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Sample records for polymer-based autologous chondrocyte

  1. Treatment of focal degenerative cartilage defects with polymer-based autologous chondrocyte grafts: four-year clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Kreuz, Peter C; Müller, Sebastian; Ossendorf, Christian; Kaps, Christian; Erggelet, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Second-generation autologous chondrocyte implantation with scaffolds stabilizing the grafts is a clinically effective procedure for cartilage repair. In this ongoing prospective observational case report study, we evaluated the effectiveness of BioSeed®-C, a cell-based cartilage graft based on autologous chondrocytes embedded in fibrin and a stable resorbable polymer scaffold, for the treatment of clinical symptomatic focal degenerative defects of the knee. Methods Clinical outcome after 4-year clinical follow-up was assessed in 19 patients with preoperatively radiologically confirmed osteoarthritis and a Kellgren-Lawrence score of 2 or more. Clinical scoring was performed before implantation of the graft and 6, 12, and 48 months after implantation using the Lysholm score, the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, and the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) score. Cartilage regeneration and articular resurfacing were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 4 years after implantation of the autologous cartilage graft. Results Significant improvement (P < 0.05) of the Lysholm and ICRS scores was observed as early as 6 months after implantation of BioSeed®-C and remained stable during follow-up. The IKDC score showed significant improvement compared with the preoperative situation at 12 and 48 months (P < 0.05). The KOOS showed significant improvement in the subclasses pain, activities of daily living, and knee-related quality of life 6 months as well as 1 and 4 years after implantation of BioSeed®-C in osteoarthritic defects (P < 0.05). MRI analysis showed moderate to complete defect filling with a normal to incidentally hyperintense signal in 16 out of 19 patients treated with BioSeed®-C. Two patients without improvement in the clinical and MRI scores received a total knee endoprosthesis after 4 years. Conclusions The results show that the good clinical

  2. Autologous Chondrocytes and Next-Generation Matrix-Based Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation.

    PubMed

    Hinckel, Betina B; Gomoll, Andreas H

    2017-07-01

    Focal chondral defects of the knee are common and can significantly impair quality of life. The autologous chondrocyte implantation technique has evolved over the past 20 years; the newest third-generation technique is matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation. Physical examination is important to characterize location and source of pain and identify associated injuries. Imaging studies allow characterization of the lesions, identification of associated lesions, and alignment. Conservative measures should be exhausted before proceeding with surgical treatment. Steps of surgical treatment are diagnostic arthroscopy and biopsy, chondrocyte culture, and chondrocyte implantation. The techniques and their outcomes are discussed in this article. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Cartilage biopsy for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI)].

    PubMed

    Pestka, J M; Salzmann, G M; Südkamp, N P; Niemeyer, P

    2013-06-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is an established two-step procedure for the treatment of full-thickness cartilage defects of the knee. Cartilage harvest from the affected knee joint represents the first step of this procedure and is essential for further in vitro expansion of autologous chondrocytes. Nevertheless, the cartilage biopsy process itself is underrepresented in the scientific literature and currently there is only a limited amount of data available addressing this process. Biopsy location as well as the technique itself and instruments used for cartilage collection are not well defined and only little standardisation can be found. The article describes the relevant aspects of the biopsy in the context of ACI with regard to the literature available. Follow-up studies to better define and standardise the cartilage biopsy process are thus required.

  4. Osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes stimulate autologous T cell responses in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sakata, M; Masuko-Hongo, K; Nakamura, H; Onuma, H; Tsuruha, J I; Aoki, H; Nishioka, K; Kato, T

    2003-01-01

    To clarify the presence of specific T cell immune response to autologous chondrocytes in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from OA or post-traumatic patients were co-cultured with irradiated autologous chondrocytes, and their proliferative response was assessed using 3H-thymidine incorporation. Expression of HLA-class II molecules was also assessed on chondrocytes by immunohistochemistry or flow cytometry. T cell responses to autologous chondrocytes in OA yielded a significantly greater mean stimulation index (6.35 +/- 1.63) compared to controls (1.21 +/- 0.09, p < 0.01). This response was partially blocked by antibodies against HLA class I, class II, CD4 or CD8. Increased expression of HLA-DP, -DQ, and -DR was observed. This study showed the autologous T cell-stimulating property of OA chondrocytes in vitro. The elucidation of the autoimmune responses may contribute to the understanding of immune-mediated mechanisms in OA.

  5. Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Welch, Tyler; Mandelbaum, Bert; Tom, Minas

    2016-06-01

    Focal cartilage defects of the knee are relatively common and may increase the risk of developing osteoarthritis. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) aims to restore the integrity of isolated cartilage lesions through the induction of hyaline-like cartilage formation. Although ACI has traditionally been used as a second-line treatment, recent evidence suggests that ACI should be considered as a first-line treatment option in certain patients. Recent controlled trials also suggest that there are improved clinical outcomes among those patients who undergo ACI over the mid-term and long-term compared with those treated with microfracture or osteochondral autograft/mosaicplasty, regardless of lesion size. Recent literature also indicates that arthroscopic, second-generation and third-generation techniques are associated with better outcomes and fewer complications than first-generation ACI. In summary, ACI is an effective tool for cartilage restoration that may be more efficacious and durable than other cartilage restoration techniques for appropriate candidates.

  6. Autologous chondrocyte implantation: superior biologic properties of hyaline cartilage repairs.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Ian; Lavigne, Patrick; Valenzuela, Herminio; Oakes, Barry

    2007-02-01

    Information regarding the quality of autologous chondrocyte implantation repair is needed to determine whether the current autologous chondrocyte implantation surgical technology and the subsequent biologic repair processes are capable of reliably forming durable hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage in vivo. We report and analyze the properties and qualities of autologous chondrocyte implantation repairs. We evaluated 66 autologous chondrocyte implantation repairs in 57 patients, 55 of whom had histology, indentometry, and International Cartilage Repair Society repair scoring at reoperation for mechanical symptoms or pain. International Knee Documentation Committee scores were used to address clinical outcome. Maximum stiffness, normalized stiffness, and International Cartilage Repair Society repair scoring were higher for hyaline articular cartilage repairs compared with fibrocartilage, with no difference in clinical outcome. Reoperations revealed 32 macroscopically abnormal repairs (Group B) and 23 knees with normal-looking repairs in which symptoms leading to arthroscopy were accounted for by other joint disorders (Group A). In Group A, 65% of repairs were either hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage compared with 28% in Group B. Autologous chondrocyte repairs composed of fibrocartilage showed more morphologic abnormalities and became symptomatic earlier than hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage repairs. The hyaline articular cartilage repairs had biomechanical properties comparable to surrounding cartilage and superior to those associated with fibrocartilage repairs.

  7. Comparison of marker gene expression in chondrocytes from patients receiving autologous chondrocyte transplantation versus osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Stoop, Reinout; Albrecht, Dirk; Gaissmaier, Christoph; Fritz, Jürgen; Felka, Tino; Rudert, Maximilian; Aicher, Wilhelm K

    2007-01-01

    Currently, autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is used to treat traumatic cartilage damage or osteochondrosis dissecans, but not degenerative arthritis. Since substantial refinements in the isolation, expansion and transplantation of chondrocytes have been made in recent years, the treatment of early stage osteoarthritic lesions using ACT might now be feasible. In this study, we determined the gene expression patterns of osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes ex vivo after primary culture and subculture and compared these with healthy chondrocytes ex vivo and with articular chondrocytes expanded for treatment of patients by ACT. Gene expression profiles were determined using quantitative RT-PCR for type I, II and X collagen, aggrecan, IL-1β and activin-like kinase-1. Furthermore, we tested the capability of osteoarthritic chondrocytes to generate hyaline-like cartilage by implanting chondrocyte-seeded collagen scaffolds into immunodeficient (SCID) mice. OA chondrocytes ex vivo showed highly elevated levels of IL-1β mRNA, but type I and II collagen levels were comparable to those of healthy chondrocytes. After primary culture, IL-1β levels decreased to baseline levels, while the type II and type I collagen mRNA levels matched those found in chondrocytes used for ACT. OA chondrocytes generated type II collagen and proteoglycan-rich cartilage transplants in SCID mice. We conclude that after expansion under suitable conditions, the cartilage of OA patients contains cells that are not significantly different from those from healthy donors prepared for ACT. OA chondrocytes are also capable of producing a cartilage-like tissue in the in vivo SCID mouse model. Thus, such chondrocytes seem to fulfil the prerequisites for use in ACT treatment. PMID:17596264

  8. Comparison of marker gene expression in chondrocytes from patients receiving autologous chondrocyte transplantation versus osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Reinout; Albrecht, Dirk; Gaissmaier, Christoph; Fritz, Jürgen; Felka, Tino; Rudert, Maximilian; Aicher, Wilhelm K

    2007-01-01

    Currently, autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is used to treat traumatic cartilage damage or osteochondrosis dissecans, but not degenerative arthritis. Since substantial refinements in the isolation, expansion and transplantation of chondrocytes have been made in recent years, the treatment of early stage osteoarthritic lesions using ACT might now be feasible. In this study, we determined the gene expression patterns of osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes ex vivo after primary culture and subculture and compared these with healthy chondrocytes ex vivo and with articular chondrocytes expanded for treatment of patients by ACT. Gene expression profiles were determined using quantitative RT-PCR for type I, II and X collagen, aggrecan, IL-1beta and activin-like kinase-1. Furthermore, we tested the capability of osteoarthritic chondrocytes to generate hyaline-like cartilage by implanting chondrocyte-seeded collagen scaffolds into immunodeficient (SCID) mice. OA chondrocytes ex vivo showed highly elevated levels of IL-1beta mRNA, but type I and II collagen levels were comparable to those of healthy chondrocytes. After primary culture, IL-1beta levels decreased to baseline levels, while the type II and type I collagen mRNA levels matched those found in chondrocytes used for ACT. OA chondrocytes generated type II collagen and proteoglycan-rich cartilage transplants in SCID mice. We conclude that after expansion under suitable conditions, the cartilage of OA patients contains cells that are not significantly different from those from healthy donors prepared for ACT. OA chondrocytes are also capable of producing a cartilage-like tissue in the in vivo SCID mouse model. Thus, such chondrocytes seem to fulfil the prerequisites for use in ACT treatment.

  9. Generative surgery of cultured autologous auricular chondrocytes for nasal augmentation.

    PubMed

    Yanaga, Hiroko; Imai, Keisuke; Yanaga, Katsu

    2009-11-01

    Conventional treatment for nasal augmentation utilizes autologous grafts, allografts, or synthetic implants such as silicon implants. Silicon implants could protrude/expose or induce nasal bone resorption. Autologous grafts are usually associated with donor site morbidity and the volume of harvested tissue is limited. We had developed a new method for nasal augmentation using cultured autologous chondrocytes (CAC). The current report presents the results of a study using that method with a larger number of patients and an improved graft technique for the nasal tip. Approximately 1 cm2 of cartilage was harvested from the auricular concha and treated with collagenase, and then chondrocytes were obtained. In our multilayer culture system the chondrocytes formed immature cartilaginous tissues with a gelatinous chondroid matrix. They were injection-grafted into the subcutaneous pocket of the nasal dorsum. The chondrocytes with a gelatinous chondroid matrix change from a soft gel to hard neocartilage tissue within 2 to 3 weeks and then stabilize. The authors have used this procedure over a 6-year period on 75 cases: 58 secondary augmentation rhinoplasties following silicon implantation and 17 primary augmentation cases. The results have been satisfactory and long-lasting. Grafting of CAC is an optional method for nasal augmentation and could be used for a wide range of facial augmentation cases.

  10. [Interaction between human chondrocytes and extracellular matrix in vitro: a contribution to autologous chondrocyte transplantation].

    PubMed

    Shakibaei, M; Csaki, C; Rahmanzadeh, M; Putz, R

    2008-05-01

    Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) has had reasonable success for repairing small articular cartilage defects. A limiting factor for ACT is, however, the in vitro cultivation of chondrocytes because it leads to dedifferentiation. Therefore, the goal of this work was to optimize the monolayer culture of chondrocytes in vitro. Human articular chondrocytes were plated on either collagen type II or untreated surfaces. The cells were evaluated morphologically and with immunoblotting. On collagen type II surfaces, a stable chondrogenic phenotype, expression of beta1-integrin, and a significant activation of phosphorylated intracellular proteins and the adaptor protein Shc could be observed up to day 20 in culture. Treatment with beta1 integrin antibody led to a loss of cell adhesion (82%). The results indicate that on collagen type II, beta1-integrin receptors are activated. Through the activation of Shc, these stimulate the Ras-MAPK pathway, which stabilizes the chondrogenic phenotype. Our results provide a practical and low-cost solution for improved long-term chondrocyte cultivation, thus providing a new perspective for using ACT on larger or arthrotic cartilage defects.

  11. AUTOLOGOUS CHONDROCYTE TRANSPLANTATION-SERIES OF 3 CASES

    PubMed Central

    Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Barreto, Ronald Bispo; Pécora, José Ricardo; Rezende, Múrcia Uchõa de; Filho, Tarcisio E.P Barros; Lombello, Christiane Bertachini

    2015-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage covers joint surfaces and plays an important role in reducing friction and mechanical loading on synovial joints such as the knee. This tissue is not supplied with blood vessels, nerves or lymphatic circulation, which may be one of the reasons why joint cartilage has such poor capacity for healing. Chondral lesions that reach the subchondral bone (osteochondral lesions) do not heal and may progress to arthrosis with the passage of time. In young patients, treatment of chondral defects of the knee is still a challenge, especially in lesions larger than 4 cm. One option for treating these patients is autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation. Because this treatment does not violate the subchondral bone and repairs the defect with tissue similar to hyaline cartilage, it has the theoretical advantage of being more biological, and mechanically superior, compared with other techniques. In this paper, we describe our experience with autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation at the Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Hospital das Clínicas, University of Sâo Paulo, through a report on three cases. PMID:27022579

  12. [Cell-based therapy options for osteochondral defects. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells compared to autologous chondrocytes].

    PubMed

    Grässel, S; Anders, S

    2012-05-01

    Cartilage defects are multifactorial and site-specific and therefore need a clear analysis of the underlying pathology as well as an individualized therapy so that cartilage repair lacks a one-for-all therapy. The results of comparative clinical studies using cultured chondrocytes in autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) have shown some superiority over conventional microfracturing under defined conditions, especially for medium or large defects and in long-term durability. Adult mesenchymal stem cells can be isolated from bone marrow, have the potency to proliferate in culture and are capable of differentiating into the chondrogenic pathway. They represent a promising versatile cell source for cartilage repair but the ideal conditions for cultivation and application in cartilage repair are not yet known or have not yet been characterized. Adding a scaffold offers mechanical stability and advances chondrogenic differentiation for both possible cell sources.

  13. Increasing the Dose of Autologous Chondrocytes Improves Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Guillén-García, Pedro; Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; Guillén-Vicente, Isabel; Caballero-Santos, Rosa; Guillén-Vicente, Marta; Abelow, Stephen; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Background: We hypothesized that implanting cells in a chondral defect at a density more similar to that of the intact cartilage could induce them to synthesize matrix with the features more similar to that of the uninjured one. Methods: We compared the implantation of different doses of chondrocytes: 1 million (n = 5), 5 million (n = 5), or 5 million mesenchymal cells (n = 5) in the femoral condyle of 15 sheep. Tissue generated by microfracture at the trochlea, and normal cartilage from a nearby region, processed as the tissues resulting from the implantation, were used as references. Histological and molecular (expression of type I and II collagens and aggrecan) studies were performed. Results: The features of the cartilage generated by implantation of mesenchymal cells and elicited by microfractures were similar and typical of a poor repair of the articular cartilage (presence of fibrocartilage, high expression of type I collagen and a low mRNA levels of type II collagen and aggrecan). Nevertheless, in the samples obtained from tissues generated by implantation of chondrocytes, hyaline-like cartilage, cell organization, low expression rates of type I collagen and high levels of mRNA corresponding to type II collagen and aggrecan were observed. These histological features, show less variability and are more similar to those of the normal cartilage used as control in the case of 5 million cells implantation than when 1 million cells were used. Conclusions: The implantation of autologous chondrocytes in type I/III collagen membranes at high density could be a promising tool to repair articular cartilage. PMID:26069691

  14. [Repair of chondral defects of the knee using a combination of autologous chondrocytes and osteochondral allograft--an animal model. Part I: in vitro culture of autologous chondrocytes].

    PubMed

    Bacenková, D; Rosocha, J; Svihla, R; Vasko, G; Bodnár, J

    2001-01-01

    In the study we used in vitro cultivated autologous chondrocytes in combination with osteochondral allografts for the treatment of local defects of articular cartilage on the animal model (rabbit). Chondrocytes for in vitro cultivation were harvested by biopsy of articular cartilage of rabbit. For the monolayer cultivation we used Nutrient mix F 12 (Gibco BRL) with addition of Lascorbic acid (50 micrograms/ml, Sigma) and insulin-trasferin-selenium (A 6.26 micrograms/ml, Gibco BRL), 20% of fectal serum (Gibco BRL) and antibiotic antimycotic solution (Gibco BRL). Cultivation of chondrocytes took place at 37 degrees in the atmosphere of 5% CO2. Multiplied chondrocytes re-suspended in fibrin glue in combination with two osteochondral allografts were used for the reparation of artificial defect of the rabbit cartilage. For the analysis of collagen type II in the cultivation medium we used the principle of salting out by 30% ammonium sulphate and subsequent pepsinization in an acid environment with a repeated salting out by means of 2M of NaCl. Precipitates were dissolved in 5.0 M of acetic acid and used for SDS PAGE and immunoblotting. As a detection system we used ECL (Amersham/Pharmacia Biotech). The final average number of chondrocytes multiplied by monolayer cultivation was 1.10(5). The presence of collagen of type II has proved the preservation of the original phenotype of chondrocytes during cultivation. Bioengineering use of cell and tissue cultivation provides new options of the treatment of defect of connective tissue. Transplantation of autologous chondrocytes in combination with osteochondral allografts is on the basis of our results obtained so far a promising therapy. The aim of our work was an ex vivo expansion of autologous chondrocytes for the purpose of cell transplantation.

  15. Heterotopic autologous chondrocyte transplantation--a realistic approach to support articular cartilage repair?

    PubMed

    El Sayed, Karym; Haisch, Andreas; John, Thilo; Marzahn, Ulrike; Lohan, Anke; Müller, Riccarda D; Kohl, Benjamin; Ertel, Wolfgang; Stoelzel, Katharina; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2010-12-01

    Injured articular cartilage is limited in its capacity to heal. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is a suitable technique for cartilage repair, but it requires articular cartilage biopsies for sufficient autologous chondrocyte expansion in vitro. Hence, ACT is restricted by donor-site morbidity and autologous articular chondrocytes availability. The use of nonarticular heterotopic chondrocytes such as auricular, nasoseptal, or costal chondrocytes for ACT might overcome these limitations: heterotopic sources show lesser donor-site morbidity and a comparable extracellular cartilage matrix synthesis profile to articular cartilage. However, heterotopic (h)ACT poses a challenge. Particular tissue characteristics of heterotopic cartilage, divergent culturing peculiarities of heterotopic chondrocytes, and the advantages and drawbacks related to these diverse cartilage sources were critically discussed. Finally, available in vitro and in vivo experimental (h)ACT approaches were summarized. The quality of the cartilage engineered using heterotopic chondrocytes remains partly controversy due to the divergent methodologies and culture conditions used. While some encouraging in vivo results using (h)ACT have been demonstrated, standardized culturing protocols are strongly required. However, whether heterotopic chondrocytes implanted into joint cartilage defects maintain their particular tissue properties or can be adapted via tissue engineering strategies to fulfill regular articular cartilage functions requires further studies.

  16. Transplantation of autologous chondrocytes ex-vivo expanded using Thermoreversible Gelation Polymer in a rabbit model of articular cartilage defect.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Sivaraman; Bhupesh Karthik, Balasubramanyan; Chinnuswami, Rajeswar; Mori, Yuichi; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Senthilkumar, Rajappa; Mathaiyan, Rajmohan; Ramalingam, Karthick; Senthilkumar, Preethy; Abraham, Samuel J K

    2017-06-01

    Graft failure due to de-differentiation of the chondrocytes during in vitro culture and after transplantation is a major hurdle in Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (ACI). We, herein, report the transplantation of autologous chondrocytes ex vivo expanded using a Thermo-reversible Gelation Polymer (TGP) in a rabbit model. A full thickness chondral defect was created in one of the knee joints in each of the six rabbits of the study and autologous chondrocytes in vitro expanded using TGP scaffold were transplanted after 10 weeks. H & E staining of the biopsy after 6 months revealed maintenance of articular cartilage phenotype.

  17. Use of a type I/III bilayer collagen membrane decreases reoperation rates for symptomatic hypertrophy after autologous chondrocyte implantation.

    PubMed

    Gomoll, Andreas H; Probst, Christian; Farr, Jack; Cole, Brian J; Minas, Tom

    2009-11-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation is associated with a high rate of reoperation, mostly due to hypertrophy of the periosteal patch. European studies investigating the use of collagen membranes as a periosteal substitute report significant decreases in reoperation rates to less than 5%. This multicenter study investigates the off-label use of 1 collagen membrane as a periosteal substitute for autologous chondrocyte implantation. The use of a collagen membrane for autologous chondrocyte implantation will decrease reoperation rates for hypertrophy with comparable rates of failure. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A multicenter cohort of 300 patients treated with periosteal-covered autologous chondrocyte implantation was compared with a consecutive series of 101 patients who underwent collagen membrane-covered autologous chondrocyte implantation with the Bio-Gide membrane by the same group of surgeons. The 1-year hypertrophy-related reoperation rates and overall failure rates of autologous chondrocyte implantation were evaluated in both groups. Both groups were comparable for age (periosteal autologous chondrocyte implantation, 31.9 years; collagen autologous chondrocyte implantation, 32.4 years; P = .8) and average defect size (4.6 cm(2) and 4.7 cm(2), respectively; P = .7). The average number of defects (1.5 and 1.8; P = .001) and total defect area per knee (6.7 cm(2) and 8.6 cm(2); P = .003) were larger in the collagen membrane group. Within 1 year of surgery, 25.7% of patients treated with periosteal-covered autologous chondrocyte implantation required reoperation for hypertrophy and 2.3% were considered to have failed their treatment with autologous chondrocyte implantation. In comparison, only 5% of patients required reoperation for hypertrophy after collagen membrane-covered autologous chondrocyte implantation, and 4% were considered treatment failures. The use of a collagen membrane for autologous chondrocyte implantation decreased the reoperation rate for

  18. Orthotopic Autologous Chondrocyte Grafting as a Method of Treatment of Growth Plate Damage in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Ryszard; Wiktor, Łukasz; Gap, Artur

    2016-10-28

    With the continuous advances in the therapy of joint cartilage injury, some of those classification systems are also being used for evaluating the quality of regenerating cartilage. Histo lo gi cal assessment of joint cartilage is a very important component in the staging of osteoarthritis and tracing therapeutic outcomes. We performed a histological assessment of regenerating growth plate in a group of New Zealand white rabbits as a component of autologous chondrocyte therapy for growth plate damage. We studied a group of 14 five-week-old in-bred white rabbits. We used a tre phine needle to harvest growth plate from the medial fourth of tibial width. The mean duration of the procedure was 25 minutes (range: 12-37 minutes). We conducted a total of 25 growth plate harvesting procedures. In 21 cases, we placed a drainage tube at the site of the defect for 22 days. After removing the tube, we introduced a cartilago-fibrinous construct containing cultured autologous chondrocytes into 14 defects, while 4 defects were left intact. Three growth plates represented non-intervention controls. Our analysis showed satisfactory graft morphology and integration; absence of inflammatory res ponse and fair restitution of growth plate architecture. 1. Growth plate damage can lead to the development of an angular deformity as a result of im paired longitudinal bone growth; 2. Autologous chondrocyte grafting is a good method of treatment for growth plate damage; 3. A weakness of autologous chondrocyte grafting is the relatively long time of chondrocyte culturing.

  19. Chondrogenic differentiation potential of osteoarthritic chondrocytes and their possible use in matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dehne, Tilo; Karlsson, Camilla; Ringe, Jochen; Sittinger, Michael; Lindahl, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is a routine technique to regenerate focal cartilage lesions. However, patients with osteoarthritis (OA) are lacking an appropriate long-lasting treatment alternative, partly since it is not known if chondrocytes from OA patients have the same chondrogenic differentiation potential as chondrocytes from donors not affected by OA. Articular chondrocytes from patients with OA undergoing total knee replacement (Mankin Score > 3, Ahlbäck Score > 2) and from patients undergoing ACT, here referred to as normal donors (ND), were isolated applying protocols used for ACT. Their chondrogenic differentiation potential was evaluated both in high-density pellet and scaffold (Hyaff-11) cultures by histological proteoglycan assessment (Bern Score) and immunohistochemistry for collagen types I and II. Chondrocytes cultured in monolayer and scaffolds were subjected to gene expression profiling using genome-wide oligonucleotide microarrays. Expression data were verified by using real-time PCR. Chondrocytes from ND and OA donors demonstrated accumulation of comparable amounts of cartilage matrix components, including sulphated proteoglycans and collagen types I and II. The mRNA expression of cartilage markers (ACAN, COL2A1, COMP, CRTL1, SOX9) and genes involved in matrix synthesis (BGN, CILP2, COL9A2, COL11A1, TIMP4) was highly induced in 3D cultures of chondrocytes from both donor groups. Genes associated with hypertrophic or OA cartilage (ALPL, COL1A1, COL3A1, COL10A1, MMP13, POSTN, PTH1R, RUNX2) were not significantly regulated between the two groups of donors. The expression of 661 genes, including COMP, FN1, and SOX9, was differentially regulated between OA and ND chondrocytes cultured in monolayer. During scaffold culture, the differences diminished between the OA and ND chondrocytes, and only 184 genes were differentially regulated. Only few genes were differentially expressed between OA and ND chondrocytes in Hyaff-11 culture. The

  20. Chondrogenic differentiation potential of osteoarthritic chondrocytes and their possible use in matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is a routine technique to regenerate focal cartilage lesions. However, patients with osteoarthritis (OA) are lacking an appropriate long-lasting treatment alternative, partly since it is not known if chondrocytes from OA patients have the same chondrogenic differentiation potential as chondrocytes from donors not affected by OA. Methods Articular chondrocytes from patients with OA undergoing total knee replacement (Mankin Score > 3, Ahlbäck Score > 2) and from patients undergoing ACT, here referred to as normal donors (ND), were isolated applying protocols used for ACT. Their chondrogenic differentiation potential was evaluated both in high-density pellet and scaffold (Hyaff-11) cultures by histological proteoglycan assessment (Bern Score) and immunohistochemistry for collagen types I and II. Chondrocytes cultured in monolayer and scaffolds were subjected to gene expression profiling using genome-wide oligonucleotide microarrays. Expression data were verified by using real-time PCR. Results Chondrocytes from ND and OA donors demonstrated accumulation of comparable amounts of cartilage matrix components, including sulphated proteoglycans and collagen types I and II. The mRNA expression of cartilage markers (ACAN, COL2A1, COMP, CRTL1, SOX9) and genes involved in matrix synthesis (BGN, CILP2, COL9A2, COL11A1, TIMP4) was highly induced in 3D cultures of chondrocytes from both donor groups. Genes associated with hypertrophic or OA cartilage (ALPL, COL1A1, COL3A1, COL10A1, MMP13, POSTN, PTH1R, RUNX2) were not significantly regulated between the two groups of donors. The expression of 661 genes, including COMP, FN1, and SOX9, was differentially regulated between OA and ND chondrocytes cultured in monolayer. During scaffold culture, the differences diminished between the OA and ND chondrocytes, and only 184 genes were differentially regulated. Conclusions Only few genes were differentially expressed between OA and

  1. The Knee Joint Loose Body as a Source of Viable Autologous Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Melrose, J.

    2016-01-01

    Loose bodies are fragments of cartilage or bone present in the synovial fluid. In the present study we assessed if loose bodies could be used as a source of autologous human chondrocytes for experimental purposes. Histochemical examination of loose bodies and differential enzymatic digestions were undertaken, the isolated cells were cultured in alginate bead microspheres and immunolocalisations were undertaken for chondrogenic markers such as aggrecan, and type II collagen. Isolated loose body cells had high viability (≥90% viable), expressed chondrogenic markers (aggrecan, type II collagen) but no type I collagen. Loose bodies may be a useful source of autologous chondrocytes of high viability. PMID:27349321

  2. Heterotopic and orthotopic autologous chondrocyte implantation using a minipig chondral defect model.

    PubMed

    Lohan, Anke; Marzahn, Ulrike; El Sayed, Karym; Bock, Christopher; Haisch, Andreas; Kohl, Benjamin; Stoelzel, Katharina; John, Thilo; Ertel, Wolfgang; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2013-10-01

    Implantation of non-articular (heterotopic) chondrocyte-based implants might be an alternative approach to articular cartilage repair. This strategy could be helpful in cases in which there are no or too few articular chondrocytes available. Therefore, this study was undertaken to compare joint cartilage defect healing in the minipig model after implantation of heterotopic auricular and orthotopic articular chondrocytes. Poly-glycolic acid (PGA) associated three-dimensional (3D) constructs were prepared culturing autologous minipig-derived articular and auricular chondrocytes for 7 days in a dynamic culture system. Chondrocyte PGA constructs were implanted into 8mm diameter and ∼1.1mm deep chondral defects within the medial and lateral condyles of the minipig knee joints. Empty defects served as controls for assessment of the intrinsic healing response. Defect healing was monitored 6 months post implantation using a macroscopic and microscopic score system and biomechanical analysis. Neo-cartilage formation could be observed in the PGA constructs seeded with articular and auricular chondrocytes in vivo. The defect healing did not significantly differ at the macroscopic and histological level in response to implantation of either autologous articular or auricular chondrocytes seeded constructs compared with the empty defects. Although the differences were not significant, the auricular chondrocytes-based implants led to a slightly inferior repair quality at the macroscopic level, but a histologically superior healing response when compared with the empty defect group. However, biomechanical analysis revealed a higher stiffness in repair tissues produced by auricular chondrocyte implantation compared with the other groups. Deduced from these results, articular chondrocytes represent the preferable cell source for implantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Deciphering chondrocyte behaviour in matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation to undergo accurate cartilage repair with hyaline matrix.

    PubMed

    Demoor, M; Maneix, L; Ollitrault, D; Legendre, F; Duval, E; Claus, S; Mallein-Gerin, F; Moslemi, S; Boumediene, K; Galera, P

    2012-06-01

    Since the emergence in the 1990s of the autologous chondrocytes transplantation (ACT) in the treatment of cartilage defects, the technique, corresponding initially to implantation of chondrocytes, previously isolated and amplified in vitro, under a periosteal membrane, has greatly evolved. Indeed, the first generations of ACT showed their limits, with in particular the dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during the monolayer culture, inducing the synthesis of fibroblastic collagens, notably type I collagen to the detriment of type II collagen. Beyond the clinical aspect with its encouraging results, new biological substitutes must be tested to obtain a hyaline neocartilage. Therefore, the use of differentiated chondrocytes phenotypically stabilized is essential for the success of ACT at medium and long-term. That is why researchers try now to develop more reliable culture techniques, using among others, new types of biomaterials and molecules known for their chondrogenic activity, giving rise to the 4th generation of ACT. Other sources of cells, being able to follow chondrogenesis program, are also studied. The success of the cartilage regenerative medicine is based on the phenotypic status of the chondrocyte and on one of its essential component of the cartilage, type II collagen, the expression of which should be supported without induction of type I collagen. The knowledge accumulated by the scientific community and the experience of the clinicians will certainly allow to relief this technological challenge, which influence besides, the validation of such biological substitutes by the sanitary authorities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Autologous chondrocyte implantation. Culture in a TGF-beta-containing medium enhances the re-expression of a chondrocytic phenotype in passaged human chondrocytes in pellet culture.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, A J; Lee, D A; Bader, D L; Bentley, G

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of patients are treated by autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). This study tests the hypothesis that culture within a defined chondrogenic medium containing TGF-beta enhances the re-expression of a chondrocytic phenotype and the subsequent production of cartilaginous extracellular matrix by human chondrocytes used in ACI. Chondrocytes surplus to clinical requirements for ACI from 24 patients were pelleted and cultured in either DMEM (Dulbecco's modified eagles medium)/ITS+Premix/TGF-beta1 or DMEM/10%FCS (fetal calf serum) and were subsequently analysed biochemically and morphologically. Pellets cultured in DMEM/ITS+/TGF-beta1 stained positively for type-II collagen, while those maintained in DMEM/10%FCS expressed type-I collagen. The pellets cultured in DMEM/ITS+/TGF-beta1 were larger and contained significantly greater amounts of DNA and glycosaminoglycans. This study suggests that the use of a defined medium containing TGF-beta is necessary to induce the re-expression of a differentiated chondrocytic phenotype and the subsequent stimulation of glycosaminoglycan and type-II collagen production by human monolayer expanded chondrocytes.

  5. [Technique of Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation for Severe Radiocarpal Arthrosis: Status Quo after 24 Months].

    PubMed

    Medved, F; Schubert, M; Held, M; Notohamiprodjo, M; Lotter, O; Schaller, H-E

    2015-06-01

    We illustrate the operative technique of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) to restore a 4° cartilage damage of the radius surface in the case of a 22-year-old patient, and report on the clinical and radiological results at 6 and 24 months postoperatively.

  6. Viability of chondrocytes seeded onto a collagen I/III membrane for matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation.

    PubMed

    Hindle, Paul; Hall, Andrew C; Biant, Leela C

    2014-11-01

    Cell viability is crucial for effective cell-based cartilage repair. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of handling the membrane during matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation surgery on the viability of implanted chondrocytes. Images were acquired under five conditions: (i) Pre-operative; (ii) Handled during surgery; (iii) Cut edge; (iv) Thumb pressure applied; (v) Heavily grasped with forceps. Live and dead cell stains were used. Images were obtained for cell counting and morphology. Mean cell density was 6.60 × 10(5) cells/cm(2) (5.74-7.11 × 10(5) ) in specimens that did not have significant trauma decreasing significantly in specimens that had been grasped with forceps (p < 0.001) or cut (p = 0.004). Cell viability on delivery grade membrane was 75.1%(72.4-77.8%). This dropped to 67.4%(64.1-69.7%) after handling (p = 0.002), 56.3%(51.5-61.6%) after being thumbed (p < 0.001) and 28.8%(24.7-31.2%) after crushing with forceps (p < 0.001). When cut with scissors there was a band of cell death approximately 275 µm in width where cell viability decreased to 13.7%(10.2-18.2%, p < 0.001). Higher magnification revealed cells without the typical rounded appearance of chondrocytes. We found that confocal laser-scanning microscope (CLSM) can be used to quantify and image the fine morphology of cells on a matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) membrane. Careful handling of the membrane is essential to minimise chondrocyte death during surgery. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Clinical application of cultured autologous human auricular chondrocytes with autologous serum for craniofacial or nasal augmentation and repair.

    PubMed

    Yanaga, Hiroko; Yanaga, Katsu; Imai, Keisuke; Koga, Mika; Soejima, Chie; Ohmori, Kitaro

    2006-05-01

    The repair of a craniofacial or nose deformity requires a large volume of reconstructive material. A conventional cartilage graft does not provide a sufficient volume of reconstructive material. Therefore, augmentation of the facial form to the defect shape is quite difficult. The authors developed a new treatment method that provides a sufficiently large volume of reconstructive material and enables an easier reconstruction of the original shape. Ages of the patients ranged between 9 and 63 years. Approximately 1 cm of auricular cartilage was collected from the auricular concha. Isolated chondrocytes were cultured with autologous serum that accelerates cell proliferation. The cells were subcultured and formed a gel-form mass. This mass, together with autologous serum, was grafted (injected) on the periosteum and into the subcutaneous pocket. The volume of grafted cultured chondrocytes ranged from 1.7 to 40 cc (1 to 5 x 10(7) cells/cc). The lesion changed from soft gel form into hard cartilage tissues within 2 to 3 weeks and stabilized. Excellent or good satisfactory results were obtained in all patients and have been maintained for periods ranging from 3 to 34 months. No patient experienced absorption of cultured chondrocytes. Biopsy of the newly formed tissues showed that it was an elastic cartilage derived from the original tissue. A small number of chondrocytes obtained from a 1-cm auricular cartilage are successfully cultured into a large number of cells in a gel form. Those autologous auricular chondrocytes in a gel form allow for the repair of complicated shapes of the defect area. This technique is applicable to various treatments for craniofacial or nose deformity.

  8. Autologous nasal chondrocytes delivered by injectable hydrogel for in vivo articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenliang; Li, Changhua; Peng, Maoxiu; Xie, Bingju; Zhang, Lei; Tang, Xiaojun

    2017-08-16

    Cell based tissue engineering serves as a promising strategy for articular cartilage repair, which remains a challenge both for researchers and clinicians. The aim of this research was to assess the potential of autologous nasal chondrocytes (NCs) combined with alginate hydrogel as injectable constructs for rabbit articular cartilage repair. Autologous nasal chondrocytes were isolated from rabbit nasal septum, expanded either on monolayer or in 3D alginate hydrogel. In vitro, DNA quantification revealed that NCs can proliferate stable in 3D alginate matrix, but slower than that cultured in monolayer. Further, a higher synthesis rate of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) was detected by GAG measurement in 3D alginate culture. Gene expression analysis at different time point (day 1, 7, 14) showed that 3D culture of NCs in alginate up-regulated chondrogenic markers (Col2A1, ACAN SOX9), meanwhile down-regulated dedifferentiation related gene (Col1A1). In vivo, autologous nasal chondrocytes combined with alginate hydrogel were used for repairing rabbit knee osteochondral defect (Alg + NC group). Histological staining indicated that Alg + NC group obtained superior and more hyaline-like repaired tissue both at 3 and 6 months after surgery. Mechanical analysis showed that the repaired tissue in the Alg + NC group possessed similar mechanical properties to the native cartilage. In conclusion, nasal chondrocytes appeared to be a very promising seed cell source for cartilage tissue engineering, and alginate hydrogel can serve as suitable delivery system.

  9. Evolution of Autologous Chondrocyte Repair and Comparison to Other Cartilage Repair Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Ashvin K.; Gibson, Matthew A.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.; Trice, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects have been addressed using microfracture, abrasion chondroplasty, or osteochondral grafting, but these strategies do not generate tissue that adequately recapitulates native cartilage. During the past 25 years, promising new strategies using assorted scaffolds and cell sources to induce chondrocyte expansion have emerged. We reviewed the evolution of autologous chondrocyte implantation and compared it to other cartilage repair techniques. Methods. We searched PubMed from 1949 to 2014 for the keywords “autologous chondrocyte implantation” (ACI) and “cartilage repair” in clinical trials, meta-analyses, and review articles. We analyzed these articles, their bibliographies, our experience, and cartilage regeneration textbooks. Results. Microfracture, abrasion chondroplasty, osteochondral grafting, ACI, and autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis are distinguishable by cell source (including chondrocytes and stem cells) and associated scaffolds (natural or synthetic, hydrogels or membranes). ACI seems to be as good as, if not better than, microfracture for repairing large chondral defects in a young patient's knee as evaluated by multiple clinical indices and the quality of regenerated tissue. Conclusion. Although there is not enough evidence to determine the best repair technique, ACI is the most established cell-based treatment for full-thickness chondral defects in young patients. PMID:25210707

  10. Effective implantation of autologous chondrocytes in a patient suffering from a painful and invalidating rizoarthrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sgherzi, Stefano; Sillani, Alessandro; Magris, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    A 45-year-old patient, caucasian, affected by severe, painful and invalidating rizoarthrosis has been treated by implanting autologous chondrocytes, normally used for degenerative joint diseases of the knee and ankle. PMID:19918494

  11. Comparison of articular cartilage repair by autologous chondrocytes with and without in vitro cultivation.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hongsen; Liao, Chun-Jen; Wang, Yao-Hong; Huang, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Chun-Nan; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Huang, Yi-You; Jiang, Ching-Chuan

    2010-04-01

    autologous chondrocyte implantation usually requires in vitro cell expansion before implantation. We compared the efficacy of cartilage regeneration by in vitro-expanded chondrocytes at high density and freshly harvested chondrocytes at low density. surgically created osteochondral defects at weight-bearing surface of femoral condyles of domestic pigs were repaired by biphasic cylindrical porous plugs of DL-poly-lactide-co-glycolide and beta-tricalcium phosphate. Plugs were seeded with autologous chondrocytes in its chondral phase, and press-fit to defects. Seeded cells were (1) in vitro-expanded chondrocytes harvested from stifle joint 3 weeks before implantation and (2) freshly harvested chondrocytes from recipient knee. Seeding densities were 70 x 10(6) and 7 x 10(6) cells/mL, respectively. Cell-free plugs served as control and defects remained untreated as null control. Outcome was examined at 6 months with International Cartilage Repair Society Scale. the two experimental groups were repaired by hyaline cartilage with collagen type II and Safranin-O. Tissue in control group was primarily fibrocartilage. No regeneration was found in null control. Experimental groups had higher mean International Cartilage Repair Society scores than control in surface, matrix, and cell distribution, but were comparable with control in cell viability, subchondral bone, and mineralization. No significant difference existed between two experimental groups in any of the six categories. Uni-axial indentation test revealed similar creeping stress-relaxation property as native cartilage on experimental, but not control, specimen. cartilage could regenerate in both experimental models, in comparable quality. Culture of chondrocytes before implantation is not necessary.

  12. Quantitative analysis of gene expression in human articular chondrocytes assigned for autologous implantation.

    PubMed

    Barlic, Ariana; Drobnic, Matej; Malicev, Elvira; Kregar-Velikonja, Nevenka

    2008-06-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) relies on the implantation of in vitro expanded cells. The aim was to study the dedifferentiation of human articular chondrocytes under different cultivating conditions [days 0-10 in the primary culture (P0); passages in a monolayer from P0 to P3; monolayer vs. alginate and monolayer vs. alginate/agarose hydrogels] using real-time PCR analysis. The relative gene expressions for collagen type I and II, aggrecan and versican were quantified and the corresponding differentiation indexes (Col2/Col1, Agr/Ver) were calculated. The values of both differentiation indexes decreased exponentially with time in the P0 monolayer culture, and continued with a significant decrease over the subsequent monolayer passages. On the contrary, the chondrocytes seeded in either of the hydrogels significantly increased the indexes compared to their parallel monolayer cultures. These results indicate that alginate and alginate/agarose hydrogels offer an appropriate environment for human articular chondrocytes to redifferentiate after being expanded in vitro. Therefore the three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel chondrocyte cultures present not only surgical, but also biological advantage over the classic suspension-periosteum chondrocyte implantation. (c) 2008 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  13. Formation of cartilage in vivo with immobilized autologous rabbit auricular cultured chondrocytes in collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Ernesto; Peñas, Lucas; Lequerica, Juan L

    2007-05-01

    The availability of generated cartilage de novo is one of the needs of reconstructive surgery. In this study, the authors constructed a matrix formed by autologous immobilized chondrocytes using collagen gel as a scaffold. Furthermore, the ability of these matrices to engraft and generate new cartilage was examined. Biopsy specimens of elastic cartilage were surgically obtained from the ears of eight New Zealand White rabbits. After collagenase II digestion of cartilage, chondrocytes were isolated and propagated in culture medium. Chondrocytes were immobilized into bovine collagen lattices and implanted, replacing pieces of removed native cartilage. Five weeks after implantation, the rabbits were killed and the ears were examined macroscopically and analyzed by means of histochemical methods. The results show the formation of new cartilage from implanted lattices with chondrocytes. Gross analysis of the ears shows similarities in appearance, consistency, texture, and histology between native and new cartilage. Fluorescence of the nucleus from bisbenzimide-labeled chondrocytes was detected in newly formed tissue, pointing out its in vitro culture origin. No signs of an inflammatory reaction attributable to implants were found in either the control or the chondrocyte lattices. The authors suggest that this approach is of value for future clinical use.

  14. Repair of experimentally produced defects in rabbit articular cartilage by autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Grande, D.A.; Pitman, M.I.; Peterson, L.; Menche, D.; Klein, M.

    1989-01-01

    Using the knee joints of New Zealand White rabbits, a baseline study was made to determine the intrinsic capability of cartilage for healing defects that do not fracture the subchondral plate. A second experiment examined the effect of autologous chondrocytes grown in vitro on the healing rate of these defects. To determine whether any of the reconstituted cartilage resulted from the chondrocyte graft, a third experiment was conducted involving grafts with chondrocytes that had been labeled prior to grafting with a nuclear tracer. Results were evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative light microscopy. Macroscopic results from grafted specimens displayed a marked decrease in synovitis and other degenerative changes. In defects that had received transplants, a significant amount of cartilage was reconstituted (82%) compared to ungrafted controls (18%). Autoradiography on reconstituted cartilage showed that there were labeled cells incorporated into the repair matrix.

  15. Standardized cartilage biopsies from the intercondylar notch for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI).

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, Philipp; Pestka, Jan M; Kreuz, Peter C; Salzmann, Gian M; Köstler, Wolfgang; Südkamp, Norbert P; Steinwachs, Matthias

    2010-08-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is an established therapy for the treatment of cartilage defects across the knee joint. Even though different techniques for initial biopsy have been described, the exact location, depth, and volume of the biopsy are chosen individually by the treating surgeon. This study evaluated 252 consecutive cartilage biopsies taken from the intercondylar notch with a standardized hollow cylinder system for the isolation and in vitro cultivation of human chondrocytes assigned to ACI. All biopsies were assessed for weight of total cartilage obtained, cartilage biopsy weight per cylinder, biopsy cylinder quality, and initial cell count after digestive cellular isolation as well as cell vitality. Parameters were correlated with individual patient parameters. Mean patient age was 35.1 years (median 35.9; range 14.7-56.4). Adequate amounts of cartilage assigned to chondrocyte in vitro cultivation could be harvested in all cases. The mean overall biopsy weight averaged 75.5 mg (SD +/- 44.9) and could be identified as main factor for initial cell number (mean 1.05E+05; SD +/- 7.44E+04). No correlation was found between the initial cell count and patient age (correlation coefficient r = 0.005) or grade of joint degeneration (r = 0.040). Concerning cell viability, a total of 4.4% (SD + 3.0) of the chondrocytes harvested were apoptotic. Cartilage biopsies from the intercondylar notch using a standardized hollow cylinder system provides a reliable, safe, and successful method to obtain articular cartilage for further in vitro cultivation of articular chondrocytes to achieve autologous chondrocyte transplantation.

  16. Advances in autologous chondrocyte implantation and related techniques for cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Foldager, Casper Bindzus

    2013-04-01

    Articular cartilage is a specialized tissue exhibiting low intrinsic capabilities of regeneration or healing after injury. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and scaffold-supported ACI are often used for treatment of larger chondral defects (> 2 cm2). These utilize open surgery re-implantation of ex vivo cultured autologous chondrocytes harvested as a biopsy arthroscopically in a prior surgery. This two-step procedure is an advanced and expensive treatment that despite high expectations have failed to regenerate articular cartilage in a consistent and predictable fashion, and as many as 25% the operated of patients have dissatisfactory outcomes. The objective of the present thesis was to address and investigate methods for optimizing the steps involved in the ACI and scaffold-supported ACI treatment including chondrocyte culture environment, chondrocyte labeling and tracking, improved biomaterials, and cell seeding densities. We hypothesized that these areas were eligible for targeted optimization, which has been addressed in the five papers constituting the work performed in the present thesis. The first two studies address the in vitro cell expansion of chondrocytes before re-implantation. After validation of hypoxia-suitable housekeeping genes for quantitative gene expression analysis using previously validated algorithms (study 1) the effect of combined hypoxic- and 3D culture on human chondrocytes gene expression was investigated (study 2). An in vitro experiment was performed to determine the effect on gene expression of an intracellular superparamagnetic labeling agent for 1.5T MRI-tracking of alginate-embedded human chondrocytes (study 3). We further performed a literature study, reviewing the cell seeding densities of the implanted chondrocytes used in clinically available cell transplantation-based treatments for cartilage repair (study 4). Finally, we tested the addition of dermatan sulfate to a clinically approved methoxy-polyethen-glycol (MPEG

  17. An injectable cellulose-based hydrogel for the transfer of autologous nasal chondrocytes in articular cartilage defects.

    PubMed

    Vinatier, C; Gauthier, O; Fatimi, A; Merceron, C; Masson, M; Moreau, A; Moreau, F; Fellah, B; Weiss, P; Guicheux, J

    2009-03-01

    Articular cartilage has a low capacity for spontaneous repair. To promote the repair of this tissue, the transfer of autologous chondrocytes using a three-dimensional matrix appears promising. In this context, the aim of the present work was to investigate the potential use of autologous rabbit nasal chondrocytes (RNC) associated with an injectable self-setting cellulose-based hydrogel (Si-HPMC). Firstly, the influence of Si-HPMC on chondrocytic phenotype was investigated by real-time PCR for specific chondrocyte markers (type II collagen and aggrecan) and type I collagen. Thereafter, autologous RNC were amplified in vitro for 4 weeks before transplantation with Si-HPMC into a rabbit articular cartilage defect followed by analysis 6 weeks later. Implants were histologically characterized for the presence of sulfated GAG and type II collagen. Transcripts analysis indicated that dedifferentiated RNC recovered expression of the main chondrocytic markers after in vitro three-dimensional culture within Si-HPMC. Histological analysis of autologous RNC transplanted in an articular cartilage defect revealed the formation of repair tissue with a histological organization similar to that of healthy articular cartilage. In addition, immunohistological analysis of type II collagen suggested that the repair tissue was a hyaline-like cartilage. Si-HPMC hydrogel associated with nasal chondrocytes therefore appears a promising injectable tissue engineering device for the repair of articular cartilage.

  18. Novel technique for suspension culture of autologous chondrocytes improves cell proliferation and tissue architecture.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshiaki; Nieda, Takamasa; Miyazaki, Eriko; Enzan, Hideaki

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a new and simple method of chondrocyte suspension culture using a spinner bottle with rotation of the matrices. We compared the characteristics of chondrocytes cultured by this method with those grown in standard monolayer cultures. We also determined the optimal nutritional medium for suspension cultures. Periosteum explants seeded with chondrocytes were grown in monolayer and suspension cultures under three conditions: in medium with no additive (control), with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), or with 10% autologous serum (AS). After culturing, the explants were harvested, processed for histology, and stained with hematoxylin-eosin or TUNEL, or immunostained for type I, II, and III collagen, and Ki-67 antigen. In monolayer cultures, the attachment of the chondrocytes to the periosteum was weak and the superficial layer consisted of fibrotic tissue and few nucleated cells. Collagen type II staining was strong, but types I and II were weak. Among the suspension cultures the AS group produced the thickest layer of chondrocytes with the fewest apoptotic cells. The superficial layer of cartilage in these cultures stained positive for type I and III collagen and Ki-67 antigen. Among the suspension cultures, total chondroitin and chondroitin-4 sulfate (C-4S) concentration was highest in the AS group, while prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was highest in the FBS group. In summary, our new method of suspension culture of periosteal explants using rotational matrices combined with AS nutritional media was the most effective method for maintaining the bond between the chondrocyte layer and periosteum, as well as the production of type I and III collagen in the superficial layer.

  19. Clinical feasibility of a novel biphasic osteochondral composite for matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implantation.

    PubMed

    Chiang, H; Liao, C-J; Hsieh, C-H; Shen, C-Y; Huang, Y-Y; Jiang, C-C

    2013-04-01

    Matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implantation has been used to treat cartilage defects. We developed a biphasic cylindrical osteochondral composite construct for such use, and conducted this study to determine its feasibility for treating osteochondral lesions in human knees. Ten patients with symptomatic osteochondral lesions at femoral condyles were treated by replacing pathological tissue with the construct of dl-poly-lactide-co-glycolide, whose lower body was impregnated with β-tricalcium phosphate and served as osseous phase. The construct had a chamber to load double-minced autologous cartilage, serving as source of chondrocytes. Osteochondral lesion was drill-fashioned a pit of identical dimension as the construct. Chondrocyte-laden construct was press-fit to fill the pit. Postoperative outcome was evaluated using Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) scale up to 24 months. Magnetic resonance image was taken, and sample tissue was collected with second-look arthroscopic needle biopsy at 12 months. Outcome parameters were primarily safety of surgery, and secondarily postoperative change in KOOS and regeneration of hyaline cartilage and cancellous bone. No patient experienced serious adverse events. Postoperative mean KOOS in "symptoms" subscale had not changed significantly from pre-operation until 24 months; whereas those in the other four subscales were significantly higher than pre-operation at 12 and 24 months. Second-look arthroscopy showed completely filled grafted sites, with regenerate cartilaginous surfaces flushed with surrounding native joint surface. Microscopically, regenerated cartilage appeared hyaline. This novel construct for chondrocyte implantation is safe for surgical application in knee. It repairs osteochondral lesions of femoral condyles by successful regeneration of hyaline cartilage. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Revision surgery after third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation in the knee.

    PubMed

    Niethammer, Thomas R; Niethammer, Thomas; Valentin, Siegfried; Ficklscherer, Andreas; Gülecyüz, Mehmet F; Gülecyüz, Mehmet; Pietschmann, Matthias F; Pietschmann, Matthias; Müller, Peter E; Müller, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is an established treatment for full thickness cartilage defects in the knee joint. However, little is known about cases when revision surgery is needed. The aim of the present study is to investigate the complication rates and the main reasons for revision surgery after third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation in the knee joint. It is of particular interest to examine in which cases revision surgery is needed and in which cases a "wait and see" strategy should be used. A total of 143 consecutive patients with 171 cartilage defects were included in this study with a minimum follow-up of two years. All defects were treated with third generation ACI (NOVACART®3D). Clinical evaluation was carried out after six months, followed by an annual evaluation using the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective score and the visual analogue scale (VAS) for rest and during activity. Revision surgery was documented. The revision rate was 23.4 % (n = 36). The following major reasons for revision surgery were found in our study: symptomatic bone marrow edema (8.3 %, n = 3), arthrofibrosis (22.2 %, n = 8) and partial graft cartilage deficiency (47.2 %, n = 17). The following revision surgery was performed: retrograde drilling combined with Iloprost infusion therapy for bone marrow oedema (8.4 %, n = 3), arthroscopic arthrolysis of the suprapatellar recess (22.2 %, n = 8) and microfracturing/antegrade drilling (47.3 %, n = 17). Significant improvements of clinical scores after revision surgery were observed. Revision surgery after third generation autologous chondrocyte implantation is common and is needed primarily in cases with arthrofibrosis, partial graft cartilage deficiency and symptomatic bone marrow oedema resulting in a significantly better clinical outcome.

