness of thin fire-retardant coatings on CFRP composites with a typical accuracy of about 10 micrometers. In addition, coating debonding is successfully imaged based on the time-delay difference of the time-domain waveforms between closely adhered and debonded sample locations. PMID:27314352

  11. High-power picosecond laser drilling/machining of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, A.; Li, L.; Mativenga, P.; Sabli, A.

    2016-02-01

    The large differences in physical and thermal properties of the carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite constituents make laser machining of this material challenging. An extended heat-affected zone (HAZ) often occurs. The availability of ultrashort laser pulse sources such as picosecond lasers makes it possible to improve the laser machining quality of these materials. This paper reports an investigation on the drilling and machining of CFRP composites using a state-of-the-art 400 W picosecond laser system. Small HAZs (<25 µm) were obtained on the entry side of 6-mm-diameter hole drilled on sample of 6 mm thickness, whereas no HAZ was seen below the top surface on the cut surfaces. Multiple ring material removal strategy was used. Furthermore, the effect of laser processing parameters such as laser power, scanning speed and repetition rate on HAZ sizes and ablation depth was investigated.

  12. Nondestructive evaluation of defects in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Andrew C. Y.; Goh, Henry K. H.; Lin, Karen K.; Liew, W. H.

    2017-04-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites are increasingly used in aerospace applications due to its superior mechanical properties and reduced weight. Adhesive bonding is commonly used to join the composite parts since it is capable of joining incompatible or dissimilar components. However, insufficient adhesive or contamination in the adhesive bonds might occur and pose as threats to the integrity of the plane during service. It is thus important to look for suitable nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques to detect and characterize the sub-surface defects within the CFRP composites. Some of the common NDT techniques include ultrasonic techniques and thermography. In this work, we report the use of the abovementioned techniques for improved interpretation of the results.

  13. Assessment of microcapsule—catalyst particles healing system in high performance fibre reinforced polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolimowski, P. A.; Wass, D. F.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-08-01

    Autonomous self-healing in carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) is demonstrated using epoxy resin filled microcapsules and a solid-state catalyst. Microcapsules filled with oligomeric epoxy resin (20-450 μm) and particles of Sc(OTf)3 are embedded in an interleave region of a unidirectional CFRP laminate and tested under mode I loading. Double cantilever beam (DCB) test specimens containing variable concentrations of microcapsules and catalyst were prepared, tested and compared to those healed by manual injection with corresponding healing resin formulation. The healing efficiency was evaluated by comparing the maximum peak load recorded on load-displacement curves for pristine and healed specimens. A 44% maximum recovery was observed for specimens containing 10 wt% of solid phase catalyst and 11 wt% of epoxy microcapsules. However, a significant (80%) decrease in initial strain energy release rate (G IC) was observed for specimens with the embedded healing chemistries.

  14. Repeated self-healing of microvascular carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coope, T. S.; Wass, D. F.; Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2014-11-01

    A self-healing, high performance, carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite is demonstrated by embedding a Lewis-acid catalytic curing agent within a laminate, manufactured using out of autoclave (OOA) composite manufacturing methods. Two configurations of healing agent delivery, pre-mixed and autonomous mixing, are investigated via injection of a healing agent through bio-inspired microvascular channels exposed on Mode I fractured crack planes. Healing is effected when an epoxy resin-solvent healing agent mixture reaches the boundary of embedded solid-state scandium(III) triflate (Sc(OTf)3) catalyst, located on the crack plane, to initiate the ring-opening polymerisation (ROP) of epoxides. Tailored self-healing agents confer high healing efficiency values after multiple healing cycles (69-108%) to successfully mitigate against crack propagation within the composite microstructure.

  15. Reinforced poly(propylene oxide): a very soft and extensible dielectric electroactive polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, K.; Galantini, F.; Mazurek, P.; Daugaard, A. E.; Gallone, G.; Skov, A. L.

    2013-11-01

    Poly(propylene oxide) (PPO), a novel soft elastomeric material, and its composites were investigated as a new dielectric electroactive polymer (EAP). The PPO networks were obtained from thiol-ene chemistry by photochemical crosslinking of α,ω-diallyl PPO with a tetra-functional thiol. The elastomer was reinforced with hexamethylenedisilazane treated fumed silica to improve the mechanical properties of PPO. The mechanical properties of PPO and composites thereof were investigated by shear rheology and stress-strain measurements. It was found that incorporation of silica particles improved the stability of the otherwise mechanically weak pure PPO network. Dielectric spectroscopy revealed high relative dielectric permittivity of PPO at 103 Hz of 5.6. The relative permittivity was decreased slightly upon addition of fillers, but remained higher than the commonly used acrylic EAP material VHB4910. The electromechanical actuation performance of both PPO and its composites showed properties as good as VHB4910 and a lower viscous loss.

  16. Measurement and analysis of thrust force in drilling sisal-glass fiber reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, M.; Gopinath, A.

    2017-05-01

    Drilling of composite materials is difficult when compared to the conventional materials because of its in-homogeneous nature. The force developed during drilling play a major role in the surface quality of the hole and minimizing the damages around the surface. This paper focuses the effect of drilling parameters on thrust force in drilling of sisal-glass fiber reinforced polymer composite laminates. The quadratic response models are developed by using response surface methodology (RSM) to predict the influence of cutting parameters on thrust force. The adequacy of the models is checked by using the analysis of variance (ANOVA). A scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis is carried out to analyze the quality of the drilled surface. From the results, it is found that, the feed rate is the most influencing parameter followed by spindle speed and the drill diameter is the least influencing parameter on the thrust force.

  17. Improved Bond Equations for Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Bars in Concrete.

    PubMed

    Pour, Sadaf Moallemi; Alam, M Shahria; Milani, Abbas S

    2016-08-30

    This paper explores a set of new equations to predict the bond strength between fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) rebar and concrete. The proposed equations are based on a comprehensive statistical analysis and existing experimental results in the literature. Namely, the most effective parameters on bond behavior of FRP concrete were first identified by applying a factorial analysis on a part of the available database. Then the database that contains 250 pullout tests were divided into four groups based on the concrete compressive strength and the rebar surface. Afterward, nonlinear regression analysis was performed for each study group in order to determine the bond equations. The results show that the proposed equations can predict bond strengths more accurately compared to the other previously reported models.

  18. Improved Bond Equations for Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Bars in Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Pour, Sadaf Moallemi; Alam, M. Shahria; Milani, Abbas S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores a set of new equations to predict the bond strength between fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) rebar and concrete. The proposed equations are based on a comprehensive statistical analysis and existing experimental results in the literature. Namely, the most effective parameters on bond behavior of FRP concrete were first identified by applying a factorial analysis on a part of the available database. Then the database that contains 250 pullout tests were divided into four groups based on the concrete compressive strength and the rebar surface. Afterward, nonlinear regression analysis was performed for each study group in order to determine the bond equations. The results show that the proposed equations can predict bond strengths more accurately compared to the other previously reported models. PMID:28773859

  19. Segmenting delaminations in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite CT using convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammons, Daniel; Winfree, William P.; Burke, Eric; Ji, Shuiwang

    2016-02-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) utilizes a variety of techniques to inspect various materials for defects without causing changes to the material. X-ray computed tomography (CT) produces large volumes of three dimensional image data. Using the task of identifying delaminations in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite CT, this work shows that it is possible to automate the analysis of these large volumes of CT data using a machine learning model known as a convolutional neural network (CNN). Further, tests on simulated data sets show that with a robust set of experimental data, it may be possible to go beyond just identification and instead accurately characterize the size and shape of the delaminations with CNNs.

  20. Effect of thermal cycling on flexural properties of carbon-graphite fiber-reinforced polymers.

    PubMed

    Segerström, Susanna; Ruyter, I Eystein

    2009-07-01

    To determine flexural strength and modulus after water storage and thermal cycling of carbon-graphite fiber-reinforced (CGFR) polymers based on poly(methyl methacrylate) and a copolymer matrix, and to examine adhesion between fiber and matrix by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Solvent cleaned carbon-graphite (CG) braided tubes of fibers were treated with a sizing resin. The resin mixture of the matrix was reinforced with 24, 36, 47 and 58wt% (20, 29, 38 and 47vol.%) CG-fibers. After heat polymerization the specimens were kept for 90 days in water and thereafter hydrothermally cycled (12,000 cycles, 5/55 degrees C). Mechanical properties were evaluated by three-point bend testing. After thermal cycling, the adhesion between fibers and matrix was evaluated by SEM. Hydrothermal cycling did not decrease flexural strength of the CGFR polymers with 24 and 36wt% fiber loadings; flexural strength values after thermocycling were 244.8 (+/-32.33)MPa for 24wt% and 441.3 (+/-68.96)MPa for 36wt%. Flexural strength values after thermal cycling were not further increased after increasing the fiber load to 47 (459.2 (+/-45.32)MPa) and 58wt% (310.4 (+/-52.79)MPa). SEM revealed good adhesion between fibers and matrix for all fiber loadings examined. The combination of the fiber treatment and resin matrix described resulted in good adhesion between CG-fibers and matrix. The flexural values for fiber loadings up to 36wt% appear promising for prosthodontic applications such as implant-retained prostheses.

  1. Development of multifunctional fiber reinforced polymer composites through ZnO nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakooti, Mohammad H.; Patterson, Brendan A.; Hwang, Hyun-Sik; Sodano, Henry A.

    2016-04-01

    Piezoelectric nanowires, in particular zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires, have been vastly used in the fabrication of electromechanical devices to convert wasted mechanical energy into useful electrical energy. Over recent years, the growth of vertically aligned ZnO nanowires on various structural fibers has led to the development of fiber-based nanostructured energy harvesting devices. However, the development of more realistic energy harvesters that are capable of continuous power generation requires a sufficient mechanical strength to withstand typical structural loading conditions. Yet, a durable, multifunctional material system has not been developed thoroughly enough to generate electrical power without deteriorating the mechanical performance. Here, a hybrid composite energy harvester is fabricated in a hierarchical design that provides both efficient power generating capabilities while enhancing the structural properties of the fiber reinforced polymer composite. Through a simple and low-cost process, a modified aramid fabric with vertically aligned ZnO nanowires grown on the fiber surface is embedded between woven carbon fabrics, which serve as the structural reinforcement as well as the top and the bottom electrodes of the nanowire arrays. The performance of the developed multifunctional composite is characterized through direct vibration excitation and tensile strength examination.

  2. Performance of reinforced polymer ablators exposed to a solid rocket motor exhaust. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, C.; Burgess, T.; Bowen, J.; Deloach, K.; Talmy, I.

    1992-10-01

    Summarized in this report is the effort by the Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) and FMC Corporation (a launcher manufacturer) to identify new high performance ablators suitable for use on Navy guided missile launchers (GML) and ships' structures. The goal is to reduce ablator erosion by 25 to 50 percent compared to that of the existing ablators such as MXBE350 (rubbermodified phenolic containing glass fiber reinforcement). This reduction in erosion would significantly increase the number of new missiles with higher-thrust, longer burn rocket motors that can be launched prior to ablator refurbishment. In fact, there are a number of new Navy missiles being considered for development and introduction into existing GML: e.g., the Antisatellite Missile (ASM) and the Theater High-Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) Missile. The U.S. Navy experimentally evaluated the eight best fiber-reinforced, polymer composites from a possible field of 25 off-the-shelf ablators previously screened by FMC Corporation. They were tested by the Navy in highly aluminized solid rocket motor exhaust plumes to determine their ability to resist erosion and to insulate.... Ablator, Guided Missile Launchers, Erosion, Tactical missiles, Convective heating, Solid rocket motors, Aluminum oxide particles.

  3. Fabrication Of Carbon-Boron Reinforced Dry Polymer Matrix Composite Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L.; Cano, Roberto J.; Treasure, Monte; Shahood, Thomas W.

    1999-01-01

    Future generation aerospace vehicles will require specialized hybrid material forms for component structure fabrication. For this reason, high temperature composite prepregs in both dry and wet forms are being developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). In an attempt to improve compressive properties of carbon fiber reinforced composites, a hybrid carbon-boron tape was developed and used to fabricate composite laminates which were subsequently cut into flexural and compression specimens and tested. The hybrid material, given the designation HYCARB, was fabricated by modifying a previously developed process for the manufacture of dry polymer matrix composite (PMC) tape at LaRC. In this work, boron fibers were processed with IM7/LaRC(TradeMark)IAX poly(amide acid) solution-coated prepreg to form a dry hybrid tape for Automated Tow Placement (ATP). Boron fibers were encapsulated between two (2) layers of reduced volatile, low fiber areal weight poly(amide acid) solution-coated prepreg. The hybrid prepreg was then fully imidized and consolidated into a dry tape suitable for ATP. The fabrication of a hybrid boron material form for tow placement aids in the reduction of the overall manufacturing cost of boron reinforced composites, while realizing the improved compression strengths. Composite specimens were press-molded from the hybrid material and exhibited excellent mechanical properties.

  4. Heat transfer mechanisms in fiber-reinforced polymer composites bonded to concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jeff; Baker, Rebecca; Kallemeyn, Lisa

    2007-04-01

    This research project investigated heat transfer mechanisms that occur during radiant heating of glass/epoxy composites bonded to concrete. The ultimate goal is to develop a field procedure for estimating the thickness of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites used to strengthen existing reinforced concrete structures. Thickness is an important parameter in the design and implementation of nondestructive testing procedures that evaluate bond in FRP systems. Four concrete samples (15 cm x 30 cm x 5 cm) were constructed with glass/epoxy composite bonded to the surface. The thickness of the composite varied from 1mm to 4mm and thermocouples were placed at 1mm intervals through the depth of the composite. Experimental data was compared with a simple theoretical model that predicts the surface temperature response of a layered system subjected to a uniform heat flux. Two factors were shown to significantly influence the heat transfer mechanism: surface absorptivity of the FRP composite and convective cooling. Additional analytical modeling using the finite element method was performed to account for these affects in an effort to obtain a better estimate of FRP thickness based on experimental data.

  5. Dual Function Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer in Simulated Pore Solution.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ji-Hua; Guo, Guanping; Wei, Liangliang; Zhu, Miaochang; Chen, Xianchuan

    2016-02-06

    The mechanical and electrochemical performance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) were investigated regarding a novel improvement in the load-carrying capacity and durability of reinforced concrete structures by adopting CFRP as both a structural strengthener and an anode of the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) system. The mechanical and anode performance of CFRP were investigated in an aqueous pore solution in which the electrolytes were available to the anode in a cured concrete structure. Accelerated polarization tests were designed with different test durations and various levels of applied currents in accordance with the international standard. The CFRP specimens were mechanically characterized after polarization. The measured feeding voltage and potential during the test period indicates CFRP have stable anode performance in a simulated pore solution. Two failure modes were observed through tensile testing. The tensile properties of the post-polarization CFRP specimens declined with an increased charge density. The CFRP demonstrated success as a structural strengthener and ICCP anode. We propose a mathematic model predicting the tensile strengths of CFRP with varied impressed charge densities.

  6. Dual Function Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer in Simulated Pore Solution

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ji-Hua; Guo, Guanping; Wei, Liangliang; Zhu, Miaochang; Chen, Xianchuan

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical and electrochemical performance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) were investigated regarding a novel improvement in the load-carrying capacity and durability of reinforced concrete structures by adopting CFRP as both a structural strengthener and an anode of the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) system. The mechanical and anode performance of CFRP were investigated in an aqueous pore solution in which the electrolytes were available to the anode in a cured concrete structure. Accelerated polarization tests were designed with different test durations and various levels of applied currents in accordance with the international standard. The CFRP specimens were mechanically characterized after polarization. The measured feeding voltage and potential during the test period indicates CFRP have stable anode performance in a simulated pore solution. Two failure modes were observed through tensile testing. The tensile properties of the post-polarization CFRP specimens declined with an increased charge density. The CFRP demonstrated success as a structural strengthener and ICCP anode. We propose a mathematic model predicting the tensile strengths of CFRP with varied impressed charge densities. PMID:28787900

  7. Flash Thermography to Evaluate Porosity in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRPs)

    PubMed Central

    Meola, Carosena; Toscano, Cinzia

    2014-01-01

    It is a fact that the presence of porosity in composites has detrimental effects on their mechanical properties. Then, due to the high probability of void formation during manufacturing processes, it is necessary to have the availability of non-destructive evaluation techniques, which may be able to discover the presence and the distribution of porosity in the final parts. In recent years, flash thermography has emerged as the most valuable method, but it is still not adequately enclosed in the industrial enterprise. The main reason of this is the lack of sufficient quantitative data for a full validation of such a technique. The intention of the present work is to supply an overview on the current state-of-the-art regarding the use of flash thermography to evaluate the porosity percentage in fiber reinforced composite materials and to present the latest results, which are gathered by the authors, on porous carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates. To this end, several coupons of two different stacking sequences and including a different amount of porosity are fabricated and inspected with both non-destructive and destructive testing techniques. Data coming from non-destructive testing with either flash thermography or ultrasonics are plotted against the porosity percentage, which was previously estimated with the volumetric method. The new obtained results are a witness to the efficacy of flash thermography. Some key points that need further consideration are also highlighted. PMID:28788527

  8. Flexural properties of denture-base polymer reinforced with glass-fibre polysulphone composite.

    PubMed

    Kemp, P L; de Wet, F A; Botha, S J; Levin, J

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of glass-fibre composite reinforcement on the flexural strength and flexural modulus poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA). Prefabricated electrical glass-fibre polysulphone composite rods (GF/PSu), 3mm in diameter, were incorporated in cylindrical, heat polymerizing PMMA specimens with diameters of 4, 5 and 6mm respectively (n = 10). These specimens were compared with PMMA control groups of similar dimension. A three point loading test was performed in air after storage of specimens in water at 37 degrees C for 8 weeks. The following variables were measured : Flexural Strength (FS) and Flexural Modulus (FM). The data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA). After testing, the fracture zone was evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The glass-fibre reinforcement used in this study significantly enhanced both the FM and FS values of PMMA. This enhancement was, however, progressively reduced in relation to an increase in cross-sectional dimension of the specimens. SEM evaluation revealed delamination and fracture of the glass-fibres in the polymer matrix.

  9. Degradable phosphate glass fiber reinforced polymer matrices: mechanical properties and cell response.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Delia S; Rüssel, Christian; Vogt, Sebastian; Weisser, Jürgen; Schnabelrauch, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    The development of biodegradable materials for internal fracture fixation is of great interest, as they would both eliminate the problem of stress shielding and obviate the need for a second operation to remove fixation devices. Preliminary investigations for the production of degradable fiber reinforced polymer composite materials are detailed. Composites were produced of phosphate invert glass fibers of the glass system P(2)O(5)-CaO-MgO-Na(2)O-TiO(2), which showed a low solubility in previous work. The fibers were embedded into a matrix of a degradable organic polymer network based on methacrylate-modified oligolactide. Fracture behavior, bending strength and elastic modulus were evaluated during 3-point bending tests and the fracture surface of the composites was investigated using a scanning electron microscope. Short-term biocompatibility was tested in an FDA/EtBr viability assay using MC3T3-E1 murine pre-osteoblast cells and showed a good cell compatibility of the composite materials. Results suggested that these composite materials are biocompatible and show mechanical properties which are of interest for the production of degradable bone fixation devices.

  10. Stabilizing Surfactant Templated Cylindrical Mesopores in Polymer and Carbon Films through Composite Formation with Silica Reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Lingyan; Feng, Dan; Lee, Hae-Jeong; Wang, Chengqing; Wu, Quanyan; Zhao, Dongyuan; Vogt, Bryan D.

    2010-10-22

    A facile approach to maintain the periodic mesostructure of cylindrical pores in polymer-resin and carbon films after thermal template removal is explored through the reactive coassembly of resol (carbon precursor) and tetraethylorthosilicate (silica precursor) with triblock copolymer Pluronic F127. Without silica, a low porosity, disordered film is formed after pyrolysis despite the presence of an ordered mesostructure prior to template removal. However for silica concentration greater than 25 wt %, pyrolysis at 350 C yields a mesoporous silica-polymer film with well-defined pore mesostructure. These films remain well ordered upon carbonization at 800 C. In addition to the mesostructural stability, the addition of silica to the matrix impacts other morphological characteristics. For example, the average pore size and porosity of the films increase from 3.2 to 7.5 nm and 12 to 45%, respectively, as the concentration of silica in the wall matrix increases from 0 to 32 wt %. The improved thermal stability of the ordered mesostructure with the addition of silica to the matrix is attributed to the reinforcement of the mechanical properties leading to resistance to stress induced collapse of the mesostructure during template removal.

  11. A carbon fiber reinforced polymer cage for vertebral body replacement: technical note.

    PubMed

    Ciappetta, P; Boriani, S; Fava, G P

    1997-11-01

    We analyzed the surgical technique used for the replacement of damaged vertebral bodies of the thoracolumbar spine and the carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) cages that are used to replace the pathological vertebral bodies. We also evaluated the biomechanical properties of carbon composite materials used in spinal surgery. The surgical technique of CFRP implants may be divided into two distinct steps, i.e., assembling the components that will replace the pathological vertebral bodies and connecting the cage to an osteosynthetic system to immobilize the cage. The CFRP cages, made of Ultrapek polymer and AS-4 pyrolytic carbon fiber (AcroMed, Rotterdam, The Netherlands), are of different sizes and may be placed one on top of the other and fixed together with a titanium rod. These components are hollow to allow fragments of bone to be pressed manually into them and present threaded holes at 15, 30, and 90 degrees on the external surface, permitting the insertion of screws to connect the cage to an anterior or posterior osteosynthetic system. To date, we have used CFRP cages in 13 patients undergoing corporectomies and 10 patients undergoing spondylectomies. None of our patients have reported complications. CFRP implants offer several advantages compared with titanium or surgical grade stainless steel implants, demonstrating high versatility and outstanding biological and mechanical properties. Furthermore, CFRP implants are radiolucent and do not hinder radiographic evaluation of bone fusion, allowing for better follow-up studies.

  12. Biomass-derived monomers for performance-differentiated fiber reinforced polymer composites

    DOE PAGES

    Rorrer, Nicholas A.; Vardon, Derek R.; Dorgan, John R.; ...

    2017-03-14

    Nearly all polymer resins used to manufacture critically important fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are petroleum sourced. In particular, unsaturated polyesters (UPEs) are widely used as matrix materials and are often based on maleic anhydride, a four-carbon, unsaturated diacid. Typically, maleic anhydride is added as a reactant in a conventional step-growth polymerization to incorporate unsaturation throughout the backbone of the UPE, which is then dissolved in a reactive diluent (styrene is widely used) infused into a fiber mat and cross-linked. Despite widespread historical use, styrene has come under scrutiny due to environmental and health concerns; in addition, many conceivable UPEsmore » are not soluble in styrene. In this study, we demonstrate that renewably-sourced monomers offer the ability to overcome these issues and improve overall composite performance. The properties of poly(butylene succinate)-based UPEs incorporating maleic anhydride are used as a baseline for comparison against UPEs derived from fumaric acid, cis,cis-muconate, and trans,trans-muconate, all of which can be obtained biologically. The resulting biobased UPEs are combined with styrene, methacrylic acid, or a mixture of methacrylic acid and cinnaminic acid, infused into woven fiberglass and cross-linked with the addition of a free-radical initiator and heat. This process produces a series of partially or fully bio-derived composites. Overall, the muconate-containing UPE systems exhibit a more favorable property suite than the maleic anhydride and fumaric acid counterparts. In all cases at the same olefinic monomer loading, the trans,trans-muconate polymers exhibit the highest shear modulus, storage modulus, and glass transition temperature indicating stronger and more thermally resistant materials. They also exhibit the lowest loss modulus indicating a greater adhesion to the glass fibers. The use of a mixture of methacrylic and cinnaminic acid as the reactive diluent

  13. Polymer composites reinforced by locking-in a liquid-crystalline assembly of cellulose nanocrystallites.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Mio; Teramoto, Yoshikuni; Nishio, Yoshiyuki

    2012-05-14

    An attempt was made to synthesize novel composites comprising poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and cellulose nanocrystallites (CNC) (acid-treated cotton microfibrils) from suspensions of CNC in an aqueous 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) monomer solution. The starting suspensions (∼5 wt % CNC) separated into an isotropic upper phase and an anisotropic bottom one in the course of quiescent standing. By way of polymerization of HEMA in different phase situations of the suspensions, we obtained films of three polymer composites, PHEMA-CNC(iso), PHEMA-CNC(aniso), and PHEMA-CNC(mix), coming from the isotropic phase, anisotropic phase, and embryonic nonseparating mixture, respectively. All the composites were transparent and, more or less, birefringent under a polarized optical microscope. A fingerprint texture typical of cholesteric liquid crystals of longer pitch spread widely in PHEMA-CNC(aniso) but rather locally appeared in PHEMA-CNC(iso). Any of the CNC incorporations into the PHEMA matrix improved the original thermal and mechanical properties of this amorphous polymer material. In dynamic mechanical measurements, the locking-in of the respective CNC assemblies gave rise to an increase in the glass-state modulus E' of PHEMA as well as a marked suppression of the E'-falling at temperatures higher than T(g) (≈ 110 °C) of the vinyl polymer. It was also observed for the composites that their modulus E' rerose in a range of about 150-190 °C, which was attributable to a secondary cross-linking formation between PHEMA chains mediated by the acidic CNC filler. The mechanical reinforcement effect of the CNC dispersions was ensured in a tensile test, whereby PHEMA-CNC(aniso) was found to surpass the other two composites in stiffness and strength.

  14. Effect of Thermal Cycling on the Tensile Behavior of Polymer Composites Reinforced by Basalt and Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, S. Mohammad Reza; Najafi, Moslem; Eslami-Farsani, Reza

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of thermal cycling on the tensile behavior of three types of polymer-matrix composites — a phenolic resin reinforced with woven basalt fibers, woven carbon fibers, and hybrid basalt and carbon fibers — in an ambient environment. For this purpose, tensile tests were performed on specimens previously subjected to a certain number of thermal cycles. The ultimate tensile strength of the specimen reinforced with woven basalt fibers had by 5% after thermal cycling, but the strength of the specimen with woven carbon fibers had reduced to a value by 11% higher than that before thermal cycling.

  15. Comparative study of microlaser excitation thermography and microultrasonic excitation thermography on submillimeter porosity in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai; Fernandes, Henrique; Hassler, Ulf; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Genest, Marc; Robitaille, François; Joncas, Simon; Maldague, Xavier

    2017-04-01

    Stitching is used to reduce incomplete infusion of T-joint core (dry-core) and reinforce T-joint structure. However, it may cause new types of flaws, especially submillimeter flaws. Thermographic approaches including microvibrothermography, microlaser line thermography, and microlaser spot thermography on the basis of pulsed and lock-in techniques were proposed. These techniques are used to detect the submillimeter porosities in a stitched T-joint carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite specimen. X-ray microcomputed tomography was used to validate the thermographic results. Finally an experimental comparison of microlaser excitation thermography and microultrasonic excitation thermography was conducted.

  16. Effects of the Amount and Shape of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Strengthening Elements on the Ductile Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungnam

    2014-09-01

    A series of beam tests were performed to evaluate the ductility of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) elements. A total of nine RC beams were produced and loaded up to failure in three-point bending under deflection control. In addition, the amount and shape of the CFRP elements (plates/sheets) were considered as the key test variables. Test results revealed that the strengthening with CFRP elements in the width direction was more effective than the strengthening across their height. The energy method used in an analysis showed that the energy ratio of the beams strengthened with CFRP plates were half or less than half of the energy ratio of the beams strengthened with CFRP sheets. In addition, the ductility of the beams decreased as the strengthening ratio of the CFRP elements increased.

  17. Shock compression behavior of a S2-glass fiber reinforced polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Liren; Yuan, Fuping; Prakash, Vikas; Dandekar, Dattatraya P.

    2009-05-01

    Synthetic heterogeneous material systems, e.g., layered composite materials with organic matrices reinforced by glass fibers (GRP), are attractive materials for a variety of lightweight armor applications. However, while the dynamic response of homogeneous materials, such as, metals and ceramics, has been well documented, the ballistic response of heterogeneous material systems is poorly understood. In the present study, in an attempt to better understand the shock-induced compression response of GRPs, a series of plate impact experiments were conducted on a S2-glas fiber reinforced polymer composite comprising S2-glass woven roving in a Cycom 4102 polyester resin matrix. The plate-impact experiments were conducted using an 82.5 mm bore single-stage gas-gun at the Case Western Reserve University. The history of the shock-induced free-surface particle velocity at the rear surface of the target plate was monitored using the multibeam VALYN™ VISAR system. The results of the experiments indicate the absence of an elastic front in the shock-induced free-surface particle velocity profile in the GRP. Moreover, in the low impact velocity range, relatively weak late-time oscillations are observed in the particle velocity profiles. Increasing the amplitude of the shock-induced compression resulted in a decrease in the rise-time of the shock wave front. The critical shock stress amplitude at which a clear shock-front is seen to develop during the shock loading was determined to be between 1.5 and 2.0 GPa. The results of the experiments are used to obtain the equation of state of the GRP in the stress range 0.04-20 GPa. Moreover, the Hugoniot curve (Hugoniot stress versus Hugoniot strain) was calculated using the Rankine-Hugoniot relationships; the departure of the Hugoniot stress versus the particle velocity curve from linearity allowed the estimation of the Hugoniot elastic limit of the GRP to be about 1.6 GPa.

  18. Scleral Reinforcement Through Host Tissue Integration with Biomimetic Enzymatically Degradable Semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Network

    PubMed Central

    Su, James; Wall, Samuel T.

    2010-01-01

    Enzymatically degradable semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (edsIPNs) were explored for their biocompatibility and ability to promote new scleral tissue growth, as a means of reinforcing the posterior wall of the eye. The edsIPNs comprised thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid), customizable peptide crosslinkers cleavable by matrix metalloproteinases, and interpenetrating linear poly(acrylic acid)-graft-peptide chains to engage with cell surface receptors. Rheological studies revealed an increase in stiffness at body temperature; the complex shear modulus |G*| was 14.13 ± 6.13 Pa at 22°C and 63.18 ± 12.24 Pa at 37°C, compatible with injection at room temperature. Primary chick scleral fibroblasts and chondrocytes cultured on edsIPN increased by 15.1- and 11.1-fold, respectively, over 11 days; both exhibited delayed onset of exponential growth compared with the cells plated on tissue culture polystyrene. The edsIPN was delivered by retrobulbar injection (100 μL) to nine 2-week-old chicks to assess biocompatibility in vivo. Ocular axial dimensions were assessed using A-scan ultrasonography over 28 days, after which eyes were processed for histological analysis. Although edsIPN injections did not affect the rate of ocular elongation, the outer fibrous sclera showed significant thickening. The demonstration that injectable biomimetic edsIPNs stimulate scleral fibrous tissue growth represents proof-of-principle for a novel approach for scleral reinforcement and a potential therapy for high myopia. PMID:19814587

  19. Fusobacterium and Enterobacteriaceae: Important players for CRC?

    PubMed Central

    Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Jobin, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays an essential role in regulating intestinal homeostasis through its capacity to modulate various biological activities ranging from barrier, immunity and metabolic function. Not surprisingly, microbial dysbiosis is associated with numerous intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and colorectal cancer (CRC). In this piece, we will review recent evidence that gut microbial dysbiosis can influence intestinal disease, including colitis and CRC. We will discuss the biological events implicated in the development of microbial dysbiosis and the emergence of CRC-associated microorganisms, focusing on E.coli and F. nucleatum. Finally, the mechanisms by which E.coli and F. nucleatum exert potentially carcinogenic effects on the host will be reviewed. PMID:24972311

  20. Fabrication of elastomeric stamps with polymer-reinforced sidewalls via chemically selective vapor deposition polymerization of poly(p-xylylene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Kahp Y.; Langer, Robert; Lahann, Jörg

    2003-11-01

    We report on the preparation of polydimethylsiloxane stamps with selectively grown polymer sidewalls by chemical vapor deposition polymerization of poly(p-xylylene). Using a thin iron layer as an inhibitor, the deposition occurs only on the sidewalls of the features in relief, resulting in a polymer-reinforced stamp. The wetting properties of stamps can be restored after removing the thin iron layer with an acidic solution, which has been verified by pattern transfer to an underlying substrate using molding and microcontact printing.

  1. Buckling of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Laminated Composite Materials Subjected to Axial Compression and Shear Loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddick, J. C.; Gates, T. S.; Frankland, S.-J. V.

    2005-01-01

    A multi-scale method to predict the stiffness and stability properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced laminates has been developed. This method is used in the prediction of the buckling behavior of laminated carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites formed by stacking layers of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer with the nanotube alignment axes of each layer oriented in different directions. Linking of intrinsic, nanoscale-material definitions to finite scale-structural properties is achieved via a hierarchical approach in which the elastic properties of the reinforced layers are predicted by an equivalent continuum modeling technique. Solutions for infinitely long symmetrically laminated nanotube-reinforced laminates with simply-supported or clamped edges subjected to axial compression and shear loadings are presented. The study focuses on the influence of nanotube volume fraction, length, orientation, and functionalization on finite-scale laminate response. Results indicate that for the selected laminate configurations considered in this study, angle-ply laminates composed of aligned, non-functionalized carbon nanotube-reinforced lamina exhibit the greatest buckling resistance with 1% nanotube volume fraction of 450 nm uniformly-distributed carbon nanotubes. In addition, hybrid laminates were considered by varying either the volume fraction or nanotube length through-the-thickness of a quasi-isotropic laminate. The ratio of buckling load-to-nanotube weight percent for the hybrid laminates considered indicate the potential for increasing the buckling efficiency of nanotube-reinforced laminates by optimizing nanotube size and proportion with respect to laminate configuration.

  2. Surface modification of fiber reinforced polymer composites and their attachment to bone simulating material.

    PubMed

    Hautamäki, M P; Puska, M; Aho, A J; Kopperud, H M; Vallittu, P K

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of fiber orientation of a fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) made of poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) and E-glass to the surface fabrication process by solvent dissolution. Intention of the dissolution process was to expose the fibers and create a macroporous surface onto the FRC to enhance bone bonding of the material. The effect of dissolution and fiber direction to the bone bonding capability of the FRC material was also tested. Three groups of FRC specimens (n = 18/group) were made of PMMA and E-glass fiber reinforcement: (a) group with continuous fibers parallel to the surface of the specimen, (b) continuous fibers oriented perpendicularly to the surface, (c) randomly oriented short (discontinuous) fibers. Fourth specimen group (n = 18) made of plain PMMA served as controls. The specimens were subjected to a solvent treatment by tetrahydrofuran (THF) of either 5, 15 or 30 min of time (n = 6/time point), and the advancement of the dissolution (front) was measured. The solvent treatment also exposed the fibers and created a surface roughness on to the specimens. The solvent treated specimens were embedded into plaster of Paris to simulate bone bonding by mechanical locking and a pull-out test was undertaken to determine the strength of the attachment. All the FRC specimens dissolved as function of time, as the control group showed no marked dissolution during the study period. The specimens with fibers along the direction of long axis of specimen began to dissolve significantly faster than specimens in other groups, but the test specimens with randomly oriented short fibers showed the greatest depth of dissolution after 30 min. The pull-out test showed that the PMMA specimens with fibers were retained better by the plaster of Paris than specimens without fibers. However, direction of the fibers considerably influenced the force of attachment. The fiber reinforcement increases significantly the

  3. Effect of tool wear on quality of carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminate during edge trimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedanianpour, Hossein

    Polymer matrix composites, especially carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) are vastly used in different high technology industries, including aerospace, automotive and wind energy. Normally, when CFRPs are cured to near net shape, finishing operations such as trimming, milling or drilling are used to remove excess materials. The quality of these finishing operations is highly essential at the level of final assembly. The present study aims to study the effect of cutting tool wear on the resulting quality for the trimming process of high performance CFRP laminates, in the aerospace field. In terms of quality parameters, the study focuses on surface roughness and material integrity damages (uncut fibers, fiber pullout, delamination or thermal damage of the matrix), which could jeopardize the mechanical performance of the components. In this study, a 3/8 inch diameter CVD diamond coated carbide tool with six flutes was used to trim 24-ply carbon fiber laminates. Cutting speeds ranging from 200 m/min to 400 m/min and feed rates ranging from 0.3048 mm/rev to 0.4064 mm/rev were used in the experiments. The results obtained using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed increasing defect rates with an increase in tool wear. The worst surface integrity, including matrix cracking, fiber pull-out and empty holes, was also observed for plies oriented at -45° degrees. For the surface finish, it was observed that an increase in tool wear resulted in a decrease in surface roughness. Regarding tool wear, a lower rate was observed at lower feed rates and higher cutting speeds, while a higher tool wear rate was observed at intermediate values of our feed rate and cutting speed ranges.

  4. Three-Dimensional Nanoporous Cellulose Gels as a Flexible Reinforcement Matrix for Polymer Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhuqun; Huang, Junchao; Liu, Chuanjun; Ding, Beibei; Kuga, Shigenori; Cai, Jie; Zhang, Lina

    2015-10-21

    With the world's focus on utilization of sustainable natural resources, the conversion of wood and plant fibers into cellulose nanowhiskers/nanofibers is essential for application of cellulose in polymer nanocomposites. Here, we present a novel fabrication method of polymer nanocomposites by in-situ polymerization of monomers in three-dimensionally nanoporous cellulose gels (NCG) prepared from aqueous alkali hydroxide/urea solution. The NCG have interconnected nanofibrillar cellulose network structure, resulting in high mechanical strength and size stability. Polymerization of the monomer gave P(MMA/BMA)/NCG, P(MMA/BA)/NCG nanocomposites with a volume fraction of NCG ranging from 15% to 78%. SEM, TEM, and XRD analyses show that the NCG are finely distributed and preserved well in the nanocomposites after polymerization. DMA analysis demonstrates a significant improvement in tensile storage modulus E' above the glass transition temperature; for instance, at 95 °C, E' is increased by over 4 orders of magnitude from 0.03 MPa of the P(MMA/BMA) up to 350 MPa of nanocomposites containing 15% v/v NCG. This reinforcement effect can be explained by the percolation model. The nanocomposites also show remarkable improvement in solvent resistance (swelling ratio of 1.3-2.2 in chloroform, acetone, and toluene), thermal stability (do not melt or decompose up to 300 °C), and low coefficients of thermal expansion (in-plane CTE of 15 ppm·K(-1)). These nanocomposites will have great promising applications in flexible display, packing, biomedical implants, and many others.