  1. [Autologous chondrocyte transplantation for treatment of cartilage defects of the knee joint. Clinical results].

    PubMed

    Erggelet, C; Browne, J E; Fu, F; Mandelbaum, B R; Micheli, L J; Mosely, J B

    2000-01-01

    Cartilage defects in the knee joint are common and have a bad tendency for healing due to the limited regeneration of hyaline cartilage. Surgeons have an ample choice of various operative treatment measures. Especially for the treatment of larger lesions first results of autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) were published in 1994 [3]. Autologous chondrocytes are isolated from an arthoscopically harvested cartilage biopsy, cultured in vitro and implanted in the defect under a periostal flap in a second procedure. In an international multicenter study 1,051 patients treated with ACT between 6/95 and 12/98 were documented with follow-up examinations after 12 months (588 patients), 24 months (220 patients) and 36 months (40 patients). The majority of the defects (61.2%) were localized on the medial femoral condyle, measuring 4.6 cm2 and mostly described as grade III/IV lesions. The clinical evaluation was performed using a modified Cincinnati knee rating system independently for clinician and patient. Evaluations showed an increase from 3.35 to 6.25 after 24 months and from 3.10 to 6.77 in a scale from 1 (bad) to 10 (excellent). ACT favours defects of the femur with an improvement rate of 85%. Adverse events possibly related to ACT were described in 4.8% of the patients. Diagnostic second-look arthroscopies are included in the reoperation rate of 5.1%. The presented data indicate autologous chondrocyte transplantation as an effective and safe option for the treatment of large full thickness cartilage defects in the knee joint.

  2. A randomized trial comparing autologous chondrocyte implantation with microfracture. Findings at five years.

    PubMed

    Knutsen, Gunnar; Drogset, Jon Olav; Engebretsen, Lars; Grøntvedt, Torbjørn; Isaksen, Vidar; Ludvigsen, Tom C; Roberts, Sally; Solheim, Eirik; Strand, Torbjørn; Johansen, Oddmund

    2007-10-01

    The optimal treatment for cartilage lesions has not yet been established. The objective of this randomized trial was to compare autologous chondrocyte implantation with microfracture. This paper represents an update, with presentation of the clinical results at five years. Eighty patients who had a single chronic symptomatic cartilage defect on the femoral condyle in a stable knee without general osteoarthritis were included in the study. Forty patients were treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation, and forty were treated with microfracture. We used the International Cartilage Repair Society, Lysholm, Short Form-36, and Tegner forms to collect clinical data, and radiographs were evaluated with use of the Kellgren and Lawrence grading system. At two and five years, both groups had significant clinical improvement compared with the preoperative status. At the five-year follow-up interval, there were nine failures (23%) in both groups compared with two failures of the autologous chondrocyte implantation and one failure of the microfracture treatment at two years. Younger patients did better in both groups. We did not find a correlation between histological quality and clinical outcome. However, none of the patients with the best-quality cartilage (predominantly hyaline) at the two-year mark had a later failure. One-third of the patients in both groups had radiographic evidence of early osteoarthritis at five years. Both methods provided satisfactory results in 77% of the patients at five years. There was no significant difference in the clinical and radiographic results between the two treatment groups and no correlation between the histological findings and the clinical outcome. One-third of the patients had early radiographic signs of osteoarthritis five years after the surgery. Further long-term follow-up is needed to determine if one method is better than the other and to study the progression of osteoarthritis.

  3. In-vitro chondrogenic potential of synovial stem cells and chondrocytes allocated for autologous chondrocyte implantation - a comparison : Synovial stem cells as an alternative cell source for autologous chondrocyte implantation.

    PubMed

    Kubosch, Eva Johanna; Heidt, Emanuel; Niemeyer, Philipp; Bernstein, Anke; Südkamp, Norbert P; Schmal, Hagen

    2017-05-01

    The use of passaged chondrocytes is the current standard for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). De-differentiation due to amplification and donor site morbidity are known drawbacks highlighting the need for alternative cell sources. Via clinically validated flow cytometry analysis, we compared the expression of human stem cell and cartilage markers (collagen type 2 (Col2), aggrecan (ACAN), CD44) of chondrocytes (CHDR), passaged chondrocytes for ACI (CellGenix™), bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC), and synovial derived stem cells (SDSC). Primary, human BMSC and SDSC revealed similar adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation potential and stem cell marker expression. However, the expression of the chondrogenic markers Col2 and ACAN was statistically significant higher in SDSC. CHDR and SDSC expressed ACAN and CD44 equally, but Col2 was expressed more strongly on the SDSC surface. The marker expression of SDSC from osteoarthritic joints (Kellgren-Lawrence score ≥3) versus normal knees (Kellgren-Lawrence score ≤2) did not differ. Similarly, there was no difference between temporarily frozen and fresh SDSC. Col2 and ACAN surface expression declined with further passaging, whereas CD44 remained unchanged. We observed the same effect after reducing the serum content. When comparing CHDR for ACI with SDSC of the same passage (P2/3), both Col2 and ACAN, correlating with clinical outcome, were expressed higher in SDSC. In summary, SDSC demonstrated high differentiation potential and a stable chondrogenic phenotype. They might therefore be better suitable for ACI than BMSC or passaged CHDR.

  4. RNA Interference and BMP-2 Stimulation Allows Equine Chondrocytes Redifferentiation in 3D-Hypoxia Cell Culture Model: Application for Matrix-Induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation.

    PubMed

    Rakic, Rodolphe; Bourdon, Bastien; Hervieu, Magalie; Branly, Thomas; Legendre, Florence; Saulnier, Nathalie; Audigié, Fabrice; Maddens, Stéphane; Demoor, Magali; Galera, Philippe

    2017-08-24

    As in humans, osteoarthritis (OA) causes considerable economic loss to the equine industry. New hopes for cartilage repair have emerged with the matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI). Nevertheless, its limitation is due to the dedifferentiation occurring during the chondrocyte amplification phase, leading to the loss of its capacity to produce a hyaline extracellular matrix (ECM). To enhance the MACI therapy efficiency, we have developed a strategy for chondrocyte redifferentiation, and demonstrated its feasibility in the equine model. Thus, to mimic the cartilage microenvironment, the equine dedifferentiated chondrocytes were cultured in type I/III collagen sponges for 7 days under hypoxia in the presence of BMP-2. In addition, chondrocytes were transfected by siRNA targeting Col1a1 and Htra1 mRNAs, which are overexpressed during dedifferentiation and OA. To investigate the quality of the neo-synthesized ECM, specific and atypical cartilage markers were evaluated by RT-qPCR and Western blot. Our results show that the combination of 3D hypoxia cell culture, BMP-2 (Bone morphogenetic protein-2), and RNA interference, increases the chondrocytes functional indexes (Col2a1/Col1a1, Acan/Col1a1), leading to an effective chondrocyte redifferentiation. These data represent a proof of concept for this process of application, in vitro, in the equine model, and will lead to the improvement of the MACI efficiency for cartilage tissue engineering therapy in preclinical/clinical trials, both in equine and human medicine.

  5. Sequential outcome following autologous chondrocyte implantation of the knee: A six-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    David, Lee A.; Briggs, Tim W. R.

    2009-01-01

    This prospective six-year longitudinal study reviews the clinical outcome of patients undergoing autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and a porcine type I/III collagen membrane cover for deep chondral defects of the knee. We present 57 patients (31 male, 26 female) with a mean age of 31.6 years (range 15–51 years) that have undergone ACI since July 1998. The mean size of the defect was 3.14 cm2 (range 1.0–7.0 cm2). All patients were assessed annually using seven independent validated clinical rating scores with the data analysed using ANOVA. ACI using a porcine type I/III collagen membrane cover produced statistically significant improvements (p < 0.001), maintained for up to six years, in knee symptoms compared to pre-operative levels. This study provides evidence of the medium-term benefit achieved by transplanting autologous chondrocytes to osteochondral defects. PMID:19669763

  6. Autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage repair: monitoring its success by magnetic resonance imaging and histology

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Sally; McCall, Iain W; Darby, Alan J; Menage, Janis; Evans, Helena; Harrison, Paul E; Richardson, James B

    2003-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation is being used increasingly for the treatment of cartilage defects. In spite of this, there has been a paucity of objective, standardised assessment of the outcome and quality of repair tissue formed. We have investigated patients treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), some in conjunction with mosaicplasty, and developed objective, semiquantitative scoring schemes to monitor the repair tissue using MRI and histology. Results indicate repair tissue to be on average 2.5 mm thick. It was of varying morphology ranging from predominantly hyaline in 22% of biopsy specimens, mixed in 48%, through to predominantly fibrocartilage, in 30%, apparently improving with increasing time postgraft. Repair tissue was well integrated with the host tissue in all aspects viewed. MRI scans provide a useful assessment of properties of the whole graft area and adjacent tissue and is a noninvasive technique for long-term follow-up. It correlated with histology (P = 0.02) in patients treated with ACI alone. PMID:12716454

  7. Autologous chondrocyte implantation in the knee: systematic review and economic evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Hema; Connock, Martin; Pink, Joshua; Shyangdan, Deepson; Clar, Christine; Royle, Pamela; Court, Rachel; Biant, Leela C; Metcalfe, Andrew; Waugh, Norman

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND The surfaces of the bones in the knee are covered with articular cartilage, a rubber-like substance that is very smooth, allowing frictionless movement in the joint and acting as a shock absorber. The cells that form the cartilage are called chondrocytes. Natural cartilage is called hyaline cartilage. Articular cartilage has very little capacity for self-repair, so damage may be permanent. Various methods have been used to try to repair cartilage. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) involves laboratory culture of cartilage-producing cells from the knee and then implanting them into the chondral defect. OBJECTIVE To assess the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ACI in chondral defects in the knee, compared with microfracture (MF). DATA SOURCES A broad search was done in MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, NHS Economic Evaluation Database and Web of Science, for studies published since the last Health Technology Assessment review. REVIEW METHODS Systematic review of recent reviews, trials, long-term observational studies and economic evaluations of the use of ACI and MF for repairing symptomatic articular cartilage defects of the knee. A new economic model was constructed. Submissions from two manufacturers and the ACTIVE (Autologous Chondrocyte Transplantation/Implantation Versus Existing Treatment) trial group were reviewed. Survival analysis was based on long-term observational studies. RESULTS Four randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published since the last appraisal provided evidence on the efficacy of ACI. The SUMMIT (Superiority of Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implant versus Microfracture for Treatment of symptomatic articular cartilage defects) trial compared matrix-applied chondrocyte implantation (MACI(®)) against MF. The TIG/ACT/01/2000 (TIG/ACT) trial compared ACI with characterised chondrocytes against MF. The ACTIVE trial compared several forms of ACI against standard treatments, mainly MF. In the SUMMIT

  8. Enhanced production of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, and RANTES by interaction of chondrocytes with autologous T cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Michiaki; Masuko-Hongo, Kayo; Yudoh, Kazuo; Kato, Tomohiro; Beppu, Moroe; Nishioka, Kusuki

    2006-09-01

    It has been reported that T cells and chondrocytes interact through cell surface molecules such as MHC, CD4 or CD8 in osteoarthritis (OA) and T cells are activated. The objective of this study is to investigate the responses of chondrocyte-T cell interaction in terms of metalloprotease (MMP) and chemokine production. Articular cartilage and autologous blood were obtained from patients with OA and fracture who under went prosthetic surgery. Synovial fluid (SF) was collected from OA patients. Isolated chondrocytes were co-cultured with autologous T cells. SF cells were analyzed by immunostaining or Alcian blue staining. The production of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, and regulated on activation, normal T expressed and secreted (RANTES) was enhanced by direct co-culture compared to indirect co-culture using Transwell. Production ratio of RANTES in OA was significantly higher than non-arthritic samples. CD3 positive mononuclear cells and chondrocyte-like cells were found in SF. Chondrocyte-T cell contact was more adhesive in OA samples. These results showed the production of MMPs and RANTES was enhanced by the interaction and that chondrocyte-T cell contact was possible in vivo.

  9. Activin A/BMP2 chimera AB235 drives efficient redifferentiation of long term cultured autologous chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, G; López-Ruiz, E; Kwiatkowski, W; Montañez, E; Arrebola, F; Carrillo, E; Gray, P C; Izpisua Belmonte, J C; Choe, S; Perán, M; Marchal, J A

    2015-11-13

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) depends on the quality and quantity of implanted cells and is hindered by the fact that chondrocytes cultured for long periods of time undergo dedifferentiation. Here we have developed a reproducible and efficient chondrogenic protocol to redifferentiate chondrocytes isolated from osteoarthritis (OA) patients. We used morphological, histological and immunological analysis together with a RT-PCR detection of collagen I and collagen II gene expression to show that chondrocytes isolated from articular cartilage biopsies of patients and subjected to long-term culture undergo dedifferentiation and that these cells can be redifferentiated following treatment with the chimeric Activin A/BMP2 ligand AB235. Examination of AB235-treated cell pellets in both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed that redifferentiated chondrocytes synthesized a cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM), primarily consisting of vertically-orientated collagen fibres and cartilage-specific proteoglycans. AB235-treated cell pellets also integrated into the surrounding subcutaneous tissue following transplantation in mice as demonstrated by their dramatic increase in size while non-treated control pellets disintegrated upon transplantation. Thus, our findings describe an effective protocol for the promotion of redifferentiation of autologous chondrocytes obtained from OA patients and the formation of a cartilage-like ECM that can integrate into the surrounding tissue in vivo.

  10. Activin A/BMP2 chimera AB235 drives efficient redifferentiation of long term cultured autologous chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, G.; López-Ruiz, E.; Kwiatkowski, W.; Montañez, E.; Arrebola, F.; Carrillo, E.; Gray, P. C.; Belmonte, J. C. Izpisua; Choe, S.; Perán, M.; Marchal, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) depends on the quality and quantity of implanted cells and is hindered by the fact that chondrocytes cultured for long periods of time undergo dedifferentiation. Here we have developed a reproducible and efficient chondrogenic protocol to redifferentiate chondrocytes isolated from osteoarthritis (OA) patients. We used morphological, histological and immunological analysis together with a RT-PCR detection of collagen I and collagen II gene expression to show that chondrocytes isolated from articular cartilage biopsies of patients and subjected to long-term culture undergo dedifferentiation and that these cells can be redifferentiated following treatment with the chimeric Activin A/BMP2 ligand AB235. Examination of AB235-treated cell pellets in both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed that redifferentiated chondrocytes synthesized a cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM), primarily consisting of vertically-orientated collagen fibres and cartilage-specific proteoglycans. AB235-treated cell pellets also integrated into the surrounding subcutaneous tissue following transplantation in mice as demonstrated by their dramatic increase in size while non-treated control pellets disintegrated upon transplantation. Thus, our findings describe an effective protocol for the promotion of redifferentiation of autologous chondrocytes obtained from OA patients and the formation of a cartilage-like ECM that can integrate into the surrounding tissue in vivo. PMID:26563344

  11. Autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage injury treatment in Chiang Mai University Hospital: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wongtriratanachai, Prasit; Pruksakorn, Dumnoensun; Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Nimkingratana, Puwapong; Pattamapaspong, Nuttaya; Phornphutkul, Chanakarn; Setsitthakun, Sasiwariya; Fongsatitkul, Ladda; Phrompaet, Sureeporn

    2013-11-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) has become one of the standard procedures for articular cartilage defect treatment. This technique provides a promising result. However the procedural process requires an approach of several steps from multidisciplinary teams. Although the success of this procedure has been reported from Srinakharinvirot University since 2007, the application of ACI is still limited in Thailand due to the complexity of processes and stringent quality control. This report is to present the first case of the cartilage defect treatment using the first generation-ACI under Chiang Mai University's (CMU) own facility and Ethics Committee. This paper also reviews the process of biotechnology procedures, patient selection, surgical, and rehabilitation techniques. The success of the first case is an important milestone for the further development of the CMU Human Translational Research Laboratory in near future.

  12. Characterization of the cells in repair tissue following autologous chondrocyte implantation in mankind: a novel report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Wright, Karina T; Mennan, Claire; Fox, Hannah; Richardson, James B; Banerjee, Robin; Roberts, Sally

    2013-11-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is used worldwide for the treatment of cartilage defects. This study has aimed to assess for the first time the cells that are contained within human ACI repair tissues several years post-treatment. We have compared the phenotypic properties of cells from within the ACI repair with adjacent chondrocytes and subchondral bone-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs). Two patients undergoing arthroplasty of their ACI-treated joint were investigated. Tissue and cells were isolated from the repair site, adjacent macroscopically normal cartilage and MSCs from the subchondral bone were characterized for their growth kinetics, morphology, immunoprofile and differentiation capacity. ACI repair tissue appeared fibrocartilaginous, and ACI repair cells were heterogeneous in morphology and size when freshly isolated, becoming more homogeneous, resembling chondrocytes from adjacent cartilage, after culture expansion. The same weight of ACI repair tissue resulted in less cells than macroscopically normal cartilage. During expansion, ACI repair cells proliferated faster than MSCs but slower than chondrocytes. ACI repair cell immunoprofiles resembled chondrocytes, but their differentiation capacity matched MSCs. This novel report demonstrates that human ACI repair cell phenotypes resemble both chondrocytes and MSCs but at different stages of their isolation and expansion in vitro.

  13. The dependence of autologous chondrocyte transplantation on varying cellular passage, yield and culture duration.

    PubMed

    Salzmann, Gian M; Sauerschnig, Martin; Berninger, Markus T; Kaltenhauser, Theresa; Schönfelder, Martin; Vogt, Stephan; Wexel, Gabriele; Tischer, Thomas; Sudkamp, Norbert; Niemeyer, Philipp; Imhoff, Andreas B; Schöttle, Philip B

    2011-09-01

    Matrix-assisted chondrocyte transplantation (m-ACI) still lacks any standardization in its execution in terms of cell passage (P), cell yield (C) and in vitro membrane-holding time (T). It was the goal of this study to analyze the effect of shifting cell culture parameters (P, C, T) on the in vitro as well as in vivo effort of a regulated animal m-ACI. Autologous rabbit knee articular chondrocytes were seeded within bilayer collagen I/III 3-D matrices in variation of P, C and T. Each time, 2 PCT-identical by 2 PCT-identical cell-matrix-constructs (CMC)/animal were created. Simultaneously 2 (PCT-distinct) were re-implanted (CMC-e) autologous into artificial trochlear pristine chondral defects in vivo to remain for 12 weeks while the remaining 2 were harvested (CMC-i) for immediate in vitro analysis at the time of transplantation of their identical twins. mRNA of both, CMC-e regenerates and CMC-i membranes, was analyzed for Collagen-1,-2,-10, COMP, Aggrecan, Sox9 expression by use of a mixed linear model, multiple regression analysis. Generally, CMC-i values were higher than CMC-e values for differentiation targets; the opposite was true for dedifferentiation targets. Regarding individual gene expression, in vivo regenerate cell-matrix properties were significantly dependent on initial cell-matrix in vitro values as a sign of linearity. The parameter membrane-holding time (T) had strongest effects on the resulting mRNA expression with slightly less impact of the parameter passage (P), whereas cell yield (C) had clearly less effects. Noting differences between in vitro and in vivo data, in general, optimal expression patterns concerning chondrogenic differentiation were achieved by few passages, medium cellular yield, short membrane-holding time. Clinical m-ACI may benefit from optimal orchestration of the cell culture parameters passage, yield and time. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The use of autologous chondrocyte implantation following and combined with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, W.; Gooding, C. R.; Sood, M.; Skinner, J. A.; Carrington, R. W.J.; Briggs, T. W.R.; Bentley, G.

    2005-01-01

    We report our experience of using autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) to treat osteochondral defects of the knee in combination with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The outcome of symptomatic osteochondral lesions treated with ACI following previous successful ACL reconstruction is also reviewed. Patients were followed for a mean of 23 months. Nine patients underwent ACL reconstruction in combination with ACI. Mean modified Cincinnati knee scores improved from 42 to 69 following surgery. Seven patients described their knee as better and two as the same. A second group of nine patients underwent ACI for symptomatic articular cartilage defects following previous ACL reconstruction. In this group, the mean modified Cincinnati knee score improved from 53 to 62 after surgery. Six patients described their knee as better and three as worse. Combined treatment using ACI with ACL reconstruction is technically feasible and resulted in sustained improvement in pain and function. The results following previous ACL reconstruction also resulted in clinical improvement, although results were not as good as following the combined procedure. PMID:16320051

  15. Cell Seeding Densities in Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation Techniques for Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Gomoll, Andreas H; Lind, Martin; Spector, Myron

    2012-04-01

    Cartilage repair techniques have been among the most intensively investigated treatments in orthopedics for the past decade, and several different treatment modalities are currently available. Despite the extensive research effort within this field, the generation of hyaline cartilage remains a considerable challenge. There are many parameters attendant to each of the cartilage repair techniques that can affect the amount and types of reparative tissue generated in the cartilage defect, and some of the most fundamental of these parameters have yet to be fully investigated. For procedures in which in vitro-cultured autologous chondrocytes are implanted under a periosteal or synthetic membrane cover, or seeded onto a porous membrane or scaffold, little is known about how the number of cells affects the clinical outcome. Few published clinical studies address the cell seeding density that was employed. The principal objective of this review is to provide an overview of the cell seeding densities used in cell-based treatments currently available in the clinic for cartilage repair. Select preclinical studies that have informed the use of specific cell seeding densities in the clinic are also discussed.

  16. Outcome of combined autologous chondrocyte implantation and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dhinsa, Baljinder S; Nawaz, Syed Z; Gallagher, Kieran R; Skinner, John; Briggs, Tim; Bentley, George

    2015-01-01

    Instability of the knee joint, after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, is contraindication to osteochondral defect repair. This prospective study is to investigate the role of combined autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) with ACL reconstruction. Three independent groups of patients with previous ACL injuries undergoing ACI were identified and prospectively followed up. The first group had ACI in combination with ACL reconstruction (combined group); the 2(nd) group consisted of individuals who had an ACI procedure having had a previously successful ACL reconstruction (ACL first group); and the third group included patients who had an ACI procedure to a clinically stable knee with documented nonreconstructed ACL disruption (No ACL group). Their outcomes were assessed using the modified cincinnati rating system, the Bentley functional (BF) rating system (BF) and a visual analog scale (VAS). At a mean followup of 64.24 months for the ACL first group, 63 months for combined group and 78.33 months for the No ACL group; 60% of ACL first patients, 72.73% of combined group and 83.33% of the No ACL group felt their outcome was better following surgery. There was no significant difference demonstrated in BF and VAS between the combined and ACL first groups. Results revealed a significant affect of osteochondral defect size on outcome measures. The study confirms that ACI in combination with ACL reconstruction is a viable option with similar outcomes as those patients who have had the procedures staged.

  17. Implantation of rAAV5-IGF-I Transduced Autologous Chondrocytes Improves Cartilage Repair in Full-thickness Defects in the Equine Model

    PubMed Central

    Ortved, Kyla F; Begum, Laila; Mohammed, Hussni O; Nixon, Alan J

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage injury often precipitates osteoarthritis which has driven research to bolster repair in cartilage impact damage. Autologous chondrocytes transduced with rAAV5-IGF-I were evaluated in chondral defects in a well-established large animal model. Cartilage was harvested from the talus of 24 horses; chondrocytes were isolated and stored frozen. Twenty million cells were cultured and transduced with 105 AAV vg/cell prior to implantation. Chondrocytes from eight horses were transduced with rAAV5-IGF-I, chondrocytes from eight horses with rAAV5-GFP, and chondrocytes from eight horses were not transduced. A 15 mm full-thickness chondral defect was created arthroscopically in the lateral trochlear ridge of the femur in both femoropatellar joints. Treated defects were filled with naive or gene-enhanced chondrocytes, in fibrin vehicle. Control defects in the opposite limb received fibrin alone. rAAV5-IGF-I transduced chondrocytes resulted in significantly better healing at 8 week arthroscopy and 8 month necropsy examination when compared to controls. At 8 months, defects implanted with cells expressing IGF-I had better histological scores compared to control defects and defects repaired with naive chondrocytes. This included increased chondrocyte predominance and collagen type II, both features of hyaline-like repair tissue. The equine model closely approximates human cartilage healing, indicating AAV-mediated genetic modification of chondrocytes may be clinically beneficial to humans. PMID:25311491

  18. Second-generation arthroscopic autologous chondrocyte implantation for the treatment of degenerative cartilage lesions.

    PubMed

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Kon, Elizaveta; Di Martino, Alessandro; Patella, Silvio; Altadonna, Giulio; Balboni, Federica; Bragonzoni, Laura; Visani, Andrea; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2012-09-01

    Degenerative cartilage lesions present a negative joint environment, which may have a negative effect on the process of cartilage regeneration. The aim of this study is to analyze the clinical outcome obtained with the treatment for isolated degenerative knee cartilage lesions by second-generation arthroscopic autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Fifty-eight consecutive patients affected by focal degenerative chondral lesions of the femoral condyles and trochlea were treated by second-generation arthroscopic ACI. The mean age at surgery was 34.7 ± 9.1 years and the average defect size was 2.3 ± 0.9 cm(2). The patients were prospectively evaluated with IKDC, EQ-VAS, and Tegner scores preoperatively, at 2 and 6 years. A statistically significant improvement was observed in all scores from the basal evaluation to the final follow-up. The IKDC subjective score improved from 39.3 ± 13.6 to 68.8 ± 22.7 and 68.5 ± 23.9 at the 2- and 6-year follow-ups, respectively, with a significant improvement (P < 0.0005) and stable results over time; the same trend was confirmed by the EQ-VAS and Tegner scores. The worst results were found in patients with a low physical activity level, women, and those having undergone previous surgery, whereas the symptom duration before surgery did not influence the final outcome. The failure rate was 18.5%. Despite a significant improvement, the results were lower with respect to the outcome reported in different study populations, and the number of failures was markedly higher, too. Tissue-engineered cartilage implantation is a promising approach for the treatment of degenerative chondral lesions, but graft properties, besides mechanical and biochemical joint environment, have to be improved. Case series, Level IV.

  19. Influence of response shift on early patient-reported outcomes following autologous chondrocyte implantation

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Jennifer S.; Mattacola, Carl G.; Mullineaux, David R.; English, Robert A.; Lattermann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Response shift is the phenomenon by which an individual's standards for evaluation change over time. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patients undergoing autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) experience response shift. Methods Forty-eight patients undergoing ACI participated. The “then-test” method was used to evaluate response shift in commonly used patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs)—the SF-36 Physical Component Scale (SF-36 PCS), WOMAC, IKDC, and Lysholm. Each PROM was completed pre- and 6 and 12 months post-surgery. At 6 and 12 months, an additional “then” version of each form was also completed. The “then” version was identical to the original except that patients were instructed to assess how they were prior to ACI. Traditional change, response shift adjusted change, and response shift magnitude were calculated at 6 and 12 months. T tests (p < 0.05) were used to compare traditional change to response-shift-adjusted change, and response shift magnitude values to previously established minimal detectable change. Results There were no differences between traditional change and response-shift-adjusted change for any of the PROMs. The mean response shift magnitude value of the WOMAC at 6 months (15 ± 14, p = 0.047) was greater than the previously established minimal detectable change (10.9). The mean response shift magnitude value for the SF-36 PCS at 12 months (9.4 ± 6.8, p = 0.017) also exceeded the previously established minimal detectable change (6.6). Conclusions There was no evidence of a group-level effect for response shift. These results support the validity of pre-test/post-test research designs in evaluating treatment effects. However, there is evidence that response shifts may occur on a patient-by-patient basis, and scores on the WOMAC and SF-36 in particular may be influenced by response shift. Level of evidence II. PMID:24061717

  20. Transplantation of autologous chondrocytes seeded on a fibrin/hyaluronan composite gel into tracheal cartilage defects in rabbits: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyun Jun; Lee, Jin Seok; Choi, Jae Won; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Lee, Han-Bin; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2012-11-01

    Reconstruction of tracheal defects is one of the most difficult procedures in head and neck surgery. To date, various reconstructing techniques have been used with no consensus on the best approach. This study investigated the feasibility of using a fibrin/hyaluronic acid (HA) composite gel with autologous chondrocytes for tracheal reconstruction. Chondrocytes from autologous rabbit auricular cartilages were expanded and seeded into a culture dish at high density to form stable tracheal cartilages mechanically using a fibrin/HA composite gel. A 1-cm long by 0.5-cm wide defect was created by a scalpel on the cervical tracheae of six rabbits. Tissue-engineered cartilages using fibrin/HA composite were trimmed and fixed to the defect boundaries with tissuecol. Postoperatively, the site was evaluated endoscopically, histologically, radiologically, and functionally. None of the six rabbits showed signs of respiratory distress. Postoperatively, in all cases, rigid telescopic examination showed that the implanted scaffolds were completely covered with regenerated mucosa without granulation or stenosis. Histologically, the grafts showed no signs of inflammatory reaction and were covered with ciliated epithelium. Even when grafts were broken and migrated from their original insertion site, the implanted cartilages were well preserved. However, the grafts did show signs of mechanical failure at the implantation site. The beat frequency of ciliated epithelium on implants was very similar to that of normal respiratory mucosa. In conclusion, implants with autologous chondrocytes cultured with fibrin/HA showed good tracheal luminal contour, functional epithelial regeneration, and preservation of neocartilage without inflammation but lacked adequate mechanical stability. © 2012, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2012, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Generating ears from cultured autologous auricular chondrocytes by using two-stage implantation in treatment of microtia.

    PubMed

    Yanaga, Hiroko; Imai, Keisuke; Fujimoto, Takuya; Yanaga, Katsu

    2009-09-01

    Microtia is a congenital ear hypoplasia associated with auricular defects. Conventional treatment involves implanted costal cartilage. The impact of surgical invasion and donor-site morbidity can be particularly severe in pediatric patients, and the collectable volume of autologous cartilage is limited. The authors therefore developed a new technique for microtia and applied it to treat four patients. Through the development of a multilayer chondrocyte culture system and two-stage implantation technique, the authors successfully generated human ears. In culture, the chondrocytes are expanded to a sufficiently large volume, produce rich chondroid matrix, and form immature cartilaginous tissues. In the authors' two-stage implantation, the cultured chondrocytes are injection-implanted into the lower abdomen of the patient, where the cells grow into a large, newly generated cartilage with neoperichondrium in 6 months. This cartilage is harvested surgically, sculptured into an ear framework, and implanted subcutaneously into the position of the new ear. The cultured chondrocytes formed a mature cartilage block with sufficient elasticity for use as an auricular cartilage. The formed block had the same histologic origin as elastic cartilage. The ear framework produced from this block was implanted into the auricular defect area, and an auricle with a smooth curvature and shape was subsequently configured. In the 2 to 5 years of postoperative monitoring, the neocartilage maintained good shape, without absorption. The authors' four patients are the first successful cases of regenerative surgery for microtia using cultured ear chondrocytes. The benefits of the technique include minimal surgical invasion, lower donor-site morbidity, lessened chance of immunologic rejection, and implantation stability.

  2. Intermediate- to Long-Term Results of Combined Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Andrew N.; Bryant, Tim; Ogura, Takahiro; Minas, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cartilage injury associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures is common; however, relatively few reports exist on concurrent cartilage repair with ACL reconstruction. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) has been utilized successfully for treatment of moderate to large chondral defects. Hypothesis: ACL insufficiency with relatively large chondral defects may be effectively managed with concurrent ACL reconstruction and ACI. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Patients undergoing concurrent ACL primary or revision reconstruction with ACI of single or multiple cartilage defects were prospectively evaluated for a minimum 2 years. Pre- and postoperative outcome measures included the modified Cincinnati Rating Scale (MCRS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, visual analog pain scales, and postsurgery satisfaction surveys. ACI graft failure or persistent pain without functional improvement were considered treatment failures. Results: Twenty-six patients were included, with 13 primary and 13 revision ACL reconstructions performed. Mean defect total surface area was 8.4 cm2, with a mean follow-up of 95 months (range, 24-240 months). MCRS improved from 3.62 ± 1.42 to 5.54 ± 2.32, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index from 45.31 ± 17.27 to 26.54 ± 17.71, and visual analog pain scale from 6.19 ± 1.27 to 3.65 ± 1.77 (all Ps <.001). Eight patients were clinical failures, 69% of patients were improved at final follow-up, and 92% stated they would likely undergo the procedure again. No outcome correlation was found with regard to age, body mass index, sex, defect size/number, follow-up time, or primary versus revision ACL reconstruction. In subanalysis, revision ACL reconstructions had worse preoperative MCRS scores and greater defect surface areas. However, revision MCRS score improvements were greater, resulting in similar final functional scores when compared with

  3. Biological Knee Reconstruction With Concomitant Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation and Meniscal Allograft Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Takahiro; Bryant, Tim; Minas, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treating articular cartilage defects and meniscal deficiency is challenging. Although some short- to mid-term follow-up studies report good clinical outcomes after concurrent autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT), longer follow-up is needed. Purpose: To evaluate mid- to long-term outcomes after combined ACI with MAT. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of prospectively gathered data from patients who had undergone ACI with MAT between 1999 and 2013. A single surgeon treated 18 patients for symptomatic full-thickness chondral defects with meniscal deficiency. One patient was lost to follow-up. Thus, 17 patients (18 knees; mean age, 31.7 years) were evaluated over a mean 7.9-year follow-up (range, 2-16 years). A mean 1.8 lesions per knee were treated over a total surface area of 7.6 cm2 (range, 2.3-21 cm2) per knee. Seventeen lateral and 1 medial MATs were performed. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. The modified Cincinnati Knee Rating Scale, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, visual analog scale, and Short Form–36 were used to evaluate clinical outcomes. Patients also self-reported knee function and satisfaction. Standard radiographs were scored for Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade. Results: Both 5- and 10-year survival rates were 75%. Outcomes for 6 knees were considered failures. Of the 6 failures, 4 knees were converted to arthroplasty and the other 2 knees underwent biological revision surgery. Of the 12 successfully operated knees, all clinical measures significantly improved postoperatively. Ten patients representing 11 of the 12 knees rated outcomes for their knees as good or excellent, and 1 rated their outcome as fair. Eight patients representing 9 of the 12 knees were satisfied with the procedure. There was no significant osteoarthritis progression based on K-L grading from preoperatively to a

  4. Influence of response shift on early patient-reported outcomes following autologous chondrocyte implantation.

    PubMed

    Howard, Jennifer S; Mattacola, Carl G; Mullineaux, David R; English, Robert A; Lattermann, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Response shift is the phenomenon by which an individual's standards for evaluation change over time. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patients undergoing autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) experience response shift. Forty-eight patients undergoing ACI participated. The "then-test" method was used to evaluate response shift in commonly used patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs)-the SF-36 Physical Component Scale (SF-36 PCS), WOMAC, IKDC, and Lysholm. Each PROM was completed pre- and 6 and 12 months post-surgery. At 6 and 12 months, an additional "then" version of each form was also completed. The "then" version was identical to the original except that patients were instructed to assess how they were prior to ACI. Traditional change, response shift adjusted change, and response shift magnitude were calculated at 6 and 12 months. T tests (p < 0.05) were used to compare traditional change to response-shift-adjusted change, and response shift magnitude values to previously established minimal detectable change. There were no differences between traditional change and response-shift-adjusted change for any of the PROMs. The mean response shift magnitude value of the WOMAC at 6 months (15 ± 14, p = 0.047) was greater than the previously established minimal detectable change (10.9). The mean response shift magnitude value for the SF-36 PCS at 12 months (9.4 ± 6.8, p = 0.017) also exceeded the previously established minimal detectable change (6.6). There was no evidence of a group-level effect for response shift. These results support the validity of pre-test/post-test research designs in evaluating treatment effects. However, there is evidence that response shifts may occur on a patient-by-patient basis, and scores on the WOMAC and SF-36 in particular may be influenced by response shift. II.

  5. Cotransplantation of autologous bone marrow stromal cells and chondrocytes as a novel therapy for reconstruction of condylar cartilage.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jiewen; Wang, Xudong; Shen, Guofang

    2011-07-01

    Condylar cartilage is absolutely necessary for the normal function of temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Unfortunately, condylar cartilage defect or missing is also one of the common clinical problems. Repair or reconstruction of cartilage is always a hot topic. Cell based cartilage regeneration is suggested as novel therapies in cartilage tissue engineering, and autologous chondrocytes were initially regarded as the ideal cell source. However, there are some disadvantages such as its limited augmentation capability for culture in vitro and may differentiate to other types of cells. On the other hand, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have gained special interest in tissue engineering. Because they can be obtained easily, cause relatively minor trauma and show the potential of long-run ex vivo expansion capacity. What most important is their capacity of multi-directional differentiation. They can differentiate into a variety of other types of cells when there are supplement exogenous factors or genes, but their clinical use is limited by safety concerns such as toxicity, insertional teratogenic, uncontrollable gene expression. Fortunately, the chondrocytes microenvironment has been demonstrated that could induce BMSCs to structure cartilage when culture in vitro or reimplanted in nude mice subcutaneously area. So in this article, we hypothesize that cotransplantation of autologous BMSCs and chondrocytes, which coculture with extracellular scaffolds, is a novel therapy for reconstruction of TMJ condylar cartilage. In our strategy, advantages of two types of cells are utilized and shortcomings are avoided, which strongly improve the feasibility and clinical safety, finally bring great hope to the patients with TMJ disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Roadmap to approval: use of an automated sterility test method as a lot release test for Carticel, autologous cultured chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kielpinski, G; Prinzi, S; Duguid, J; du Moulin, G

    2005-01-01

    In February 2004, FDA approved a supplement to our biologics license for Carticel, autologous cultured chondrocytes, to use the BacT/ALERT microbial detection system as an alternative to the compendial sterility test for lot release. This article provides a roadmap to our approval process. The approval represents more than 4 years of development and validation studies comparing the Steritest compact system to the BacT/ALERT microbial detection system. For this study, freshly cultured chondrocytes were prepared from a characterized cell bank. Microbial isolates were prepared from either American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) strains or from in-house contaminants. For each test condition, a suspension of chondrocyte cells and test organisms was inoculated into both aerobic media (SA standard adult culture bottles, FA FAN, tryptic soy broth) and anaerobic media (SN standard adult culture bottles, FN FAN, fluid thioglycollate media) and tested for sterility using the Steritest compact system (Millipore, Bedford, MA, USA) and the BacT/ALERT microbial detection system (bioMerieux, Durham, NC, USA). Negative control bottles were inoculated with chondrocytes and no microorganisms. All bottles were incubated for 14 days and read daily. Bacterial growth was determined by either visual examination of Steritest canisters or detection of a positive by the BacT/ALERT system. A gram stain and streak plate were used to confirm positive bottles and negative bottles after 14 days. The detection of a positive by either the Steritest compact system or the BacT/ALERT system was summarized for each organism in each validation study. Data generated from studies reducing the incubation temperature from 35 degrees C to 32 degrees C improved detection times in the automated method compared with the compendial method. Other improvements included the use of FAN aerobic and anaerobic media to absorb the gentamicin contained in the culture media of prepared chondrocyte samples. Chondrocytes

  7. Is autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) an adequate treatment option for repair of cartilage defects in paediatric patients?

    PubMed

    Kaszkin-Bettag, Marietta

    2013-08-01

    Cartilage lesions in the knee of juvenile patients require an effective repair to regain life-long functional activity of the joint. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is discussed to be advantageous over other methods for cartilage repair regarding long-term outcome. ACI has successfully been applied in juvenile patients, although currently recommended for patients ≥18 years of age. Only few controlled clinical trials present evidence of efficacy and safety of ACI in adolescent patients. ACI products have to undergo the process of a marketing authorisation application, including the submission of a paediatric investigation plan (PIP). Data from prospective clinical studies or retrospective collection of long-term data in paediatric patients should be submitted for risk-benefit evaluation by the Paediatric Committee (PDCO).

  8. Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation for the treatment of chondral defects of the knees in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongwen; Zhong, Xin; Ji, Huiru; Tang, Zibin; Bai, Jianpeng; Yao, Minmin; Hou, Jianlei; Zheng, Minghao; Wood, David J; Sun, Jiazhi; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Liu, Aibing

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage injury is the most common type of damage seen in clinical orthopedic practice. The matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implant (MACI) was developed to repair articular cartilage with an advance on the autologous chondrocyte implant procedure. This study aimed to evaluate whether MACI is a safe and efficacious cartilage repair treatment for patients with knee cartilage lesions. The primary outcomes were the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) domains and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results, compared between baseline and postoperative months 3, 6, 12, and 24. A total of 15 patients (20 knees), with an average age of 33.9 years, had a mean defect size of 4.01 cm(2). By 6-month follow-up, KOOS results demonstrated significant improvements in symptoms and knee-related quality of life. MRI showed significant improvements in four individual graft scoring parameters at 24 months postoperatively. At 24 months, 90% of MACI grafts had filled completely and 10% had good-to-excellent filling of the chondral defect. Most (95%) of the MACI grafts were isointense and 5% were slightly hyperintense. Histologic evaluation at 15 and 24 months showed predominantly hyaline cartilage in newly generated tissue. There were no postoperative complications in any patients and no adverse events related to the MACI operation. This 2-year study has confirmed that MACI is safe and effective with the advantages of a simple technique and significant clinical improvements. Further functional and mechanistic studies with longer follow-up are needed to validate the efficacy and safety of MACI in patients with articular cartilage injuries.

  9. Matrix-Assisted Autologous Chondrocyte Transplantation in the Knee: A Systematic Review of Mid- to Long-Term Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schuette, Hayden B.; Kraeutler, Matthew J.; McCarty, Eric C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) is a surgical treatment option for articular cartilage lesions of the knee joint. Purpose: To investigate mid- to long-term clinical outcomes of MACT in the patellofemoral (PF) and tibiofemoral (TF) joints. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review was performed by searching PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library to find studies evaluating minimum 5-year clinical outcomes of patients undergoing MACT in the knee joint. Search terms used were knee, matrix, and autologous chondrocyte. Patients were evaluated based on treatment failure rates, magnetic resonance imaging, and subjective outcome scores. Study methodology was assessed using the Modified Coleman Methodology Score (MCMS). Results: Ten studies (two level 1, one level 2, one level 3, and six level 4 evidence) were identified that met inclusion and exclusion criteria, for a total of 442 TF patients and 136 PF patients. Treatment failure occurred in 9.7% of all patients, including 4.7% of PF patients and 12.4% of TF patients (P = .037). Weighted averages of subjective outcome scores, including Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Short Form–36 Health Survey, and Tegner scores, improved from baseline to latest follow-up in both TF and PF patients. The mean MCMS was found to be 57.4, with a standard deviation of 18.5. Conclusion: Patients undergoing MACT in the knee show favorable mid- to long-term clinical outcomes. A significantly higher treatment failure rate was found in patients undergoing MACT in the TF joint compared with the PF joint. PMID:28620621

  10. Autologous protein solution inhibits MMP-13 production by IL-1β and TNFα-stimulated human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Woodell-May, Jennifer; Matuska, Andrea; Oyster, Megan; Welch, Zachary; O'Shaughnessey, Krista; Hoeppner, Jacy

    2011-09-01

    Catabolic inflammatory cytokines are prevalent in osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate an autologous protein solution (APS) as a potential chondroprotective agent for OA therapy. APS was prepared from platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The APS solution contained both anabolic (bFGF, TGF-β1, TGF-β2, EGF, IGF-1, PDGF-AB, PDGF-BB, and VEGF) and anti-inflammatory (IL-1ra, sTNF-RI, sTNF-RII, IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, and IFNγ) cytokines but low concentrations of catabolic cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, TNFα, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17, and IL-18). Human articular chondrocytes were pre-incubated with the antagonists IL-1ra, sTNF-RI, or APS prior to the addition of recombinant human IL-1β or TNFα. Following exposure to inflammatory cytokines, the levels of MMP-13 in the culture medium were evaluated by ELISA. MMP-13 production stimulated in chondrocytes by IL-1β or TNFα was reduced by rhIL-1ra and sTNF-RI to near basal levels. APS was also capable of inhibiting the production of MMP-13 induced by both IL-1β and TNFα. The combination of anabolic and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the APS created from PRP may render this formulation to be a potential candidate for the treatment of inflammation in patients at early stages of OA. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  11. Mechanical characterization of matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI®) grafts in an equine model at 53 weeks.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Darvin J; Bonnevie, Edward D; Lachowsky, Devin J; Hart, James C A; Sparks, Holly D; Moran, Nance; Matthews, Gloria; Nixon, Alan J; Cohen, Itai; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2015-07-16

    There has been much interest in using autologous chondrocytes in combination with scaffold materials to aid in cartilage repair. In the present study, a total of 27 animals were used to compare the performance of matrix-assisted chondrocyte implantation (MACI®) using a collagen sponge as a chondrocyte delivery vehicle, the sponge membrane alone, and empty controls. A total of three distinct types of mechanical analyses were performed on repaired cartilage harvested from horses after 53 weeks of implantation: (1) compressive behavior of samples to measure aggregate modulus (HA) and hydraulic permeability (k) in confined compression; (2) local and global shear modulus using confocal strain mapping; and (3) boundary friction coefficient using a custom-built tribometer. Cartilage defects receiving MACI® implants had equilibrium modulus values that were 70% of normal cartilage, and were not statistically different than normal tissue. Defects filled with Maix™ membrane alone or left empty were only 46% and 51-63% of control, respectively. The shear modulus of tissue from all groups of cartilage defects were between 4 and 10 times lower than control tissue, and range from 0.2 to 0.4 MPa. The average values of boundary mode friction coefficients of control tissue from all groups ranged from 0.42 to 0.52. This study represents an extensive characterization of the mechanical performance of the MACI® grafts implant in a large animal model at 53 weeks. Collectively, these data demonstrate a range of implant performance, revealing similar compressive and frictional properties to native tissue, with inferior shear properties.

  12. Second-generation autologous chondrocyte transplantation: MRI findings and clinical correlations at a minimum 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kon, E; Di Martino, A; Filardo, G; Tetta, C; Busacca, M; Iacono, F; Delcogliano, M; Albisinni, U; Marcacci, M

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of hyaluronan-based arthroscopic autologous chondrocyte transplantation at a minimum of 5 years of follow-up and to correlate it with the MRI evaluation parameters. Fifty consecutive patients were included in the study and evaluated clinically using the Cartilage Standard Evaluation Form as proposed by ICRS and the Tegner score. Forty lesions underwent MRI evaluation at a minimum 5-year follow-up. For the description and evaluation of the graft, we employed the MOCART-scoring system. A statistically significant improvement in all clinical scores was observed at 2 and over 5 years. The total MOCART score and the signal intensity (3D-GE-FS) of the repair tissue were statistically correlated to the IKDC subjective evaluation. Larger size of the treated cartilage lesions had a negative influence on the degree of defect repair and filling, the integration to the border zone and the subchondral lamina integrity, whereas more intensive sport activity had a positive influence on the signal intensity of the repair tissue, the repair tissue surface, and the clinical outcome. Our findings confirm the durability of the clinical results obtained with Hyalograft C and the usefulness of MRI as a non-invasive method for the evaluation of the repaired tissue and the outcome after second-generation autologous transplantation over time. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. One-Year Clinical and Radiological Results of a Prospective, Investigator-Initiated Trial Examining a Novel, Purely Autologous 3-Dimensional Autologous Chondrocyte Transplantation Product in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Gerwien, Philip; Helmert, Benjamin; Schattenberg, Torsten; Weckbach, Sabine; Kaszkin-Bettag, Marietta; Lehmann, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Background: The 3-dimensional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT3D) comprises isolation of chondrocytes from cartilage biopsies, cultivation to spheroids, and transplantation into the cartilage defect. Objectives: To evaluate the patients’ general health and functionality and to assess the defect repair after ACT3D with spheroids by MRI and MOCART scoring. Methods: Thirty-seven patients with isolated chondral lesions of the knee underwent ACT3D with spheroids through medial arthrotomy. Patient-administered scores were assessed at baseline (day before transplantation), at 6 weeks, and at 3, 6, and 12 months. MRI and MOCART scoring were performed at 3 and 12 months after ACT3D. Results: Patients were diagnosed with full-thickness patellofemoral (n = 16), femoral condylar (n = 18), or both defect types (n = 3), International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grade 3 or 4, with defect sizes between 1.0 and 12.0 cm2. On average, 59.5 spheroids/cm2 in defect size were transplanted. An overall statistically significant improvement from baseline to 12 months was observed for all assessment scores (Lysholm, International Knee Documentation Committee [IKDC], SF-36, Tegner) combined with a significant reduction in the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and an advanced defect filling. Subgroup analyses revealed a positive clinical outcome independent on defect size, defect locations, spheroid dosage, age, duration of symptoms, and severity of complaints at baseline. Seven patients experienced in total 8 adverse events, of which knee joint effusion and blocking were assessed as possibly or probably related to ACT3D. Conclusions: The patient-administered assessment scores along with the fast defect filling with ACT3D using spheroids demonstrated an increase in activity level and quality of life after a 1-year follow-up. PMID:26069617

  14. "Take" of a polymer-based autologous cultured composite "skin" on an integrated temporizing dermal matrix: proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Dearman, Bronwyn L; Stefani, Kristian; Li, Amy; Greenwood, John E

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the ability of an autologous cultured composite skin (CCS) to close similar biodegradable temporizing matrix (BTM)-integrated wounds, and its effectiveness in healing fresh full-thickness wounds after the failure of cultured epithelial autograft in its two forms (sheets and suspensions) to epithelialize over an integrated polymer BTM. Using a porcine model, autologous split-skin grafts were harvested three of four dorsal 8 × 8 cm treatment sites. These three sites were subsequently converted to full-thickness wounds and BTMs were implanted. The grafts were used to produce autologous CCSs for each pig. These consisted of a 1 mm thick biodegradable polymer foam scaffold into which fibroblasts and keratinocytes harvested from the grafts were cocultured. At Day 28, on each animal, the autologous CCSs were applied to two of the integrated BTMs, an autologous split-skin graft was applied to the third integrated BTM, and one CCS was applied immediately into a fresh, "naked" (no BTM applied) wound. The CCSs were capable of generating a bilayer repair over the naked wound's fat base and BTM-integrated wounds, which consisted of dermal elements and a keratinized stratified squamous epidermis anchored with a basement membrane by day 7. The CCSs behaved in different ways: either as a delivery vehicle allowing similar development of a bilayer repair while the polymer foam was shed from the wound, or generating a bilayer repair with the foam scaffold being retained (composite "take"). These results conclude our porcine program and provide proof of concept that the integrated BTM can be closed with an autologous CCS. Once fully optimized, this may provide robust repair without resorting to the split-skin graft, important in those cases where unburned donor site is unavailable.

  15. Acid ceramidase treatment enhances the outcome of autologous chondrocyte implantation in a rat osteochondral defect model.

    PubMed

    Frohbergh, M E; Guevara, J M; Grelsamer, R P; Barbe, M F; He, X; Simonaro, C M; Schuchman, E H

    2016-04-01

    The overall aim of this study was to evaluate how supplementation of chondrocyte media with recombinant acid ceramidase (rhAC) influenced cartilage repair in a rat osteochondral defect model. Primary chondrocytes were grown as monolayers in polystyrene culture dishes with and without rhAC (added once at the time of cell plating) for 7 days, and then seeded onto Bio-Gide® collagen scaffolds and grown for an additional 3 days. The scaffolds were then introduced into osteochondral defects created in Sprague-Dawley rat trochlea by a microdrilling procedure. Analysis was performed 6 weeks post-surgery macroscopically, by micro-CT, histologically, and by immunohistochemistry. Treatment with rhAC led to increased cell numbers and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) production (∼2 and 3-fold, respectively) following 7 days of expansion in vitro. Gene expression of collagen 2, aggrecan and Sox-9 also was significantly elevated. After seeding onto Bio-Gide®, more rhAC treated cells were evident within 4 h. At 6 weeks post-surgery, defects containing rhAC-treated cells exhibited more soft tissue formation at the articular surface, as evidenced by microCT, as well as histological evidence of enhanced cartilage repair. Notably, collagen 2 immunostaining revealed greater surface expression in animals receiving rhAC treated cells as well. Collagen 10 staining was not enhanced. The results further demonstrate the positive effects of rhAC treatment on chondrocyte growth and phenotype in vitro, and reveal for the first time the in vivo effects of the treated cells on cartilage repair. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Acid Ceramidase Treatment Enhances the Outcome of Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation in a Rat Osteochondral Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Frohbergh, Michael E.; Guevara, Johana M.; Grelsamer, Ronald P.; Barbe, Mary F.; He, Xingxuan; Simonaro, Calogera M.; Schuchman, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The overall aim of this study was to evaluate how supplementation of chondrocyte media with recombinant acid ceramidase (rhAC) influenced cartilage repair in a rat osteochondral defect model. Methods Primary chondrocytes were grown as monolayers in polystyrene culture dishes with and without rhAC (added once at the time of cell plating) for 7 days, and then seeded onto Bio-Gide® collagen scaffolds and grown for an additional 3 days. The scaffolds were then introduced into osteochondroal defects created in Sprague-Dawley rat trochlea by a micordrilling procedure. Analysis was performed 6 weeks post-surgery macroscopically, by micro-CT, histologically, and by immunohistochemistry. Results Treatment with rhAC led to increased cell numbers and glycosaminoglycan production (~2 and 3-fold, respectively) following 7 days of expansion in vitro. Gene expression of collagen 2, aggrecan and Sox-9 also was significantly elevated. After seeding onto Bio-Gide®, more rhAC treated cells were evident within 4 hours. At 6 weeks post-surgery, defects containing rhAC-treated cells exhibited more soft tissue formation at the articular surface, as evidenced by microCT, as well as histological evidence of enhanced cartilage repair. Notably, collagen 2 immunostaining revealed greater surface expression in animals receiving rhAC treated cells as well. Collagen 10 staining was not enhanced. Conclusion The results further demonstrate the positive effects of rhAC treatment on chondrocyte growth and phenotype in vitro, and reveal for the first time the in vivo effects of the treated cells on cartilage repair. PMID:26524412

  17. Comparative repair capacity of knee osteochondral defects using regenerated silk fiber scaffolds and fibrin glue with/without autologous chondrocytes during 36 weeks in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Khanmohammadi, Manijeh; Mobini, Sahba; Taghizadeh-Jahed, Masoud; Khanjani, Sayeh; Arasteh, Shaghayegh; Golshahi, Hannaneh; Torkaman, Giti; Ravanbod, Roya; Heidari-Vala, Hamed; Moshiri, Ali; Tahmasebi, Mohammad-Naghi; Akhondi, Mohammad-Mehdi

    2016-06-01

    The reconstruction capability of osteochondral (OCD) defects using silk-based scaffolds has been demonstrated in a few studies. However, improvement in the mechanical properties of natural scaffolds is still challengeable. Here, we investigate the in vivo repair capacity of OCD defects using a novel Bombyx mori silk-based composite scaffold with great mechanical properties and porosity during 36 weeks. After evaluation of the in vivo biocompatibility and degradation rate of these scaffolds, we examined the effectiveness of these fabricated scaffolds accompanied with/without autologous chondrocytes in the repair of OCD lesions of rabbit knees after 12 and 36 weeks. Moreover, the efficiency of these scaffolds was compared with fibrin glue (FG) as a natural carrier of chondrocytes using parallel clinical, histopathological and mechanical examinations. The data on subcutaneous implantation in mice showed that the designed scaffolds have a suitable in vivo degradation rate and regenerative capacity. The repair ability of chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds was typically higher than the scaffolds alone. After 36 weeks of implantation, most parts of the defects reconstructed by chondrocytes-seeded silk scaffolds (SFC) were hyaline-like cartilage. However, spontaneous healing and filling with a scaffold alone did not eventuate in typical repair. We could not find significant differences between quantitative histopathological and mechanical data of SFC and FGC. The fabricated constructs consisting of regenerated silk fiber scaffolds and chondrocytes are safe and suitable for in vivo repair of OCD defects and promising for future clinical trial studies.

  18. Human osteoarthritic chondrons outnumber patient- and joint-matched chondrocytes in hydrogel culture - future application in autologous cell-based OA cartilage repair?

    PubMed

    Rothdiener, Miriam; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Südkamp, Norbert; Aurich, Matthias; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Kurz, Bodo; Rolauffs, Bernd

    2017-07-17

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is used in 34-60% for osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage defects, although ACI is neither recommended nor designed for OA. Envisioning a hydrogel-based ACI for OA that uses chondrons instead of classically used chondrocytes, we hypothesized that human OA-chondrons may outperform OA-chondrocytes. We compared patient- and joint surface-matched human OA-chondrons vs. OA-chondrocytes cultured for the first time in a hydrogel, using a self-assembling peptide system. We determined yield, viability, cell numbers, mRNA expression, GAPDH mRNA enzyme activity, collagen II synthesis (CPII) and degradation (C2C), and sGAG. Ex vivo, mRNA expression was comparable. Over time, significant differences in survival led to 3.4-fold higher OA-chondron numbers in hydrogels after two weeks (p=0.002). Significantly more enzymatically active GAPDH protein indicated higher metabolic activity. The number of cultures that expressed mRNA for collagen types I, VI, COMP, aggrecan, VEGF, TGF-β1, and FGF-2 (but not collagen types II, X) was different, resulting in a 3.5-fold higher number of expression-positive OA-chondron cultures (p<0.05). Measuring CPII and C2C per hydrogel, OA-chondron hydrogels synthesized more than they degraded collagen type II, the opposite was true for OA-chondrocytes. Per cell, OA-chondrons but not OA-chondrocytes displayed more synthesis than degradation. Thus, OA-chondrons displayed superior biosynthesis and mRNA expression of tissue engineering and phenotype-relevant genes. Moreover, human OA-chondrons displayed a significant survival advantage in hydrogel culture, whose presence, drastic extent, and time scale was novel and is clinically significant. Collectively, these data highlight the high potential of human OA-chondrons for OA-ACI, as they would outnumber and, thus, surpass OA-chondrocytes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Autologous chondrocyte implantation for the treatment of cartilage lesions of the knee: a systematic review of randomized studies.

    PubMed

    Vasiliadis, Haris S; Wasiak, Jason; Salanti, Georgia

    2010-12-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) techniques are becoming more popular for the treatment of full thickness cartilage lesions of the knee joint. However, there is no systematic information for the efficacy of the new generation ACI techniques compared to other treatment options. A systematic review of the existing evidence from randomized clinical trials of ACI treatment would contribute to understanding the advantages and limitations of this method and would inform the planning of future studies. Using pre-defined criteria, we searched a number of electronic databases to identify all the existing randomized control trials of any type of ACI treatment. Risk of bias was assessed and an analysis of the reported outcomes was performed. Information on the clinical efficacy and safety of ACI compared to other interventions was collected and presented. Nine trials were identified with 626 patients. Patients ranged from 15 to 52 years, and the size of treated lesions was between 1 and 22 cm(2). ACI was associated with improvement in clinical outcomes compared to baseline. However, the body of evidence did not suggest any superiority of ACI over other treatments. Complication rates were comparable between interventions except from an increased rate of graft hypertrophies after ACI with periosteum. ACI is an effective treatment for full thickness chondral defects of the knee, providing an improvement of clinical outcomes. However, there is insufficient data to say whether ACI is superior to other treatment strategies. More high quality studies and harmonization in the reported outcomes are needed before specific suggestions for practice can be made.

  20. Nasal chondrocyte-based engineered autologous cartilage tissue for repair of articular cartilage defects: an observational first-in-human trial.

    PubMed

    Mumme, Marcus; Barbero, Andrea; Miot, Sylvie; Wixmerten, Anke; Feliciano, Sandra; Wolf, Francine; Asnaghi, Adelaide M; Baumhoer, Daniel; Bieri, Oliver; Kretzschmar, Martin; Pagenstert, Geert; Haug, Martin; Schaefer, Dirk J; Martin, Ivan; Jakob, Marcel

    2016-10-22

    Articular cartilage injuries have poor repair capacity, leading to progressive joint damage, and cannot be restored predictably by either conventional treatments or advanced therapies based on implantation of articular chondrocytes. Compared with articular chondrocytes, chondrocytes derived from the nasal septum have superior and more reproducible capacity to generate hyaline-like cartilage tissues, with the plasticity to adapt to a joint environment. We aimed to assess whether engineered autologous nasal chondrocyte-based cartilage grafts allow safe and functional restoration of knee cartilage defects. In a first-in-human trial, ten patients with symptomatic, post-traumatic, full-thickness cartilage lesions (2-6 cm(2)) on the femoral condyle or trochlea were treated at University Hospital Basel in Switzerland. Chondrocytes isolated from a 6 mm nasal septum biopsy specimen were expanded and cultured onto collagen membranes to engineer cartilage grafts (30 × 40 × 2 mm). The engineered tissues were implanted into the femoral defects via mini-arthrotomy and assessed up to 24 months after surgery. Primary outcomes were feasibility and safety of the procedure. Secondary outcomes included self-assessed clinical scores and MRI-based estimation of morphological and compositional quality of the repair tissue. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01605201. The study is ongoing, with an approved extension to 25 patients. For every patient, it was feasible to manufacture cartilaginous grafts with nasal chondrocytes embedded in an extracellular matrix rich in glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen. Engineered tissues were stable through handling with forceps and could be secured in the injured joints. No adverse reactions were recorded and self-assessed clinical scores for pain, knee function, and quality of life were improved significantly from before surgery to 24 months after surgery. Radiological assessments indicated variable degrees of

  1. Karyotyping of human chondrocytes in scaffold-assisted cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Trimborn, Marc; Endres, Michaela; Bommer, Christiane; Janke, Una; Krüger, Jan-Philipp; Morawietz, Lars; Kreuz, Peter C; Kaps, Christian

    2012-04-01

    Scaffold-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is an effective clinical procedure for cartilage repair. The aim of our study was to evaluate the chromosomal stability of human chondrocytes subjected to typical cell culture procedures needed for regenerative approaches in polymer-scaffold-assisted cartilage repair. Chondrocytes derived from post mortem donors and from donors scheduled for ACI were expanded, cryopreserved and re-arranged in polyglycolic acid (PGA)-fibrin scaffolds for tissue culture. Chondrocyte redifferentiation was analyzed by electron microscopy, histology and gene expression analysis. Karyotyping was performed using GTG banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization on a single cell basis. Chondrocytes showed de- and redifferentiation accompanied by the formation of extracellular matrix and induction of typical chondrocyte marker genes like type II collagen in PGA-fibrin scaffolds. Post mortem chondrocytes showed up to 1.7% structural and high numbers of numerical (up to 26.7%) chromosomal aberrations, while chondrocytes from living donors scheduled for ACI showed up to 1.8% structural and up to 1.3% numerical alterations. Cytogenetically, cell culture procedures and PGA-fibrin scaffolds did not significantly alter chromosomal integrity of the chondrocyte genome. Human chondrocytes derived from living donors subjected to regenerative medicine cell culture procedures like cell expansion, cryopreservation and culture in resorbable polymer-based scaffolds show normal chromosomal integrity and normal karyotypes. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Classification of graft hypertrophy after autologous chondrocyte implantation of full-thickness chondral defects in the knee.

    PubMed

    Kreuz, P C; Steinwachs, M; Erggelet, C; Krause, S J; Ossendorf, C; Maier, D; Ghanem, N; Uhl, M; Haag, M

    2007-12-01

    Graft hypertrophy is a major complication seen in autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) with a periosteal flap. We present the first magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) classification for periosteal hypertrophy including a grading of clinical symptoms and the surgical consequences. One hundred and two patients with isolated chondral defects underwent an ACI covered with periosteum and were evaluated preoperatively, 6, 18 and 36 months after surgery. Exclusion criteria were meniscal pathologies, axial malpositioning and ligament instabilities. Baseline clinical scores were compared with follow-up data by paired Wilcoxon-tests for the modified Cincinnati knee, the ICRS (International Cartilage Repair Society) and a new MRI score including the parameters defect filling, subchondral edema, effusion, cartilage signal and graft hypertrophy. Hypertrophic changes were graded from 1 (minimal) to 4 (severe). All scores showed significant improvement (P<0.001) over the entire study period. Patients with femoral lesions had significantly better results than patients with patella lesions after 18 and 36 months postoperative (P<0.03). Periosteal hypertrophy occurred in 28% of all patients. Fifty percent of all patella implants developed hypertrophic changes. No patient with grade 1, and all patients with grade 4 hypertrophy had to undergo revision surgery. The Pearson correlation between graft hypertrophy and ICRS score was 0.78 after 6 months, and 0.69 after 36 months (P<0.01). Inclusion of graft hypertrophy in the MRI score improves the correlation to clinical scores from 0.6 to 0.69. Grading graft hypertrophy helps to identify patients needing an early shaving of the graft. Its integration into an MRI score improves correlation with clinical scores. Re-operation depends on the grade of hypertrophy and clinical symptoms.

  3. Immunohistochemical study of collagen types I and II and procollagen IIA in human cartilage repair tissue following autologous chondrocyte implantation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S; Menage, J; Sandell, L J; Evans, E H; Richardson, J B

    2009-10-01

    This study has assessed the relative proportions of type I and II collagens and IIA procollagen in full depth biopsies of repair tissue in a large sample of patients treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Sixty five full depth biopsies were obtained from knees of 58 patients 8-60 months after treatment by ACI alone (n=55) or in combination with mosaicplasty (n=10). In addition articular cartilage was examined from eight individuals (aged 10-50) as controls. Morphology and semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry for collagen types I and II and procollagen IIA in the repair tissue were studied. Repair cartilage thickness was 2.89+/-1.5 mm and there was good basal integration between the repair cartilage, calcified cartilage and subchondral bone. Sixty five percent of the biopsies were predominantly fibrocartilage (mostly type I collagen and IIA procollagen), 15% were hyaline cartilage (mostly type II collagen), 17% were of mixed morphology and 3% were fibrous tissue (mostly type I collagen). Type II collagen and IIA procollagen were usually found in the lower regions near the bone and most type II collagen was present 30-60 months after treatment. The presence of type IIA procollagen in the repair tissue supports our hypothesis that this is indicative of a developing cartilage, with the ratio of type II collagen:procollagen IIA increasing from <2% in the first two years post-treatment to 30% three to five years after treatment. This suggests that cartilage repair tissue produced following ACI treatment, is likely to take some years to mature.

  4. Combined autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) with supra-condylar femoral varus osteotomy, following lateral growth-plate damage in an adolescent knee: 8-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We report the 8-year clinical and radiographic outcome of an adolescent patient with a large osteochondral defect of the lateral femoral condyle, and ipsilateral genu valgum secondary to an epiphyseal injury, managed with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and supracondylar re-alignment femoral osteotomy. Long-term clinical success was achieved using this method, illustrating the effective use of re-alignment osteotomy in correcting mal-alignment of the knee, protecting the ACI graft site and providing the optimum environment for cartilage repair and regeneration. This is the first report of the combined use of ACI and femoral osteotomy for such a case. PMID:21418566

  5. Evidence-based status of second- and third-generation autologous chondrocyte implantation over first generation: a systematic review of level I and II studies.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Deepak; Goyal, Anjali; Keyhani, Sohrab; Lee, Eng Hin; Hui, James H P

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the Level I and II evidence for newer generations of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) versus first-generation ACI and to establish whether the newer generations have overcome the limitations associated with first-generation ACI. A literature search was carried out for Level I and II evidence studies on cartilage repair using the PubMed database. All the studies that dealt with ACI were identified. Only Level I and II studies that compared newer generations against earlier generations were selected, whereas studies that compared ACI against other methods of cartilage repair were excluded. A total of 7 studies matched the selection criteria. Two studies compared periosteum-based autologous chondrocyte implantation (P-ACI) against collagen membrane-based autologous chondrocyte implantation (C-ACI), whereas one study each compared membrane-associated autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) against P-ACI and C-ACI. One study on C-ACI compared results related to age, whereas 2 studies evaluated postoperative rehabilitation after MACI. There was weak evidence showing that C-ACI is better than P-ACI and that MACI is comparable with both P-ACI and C-ACI. The weak evidence is because of studies with short durations of follow-up, small numbers of patients, medium-sized defects, and younger age groups. There is good evidence favoring an accelerated weight-bearing regimen after MACI. There is currently no evidence that supports scaffold-based ACI or arthroscopic implantation over first-generation ACI. The hypothesis is thus partly proved in favor of C-ACI/MACI against P-ACI with weak evidence, in favor of accelerated weight bearing after MACI with strong evidence, and not in favor of arthroscopic and scaffold-based implantations because of unavailable evidence. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II, systematic review of Level I and II studies. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  6. Combined autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) with supra-condylar femoral varus osteotomy, following lateral growth-plate damage in an adolescent knee: 8-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Sridhar; Bentley, George

    2011-03-18

    We report the 8-year clinical and radiographic outcome of an adolescent patient with a large osteochondral defect of the lateral femoral condyle, and ipsilateral genu valgum secondary to an epiphyseal injury, managed with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and supracondylar re-alignment femoral osteotomy. Long-term clinical success was achieved using this method, illustrating the effective use of re-alignment osteotomy in correcting mal-alignment of the knee, protecting the ACI graft site and providing the optimum environment for cartilage repair and regeneration. This is the first report of the combined use of ACI and femoral osteotomy for such a case.

  7. An animal model study for repair of tracheal defects with autologous stem cells and differentiated chondrocytes from adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hashemibeni, Batool; Goharian, Vahid; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Sadeghi, Farzaneh; Fasihi, Farzaneh; Alipur, Razie; Valiani, Ali; Ghorbani, Masoud; Emami, Zahra Motavali; Shabani, Fatemeh; Goharian, Maryam

    2012-11-01

    Stenosis of trachea with mucosal and cartilage lesions is a challenging problem in tracheal surgery. Owing to ease of harvest and abundance, adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are attractive and increasingly used in tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to evaluate the repair of trachea with autologous stem cells and differentiated chondrocytes from adipose-derived stem cells in an animal model. Six canine ADSCs were isolated and proliferated in monolayer culture and CD44; CD90 markers were investigated by flow cytometry. ADSCs were seeded in alginate beads and were differentiated into chondrocytes by TGF-β3. Cartilage-specific markers with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction were demonstrated in differentiated cells. These differentiated cells and stem cells in alginate scaffold were separately transferred to a defect created in canine's trachea. After 8 weeks, the healing and cartilage formation in the trachea was evaluated by histological methods. We identified formed cartilage pieces and chondrocytes with lacuna and extracellular matrix in defects implanted with differentiated cells, but in other groups, staining of the sections did not show the presence of cartilage in the engineered tracheal wall. We showed that cartilage- engineered from differentiated adipose-derived stem cells in alginate biodegradable scaffold could repair tracheal cartilage defects. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Prospective evaluation of serum biomarker levels and cartilage repair by autologous chondrocyte transplantation and subchondral drilling in a canine model

    PubMed Central

    Nganvongpanit, Korakot; Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Chaochird, Patama; Klunklin, Kasisin; Warrit, Kanawee; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Pattamapaspong, Nuttaya; Luevitoonvechkij, Sirichai; Arpornchayanon, Olarn; Kongtawelert, Prachya; Pruksakorn, Dumnoensun

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to evaluate serum chondroitin sulfate (CS) and hyaluronic acid (HA) levels and the capability of cartilage repair of full-thickness cartilage defects after treatment with two different fundamental surgical techniques: autologous chondrocyte transplantation (AC) and subchondral drilling (SD). Methods A 4-mm-diameter full-thickness cartilage defect was created in each of 10 skeletally mature male outbred dogs. The dogs were randomly separated into two groups. Groups A and B were treated with AC and SD, respectively. An evaluation was made at the 24th week of the experiment. Serum was analyzed prospectively – preoperatively and at 6-week intervals – for CS and HA levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and ELISA-based assays, respectively. Results The cartilage repair assessment score (median ± standard deviation) of group A (9.5 ± 2.5) was significantly higher than that of group B (2.5 ± 1.3) (P < 0.05). Group A also demonstrated a better quality of hyaline-like cartilage repair. Prospective analysis of serum WF6 and HA levels between the two groups did not show any significant difference. Serum WF6 levels at the 24th week of the experiment had a negative correlation (r = -0.69, P < 0.05) with the cartilage repair assessment score, whereas serum HA levels tended to correlate positively (r = 0.46, 0.1

  9. Incidence, degree, and development of graft hypertrophy 24 months after matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation: association with clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Jay R; Smith, Anne; Fallon, Michael; Butler, Rodney; Nairn, Robert; Breidahl, William; Wood, David J

    2015-09-01

    Graft hypertrophy is a common occurrence after periosteal, collagen-covered and matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence, development, and degree of graft hypertrophy at 24 months after MACI. The hypothesis was that graft hypertrophy would not be associated with clinical outcome at 24 months. Case series, Level of evidence, 4. This study was undertaken in 180 consecutive patients (113 male, 67 female) after MACI in the knee. All patients were assessed clinically using the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3, 12, and 24 months after surgery. The incidence of hypertrophy relevant to anatomic graft site was investigated, as was the progressive change in hypertrophic studies postoperatively. The degree of tissue overgrowth in hypertrophic cases was investigated, as was its association with patient clinical outcome at 24 months after surgery. Of the 180 patients, 50 demonstrated a hypertrophic graft at 1 or more postoperative time points. This included 9 grafts (5.0%) at 3 months and 32 grafts (18.7%) at 12 months. At 24 months, 47 grafts (26.1%)-43 (32.1%) tibiofemoral and 4 (8.7%) patellofemoral-were hypertrophic. Patients with hypertrophic grafts at 24 months (n = 47) were younger (P = .051), they had a lower body mass index (BMI; P = .069), and significantly fewer of them had patellofemoral grafts (P = .007) compared with patients who had grafts with full (100%) tissue infill (n = 61). There were no significant differences in any of the KOOS subscales between patients with graft hypertrophy or full (100%) tissue infill at 24 months after surgery, while the severity of graft hypertrophy was not associated with KOOS subscales at 24 months. Hypertrophic grafts after MACI were common and continued to develop through to 24 months after surgery. Hypertrophic growth was associated with being younger and having a lower BMI, was

  10. Ectopic bone formation during tissue-engineered cartilage repair using autologous chondrocytes and novel plasma-derived albumin scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Robla Costales, David; Junquera, Luis; García Pérez, Eva; Gómez Llames, Sara; Álvarez-Viejo, María; Meana-Infiesta, Álvaro

    2016-10-01

    The aims of this study were twofold: first, to evaluate the production of cartilaginous tissue in vitro and in vivo using a novel plasma-derived scaffold, and second, to test the repair of experimental defects made on ears of New Zealand rabbits (NZr) using this approach. Scaffolds were seeded with chondrocytes and cultured in vitro for 3 months to check in vitro cartilage production. To evaluate in vivo cartilage production, a chondrocyte-seeded scaffold was transplanted subcutaneously to a nude mouse. To check in vivo repair, experimental defects made in the ears of five New Zealand rabbits (NZr) were filled with chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds. In vitro culture produced mature chondrocytes with no extracellular matrix (ECM). Histological examination of redifferentiated in vitro cultures showed differentiated chondrocytes adhered to scaffold pores. Subcutaneous transplantation of these constructs to a nude mouse produced cartilage, confirmed by histological study. Experimental cartilage repair in five NZr showed cartilaginous tissue repairing the defects, mixed with calcified areas of bone formation. It is possible to produce cartilaginous tissue in vivo and to repair experimental auricular defects by means of chondrocyte cultures and the novel plasma-derived scaffold. Further studies are needed to determine the significance of bone formation in the samples. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for cartilage defects of the knee: a guideline by the working group "Tissue Regeneration" of the German Society of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology (DGOU)].

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, P; Andereya, S; Angele, P; Ateschrang, A; Aurich, M; Baumann, M; Behrens, P; Bosch, U; Erggelet, C; Fickert, S; Fritz, J; Gebhard, H; Gelse, K; Günther, D; Hoburg, A; Kasten, P; Kolombe, T; Madry, H; Marlovits, S; Meenen, N M; Müller, P E; Nöth, U; Petersen, J P; Pietschmann, M; Richter, W; Rolauffs, B; Rhunau, K; Schewe, B; Steinert, A; Steinwachs, M R; Welsch, G H; Zinser, W; Albrecht, D

    2013-02-01

    Autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation (ACT/ACI) is an established and recognised procedure for the treatment of localised full-thickness cartilage defects of the knee. The present review of the working group "Clinical Tissue Regeneration" of the German Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (DGOU) describes the biology and function of healthy articular cartilage, the present state of knowledge concerning potential consequences of primary cartilage lesions and the suitable indication for ACI. Based on current evidence, an indication for ACI is given for symptomatic cartilage defects starting from defect sizes of more than 3-4 cm2; in the case of young and active sports patients at 2.5 cm2. Advanced degenerative joint disease is the single most important contraindication. The review gives a concise overview on important scientific background, the results of clinical studies and discusses advantages and disadvantages of ACI.

  12. Evaluation and analysis of graft hypertrophy by means of arthroscopy, biochemical MRI and osteochondral biopsies in a patient following autologous chondrocyte implantation for treatment of a full-thickness-cartilage defect of the knee.

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, Philipp; Uhl, Markus; Salzmann, Gian M; Morscheid, Yannik P; Südkamp, Norbert P; Madry, Henning

    2015-06-01

    Graft hypertrophy represents a characteristic complication following autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for treatment of cartilage defects. Although some epidemiological data suggest that incidence is associated with first-generation ACI using autologous chondrocyte implantation, it has also been reported in other technical modifications of ACI using different biomaterials. Nevertheless, it has not been described in autologous, non-periosteum, implant-free associated ACI. In addition, little is known about histological and T2-relaxation appearance of graft hypertrophy. The present case report provides a rare case of extensive graft hypertrophy following ACI using an autologous spheres technique with clinical progression over time. Detailed clinical, MR tomographic and histological evaluation has been performed, which demonstrates a high quality of repair tissue within the hypertrophic as well as non-hypertrophic transplanted areas of the repair tissue. No expression of collagen type X (a sign of chondrocyte hypertrophy), only slight changes of the subchondral bone and a nearly normal cell-matrix ratio suggest that tissue within the hypertrophic area does not significantly differ from intact and high-quality repair tissue and therefore seems not to cause graft hypertrophy. This is in contrast to the assumption that histological hypertrophy might cause or contribute to an overwhelming growth of the repair tissue within the transplantation site. Data presented in this manuscript might contribute to further explain the etiology of graft hypertrophy following ACI.

  13. [Chondrocytes application in regenerative medicine].

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Katarzyna; Zalewski, Mateusz; Gadek, Artur; Drukała, Justyna

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage reconstruction is a crucial issue for tissue engineering because of high damage frequency in connection with low regenerative capacity. Microfractures and shaving are the oldest and most commonly used practices. The newest techniques are: Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation, Matrix Associated Chondrocytes Implantation and their derivatives. Dedifferentiation of chondrocytes due to low proliferation rate and phenotype loss makes isolation and in vitro culture of normal human chondrocytes very complex. Therefore, obtaining mesenchymal stem cells from various sources and differentiating them into chondrocytes is another interesting approach.

  14. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for cartilage defects of the knee: A guideline by the working group "Clinical Tissue Regeneration" of the German Society of Orthopaedics and Trauma (DGOU).

    PubMed

    Niemeyer, P; Albrecht, D; Andereya, S; Angele, P; Ateschrang, A; Aurich, M; Baumann, M; Bosch, U; Erggelet, C; Fickert, S; Gebhard, H; Gelse, K; Günther, D; Hoburg, A; Kasten, P; Kolombe, T; Madry, H; Marlovits, S; Meenen, N M; Müller, P E; Nöth, U; Petersen, J P; Pietschmann, M; Richter, W; Rolauffs, B; Rhunau, K; Schewe, B; Steinert, A; Steinwachs, M R; Welsch, G H; Zinser, W; Fritz, J

    2016-06-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is an established and well-accepted procedure for the treatment of localised full-thickness cartilage defects of the knee. The present review of the working group "Clinical Tissue Regeneration" of the German Society of Orthopaedics and Trauma (DGOU) describes the biology and function of healthy articular cartilage, the present state of knowledge concerning therapeutic consequences of primary cartilage lesions and the suitable indication for ACI. Based on best available scientific evidence, an indication for ACI is given for symptomatic cartilage defects starting from defect sizes of more than three to four square centimetres; in the case of young and active sports patients at 2.5cm(2), while advanced degenerative joint disease needs to be considered as the most important contraindication. The present review gives a concise overview on important scientific background and the results of clinical studies and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of ACI. Non-systematic Review. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The secretory profiles of cultured human articular chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells: implications for autologous cell transplantation strategies.

    PubMed

    Polacek, Martin; Bruun, Jack-Ansgar; Elvenes, Jan; Figenschau, Yngve; Martinez, Inigo

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the phenotype of human articular chondrocytes (ACs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) after cell expansion by studying the spectrum of proteins secreted by cells into the culture medium. ACs and MSCs were expanded in monolayer cultures for some weeks, as done in standard cell transplantation procedures. Initially, the expression of cartilage signature genes was compared by real-time PCR. Metabolic labeling of proteins (SILAC) in combination with mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) was applied to investigate differences in released proteins. In addition, multiplex assays were carried out to quantify the amounts of several matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and their natural inhibitors (TIMPs). Expanded chondrocytes showed a slightly higher expression of cartilage-specific genes than MSCs, whereas the overall spectra of released proteins were very similar for the two cell types. In qualitative terms MSCs seemed to secrete similar number of extracellular matrix proteins (43% vs. 45% of total proteins found) and catabolic agents (9% vs. 10%), and higher number of anabolic agents (12 % vs. 7%) compared to ACs. Some matrix-regulatory agents such as serpins, BMP-1, and galectins were detected only in MSC supernatants. Quantitative analyses of MMPs and TIMPs revealed significantly higher levels of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-7 in the medium of ACs. Our data show that after the expansion phase, both ACs and MSCs express a dedifferentiated phenotype, resembling each other. ACs hold a phenotype closer to native cartilage at the gene expression level, whereas MSCs show a more anabolic profile by looking at the released proteins pattern. Our data together with the inherent capability of MSCs to maintain their differentiation potential for longer cultivation periods would favor the use of these cells for cartilage reconstruction.

  16. Matrix-encapsulation cell-seeding technique to prevent cell detachment during arthroscopic implantation of matrix-induced autologous chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Masri, Maria; Lombardero, Germán; Velasquillo, Cristina; Martínez, Valentín; Neri, Rosario; Villegas, Hilda; Ibarra, Clemente

    2007-08-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of obtaining a large number of viable cells within a construct that will not be detached by high fluid flow during arthroscopic implantation. Arthroscopic osteochondral biopsy specimens were obtained from the medial femoral trochlea of 8 horses. Chondrocytes were isolated by collagenase digestion and expanded in M199 media until confluency. After 10 to 12 days, cultures were trypsinized and cells resuspended in culture media. Then, 5 x 10(6) cells x mL(-1) were seeded on a culture dish and the same amount in a flask. Once extracellular matrix was formed, a polyglycolic/polylactic acid disk was placed in the culture dish. Cells obtained from the culture flasks (2 x 10(7) cells) were seeded onto the polymer and encapsulated by lifting the monolayer of cells and matrix from the bottom of the dish with surgical forceps. On days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9, viability was evaluated by calcein fluorescence. Fiber cell attachment was evaluated before implantation by environmental scanning electron microscopy. Six horses were implanted with naive cell-polymer constructs, and two horses were implanted with adenoviral vector with green fluorescent protein (AdGFP)-transduced cells. Biopsy specimens of repair tissue were evaluated at 8 weeks in 6 horses and at 4 weeks in the 2 horses implanted with AdGFP-transduced cells by second-look arthroscopy and biopsy, histochemistry, and confocal laser scanning microscopy via MitoTracker Red 580 (Invitrogen [Molecular Probes], Gibco, Carlsbad, CA) to assess cell viability. Viability and attachment of cells to polymer were confirmed by calcein fluorescence microscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy. Consistency of the construct was ideal for implantation between 7 and 9 days. Repair tissue with AdGFP chondrocytes after 4 weeks showed fluorescent cells also positive to MitoTracker probe by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Repair tissue after 8 weeks showed very cellular new

  17. Reconstruction of Alar Nasal Cartilage Defects Using a Tissue Engineering Technique Based on a Combined Use of Autologous Chondrocyte Micrografts and Platelet-rich Plasma: Preliminary Clinical and Instrumental Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Scioli, Maria G.; Bielli, Alessandra; Orlandi, Augusto; Cervelli, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Developing cartilage constructs with injectability, appropriate matrix composition, and persistent cartilaginous phenotype remains an enduring challenge in cartilage repair. The combined use of autologous chondrocyte micrografts and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an alternative that opens a new era in this field. Methods: At the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy, 11 patients underwent nasal alar reconstruction with chondrocyte micrografts gently poured onto PRP in solid form. A computed tomographic scan control was performed after 12 months. Pearson’s Chi-square test was used to investigate difference in cartilage density between native and newly formed cartilages. Results: The constructs of chondrocyte micrografts–PRP that were subcutaneously injected resulted in a persistent cartilage tissue with appropriate morphology, adequate central nutritional perfusion without central necrosis or ossification, and further augmented nasal dorsum without obvious contraction and deformation. Conclusion: This report demonstrated that chondrocyte micrografts derived from nasal septum poured onto PRP in solid form are useful for cartilage regeneration in patients with external nasal valve collapse. PMID:27826462

  18. Single-stage cartilage repair in the knee with microfracture covered with a resorbable polymer-based matrix and autologous bone marrow concentrate.

    PubMed

    Enea, D; Cecconi, S; Calcagno, S; Busilacchi, A; Manzotti, S; Kaps, C; Gigante, A

    2013-12-01

    Different single-stage surgical approaches are currently under evaluation to repair focal cartilage lesions. This study aims to analyze the clinical and histological results after treatment of focal condylar articular lesions of the knee with microfracture and subsequent covering with a resorbable polyglycolic acid/hyaluronan (PGA -HA) matrix augmented with autologous bone marrow concentrate (BMC). Nine patients with focal lesions of the condylar articular cartilage were consecutively treated with arthroscopic PGA -HA-covered microfracture and bone marrow concentrate (PGA -HA-CMBMC). Patients were retrospectively assessed using standardized assessment tools and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Five patients consented to undergo second look arthroscopy and 2 consented biopsy harvest. All the patients but one showed improvement in clinical scoring from the pre-operative situation to the latest follow-up (average 22±2months). The mean IKDC subjective score, Lysholm score, VAS and the median Tegner score significantly increased from baseline to the latest follow-up. Cartilage macroscopic assessment at 12months revealed that one repair appeared normal, three almost normal and one appeared abnormal. Histological analysis proofed hyaline-like cartilage repair tissue formation in one case. MRI at 8 to 12months follow-up showed complete defect filling. The first clinical experience with single-stage treatment of focal cartilage defects of the knee with microfracture and covering with the PGA -HA matrix augmented with autologous BMC (PGA -HA-CMBMC) suggests that it is safe, it improves knee function and has the potential to regenerate hyaline-like cartilage. IV, case series. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Post-treatment rehabilitation after autologous chondrocyte implantation: State of the art and recommendations of the Clinical Tissue Regeneration Study Group of the German Society for Accident Surgery and the German Society for Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery].

    PubMed

    Pietschmann, M F; Horng, A; Glaser, C; Albrecht, D; Bruns, J; Scheffler, S; Marlovits, S; Angele, P; Aurich, M; Bosch, U; Fritz, J; Frosch, K H; Kolombe, T; Richter, W; Petersen, J P; Nöth, U; Niemeyer, P; Jagodzinsky, M; Kasten, P; Ruhnau, K; Müller, P E

    2014-03-01

    Over the course of the past two decades autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) has become an important surgical technique for treating large cartilage defects. The original method using a periostal flap has been improved by using cell-seeded scaffolds for implantation, the matrix-based autologous chondrocyte implantation (mb-ACI) procedure. Uniform nationwide guidelines for post-ACI rehabilitation do not exist. A survey was conducted among the members of the clinical tissue regeneration study group concerning the current rehabilitation protocols and the members of the study group published recommendations for postoperative rehabilitation and treatment after ACI based on the results of this survey. There was agreement on fundamentals concerning a location-specific rehabilitation protocol (femoral condyle vs. patellofemoral joint). With regard to weight bearing and range of motion a variety of different protocols exist. Similar to this total agreement on the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for postsurgical care was found but again a great variety of different protocols exist. This manuscript summarizes the recommendations of the members of the German clinical tissue regeneration study group on postsurgical rehabilitation and MRI assessment after ACI (level IVb/EBM).

  20. A Randomized Multicenter Trial Comparing Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation with Microfracture: Long-Term Follow-up at 14 to 15 Years.

    PubMed

    Knutsen, Gunnar; Drogset, Jon Olav; Engebretsen, Lars; Grøntvedt, Torbjørn; Ludvigsen, Tom C; Løken, Sverre; Solheim, Eirik; Strand, Torbjørn; Johansen, Oddmund

    2016-08-17

    The management of cartilage and osteochondral lesions in the knee remains problematic and controversial. Our group reported the 2-year and 5-year results of a randomized controlled trial comparing autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and microfracture in patients with focal femoral cartilage injuries. The objective of the present study was to report the long-term results. Eighty patients with a single symptomatic chronic cartilage defect on the femoral condyle without general osteoarthritis were included in the study at the time of the index operation (January 1999 to February 2000). We used the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS), Lysholm, Short Form-36 (SF-36), and Tegner forms to collect data at the time of inclusion and at follow-up evaluations. Standing weight-bearing radiographs were evaluated for evidence of osteoarthritis according to the method described by Kellgren and Lawrence. For the long-term follow-up in 2014, we used the Synaflexer frame to standardize the radiographs. The operation was considered to have failed if a reoperation was performed because of symptoms from a lack of healing of the treated defect. At the long-term follow-up evaluation, no significant differences between the treatment groups were detected with respect to the results on the clinical scoring systems. At the 15-year evaluation, there were 17 failures in the ACI group compared with 13 in the microfracture group. We observed that more total knee replacements were needed in the ACI group than in the microfracture group (6 compared with 3). The surviving patients in both groups, i.e., those who had not had a failure, had significant improvement in the clinical scores compared with baseline. Fifty-seven percent of the surviving patients in the ACI group and 48% of such patients in the microfracture group had radiographic evidence of early osteoarthritis (a Kellgren and Lawrence grade of ≥2); the difference was not significant. The survivors in both groups improved

  1. Long-term follow-up evaluation of autologous chondrocyte implantation for symptomatic cartilage lesions of the knee: A single-centre prospective study.

    PubMed

    Berruto, M; Ferrua, P; Pasqualotto, S; Uboldi, F; Maione, A; Tradati, D; Usellini, E

    2017-08-04

    Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (ACI) has been the first technique in reconstruction of a valid articular surface. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical results of this technique at an average follow up of 162±27months (range 88-208) in a group of patients who underwent ACI. 32 patients were operated between 1997 and 2007 for chondral lesions or osteochondritis dissecans of the knee. Mean size of the defect was 5.48cm(2)±1.53 (range 2-9). Nine patients were treated with I generation technique and 23 with II generation. All patients were evaluated with Subjective IKDC and Tegner Activity Scales for clinical outcomes and with EQ-VAS for a quantitative measure of health after intervention, starting from pre-operative period and at regular follow up (minimum 88 months-maximum 208 months). A significant increment of all scores was noticed comparing preoperative and postoperative results. In particular medium IKDC score increased from 40.3±9.6 in preoperative evaluation to 74.2±11.6 at one year (p<0.00001) and to 83.9±10.4 at 5 years follow up (p<0.001). Mean IKDC values at the last follow-up were 80.3±14.2, showing no statistical differences with those obtained at five-year follow-up. Tegner Activity Scale values increased from 2.8±1.1 preoperatively to 4.1±1.1 (p<0.0001) after one year and to 6±1.1 at five years (p<0.0001). Mean Tegner Activity Scale values decreased to 4.8±1.4 at the last follow-up. EQ-VAS evaluation showed superposable results comparing the 5 years evaluation with the ones at a medium follow up of 162±27months. The most important finding is the reliability at long-term of ACI technique, which in our series gave excellent clinical results. No statistical differences were observed between first- and second-generation. Clinical outcomes were significantly better for defects in the femoral condyles, influenced by age (worse results over 30 years old). ACI represents a valid technique for chondral and osteochondral lesions of the

  2. In vivo evaluation of biomechanical properties in the patellofemoral joint after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation by means of quantitative T2 MRI.

    PubMed

    Pachowsky, M L; Trattnig, S; Wondrasch, B; Apprich, S; Marlovits, S; Mauerer, A; Welsch, Goetz H; Blanke, M

    2014-06-01

    To determine in vivo biomechanical properties of articular cartilage and cartilage repair tissue of the patella, using biochemical MRI by means of quantitative T2 mapping. Twenty MR scans were achieved at 3T MRI, using a new 8-channel multi-function coil allowing controlled bending of the knee. Multi-echo spin-echo T2 mapping was prepared in healthy volunteers and in age- and sex-matched patients after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) of the patella. MRI was performed at 0° and 45° of flexion of the knee after 0 min and after 1 h. A semi-automatic region-of-interest analysis was performed for the whole patella cartilage. To allow stratification with regard to the anatomical (collagen) structure, further subregional analysis was carried out (deep-middle-superficial cartilage layer). Statistical analysis of variance was performed. During 0° flexion (decompression), full-thickness T2 values showed no significant difference between volunteers (43 ms) and patients (41 ms). Stratification was more pronounced for healthy cartilage compared to cartilage repair tissue. During 45° flexion (compression), full-thickness T2 values within volunteers were significantly increased (54 ms) compared to patients (44 ms) (p < 0.001). Again, stratification was more pronounced in volunteers compared to patients. The volunteer group showed no significant increase in T2 values measured in straight position and in bended position. There was no significant difference between the 0- and the 60-min MRI examination. T2 values in the patient group increased between the 0- and the 60-min examination. However, the increase was only significant in the superior cartilage layer of the straight position (p = 0.021). During compression (at 45° flexion), healthy patellar cartilage showed a significant increase in T2-values, indicating adaptations of water content and collagen fibril orientation to mechanical load. This could not be observed within the patella

  3. PGA-associated heterotopic chondrocyte cocultures: implications of nasoseptal and auricular chondrocytes in articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    El Sayed, K; Marzahn, U; John, T; Hoyer, M; Zreiqat, H; Witthuhn, A; Kohl, B; Haisch, A; Schulze-Tanzil, G

    2013-01-01

    The availability of autologous articular chondrocytes remains a limiting issue in matrix assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation. Non-articular heterotopic chondrocytes could be an alternative autologous cell source. The aims of this study were to establish heterotopic chondrocyte cocultures to analyze cell-cell compatibilities and to characterize the chondrogenic potential of nasoseptal chondrocytes compared to articular chondrocytes. Primary porcine and human nasoseptal and articular chondrocytes were investigated for extracellular cartilage matrix (ECM) expression in a monolayer culture. 3D polyglycolic acid- (PGA) associated porcine heterotopic mono- and cocultures were assessed for cell vitality, types II, I, and total collagen-, and proteoglycan content. The type II collagen, lubricin, and Sox9 gene expressions were significantly higher in articular compared with nasoseptal monolayer chondrocytes, while type IX collagen expression was lower in articular chondrocytes. Only β1-integrin gene expression was significantly inferior in humans but not in porcine nasoseptal compared with articular chondrocytes, indicating species-dependent differences. Heterotopic chondrocytes in PGA cultures revealed high vitality with proteoglycan-rich hyaline-like ECM production. Similar amounts of type II collagen deposition and type II/I collagen ratios were found in heterotopic chondrocytes cultured on PGA compared to articular chondrocytes. Quantitative analyses revealed a time-dependent increase in total collagen and proteoglycan content, whereby the differences between heterotopic and articular chondrocyte cultures were not significant. Nasoseptal and auricular chondrocytes monocultured in PGA or cocultured with articular chondrocytes revealed a comparable high chondrogenic potential in a tissue engineering setting, which created the opportunity to test them in vivo for articular cartilage repair. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Evaluation of cartilage repair tissue after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation using a hyaluronic-based or a collagen-based scaffold with morphological MOCART scoring and biochemical T2 mapping: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Goetz Hannes; Mamisch, Tallal Charles; Zak, Lukas; Blanke, Matthias; Olk, Alexander; Marlovits, Stefan; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2010-05-01

    In cartilage repair, bioregenerative approaches using tissue engineering techniques have tried to achieve a close resemblance to hyaline cartilage, which might be visualized using advanced magnetic resonance imaging. To compare cartilage repair tissue at the femoral condyle noninvasively after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation using Hyalograft C, a hyaluronic-based scaffold, to cartilage repair tissue after transplantation using CaReS, a collagen-based scaffold, with magnetic resonance imaging using morphologic scoring and T2 mapping. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Twenty patients after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (Hyalograft C, n = 10; CaReS, n = 10) underwent 3-T magnetic resonance imaging 24 months after surgery. Groups were matched by age and defect size/localization. For clinical outcome, the Brittberg score was assessed. Morphologic analysis was applied using the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue score, and global and zonal biochemical T2 mapping was performed to reflect biomechanical properties with regard to collagen matrix/content and hydration. The clinical outcome was comparable in each group. The magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue score showed slightly but not significantly (P= .210) better results in the CaReS group (76.5) compared to the Hyalograft C group (70.0), with significantly better (P= .004) constitution of the surface of the repair tissue in the CaReS group. Global T2 relaxation times (milliseconds) for healthy surrounding cartilage were comparable in both groups (Hyalograft C, 49.9; CaReS, 51.9; P= .398), whereas cartilage repair tissue showed significantly higher results in the CaReS group (Hyalograft C, 48.2; CaReS, 55.5; P= .011). Zonal evaluation showed no significant differences (P > or = .05). Most morphologic parameters provided comparable results for both repair tissues. However, differences in the surface and higher T2 values for

  5. Repair of articular cartilage defect by autologous transplantation of basic fibroblast growth factor gene-transduced chondrocytes with adeno-associated virus vector.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, Naoki; Saito, Tomoyuki; Uesugi, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Naomi; Xin, Ke-Qin; Okuda, Kenji; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Ozawa, Keiya; Koshino, Tomihisa

    2005-01-01

    To examine the effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) gene-transduced chondrocytes on the repair of articular cartilage defects. LacZ gene or bFGF gene was transduced into primary isolated rabbit chondrocytes with the use of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector. These gene-transduced chondrocytes were embedded in collagen gel and transplanted into a full-thickness defect in the articular cartilage of the patellar groove of a rabbit. The efficiency of gene transduction was assessed according to the percentage of LacZ-positive cells among the total number of living cells. The concentration of bFGF in the culture supernatant was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to confirm the production by bFGF gene-transduced chondrocytes. At 4, 8, and 12 weeks after transplantation, cartilage repair was evaluated histologically and graded semiquantitatively using a histologic scoring system ranging from 0 (complete regeneration) to 14 (no regeneration) points. LacZ gene expression by chondrocytes was maintained until 8 weeks in >85% of the in vitro population. LacZ-positive cells were found at the transplant sites for at least 4 weeks after surgery. The mean concentration of bFGF was significantly increased in bFGF gene-transduced cells compared with control cells (P < 0.01). Semiquantitative histologic scoring indicated that the total score was significantly lower in the bFGF-transduced group than in the control group throughout the observation period. These results demonstrated that gene transfer to chondrocytes by an ex vivo method was established with the AAV vector, and transplantation of bFGF gene-transduced chondrocytes had a clear beneficial effect on the repair of rabbit articular cartilage defects.

  6. A randomized trial comparing accelerated and traditional approaches to postoperative weightbearing rehabilitation after matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation: findings at 5 years.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Jay R; Fallon, Michael; Zheng, M H; Wood, David J; Ackland, Timothy R

    2012-07-01

    While structured postoperative rehabilitation after matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) is considered critical, very little has been made available on how best to progressively increase weightbearing and exercise after surgery. A significant improvement will exist in clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based scoring measures to 5 years after surgery. Furthermore, there will be no significant differences in outcomes in MACI patients at 5 years when comparing a traditional and an accelerated postoperative weightbearing regimen. Finally, patient demographics, cartilage defect parameters, and injury/surgery history will be associated with graft outcome. Randomized controlled trial; level of evidence, 1. Clinical and radiological outcomes were studied in 70 patients who underwent MACI to the medial or lateral femoral condyle, in conjunction with either an "accelerated" or a "traditional" approach to postoperative weightbearing rehabilitation. Under the accelerated protocol, patients reached full weightbearing at 8 weeks after surgery, compared with 11 weeks for the traditional group. Clinical measures (knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score [KOOS], short-form health survey [SF-36], visual analog scale [VAS], 6-minute walk test, and knee range of motion) were assessed before surgery and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months and 5 years after surgery. High-resolution MRI was undertaken at 3, 12, and 24 months and 5 years after surgery and assessed 8 previously defined pertinent parameters of graft repair as well as a combined MRI composite score. The association between clinical and MRI-based outcomes, patient demographics, chondral defect parameters, and injury/surgery history was investigated. Of the 70 patients recruited, 63 (31 accelerated, 32 traditional) underwent clinical follow-up at 5 years; 58 (29 accelerated, 29 traditional) also underwent radiological assessment. A significant time effect (P < .05) was demonstrated for all clinical

  7. Patient-oriented and performance-based outcomes after knee autologous chondrocyte implantation: a timeline for the first year of recovery.

    PubMed

    Howard, Jennifer S; Mattacola, Carl G; Mullineaux, David R; English, Robert A; Lattermann, Christian

    2014-08-01

    It is well established that autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) can require extended recovery postoperatively; however, little information exists to provide clinicians and patients with a timeline for anticipated function during the first year after ACI. To document the recovery of functional performance of activities of daily living after ACI. ACI patients (n = 48, 29 male; 35.1 ± 8.0 y). All patients completed functional tests (weight-bearing squat, walk-across, sit-to-stand, step-up/over, and forward lunge) using the NeuroCom long force plate (Clackamas, OR) and completed patient-reported outcome measures (International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Evaluation Form, Lysholm, Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index [WOMAC], and 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey) preoperatively and 3, 6, and 12 mo postoperatively. A covariance pattern model was used to compare performance and self-reported outcome across time and provide a timeline for functional recovery after ACI. Participants demonstrated significant improvement in walk-across stride length from baseline (42.0% ± 8.9% height) at 6 (46.8% ± 8.1%) and 12 mo (46.6% ± 7.6%). Weight bearing on the involved limb during squatting at 30°, 60°, and 90° was significantly less at 3 mo than presurgery. Step-up/over time was significantly slower at 3 mo (1.67 ± 0.69 s) than at baseline (1.49 ± 0.33 s), 6 mo (1.51 ± 0.36 s), and 12 mo (1.40 ± 0.26 s). Step-up/over lift-up index was increased from baseline (41.0% ± 11.3% body weight [BW]) at 3 (45.0% ± 11.7% BW), 6 (47.0% ± 11.3% BW), and 12 mo (47.3% ± 11.6% BW). Forward-lunge time was decreased at 3 mo (1.51 ± 0.44 s) compared with baseline (1.39 ± 0.43 s), 6 mo (1.32 ± 0.05 s), and 12 mo (1.27 ± 0.06). Similarly, forward-lunge impact force was decreased at 3 mo (22.2% ± 1.4% BW) compared with baseline (25.4% ± 1.5% BW). The WOMAC demonstrated significant improvements at 3 mo. All patient-reported outcomes were improved

  8. Two-stage transplantation of cell-engineered autologous auricular chondrocytes to regenerate chondrofat composite tissue: clinical application in regenerative surgery.

    PubMed

    Yanaga, Hiroko; Imai, Keisuke; Tanaka, Yoshio; Yanaga, Katsu

    2013-12-01

    The authors have developed a unique multilayered culture method that expands to large volumes elastic chondrocytes from a small piece of human auricular cartilage. In this study, the authors applied the two-stage transplantation method for cultured auricular chondrocytes to difficult cases of nasal/chin reconstruction where subcutaneous tissue is thin or scarred. Auricular chondrocytes were cultured and expanded to sufficiently large volumes, and then, in a two-stage transplantation process, injection-transplanted into a patient's lower abdomen, where they were regenerated into larger chondrofat composite tissue in 6 months and used as a material for nasal/chin reconstruction. The authors then performed histologic and electron microscopic analysis of serial cross-sections and magnetic resonance imaging analysis of the chondrofat composite tissue. The cultured auricular chondrocytes consistency regenerated intraabdominally to a larger, stable neocartilage, with adherent fat tissue within 6 months. Eighteen patients (nose, n = 14; chin, n = 4) underwent this procedure, and the chondrofat composite tissue was stable after 1 to 5 years' postoperative follow-up. The chondrofat composite tissue maintained good shape, with no major complications. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the chondrofat composite tissue was regenerated and vascularized in the abdomen in all 18 cases (100 percent). Infection and total absorption were not seen. Only partial absorption was noted (5.6 percent). The chondrofat composite tissue was found to be a new innovative graft material in which neocartilage is regenerated to be continuous with fat tissue by means of the neoperichondrium. It has thereby become possible to perform the previously impossible simultaneous reconstruction of cartilage and fat tissue.

  9. Collagen VI enhances cartilage tissue generation by stimulating chondrocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Smeriglio, Piera; Dhulipala, Lakshmi; Lai, Janice H; Goodman, Stuart B; Dragoo, Jason L; Smith, Robert L; Maloney, William J; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-02-01

    Regeneration of human cartilage is inherently inefficient. Current cell-based approaches for cartilage repair, including autologous chondrocytes, are limited by the paucity of cells, associated donor site morbidity, and generation of functionally inferior fibrocartilage rather than articular cartilage. Upon investigating the role of collagen VI (Col VI), a major component of the chondrocyte pericellular matrix (PCM), we observe that soluble Col VI stimulates chondrocyte proliferation. Interestingly, both adult and osteoarthritis chondrocytes respond to soluble Col VI in a similar manner. The proliferative effect is, however, strictly due to the soluble Col VI as no proliferation is observed upon exposure of chondrocytes to immobilized Col VI. Upon short Col VI treatment in 2D monolayer culture, chondrocytes maintain high expression of characteristic chondrocyte markers like Col2a1, agc, and Sox9 whereas the expression of the fibrocartilage marker Collagen I (Col I) and of the hypertrophy marker Collagen X (Col X) is minimal. Additionally, Col VI-expanded chondrocytes show a similar potential to untreated chondrocytes in engineering cartilage in 3D biomimetic hydrogel constructs. Our study has, therefore, identified soluble Col VI as a biologic that can be useful for the expansion and utilization of scarce sources of chondrocytes, potentially for autologous chondrocyte implantation. Additionally, our results underscore the importance of further investigating the changes in chondrocyte PCM with age and disease and the subsequent effects on chondrocyte growth and function.

  10. [Repair of articular cartilage defects by autologous bone mesenchymal stem cells and allogeneic costal chondrocytes in the knee of Wuzhishan miniature pigs].