  5. 1981 CRC Octane Number Requirement Survey.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    were found to have premium unleaded gasoline in their tanks at the time they were rated than in last year’s Survey. This may account for the lower...select models totaling 123 cars, and are plotted in Figures J-1 through J-9 for the 50 percent satisfaction level. The select model calculated results...i • .. . .. . " - lJ ii t i -- - n i I ... .. . " ’ ... B-1 1981 CRC OCTANE NUMBER REQUIREMENT SURVEY (CRC Project No. CM- 123 -81) 1981 Analysts

  6. The tumor accumulation and therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin carried in calcium phosphate-reinforced polymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Hong Jae; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Jeong, Seo Young; Lee, Sang Cheon

    2012-08-01

    A mineral (calcium phosphate, CaP)-reinforced core-shell-corona micelle was evaluated as a nanocarrier of doxorubicin (DOX) for cancer therapy. The polymer micelles of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-aspartic acid)-b-poly(L-phenylalanine) (PEG-PAsp-PPhe) in the aqueous phase provided the three distinct functional domains: the hydrated PEG outer corona for prolonged circulation, the anionic PAsp middle shell for CaP mineralization, and the hydrophobic PPhe inner core for DOX loading. CaP mineralization was performed by initial electrostatic localization of calcium ions at anionic PAsp shells, and the consequent addition of phosphate anions to trigger the growth of CaP. The mineralization did not affect the micelle size or the spherical morphology. The CaP-mineralized micelles exhibited enhanced serum stability. The DOX release from the DOX-loaded mineralized micelles (DOX-CaP-PM) at physiological pH was efficiently inhibited, whereas at an endosomal pH (pH 4.5), DOX release was facilitated due to the rapid dissolution of the CaP mineral layers in the middle shell domains. The in vivo tissue distribution and tumor accumulation of the DOX-CaP-PM that were labeled with a near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) dye, Cy5.5, were monitored in MDA-MB231 tumor-bearing mice. Non-invasive real-time optical imaging results indicated that the DOX-CaP-PM exhibited enhanced tumor specificity due to the prolonged stable circulation in the blood and an enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect compared with the DOX-loaded nonmineralized polymer micelles (DOX-NPM). The DOX-CaP-PM exhibited enhanced therapeutic efficacy in tumor-bearing mice compared with free DOX and DOX-NPM. The CaP mineralization on assembled nanoparticles may serve as a useful guide for enhancing the antitumor therapeutic efficacy of various polymer micelles and nano-aggregates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Active vibration control of a smart pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer I-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, G.; Qiao, P.; Sethi, V.; Prasad, A.

    2004-08-01

    Advanced and innovative materials and structures are increasingly used in civil infrastructure applications. By combining the advantages of composites and smart sensors and actuators, active or smart composite structures can be created and be efficiently adopted in practical structural applications. This paper presents results on active vibration control of pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite thin-walled I-beams using smart sensors and actuators. The FRP I-beams are made of E-glass fibers and polyester resins. The FRP I-beam is in a cantilevered configuration. The PZT (lead zirconate titanate) type of piezoelectric ceramic patches are used as smart sensors and actuators. These patches are surface bonded near the cantilevered end of the I-beam. Utilizing results from modal analyses and experimental modal testing, several active vibration control methods, such as position feedback control, strain rate feedback control and lead compensation, are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods achieve effective vibration control of FRP I-beams. For instance, the modal damping ratio of the strong direction first bending mode increases by more than 1000% with positive position feedback control.

  8. Active vibration control of a smart pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer I-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gangbing; Qiao, Pizhong; Sethi, Vineet; Prasad, A.

    2002-06-01

    Advanced and innovative materials and structures are increasingly used in civil infrastructure applications. By combining the advantages of composites and smart sensors and actuators, active or smart composite structures can be created and be efficiently adopted in practical structural applications. This paper presents results of active vibration control of a pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites thin-walled I-beams using smart sensors and actuators. The FRP I-beams are made of E-glass fibers and polyester resins. The FRP I-beam is in a cantilevered configuration. PZT (Lead zirconate titanate) type of piezoelectric ceramic patches are used as smart sensors and actuators. These patches are surface-bonded near the cantilevered end of the I-beam. Utilizing results from modal analyses and experimental modal testing, several active vibration control methods, such as position feedback control, strain rate feedback control and lead compensator, are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods achieve effective vibration control of FRP I-beams. For instance, the modal damping ratio of the strong direction first bending mode increases by more than 1000 percent with a positive position feedback control.

  9. Failure of a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer implant used for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Sardar, Zeeshan; Jarzem, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Lumbar interbody fusion is a common procedure owing to the high prevalence of degenerative spinal disorders. During such procedures, carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) cages are frequently utilized to fill the void created between adjacent vertebral bodies, to provide mechanical stability, and to carry graft material. Failure of such implants can lead to significant morbidity. We discuss the possible causes leading to the failure of a CFRP cage in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. Review of a 49-year-old woman who underwent revision anterior lumbar interbody fusion 2 years after posterior instrumentation and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion at L4-L5 and L5-S1. The patient developed pseudarthrosis at the two previously fused levels with failure of the posterior instrumentation. Revision surgery reveled failure with fragmentation of the CFRP cage at the L5-S1 level. CFRP implants can break if mechanical instability or nonunion occurs in the spinal segments, thus emphasizing the need for optimizing medical management and meticulous surgical technique in achieving stability.

  10. Characterization and analysis of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminates with embedded circular vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C.-Y.; Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the influence of embedded circular hollow vascules on structural performance of a fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite laminate is presented. Incorporating such vascules will lead to multi-functional composites by bestowing functions such as self-healing and active thermal management. However, the presence of off-axis vascules leads to localized disruption to the fibre architecture, i.e. resin-rich pockets, which are regarded as internal defects and may cause stress concentrations within the structure. Engineering approaches for creating these simple vascule geometries in conventional FRP laminates are proposed and demonstrated. This study includes development of a manufacturing method for forming vascules, microscopic characterization of their effect on the laminate, finite element (FE) analysis of crack initiation and failure under load, and validation of the FE results via mechanical testing observed using high-speed photography. The failure behaviour predicted by FE modelling is in good agreement with experimental results. The reduction in compressive strength owing to the embedding of circular vascules ranges from 13 to 70 per cent, which correlates with vascule dimension. PMID:20150337

  11. High Power Laser Cutting of Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Polymers with cw- and Pulsed Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, F.; Wolf, N.; Petring, D.

    Glass fiber and carbon fiber reinforced polymers with thermoplastic matrix enable high volume production with short cycle times. Cutting and trimming operations in these production chains require the use of high average laser power for an efficient cutting speed, but employment of high laser power runs the risk to induce a wide heat affected zone (HAZ). This paper deals with investigations with cw and ns-pulsed CO2-laser radiation in the kilowatt range in single-pass and multiple-pass processes. Using multi-pass processing at high processing speeds of 100 m/min and above a reduced heat affected zone in the range of 100 μm to 200 μm could be achieved by the ns-pulsed radiation. With cw radiation at the same average power of 1 kW however, the HAZ was 300-400 μm. Also employing ns-pulses in the kW-range average power leads to heat accumulation in the material. Small HAZ were obtained with sufficient break times between subsequent passes.

  12. Failure of a Carbon Fiber–Reinforced Polymer Implant Used for Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Sardar, Zeeshan; Jarzem, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar interbody fusion is a common procedure owing to the high prevalence of degenerative spinal disorders. During such procedures, carbon fiber–reinforced polymer (CFRP) cages are frequently utilized to fill the void created between adjacent vertebral bodies, to provide mechanical stability, and to carry graft material. Failure of such implants can lead to significant morbidity. We discuss the possible causes leading to the failure of a CFRP cage in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. Review of a 49-year-old woman who underwent revision anterior lumbar interbody fusion 2 years after posterior instrumentation and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion at L4–L5 and L5–S1. The patient developed pseudarthrosis at the two previously fused levels with failure of the posterior instrumentation. Revision surgery reveled failure with fragmentation of the CFRP cage at the L5–S1 level. CFRP implants can break if mechanical instability or nonunion occurs in the spinal segments, thus emphasizing the need for optimizing medical management and meticulous surgical technique in achieving stability. PMID:24436878

  13. Research on the mechanical properties of a glass fiber reinforced polymer-steel combined truss structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Zhao, Qilin; Li, Fei; Liu, Jinchun; Chen, Haosen

    2014-01-01

    An assembled plane truss structure used for vehicle loading is designed and manufactured. In the truss, the glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) tube and the steel joint are connected by a new technology featuring a pretightened tooth connection. The detailed description for the rod and node design is introduced in this paper, and a typical truss panel is fabricated. Under natural conditions, the short-term load test and long-term mechanical performance test for one year are performed to analyze its performance and conduct a comparative analysis for a reasonable FEM model. The study shows that the design and fabrication for the node of an assembled truss panel are convenient, safe, and reliable; because of the creep control design of the rods, not only does the short-term structural stiffness meet the design requirement but also the long-term creep deformation tends towards stability. In addition, no significant change is found in the elastic modules, so this structure can be applied in actual engineering. Although the safety factor for the strength of the composite rods is very large, it has a lightweight advantage over the steel truss for the low density of GFRP. In the FEM model, simplifying the node as a hinge connection relatively conforms to the actual status.

  14. Characterization and analysis of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminates with embedded circular vasculature.

    PubMed

    Huang, C-Y; Trask, R S; Bond, I P

    2010-08-06

    A study of the influence of embedded circular hollow vascules on structural performance of a fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite laminate is presented. Incorporating such vascules will lead to multi-functional composites by bestowing functions such as self-healing and active thermal management. However, the presence of off-axis vascules leads to localized disruption to the fibre architecture, i.e. resin-rich pockets, which are regarded as internal defects and may cause stress concentrations within the structure. Engineering approaches for creating these simple vascule geometries in conventional FRP laminates are proposed and demonstrated. This study includes development of a manufacturing method for forming vascules, microscopic characterization of their effect on the laminate, finite element (FE) analysis of crack initiation and failure under load, and validation of the FE results via mechanical testing observed using high-speed photography. The failure behaviour predicted by FE modelling is in good agreement with experimental results. The reduction in compressive strength owing to the embedding of circular vascules ranges from 13 to 70 per cent, which correlates with vascule dimension.

  15. Prediction of failure in notched carbon-fibre-reinforced-polymer laminates under multi-axial loading.

    PubMed

    Tan, J L Y; Deshpande, V S; Fleck, N A

    2016-07-13

    A damage-based finite-element model is used to predict the fracture behaviour of centre-notched quasi-isotropic carbon-fibre-reinforced-polymer laminates under multi-axial loading. Damage within each ply is associated with fibre tension, fibre compression, matrix tension and matrix compression. Inter-ply delamination is modelled by cohesive interfaces using a traction-separation law. Failure envelopes for a notch and a circular hole are predicted for in-plane multi-axial loading and are in good agreement with the observed failure envelopes from a parallel experimental study. The ply-by-ply (and inter-ply) damage evolution and the critical mechanisms of ultimate failure also agree with the observed damage evolution. It is demonstrated that accurate predictions of notched compressive strength are obtained upon employing the band broadening stress for microbuckling, highlighting the importance of this damage mode in compression. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Plastic Passive Composite Damper by Use of Piezoelectric Polymer/Ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Toshio

    2002-11-01

    In this study, the passive damping of carbon-fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) cantilever beams is examined using (1) interleaving of viscoelastic thermoplastic films, (2) piezoelectric polymer (PVDF) film interlayers and (3) surface-bonded piezoelectric ceramics. Introducing polyethylene-based film interlayers between composite plies resulted in a significant increase in the vibration loss factor. It is also shown that the vibration damping of CFRP laminates can be improved passively by means of PVDF film interlayers and resistively shunted, surface-bonded piezoelectric ceramic, PbZrO3-PbTiO3 (PZT) sheets. This paper also discusses the enhanced vibration damping of CFRP laminates with dispersed PZT particle interlayers. All these damping methods, interleaving of thermoplastic films, interlayers of PVDF films or dispersed PZT particles between composite plies, and resistively shunted, surface-bonded PZT sheets, can be jointly used to improve the damping of CFRP laminates/structures. The use of CFRP beams in combination with several damping concepts discussed here is promising for application in structures where light weight and improved vibration damping are desired.

  17. The strong diamagnetic behaviour of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galehdar, A.; Nicholson, K. J.; Callus, P. J.; Rowe, W. S. T.; John, S.; Wang, C. H.; Ghorbani, K.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon fibers are finite conductors with a weak diamagnetic response in a static magnetic field. When illuminated with a high-frequency alternating electromagnetic wave such that the skin depth is greater than the fiber diameter, carbon-fiber composites are shown to exhibit a strong dynamic diamagnetic response. The magnetic susceptibility (χm) is controlled by the polarization angle (θ), which is the angle between the incident electric field and conductor direction. A closed form solution for this behaviour was derived using Maxwell's equations and an understanding of the induced conductor currents. The equation was verified using simulation and free space "wall" and waveguide measurements on unidirectional IM7/977-3 carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates. The measured responses ranged from non-magnetic at θ = 90°, χm = 0, up to strongly diamagnetic at θ = 30°, χm = -0.75, over the 8-18 GHz bandwidth. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions and computational simulations.

  18. Argon-oxygen atmospheric pressure plasma treatment on carbon fiber reinforced polymer for improved bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartosias, Marios

    Acceptance of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) structures requires a robust surface preparation method with improved process controls capable of ensuring high bond quality. Surface preparation in a production clean room environment prior to applying adhesive for bonding would minimize risk of contamination and reduce cost. Plasma treatment is a robust surface preparation process capable of being applied in a production clean room environment with process parameters that are easily controlled and documented. Repeatable and consistent processing is enabled through the development of a process parameter window utilizing techniques such as Design of Experiments (DOE) tailored to specific adhesive and substrate bonding applications. Insight from respective plasma treatment Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) and screening tests determined critical process factors from non-factors and set the associated factor levels prior to execution of the DOE. Results from mode I Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) testing per ASTM D 5528 [1] standard and DOE statistical analysis software are used to produce a regression model and determine appropriate optimum settings for each factor.

  19. Optimal Electrode Selection for Electrical Resistance Tomography in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    PubMed Central

    Escalona Galvis, Luis Waldo; Diaz-Montiel, Paulina; Venkataraman, Satchi

    2017-01-01

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) offers a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that takes advantage of the inherent electrical properties in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites for internal damage characterization. This paper investigates a method of optimum selection of sensing configurations for delamination detection in thick cross-ply laminates using ERT. Reduction in the number of sensing locations and measurements is necessary to minimize hardware and computational effort. The present work explores the use of an effective independence (EI) measure originally proposed for sensor location optimization in experimental vibration modal analysis. The EI measure is used for selecting the minimum set of resistance measurements among all possible combinations resulting from selecting sensing electrode pairs. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) is applied to obtain a spectral representation of the resistance measurements in the laminate for subsequent EI based reduction to take place. The electrical potential field in a CFRP laminate is calculated using finite element analysis (FEA) applied on models for two different laminate layouts considering a set of specified delamination sizes and locations with two different sensing arrangements. The effectiveness of the EI measure in eliminating redundant electrode pairs is demonstrated by performing inverse identification of damage using the full set and the reduced set of resistance measurements. This investigation shows that the EI measure is effective for optimally selecting the electrode pairs needed for resistance measurements in ERT based damage detection. PMID:28772485

  20. Optimal Electrode Selection for Electrical Resistance Tomography in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites.

    PubMed

    Escalona Galvis, Luis Waldo; Diaz-Montiel, Paulina; Venkataraman, Satchi

    2017-02-04

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) offers a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that takes advantage of the inherent electrical properties in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites for internal damage characterization. This paper investigates a method of optimum selection of sensing configurations for delamination detection in thick cross-ply laminates using ERT. Reduction in the number of sensing locations and measurements is necessary to minimize hardware and computational effort. The present work explores the use of an effective independence (EI) measure originally proposed for sensor location optimization in experimental vibration modal analysis. The EI measure is used for selecting the minimum set of resistance measurements among all possible combinations resulting from selecting sensing electrode pairs. Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) is applied to obtain a spectral representation of the resistance measurements in the laminate for subsequent EI based reduction to take place. The electrical potential field in a CFRP laminate is calculated using finite element analysis (FEA) applied on models for two different laminate layouts considering a set of specified delamination sizes and locations with two different sensing arrangements. The effectiveness of the EI measure in eliminating redundant electrode pairs is demonstrated by performing inverse identification of damage using the full set and the reduced set of resistance measurements. This investigation shows that the EI measure is effective for optimally selecting the electrode pairs needed for resistance measurements in ERT based damage detection.

  1. Modeling continuous-fiber reinforced polymer composites for exploration of damage tolerant concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Peter J.

    This work aims to improve the predictive capability for fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composite laminates using the finite element method. A new tool for modeling composite damage was developed which considers important modes of failure. Well-known micromechanical models were implemented to predict material values for material systems of interest to aerospace applications. These generated material values served as input to intralaminar and interlaminar damage models. A three-dimensional in-plane damage material model was implemented and behavior verified. Deficiencies in current state-of-the-art interlaminar capabilities were explored using the virtual crack closure technique and the cohesive zone model. A user-defined cohesive element was implemented to discover the importance of traction-separation material constitutive behavior. A novel method for correlation of traction-separation parameters was created. This new damage modeling tool was used for evaluation of novel material systems to improve damage tolerance. Classical laminate plate theory was used in a full-factorial study of layerwise-hybrid laminates. Filament-wound laminated composite cylindrical shells were subjected to quasi-static loading to validate the finite element computational composite damage model. The new tool for modeling provides sufficient accuracy and generality for use on a wide-range of problems.

  2. Detection of Bond Defects in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Strengthened Concrete Using Pulse Phase Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabry, Nehemiah James

    As externally bonded fiber-reinforced polymers (FRP) are finding regular use in the strengthening of existing concrete structures, common installation practices still allow for the likelihood of defects forming at the interface of these bond-critical systems. Though published guidelines exist to provide recommendations for handling this issue in the field, significant research is still needed to determine critical defects, their identification using rapid methods of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, and the effect of such defects on the overall performance. This dissertation examines the use of pulsed phase infrared thermography (PPT) as a method to determine the location, size and depth of bond defects in wet lay-up carbon FRP (CFRP) systems. A series of small scale, single lap shear pull-tests were also performed to examine the effect detectable defects have on the strength of the CFRP strengthened concrete joints. Environmental conditioning protocols, namely submersion and freeze-thaw cycles, were also subjected to a subsample of specimens in order to observe durability effects on ultimate loads and strains. Results from PPT inspection and structural tests were then compared to present an effective approach for monitoring and evaluation. Finally a set of conclusions were presented regarding PPT inspection and the criticality of defects found in CFRP strengthened concrete governed by the common debonding mechanism.

  3. Bond Behavior of Historical Clay Bricks Strengthened with Steel Reinforced Polymers (SRP)

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Ernesto; Imbimbo, Maura; Sacco, Elio

    2011-01-01

    In the strengthening interventions of past and historical masonry constructions, the non-standardized manufacture processes, the ageing and the damage of masonry units, could significantly affect the properties of the surfaces where strengthening materials are applied. This aspect requires particular care in evaluating the performance of externally bonded strengthening layers, especially with reference to the detachment mechanism. The bond response of old masonries could be very different from that occurring in new masonry units which are the ones generally considered in most of the bond tests available in technical literature. The aim of the present paper is the study of the bond behavior of historical clay bricks strengthened with steel reinforced polymers (SRP) materials. In particular, the results of an experimental study concerning new manufactured clay bricks and old bricks extracted from different historical masonry buildings are presented. The obtained results, particularly in terms of bond resistance, detachment mechanism and strain distributions, are discussed for the purpose of analyzing the peculiarities of the historical bricks in comparison with new manufactured ones. Some considerations on the efficacy of the theoretical formulations of the recent Italian code are also carried out.

  4. Research on the Mechanical Properties of a Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer-Steel Combined Truss Structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengfei; Zhao, Qilin; Li, Fei; Liu, Jinchun; Chen, Haosen

    2014-01-01

    An assembled plane truss structure used for vehicle loading is designed and manufactured. In the truss, the glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) tube and the steel joint are connected by a new technology featuring a pretightened tooth connection. The detailed description for the rod and node design is introduced in this paper, and a typical truss panel is fabricated. Under natural conditions, the short-term load test and long-term mechanical performance test for one year are performed to analyze its performance and conduct a comparative analysis for a reasonable FEM model. The study shows that the design and fabrication for the node of an assembled truss panel are convenient, safe, and reliable; because of the creep control design of the rods, not only does the short-term structural stiffness meet the design requirement but also the long-term creep deformation tends towards stability. In addition, no significant change is found in the elastic modules, so this structure can be applied in actual engineering. Although the safety factor for the strength of the composite rods is very large, it has a lightweight advantage over the steel truss for the low density of GFRP. In the FEM model, simplifying the node as a hinge connection relatively conforms to the actual status. PMID:25247203

  5. Finite strain formulation of viscoelastic damage model for simulation of fabric reinforced polymers under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treutenaere, S.; Lauro, F.; Bennani, B.; Matsumoto, T.; Mottola, E.

    2015-09-01

    The use of fabric reinforced polymers in the automotive industry is growing significantly. The high specific stiffness and strength, the ease of shaping as well as the great impact performance of these materials widely encourage their diffusion. The present model increases the predictability of explicit finite element analysis and push the boundaries of the ongoing phenomenological model. Carbon fibre composites made up various preforms were tested by applying different mechanical load up to dynamic loading. This experimental campaign highlighted the physical mechanisms affecting the initial mechanical properties, namely intra- and interlaminar matrix damage, viscoelasticty and fibre failure. The intralaminar behaviour model is based on the explicit formulation of the matrix damage model developed by the ONERA as the given damage formulation correlates with the experimental observation. Coupling with a Maxwell-Wiechert model, the viscoelasticity is included without losing the direct explicit formulation. Additionally, the model is formulated under a total Lagrangian scheme in order to maintain consistency for finite strain. Thus, the material frame-indifference as well as anisotropy are ensured. This allows reorientation of fibres to be taken into account particularly for in-plane shear loading. Moreover, fall within the framework of the total Lagrangian scheme greatly makes the parameter identification easier, as based on the initial configuration. This intralaminar model thus relies upon a physical description of the behaviour of fabric composites and the numerical simulations show a good correlation with the experimental results.

  6. Noncontact detection of Teflon inclusions in glass-fiber-reinforced polymer composites using terahertz imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Wang, Jie; Han, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong-Liang; Shi, Changcheng; Zhang, Jinbo; Shen, Yan

    2016-12-20

    We employed terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) imaging technology, a new nondestructive testing method, to detect the inclusions of glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. The refractive index and absorption coefficient of two types of GFRP composites (epoxy GFRP composites and polyester GFRP composites) were first extracted, and GFRP composites with Teflon inclusions were examined, including an epoxy GFRP solid panel with a smaller Teflon inclusion hidden behind a larger Teflon inclusion, and polyester GFRP solid panels with Teflon inclusions of various sizes, at different depths. It was experimentally demonstrated that THz TDS imaging technology could clearly detect a smaller inclusion hidden behind a larger inclusion. When the reflected THz pulse from the inclusion did not overlap with that from the front surface of the sample, removal of the latter before Fourier transform was shown to be helpful in imaging the inclusions. With sufficiently strong incident THz radiation, inclusion insertion depth had little impact on the ability of the THz wave to detect inclusions. However, as the thickness of the inclusion became thinner, the inclusion detection ability of the THz wave deteriorated. In addition, with a combination of reflected C-scan imaging and B-scan imaging using the reflected time-domain waveform, both the lateral sizes and locations of the inclusions and the depths and thicknesses of the inclusions were clearly ascertained.

  7. Recycling of woven carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer composites using supercritical water.

    PubMed

    Knight, Chase C; Zeng, Changchun; Zhang, Chuck; Wang, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, there has been great deal of interest in recycling carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer composites. One method that has shown promising results involves the use of supercritical fluids to achieve separation between matrix and fibres by effectively degrading the resin into lower molecular weight compounds. In addition, the solvents used are environmentally benign and can also be recovered and reused. In this study, supercritical water with 0.05 M KOH as the catalyst was used for the recycling of an aerospace-grade high-performance epoxy carbon fibre composite (Hexcel 8552/IM7). The morphology of the reclaimed fibres was observed by scanning electron microscopy, and the tensile properties of the fibres were measured by single filament testing. The effects of processing time on the resin elimination efficiency and fibre property retention were investigated. With the process developed in this research, as much as 99.2 wt% resin elimination was achieved, resulting in the recovery of clean, undamaged fibres. The reclaimed fibres retained the original tensile strength. The feasibility of recycling multiple layer composites was also explored.

  8. Crystallization kinetics and thermal resistance of bamboo fiber reinforced biodegradable polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumsorn, S.; Srisawat, N.; On, J. Wong; Pivsa-Art, S.; Hamada, H.

    2014-05-01

    Bamboo fiber reinforced biodegradable polymer composites were prepared in this study. Biodegradable poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) was blended with bamboo fiber in a twin screw extruder with varied bamboo content from 20-0wt%. PBS/bamboo fiber composites were fabricated by compression molding process. The effect of bamboo fiber contents on properties of the composites was investigated. Non-isothermal crystallization kinetic study of the composites was investigated based on Avrami equation. The kinetic parameters indicated that bamboo fiber acted as heterogeneous nucleation and enhanced crystallinity of the composites. Bamboo fiber was well dispersed on PBS matrix and good adhered with the matrix. Tensile strength of the composites slightly deceased with adding bamboo fiber. However, tensile modulus and impact strength of the composites increased when increasing bamboo fiber contents. It can be noted that bamboo fiber promoted crystallization and crystallinity of PBS in the composites. Therefore, the composites were better in impact load transferring than neat PBS, which exhibited improving on impact performance of the composites.

  9. Construction of a transversal section through the wells MUCIE, CRC-7, CRC-6, and CRC-3, El Carito field

    SciTech Connect

    Aponte, A.; Gonzalez, O.

    1996-08-01

    In this work we show how a transversal section of estimated petrophysical properties through the wells MUC-1E, CRC-7, CRC-6, and CRC-3 in the Naricual reservoir was constructed. The wells belong to El Carito field, located in the north of Monagas state, Venezuela. The methodology presented includes geometrical and geostatistical characterization of the section. Raw data used were the formation structural maps of six layers of the Naricual reservoir and petrophysical attributes - porosity, permeability and water saturation - measured in fifteen wells distributed throughout El Carito field. Top maps were used to generate the structural framework of the section and well data was used as conditional data in the stochastic interpolation process. Variographic analysis and estimations were performed with algorithms of the GSLIB library. The result was a detailed transversal section for each petrophysical attribute in the reservoir original geometry. Faults and folds were included. Petrophysical meshes obtained in this way can be used in fluid flow simulators in order to simulate the performance of the reservoir, understand the gas/water injection process and to study secondary-recovery projects.

  10. An experimental and theoretical study of the effect of temperature on the mechanical behavior of nanoclay reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, Nuno R. O.

    The goals of this study are to investigate the tensile loading and low velocity impact response of nanoclay reinforced polymers at various temperatures. Three types of polypropylene (PP 3371, Borealis and TP 3868) and epoxy with various nanoclay reinforcement percentages were considered. Tensile tests were conducted on ASTM Type I specimens instrumented with strain gauges using an MTS testing machine equipped with an environmental chamber. Low velocity impact tests were also performed using an Instron-Dynatup 8250 impact test machine equipped with an environmental chamber. Tensile test results were used to determine the effect of nanoclay reinforcement and different resins on the mechanical properties at various temperatures. The tensile tests results indicate that the Young's modulus of the nanocomposite increases with increasing nanoclay reinforcement percentage. The temperature has even a more significant effect. It was observed that as the temperature decreases the material becomes brittle, has higher stiffness and fails at lower strains. High temperatures have the opposite effect, in that, as the temperature increases the material loses stiffness and becomes more ductile. Temperature and nanoclay reinforcement affect the Poisson's ratio also, but this effect is less significant. In general, as the temperature increases the Poisson's ratio also increases. However, an increase in nanoclay reinforcement generally reduces the Poisson's ratio. The mechanical properties of polymer/clay nanocomposites were also calculated using the Mori-Tanaka formulation and the finite element method. Furthermore, the Mori-Tanaka model was modified to include the effect of temperature and voids. In the Mori-Tanaka formulation three types of nanoclay particle distribution was assumed: oriented nanoclay particles parallel to the direction of tensile loading, 2-D randomly distributed particles and 3-D randomly distributed particles. The finite element calculations were performed on a

  11. Active rigidization of carbon-fiber reinforced polymer composites for ultra-lightweight space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarles, Stephen A.; Leo, Donald J.

    2006-03-01

    An active approach for initiating rigidization in carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) thermosets links controllable mechanical stiffening to inherent electrical resistivity. With direct applications toward the rigidization of ultra-lightweight, inflatable space structures, temperature-controlled resistive heating is used to create oncommand rigidization. As required by the on-orbit conditions in space, flexible, rigidizable structures demand stable and space-survivable materials that incorporate techniques for providing shape control and structural stiffening. Methods currently employed to achieve a mechanical hardening include many passive techniques: UV curing, sub-T g hardening, and hydro-gel evaporation. The benefits of a passive system (simplicity, energy efficiency) are offset by their inherent lack of control, which can lead to long curing times and weak spots due to uneven curing. In efforts to significantly reduce the transition time of the composite from a structurally-vulnerable state to a fully-rigidized shape and to increase control of the curing process, an active approach is taken. Specifically, temperature-controlled internal resistive heating initiates thermoset curing in a coated carbon fiber composite to form an electrically-controlled, thermally-activated material. Through controlled heating, this research examines how selective temperature control can be used to prescribe matrix consolidation and material rigidization on two different thermosetting resins, U-Nyte Set 201A and 201B. Feedback temperature control, based on a PID control algorithm, was applied to the process of resistive heating. Precise temperature tracking (less than 1.1°C RMS or +/-3.3% error) was achieved for controlled sample heating. Using samples of the thermoset-coated carbon-fiber tow, composite hardening through resistive heating occurred in 24 minutes and required roughly 1 W-hr/inch of electrical energy. The rigidized material was measured to be 14-21 times stiffer

  12. The Mechanics of Creep Deformation in Polymer Derived Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, E.

    2001-01-30

    The objective of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation and Dow Corning Corporation was to study the effects of temperature, stress, fiber type and fiber architecture on the time-dependent deformation and stress-rupture behavior of polymer-derived ceramic matrix composites developed by the Dow Corning Corporation. Materials reinforced with CG-Nicalon{trademark}, Hi-Nicalon{trademark} and Sylramic{reg_sign} fibers were evaluated under fast fracture, stress-relaxation, and stress-rupture conditions at temperatures between 700 C and 1400 C in ambient air and for stresses between 50 and 200 MPa. Some of the stress-rupture tests conducted as part of this program are among the longest-duration experiments ever conducted with these materials. The possibility of using accelerated test techniques to evaluate the very-long term stress-rupture/creep behavior of these materials was investigated by means of stress-relaxation experiments. However it was found that because these materials exhibit non-linear stress-strain behavior at stresses larger than the matrix cracking stress and because of environmentally-induced changes in the micro and mesostructure of the material, particularly at elevated temperatures, this approach is impractical. However, the results of stress-relaxation experiments will be useful to predict the behavior of these materials in applications where stresses are thermally-induced and therefore driven by strains (e.g., when components are subjected to thermal gradients). The evolution of the microstructure of the fibers, matrix and fiber-matrix interface was studied as a function of stress and temperature, using analytical electron microscopy. The results from these analyses were essential to understand the relationships between environment, stress, temperature and processing on the microstructure and properties of these materials.

  13. Dynamic shear strength of S2 glass fiber reinforced polymer composites under shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fuping; Tsai, Liren; Prakash, Vikas; Dandekar, Dattatraya P.; Rajendran, A. M.

    2008-05-01

    In the present paper, a series of plate impact shock-reshock and shock-release experiments were conducted to study the critical shear strength of a S2 glass fiber reinforced polymer (GRP) composite under shock compression levels ranging from 0.8 to 1.8 GPa. The GRP was fabricated at ARL, Aberdeen, using S2 glass woven roving in a Cycom 4102 polyester resin matrix. The experiments were conducted by using an 82.5 mm bore single-stage gas gun at Case Western Reserve University. In order to conduct shock-reshock and shock-release experiments a dual flyer plate assembly was utilized. The shock-reshock experiments were conducted by using a projectile faced with GRP and backed with a relatively high shock impedance Al 6061-T6 plate; while for the shock-release experiments the GRP was backed by a relatively lower impedance polymethyl methacrylate backup flyer plate. A multibeam velocity interferometer was used to measure the particle velocity profile at the rear surface of the target plate. By using self-consistent technique procedure described by Asay and Chabbildas [Shock Waves and High-Strain-Rate Phenomena, in Metals, edited by M. M. Myers and L. E. Murr (Plenum, New York, 1981), pp. 417-431], the critical shear strength of the GRP (2τc) was determined for impact stresses in the range of 0.8 to 1.8 GPa. The results show that the critical shear strength of the GRP is increased from 0.108 GPa to 0.682 GPa when the impact stress is increased from 0.8 to 1.8 GPa. The increase in critical shear strength may be attributed to rate-dependence and/or pressure dependent yield behavior of the GRP.

  14. Nanostructured Carbon Nitride Polymer-Reinforced Electrolyte To Enable Dendrite-Suppressed Lithium Metal Batteries.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiulin; Tian, Jing; Li, Chilin

    2017-04-05

    Lithium metal batteries (LMBs) containing S, O2, and fluoride cathodes are attracting increasing attention owing to their much higher energy density than that of Li-ion batteries. However, current limitation for the progress of LMBs mainly comes from the uncontrolled formation and growth of Li dendrites at the anode side. In order to suppress dendrite growth, exploring novel nanostructured electrolyte of high modulus without degradation of Li-electrolyte interface appears to be a potential solution. Here we propose a lightweight polymer-reinforced electrolyte based on graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) mesoporous microspheres as electrolyte filler [bis(trifluoromethanesulfonimide) lithium salt/di(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether mixed with g-C3N4, denoted as LiTFSI-DGM-C3N4] for the first time. This nanostructured electrolyte can effectively suppress lithium dendrite growth during cycling, benefiting from the high mechanical strength and nanosheet-built hierarchical structure of g-C3N4. The Li/Li symmetrical cell based on this slurrylike electrolyte enables long-term cycling of at least 120 cycles with a high capacity of 6 mA·h/cm(2) and small plating/stripping overpotential of ∼100 mV at a high current density of 2 mA/cm(2). g-C3N4 filling also enables a separator(Celgard)-free Li/FeS2 cell with at least 400 cycles. The 3D geometry of g-C3N4 shows advantages on interfacial resistance and Li plating/stripping stability compared to its 2D geometry.

  15. Exposure Assessment of a High-energy Tensile Test With Large Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Cables.

    PubMed

    Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Michel, Silvain; Terrasi, Giovanni; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the particle and fiber release from two carbon fiber reinforced polymer cables that underwent high-energy tensile tests until rupture. The failing event was the source of a large amount of dust whereof a part was suspected to be containing possibly respirable fibers that could cause adverse health effects. The released fibers were suspected to migrate through small openings to the experiment control room and also to an adjacent machine hall where workers were active. To investigate the fiber release and exposure risk of the affected workers, the generated particles were measured with aerosol devices to obtain the particle size and particle concentrations. Furthermore, particles were collected on filter samples to investigate the particle shape and the fiber concentration. Three situations were monitored for the control room and the machine hall: the background concentrations, the impact of the cable failure, and the venting of the exposed rooms afterward. The results showed four important findings: The cable failure caused the release of respirable fibers with diameters below 3 μm and an average length of 13.9 μm; the released particles did migrate to the control room and to the machine hall; the measured peak fiber concentration of 0.76 fibers/cm(3) and the overall fiber concentration of 0.07 fibers/cm(3) in the control room were below the Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) for fibers without indication of carcinogenicity; and the venting of the rooms was fast and effective. Even though respirable fibers were released, the low fiber concentration and effective venting indicated that the suspected health risks from the experiment on the affected workers was low. However, the effect of long-term exposure is not known therefore additional control measures are recommended.

  16. CRC changes are no licence for inaction.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Debra

    2011-05-01

    Last Autumn's Comprehensive Spending Review included what international environmental consultancy Environ describes as "an unexpected update" on the Carbon Reduction Commitment (CRC), with a change in its structure and timelines. Here Environ principal Debra Hobbs explains the implications for the healthcare estate, explains the steps organisations obligated under the scheme need to take over the next 3-4 years, and cautions them against "hitting the pause button".

  17. Properties of glass/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy hybrid polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Sevkani, V. R.; Patel, B. R.; Patel, V. B.

    2016-05-01

    Composite Materials are well known for their tailor-made properties. For the fabrication of composites different types of reinforcements are used for different applications. Sometimes for a particular application, one type of reinforcement may not fulfill the requirements. Therefore, more than one type of reinforcements may be used. Thus, the idea of hybrid composites arises. Hybrid composites are made by joining two or more different reinforcements with suitable matrix system. It helps to improve the properties of composite materials. In the present work glass/carbon fiber reinforcement have been used with a matrix triglycidyl ether of tris(m-hydroxy phenyl) phosphate epoxy resin using amine curing agent. Different physical and mechanical properties of the glass, carbon and glass/carbon fiber reinforced polymeric systems have been found out.

  18. Self-reinforced composites of bioabsorbable polymer and bioactive glass with different bioactive glass contents. Part II: In vitro degradation.

    PubMed

    Niemelä, Tiiu; Niiranen, Henna; Kellomäki, Minna

    2008-01-01

    The in vitro degradation behavior of self-reinforced bioactive glass-containing composites was investigated comparatively with plain self-reinforced matrix polymer. The materials used were spherical bioactive glass 13-93 particles, with a particle size distribution of 50-125 microm, as a filler material and bioabsorbable poly-L,DL-lactide 70/30 as a matrix material. The composites containing 0, 20, 30, 40 and 50 wt.% of bioactive glass were manufactured using twin-screw extruder followed by self-reinforcing. The samples studied were characterized determining the changes in mechanical properties, thermal properties, molecular weight, mass loss and water absorption in phosphate-buffered saline at 37 degrees C for up to 104 weeks. The results showed that the bioactive glass addition modified the degradation kinetics and material morphology of the matrix material. It was concluded that the optimal bioactive glass content depends on the applications of the composites. The results of this study could be used as a guideline when estimating the best filler content of other self-reinforced osteoconductive filler containing composites which are manufactured in a similar way.

  19. Toughening of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy polymer composites via copolymers and graphene nano-platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, Markus A.

    Carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites currently play a significant role in many different industries. Due to their high cross-link density, aromatic epoxy polymers used as the matrix in composite materials are very strong and stiff however they lack toughness. This dissertation investigates three areas of the carbon fiber-reinforced composite, which have the potential to increase toughness: the carbon fiber surface; the fiber/matrix interphase; and the matrix material. Approaches to improving each area are presented which lead to enhancing the overall composite toughness without reducing other composite mechanical properties. The toughening of the base matrix material, DGEBA/mPDA, was accomplished by two methods: first, using low concentrations of aliphatic copolymers to enhance energy absorption and second by adding graphene nano-platelets (GnP) to act as crack deflection agents. 1wt% copolymer concentration was determined to substantially increase the notched Izod impact strength without reducing other static-mechanical properties. Toughening of DGEBA/mPDA using 3wt% GnP was found to be dependent on the aspect ratio of GnP and treatment of GnP with tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA). GnP C750 enhanced flexural properties but not fracture toughness because the small aspect ratio cannot effectively deflect cracks. TEPA-grafting enhanced GnP/matrix bonding. Larger aspect ratio GnP M5 and M25 showed significant increases in fracture toughness due to better crack deflection but also decreased flexural strength based on limited GnP/matrix bonding. TEPA-grafting mitigated some of the flexural strength reductions for GnP M5, due to enhanced GnP/matrix adhesion. In the high-fiber volume fraction composite, the fiber/matrix bonding was enhanced with UV-ozone surface treatment by reducing a weak fiber surface boundary layer and increasing the concentration of reactive oxygen groups on the fiber surface. Further increases in Mode I fracture toughness were seen with the

  20. Fabrication and static characterization of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers with embedded NiTi shape memory wire actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araújo, C. J.; Rodrigues, L. F. A.; Coutinho Neto, J. F.; Reis, R. P. B.

    2008-12-01

    In this work, unidirectional carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP) with embedded NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuators were manufactured using a universal testing machine equipped with a thermally controlled chamber. Beam specimens containing cold-worked, annealed and trained NiTi SMA wires distributed along their neutral plane were fabricated. Several tests in a three-point bending mode at different constant temperatures were performed. To verify thermal buckling effects, electrical activation of the specimens was realized in a cantilevered beam mode and the influence of the SMA wire actuators on the tip deflection of the composite is demonstrated.

  1. Inductive wireless sensor-actuator node for structural health monitoring of fiber reinforced polymers by means of Lamb-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focke, Oliver; Salas, Mariugenia; Herrmann, Axel S.; Lang, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Wireless excitation of Piezo-Wafer-Active-Sensors (PWAS) was achieved using Low-frequency coils produced via Tailored-Fiber-Placement. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer behaves as conductor and depending on the frequency it shields radio waves; this effect is rising at high-frequency. A high permeability material was placed under the highfrequency antenna and re-tuning was performed to improve the quality of transmission. In this manner sensor responses were successfully transmitted wirelessly by analog amplitude modulation. The signals were evaluated to verify the functionality in presence of defects like delamination or holes. Generated power was confirmed to be enough to excite the actuator.

  2. The Crc/CrcZ-CrcY global regulatory system helps the integration of gluconeogenic and glycolytic metabolism in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Ruggero; Nogales, Juan; Rojo, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    In metabolically versatile bacteria, carbon catabolite repression (CCR) facilitates the preferential assimilation of the most efficient carbon sources, improving growth rates and fitness. In Pseudomonas putida, the Crc and Hfq proteins and the CrcZ and CrcY small RNAs, which are believed to antagonize Crc/Hfq, are key players in CCR. Unlike that seen in other bacterial species, succinate and glucose elicit weak CCR in this bacterium. In the present work, metabolic, transcriptomic and constraint-based metabolic flux analyses were combined to clarify whether P. putida prefers succinate or glucose, and to identify the role of the Crc protein in the metabolism of these compounds. When provided simultaneously, succinate was consumed faster than glucose, although both compounds were metabolized. CrcZ and CrcY levels were lower when both substrates were present than when only one was provided, suggesting a role for Crc in coordinating metabolism of these compounds. Flux distribution analysis suggested that, when both substrates are present, Crc works to organize a metabolism in which carbon compounds flow in opposite directions: from glucose to pyruvate, and from succinate to pyruvate. Thus, our results support that Crc not only favours the assimilation of preferred compounds, but balances carbon fluxes, optimizing metabolism and growth.

  3. Characterization of nanocellulose reinforced semi-interpenetrating polymer network of poly(vinyl alcohol) & polyacrylamide composite films.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Arup; Chakrabarty, Debabrata

    2015-12-10

    Semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) of poly(vinyl alcohol)/polyacrylamide was reinforced with various doses of nanocellulose. The different composite films thus prepared were characterized with respect to their mechanical, thermal, morphological and barrier properties. The composite film containing 5 wt.% of nanocellulose showed the highest tensile strength. The semi-interpenetrating polymer network of poly(vinyl alcohol)/polyacrylamide; and its various composites with nanocellulose were almost identical in their thermal stability. Each of the composites however exhibited much superior stability with respect to the linear poly(vinyl alcohol) and crosslinked polyacrylamide. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies exhibited phase separated morphology where agglomerates of nanocellulose were found to be dispersed in the matrix of the semi-IPN. The moisture vapor transmission rate (MVTR) was the lowest for the film containing 5 wt.% of nanocellulose.

  4. Three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation for injection molding flow of short fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Liping; Lu, Gang; Chen, Dachuan; Li, Wenjun; Lu, Chunsheng

    2017-07-01

    This paper investigates the three-dimensional (3D) injection molding flow of short fiber-reinforced polymer composites using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation method. The polymer melt was modeled as a power law fluid and the fibers were considered as rigid cylindrical bodies. The filling details and fiber orientation in the injection-molding process were studied. The results indicated that the SPH method could effectively predict the order of filling, fiber accumulation, and heterogeneous distribution of fibers. The SPH simulation also showed that fibers were mainly aligned to the flow direction in the skin layer and inclined to the flow direction in the core layer. Additionally, the fiber-orientation state in the simulation was quantitatively analyzed and found to be consistent with the results calculated by conventional tensor methods.

  5. Characterization of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer repair system for structurally deficient steel piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey M.

    This Dissertation investigates a carbon fiber reinforced polymer repair system for structurally deficient steel piping. Numerous techniques exist for the repair of high-pressure steel piping. One repair technology that is widely gaining acceptance is composite over-wraps. Thermal analytical evaluations of the epoxy matrix material produced glass transition temperature results, a cure kinetic model, and a workability chart. These results indicate a maximum glass transition temperature of 80°C (176°F) when cured in ambient conditions. Post-curing the epoxy, however, resulted in higher glass-transition temperatures. The accuracy of cure kinetic model presented is temperature dependent; its accuracy improves with increased cure temperatures. Cathodic disbondment evaluations of the composite over-wrap show the epoxy does not breakdown when subjected to a constant voltage of -1.5V and the epoxy does not allow corrosion to form under the wrap from permeation. Combustion analysis of the composite over-wrap system revealed the epoxy is flammable when in direct contact with fire. To prevent combustion, an intumescent coating was developed to be applied on the composite over-wrap. Results indicate that damaged pipes repaired with the carbon fiber composite over-wrap withstand substantially higher static pressures and exhibit better fatigue characteristics than pipes lacking repair. For loss up to 80 percent of the original pipe wall thickness, the composite over-wrap achieved failure pressures above the pipe's specified minimum yield stress during monotonic evaluations and reached the pipe's practical fatigue limit during cyclical pressure testing. Numerous repairs were made to circular, thru-wall defects and monotonic pressure tests revealed containment up to the pipe's specified minimum yield strength for small diameter defects. The energy release rate of the composite over-wrap/steel interface was obtained from these full-scale, leaking pipe evaluations and results

  6. An experimental investigation into the behavior of glassfiber reinforced polymer elements at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Kenny Zongxi

    This thesis presents a literature review and results of an experimental study about the effects of high temperatures and cyclic loading on the physical and mechanical properties of pultruded glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) square tubes used in civil engineering structural applications. Most laboratory researches have focused mainly on the effect of elevated temperature on the compressive strength of the GFRP square tubes. Limited research has focused on the tensile strength of GFRP coupons under elevated temperatures. Dynamic Mechanical Analyses (DMA) was performed to assess the viscoelastic behavior including the glass transition temperature of GFRP. Sixteen GFRP coupons were tested under elevated temperatures to investigate the tensile strength and the effect of elevated temperatures to the tensile strength of GFRP. The results of an experimental program performed on fifty GFRP square tubes with different designs in 1.83m at normal temperatures were discussed to investigate compression performance. Another experimental program was performed on 20 GFRP square tubes with different designs in 1.22m under elevated temperatures. The experiments results were discussed and showed that the compressive strength of GFRP material was influenced by several factors including the glass transition v temperature and the connection bolts. Failure modes under 25°C and 75°C were crushing and the failure modes with the temperatures above 75°C were not typical crushing due to the glass transition of GFRP. Sixteen GFRP square tubes with length of 0.61m were tested with the same experimental program under elevated temperatures as the control group. Twelve GFRP square tubes with the same size were subjected to cyclic loading under elevated temperatures to investigate the effect of the cyclic loading to the compression properties of GFRP material. According to the experimental results and the discussion, the stiffness was reduced by the cyclic loading. On the contrary, the

  7. Recycling high-performance carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites using sub-critical and supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chase C.

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) are composite materials that consist of carbon fibers embedded in a polymer matrix, a combination that yields materials with properties exceeding the individual properties of each component. CFRP have several advantages over metals: they offer superior strength to weight ratios and superior resistance to corrosion and chemical attack. These advantages, along with continuing improvement in manufacturing processes, have resulted in rapid growth in the number of CFRP products and applications especially in the aerospace/aviation, wind energy, automotive, and sporting goods industries. Due to theses well-documented benefits and advancements in manufacturing capabilities, CFRP will continue to replace traditional materials of construction throughout several industries. However, some of the same properties that make CFRP outstanding materials also pose a major problem once these materials reach the end of service life. They become difficult to recycle. With composite consumption in North America growing by almost 5 times the rate of the US GDP in 2012, this lack of recyclability is a growing concern. As consumption increases, more waste will inevitably be generated. Current composite recycling technologies include mechanical recycling, thermal processing, and chemical processing. The major challenge of CFRP recycling is the ability to recover materials of high-value and preserve their properties. To this end, the most suitable technology is chemical processing, where the polymer matrix can be broken down and removed from the fiber, with limited damage to the fibers. This can be achieved using high concentration acids, but such a process is undesirable due to the toxicity of such materials. A viable alternative to acid is water in the sub-critical and supercritical region. Under these conditions, the behavior of this abundant and most environmentally friendly solvent resembles that of an organic compound, facilitating the breakdown

  8. 1981 CRC Altitude Octane Requirement Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    the test program. -3- The following models were tested: Sample Size Car Model Engine Emgine Controls 10 Buick Skylark 2.5L - 2V CLAF, EST 10 Buick...Mark VI 5.OL - TBI BARO, CLAF, EST 10 Mercury Capri 2.3L - 2V CLAF 10 Toyota Corolla 1.8L - 2V CLAF NOTE: BARO = Barometrically Compensated Spark...of the small sample sizes (only three cars per group), which precludes drawing mean ngful distribution curves. D. Comparison of 1981 CRC Altitude

  9. Dispersion and Reinforcement of Nanotubes in High Temperature Polymers for Ultrahigh Strength and Thermally Conductive Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-03

    polymerization ( ATRP ) to prepare a prepolymer of controlled crosslinking density by directing reactions of the multiple-functioned polymer chains with small... ATRP (atomic transfer radical polymerization) method to grow polymers from the carbon nanotube surface. ATRP is a living polymerization method for...order to solve the problem, synthesis of prepolymers by employing ATRP was used, where the polymer chain end reacts with functionalized MWNTs

  10. Effects of water storage of E-glass fiber reinforced denture base polymers on residual methyl methacrylate content.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Gulsen; Duran, Ozlem; Bural, Canan; Guvener, Bora

    2004-07-15

    This study investigated the effect of water storage on residual methyl methacrylate (MMA) content of continuous E-glass fiber (Wetrotex International) reinforced denture base polymers. Heat-polymerization (short- and long-term boiling and conventional curing cycle using Meliodent), autopolymerization (processed in air at room temperature and in water at 60 degrees C with the use of Meliodent Rapid Repair), and microwave-polymerization (3 min at 500 W with the use of Acron MC) were employed. The residual MMA contents of 120 specimens were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography at deflasking (control) and after water (37 degrees C) storage of 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month. Bonferroni's pairwise comparison test was used for statistical analysis. Significant reduction were determined only in the long-term terminal boiled heat-polymerized test group at the end of 1 day (p < 0.01), 1 week (p < 0.05) and also 1 month of water storage (p < 0.01). Significant reduction in autopolymerized test groups started even after 1 week of water storage (p < 0.05). Microwave-polymerized test groups did not show a significant residual MMA reduction in all time intervals (p > 0.05). The polymerization methods and cycles applied to the glass fiber reinforced denture base polymers influence both the content and the reduction of residual MMA after water storage.

  11. Microscopic study of surface degradation of glass fiber-reinforced polymer rods embedded in concrete castings subjected to environmental conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, L.C.; Puterman, M.

    1997-12-31

    The surface degradation of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) pultruded rods when embedded in concrete castings and subjected to environmental conditioning is discussed in this paper. Investigation of the degradation of the GFRP rods were performed using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Unidirectionally reinforced pultruded rods (6.3- and 12.7-mm diameters) containing E-glass fibers in polyester and vinylester matrices were conditioned at standard laboratory conditions (21 C, 65% relative humidity) or submerged in aqueous solutions (tap water) at 80 C for durations of 14 and 84 days. Observations of the surfaces and cross-sections of the rods by optical microscopy and SEM revealed a variety of degradation phenomena. Embedded hygrothermally conditioned rods were found to have developed surface blisters of different sizes and depths. SEM studies of the surface revealed degradation of the polymer matrix material and exposure and degradation of the fibers close to the surface of the rods. The rods with the vinylester resin matrix showed less extensive degradation than those with the polyester resin matrix; however, the degradation characteristics of the two types of rods appear to be similar.

  12. CrcZ and CrcX regulate carbon utilization in Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato strain DC3000

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are important components of many regulatory pathways in bacteria and play key roles in regulating factors important for virulence. Carbon catabolite repression control is modulated by small RNAs (crcZ or crcZ and crcY) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida. ...

  13. Mechanical analysis of carbon fiber reinforced shape memory polymer composite for self-deployable structure in space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seok Bin; Ahn, Yong San; Jang, Joon Hyeok; Kim, Jin-Gyun; Goo, Nam Seo; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory polymer (SMP) is one of smart polymers which exhibit shape memory effect upon external stimuli. Reinforcements as carbon fiber had been used for making shape memory polymer composite (CF-SMPC). This study investigated a possibility of designing self-deployable structures in harsh space condition using CF-SMPCs and analyzed their shape memory behaviors with constitutive equation model.CF-SMPCs were prepared using woven carbon fabrics and a thermoset epoxy based SMP to obtain their basic mechanical properties including actuation in harsh environment. The mechanical and shape memory properties of SMP and CF-SMPCs were characterized using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and universal tensile machine (UTM) with an environmental chamber. The mechanical properties such as flexural strength and tensile strength of SMP and CF-SMPC were measured with simple tensile/bending test and time dependent shape memory behavior was characterized with designed shape memory bending test. For mechanical analysis of CF-SMPCs, a 3D constitutive equation of SMP, which had been developed using multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient and shape memory strains, was used with material parameters determined from CF-SMPCs. Carbon fibers in composites reinforced tensile and flexural strength of SMP and acted as strong elastic springs in rheology based equation models. The actuation behavior of SMP matrix and CF-SMPCs was then simulated as 3D shape memory bending cases. Fiber bundle property was imbued with shell model for more precise analysis and it would be used for prediction of deploying behavior in self-deployable hinge structure.

  14. The effect of shock wave impingement on thin, woven glass fiber reinforced, polymer composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, Douglas M.

    High-performance fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites have been increasingly used in many applications over the last 30 years. Their high specific stiffness, specific strength, and energy absorption capacity have made them attractive as replacements for traditional materials. While the dynamic response of homogeneous or monolithic materials has been well documented, the response of FRP composites is still under investigation. Knowledge of the response of FRP composites under this type of loading is essential to evaluating its performance as a structural or protective material. While such information starts to be slowly available, the effects of dynamic thermomechanical extremes such as shock wave loading on the FRP composites is relatively unknown. The challenge then is to develop a consistent laboratory methodology that allows investigations of the interactions between a FRP composite and a shock wave and eventually testing of such materials for performance evaluations under shock loading. Measuring the deformation of test specimens caused by shock wave impingement of different intensities was basic to understanding the gross effects on the FRP composites. In early tests, displacement across the diameter of the test specimen was measured after the end of the test giving a static measurement of the permanent deformation. To allow meaningful comparisons between disparate materials subject to different shock wave intensities a method of weighting and normalizing the was developed. The complexity of setting up and running a shock wave test limited the number tests could be performed, so while the results aren't statically robust, the trends observed are useful in comparing or choosing among different materials. A Time-Resolved Catadioptric Stereo Digital Image Correlation (TRC-SDIC) technique was developed which provide a non-contact, full-field method of measuring deformation over the time span from the impingement of the shock wave including the maximum

  15. Micromechanical analysis of a hybrid composite—effect of boron carbide particles on the elastic properties of basalt fiber reinforced polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Golla, Sai; Prasanthi, P.

    2016-11-01

    A fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite is an important material for structural application. The diversified application of FRP composites has become the center of attention for interdisciplinary research. However, improvements in the mechanical properties of this class of materials are still under research for different applications. The reinforcement of inorganic particles in a composite improves its structural properties due to their high stiffness. The present research work is focused on the prediction of the mechanical properties of the hybrid composites where continuous fibers are reinforced in a micro boron carbide particle mixed polypropylene matrix. The effectiveness of the addition of 30 wt. % of boron carbide (B4C) particle contributions regarding the longitudinal and transverse properties of the basalt fiber reinforced polymer composite at various fiber volume fractions is examined by finite element analysis (FEA). The experimental approach is the best way to determine the properties of the composite but it is expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, the finite element method (FEM) and analytical methods are the viable methods for the determination of the composite properties. The FEM results were obtained by adopting a micromechanics approach with the support of FEM. Assuming a uniform distribution of reinforcement and considering one unit-cell of the whole array, the properties of the composite materials are determined. The predicted elastic properties from FEA are compared with the analytical results. The results suggest that B4C particles are a good reinforcement for the enhancement of the transverse properties of basalt fiber reinforced polypropylene.

  16. Scalable plasticized polymer electrolytes reinforced with surface-modified sepiolite fillers - A feasibility study in lithium metal polymer batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejía, Alberto; Devaraj, Shanmukaraj; Guzmán, Julio; Lopez del Amo, Juan Miguel; García, Nuria; Rojo, Teófilo; Armand, Michel; Tiemblo, Pilar

    2016-02-01

    Electrochemical properties of (polyethylene oxide) (PEO)/lithium trifluoromethanesulfonate (LiTf)/ethylene carbonate (EC)/sepiolite extruded composite electrolytes were studied. Appreciable electrochemical stability of 4.5 V at 70 °C was observed for polymer composite membranes with D-α-tocopherol-polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-coated sepiolite fillers. Lithium plating/stripping analysis indicated no evidence of dendrite formation with good interfacial properties which were further confirmed by postmortem analysis of the cells. Solid state NMR studies show the presence of two Li+ population in the membranes. The feasibility of these electrolytes has been shown with LiFePO4 cathode materials. Initial discharge capacity of 142 mAh/g was observed remaining at 110 mAh/g after 25 cycles with a coulombic efficiency of 96%. The upscaling of these polymers can be easily achieved by extrusion technique and the capacity can be improved by varying the cathode architecture.

  17. Fundamental Studies of Low Velocity Impact Resistance of Graphite Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to relate the impact resistance of graphite fiber reinforced composites with matrix properties through gaining an understanding of the basic mechanics involved in the deformation and fracture process, and the effect of the polymer matrix structure on these mechanisms. It was found that the resin matrix structure influences the composite impact resistance in at least two ways. The integration of flexibilizers into the polymer chain structure tends to reduce the T sub g and the mechanical properties of the polymer. The reduction in the mechanical properties of the matrix does not enhance the composite impact resistance because it allows matrix controlled failure to initiate impact damage. It was found that when the instrumented dropweight impact tester is used as a means for assessing resin toughness, the resin toughness is enhanced by the ability of the clamped specimen to deflect enough to produce sufficient membrane action to support a significant amount of the load. The results of this study indicate that crossplied composite impact resistance is very much dependent on the matrix mechanical properties.

  18. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Program in Latvia

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study is to evaluate the incidence and phenotype - genotype characteristics of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in Latvia in order to develop the basis of clinical management for patients and their relatives affected by these syndromes. Materials and methods From 02/1999-09/2002 in several hospitals in Latvia cancer family histories were collected from 865 patients with CRC. In families suspected of having a history consistent with a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, DNA testing for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes was performed. In addition immunohistochemical (IH) examination of the normal and cancer tissue from large bowel tumors for MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression was performed prior to DNA analysis. Results From the 865 CRC cases only 3 (0.35%) pedigrees fulfilled the Amsterdam II criteria of Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and 15 cases (1.73%) were suspected of HNPCC. In 69 cases (8%) with a cancer family aggregation (CFA) were identified. Thus far 27 IH analyses have been performed and in 3 cancers homogenous lack of MSH2 or MSH6 protein expression was found. In one of these cases a mutation in MSH6 was identified. In 18 patients suspected of HNPCC or of matching the Amsterdam II criteria, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) followed by DNA sequencing of any heteroduplexes of the 35 exons comprising both MLH1 and MSH2 was performed revealing 3 mutations. For all of kindreds diagnosed definitively or with a high probability of being an HNPCC family appropriate recommendations concerning prophylactic measures, surveillance and treatment were provided in written form. Conclusions Existing pedigree/clinical data suggest that in Latvia the frequency of HNPCC is around 2% of consecutive colorectal cancer patients. It is crucial that genetic counseling is an integral part of cancer family syndrome management.

  19. The Impact of Colorectal Cancer (CRC) in Mississippi, and the need for Mississippi to Eliminate its CRC Burden.

    PubMed

    Duhé, Roy J

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), while highly preventable and highly treatable, is a major public health problem in Mississippi. This article reviews solutions to this problem, beginning with the relationship between modifiable behavioral risk factors and CRC incidence. It then describes the impact of CRC screening on national downward trends in CRC incidence and mortality and summarizes recent data on the burden of CRC in Mississippi. While other states have created Comprehensive Colorectal Cancer Control Programs in an organized effort to manage this public health problem, Mississippi has not. Responding to Mississippi's situation, the 70x2020 Colorectal Cancer Screening Initiative arose as an unconventional approach to increase CRC screening rates throughout the state. This article concludes by considering the current limits of CRC treatment success and proposes that improved clinical outcomes should result from research to translate recently-identified colorectal cancer subtype information into novel clinical paradigms for the treatment of early-stage colorectal cancer.

  20. Strain measurement in a concrete beam by use of the Brillouin-scattering-based distributed fiber sensor with single-mode fibers embedded in glass fiber reinforced polymer rods and bonded to steel reinforcing bars.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaodong; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chhoa, Chia Yee; Bremner, Theodore W; Brown, Anthony W; DeMerchant, Michael D; Ferrier, Graham; Kalamkarov, Alexander L; Georgiades, Anastasis V

    2002-08-20

    The strain measurement of a 1.65-m reinforced concrete beam by use of a distributed fiber strain sensor with a 50-cm spatial resolution and 5-cm readout resolution is reported. The strain-measurement accuracy is +/-15 microepsilon (microm/m) according to the system calibration in the laboratory environment with non-uniform-distributed strain and +/-5 microepsilon with uniform strain distribution. The strain distribution has been measured for one-point and two-point loading patterns for optical fibers embedded in pultruded glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rods and those bonded to steel reinforcing bars. In the one-point loading case, the strain deviations are +/-7 and +/-15 microepsilon for fibers embedded in the GFRP rods and fibers bonded to steel reinforcing bars, respectively, whereas the strain deviation is +/-20 microepsilon for the two-point loading case.

  1. Thermo-oxidative stability studies of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various continuous fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the thermooxidative stability of PMR-15 composites reinforced with various fibers and to observe differences in the way they degrade in air. The fibers studied include graphite and the thermally stable Nicalon and Nextel ceramic fibers. Weight-loss rates for the different composites were assessed as a function of mechanical properties, specimen geometry, fiber sizing, and interfacial bond strength. Differences were observed in rates of weight loss, matrix cracking, geometry dependency, and fiber sizing effects. It was shown that Celion 6000 fiber-reinforced composites do not exhibit a straight-line Arrhenius relationship at temperatures above 316 C.

  2. Thermo-oxidative stability studies of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various continuous fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the thermooxidative stability of PMR-15 composites reinforced with various fibers and to observe differences in the way they degrade in air. The fibers studied include graphite and the thermally stable Nicalon and Nextel ceramic fibers. Weight-loss rates for the different composites were assessed as a function of mechanical properties, specimen geometry, fiber sizing, and interfacial bond strength. Differences were observed in rates of weight loss, matrix cracking, geometry dependency, and fiber sizing effects. It was shown that Celion 6000 fiber-reinforced composites do not exhibit a straight-line Arrhenius relationship at temperatures above 316 C.

  3. Mineral-Ground Micro-Fibrillated Cellulose Reinforcement for Polymer Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, Jon; Ireland, Sean; Skuse, David; Edwards, Martha; Mclain, Leslie; Tekinalp, Halil L.; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Ozcan, Soydan

    2017-01-01

    ORNL worked with Imerys to demonstrate reinforcement of additive manufacturing feedstock materials using mineral-ground microfibrillated cellulose (MFC). Properly prepared/dried mineral-ground cellulose microfibrils significantly improved mechanical properties of both ABS and PLA resins. While tensile strength increases up to ~40% were observed, elastic modulus of the both resins doubled with the addition of 30% MFC.

  4. Reinforcement effect of soy protein/carbohydrate ratio in styrene-butadiene polymer

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soy protein and carbohydrate at different ratios were blended with latex to form composites. The variation of protein to carbohydrate ratio has a sifnificant effect on the composite properties and the results from dynamic mechanical method showed a substantial reinforcement effect. The composites ...

  5. Investigation of mechanical properties of aluminium reinforced glass fibre polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, G. B. Veeresh; Pramod, R.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the recent work about reinforcing E-glass into Aluminium foil to attain high strength to weight ratio. Aluminium is corrosion resistant, light in weight and ductile, also when alloyed through other metals deliver the greater strengths as desirable for high-tech applications. The density of pure Aluminium is 2.7 g cm3. Electrical grade glass formally known as E-glass, is by far the most used fiber in reinforced plastic composites. It is a high strength material with light weight compared to steel and corrosive resistant. The matrix and reinforcement is bonded with a resin, named Araldite Ly556, which has density at 25 °C, 1.15-1.20 g cm3. Thus gives a good binding structure. In the present work, Aluminium, E-Glass and Epoxy are combined to fabricate a laminate by Hand-Lay process. Hand-lay is the oldest and simplest method used for producing reinforced plastic laminates. The fabricated metal matrix composites are tested for their mechanical properties. The metal laminate is found to render high strength, hardness, flexural strength and increased wear resistance. Further theoretical simulations was carried out to validate the experimental results.

  6. Dependence of the degree of reinforcement of polymer/carbon nanotubes nanocomposites on the nanofiller dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikitaev, A. K.; Kozlov, G. V.

    2015-05-01

    The dependence of the degree of reinforcement of polymethylmethacrylate/carbon nanotubes on the nanofiller content at ultrasmall concentrations of the latter is investigated. It is shown that the extreme character of this dependence is determined by the structural features of the nanofiller. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes gives a positive effect only below their percolation threshold.

  7. Effect of monomer composition of polymer matrix on flexural properties of glass fibre-reinforced orthodontic archwire.

    PubMed

    Ohtonen, J; Vallittu, P K; Lassila, L V J

    2013-02-01

    To compare force levels obtained from glass fibre-reinforced composite (FRC) archwires. Specifically, FRC wires were compared with polymer matrices having different dimethacrylate monomer compositions. FRC material (E-glass provided by Stick Tech Ltd, Turku, Finland) with continuous unidirectional glass fibres and four different types of dimethacrylate monomer compositions for the resin matrix were tested. Cross-sectionally round FRC archwires fitting into the 0.3 mm slot of a bracket were divided into 16 groups with six specimens in each group. Glass fibres were impregnated by the manufacturer, and they were initially light-cured by hand light-curing unit or additionally post-cured in light-curing oven. The FRC archwire specimens were tested at 37°C according to a three-point bending test in dry and wet conditions using a span length of 10 mm and a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. The wires were loaded until final failure. The data were statistically analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). The dry FRC archwire specimens revealed higher load values than water stored ones, regardless of the polymer matrix. A majority of the FRC archwires showed higher load values after being post-cured. ANOVA revealed that the polymer matrix, curing method, and water storage had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on the flexural behaviour of the FRC archwire. Polymer matrix composition, curing method, and water storage affected the flexural properties and thus, force level and working range which could be obtained from the FRC archwire.

  8. New Textile Sensors for In Situ Structural Health Monitoring of Textile Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites Based on the Conductive Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) Polymer Complex.

    PubMed

    Jerkovic, Ivona; Koncar, Vladan; Grancaric, Ana Marija

    2017-10-10

    Many metallic structural and non-structural parts used in the transportation industry can be replaced by textile-reinforced composites. Composites made from a polymeric matrix and fibrous reinforcement have been increasingly studied during the last decade. On the other hand, the fast development of smart textile structures seems to be a very promising solution for in situ structural health monitoring of composite parts. In order to optimize composites' quality and their lifetime all the production steps have to be monitored in real time. Textile sensors embedded in the composite reinforcement and having the same mechanical properties as the yarns used to make the reinforcement exhibit actuating and sensing capabilities. This paper presents a new generation of textile fibrous sensors based on the conductive polymer complex poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) developed by an original roll to roll coating method. Conductive coating for yarn treatment was defined according to the preliminary study of percolation threshold of this polymer complex. The percolation threshold determination was based on conductive dry films' electrical properties analysis, in order to develop highly sensitive sensors. A novel laboratory equipment was designed and produced for yarn coating to ensure effective and equally distributed coating of electroconductive polymer without distortion of textile properties. The electromechanical properties of the textile fibrous sensors confirmed their suitability for in situ structural damages detection of textile reinforced thermoplastic composites in real time.

  9. A Comparison of the Elastic Properties of Graphene- and Fullerene-Reinforced Polymer Composites: The Role of Filler Morphology and Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chang-Tsan; Weerasinghe, Asanka; Maroudas, Dimitrios; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin

    2016-08-01

    Nanoscale carbon-based fillers are known to significantly alter the mechanical and electrical properties of polymers even at relatively low loadings. We report results from extensive molecular-dynamics simulations of mechanical testing of model polymer (high-density polyethylene) nanocomposites reinforced by nanocarbon fillers consisting of graphene flakes and fullerenes. By systematically varying filler concentration, morphology, and size, we identify clear trends in composite stiffness with reinforcement. To within statistical error, spherical fullerenes provide a nearly size-independent level of reinforcement. In contrast, two-dimensional graphene flakes induce a strongly size-dependent response: we find that flakes with radii in the 2-4 nm range provide appreciable enhancement in stiffness, which scales linearly with flake radius. Thus, with flakes approaching typical experimental sizes (~0.1-1 μm), we expect graphene fillers to provide substantial reinforcement, which also is much greater than what could be achieved with fullerene fillers. We identify the atomic-scale features responsible for this size- and morphology-dependent response, notably, ordering and densification of polymer chains at the filler-matrix interface, thereby providing insights into avenues for further control and enhancement of the mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites.

  10. Experimental Research Into the Effect Of External Actions and Polluting Environments on the Serviceablity of Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, D. S.; Vildeman, V. E.; Babin, A. D.; Grinev, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    The results of mechanical tests of fiberglass and CFRP specimens in transverse bending and interlaminar shear (the short-beam method) and of sandwich panels in tension and compression are presented. The effect of external polluting environments on the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced polymer composite materials and structures is estimated. Stress-strain diagrams are constructed.

  11. A Comparison of the Elastic Properties of Graphene- and Fullerene-Reinforced Polymer Composites: The Role of Filler Morphology and Size

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chang-Tsan; Weerasinghe, Asanka; Maroudas, Dimitrios; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale carbon-based fillers are known to significantly alter the mechanical and electrical properties of polymers even at relatively low loadings. We report results from extensive molecular-dynamics simulations of mechanical testing of model polymer (high-density polyethylene) nanocomposites reinforced by nanocarbon fillers consisting of graphene flakes and fullerenes. By systematically varying filler concentration, morphology, and size, we identify clear trends in composite stiffness with reinforcement. To within statistical error, spherical fullerenes provide a nearly size-independent level of reinforcement. In contrast, two-dimensional graphene flakes induce a strongly size-dependent response: we find that flakes with radii in the 2–4 nm range provide appreciable enhancement in stiffness, which scales linearly with flake radius. Thus, with flakes approaching typical experimental sizes (~0.1–1 μm), we expect graphene fillers to provide substantial reinforcement, which also is much greater than what could be achieved with fullerene fillers. We identify the atomic-scale features responsible for this size- and morphology-dependent response, notably, ordering and densification of polymer chains at the filler–matrix interface, thereby providing insights into avenues for further control and enhancement of the mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites. PMID:27546738

  12. Evaluation of two matrix materials intended for fiber-reinforced polymers.

    PubMed

    Segerström, Susanna; Meriç, Gökçe; Knarvang, Torbjørn; Ruyter, I Eystein

    2005-10-01

    Two matrix resins for fiber composites that remain in a fluid state during storage and handling before polymerization were evaluated. The resin mixtures, based on methyl methacrylate (MMA), were produced with two different cross-linking agent systems: 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate or diethylene glycol dimethacrylate. Water sorption, water solubility, water uptake and residual MMA monomer were determined. Thermomechanical analysis was used to determine linear dimensional changes as a function of temperature. Flexural strength and modulus as well as fracture work and the maximum stress intensity factor were determined. The results revealed similar values for both matrix polymers regarding water sorption, water solubility, water uptake, residual MMA monomer (0.5 wt% (+/- 0.03)) and coefficient of linear thermal expansion. Flexural strength for polymer B was 68.7 MPa (+/- 9.8) compared to 56.0 MPa (+/- 13.3) for polymer A when tested dry and 64 MPa (+/- 6.1) compared to (54 MPa (+/- 3.3) when water-saturated. Fracture toughness tests showed higher maximum stress intensity factor values for polymer B (0.75 +/- 0.17) MPa x m1/2 than for polymer A (0.55 +/- 0.12) MPa x m1/2. The resin binders showed an appropriate consistency while remaining in a fluid state during storage and manipulation.

  13. Finite element analysis of the effect of an interphase on toughening of a particle reinforced polymer composite

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenhai; Sadeghipour, Keya; Baran, George

    2008-01-01

    A numerical method was used to study the interaction between a crack and the filler phase in a particle-reinforced polymer composite. The simulation was achieved by implementing a progressive damage-and-failure material model and element-removal technique through finite element analysis, providing a framework for the quantitative prediction of the deformation and fracture response of the composite. The effect of an interphase on composite toughness was also studied. Results show that a thin and high strength interphase results in efficient stress transfer between particle and matrix and causes the crack to deflect and propagate within the matrix. Alternatively, a thick and low strength interphase results in crack propagation within the interphase layer, and crack blunting. Further analysis of the effect of volume fraction and particle-particle interactions on fracture toughness as well as prediction of the fracture toughness can also be achieved within this framework. PMID:19492012

  14. Carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer variable-curvature mirror used for optical zoom imaging: prototype design and experimental demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Fan, Xuewu; Pang, Zhihai; Ren, Guorui; Wang, Wei; Xie, Yongjie; Ma, Zhen; Du, Yunfei; Su, Yu; Wei, Jingxuan

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, optical zoom imaging without moving elements has received much attention. The key to realizing this technique lies in the design of the variable-curvature mirror (VCM). To obtain enough optical magnification, the VCM should be able to change its radius of curvature over a wide range. In other words, the VCM must be able to provide a large sagittal variation, which requires the mirror material to be robust during curvature variation, require little force to deform, and have high ultimate strength. Carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) satisfies all these requirements and is suitable for fabricating such a VCM. Therefore, in this research, a CFRP prototype VCM has been designed, fabricated, and tested. With a diameter of 100 mm, a thickness of 2 mm, and an initial radius of curvature of 1740 mm, this VCM can provide a maximum 23-μm sagittal variation and a minimum and maximum radius of curvature of 1705 and 1760 mm.

  15. Diagnostics of glass fiber reinforced polymers and comparative analysis of their fabrication techniques with the use of acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkov, O. V.; Bryansky, A. A.; Panin, S. V.; Zaikov, V. I.

    2016-11-01

    Strength properties of the glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP) fabricated by vacuum and vacuum autoclave molding techniques were analyzed. Measurements of porosity of the GFRP parts manufactured by various molding techniques were conducted with the help of optical microscopy. On the basis of experimental data obtained by means of acoustic emission hardware/software setup, the technique for running diagnostics and forecasting the bearing capacity of polymeric composite materials based on the result of three-point bending tests has been developed. The operation principle of the technique is underlined by the evaluation of the power function index change which takes place on the dependence of the total acoustic emission counts versus the loading stress.

  16. Modeling and Measurement of Sustained Loading and Temperature-Dependent Deformation of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Bonded to Concrete.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yoseok; Lee, Jaeha; Kim, WooSeok

    2015-01-29

    This paper aims at presenting the effects of short-term sustained load and temperature on time-dependent deformation of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) bonded to concrete and pull-off strength at room temperature after the sustained loading period. The approach involves experimental and numerical analysis. Single-lap shear specimens were used to evaluate temperature and short-term sustained loading effects on time-dependent behavior under sustained loading and debonding behavior under pull-off loading after a sustained loading period. The numerical model was parameterized with experiments on the concrete, FRP, and epoxy. Good correlation was seen between the numerical results and single-lap shear experiments. Sensitivity studies shed light on the influence of temperature, epoxy modulus, and epoxy thickness on the redistribution of interfacial shear stress during sustained loading. This investigation confirms the hypothesis that interfacial stress redistribution can occur due to sustained load and elevated temperature and its effect can be significant.

  17. Polymer blend of PLA/PHBV based bionanocomposites reinforced with nanocrystalline cellulose for potential application as packaging material.

    PubMed

    Dasan, Y K; Bhat, A H; Ahmad, Faiz

    2017-02-10

    The current research discusses the development of poly (lactic acid) (PLA) and poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) reinforced nanocrystalline cellulose bionanocomposites. The nanocrystalline cellulose was derived from waste oil palm empty fruit bunch fiber by acid hydrolysis process. The resulting nanocrystalline cellulose suspension was then surface functionalized by TEMPO-mediated oxidation and solvent exchange process. Furthermore, the PLA/PHBV/nanocrystalline cellulose bionanocomposites were produced by solvent casting method. The effect of the addition of nanocrystalline cellulose on structural, morphology, mechanical and barrier properties of bionanocomposites was investigated. The results revealed that the developed bionanocomposites showed improved mechanical properties and decrease in oxygen permeability rate. Therefore, the developed bio-based composite incorporated with an optimal composition of nanocrystalline cellulose exhibits properties as compared to the polymer blend.

  18. Prestressing Effects on the Performance of Concrete Beams with Near-surface-mounted Carbon-fiber-reinforced Polymer Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungnam; Park, Sun-Kyu

    2016-07-01

    The effects of various prestressing levels on the flexural behavior of concrete beams strengthened with prestressed near-surface-mounted (NSM) carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) bars were investigated in this study. Four-point flexural tests up to failure were performed using a total of six strengthened prestressed and nonprestressed concrete beams. The nonprestressed strengthened beam failed by premature debonding at the interface of concrete and the epoxy adhesive, but the prestressed one failed owing due to rupture of the CFRP bar. As the prestressing level of the CFRP bar increased, the cracking and yield loads of the prestressed beams increased, but its effect on their deflections was insignificant. The ultimate load was constant regardless of prestressing level, but the ultimate deflection was almost inversely proportional to the level.

  19. Effect of asperity-scale tensile stresses on the wear behavior of normally oriented fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.P.; Ovaert, T.C.

    1994-01-01

    Wear of unidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced polymer composites with fiber orientation normal to the contact plane, sliding over scribed stainless steel disks having a controlled surface topography, is investigated in relation to the tensile stresses developed near the contact region. The composite is modeled as a transversely isotropic half-space whose effective elastic moduli are estimated from composite micro-mechanical considerations. The scribed disk is treated as a rough surface whose controlled topographical features serve as model hemispherical indenters against the composite. With friction coefficients obtained from the wear experiments, the tensile stress field at an below the composite surface is estimated. From this, an estimated of the theoretical depth of fiber-matrix separation (fiber debonding) is calculated based on the composite transverse tensile strength. A correlation between the wear rate and theoretical depth of debonding was shown for several composites.