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Ni, Jiangdong; Zhang, Shou; Fan, Zhongcheng

    2017-08-28

    To investigate the feasibility of construction of tissue engineered cartilage by co-culture of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and costal chondrocytes (CCs), and to provide theoretical basis and experimental basis for clinical repair of articular cartilage defects by Wuzhishan miniature pig knee cartilage defects with co-cultured cells.
 Methods: Density gradient centrifugation method was used to isolate BMSCs from Wuzhishan miniature pig. The double enzyme digestion method was used to isolate CCs. The passage 3 generation of BMSCs and passage 2 generation of CCs were randomly divided into 3 groups: a co-culture group of BMSCs:CCs for 1:2 (Group A), a simple CCs (Group B), and a simple BMSCs (Group C). The cell growth curve was drawn, and the content of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) of external separation in chondrocytes was determined. The 12 Wuzhishan miniature pigs were randomly divided into a co-culture cells/collagen membrane experimental group, a collagen membrane control group and the blank group. In the co-culture cells/collagen membrane experimental group, the co-cultured cells/collagen membrane were implanted into the cartilage defects of the mandibular condyle; in the collagen membrane control group, only collagen membrane was implanted; while in the blank group, nothing was implanted. Six animals were sacrificed at 8 and 16 weeks after surgery respectively (2 animals in each group). General observation, cartilage histological score and histopathological examination were carried out.
 Results: The BMSCs and co-culture cells grew well. The biological activity of CCs was good. After 16 weeks of operation, the repair tissues in the co-cultured cells/collagen membrane experimental group showed hyaline cartilage features: smooth, flat, and integrated well with the surrounding cartilage and subchondral bone. The collagen membrane in the collagen membrane control group was fibrously repaired. Repair tissue gross score in the co-culture cells

  11. A prospective multicenter study on the outcome of type I collagen hydrogel-based autologous chondrocyte implantation (CaReS) for the repair of articular cartilage defects in the knee.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ulrich; Rackwitz, Lars; Andereya, Stefan; Siebenlist, Sebastian; Fensky, Florian; Reichert, Johannes; Löer, Ingo; Barthel, Thomas; Rudert, Maximilian; Nöth, Ulrich

    2011-12-01

    The Cartilage Regeneration System (CaReS) is a novel matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) technique for the treatment of chondral and osteochondral lesions (Outerbridge grades III and IV). For this technology, no expansion of the chondrocytes in a monolayer culture is needed, and a homogeneous cell distribution within the gel is guaranteed. To report a prospective multicenter study of matrix-associated ACI of the knee using a new type I collagen hydrogel (CaReS). Case series; Level of evidence, 4. From 2003 to 2008, 116 patients (49 women and 67 men; mean age, 32.5 ± 8.9 years) had CaReS implantation of the knee in 9 different centers. On the basis of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) Cartilage Injury Evaluation Package 2000, the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, pain score (visual analog scale [VAS]), SF-36 score, overall treatment satisfaction and the IKDC functional status were evaluated. Patient follow-up was performed at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery and annually thereafter. Mean follow-up was 30.2 ± 17.4 months (range, 12-60 months). There were 67 defects of the medial condyle, 14 of the lateral, 22 of the patella/trochlea, and 3 of the tibial plateau, and 10 patients had 2 lesions. The mean defect size was 5.4 ± 2.4 cm(2). Thirty percent of the defects were <4 cm(2) and 70% were >4 cm(2). The IKDC score improved significantly from 42.4 ± 13.8 preoperatively to 70.5 ± 18.7 (P < .001) at latest follow-up. Global pain level significantly decreased (P < .001) from 6.7 ± 2.2 preoperatively to 3.2 ± 3.1 at latest follow-up. There also was a significant increase of both components of the SF-36 score. The overall treatment satisfaction was judged as very good or good in 88% by the surgeon and 80% by the patient. The IKDC functional knee status was grade I in 23.4%, II in 56.3%, III in 17.2%, and IV in 3.1% of the patients. Matrix-associated ACI employing the CaReS technology for the treatment

  12. Morphological, genetic and phenotypic comparison between human articular chondrocytes and cultured chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mata-Miranda, Mónica Maribel; Martinez-Martinez, Claudia María; Noriega-Gonzalez, Jesús Emmanuel; Paredes-Gonzalez, Luis Enrique; Vázquez-Zapién, Gustavo Jesús

    2016-08-01

    Articular cartilage is an avascular and aneural tissue with limited capacity for regeneration. On large articular lesions, it is recommended to use regenerative medicine strategies, like autologous chondrocyte implantation. There is a concern about morphological changes that chondrocytes suffer once they have been isolated and cultured. Due to the fact that there is little evidence that compares articular cartilage chondrocytes with cultured chondrocytes, in this research we proposed to obtain chondrocytes from human articular cartilage, compare them with themselves once they have been cultured and characterize them through genetic, phenotypic and morphological analysis. Knee articular cartilage samples of 10 mm were obtained, and each sample was divided into two fragments; a portion was used to determine gene expression, and from the other portion, chondrocytes were obtained by enzymatic disaggregation, in order to be cultured and expanded in vitro. Subsequently, morphological, genetic and phenotypic characteristics were compared between in situ (articular cartilage) and cultured chondrocytes. Obtained cultured chondrocytes were rounded in shape, possessing a large nucleus with condensed chromatin and a clear cytoplasm; histological appearance was quite similar to typical chondrocyte. The expression levels of COL2A1 and COL10A1 genes were higher in cultured chondrocytes than in situ chondrocytes; moreover, the expression of COL1A1 was almost undetectable on cultured chondrocytes; likewise, COL2 and SOX9 proteins were detected by immunofluorescence. We concluded that chondrocytes derived from adult human cartilage cultured for 21 days do not tend to dedifferentiate, maintaining their capacity to produce matrix and also retaining their synthesis capacity and morphology.

  13. Polymer based tunneling sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Tianhong (Inventor); Wang, Jing (Inventor); Zhao, Yongjun (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A process for fabricating a polymer based circuit by the following steps. A mold of a design is formed through a lithography process. The design is transferred to a polymer substrate through a hot embossing process. A metal layer is then deposited over at least part of said design and at least one electrical lead is connected to said metal layer.

  14. Differences between chondrocytes and bone marrow-derived chondrogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hongsen; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Lin, Yun-Han; Lin, Shiming; Tsai-Wu, Jyy-Jih; Jiang, Ching-Chuan

    2011-12-01

    Implantation of autologous chondrogenic cells has become the mainstay strategy for repairing articular cartilage defects. Because the availability of autologous chondrocytes is extremely limited, many recent studies have used artificially induced mesenchymal stem cells (iMSCs) as substitutes for chondrocytes. In this study, we analyzed the differences between the iMSCs and chondrocytes, including their molecular biological and mechanical properties. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were collected and induced to exhibit the chondrogenic phenotype by culturing the pelleted MSCs in a chemically defined culture medium supplemented with transforming growth factor-beta 1. The molecular biological properties of iMSCs and culture-expanded chondrocytes, including their mRNA profiles and surface proteomics, were analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry, respectively. The biomechanical properties of iMSCs and native chondrocytes, including their surface topology, adhesion force, and membrane stiffness, were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Both iMSCs and chondrocytes presented type II collagen and glycosaminoglycan, whereas only chondrocytes presented type X collagen. Flow cytometric assays showed that the expression of type II collagen and integrin-1 was higher in the chondrocytes than in the iMSCs. AFM revealed that the MSCs, iMSCs, and chondrocytes greatly differed in their shape. The MSCs were spindle shaped and easily distinguishable from the spherical chondrocytes. The iMSCs appeared round and resembled the spherical chondrocytes; however, the iMSCs were flatter with a central hump of condensed mass and a surrounding thin and broad pleat. The mean adhesion force and mean surface stiffness were significantly lower for the iMSCs (4.54 nN and 0.109 N/m, respectively) than for the chondrocytes (6.86 nN and 0.134 N/m, respectively). To conclude, although the iMSCs exhibited the chondrogenic phenotype, they differed

  15. Human adipose-derived stem cells contribute to chondrogenesis in coculture with human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hildner, Florian; Concaro, Sebastian; Peterbauer, Anja; Wolbank, Susanne; Danzer, Martin; Lindahl, Anders; Gatenholm, Paul; Redl, Heinz; van Griensven, Martijn

    2009-12-01

    Adipose tissue is easily available and contains high numbers of stem cells that are capable for chondrogenic differentiation. We hypothesize that a partial substitution of chondrocytes with autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) might be a possible strategy to reduce the number of chondrocytes needed in matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation. To lay the ground, in vitro coculture experiments were performed using human chondrocytes and human ASC. Chondrocytes were obtained from donors undergoing matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation. ASC were isolated from liposuction material. Chondrocytes and ASC were seeded either in fibrin (Tisseel; Baxter, Vienna, Austria) or collagen matrix (Tissue Fleece; Baxter, Unterschleissheim, Germany). RNA for quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT)-polymerase chain reaction was isolated after 2 weeks of culture in chondrogenic medium, and after 4 weeks samples were processed for histology. Related to the number of chondrocytes used, coculture with ASC led to strong increase in collagen type IX mRNA expression, which is an indicator for long-term stability of cartilage. Moderate upregulation was shown for SOX9, aggrecan, melanoma inhibitory activity, cartilage link protein 1, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein mRNA. However, expression of collagen I and collagen II indicates the synthesis of fibrous tissue, which might be due to the use of dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Tisseel provided slightly better chondrogenic conditions than Tissue Fleece. These data support the possibility to take advantage of ASC in cartilage regeneration in conjunction with autologous chondrocytes.

  16. Characterization of auricular chondrocytes and auricular/articular chondrocyte co-cultures in terms of an application in articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Kuhne, Maren; John, Thilo; El-Sayed, Karym; Marzahn, Ulrike; Aue, Annekatrin; Kohl, Benjamin; Stoelzel, Katharina; Ertel, Wolfgang; Blottner, Dieter; Haisch, Andreas; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2010-05-01

    Cartilage injury remains a challenge in orthopedic surgery as articular cartilage only has a limited capacity for intrinsic healing. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is a suitable technique for cartilage repair, but requires articular cartilage biopsies for autologous chondrocyte expansion. The use of heterotopic chondrocytes derived from non-articular cartilage sources such as auricular chondrocytes may be a novel approach for ACT. The aim of the study is to evaluate whether co-cultured articular/auricular chondrocytes exhibit characteristics comparable to articular chondrocytes. Analysis of the proliferation rate, extracellular cartilage matrix (ECM) gene and protein expression (type II and I collagen, elastin, lubricin), beta1-integrins and the chondrogenic transcription factor sox9 in articular/auricular chondrocytes was performed using RTD-PCR, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blot analysis. Additionally, three-dimensional (3D) chondrocyte mono- and co-cultures were established. The proliferative activity and elastin gene expression were lower and that of type II collagen and lubricin was higher in articular compared with auricular chondrocytes. The species generally did not influence the chondrocyte characteristics, with the exception of type I collagen and sox9 expression, which was higher in porcine but not in human articular chondrocytes compared with both types of auricular chondrocytes. beta1-integrin gene expression did not differ significantly between the chondrocyte types. The type II collagen gene and protein expression was higher in articular chondrocyte monocultures and was slightly higher in co-cultures compared with monocultured auricular chondrocytes. Both chondrocyte types survived in co-culture. Despite their differing expression profiles, co-cultures revealed some adjustment in the ECM expression of both chondrocyte types.

  17. Recombinant human midkine stimulates proliferation and decreases dedifferentiation of auricular chondrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chuanying; Zhang, Zhonghui; Wu, Mingyuan; Zhu, Shunying; Gao, Jin; Zhang, Jing; Yuan, Yunsheng; Zhang, Kejian; Yu, Yan; Han, Wei

    2011-11-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is widely used for the repair of cartilage defects. However, due to the lack of chondrocyte growth factor and dedifferentiation of the cultured primary chondrocytes, cell source has limited the clinical potential of ACI. Auricular cartilage is an attractive potential source of cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Here we demonstrated that recombinant human midkine (rhMK) significantly promoted proliferation of rat primary auricular chondrocytes cultured and passaged in monolayer, which was mediated by the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathways. Furthermore, rhMK attenuated the dedifferentiation of cultured chondrocytes by maintaining the expression of chondrocyte-specific matrix proteins during culture expansion and passage. Importantly, rhMK-expanded chondrocytes reserved their full chondrogenic potential and redifferentiated into elastic chondrocytes after being cultured in high density. The results suggest that rhMK may be used for the preparation of chondrocytes in cartilage tissue engineering.

  18. Passaged human chondrocytes accumulate extracellular matrix when induced by bovine chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nazish; Taylor, Drew W; Wunder, Jay; Nagy, Andras; Gross, Allan E; Kandel, Rita A

    2010-03-01

    A source of sufficient number of cells is a major limiting factor for cartilage tissue engineering. To circumvent this problem, we developed a co-culture method to induce redifferentiation in bovine articular chondrocytes, which had undergone dedifferentiation following serial passage in monolayer culture. In this study we determine whether human osteoarthritic (OA) and non-diseased passaged dedifferentiated chondrocytes will respond similarly. Human passaged chondrocytes were co-cultured for 4 weeks with primary bovine chondrocytes and their redifferentiation status was determined. Afterwards the cells were cultured either independently or in co-culture with cryopreserved passaged cells for functional analysis. The co-culture of passaged cells with primary chondrocytes resulted in reversion of their phenotype towards articular chondrocytes, as shown by increased gene expression of type II collagen and COMP, decreased type I collagen expression and extracellular matrix formation in vitro. Furthermore, this redifferentiation was stable, as those cells not only formed hyaline-like cartilage tissue when grown on their own but also they could induce redifferentiation of passaged chondrocytes in co-culture. These data suggest that it may be possible to use autologous chondrocytes obtained from osteoarthritic cartilage to form tissue suitable to use for cartilage repair. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Eo, Seong-Hui; Abbas, Qamar; Ahmed, Madiha

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes. PMID:27631002

  20. DNA Methylation Profiling in Chondrocyte Dedifferentiation In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Duan, Li; Liang, Yujie; Ma, Bin; Wang, Daming; Liu, Wei; Huang, Jianghong; Xiong, Jianyi; Peng, Liangquan; Chen, Jielin; Zhu, Weimin; Wang, Daping

    2017-07-01

    DNA methylation has emerged as a crucial regulator of chondrocyte dedifferentiation, which severely compromises the outcome of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) treatment for cartilage defects. However, the full-scale DNA methylation profiling in chondrocyte dedifferentiation remains to be determined. Here, we performed a genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of dedifferentiated chondrocytes in monolayer culture and chondrocytes treated with DNA methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine (5-AzaC). This research revealed that the general methylation level of CpG was increased while the COL-1A1 promoter methylation level was decreased during the chondrocyte dedifferentiation. 5-AzaC could reduce general methylation levels and reverse the chondrocyte dedifferentiation. Surprisingly, the DNA methylation level of COL-1A1 promoter was increased after 5-AzaC treatment. The COL-1A1 expression level was increased while that of SOX-9 was decreased during the chondrocyte dedifferentiation. 5-AzaC treatment up-regulated the SOX-9 expression while down-regulated the COL-1A1 promoter activity and gene expression. Taken together, these results suggested that differential regulation of the DNA methylation level of cartilage-specific genes might contribute to the chondrocyte dedifferentiation. Thus, the epigenetic manipulation of these genes could be a potential strategy to counteract the chondrocyte dedifferentiation accompanying in vitro propagation. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1708-1716, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Nasal chondrocytes and fibrin sealant for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Vinatier, C; Gauthier, O; Masson, M; Malard, O; Moreau, A; Fellah, B H; Bilban, M; Spaethe, R; Daculsi, G; Guicheux, J

    2009-04-01

    Hybrid constructs associating a biodegradable matrix and autologous chondrocytes hold promise for the treatment of articular cartilage defects. In this context, our objective was to investigate the potential use of nasal chondrocytes associated with a fibrin sealant for the treatment of articular cartilage defects. The phenotype of primary nasal chondrocytes (NC) from human (HNC) and rabbit (RNC) origin were characterized by RT-PCR. The ability of constructs associating fibrin sealant and NC to form a cartilaginous tissue in vivo was investigated, firstly in a subcutaneous site in nude mice and secondly in an articular cartilage defect in rabbit. HNC express type II collagen and aggrecan, the two major hallmarks of a chondrocytic phenotype. Furthermore, when injected subcutaneously into nude mice within a fibrin sealant, these chondrocytes were able to form a cartilage-like tissue. Our data indicate that RNC also express type II collagen and aggrecan and maintained their phenotype in three-dimensional culture within a fibrin sealant. Moreover, treatment of rabbit articular cartilage defects with autologous RNC embedded in a fibrin sealant led to the formation of a hyalin-like repair tissue. The use of fibrin sealant containing hybrid autologous NC therefore appears as a promising approach for cell-based therapy of articular cartilage. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Chondroprotective effects of taurine in primary cultures of human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Lu, Zhenhui; Wu, Huayu; Zheng, Li

    2015-03-01

    Articular cartilage is characterized by the lack of blood vessels and has a poor self-healing potential. Limited cell numbers and dedifferentiation of chondrocytes when expanded in vitro are the major obstacles of autologous chondrocyte implantation. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a cell-based treatment that can be used as a second-line measure to regenerate chondral or osteochondral defects in younger, active patients. There is an urgent need to find an effective chondrogenic protection agent alleviating or inhibiting chondrocyte dedifferentiation. In this study, we explored the effect of taurine (2-aminoethane sulfonic acid) on proliferation and phenotype maintenance of human articular chondrocytes by analyzing the cell proliferation, morphology, viability, and expression of cartilage specific mRNAs and proteins. Primary chondrocytes were isolated from human articular cartilage tissues. Results showed that taurine effectively promoted chondrocyte growth and enhanced accumulation of glycosaminoglycans and collagens in the conditioned media of chondrocytes. Moreover, taurine exposure caused significant increases in the relative expression levels of mRNAs for cartilage specific markers, including aggrecan, collagen type II and SOX9. Aggrecan is a cartilage-specific proteoglycan, and SOX9 is a chondrogenic transcription factor. In contrast, the mRNA expression of collagen type I, a marker for chondrocyte dedifferentiation, was significantly decreased in cells treated with taurine, indicating that taurine inhibits the chondrocyte dedifferentiation. This study reveals that taurine is effective in proliferation promotion and phenotype maintenance of chondrocytes. Thus, taurine may be a useful pro-chondrogenic agent for autologous chondrocyte implantation in the treatment of cartilage repair.

  3. Chondrogenic capacity and alterations in hyaluronan synthesis of cultured human osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yohei; Sakai, Tadahiro; Hiraiwa, Hideki; Hamada, Takashi; Omachi, Takaaki; Nakashima, Motoshige; Ishizuka, Shinya; Matsukawa, Tetsuya; Knudson, Warren; Knudson, Cheryl B; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2013-06-14

    During osteoarthritis there is a disruption and loss of the extracellular matrix of joint cartilage, composed primarily of type II collagen, aggrecan and hyaluronan. In young patients, autologous chondrocyte implantation can be used to repair cartilage defects. However, for more elderly patients with osteoarthritis, such a repair approach is contraindicated because the procedure requires a large expansion of autologous chondrocytes in vitro leading a rapid, perhaps irreversible, loss of the chondrocyte phenotype. This study investigates whether osteoarthritic chondrocytes obtained from older patients can be expanded in vitro and moreover, induced to re-activate their chondrocyte phenotype. A decrease in chondrocyte phenotype markers, collagen II, aggrecan and SOX9 mRNA was observed with successive expansion of cells in monolayer culture. However, chondrogenic induction in three-dimensional pellet culture successfully rescued the expression of all three marker genes to native levels, even with 4th passage cells-cells representing an approximate 625-fold expansion in cell number. This data supports the use of osteoarthritic cells for autologous implantation repair. In addition, another set of gene products were explored as useful markers of the chondrocyte phenotype. Differentiated primary chondrocytes exhibited a common pattern of hyaluronan synthase isoforms that changed upon cell expansion in vitro and, reverted back to the original pattern following pellet culture. Moreover, the change in isoform pattern correlated with changes in the molecular size of synthesized hyaluronan. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Elastic cartilage reconstruction by transplantation of cultured hyaline cartilage-derived chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, M; Takebe, T; Kobayashi, S; Kimura, S; Masutani, M; Lee, S; Jo, Y H; Lee, J I; Taniguchi, H

    2014-05-01

    Current surgical intervention of craniofacial defects caused by injuries or abnormalities uses reconstructive materials, such as autologous cartilage grafts. Transplantation of autologous tissues, however, places a significant invasiveness on patients, and many efforts have been made for establishing an alternative graft. Recently, we and others have shown the potential use of reconstructed elastic cartilage from ear-derived chondrocytes or progenitors with the unique elastic properties. Here, we examined the differentiation potential of canine joint cartilage-derived chondrocytes into elastic cartilage for expanding the cell sources, such as hyaline cartilage. Articular chondrocytes are isolated from canine joint, cultivated, and compared regarding characteristic differences with auricular chondrocytes, including proliferation rates, gene expression, extracellular matrix production, and cartilage reconstruction capability after transplantation. Canine articular chondrocytes proliferated less robustly than auricular chondrocytes, but there was no significant difference in the amount of sulfated glycosaminoglycan produced from redifferentiated chondrocytes. Furthermore, in vitro expanded and redifferentiated articular chondrocytes have been shown to reconstruct elastic cartilage on transplantation that has histologic characteristics distinct from hyaline cartilage. Taken together, cultured hyaline cartilage-derived chondrocytes are a possible cell source for elastic cartilage reconstruction. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Adenoviral transduction supports matrix expression of alginate cultured articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pohle, D; Kasch, R; Herlyn, P; Bader, R; Mittlmeier, T; Pützer, B M; Müller-Hilke, B

    2012-09-01

    The present study examines the effects of adenoviral (Ad) transduction of human primary chondrocyte on transgene expression and matrix production. Primary chondrocytes were isolated from healthy articular cartilage and from cartilage with mild osteoarthritis (OA), transduced with an Ad vector and either immediately cultured in alginate or expanded in monolayer before alginate culture. Proteoglycan production was measured using dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay and matrix gene expression was quantified by real-time PCR. Viral infection of primary chondrocytes results in a stable long time transgene expression for up to 13 weeks. Ad transduction does not significantly alter gene expression and matrix production if chondrocytes are immediately embedded in alginate. However, if expanded prior to three dimension (3D) culture in alginate, chondrocytes produce not only more proteoglycans compared to non-transduced controls, but also display an increased anabolic and decreased catabolic activity compared to non-transduced controls. We therefore suggest that successful autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) should combine adenoviral transduction of primary chondrocytes with expansion in monolayer followed by 3D culture. Future studies will be needed to investigate whether the subsequent matrix production can be further improved by using Ad vectors bearing genes encoding matrix proteins. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Microfluidics‑based optimization of neuroleukin‑mediated regulation of articular chondrocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Kang; Zhong, Weiliang; Zhang, Yingqiu; Yin, Baosheng; Zhang, Weiguo; Liu, Han

    2016-01-01

    Due to the low proliferative and migratory capacities of chondrocytes, cartilage repair remains a challenging clinical problem. Current therapeutic strategies for cartilage repair result in unsatisfactory outcomes. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a cell based therapy that relies on the in vitro expansion of healthy chondrocytes from the patient, during which proliferation‑promoting factors are frequently used. Neuroleukin (NLK) is a multifunctional protein that possesses growth factor functions, and its expression has been associated with cartilage development and bone regeneration, however its direct role in chondrocyte proliferation remains to be fully elucidated. In the current study, the role of NLK in chondrocyte proliferation in vitro in addition to its potential to act as an exogenous factor during ACI was investigated. Furthermore, the concentration of NLK for in vitro chondrocyte culture was optimized using a microfluidic device. An NLK concentration of 12.85 ng/ml was observed to provide optimal conditions for the promotion of chondrocyte proliferation. Additionally, NLK stimulation resulted in an increase in type II collagen synthesis by chondrocytes, which is a cartilaginous secretion marker and associated with the phenotype of chondrocytes. Together these data suggest that NLK is able to promote cell proliferation and type II collagen synthesis during in vitro chondrocyte propagation, and thus may serve as an exogenous factor for ACI.

  7. Serum-free media for articular chondrocytes in vitro expansion.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xin-xin; Duncan, Neil A; Lin, Lin; Fu, Xin; Zhang, Ji-ying; Yu, Chang-long

    2013-07-01

    In vitro chondrocyte expansion is a major challenge in cell-based therapy for human articular cartilage repair. Classical culture conditions usually use animal serum as a medium supplement, which raises a number of undesirable questions. In the present study, two kinds of defined, serum-free media were developed to expand chondrocytes in monolayer culture for the purpose of cartilage tissue engineering. Bovine chondrocytes were expanded in serum-free media supplemented with fibroblast growth factor-2 and platelet-derived growth factor or fibroblast growth factor-2 and insulin-like growth factor. Expansion culture in a conventional 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) medium served as control. Fibronectin coating was used to help cell adhesion in serum-free medium. Next, in vitro three-dimensional pellet culture was used to evaluate the chondrocyte capacity. Cell pellets were expanded in different media to re-express the differentiated phenotype (re-differentiation) and to form cartilaginous tissue. The pellets were assessed by glycosaminoglycans contents, collagen II, collagen I and collagen X immunohistological staining. Chondrocytes cultured in serum-free media showed no proliferation difference than cells grown with 10% FBS medium. In addition, chondrocytes expanded in both serum-free media expressed more differentiated phenotypes at the end of monolayer culture, as indicated by higher gene expression ratios of collagen type II to collagen type I. Pellets derived from chondrocytes cultured in both serum-free media displayed comparable chondrogenic capacities to pellets from cells expanded in 10% FBS medium. These findings provide alternative culture approaches for chondrocytes in vitro expansion, which may benefit the clinical use of autologous chondrocytes implantation.

  8. The potential of human allogeneic juvenile chondrocytes for restoration of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Adkisson, H Davis; Martin, James A; Amendola, Richard L; Milliman, Curt; Mauch, Kelsey A; Katwal, Arbindra B; Seyedin, Mitchell; Amendola, Annuziato; Streeter, Philip R; Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2010-07-01

    Donor-site morbidity, limited numbers of cells, loss of phenotype during ex vivo expansion, and age-related decline in chondrogenic activity present critical obstacles to the use of autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage repair. Chondrocytes from juvenile cadaveric donors may represent an alternative to autologous cells. Hypothesis/ The authors hypothesized that juvenile chondrocyte would show stronger and more stable chondrogenic activity than adult cells in vitro and that juvenile cells pose little risk of immunologic incompatibility in adult hosts. Controlled laboratory study. Cartilage samples were from juvenile (<13 years old) and adult (>13 years old) donors. The chondrogenic activity of freshly isolated human articular chondrocytes and of expanded cells after monolayer culture was measured by proteoglycan assay, gene expression analysis, and histology. Lymphocyte proliferation assays were used to assess immunogenic activity. Proteoglycan content in neocartilage produced by juvenile chondrocytes was 100-fold higher than in neocartilage produced by adult cells. Collagen type II and type IX mRNA in fresh juvenile chondrocytes were 100- and 700-fold higher, respectively, than in adult chondrocytes. The distributions of collagens II and IX were similar in native juvenile cartilage and in neocartilage made by juvenile cells. Juvenile cells grew significantly faster in monolayer cultures than adult cells (P = .002) and proteoglycan levels produced in agarose culture was significantly higher in juvenile cells than in adult cells after multiple passages (P < .001). Juvenile chondrocytes did not stimulate lymphocyte proliferation. These results document a dramatic age-related decline in human chondrocyte chondrogenic potential and show that allogeneic juvenile chondrocytes do not stimulate an immunologic response in vivo. Juvenile human chondrocytes have greater potential to restore articular cartilage than adult cells, and may be transplanted without the

  9. THE POTENTIAL OF HUMAN ALLOGENEIC JUVENILE CHONDROCYTES FOR RESTORATION OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE

    PubMed Central

    Adkisson, H. Davis; Martin, James A.; Amendola, Richard L.; Milliman, Curt; Mauch, Kelsey A.; Katwal, Arbindra B.; Seyedin, Mitchell; Amendola, Annuziato; Streeter, Philip R.; Buckwalter, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Donor site morbidity, limited numbers of cells, loss of phenotype during ex vivo expansion, and age-related decline in chondrogenic activity present critical obstacles to the use of autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage repair. Chondrocytes from juvenile cadaveric donors may represent an alternative to autologous cells. Hypothesis/Purpose The authors hypothesized that juvenile chondrocyte would show stronger and more stable chondrogenic activity than adult cells in vitro and that juvenile cells pose little risk of immunologic incompatibility in adult hosts. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Cartilage samples were from juvenile (<13 years old) and adult (> 13 years old) donors. The chondrogenic activity of freshly isolated human articular chondrocytes and of expanded cells after monolayer culture was measured by proteoglycan assay, gene expression analysis, and histology. Lymphocyte proliferation assays were used to assess immunogenic activity. Results Proteoglycan content in neocartilage produced by juvenile chondrocytes was 100-fold higher than in neocartilage produced by adult cells. Collagen type II and type IX mRNAs in fresh juvenile chondrocytes were 100- and 700-fold higher, respectively, than in adult chondrocytes. The distributions of collagens II and IX were similar in native juvenile cartilage and in neocartilage made by juvenile cells. Juvenile cells grew significantly faster in monolayer cultures than adult cells (p = 0.002) and proteoglycan levels produced in agarose culture was significantly higher in juvenile cells than in adult cells after multiple passages (p < 0.001). Juvenile chondrocytes did not stimulate lymphocyte proliferation. Conclusions These results document a dramatic age related decline in human chondrocyte chondrogenic potential and show that allogeneic juvenile chondrocytes do not stimulate an immunologic response in vivo. Clinical Relevance Juvenile human chondrocytes have greater potential to

  10. Opiates do not violate the viability and proliferative activity of human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chechik, Ofir; Arbel, Ron; Salai, Moshe; Gigi, Roy; Beilin, Mark; Flaishon, Ron; Sever, Ronen; Khashan, Morsi; Ben-Tov, Tomer; Gal-Levy, Ronit; Yayon, Avner; Blumenstein, Sara

    2014-09-01

    Articular cartilage injuries present a challenge for the clinician. Autologous chondrocyte implantation embedded in scaffolds are used to treat cartilage defects with favorable outcomes. Autologous serum is often used as a medium for chondrocyte cell culture during the proliferation phase of the process of such products. A previous report showed that opiate analgesics (fentanyl, alfentanil and diamorphine) in the sera have a significant inhibitory effect on chondrocyte proliferation. In order to determine if opiates in serum inhibit chondrocyte proliferation, twenty two patients who underwent knee arthroscopy and were anesthetized with either fentanyl or remifentanil were studied. Blood was drawn before and during opiate administration and up to 2 h after its discontinuation. The sera were used as medium for in vitro proliferation of both cryopreserved and freshly isolated chondrocytes, and the number and viability of cells were measured. There was no difference in the yield or cell viability between the serum samples of patients anesthetized with fentanyl when either fresh or cryopreserved human articular chondrocytes (hACs) were used. Some non-significant reduction in the yield of cells was observed in the serum samples of patients anesthetized with remifentanil when fresh hAC were used. We conclude that Fentanyl in human autologous serum does not inhibit in vitro hAC proliferation. Remifentanil may show minimal inhibitory effect on in vitro fresh hAC proliferation.

  11. Cartilaginous constructs using primary chondrocytes from continuous expansion culture seeded in dense collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, D H; Chicatun, F; Nazhat, S N; Quinn, T M

    2013-12-01

    Cell-based therapies such as autologous chondrocyte implantation require in vitro cell expansion. However, standard culture techniques require cell passaging, leading to dedifferentiation into a fibroblast-like cell type. Primary chondrocytes grown on continuously expanding culture dishes (CE culture) limits passaging and protects against dedifferentiation. The authors tested whether CE culture chondrocytes were advantageous for producing mechanically competent cartilage matrix when three-dimensionally seeded in dense collagen gels. Primary chondrocytes, grown either in CE culture or passaged twice on static silicone dishes (SS culture; comparable to standard methods), were seeded in dense collagen gels and cultured for 3 weeks in the absence of exogenous chondrogenic growth factors. Compared with gels seeded with SS culture chondrocytes, CE chondrocyte-seeded gels had significantly higher chondrogenic gene expression after 2 and 3 weeks in culture, correlating with significantly higher aggrecan and type II collagen protein accumulation. There was no obvious difference in glycosaminoglycan content from either culture condition, yet CE chondrocyte-seeded gels were significantly thicker and had a significantly higher dynamic compressive modulus than SS chondrocyte-seeded gels after 3 weeks. Chondrocytes grown in CE culture and seeded in dense collagen gels produce more cartilaginous matrix with superior mechanical properties, making them more suitable than SS cultured cells for tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Linking cell shape, elasticity and fate: in vitro re-differentiation of chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaofei; Chim, Yahua; Yin, Huabing

    2014-02-01

    Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) has become a promising method for repairing large articular defects. However, dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during cell expansion remains a major limitation for ACT procedures. In this study, we explore the potential of confining cell shape for re-differentiation of dedifferentiated bovine chondrocytes. A novel culture system, combining 2D micropatterning with 3D matrix formation, was developed to control and maintain individual chondrocyte's shape. Both collagen II synthesis and the mechanical properties of cells were monitored during re-differentiation. We show that a spherical morphology without cell spreading plays a limited role in induction of re-differentiation. Instead, isolated, dedifferentiated chondrocytes partially regain chondrogenic properties if they have an appropriate cell shape and limited spreading.

  13. Pediatric auricular chondrocytes gene expression analysis in monolayer culture and engineered elastic cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ruszymah, B H I; Lokman, B S; Asma, A; Munirah, S; Chua, Kienhui; Mazlyzam, A L; Isa, M R; Fuzina, N H; Aminuddin, B S

    2007-08-01

    This study was aimed at regenerating autologous elastic cartilage for future use in pediatric ear reconstruction surgery. Specific attentions were to characterize pediatric auricular chondrocyte growth in a combination culture medium and to assess the possibility of elastic cartilage regeneration using human fibrin. Laboratory experiment using human pediatric auricular chondrocytes. Pediatric auricular chondrocytes growth kinetics and quantitative gene expression profile in three different types of media were compared in primary culture and subsequent three passages. Large-scale culture-expanded chondrocytes from the combination medium were then mixed with human fibrin for the formation of elastic cartilage via tissue engineering technique. The equal mixture of Ham's F12 and Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (FD) promoted the best chondrocyte growth at every passage compared to the individual media. Chondrocytes differentiation index; ratio of type II to type I collagen gene expression level, aggrecan and elastin expression gradually decreased while passaging but they were then restored in engineered tissues after implantation. The engineered cartilage was glistening white in color and firm in consistency. Histological evaluation, immunohistochemistry analysis and quantitative gene expression assessment demonstrated that the engineered cartilage resemble the features of native elastic cartilage. Pediatric auricular chondrocytes proliferate better in the combination medium (FD) and the utilization of human fibrin as a biomaterial hold promises for the regeneration of an autologous elastic cartilage for future application in ear reconstructive surgery.

  14. Should human chondrocytes fly? The impact of electromagnetic irradiation on chondrocyte viability and implications for their use in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Koehler, C; Niederbichler, A D; Scholz, T; Bode, B; Roos, J; Jung, F J; Hoerstrup, S P; Hellermann, J P; Wedler, V

    2006-12-01

    A significant logistic factor as to the successful clinical application of the autologous tissue engineering concept is efficient transportation: the donor cells need to be delivered to tissue processing facilities which in most cases requires air transportation. This study was designed to evaluate how human chondrocytes react to X-ray exposure. Primary cell cultures were established, cultured, incubated and exposed to different doses and time periods of radiation. Subsequently, quantitative cell proliferation assays were done and qualitative evaluation of cellular protein production were performed. Our results show that after irradiation of chondrocytes with different doses, no significant differences in terms of cellular viability occurred compared with the control group. These results were obtained when chondrocytes were exposed to luggage transillumination doses as well as exposure to clinically used radiation doses. Any damage affecting cell growth or quality was not observed in our study. However, information about damage of cellular DNA remains incomplete.

  15. Focal Adhesion Assembly Induces Phenotypic Changes and Dedifferentiation in Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyunjun; Lee, Mi Nam; Choung, Jin Seung; Kim, Sanghee; Choi, Byung Hyune; Noh, Minsoo; Shin, Jennifer H

    2016-08-01

    The expansion of autologous chondrocytes in vitro is used to generate sufficient populations for cell-based therapies. However, during monolayer culture, chondrocytes lose inherent characteristics and shift to fibroblast-like cells as passage number increase. Here, we investigated passage-dependent changes in cellular physiology, including cellular morphology, motility, and gene and protein expression, as well as the role of focal adhesion and cytoskeletal regulation in the dedifferentiation process. We found that the gene and protein expression levels of both the focal adhesion complex and small Rho GTPases are upregulated with increasing passage number and are closely linked to chondrocyte dedifferentiation. The inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) but not small Rho GTPases induced the loss of fibroblastic traits and the recovery of collagen type II, aggrecan, and SOX9 expression levels in dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Based on these findings, we propose a strategy to suppress chondrogenic dedifferentiation by inhibiting the identified FAK or Src pathways while maintaining the expansion capability of chondrocytes in a 2D environment. These results highlight a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of skeletal diseases and the generation of cartilage in tissue-engineering approaches. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1822-1831, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Chondrocytes culture in three-dimensional porous alginate scaffolds enhanced cell proliferation, matrix synthesis and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ju; Yen, Chi-Nan; Hu, Yu-Chen; Wu, Yung-Chih; Liao, Chun-Jen; Chu, I-Ming

    2009-01-01

    For the limited availability of autologous chondrocytes, a cultured system for expansion in vitro until sufficient cells are obtained must be developed. These cells must maintain their chondrocyte phenotype in vitro as well as in vivo, following implantation to ensure that differentiated chondrocytes synthesize a normal hyaline cartilage matrix and not a fibro-cartilage matrix. This study uses porous three-dimensional (3-D) alginate scaffolds within a perfusion system to culture low-density (5 x 10(5) cells) primary porcine chondrocytes for 1-4 weeks to study their proliferation and differentiation. The results of RT-PCR reveal that most cells could maintain their differentiation state for up to 4 weeks of culturing. Chondrocytes proliferated to 3 x 10(7) cells after 4 weeks in culture. Alginate scaffolds induced the formation of chondrocyte clusters and stimulated the synthesis of matrix, which effects were evaluated using histology and electron microscopy. These findings demonstrate that culturing chondrocytes in alginate scaffolds may effectively prevent the dedifferentiation and improve autologous chondrocyte transplantation. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Conductive polymer-based material

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F.; Koren, Amy B.; Dourado, Sunil K.; Dulebohn, Joel I.; Hanchar, Robert J.

    2007-04-17

    Disclosed are polymer-based coatings and materials comprising (i) a polymeric composition including a polymer having side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, at least two of the side chains being substituted with a heteroatom selected from oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus and combinations thereof; and (ii) a plurality of metal species distributed within the polymer. At least a portion of the heteroatoms may form part of a chelation complex with some or all of the metal species. In many embodiments, the metal species are present in a sufficient concentration to provide a conductive material, e.g., as a conductive coating on a substrate. The conductive materials may be useful as the thin film conducting or semi-conducting layers in organic electronic devices such as organic electroluminescent devices and organic thin film transistors.

  18. Polymer-Based Organic Batteries.

    PubMed

    Muench, Simon; Wild, Andreas; Friebe, Christian; Häupler, Bernhard; Janoschka, Tobias; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2016-08-24

    The storage of electric energy is of ever growing importance for our modern, technology-based society, and novel battery systems are in the focus of research. The substitution of conventional metals as redox-active material by organic materials offers a promising alternative for the next generation of rechargeable batteries since these organic batteries are excelling in charging speed and cycling stability. This review provides a comprehensive overview of these systems and discusses the numerous classes of organic, polymer-based active materials as well as auxiliary components of the battery, like additives or electrolytes. Moreover, a definition of important cell characteristics and an introduction to selected characterization techniques is provided, completed by the discussion of potential socio-economic impacts.

  19. Collagen, agarose, alginate and Matrigel hydrogels as cell substrates for culture of chondrocytes in vitro: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhikang; Lu, Zhenhui; Wu, Huayu; Liu, Hui; Li, Muyan; Lei, Danqing; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Jinmin

    2017-09-23

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) has emerged as a new approach to cartilage repair through the use of harvested chondrocytes. But the expansion of the chondrocytes from the donor tissue in vitro is restricted by limited cell numbers and dedifferentiation of chondrocytes. In this study, we used four types of hydrogels including agarose, alginate, Matrigel and collagen type I hydrogels to serve as cell substrates and investigated the effect on proliferation and phenotype maintenance of chondrocytes. As a substrate for monolayer culture, collagen facilitated cell expansion and effectively suppressed the dedifferentiation of chondrocytes, as evidenced by fluorescein diacetate / propidium iodide (FDA/PI), hematoxylin-eosin staining (HE), Safranin O, immunofluorescenceassay, biochemistry analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Compared with that in agarose gels, alginate and Matrigel, collagen accelerated cell proliferation and enhanced the expression of cartilage specific genes such as ACAN, SOX9 and COLII more markedly. Furthermore, significantly lower expression of COL I (an indicator of dedifferentiation) and COL X (the chondrocyte hypertrophy marker) was present in collagen group than in other groups. This indicated that collagen substrate can better support chondrocyte growth and maintain cell phenotype, due to that it might serve as a cartilage-like ECM to provide adhesive site for chondrocytes. In summary, collagen hydrogel is a promising cell substrate for chondrocytes culture for ACI. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. The Interplay between Chondrocyte Redifferentiation Pellet Size and Oxygen Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Babur, Betul Kul; Ghanavi, Parisa; Levett, Peter; Lott, William B.; Klein, Travis; Cooper-White, Justin J.; Crawford, Ross; Doran, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Chondrocytes dedifferentiate during ex vivo expansion on 2-dimensional surfaces. Aggregation of the expanded cells into 3-dimensional pellets, in the presence of induction factors, facilitates their redifferentiation and restoration of the chondrogenic phenotype. Typically 1×105–5×105 chondrocytes are aggregated, resulting in “macro” pellets having diameters ranging from 1–2 mm. These macropellets are commonly used to study redifferentiation, and recently macropellets of autologous chondrocytes have been implanted directly into articular cartilage defects to facilitate their repair. However, diffusion of metabolites over the 1–2 mm pellet length-scales is inefficient, resulting in radial tissue heterogeneity. Herein we demonstrate that the aggregation of 2×105 human chondrocytes into micropellets of 166 cells each, rather than into larger single macropellets, enhances chondrogenic redifferentiation. In this study, we describe the development of a cost effective fabrication strategy to manufacture a microwell surface for the large-scale production of micropellets. The thousands of micropellets were manufactured using the microwell platform, which is an array of 360×360 µm microwells cast into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), that has been surface modified with an electrostatic multilayer of hyaluronic acid and chitosan to enhance micropellet formation. Such surface modification was essential to prevent chondrocyte spreading on the PDMS. Sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) production and collagen II gene expression in chondrocyte micropellets increased significantly relative to macropellet controls, and redifferentiation was enhanced in both macro and micropellets with the provision of a hypoxic atmosphere (2% O2). Once micropellet formation had been optimized, we demonstrated that micropellets could be assembled into larger cartilage tissues. Our results indicate that micropellet amalgamation efficiency is inversely related to the time cultured as discreet

  1. Modelling and Simulating the Adhesion and Detachment of Chondrocytes in Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jian; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Rosenstrauch, Doreen

    Chondrocytes are typically studied in the environment where they normally reside such as the joints in hips, intervertebral disks or the ear. For example, in [SKE+99], the effect of seeding duration on the strength of chondrocyte adhesion to articulate cartilage has been studied in shear flow chamber since such adhesion may play an important role in the repair of articular defects by maintaining cells in positions where their biosynthetic products can contribute to the repair process. However, in this investigation, we focus mainly on the use of auricular chondrocytes in cardiovascular implants. They are abundant, easily and efficiently harvested by a minimally invasive technique. Auricular chondrocytes have ability to produce collagen type-II and other important extracellular matrix constituents; this allows them to adhere strongly to the artificial surfaces. They can be genetically engineered to act like endothelial cells so that the biocompatibility of cardiovascular prothesis can be improved. Actually in [SBBR+02], genetically engineered auricular chondrocytes can be used to line blood-contacting luminal surfaces of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) and a chondrocyte-lined LVAD has been planted into the tissue-donor calf and the results in vivo have proved the feasibility of using autologous auricular chondrocytes to improve the biocompatibility of the blood-biomaterial interface in LVADs and cardiovascular prothesis. Therefore, cultured chondrocytes may offer a more efficient and less invasive means of covering artificial surface with a viable and adherent cell layer.

  2. Chondrocyte channel transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; May, Hannah; Mobasheri, Ali; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    To date, a range of ion channels have been identified in chondrocytes using a number of different techniques, predominantly electrophysiological and/or biomolecular; each of these has its advantages and disadvantages. Here we aim to compare and contrast the data available from biophysical and microarray experiments. This letter analyses recent transcriptomics datasets from chondrocytes, accessible from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI). We discuss whether such bioinformatic analysis of microarray datasets can potentially accelerate identification and discovery of ion channels in chondrocytes. The ion channels which appear most frequently across these microarray datasets are discussed, along with their possible functions. We discuss whether functional or protein data exist which support the microarray data. A microarray experiment comparing gene expression in osteoarthritis and healthy cartilage is also discussed and we verify the differential expression of 2 of these genes, namely the genes encoding large calcium-activated potassium (BK) and aquaporin channels. PMID:23995703

  3. Single-Stage Cartilage Repair Using Platelet-Rich Fibrin Scaffolds With Autologous Cartilaginous Grafts.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chin-Chean; Chen, Chih-Hwa; Chan, Wing P; Chiu, Li-Hsuan; Ho, Wei-Pin; Hsieh, Fon-Jou; Chen, You-Tzung; Yang, Tsung-Lin

    2017-09-01

    To avoid complicated procedures requiring in vitro chondrocyte expansion for cartilage repair, the development of a culture-free, 1-stage approach combining platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) and autologous cartilage grafts may be the solution. To develop a feasible 1-step procedure to combine PRF and autologous cartilage grafts for articular chondral defects. Controlled laboratory study Methods: The chemotactic effects of PRF on chondrocytes harvested from the primary culture of rabbit cartilage were evaluated in vitro and ex vivo. The rabbit chondrocytes were cultured with different concentrations of PRF media and evaluated for their cell proliferation, chondrogenic gene expression, cell viability, and extracellular matrix synthesis abilities. For the in vivo study, the chondral defects were created on established animal models of rabbits. The gross anatomy, histology, and objective scores were evaluated to validate the treatment results. PRF improved the chemotaxis, proliferation, and viability of the cultured chondrocytes. The gene expression of the chondrogenic markers, including type II collagen and aggrecan, revealed that PRF induced the chondrogenic differentiation of cultured chondrocytes. PRF increased the formation and deposition of the cartilaginous matrix produced by cultured chondrocytes. The efficacy of PRF on cell viability was comparable with that of fetal bovine serum. In animal disease models, morphologic, histological, and objectively quantitative evaluation demonstrated that PRF combined with cartilage granules was feasible in facilitating chondral repair. PRF enhances the migration, proliferation, viability, and differentiation of chondrocytes, thus showing an appealing capacity for cartilage repair. The data altogether provide evidence to confirm the feasibility of 1-stage, culture-free method of combining PRF and autologous cartilage graft for repairing articular chondral defects. The single-stage, culture-free method of combining PRF and autologous

  4. Rapid Chondrocyte Isolation for Tissue Engineering Applications: The Effect of Enzyme Concentration and Temporal Exposure on the Matrix Forming Capacity of Nasal Derived Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Vedicherla, Srujana

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory based processing and expansion to yield adequate cell numbers had been the standard in Autologous Disc Chondrocyte Transplantation (ADCT), Allogeneic Juvenile Chondrocyte Implantation (NuQu®), and Matrix-Induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (MACI). Optimizing cell isolation is a key challenge in terms of obtaining adequate cell numbers while maintaining a vibrant cell population capable of subsequent proliferation and matrix elaboration. However, typical cell yields from a cartilage digest are highly variable between donors and based on user competency. The overall objective of this study was to optimize chondrocyte isolation from cartilaginous nasal tissue through modulation of enzyme concentration exposure (750 and 3000 U/ml) and incubation time (1 and 12 h), combined with physical agitation cycles, and to assess subsequent cell viability and matrix forming capacity. Overall, increasing enzyme exposure time was found to be more detrimental than collagenase concentration for subsequent viability, proliferation, and matrix forming capacity (sGAG and collagen) of these cells resulting in nonuniform cartilaginous matrix deposition. Taken together, consolidating a 3000 U/ml collagenase digest of 1 h at a ratio of 10 ml/g of cartilage tissue with physical agitation cycles can improve efficiency of chondrocyte isolation, yielding robust, more uniform matrix formation. PMID:28337445

  5. In vitro effect of a synthesized sulfonamido-based gallate on articular chondrocyte metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao; Zheng, Li; Liu, Qin; Liu, Buming; Jiang, Bingli; Peng, Xiaoyu; Lin, Cuiwu

    2014-06-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a promising strategy for cartilage repair and reconstitution. However, limited cell numbers and the dedifferentiation of chondrocytes present major difficulties to the success of ACI therapy. Therefore, it is important to find effective pro-chondrogenic agents that restore these defects to ensure a successful therapy. In this study, we synthesized a sulfonamido-based gallate, namely N-[4-(4,6-dimethyl-pyrimidin-2-ylsulfamoyl)-phenyl]-3,4,5-trihydroxy-benzamide (EJTC), and investigated its effects on rabbit articular chondrocytes through an examination of its specific effects on cell proliferation, morphology, viability, GAG synthesis, and cartilage-specific gene expression. The results show that EJTC can effectively promote chondrocyte growth and enhance the secretion and synthesis of cartilage ECM by upregulating the expression levels of the aggrecan, collagen II, and Sox9 genes. The expression of the collagen I gene was effectively downregulated, which indicates that EJTC inhibits chondrocytes dedifferentiation. Chondrocyte hypertrophy, which may lead to chondrocyte ossification, was also undetectable in the EJTC-treated groups. The recommended dose of EJTC ranges from 3.125 μg/mL to 7.8125 μg/mL, and the most profound response was observed with 7.8125 μg/mL. This study may provide a basis for the development of a novel agent for the treatment of articular cartilage defects.

  6. Chondrogenic capability of osteoarthritic chondrocytes from the trapeziometacarpal and hip joints.

    PubMed

    Lovati, Arianna B; Colombini, Alessandra; Recordati, Camilla; Ceriani, Cristina; Zagra, Luigi; Berzero, Gianfranco; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common degenerative disease of joints like the hip and the trapeziometacarpal joint (rhizarthrosis). In this in vitro study, we compared the chondrogenesis of chondrocytes derived from the trapezium and the femoral head cartilage of osteoarthritic patients to have a deeper insight on trapezium chondrocyte behavior as autologous cell source for the repair of cartilage lesions in rhizarthrosis. Chondrocytes collected from trapezium and femoral head articular cartilage were cultured in pellets and analyzed for chondrogenic differentiation, cell proliferation, glycosaminoglycan production, gene expression of chondrogenic and fibrous markers, histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Our results showed a higher cartilaginous matrix deposition and a lower fibrocartilaginous phenotype of the femoral chondrocytes with respect to the trapezium chondrocytes assessed by a higher absolute glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen production, thus demonstrating a superior chondrogenic potential of the femoral with respect to the trapezium chondrocytes. The differences in chondrogenic potential between trapezium and femoral head chondrocytes confirmed a lower regenerative capability in the trapezium than in the femoral head cartilage due to the different environment and loading acting on these joints that affects the metabolism of the resident cells. This could represent a limitation to apply the cell therapy for rhizoarthrosis.

  7. Polymer-Based Carbon Monoxide Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, M. L.; Shevade, A. V.; Zhou, H.; Kisor, A. K.; Lara, L. M.; Yen, S.-P. S.; Ryan, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Polymer-based sensors have been used primarily to detect volatile organics and inorganics; they are not usually used for smaller, gas phase molecules. We report the development and use of two types of polymer-based sensors for the detection of carbon monoxide. Further understanding of the experimental results is also obtained by performing molecular modeling studies to investigate the polymer-carbon monoxide interactions. The first type is a carbon-black-polymer composite that is comprised of a non-conducting polymer base that has been impregnated with carbon black to make it conducting. These chemiresistor sensors show good response to carbon monoxide but do not have a long lifetime. The second type of sensor has a non-conducting polymer base but includes both a porphyrin-functionalized polypyrrole and carbon black. These sensors show good, repeatable and reversible response to carbon monoxide at room temperature.

  8. Polymer-Based Carbon Monoxide Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, M. L.; Shevade, A. V.; Zhou, H.; Kisor, A. K.; Lara, L. M.; Yen, S.-P. S.; Ryan, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Polymer-based sensors have been used primarily to detect volatile organics and inorganics; they are not usually used for smaller, gas phase molecules. We report the development and use of two types of polymer-based sensors for the detection of carbon monoxide. Further understanding of the experimental results is also obtained by performing molecular modeling studies to investigate the polymer-carbon monoxide interactions. The first type is a carbon-black-polymer composite that is comprised of a non-conducting polymer base that has been impregnated with carbon black to make it conducting. These chemiresistor sensors show good response to carbon monoxide but do not have a long lifetime. The second type of sensor has a non-conducting polymer base but includes both a porphyrin-functionalized polypyrrole and carbon black. These sensors show good, repeatable and reversible response to carbon monoxide at room temperature.

  9. Effect of polystyrene and polyether imide cell culture inserts with different roughness on chondrocyte metabolic activity and gene expression profiles of aggrecan and collagen.