  20. Gas-phase plume from laser-irradiated fiberglass-reinforced polymers via imaging fourier transform spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Roberto I; Gross, Kevin C; Perram, Glen P; Johnson, Shane M; Dao, Ly; Medina, David F; Roybal, Robert; Black, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Emissive plumes from laser-irradiated fiberglass-reinforced polymers (FRP) were investigated using a mid-infrared imaging Fourier transform spectrometer, operating at fast framing rates (50 kHz imagery and 2.5 Hz hyperspectral imagery) with adequate spatial (0.81 mm(2) per pixel) and spectral resolution (2 cm(-1)). Fiberglass-reinforced polymer targets were irradiated with a 1064 nm continuous wave neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser for 60 s at 100 W in air. Strong emissions from H(2)O, CO, CO(2), and hydrocarbons were observed between 1800 and 5000 cm(-1). A single-layer radiative transfer model was developed for the spectral region from 2000 to 2400 cm(-1) to estimate spatial maps of temperature and column densities of CO and CO(2) from the hyperspectral imagery. The spectral model was used to compute the absorption cross sections of CO and CO(2) using spectral line parameters from the high-temperature extension of the HITRAN. The analysis of pre-combustion spectra yields effective temperatures rising from ambient to 1200 K and suddenly increasing to 1515 K upon combustion. The peak signal-to-noise ratio for a single spectrum exceeds 60:1, enabling temperature and column density determinations with low statistical error. For example, the spectral analysis for a single pixel within a single frame yields an effective temperature of 1019 ± 6 K, and CO and CO(2) column densities of 1.14 ± 0.05 and 1.11 ± 0.03 × 10(18) molec/cm(2), respectively. Systematic errors associated with the radiative transfer model dominate, yielding effective temperatures with uncertainties of >100 K and column densities to within a factor of 2-3. Hydrocarbon emission at 2800 to 3200 cm(-1) is well correlated with CO column density.

  1. UV-Assisted 3D Printing of Glass and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Dual-Cure Polymer Composites

    PubMed Central

    Invernizzi, Marta; Natale, Gabriele; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano; Griffini, Gianmarco

    2016-01-01

    Glass (GFR) and carbon fiber-reinforced (CFR) dual-cure polymer composites fabricated by UV-assisted three-dimensional (UV-3D) printing are presented. The resin material combines an acrylic-based photocurable resin with a low temperature (140 °C) thermally-curable resin system based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether as base component, an aliphatic anhydride (hexahydro-4-methylphthalic anhydride) as hardener and (2,4,6,-tris(dimethylaminomethyl)phenol) as catalyst. A thorough rheological characterization of these formulations allowed us to define their 3D printability window. UV-3D printed macrostructures were successfully demonstrated, giving a clear indication of their potential use in real-life structural applications. Differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis highlighted the good thermal stability and mechanical properties of the printed parts. In addition, uniaxial tensile tests were used to assess the fiber reinforcing effect on the UV-3D printed objects. Finally, an initial study was conducted on the use of a sizing treatment on carbon fibers to improve the fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion, giving preliminary indications on the potential of this approach to improve the mechanical properties of the 3D printed CFR components. PMID:28773704

  2. An experimental study of non-destructive testing on glass fibre reinforced polymer composites after high velocity impact event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razali, N.; Sultan, M. T. H.; Cardona, F.

    2016-10-01

    A non-destructive testing method on Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) after high velocity impact event using single stage gas gun (SSGG) is presented. Specimens of C- type and E-type fibreglass reinforcement, which were fabricated with 6mm, 8mm, 10mm and 12mm thicknesses and size 100 mm x 100 mm, were subjected to a high velocity impact with three types of bullets: conical, hemispherical and blunt at various gas gun pressure levels from 6 bar to 60 bar. Visual observation techniques using a lab microscope were used to determine the infringed damage by looking at the crack zone. Dye penetrants were used to inspect the area of damage, and to evaluate internal and external damages on the specimens after impact. The results from visual analysis of the impacted test laminates were discussed and presented. It was found that the impact damage started with induced delamination, fibre cracking and then failure, simultaneously with matrix cracking and breakage, and finally followed by the fibres pulled out. C-type experienced more damaged areas compared to E-type of GFRP.

  3. UV-Assisted 3D Printing of Glass and Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Dual-Cure Polymer Composites.

    PubMed

    Invernizzi, Marta; Natale, Gabriele; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano; Griffini, Gianmarco

    2016-07-16

    Glass (GFR) and carbon fiber-reinforced (CFR) dual-cure polymer composites fabricated by UV-assisted three-dimensional (UV-3D) printing are presented. The resin material combines an acrylic-based photocurable resin with a low temperature (140 °C) thermally-curable resin system based on bisphenol A diglycidyl ether as base component, an aliphatic anhydride (hexahydro-4-methylphthalic anhydride) as hardener and (2,4,6,-tris(dimethylaminomethyl)phenol) as catalyst. A thorough rheological characterization of these formulations allowed us to define their 3D printability window. UV-3D printed macrostructures were successfully demonstrated, giving a clear indication of their potential use in real-life structural applications. Differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis highlighted the good thermal stability and mechanical properties of the printed parts. In addition, uniaxial tensile tests were used to assess the fiber reinforcing effect on the UV-3D printed objects. Finally, an initial study was conducted on the use of a sizing treatment on carbon fibers to improve the fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion, giving preliminary indications on the potential of this approach to improve the mechanical properties of the 3D printed CFR components.

  4. Rigid spine reinforced polymer microelectrode array probe and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Tabada, Phillipe; Pannu, Satinderpall S

    2014-05-27

    A rigid spine-reinforced microelectrode array probe and fabrication method. The probe includes a flexible elongated probe body with conductive lines enclosed within a polymeric material. The conductive lines connect microelectrodes found near an insertion end of the probe to respective leads at a connector end of the probe. The probe also includes a rigid spine, such as made from titanium, fixedly attached to the probe body to structurally reinforce the probe body and enable the typically flexible probe body to penetrate and be inserted into tissue, such as neural tissue. By attaching or otherwise fabricating the rigid spine to connect to only an insertion section of the probe body, an integrally connected cable section of the probe body may remain flexible.

  5. Fluorescent protein senses and reports mechanical damage in glass-fiber-reinforced polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Makyła, Katarzyna; Müller, Christoph; Lörcher, Samuel; Winkler, Thomas; Nussbaumer, Martin G; Eder, Michaela; Bruns, Nico

    2013-05-21

    Yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) is used as a mechanoresponsive layer at the fiber/resin interface in glass-fiber-reinforced composites. The protein loses its fluorescence when subjected to mechanical stress. Within the material, it reports interfacial shear debonding and barely visible impact damage by a transition from a fluorescent to a non-fluorescent state. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Optimisation of Fabric Reinforced Polymer Composites Using a Variant of Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axinte, Andrei; Taranu, Nicolae; Bejan, Liliana; Hudisteanu, Iuliana

    2017-03-01

    Fabric reinforced polymeric composites are high performance materials with a rather complex fabric geometry. Therefore, modelling this type of material is a cumbersome task, especially when an efficient use is targeted. One of the most important issue of its design process is the optimisation of the individual laminae and of the laminated structure as a whole. In order to do that, a parametric model of the material has been defined, emphasising the many geometric variables needed to be correlated in the complex process of optimisation. The input parameters involved in this work, include: widths or heights of the tows and the laminate stacking sequence, which are discrete variables, while the gaps between adjacent tows and the height of the neat matrix are continuous variables. This work is one of the first attempts of using a Genetic Algorithm (GA) to optimise the geometrical parameters of satin reinforced multi-layer composites. Given the mixed type of the input parameters involved, an original software called SOMGA (Satin Optimisation with a Modified Genetic Algorithm) has been conceived and utilised in this work. The main goal is to find the best possible solution to the problem of designing a composite material which is able to withstand to a given set of external, in-plane, loads. The optimisation process has been performed using a fitness function which can analyse and compare mechanical behaviour of different fabric reinforced composites, the results being correlated with the ultimate strains, which demonstrate the efficiency of the composite structure.

  7. Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites in Bridges: a State-of-the-Art Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    VACUUM ASSISTED RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING Description of VARTM Process VARTM is a vacuum variation of RTM (Resin Transfer Molding). In RTM ...AMIPC has worked toward developing and demonstrating intelligent RTM and VARTM processing of polymer composites to improve quality and reduce...comprehensive, 3-D simulation software tool for mold filing and enables investigating processing conditions in RTM and VARTM . • VARTM Injection

  8. Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites in Bridges: A State-of-the-Art Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    VACUUM ASSISTED RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING Description of VARTM Process VARTM is a vacuum variation of RTM (Resin Transfer Molding). In RTM ...AMIPC has worked toward developing and demonstrating intelligent RTM and VARTM processing of polymer composites to improve quality and reduce...comprehensive, 3-D simulation software tool for mold filing and enables investigating processing conditions in RTM and VARTM . • VARTM Injection

  9. Deformation behavior of carbon-fiber reinforced shape-memory-polymer composites used for deployable structures (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Xin; Liu, Liwu; Li, Fengfeng; Pan, Chengtong; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2017-04-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are a new type of smart material, they perform large reversible deformation with a certain external stimulus (e.g., heat and electricity). The properties (e.g., stiffness, strength and other mechanically static or quasi-static load-bearing capacity) are primarily considered for conventional resin-based composite materials which are mainly used for structural materials. By contrast, the mechanical actuating performance with finite deformation is considered for the shape memory polymers and their composites which can be used for both structural materials and functional materials. For shape memory polymers and their composites, the performance of active deformation is expected to further promote the development in smart active deformation structures, such as deployable space structures and morphing wing aircraft. The shape memory polymer composites (SMPCs) are also one type of High Strain Composite (HSC). The space deployable structures based on carbon fiber reinforced shape memory polymer composites (SMPCs) show great prospects. Considering the problems that SMPCs are difficult to meet the practical applications in space deployable structures in the recent ten years, this paper aims to research the mechanics of deformation, actuation and failure of SMPCs. In the overall view of the shape memory polymer material's nonlinearity (nonlinearity and stress softening in the process of pre-deformation and recovery, relaxation in storage process, irreversible deformation), by the multiple verifications among theory, finite element and experiments, one obtains the deformation and actuation mechanism for the process of "pre-deformation, energy storage and actuation" and its non-fracture constraint domain. Then, the parameters of SMPCs will be optimized. Theoretical analysis is realized by the strain energy function, additionally considering the interaction strain energy between the fiber and the matrix. For the common resin-based or soft

  10. Molecular Dynamics Study on the Photothermal Actuation of a Glassy Photoresponsive Polymer Reinforced with Gold Nanoparticles with Size Effect.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joonmyung; Chung, Hayoung; Yun, Jung-Hoon; Cho, Maenghyo

    2016-09-14

    We investigated the optical and thermal actuation behavior of densely cross-linked photoresponsive polymer (PRP) and polymer nanocomposites containing gold nanoparticles (PRP/Au) using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The modeled molecular structures contain a large number of photoreactive mesogens with linear orientation. Flexible side chains are interconnected through covalent bonds under periodic boundary conditions. A switchable dihedral potential was applied on a diazene moiety to describe the photochemical trans-to-cis isomerization. To quantify the photoinduced molecular reorientation and its effect on the macroscopic actuation of the neat PRP and PRP/Au materials, we characterized the photostrain and other material properties including elastic stiffness and thermal stability according to the photoisomerization ratio of the reactive groups. We particularly examined the effect of nanoparticle size on the photothermal actuation by varying the diameter of the nanofiller (10-20 Å) under the same volume fraction of 1.62%. The results indicated that the insertion of the gold nanoparticles enlarges the photostrain of the material while enhancing its mechanical stiffness and thermal stability. When the diameter of the nanoparticle reaches a size similar to or smaller than the length of the mesogen, the interfacial energy between the nanofiller and the surrounding polymer matrix does not significantly affect the alignment of the mesogens, but rather the adsorption energy at the interface generates a stable interphase layer. Hence, these improvements were more effective as the size of the gold nanoparticle decreased. The present findings suggest a wider analysis of the nanofiller-reinforced PRP composites and could be a guide for the mechanical design of the PRP actuator system.

  11. Polymer concrete for precast repair of continuously reinforced concrete pavement on IH 30, near Mt. Pleasant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, A. M.; McCullough, B. F.; Fowler, D. W.

    1981-08-01

    Two punchout repairs made in a continuously reinforced concrete pavement (CRCP) using precast portland cement panels are described. The two repairs, one 1.44 sq. ft., the other 36 sq. ft., were completed and opened to traffic in one afternoon. This technique provides a rapid method of repair that produces a repair that is structurally as good or better than the surrounding pavement. With a trained crew, the repair time can be reduced and thus reducing lane closure time. Since lane closure time is a critical consideration in high volume highways, this method is cost effective in those areas.

  12. Bond strength investigations and structural applicability of composite fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) rebars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachlakev, Damian Ivanov

    The composite FRP rebars research at Oregon State University was initiated in 1993 principally to develop a non-metallic hollow reinforcement. It was recognized that the tensile properties of such reinforcement are unquestionably superior to steel, but its performance in concrete could be problematic. The bond between FRP rebars and concrete was identified as a critical area of concern. The purpose of this study is (i) to analyze a variety of FRP and steel reinforcing units; (ii) to advance the knowledge of bond mechanism, failure modes, and parameters influencing the bond strength; (iii) to compare composite rebars to conventional steel and to assess their applicability as reinforcing members. Commercially available FRP rebars were investigated. Particular emphasis was given to a hollow glass FRP rod designed at Oregon State University. Several parameters were investigated, including: failure mode, concrete compressive strength, rebar diameter and circumference/cross section ratio, embedment length, concrete cover, and microstructure of the composite rebars. It was recognized that the ASTM C234-90 pull-out standard is test of concrete strength. Therefore, a modified pull-out test was developed for evaluating the bond strength behavior. A newly developed European bond test procedure was compared with locally modified version of the pull-out method. The new procedure was used for the first time in the United States. The study demonstrated a phenomenon, not reported in the published research at this time, defined as a size effect. The size effects result in lower bond strength with increasing area of the interface between FRP bars and concrete. The next phase of the research was dedicated to the hollow glass FRP rebar. The goal was to compare its bond properties to conventional steel and solid FRP bars. The study led to two new phenomena not described in the literature previously. Results showed that the concrete compressive strength does not significantly affect the

  13. Modeling of dynamic mechanical properties of polymer composites reinforced by one dimensional nanofillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Lu, M.; Chen, M. H.; Wang, L. S.; Bu, Z. X.; Song, G.; Sun, L.

    2016-11-01

    Owing to their high aspect ratio, large specific surface area, high axial Young's modulus/strength, and low density, one dimensional carbon nanomaterials can introduce significant change to the mechanical properties of polymer matrices, both static and dynamic. Thus, one of the most important potential applications of carbon nanotubes or nanofibers is to utilize the enhanced dynamic damping properties of polymer nanocomposites for improved vibration, acoustic, and fatigue performances. This study focuses on calculating the nanocomposite energy dissipation under dynamic mechanical loading. A micromechanical model based on quasi-static stick-slip analysis has been developed to quantify the dynamic mechanical properties of the nanocomposites as a function of external strain in the elastic region. Storage and loss moduli are used to characterize such dynamic mechanical behaviors. Influences of nanotube bundling and nanotube alignment on the damping property of composites have been quantified. Simulation results are in good agreement with the reported experimental measurements.

  14. A plant fiber reinforced polymer composite prepared by a twin-screw extruder.

    PubMed

    Sui, G; Fuqua, M A; Ulven, C A; Zhong, W H

    2009-02-01

    Polypropylene (PP) composites reinforced using a novel plant fiber, sunflower hull sanding dust (SHSD), were prepared using a twin-screw extruder. Thermal and mechanical properties of the SHSD/PP composites were characterized and compared to an organically modified clay (organo-clay)/PP composite. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis showed that the crystallization temperature and the degree of crystallinity of PP exhibited changes with addition of SHSD and organo-clay. Mechanical properties of the PP were enhanced with the addition of SHSDs. Both the flexural strength and flexural modulus of the PP composites containing 5% (w/w) SHSD were comparable to that of the 5% (w/w) organo-clay reinforced PP. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation showed that no obvious agglomeration of SHSD existed in the PP matrix. Compared to the neat PP and organo-clay/PP, the SHSD/PP composites exhibited a relatively decreasing rate of thermal degradation with increase in temperature. Experimental results suggest that SHSD, as a sunflower processing byproduct, may find promising applications in composite materials.

  15. Physicochemical evaluation of silica-glass fiber reinforced polymers for prosthodontic applications.

    PubMed

    Meriç, Gökçe; Dahl, Jon E; Ruyter, I Eystein

    2005-06-01

    This investigation was designed to formulate silica-glass fiber reinforced polymeric materials. Fused silica-glass fibers were chosen for the study. They were heat-treated at various temperatures (500 degrees C, 800 degrees C and 1100 degrees C), silanized, sized and incorporated in two modified resin mixtures (A and B). The flexural properties in dry and wet conditions were tested and statistically analyzed, and the content of residual methyl methacrylate (MMA) monomer, dimensional changes with temperature, water sorption and solubility were determined. Woven fibers [36.9% (wt/wt)], heat-treated at 500 degrees C, gave the highest strength values for the polymeric composites (an ultimate transverse strength of 200 Mpa and a flexural modulus of 10 GPa) compared with the fibers heat-treated at other temperatures. There was no statistically significant difference in the measured flexural properties between resins A and B regarding fiber treatment and water storage time. These fiber composites had a small quantity of residual MMA content [0.37 +/- 0.007% (wt/wt)] and very low water solubility, indicating good biocompatibility. It was suggested that silica-glass fibers could be used for reinforcement as a result of their anticipated good qualities in aqueous environments, such as the oral environment.

  16. Nafion electro-spun reinforced membranes for polymer electrolyte fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Alessandra; Saccà, Ada; Busacca, Concetta; Frontera, Patrizia; Antonucci, Pier Luigi; Passalacqua, Enza

    2011-10-01

    The introduction of different reinforcement materials (yarns, fibrils, etc) into the membranes has been investigated with the aim of maintaining adequate membrane properties in terms of mechanical strength, good chemical stability, low swelling at critical temperatures and a stable electrochemical performance in PEFC. An innovative technique for the development of membranes is based on polymeric films containing polymeric nanofibres obtained through electrospinning. The electrospinning of Nafion blends with polyvinylpirrolidone (PVP) and polystyrene (PS) was investigated in this work. In particular, the morphology and diameter of electrospun fibres as a function of the electrospinning parameters and solution preparation have been studied and in both cases, a critical concentration of blend solution was found. Beaded fibres were obtained above such a concentration and, below it, only fibre mats were observed. Reinforced Nafion-based membranes were realised by using the obtained spun films. Preliminary proton conductivity and fuel cell results have shown the capability of operating in a fuel cell environment with a slightly higher performance than pure Nafion but having an improved stability at high temperatures.

  17. A viscoelastic-viscoplastic model for short-fibre reinforced polymers with complex fibre orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nciri, M.; Notta-Cuvier, D.; Lauro, F.; Chaari, F.; Zouari, B.; Maalej, Y.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents an innovative approach for the modelling of viscous behaviour of short-fibre reinforced composites (SFRC) with complex distributions of fibre orientations and for a wide range of strain rates. As an alternative to more complex homogenisation methods, the model is based on an additive decomposition of the state potential for the computation of composite's macroscopic behaviour. Thus, the composite material is seen as the assembly of a matrix medium and several linear elastic fibre media. The division of short fibres into several families means that complex distributions of orientation or random orientation can be easily modelled. The matrix behaviour is strain-rate sensitive, i.e. viscoelastic and/or viscoplastic. Viscoelastic constitutive laws are based on a generalised linear Maxwell model and the modelling of the viscoplasticity is based on an overstress approach. The model is tested for the case of a polypropylene reinforced with short-glass fibres with distributed orientations and subjected to uniaxial tensile tests, in different loading directions and under different strain rates. Results demonstrate the efficiency of the model over a wide range of strain rates.

  18. Synchrotron X-ray tomography for 3D chemical distribution measurement of a flame retardant and synergist in a fiberglass-reinforced polymer blend.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Heath A; Ham, Kyungmin; Scorsone, Jason T; Butler, Leslie G

    2010-01-14

    A fiberglass-reinforced polymer blend with a new-generation flame retardant is studied with multienergy synchrotron X-ray tomography to assess the blend homogeneity. Relative to other composite materials, this sample is difficult to image due to low X-ray contrast between the fiberglass reinforcement and the polymer blend. Also, the glass fibers are only slightly larger than the 3.26 microm voxels and, due to their high concentration, exist as partially aligned bundles in the polymer matrix. To investigate the chemical composition surrounding the glass fibers, new procedures were developed to find and mark the fiberglass and then assess the flame retardant distribution near the fiber bundles. On the basis of the multienergy imaging across Br and Sb K-edges, the absorbance values were converted to volume percent concentrations. Besides the basic question of the successful and stable blending of the flame retardant and synergist within the polymer matrix, we are also interested in precipitation reactions that might concentrate or diminish concentrations in the close vicinity of the fiberglass reinforcement. Thus, a procedure was developed to analyze radial concentrations about selected, well-isolated fiberglass bundles. Overall, the results show a nicely homogeneous system to the level of the tomography resolution, 3.26 microm, with some enhanced concentration near, approximately 20 microm, the fiber bundles.

  19. Extrusion of polysaccharide nanocrystal reinforced polymer nanocomposites through compatibilization with poly(ethylene oxide).

    PubMed

    Pereda, Mariana; El Kissi, Nadia; Dufresne, Alain

    2014-06-25

    Polysaccharide nanocrystals with a rodlike shape but with different dimensions and specific surface area were prepared from cotton and capim dourado cellulose, and with a plateletlike morphology from waxy maize starch granules. The rheological behavior of aqueous solutions of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) with different molecular weights when adding these nanoparticles was investigated evidencing specific interactions between PEO chains and nanocrystals. Because PEO also bears hydrophobic moieties, it was employed as a compatibilizing agent for the melt processing of polymer nanocomposites. The freeze-dried mixtures were used to prepare nanocomposite materials with a low density polyethylene matrix by extrusion. The thermal and mechanical behavior of ensuing nanocomposites was studied.

  20. Fundamental analysis of the failure of polymer-based fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanninen, M. F.; Rybicki, E. F.; Griffith, W. I.; Broek, D.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical model predicting the strength of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites containing known flaws and with linear elastic-brittle material behavior was developed. The approach was to imbed a local heterogeneous region surrounding the crack tip into an anisotropic elastic continuum. This (1) permits an explicit analysis of the micromechanical processes involved in the fracture, and (2) remains simple enough to be useful in practical computations. Computations for arbitrary flaw size and orientation under arbitrary applied loads were performed. The mechanical properties were those of graphite epoxy. With the rupture properties arbitrarily varied to test the capabilities of the model to reflect real fracture modes, it was shown that fiber breakage, matrix crazing, crack bridging, matrix-fiber debonding, and axial splitting can all occur during a period of (gradually) increasing load prior to catastrophic failure. The calculations also reveal the sequential nature of the stable crack growth process proceding fracture.

  1. Pyrolysis of reinforced polymer composites: Parameterizing a model for multiple compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Geraldine E.

    A single set of material properties was developed to describe the pyrolysis of fiberglass reinforced polyester composites at multiple composition ratios. Milligram-scale testing was performed on the unsaturated polyester (UP) resin using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to establish and characterize an effective semi-global reaction mechanism, of three consecutive first-order reactions. Radiation-driven gasification experiments were conducted on UP resin and the fiberglass composites at compositions ranging from 41 to 54 wt% resin at external heat fluxes from 30 to 70 kW m -2. The back surface temperature was recorded with an infrared camera and used as the target for inverse analysis to determine the thermal conductivity of the systematically isolated constituent species. Manual iterations were performed in a comprehensive pyrolysis model, ThermaKin. The complete set of properties was validated for the ability to reproduce the mass loss rate during gasification testing.

  2. Assessment of solvent capsule-based healing for woven E-glass fibre-reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfredi, Erica; Cohades, Amaël; Richard, Inès; Michaud, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Vacuum Assisted Resin Infusion Molding (VARIM) with low vacuum pressure difference was used to manufacture woven glass fibre-reinforced epoxy resin plates, with a fibre volume fraction of approx. 50 vol% and containing ethyl phenylacetate (EPA)-filled capsules for self-healing purposes. Capsules were introduced by functionalising the fabrics through manual dispersion. We investigated the capability of autonomously healing delaminations induced by static loading in Mode I and II. Healing did not take place for composite samples; this was attributed to the presence of bare fibres on the crack plane and to the reduction of EPA diffusion into the matrix in the presence of fibres both of which hinder the swelling mechanism responsible for healing the cracks.

  3. An integrated computational framework for simulating the failure response of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadian, Hossein; Liang, Bowen; Soghrati, Soheil

    2017-08-01

    A new computational framework is introduced for the automated finite element (FE) modeling of fiber reinforced composites and simulating their micromechanical behavior. The proposed methodology relies on a new microstructure reconstruction algorithm that implements the centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT) to generate an initial uniform distribution of fibers with desired volume fraction and size distribution in a repeating unit cell of the composite. The genetic algorithm (GA) is then employed to optimize locations of fibers such that they replicate the target spatial arrangement. We also use a non-iterative mesh generation algorithm, named conforming to interface structured adaptive mesh refinement (CISAMR), to create FE models of the CFRPC. The CVT-GA-CISAMR framework is then employed to investigate the appropriate size of the composite's representative volume element. We also study the strength and failure mechanisms in the CFRPC subject to varying uniaxial and mixed-mode loadings.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Carbon Nanofiber Reinforced Polymer Composites-Molecular Dynamics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumit; Chandra, Rakesh; Kumar, Pramod; Kumar, Navin

    2016-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been used to study the effect of carbon nanofiber (CNF) volume fraction ( V f) and aspect ratio ( l/d) on mechanical properties of CNF-reinforced polypropylene (PP) composites. Materials Studio 5.5 has been used as a tool for finding the modulus and damping in composites. CNF composition in PP was varied by volume from 0% to 16%. The aspect ratio of CNF was varied from l/d = 5 to l/d = 100. Results show that, with only 2% addition by volume of CNF in PP, E 11 increases 748%. Increase in E 22 is much less in comparison to the increase in E 11. With the increase in the CNF aspect ratio ( l/d) up to l/d = 60, the longitudinal loss factor ( η 11) decreases rapidly. The results of this study have been compared with those available in the literature.

  5. Milling damage on Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer using TiAlN coated End mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konneh, Mohamed; Izman, Sudin; Rahman Kassim, Abdullah Abdul

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports on the damage caused by milling Carbon Fibre Reinforced Composite (CFRP) with 2-flute 4 mm-diameter solid carbide end mills, coated with titanium aluminium nitride. The machining parameters considered in work are, rotation speed, feed rate and depth of cut. Experiments were designed based on Box-Behnken design and the experiments conducted on a Mikrotool DT-110 CNC micro machine. A laser tachometer was used to ascertain a rotational speed for conducting any machining trial. Optical microscopy examination reveals minimum delamination value of 4.05 mm at the spindle speed of 25,000 rpm, depth of cut of 50μm and feed rate of 3 mm/min and the maximum delamination value of 5.04 mm at the spindle speed of 35000 rpm, depth of cut of 150μm and feed rate of 9 mm/min A mathematical model relating the milling parameters and delamination has been established.

  6. Effect of embedded printed circuit board (PCB) sensors on the mechanical behavior of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javdanitehran, M.; Hoffmann, R.; Groh, J.; Vossiek, M.; Ziegmann, G.

    2016-06-01

    The embedding of dielectric chipless sensors for cure monitoring into fiber-reinforced thermosets allows for monitoring and controlling the curing process and consequently higher quality in production. The embedded sensors remain after the processing in the structure. This affects the integrity of the composite structure locally. In order to investigate these effects on the mechanical behavior of the glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP), sensors made on special low loss substrates are integrated into laminates with different lay-ups and thicknesses using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) method. In a parametric study the size of the sensor is varied to observe its influence on the strength and the stiffness of the laminates according to its lay-up and thickness. The size and orientation of the resin rich areas near sensors as well as the distortion in load bearing area as the consequences of the introduction of the sensors are investigated in conjunction with the strength of the structure. An empirical model is proposed by the authors which involves the previously mentioned factors and is used as a rapid tool for the prediction of the changes in bending and tensile strength of simple structures with embedded sensors. The methodology for model’s calibration as well as the validation of the model against the experimental data of different laminates with distinct lay-ups and thicknesses are presented in this work. Mechanical tests under tensile and bending loading indicate that the reduction of the structure’s strength due to sensor integration can be attributed to the size and the orientation of rich resin zones and depends over and above on the size of distorted load bearing area. Depending on the sensor’s elastic modulus the stiffness of the structure may vary through the introduction of a sensor.

  7. On acoustic emission for damage detection and failure prediction in fiber reinforced polymer rods using pattern recognition analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shateri, Mohammadhadi; Ghaib, Maha; Svecova, Dagmar; Thomson, Douglas

    2017-06-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) rods are used for pre-stressing and reinforcing in civil engineering applications. Damage in FRP rods can lead to sudden brittle failure, therefore, a reliable method that provides indicators of damage progression and potential failure in FRP rods is highly desirable. Acoustic emission (AE) signal analysis has been used for damage detection and monitoring of FRP materials. In this study, a new AE event detection algorithm, utilizing the root mean square envelope of AE signal, is applied to AE data to isolate each AE event separately, even when AE events are nearly coincident. A fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering algorithm is used to classify these isolated AE events into 3 clusters. Scanning electron microscopy images of FRP rod cross-sections also show 3 types of damage. The hypothesis in this study is that each cluster represents a damage mechanism. The number of events in each cluster is monitored versus the percent of the ultimate load. The ratio of the number of AE events in one of the FCM clusters to the number of AE events in another FCM cluster was useful for providing an indication of when the stress levels have reached the point where the loads may cause the FRP rod to fail. The results of applying this parameter to four FRP rods show a significant slope change (factor of 10) in this ratio at around 40% and 60% of the ultimate load for glass FRP rods and carbon FRP rods, respectively. This method may prove useful in damage progression and failure prediction of the FRP rods in prefabricated structures where pre-stressed FRP is used and in field monitoring of FRP materials.

  8. Investigation of dielectric properties of polymer composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes in the frequency band of 0.01 Hz - 10 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goshev, A. A.; Eseev, M. K.; Kapustin, S. N.; Vinnik, L. N.; Volkov, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this work is experimental study of dielectric properties of polymer nanocomposites reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in alternating electric field in low frequency band of 0.01 Hz - 10 MHz. We investigated the influence, functionalization degree, aspect ratio, concentration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on dielectric properties of polymer sample. We also studied the dependence of dielectric properties on the polymerization temperature. The dependence of CNTs agglomeration on sample polymerization temperature and temperature's influence on conductivity has been shown. We conducted model calculation of percolation threshold and figured out its dependence on CNTs aspect ratio.

  9. Study on experimental characterization of carbon fiber reinforced polymer panel using digital image correlation: A sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashfuddoja, Mohammad; Prasath, R. G. R.; Ramji, M.

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the experimental characterization of polymer-matrix and polymer based carbon fiber reinforced composite laminate by employing a whole field non-contact digital image correlation (DIC) technique is presented. The properties are evaluated based on full field data obtained from DIC measurements by performing a series of tests as per ASTM standards. The evaluated properties are compared with the results obtained from conventional testing and analytical models and they are found to closely match. Further, sensitivity of DIC parameters on material properties is investigated and their optimum value is identified. It is found that the subset size has more influence on material properties as compared to step size and their predicted optimum value for the case of both matrix and composite material is found consistent with each other. The aspect ratio of region of interest (ROI) chosen for correlation should be the same as that of camera resolution aspect ratio for better correlation. Also, an open cutout panel made of the same composite laminate is taken into consideration to demonstrate the sensitivity of DIC parameters on predicting complex strain field surrounding the hole. It is observed that the strain field surrounding the hole is much more sensitive to step size rather than subset size. Lower step size produced highly pixilated strain field, showing sensitivity of local strain at the expense of computational time in addition with random scattered noisy pattern whereas higher step size mitigates the noisy pattern at the expense of losing the details present in data and even alters the natural trend of strain field leading to erroneous maximum strain locations. The subset size variation mainly presents a smoothing effect, eliminating noise from strain field while maintaining the details in the data without altering their natural trend. However, the increase in subset size significantly reduces the strain data at hole edge due to discontinuity in

  10. Effect of oil palm empty fruit bunches fibers reinforced polymer recycled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermawan, B.; Nikmatin, S.; Sudaryanto; Alatas, H.; Sukaryo, S. G.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this research is to process the OPEFB to become fiber with various sizes which will be used as a filler of polymer matrix recycled acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Molecular analysis and mechanical test have been done to understand the influence of fiber size toward material capability to receive outer deformation. Single screw extruder formed a biocomposites granular continued with injection moulding to shaped test pieces. Maleic anhydride was added as coupling agent between filler and matrix. Filler concentration were 10 and 20% in fiber size respectively with constant additif. Two kind of fiber glass (10%) were used as comparator. In order to analyze the results of the mechanical test Fisher least significant difference (LSD) in ANOVA method was performed (-with α=0,05-).

  11. Understanding the Stress Relaxation Behavior of Polymers Reinforced with Short Elastic Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Obaid, Numaira; Kortschot, Mark T.; Sain, Mohini

    2017-01-01

    Although it has been experimentally shown that the addition of short-fibers slows the stress relaxation process in composites, the underlying phenomenon is complex and not well understood. Previous studies have proposed that fibers slow the relaxation process by either hindering the movement of nearby polymeric chains or by creating additional covalent bonds at the fiber-matrix interface that must be broken before bulk relaxation can occur. In this study, we propose a simplified analytical model that explicitly accounts for the influence of polymer viscoelasticity on shear stress transfer to the fibers. This model adequately explains the effect of fiber addition on the relaxation behavior without the need to postulate structural changes at the fiber-matrix interface. The model predictions were compared to those from Monte Carlo finite-element simulations, and good agreement between the two was observed. PMID:28772835

  12. Investigation on Mechanical Properties of Coir Fiber Reinforced Polymer Resin Composites Saturated with Different Filling Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallusamy, S.; Suganthini Rekha, R.; Karthikeyan, A.

    2017-08-01

    The main objective of this research article is to assess the mechanical properties and fracture analysis of bone and sea shell powders independently integrated with coir fiber polymer composites. The specimen was fabricated with coir fiber at various dimensions of coir fiber like diameter, length, content and mesh size of the powder. Tensile, compressive, flexural and impact tests were conducted in the prepared composite materials as per the techniques of ASTM standard. The fracture faces were explored with the help of SEM images. From the final results it was concluded that the sea shell powder composite provides good tensile and flexural strength than bone powder composite, while bone powder composite material gives good compressive and impact strength than sea shell powder composite material.

  13. Mechanical properties of neat polymer matrix materials and their unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of two neat resin systems for use in carbon fiber epoxy composites were characterized. This included tensile and shear stiffness and strengths, coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion, and fracture toughness. Tests were conducted on specimens in the dry and moisture-saturated states, at temperatures of 23, 82 and 121 C. The neat resins tested were American Cyanamid 1806 and Union Carbide ERX-4901B(MPDA). Results were compared to previously tested neat resins. Four unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced composites were mechanically characterized. Axial and transverse tension and in-plane shear strengths and stiffness were measured, as well as transverse coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion. Tests were conducted on dry specimens only at 23 and 100 C. The materials tested were AS4/3502, AS6/5245-C, T300/BP907, and C6000/1806 unidirectional composites. Scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces was performed to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental test conditions.

  14. The meter-class carbon fiber reinforced polymer mirror and segmented mirror telescope at the Naval Postgraduate School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Christopher; Fernandez, Bautista; Bagnasco, John; Martinez, Ty; Romeo, Robert; Agrawal, Brij

    2015-03-01

    The Adaptive Optics Center of Excellence for National Security at the Naval Postgraduate School has implemented a technology testing platform and array of facilities for next-generation space-based telescopes and imaging system development. The Segmented Mirror Telescope is a 3-meter, 6 segment telescope with actuators on its mirrors for system optical correction. Currently, investigation is being conducted in the use of lightweight carbon fiber reinforced polymer structures for large monolithic optics. Advantages of this material include lower manufacturing costs, very low weight, and high durability and survivability compared to its glass counterparts. Design and testing has begun on a 1-meter, optical quality CFRP parabolic mirror for the purpose of injecting collimated laser light through the SMT primary and secondary mirrors as well as the following aft optics that include wavefront sensors and deformable mirrors. This paper will present the design, testing, and usage of this CFRP parabolic mirror and the current path moving forward with this ever-evolving technology.

  15. Carbon fiber reinforced polymer dimensional stability investigations for use on the laser interferometer space antenna mission telescope.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán, J; Preston, A; Korytov, D; Spector, A; Freise, A; Dixon, G; Livas, J; Mueller, G

    2011-12-01

    The laser interferometer space antenna (LISA) is a mission designed to detect low frequency gravitational waves. In order for LISA to succeed in its goal of direct measurement of gravitational waves, many subsystems must work together to measure the distance between proof masses on adjacent spacecraft. One such subsystem, the telescope, plays a critical role as it is the laser transmission and reception link between spacecraft. Not only must the material that makes up the telescope support structure be strong, stiff, and light, but it must have a dimensional stability of better than 1 pm Hz(-1/2) at 3 mHz and the distance between the primary and the secondary mirrors must change by less than 2.5 μm over the mission lifetime. Carbon fiber reinforced polymer is the current baseline material; however, it has not been tested to the pico meter level as required by the LISA mission. In this paper, we present dimensional stability results, outgassing effects occurring in the cavity and discuss its feasibility for use as the telescope spacer for the LISA spacecraft.

  16. Tolerancing of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer metering tube structure of a high-resolution space-borne telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekinci, Mustafa

    2016-07-01

    High resolution space borne telescopes require dimensionally stable structures to meet very stringent optical requirements. Furthermore, high resolution space borne telescope structures need to have high stiffness and be lightweight in order to survive launch loads. Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) are lightweight and have tailorable mechanical properties like stiffness and coefficient of thermal expansion. However, mechanical properties are highly dependent on manufacturing processes and manufacturing precision. Moreover CFRP tend to absorb moisture which affects dimensional stability of the structure in the vacuum environment. In order to get specified properties out of manufacturing, tolerances need to be defined very accurately. In this paper, behavior of CFRP metering tube structure of a high resolution space borne camera is investigated for ply orientation, fiber and void content deviations which may arise from manufacturing errors and limitations. A computer code is generated to determine laminate properties of stacked up uni-directional (UD) laminae using classical laminate theory with fiber and matrix properties obtained from suppliers and literature. After defining laminate stackup, many samples are virtually created with ply orientations, volumetric fiber and void content that randomly deviates in a tolerance range which will be used in manufacturing. Normal distribution, standard deviation and mean values are presented for elasticity modulus, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), coefficient of moisture expansion (CME) and thermal conductivity in axial and transverse directions of quasi-isotropic stackups and other stackups which have properties presented in literature.

  17. Active vortex generator deployed on demand by size independent actuation of shape memory alloy wires integrated in fiber reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübler, M.; Nissle, S.; Gurka, M.; Wassenaar, J.

    2016-04-01

    Static vortex generators (VGs) are installed on different aircraft types. They generate vortices and interfuse the slow boundary layer with the fast moving air above. Due to this energizing, a flow separation of the boundary layer can be suppressed at high angles of attack. However the VGs cause a permanently increased drag over the whole flight cycle reducing the cruise efficiency. This drawback is currently limiting the use of VGs. New active VGs, deployed only on demand at low speed, can help to overcome this contradiction. Active hybrid structures, combining the actuation of shape memory alloys (SMA) with fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) on the materials level, provide an actuation principle with high lightweight potential and minimum space requirements. Being one of the first applications of active hybrid structures from SMA and FRP, these active vortex generators help to demonstrate the advantages of this new technology. A new design approach and experimental results of active VGs are presented based on the application of unique design tools and advanced manufacturing approaches for these active hybrid structures. The experimental investigation of the actuation focuses on the deflection potential and the dynamic response. Benchmark performance data such as a weight of 1.5g and a maximum thickness of only 1.8mm per vortex generator finally ensure a simple integration in the wing structure.

  18. Glass fiber-reinforced polymer packaged fiber Bragg grating sensors for low-speed weigh-in-motion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Tarawneh, Mu'ath; Huang, Ying

    2016-08-01

    The weight of rolling trucks on roads is one of the critical factors for the management of road networks due to the continuous increase in truck weight. Weigh-in-motion (WIM) sensors have been widely used for weight enforcement. A three-dimensional glass fiber-reinforced polymer packaged fiber Bragg grating sensor (3-D GFRP-FBG) is introduced for in-pavement WIM measurement at low vehicle passing speed. A sensitivity study shows that the developed sensor is very sensitive to the sensor installation depth and the longitudinal and transverse locations of the wheel loading position. The developed 3-D GFRP-FBG sensor is applicable for most practical pavements with a panel length larger than 6 ft, and it also shows a very good long-term durability. For the three components in 3-D of the developed sensor, the longitudinal component has the highest sensitivity for WIM measurements, followed by the transverse and vertical components. Field testing validated the sensitivity and repeatability of the developed 3-D GFRP-FBG sensor. The developed sensor provides the transportation agency one alternative solution for WIM measurement, which could significantly improve the measurement efficiency and long-term durability.

  19. Computational modeling of the electromagnetic characteristics of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites with different weave structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, A. M.; Douglas, J. F.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites (CFRPC) are of great interest in the aerospace and automotive industries due to their exceptional mechanical properties. Carbon fibers are typically woven and inter-laced perpendicularly in warps and wefts to form a carbon fabric that can be embedded in a binding matrix. The warps and wefts can be interlaced in different patterns called weaving structures. The primary weaving structures are the plain, twill, and satin weaves, which give different mechanical composite properties. The goal of this work is to computationally investigate the dependence of CFRPC microwave and terahertz electromagnetic characteristics on weave structure. These bands are good candidates for the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of CFRPC since their wavelengths are comparable to the main weave features. 3D full wave electromagnetic simulations of several different weave models have been performed using a finite element (FEM) simulator, which is able to accurately model the complex weave structure. The computational experiments demonstrate that the reflection of electromagnetic waves from CFRPC depend sensitively on weave structure. The reflection spectra calculated in this work can be used to identify the optimal frequencies for the NDE of each weave structure.

  20. Determining the material parameters for the reconstruction of defects in carbon fiber reinforced polymers from data measured by flash thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Jan P.; Götschel, Sebastian; Maierhofer, Christiane; Weiser, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Flash thermography is a fast and reliable non-destructive testing method for the investigation of defects in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) materials. In this paper numerical simulations of transient thermography data are presented, calculated for a quasi-isotropic flat bottom hole sample. They are compared to experimental data. These simulations are one important step towards the quantitative reconstruction of a flaw by assessing thermographic data. The applied numerical model is based on the finite-element method, extended by a semi-analytical treatment of the boundary of the sample, which is heated by the flash light. A crucial part for a reliable numerical model is the prior determination of the material parameters of the specimen as well as of the experimental parameters of the set-up. The material parameters in plane and in depth diffusivity are measured using laser line excitation. In addition, the absorption and heat transfer process of the first layers is investigated using an IR microscopic lens. The performance of the two distinct components of CFRP during heating - epoxy resin and carbon fibers - is examined. Finally, the material parameters are optimized by variation and comparison of the simulation results to the experimental data. The optimized parameters are compared to the measured ones and further methods to ensure precise material parameter measurements are discussed.

  1. Modeling and Measurement of Sustained Loading and Temperature-Dependent Deformation of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Bonded to Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yoseok; Lee, Jaeha; Kim, WooSeok

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at presenting the effects of short-term sustained load and temperature on time-dependent deformation of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) bonded to concrete and pull-off strength at room temperature after the sustained loading period. The approach involves experimental and numerical analysis. Single-lap shear specimens were used to evaluate temperature and short-term sustained loading effects on time-dependent behavior under sustained loading and debonding behavior under pull-off loading after a sustained loading period. The numerical model was parameterized with experiments on the concrete, FRP, and epoxy. Good correlation was seen between the numerical results and single-lap shear experiments. Sensitivity studies shed light on the influence of temperature, epoxy modulus, and epoxy thickness on the redistribution of interfacial shear stress during sustained loading. This investigation confirms the hypothesis that interfacial stress redistribution can occur due to sustained load and elevated temperature and its effect can be significant. PMID:28787948

  2. Development of a self-stressing NiTiNb shape memory alloy (SMA)/fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Tahan, M.; Dawood, M.; Song, G.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a self-stressing patch using a combination of shape memory alloys (SMAs) and fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. Prestressed carbon FRP patches are emerging as a promising alternative to traditional methods to repair cracked steel structures and civil infrastructure. However, prestressing these patches typically requires heavy and complex fixtures, which is impractical in many applications. This paper presents a new approach in which the prestressing force is applied by restraining the shape memory effect of NiTiNb SMA wires. The wires are subsequently embedded in an FRP overlay patch. This method overcomes the practical challenges associated with conventional prestressing. This paper presents the conceptual development of the self-stressing patch with the support of experimental observations. The bond between the SMA wires and the FRP is evaluated using pull-out tests. The paper concludes with an experimental study that evaluates the patch response during activation subsequent monotonic tensile loading. The results demonstrate that the self-stressing patch with NiTiNb SMA is capable of generating a significant prestressing force with minimal tool and labor requirements.

  3. Friction and wear characteristics of polymer-matrix friction materials reinforced by brass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Jia; Xiaomei, Ling

    2004-10-01

    This study is an investigation of friction materials reinforced by brass fibers, and the influence of the organic adhesion agent, cast-iron debris, brass fiber, and graphite powder on the friction-wear characteristics. Friction and wear testing was performed on a block-on-ring tribometer (MM200). The friction pair consisted of the friction materials and gray cast iron (HT200). The worn surface layers formed by sliding dry friction were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray energy-dispersive analysis (EDX), and differential thermal analysis-thermogravimetric analysis (DTA-TAG). The experimental results showed that the friction coefficient and the wear loss of the friction materials increased with the increase of cast-iron debris, but decreased with the increase of graphite powder content. The friction coefficient and wear loss also increased slightly when the mass fraction of brass fibers was over 19%. When the mass fraction of organic adhesion agent was about 10 11%, the friction materials had excellent friction-wear performance. Surface heating from friction pyrolyzes the organic ingredient in the worn surface layer of the friction materials, with the pyrolysis depth being about 0.5 mm. The surface layers were rich in iron but poor in copper, and they were formed on the worn surface of the friction material. When the mass fraction of brass fibers was about 16 20%, the friction materials possessed better wear resistance and a copper transfer film formed on the friction surface of counterpart. Fatigue cracks were also found in the worn surface of the gray cast-iron counterpart, with fatigue wear being the prevailing wear mechanism.

  4. Self-healing of damage in fibre-reinforced polymer-matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Hayes, S A; Zhang, W; Branthwaite, M; Jones, F R

    2007-04-22

    Self-healing resin systems have been discussed for over a decade and four different technologies had been proposed. However, little work on their application as composite matrices has been published although this was one of the stated aims of the earliest work in the field. This paper reports on the optimization of a solid-state self-healing resin system and its subsequent use as a matrix for high volume fraction glass fibre-reinforced composites. The resin system was optimized using Charpy impact testing and repeated healing, while the efficiency of healing in composites was determined by analysing the growth of delaminations following repeated impacts with or without a healing cycle. To act as a reference, a non-healing resin system was subjected to the same treatments and the results are compared with the healable system. The optimized resin system displays a healing efficiency of 65% after the first healing cycle, dropping to 35 and 30% after the second and third healing cycles, respectively. Correction for any healability due to further curing showed that approximately 50% healing efficiency could be achieved with the bisphenol A-based epoxy resin containing 7.5% of polybisphenol-A-co-epichlorohydrin. The composite, on the other hand, displays a healing efficiency of approximately 30%. It is therefore clear that the solid-state self-healing system is capable of healing transverse cracks and delaminations in a composite, but that more work is needed to optimize matrix healing within a composite and to develop a methodology for assessing recovery in performance.

  5. Spatial Gradients in Particle Reinforced Polymers Characterized by X-Ray Attenuation and Laser Confocal Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    LAGASSE,ROBERT R.; THOMPSON,KYLE R.

    2000-06-12

    The goal of this work is to develop techniques for measuring gradients in particle concentration within filled polymers, such as encapsulant. A high concentration of filler particles is added to such materials to tailor physical properties such as thermal expansion coefficient. Sedimentation and flow-induced migration of particles can produce concentration gradients that are most severe near material boundaries. Therefore, techniques for measuring local particle concentration should be accurate near boundaries. Particle gradients in an alumina-filled epoxy resin are measured with a spatial resolution of 0.2 mm using an x-ray beam attenuation technique, but an artifact related to the finite diameter of the beam reduces accuracy near the specimen's edge. Local particle concentration near an edge can be measured more reliably using microscopy coupled with image analysis. This is illustrated by measuring concentration profiles of glass particles having 40 {micro}m median diameter using images acquired by a confocal laser fluorescence microscope. The mean of the measured profiles of volume fraction agrees to better than 3% with the expected value, and the shape of the profiles agrees qualitatively with simple theory for sedimentation of monodisperse particles. Extending this microscopy technique to smaller, micron-scale filler particles used in encapsulant for microelectronic devices is illustrated by measuring the local concentration of an epoxy resin containing 0.41 volume fraction of silica.

  6. LOW-COST COMPOSITES IN VEHICLE MANUFACTURE - Natural-fiber-reinforced polymer composites in automotive applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Holbery, Jim; Houston, Dan

    2006-11-01

    In the last decade, natural fiber composites have experienced rapid growth in the European automotive market, and this trend appears to be global in scale, provided the cost and performance is justified against competing technologies. However, mass reduction, recyclability, and performance requirements can be met today by competing systems such as injection-molded unreinforced thermoplastics; natural fiber composites will continue to expand their role in automotive applications only if such technical challenges as moisture stability, fiber-polymer interface compatibility, and consistent, repeatable fiber sources are available to supply automotive manufacturers. Efforts underway by Tier I and II automotive suppliers to explore hybrid glass-natural fiber systems, as well as applications that exploit such capabilities as natural fiber sound dampening characteristics, could very well have far-reaching effects. In addition, the current development underway of bio-based resins such as Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biodegradable polyesters and bio-based polyols could provide fully bio-based composite options to future automotive designers. In short, the development of the natural fiber composite market would make a positive impact on farmers and small business owners on a global scale, reduce US reliance on foreign oil, improve environmental quality through the development of a sustainable resource supply chain, and achieve a better CO2 balance over the vehicle?s lifetime with near-zero net greenhouse gas emissions.

  7. Self-Healing Nanofiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites. 1. Tensile Testing and Recovery of Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Wook; An, Seongpil; Jo, Hong Seok; Yoon, Sam S; Yarin, Alexander L

    2015-09-09

    the composites reinforced by such mats. This is the first work, to the best of our knowledge, where self-healing nanofibers and composites based on them were developed, tested, and revealed restoration of mechanical properties (stiffness) in a 24 h rest period at room temperature.

  8. The microflow behavior and interphase characterization of fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Maureen Elizabeth

    reduction. This process was used to evaluate glass fiber reinforced epoxy and vinyl ester systems under quasi-static and cyclic loading as examples of the DILA capabilities.

  9. Strain measurement in a concrete beam by use of the Brillouin-scattering-based distributed fiber sensor with single-mode fibers embedded in glass fiber reinforced polymer rods and bonded to steel reinforcing bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaodong; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chhoa, Chia Yee; Bremner, Theodore W.; Brown, Anthony W.; DeMerchant, Michael D.; Ferrier, Graham; Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Georgiades, Anastasis V.

    2002-08-01

    The strain measurement of a 1.65-m reinforced concrete beam by use of a distributed fiber strain sensor with a 50-cm spatial resolution and 5-cm readout resolution is reported. The strain-measurement accuracy is plus-or-minus15 mu][epsilon (mum/m) according to the system calibration in the laboratory environment with non-uniform-distributed strain and plus-or-minus5 mu][epsilon with uniform strain distribution. The strain distribution has been measured for one-point and two-point loading patterns for optical fibers embedded in pultruded glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rods and those bonded to steel reinforcing bars. In the one-point loading case, the strain deviations are plus-or-minus7 and plus-or-minus15 mu][epsilon for fibers embedded in the GFRP rods and fibers bonded to steel reinforcing bars, respectively, whereas the strain deviation is plus-or-minus20 mu][epsilon for the two-point loading case.

  10. Experimental Study of the Flexural and Compression Performance of an Innovative Pultruded Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Wood Composite Profile

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yujun; Xiong, Wei; Liu, Weiqing; Fang, Hai; Lu, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    The plate of a pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer or fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) profile produced via a pultrusion process is likely to undergo local buckling and cracking along the fiber direction under an external load. In this study, we constructed a pultruded glass-fiber-reinforced polymer-light wood composite (PGWC) profile to explore its mechanical performance. A rectangular cross-sectional PGWC profile was fabricated with a paulownia wood core, alkali-free glass fiber filaments, and unsaturated phthalate resin. Three-point bending and short column axial compression tests were conducted. Then, the stress calculation for the PGWC profile in the bending and axial compression tests was performed using the Timoshenko beam theory and the composite component analysis method to derive the flexural and axial compression rigidity of the profile during the elastic stress stage. The flexural capacity for this type of PGWC profile is 3.3-fold the sum of the flexural capacities of the wood core and the glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) shell. The equivalent flexural rigidity is 1.5-fold the summed flexural rigidity of the wood core and GFRP shell. The maximum axial compressive bearing capacity for this type of PGWC profile can reach 1.79-fold the sum of those of the wood core and GFRP shell, and its elastic flexural rigidity is 1.2-fold the sum of their rigidities. These results indicate that in PGWC profiles, GFRP and wood materials have a positive combined effect. This study produced a pultruded composite material product with excellent mechanical performance for application in structures that require a large bearing capacity. PMID:26485431

  11. Experimental Study of the Flexural and Compression Performance of an Innovative Pultruded Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Wood Composite Profile.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yujun; Xiong, Wei; Liu, Weiqing; Fang, Hai; Lu, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    The plate of a pultruded fiber-reinforced polymer or fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) profile produced via a pultrusion process is likely to undergo local buckling and cracking along the fiber direction under an external load. In this study, we constructed a pultruded glass-fiber-reinforced polymer-light wood composite (PGWC) profile to explore its mechanical performance. A rectangular cross-sectional PGWC profile was fabricated with a paulownia wood core, alkali-free glass fiber filaments, and unsaturated phthalate resin. Three-point bending and short column axial compression tests were conducted. Then, the stress calculation for the PGWC profile in the bending and axial compression tests was performed using the Timoshenko beam theory and the composite component analysis method to derive the flexural and axial compression rigidity of the profile during the elastic stress stage. The flexural capacity for this type of PGWC profile is 3.3-fold the sum of the flexural capacities of the wood core and the glass-fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) shell. The equivalent flexural rigidity is 1.5-fold the summed flexural rigidity of the wood core and GFRP shell. The maximum axial compressive bearing capacity for this type of PGWC profile can reach 1.79-fold the sum of those of the wood core and GFRP shell, and its elastic flexural rigidity is 1.2-fold the sum of their rigidities. These results indicate that in PGWC profiles, GFRP and wood materials have a positive combined effect. This study produced a pultruded composite material product with excellent mechanical performance for application in structures that require a large bearing capacity.

  12. Fatigue damage characterization of braided and woven fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites at room and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesano, John

    The use of polymer matrix composites (PMC) for manufacturing primary load-bearing structural components has significantly increased in many industrial applications. Specifically in the aerospace industry, PMCs are also being considered for elevated temperature applications. Current aerospace-grade composite components subjected to fatigue loading are over-designed due to insufficient understanding of the material failure processes, and due to the lack of available generic fatigue prediction models. A comprehensive literature survey reveals that there are few fatigue studies conducted on woven and braided fabric reinforced PMC materials, and even fewer at elevated temperatures. It is therefore the objective of this study to characterize and subsequently model the elevated temperature fatigue behaviour of a triaxial braided PMC, and to investigate the elevated temperature fatigue properties of two additional woven PMCs. An extensive experimental program is conducted using a unique test protocol on the braided and woven composites, which consists of static and fatigue testing at various test temperatures. The development of mechanically-induced damage is monitored using a combination of non-destructive techniques which included infrared thermography, fiber optic sensors and edge replication. The observed microscopic damage development is quantified and correlated to the exhibited macroscopic material behaviour at all test temperatures. The fiber-dominated PMC materials considered in this study did not exhibit notable time- or temperature-dependent static properties. However, fatigue tests reveal that the local damage development is in fact notably influenced by temperature. The elevated temperature environment increases the toughness of the thermosetting polymers, which results in consistently slower fatigue crack propagation rates for the respective composite materials. This has a direct impact on the stiffness degradation rate and the fatigue lives for the braided

  13. Fracture strength of lithium disilicate crowns compared to polymer-infiltrated ceramic-network and zirconia reinforced lithium silicate crowns.

    PubMed

    Sieper, Kim; Wille, Sebastian; Kern, Matthias

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture strength of crowns made from current CAD/CAM materials. In addition the influence of crown thickness and chewing simulation on the fracture strength was evaluated. Crowns were fabricated from lithium disilicate, zirconia reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS-ceramic) and a polymer-infiltrated ceramic-network (PICN) with an occlusal thickness of 1.0mm or 1.5mm, respectively (n=16). Crowns were cemented on composite dies. Subgroups of eight specimens were loaded with 5kg in a chewing simulator for 1,200,000 cycles with thermal cycling. Finally, all specimens were loaded until fracture in a universal testing machine. Three-way ANOVA was used to detect statistical interaction. Differences regarding the materials were tested with two-way ANOVA, following one-way ANOVA and a post-hoc Tukey's-Test. All crowns survived the chewing simulation. The material had a significant influence on the fracture resistance (p≤0.05). Lithium disilicate achieved the highest values of fracture strength in almost all groups followed by ZLS-ceramic. PICN achieved the lowest values of fracture strength. Chewing simulation increased the fracture strength of thick lithium disilicate crown significantly. Greater occlusal thickness of all crown materials resulted in higher crown fracture strength before chewing simulation. After chewing simulation occlusal thickness of lithium disilicate and PICN crowns had no significant influence on the fracture strength. All crowns revealed fracture strength above the clinically expected loading forces. Therefore the durability of the tested CAD/CAM materials seems promising also in an occlusal thickness of 1.0mm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fault isolation through no-overhead link level CRC

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan G.

    2007-04-24

    A fault isolation technique for checking the accuracy of data packets transmitted between nodes of a parallel processor. An independent crc is kept of all data sent from one processor to another, and received from one processor to another. At the end of each checkpoint, the crcs are compared. If they do not match, there was an error. The crcs may be cleared and restarted at each checkpoint. In the preferred embodiment, the basic functionality is to calculate a CRC of all packet data that has been successfully transmitted across a given link. This CRC is done on both ends of the link, thereby allowing an independent check on all data believed to have been correctly transmitted. Preferably, all links have this CRC coverage, and the CRC used in this link level check is different from that used in the packet transfer protocol. This independent check, if successfully passed, virtually eliminates the possibility that any data errors were missed during the previous transfer period.

  15. Multi-scale bending, buckling and vibration analyses of carbon fiber/carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer nanocomposite plates with various shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, M.; Ansari, R.; Rouhi, H.

    2017-09-01

    Using a finite element-based multi-scale modeling approach, the bending, buckling and free vibration of hybrid polymer matrix composites reinforced by carbon fibers and carbon nanotubes (CF/CNT-RP) are analyzed herein. Thick composite plates with rectangular, circular, annular and elliptical shapes are considered. First, the equivalent material properties of CF/CNT-RP are calculated for different volume fractions of CF and CNT. To accomplish this aim, a two-step procedure is presented through which the coupled effects of nano- and micro-scale are taken into account. In the first step, modeling of dispersion of CNTs into the polymer matrix is done with considering interphase formed by their chemical interaction with the matrix, and the equivalent properties of resulting composite material are determined accordingly. CFs are then dispersed into CNT-RP which is considered a homogenous material in this step. Both distributions of CNTs and CFs are assumed to be random. After computing the equivalent properties of CF/CNT-RP for different volume fractions of its constituents, the bending, buckling and free vibration analyses of plates with different shapes are performed. It is shown that the reinforcement of the polymer matrix with both CF and CNT significantly affects the bending, buckling and free vibration characteristics of plates.

  16. Polar Coding with CRC-Aided List Decoding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    effect of changing the polynomial is smaller than the measurement error , and too small to matter. For each of the eight systems tested, we interpolated to...The 6-bit CRC performed slightly better at 2.25 dB, but the difference is well within measurement error . 14 5.5.3 Test With a Different List Size For...with the lowest BER at both 1.8 and 1.9 dB. The 8-bit CRC performed slightly better at 1.7 dB, but the difference is well within measurement error

  17. A distant real-time radar NDE technique for the in-depth inspection of glass fiber reinforced polymer-retrofitted concrete columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tzu-Yang; Buyukozturk, Oral

    2008-03-01

    A novel real-time radar NDE technique for the in-depth inspection of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP)-retrofitted concrete columns is proposed. In this technique, continuous wave radar signals are transmitted in the far-field region (distant inspection), and reflected signals are collected by the same signal transmitter. Collected radar signals are processed by tomographic reconstruction methods for real-time image reconstruction. In-depth condition in the near-surface region of GFRP-concrete systems is revealed and evaluated by reconstructed images.

  18. Pulsed micro-laser line thermography on submillimeter porosity in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites: experimental and numerical analyses for the capability of detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai; Fernandes, Henrique; Djupkep Dizeu, Frank Billy; Hassler, Ulf; Fleuret, Julien; Genest, Marc; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Robitaille, François; Joncas, Simon; Maldague, Xavier

    2016-12-01

    In this article, pulsed micro-laser line thermography (pulsed micro-LLT) was used to detect the submillimeter porosities in a 3D preformed carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite specimen. X-ray microcomputed tomography was used to verify the thermographic results. Then, finite element analysis was performed on the corresponding models on the basis of the experimental results. The same infrared image processing techniques were used for the experimental and simulation results for comparative purposes. Finally, a comparison of experimental and simulation postprocessing results was conducted. In addition, an analysis of probability of detection was performed to evaluate the detection capability of pulsed micro-LLT on submillimeter porosity.

  19. Anterior cervical corpectomy: review and comparison of results using titanium mesh cages and carbon fibre reinforced polymer cages.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Syed M R; Alabi, J; Rezajooi, Kia; Casey, Adrian T H

    2010-10-01

    Different types of cages have recently become available for reconstruction following anterior cervical corpectomy. We review the results using titanium mesh cages (TMC) and stackable CFRP (carbon fibre reinforced polymer) cages. Forty-two patients who underwent anterior cervical corpectomy between November 2001 and September 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Pathologies included cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), cervical radiculopathy, OPLL (ossified posterior longitudinal ligament), metastasis/primary bone tumour, rheumatoid arthritis and deformity correction. All patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically. Outcome was assessed on the basis of the Odom's criteria, neck disability index (NDI) and myelopathy disability index (MDI). Mean age was 60 years and mean follow-up was 1½ years. Majority of the patients had single-level corpectomy. Twenty-three patients had TMC cages while 19 patients had CFRP cages. The mean subsidence noted with TMC cage was 1.91 mm, while with the stackable CFRP cage it was 0.5 mm. This difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). However, there was no statistically significant correlation noted between subsidence and clinical outcome (p > 0.05) or between subsidence and post-operative sagittal alignment (p > 0.05) in either of the groups. Three patients had significant subsidence (> 3 mm), one of whom was symptomatic. There were no hardware-related complications. On the basis of the Odom's criterion, 9 patients (21.4%) had an excellent outcome, 14 patients (33.3%) had a good outcome, 9 patients (21.4%) had a fair outcome and 5 patients (11.9%) had a poor outcome, i.e. symptoms and signs unchanged or exacerbated. Mean post-operative NDI was 26.27% and mean post-operative MDI was 19.31%. Fusion was noted in all 42 cases. Both TMC and stackable CFRP cages provide solid anterior column reconstruction with good outcome following anterior cervical corpectomy. However, more subsidence is noted with TMC cages though

  20. Acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic signature analysis of failure mechanisms in carbon fiber reinforced polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Shawn Allen

    Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials, particularly carbon (CFRPs), are being used for primary structural applications, particularly in the aerospace and naval industries. Advantages of CFRP materials, compared to traditional materials such as steel and aluminum, include: light weight, high strength to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and long life expectancy. A concern with CFRPs is that despite quality control during fabrication, the material can contain many hidden internal flaws. These flaws in combination with unseen damage due to fatigue and low velocity impact have led to catastrophic failure of structures and components. Therefore a large amount of research has been conducted regarding nondestructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) of CFRP materials. The principal objective of this research program was to develop methods to characterize failure mechanisms in CFRP materials used by the U.S. Army using acoustic emission (AE) and/or acousto-ultrasonic (AU) data. Failure mechanisms addressed include fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination due to shear between layers. CFRP specimens were fabricated and tested in uniaxial tension to obtain AE and AU data. The specimens were designed with carbon fibers in different orientations to produce the different failure mechanisms. Some specimens were impacted with a blunt indenter prior to testing to simulate low-velocity impact. A signature analysis program was developed to characterize the AE data based on data examination using visual pattern recognition techniques. It was determined that it was important to characterize the AE event , using the location of the event as a parameter, rather than just the AE hit (signal recorded by an AE sensor). A back propagation neural network was also trained based on the results of the signature analysis program. Damage observed on the specimens visually with the aid of a scanning electron microscope agreed with the damage type assigned by the

  1. Prospective study on cranioplasty with individual carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) implants produced by means of stereolithography.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Gabriele; Tomancok, Berndt; Holl, Kurt; Trenkler, Johannes

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) cranial implants produced by means of 3-dimensional (3D) stereolithography (SL) and template modeling for reconstructions of complex or extensive cranial defects. A series of 41 cranioplasties with individual CFRP implants was performed in 37 patients between April 1996 and November 2002. Only patients with complex and/or large cranial defects were included, most of them having extended scarring or dural calcification and poor quality of the overlying soft-tissue cover after infection or multiple preceding operations. Involvement of frontal sinus, a known risk factor for complications after cranioplasty, was the case in 21 patients (51.2%). A computer-based 3D model of the skull with the bony defect was generated by means of stereolithography after acquisition, evaluation and transfer of the patient's helical computed tomography (CT) data. A wax template of the defect that was used to design the individual prosthesis-shape was invested in dental stone. Then, the cranial implant was fabricated out of CFRP by loosen mold. Reconstruction of defects measuring up to 17 x 9 cm was performed. The intra-operative fit of the implants was excellent in 36 (87.8%), good in 1 (2.4%), and fair in 4 (9.8%) of the cases. Problems of implant fit occurred because of extended scarring and poor quality of soft-tissue cover. Adverse reactions were observed in 5 patients (1 subdural, 1 subcutaneous hematoma, 2 infections, 1 allergic reaction). Excellent contours and a solid stable reconstruction have been maintained in 30 out of 35 remaining plates (mean follow-up 3.6 years). No adverse effects concerning postoperative imaging, the accuracy of electroencephalograms and radiation therapy have been observed. The authors believe that this relatively new technique represents an advance in the management of complex and large cranial defects, but seems less suitable for simple defects because of cost

  2. CRC Credential Attainment by State Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpster, Anna M.; Byers, Katherine L.; Harris, LaKeisha L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines 137 state vocational rehabilitation (VR) counselors' perceptions of the value of having the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) credential. While almost 53% of this sample included persons who were certified, the majority who were not indicated that the two major reasons for not currently having this designation were: (a)…

  3. CRC Credential Attainment by State Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpster, Anna M.; Byers, Katherine L.; Harris, LaKeisha L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines 137 state vocational rehabilitation (VR) counselors' perceptions of the value of having the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) credential. While almost 53% of this sample included persons who were certified, the majority who were not indicated that the two major reasons for not currently having this designation were: (a)…

  4. Cheap, Gram-Scale Fabrication of BN Nanosheets via Substitution Reaction of Graphite Powders and Their Use for Mechanical Reinforcement of Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Mo, Xiaoshu; Gan, Haibo; Guo, Tongyi; Wang, Xuebin; Chen, Bin; Chen, Jun; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most important two-dimensional (2D) materials, BN nanosheets attracted intensive interest in the past decade. Although there are many methods suitable for the preparation of BN sheets, finding a cheap and nontoxic way for their mass and high-quality production is still a challenge. Here we provide a highly effective and cheap way to synthesize gram-scale-level well-structured BN nanosheets from many common graphite products as source materials. Single-crystalline multi-layered BN sheets have a mean lateral size of several hundred nanometers and a thickness ranging from 5 nm to 40 nm. Cathodoluminescence (CL) analysis shows that the structures exhibit a near band-edge emission and a broad emission band from 300 nm to 500 nm. Utilization of nanosheets for the reinforcement of polymers revealed that the Young's modulus of BN/PMMA composite had increased to 1.56 GPa when the BN's fraction was only 2 wt.%, thus demonstrating a 20% gain compared to a blank PMMA film. It suggests that the BN nanosheet is an ideal mechanical reinforcing material for polymers. In addition, this easy and nontoxic substitution method may provide a universal route towards high yields of other 2D materials. PMID:24572725

  5. Cheap, gram-scale fabrication of BN nanosheets via substitution reaction of graphite powders and their use for mechanical reinforcement of polymers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Mo, Xiaoshu; Gan, Haibo; Guo, Tongyi; Wang, Xuebin; Chen, Bin; Chen, Jun; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio

    2014-02-27

    As one of the most important two-dimensional (2D) materials, BN nanosheets attracted intensive interest in the past decade. Although there are many methods suitable for the preparation of BN sheets, finding a cheap and nontoxic way for their mass and high-quality production is still a challenge. Here we provide a highly effective and cheap way to synthesize gram-scale-level well-structured BN nanosheets from many common graphite products as source materials. Single-crystalline multi-layered BN sheets have a mean lateral size of several hundred nanometers and a thickness ranging from 5 nm to 40 nm. Cathodoluminescence (CL) analysis shows that the structures exhibit a near band-edge emission and a broad emission band from 300 nm to 500 nm. Utilization of nanosheets for the reinforcement of polymers revealed that the Young's modulus of BN/PMMA composite had increased to 1.56 GPa when the BN's fraction was only 2 wt.%, thus demonstrating a 20% gain compared to a blank PMMA film. It suggests that the BN nanosheet is an ideal mechanical reinforcing material for polymers. In addition, this easy and nontoxic substitution method may provide a universal route towards high yields of other 2D materials.

  6. Cheap, Gram-Scale Fabrication of BN Nanosheets via Substitution Reaction of Graphite Powders and Their Use for Mechanical Reinforcement of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Mo, Xiaoshu; Gan, Haibo; Guo, Tongyi; Wang, Xuebin; Chen, Bin; Chen, Jun; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio

    2014-02-01

    As one of the most important two-dimensional (2D) materials, BN nanosheets attracted intensive interest in the past decade. Although there are many methods suitable for the preparation of BN sheets, finding a cheap and nontoxic way for their mass and high-quality production is still a challenge. Here we provide a highly effective and cheap way to synthesize gram-scale-level well-structured BN nanosheets from many common graphite products as source materials. Single-crystalline multi-layered BN sheets have a mean lateral size of several hundred nanometers and a thickness ranging from 5 nm to 40 nm. Cathodoluminescence (CL) analysis shows that the structures exhibit a near band-edge emission and a broad emission band from 300 nm to 500 nm. Utilization of nanosheets for the reinforcement of polymers revealed that the Young's modulus of BN/PMMA composite had increased to 1.56 GPa when the BN's fraction was only 2 wt.%, thus demonstrating a 20% gain compared to a blank PMMA film. It suggests that the BN nanosheet is an ideal mechanical reinforcing material for polymers. In addition, this easy and nontoxic substitution method may provide a universal route towards high yields of other 2D materials.

  7. Investigation of the dielectric properties and defectoscopy of nanocomposites based on silica and polymers reinforced with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osokin, C. S.; Eseev, M. K.; Goshev, A. A.; Horodek, P.; Kapustin, S. N.; Kobets, A. G.; Volkov, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    This work presents the results of experimental studies of the properties of nanocomposites based on silica and polypropylene reinforced with carbon nanotubes by dielectric relaxation and positron annihilation spectroscopy. On the basis of these results the technique of diagnosis and control of the investigated materials are proposed. This work was supported by the project of the Ministry of Education of Russian Federation №3635 "Investigation of the nanocomposites properties at controlled modification of the structure by reinforcement with carbon nanotubes".

  8. A Refined Strut Model for Describing the Elastic Properties of Highly Porous Cellular Polymers Reinforced with Short Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagzdins, A.; Zilaucs, A.; Beverte, I.; Andersons, J.; Cabulis, U.

    2017-07-01

    A structural model of a highly porous cellular plastic reinforced with short fibers is developed for calculating its linearly elastic characteristics. By means of orientationally averaging the stiffness tensors of structural elements, whose dimensions and properties also depend on their spatial orientation, relationships for the stiffness tensor of entire cellular plastic are derived. It is shown that they allowed us to describe experimental data for the elastic moduli of a transversely isotropic nanoclay-filled foam plastic reinforced with short carbon fibers.

  9. Selection of polymer binders and fabrication of SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, John S.; Lightfoot, A.; Sigalovsky, J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: effects of solvent and polymer exposures on nitriding kinetics of high purity Si powders and on resulting phase distributions; effects of solvent and polymer exposures on Si Surface Chemistry; effects of solvent and polymeric exposures on nitriding kinetics; and fabrication of flexural test samples.

  10. Fracture behavior of block copolymer and graphene nanoplatelet modified epoxy and fiber reinforced/epoxy polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamar, Nicholas T.

    Glass and carbon fiber reinforced/epoxy polymer composites (GFRPs and CFRPs) have high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios. Thus, GFRPs and CFRPs are used to lightweight aircraft, marine and ground vehicles to reduce transportation energy utilization and cost. However, GFRP and CFRP matrices have a low resistance to crack initiation and propagation; i.e. they have low fracture toughness. Current methods to increase fracture toughness of epoxy and corresponding GFRP and CFRPs often reduce composite mechanical and thermomechanical properties. With the advent of nanotechnology, new methods to improve the fracture toughness and impact properties of composites are now available. The goal of this research is to identify the fracture behavior and toughening mechanisms of nanoparticle modified epoxy, GFRPs and CFRPs utilizing the triblock copolymer poly(styrene)-block-poly(butadiene)-block-poly(methylmethacrylate) (SBM) and graphene nanoplatelets (GnPs) as toughening agents. The triblock copolymer SBM was used to toughen the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) resin cured with m-phenylenediamine (mPDA) and corresponding AS4-12k CFRPs. SBM self assembled in epoxy to form nanostructured domains leading to larger increases in fracture toughness, KQ (MPa*m 1/2) than the traditional, phase separating carboxyl-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile (CTBN) rubber. Additionally, SBM increased the mode-I fracture toughness, GIc (J/m2) of CFRPs without corresponding reductions in composite three-point flexural properties and glass transition temperature (Tg). Fractography of SBM modified epoxy and CFRPs via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that sub 100 nm spherical micelles cavitated to induce void growth and matrix shear yielding toughening mechanisms. Furthermore, SBM did not suppress epoxy Tg, while CTBN decreased Tg with both increasing concentration and acrylonitrile content. Graphene nanoplatelets (GnPs) consist of a few layers of graphene sheets, which

  11. Bending and Shear Behavior of Pultruded Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Beams With Closed and Open Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estep, Daniel Douglas

    Several advantages, such as high strength-to-weight ratio, high stiffness, superior corrosion resistance, and high fatigue and impact resistance, among others, make FRPs an attractive alternative to conventional construction materials for use in developing new structures as well as rehabilitating in-service infrastructure. As the number of infrastructure applications using FRPs grows, the need for the development of a uniform Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) approach, including design procedures and examples, has become paramount. Step-by-step design procedures and easy-to-use design formulas are necessary to assure the quality and safety of FRP structural systems by reducing the possibility of design and construction errors. Since 2008, the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), in coordination with the American Composites Manufacturers Association (ACMA), has overseen the development of the Pre-Standard for Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) of Pultruded Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) Structures using probability-based limit states design. The fifth chapter of the pre-standard focuses on the design of members in flexure and shear under different failure modes, where the current failure load prediction models proposed within have been shown to be highly inaccurate based on experimental data and evaluation performed by researchers at the West Virginia University Constructed Facilities Center. A new prediction model for determining the critical flexural load capacity of pultruded GFRP square and rectangular box beams is presented within. This model shows that the type of failure can be related to threshold values of the beam span-to-depth ratio (L/h) and total flange width-to-thickness ratio (bf /t), resulting in three governing modes of failure: local buckling failure in the compression flange (4 ≤ L/h < 6), combined strain failure at the web-flange junction (6 ≤ L/h ≤ 10), and bending failure in the tension flange (10 < L/h ≤ 42

  12. Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an open-ended experiment which has students exploring polymer chemistry and reverse osmosis. This activity involves construction of a polymer membrane, use of it in a simple osmosis experiment, and application of its principles in solving a science-technology-society problem. (ML)

  13. Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an open-ended experiment which has students exploring polymer chemistry and reverse osmosis. This activity involves construction of a polymer membrane, use of it in a simple osmosis experiment, and application of its principles in solving a science-technology-society problem. (ML)

  14. CRC (Coordinating Research Council) Octane Number Requirement Survey 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    aviation fuels, lubricants, and equipment performance ; heavy-duty vehicle fuels, lubricants, and equipment performance (e.g., diesel trucks); and...light-duty vehicle fuels, lubricants, and equipment performance (e.g., passenger cars). CRC’s function is to provide the mechanism for joint research...recorded. 2. Inspect all vacuum lines and air pump hoses for appropriate connec- tions. Also, check to see if PCV valve, s irk advance vacuum delay

  15. Structural Foaming at the Nano-, Micro-, and Macro-Scales of Continuous Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-29

    pore Center of Democritus (National Center of Scientific Research) in Greece, joined our team while on sabbatical, significantly contributing to our... Democritus , as well. PUBLICATIONS 1) Vasileios M. Drakonakis, Chris N. Velisaris, and James C. Seferis, Charalabos C. Doumanidis, CNT Reinforced

  16. Effect of Cr/C Ratio on Microstructure and Corrosion Performance of Cr3C2-NiCr Composite Fabricated by Laser Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Deyuan; Liu, Dun; He, Chunlin; Bennett, Peter; Chen, Lie; Yang, Qibiao; Fearon, Eamonn; Dearden, Geoff

    2016-01-01

    The present study focuses on the effect of different Cr/C ratios on the microstructure, microhardness, and corrosion resistance of Ni-based laser clad hardfacings, reinforced by in situ synthesized chromium carbide particles. Cr3C2-NiCr composites have been laser processed with graphite/Cr/Ni powder blends with varying Cr/C ratios. Following phase analysis (x-ray diffraction) and microstructure investigation (scanning electron microscopy; energy dispersive x-ray analysis; transmission electron microscopy), the solidification of laser melt pool is discussed, and the corrosion resistances are examined. Several different zones (planar, dendritic, eutectic and re-melt zone) were formed in these samples, and the thicknesses and shapes of these zones vary with the change of Cr/C ratio. The sizes and types of carbides and the content of reserved graphite in the composites change as the Cr/C ratio varies. With the content of carbides (especially Cr3C2) grows, the microhardness is improved. The corrosive resistance of the composites to 0.2M H2SO4 aqueous solution decreases as the Cr/C ratio reduces owing to not only the decreasing Cr content in the NiCr matrix but also the galvanic corrosion formed within the carbide and graphite containing Ni matrix.