    PubMed

    König, Josephine; Kohl, Benjamin; Kratz, Karl; Jung, Friedrich; Lendlein, Andreas; Ertel, Wolfgang; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2013-01-01

    In vitro cultured autologous chondrocytes can be used for implantation to support cartilage repair. For this purpose, a very small number of autologous cells harvested from a biopsy have to be expanded in monolayer culture. Commercially available polymer surfaces lead to chondrocyte dedifferentiation. Hence, the demanding need for optimized polymers and surface topologies supporting chondrocytes' differentiated phenotypes in vitro arises. In this study we explored the effect of tailored cell culture plate inserts prepared from polystyrene (PS) and polyether imide (PEI) exhibiting three different roughness levels (R0, RI, RII) on chondrocyte morphology, metabolism and gene expression profile. As a control, commercially available tissue culture plastic (TCP) dishes were included. Primary porcine articular chondrocytes were seeded on tailored PS and PEI inserts with three different roughness levels. The metabolic activity of the chondrocytes was determined after 24 hours using alamar blue assay. Chondrocyte gene expression profiles (aggrecan, type I and type II collagen) were monitored after 48 hours using Real Time Detection (RTD)-PCR. Chondrocytes cultured on PS and PEI surfaces formed cell clusters after 24 and 48 hours, which was not observed on TCP. The metabolic activity of chondrocytes cultured on PS was lower than of chondrocytes cultured on PEI, but also lower than on TCP. Gene expression analyses revealed an elevated expression of cartilage-specific aggrecan and an impaired expression of both collagen types by chondrocytes on PS and PEI compared with TCP. In summary, PEI is a biocompatible biomaterial suitable for chondrocyte culturing, which can be further chemically functionalized for generating specific surface interactions or covalent binding of biomolecules.

  10. Cartilage repair with chondrocytes in fibrin hydrogel and MPEG polylactide scaffold: an in vivo study in goats.

    PubMed

    Lind, Martin; Larsen, Allan; Clausen, Christian; Osther, Kurt; Everland, Hanne

    2008-07-01

    Polylactic acid polymers have been used extensively as biomaterials and have shown promising properties for cartilage tissue engineering. Numerous scaffold materials exist and the optimal scaffold needs to be identified. We have tried to assess the possibilities for cartilage repair by the use of two different scaffold techniques; autologous chondrocytes in a fibrin hydrogel and a novel MPEG-PLGA scaffold, where autologous chondrocytes are immobilized within the MPEG-PLGA scaffold by a fibrin hydrogel. Twenty adult goats were used for the study. A 6 mm circular full-thickness cartilage defect was created in both medial femoral condyles. The defects were randomized to the following four treatment groups. (1) Empty defect (control). (2) Subchondral drilling (control). (3) Fibrin hydrogel with autologous chondrocytes. (4) Fibrin hydrogel/chondrocyte solution in a MPEG-PLGA porous scaffold. Animals were followed for 4 month. Eight defects in each treatment group completed the study. ICRS macroscopic scoring (0-12). Indentation test was performed to assess stiffness of repair tissue. Histological analyses was performed using O'Driscoll and Pineda cartilage scores as well as percentage tissue filling of the defects. The MPEG-PLGA/chondrocytes scaffold was the superior treatment modality based on the macroscopic surface score, histological scores and defect filling. The mechanical test demonstrated no difference between treatment groups. The MPEG-PLGA/chondrocyte composite demonstrated significantly better cartilage repair response than empty defects, osteochondral drilling and fibrin hydrogel with chondrocytes. The novel MPEG-PLGA scaffold in combination with chondrocytes need further studies with respect to longer follow-up times.

  11. Chondrocyte survival in osteochondral transplant cylinders depends on the harvesting technique.

    PubMed

    Hafke, Benedikt; Petri, Maximilian; Suero, Eduardo; Neunaber, Claudia; Kwisda, Sebastian; Krettek, Christian; Jagodzinski, Michael; Omar, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    In autologous osteochondral transplantation, the edges of the harvested plug are particularly susceptible to mechanical or thermal damage to the chondrocytes. We hypothesised that the applied harvesting device has an impact on chondrocyte vitality. Both knees of five blackhead sheep (ten knees) underwent open osteochondral plug harvesting with three different circular harvesting devices (osteoarticular transfer system harvester [OATS; diameter 8 mm; Arthrex, Munich, Germany], diamond cutter [DC; diameter 8.35 mm; Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany] and hollow reamer with cutting crown [HRCC; diameter 7 mm; Dannoritzer, Tuttlingen, Germany]) from distinctly assigned anatomical sites of the knee joint. The rotary cutters (DC and HRCC) were either used with (+) or without cooling (-). Surgical cuts of the cartilage with a scalpel blade were chosen as control method. After cryotomy cutting, chondrocyte vitality was assessed using fluorescence microscopy and a Live/Dead assay. There were distinct patterns of chondrocyte vitality, with reproducible accumulations of dead chondrocytes along the harvesting edge. No statistical difference in chondrocyte survivorship was seen between the OATS technique and the control method, or between the HRCC+ technique and the control method (P > 0.05). The DC+, HRCC- and DC- techniques yielded significantly lower chondrocyte survival rates compared with the control method (P < 0.05). Chondrocyte survival in osteochondral cylinders depends on the applied harvesting technique. The use of rotary cutters without cooling yielded worst results, while the traditional OATS punch and rotary cutters with cooling achieved comparable rates of chondrocyte vitality.

  12. Cartilage tissue engineering of nasal septal chondrocyte-macroaggregates in human demineralized bone matrix.

    PubMed

    Liese, Juliane; Marzahn, Ulrike; El Sayed, Karym; Pruss, Axel; Haisch, Andreas; Stoelzel, Katharina

    2013-06-01

    Tissue Engineering is an important method for generating cartilage tissue with isolated autologous cells and the support of biomaterials. In contrast to various gel-like biomaterials, human demineralized bone matrix (DBM) guarantees some biomechanical stability for an application in biomechanically loaded regions. The present study combined for the first time the method of seeding chondrocyte-macroaggregates in DBM for the purpose of cartilage tissue engineering. After isolating human nasal chondrocytes and creating a three-dimensional macroaggregate arrangement, the DBM was cultivated in vitro with the macroaggregates. The interaction of the cells within the DBM was analyzed with respect to cell differentiation and the inhibitory effects of chondrocyte proliferation. In contrast to chondrocyte-macroaggregates in the cell-DBM constructs, morphologically modified cells expressing type I collagen dominated. The redifferentiation of chondrocytes, characterized by the expression of type II collagen, was only found in low amounts in the cell-DBM constructs. Furthermore, caspase 3, a marker for apoptosis, was detected in the chondrocyte-DBM constructs. In another experimental setting, the vitality of chondrocytes as related to culture time and the amount of DBM was analyzed with the BrdU assay. Higher amounts of DBM tended to result in significantly higher proliferation rates of the cells within the first 48 h. After 96 h, the vitality decreased in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, this study provides the proof of concept of chondrocyte-macroaggregates with DBM as an interesting method for the tissue engineering of cartilage. The as-yet insufficient redifferentiation of the chondrocytes and the sporadic initiation of apoptosis will require further investigations.

  13. Precipitant induced porosity augmentation of polystyrene preserves the chondrogenicity of human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Joergensen, Natasja L; Foldager, Casper B; Le, Dang Q S; Lind, Martin; Lysdahl, Helle

    2016-12-01

    Cells constantly sense and receive chemical and physical signals from neighboring cells, interstitial fluid, and extracellular matrix, which they integrate and translate into intracellular responses. Thus, the nature of the surface on which cells are cultured in vitro plays an important role for cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Autologs chondrocyte implantation is considered the treatment of choice for larger cartilage defects in the knee. To obtain a sufficient number of chondrocytes for implantation multiple passaging is often needed, which raises concerns about the changes in the chondrogenic phenotype. In the present study, we analyzed the effect at cellular and molecular level of precipitant induced porosity augmentation (PIPA) of polystyrene surfaces on proliferation and differentiation of human chondrocytes. Human chondrocytes were isolated from healthy patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and cultured on PIPA modified polystyrene surfaces. Microscopical analysis revealed topographically arranged porosity with micron pores and nanometer pits. Chondrocytes cultured on PIPA surfaces revealed no difference in cell viability and proliferation, but gene- and protein expressions of collagen type II were pronounced in the first passage of chondrocytes when compared to chondrocytes cultured on control surfaces. Additionally, an analysis of 40 kinases revealed that chondrocytes expanded on PIPA caused upregulated PI3K/mTOR pathway activation and inhibition of mTORC1 resulted in reduced sGAG synthesis. These findings indicate that PIPA modified polystyrene preserved the chondrogenicity of expanded human chondrocytes at gene and protein levels, which clinically may be attractive for the next generation of cell-culture surfaces for ex vivo cell growth. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 3073-3081, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Comparative study of the chondrogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells, neonatal chondrocytes and adult chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Sushmita; Kirkham, Jennifer; Wood, David; Curran, Stephen; Yang, Xuebin

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} This study has characterised three different cell types under conditions similar to those used for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for applications in cartilage repair/regeneration. {yields} Compared for the first time the chondrogenic potential of neonatal chondrocytes with human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and adult chondrocytes. {yields} Demonstrated that adult chondrocytes hold greatest potential for use in ACI based on their higher proliferation rates, lower alkaline phosphatise activity and enhanced expression of chondrogenic genes. {yields} Demonstrated the need for chondroinduction as a necessary pre-requisite to efficient chondrogenesis in vitro and, by extrapolation, for cell based therapy (e.g. ACI or cartilage tissue engineering). -- Abstract: Cartilage tissue engineering is still a major clinical challenge with optimisation of a suitable source of cells for cartilage repair/regeneration not yet fully addressed. The aims of this study were to compare and contrast the differences in chondrogenic behaviour between human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs), human neonatal and adult chondrocytes to further our understanding of chondroinduction relative to cell maturity and to identify factors that promote chondrogenesis and maintain functional homoeostasis. Cells were cultured in monolayer in either chondrogenic or basal medium, recapitulating procedures used in existing clinical procedures for cell-based therapies. Cell doubling time, morphology and alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALPSA) were determined at different time points. Expression of chondrogenic markers (SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1) was compared via real time polymerase chain reaction. Amongst the three cell types studied, HBMSCs had the highest ALPSA in basal culture and lowest ALPSA in chondrogenic media. Neonatal chondrocytes were the most proliferative and adult chondrocytes had the lowest ALPSA in basal media. Gene expression analysis revealed

  15. Chondrocytes Cocultured with Stromal Vascular Fraction of Adipose Tissue Present More Intense Chondrogenic Characteristics Than with Adipose Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ling; Prins, Henk-Jan; Leijten, Jeroen; Helder, Marco N; Evseenko, Denis; Moroni, Lorenzo; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Lin, Yunfeng; Karperien, Marcel

    2016-02-01

    Partial replacement of chondrocytes by stem cells has been proposed to improve the performance of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Our previous studies showed that the increased cartilage production in pellet cocultures of chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is due to a trophic role of the MSCs by stimulating chondrocyte proliferation and matrix production rather than MSCs actively undergoing chondrogenic differentiation. The aim of this study is to compare the trophic effects of stromal vascular fraction cells (SVF) and in vitro expanded adipose stem cells (ASC). SVF and culture-expanded ASC (n = 9) were cocultured with primary human chondrocytes in pellets. By glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and DNA assays, we showed that coculture pellets of SVF and chondrocytes have more GAG deposition than that of ASC and chondrocytes. Results of the short tandem repeats analysis indicated that the increase in the chondrocyte proportion in the coculture pellets is more pronounced in the SVF coculture group than in the ASC coculture group. Using flow cytometry and microarray, we demonstrated that SVF and ASC have different characteristics in cell surface markers and gene expression profiles. SVF is more heterogeneous than ASC, whereas ASC is more enriched in cells from the mesenchymal lineage than SVF. By subcutaneous implantation into nude mice, we showed that constructs of SVF and chondrocytes are better in depositing cartilage matrix than the mixture of ASC and chondrocytes. Taken together, SVF is better than ASC in terms of forming cartilage matrix in pellet coculture and in coimplantation models omitting the need for prior cell expansion. Our study suggests that the SVF in combination with primary human chondrocytes may be a good cell combination for one-stage cartilage repair.

  16. Macrophage-inducing FasL on chondrocytes forms immune privilege in cartilage tissue engineering, enhancing in vivo regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Yuko; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2014-05-01

    To obtain stable outcomes in regenerative medicine, controlling inflammatory reactions is a requirement. Previously, auricular chondrocytes in tissue-engineered cartilage have been shown to express factors related to immune privilege including Fas ligand (FasL) in mice. Since elucidation of mechanism on immune privilege formed in cartilage regeneration may contribute to suppression of excessive inflammation, in this study, we investigated the function of FasL and induction of immune privilege in tissue-engineered cartilage using a mouse subcutaneous model. When cocultured, auricular chondrocytes of FasL-dysfunctional mice, C57BL/6JSlc-gld/gld (gld), induced less cell death and apoptosis of macrophage-like cells, RAW264, compared with chondrocytes of C57BL/6 mice (wild), suggesting that FasL on chondrocytes could induce the apoptosis of macrophages. Meanwhile, the viability of chondrocytes was hardly affected by cocultured RAW264, although the expression of type II collagen was decreased, indicating that macrophages could hamper the maturation of chondrocytes. Tissue-engineered cartilage containing gld chondrocytes exhibited greater infiltration of macrophages, with less accumulation of proteoglycan than did wild constructs. Analysis of the coculture medium identified G-CSF as an inducer of FasL on chondrocytes, and G-CSF-treated tissue-engineered cartilage showed less infiltration of macrophages, with increased formation of cartilage after transplantation. The interactions between chondrocytes and macrophages may increase G-CSF secretion in macrophages and induce FasL on chondrocytes, which in turn induce the apoptosis of macrophages and suppress tissue reactions, promoting the maturation of tissue-engineered cartilage. These findings provide scientific insight into the mechanism of autologous chondrocyte transplantation, which could be applied as a novel strategy for cartilage tissue engineering.

  17. Culture of Primary Bovine Chondrocytes on a Continuously Expanding Surface Inhibits Dedifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Derek H.; Matmati, Mourad; Khayat, Ghazaleh; Chaudhry, Sidharth; Hinz, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Expansion of autologous chondrocytes in vitro is used to generate adequate populations for cell-based therapies. However, standard (SD) culture methods cause loss of chondrocyte phenotype and dedifferentiation to fibroblast-like cells. Here, we use a novel surface expansion culture system in an effort to inhibit chondrocyte dedifferentiation. A highly elastic silicone rubber culture surface was continuously stretched over a 13-day period to 600% of its initial surface area. This maintained cells at a high density while limiting contact inhibition and reducing the need for passaging. Gene expression analysis, biochemical assays, and immunofluorescence microscopy of follow-on pellet cultures were used to characterize the results of continuous expansion (CE) culture versus SD cultures on rigid polystyrene. CE culture yielded cells with a more chondrocyte-like morphology and higher RNA-level expression of the chondrogenic markers collagen type II, aggrecan, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein. Furthermore, the expression of collagen type I RNA and α-smooth muscle actin protein were significantly reduced, indicating suppression of fibroblastic features. Pellet cultures from CE chondrocytes contained more sulphated glycosaminoglycan and collagen type II than pellets from SD culture. Additional control cultures on static (unexpanded) silicone (SS culture) indicated that benefits of CE culture were partially due to features of the culture surface itself and partially due to the reduced passaging which that surface enabled through CE. Chondrocytes grown in CE culture may, therefore, be a superior source for cell-based therapies. PMID:22738340

  18. Culture of primary bovine chondrocytes on a continuously expanding surface inhibits dedifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Derek H; Matmati, Mourad; Khayat, Ghazaleh; Chaudhry, Sidharth; Hinz, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2012-12-01

    Expansion of autologous chondrocytes in vitro is used to generate adequate populations for cell-based therapies. However, standard (SD) culture methods cause loss of chondrocyte phenotype and dedifferentiation to fibroblast-like cells. Here, we use a novel surface expansion culture system in an effort to inhibit chondrocyte dedifferentiation. A highly elastic silicone rubber culture surface was continuously stretched over a 13-day period to 600% of its initial surface area. This maintained cells at a high density while limiting contact inhibition and reducing the need for passaging. Gene expression analysis, biochemical assays, and immunofluorescence microscopy of follow-on pellet cultures were used to characterize the results of continuous expansion (CE) culture versus SD cultures on rigid polystyrene. CE culture yielded cells with a more chondrocyte-like morphology and higher RNA-level expression of the chondrogenic markers collagen type II, aggrecan, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein. Furthermore, the expression of collagen type I RNA and α-smooth muscle actin protein were significantly reduced, indicating suppression of fibroblastic features. Pellet cultures from CE chondrocytes contained more sulphated glycosaminoglycan and collagen type II than pellets from SD culture. Additional control cultures on static (unexpanded) silicone (SS culture) indicated that benefits of CE culture were partially due to features of the culture surface itself and partially due to the reduced passaging which that surface enabled through CE. Chondrocytes grown in CE culture may, therefore, be a superior source for cell-based therapies.

  19. Comprehensive characterization of chondrocyte cultures in plasma and whole blood biomatrices for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Ronny M; Haberhauer, Marcus; Zernia, Göran; Pösel, Claudia; Thümmler, Christian; Somerson, Jeremy S; Huster, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Many synthetic polymers and biomaterials have been used as matrices for 3D chondrocyte seeding and transplantation in the field of cartilage tissue engineering. To develop a fully autologous carrier for chondrocyte cultivation, we examined the feasibility of allogeneic plasma and whole blood-based matrices and compared them to agarose constructs. Primary articular chondrocytes isolated from 12-month-old pigs were embedded into agarose, plasma and whole blood matrices and cultivated under static-free swelling conditions for up to four weeks. To evaluate the quality of the synthesized extracellular matrix (ECM), constructs were subjected to weekly examinations using histological staining, spectrophotometry, immunohistochemistry and biochemical analysis. In addition, gene expression of cartilage-specific markers such as aggrecan, Sox9 and collagen types I, II and X was determined by RT-PCR. Chondrocyte morphology was assessed via scanning electron microscopy and viability staining, including proliferation and apoptosis assays. Finally, (13)  C NMR spectroscopy provided further evidence of synthesis of ECM components. It was shown that chondrocyte cultivation in allogeneic plasma and whole-blood matrices promoted sufficient chondrocyte viability and differentiation behaviour, resulting in neo-formation of a hyaline-like cartilage matrix.

  20. Characterization of pediatric microtia cartilage: a reservoir of chondrocytes for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies.

    PubMed

    Melgarejo-Ramírez, Y; Sánchez-Sánchez, R; García-López, J; Brena-Molina, A M; Gutiérrez-Gómez, C; Ibarra, C; Velasquillo, C

    2016-09-01

    The external ear is composed of elastic cartilage. Microtia is a congenital malformation of the external ear that involves a small reduction in size or a complete absence. The aim of tissue engineering is to regenerate tissues and organs clinically implantable based on the utilization of cells and biomaterials. Remnants from microtia represent a source of cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering. To examine the macromolecular architecture of microtia cartilage and behavior of chondrocytes, in order to enrich the knowledge of this type of cartilage as a cell reservoir. Auricular cartilage remnants were obtained from pediatric patients with microtia undergoing reconstructive procedures. Extracellular matrix composition was characterized using immunofluorescence and histological staining methods. Chondrocytes were isolated and expanded in vitro using a mechanical-enzymatic protocol. Chondrocyte phenotype was analyzed using qualitative PCR. Microtia cartilage preserves structural organization similar to healthy elastic cartilage. Extracellular matrix is composed of typical cartilage proteins such as type II collagen, elastin and proteoglycans. Chondrocytes displayed morphological features similar to chondrocytes derived from healthy cartilage, expressing SOX9, COL2 and ELN, thus preserving chondral phenotype. Cell viability was 94.6 % during in vitro expansion. Elastic cartilage from microtia has similar characteristics, both architectural and biochemical to healthy cartilage. We confirmed the suitability of microtia remnant as a reservoir of chondrocytes with potential to be expanded in vitro, maintaining phenotypical features and viability. Microtia remnants are an accessible source of autologous cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies.

  1. A Biosynthetic Scaffold that Facilitates Chondrocyte-Mediated Degradation and Promotes Articular Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar., Balaji V.; Dailing, Eric A.; Brock, J. Logan; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Randolph, Mark A.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage remains a significant clinical challenge to repair because of its limited self-healing capacity. Interest has grown in the delivery of autologous chondrocytes to cartilage defects, and combining cell-based therapies with scaffolds that capture aspects of native tissue and allow cell-mediated remodeling could improve outcomes. Currently, scaffold-based therapies with encapsulated chondrocytes permit matrix production; however, resorption of the scaffold often does not match the rate of matrix production by chondrocytes, which can limit functional tissue regeneration. Here, we designed a hybrid biosynthetic system consisting of poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) endcapped with thiols and crosslinked by norbornene-functionalized gelatin via a thiol-ene photopolymerization. The protein crosslinker was selected to facilitate chondrocyte-mediated scaffold remodeling and matrix deposition. Gelatin was functionalized with norbornene to varying degrees (~4–17 norbornenes/gelatin), and the shear modulus of the resulting hydrogels was characterized (<0.1–0.5 kPa). Degradation of the crosslinked PEG-gelatin hydrogels by chondrocyte-secreted enzymes was confirmed by gel permeation chromatography. Finally, chondrocytes encapsulated in these biosynthetic scaffolds showed significantly increased glycosaminoglycan deposition over just 14 days of culture, while maintaining high levels of viability and producing a distributed matrix. These results indicate the potential of a hybrid PEG-gelatin hydrogel to permit chondrocyte-mediated remodeling and promote articular cartilage matrix production. Tunable scaffolds that can easily permit chondrocyte-mediated remodeling may be useful in designing treatment options for cartilage tissue engineering applications. PMID:26900597

  2. Isolation and characterization of human articular chondrocytes from surgical waste after total knee arthroplasty (TKA)

    PubMed Central

    Gradišnik, Lidija; Gorenjak, Mario; Vogrin, Matjaž

    2017-01-01

    Background Cartilage tissue engineering is a fast-evolving field of biomedical engineering, in which the chondrocytes represent the most commonly used cell type. Since research in tissue engineering always consumes a lot of cells, simple and cheap isolation methods could form a powerful basis to boost such studies and enable their faster progress to the clinics. Isolated chondrocytes can be used for autologous chondrocyte implantation in cartilage repair, and are the base for valuable models to investigate cartilage phenotype preservation, as well as enable studies of molecular features, nature and scales of cellular responses to alterations in the cartilage tissue. Methods Isolation and consequent cultivation of primary human adult articular chondrocytes from the surgical waste obtained during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was performed. To evaluate the chondrogenic potential of the isolated cells, gene expression of collagen type 2 (COL2), collagen 1 (COL1) and aggrecan (ACAN) was evaluated. Immunocytochemical staining of all mentioned proteins was performed to evaluate chondrocyte specific production. Results Cartilage specific gene expression of COL2 and ACAN has been shown that the proposed protocol leads to isolation of cells with a high chondrogenic potential, possibly even specific phenotype preservation up to the second passage. COL1 expression has confirmed the tendency of the isolated cells dedifferentiation into a fibroblast-like phenotype already in the second passage, which confirms previous findings that higher passages should be used with care in cartilage tissue engineering. To evaluate the effectiveness of our approach, immunocytochemical staining of the evaluated chondrocyte specific products was performed as well. Discussion In this study, we developed a protocol for isolation and consequent cultivation of primary human adult articular chondrocytes with the desired phenotype from the surgical waste obtained during TKA. TKA is a common and very

  3. Neuroleukin/Autocrine Motility Factor Receptor Pathway Promotes Proliferation of Articular Chondrocytes through Activation of AKT and Smad2/3

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Kang; Zhong, Weiliang; Zheng, Xifu; Zhang, Jinrui; Liu, Pixu; Zhang, Weiguo; Liu, Han

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage defect is an intractable clinical problem. Therapeutic strategies for cartilage repair are far from optimal due to poor proliferation capacity of chondrocytes. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a cell based therapy that uses in vitro amplified healthy chondrocytes from the patient. However, chondrocyte dedifferentiation during in vitro culture limits its application. Neuroleukin (NLK) is a multifunctional protein that stimulates cell growth and migration, together with its receptor autocrine motility factor receptor (AMFR, also called gp78). We investigated expression of NLK and AMFR/gp78 during cartilage development in vivo and in cultured articular chondrocytes in vitro, and found the pair associates with chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. While applied to isolated articular chondrocytes, NLK promotes cell proliferation and secretion of type II collagen, a marker of proliferating chondrocytes. Further work demonstrates that NLK up regulates pAKT and pSmad2/3, but down regulates pSmad1/5. In animals, NLK treatment also promotes chondrocyte proliferation while inhibits terminal differentiation, leading to expanded proliferating zone but decreased prehypertrophic and hypertrophic zones in the growth plate region. NLK is therefore a candidate factor that can be applied in the treatment of cartilage defects. PMID:26459914

  4. Neuroleukin/Autocrine Motility Factor Receptor Pathway Promotes Proliferation of Articular Chondrocytes through Activation of AKT and Smad2/3.

    PubMed

    Tian, Kang; Zhong, Weiliang; Zheng, Xifu; Zhang, Jinrui; Liu, Pixu; Zhang, Weiguo; Liu, Han

    2015-10-13

    Cartilage defect is an intractable clinical problem. Therapeutic strategies for cartilage repair are far from optimal due to poor proliferation capacity of chondrocytes. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a cell based therapy that uses in vitro amplified healthy chondrocytes from the patient. However, chondrocyte dedifferentiation during in vitro culture limits its application. Neuroleukin (NLK) is a multifunctional protein that stimulates cell growth and migration, together with its receptor autocrine motility factor receptor (AMFR, also called gp78). We investigated expression of NLK and AMFR/gp78 during cartilage development in vivo and in cultured articular chondrocytes in vitro, and found the pair associates with chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. While applied to isolated articular chondrocytes, NLK promotes cell proliferation and secretion of type II collagen, a marker of proliferating chondrocytes. Further work demonstrates that NLK up regulates pAKT and pSmad2/3, but down regulates pSmad1/5. In animals, NLK treatment also promotes chondrocyte proliferation while inhibits terminal differentiation, leading to expanded proliferating zone but decreased prehypertrophic and hypertrophic zones in the growth plate region. NLK is therefore a candidate factor that can be applied in the treatment of cartilage defects.

  5. Different ratios of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes used in tissue-engineered cartilage and its application for human ear-shaped substitutes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ning; Liu, Xia; Yan, Li; Wang, Qian; Cao, Yilin; Xiao, Ran

    2013-01-01

    The application of chondrocyte-based cartilage tissue engineering is limited because of the lack of autologous cartilage sources and chondrocyte dedifferentiation after in vitro expansion. Coculture of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and chondrocytes has been a promising strategy for cartilage engineering as chondrocytes can provide a chondrogenic environment for BMSCs. However, there are no systematic comparison studies for engineered cartilage constructed using different mixing ratios of BMSCs and chondrocytes, and the most effective mixing ratio with the lowest number of chondrocytes is unknown. Here, we set a gradient of mixing ratios of BMSCs to chondrocytes for an in vitro coculture system and compared the shape retention and quality of the engineered cartilage using macroscopic and histological assays, glycosaminoglycan content assessment and immunohistochemical staining of type II collagen, biomechanical evaluation and hypertrophy-related gene expression analysis. The results showed that at least 30% chondrocytes were required to generate cartilage tissue with satisfactory shape and quality. Therefore, we preliminarily assessed the feasibility of engineering a human ear-shaped substitute using a coculture system with a 7:3 ratio of BMSCs to chondrocytes. After 8 weeks of in vitro culture, the precise architecture of the human ear-shaped construct was well maintained with the typical cartilaginous composition confirmed by histological assays.

  6. Early induction of a prechondrogenic population allows efficient generation of stable chondrocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jieun; Taylor, Sarah E. B.; Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice; Maloney, William J.; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of human cartilage is inherently inefficient; an abundant autologous source, such as human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), is therefore attractive for engineering cartilage. We report a growth factor-based protocol for differentiating hiPSCs into articular-like chondrocytes (hiChondrocytes) within 2 weeks, with an overall efficiency >90%. The hiChondrocytes are stable and comparable to adult articular chondrocytes in global gene expression, extracellular matrix production, and ability to generate cartilage tissue in vitro and in immune-deficient mice. Molecular characterization identified an early SRY (sex-determining region Y) box (Sox)9low cluster of differentiation (CD)44lowCD140low prechondrogenic population during hiPSC differentiation. In addition, 2 distinct Sox9-regulated gene networks were identified in the Sox9low and Sox9high populations providing novel molecular insights into chondrogenic fate commitment and differentiation. Our findings present a favorable method for generating hiPSC-derived articular-like chondrocytes. The hiChondrocytes are an attractive cell source for cartilage engineering because of their abundance, autologous nature, and potential to generate articular-like cartilage rather than fibrocartilage. In addition, hiChondrocytes can be excellent tools for modeling human musculoskeletal diseases in a dish and for rapid drug screening.—Lee, J., Taylor, S. E. B., Smeriglio, P., Lai, J., Maloney, W. J., Yang, F., Bhutani, N. Early induction of a prechondrogenic population allows efficient generation of stable chondrocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25911615

  7. Ear-Shaped Stable Auricular Cartilage Engineered from Extensively Expanded Chondrocytes in an Immunocompetent Experimental Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Pomerantseva, Irina; Bichara, David A.; Tseng, Alan; Cronce, Michael J.; Cervantes, Thomas M.; Kimura, Anya M.; Neville, Craig M.; Roscioli, Nick; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Randolph, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Advancement of engineered ear in clinical practice is limited by several challenges. The complex, largely unsupported, three-dimensional auricular neocartilage structure is difficult to maintain. Neocartilage formation is challenging in an immunocompetent host due to active inflammatory and immunological responses. The large number of autologous chondrogenic cells required for engineering an adult human-sized ear presents an additional challenge because primary chondrocytes rapidly dedifferentiate during in vitro culture. The objective of this study was to engineer a stable, human ear-shaped cartilage in an immunocompetent animal model using expanded chondrocytes. The impact of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) supplementation on achieving clinically relevant expansion of primary sheep chondrocytes by in vitro culture was determined. Chondrocytes expanded in standard medium were either combined with cryopreserved, primary passage 0 chondrocytes at the time of scaffold seeding or used alone as control. Disk and human ear-shaped scaffolds were made from porous collagen; ear scaffolds had an embedded, supporting titanium wire framework. Autologous chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in sheep after 2 weeks of in vitro incubation. The quality of the resulting neocartilage and its stability and retention of the original ear size and shape were evaluated at 6, 12, and 20 weeks postimplantation. Neocartilage produced from chondrocytes that were expanded in the presence of bFGF was superior, and its quality improved with increased implantation time. In addition to characteristic morphological cartilage features, its glycosaminoglycan content was high and marked elastin fiber formation was present. The overall shape of engineered ears was preserved at 20 weeks postimplantation, and the dimensional changes did not exceed 10%. The wire frame within the engineered ear was able to withstand mechanical forces during wound healing and neocartilage

  8. Ear-Shaped Stable Auricular Cartilage Engineered from Extensively Expanded Chondrocytes in an Immunocompetent Experimental Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Pomerantseva, Irina; Bichara, David A; Tseng, Alan; Cronce, Michael J; Cervantes, Thomas M; Kimura, Anya M; Neville, Craig M; Roscioli, Nick; Vacanti, Joseph P; Randolph, Mark A; Sundback, Cathryn A

    2016-02-01

    Advancement of engineered ear in clinical practice is limited by several challenges. The complex, largely unsupported, three-dimensional auricular neocartilage structure is difficult to maintain. Neocartilage formation is challenging in an immunocompetent host due to active inflammatory and immunological responses. The large number of autologous chondrogenic cells required for engineering an adult human-sized ear presents an additional challenge because primary chondrocytes rapidly dedifferentiate during in vitro culture. The objective of this study was to engineer a stable, human ear-shaped cartilage in an immunocompetent animal model using expanded chondrocytes. The impact of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) supplementation on achieving clinically relevant expansion of primary sheep chondrocytes by in vitro culture was determined. Chondrocytes expanded in standard medium were either combined with cryopreserved, primary passage 0 chondrocytes at the time of scaffold seeding or used alone as control. Disk and human ear-shaped scaffolds were made from porous collagen; ear scaffolds had an embedded, supporting titanium wire framework. Autologous chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in sheep after 2 weeks of in vitro incubation. The quality of the resulting neocartilage and its stability and retention of the original ear size and shape were evaluated at 6, 12, and 20 weeks postimplantation. Neocartilage produced from chondrocytes that were expanded in the presence of bFGF was superior, and its quality improved with increased implantation time. In addition to characteristic morphological cartilage features, its glycosaminoglycan content was high and marked elastin fiber formation was present. The overall shape of engineered ears was preserved at 20 weeks postimplantation, and the dimensional changes did not exceed 10%. The wire frame within the engineered ear was able to withstand mechanical forces during wound healing and neocartilage

  9. Extracellular Matrix Deposited by Synovium-Derived Stem Cells Delays Replicative Senescent Chondrocyte Dedifferentiation and Enhances Redifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Ming; He, Fan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of extracellular matrix (ECM) deposited by synovium-derived stem cells (SDSCs) on articular chondrocyte expansion and maintenance of differentiation status and redifferentiation capacity. Passage 0 (P0) pig articular chondrocytes were expanded for six passages on plastic flasks (Plastic), SDSC-derived ECM (ECM), or substrate switching from either Plastic to ECM (PtoE) or ECM to Plastic (EtoP). Cell morphology, gene expression profiles, and immunophenotypes at each passage were used to characterize differentiation status of expanded cells. Chondrocytes at P0, P2, and P6 were assessed for redifferentiation capacity in a pellet culture system treated with either TGF-β1- or serum-containing medium for 14 days, using histology, immunohistochemistry, biochemistry, western blot, and real-time PCR. We found that ECM not only greatly enhanced chondrocyte expansion but also delayed dedifferentiation of expanded chondrocytes. Intriguingly, compared to a dramatic decrease in CD90+/CD105+ cells and CD90+ cells, CD105+ cells dramatically increased when chondrocytes were plated on Plastic; on the contrary, ECM expansion dramatically increased CD90+ cells and delayed the decrease of CD90+/CD105+ cells. Interestingly, expanded chondrocytes on ECM also acquired a strong redifferentiation capacity, particularly in the pellets treated with TGF-β1. In conclusion, the ratio of CD90 to CD105 may serve as a marker indicative of proliferation and redifferentiation capacity of dedifferentiated chondrocytes. ECM deposited by SDSCs provides a tissue-specific three-dimensional microenvironment for ex vivo expansion of articular chondrocytes while retaining redifferentiation capacity, suggesting that ECM may provide a novel approach for autologous chondrocyte - based cartilage repair. PMID:21792932

  10. Endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux with a chondrocyte-alginate suspension.

    PubMed

    Atala, A; Kim, W; Paige, K T; Vacanti, C A; Retik, A B

    1994-08-01

    Injection of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) or collagen has been used in the endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux. Although the principle of an endoscopic treatment is valid, there are concerns regarding the long-term safety and effectiveness of these substances. In search of a different injectable material we conducted experiments using chondrocytes in a biodegradable polymer solution for the treatment of vesicoureteral reflux in an animal model. Reflux was created in 4 mini-pigs and confirmed with a cystogram. Cartilage was obtained from the auricular surface of each animal. Chondrocytes were harvested and expanded in vitro. The cells were individually quantitated and concentrated to 40 million cells per cc. The cell suspensions were mixed with a sodium alginate and calcium sulfate solution. Each pig was injected unilaterally in the subureteral region with the autologous chondrocyte suspension. The opposite ureter served as an internal control in all animals. Cystograms showed resolution of reflux in the treated side and persistence of reflux in the opposite untreated side in each instance. Excretory urograms revealed no evidence of obstruction. Histological examination of the subureteral region demonstrated cartilage. Autologous chondrocytes can be readily harvested, expanded in vitro and injected cystoscopically. The cells survive and form a cartilage nidus that is nonantigenic. This system is able to correct reflux without any evidence of obstruction.

  11. Improved Chondrogenic Capacity of Collagen Hydrogel-Expanded Chondrocytes: In Vitro and in Vivo Analyses.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Ramos, Patricia; Duart, Julio; Rodríguez-Goñi, María Victoria; Vicente-Pascual, Mikel; Dotor, Javier; Mora, Gonzalo; Izal-Azcárate, Iñigo

    2014-07-02

    The use of autologous chondrocytes in cartilage repair is limited because of loss of the cartilage phenotype during expansion. The mechanosensing capacity of chondrocytes suggests evaluating the use of soft substrates for in vitro expansion. Our aim was to test the expansion of chondrocytes on collagen hydrogels to improve their capacity for chondrogenesis after a number of passages. Rat cartilage cells were expanded on collagen hydrogels and on plastic, and the preservation of their chondrogenic capacity was tested both in vitro and in vivo. The expression of relevant markers during expansion on each surface was measured by real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Expanded cells were then implanted in focal lesions in the medial femoral condyle of healthy sheep, and the newly formed tissue was analyzed by histomorphometry. Compared with cells cultured on plastic, cells cultured on hydrogels had better maintenance of the expression of the Sox9, Col2 (type-II collagen), FGFR3, and Alk-5 genes and decreased expression of Alk-1 and BMP-2. Pellets also showed increased expression of the cartilage marker genes aggrecan, Sox9, and Col2, and decreased expression of Col1 and Col10 (type-I and type-X collagen). ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) also showed a higher ratio of type-II to type-I collagen in pellets formed from cells expanded on hydrogels. When sheep chondrocytes were expanded and implanted in cartilage lesions in the femoral condyle of healthy sheep, hydrogel-expanded cells produced histologically better tissue compared with plastic-expanded cells. The expansion of chondrocytes on collagen hydrogels yielded cells with an improved chondrogenic capacity compared with cells expanded on plastic. The study results favor the use of hydrogel-expanded cells over the traditional plastic-expanded cells for autologous chondrocyte implantation. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  12. Chondrocytes expressing intracellular collagen type II enter the cell cycle and co-express collagen type I in monolayer culture.

    PubMed

    Tekari, Adel; Luginbuehl, Reto; Hofstetter, Willy; Egli, Rainer J

    2014-11-01

    For autologous chondrocyte transplantation, articular chondrocytes are harvested from cartilage tissue and expanded in vitro in monolayer culture. We aimed to characterize with a cellular resolution the synthesis of collagen type II (COL2) and collagen type I (COL1) during expansion in order to further understand why these cells lose the potential to form cartilage tissue when re-introduced into a microenvironment that supports chondrogenesis. During expansion for six passages, levels of transcripts encoding COL2 decreased to <0.1%, whereas transcript levels encoding COL1 increased 370-fold as compared to primary chondrocytes. Flow cytometry for intracellular proteins revealed that chondrocytes acquired a COL2/COL1-double positive phenotype during expansion, and the COL2 positive cells were able to enter the cell cycle. While the fraction of COL2 positive cells decreased from 70% to <2% in primary chondrocytes to passage six cells, the fraction of COL1 positive cells increased from <1% to >95%. In parallel to the decrease of the fraction of COL2 positive cells, the cells' potential to form cartilage-like tissue in pellet cultures steadily decreased. Intracellular staining for COL2 enables for characterization of chondrocyte lineage cells in more detail with a cellular resolution, and it may allow predicting the effectiveness of expanded chondrocytes to form cartilage-like tissue. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Chronic exposure of bone morphogenetic protein-2 favors chondrogenic expression in human articular chondrocytes amplified in monolayer cultures.

    PubMed

    Claus, S; Aubert-Foucher, E; Demoor, M; Camuzeaux, B; Paumier, A; Piperno, M; Damour, O; Duterque-Coquillaud, M; Galéra, P; Mallein-Gerin, F

    2010-12-15

    Articular cartilage is a specialized connective tissue containing chondrocytes embedded in a network of extracellular macromolecules such as type II collagen and presents poor capacity to self-repair. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is worldwide used for treatment of focal damage to articular cartilage. However, dedifferentiation of chondrocytes occurs during the long term culture necessary for mass cell production. The aim of this study was to investigate if addition of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, a strong inducer of chondrogenic expression, to human chondrocytes immediately after their isolation from cartilage, could help to maintain their chondrogenic phenotype in long-term culture conditions. Human articular chondrocytes were cultured according to the procedure used for ACT. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to evaluate the cellular phenotype. Exogenous BMP-2 dramatically improves the chondrogenic character of knee articular chondrocytes amplified over two passages, as assessed by the BMP-2 stimulation on type II procollagen expression and synthesis. This study reveals that BMP-2 could potentially serve as a therapeutic agent for supporting the chondrogenic phenotype of human articular chondrocytes expanded in the conditions generally used for ACT. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Interaction of periosteal explants with articular chondrocytes alters expression profile of matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Matthias; Dreier, Rita; Radons, Jürgen; Opolka, Alfred; Grifka, Joachim; Anders, Sven; Grässel, Susanne

    2010-12-01

    Periosteal tissue is a source of growth factors and of osteochondral progenitor cells which makes it suitable for implantation in chondral defects as known in autologous chondrocyte implantation. The aim of this study was to determine the interaction between periosteal tissue and articular chondrocytes with respect to catabolic effectors such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and IL-6. Human articular chondrocytes were cultured for up to 28 days as micromass pellets in coculture either with physical contact to periosteal explants or allowing paracrine interactions only. Expression, secretion, and activation of MMPs and IL-6 were analyzed in chondrocytes, periosteum, and culture supernatants. Both coculture conditions influence gene expression levels of MMPs and IL-6 in a time-, culture-, and tissue-dependent manner. Coculturing of periosteum with chondrocytes promotes gene expression and secretion of IL-6. In periosteum, physical contact inhibits MMP-2 and MMP-13 gene expression while paracrine coculture induces expression of IL-6, MMP-2, -7, and -13. Pro-MMP-2, -7, and -13 were detected in supernatants of all culture regimens whereas pro-MMP-9 was secreted from periosteum only. As a balanced amount of MMP activity is likely required to achieve sufficient integration of the regenerate tissue with the surrounding healthy cartilage, an exceeding expression of proteinases might result in degradation, hypertrophy or rejection of the graft. © 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate scaffold.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, G; Loreto, C; Carnazza, M L; Coppolino, F; Cardile, V; Leonardi, R

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogels (PEG-DA) encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i) in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii) in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease.

  16. Porcine Intervertebral Disc Repair Using Allogeneic Juvenile Articular Chondrocytes or Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Frank L.; Metz, Lionel; Adkisson, Huston Davis; Liu, Jane; Carruthers-Liebenberg, Ellen; Milliman, Curt; Maloney, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies for intervertebral disc repair have focused on the use of autologous disc-derived chondrocytes. Difficulties with graft procurement, harvest site morbidity, and functionality, however, may limit the utility of this cell source. We used an in vivo porcine model to investigate allogeneic non-disc-derived chondrocytes and allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for disc repair. After denucleation, lumbar discs were injected with either fibrin carrier alone, allogeneic juvenile chondrocytes (JCs), or allogeneic MSCs. Discs were harvested at 3, 6, and 12 months, and cell viability and functionality were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. JC-treated discs demonstrated abundant cartilage formation at 3 months, and to a lesser extent at 6 and 12 months. For the carrier and MSC-treated groups, however, there was little evidence of proteoglycan matrix or residual notochordal/chondrocyte cells, but rather a type I/II collagen-enriched scar tissue. By contrast, JCs produced a type II collagen-rich matrix that was largely absent of type I collagen. Viable JCs were observed at all time points, whereas no evidence of viable MSCs was found. These data support the premise that committed chondrocytes are more appropriate for use in disc repair, as they are uniquely suited for survival in the ischemic disc microenvironment. PMID:21910592

  17. Chondrocytes, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, and Their Combination in Articular Cartilage Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Nazempour, A; Van Wie, B J

    2016-05-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is a highly organized connective tissue lining, covering the ends of bones within articulating joints. Its highly ordered structure is essential for stable motion and provides a frictionless surface easing load transfer. AC is vulnerable to lesions and, because it is aneural and avascular, it has limited self-repair potential which often leads to osteoarthritis. To date, no fully successful treatment for osteoarthritis has been reported. Thus, the development of innovative therapeutic approaches is desperately needed. Autologous chondrocyte implantation, the only cell-based surgical intervention approved in the United States for treating cartilage defects, has limitations because of de-differentiation of articular chondrocytes (AChs) upon in vitro expansion. De-differentiation can be abated if initial populations of AChs are co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which not only undergo chondrogenesis themselves but also support chondrocyte vitality. In this review we summarize studies utilizing AChs, non-AChs, and MSCs and compare associated outcomes. Moreover, a comprehensive set of recent human studies using chondrocytes to direct MSC differentiation, MSCs to support chondrocyte re-differentiation and proliferation in co-culture environments, and exploratory animal intra- and inter-species studies are systematically reviewed and discussed in an innovative manner allowing side-by-side comparisons of protocols and outcomes. Finally, a comprehensive set of recommendations are made for future studies.

  18. Osteoarthritis-derived chondrocytes are a potential source of multipotent progenitor cells for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Oda, Tomoyuki; Sakai, Tadahiro; Hiraiwa, Hideki; Hamada, Takashi; Ono, Yohei; Nakashima, Motoshige; Ishizuka, Shinya; Matsukawa, Tetsuya; Yamashita, Satoshi; Tsuchiya, Saho; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2016-10-21

    The natural healing capacity of damaged articular cartilage is poor, rendering joint surface injuries a prime target for regenerative medicine. While autologous chondrocyte or mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) implantation can be applied to repair cartilage defects in young patients, no appropriate long-lasting treatment alternative is available for elderly patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Multipotent progenitor cells are reported to present in adult human articular cartilage, with a preponderance in OA cartilage. These facts led us to hypothesize the possible use of osteoarthritis-derived chondrocytes as a cell source for cartilage tissue engineering. We therefore analyzed chondrocyte- and stem cell-related markers, cell growth rate, and multipotency in OA chondrocytes (OACs) and bone marrow-derived MSCs, along with normal articular chondrocytes (ACs) as a control. OACs demonstrated similar phenotype and proliferation rate to MSCs. Furthermore, OACs exhibited multilineage differentiation ability with a greater chondrogenic differentiation ability than MSCs, which was equivalent to ACs. We conclude that chondrogenic capacity is not significantly affected by OA, and OACs could be a potential source of multipotent progenitor cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cellular automata model for human articular chondrocytes migration, proliferation and cell death: An in vitro validation.

    PubMed

    Vaca-González, J J; Gutiérrez, M L; Guevara, J M; Garzón-Alvarado, D A

    2016-01-07

    Articular cartilage is characterized by low cell density of only one cell type, chondrocytes, and has limited self-healing properties. When articular cartilage is affected by traumatic injuries, a therapeutic strategy such as autologous chondrocyte implantation is usually proposed for its treatment. This approach requires in vitro chondrocyte expansion to yield high cell number for cell transplantation. To improve the efficiency of this procedure, it is necessary to assess cell dynamics such as migration, proliferation and cell death during culture. Computational models such as cellular automata can be used to simulate cell dynamics in order to enhance the result of cell culture procedures. This methodology has been implemented for several cell types; however, an experimental validation is required for each one. For this reason, in this research a cellular automata model, based on random-walk theory, was devised in order to predict articular chondrocyte behavior in monolayer culture during cell expansion. Results demonstrated that the cellular automata model corresponded to cell dynamics and computed-accurate quantitative results. Moreover, it was possible to observe that cell dynamics depend on weighted probabilities derived from experimental data and cell behavior varies according to the cell culture period. Thus, depending on whether cells were just seeded or proliferated exponentially, culture time probabilities differed in percentages in the CA model. Furthermore, in the experimental assessment a decreased chondrocyte proliferation was observed along with increased passage number. This approach is expected to having other uses as in enhancing articular cartilage therapies based on tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  20. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, G.; Loreto, C.; Carnazza, M.L.; Coppolino, F.; Cardile, V.; Leonardi, R.

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogels (PEG-DA) encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i) in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii) in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease. PMID:22073377

  1. RhoA activation and nuclearization marks loss of chondrocyte phenotype in crosstalk with Wnt pathway.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Ece; Despot-Slade, Evelin; Pichler, Michael; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy

    2017-09-01

    De-differentiation comprises a major drawback for the use of autologous chondrocytes in cartilage repair. Here, we investigate the role of RhoA and canonical Wnt signaling in chondrocyte phenotype. Chondrocyte de-differentiation is accompanied by an upregulation and nuclear localization of RhoA. Effectors of canonical Wnt signaling including β-catenin and YAP/TAZ are upregulated in de-differentiating chondrocytes in a Rho-dependent manner. Inhibition of Rho activation with C3 transferase inhibits nuclear localization of RhoA, induces expression of chondrogenic markers on 2D and enhances the chondrogenic effect of 3D culturing. Upregulation of chondrogenic markers by Rho inhibition is accompanied by loss of canonical Wnt signaling markers in 3D or on 2D whereas treatment of chondrocytes with Wnt-3a abrogates this effect. However, induction of canonical Wnt signaling inhibits chondrogenic markers on 2D but enhances chondrogenic re-differentiation on 2D with C3 transferase or in 3D. These data provide insights on the context-dependent role of RhoA and Wnt signaling in de-differentiation and on mechanisms to induce chondrogenic markers for therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. An ovine in vitro model for chondrocyte-based scaffold-assisted cartilage grafts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Scaffold-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation is an effective clinical procedure for cartilage repair. From the regulatory point of view, the ovine model is one of the suggested large animal models for pre-clinical studies. The aim of our study was to evaluate the in vitro re-differentiation capacity of expanded ovine chondrocytes in biomechanically characterized polyglycolic acid (PGA)/fibrin biomaterials for scaffold-assisted cartilage repair. Methods Ovine chondrocytes harvested from adult articular cartilage were expanded in monolayer and re-assembled three-dimensionally in PGA-fibrin scaffolds. De- and re-differentiation of ovine chondrocytes in PGA-fibrin scaffolds was assessed by histological and immuno-histochemical staining as well as by real-time gene expression analysis of typical cartilage marker molecules and the matrix-remodelling enzymes matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) -1, -2 and −13 as well as their inhibitors. PGA scaffolds characteristics including degradation and stiffness were analysed by electron microscopy and biomechanical testing. Results Histological, immuno-histochemical and gene expression analysis showed that dedifferentiated chondrocytes re-differentiate in PGA-fibrin scaffolds and form a cartilaginous matrix. Re-differentiation was accompanied by the induction of type II collagen and aggrecan, while MMP expression decreased in prolonged tissue culture. Electron microscopy and biomechanical tests revealed that the non-woven PGA scaffold shows a textile structure with high tensile strength of 3.6 N/mm2 and a stiffness of up to 0.44 N/mm2, when combined with gel-like fibrin. Conclusion These data suggest that PGA-fibrin is suited as a mechanically stable support structure for scaffold-assisted chondrocyte grafts, initiating chondrogenic re-differentiation of expanded chondrocytes. PMID:23137017

  3. Cartilage tissue engineering: molecular control of chondrocyte differentiation for proper cartilage matrix reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Demoor, Magali; Ollitrault, David; Gomez-Leduc, Tangni; Bouyoucef, Mouloud; Hervieu, Magalie; Fabre, Hugo; Lafont, Jérôme; Denoix, Jean-Marie; Audigié, Fabrice; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Legendre, Florence; Galera, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Articular cartilage defects are a veritable therapeutic problem because therapeutic options are very scarce. Due to the poor self-regeneration capacity of cartilage, minor cartilage defects often lead to osteoarthritis. Several surgical strategies have been developed to repair damaged cartilage. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) gives encouraging results, but this cell-based therapy involves a step of chondrocyte expansion in a monolayer, which results in the loss in the differentiated phenotype. Thus, despite improvement in the quality of life for patients, reconstructed cartilage is in fact fibrocartilage. Successful ACI, according to the particular physiology of chondrocytes in vitro, requires active and phenotypically stabilized chondrocytes. This review describes the unique physiology of cartilage, with the factors involved in its formation, stabilization and degradation. Then, we focus on some of the most recent advances in cell therapy and tissue engineering that open up interesting perspectives for maintaining or obtaining the chondrogenic character of cells in order to treat cartilage lesions. Current research involves the use of chondrocytes or progenitor stem cells, associated with "smart" biomaterials and growth factors. Other influential factors, such as cell sources, oxygen pressure and mechanical strain are considered, as are recent developments in gene therapy to control the chondrocyte differentiation/dedifferentiation process. This review provides new information on the mechanisms regulating the state of differentiation of chondrocytes and the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells that will lead to the development of new restorative cell therapy approaches in humans. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Matrix-mediated cell behaviour and properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Human Cartilage-Derived Progenitor Cells From Committed Chondrocytes for Efficient Cartilage Repair and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yangzi; Cai, Youzhi; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Zi; Hu, Changchang; Tong, Tong; Lu, Ping; Zhang, Shufang; Neculai, Dante; Tuan, Rocky S; Ouyang, Hong Wei

    2016-06-01

    Articular cartilage is not a physiologically self-renewing tissue. Injury of cartilage often progresses from the articular surface to the subchondral bone, leading to pathogenesis of tissue degenerative diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Therapies to treat cartilage defects using autologous chondrocyte-based tissue engineering have been developed and used for more than 20 years; however, the challenge of chondrocyte expansion in vitro remains. A promising cell source, cartilage stem/progenitor cells (CSPCs), has attracted recent attention. Because their origin and identity are still unclear, the application potential of CSPCs is under active investigation. Here we have captured the emergence of a group of stem/progenitor cells derived from adult human chondrocytes, highlighted by dynamic changes in expression of the mature chondrocyte marker, COL2, and mesenchymal stromal/stem cell (MSC) marker, CD146. These cells are termed chondrocyte-derived progenitor cells (CDPCs). The stem cell-like potency and differentiation status of CDPCs were determined by physical and biochemical cues during culture. A low-density, low-glucose 2-dimensional culture condition (2DLL) was critical for the emergence and proliferation enhancement of CDPCs. CDPCs showed similar phenotype as bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells but exhibited greater chondrogenic potential. Moreover, the 2DLL-cultured CDPCs proved efficient in cartilage formation both in vitro and in vivo and in repairing large knee cartilage defects (6-13 cm(2)) in 15 patients. These findings suggest a phenotype conversion between chondrocytes and CDPCs and provide conditions that promote the conversion. These insights expand our understanding of cartilage biology and may enhance the success of chondrocyte-based therapies. Injury of cartilage, a non-self-repairing tissue, often progresses to pathogenesis of degenerative joint diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Although tissue-derived stem cells have been shown to

  5. Human Cartilage-Derived Progenitor Cells From Committed Chondrocytes for Efficient Cartilage Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yangzi; Cai, Youzhi; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Zi; Hu, Changchang; Tong, Tong; Lu, Ping; Zhang, Shufang; Neculai, Dante

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage is not a physiologically self-renewing tissue. Injury of cartilage often progresses from the articular surface to the subchondral bone, leading to pathogenesis of tissue degenerative diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Therapies to treat cartilage defects using autologous chondrocyte-based tissue engineering have been developed and used for more than 20 years; however, the challenge of chondrocyte expansion in vitro remains. A promising cell source, cartilage stem/progenitor cells (CSPCs), has attracted recent attention. Because their origin and identity are still unclear, the application potential of CSPCs is under active investigation. Here we have captured the emergence of a group of stem/progenitor cells derived from adult human chondrocytes, highlighted by dynamic changes in expression of the mature chondrocyte marker, COL2, and mesenchymal stromal/stem cell (MSC) marker, CD146. These cells are termed chondrocyte-derived progenitor cells (CDPCs). The stem cell-like potency and differentiation status of CDPCs were determined by physical and biochemical cues during culture. A low-density, low-glucose 2-dimensional culture condition (2DLL) was critical for the emergence and proliferation enhancement of CDPCs. CDPCs showed similar phenotype as bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells but exhibited greater chondrogenic potential. Moreover, the 2DLL-cultured CDPCs proved efficient in cartilage formation both in vitro and in vivo and in repairing large knee cartilage defects (6–13 cm2) in 15 patients. These findings suggest a phenotype conversion between chondrocytes and CDPCs and provide conditions that promote the conversion. These insights expand our understanding of cartilage biology and may enhance the success of chondrocyte-based therapies. Significance Injury of cartilage, a non-self-repairing tissue, often progresses to pathogenesis of degenerative joint diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Although tissue-derived stem cells have been shown

  6. Hyaline cartilage degenerates after autologous osteochondral transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tibesku, C O; Szuwart, T; Kleffner, T O; Schlegel, P M; Jahn, U R; Van Aken, H; Fuchs, S

    2004-11-01

    Autologous osteochondral grafting is a well-established clinical procedure to treat focal cartilage defects in patients, although basic research on this topic remains sparse. The aim of the current study was to evaluate (1) histological changes of transplanted hyaline cartilage of osteochondral grafts and (2) the tissue that connects the transplanted cartilage with the adjacent cartilage in a sheep model. Both knee joints of four sheep were opened surgically and osteochondral grafts were harvested and simultaneously transplanted to the contralateral femoral condyle. The animals were sacrificed after three months and the received knee joints were evaluated histologically. Histological evaluation showed a complete ingrowth of the osseous part of the osteochondral grafts. A healing or ingrowth at the level of the cartilage could not be observed. Histological evaluation of the transplanted grafts according to Mankin revealed significantly more and more severe signs of degeneration than the adjacent cartilage, such as cloning of chondrocytes and irregularities of the articular surface. We found no connecting tissue between the transplanted and the adjacent cartilage and histological signs of degeneration of the transplanted hyaline cartilage. In the light of these findings, long-term results of autologous osteochondral grafts in human beings have to be followed critically.