  17. Electrical conductivity, dielectric response and space charge dynamics of an electroactive polymer with and without nanofiller reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochetov, R.; Tsekmes, I. A.; Morshuis, P. H. F.

    2015-07-01

    Electroactive polymers have gained considerable attention over the last 20 years for exhibiting a large displacement in response to electrical stimulation. The promising fields of application include wave energy converters, muscle-like actuators, sensors, robotics, and biomimetics. For an electrical engineer, electroactive polymers can be seen as a dielectric elastomer film or a compliant capacitor with a highly deformable elastomeric medium. If the elastomer is pre-stretched and pre-charged, a reduction of the tensile force lets the elastomer revert to its original form and increases the electrical potential. The light weight of electroactive polymers, low cost, high intrinsic breakdown strength, cyclical way of operation, reliable performance, and high efficiency can be exploited to utilize the elastomeric material as a transducer. The energy storage for a linear dielectric polymer is determined by its relative permittivity and the applied electric field. The latter is limited by the dielectric breakdown strength of the material. Therefore, to generate a high energy density of a flexible capacitor, the film must be used at the voltage level close to the material’s breakdown or inorganic particles with high dielectric permittivity which can be introduced into the polymer matrix. In the present study, silicone-titania elastomer nanocomposites were produced and the influence of nanoparticles on the macroscopic dielectric properties of the neat elastomer including space charge dynamics, complex permittivity, and electrical conductivity, were investigated.

  18. Time dependence of mesoscopic strain distribution for triaxial woven carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer under creep loading measured by digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyanagi, Jun; Nagayama, Hideo; Yoneyama, Satoru; Aoki, Takahira

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the time dependence of the mesoscopic strain of a triaxial woven carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer under creep loading measured using digital image correlation (DIC). Two types of DIC techniques were employed for the measurement: conventional subset DIC and mesh DIC. Static tensile and creep tests were carried out, and the time dependence of the mesoscopic strain distribution was investigated by applying these techniques. The ultimate failure of this material is dominated by inter-bundle decohesion caused by relative rigid rotation and relating shear stress. Therefore, these were focused on in the present study. During the creep tests, the fiber directional strain, shear strain, and rotation were monitored using the DIC, and the mechanism for the increase in the specimen's macro-strain over time was investigated based on the results obtained by the DIC measurement.

  19. Influence of Layup and Curing on the Surface Accuracy in the Manufacturing of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) Composite Space Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jianbao; Xie, Yongjie; Zhang, Boming; Sun, Baogang; Guo, Hongjun

    2017-03-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer, CFRP, composite materials have been used to fabricate space mirror. Usually the composite space mirror can completely replicate the high-precision surface of mould by replication process, but the actual surface accuracy of replicated space mirror is always reduced, still needed further study. We emphatically studied the error caused by layup and curing on the surface accuracy of space mirror through comparative experiments and analyses, the layup and curing influence factors include curing temperature, cooling rate of curing, method of prepreg lay-up, and area weight of fiber. Focusing on the four factors, we analyzed the error influence rule and put forward corresponding control measures to improve the surface figure of space mirror. For comparative analysis, six CFRP composite mirrors were fabricated and surface profile of mirrors were measured. Four guiding control measures were described here. Curing process of composite space mirror is our next focus.

  20. Comparative study on submillimeter flaws in stitched T-joint carbon fiber reinforced polymer by infrared thermography, microcomputed tomography, ultrasonic c-scan and microscopic inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai; Hassler, Ulf; Genest, Marc; Fernandes, Henrique; Robitaille, Francois; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Joncas, Simon; Maldague, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Stitching is used to reduce dry-core (incomplete infusion of T-joint core) and reinforce T-joint structure. However, it may cause new types of flaws, especially submillimeter flaws. Microscopic inspection, ultrasonic c-scan, pulsed thermography, vibrothermography, and laser spot thermography are used to investigate the internal flaws in a stitched T-joint carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) matrix composites. Then, a new microlaser line thermography is proposed. Microcomputed tomography (microCT) is used to validate the infrared results. A comparison between microlaser line thermography and microCT is performed. It was concluded that microlaser line thermography can detect the internal submillimeter defects. However, the depth and size of the defects can affect the detection results. The microporosities with a diameter of less than 54 μm are not detected in the microlaser line thermography results. Microlaser line thermography can detect the microporosity (a diameter of 0.162 mm) from a depth of 90 μm. However, it cannot detect the internal microporosity (a diameter of 0.216 mm) from a depth of 0.18 mm. The potential causes are given. Finally, a comparative study is conducted.

  1. Multi-Length Scale-Enriched Continuum-Level Material Model for Kevlar®-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Pandurangan, B.; Snipes, J. S.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2013-03-01

    Fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composite materials display quite complex deformation and failure behavior under ballistic/blast impact loading conditions. This complexity is generally attributed to a number of factors such as (a) hierarchical/multi-length scale architecture of the material microstructure; (b) nonlinear, rate-dependent and often pressure-sensitive mechanical response; and (c) the interplay of various intrinsic phenomena and processes such as fiber twisting, interfiber friction/sliding, etc. Material models currently employed in the computational engineering analyses of ballistic/blast impact protective structures made of this type of material do not generally include many of the aforementioned aspects of the material dynamic behavior. Consequently, discrepancies are often observed between computational predictions and their experimental counterparts. To address this problem, the results of an extensive set of molecular-level computational analyses regarding the role of various microstructural/morphological defects on the Kevlar® fiber mechanical properties are used to upgrade one of the existing continuum-level material models for fiber-reinforced composites. The results obtained show that the response of the material is significantly affected as a result of the incorporation of microstructural effects both under quasi-static simple mechanical testing condition and under dynamic ballistic-impact conditions.

  2. Observations on Polar Coding with CRC Aided List Decoding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    good error-correction per- formance. We used the Tal/Vardy method of [5]. The polar encoder uses a row vector u of length N . Let uA be the subvector...aided polar list decoding was introduced by Tal and Vardy in [4]. This method uses a concate- nated code: a CRC is added to the information bits before...CONSTRUCTION All polar codes in this report were constructed with the Tal/Vardy method ([5]) with µ = 512. 3 3. CHANNEL MODEL We assume that for each bit

  3. 29 CFR 37.88 - Who may contact CRC about a complaint?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Who may contact CRC about a complaint? 37.88 Section 37.88... PROVISIONS OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) Compliance Procedures § 37.88 Who may contact CRC... contact CRC for information about the complaint. The Director will determine what information, if...

  4. 29 CFR 37.88 - Who may contact CRC about a complaint?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Who may contact CRC about a complaint? 37.88 Section 37.88... PROVISIONS OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) Compliance Procedures § 37.88 Who may contact CRC... contact CRC for information about the complaint. The Director will determine what information, if...

  5. 29 CFR 37.88 - Who may contact CRC about a complaint?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Who may contact CRC about a complaint? 37.88 Section 37.88... PROVISIONS OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) Compliance Procedures § 37.88 Who may contact CRC... contact CRC for information about the complaint. The Director will determine what information, if...

  6. 12 CFR 617.7305 - What is a CRC and who are the members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... decisions made by a qualified lender. The CRC may only review adverse credit decisions at the request of the applicant or borrower. The CRC has the ultimate decision-making authority on the loan or application under... on Applications; Review of Credit Decisions § 617.7305 What is a CRC and who are the members? The...

  7. 12 CFR 617.7305 - What is a CRC and who are the members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... decisions made by a qualified lender. The CRC may only review adverse credit decisions at the request of the applicant or borrower. The CRC has the ultimate decision-making authority on the loan or application under... on Applications; Review of Credit Decisions § 617.7305 What is a CRC and who are the members? The...

  8. 12 CFR 617.7305 - What is a CRC and who are the members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... decisions made by a qualified lender. The CRC may only review adverse credit decisions at the request of the applicant or borrower. The CRC has the ultimate decision-making authority on the loan or application under... on Applications; Review of Credit Decisions § 617.7305 What is a CRC and who are the members? The...

  9. 12 CFR 617.7305 - What is a CRC and who are the members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... decisions made by a qualified lender. The CRC may only review adverse credit decisions at the request of the applicant or borrower. The CRC has the ultimate decision-making authority on the loan or application under... on Applications; Review of Credit Decisions § 617.7305 What is a CRC and who are the members? The...

  10. 12 CFR 617.7305 - What is a CRC and who are the members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... decisions made by a qualified lender. The CRC may only review adverse credit decisions at the request of the applicant or borrower. The CRC has the ultimate decision-making authority on the loan or application under... on Applications; Review of Credit Decisions § 617.7305 What is a CRC and who are the members? The...

  11. Multi-Length Scale-Enriched Continuum-Level Material Model for Kevlar-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-03

    Angstadt, Y.-P. Sun, and K.L. Koudela, Micro-Mechanics Based Derivation of the Materials Constitutive Relations for Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Poly-Vinyl...intralamina and interlamina damage mechanisms (e.g., fiber breakage within the yarns , fiber/matrix de-bonding, diffuse delamination/interlam- ina separation...a closer look is given to the architecture of the woven fabric. Specifically, details of yarn weaving and crimping, yarn cross-section change, and

  12. Connecting high-performance carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer cables of suspension and cable-stayed bridges through the use of gradient materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Urs; Farshad, Mehdi

    1996-08-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) cables offer a very attractive combination of high specific strength and modulus (ratio of strength or modulus to density), outstanding fatigue performance, good corrosion resistance, and low axial thermal expansion. The high specific strength permits the design of structures with highly increased spans. The high specific modulus translates into a high relative equivalent modulus. This factor is very important in view of the deflection constraints imposed on large bridges. A relative high modulus coupled with a low mass density offer CFRP cables already an advantage for spans above 1000 m. Since 1980 EMPA has been developing CFRP cables for cable-stayed and suspension bridges that are produced as assemblies of parallel CFRP wires. The key problem facing the application of CFRP cables, and thus their widespread use in the future, is how to connect them. A new reliable anchoring scheme developed with computer-aided materials design and produced with advanced gradient materials based on ceramics and polymers is described. Early 1996 such CFRP cables with a load-carrying capacity of 12 MN (1200 metric tons) have been applied for the first time on a cable-stayed road bridge with a 124-m span. Each cable is built up from 241 CFRP wires having a diameter of 5 mm.

  13. Understanding factors related to Colorectal Cancer (CRC) screening among urban Hispanics: use of focus group methodology.

    PubMed

    Varela, Alejandro; Jandorf, Lina; Duhamel, Katherine

    2010-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer deaths among US Hispanics. Screening decreases mortality through early detection. To understand factors related to CRC screening among Hispanics, focus groups were conducted. Reasons for getting screened included peace of mind; influence from family and friends; and wanting to prevent CRC. Barriers included fear of finding cancer and fear of the examination. These results informed a survey to better understand CRC screening among Hispanics in a cross-sectional study. The information from both will direct the development of interventions to increase CRC screening among Hispanics.

  14. Understanding Factors Related to Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Screening Among Urban Hispanics: Use of Focus Group Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Alejandro; DuHamel, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer deaths among US Hispanics. Screening decreases mortality through early detection. To understand factors related to CRC screening among Hispanics, focus groups were conducted. Reasons for getting screened included peace of mind; influence from family and friends; and wanting to prevent CRC. Barriers included fear of finding cancer and fear of the examination. These results informed a survey to better understand CRC screening among Hispanics in a cross-sectional study. The information from both will direct the development of interventions to increase CRC screening among Hispanics. PMID:20082178

  15. Creep and creep-rupture behavior of a continuous strand, swirl mat reinforced polymer composite in automotive environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, W.; Brinkman, C.R.

    1998-12-31

    Creep and creep-rupture behavior of an isocyanurate based polyurethane matrix with a continuous strand, swirl mat E-glass reinforcement was investigated for automotive applications. The material under stress was exposed to various automobile service environments. Results show that environment has substantial effects on its creep and creep-rupture properties. Proposed design guide lines and stress reduction factors were developed for various automotive environments. These composites are considered candidate structural materials for light weight and fuel efficient automobiles of the future.

  16. Particulate Composite Materials: Numerical Modeling of a Cross-Linked Polymer Reinforced With Alumina-Based Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Máša, B.; Náhlík, L.; Hutař, P.

    2013-09-01

    The macroscopic mechanical properties of a particulate composite under uniaxial tensile loading have been estimated. The composite studied consisted of a polymer matrix in a rubbery state (polymethylmethacrylate - PMMA) and alumina-based particles (Al2O3). A numerical modeling by using the finite-element method (FEM) was performed to determine the stress-strain behavior of the particulate composite. The numerical simulation took into account the hyperelastic properties of the cross-linked polymer matrix, which was described by the three-parameter Mooney-Rivlin material model. A representative volume element (RVE) was chosen for FE analyses to model the microstructure of the composite. Various compositions of particles and their different shape and orientation were considered in the study. Various directions of loading of the RVE were also investigated. A progressive damage model was implemented into the numerical models. The mechanical characteristics obtained from computations, which included the damage model, were compared with experimental data, and a good agreement has been found to exist between them. The procedure presented can be used for estimating the mechanical properties of new particulate composites with a cross-linked polymer matrix, and it also contributes to the clarification of damage development and failure in composites of the type studied.

  17. Poly(vinylidene fluoride) reinforced by carbon fibers: Structural parameters of fibers and fiber-polymer adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianghong; Wu, Defeng; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Ming; Zhou, Weidong

    2012-10-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) composites containing carbon fibers (CFs) with or without surface treatment were prepared via melt mixing. The mechanical properties of the PVDF/CF composites were then studied to explore the relations between the short-range and long-range structures of CFs and the properties of the composites. The results showed that the presence of CFs had a reinforcement effect on the PVDF and the Nielsen model was used to describe the concentration effect of CFs, especially at the lower concentration levels. The short-range aspect ratio structure and the long-range orientation structure of the CFs are the two most important structures that affected the final properties of the composites. The effective aspect ratio and orientation degree of the CFs in the PVDF matrix can be evaluated by the Halpin-Tsai and the Krenchel-COX models, which agree well with the experimental observations. After surface treatment, the CFs show stronger reinforcement effect due to reduced interfacial tension and increased interfacial area between two phases

  18. Nanoclays reinforced glass ionomer cements: dispersion and interaction of polymer grade (PG) montmorillonite with poly(acrylic acid).

    PubMed

    Fareed, Muhammad A; Stamboulis, Artemis

    2014-01-01

    Montmorillonite nanoclays (PGV and PGN) were dispersed in poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) for utilization as reinforcing filler in glass ionomer cements (GICs). Chemical and physical interaction of PAA and nanoclay (PGV and PGN) was studied. PAA–PGV and PAA–PGN solutions were prepared in different weight percent loadings of PGV and PGN nanoclay (0.5-8.0 wt%) via exfoliation-adsorption method. Characterization was carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. XRD results of PAA–PGN demonstrated that the interlayer space expanded from 12.83 to 16.03 Å indicating intercalation whereas the absence of the peak at d(001) in PAA–PGV indicated exfoliation. XPS scans of PGV and PGN nanoclays depicted the main peak of O 1s photoelectron due to Si–O–M (M = Mg, Al, Fe) whereas, Si–O–Al linkages were identified by Si 2p or Si 2s and Al 2p or Al 2s peaks. The disappearance of the Na peak confirmed that PAA molecules exchanged sodium ions present on surface of silicate layers and significantly reduced the electrostatic van-der-Waals forces between silicate plates resulting in intercalation or exfoliation. FTIR spectra of PAA–nanoclay suspensions demonstrated the presence of a new peak at 1,019 cm(-1) associated with Si–O– stretching vibrations which increased with increasing nanoclays concentration. Information concerning the dispersion of nanoclay in PAA aqueous solutions, chemical reaction and increase interlayer space in montmorillonite nanoclay is particularly useful regarding dispersion and reinforcement of nanoclay in PAA.

  19. Preparation, structure, and properties of aluminium nitride (AIN) reinforced polymer composites: alternative substrate materials for microelectronic packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao; Koh, Juay S.; Hing, Peter

    1997-08-01

    A series of composite materials of varying compositions based on a high temperature resistance engineering thermotropic liquid crystalline polymer and particulate aluminium nitride (AlN) were compounded at relatively low temperature using a co-rotating twin screw extruder/compounder equipped with the segmented screws. The compounded composites are injection molded into different shapes, i.e., dumbbell, rectangular bar and cylindrical disk, for various physical and mechanical tests. In particular, detailed study was carried out to understand the effect of AlN on the dielectric constant, thermal conductivity and thermal expansion behavior of these materials. Results have shown that the thermal conductivity steadily increases with AlN filler concentration. An increase by about 80 percent in thermal conductivity of the composite materials is achieved as compared to the unfilled polymer. The dielectric constants of these composites were found to increase with filer content and range from 3.6 to 5.0 at 1 kHz and 3.0 to 4.2 at 10 MHz. Substantial reductio in thermal expansion coefficient was also achieved in the composite materials. Attempt has been made to correlate the experimental data with composite theories.

  20. Microtensile bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite with semi-interpenetrating polymer matrix to dentin using various bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2008-11-01

    This study investigated the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) to dentin using various adhesive systems. Forty eight (n = 8/group) human molars were flattened to expose dentin. A layer of preimpregnated unidirectional FRC (everStick) was applied on the dentin surface after treatment with either a single-step self-etching adhesive, two-step self-etching system, or a conventional three-step adhesive system. For the control, particulate filler composite (PFC) (Filtek Z250) layering without FRC was used. After 24-hour water storage at 37 degrees C, the specimens were sectioned, further water-stored at 37 degrees C for 30 days and then tested. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test, and reliability was analyzed with Weibull distribution. microTBS values differed significantly according to the adhesive material used (p < 0.05). Single-step self-etching adhesive showed the lowest bond reliability and microTBS values with both FRC and PFC, whereas conventional three-step and two-step self-etching systems showed higher bond reliability and microTBS with both materials.

  1. Mechanical characterization of a short fiber-reinforced polymer at room temperature: experimental setups evaluated by an optical measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhrig, C.; Scheffer, T.; Diebels, S.

    2017-09-01

    Composite materials are of great interest for industrial applications because of their outstanding properties. Each composite material has its own characteristics due to the large number of possible combinations of matrix and filler. As a result of their compounding, composites usually show a complex material behavior. This work is focused on the experimental testing of a short fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composite at room temperature. The characteristic behavior of this material class is often based on a superposition of typical material effects. The predicted characteristic material properties such as elasto-plasticity, damage and anisotropy of the investigated material are obtained from results of cyclic uniaxial tensile tests at constant strain rate. Concerning the manufacturing process as well as industrial applications, the experimental investigations are extended to multiaxial loading situations. Therefore, the composite material is examined with a setup close to a deep-drawing process, the Nakajima test (Nakazima et al. in Study on the formability of steel sheets. Yawate Technical Report No. 264, pp 8517-8530, 1968). The evaluation of the experimental investigations is provided by an optical analysis system using a digital image correlation software. Finally, based on the results of the uniaxial tensile tests, a one-dimensional macroscopic model is introduced and first results of the simulation are provided.

  2. Mechanical characterization of a short fiber-reinforced polymer at room temperature: experimental setups evaluated by an optical measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhrig, C.; Scheffer, T.; Diebels, S.

    2017-02-01

    Composite materials are of great interest for industrial applications because of their outstanding properties. Each composite material has its own characteristics due to the large number of possible combinations of matrix and filler. As a result of their compounding, composites usually show a complex material behavior. This work is focused on the experimental testing of a short fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composite at room temperature. The characteristic behavior of this material class is often based on a superposition of typical material effects. The predicted characteristic material properties such as elasto-plasticity, damage and anisotropy of the investigated material are obtained from results of cyclic uniaxial tensile tests at constant strain rate. Concerning the manufacturing process as well as industrial applications, the experimental investigations are extended to multiaxial loading situations. Therefore, the composite material is examined with a setup close to a deep-drawing process, the Nakajima test (Nakazima et al. in Study on the formability of steel sheets. Yawate Technical Report No. 264, pp 8517-8530, 1968). The evaluation of the experimental investigations is provided by an optical analysis system using a digital image correlation software. Finally, based on the results of the uniaxial tensile tests, a one-dimensional macroscopic model is introduced and first results of the simulation are provided.

  3. Preparation and characterization of water-soluble carbon nanotube reinforced Nafion membranes and so-based ionic polymer metal composite actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru, Jie; Wang, Yanjie; Chang, Longfei; Chen, Hualing; Li, Dichen

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we developed a new kind of ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) actuator by doping water-soluble sulfonated multi-walled carbon nanotube (sMWCNT) into Nafion matrix to overcome some major drawbacks of traditional IPMCs, such as relatively low bending deformation and carring capacity at low driving voltages. Firstly, sMWCNT was synthesized via diazotization coupling reaction, and then doped into Nafion matrix by casting method. Subsequently, the electrochemical and electromechanical properties of sMWCNT-reinforced Nafion membranes and the corresponding IPMCs were investigated. Finally, the effects of sMWCNT on the performances of IPMCs were evaluated and analyzed systematacially. The results showed that sMWCNT was homogeneously dispersed in Nafion matrix without any entangled structure or obvious agglomeration. The main factors for superior actuation performances, like water-uptake ratio, proton conductivity and elastic modulus, increased significantly. Compared to the pure Nafion IPMC and MWCNT/Nafion IPMC, much superior electrochemical and electromechanical performances were achieved in the sMWCNT/Nafion IPMC, which were attributed to the numerous insertion sites, high surface conductivity and excellent mechanical strength as well as the homogeneous dispersity of the incorporated sMWCNT. Herein, a trace amount of sMWCNT can improve the performances of IPMCs significantly for realistic applications.

  4. EVITA Project: Comparison Between Traditional Non-Destructive Techniques and Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging Applied to Aerospace Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresil, Matthieu; Revol, Vincent; Kitsianos, Konstantinos; Kanderakis, Georges; Koulalis, Ilias; Sauer, Marc-Olivier; Trétout, Hervé; Madrigal, Ana-Maria

    2016-10-01

    The EU-project EVITA (Non-Destructive EValuation, Inspection and Testing of Primary Aeronautical Composite Structures Using Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging) aims at bringing Grating-based Phase Contrast X-ray imaging technology to Non-Destructive Evaluation and Inspection of advanced primary and/or complex aerospace composite structures. Grating-based Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging is based on the so-called Talbot-Lau interferometer, which is made of the combination of a standard X-ray apparatus with three transmission gratings as documented in the literature. This paper presents a comparison of two traditional non-destructive techniques (NDT): ultrasonic through transmission (immersed and water jet) and ultrasonic phased-array pulse echo, with the developed phase contrast X-Ray Imaging applied to advanced aerospace carbon fibre reinforced polymer. Typical defects produced during manufacture is examined as part of the testing and validation procedure. The following defects have been identified as being those most likely to be detected more effectively by the Grating-based Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging process than other state of the art industrial NDT techniques: porosity, foreign objects, cracks, resin rich, cut fibres, and wavy fibres. The introduction of this innovative methodology is expected to provide the aeronautical industry with a reliable and detailed insight of the integrity of thin and thick composite structures as well as of complex geometry ones, such as integrated closed boxes and sandwiches.

  5. EVITA Project: Comparison Between Traditional Non-Destructive Techniques and Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging Applied to Aerospace Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresil, Matthieu; Revol, Vincent; Kitsianos, Konstantinos; Kanderakis, Georges; Koulalis, Ilias; Sauer, Marc-Olivier; Trétout, Hervé; Madrigal, Ana-Maria

    2017-04-01

    The EU-project EVITA (Non-Destructive EValuation, Inspection and Testing of Primary Aeronautical Composite Structures Using Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging) aims at bringing Grating-based Phase Contrast X-ray imaging technology to Non-Destructive Evaluation and Inspection of advanced primary and/or complex aerospace composite structures. Grating-based Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging is based on the so-called Talbot-Lau interferometer, which is made of the combination of a standard X-ray apparatus with three transmission gratings as documented in the literature. This paper presents a comparison of two traditional non-destructive techniques (NDT): ultrasonic through transmission (immersed and water jet) and ultrasonic phased-array pulse echo, with the developed phase contrast X-Ray Imaging applied to advanced aerospace carbon fibre reinforced polymer. Typical defects produced during manufacture is examined as part of the testing and validation procedure. The following defects have been identified as being those most likely to be detected more effectively by the Grating-based Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging process than other state of the art industrial NDT techniques: porosity, foreign objects, cracks, resin rich, cut fibres, and wavy fibres. The introduction of this innovative methodology is expected to provide the aeronautical industry with a reliable and detailed insight of the integrity of thin and thick composite structures as well as of complex geometry ones, such as integrated closed boxes and sandwiches.

  6. Artifacts in spine magnetic resonance imaging due to different intervertebral test spacers: an in vitro evaluation of magnesium versus titanium and carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers as biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Ernstberger, Thorsten; Buchhorn, Gottfried; Heidrich, Gabert

    2009-08-01

    Intervertebral spacers are made of different materials, which can affect the postfusion magnetic imaging (MRI) scans. Susceptibility artifacts especially for metallic implants can decrease the image quality. This study aimed to determine whether magnesium as a lightweight and biocompatible metal is suitable as a biomaterial for spinal implants based on its MRI artifacting behavior. To compare artifacting behaviors, we implanted into one porcine cadaveric spine different test spacers made of magnesium, titanium, and carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP). All test spacers were scanned using two T1-TSE MRI sequences. The artifact dimensions were traced on all scans and statistically analyzed. The total artifact volume and median artifact area of the titanium spacers were statistically significantly larger than magnesium spacers (p < 0.001), while magnesium and CFRP spacers produced almost identical artifacting behaviors (p > 0.05). Our results suggest that spinal implants made with magnesium alloys will behave more like CFRP devices in MRI scans. Given its osseoconductive potential as a metal, implant alloys made with magnesium would combine the advantages to the two principal spacer materials currently used but without their limitations, at least in terms of MRI artifacting.

  7. CRC Program for Quantifying Performance of Knock-Sensor-Equipped Vehicles with Varying Octane Level

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    Research Council, Inc. (CRC) is a non-profit corporation supported by the petroleum and automotive equipment industries. CRC oper- ates through... automotive equipment. CRC’s work is limited to research that is mutually beneficial to the two industries involved, and all information is available...Octane Technology and Test Procedures Group August 1990 Automotive Vehicle Fuel, Lubricant, and Equipment Research Committee of the Coordinating Research

  8. The CRC orthologue from Pisum sativum shows conserved functions in carpel morphogenesis and vascular development.

    PubMed

    Fourquin, Chloé; Primo, Amparo; Martínez-Fernández, Irene; Huet-Trujillo, Estefanía; Ferrándiz, Cristina

    2014-11-01

    CRABS CLAW (CRC) is a member of the YABBY family of transcription factors involved in carpel morphogenesis, floral determinacy and nectary specification in arabidopsis. CRC orthologues have been functionally characterized across angiosperms, revealing additional roles in leaf vascular development and carpel identity specification in Poaceae. These studies support an ancestral role of CRC orthologues in carpel development, while roles in vascular development and nectary specification appear to be derived. This study aimed to expand research on CRC functional conservation to the legume family in order to better understand the evolutionary history of CRC orthologues in angiosperms. CRC orthologues from Pisum sativum and Medicago truncatula were identified. RNA in situ hybridization experiments determined the corresponding expression patterns throughout flower development. The phenotypic effects of reduced CRC activity were investigated in P. sativum using virus-induced gene silencing. CRC orthologues from P. sativum and M. truncatula showed similar expression patterns, mainly restricted to carpels and nectaries. However, these expression patterns differed from those of other core eudicots, most importantly in a lack of abaxial expression in the carpel and in atypical expression associated with the medial vein of the ovary. CRC downregulation in pea caused defects in carpel fusion and style/stigma development, both typically associated with CRC function in eudicots, but also affected vascular development in the carpel. The data support the conserved roles of CRC orthologues in carpel fusion, style/stigma development and nectary development. In addition, an intriguing new aspect of CRC function in legumes was the unexpected role in vascular development, which could be shared by other species from widely diverged clades within the angiosperms, suggesting that this role could be ancestral rather than derived, as so far generally accepted. © The Author 2014. Published by

  9. The CRC orthologue from Pisum sativum shows conserved functions in carpel morphogenesis and vascular development

    PubMed Central

    Fourquin, Chloé; Primo, Amparo; Martínez-Fernández, Irene; Huet-Trujillo, Estefanía; Ferrándiz, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims CRABS CLAW (CRC) is a member of the YABBY family of transcription factors involved in carpel morphogenesis, floral determinacy and nectary specification in arabidopsis. CRC orthologues have been functionally characterized across angiosperms, revealing additional roles in leaf vascular development and carpel identity specification in Poaceae. These studies support an ancestral role of CRC orthologues in carpel development, while roles in vascular development and nectary specification appear to be derived. This study aimed to expand research on CRC functional conservation to the legume family in order to better understand the evolutionary history of CRC orthologues in angiosperms. Methods CRC orthologues from Pisum sativum and Medicago truncatula were identified. RNA in situ hybridization experiments determined the corresponding expression patterns throughout flower development. The phenotypic effects of reduced CRC activity were investigated in P. sativum using virus-induced gene silencing. Key Results CRC orthologues from P. sativum and M. truncatula showed similar expression patterns, mainly restricted to carpels and nectaries. However, these expression patterns differed from those of other core eudicots, most importantly in a lack of abaxial expression in the carpel and in atypical expression associated with the medial vein of the ovary. CRC downregulation in pea caused defects in carpel fusion and style/stigma development, both typically associated with CRC function in eudicots, but also affected vascular development in the carpel. Conclusions The data support the conserved roles of CRC orthologues in carpel fusion, style/stigma development and nectary development. In addition, an intriguing new aspect of CRC function in legumes was the unexpected role in vascular development, which could be shared by other species from widely diverged clades within the angiosperms, suggesting that this role could be ancestral rather than derived, as so far

  10. [Fixed angle carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite plate for treatment of distal radius fractures : Pilot study on clinical applications].

    PubMed

    Behrendt, P; Kruse, E; Klüter, T; Fitschen-Oestern, S; Weuster, M; Menzdorf, L; Finn, J; Varoga, D; Seekamp, A; Müller, M; Lippross, S

    2017-02-01

    The clinical implementation of a new carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketon (PEEK) plate for distal radius fractures might offer advantageous properties over the conventional metallic devices. This includes similar elastic modulus to cortical bone, radiolucency, low artifacts on MRI scans and the lack of metal allergies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical results at 6-week and 12-month follow-up using either a new fixed angle (monoaxial) PEEK plate system or a fixed angle (polyaxial) titanium plate. We included 26 patients (mean age 59.3) with displaced fractures of the distal radius (all AO types). Radiological and functional outcomes were measured prospectively at a 6-week and 12 month follow-up. We documented no cases of hardware breakage or significant loss of the surgically achieved fracture reduction with the usage oft the new PEEK device. Operating time was 101.0 min using PEEK versus 109.3 min in titanium plates, recorded times were including preparation, draping, and postoperative processing (ns, p 0.156). At the 6-week follow up the PEEK plate showed a trend for better range of motion and functional results (DASH-score, Mayo-wrist score, VAS) with no statistical significance. Results of 12 month follow up with PEEK showed comparable results with corresponding studies examining titanium plate after this period. First experience with PEEK plate osteosynthesis demonstrate quick clinical implementation with good clinical outcome and the advantage of excellent postoperative radiological assessment. At early follow-up PEEK even showed a trend for improved functional results.

  11. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies of graphitic materials and interfacial interactions in carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Hema L.

    This dissertation involves the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) study of the chemistry associated with carbon fiber-reinforced composites fabricated using PAN-based carbon fibers and a thermoplastic polyimide resin. The mechanical properties of the ultimate composite are significantly affected by the nature of the fiber/matrix interface. Interfacial interaction can be promoted by the electrochemical modification of the fiber surface. The determination of carbon fiber microstructure was conducted through angle-resolved valence band photoemission studies of highly ordered graphite. The change in orientation of the basal planes and reactive edge sites with take-off angle provided a method for the determination of surface microstructure. The electronic structure of solid-state graphite was described using a band structure model and the results obtained were compared with the multiple scattered wave X a calculations. PAN-based fibers were electrochemically oxidized and studied using monochromatic X-radiation. The extremely narrow natural linewidth of the monochromatized Al K a radiation allowed previously unresolved features to be seen. In addition, sample decomposition due to radiative heat from the X-ray source is eliminated. Fibers that were pretreated by the manufacturer were subjected to further electrochemical oxidation. The fibers behaved in an erratic and non-reproducible manner. The surface treatment was removed by heating the fibers in vacuum, followed by XPS analysis and electrochemical oxidation. The fiber/matrix interface was simulated by coating a very thin layer of the polyimide resin on the surface of the fiber followed by XPS analysis. The validity of a proposed structure for the resin was confirmed by comparison with ab initio calculations conducted on the resin repeat unit. A high level of fiber/matrix interaction was observed for electrochemically oxidized fibers. The possibility of solvent interaction with the fiber surface was eliminated by

  12. Electronic spectroscopy and electronic structure of diatomic CrC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugh, Dale J.; Morse, Michael D.; Kalemos, Apostolos; Mavridis, Aristides

    2010-07-01

    Optical spectra of jet-cooled diatomic CrC have been recorded in the near infrared region using resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy combined with mass-selective detection of the resulting ions. Several weak transitions have been observed, along with one relatively strong band near 842 nm. Rotational resolution and analysis of this band confirms that the ground state is of Σ3- symmetry. Ab initio calculations have been performed that demonstrate that the ground state is highly multiconfigurational in nature, with a leading configuration of 1σ22σ21π41δ2 for the ten valence electrons. From the rotational analysis of the 842 nm Σ3-←X Σ3- band, the derived spectroscopic constants of the ground and excited states for C52rC12 are B0″=0.659 97(49), λ0″=6.74(24), γ0″=-0.066(20), T0=11 870.7660(65), B'=0.608 29(39), λ'=7.11(24), and γ'=0.144(17) cm-1. Here and throughout this article, 1σ error limits are reported in parentheses. These rotational constants may be inverted to provide the bond lengths in the ground and excited states, r0″=1.6188(6) Å and r'=1.6861(5) Å, respectively. Ab initio calculations show that the upper state is the third state of Σ3- symmetry.

  13. Epoxy resin reinforced with nanothin polydopamine-coated carbon nanotubes: a study of the interfacial polymer layer thickness

    DOE PAGES

    Ling, Yang; Li, Weizhen; Wang, Baoyu; ...

    2016-03-29

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) functionalized by a nanothin poly(dopamine) (PDA) layer were produced by a one-pot, nondestructive approach, with direct polymerization of dopamine on the CNT surface. The thickness of the PDA layer can be well-controlled by the reaction time and the proportion of dopamine, and this thickness is found to be the key factor in controlling the dispersion of CNTs and the extent of the interfacial interactions between the CNT@PDA and epoxy resin. SEM results indicated that the dispersion of CNTs in epoxy was improved significantly by coating a nanothin PDA layer onto the CNT surface. In agreeme nt withmore » this finding, the CNTs functionalized with the thinnest PDA layer provided the best mechanical and thermal properties. This result confirmed that a thinner PDA layer could provide optimized interfacial interactions between the CNT@PDA and epoxy matrix and weaken the self-agglomeration of CNTs, which led to an improved effective stress and heat transfer between the CNTs and the polymer matrix.« less

  14. Epoxy resin reinforced with nanothin polydopamine-coated carbon nanotubes: a study of the interfacial polymer layer thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, Yang; Li, Weizhen; Wang, Baoyu; Gan, Wenjun; Zhu, Chenhui; Brady, Michael A.; Wang, Cheng

    2016-03-29

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) functionalized by a nanothin poly(dopamine) (PDA) layer were produced by a one-pot, nondestructive approach, with direct polymerization of dopamine on the CNT surface. The thickness of the PDA layer can be well-controlled by the reaction time and the proportion of dopamine, and this thickness is found to be the key factor in controlling the dispersion of CNTs and the extent of the interfacial interactions between the CNT@PDA and epoxy resin. SEM results indicated that the dispersion of CNTs in epoxy was improved significantly by coating a nanothin PDA layer onto the CNT surface. In agreeme nt with this finding, the CNTs functionalized with the thinnest PDA layer provided the best mechanical and thermal properties. This result confirmed that a thinner PDA layer could provide optimized interfacial interactions between the CNT@PDA and epoxy matrix and weaken the self-agglomeration of CNTs, which led to an improved effective stress and heat transfer between the CNTs and the polymer matrix.

  15. Short and long term behaviour of externally bonded fibre reinforced polymer laminates with bio-based resins for flexural strengthening of concrete beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSwiggan, Ciaran

    The use of bio-based resins in composites for construction is emerging as a way to reduce of embodied energy produced by a structural system. In this study, two types of bio-based resins were explored: an epoxidized pine oil resin blend (EP) and a furfuryl alcohol resin (FA) derived from corn cobs and sugar cane. Nine large-scale reinforced concrete beams strengthened using externally bonded carbon and glass fibre reinforced bio-based polymer (CFRP and GFRP) sheets were tested. The EP resin resulted in a comparable bond strength to conventional epoxy (E) when used in wet layup, with a 7% higher strength for CFRP. The FA resin, on the other hand, resulted in a very weak bond, likely due to concrete alkalinity affecting curing. However, when FA resin was used to produce prefabricated cured CFRP plates which were then bonded to concrete using conventional epoxy paste, it showed an excellent bond strength. The beams achieved an increase in peak load ranging from 18-54% and a 9-46% increase in yielding load, depending on the number of FRP layers and type of fibres and resin. Additionally, 137 concrete prisms with a mid-span half-depth saw cut were used to test CFRP bond durability, and 195 CFRP coupons were used to examine tensile strength durability. Specimens were conditioned in a 3.5% saline solution at 23, 40 or 50°C, for up to 240 days. Reductions in bond strength did not exceed 15%. Bond failure of EP was adhesive with traces of cement paste on CFRP, whereas that of FA was cohesive with a thicker layer of concrete on CFRP, suggesting that the bond between FA and epoxy paste is excellent. EP tension coupons had similar strength and modulus to E resin, whereas FA coupons had a 9% lower strength and 14% higher modulus. After 240 days of exposure, maximum reductions in tensile strength were 8, 19 and 10% for EP, FA and E resins, respectively. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was also performed to assess the significance of the reductions observed. High degrees of

  16. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo. PMID:24707488

  17. Carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo.

  18. The life times of polymer composites in construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Urs

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses examples that prove the long-term reliability of Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) under extreme loading conditions and outdoor weathering. Results of polymer/steel-composite anchorage systems, Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) plates and shells, GFRP box girders, Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) post-tensioning tendons and CFRP stays are going to be presented.

  19. 21 CFR 178.3850 - Reinforced wax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Type II Polyethylene Rosins and rosin derivatives as provided in § 178.3870 Synthetic wax polymer as... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Reinforced wax. 178.3850 Section 178.3850 Food and... and Production Aids § 178.3850 Reinforced wax. Reinforced wax may be safely used as an article or...

  20. 12 CFR 617.7310 - What is the review process of the CRC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... borrower's request will be reviewed. (b) Who may make a personal appearance before the CRC? Each applicant... results of any independent collateral evaluation before making a final determination with respect to the...

  1. Detection of Colorectal Cancer (CRC) by Urinary Volatile Organic Compound Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Arasaradnam, Ramesh P.; McFarlane, Michael J.; Ryan-Fisher, Courtenay; Westenbrink, Erik; Hodges, Paula; Thomas, Matthew G.; Chambers, Samantha; O'Connell, Nicola; Bailey, Catherine; Harmston, Christopher; Nwokolo, Chuka U.; Bardhan, Karna D.; Covington, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer related death in Europe and the USA. There is no universally accepted effective non-invasive screening test for CRC. Guaiac based faecal occult blood (gFOB) testing has largely been superseded by Faecal Immunochemical testing (FIT), but sensitivity still remains poor. The uptake of population based FOBt testing in the UK is also low at around 50%. The detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) signature(s) for many cancer subtypes is receiving increasing interest using a variety of gas phase analytical instruments. One such example is FAIMS (Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometer). FAIMS is able to identify Inflammatory Bowel disease (IBD) patients by analysing shifts in VOCs patterns in both urine and faeces. This study extends this concept to determine whether CRC patients can be identified through non-invasive analysis of urine, using FAIMS. 133 patients were recruited; 83 CRC patients and 50 healthy controls. Urine was collected at the time of CRC diagnosis and headspace analysis undertaken using a FAIMS instrument (Owlstone, Lonestar, UK). Data was processed using Fisher Discriminant Analysis (FDA) after feature extraction from the raw data. FAIMS analyses demonstrated that the VOC profiles of CRC patients were tightly clustered and could be distinguished from healthy controls. Sensitivity and specificity for CRC detection with FAIMS were 88% and 60% respectively. This study suggests that VOC signatures emanating from urine can be detected in patients with CRC using ion mobility spectroscopy technology (FAIMS) with potential as a novel screening tool. PMID:25268885

  2. 1982 CRC Fuel Rating Program: Road Octane Performance of Oxygenates in 1982 Model Cars.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    RATING PROGRAM: ROAD OCTANE PERFORMANCE OF OXYGENATES IN 1982 MODEL CARS July 1985 L 85 09 11 023 COORDINATING RESEARCH COUNCIL, INC. 219 PERIMETER...1982 CRC FUEL RATING PROGRAM: ROAD OCTANE PERFORM4ANCE OF OXYGENATES IN 1982 MODEL CARS (CRC, PROJECT N~O. CM-124-82) IN FORMULATING AND APPROVING...3 V. TEST CARS ............................................ 4 VI. BLENDING OCTANE NUMBERS................................ 5 VII. ROAD

  3. CRC Tissue Core Management System (TCMS): Integration of Basic Science and Clinical Data for Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, Andrew W.; Payne, Philip R.O.; Rassenti, Laura; Kipps, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    The Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Research Consortium (CRC) consists of 9 geographically distributed sites conducting a program of research including both basic science and clinical components. The CRC TCMS was designed to capture and integrate basic science and clinical data sets. The system utilizes multiple data modeling methodologies and web-application platforms, and was designed with the high level objectives of providing an extensible, generalizable model for integrating data as required to conduct translational research. PMID:14728358

  4. Cross-regulation by CrcZ RNA controls anoxic biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Pusic, Petra; Tata, Muralidhar; Wolfinger, Michael T.; Sonnleitner, Elisabeth; Häussler, Susanne; Bläsi, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) can thrive in anaerobic biofilms in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Here, we show that CrcZ is the most abundant PA14 RNA bound to the global regulator Hfq in anoxic biofilms grown in cystic fibrosis sputum medium. Hfq was crucial for anoxic biofilm formation. This observation complied with an RNAseq based transcriptome analysis and follow up studies that implicated Hfq in regulation of a central step preceding denitrification. CrcZ is known to act as a decoy that sequesters Hfq during relief of carbon catabolite repression, which in turn alleviates Hfq-mediated translational repression of catabolic genes. We therefore inferred that CrcZ indirectly impacts on biofilm formation by competing for Hfq. This hypothesis was supported by the findings that over-production of CrcZ mirrored the biofilm phenotype of the hfq deletion mutant, and that deletion of the crcZ gene augmented biofilm formation. To our knowledge, this is the first example where competition for Hfq by CrcZ cross-regulates an Hfq-dependent physiological process unrelated to carbon metabolism. PMID:28000785

  5. Cross-regulation by CrcZ RNA controls anoxic biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusic, Petra; Tata, Muralidhar; Wolfinger, Michael T.; Sonnleitner, Elisabeth; Häussler, Susanne; Bläsi, Udo

    2016-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) can thrive in anaerobic biofilms in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Here, we show that CrcZ is the most abundant PA14 RNA bound to the global regulator Hfq in anoxic biofilms grown in cystic fibrosis sputum medium. Hfq was crucial for anoxic biofilm formation. This observation complied with an RNAseq based transcriptome analysis and follow up studies that implicated Hfq in regulation of a central step preceding denitrification. CrcZ is known to act as a decoy that sequesters Hfq during relief of carbon catabolite repression, which in turn alleviates Hfq-mediated translational repression of catabolic genes. We therefore inferred that CrcZ indirectly impacts on biofilm formation by competing for Hfq. This hypothesis was supported by the findings that over-production of CrcZ mirrored the biofilm phenotype of the hfq deletion mutant, and that deletion of the crcZ gene augmented biofilm formation. To our knowledge, this is the first example where competition for Hfq by CrcZ cross-regulates an Hfq-dependent physiological process unrelated to carbon metabolism.

  6. The CRC 20 years: An overview of some of the major achievements and remaining challenges.

    PubMed

    Doek, Jaap E

    2009-11-01

    On 20 November 1989, the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). It entered into force on 2 September 1990 and has by now been ratified by 193 States, making the most universally ratified human rights treaty. This overview will present and discuss the impact of this treaty both at the international and the national level, an overview which necessarily has to be limited to some of the developments as a result of the implementation of the CRC. The first part of this paper will be devoted to the impact the CRC had and still has on the setting and development of the international agenda for the promotion and protection of the rights and welfare of children. Special attention will given to developments, achievements, and remaining challenges at the international level with regard to protection of children in armed conflict; prevention and the protection of children from sexual exploitation; and from all forms of violence. This will include some information on the impact of these international developments and actions at the national level, for example, in the area of legislation. The second part will focus on the impact at the national level. Given the wide scope of the CRC this part will be limited to some of the General Measures of Implementation (law reform, national programmes, and independent monitoring) and the General Principles (non-discrimination, best interest, right to be heard) of the CRC. This will be based on reports of States on the implementation of the CRC submitted to the CRC Committee and the Concluding Observations of this Committee and on a number of studies. The conclusion will provide remarks on poverty as one of the major remaining challenges for the implementation of children's rights.

  7. Genetic variants in IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway and the risk of CRC.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuwei; Zhang, Weidong

    2016-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 and the downstream Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway have previously been reported to be important in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC), and several studies have shown the relationship between the polymorphisms of related genes in this pathway with the risk of CRC. However, the findings of these related studies are inconsistent. Moreover, there has no systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between genetic variants in IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway and CRC susceptibility. Hence, we conducted a meta-analysis to explore the relationship between polymorphisms in IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway genes and CRC risk. Eighteen eligible studies with a total of 13,795 CRC cases and 18,043 controls were identified by searching PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases for the period up to September 15, 2015. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were used to calculate the strength of the association. Our results indicated that IL-6 genetic variants in allele additive model (OR = 1.05, 95 % CI = 1.00, 1.09) and JAK2 genetic variants (OR = 1.40, 95 % CI = 1.15, 1.65) in genotype recessive model were significantly associated with CRC risk. Moreover, the pooled data revealed that IL-6 rs1800795 polymorphism significantly increased the risk of CRC in allele additive model in Europe (OR = 1.07, 95 % CI = 1.01, 1.14). In conclusion, the present findings indicate that IL-6 and JAK2 genetic variants are associated with the increased risk of CRC while STAT3 genetic variants not. We need more well-designed clinical studies covering more countries and population to definitively establish the association between genetic variants in IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway and CRC susceptibility.

  8. Therapeutic value of EGFR inhibition in CRC and NSCLC: 15 years of clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Troiani, Teresa; Napolitano, Stefania; Della Corte, Carminia Maria; Martini, Giulia; Martinelli, Erika; Morgillo, Floriana; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a key role in tumour evolution, proliferation and immune evasion, and is one of the most important targets for biological therapy, especially for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and colorectal cancer (CRC). In the past 15 years, several EGFR antagonists have been approved for the treatment of NSCLC and metastatic CRC (mCRC). To optimise the use of anti-EGFR agents in clinical practice, various clinical and molecular biomarkers have been investigated, thus moving their indication from unselected to selected populations. Nowadays, anti-EGFR drugs represent a gold-standard therapy for metastatic NSCLC harbouring EGFR activating mutation and for RAS wild-type mCRC. Their clinical efficacy is limited by the presence of intrinsic resistance or the onset of acquired resistance. In this review, we provide an overview of the antitumour activity of EGFR inhibitors in NSCLC and CRC and of mechanisms of resistance, focusing on the development of a personalised approach through 15 years of preclinical and clinical research. PMID:27843640

  9. Co-expression analysis identifies CRC and AP1 the regulator of Arabidopsis fatty acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Han, Xinxin; Yin, Linlin; Xue, Hongwei

    2012-07-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) play crucial rules in signal transduction and plant development, however, the regulation of FA metabolism is still poorly understood. To study the relevant regulatory network, fifty-eight FA biosynthesis genes including de novo synthases, desaturases and elongases were selected as "guide genes" to construct the co-expression network. Calculation of the correlation between all Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) genes with each guide gene by Arabidopsis co-expression dating mining tools (ACT) identifies 797 candidate FA-correlated genes. Gene ontology (GO) analysis of these co-expressed genes showed they are tightly correlated to photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism, and function in many processes. Interestingly, 63 transcription factors (TFs) were identified as candidate FA biosynthesis regulators and 8 TF families are enriched. Two TF genes, CRC and AP1, both correlating with 8 FA guide genes, were further characterized. Analyses of the ap1 and crc mutant showed the altered total FA composition of mature seeds. The contents of palmitoleic acid, stearic acid, arachidic acid and eicosadienoic acid are decreased, whereas that of oleic acid is increased in ap1 and crc seeds, which is consistent with the qRT-PCR analysis revealing the suppressed expression of the corresponding guide genes. In addition, yeast one-hybrid analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) revealed that CRC can bind to the promoter regions of KCS7 and KCS15, indicating that CRC may directly regulate FA biosynthesis. © 2012 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  10. A computational analysis and suitability assessment of cold-gas dynamic spraying of glass-fiber-reinforced poly-amide 6 for use in direct-adhesion polymer metal hybrid components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Pandurangan, B.; Bell, W. C.; Daqaq, M.; Ma, L.; Seyr, Norbert; Erdmann, Marc; Holzleitner, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    SummaryA transient non-linear dynamics computational analysis of cold-gas dynamic spraying (CGDS) of glass-fiber-reinforced poly-amide (nylon) 6 has been carried out using Ansys-Autodyn [Century Dynamics Inc., Ansys-Autodyn Version 11.0, User Documentation, Century Dynamics Inc. (a subsidiary of ANSYS Inc.), 2007] in order to assess the suitability of this spraying technology for coating of metal stampings used in polymer metal hybrid (PMH) load-bearing automotive component applications. In addition, the suitability of the CGDS is assessed with respect to a need for metal stamping surface preparation/treatment, the ability to deposit polymeric material without significant material degradation, the ability to selectively overcoat the metal stamping, the resulting magnitude of the polymer-to-metal adhesion strength, durability of the polymer/metal bond with respect to prolonged exposure to high-temperature/high-humidity and mechanical/thermal fatigue service conditions, and compatibility with the automotive body-in-white ( BIW) manufacturing process chain. The analysis revealed that CGDS can be considered as a viable technology for coating of metal stampings used in PMH load-bearing automotive component applications.

  11. Increasing the Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Diffusivity of Asbestos-Reinforced Laminates Through Modification of their Polymer Matrix with Carbon Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilova-Tret'yak, S. M.; Evseeva, L. E.; Tanaeva, S. A.

    2014-11-01

    Experimental investigations of the thermophysical properties of traditional and modified asbestos-reinforced laminates depending on the type of their carbon nanofiller have been carried out in the range of temperatures from -150 to 150°C. It has been shown that the largest (nearly twofold) increase in the thermal-conductivity and thermal-diffusivity coefficients of the indicated materials is observed when they are modified with a small-scale fraction of a nanofiller (carbon nanotubes). The specific heats of the modified and traditional asbestos-reinforced laminates turned out to be identical, in practice, within the measurement error.

  12. CRC Volatility Program on the Effect of Oxygenated Fuels and Altitude on Cold-Start Drivability at Low Ambient Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    t CRC eport No. 569 CRC VOLATILITY PROGRAM ON THE EFFECT OF OXYGENATED FUELS AND ALTITUDE ON COLD-START DRIVEABILITY AT LOW AMBIENT TEMPERATURES...Research Committee of the Coordinating Research Council, Inc. ABSTRACT The 1988 CRC driveability program investigated the effects of altitude and fuel...and gasoline-MTBE blends. The altitude change between the two sites was found to have no statistically significant effect on driveability for the

  13. Conjugate Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Richard F.

    Conjugate reinforcement is a new attention measure which has emerged from experimental psychology. It can provide accurate measurement of a subject's attention to a stimulus. In conjugate reinforcement, the duration of the stimulus varies directly and immediately with the subject's rate of response. In this process, the subject must demonstrate…

  14. Damage tolerance in discontinuously reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, H.J.; Ratnaparkhi, P.

    1988-11-01

    Properly designed discontinuously-reinforced MMCs have been projected by linear-elastic fracture mechanics to be competitive, on both cost and performance bases, with cross-plied graphite-reinforced polymer-matrix composites and continuously-reinforced MMCs. With respect to the latter, discontinuously-reinforced MMCs achieve considerable advantages in virtue of their lower-cost reinforcements and their fabricability by standard metal-working practices. Discontinuously reinforced MMC billets can also be produced through powder-blending and direct-spraying techniques. SiC short fibers, whiskers, and particulates are typical of the discontinuous reinforcements used in 2124 and 6061 aluminum matrices. 18 references.

  15. The long-term mechanical integrity of non-reinforced PEEK-OPTIMA polymer for demanding spinal applications: experimental and finite-element analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Stephen J; Visser, Judith M A; Polikeit, Anne

    2006-02-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a novel polymer with potential advantages for its use in demanding orthopaedic applications (e.g. intervertebral cages). However, the influence of a physiological environment on the mechanical stability of PEEK has not been reported. Furthermore, the suitability of the polymer for use in highly stressed spinal implants such as intervertebral cages has not been investigated. Therefore, a combined experimental and analytical study was performed to address these open questions. A quasi-static mechanical compression test was performed to compare the initial mechanical properties of PEEK-OPTIMA polymer in a dry, room-temperature and in an aqueous, 37 degrees C environment (n=10 per group). The creep behaviour of cylindrical PEEK polymer specimens (n=6) was measured in a simulated physiological environment at an applied stress level of 10 MPa for a loading duration of 2000 hours (12 weeks). To compare the biomechanical performance of different intervertebral cage types made from PEEK and titanium under complex loading conditions, a three-dimensional finite element model of a functional spinal unit was created. The elastic modulus of PEEK polymer specimens in a physiological environment was 1.8% lower than that of specimens tested at dry, room temperature conditions (P<0.001). The results from the creep test showed an average creep strain of less than 0.1% after 2000 hours of loading. The finite element analysis demonstrated high strain and stress concentrations at the bone/implant interface, emphasizing the importance of cage geometry for load distribution. The stress and strain maxima in the implants were well below the material strength limits of PEEK. In summary, the experimental results verified the mechanical stability of the PEEK-OPTIMA polymer in a simulated physiological environment, and over extended loading periods. Finite element analysis supported the use of PEEK-OPTIMA for load-bearing intervertebral implants.

  16. The CRC 20 Years: An Overview of Some of the Major Achievements and Remaining Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doek, Jaap E.

    2009-01-01

    On 20 November 1989, the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). It entered into force on 2 September 1990 and has by now been ratified by 193 States, making the most universally ratified human rights treaty. This overview will present and discuss the impact of this treaty both at the…

  17. Self Reported Awareness of Child Maltreatment among School Professionals in Saudi Arabia: Impact of CRC Ratification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AlBuhairan, Fadia S.; Inam, Sarah S.; AlEissa, Majid A.; Noor, Ismail K.; Almuneef, Maha A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) was ratified by Saudi Arabia 15 years ago; yet addressing the issue of child maltreatment only began in more recent years. School professionals play a significant role in children's lives, as they spend a great deal of time with them and are hence essential to protecting and identifying…

  18. Chromosome 8 deletions in colorectal carcinoma (CRC): Localization and clinical significance

    SciTech Connect

    Takanishi, D.M. Jr.; Kelemen, P.R.; Kim, A.H.

    1994-09-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) from the short arm of chromosome 8 (8p) is common in a number of epithelial malignancies, including CRC, lung, hepatoma, prostate, and breast. We and others demonstrated that there are two discrete regions of 8p LOH in CRC, suggesting the possible existence of two independent tumor suppressor genes. To better define the deletion region, we examined 41 cases of CRC and matched normal tissue with a panel of thirteen microsatellite polymorphisms from 8p, including 30 paraffin-embedded samples enriched by slide microdissection, and 11 primary explant tissue cultures (passage 3 or higher). Of these 41 cases, 25 were noted to have LOH (61%). Most tumors had large deletions, but several had localized interstitial losses, enabling us to specify two non-overlapping regions of LOH; the proximal region is defined by markers D8S137 to D8S259 at 8p21, while the distal region is contained with LPL5{prime} and D8S262 at 8p22. Correlation with clinical features suggests a trend toward association with microinvasion (p=.057, Fisher exact test) but this could not be related to proximal or distal LOH because of the small numbers. Microinvasion (invasion of lymphatics, vessels, or nerves ascertained by light microscopy) is a stage-independent indicator of poor prognosis. We conclude that 8p LOH is a common occurrence in CRC which may be associated with more aggressive biologic behavior, and that there are two discrete chromosomal regions involved.

  19. Barriers to CRC Screening among Latino Adults in Pennsylvania: ACCN Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Dominic, Oralia; Lengerich, Eugene J.; Wray, Linda A.; Parrott, Roxanne; Aumiller, Betsy; Kluhsman, Brenda; Renderos, Carlos; Dignan, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To describe knowledge of and barriers to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening by sex and geography among Latino adults in Pennsylvania. Methods: Eighty-two Latinos greater than 50 years old engaged in one of 8 focus groups. Focus groups consisted of 4 components. Focus group data were audiotaped, transcribed, and grouped into thematic…

  20. Barriers to CRC Screening among Latino Adults in Pennsylvania: ACCN Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Dominic, Oralia; Lengerich, Eugene J.; Wray, Linda A.; Parrott, Roxanne; Aumiller, Betsy; Kluhsman, Brenda; Renderos, Carlos; Dignan, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To describe knowledge of and barriers to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening by sex and geography among Latino adults in Pennsylvania. Methods: Eighty-two Latinos greater than 50 years old engaged in one of 8 focus groups. Focus groups consisted of 4 components. Focus group data were audiotaped, transcribed, and grouped into thematic…

  1. The CRC 20 Years: An Overview of Some of the Major Achievements and Remaining Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doek, Jaap E.

    2009-01-01

    On 20 November 1989, the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). It entered into force on 2 September 1990 and has by now been ratified by 193 States, making the most universally ratified human rights treaty. This overview will present and discuss the impact of this treaty both at the…

  2. Multi-Length Scale-Enriched Continuum-Level Material Model for Kevlar (registered trademark)-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Derivation of the Materials Constitutive Relations for Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Poly-Vinyl-Ester-Epoxy Based Composites, J. Mater. Sci., 2007, 42, p...within the yarns , fiber/matrix de-bonding, diffuse delamination/interlam- ina separation, etc.) as well as discrete damage modes (e.g., transverse...fabric. Specifically, details of yarn weaving and crimping, yarn cross-section change, and yarn sliding at the warp- yarn /weft- yarn cross-over points are

  3. Finite element and micromechanical modeling for investigating effective material properties of polymer-matrix nanocomposites with microfiber, reinforced by CNT arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahouneh, Vahid; Mashhadi, Mahmoud Mosavi; Naei, Mohammad Hasan

    2016-09-01

    This paper is motivated by the lack of studies to investigate the effect of fiber reinforced CNT arrays on the material properties of nanocomposites. To make a comprehensive study, this research work is conducted in two ways. Firstly, the effect of microfiber as reinforcement on the effective material properties is investigated; secondly, the study is carried on as the microfibers reinforced by CNT arrays. In both above-mentioned approaches, the results are compared to the results of generalized mixture rule which is known as a widely used micro-mechanical model. The representative volume element (RVE) is considered as a well-known method to investigate the effect of adding CNT arrays on the skin of microfibers. The results show that Generalized Mixture Rule cannot properly predict the effects of changing the length and diameter of nanotubes on the effective properties of nanocomposites. The main objective of this research work is to determine the effects of increasing nanotubes on the elastic properties which are achieved using two aforementioned methods including FE and rule of mixture. It is also absorbed; effective properties of RVE can be improved by increasing the volume fraction, length and decreasing CNT arrays diameter.

  4. Whole Gene Capture Analysis of 15 CRC Susceptibility Genes in Suspected Lynch Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    van Wezel, Tom; Jagmohan-Changur, Shantie C.; Ruano, Dina; van der Klift, Heleen M.; van den Akker, Brendy E. W. M.; Laros, Jeroen F. J.; van Galen, Michiel; Wagner, Anja; Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Gómez-García, Encarna B.; Tops, Carli M. J.; Vasen, Hans F.; Devilee, Peter; Hes, Frederik J.; Morreau, Hans; Wijnen, Juul T.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Lynch Syndrome (LS) is caused by pathogenic germline variants in one of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes. However, up to 60% of MMR-deficient colorectal cancer cases are categorized as suspected Lynch Syndrome (sLS) because no pathogenic MMR germline variant can be identified, which leads to difficulties in clinical management. We therefore analyzed the genomic regions of 15 CRC susceptibility genes in leukocyte DNA of 34 unrelated sLS patients and 11 patients with MLH1 hypermethylated tumors with a clear family history. Methods Using targeted next-generation sequencing, we analyzed the entire non-repetitive genomic sequence, including intronic and regulatory sequences, of 15 CRC susceptibility genes. In addition, tumor DNA from 28 sLS patients was analyzed for somatic MMR variants. Results Of 1979 germline variants found in the leukocyte DNA of 34 sLS patients, one was a pathogenic variant (MLH1 c.1667+1delG). Leukocyte DNA of 11 patients with MLH1 hypermethylated tumors was negative for pathogenic germline variants in the tested CRC susceptibility genes and for germline MLH1 hypermethylation. Somatic DNA analysis of 28 sLS tumors identified eight (29%) cases with two pathogenic somatic variants, one with a VUS predicted to pathogenic and LOH, and nine cases (32%) with one pathogenic somatic variant (n = 8) or one VUS predicted to be pathogenic (n = 1). Conclusions This is the first study in sLS patients to include the entire genomic sequence of CRC susceptibility genes. An underlying somatic or germline MMR gene defect was identified in ten of 34 sLS patients (29%). In the remaining sLS patients, the underlying genetic defect explaining the MMRdeficiency in their tumors might be found outside the genomic regions harboring the MMR and other known CRC susceptibility genes. PMID:27300758

  5. Research Update for: A Method for Out-of-autoclave Fabrication of High Fiber Volume Fraction Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites (ARL-TR-6057)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    2 Figure 2. Tensile modulus of samples evaluated using ASTM D 3039 ...American Society for Testing and Materials ( ASTM ) standards D 3039 (Standard Test Method for Tensile Properties of Polymer Matrix Composite Materials...The mean increase in tensile modulus is approximately 10.0%. Figure 2. Tensile modulus of samples evaluated using ASTM D 3039 . The tendency for

  6. 2015 CRC Aviation Meetings Particle Count Limits Recommendation for Aviation Fuel (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-05

    31 AUG 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 2015 CRC Aviation Meetings Particle Count Limits...Recommendation for Aviation Fuel 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Joel Schmitigal 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...ABSTRACT None 15. SUBJECT TERMS 2015 Coordinating Research Council Aviation Meetings 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  7. CRC Clinical Trials Management System (CTMS): An Integrated Information Management Solution for Collaborative Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Philip R.O.; Greaves, Andrew W.; Kipps, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    The Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Research Consortium (CRC) consists of 9 geographically distributed sites conducting a program of research including both basic science and clinical components. To enable the CRC’s clinical research efforts, a system providing for real-time collaboration was required. CTMS provides such functionality, and demonstrates that the use of novel data modeling, web-application platforms, and management strategies provides for the deployment of an extensible, cost effective solution in such an environment. PMID:14728471

  8. Improving time-lapse seismic repeatability: CO2CRC Otway site permanent geophone array field trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevzner, Roman; Dupuis, Christian; Shulakova, Valeriya; Urosevic, Milovan; Lumley, David

    2013-04-01

    The proposed Stage 2C of the CO2CRC Otway project involves injection of a small amount (around 15,000 tonnes) of CO2/CH4 gas mixture into saline acquifer (Paaratte formation) at the depth of ~1.5 km. The seismic time-lapse signal will depend largely on the formation properties and the injection scenario, but is likely to be relatively weak. In order to improve time-lapse seismic monitoring capabilities by decreasing the noise level, a buried receiver arrays can be used. A small-scale trial of such an array was conducted at Otway site in June 2012. A set of 25 geophones was installed in 3 m deep boreholes in parallel to the same number of surface geophones. In addition, four geophones were placed into boreholes of 1 to 12 m depth. In order to assess the gain in the signal-to-noise ratio and repeatability, both active and passive seismic surveys were carried out. The surveys were conducted in relatively poor weather conditions, with rain, strong wind and thunderstorms increasing the noise level. We found that noise level for buried geophones is on average 20 dB lower compared to the surface ones. Furthermore, the combination of active and passive experiments has allowed us to perform a detailed classification of various noise sources. Acknowledgement The authors acknowledge the funding provided by the Australian government through its CRC program to support this CO2CRC research project. We also acknowledge the CO2CRC's corporate sponsors and the financial assistance provided through Australian National Low Emissions Coal Research and Development (ANLEC R&D). ANLEC R&D is supported by Australian Coal Association Low Emissions Technology Limited and the Australian Government through the Clean Energy Initiative.

  9. Self reported awareness of child maltreatment among school professionals in Saudi Arabia: impact of CRC ratification.

    PubMed

    AlBuhairan, Fadia S; Inam, Sarah S; AlEissa, Majid A; Noor, Ismail K; Almuneef, Maha A

    2011-12-01

    The Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) was ratified by Saudi Arabia 15 years ago; yet addressing the issue of child maltreatment only began in more recent years. School professionals play a significant role in children's lives, as they spend a great deal of time with them and are hence essential to protecting and identifying those in danger or at risk. The objective of this study is to identify school professional's awareness of child maltreatment and the existing national policies and procedures to examine the extent of efforts made in Saudi Arabia and to activate the roles of schools and school professionals in protecting children from violence and implementation of Article 19 of the CRC. This was a cross-sectional study, where school professionals from randomly selected schools throughout the country were invited to participate in a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 3,777 school professionals participated in the study. Fifty-five percent of professionals had at least 10 years of work experience. A low-level of awareness of child maltreatment was found in about 1/3 of school professionals. Only 1.9% of school professionals had ever attended any sort of specific training on child maltreatment, though 69.3% of those who had not, were willing to attend future training. With regards to awareness of CRC Article 19 or policies and procedures addressing child maltreatment, only 22% reported being aware of it. The majority of school professionals in Saudi Arabia have a low-intermediate level of awareness of child maltreatment, ratification of CRC, and related national policies and procedures, yet most are willing to attend training programs on this subject matter. Efforts need to be made in the country to fill this gap. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrathin Nanosheets of Organic-Modified β-Ni(OH)2 with Excellent Thermal Stability: Fabrication and Its Reinforcement Application in Polymers.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Saihua; Gui, Zhou; Chen, Guohua; Liang, Dong; Alam, Jahangir

    2015-07-15

    β-Nickel hydroxide (β-Ni(OH)2), which combines two-dimensional (2D) structure and the catalytic property of nickel-containing compounds, has shown great potential for the application in polymer nanocomposites. However, conventional β-Ni(OH)2 exhibits large thickness, poor thermal stability, and irreversible aggregation in polymer matrices, which limits its application. Here, we use a novel phosphorus-containing organosilane to modify the β-Ni(OH)2 nanosheet, obtaining a new β-Ni(OH)2 ultrathin nanosheet with excellent thermal stability. When compared to pristine β-Ni(OH)2, the organic-modified β-Ni(OH)2 (M-Ni(OH)2) maintains nanosheet-like structure, and also presents a small thickness of around 4.6 nm and an increased maximum degradation temperature by 41 °C. Owing to surface organic-modification, the interfacial property of M-Ni(OH)2 nanosheets is enhanced, which results in the exfoliation and good distribution of the nanosheets in a PMMA matrix. The addition of M-Ni(OH)2 significantly improves the mechanical performance, thermal stability, and flame retardancy of PMMA/M-Ni(OH)2 nanocomposites, including increased storage modulus by 38.6%, onset thermal degradation temperature by 42 °C, half thermal degradation temperature by 65 °C, and decreased peak heat release rate (PHRR) by 25.3%. Moreover, it is found that M-Ni(OH)2 alone can catalyze the formation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) during the PMMA/M-Ni(OH)2 nanocomposite combustion, which is a very helpful factor for the flame retardancy enhancement and has not been reported before. This work not only provides a new 2D ultrathin nanomaterial with good thermal stability for polymer nanocomposites, but also will trigger more scientific interest in the development and application of new types of 2D ultrathin nanomaterials.

  11. Influence of the Crc regulator on the hierarchical use of carbon sources from a complete medium in Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Ruggero; Behrends, Volker; Williams, Huw D; Bundy, Jacob G; Rojo, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    The Crc protein, together with the Hfq protein, participates in catabolite repression in pseudomonads, helping to coordinate metabolism. Little is known about how Crc affects the hierarchy of metabolite assimilation from complex mixtures. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we carried out comprehensive metabolite profiling of culture supernatants (metabolic footprinting) over the course of growth of both Pseudomonas putida and P. aeruginosa, and compared the wild-type strains with deletion mutants for crc. A complex metabolite consumption hierarchy was observed, which was broadly similar between the two species, although with some important differences, for example in sugar utilization. The order of metabolite utilization changed upon inactivation of the crc gene, but even in the Crc-null strains some compounds were completely consumed before late metabolites were taken up. This suggests the presence of additional regulatory elements that determine the time and order of consumption of compounds. Unexpectedly, the loss of Crc led both species to excrete acetate and pyruvate as a result of unbalanced growth during exponential phase, compounds that were later consumed in stationary phase. This loss of carbon during growth helps to explain the contribution of the Crc/Hfq regulatory system to evolutionary fitness of pseudomonads.

  12. U.S. ratification of the CRC and reducing child poverty: can we get there from here?

    PubMed

    Aber, J Lawrence; Hammond, Andrew S; Thompson, Scott M

    2010-01-01

    If the United States finally ratifies the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child (CRC), will it improve the country's to effectively combat child poverty and thereby improve child well-being? This article addresses this and related questions in two ways. First, the authors examine how ratification of the CRC has influenced the efforts of other wealthy Anglophone countries to reduce child poverty. Second, they draw on lessons learned from these other countries' efforts to generate predictions about America's postratification future. The authors conclude that, while the CRC is a compelling, practical tool, a communications strategy and business plan are necessary complements to achieve desired results.

  13. Development of the experimental procedure to examine the response of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites subjected to a high-intensity pulsed electric field and low-velocity impact.

    PubMed

    Hart, Robert J; Zhupanska, Olesya I

    2016-01-01

    A new fully automated experimental setup has been developed to study the response of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites subjected to a high-intensity pulsed electric field and low-velocity impact. The experimental setup allows for real-time measurements of the pulsed electric current, voltage, impact load, and displacements on the CFRP composite specimens. The setup includes a new custom-built current pulse generator that utilizes a bank of capacitor modules capable of producing a 20 ms current pulse with an amplitude of up to 2500 A. The setup enabled application of the pulsed current and impact load and successfully achieved coordination between the peak of the current pulse and the peak of the impact load. A series of electrical, impact, and coordinated electrical-impact characterization tests were performed on 32-ply IM7/977-3 unidirectional CFRP composites to assess their ability to withstand application of a pulsed electric current and determine the effects of the pulsed current on the impact response. Experimental results revealed that the electrical resistance of CFRP composites decreased with an increase in the electric current magnitude. It was also found that the electrified CFRP specimens withstood higher average impact loads compared to the non-electrified specimens.

  14. Development of the experimental procedure to examine the response of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites subjected to a high-intensity pulsed electric field and low-velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Robert J.; Zhupanska, Olesya I.

    2016-01-01

    A new fully automated experimental setup has been developed to study the response of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites subjected to a high-intensity pulsed electric field and low-velocity impact. The experimental setup allows for real-time measurements of the pulsed electric current, voltage, impact load, and displacements on the CFRP composite specimens. The setup includes a new custom-built current pulse generator that utilizes a bank of capacitor modules capable of producing a 20 ms current pulse with an amplitude of up to 2500 A. The setup enabled application of the pulsed current and impact load and successfully achieved coordination between the peak of the current pulse and the peak of the impact load. A series of electrical, impact, and coordinated electrical-impact characterization tests were performed on 32-ply IM7/977-3 unidirectional CFRP composites to assess their ability to withstand application of a pulsed electric current and determine the effects of the pulsed current on the impact response. Experimental results revealed that the electrical resistance of CFRP composites decreased with an increase in the electric current magnitude. It was also found that the electrified CFRP specimens withstood higher average impact loads compared to the non-electrified specimens.

  15. Evaporative Emissions from In-Use Vehicles: Test Fleet Expansion (CRC E-77-2b) Final Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report describes the ongoing investigation into the evaporative emission performance of aging light-duty vehicles. The objective was to add additional data to the Coordinating Research Council's (CRC) E-77-2 evaporative emission/permeation test program

  16. Estimation of seismically detectable portion of a gas plume: CO2CRC Otway project case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevzner, Roman; Caspari, Eva; Bona, Andrej; Galvin, Robert; Gurevich, Boris

    2013-04-01

    CO2CRC Otway project comprises of several experiments involving CO2/CH4 or pure CO2 gas injection into different geological formations at the Otway test site (Victoria, Australia). During the first stage of the project, which was finished in 2010, more than 64,000 t of gas were injected into the depleted gas reservoir at ~2 km depth. At the moment, preparations for the next stage of the project aiming to examine capabilities of seismic monitoring of small scale injection (up to 15,000 t) into saline formation are ongoing. Time-lapse seismic is one of the most typical methods for CO2 geosequestration monitoring. Significant experience was gained during the first stage of the project through acquisition and analysis of the 4D surface seismic and numerous time-lapse VSP surveys. In order to justify the second stage of the project and optimise parameters of the experiment, several modelling studies were conducted. In order to predict seismic signal we populate realistic geological model with elastic properties, model their changes using fluid substitution technique applied to the fluid flow simulation results and compute synthetic seismic baseline and monitor volumes. To assess detectability of the time-lapse signal caused by the injection, we assume that the time-lapse noise level will be equivalent to the level of difference between the last two Otway 3D surveys acquired in 2009 and 2010 using conventional surface technique (15,000 lbs vibroseis sources and single geophones as the receivers). In order to quantify the uncertainties in plume imaging/visualisation due to the time-lapse noise realisation we propose to use multiple noise realisations with the same F-Kx-Ky amplitude spectra as the field noise for each synthetic signal volume. Having signal detection criterion defined in the terms of signal/time- lapse noise level on a single trace we estimate visible portion of the plume as a function of this criterion. This approach also gives an opportunity to attempt to

  17. The New UN CRC General Comment 13: "The Right of the Child to Freedom from All Forms of Violence"--Changing How the World Conceptualizes Child Protection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svevo-Cianci, Kimberly A.; Herczog, Maria; Krappmann, Lothar; Cook, Philip

    2011-01-01

    The UN Committee on the Rights of the Child established CRC General Comment 13 (April 2011) to address today's unabating high rates of violence against children globally despite CRC advances. GC13 provides clear interpretations and stronger detail to supplement the legal language of CRC Article 19, intended to establish protection of children from…

  18. The New UN CRC General Comment 13: "The Right of the Child to Freedom from All Forms of Violence"--Changing How the World Conceptualizes Child Protection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svevo-Cianci, Kimberly A.; Herczog, Maria; Krappmann, Lothar; Cook, Philip

    2011-01-01

    The UN Committee on the Rights of the Child established CRC General Comment 13 (April 2011) to address today's unabating high rates of violence against children globally despite CRC advances. GC13 provides clear interpretations and stronger detail to supplement the legal language of CRC Article 19, intended to establish protection of children from…

  19. The β-catenin E3 ubiquitin ligase SIAH-1 is regulated by CSN5/JAB1 in CRC cells.

    PubMed

    Jumpertz, Sandra; Hennes, Thomas; Asare, Yaw; Vervoorts, Jörg; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Schütz, Anke K

    2014-09-01

    COP9 signalosome subunit 5 (CSN5) plays a decisive role in cellular processes such as cell cycle regulation and apoptosis via promoting protein degradation, gene transcription, and nuclear export. CSN5 regulates cullin-RING-E3 ligase (CRL) activity through its deNEDDylase function. It is overexpressed in several tumor entities, but its role in colorectal cancer (CRC) is poorly understood. Wnt/β-catenin signaling is aberrant in most CRC cells, resulting in increased levels of oncogenic β-catenin and thus tumor progression. Under physiological conditions, β-catenin levels are tightly regulated by continuous proteasomal degradation. We recently showed that knockdown of CSN5 in model and CRC cells results in decreased (phospho)-β-catenin levels. Reduced β-catenin levels were associated with an attenuated proliferation rate of different CRC cell types after CSN5 knockdown. The canonical Wnt pathway involves degradation of β-catenin by a β-TrCP1-containing E3 ligase, but is mostly non-functional in CRC cells. We thus hypothesized that alternative β-catenin degradation mediated by SIAH-1 (seven in absentia homolog-1), is responsible for the effect of CSN5 on β-catenin signaling in CRC cells. We found that SIAH-1 plays an essential role in β-catenin degradation in HCT116 CRC cells and that CSN5 affects β-catenin target gene expression in these cells. Of note, CSN5 affected SIAH-1 mRNA and SIAH-1 protein levels. Moreover, β-catenin and SIAH-1 form protein complexes with CSN5 in HCT116 cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that CSN5 promotes SIAH-1 degradation in HCT116 and SW480 cells and that this is associated with its deNEDDylase activity. In conclusion, we have identified a CSN5/β-catenin/SIAH-1 interaction network that might control β-catenin degradation in CRC cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An efficient approach to selective electromembrane extraction of naproxen by means of molecularly imprinted polymer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes-reinforced hollow fibers.