  7. Polymer-based platform for microfluidic systems

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William [Livermore, CA; Krulevitch, Peter [Pleasanton, CA; Maghribi, Mariam [Livermore, CA; Hamilton, Julie [Tracy, CA; Rose, Klint [Boston, MA; Wang, Amy W [Oakland, CA

    2009-10-13

    A method of forming a polymer-based microfluidic system platform using network building blocks selected from a set of interconnectable network building blocks, such as wire, pins, blocks, and interconnects. The selected building blocks are interconnectably assembled and fixedly positioned in precise positions in a mold cavity of a mold frame to construct a three-dimensional model construction of a microfluidic flow path network preferably having meso-scale dimensions. A hardenable liquid, such as poly (dimethylsiloxane) is then introduced into the mold cavity and hardened to form a platform structure as well as to mold the microfluidic flow path network having channels, reservoirs and ports. Pre-fabricated elbows, T's and other joints are used to interconnect various building block elements together. After hardening the liquid the building blocks are removed from the platform structure to make available the channels, cavities and ports within the platform structure. Microdevices may be embedded within the cast polymer-based platform, or bonded to the platform structure subsequent to molding, to create an integrated microfluidic system. In this manner, the new microfluidic platform is versatile and capable of quickly generating prototype systems, and could easily be adapted to a manufacturing setting.

  8. Ultrasonic motors with polymer-based vibrators.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang; Mizuno, Yosuke; Tabaru, Marie; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2015-12-01

    With their characteristics of low density and elastic moduli, polymers are promising materials for making ultrasonic motors (USMs) with high energy density. Although it has been believed for a long time that polymers are too lossy to be applied to high-amplitude vibrators, there are several new polymers that exhibit excellent vibration characteristics. First, we measure the damping coefficients of some functional polymers to explore the applicability of polymers as vibrators for USMs. Second, to investigate the vibration characteristics, we fabricate bimorph vibrators using several kinds of polymers that have low attenuation. Third, a bending mode USM is fabricated with a polymer rod and four piezoelectric plates bonded on the rod as a typical example of a USM. Through an experimental investigation of the motor performance, it was found that the polymer-based USMs exhibited higher rotation velocity than the aluminum-based USM under a light preload, although the maximum torque of the polymer-based USMs was smaller than the aluminum-based USM. Among the tested polymers, polyphenylenesulfide was a prospective material for USMs under light preloads because of the high amplitude and lightweight of polyphenylenesulfide.

  9. Dynamic gold nanoparticle, polymer-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, Millicent; Junghans, Ann; Hayden, Steven; Majeski, Jaroslaw; CINT, Lujan Team

    2014-03-01

    Artificial polymer-based biomembranes may serve as a foundational architecture for the integration and spatial organization of metal nanoparticles forming functional nanocomposites. Nonionic triblock copolymer (PEO-PPO-PEO), lipid-based gels, containing Au nanoparticles (NPs) can be prepared by either external doping of the preformed nanoparticles or by in-situ reduction of Au 3+. Neutron reflectivity on quartz supported thin films of the Au NP -doped polymer-based biomembranes was used to determine the location of the Au. The nanoparticles were found to preferentially reside within the ethylene oxide chains located at the interface of the bulk water channels and the amphiphile bilayers. The embedded Au nanoparticles can act as localized heat sinks, inducing changes in the polymer conformation. The collective, thermally-triggered expansion and contraction of the EO chains modulate the mesophase structure of the gels. Synchrotron X-ray scattering (SAXS) was used to monitor mesophase structure as a function of both temperature and photo-irradiation. These studies represent a first step towards designingexternally-responsive polymer-nanoparticle composites.

  10. Stretchable polymer-based electronic device

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Davidson, James Courtney; Wilson, Thomas S.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Benett, William J.; Tovar, Armando R.

    2008-02-26

    A stretchable electronic circuit or electronic device and a polymer-based process to produce a circuit or electronic device containing a stretchable conducting circuit. The stretchable electronic apparatus has a central longitudinal axis and the apparatus is stretchable in a longitudinal direction generally aligned with the central longitudinal axis. The apparatus comprises a stretchable polymer body and at least one circuit line operatively connected to the stretchable polymer body. The circuit line extends in the longitudinal direction and has a longitudinal component that extends in the longitudinal direction and has an offset component that is at an angle to the longitudinal direction. The longitudinal component and the offset component allow the apparatus to stretch in the longitudinal direction while maintaining the integrity of the circuit line.

  11. Extracellular Matrix Domain Formation as an Indicator of Chondrocyte Dedifferentiation and Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ling; Gonzalez, Stephanie; Shah, Saumya; Kyupelyan, Levon; Petrigliano, Frank A.; McAllister, David R.; Adams, John S; Karperien, Marcel; Tuan, Tai-Lan; Benya, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage injury represents one of the most significant clinical conditions. Implantation of expanded autologous chondrocytes from noninjured compartments of the joint is a typical strategy for repairing cartilage. However, two-dimensional culture causes dedifferentiation of chondrocytes, making them functionally inferior for cartilage repair. We hypothesized that functional exclusion of dedifferentiated chondrocytes can be achieved by the selective mapping of collagen molecules deposited by chondrogenic cells in a three-dimensional environment. Freshly isolated and in vitro expanded human fetal or adult articular chondrocytes were cultured in a thermoreversible hydrogel at density of 1×107 cells/mL for 24 h. Chondrocytes were released from the gel, stained with antibodies against collagen type 2 (COL II) or COL I or COL X and sorted by fluorescence activated cell sorting. Imaging flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) assays were performed to evaluate the differences between COL II domain forming and COL II domain-negative cells. Freshly dissected periarticular chondrocytes robustly formed domains that consisted of the extracellular matrix surrounding cells in the hydrogel as a capsule clearly detectable by imaging flow cytometry (ImageStream) and confocal microscopy. These domains were almost exclusively formed by COL II. In contrast to that, a significant percentage of freshly isolated growth plate pre-hypertrophic and hyperdrophic chondrocytes deposited matrix domains positive for COL II, COL I, and COL X. The proportion of the cells producing COL II domains decreased with the increased passage of in vitro expanded periarticular fetal or adult articular chondrocytes. Sorted COL II domain forming cells deposited much higher levels of COL II and GAGs in pellet assays than COL II domain-negative cells. COL II domain forming cells expressed chondrogenic genes at higher levels than negative cells

  12. Surface markers and gene expression to characterize the differentiation of monolayer expanded human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Takashi; Sakai, Tadahiro; Hiraiwa, Hideki; Nakashima, Motoshige; Ono, Yohei; Mitsuyama, Hirohito; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2013-02-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a method of cartilage repair. To improve the quality of regenerated tissue by ACI, it is essential to identify surface marker expression correlated with the differentiation status of monolayer expanded human articular chondrocytes and to define the index for discriminating dedifferentiated cells from monolayer expanded human articular chondrocytes. Normal human articular chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer until passage 4. At each passage, mRNA expression of collagen type I, II, and X and aggrecan was analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR, and the surface marker expression of CD14, CD26, CD44, CD49a, CD49c, CD54, and CD151 was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The ratios of mRNA levels of collagen type II to I (Col II/Col I) represented the differentiation status of chondrocytes more appropriately during monolayer culture. The surface marker expression of CD44, CD49c, and CD151 was upregulated according to the dedifferentiation status, whereas that of CD14, CD49a, and CD54 was downregulated. The most appropriate combination of the ratio of Col II/Col I was CD54 and CD44. Cell sorting was performed using a magnetic cell sorting system (MACS) according to CD54 and CD44, and real-time quantitative PCR was performed for the cell subpopulations before and after cell sorting. The expression of collagen type II and aggrecan of the chondrocytes after MACS was higher than that before sorting, but not significantly. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) ratio of CD54 to CD44 could be an adequate candidate as the index of the differentiation status.

  13. BMP-2, Hypoxia, and COL1A1/HtrA1 siRNAs Favor Neo-Cartilage Hyaline Matrix Formation in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ollitrault, David; Legendre, Florence; Drougard, Carole; Briand, Mélanie; Benateau, Hervé; Goux, Didier; Chajra, Hanane; Poulain, Laurent; Hartmann, Daniel; Vivien, Denis; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Baldi, Alfonso; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Boumediene, Karim; Demoor, Magali

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is an irreversible pathology that causes a decrease in articular cartilage thickness, leading finally to the complete degradation of the affected joint. The low spontaneous repair capacity of cartilage prevents any restoration of the joint surface, making OA a major public health issue. Here, we developed an innovative combination of treatment conditions to improve the human chondrocyte phenotype before autologous chondrocyte implantation. First, we seeded human dedifferentiated chondrocytes into a collagen sponge as a scaffold, cultured them in hypoxia in the presence of a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), BMP-2, and transfected them with small interfering RNAs targeting two markers overexpressed in OA dedifferentiated chondrocytes, that is, type I collagen and/or HtrA1 serine protease. This strategy significantly decreased mRNA and protein expression of type I collagen and HtrA1, and led to an improvement in the chondrocyte phenotype index of differentiation. The effectiveness of our in vitro culture process was also demonstrated in the nude mouse model in vivo after subcutaneous implantation. We, thus, provide here a new protocol able to favor human hyaline chondrocyte phenotype in primarily dedifferentiated cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Our study also offers an innovative strategy for chondrocyte redifferentiation and opens new opportunities for developing therapeutic targets. PMID:24957638

  14. BMP-2, hypoxia, and COL1A1/HtrA1 siRNAs favor neo-cartilage hyaline matrix formation in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ollitrault, David; Legendre, Florence; Drougard, Carole; Briand, Mélanie; Benateau, Hervé; Goux, Didier; Chajra, Hanane; Poulain, Laurent; Hartmann, Daniel; Vivien, Denis; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Baldi, Alfonso; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Boumediene, Karim; Demoor, Magali; Galera, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is an irreversible pathology that causes a decrease in articular cartilage thickness, leading finally to the complete degradation of the affected joint. The low spontaneous repair capacity of cartilage prevents any restoration of the joint surface, making OA a major public health issue. Here, we developed an innovative combination of treatment conditions to improve the human chondrocyte phenotype before autologous chondrocyte implantation. First, we seeded human dedifferentiated chondrocytes into a collagen sponge as a scaffold, cultured them in hypoxia in the presence of a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), BMP-2, and transfected them with small interfering RNAs targeting two markers overexpressed in OA dedifferentiated chondrocytes, that is, type I collagen and/or HtrA1 serine protease. This strategy significantly decreased mRNA and protein expression of type I collagen and HtrA1, and led to an improvement in the chondrocyte phenotype index of differentiation. The effectiveness of our in vitro culture process was also demonstrated in the nude mouse model in vivo after subcutaneous implantation. We, thus, provide here a new protocol able to favor human hyaline chondrocyte phenotype in primarily dedifferentiated cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Our study also offers an innovative strategy for chondrocyte redifferentiation and opens new opportunities for developing therapeutic targets.

  15. Off-loading of cyclic hydrostatic pressure promotes production of extracellular matrix by chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tatsumura, Masaki; Sakane, Masataka; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Mizuno, Shuichi

    2013-01-01

    The addition of cyclic hydrostatic pressure (cHP) to cell culture medium has been used to promote extracellular matrix (ECM) production by articular chondrocytes. Though a combination of cHP followed by atmospheric pressure (AP) has been examined previously, the rationale of such a combination was unclear. We compared the effects of loading once versus twice (combinations of cHP followed by AP) regarding both gene expression and biochemical and histological phenotypes of chondrocytes. Isolated bovine articular chondrocytes were embedded in a collagen gel and incubated for 14 days under conditions combining cHP and AP. The gene expression of aggrecan core protein and collagen type II were upregulated in response to cHP, and those levels were maintained for at least 4 days after cHP treatment. Accumulation of cartilage-specific sulfated glycosaminoglycans following cHP for 7 days and subsequent AP for 7 days was significantly greater than that of the AP control (p < 0.05). Therefore, incubation at AP after loading with cHP was found to beneficially affect ECM accumulation. Manipulating algorithms of cHP combined with AP will be useful in producing autologous chondrocyte-based cell constructs for implantation. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Xiphoid process-derived chondrocytes: a novel cell source for elastic cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seungwoo; Cho, Wheemoon; Cho, Hyunji; Lee, Jungsun; Lee, EunAh; Son, Youngsook

    2014-11-01

    Reconstruction of elastic cartilage requires a source of chondrocytes that display a reliable differentiation tendency. Predetermined tissue progenitor cells are ideal candidates for meeting this need; however, it is difficult to obtain donor elastic cartilage tissue because most elastic cartilage serves important functions or forms external structures, making these tissues indispensable. We found vestigial cartilage tissue in xiphoid processes and characterized it as hyaline cartilage in the proximal region and elastic cartilage in the distal region. Xiphoid process-derived chondrocytes (XCs) showed superb in vitro expansion ability based on colony-forming unit fibroblast assays, cell yield, and cumulative cell growth. On induction of differentiation into mesenchymal lineages, XCs showed a strong tendency toward chondrogenic differentiation. An examination of the tissue-specific regeneration capacity of XCs in a subcutaneous-transplantation model and autologous chondrocyte implantation model confirmed reliable regeneration of elastic cartilage regardless of the implantation environment. On the basis of these observations, we conclude that xiphoid process cartilage, the only elastic cartilage tissue source that can be obtained without destroying external shape or function, is a source of elastic chondrocytes that show superb in vitro expansion and reliable differentiation capacity. These findings indicate that XCs could be a valuable cell source for reconstruction of elastic cartilage. ©AlphaMed Press.

  17. Xiphoid Process-Derived Chondrocytes: A Novel Cell Source for Elastic Cartilage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seungwoo; Cho, Wheemoon; Cho, Hyunji; Lee, Jungsun

    2014-01-01

    Reconstruction of elastic cartilage requires a source of chondrocytes that display a reliable differentiation tendency. Predetermined tissue progenitor cells are ideal candidates for meeting this need; however, it is difficult to obtain donor elastic cartilage tissue because most elastic cartilage serves important functions or forms external structures, making these tissues indispensable. We found vestigial cartilage tissue in xiphoid processes and characterized it as hyaline cartilage in the proximal region and elastic cartilage in the distal region. Xiphoid process-derived chondrocytes (XCs) showed superb in vitro expansion ability based on colony-forming unit fibroblast assays, cell yield, and cumulative cell growth. On induction of differentiation into mesenchymal lineages, XCs showed a strong tendency toward chondrogenic differentiation. An examination of the tissue-specific regeneration capacity of XCs in a subcutaneous-transplantation model and autologous chondrocyte implantation model confirmed reliable regeneration of elastic cartilage regardless of the implantation environment. On the basis of these observations, we conclude that xiphoid process cartilage, the only elastic cartilage tissue source that can be obtained without destroying external shape or function, is a source of elastic chondrocytes that show superb in vitro expansion and reliable differentiation capacity. These findings indicate that XCs could be a valuable cell source for reconstruction of elastic cartilage. PMID:25205841

  18. Tissue responses against tissue-engineered cartilage consisting of chondrocytes encapsulated within non-absorbable hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Sanshiro; Fujihara, Yuko; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Asawa, Yukiyo; Komura, Makoto; Nagata, Satoru; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    To disclose the influence of foreign body responses raised against a non-absorbable hydrogel consisting of tissue-engineered cartilage, we embedded human/canine chondrocytes within agarose and transplanted them into subcutaneous pockets in nude mice and donor beagles. One month after transplantation, cartilage formation was observed in the experiments using human chondrocytes in nude mice. No significant invasion of blood cells was noted in the areas where the cartilage was newly formed. Around the tissue-engineered cartilage, agarose fragments, a dense fibrous connective tissue and many macrophages were observed. On the other hand, no cartilage tissue was detected in the autologous transplantation of canine chondrocytes. Few surviving chondrocytes were observed in the agarose and no accumulation of blood cells was observed in the inner parts of the transplants. Localizations of IgG and complements were noted in areas of agarose, and also in the devitalized cells embedded within the agarose. Even if we had inhibited the proximity of the blood cells to the transplanted cells, the survival of the cells could not be secured. We suggest that these cytotoxic mechanisms seem to be associated not only with macrophages but also with soluble factors, including antibodies and complements.

  19. Doublecortin is expressed in articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Ryan, James A; Di Cesare, Paul E; Liu, Judy; Walsh, Christopher A; You, Zongbing

    2007-11-23

    Articular cartilage and cartilage in the embryonic cartilaginous anlagen and growth plates are both hyaline cartilages. In this study, we found that doublecortin (DCX) was expressed in articular chondrocytes but not in chondrocytes from the cartilaginous anlagen or growth plates. DCX was expressed by the cells in the chondrogenous layers but not intermediate layer of joint interzone. Furthermore, the synovium and cruciate ligaments were DCX-negative. DCX-positive chondrocytes were very rare in tissue engineered cartilage derived from in vitro pellet culture of rat chondrosarcoma, ATDC5, and C3H10T1/2 cells. However, the new hyaline cartilage formed in rabbit knee defect contained mostly DCX-positive chondrocytes. Our results demonstrate that DCX can be used as a marker to distinguish articular chondrocytes from other chondrocytes and to evaluate the quality of tissue engineered or regenerated cartilage in terms of their "articular" or "non-articular" nature.

  20. Autologous Therapies in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sumir; Mahajan, Bharat Bhushan; Singh, Amarbir

    2014-01-01

    Autologous therapy is a therapeutic intervention that uses an individual’s cells or tissues, which are processed outside the body, and reintroduced into the donor. This emerging field presently represents a mere tip of the iceberg with much knowledge and applications yet to be discovered. It, being free from risks of hypersensitivity reactions and transmission of infectious agents, has been explored in various fields, such as plastic surgery, orthopedics, and dermatology. This review article focuses on various forms of autologous therapies used in dermatology along with their applications and mechanisms of action. PMID:25584137

  1. Assessment of TGF-β3 on production of aggrecan by human articular chondrocytes in pellet culture system.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Saeed; Hashemibeni, Batool; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Kabiri, Azadeh; Rabbani, Hossein; Abutorabi, Roshanak

    2014-01-01

    The Autologous Chondrocytes Transplantation (ACT) method is being studied for repair of cartilage diseases. As the chondrocytes dedifferentiated during monolayer culture, three-dimensional cultures are suggested to redifferentiate them. The aim of this study was investigation of the effect of TGF-β3 growth factor on chondrocytes in pellet culture system. The chondrocytes were isolated from three human articular cartilages by enzymatic digestion. The cells of the second passage were transferred to pellet culture system. We determined the chondrogenic medium with TGF-β3 as the experimental group and without it as the control group. After 2 weeks, the aggrecan production was investigated using histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) methods. The presence of glycosaminoglycans was proved through Toluiden blue staining. Comparison of IHC results using MATLAB software showed that aggrecan in the experimental group was significantly higher than in the control group (P ≤ 0.05). The presence of TGF-β3 in the chondrogenic medium could lead to the production of more aggrecan in chondrocytes cultivated in pellet culture system.

  2. In Vitro Expression of the Extracellular Matrix Components Aggrecan, Collagen Types I and II by Articular Cartilage-Derived Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Schneevoigt, J; Fabian, C; Leovsky, C; Seeger, J; Bahramsoltani, M

    2017-02-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of hyaline cartilage is perfectly suited to transmit articular pressure load to the subchondral bone. Pressure is transferred by a high amount of aggrecan-based proteoglycans and collagen type II fibres in particular. After any injury, the hyaline cartilage is replaced by fibrocartilage, which is low in proteoglycans and contains collagen type I predominantly. Until now, long-term results of therapeutic procedures including cell-based therapies like autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) lead to a replacement tissue meeting the composition of fibrocartilage. Therefore, it is of particular interest to discover how and to what extent isolation and in vitro cultivation of chondrocytes affect the cells and their expression of ECM components. Hyaline cartilage-derived chondrocytes were cultivated in vitro and observed microscopically over a time period of 35 days. The expression of collagen type I, collagen type II and aggrecan was analysed using RT-qPCR and Western blot at several days of cultivation. Chondrocytes presented a longitudinal shape for the entire cultivation period. While expression of collagen type I prevailed within the first days, only prolonged cultivation led to an increase in collagen type II and aggrecan expression. The results indicate that chondrocyte isolation and in vitro cultivation lead to a dedifferentiation at least to the stage of chondroprogenitor cells.

  3. Enhanced hyaline cartilage matrix synthesis in collagen sponge scaffolds by using siRNA to stabilize chondrocytes phenotype cultured with bone morphogenetic protein-2 under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Florence; Ollitrault, David; Hervieu, Magalie; Baugé, Catherine; Maneix, Laure; Goux, Didier; Chajra, Hanane; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Boumediene, Karim; Galera, Philippe; Demoor, Magali

    2013-07-01

    Cartilage healing by tissue engineering is an alternative strategy to reconstitute functional tissue after trauma or age-related degeneration. However, chondrocytes, the major player in cartilage homeostasis, do not self-regenerate efficiently and lose their phenotype during osteoarthritis. This process is called dedifferentiation and also occurs during the first expansion step of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). To ensure successful ACI therapy, chondrocytes must be differentiated and capable of synthesizing hyaline cartilage matrix molecules. We therefore developed a safe procedure for redifferentiating human chondrocytes by combining appropriate physicochemical factors: hypoxic conditions, collagen scaffolds, chondrogenic factors (bone morphogenetic protein-2 [BMP-2], and insulin-like growth factor I [IGF-I]) and RNA interference targeting the COL1A1 gene. Redifferentiation of dedifferentiated chondrocytes was evaluated using gene/protein analyses to identify the chondrocyte phenotypic profile. In our conditions, under BMP-2 treatment, redifferentiated and metabolically active chondrocytes synthesized a hyaline-like cartilage matrix characterized by type IIB collagen and aggrecan molecules without any sign of hypertrophy or osteogenesis. In contrast, IGF-I increased both specific and noncharacteristic markers (collagens I and X) of chondrocytes. The specific increase in COL2A1 gene expression observed in the BMP-2 treatment was shown to involve the specific enhancer region of COL2A1 that binds the trans-activators Sox9/L-Sox5/Sox6 and Sp1, which are associated with a decrease in the trans-inhibitors of COL2A1, c-Krox, and p65 subunit of NF-kappaB. Our procedure in which BMP-2 treatment under hypoxia is associated with a COL1A1 siRNA, significantly increased the differentiation index of chondrocytes, and should offer the opportunity to develop new ACI-based therapies in humans.

  4. Simvastatin inhibits CD44 fragmentation in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Terabe, Kenya; Takahashi, Nobunori; Takemoto, Toki; Knudson, Warren; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa

    2016-08-15

    In human osteoarthritic chondrocytes, the hyaluronan receptor CD44 undergoes proteolytic cleavage at the cell surface. CD44 cleavage is thought to require transit of CD44 into cholesterol-rich lipid rafts. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether statins exert a protective effect on articular chondrocytes due to diminution of cholesterol. Three model systems of chondrocytes were examined including human HCS-2/8 chondrosarcoma cells, human osteoarthritic chondrocytes and normal bovine articular chondrocytes. Treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M resulted in a substantial increase in CD44 fragmentation in each of the three chondrocyte models. Pre-incubation with simvastatin prior to treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M decreased the level of CD44 fragmentation, decreased the proportion of CD44 that transits into the lipid raft fractions, decreased ADAM10 activity and diminished the interaction between CD44 and ADAM10. In HCS-2/8 cells and bovine articular chondrocytes, fragmentation of CD44 was blocked by the knockdown of ADAM10. Inhibition of CD44 fragmentation by simvastatin also resulted in improved retention of pericellular matrix. Addition of cholesterol and farnesyl-pyrophosphate reversed the protective effects of simvastatin. Thus, the addition of simvastatin exerts positive effects on chondrocytes including reduced CD44 fragmentation and enhanced the retention of pericellular matrix. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. In vivo cultivation of human articular chondrocytes in a nude mouse-based contained defect organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Rath, R; Gavénis, K; Gravius, S; Andereya, S; Mumme, T; Schneider, U

    2007-01-01

    The nude mouse model is an established method to cultivate and investigate tissue engineered cartilage analogues under in vivo conditions. One limitation of this common approach is the lack of appropriate surrounding articular tissues. Thus the bonding capacity of cartilage repair tissue cannot be evaluated. Widely applied surgical techniques in cartilage repair such as conventional and three-dimensional autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) based on a collagen gel matrix cannot be included into nude mouse studies, since their application require a contained defect. The aim of this study is to apply an organ culture defect model for the in vivo cultivation of different cell-matrix-constructs. Cartilage defects were created on osteochondral specimens which had been harvested from 10 human knee joints during total knee replacement. Autologous chondrocytes were isolated from the cartilage samples and cultivated in monolayer until passage 2. On each osteochondral block defects were treated either by conventional ACI or a collagen gel seeded with autologous chondrocytes, including a defect left empty as a control. The samples were implanted into the subcutaneous pouches of nude mice and cultivated for six weeks. After retrieval, the specimens were examined histologically, immunohistochemically and by cell morphology quantification. In both, ACI and collagen gel based defect treatment, a repair tissue was formed, which filled the defect and bonded to the adjacent tissues. The repair tissue was immature with low production of collagen type II. In both groups redifferentiation of chondrocytes remained incomplete. Different appearances of interface zones between the repair tissue and the adjacent cartilage were found. The presented contained defect organ culture model offers the possibility to directly compare different types of clinically applied biologic cartilage repair techniques using human articular tissues in a nude mouse model.

  6. P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase promotes dedifferentiation of primary articular chondrocytes in monolayer culture.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Derek H; Ou, Sing J; Quinn, Thomas M

    2013-04-01

    Articular cartilage is an avascular tissue with poor regenerative capacity following injury, a contributing factor to joint degenerative disease. Cell-based therapies for cartilage tissue regeneration have rapidly advanced; however, expansion of autologous chondrocytes in vitro using standard methods causes 'dedifferentiation' into fibroblastic cells. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling is crucial for chondrocyte metabolism and matrix production, and changes in MAPK signals can affect the phenotype of cultured cells. We investigated the effects of inhibition of MAPK signalling on chondrocyte dedifferentiation during monolayer culture. Blockade of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signalling caused a significant increase in cartilage gene expression, however, also caused up-regulation of fibrotic gene expression. Inhibition of p38 MAPK (p38) caused a significant up-regulation of collagen type II while suppressing collagen type I expression. P38 inhibition also resulted in consistently more organized secretion of collagen type II protein deposits on cell culture surfaces. Follow-on pellet culture of treated cells revealed that MAPK inhibition reduced cell migration from the pellet. ERK and JNK inhibition caused more collagen type I accumulation in pellets versus controls while p38 inhibition strongly promoted collagen type II accumulation with no effect on collagen type I. Blockade of all three MAPKs caused increased GAG content in pellets. These results indicate a role for MAPK signalling in chondrocyte phenotype loss during monolayer culture, with a strong contribution from p38 signalling. Thus, blockade of p38 enhances chondrocyte phenotype in monolayer culture and may promote more efficient cartilage tissue regeneration for cell-based therapies. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase promotes dedifferentiation of primary articular chondrocytes in monolayer culture

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Derek H; Ou, Sing J; Quinn, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage is an avascular tissue with poor regenerative capacity following injury, a contributing factor to joint degenerative disease. Cell-based therapies for cartilage tissue regeneration have rapidly advanced; however, expansion of autologous chondrocytes in vitro using standard methods causes ‘dedifferentiation’ into fibroblastic cells. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling is crucial for chondrocyte metabolism and matrix production, and changes in MAPK signals can affect the phenotype of cultured cells. We investigated the effects of inhibition of MAPK signalling on chondrocyte dedifferentiation during monolayer culture. Blockade of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signalling caused a significant increase in cartilage gene expression, however, also caused up-regulation of fibrotic gene expression. Inhibition of p38 MAPK (p38) caused a significant up-regulation of collagen type II while suppressing collagen type I expression. P38 inhibition also resulted in consistently more organized secretion of collagen type II protein deposits on cell culture surfaces. Follow-on pellet culture of treated cells revealed that MAPK inhibition reduced cell migration from the pellet. ERK and JNK inhibition caused more collagen type I accumulation in pellets versus controls while p38 inhibition strongly promoted collagen type II accumulation with no effect on collagen type I. Blockade of all three MAPKs caused increased GAG content in pellets. These results indicate a role for MAPK signalling in chondrocyte phenotype loss during monolayer culture, with a strong contribution from p38 signalling. Thus, blockade of p38 enhances chondrocyte phenotype in monolayer culture and may promote more efficient cartilage tissue regeneration for cell-based therapies. PMID:23480786

  8. Low oxygen reduces the modulation to an oxidative phenotype in monolayer-expanded chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Heywood, Hannah K; Lee, David A

    2010-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation requires a phase of in vitro cell expansion, achieved by monolayer culture under atmospheric oxygen levels. Chondrocytes reside under low oxygen conditions in situ and exhibit a glycolytic metabolism. However, oxidative phosphorylation rises progressively during culture, with concomitant reactive oxygen species production. We determine if the high oxygen environment in vitro provides the transformation stimulus. Articular chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer for up to 14 days under 2%, 5%, or 20% oxygen. Expansion under 2% and 5% oxygen reduced the rate at which the cells developed an oxidative phenotype compared to 20% oxygen. However, at 40 +/- 4 fmol cell(-1) h(-1) the oxygen consumption by chondrocytes expanded under 2% oxygen for 14 days was still 14 times the value observed for freshly isolated cells. Seventy-five to 78% of the increased oxygen consumption was accounted for by oxidative phosphorylation (oligomycin sensitive). Expansion under low oxygen also reduced cellular proliferation and 8-hydroxyguanosine release, a marker of oxidative DNA damage. However, these parameters remained elevated compared to freshly isolated cells. Thus, expansion under physiological oxygen levels reduces, but does not abolish, the induction of an oxidative energy metabolism. We conclude that simply transferring chondrocytes to low oxygen is not sufficient to either maintain or re-establish a normal energy metabolism. Furthermore, a hydrophobic polystyrene culture surface which promotes rounded cell morphology had no effect on the development of an oxidative metabolism. Although the shift towards an oxidative energy metabolism is often accompanied by morphological changes, this study does not support the hypothesis that it is driven by them.

  9. Articular chondrocyte metabolism and osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Leipold, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage matrix that occurs during osteoarthritis causes a measurable increase of cartilage proteoglycan components in the synovial fluid and sera, (2) to observe what effect intracellular cAMP has on the expression of matrix components by chondrocytes, and (3) to determine if freshly isolated chondrocytes contain detectable levels of mRNA for fibronectin. Canine serum keratan sulfate and hyaluronate were measured to determine if there was an elevation of these serum glycosaminoglycans in a canine model of osteoarthritis. A single intra-articular injection of chymopapain into a shoulder joint increased serum keratan sulfate 10 fold and hyaluronate less than 2 fold in 24 hours. Keratan sulfate concentrations in synovial fluids of dogs about one year old were unrelated to the presence of spontaneous cartilage degeneration in the joints. High keratan sulfate in synovial fluids correlated with higher keratan sulfate in serum. The mean keratan sulfate concentration in sera of older dogs with osteoarthritis was 37% higher than disease-free controls, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Treatment of chondrocytes with 0.5 millimolar (mM) dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) caused the cells to adopt a more rounded morphology. There was no difference between the amount of proteins synthesized by cultures treated with DBcAMP and controls. The amount of fibronectin (FN) in the media of DBcAMP treated cultures detected by an ELISA was specifically reduced, and the amount of {sup 35}S-FN purified by gelatin affinity chromatography decreased. Moreover, the percentage of FN containing the extra domain. A sequence was reduced. Concomitant with the decrease in FN there was an increase in the concentration of keratan sulfate.

  10. Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis in the Knee: A Review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yee Han Dave; Suzer, Ferzan; Thermann, Hajo

    2014-07-01

    Autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) is a 1-step cartilage restoration technique that combines microfracture with the use of an exogenous scaffold. This matrix covers and mechanically stabilizes the clot. There have been an increasing number of studies performed related to the AMIC technique and an update of its use and results is warranted. Using the PubMed database, a literature search was performed using the terms "AMIC" or "Autologous Matrix Induced Chondrogenesis." A total of 19 basic science and clinical articles were identified. Ten studies that were published on the use of AMIC for knee chondral defects were identified and the results of 219 patients were analyzed. The improvements in Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective, Lysholm and Tegner scores at 2 years were comparable to the published results from autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and matrix ACI techniques for cartilage repair. Our systematic review of the current state of the AMIC technique suggests that it is a promising 1-stage cartilage repair technique. The short-term clinical outcomes and magnetic resonance imaging results are comparable to other cell-based methods. Further studies with AMIC in randomized studies versus other repair techniques such as ACI are needed in the future.

  11. Autologous collagen induced chondrogenesis (ACIC: Shetty-Kim technique) - A matrix based acellular single stage arthroscopic cartilage repair technique.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Asode Ananthram; Kim, Seok Jung; Shetty, Vishvas; Jang, Jae Deog; Huh, Sung Woo; Lee, Dong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The defects of articular cartilage in the knee joint are a common degenerative disease and currently there are several established techniques to treat this problem, each with their own advantages and shortcomings. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is the current gold standard but the technique is expensive, time-consuming and most versions require two stage procedures and an arthrotomy. Autologous collagen induced chondrogenesis (ACIC) is a single-stage arthroscopic procedure and we developed. This method uses microfracture technique with atelocollagen mixed with fibrin gel to treat articular cartilage defects. We introduce this ACIC techniques and its scientific background.

  12. Quantification of Changes in Morphology, Mechanotransduction, and Gene Expression in Bovine Articular Chondrocytes in Response to 2-Dimensional Culture Indicates the Existence of a Novel Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Qusous, Ala

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) offers a potential solution for cartilage repair but is currently hindered by loss of the chondrocyte differentiated phenotype. To further our understanding of the mechanism of dedifferentiation, changes in the phenotype in relation to mechanotransduction were recorded in response to monolayer culture. Methods: Bovine cartilage explants were excised and chondrocytes cultured for 9 days (P1), 14 days (P2), and 21 (P3) days. Changes in morphology and regulatory volume increase (RVI; a mechanotransduction response) were determined by the expression of key genes by RT-PCR and confocal microscopy, respectively. Results: A loss of a differentiated phenotype was observed in P1 with a reduction in sphericity and an overall increase in cell volume from 474.7 ± 32.1 µm3 to 725.2 ± 35.6 µm3. Furthermore, the effect of 2-dimensional (2-D) culture-induced dedifferentiation on mechanotransduction was investigated, whereby RVI and Gd3+-sensitive REV5901-induced calcium rise were only observed in 2-D cultured chondrocytes. A significant up-regulation of types I and II collagens and Sox9 was observed in P1 chondrocytes and no further significant change in type I collagen but a return to baseline levels of type II collagen and Sox9 upon further culture. Conclusion: These data indicated the presence of an intermediate, mesodifferentiated phenotype and highlight the importance of mechanotransduction as a marker of the chondrocytic cell type. PMID:26069635

  13. Successful creation of tissue-engineered autologous auricular cartilage in an immunocompetent large animal model.

    PubMed

    Bichara, David A; Pomerantseva, Irina; Zhao, Xing; Zhou, Libin; Kulig, Katherine M; Tseng, Alan; Kimura, Anya M; Johnson, Matthew A; Vacanti, Joseph P; Randolph, Mark A; Sundback, Cathryn A

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-engineered cartilage has historically been an attractive alternative treatment option for auricular reconstruction. However, the ability to reliably generate autologous auricular neocartilage in an immunocompetent preclinical model should first be established. The objectives of this study were to demonstrate engineered autologous auricular cartilage in the immunologically aggressive subcutaneous environment of an immunocompetent animal model, and to determine the impact of in vitro culture duration of chondrocyte-seeded constructs on the quality of neocartilage maturation in vivo. Auricular cartilage was harvested from eight adult sheep; chondrocytes were isolated, expanded in vitro, and seeded onto fibrous collagen scaffolds. Constructs were cultured in vitro for 2, 6, and 12 weeks, and then implanted autologously in sheep and in control nude mice for 6 and 12 weeks. Explanted tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin, safranin O, toluidine blue, collagen type II, and elastin. DNA and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were quantified. The quality of cartilage engineered in sheep decreased with prolonged in vitro culture time. Superior cartilage formation was demonstrated after 2 weeks of in vitro culture; the neocartilage quality improved with increased implantation time. In nude mice, neocartilage resembled native sheep auricular cartilage regardless of the in vitro culture length, with the exception of elastin expression. The DNA quantification was similar in all engineered and native cartilage (p>0.1). All cartilage engineered in sheep had significantly less GAG than native cartilage (p<0.02); significantly more GAG was observed with increased implantation time (p<0.02). In mice, the GAG content was similar to that of native cartilage and became significantly higher with increased in vitro or in vivo durations (p<0.02). Autologous auricular cartilage was successfully engineered in the subcutaneous environment of an ovine model using expanded chondrocytes

  14. Autologous Costochondral Microtia Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sapna A; Bhrany, Amit D; Murakami, Craig S; Sie, Kathleen C Y

    2016-04-01

    Reconstruction with autologous costochondral cartilage is one of the mainstays of surgical management of congenital microtia. We review the literature, present our current technique for microtia reconstruction with autologous costochondral graft, and discuss the evolution of our technique over the past 20 years. We aim to minimize donor site morbidity and create the most durable and natural appearing ear possible using a stacked framework to augment the antihelical fold and antitragal-tragal complex. Assessment of outcomes is challenging due to the paucity of available objective measures with which to evaluate aesthetic outcomes. Various instruments are used to assess outcomes, but none is universally accepted as the standard. The challenges we continue to face are humbling, but ongoing work on tissue engineering, application of 3D models, and use of validated questionnaires can help us get closer to achieving a maximal aesthetic outcome. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Culture temperature affects human chondrocyte messenger RNA expression in monolayer and pellet culture systems.

    PubMed

    Ito, Akira; Nagai, Momoko; Tajino, Junichi; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Iijima, Hirotaka; Zhang, Xiangkai; Aoyama, Tomoki; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapy has been explored for articular cartilage regeneration. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a promising cell-based technique for repairing articular cartilage defects. However, there are several issues such as chondrocyte de-differentiation. While numerous studies have been designed to overcome some of these issues, only a few have focused on the thermal environment that can affect chondrocyte metabolism and phenotype. In this study, the effects of different culture temperatures on human chondrocyte metabolism- and phenotype-related gene expression were investigated in 2D and 3D environments. Human chondrocytes were cultured in a monolayer or in a pellet culture system at three different culture temperatures (32°C, 37°C, and 41°C) for 3 days. The results showed that the total RNA level, normalized to the threshold cycle value of internal reference genes, was higher at lower temperatures in both culture systems. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and citrate synthase (CS), which are involved in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle, respectively, were expressed at similar levels at 32°C and 37°C in pellet cultures, but the levels were significantly lower at 41°C. Expression of the chondrogenic markers, collagen type IIA1 (COL2A1) and aggrecan (ACAN), was higher at 37°C than at 32°C and 41°C in both culture systems. However, this phenomenon did not coincide with SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 9 (SOX9), which is a fundamental transcription factor for chondrogenesis, indicating that a SOX9-independent pathway might be involved in this phenomenon. In conclusion, the expression of chondrocyte metabolism-related genes at 32°C was maintained or enhanced compared to that at 37°C. However, chondrogenesis-related genes were further induced at 37°C in both culture systems. Therefore, manipulating the culture temperature may be an advantageous approach for regulating human chondrocyte metabolic activity and chondrogenesis.

  16. Posttraumatic Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Murine Xiphoid.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher G; Eisner, Eric; McGlynn, Margaret; Shelton, John M; Richardson, James; Borrelli, Joseph; Chen, Christopher C T

    2013-10-01

    To demonstrate posttraumatic chondrocyte apoptosis in the murine xiphoid after a crush-type injury and to ultimately determine the pathway (i.e., intrinsic or extrinsic) by which chondrocytes undergo apoptosis in response to mechanical injury. The xiphoids of adult female wild-type mice were injured with the use of a modified Kelly clamp. Postinjury xiphoid cartilage was analyzed via 3 well-described independent means of assessing apoptosis in chondrocytes: hematoxylin and eosin staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay, and activated caspase-3 staining. Injured specimens contained many chondrocytes with evidence of apoptosis, which is characterized by cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, nuclear fragmentation, and the liberation of apoptotic bodies. There was a statistically significant increase in the number of chondrocytes undergoing apoptosis in the injured specimens as compared with the uninjured specimens. Chondrocytes can be stimulated to undergo apoptosis as a result of mechanical injury. These experiments involving predominantly cartilaginous murine xiphoid in vivo establish a baseline for future investigations that employ the genetic and therapeutic modulation of chondrocyte apoptosis in response to mechanical injury.

  17. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid

  18. Regeneration of human-ear-shaped cartilage by co-culturing human microtia chondrocytes with BMSCs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; He, Aijuan; Yin, Zongqi; Yu, Zheyuan; Luo, Xusong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wenjie; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Guangdong

    2014-06-01

    Previously, we had addressed the issues of shape control/maintenance of in vitro engineered human-ear-shaped cartilage. Thus, lack of applicable cell source had become a major concern that blocks clinical translation of this technology. Autologous microtia chondrocytes (MCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were both promising chondrogenic cells that did not involve obvious donor site morbidity. However, limited cell availability of MCs and ectopic ossification of chondrogenically induced BMSCs in subcutaneous environment greatly restricted their applications in external ear reconstruction. The current study demonstrated that MCs possessed strong proliferation ability but accompanied with rapid loss of chondrogenic ability during passage, indicating a poor feasibility to engineer the entire ear using expanded MCs. Fortunately, the co-transplantation results of MCs and BMSCs (25% MCs and 75% BMSCs) demonstrated a strong chondroinductive ability of MCs to promote stable ectopic chondrogenesis of BMSCs in subcutaneous environment. Moreover, cell labeling demonstrated that BMSCs could transform into chondrocyte-like cells under the chondrogenic niche provided by co-cultured MCs. Most importantly, a human-ear-shaped cartilaginous tissue with delicate structure and proper elasticity was successfully constructed by seeding the mixed cells (MCs and BMSCs) into the pre-shaped biodegradable ear-scaffold followed by 12 weeks of subcutaneous implantation in nude mouse. These results may provide a promising strategy to construct stable ectopic cartilage with MCs and stem cells (BMSCs) for autologous external ear reconstruction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Chondrocyte mecanobiology. Application in cartilage tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Stoltz, Jean François; Netter, Patrick; Huselstein, Céline; de Isla, Natalia; Wei Yang, Jing; Muller, Sylvaine

    2005-11-01

    Cartilage is a hydrated connective tissue that withstands and distributes mechanical forces within joints. Chondrocytes utilize mechanical signals to maintain cartilaginous tissue homeostasis. They regulate their metabolic activity through complex biological and biophysical interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM). Some mechanotransduction mechanisms are known, while many others no doubt remain to be discovered. Various aspects of chondrocyte mechanobiology have been applied to tissue engineering, with the creation of replacement tissue in vitro from bioresorbable or non-bioresorbable scaffolds and harvested cells. The tissues are maintained in a near-physiologic mechanical and biochemical environment. This paper is an overview of both chondrocyte mechanobiology and cartilage tissue engineering

  20. Redifferentiation of dedifferentiated chondrocytes by adenoviral vector-mediated TGF-β3 and collagen-1 silencing shRNA in 3D culture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Yao, Yongchang; Su, Kai; Pang, Patricia Xiaotian; Zhou, Ruijie; Wang, Yingjun; Wang, Dong-An

    2011-12-01

    Autologous chondrocytes remain one of the most preferable candidates among various therapeutic cell species because of their high efficacy, despite remarkable progress in discovery and development of therapeutic cells for cartilage regenerative medicine to date. However, the essential process of cell expansion via repeated monolayer sub-cultures inevitably induces chondrocytic dedifferentiation. In this study, we aimed to achieve and enhance redifferentiation of dedifferentiated chondrocytes with dual genes of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) that restore chondrocytic phenotype and silence fibrous collagen type I (Col I), respectively. It was hypothesized that gene delivery of the two targets would promote chondrogenesis in chondrocytes, and meanwhile inhibit the expression of the undesired Col I. Three types of recombinant adenoviruses were constructed. Two of them were of single-function vectors with the ability to express either TGF-β3 (Ad-TGFβ3) or shRNA (specific for Col I, Ad-shRNA); the third type was of double-function vectors that encode both TGF-β3 and anti-Col I shRNA (Ad-double). We infected the dedifferentiated chondrocytes with Ad-double, or co-transduced them with Ad-TGFβ3 and Ad-shRNA at the same time (designated as Ad-combination). Data from real-time RT-PCR and histological staining suggested a restoration in the expression of cartilage-specific genes including aggrecan, type II collagen, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP); while a significant down-regulation of Col I expression was observed in groups treated with Ad-double and Ad-combination compared to other control groups. These results demonstrated that, by genetic modification, dedifferentiated chondrocytes managed to redifferentiate back to chondrocytic phenotype, which may greatly facilitate cartilage regenerative medicine by providing sufficient number of competent therapeutic cells.

  1. ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of human articular chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Emi; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kanazawa, Tomoko; Tamura, Masanori; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor stimulates chondrogenic gene expression of articular chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor enhances the redifferentiation of cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor is useful for preparation of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor may be a useful reagent for chondrocyte-based regeneration therapy. -- Abstract: Chondrocytes lose their chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro. The Rho family GTPase ROCK, involved in organizing the actin cytoskeleton, modulates the differentiation status of chondrocytic cells. However, the optimum method to prepare a large number of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of ROCK inhibitor (ROCKi) on the chondrogenic property of monolayer-cultured articular chondrocytes. Human articular chondrocytes were subcultured in the presence or absence of ROCKi (Y-27632). The expression of chondrocytic marker genes such as SOX9 and COL2A1 was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Cellular morphology and viability were evaluated. Chondrogenic redifferentiation potential was examined by a pellet culture procedure. The expression level of SOX9 and COL2A1 was higher in ROCKi-treated chondrocytes than in untreated cells. Chondrocyte morphology varied from a spreading form to a round shape in a ROCKi-dependent manner. In addition, ROCKi treatment stimulated the proliferation of chondrocytes. The deposition of safranin O-stained proteoglycans and type II collagen was highly detected in chondrogenic pellets derived from ROCKi-pretreated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that ROCKi prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes, and may be a useful reagent to maintain chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro for chondrocyte

  2. β-Defensin-4 (HBD-4) is expressed in chondrocytes derived from normal and osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in PEGDA scaffold.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Carnazza, Maria Luisa; Loreto, Corrado; Leonardi, Rosalia; Loreto, Carla

    2012-12-01

    Defensins are antibiotic peptides involved in host defense mechanisms, wound healing and tissue repair. Furthermore, they seem to play an important role in protection mechanisms in articular joints. The aim of this study was to investigate β-defensin-4 expression in chondrocytes taken from articular cartilage of knees of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) compared to normal cartilage, in vivo in explanted tissue, and in vitro in chondrocytes encapsulated in construct PEGDA hydrogels. The present investigation was conducted to try and elucidate the possible use of β-defensin-4 as a relevant marker for the eventual use of successive scaffold allografts, and to provide new insights for hydrogel PEGDA scaffold efficacy in re-differentiation or repair of OA chondrocytes in vitro. Articular cartilage specimens from OA cartilage and normal cartilage were assessed by histology, histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The results showed strong β-defensin-4 immunoexpression in explanted tissue from OA cartilage and weak β-defensin-4 expression in control cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 4 weeks of culture in PEGDA hydrogels showed the formation of new hyaline cartilage and a decreased expression of β-defensin-4 immunostaining comparable to that of control cartilage. Our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repair of cartilage lesions in patients with OA using β-defensin-4 as a relevant marker. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Chondrocyte Viability After a Simulated Blast Exposure.

    PubMed

    Shaw, K Aaron; Johnson, Peter C; Williams, David; Zumbrun, Steven D; Topolski, Richard; Cameron, Craig D

    2017-07-01

    The effects of blast exposure have gained increasing interest in the military medical community with their continued occurrence on the battlefield. The impact of the direct and indirect energy imparted from blasts to hollow viscera, as well as closed head injuries, have been well studied. However, the injury to articular cartilage has not been investigated, despite previous correlations regarding the development of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to assess the degree of injury to articular chondrocytes after exposure to a simulated blast overpressure wave. Fresh juvenile porcine stifle joints were subjected to a simulated blast overpressure wave utilizing a custom fabricated blast simulator with compressed gases, within the reported range of observed battlefield blasts. Chondrocyte viability was assessed with live/dead staining using ethidium homodimer-2 and calcien acetoxymethylester stain and confocal laser scanning microscopy, calculated as a ratio of dead chondrocytes to live chondrocytes. Testing was performed at time points of 2, 4, and 8 hours after blast exposure and was compared with unblasted control samples. Chondrocyte viability decreased after exposure to a blast overpressure wave when compared with control samples. The amount of death was greater closer to the articular surface and dissipated with increasing tissue depth. Chondrocyte death increased with time after exposure. Chondrocyte death is present after exposure to a simulated blast wave. There is an inverse relationship between chondrocyte viability and the depth from the articular surface. Additional studies are needed to further characterize dose and time effects of blast exposure. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  4. Combined 3D and hypoxic culture improves cartilage-specific gene expression in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Foldager, Casper B; Nielsen, Anna B; Munir, Samir; Ulrich-Vinther, Michael; Søballe, Kjeld; Bünger, Cody; Lind, Martin

    2011-04-01

    In vitro expansion of autologous chondrocytes is an essential part of many clinically used cartilage repair treatments. Native chondrocytes reside in a 3-dimensional (3D) network and are exposed to low levels of oxygen. We compared monolayer culture to combined 3D and hypoxic culture using quantitative gene expression analysis. Cartilage biopsies were collected from the intercondylar groove in the distal femur from 12 patients with healthy cartilage. Cells were used for either monolayer or scaffold culture. The scaffolds were clinically available MPEG-PLGA scaffolds (ASEED). After harvesting of cells for baseline investigation, the remainder was divided into 3 groups for incubation in conditions of normoxia (21% oxygen), hypoxia (5% oxygen), or severe hypoxia (1% oxygen). RNA extractions were performed 1, 2, and 6 days after the baseline time point, respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed using assays for RNA encoding collagen types 1 and 2, aggrecan, sox9, ankyrin repeat domain-37, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase relative to 2 hypoxia-stable housekeeping genes. Sox9, aggrecan, and collagen type 2 RNA expression increased with reduced oxygen. On day 6, the expression of collagen type 2 and aggrecan RNA was higher in 3D culture than in monolayer culture. Our findings suggest that there was a combined positive effect of 3D culture and hypoxia on cartilage-specific gene expression. The positive effects of 3D culture alone were not detected until day 6, suggesting that seeding of chondrocytes onto a scaffold for matrix-assisted chondrocyte implantation should be performed earlier than 2 days before implantation.

  5. Effects of mechanical stress on chondrocyte phenotype and chondrocyte extracellular matrix expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiang; Hu, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xin; Duan, Xiaoning; Yang, Peng; Zhao, Fengyuan; Ao, Yingfang

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical factors play a key role in regulating the development of cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis. This study aimed to identify the influence of mechanical stress in cartilage and chondrocytes. To explore the effects of mechanical stress on cartilage morphology, we observed cartilages in different regions by histological and microscopic examination. Nanoindentation was performed to assess cartilage biomechanics. To investigate the effects of mechanical stress on chondrocytes, cyclic tensile strain (CTS, 0.5 Hz, 10%) was applied to monolayer cultures of human articular chondrocytes by using Flexcell-5000. We quantified the mechanical properties of chondrocytes by atomic force microscopy. Chondrocytes were stained with Toluidine blue and Alcian blue after exposure to CTS. The expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules was detected by qPCR and immunofluorescence analyses in chondrocytes after CTS. Our results demonstrated distinct morphologies and mechanical properties in different cartilage regions. In conclusion, mechanical stress can affect the chondrocyte phenotype, thereby altering the expression of chondrocyte ECM. PMID:27853300

  6. Effect of collagen type I or type II on chondrogenesis by cultured human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rutgers, Marijn; Saris, Daniel B; Vonk, Lucienne A; van Rijen, Mattie H; Akrum, Vanessa; Langeveld, Danielle; van Boxtel, Antonette; Dhert, Wouter J; Creemers, Laura B

    2013-01-01

    Current cartilage repair procedures using autologous chondrocytes rely on a variety of carriers for implantation. Collagen types I and II are frequently used and valuable properties of both were shown earlier in vitro, although a preference for either was not demonstrated. Recently, however, fibrillar collagens were shown to promote cartilage degradation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of collagen type I and type II coating on chondrogenic properties of in vitro cultured human chondrocytes, and to investigate if collagen-mediated cartilage degradation occurs. Human chondrocytes of eight healthy cartilage donors were isolated, expanded, and cultured on culture well inserts coated with either collagen type I, type II, or no coating (control). After 28 days of redifferentiation culture, safranin O and immunohistochemical staining for collagen types I, II, X, and Runx2/Cbfa1 were performed and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and DNA content and release were examined. Further, expression of collagen type I, type II, type X, MMP13, Runx2/Cbfa1, DDR2, α2 and β1 integrin were examined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The matrix, created by chondrocytes grown on collagen type I- and II-coated membranes, resembled cartilage more than when grown on noncoated membranes as reflected by histological scoring. Immunohistochemical staining did not differ between the conditions. GAG content as well as GAG/DNA were higher for collagen type II-coated cartilage constructs than control. GAG release was also higher on collagen type I- and II-coated constructs. Expression of collagen type X was higher of chondrocytes grown on collagen type II compared to controls, but no collagen X protein could be demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. No effects of collagen coating on DDR2 nor MMP-13 gene expression were found. No differences were observed between collagen types I and II. Chondrocyte culture on collagen type I or II promotes more active matrix production

  7. From gristle to chondrocyte transplantation: treatment of cartilage injuries

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses the progress in cartilage repair technology over the decades with an emphasis on cartilage regeneration with cell therapy. The most abundant cartilage is the hyaline cartilage that covers the surface of our joints and, due to avascularity, this tissue is unable to repair itself. The cartilage degeneration seen in osteoarthritis causes patient suffering and is a huge burden to society. The surgical approach to cartilage repair was non-existing until the 1950s when new surgical techniques emerged. The use of cultured cells for cell therapy started as experimental studies in the 1970s that developed over the years to a clinical application in 1994 with the introduction of the autologous chondrocyte transplantation technique (ACT). The technology is now spread worldwide and has been further refined by combining arthroscopic techniques with cells cultured on matrix (MACI technology). The non-regenerating hypothesis of cartilage has been revisited and we are now able to demonstrate cell divisions and presence of stem-cell niches in the joint. Furthermore, cartilage derived from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells could be the base for new broader cell treatments for cartilage injuries and the future technology base for prevention and cure of osteoarthritis. PMID:26416680

  8. From gristle to chondrocyte transplantation: treatment of cartilage injuries.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Anders

    2015-10-19

    This review addresses the progress in cartilage repair technology over the decades with an emphasis on cartilage regeneration with cell therapy. The most abundant cartilage is the hyaline cartilage that covers the surface of our joints and, due to avascularity, this tissue is unable to repair itself. The cartilage degeneration seen in osteoarthritis causes patient suffering and is a huge burden to society. The surgical approach to cartilage repair was non-existing until the 1950s when new surgical techniques emerged. The use of cultured cells for cell therapy started as experimental studies in the 1970s that developed over the years to a clinical application in 1994 with the introduction of the autologous chondrocyte transplantation technique (ACT). The technology is now spread worldwide and has been further refined by combining arthroscopic techniques with cells cultured on matrix (MACI technology). The non-regenerating hypothesis of cartilage has been revisited and we are now able to demonstrate cell divisions and presence of stem-cell niches in the joint. Furthermore, cartilage derived from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells could be the base for new broader cell treatments for cartilage injuries and the future technology base for prevention and cure of osteoarthritis.

  9. Chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis express typical extracellular matrix molecules once grown onto a three-dimensional hyaluronan-based scaffold.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Carola; Desando, Giovanna; Facchini, Andrea; Grigolo, Brunella

    2010-04-01

    The opportunity to apply autologous chondrocyte transplantation in repairing cartilage lesions in osteoarthritis (OA) is of great interest. To this end, chondrocytes from cartilage of these patients and from healthy donors were used to evaluate the expression of some extracellular matrix molecules once these cells were grown onto a hyaluronan-based scaffold already used in clinical practice. Constructs were analyzed by immunohistochemical and real-time PCR analyses. Chondrocytes from control and patients with OA cartilages expressed the same extracellular matrix molecules even if at different amount. These differences, which were appreciable both at protein and molecular levels, were not evident once the cells were grown onto Hyaff-11 scaffold. In this experimental culture condition, the cells derived from control and patients with OA showed a significant increase of collagen type II, Sox-9, and aggrecan and a decrease of collagen type I compared with chondrocytes grown in monolayer. On the other hand, MMPs were downregulated in both the cell types evaluated by the specific action of TIMP-1 which was highly expressed at molecular and protein levels in the two groups. The growth of chondrocytes onto Hyaff-11 membrane seems to erase the differences between the cells derived from normal and OA cartilages. The cells seem to benefit of the "hyaluronan" presence which is able to create an ideal environment for the expression of cartilage genes even in absence of specific growth factors. This is of particular relevance hypothesizing the use of tissue engineering therapeutical approach also in patients with OA.

  10. Cultured chondrocyte and porcine cartilage-derived substance (PCS) construct as a possible dorsal augmentation material in rhinoplasty: A preliminary animal study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoo Suk; Park, Do-Yang; Cho, Yong Hyun; Chang, Jae Won; Choi, Jae Won; Park, Joo Kyung; Min, Byung Hyun; Shin, Yoo Seob; Kim, Chul Ho

    2015-05-01

    As there is no single ideal material for dorsal augmentation in rhinoplasty, there has been a continuing need for the development of improved materials. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the outcome of using a novel tissue-engineered construct composed of autologous chondrocytes cultured with a porcine cartilage-derived substance (PCS) scaffold as an augmentation material in rhinoplasty. A scaffold derived from decellularized and powdered porcine articular cartilage was prepared. The rabbit articular cartilage was used as the source of homologous chondrocytes, which were expanded and cultured with the PCS scaffold for 7 weeks. The chondrocyte-PCS constructs were then surgically implanted on the nasal dorsum of six rabbits. Four and eight weeks after implantation, the gross morphology, radiologic images, and histologic features of the site of implant were analyzed. The rabbits showed no signs of postoperative inflammation and infection. The degree of dorsal augmentation was maintained during the 8-week postoperative observation period. Postoperative histologic examinations showed chondrocyte proliferation without an inflammatory response. However, neo-cartilage formation from the constructs was not confirmed. The biocompatibility and structural features of tissue-engineered chondrocyte-PCS constructs indicate their potential as candidate dorsal augmentation material for use in rhinoplasty.

  11. Transforming Growth Factor Beta Signaling Is Essential for the Autonomous Formation of Cartilage-Like Tissue by Expanded Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tekari, Adel; Luginbuehl, Reto; Hofstetter, Willy; Egli, Rainer J.

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage is a tissue with limited self-healing potential. Hence, cartilage defects require surgical attention to prevent or postpone the development of osteoarthritis. For cell-based cartilage repair strategies, in particular autologous chondrocyte implantation, articular chondrocytes are isolated from cartilage and expanded in vitro to increase the number of cells required for therapy. During expansion, the cells lose the competence to autonomously form a cartilage-like tissue, that is in the absence of exogenously added chondrogenic growth factors, such as TGF-βs. We hypothesized that signaling elicited by autocrine and/or paracrine TGF-β is essential for the formation of cartilage-like tissue and that alterations within the TGF-β signaling pathway during expansion interfere with this process. Primary bovine articular chondrocytes were harvested and expanded in monolayer culture up to passage six and the formation of cartilage tissue was investigated in high density pellet cultures grown for three weeks. Chondrocytes expanded for up to three passages maintained the potential for autonomous cartilage-like tissue formation. After three passages, however, exogenous TGF-β1 was required to induce the formation of cartilage-like tissue. When TGF-β signaling was blocked by inhibiting the TGF-β receptor 1 kinase, the autonomous formation of cartilage-like tissue was abrogated. At the initiation of pellet culture, chondrocytes from passage three and later showed levels of transcripts coding for TGF-β receptors 1 and 2 and TGF-β2 to be three-, five- and five-fold decreased, respectively, as compared to primary chondrocytes. In conclusion, the autonomous formation of cartilage-like tissue by expanded chondrocytes is dependent on signaling induced by autocrine and/or paracrine TGF-β. We propose that a decrease in the expression of the chondrogenic growth factor TGF-β2 and of the TGF-β receptors in expanded chondrocytes accounts for a decrease in the activity of

  12. Transforming growth factor beta signaling is essential for the autonomous formation of cartilage-like tissue by expanded chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tekari, Adel; Luginbuehl, Reto; Hofstetter, Willy; Egli, Rainer J

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage is a tissue with limited self-healing potential. Hence, cartilage defects require surgical attention to prevent or postpone the development of osteoarthritis. For cell-based cartilage repair strategies, in particular autologous chondrocyte implantation, articular chondrocytes are isolated from cartilage and expanded in vitro to increase the number of cells required for therapy. During expansion, the cells lose the competence to autonomously form a cartilage-like tissue, that is in the absence of exogenously added chondrogenic growth factors, such as TGF-βs. We hypothesized that signaling elicited by autocrine and/or paracrine TGF-β is essential for the formation of cartilage-like tissue and that alterations within the TGF-β signaling pathway during expansion interfere with this process. Primary bovine articular chondrocytes were harvested and expanded in monolayer culture up to passage six and the formation of cartilage tissue was investigated in high density pellet cultures grown for three weeks. Chondrocytes expanded for up to three passages maintained the potential for autonomous cartilage-like tissue formation. After three passages, however, exogenous TGF-β1 was required to induce the formation of cartilage-like tissue. When TGF-β signaling was blocked by inhibiting the TGF-β receptor 1 kinase, the autonomous formation of cartilage-like tissue was abrogated. At the initiation of pellet culture, chondrocytes from passage three and later showed levels of transcripts coding for TGF-β receptors 1 and 2 and TGF-β2 to be three-, five- and five-fold decreased, respectively, as compared to primary chondrocytes. In conclusion, the autonomous formation of cartilage-like tissue by expanded chondrocytes is dependent on signaling induced by autocrine and/or paracrine TGF-β. We propose that a decrease in the expression of the chondrogenic growth factor TGF-β2 and of the TGF-β receptors in expanded chondrocytes accounts for a decrease in the activity of

  13. EFRC: Polymer-Based Materials for Harvesting Solar Energy (stimulus)"

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Thomas P.

    2016-12-08

    The University of Massachusetts Amherst is proposing an Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC) on Polymer-Based Materials for Harvesting Solar Energy that will integrate the widely complementary experimental and theoretical expertise of 23 faculty at UMass-Amherst Departments with researchers from the University of Massachusetts Lowell, University of Pittsburgh, the Pennsylvania State University and Konarka Technologies, Inc. Collaborative efforts with researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of Bayreuth, Seoul National University and Tohoku University will complement and expand the experimental efforts in the EFRC. Our primary research aim of this EFRC is the development of hybrid polymer-based devices with efficiencies more than twice the current organic-based devices, by combining expertise in the design and synthesis of photoactive polymers, the control and guidance of polymer-based assemblies, leadership in nanostructured polymeric materials, and the theory and modeling of non-equilibrium structures. A primary goal of this EFRC is to improve the collection and conversion efficiency of a broader spectral range of solar energy using the directed self-assembly of polymer-based materials so as to optimize the design and fabrication of inexpensive devices.

  14. High Density Polymer-Based Integrated Electgrode Array

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Davidson, James Courtney; Hamilton, Julie K.

    2006-04-25

    A high density polymer-based integrated electrode apparatus that comprises a central electrode body and a multiplicity of arms extending from the electrode body. The central electrode body and the multiplicity of arms are comprised of a silicone material with metal features in said silicone material that comprise electronic circuits.

  15. The use of de-differentiated chondrocytes delivered by a heparin-based hydrogel to regenerate cartilage in partial-thickness defects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mihye; Kim, Se Eun; Kang, Seong Soo; Kim, Young Ha; Tae, Giyoong

    2011-11-01

    Partial-thickness cartilage defects, with no subchondral bone injury, do not repair spontaneously, thus there is no clinically effective treatment for these lesions. Although the autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is one of the promising approaches for cartilage repair, it requires in vitro cell expansion to get sufficient cells, but chondrocytes lose their chondrogenic phenotype during expansion by monolayer culture, leading to de-differentiation. In this study, a heparin-based hydrogel was evaluated and optimized to induce cartilage regeneration with de-differentiated chondrocytes. First, re-differentiation of de-differentiated chondrocytes encapsulated in heparin-based hydrogels was characterized in vitro with various polymer concentrations (from 3 to 20 wt.%). Even under a normal cell culture condition (no growth factors or chondrogenic components), efficient re-differentiation of cells was observed with the optimum at 10 wt.% hydrogel, showing the complete re-differentiation within a week. Efficient re-differentiation and cartilage formation of de-differentiated cell/hydrogel construct were also confirmed in vivo by subcutaneous implantation on the back of nude mice. Finally, excellent cartilage regeneration and good integration with surrounding, similar to natural cartilage, was also observed by delivering de-differentiated chondrocytes using the heparin-based hydrogel in partial-thickness defects of rabbit knees whereas no healing was observed for the control defects. These results demonstrate that the heparin-based hydrogel is very efficient for re-differentiation of expanded chondrocytes and cartilage regeneration without using any exogenous inducing factors, thus it could serve as an injectable cell-carrier and scaffold for cartilage repair. Excellent chondrogenic nature of the heparin-based hydrogel might be associated with the hydrogel characteristic that can secure endogenous growth factors secreted from chondrocytes, which then can promote

  16. Sodium nitroprusside induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by a slowly progressing degradation of the matrix and destruction of articular cartilage. Apoptosis of chondrocyte is accounted for the mechanism of OA. Nitric oxide (NO), as a stimulus, has been shown to induce chondrocyte apoptosis by activating the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), increasing the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and the level of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), inhibiting the proteoglycan synthesis and type II collagen expression. In this study, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was administered to be the NO donor to explore the mechanism of NO-induced apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes obtained from six weeks old New Zealand rabbits. CCK-8 assay revealed the inhibitory effect of SNP on cell viability. We used flow cytometry (FCM) to assess the form of cell death by Annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining, and evaluate the change of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). We found that the SNP induced chondrocyte apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner and an observable reduction of ΔΨm. In conclusion, our findings indicate that SNP induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes via a mitochondria-mediated pathway.

  17. Cell Death in Chondrocytes, Osteoblasts, and Osteocytes

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Cell death in skeletal component cells, including chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and osteocytes, plays roles in skeletal development, maintenance, and repair as well as in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. Chondrocyte proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis are important steps for endochondral ossification. Although the inactivation of P53 and RB is involved in the pathogenesis of osteosarcomas, the deletion of p53 and inactivation of Rb are insufficient to enhance chondrocyte proliferation, indicating the presence of multiple inhibitory mechanisms against sarcomagenesis in chondrocytes. The inflammatory processes induced by mechanical injury and chondrocyte death through the release of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are involved in the pathogenesis of posttraumatic osteoarthritis. The overexpression of BCLXL increases bone volume with a normal structure and maintains bone during aging by inhibiting osteoblast apoptosis. p53 inhibits osteoblast proliferation and enhances osteoblast apoptosis, thereby reducing bone formation, but also exerts positive effects on osteoblast differentiation through the Akt–FoxOs pathway. Apoptotic osteocytes release ATP, which induces the receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (Rankl) expression and osteoclastogenesis, from pannexin 1 channels. Osteocyte death ultimately results in necrosis; DAMPs are released to the bone surface and promote the production of proinflammatory cytokines, which induce Rankl expression, and osteoclastogenesis is further enhanced. PMID:27929439

  18. Reduced chondrocyte proliferation and chondrodysplasia in mice lacking the integrin-linked kinase in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, Leonieke; Prud'homme, Josée; Arabian, Alice; Takeda, Shu; Karsenty, Gérard; Dedhar, Shoukat; St-Arnaud, René

    2003-01-01

    Chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation requires their attachment to the collagen type II–rich matrix of developing bone. This interaction is mediated by integrins and their cytoplasmic effectors, such as the integrin-linked kinase (ILK). To elucidate the molecular mechanisms whereby integrins control these processes, we have specifically inactivated the ILK gene in growth plate chondrocytes using the Cre-lox methodology. Mice carrying an ILK allele flanked by loxP sites (ILK-fl) were crossed to transgenic mice expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of the collagen type II promoter. Inactivation of both copies of the ILK-fl allele lead to a chondrodysplasia characterized by a disorganized growth plate and to dwarfism. Expression of chondrocyte differentiation markers such as collagen type II, collagen type X, Indian hedgehog and the PTH-PTHrP receptor was normal in ILK-deficient growth plates. In contrast, chondrocyte proliferation, assessed by BrdU or proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling, was markedly reduced in the mutant growth plates. Cell-based assays showed that integrin-mediated adhesion of primary cultures of chondrocytes from mutant animals to collagen type II was impaired. ILK inactivation in chondrocytes resulted in reduced cyclin D1 expression, and this most likely explains the defect in chondrocyte proliferation observed when ILK is inactivated in growth plate cells. PMID:12835312

  19. What is autologous blood transfusion?

    PubMed

    Sansom, A

    1993-07-01

    The word autologous is Greek in origin. The definition is exact 'autos' means self and 'logus' means relation. Thus, the meaning is 'related to self'. Autologous blood transfusion, which also is referred to frequently but incorrectly and imprecisely as auto transfusion, designates the reinfusion of blood or blood components to the same individual from whom they were taken. Homologous blood is blood or blood components, from another human donor, taken and stored for later transfusion as required.

  20. Liquid perfluorochemical-supported hybrid cell culture system for proliferation of chondrocytes on fibrous polylactide scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Pilarek, Maciej; Grabowska, Iwona; Senderek, Ilona; Wojasiński, Michał; Janicka, Justyna; Janczyk-Ilach, Katarzyna; Ciach, Tomasz

    2014-09-01

    CP5 bovine chondrocytes were cultured on biodegradable electrospun fibrous polylactide (PLA) scaffolds placed on a flexible interface formed between two immiscible liquid phases: (1) hydrophobic perfluorochemical (PFC) and (2) aqueous culture medium, as a new way of cartilage implant development. Robust and intensive growth of CP5 cells was achieved in our hybrid liquid-solid-liquid culture system consisting of the fibrous PLA scaffolds in contrast to limited growth of the CP5 cells in traditional culture system with PLA scaffold placed on solid surface. The multicellular aggregates of CP5 cells covered the surface of PLA scaffolds and the chondrocytes migrated through and overgrew internal fibers of the scaffolds. Our hybrid culture system simultaneously allows the adhesion of adherent CP5 cells to fibers of PLA scaffolds as well as, due to use of phase of PFC, enhances the mass transfer in the case of supplying/removing of respiratory gases, i.e., O2 and CO2. Our flexible (independent of vessel shape) system is simple, ready-to-use and may utilize a variety of polymer-based scaffolds traditionally proposed for implant development.

  1. Oxygen tension affects lubricin expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Taku; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Okuno, Hiroshi; Itoi, Eiji

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the effects of oxygen tension on lubricin expression in bovine chondrocytes and cartilage explants and a role for hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α in regulating lubricin expression was investigated using a murine chondroprogenitor cell line, ATDC5, and bovine chondrocytes isolated from superficial and middle/deep zones of femoral cartilage. ATDC5 cells and bovine chondrocytes were cultured in micromass under different oxygen tensions (21%, 5%, and 1%). ATDC5 cells and middle/deep zone chondrocytes that initially had low lubricin expression levels were also cultured with or without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used to determine lubricin and chondrogenic marker gene mRNA levels and immunohistochemistry was used to assess lubricin protein expression. Explant cartilage plugs cultured under different oxygen tensions were also subjected to immunohistological analysis for lubricin. HIF-1α gene silencing was achieved by electroporatic transfer into ATDC5 cells. A low oxygen tension reduced lubricin gene expression levels in bovine superficial chondrocytes, TGF-β1-treated middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and TGF-β1-treated ATDC5 cells. Lubricin expression in explant cartilage was also suppressed under hypoxia. HIF-1α gene silencing in ATDC5 cells attenuated the lubricin expression response to the oxygen tension. These results corroborate with previous studies that the oxygen tension regulates lubricin gene expression and suggest that HIF-1α plays an important role in this regulation. The normal distribution of lubricin in articular cartilage may be due to the hypoxic oxygen environment of cartilage as it is an avascular tissue. An oxygen tension gradient may be a key factor for engineering cartilage tissue with a layered morphology.

  2. Tissue engineering on matrix: future of autologous tissue replacement.

    PubMed

    Weber, Benedikt; Emmert, Maximilian Y; Schoenauer, Roman; Brokopp, Chad; Baumgartner, Laura; Hoerstrup, Simon P

    2011-05-01

    Tissue engineering aims at the creation of living neo-tissues identical or close to their native human counterparts. As basis of this approach, temporary biodegradable supporter matrices are fabricated in the shape of a desired construct, which promote tissue strength and provide functionality until sufficient neo-tissue is formed. Besides fully synthetic polymer-based scaffolds, decellularized biological tissue of xenogenic or homogenic origin can be used. In a second step, these scaffolds are seeded with autologous cells attaching to the scaffold microstructure. In order to promote neo-tissue formation and maturation, the seeded scaffolds are exposed to different forms of stimulation. In cardiovascular tissue engineering, this "conditioning" can be achieved via culture media and biomimetic in vitro exposure, e.g., using flow bioreactors. This aims at adequate cellular differentiation, proliferation, and extracellular matrix production to form a living tissue called the construct. These living autologous constructs, such as heart valves or vascular grafts, are created in vitro, comprising a viable interstitium with repair and remodeling capabilities already prior to implantation. In situ further in vivo remodeling is intended to recapitulate physiological vascular architecture and function. The remodeling mechanisms were shown to be dominated by monocytic infiltration and chemotactic host-cell attraction leading into a multifaceted inflammatory process and neo-tissue formation. Key molecules of these processes can be integrated into the scaffold matrix to direct cell and tissue fate in vivo.

  3. Bovine achondrogenesis: evidence for defective chondrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Horton, W A; Jayo, M J; Leipold, H W; Machado, M A; Campbell, D; Ahmed, S

    1987-01-01

    A survey study of growth cartilage abnormalities in bovine bone dysplasias revealed that a disorder in Holstein cattle called bulldog calf closely resembles human achondrogenesis Type II. Substantial amounts of Type I collagen and other non Type II collagens were detected in the bulldog cartilage which was comprised primarily of extensive vascular canals and cells having the characteristics of hypertrophic and degenerative chondrocytes normally found in the growth plate. It is proposed that chondrocytes throughout the bulldog growth cartilage prematurely differentiate into hypertrophic cells that degenerate and predispose the cartilage to vascular invasion and the formation of cartilage canals. The presence of these canals probably accounts for most of the observed collagen abnormalities.

  4. Radiation-resistant polymer-based photonics for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Edward W.; Nichter, James E.; Nash, Fazio; Haas, Franz; Szep, Attila A.; Michalak, Richard J.; Flusche, B.; Repak, Paul L.; Brost, George A.; Pirich, Andrew R.; Craig, Douglas M.; Le, Dang T.; Cardimona, David A.; Fetterman, Harold R.; Tsap, Boris; Castaneda, Carlos M.; Barto, Richard R.; Zeng, Tingying; Wood, David; Claus, Richard O.

    2004-10-01

    Empirical data regarding the radiation induced responses of Mach Zehnder interferometric electro-optic polymer based modulators (PBMs) operating at 1310 and 1550 nm and broadband InP quantum dot (QD) polymer photodetectors (PPDs) operating into the near infrared (NIR) are reported. Modulators composed of spun-on materials and hybrid electostatically self assembled (ESA) and spun-on NLO materials are examined for changes to their half-wave voltage and insertion losses following a gamma-ray total dose of 163 krad(Si) and irradiation by 25.6 MeV protons at a fluence of ~1011 cm-2. Pre- and post- irradiation responses of ESA grown polymer detectors using InP QDs are examined for photovoltage degradation and aging effects. The data indicates and excellent potential for developing polymer based photonic (PBP) devices with increased radiation resistance suitable for transition to photonic space applications.

  5. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626)...

  6. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626)...

  7. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626) is...

  8. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626) is...

  9. 40 CFR 721.463 - Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acrylate of polymer based on... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.463 Acrylate of polymer based on isophorone... substance identified generically as acrylate of polymer based on isophorone diisocyanate (PMN P-00-0626) is...

  10. Autoimmune regulator, Aire, is a novel regulator of chondrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Si, Yuan; Inoue, Kazuki; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Kanno, Jun; Imai, Yuuki

    2013-08-09

    Chondrocyte differentiation is controlled by various regulators, such as Sox9 and Runx2, but the process is complex. To further understand the precise underlying molecular mechanisms of chondrocyte differentiation, we aimed to identify a novel regulatory factor of chondrocyte differentiation using gene expression profiles of micromass-cultured chondrocytes at different differentiation stages. From the results of microarray analysis, the autoimmune regulator, Aire, was identified as a novel regulator. Aire stable knockdown cells, and primary cultured chondrocytes obtained from Aire(-/-) mice, showed reduced mRNA expression levels of chondrocyte-related genes. Over-expression of Aire induced the early stages of chondrocyte differentiation by facilitating expression of Bmp2. A ChIP assay revealed that Aire was recruited on an Airebinding site (T box) in the Bmp2 promoter region in the early stages of chondrocyte differentiation and histone methylation was modified. These results suggest that Aire can facilitate early chondrocyte differentiation by expression of Bmp2 through altering the histone modification status of the promoter region of Bmp2. Taken together, Aire might play a role as an active regulator of chondrocyte differentiation, which leads to new insights into the regulatory mechanisms of chondrocyte differentiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prolactin inhibits the apoptosis of chondrocytes induced by serum starvation.

    PubMed

    Zermeño, C; Guzmán-Morales, J; Macotela, Y; Nava, G; López-Barrera, F; Kouri, J B; Lavalle, C; de la Escalera, G Martínez; Clapp, C

    2006-05-01

    The apoptosis of chondrocytes plays an important role in endochondral bone formation and in cartilage degradation during aging and disease. Prolactin (PRL) is produced in chondrocytes and is known to promote the survival of various cell types. Here we show that articular chondrocytes from rat postpubescent and adult cartilage express the long form of the PRL receptor as revealed by immunohistochemistry of cartilage sections and by RT-PCR and Western blot analyses of the isolated chondrocytes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PRL inhibits the apoptosis of these same chondrocytes cultured in low-serum. Chondrocyte apoptosis was measured by hypodiploid DNA content determined by flow cytometry and by DNA fragmentation evaluated by the ELISA and the TUNEL methods. The anti-apoptotic effect of PRL was dose-dependent and was prevented by heat inactivation. These data demonstrate that PRL can act as a survival factor for chondrocytes and that it has potential preventive and therapeutic value in arthropathies characterized by cartilage degradation.

  12. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Cocultured with Chondrocytes Promote the Proliferation of Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Articular cartilage injury and defect caused by trauma and chronic osteoarthritis vascularity are very common, while the repair of injured cartilage remains a great challenge due to its limited healing capacity. Stem cell-based tissue engineering provides a promising treatment option for injured articular cartilage because of the cells potential for multiple differentiations. However, its application has been largely limited by stem cell type, number, source, proliferation, and differentiation. We hypothesized that (1) adipose-derived stem cells are ideal seed cells for articular cartilage repair because of their accessibility and abundance and (2) the microenvironment of articular cartilage could induce adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) to differentiate into chondrocytes. In order to test our hypotheses, we isolated stem cells from rabbit adipose tissues and cocultured these ADSCs with rabbit articular cartilage chondrocytes. We found that when ADSCs were cocultured with chondrocytes, the proliferation of articular cartilage chondrocytes was promoted, the apoptosis of chondrocytes was inhibited, and the osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of ADSCs was enhanced. The study on the mechanism of this coculture system indicated that the role of this coculture system is similar to the function of TGF-β1 in the promotion of chondrocytes. PMID:28133485

  13. Giant crystals inside mitochondria of equine chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nürnberger, S; Rentenberger, C; Thiel, K; Schädl, B; Grunwald, I; Ponomarev, I; Marlovits, St; Meyer, Ch; Barnewitz, D

    2017-05-01

    The present study reports for the first time the presence of giant crystals in mitochondria of equine chondrocytes. These structures show dark contrast in TEM images as well as a granular substructure of regularly aligned 1-2 nm small units. Different zone axes of the crystalline structure were analysed by means of Fourier transformation of lattice-resolution TEM images proving the crystalline nature of the structure. Elemental analysis reveals a high content of nitrogen referring to protein. The outer shape of the crystals is geometrical with an up to hexagonal profile in cross sections. It is elongated, spanning a length of several micrometres through the whole cell. In some chondrocytes, several crystals were found, sometimes combined in a single mitochondrion. Crystals were preferentially aligned along the long axis of the cells, thus appearing in the same orientation as the chondrocytes in the tissue. Although no similar structures have been found in the cartilage of any other species investigated, they have been found in cartilage repair tissue formed within a mechanically stimulated equine chondrocyte construct. Crystals were mainly located in superficial regions of cartilage, especially in joint regions of well-developed superficial layers, more often in yearlings than in adult horses. These results indicate that intramitochondrial crystals are related to the high mechanical stress in the horse joint and potentially also to the increased metabolic activity of immature individuals.

  14. [Toxicity of antiseptics on chondrocytes in vitro].

    PubMed

    Schaumburger, J; Beckmann, J; Springorum, H-R; Handel, M; Anders, S; Kalteis, T; Grifka, J; Rath, B

    2010-01-01

    Local antiseptics are commonly used for perioperative skin and wound disinfection and as solutions for joint lavage. Therefore, we examined if an intra-articular use of these antiseptics is possible by using an IN VITRO chondrocyte model. Articular chondrocytes harvested from 7 patients were cultured. After reaching 80% confluency different concentrations (0%, 1%, 10%, 50%, 100%) of polyhexanide, hydrogen peroxide and povidone-iodine were added for 5 minutes. Afterwards, the solution was removed and the chondrocytes were cultured for 24 hours. Subsequently the vitality and proliferation rate (DNA synthesis) were analysed with the WST-1 and BrdU tests. 1% povidone-iodine and 1% hydrogen peroxide solutions significantly (p=0.001) decreased the chondrocyte vitality as compared to our control group. There was no significant difference (p=0.71) after the application of 1% polyhexanide in the vitality ratios. A significant decrease in vitality was also observed after the application of 10% polyhexanide solution (p=0.001). Application of 1% povidone-iodine solution, 1% hydrogen peroxide solution and 10% polyhexanide revealed a decrease in the metabolic cell activity of 80% compared to our control group, whereas the activity was 65% (p=0.026) compared to the control group after application of 1% polyhexanide solution. Our results demonstrate the chondrotoxic effect of the tested antiseptic solutions in clinical used concentrations within short time points. Polyhexanide in a low concentrated solution (1%) was the antiseptic with the lowest influence on the vitality and the DNA synthesis of chondrocytes. Thus, this antiseptic solution seemed to be the best choice for intra-articular application. But overall, our study showed general limitations for the intra-articular use of local antiseptics. Copyright (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  15. Regenerative Potential of Tissue-Engineered Nasal Chondrocytes in Goat Articular Cartilage Defects.

    PubMed

    Mumme, Marcus; Steinitz, Amir; Nuss, Katja M; Klein, Karina; Feliciano, Sandra; Kronen, Peter; Jakob, Marcel; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Martin, Ivan; Barbero, Andrea; Pelttari, Karoliina

    2016-11-01

    Nasal chondrocytes (NC) were previously demonstrated to remain viable and to participate in the repair of articular cartilage defects in goats. Here, we investigated critical features of tissue-engineered grafts generated by NC in this large animal model, namely cell retention at the implantation site, architecture and integration with adjacent tissues, and effects on subchondral bone changes. In this study, isolated autologous goat NC (gNC) and goat articular chondrocytes (gAC, as control) were expanded, green fluorescent protein-labelled and seeded on a type I/III collagen membrane. After chondrogenic differentiation, tissue-engineered grafts were implanted into chondral defects (6 mm in diameter) in the stifle joint for 3 or 6 months. At the time of explantation, surrounding tissues showed no or very low (only in the infrapatellar fat pad <0.32%) migration of the grafted cells. In repair tissue, gNC formed typical structures of articular cartilage, such as flattened cells at the surface and column-like clusters in the middle layers. Semi-quantitative histological evaluation revealed efficient integration of the grafted tissues with the adjacent native cartilage and underlying subchondral bone. A significantly increased subchondral bone area, as a sign for the onset of osteoarthritis, was observed following treatment of cartilage defects with gAC-, but not with gNC-grafts. Our results reinforce the use of NC-based engineered tissue for articular cartilage repair and preliminarily indicate their potential for the treatment of early osteoarthritic defects.

  16. A chondrocyte infiltrated collagen type I/III membrane (MACI® implant) improves cartilage healing in the equine patellofemoral joint model.

    PubMed

    Nixon, A J; Rickey, E; Butler, T J; Scimeca, M S; Moran, N; Matthews, G L

    2015-04-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) has improved outcome in long-term studies of joint repair in man. However, ACI requires sutured periosteal flaps to secure the cells, which precludes minimally-invasive implantation, and introduces complications with arthrofibrosis and graft hypertrophy. This study evaluated ACI on a collagen type I/III scaffold (matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation; MACI(®)) in critical sized defects in the equine model. Chondrocytes were isolated from horses, expanded and seeded onto a collagen I/III membrane (ACI-Maix™) and implanted into one of two 15-mm defects in the femoral trochlear ridge of six horses. Control defects remained empty as ungrafted debrided defects. The animals were examined daily, scored by second look arthroscopy at 12 weeks, and necropsy examination 6 months after implantation. Reaction to the implant was determined by lameness, and synovial fluid constituents and synovial membrane histology. Cartilage healing was assessed by arthroscopic scores, gross assessment, repair tissue histology and immunohistochemistry, cartilage glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and DNA assay, and mechanical testing. MACI(®) implanted defects had improved arthroscopic second-look, gross healing, and composite histologic scores, compared to spontaneously healing empty defects. Cartilage GAG and DNA content in the defects repaired by MACI implant were significantly improved compared to controls. Mechanical properties were improved but remained inferior to normal cartilage. There was minimal evidence of reaction to the implant in the synovial fluid, synovial membrane, subchondral bone, or cartilage. The MACI(®) implant appeared to improve cartilage healing in a critical sized defect in the equine model evaluated over 6 months. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. New polymer-based phantom for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Iwazaki, Hideaki; Ida, Taiichiro; Nishi, Taiji; Tanikawa, Yukari; Nitta, Naotaka

    2014-03-01

    We will report newly developed polymer-based phantom for photoacoustic (PA) imaging systems. Phantoms are important for performance evaluation and calibration of new modalities; however, there is no established method for making phantoms with no long-term change. We have developed skin mimicking phantoms simulating both optical and acoustic properties (i.e. optical scattering and absorption coefficients, and sound velocity). Furthermore, the phantoms are able to give accurate simulation of blood vessels by Inkjet-printing. Newly developed phantoms are consisted of castor oil included acrylic block copolymer and we can fabricate 0.8mm or less thick sheets and pile them using their self-adhesiveness.

  18. Targeted Deletion of Capn4 in Cells of the Chondrocyte Lineage Impairs Chondrocyte Proliferation and Differentiation▿

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Aki; Schipani, Ernestina; Fein, Mikaela J.; Greer, Peter A.; Shimada, Masako

    2010-01-01

    Calpains are calcium-dependent intracellular cysteine proteases, which include ubiquitously expressed μ- and m-calpains. Both calpains are heterodimers consisting of a large catalytic subunit and a small regulatory subunit. The calpain small subunit encoded by the gene Capn4 directly binds to the intracellular C-terminal tail of the receptor for the parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTH-related peptide and modulates cellular functions in cells of the osteoblast lineage in vitro and in vivo. To investigate a physiological role of the calpain small subunit in cells of the chondrocyte lineage, we generated chondrocyte-specific Capn4 knockout mice. Mutant embryos had reduced chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation in embryonic growth plates compared with control littermates. In vitro analysis further revealed that deletion of Capn4 in cells of the chondrocyte lineage correlated with impaired cell cycle progression at the G1/S transition, reduced cyclin D gene transcription, and accumulated cell cycle proteins known as calpain substrates. Moreover, silencing of p27Kip1 rescued an impaired cell growth phenotype in Capn4 knockdown cells, and reintroducing the calpain small subunit partially normalized cell growth and accumulated cyclin D protein levels in a dose-dependent manner. Collectively, our findings suggest that the calpain small subunit is essential for proper chondrocyte functions in embryonic growth plates. PMID:20368361

  19. Chondrocyte hypertrophy in skeletal development, growth, and disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Margaret Man-Ger; Beier, Frank

    2014-03-01

    Most of our bones form through the process of endochondral ossification, which is tightly regulated by the activity of the cartilage growth plate. Chondrocyte maturation through the various stages of growth plate physiology ultimately results in hypertrophy. Chondrocyte hypertrophy is an essential contributor to longitudinal bone growth, but recent data suggest that these cells also play fundamental roles in signaling to other skeletal cells, thus coordinating endochondral ossification. On the other hand, ectopic hypertrophy of articular chondrocytes has been implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. Thus, a better understanding of the processes that control chondrocyte hypertrophy in the growth plate as well as in articular cartilage is required for improved management of both skeletal growth disorders and osteoarthritis. This review summarizes recent findings on the regulation of hypertrophic chondrocyte differentiation, the cellular mechanisms involved in hypertrophy, and the role of chondrocyte hypertrophy in skeletal physiology and pathophysiology.

  20. Rebooting autoimmunity with autologous HSCT.

    PubMed

    Snowden, John A

    2016-01-07

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is increasingly used for severe autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, but the mechanisms involved have yet to be elucidated. In this issue of Blood, Delemarre et al report their findings in both animal and human models which provide insights into restoration of functionality and diversity within the regulatory T-cell (Treg) compartment following HSCT.

  1. Long-term in vitro expansion of osteoarthritic human articular chondrocytes do not alter genetic stability: a microsatellite instability analysis.

    PubMed

    Neri, Simona; Mariani, Erminia; Cattini, Luca; Facchini, Andrea

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we investigated genetic damage acquisition during in vitro culture of human osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes to evaluate their safety for use in regenerative medicine clinical applications. In particular, we have addressed the impact of long-term in vitro culture on simple sequence repeat stability, to evaluate the involvement of the mismatch repair system (MMR) in the accumulation of genetic damage. MMR, the main post-replicative correction pathway, has a fundamental role in maintaining genomic stability and can be monitored by assessing microsatellite instability (MSI). MMR activity has been reported to decrease with age not only in vivo, but also in vitro in relationship to culture passages. OA chondrocytes from seven donors were cultured corresponding to 13-29 population doublings. Aliquots of the cells were collected and analyzed for MSI at five DNA loci (CD4, VWA, FES, TPOX, and P53) and for MMR gene expression at each subculture. Genetic stability was confirmed throughout the culture period. MMR genes demonstrated a strong coordination at the transcriptional level among the different components; expression levels were very low, in accordance with the observed genetic stability. The reduced expression of MMR genes might underline no need for increasing DNA repair control in the culture conditions tested, in which no genetic damage was evidenced. These data argue for the safety of chondrocytes for cellular therapies and are encouraging for the potential use of in vitro expanded OA chondrocytes, supporting the extension of autologous cell therapy procedures to degenerative articular diseases. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Crystallization-driven assembly of conjugated-polymer-based nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, Ryan C.

    2016-10-15

    The goal of this project has been to improve our ability to simultaneously control the organization, and therefore the opto-electronic properties, of conjugated-polymer based materials across three different length-scales: 1) the molecular scale, in the sense of controlling growth and functionalization of highly crystalline semiconducting organic materials capable of efficient charge transport, 2) the nanoscale, in terms of positioning n- and p-type materials with domain sizes comparable to exciton diffusion lengths (~ 10 nm) to facilitate charge separation, and 3) the colloidal scale, such that well-defined crystalline nanoscale building blocks can be hierarchically organized into device layers. As described in more detail below, the project was successful in generating powerful new approaches to, and improved fundamental understanding of, processing and self-assembly of organic and hybrid semiconducting materials across all three length-scales. Although the goals of the project were formulated with primarily photovoltaic architectures in mind, the outcomes of the project have significant implications for a variety of conjugated-polymer-based devices including field-effect-transistors for sensors and logic devices, as well as potentially thermoelectrics and battery electrode materials. The project has resulted in 10 peer-reviewed publications to date [1-10], with several additional manuscripts currently in preparation.

  3. Development and evaluation of PLGA polymer based nanoparticles of quercetin.

    PubMed

    Anwer, Md Khalid; Al-Mansoor, Mohammed A; Jamil, Shahid; Al-Shdefat, Ramadan; Ansari, Mohammad Nazam; Shakeel, Faiyaz

    2016-11-01

    Quercetin is the most abundant antioxidant found in the human diet. Low aqueous solubility of quercetin limits its bioavailability and hence therapeutic effects. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to develop a poly lactide-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) polymer based nanoparticles of quercetin with a view to improve its aqueous solubility and examine the effect on its antioxidant and diuretic properties. Nanoparticles of quercetin were developed by single emulsion-solvent evaporation technique and evaluated in vitro for differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transforms infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, particle size, polydispersity index and drug entrapment efficiency. Among the five different formulations (F1, F2, F3, F4 and F5), F2 and F3 were optimized with an average particle size of 189nm and 186nm and high entrapment values of 86.48%, 83.71%, respectively. SEM images of confirmed that prepared nanoparticles were spherical in shape with a smooth surface. In vitro release and anti-oxidant activity confirmed significant results. Furthermore, its in vivo diuretic activity was much better as compared to pure quercetin. The overall results suggest that PLGA polymer based nanoparticle could be a potential option for quercetin delivery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Polymer-based tubular microbots: role of composition and preparation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Uygun, Aysegul; Pei, Allen; Ponedal, Adam; Wang, Joseph

    2012-04-07

    The influence of the composition and electropolymerization conditions upon the propulsion of new template-prepared polymer-based bilayer microtubular microbots is described. The effects of different electropolymerized outer layers, including polypyrrole (PPy), poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), polyaniline (PANI), and of various inner catalytic metal surfaces (Ag, Pt, Au, Ni-Pt alloy), upon the movement of such bilayer microtubes are evaluated and compared. Electropolymerization conditions, such as the monomer concentration and medium (e.g. surfactant, electrolyte), have a profound effect upon the morphology and locomotion of the resulting microtubes. The most efficient propulsion is observed using PEDOT/Pt microbots that offer a record-breaking speed of over 1400 body lengths s(-1) at physiological temperature, which is the fastest relative speed reported to date for all artificial micro/nanomotors. An inner Pt-Ni alloy surface is shown useful for combining magnetic control and catalytic fuel decomposition within one layer, thus greatly simplifying the preparation of magnetically-guided microbots. Polymer-based microbots with an inner gold layer offer efficient biocatalytic propulsion in low peroxide level in connection to an immobilized catalase enzyme. Metallic Au/Pt bilayer microbots can also be prepared electrochemically to offer high speed propulsion towards potential biomedical applications through functionalization of the outer gold surface. Such rational template preparation and systematic optimization of highly efficient microbots hold considerable promise for diverse practical applications.

  5. Polymer-based resistive memory materials and devices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Peng; Liu, Shu-Juan; Gong, Tao; Zhao, Qiang; Huang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Due to the advantages of good scalability, flexibility, low cost, ease of processing, 3D-stacking capability, and large capacity for data storage, polymer-based resistive memories have been a promising alternative or supplementary devices to conventional inorganic semiconductor-based memory technology, and attracted significant scientific interest as a new and promising research field. In this review, we first introduced the general characteristics of the device structures and fabrication, memory effects, switching mechanisms, and effects of electrodes on memory properties associated with polymer-based resistive memory devices. Subsequently, the research progress concerning the use of single polymers or polymer composites as active materials for resistive memory devices has been summarized and discussed. In particular, we consider a rational approach to their design and discuss how to realize the excellent memory devices and understand the memory mechanisms. Finally, the current challenges and several possible future research directions in this field have also been discussed. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Increased chondrocyte death after steroid and local anesthetic combination.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Boglárka; Kvell, Krisztián; Czömpöly, Tamás; Illés, Tamás; Bárdos, Tamás

    2010-11-01

    Hyaline articular cartilage has limited repair and regeneration capacity. Intraarticular administration of glucocorticoid and local anesthetic injections play an important role in the therapy of osteoarthritis. Glucocorticoids and anesthetics reportedly enhance apoptosis in chondrocytes, but effects of the combined use of glucocorticoids and local anesthetics are unknown. We asked whether glucocorticoid and local anesthetic agents combined had any synergistic effects on chondrocyte apoptosis. Cell viability and apoptosis/necrosis assessment of human articular chondrocytes were performed in vitro (chondrocyte cell cultures) and ex vivo (osteochondral specimens) using flow cytometry and TUNEL analysis, respectively. Glucocorticoids and local anesthetics induce apoptosis in chondrocytes at various rates. When used in combination, the percentage of dead chondrocytes was increased in in vitro chondrocyte cell cultures and osteochondral ex vivo specimens. We observed a time-dependent decrease in chondrocyte viability after concurrent steroid and local anesthetic exposure. The combination of glucocorticoids and local anesthetics has an adverse effect on articular chondrocytes, and it raises a question regarding whether concomitant administration should be used in treating osteoarthritis.

  7. Smad4 regulates growth plate matrix production and chondrocyte polarity

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Amanda T.; Berthet, Ellora; Cantu, Andrea; Laird, Diana J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Smad4 is an intracellular effector of the TGFβ family that has been implicated in Myhre syndrome, a skeletal dysplasia characterized by short stature, brachydactyly and stiff joints. The TGFβ pathway also plays a critical role in the development, organization and proliferation of the growth plate, although the exact mechanisms remain unclear. Skeletal phenotypes in Myhre syndrome overlap with processes regulated by the TGFβ pathway, including organization and proliferation of the growth plate and polarity of the chondrocyte. We used in vitro and in vivo models of Smad4 deficiency in chondrocytes to test the hypothesis that deregulated TGFβ signaling leads to aberrant extracellular matrix production and loss of chondrocyte polarity. Specifically, we evaluated growth plate chondrocyte polarity in tibiae of Col2-Cre+/−;Smad4fl/fl mice and in chondrocyte pellet cultures. In vitro and in vivo, Smad4 deficiency decreased aggrecan expression and increased MMP13 expression. Smad4 deficiency disrupted the balance of cartilage matrix synthesis and degradation, even though the sequential expression of growth plate chondrocyte markers was intact. Chondrocytes in Smad4-deficient growth plates also showed evidence of polarity defects, with impaired proliferation and ability to undergo the characteristic changes in shape, size and orientation as they differentiated from resting to hypertrophic chondrocytes. Therefore, we show that Smad4 controls chondrocyte proliferation, orientation, and hypertrophy and is important in regulating the extracellular matrix composition of the growth plate. PMID:28167493

  8. Human Articular Chondrocytes Regulate Immune Response by Affecting Directly T Cell Proliferation and Indirectly Inhibiting Monocyte Differentiation to Professional Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rui C.; Martinelli, Daniela; Cancedda, Ranieri; Gentili, Chiara; Poggi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation is the current gold standard cell therapy for cartilage lesions. However, in some instances, the heavily compromised health of the patient can either impair or limit the recovery of the autologous chondrocytes and a satisfactory outcome of the implant. Allogeneic human articular chondrocytes (hAC) could be a good alternative, but the possible immunological incompatibility between recipient and hAC donor should be considered. Herein, we report that allogeneic hAC inhibited T lymphocyte response to antigen-dependent and -independent proliferative stimuli. This effect was maximal when T cells and hAC were in contact and it was not relieved by the addition of exogenous lymphocyte growth factor interleukin (IL)-2. More important, hAC impaired the differentiation of peripheral blood monocytes induced with granulocyte monocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-4 (Mo) to professional antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DC). Indeed, a marked inhibition of the onset of the CD1a expression and an ineffective downregulation of CD14 antigens was observed in Mo–hAC co-cultures. Furthermore, compared to immature or mature DC, Mo from Mo–hAC co-cultures did not trigger an efficacious allo-response. The prostaglandin (PG) E2 present in the Mo–hAC co-culture conditioned media is a putative candidate of the hAC-mediated inhibition of Mo maturation. Altogether, these findings indicate that allogeneic hAC inhibit, rather than trigger, immune response and strongly suggest that an efficient chondrocyte implantation could be possible also in an allogeneic setting. PMID:27822208

  9. Inhibition of phosphate-induced apoptosis in resting zone chondrocytes by thrombin peptide 508.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ming; Carney, Darrell H; Ryaby, James T; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2009-01-01

    Growth plate chondrocytes are susceptible to apoptosis. Terminally differentiated chondrocytes are deleted via apoptosis, which primes the growth plate to vascular invasion and subsequent bone formation. Whether less differentiated resting zone chondrocytes are subject to the same mechanism that governs the apoptotic pathway of more differentiated growth zone chondrocytes is not known. In our current study, we demonstrated that inorganic phosphate, a key inducer of growth plate chondrocyte apoptosis, also causes apoptosis in resting zone chondrocytes, via a pathway similar to the one in growth zone chondrocytes. Our results demonstrated that the conditions that cause growth plate chondrocyte apoptosis lie in the external environment, instead of the differences in differentiation state.

  10. TGFβ inhibition during expansion phase increases the chondrogenic re-differentiation capacity of human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Narcisi, R; Signorile, L; Verhaar, J A N; Giannoni, P; van Osch, G J V M

    2012-10-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation is a cell-based treatment to repair articular cartilage defects, relying on the availability of expanded (de-differentiated) chondrocytes. Unfortunately, the expansion process causes several phenotypical changes, requiring re-establishment of the native chondrogenic phenotype to sustain proper repair. Among other proteins, transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) is known to influence the chondrogenic re-differentiation of human articular chondrocytes (HACs) and their matrix deposition. Thus we investigated the effects of TGFβ-depletion during the expansion phase. HACs were isolated from articular cartilage and expanded in the canonical serum-supplemented medium [fetal calf serum (FCS)] or in a chemically-defined (CD) medium, with or without anti-TGFβ antibody administration. The re-differentiation potential of the cells was assessed by pellet cultures, gene expression analysis and histology. Cell proliferation proceeded more rapidly in CD-medium than in FCS-medium; it was not affected by the use of anti-TGFβ antibody but was further increased by addition of exogenous TGFβ1, via increased p-Smad1/5/8. Conversely, in FCS-medium, addition of anti-TGFβ antibody decreased both proliferation and p-Smad1/5/8 level. Challenging either FCS- or CD-medium with anti-TGFβ antibody during expansion enhanced chondrogenesis in the subsequent pellet cultures. Moreover, TGFβ-depletion during expansion in CD-medium inhibited mRNA expression of hypertrophic markers, collagen type-X (COL10) and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13). Interestingly, the TGFβ1 level detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent sandwich assay (ELISA) during cell expansion was correlated with COL10 mRNA expression after re-differentiation. TGFβ-depletion during expansion improves the re-differentiation capacity of chondrocytes and inhibits hypertrophy. These results indicate the importance of the expansion medium composition to improve chondrogenic re-differentiation and

  11. Dedifferentiation and redifferentiation of articular chondrocytes from surface and middle zones: changes in microRNAs-221/-222, -140, and -143/145 expression.