    PubMed

    Tahmasebi, Zeinab; Davarani, Saied Saeed Hosseiny; Asgharinezhad, Ali Akbar

    2016-10-28

    In this work, a novel microextraction technique using molecularly imprinted polymer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MIP-MWCNTs) in electromembrane extraction (EME) procedure is described. The method in combination with HPLC-UV was utilized to determine naproxen, as an acidic model drug, in urine, plasma and wastewater samples. For this purpose, MIP-MWCNTs were placed in the pores of polypropylene hollow fiber. The MIP-MWCNTs-EME method has the advantages of high selectivity and cleanup of MIP along with high enrichment ability of the EME in a single step extraction. Continuing with the research, optimization of the factors affecting the migration of naproxen from sample solutions to MIP-MWCNTs sites and then into the lumen of hollow fiber was explored. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) of the developed method was calculated to be 0.3μgL(-1). All relative standard deviations (RSDs) were lower than 3%. Linearity of the method was obtained within the range of 1-1000μgL(-1) with the coefficient of determination (r(2)) being higher than 0.999. Under the optimized conditions, an extraction recovery of 66% was obtained, which corresponded to a preconcentration factor of 88. Finally, the developed method was satisfactorily used to determine naproxen in urine, plasma and wastewater samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Microstructures and friction-wear behaviors of cathodic arc ion plated CrC coating at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejun, Kong; Shouyu, Zhu

    2016-11-01

    A CrC coating was deposited on YT14 cemented carbide cutting tools by a CAIP (cathodic arc ion plating). The surface and interface morphologies, chemical composition, and phases of the obtained coating were analyzed with a field emission scanning electronic microscope (FESEM), energy dispersive spectroscope (EDS), and x-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The COFs (coefficient of frictions) and worn morphologies of the CrC coating at 300 °C, 400 °C, and 500 °C were investigated by using a high temperature tribometer, the effects of wear temperatures on the friction-wear properties of the CrC coating were discussed. The results show that the CrC coating exhibits fine dense structure, and the lattice constants of CrC coatings are dependent on processing parameters. The C and Cr elements in the coating are mutually diffused with the W, Co, and Ti in the substrate. The average COF of the coating at 300 °C, 400 °C, and 500 °C is 0.64, 0.63, and 0.40, respectively. The Cr2O3 layer formed on the CrC coating at 500 °C has excellent oxidation resistance, which improves lubrication and wear performance, the wear mechanism is abrasive wear and oxidation wear.

  2. IRRIGATION PRACTICES IN LONG-TERM SURVIVORS OF COLORECTAL CANCER (CRC) WITH COLOSTOMIES

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Marcia; McMullen, Carmit K.; Altschuler, Andrea; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Herrinton, Lisa J.; Wendel, Christopher S.; Baldwin, Carol M.; Krouse, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Creation of a colostomy in colorectal (CRC) cancer patients results in a loss of control over bowel evacuation. The only way to re-establish some control is through irrigation, a procedure that involves instilling fluid into the bowel to allow for gas and fecal output. This article reports on irrigation practices of participants in a large, multi-site, multi-investigator study of health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) in long term CRC survivors. Questions about irrigation practices were identified in open-ended questions within a large HR-QOL survey and in focus groups of men and women with high and low HR-QOL. Descriptive data on survivors were combined with content analysis of irrigation knowledge and practices. Patient education and use of irrigation in the United States has decreased over the years, with no clear identification of why this change in practice has occurred. Those respondents who used irrigation had their surgery longer ago, and spent more time in colostomy care than those that did not irrigate. Reasons for the decrease in colostomy irrigation are unreported and present priorities for needed research. PMID:23022935

  3. Polymeric micelles self-assembled from amphiphilic polymers with twin disulfides used as siRNA carriers to enhance the transfection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Can Yang; Peng, Shiyuan; Zhao, Bin; Luo, Wenji; Zhang, Lijuan

    2017-09-01

    The sequence-defined polycationic polymers with or without Cys-Arg-Cys motifs conjugated with targeting and shielding segments were synthesized as siRNA carriers via native chemical ligation (NCL) reaction. After purification, the structures and physicochemical characteristics were determined by a variety of experimental techniques. The particle size of siRNA/CRC-polymer polyplex was much smaller than that of polyplex without CRC motifs. The buffer capacity and siRNA binding ability of CRC motifs modified polymers were significantly improved, resulting from the twin disulfides and hexatomic ring formulation. The critical micelle concentrations of the polymers were <10mg/L, indicating formation of polymeric micelles and sufficient stability of the system. The CRC motifs modified polymers with folate targeted ligands exhibited a strongly enhanced cellular uptake than the negative control and the unmodified analogues. The results of gene transfection showed that the folate-PEG-ligated polymer modified with CRC motifs had much better gene transfection compared to the alanine-ended control and other analogues. Furthermore, they showed barely cytotoxicity. By the way, there was no distinctly improvement for pDNA transfection. All above results suggested that folate-PEG-ligated polymers modified with CRC motifs and their self-assembly polymeric micelles could be promising non-viral siRNA carriers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Polymer Matrix Composites: A Perspective for a Special Issue of Polymer Reviews

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, Michael R.

    2012-09-04

    Polymer matrix composites, with their high specific strength and stiffness, are used in a wide range of applications from large wind turbine blades to microelectronics. This perspective article provides a brief primer on polymer matrix composites, discusses some of their advantages and limitations, and describes a number of emerging trends in the field. In addition, it introduces four review articles on the topics of recent developments in carbon fibers, natural fiber reinforced composites, evaluation of the interface between the fiber reinforcement and polymer matrix, and carbon nanotube reinforced polymers.

  5. Microstructural characterization of fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Summerscales, J.

    1998-12-31

    In the past 50 years, great progress has been made in developing artificial fiber-reinforced composite materials, generally using filaments with microscopic diameters. An array of reinforcement forms can be used in commercial applications--with the microstructure being a critical factor in realizing the required properties in a material. This book comprehensively examines the application of advanced microstructural characterization techniques to fiber-reinforced composites. Its contents include: (1) flexible textile composite microstructure; (2) 3-D confocal microscopy of glass fiber-reinforced composites; (3) geometric modeling of yarn and fiber assemblies; (4) characterization of yarn shape in woven fabric composites; (5) quantitative microstructural analysis for continuous fiber composites; (6) electron microscopy of polymer composites; (7) micromechanics of reinforcement using laser raman spectroscopy; and (8) acoustic microscopy of ceramic fiber composites.

  6. NSC30049 inhibits Chk1 pathway in 5-FU-resistant CRC bulk and stem cell populations.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Satya; Jaiswal, Aruna S; Sharma, Ritika; Nawab, Akbar; Duckworth, Lizette Vila; Law, Brian K; Zajac-Kaye, Maria; George, Thomas J; Sharma, Jay; Sharma, Arun K; Hromas, Robert A

    2017-08-22

    The 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment induces DNA damage and stalling of DNA replication forks. These stalled replication forks then collapse to form one sided double-strand breaks, leading to apoptosis. However, colorectal cancer (CRC) stem cells rapidly repair the stalled/collapsed replication forks and overcome treatment effects. Recent evidence suggests a critical role of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) in preventing the replicative stress. Therefore, Chk1 kinase has been a target for developing mono or combination therapeutic agents. In the present study, we have identified a novel orphan molecule NSC30049 (NSC49L) that is effective alone, and in combination potentiates 5-FU-mediated growth inhibition of CRC heterogeneous bulk and FOLFOX-resistant cell lines in culture with minimal effect on normal colonic epithelial cells. It also inhibits the sphere forming activity of CRC stem cells, and decreases the expression levels of mRNAs of CRC stem cell marker genes. Results showed that NSC49L induces 5-FU-mediated S-phase cell cycle arrest due to increased load of DNA damage and increased γ-H2AX staining as a mechanism of cytotoxicity. The pharmacokinetic analysis showed a higher bioavailability of this compound, however, with a short plasma half-life. The drug is highly tolerated by animals with no pathological aberrations. Furthermore, NSC49L showed very potent activity in a HDTX model of CRC stem cell tumors either alone or in combination with 5-FU. Thus, NSC49L as a single agent or combined with 5-FU can be developed as a therapeutic agent by targeting the Chk1 pathway in 5-FU-resistant CRC heterogeneous bulk and CRC stem cell populations.

  7. Viscoelastic Properties of Silica Fibre Reinforced Epoxides and a Theory of Fracture of Fibre Reinforced Viscoelastic Materials,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    the rate at which elastic energy, released by fiber breakage, can be absorbed, is calculated. Analogies of fiber reinforcement theory and chain fracture theories in polymers are discussed. (Author Modified Abstract)

  8. High-temperature polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Polymers research at the NASA Lewis Research Center has produced high-temperature, easily processable resin systems, such as PMR-15. In addition, the Polymers Branch has investigated ways to improve the mechanical properties of polymers and the microcracking resistance of polymer matrix composites in response to industry need for new and improved aeropropulsion materials. Current and future research in the Polymers Branch is aimed at advancing the upper use temperature of polymer matrix composites to 700 F and beyond by developing new resins, by examining the use of fiber reinforcements other than graphite, and by developing coatings for polymer matrix composites to increase their oxidation resistance.

  9. CRC (Coordinating Research Council) cross-correlation aircraft-engine emission test program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    The CRC sponsored a test program to compare the performance of aircraft emission-measurement systems. The tests were conducted at the FAA's National Aviation Facilities Experimental Center, Atlantic City, N.J. This report details the results of an analysis of the secured cross-correlation emissions data taken over five weeks by seven participants. Results of the participant-to-participant variability of the gaseous pollutants are provided for CO, CO/sub 2/, THC, and NOx at low and high concentration, and low or high power. Results for smoke indicate additional development effort is required to secure repeatable smoke data among participants. The smoke analysis was also limited by the small amount of data and the high levels which are no longer typical of current engine emission control technology.

  10. Uncaria tomentosa for Reducing Side Effects Caused by Chemotherapy in CRC Patients: Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Farias, I. L. G.; Araújo, M. C. S.; Farias, J. G.; Rossato, L. V.; Elsenbach, L. I.; Dalmora, S. L.; Flores, N. M. P.; Durigon, M.; Cruz, I. B. M.; Morsch, V. M.; Schetinger, M. R. C.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa in minimizing the side effects of chemotherapy and improving the antioxidant status of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, a randomized clinical trial was conducted. Patients (43) undergoing adjuvant/palliative chemotherapy with 5-Fluorouracil/leucovorin + oxaliplatin (FOLFOX4) were split into two groups: the UT group received chemotherapy plus 300 mg of Uncaria tomentosa daily and the C group received only FOLFOX4 and served as a control. Blood samples were collected before each of the 6 cycles of chemotherapy, and hemograms, oxidative stress, enzymes antioxidants, immunologic parameters, and adverse events were analyzed. The use of 300 mg of Uncaria tomentosa daily during 6 cycles of FOLFOX4 did not change the analyzed parameters, and no toxic effects were observed. PMID:21869902

  11. Uncaria tomentosa for Reducing Side Effects Caused by Chemotherapy in CRC Patients: Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Farias, I L G; Araújo, M C S; Farias, J G; Rossato, L V; Elsenbach, L I; Dalmora, S L; Flores, N M P; Durigon, M; Cruz, I B M; Morsch, V M; Schetinger, M R C

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Uncaria tomentosa in minimizing the side effects of chemotherapy and improving the antioxidant status of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, a randomized clinical trial was conducted. Patients (43) undergoing adjuvant/palliative chemotherapy with 5-Fluorouracil/leucovorin + oxaliplatin (FOLFOX4) were split into two groups: the UT group received chemotherapy plus 300 mg of Uncaria tomentosa daily and the C group received only FOLFOX4 and served as a control. Blood samples were collected before each of the 6 cycles of chemotherapy, and hemograms, oxidative stress, enzymes antioxidants, immunologic parameters, and adverse events were analyzed. The use of 300 mg of Uncaria tomentosa daily during 6 cycles of FOLFOX4 did not change the analyzed parameters, and no toxic effects were observed.

  12. The Crc protein inhibits the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates in Pseudomonas putida under balanced carbon/nitrogen growth conditions.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Ruggero; de la Peña, Fernando; Prieto, María Axiliadora; Rojo, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida synthesizes polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) as storage compounds. PHA synthesis is more active when the carbon source is in excess and the nitrogen source is limiting, but can also occur at a lower rate under balanced carbon/nitrogen ratios. This work shows that PHA synthesis is controlled by the Crc global regulator, a protein that optimizes carbon metabolism by inhibiting the expression of genes involved in the use of non-preferred carbon sources. Crc acts post-transcriptionally. The mRNAs of target genes contain characteristic catabolite activity (CA) motifs near the ribosome binding site. Sequences resembling CA motifs can be predicted for the phaC1 gene, which codes for a PHA polymerase, and for phaI and phaF, which encode proteins associated to PHA granules. Our results show that Crc inhibits the translation of phaC1 mRNA, but not that of phaI or phaF, reducing the amount of PHA accumulated in the cell. Crc inhibited PHA synthesis during exponential growth in media containing a balanced carbon/nitrogen ratio. No inhibition was seen when the carbon/nitrogen ratio was imbalanced. This extends the role of Crc beyond that of controlling the hierarchical utilization of carbon sources and provides a link between PHA synthesis and the global regulatory networks controlling carbon flow.

  13. Reinforced structural plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubowitz, H. R.; Kendrick, W. P.; Jones, J. F.; Thorpe, R. S.; Burns, E. A. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    Reinforced polyimide structures are described. Reinforcing materials are impregnated with a suspension of polyimide prepolymer and bonded together by heat and pressure to form a cured, hard-reinforced, polyimide structure.

  14. Continuous carbon nanotube reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Ci, L; Suhr, J; Pushparaj, V; Zhang, X; Ajayan, P M

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are considered short fibers, and polymer composites with nanotube fillers are always analogues of random, short fiber composites. The real structural carbon fiber composites, on the other hand, always contain carbon fiber reinforcements where fibers run continuously through the composite matrix. With the recent optimization in aligned nanotube growth, samples of nanotubes in macroscopic lengths have become available, and this allows the creation of composites that are similar to the continuous fiber composites with individual nanotubes running continuously through the composite body. This allows the proper utilization of the extreme high modulus and strength predicted for nanotubes in structural composites. Here, we fabricate such continuous nanotube polymer composites with continuous nanotube reinforcements and report that under compressive loadings, the nanotube composites can generate more than an order of magnitude improvement in the longitudinal modulus (up to 3,300%) as well as damping capability (up to 2,100%). It is also observed that composites with a random distribution of nanotubes of same length and similar filler fraction provide three times less effective reinforcement in composites.

  15. Multicenter retrospective analysis of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H).

    PubMed

    Goldstein, J; Tran, B; Ensor, J; Gibbs, P; Wong, H L; Wong, S F; Vilar, E; Tie, J; Broaddus, R; Kopetz, S; Desai, J; Overman, M J

    2014-05-01

    The microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) phenotype, present in 15% of early colorectal cancer (CRC), confers good prognosis. MSI-H metastatic CRC is rare and its impact on outcomes is unknown. We describe survival outcomes and the impact of chemotherapy, metastatectomy, and BRAF V600E mutation status in the largest reported cohort of MSI-H metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). A retrospective review of 55 MSI-H metastatic CRC patients from two institutions, Royal Melbourne Hospital (Australia) and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States), was conducted. Statistical analyses utilized Kaplan-Meier method, Log-rank test, and Cox proportional hazards models. Median age was 67 years (20-90), 58% had poor differentiation, and 45% had stage IV disease at presentation. Median overall survival (OS) from metastatic disease was 15.4 months. Thirteen patients underwent R0/R1 metastatectomies, with median OS from metastatectomy 33.8 months. Thirty-one patients received first-line systemic chemotherapy for metastatic disease with median OS from the start of chemotherapy 11.5 months. No statistically significant difference in progression-free survival or OS was seen between fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, or irinotecan based chemotherapy. BRAF V600E mutation was present in 14 of 47 patients (30%). BRAF V600E patients demonstrated significantly worse median OS; 10.1 versus 17.3 months, P = 0.03. In multivariate analyses, BRAF V600E mutants had worse OS (HR 4.04; P = 0.005), while patients undergoing metastatectomy (HR 0.11; P = <0.001) and patients who initially presented as stage IV disease had improved OS (HR 0.27; P = 0.003). Patients with MSI-H metastatic CRC do not appear to have improved outcomes. BRAF V600E mutation is a poor prognostic factor in MSI-H metastatic CRC.

  16. Polymers for engineering applications

    SciTech Connect

    Seymour, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the world of engineering plastics. It discusses the polymers, their properties strengths and limitations. There are 11 chapters, organized so that each chapter builds on the knowledge of the previous material. Coverage includes important polymer concepts, such as molecular structure, bonding, morphology and molecular weight, and polymer properties, such as thermal expansion, thermal transition, electrical properties and viscoelasticity. Details are provided on methods of processing fabrication and on specific families of polymers. The general-purpose polymers are discussed, such as natural and synthetic rubbers, rayon, acrylic and alkyd coatings, polyethylene, polystyrene and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). There's information on high-performance polymers - fibers, elastomers, and coatings. A thorough explanation of the characteristics and qualities of nylons, polyesters, polyimides, neoprene, silicones, polyurethanes and other polymers is given in the same section. Functional polymers with special properties, such as photoconductivity, electric conductivity, piezoelectricity, light sensitivity, and ion exchange; and polymers that are superior to general-purpose plastics, such as ABS, filled polypropylene, and glass-reinforced plastics, are also covered.

  17. An overview of long fiber reinforced thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Bockstedt, R.J.; Skarlupka, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    Long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFRTP) are a class of injection molding materials that extend the physical property envelope of thermoplastics polymers. These materials are manufactured by pulling continuous fiber tows through a thermoplastic polymer melt in a specialized processing die. The strands are subsequently cooled and chopped into pellets of equal length. LFRTP materials are available in virtually every common thermoplastic resin with glass, aramid, stainless steel, or carbon fiber reinforcement at levels up to 60% by weight. Unlike short fiber reinforced thermoplastics manufactured by conventional screw compounding processes, LFRTP exhibit simultaneous improvements in both flexural modulus and impact resistance. Improvements in load transfer, creep resistance at elevated temperatures, and dimensional stability can also be attributed to the long fiber network formed in the molded part. This unique combination of properties makes LFRTP the material of choice for replacement of metal structural assemblies in many automotive, industrial, consumer and recreational applications.

  18. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2005-06-28

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  19. Recruiting community health centers into pragmatic research: Findings from STOP CRC.

    PubMed

    Coronado, Gloria D; Retecki, Sally; Schneider, Jennifer; Taplin, Stephen H; Burdick, Tim; Green, Beverly B

    2016-04-01

    Challenges of recruiting participants into pragmatic trials, particularly at the level of the health system, remain largely unexplored. As part of Strategies and Opportunities to STOP Colon Cancer in Priority Populations (STOP CRC), we recruited eight separate community health centers (consisting of 26 individual safety net clinics) into a large comparative effectiveness pragmatic study to evaluate methods of raising the rates of colorectal cancer screening. In partnership with STOP CRC's advisory board, we defined criteria to identify eligible health centers and applied these criteria to a list of health centers in Washington, Oregon, and California affiliated with Oregon Community Health Information Network, a 16-state practice-based research network of federally sponsored health centers. Project staff contacted centers that met eligibility criteria and arranged in-person meetings of key study investigators with health center leadership teams. We used the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research to thematically analyze the content of discussions during these meetings to identify major facilitators of and barriers to health center participation. From an initial list of 41 health centers, 11 met the initial inclusion criteria. Of these, leaders at three centers declined and at eight centers (26 clinic sites) agreed to participate (73%). Participating and nonparticipating health centers were similar with respect to clinic size, percent Hispanic patients, and percent uninsured patients. Participating health centers had higher proportions of Medicaid patients and higher baseline colorectal cancer screening rates. Common facilitators of participation were perception by center leadership that the project was an opportunity to increase colorectal cancer screening rates and to use electronic health record tools for population management. Barriers to participation were concerns of center leaders about ability to provide fecal testing to and assure follow-up of

  20. DcR3 induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition through activation of the TGF-β3/SMAD signaling pathway in CRC

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhi-Yan; Li, Sheng-Nan; Kan, He-Ping; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Zu-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3), a novel member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family, was recently reported to be associated with tumorigenesis and metastasis. However, the role of DcR3 in human colorectal cancer (CRC) has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we found that DcR3 expression was significantly higher in human colorectal cancer tissues than in paired normal tissues, and that DcR3 expression was strongly correlated with tumor invasion, lymph node metastases and poor prognoses. Moreover, DcR3 overexpression significantly enhanced CRC cell proliferation and migration in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. Conversely, DcR3 knockdown significantly repressed CRC cell proliferation and migration in vitro, and DcR3 deficiency also attenuated CRC tumorigenesis and metastasis in vivo. Functionally, DcR3 was essential for TGF-β3/SMAD-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of CRC cells. Importantly, cooperation between DcR3 and TGF-β3/SMAD-EMT signaling-related protein expression was correlated with survival and survival time in CRC patients. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that DcR3 may be a prognostic biomarker for CRC and that this receptor facilitates CRC development and metastasis by participating in TGF-β3/SMAD-mediated EMT of CRC cells. PMID:27764793

  1. The Crc and Hfq proteins of Pseudomonas putida cooperate in catabolite repression and formation of ribonucleic acid complexes with specific target motifs.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Renata; Hernández-Arranz, Sofía; La Rosa, Ruggero; Yuste, Luis; Madhushani, Anjana; Shingler, Victoria; Rojo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The Crc protein is a global regulator that has a key role in catabolite repression and optimization of metabolism in Pseudomonads. Crc inhibits gene expression post-transcriptionally, preventing translation of mRNAs bearing an AAnAAnAA motif [the catabolite activity (CA) motif] close to the translation start site. Although Crc was initially believed to bind RNA by itself, this idea was recently challenged by results suggesting that a protein co-purifying with Crc, presumably the Hfq protein, could account for the detected RNA-binding activity. Hfq is an abundant protein that has a central role in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Herein, we show that the Pseudomonas putida Hfq protein can recognize the CA motifs of RNAs through its distal face and that Crc facilitates formation of a more stable complex at these targets. Crc was unable to bind RNA in the absence of Hfq. However, pull-down assays showed that Crc and Hfq can form a co-complex with RNA containing a CA motif in vitro. Inactivation of the hfq or the crc gene impaired catabolite repression to a similar extent. We propose that Crc and Hfq cooperate in catabolite repression, probably through forming a stable co-complex with RNAs containing CA motifs to result in inhibition of translation initiation.

  2. Microbial Degradation of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-16

    Processing 6. Chemical Vapour Deposition 7. Pultrusion 8. Sheet Moulding Compound volume IV 1. Bonded and Bolted Joints 2. Hybrids 3. Vibration 4... Polyurethane Coatings, Prcedig of Shirley Institute Conferenc ’k4anhesmw UlK Shirey Institut Publication S41, March 1981. 20. lUPalWt PJ., Microbial Attak on

  3. Protecting Children from Violence and Maltreatment: A Qualitative Comparative Analysis Assessing the Implementation of U.N. CRC Article 19

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svevo-Cianci, Kimberly A.; Hart, Stuart N.; Rubinson, Claude

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: (1) To identify which United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) recommended child protection (CP) measures, such as policy, reporting systems, and services for child abuse and neglect (CAN) victims, individually or in combination, were most important in establishing a basic level of child protection in 42 countries;…

  4. First-line bevacizumab and capecitabine-oxaliplatin in elderly patients with mCRC: GEMCAD phase II BECOX study.

    PubMed

    Feliu, J; Salud, A; Safont, M J; García-Girón, C; Aparicio, J; Vera, R; Serra, O; Casado, E; Jorge, M; Escudero, P; Bosch, C; Bohn, U; Pérez-Carrión, R; Carmona, A; Martínez-Marín, V; Maurel, J

    2014-07-15

    Subgroup analyses of clinical studies suggest that bevacizumab plus XELOX is effective and tolerable in elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The prospective BECOX study examined the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab plus XELOX, followed by bevacizumab plus capecitabine in elderly patients with mCRC. Patients aged ⩾70 years with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 out of 1 and confirmed mCRC were included. Patients received bevacizumab 7.5 mg kg(-1) and oxaliplatin 130 mg m(-2) on day 1, plus capecitabine 1000 mg m(-2) bid orally on days 1-14 every 21 days; oxaliplatin was discontinued after 6 cycles. The primary end point was time to progression (TTP). The intent-to-treat population comprised 68 patients (65% male, median age 76 years). Median TTP was 11.1 months; median overall survival was 20.4 months; overall response rate was 46%. Grade 3 or 4 adverse events included diarrhoea (18%) and asthenia (16%). Grade 3 or 4 adverse events of special interest for bevacizumab included deep-vein thrombosis (6%) and pulmonary embolism (4%). Bevacizumab plus XELOX was effective and well tolerated in elderly patients in the BECOX study. The adverse-event profile was similar to previous reports; no new safety concerns were identified. Fit elderly patients with mCRC should be considered for treatment with bevacizumab plus XELOX.

  5. First-line bevacizumab and capecitabine–oxaliplatin in elderly patients with mCRC: GEMCAD phase II BECOX study

    PubMed Central

    Feliu, J; Salud, A; Safont, M J; García-Girón, C; Aparicio, J; Vera, R; Serra, O; Casado, E; Jorge, M; Escudero, P; Bosch, C; Bohn, U; Pérez-Carrión, R; Carmona, A; Martínez-Marín, V; Maurel, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Subgroup analyses of clinical studies suggest that bevacizumab plus XELOX is effective and tolerable in elderly patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The prospective BECOX study examined the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab plus XELOX, followed by bevacizumab plus capecitabine in elderly patients with mCRC. Methods: Patients aged ⩾70 years with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 out of 1 and confirmed mCRC were included. Patients received bevacizumab 7.5 mg kg−1 and oxaliplatin 130 mg m−2 on day 1, plus capecitabine 1000 mg m−2 bid orally on days 1–14 every 21 days; oxaliplatin was discontinued after 6 cycles. The primary end point was time to progression (TTP). Results: The intent-to-treat population comprised 68 patients (65% male, median age 76 years). Median TTP was 11.1 months; median overall survival was 20.4 months; overall response rate was 46%. Grade 3 or 4 adverse events included diarrhoea (18%) and asthenia (16%). Grade 3 or 4 adverse events of special interest for bevacizumab included deep-vein thrombosis (6%) and pulmonary embolism (4%). Conclusions: Bevacizumab plus XELOX was effective and well tolerated in elderly patients in the BECOX study. The adverse-event profile was similar to previous reports; no new safety concerns were identified. Fit elderly patients with mCRC should be considered for treatment with bevacizumab plus XELOX. PMID:24946000

  6. Segmental distribution of some common molecular markers for colorectal cancer (CRC): influencing factors and potential implications.

    PubMed

    Papagiorgis, Petros Christakis

    2016-05-01

    Proximal and distal colorectal cancers (CRCs) are regarded as distinct disease entities, evolving through different genetic pathways and showing multiple clinicopathological and molecular differences. Segmental distribution of some common markers (e.g., KRAS, EGFR, Ki-67, Bcl-2, COX-2) is clinically important, potentially affecting their prognostic or predictive value. However, this distribution is influenced by a variety of factors such as the anatomical overlap of tumorigenic molecular events, associations of some markers with other clinicopathological features (stage and/or grade), and wide methodological variability in markers' assessment. All these factors represent principal influences followed by intratumoral heterogeneity and geographic variation in the frequency of detection of particular markers, whereas the role of other potential influences (e.g., pre-adjuvant treatment, interaction between markers) remains rather unclear. Better understanding and elucidation of the various influences may provide a more accurate picture of the segmental distribution of molecular markers in CRC, potentially allowing the application of a novel patient stratification for treatment, based on particular molecular profiles in combination with tumor location.

  7. Genetics, inheritance and strategies for prevention in populations at high risk of colorectal cancer (CRC).

    PubMed

    Burn, John; Mathers, John; Bishop, D Tim

    2013-01-01

    largest polyp in the aspirin versus non-aspirin group (p = 0.02), Mean crypt length decreased significantly over time on study in the two combined RS groups, compared with the two combined non-RS groups (p < 0.0001 for interaction), in a model of the interaction between intervention and time. In CAPP2, 1009 Lynch syndrome gene carriers were recruited from 43 international centres. 937 commenced intervention: 600 mg enteric coated aspirin and/or 30grams of the resistant starch Novelose in a 2 by 2 factorial placebo controlled design. After a mean of 29 months, intervention, there was no evidence that either agent influenced development of colonic neoplasia. However, the design included double blind follow-up for at least 10 years. After a mean of 55.7 months, and despite regular colonoscopy and polyp removal, 48 recruits developed CRC. Of these, 18 received aspirin and 30 received AP; the HR for CRC for aspirin was 0.63 (CI 0.35-1.13, p = 0.12). Five of the 48 people who developed CRC each had two primary colon cancers. Poisson regression analysis to allow for multiple primary events indicated a protective effect: IRR 0.56 (CI 0.32-0.99, p = 0.05). For those who took aspirin (or AP) for a minimum of 2 years (per protocol) the HR was 0.41 (CI 0.19-0.86 p = 0.02) and the IRR, 0.37 (CI 0.18-0.78 p = 0.008). Combined analysis of all LS cancers including CRC revealed a similar effect. On intention to treat analysis, the HR was 0.65 (CI 0.42-1.00, p = 0.05 and IRR was 0.59 (CI 0.39-0.90 p = 0.01), while the Per Protocol analysis HR was 0.45 (CI 0.26-0.79 p = 0.005,) and IRR was 0.42 (CI 0.25-0.72, p = 0.001). Adverse events in the aspirin and placebo groups were similar with 11 significant gastrointestinal bleeds or ulcers in the aspirin group and 9 in the placebo group. The evidence is now sufficient to recommend aspirin to all Lynch syndrome gene carriers. CAPP3 will recruit 3000 gene carriers into a dose inferiority study to test the relative benefits of 100mg, 300 or 600mg

  8. CRC/EORTC/NCI Joint Formulation Working Party: experiences in the formulation of investigational cytotoxic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Beijnen, J. H.; Flora, K. P.; Halbert, G. W.; Henrar, R. E.; Slack, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    The pharmaceutical formulation of a new anti-tumour agent has often been perceived as the bottleneck in anti-cancer drug development. In order to increase the speed of this essential development step, the Cancer Research Campaign (CRC), the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) agreed in 1987 to form the Joint Formulation Working Party (JFWP). The main goal of the JFWP is to facilitate the rapid progress of a new drug through pharmaceutical developmental to preclinical toxicology and subsequently to phase I clinical trial. Under the auspices of the JFWP around 50 new agents have been developed or are currently in development. In this report we present our formulation experiences since the establishment of the JFWP with a selected number of agents: aphidicolin glycinate, bryostatin 1, carmethizole, carzelesin, combretastatin A4, dabis maleate, disulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine, E.O.9, 4-hydroxyanisole, pancratistatin, rhizoxin, Springer pro-drug, SRI 62-834, temozolomide, trimelamol and V489. The approaches used and problems presented may be of general interest to scientists in related fields and those considering submitting agents for development. PMID:7599054

  9. CRC fuel rating program: road octane performance of oxygenates in 1982 model cars

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    Because of the widespread interest in the use of alcohols and ethers as gasoline blending components, this program was conducted to evaluate the effects of several oxygenates on gasoline octane performance and to evaluate the effects of car design features such as engine and transmission type. Five oxygenates were evaluated at two nominal concentrations, 5 and 10 volume%, at both regular- and premium-grade octane levels: methanol (MeOH), ethanol (ETOH), isopropanol (IPA), tertiary butanol (TBA), and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). A blend of 5% MeOH and 5 percent TBA was also tested at both octane levels. Twenty-eight unleaded fuels, including four hydrocarbon fuels, two hydrocarbon fuels plus toluene, and twenty-two oxygenated fuels, were rated in duplicate in thirty-eight cars using the Modified Uniontown Technique (CRC Designation F-28-75 described in Appendix C), plus some additional instructions. All testing was done on chassis dynamometers. Ratings were obtained at full throttle with all thirty-eight cars, and at the most critical part-throttle condition (occurring with manifold vacuum of 4 in. Hg (13.5 kPa) or greater above the full-throttle vacuum) with nine cars.

  10. Graphene Nanoplatelet Reinforced Tantalum Carbide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-27

    reinforced metals: copper/tungsten and copper/molybdenum. J Mech Phys Solids 1965;13:329–50. [27] Lourie O, Cox DM, Wagner HD . Buckling and collapse of...embedded carbon nanotubes. Phys Rev Lett 1998;81:1638. [28] Wagner HD , Lourie O, Feldman Y, Tenne R. Stress-induced fragmentation of multiwall carbon...nanotubes in a polymer matrix. Appl Phys Lett 1998;72:188. [29] Filleter T, Bernal R, Li S, Espinosa HD . Ultrahigh strength and stiffness in cross-linked

  11. Reducing Behavior through Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deitz, Diane E. D.; Repp, Alan C.

    1983-01-01

    The use of reinforcement to reduce inappropriate behaviors of mentally retarded and emotionally disturbed students may involve the following procedures: differential reinforcement of low rates of responding (DRL), the differential reinforcement of response omission (DRO), and the differential reinforcement of incompatible (DRI) or alternative…

  12. The Reinforcement Hierarchy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forness, Steven R.

    1973-01-01

    Reinforcement hierarchy implies movement along a continuum from top to bottom, from primitive levels of reinforcement to more sophisticated levels. Unless it is immediately obvious that a child cannot function without the use of lower-order reinforcers, we should approach him as though he responds to topmost reinforcers until he demonstrates…

  13. Multilayered Glass Fibre-reinforced Composites In Rotational Moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W. C.; Harkin-Jones, E.; Kearns, M.; McCourt, M.

    2011-05-01

    The potential of multiple layer fibre-reinforced mouldings is of growing interest to the rotational moulding industry because of their cost/performance ratio. The particular problem that arises when using reinforcements in this process relate to the fact that the process is low shear and good mixing of resin and reinforcement is not optimum under those conditions. There is also a problem of the larger/heavier reinforcing agents segregating out of the powder to lay up on the inner part surface. In this study, short glass fibres were incorporated and distributed into a polymer matrix to produce fibre-reinforced polymer composites using the rotational moulding process and characterised in terms of morphology and mechanical properties.

  14. Multilayered Glass Fibre-reinforced Composites In Rotational Moulding

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, W. C.; Harkin-Jones, E.; Kearns, M.; McCourt, M.

    2011-05-04

    The potential of multiple layer fibre-reinforced mouldings is of growing interest to the rotational moulding industry because of their cost/performance ratio. The particular problem that arises when using reinforcements in this process relate to the fact that the process is low shear and good mixing of resin and reinforcement is not optimum under those conditions. There is also a problem of the larger/heavier reinforcing agents segregating out of the powder to lay up on the inner part surface. In this study, short glass fibres were incorporated and distributed into a polymer matrix to produce fibre-reinforced polymer composites using the rotational moulding process and characterised in terms of morphology and mechanical properties.

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) Pro12Ala polymorphism and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Shao, Yan; Tang, Shenhua; Cheng, Xianyong; Lian, Haifeng; Qin, Chengyong

    2015-01-01

    The association between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) Pro12Ala polymorphism and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk was inconclusive. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism and CRC risk. We searched Pubmed, EMBASE, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases. Data were extracted and pooled odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. A total of 17 case-control studies with 12635 and 15803 controls were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism was associated with CRC risk (OR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.75-0.94, P = 0.003, I(2) = 35%). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, a significant association was found among Caucasians (OR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.75-0.96, P = 0.007, I(2) = 38%) but not among Asians (OR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.51-1.12, P = 0.17, I(2) = 28%). In the subgroup analysis by CRC site, a significant association was found among colon cancer (OR = 0.81, 95% CI 0.66-0.98, P = 0.03, I(2) = 16%) but not among rectal cancer (OR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.57-1.21, P = 0.34, I(2) = 63%). The sensitivity analysis did not influence the result by omitting low-quality studies (OR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.63-0.93, P = 0.006, I(2) = 51%). In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested that PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism was significant associated with CRC risk.

  16. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) Pro12Ala polymorphism and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Shao, Yan; Tang, Shenhua; Cheng, Xianyong; Lian, Haifeng; Qin, Chengyong

    2015-01-01

    Background: The association between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) Pro12Ala polymorphism and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk was inconclusive. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism and CRC risk. Material and Method: We searched Pubmed, EMBASE, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases. Data were extracted and pooled odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Results: A total of 17 case-control studies with 12635 and 15803 controls were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism was associated with CRC risk (OR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.75-0.94, P = 0.003, I2 = 35%). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, a significant association was found among Caucasians (OR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.75-0.96, P = 0.007, I2 = 38%) but not among Asians (OR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.51-1.12, P = 0.17, I2 = 28%). In the subgroup analysis by CRC site, a significant association was found among colon cancer (OR = 0.81, 95% CI 0.66-0.98, P = 0.03, I2 = 16%) but not among rectal cancer (OR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.57-1.21, P = 0.34, I2 = 63%). The sensitivity analysis did not influence the result by omitting low-quality studies (OR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.63-0.93, P = 0.006, I2 = 51%). Conclusions: In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested that PPARγ Pro12Ala polymorphism was significant associated with CRC risk. PMID:26064311

  17. Polymer/Silicate Nanocomposites Developed for Improved Thermal Stability and Barrier Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi G.

    2001-01-01

    The nanoscale reinforcement of polymers is becoming an attractive means of improving the properties and stability of polymers. Polymer-silicate nanocomposites are a relatively new class of materials with phase dimensions typically on the order of a few nanometers. Because of their nanometer-size features, nanocomposites possess unique properties typically not shared by more conventional composites. Polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites can attain a certain degree of stiffness, strength, and barrier properties with far less ceramic content than comparable glass- or mineral-reinforced polymers. Reinforcement of existing and new polyimides by this method offers an opportunity to greatly improve existing polymer properties without altering current synthetic or processing procedures.

  18. An overview of long fiber reinforced thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Bockstedt R.J.; Skarlupka, R.J.

    1997-12-31

    Long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFRTP) are a class of injection molding materials that extend the physical property envelope of thermoplastic polymers. The technology to manufacture LFRTP has improved during the last 10 years. This has resulted in dramatic improvements in the quality of these materials. They are now used in numerous, high volume commercial applications. LFRTP are pelletized, fiber reinforced thermoplastic polymers which are injection molded to form parts. The reinforcing fibers are 9-12 mm in length, compared to 0.5-1.0 mm typically found in other fiber reinforced thermoplastic materials. These longer fibers provide several property enhancements: higher impact strength, improved modulus at elevated temperatures and better dimensional stability. LFRTP are manufactured by pulling continuous fiber tows through a thermoplastic polymer melt in a specialized processing die. The ratio of fiber to resin is controlled by a metering orifice. The resulting rods are cut into pellets, 8-12 mm in length, that can be injection molded to form a part. Early manufacturing attempts mimicked wire-coating technology and did not wet-out the individual fibers within the tow. This resulted in poorly wet-out pellets, containing high levels of loose fibers. This creates problems in automated material handling and produces potential flaws in a molded part.

  19. Compatibilization of recycled polymers through radiation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czvikovszky, T.; Hargitai, H.

    1999-08-01

    The use of compatibilizers is crucial in composites of apolar polymer matrix such as PP, and fibrous, polar reinforcement such as viscose, flax, hemp and similar fibers. Radiation treatment using small EB dose of 8 kGy may enhance the effect of reactive compatibilizers of acrylic oligomer type, involving both matrix and reinforcement into a chemically attached system. In the present work we applied by-products of the textile industry as reinforcing additives for polypropylene reprocessed from recollected car-bumpers.

  20. Polymer films

    DOEpatents

    Granick, Steve; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.

    2008-12-30

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.