    PubMed

    Hong, Eunmee; Reddi, A Hari

    2013-04-01

    Articular cartilage contains three functional zones (superficial, middle, and deep) characterized by distinct structure, composition, and biomechanical properties. One of the unsolved major challenges in cartilage tissue engineering is to produce tissue that mimics the zonal organization of the native articular cartilage. An increasing number of studies aim to design zonal organization into tissue-engineered cartilage by forming a stratified construct using zonal cell subpopulations. However, in vitro monolayer expansion of chondrocytes, which is generally required to obtain high cell numbers necessary for tissue engineering and autologous chondrocyte implantation, leads to dedifferentiation of chondrocytes into fibroblast-like cells, resulting in loss of zonal markers, such as the superficial zone protein (SZP) of the superficial zone as well as chondrocytic phenotype markers, such as type II collagen and aggrecan. Several microRNAs (miRNAs), including miR-221, miR-222, miR-143, and miR-145, have been identified from bovine articular cartilage as superficial zone-enriched miRNAs. miR-140 has been known as a cartilage-specific miRNA whose expression is implicated in chondrocyte differentiation and cartilage tissue homeostasis. As miRNAs play an important role in regulating gene expression during cell differentiation and maintaining tissue homeostasis, we determined the expression of the miRNAs with zonal differentiation and homeostasis. We investigated how chondrocyte dedifferentiation during multiple passages and redifferentiation in a three-dimensional (3D) agarose culture regulates the expression of these miRNAs by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Additionally, the effect of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), which is known to enhance chondrocytic differentiation and SZP expression, on these miRNAs was evaluated. The expression of miR-221 and miR-222 increased during dedifferentiation and during redifferentiation in a 3D

  12. Induction of CD44 Cleavage in Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Nobunori; Knudson, Cheryl B.; Thankamony, Sai; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Mellor, Liliana; Im, Hee-Jeong; Knudson, Warren

    2010-01-01

    Objective The hyaluronan receptor CD44 provides chondrocytes with a mechanism for sensing and responding to changes in the extracellular matrix. The purpose of this study was to document the fragmentation and loss of CD44 and to determine the likely mechanisms involved. Methods A polyclonal anti-CD44 cytotail antibody was generated to detect CD44 fragmentation by Western blot analysis. Chondrocytes were isolated from human or bovine articular cartilage. Primary articular chondrocytes were treated with interleukin-1β (IL-1β), hyaluronan oligosaccharides, or phorbol myristate acetate or were passaged and subcultured in monolayer to induce dedifferentiation. Conditions that altered the capacity of CD44 to transit into lipid rafts, or pharmacologic inhibitors of metalloproteinase or γ-secretase activity were used to define the mechanism of fragmentation of CD44. Results Chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage exhibited CD44 fragmentation as low molecular mass bands, corresponding to the CD44-EXT and CD44-ICD bands. Following dedifferentiation of chondrocytes or treatment of primary chondrocytes with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, IL-1β, or phorbol myristate acetate, CD44 fragmentation was enhanced. Subsequent culture of the dedifferentiated chondrocytes in 3-dimensional alginate beads rescued the chondrocyte phenotype and diminished the fragmentation of CD44. Fragmentation of CD44 in chondrocytes was blocked in the presence of the metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001 and the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT. Conclusion CD44 fragmentation, consistent with a signature pattern reported for sequential metalloproteinase/γ-secretase cleavage of CD44, is a common metabolic feature of chondrocytes that have undergone dedifferentiation in vitro and osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Transit of CD44 into lipid rafts may be required for its fragmentation. PMID:20178130

  13. Polymer-based nanocarriers for vaginal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    das Neves, José; Nunes, Rute; Machado, Alexandra; Sarmento, Bruno

    2015-09-15

    The vaginal delivery of various drugs is well described and its relevance established in current medical practice. Alongside recent advances and achievements in the fields of pharmaceutical nanotechnology and nanomedicine, there is an increasing interest in the potential use of different nanocarriers for the delivery of old and new pharmacologically active molecules with either therapeutic or prophylactic purposes. Nanosystems of polymeric nature in particular have been investigated over the last years and their interactions with mucosal fluids and tissues, as well as genital tract biodistribution upon vaginal administration, are now better understood. While different applications have been envisioned, most of the current research is focusing in the development of nano-formulations with the potential to inhibit the vaginal transmission of HIV upon sexual intercourse. The present work focuses its discussion on the potential and perils of polymer-based nanocarriers for the vaginal administration of different pharmacologically active molecules.

  14. Polymer-based tubular microbots: role of composition and preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Uygun, Aysegul; Pei, Allen; Ponedal, Adam; Wang, Joseph

    2012-03-01

    The influence of the composition and electropolymerization conditions upon the propulsion of new template-prepared polymer-based bilayer microtubular microbots is described. The effects of different electropolymerized outer layers, including polypyrrole (PPy), poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), polyaniline (PANI), and of various inner catalytic metal surfaces (Ag, Pt, Au, Ni-Pt alloy), upon the movement of such bilayer microtubes are evaluated and compared. Electropolymerization conditions, such as the monomer concentration and medium (e.g. surfactant, electrolyte), have a profound effect upon the morphology and locomotion of the resulting microtubes. The most efficient propulsion is observed using PEDOT/Pt microbots that offer a record-breaking speed of over 1400 body lengths s-1 at physiological temperature, which is the fastest relative speed reported to date for all artificial micro/nanomotors. An inner Pt-Ni alloy surface is shown useful for combining magnetic control and catalytic fuel decomposition within one layer, thus greatly simplifying the preparation of magnetically-guided microbots. Polymer-based microbots with an inner gold layer offer efficient biocatalytic propulsion in low peroxide level in connection to an immobilized catalase enzyme. Metallic Au/Pt bilayer microbots can also be prepared electrochemically to offer high speed propulsion towards potential biomedical applications through functionalization of the outer gold surface. Such rational template preparation and systematic optimization of highly efficient microbots hold considerable promise for diverse practical applications.The influence of the composition and electropolymerization conditions upon the propulsion of new template-prepared polymer-based bilayer microtubular microbots is described. The effects of different electropolymerized outer layers, including polypyrrole (PPy), poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), polyaniline (PANI), and of various inner catalytic metal

  15. Photon Harvesting in Conjugated Polymer-Based Functional Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jana, Bikash; Ghosh, Arnab; Patra, Amitava

    2017-09-21

    The design of new generation light-harvesting systems based on conjugated polymer nanoparticles (PNPs) is an emerging field of research to convert solar energy into renewable energy. In this Perspective, we focus on the understanding of the light harvesting processes like exciton dynamics, energy transfer, antenna effect, charge carrier dynamics, and other related processes of conjugated polymer-based functional nanomaterials. Spectroscopic investigations unveil the rotational dynamics of the dye molecules inside of PNPs and exciton dynamics of the self-assembled structures. A detailed understanding of the cascade energy transfer for white light and singlet oxygen generation in multiple fluorophores containing a PNP system by time-resolved spectroscopy is highlighted. Finally, ultrafast spectroscopic investigations provide direct insight into the impacts of electron and hole transfer at the interface in the hybrid materials for photocatalysis and photocurrent generation to construct efficient light-harvesting systems.

  16. An easily fabricated high performance ionic polymer based sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zicai; Wang, Yanjie; Hu, Xiaopin; Sun, Xiaofei; Chang, Longfei; Lu, Pin

    2016-08-01

    Ionic polymer materials can generate an electrical potential from ion migration under an external force. For traditional ionic polymer metal composite sensors, the output voltage is very small (a few millivolts), and the fabrication process is complex and time-consuming. This letter presents an ionic polymer based network of pressure sensors which is easily and quickly constructed, and which can generate high voltage. A 3 × 3 sensor array was prepared by casting Nafion solution directly over copper wires. Under applied pressure, two different levels of voltage response were observed among the nine nodes in the array. For the group producing the higher level, peak voltages reached as high as 25 mV. Computational stress analysis revealed the physical origin of the different responses. High voltages resulting from the stress concentration and asymmetric structure can be further utilized to modify subsequent designs to improve the performance of similar sensors.

  17. Conducting polymer-based multilayer films for instructive biomaterial coatings

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, John G; Li, Hetian; Chow, Jacqueline K; Geissler, Sydney A; McElroy, Austin B; Nguy, Lindsey; Hernandez, Derek S; Schmidt, Christine E

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To demonstrate the design, fabrication and testing of conformable conducting biomaterials that encourage cell alignment. Materials & methods: Thin conducting composite biomaterials based on multilayer films of poly(3.4-ethylenedioxythiophene) derivatives, chitosan and gelatin were prepared in a layer-by-layer fashion. Fibroblasts were observed with fluorescence microscopy and their alignment (relative to the dipping direction and direction of electrical current passed through the films) was determined using ImageJ. Results: Fibroblasts adhered to and proliferated on the films. Fibroblasts aligned with the dipping direction used during film preparation and this was enhanced by a DC current. Conclusion: We report the preparation of conducting polymer-based films that enhance the alignment of fibroblasts on their surface which is an important feature of a variety of tissues. PMID:28031928

  18. Lipid- and Polymer-Based Nanostructures for Cancer Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Brian T.; Fang, Ronnie H.; Zhang, Liangfang

    2012-01-01

    The relatively new field of nanotheranostics combines the advantages of in vivo diagnosis with the ability to administer treatment through a single nano-sized carrier, offering new opportunities for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Nanotheranostics has facilitated the development of nanomedicine through direct visualization of drug blood circulation and biodistribution. From a clinical perspective, nanotheranostics allows therapies to be administered and monitored in real time, thus decreasing the potential of under- or over-dosing and allowing for more personalized treatment regimens. Herein, we review recent development of nanotheranostics using lipid- and polymer-based formulations, with a particular focus on their applications in cancer research. Recent advances in nanotechnology aimed to combine therapeutic molecules with imaging agents for magnetic resonance imaging, radionuclide imaging, or fluorescence imaging are discussed. PMID:23382770

  19. Traveling wave ultrasonic motor using polymer-based vibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiang; Mizuno, Yosuke; Tabaru, Marie; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    With the characteristics of low density, low elastic modulus, and low mechanical loss, poly(phenylene sulfide) (PPS) is a promising material for fabricating lightweight ultrasonic motors (USMs). For the first time, we used PPS to fabricate an annular elastomer with teeth and glued a piece of piezoelectric-ceramic annular disk to the bottom of the elastomer to form a vibrator. To explore for a material suitable for the rotor surface coming in contact with the PPS-based vibrator, several disk-shaped rotors made of different materials were fabricated to form traveling wave USMs. The polymer-based USM rotates successfully as the conventional metal-based USMs. The experimental results show that the USM with the aluminum rotor has the largest torque, which indicates that aluminum is the most suitable for the rotor surface among the tested materials.

  20. Autologous umbilical cord blood transfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Ballin, A.; Arbel, E.; Kenet, G.; Berar, M.; Kohelet, D.; Tanay, A.; Zakut, H.; Meytes, D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine some aspects of umbilical cord blood collection for autologous transfusion in premature infants. All 120 microbacterial cultures (aerobic and anaerobic) of cord blood samples as well as 30 cultures of mycoplasma were treated. Cord prothrombin fragment (F 1 + 2) concentrations were quantified at one and 10 minutes after clamping of the cord. F 1 + 2 concentrations assessed on 25 newborn infants were similar and no linear association with time of clamping could be drawn. This means that cord blood thrombosis is not activated for at least 10 minutes following clamping of the cord. As far as is known, the first newborn infant to benefit from this method of transfusion is reported here. The premature infant received two portions of autologous blood (on days 5 and 7). No untoward effects were noted. Blood, collected from the umbilical cord, is a safe source for autotransfusion, provided that bacteriological testing has been carried out. PMID:8535878

  1. Chondrocyte-specific ablation of Osterix leads to impaired endochondral ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jung-Hoon; Park, Seung-Yoon; Crombrugghe, Benoit de; Kim, Jung-Eun

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional ablation of Osterix (Osx) in chondrocytes leads to skeletal defects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osx regulates chondrocyte differentiation and bone growth in growth plate chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osx has an autonomous function in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification. -- Abstract: Osterix (Osx) is an essential transcription factor required for osteoblast differentiation during both intramembranous and endochondral ossification. Endochondral ossification, a process in which bone formation initiates from a cartilage intermediate, is crucial for skeletal development and growth. Osx is expressed in differentiating chondrocytes as well as osteoblasts during mouse development, but its role in chondrocytes has not been well studied. Here, the in vivo function of Osx in chondrocytes was examined in a chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout model using Col2a1-Cre. Chondrocyte-specific Osx deficiency resulted in a weak and bent skeleton which was evident in newborn by radiographic analysis and skeletal preparation. To further understand the skeletal deformity of the chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout, histological analysis was performed on developing long bones during embryogenesis. Hypertrophic chondrocytes were expanded, the formation of bone trabeculae and marrow cavities was remarkably delayed, and subsequent skeletal growth was reduced. The expression of several chondrocyte differentiation markers was reduced, indicating the impairment of chondrocyte differentiation and endochondral ossification in the chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout. Taken together, Osx regulates chondrocyte differentiation and bone growth in growth plate chondrocytes, suggesting an autonomous function of Osx in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification.

  2. Creep behaviour of a polymer-based underground support liner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guner, Dogukan; Ozturk, Hasan

    2017-09-01

    All underground excavations (tunnels, mines, caverns, etc.) need a form of support to ensure that excavations remain safe and stable for the designed service lifetime. In the last decade, a new support material, thin spray-on liner (TSL) has started to take place of traditional underground surface supports of bolts and shotcrete. TSLs are generally cement, latex, polymer-based and also reactive or non-reactive, multi-component materials applied to the rock surface with a layer of few millimeter thickness. They have the advantages of low volume, logistics, rapid application and low operating cost. The majority of current TSLs are two-part products that are mixed on site before spraying onto excavation rock surfaces. Contrary to the traditional brittle supports, the high plastic behaviour of TSLs make them to distribute the loads on larger lining area. In literature, there is a very limited information exist on the creep behavior of TSLs. In this study, the creep behavior of a polymer-based TSL was investigated. For this purpose, 7-day cured dogbone TSL specimens were tested under room temperature and humidity conditions according to ASTM-D2990 creep testing standard. A range of dead weights (80, 60, 40, and 20 % of the tensile strength) were applied up to 1500 hours. As a result of this study, the time-dependent strain behavior of a TSL was presented for different constant load conditions. Moreover, a new equation was derived to estimate tensile failure time of the TSL for a given loading condition. If the tensile stress acting on the TSL is known, the effective permanent support time of the TSL can be estimated by the proposed relationship.

  3. Rhinoplasty using autologous costal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Nancy; Larocca, Carlos Gil; Aponte, Ciro

    2013-06-01

    Most Latin American patients looking to have a primary septorhinoplasty share common characteristics in relation to an incorrect projection of the nasal tip complex and a low dorsal line. Thus, the frequent use of structural techniques and of surgical enhancement techniques becomes necessary to improve the nasal contour. In cases of secondary septorhinoplasty, it is also usual in our practice not to have sufficient septal cartilage available or with the required quality to give structure and support to the nasal tip complex, handle the nasal dorsum, and simultaneously correct postseptorhinoplasty deformities. For these reasons, in our practice costal cartilage represents an excellent option as autologous graft material. We present our experience using autologous costal cartilage for structural and nonstructural purposes in 286 selected patients who underwent open rhinoplasty between 2004 and 2011. We emphasize preoperative analyses, we discuss the criteria for selecting costal graft as graft material, we show key aspects of the dynamic of the surgery, and we consider the possibility of using autologous costal graft in combination with heterologous grafts. In this work we also establish the disadvantages of costal cartilage as graft material in specific areas of the surgical anatomy of the nose.

  4. Dicer-dependent pathways regulate chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Lu, Jun; Cobb, Bradley S; Rodda, Stephen J; McMahon, Andrew P; Schipani, Ernestina; Merkenschlager, Matthias; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2008-02-12

    Small noncoding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), bind to messenger RNAs through base pairing to suppress gene expression. Despite accumulating evidence that miRNAs play critical roles in various biological processes across diverse organisms, their roles in mammalian skeletal development have not been demonstrated. Here, we show that Dicer, an essential component for biogenesis of miRNAs, is essential for normal skeletal development. Dicer-null growth plates show a progressive reduction in the proliferating pool of chondrocytes, leading to severe skeletal growth defects and premature death of mice. The reduction of proliferating chondrocytes in Dicer-null growth plates is caused by two distinct mechanisms: decreased chondrocyte proliferation and accelerated differentiation into postmitotic hypertrophic chondrocytes. These defects appear to be caused by mechanisms downstream or independent of the Ihh-PTHrP signaling pathway, a pivotal signaling system that regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. Microarray analysis of Dicer-null chondrocytes showed limited expression changes in miRNA-target genes, suggesting that, in the majority of cases, chondrocytic miRNAs do not directly regulate target RNA abundance. Our results demonstrate the critical role of the Dicer-dependent pathway in the regulation of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation during skeletal development.

  5. A theoretical analysis of water transport through chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ateshian, G A; Costa, K D; Hung, C T

    2007-01-01

    Because of the avascular nature of adult cartilage, nutrients and waste products are transported to and from the chondrocytes by diffusion and convection through the extracellular matrix. The convective interstitial fluid flow within and around chondrocytes is poorly understood. This theoretical study demonstrates that the incorporation of a semi-permeable membrane when modeling the chondrocyte leads to the following findings: under mechanical loading of an isolated chondrocyte the intracellular fluid pressure is on the order of tens of Pascals and the transmembrane fluid outflow, on the order of picometers per second, takes several days to subside; consequently, the chondrocyte behaves practically as an incompressible solid whenever the loading duration is on the order of minutes or hours. When embedded in its extracellular matrix (ECM), the chondrocyte response is substantially different. Mechanical loading of the tissue leads to a fluid pressure difference between intracellular and extracellular compartments on the order of tens of kilopascals and the transmembrane outflow, on the order of a nanometer per second, subsides in about 1 h. The volume of the chondrocyte decreases concomitantly with that of the ECM. The interstitial fluid flow in the extracellular matrix is directed around the cell, with peak values on the order of tens of nanometers per second. The viscous fluid shear stress acting on the cell surface is several orders of magnitude smaller than the solid matrix shear stresses resulting from the ECM deformation. These results provide new insight toward our understanding of water transport in chondrocytes.

  6. The effect of matrix stiffness on biomechanical properties of chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanyou; Yu, Yang; Zhao, Hucheng

    2016-10-01

    The behavior of chondrocytes is regulated by multiple mechanical microenvironmental cues. During development and degenerative disease of articular cartilage, as an external signal, the extracellular matrix stiffness of chondrocytes changes significantly, but whether and how this biophysical cue affects biomechanical properties of chondrocytes remain elusive. In the present study, we designed supporting-biomaterials as  mimics of native pericellular matrix to study the effect of matrix stiffness on chondrocyte morphology and F-actin distribution. Furthermore, the active mechanical behavior of chondrocytes during sensing and responding to different matrix stiffness was quantitatively investigated using atom force microscope technique and theoretical model. Our results indicated that stiffer matrix tends to increase the cell spreading area, the percentage of irregular cell shape distribution and mechanical parameters including elastic modulus (Eelastic), instantaneous modulus (E0), relaxed modulus (ER) and apparent viscosity (μ) of chondrocytes. Knowledge of matrix stiffness-dependent biomechanical behaviors of chondrocytes has important implications for optimizing matrix material and advancing chondrocyte-based applications for functional tissue engineering. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. TGF β-1 administration during ex vivo expansion of human articular chondrocytes in a serum-free medium redirects the cell phenotype toward hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Narcisi, R; Quarto, R; Ulivi, V; Muraglia, A; Molfetta, L; Giannoni, P

    2012-09-01

    Cell-based cartilage resurfacing requires ex vivo expansion of autologous articular chondrocytes. Defined culture conditions minimize expansion-dependent phenotypic alterations but maintenance of the cells' differentiation potential must be carefully assessed. Transforming growth factor β-1 (TGF β-1) positively regulates the expression of several cartilage proteins, but its therapeutic application in damaged cartilage is controversial. Thus we evaluated the phenotypic outcomes of cultured human articular chondrocytes exposed to TGF β-1 during monolayer expansion in a serum-free medium. After five doublings cells were transferred to micromass cultures to assess their chondrogenic differentiation, or replated in osteogenic medium. Immunocytostainings of micromasses of TGF-expanded cells showed loss of aggrecan and type II collagen. Positivity was evidenced for RAGE, IHH, type X collagen and for apoptotic cells, paralleling a reduction of BCL-2 levels, suggesting hypertrophic differentiation. TGF β-1-exposed cells also evidenced increased mRNA levels for bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, matrix metalloproteinase-13, TIMP-3, VEGF and SMAD7, enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity and pyrophosphate availability. Conversely, SMAD3 mRNA and protein contents were reduced. After osteogenic induction, only TGF-expanded cells strongly mineralized and impaired p38 kinase activity, a contributor of chondrocytes' differentiation. To evaluate possible endochondral ossification progression, we seeded the chondrocytes on hydroxyapatite scaffolds, subsequently implanted in an in vivo ectopic setting, but cells failed to reach overt ossification; nonetheless, constructs seeded with TGF-exposed cells displayed blood vessels of the host vascular supply with enlarged diameters, suggestive of vascular remodeling, as in bone growth. Thus TGF-exposure during articular chondrocytes expansion induces a phenotype switch to hypertrophy, an undesirable effect for cells possibly intended for

  8. Biomarkers of Chondrocyte Apoptosis and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Weinberg, Annelie Martina; Al-Wasiyah, Mohammad K.; Alqahtani, Mohammed H.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Cell death with morphological and molecular features of apoptosis has been detected in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage, which suggests a key role for chondrocyte death/survival in the pathogenesis of OA. Identification of biomarkers of chondrocyte apoptosis may facilitate the development of novel therapies that may eliminate the cause or, at least, slow down the degenerative processes in OA. The aim of this review was to explore the molecular markers and signals that induce chondrocyte apoptosis in OA. A literature search was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar using the keywords chondrocyte death, apoptosis, osteoarthritis, autophagy and biomarker. Several molecules considered to be markers of chondrocyte apoptosis will be discussed in this brief review. Molecular markers and signalling pathways associated with chondroycte apoptosis may turn out to be therapeutic targets in OA and approaches aimed at neutralizing apoptosis-inducing molecules may at least delay the progression of cartilage degeneration in OA. PMID:26334269

  9. Selenium effect on selenoprotein transcriptome in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jidong; Zheng, Yuewen; Min, Zixin; Ning, Qilan; Lu, Shemin

    2013-04-01

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient and exerts its biological functions predominantly through selenoproteins. Selenium deficiency is associated with cartilage function. This study demonstrated that all 24 selenoprotein transcripts in mouse genome were detectable in ATDC5 chondrocytes except deiodinase 1 (DIO1), DIO2, and selenoprotein V (Sel V), while all 25 selenoprotein transcripts in human genome were detectable in C28/I2 chondrocytes except glutathione peroxidase 6 (GPx6) and DIO1. In addition, gene expression of five selenoproteins (GPx1, Sel H, Sel N, Sel P, and Sel W) was up-regulated and two selenoproteins (SPS2 and Sel O) was down-regulated by sodium selenite (Se) in both ATDC5 and C28/I2 cells. Gene expression of six selenoproteins (TrxR1, Sel I, Sel M, Sel R, Sel S, Sel T) and one selenoprotein (GPx3) was up-regulated by Se in ATDC5 and C28/I2 cells, respectively. Gene expression of one selenoprotein (TrxR2) was down-regulated by Se only in ATDC5 cells. Further transcription inhibition assay showed that both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms involved in Se-regulated gene expression of GPx1, TrxR1, TrxR2, SPS2, Sel O, and Sel S. However, Se-regulated gene expression of Sel H, Sel I, Sel M, Sel N, Sel P, Sel R, Sel T, and Sel W mainly at posttranscriptional level. Moreover, new protein synthesis inhibition assay indicated that Se-mediated new protein synthesis also played roles in Se-regulated gene expression of GPx1, TrxR1, TrxR2, Sel H, Sel O, Sel P, Sel R, and Sel W. In summary, this study described the selenoprotein transcriptome, Se-regulated selenoproteins and possible mechanisms involved in chondrocytes.

  10. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine acts as a modulator of chondrocyte hypertrophy and maturation in chick caudal region chondrocytes in culture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to explore the effect of DNA hypomethylation on chondrocytes phenotype, in particular the effect on chondrocyte hypertrophy, maturation, and apoptosis. Chondrocytes derived from caudal region of day 17 embryonic chick sterna were pretreated with hypomethylating drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine for 48 hours and then maintained in the normal culture medium for up to 14 days. Histological studies showed distinct morphological changes occurred in the pretreated cultures when compared to the control cultures. The pretreated chondrocytes after 7 days in culture became bigger in size and acquired more flattened fibroblastic phenotype as well as a loss of cartilage specific extracellular matrix. Scanning electron microscopy at day 7 showed chondrocytes to have increased in cell volume and at day 14 in culture the extracellular matrix of the pretreated cultures showed regular fibrillar structure heavily embedded with matrix vesicles, which is the characteristic feature of chondrocyte hypertrophy. Transmission electron microscopic studies indicated the terminal fate of the hypertrophic cells in culture. The pretreated chondrocytes grown for 14 days in culture showed two types of cells: dark cells which had condense chromatin in dark patches and dark cytoplasm. The other light chondrocytes appeared to be heavily loaded with endoplasmic reticulum indicative of very active protein and secretory activity; their cytoplasm had large vacuoles and disintegrating cytoplasm. The biosynthetic profile showed that the pretreated cultures were actively synthesizing and secreting type X collagen and alkaline phosphatase as a major biosynthetic product. PMID:27382512

  11. [Chondrocytes - one cell type, different subpopulations : characteristics and behavior of different types of chondrocytes and implications for tissue engineering applications].

    PubMed

    Grad, S; Salzmann, G M

    2009-11-01

    Chondrocytes represent the most important cell source for engineering of cartilaginous tissues. Depending on the tissue type and the localization within the tissue, these cells may behave differently. Numerous studies have been done to compare articular, nasal, auricular, and costal chondrocytes in order to evaluate differences between knee and ankle joint cartilage and to investigate topographical variations within an articular joint. Moreover, the zonal structure of articular cartilage needs to be considered because it leads to phenotypical differences between chondrocytes of the superficial and the deeper zones. Several studies indicate, however, that even differentiated chondrocytes demonstrate a certain plasticity and strive to adapt their phenotypes to a new mechanical and biochemical environment. The aim of this review is to report on similarities and differences of chondrocytes from different tissues, zones, and topographical locations. In particular, an overview of recent results from comparative studies is presented, and possible consequences for the design of tissue engineering models are discussed.

  12. Induced superficial chondrocyte death reduces catabolic cartilage damage in murine posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minjie; Mani, Sriniwasan B; He, Yao; Hall, Amber M; Xu, Lin; Li, Yefu; Zurakowski, David; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Joints that have degenerated as a result of aging or injury contain dead chondrocytes and damaged cartilage. Some studies have suggested that chondrocyte death precedes cartilage damage, but how the loss of chondrocytes affects cartilage integrity is not clear. In this study, we examined whether chondrocyte death undermines cartilage integrity in aging and injury using a rapid 3D confocal cartilage imaging technique coupled with standard histology. We induced autonomous expression of diphtheria toxin to kill articular surface chondrocytes in mice and determined that chondrocyte death did not lead to cartilage damage. Moreover, cartilage damage after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus of the knee was increased in mice with intact chondrocytes compared with animals whose chondrocytes had been killed, suggesting that chondrocyte death does not drive cartilage damage in response to injury. These data imply that chondrocyte catabolism, not death, contributes to articular cartilage damage following injury. Therefore, therapies targeted at reducing the catabolic phenotype may protect against degenerative joint disease.

  13. Development of a 3D cell printed structure as an alternative to autologs cartilage for auricular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju Young; Choi, Yeong-Jin; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Park, Jeong Hun; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2017-07-01

    Surgical technique using autologs cartilage is considered as the best treatment for cartilage tissue reconstruction, although the burdens of donor site morbidity and surgical complications still remain. The purpose of this study is to apply three-dimensional (3D) cell printing to fabricate a tissue-engineered graft, and evaluate its effects on cartilage reconstruction. A multihead tissue/organ building system is used to print cell-printed scaffold (CPS), then assessed the effect of the CPS on cartilage regeneration in a rabbit ear. The cell viability and functionality of chondrocytes were significantly higher in CPS than in cell-seeded scaffold (CSS) and cell-seeded hybrid scaffold (CSHS) in vitro. CPS was then implanted into a rabbit ear that had an 8 mm-diameter cartilage defect; at 3 months after implantation the CPS had fostered complete cartilage regeneration whereas CSS and autologs cartilage (AC) fostered only incomplete healing. This result demonstrates that cell printing technology can provide an appropriate environment in which encapsulated chondrocytes can survive and differentiate into cartilage tissue in vivo. Moreover, the effects of CPS on cartilage regeneration were even better than those of AC. Therefore, we confirmed the feasibility of CPS as an alternative to AC for auricular reconstruction. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1016-1028, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effect of stratified culture compared to confluent culture in monolayer on proliferation and differentiation of human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Jeanine; Riesle, Jens; Vanblitterswijk, Clemens A

    2006-09-01

    with high levels of AsAP and NEAA. In contrast to other 3D culture techniques like microcarrier or suspension culture, nutrient consumption remained the same as with conventional expansion. Because this allows culturing of clinically relevant amounts of chondrocytes without increasing the amount of serum, chondrocytes can be fully expanded in the presence autologous serum, avoiding the risk of viral and/or prion disease transmission associated with the use of animal-derived serum or serum replacers with animal-derived constituents.

  15. Cryoprotectant agent toxicity in porcine articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jomha, Nadr M; Weiss, Andrew D H; Fraser Forbes, J; Law, Garson K; Elliott, Janet A W; McGann, Locksley E

    2010-12-01

    Large articular cartilage defects have proven difficult to treat and often result in osteoarthritis of the affected joint. Cryopreservation of articular cartilage can provide an increased supply of tissues for osteochondral allograft but cryoprotective agents are required; however, few studies have been performed on the toxicity of these agents. This study was designed to determine the order of toxicity of five commonly used cryoprotectant agents as well as interactions that occur between them. Isolated porcine articular chondrocytes were exposed to individual cryoprotectant agents and combinations of these agents at 1M and 3M concentrations for 5 min and 120 min. Cell viability was determined using membrane integrity dyes and a metabolic activity assay. Subsequently, a regression analysis based study was undertaken to extract the maximum amount of information from this data. Results of this study demonstrated that all 1M solutions were minimally toxic. The 3M solutions demonstrated varying toxicity after 120 min. Ethylene glycol and glycerol were less toxic than propylene glycol, dimethyl sulfoxide, and formamide. Combinations of cryoprotectant agents were less toxic than single cryoprotectant agents at the same concentration. This is the most comprehensive study investigating cryoprotectant agent toxicity in articular chondrocytes and has resulted in important information regarding the order of toxicity and interactions that occur between these agents. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of insulin-like growth factor 1 and basic fibroblast growth factor on the morphology and proliferation of chondrocytes embedded in Matrigel in a microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuancheng; Fan, Qinbo; Jiang, Yong; Gong, Fuliang; Xia, Honggang

    2017-09-01

    in vivo morphology, which will improve autologous chondrocyte implantation capabilities for the treatment of cartilage injury.

  17. In vitro cartilage regeneration from proliferated adult elastic chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Terada, Shinichi; Fuchs, Julie R; Yoshimoto, Hiroshi; Fauza, Dario O; Vacanti, Joseph P

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate cellular feasibility in the proliferation and differentiation status of adult chondrocytes for cartilage regeneration in comparison to fetal chondrocytes. Primary cells were isolated from adult (n = 6) and fetal (n = 6) sheep ear cartilages and expanded in 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) containing Ham's F12 medium, in which adult and fetal cell proliferation rates were compared using a WST-1 assay kit. Approximately 4 million cells were seeded onto each 1 x 1 x 0.2-cm (200 microL) nonwoven fabric scaffold made from polyglycolic acid. Cell/polymer constructs were cultured in serum-free DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with 5 ng/mL TGF-beta2 and 5 ng/mL des(1-3)IGF-I (adult chondrocytes, group A) or in 10% FBS containing Ham's F12 medium (adult chondrocytes, group B, and fetal chondrocytes, group C) as controls in a rotating bioreactor for 6 weeks. The proliferation assay showed that fetal cells had a significantly better growth potential than did adult cells. Histology and extracellular matrix analyses revealed that groups A and C qualitatively displayed better matrix deposition than did group B. In conclusion, although adult sheep elastic chondrocytes had less growth potential than did fetal cells, the serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors significantly enhanced the production of cartilage matrix secreted from proliferated adult sheep elastic chondrocytes.

  18. Influence of ion channels on the proliferation of human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wohlrab, David; Lebek, Susanne; Krüger, Thomas; Reichel, Heiko

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the study was to examine connections between ion channel activity and the proliferation of human chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were isolated form human osteoarthritic knee joint cartilage. In this study the concentration-dependent influence of the ion channel modulators tetraethylammonium (TEA), 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), 4',4' diisothiocyanato-stilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonic acid stilbene (SITS), verapamil (vp) and lidocaine (lido) on the membrane potential and the proliferation of human chondrocytes was investigated using flow cytometry and the measurement of (3)H-thymidine incorporation as measure for the cell proliferation. The results show an effect of the used ion channel modulators causing a change of the membrane potential of human chondrocytes. The maximal measurable effects of the membrane potential were listed with 0.25 mmol/l verapamil (-18%) and 0.1 mmol/l lidocaine (+20%). When measuring DNA distribution, it became apparent that the human chondrocytes are diploid cells with a very low proliferation tendency. After 12 days culture duration, lidocaine and 4-AP cause an increase of the DNA synthesis rate being a limited effect. These results allow the conclusion of an influence of ion channel modulators on chondrocyte proliferation. To gain knowledge of the regulation of chondrocyte proliferation via ion channel modulators could serve the research of new osteoarthritis treatment concepts.

  19. Fibroblast growth factor is an inhibitor of chondrocyte terminal differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Y.; Iwamoto, M. )

    1990-04-05

    The effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on terminal differentiation of chondrocytes and cartilage-matrix calcification were investigated. Rabbit growth-plate chondrocytes maintained as a pelleted mass in a centrifuge tube produced an abundant proteoglycan matrix during the matrix-maturation stage, yielding a cartilage-like tissue. Thereafter, they terminally differentiated to hypertrophic chondrocytes which produced high levels of alkaline phosphatase. These cells induced extensive calcification of the matrix in the absence of additional phosphate. Addition of bFGF to the chondrocyte cultures abolished the increases in alkaline phosphatase activity, {sup 45}Ca deposition, and the calcium content. These effects were dose-dependent, reversible, and observed in the presence of cytosine arabinoside, an inhibitor of DNA synthesis. The inhibitory effects could be observed only when chondrocytes were exposed to bFGF in a transition period between the matrix-maturation and hypertrophic stages. As chondrocytes differentiated to hypertrophic cells, bFGF became less effective in inhibiting the expression of the mineralization-related phenotypes. The present study also shows that although the rate of ({sup 35}S)sulfate incorporation into large, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in the cell-matrix fraction is very high during the matrix-maturation stage, it abruptly decreases by 90% after terminal differentiation. Furthermore, the terminal differentiation-associated decrease in proteoglycan synthesis was delayed by bFGF. These results provide evidence that bFGF inhibits terminal differentiation of chondrocytes and calcification.

  20. Cartilage replacement by use of hybrid systems of autologous cells and polyethylene: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Schoen, Ilona; Rahne, Torsten; Markwart, Annekatrin; Neumann, Kerstin; Berghaus, Alexander; Roepke, Ernst

    2009-10-01

    This study used porous polyethylene (PE) as a scaffold in an animal model system. The surface of the scaffolds was either modified with collagen II coating or first functionalized by oxygen plasma treatment and then coated with collagen II. The specimens were inoculated with autologous chondrocytes and transplanted into the concha of guinea pigs. Bare scaffolds were used as controls. Periods of 1, 6, and 12 months after implantation, samples of cells containing specimens and control samples were evaluated microscopically. As a result, the pre-seeded specimens were better integrated into the surrounding tissue than cell-free PE-specimens. Also a weaker immune reaction and an improved cartilage generation could be detected in the pre-seeded specimen. Compared to the other surface modifications, no further improvement of cartilage development was observed in the long term in vivo animal experimental study.

  1. Polymer-based chips for surface plasmon resonance sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreja, Paula; Cristea, Dana; Kusko, Mihai; Dinescu, Adrian

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a design and low-cost techniques for polymer-based chips for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors. To obtain a polymer chip with a prism, microchannels and a chamber at microscale dimensions, replication techniques in polymers with controlled refractive index have been developed. Photoresist, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and epoxy resin were used. Silicon dioxide/silicon-based molds have been obtained by anisotropic etching of silicon, and glass prisms were used as masters for replication. The photoresist molds were obtained by optical lithography and were used to obtain the microchannels and the chamber. A liquid prepolymer (PDMS, Sylgard 184) with curing agent at a ratio of 10:1 was used, and a special technique was developed in order to fabricate the components of the structure at the same time. For the deposition and direct patterning of the metallic layers onto the polymer surface, different methods were experimented with, including sputtering. The materials and techniques used to achieve SPR sensors are presented, and the possibilities and limitations of the technology are discussed.

  2. Magnetic field sensor using a polymer-based vibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiang; Hasebe, Kazuhiko; Mizuno, Yosuke; Tabaru, Marie; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2016-09-01

    In this technical note, a polymer-based magnetic sensor with a high resolution was devised for sensing the high magnetic field. It consisted of a bimorph (vibrator) made of poly (phenylene sulfide) (PPS) and a phosphor-bronze foil glued on the free end of the bimorph. According to Faraday’s law of induction, when a magnetic field in the direction perpendicular to the bimorph was applied, the foil cut the magnetic flux, and generated an alternating voltage across the leads at the natural frequency of the bimorph. Because PPS has low mechanical loss, low elastic modulus, and low density, high vibration velocity can be achieved if it is employed as the elastomer of the bimorph. The devised sensor was tested in the magnetic field range of 0.1-570 mT and exhibited a minimum detectable magnetic field of 0.1 mT. At a zero-to-peak driving voltage of 60 V, the sensitivity of the PPS-based magnetic sensor reached 10.5 V T-1, which was 1.36 times the value of the aluminum-based magnetic sensor with the same principle and dimensions.

  3. Electroencephalogram measurement using polymer-based dry microneedle electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Miyako; Nishinaka, Yuya; Miki, Norihisa

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we report a successful electroencephalogram (EEG) measurement using polymer-based dry microneedle electrodes. The electrodes consist of needle-shaped substrates of SU-8, a silver film, and a nanoporous parylene protective film. Differently from conventional wet electrodes, microneedle electrodes do not require skin preparation and a conductive gel. SU-8 is superior as a structural material to poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS; Dow Corning Toray Sylgard 184) in terms of hardness, which was used in our previous work, and facilitates the penetration of needles through the stratum corneum. SU-8 microneedles can be successfully inserted into the skin without breaking and could maintain a sufficiently low skin-electrode contact impedance for EEG measurement. The electrodes successfully measured EEG from the frontal pole, and the quality of acquired signals was verified to be as high as those obtained using commercially available wet electrodes without any skin preparation or a conductive gel. The electrodes are readily applicable to record brain activities for a long period with little stress involved in skin preparation to the users.

  4. Multifunctional hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers based on natural aminoglycosides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingsheng; Hu, Mei; Wang, Dali; Wang, Guojian; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue; Sun, Jian

    2012-06-20

    Multifunctional gene vectors with high transfection, low cytotoxicity, and good antitumor and antibacterial activities were prepared from natural aminoglycosides. Through the Michael-addition polymerization of gentamycin and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide, cationic hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers were synthesized, and their physical and chemical properties were analyzed by FTIR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, GPC, ζ-potential, and acid-base titration techniques. The cytotoxicity of these hyperbranched glycoconjugated polycations was low because of the hydrolysis of degradable glycosidic and amide linkages in acid conditions. Owing to the presence of various primary, secondary, and tertiary amines in the polymers, hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers showed high buffering capacity and strong DNA condensation ability, resulting in the high transfection efficiency. In the meantime, due to the introduction of natural aminoglycosides into the polymeric backbone, the resultant hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers inhibited the growth of cancer cells and bacteria efficiently. Combining the gene transfection, antitumor, and antibacterial abilities together, the multifunctional hyperbranched glycoconjugated polymers based on natural aminoglycosides may play an important role in protecting cancer patients from bacterial infections.

  5. Response of zonal chondrocytes to extracellular matrix-hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Nathaniel S; Varghese, Shyni; Lee, H Janice; Theprungsirikul, Parnduangjai; Canver, Adam; Sharma, Blanka; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2007-09-04

    We investigated the biological response of chondrocytes isolated from different zones of articular cartilage and their cellular behaviors in poly (ethylene glycol)-based (PEG) hydrogels containing exogenous type I collagen, hyaluronic acid (HA), or chondroitin sulfate (CS). The cellular morphology was strongly dependent on the extracellular matrix component of hydrogels. Additionally, the exogenous extracellular microenvironment affected matrix production and cartilage specific gene expression of chondrocytes from different zones. CS-based hydrogels showed the strongest response in terms of gene expression and matrix accumulation for both superficial and deep zone chondrocytes, but HA and type I collagen-based hydrogels demonstrated zonal-dependent cellular responses.

  6. RESPONSE OF ZONAL CHONDROCYTES TO EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX-HYDROGELS

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Nathaniel S.; Varghese, Shyni; Lee, H. Janice; Theprungsirikul, Parnduangjai; Canver, Adam; Sharma, Blanka; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the biological response of chondrocytes isolated from different zones of articular cartilage and their cellular behaviors in poly (ethylene glycol)-based (PEG) hydrogels containing exogenous type I collagen, hyaluronic acid (HA), or chondroitin sulfate (CS). The cellular morphology was strongly dependent on the extracellular matrix component of hydrogels. Additionally, the exogenous extracellular microenvironment affected matrix production and cartilage specific gene expression of chondrocytes from different zones. CS-based hydrogels showed the strongest response in terms of gene expression and matrix accumulation for both superficial and deep zone chondrocytes, but HA and type I collagen-based hydrogels demonstrated zonal-dependent cellular responses. PMID:17692846

  7. Calcium flux and endogenous calcium content in isolated mammalian growth-plate chondrocytes, hyaline-cartilage chondrocytes, and hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Iannotti, J P; Brighton, C T; Stambough, J L; Storey, B T

    1985-01-01

    The role of chondrocyte mitochondria in endochondral ossification has been the subject of intensive investigation and controversy. The purpose of this study was to quantitate the endogenous calcium content and the maximum capacity for calcium accumulation and release in isolated mammalian growth-plate chondrocytes and hyaline-cartilage chondrocytes. The results indicated that the mitochondria of the isolated growth-plate and hyaline-cartilage chondrocytes possess a greater endogenous calcium content, a greater capacity for calcium accumulation, and a larger labile Ca+2 pool than do the mitochondria of hepatocytes. Growth-plate and hyaline-cartilage mitochondria had an endogenous calcium content of 908 and 142 nanomoles of Ca+2 per milligram of mitochondrial protein. The growth-plate mitochondria had a maximum calcium capacity of 5249 nanomoles of Ca+2 per milligram of mitochondrial protein. In comparison, the mitochondria of hepatocytes had a much smaller endogenous-calcium content and a smaller maximum Ca+2 capacity: twenty-one and 3262 nanomoles of Ca+2 per milligram of mitochondrial protein, respectively. The mitochondrial labile-calcium pool in both growth-plate and hyaline-cartilage chondrocytes was twofold greater than that in the mitochondria of hepatocytes. Chondrocyte mitochondria released approximately 2400 nanomoles of Ca+2 per milligram of mitochondrial protein, whereas hepatocyte mitochondria released 1200 nanomoles of Ca+2 per milligram. These results suggest that the chondrocyte mitochondria are specialized for calcium transport and are important in the calcification of the extracellular matrix of the growth plate.

  8. Runx1 Activities in Superficial Zone Chondrocytes, Osteoarthritic Chondrocyte Clones and Response to Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Kimberly T.; Walcott, Marie E.; Gaur, Tripti; O’Connell, Shannon L.; Basil, Kirti; Tadiri, Christina P.; Mason-Savas, April; Silva, Jason A.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S; Ayers, David C.; Lian, Jane B.; Fanning, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Runx1, the hematopoietic lineage determining transcription factor, is present in perichondrium and chondrocytes. Here we addressed Runx1 functions, by examining expression in cartilage during mouse and human osteoarthritis (OA) progression and in response to mechanical loading. Methods Spared and diseased compartments in knees of OA patients and in mice with surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus were examined for changes in expression of Runx1 mRNA (Q-PCR) and protein (immunoblot, immunohistochemistry). Runx1 levels were quantified in response to static mechanical compression of bovine articular cartilage. Runx1 function was assessed by cell proliferation (Ki67, PCNA) and cell type phenotypic markers. Results Runx1 is enriched in superficial zone (SZ) chondrocytes of normal bovine, mouse, and human tissues. Increasing loading conditions in bovine cartilage revealed a positive correlation with a significant elevation of Runx1. Runx1 becomes highly expressed at the periphery of mouse OA lesions and in human OA chondrocyte ‘clones’ where Runx1 co-localizes with Vcam1, the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) marker and lubricin (Prg4), a cartilage chondroprotective protein. These OA induced cells represent a proliferative cell population, Runx1 depletion in MPCs decreases cell growth, supporting Runx1 contribution to cell expansion. Conclusion The highest Runx1 levels in SZC of normal cartilage suggest a function that supports the unique phenotype of articular chondrocytes, reflected by upregulation under conditions of compression. We propose Runx1 co-expression with Vcam1 and lubricin in murine cell clusters and human ‘clones’ of OA cartilage, participate in a cooperative mechanism for a compensatory anabolic function. PMID:25078095

  9. Chondrogenic Potency Analyses of Donor-Matched Chondrocytes and Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Bone Marrow, Infrapatellar Fat Pad, and Subcutaneous Fat

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, John; McCarthy, Helen S.; Roberts, Sally; Richardson, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a cell-based therapy that has been used clinically for over 20 years to treat cartilage injuries more efficiently in order to negate or delay the need for joint replacement surgery. In this time, very little has changed in the ACI procedure, but now many centres are considering or using alternative cell sources for cartilage repair, in particular mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this study, we have tested the chondrogenic potential of donor-matched MSCs derived from bone marrow (BM), infrapatellar fat pad (FP), and subcutaneous fat (SCF), compared to chondrocytes. We have confirmed that there is a chondrogenic potency hierarchy ranging across these cell types, with the most potent being chondrocytes, followed by FP-MSCs, BM-MSCs, and lastly SCF-MSCs. We have also examined gene expression and surface marker profiles in a predictive model to identify cells with enhanced chondrogenic potential. In doing so, we have shown that Sox-9, Alk-1, and Coll X expressions, as well as immunopositivity for CD49c and CD39, have predictive value for all of the cell types tested in indicating chondrogenic potency. The findings from this study have significant clinical implications for the refinement and development of novel cell-based cartilage repair strategies. PMID:27781068

  10. VEGF, BMP-7, Matrigel(TM), hyaluronic acid, in vitro cultured chondrocytes and trephination for healing of the avascular portion of the meniscus. An experimental study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Forriol, Francisco; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Duart, Julio; Ripalda, Purification; Vaquero, Javier; Loppini, Mattia; Romeo, Giovanni; Campi, Stefano; Khan, Wasim S; Muda, Andrea O; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of VEGF, BMP-7, Matrigel(TM), hyaluronic acid, in vitro cultured chondrocytes and trephination to promote and enhance the healing process of avascular meniscal tears in an animal model. A longitudinal tear was produced in the inner avascular part of the meniscus of 24 sheeps. Each tear was treated with trephination technique and suture. The animals were divided into 6 groups to receive a different treatment: control (I); VEGF, BMP-7, Matrigel(TM), hyaluronic acid, in vitro cultured chondrocytes. At 8 weeks from surgery, meniscal samples were explanted and analyzed by histology, immunohistochemistry, and histomorphometry. At the histological examination, Group IV and VI showed a partial closure of the meniscal lesion, whereas Group I, II, III, and V did not show any evidence of healing. In the group IV, the healed tissue represented the 22.95% of the lesion area. In the group VI, the healed tissue represented the 43.75% of the lesion area. Autologous chondrocytes and BMP-7 associated with trephination and suture techniques enhanced healing process of meniscal tears in the avascular inner third of the meniscus in ovine model.

  11. A Qualitative Model of the Differentiation Network in Chondrocyte Maturation: A Holistic View of Chondrocyte Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhofs, Johan; Leijten, Jeroen; Bolander, Johanna; Luyten, Frank P.; Post, Janine N.; Geris, Liesbet

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of chondrocytes towards hypertrophy is a natural process whose control is essential in endochondral bone formation. It is additionally thought to play a role in several pathophysiological processes, with osteoarthritis being a prominent example. We perform a dynamic analysis of a qualitative mathematical model of the regulatory network that directs this phenotypic switch to investigate the influence of the individual factors holistically. To estimate the stability of a SOX9 positive state (associated with resting/proliferation chondrocytes) versus a RUNX2 positive one (associated with hypertrophy) we employ two measures. The robustness of the state in canalisation (size of the attractor basin) is assessed by a Monte Carlo analysis and the sensitivity to perturbations is assessed by a perturbational analysis of the attractor. Through qualitative predictions, these measures allow for an in silico screening of the effect of the modelled factors on chondrocyte maintenance and hypertrophy. We show how discrepancies between experimental data and the model’s results can be resolved by evaluating the dynamic plausibility of alternative network topologies. The findings are further supported by a literature study of proposed therapeutic targets in the case of osteoarthritis. PMID:27579819

  12. Polymer-based micro-deformable mirror for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liotard, Arnaud; Zamkotsian, Frederic; Conedera, Veronique; Fabre, Norbert; Lanzoni, Patrick; Camon, Henri; Chazallet, Frederic

    2006-01-01

    Highly performing adaptive optical (AO) systems are mandatory for next generation giant telescopes as well as next generation instrumentation for 10m-class telescopes, for studying new fields like circumstellar disks and extra-solar planets. These systems require deformable mirrors with very challenging parameters, including number of actuators up to 250 000 and inter-actuator spacing around 500μm. MOEMS-based devices are promising for future deformable mirrors. We are currently developing a micro-deformable mirror (MDM) based on an array of electrostatic actuators with attachment posts to a continuous mirror on top. In order to reach large stroke for low driving voltage, the originality of our approach lies in the elaboration of a sacrificial layer and of a structural layer made of polymer materials. We have developed the first polymer piston-motion actuator: a 10μm thick mobile plate with four springs attached to the substrate, and with an air gap of 10μm exhibits a piston motion of 2μm for 30V, and measured resonance frequency of 6.5kHz is well suited for AO systems. The electrostatic force provides a non-linear actuation, while AO systems are based on linear matrices operations. We have successfully developed a dedicated 14-bit electronics in order to "linearize" the actuation. Actual location of the actuator versus expected location of the actuator is obtained with a standard deviation of 21 nm. Comparison with FEM models shows very good agreement, and design of a complete polymer-based MDM has been done.

  13. Platelet-rich plasma increases transforming growth factor-beta1 expression at graft-host interface following autologous osteochondral transplantation in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Boakye, Lorraine A; Ross, Keir A; Pinski, John M; Smyth, Niall A; Haleem, Amgad M; Hannon, Charles P; Fortier, Lisa A; Kennedy, John G

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effect of platelet-rich plasma on protein expression patterns of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) in cartilage following autologous osteochondral transplantation (AOT) in a rabbit knee cartilage defect model. METHODS: Twelve New Zealand white rabbits received bilateral AOT. In each rabbit, one knee was randomized to receive an autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) injection and the contralateral knee received saline injection. Rabbits were euthanized at 3, 6 and 12 wk post-operatively. Articular cartilage sections were stained with TGF-β1 antibody. Histological regions of interest (ROI) (left, right and center of the autologous grafts interfaces) were evaluated using MetaMorph. Percentage of chondrocytes positive for TGF-β1 was then assessed. RESULTS: Percentage of chondrocytes positive for TGF-β1 was higher in PRP treated knees for selected ROIs (left; P = 0.03, center; P = 0.05) compared to control and was also higher in the PRP group at each post-operative time point (P = 6.6 × 10-4, 3.1 × 10-4 and 7.3 × 10-3 for 3, 6 and 12 wk, respectively). TGF-β1 expression was higher in chondrocytes of PRP-treated knees (36% ± 29% vs 15% ± 18%) (P = 1.8 × 10-6) overall for each post-operative time point and ROI. CONCLUSION: Articular cartilage of rabbits treated with AOT and PRP exhibit increased TGF-β1 expression compared to those treated with AOT and saline. Our findings suggest that adjunctive PRP may increase TGF-β1 expression, which may play a role in the chondrogenic effect of PRP in vivo. PMID:26716092

  14. Catabolic effects of muramyl dipeptide on rabbit chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ikebe, T.; Iribe, H.; Hirata, M.; Yanaga, F.; Koga, T. )

    1990-12-01

    Muramyl dipeptide, an essential structure for the diverse biologic activities of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan, inhibited the synthesis of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan in cultured rabbit costal chondrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Muramyl dipeptide, as well as lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-1 alpha, also enhanced the release of 35S-sulfate-prelabeled glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan from the cell layer, which seems to reflect, at least partially, the increasing degradation of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan. Five synthetic analogs of muramyl dipeptide known to be adjuvant active or adjuvant inactive were tested for their potential to inhibit synthesis of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan and to enhance the release of glycosaminoglycan/proteoglycan in chondrocytes. The structural dependence of these synthetic analogs on chondrocytes was found to parallel that of immunoadjuvant activity. These results suggest that muramyl dipeptide is a potent mediator of catabolism in chondrocytes.

  15. Vascular endothelial growth factor activities on osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pulsatelli, L; Dolzani, P; Silvestri, T; Frizziero, L; Facchini, A; Meliconi, R

    2005-01-01

    Evaluation of the role of VEGF in cartilage pathophysiology. VEGF release from chondrocytes in the presence of IL-1beta, TGFbeta and IL-10 was detected by immunoassay. VEGF receptor -1 and -2 expression and VEGF ability to modulate caspase -3 and cathepsin B expression were detected by immunohistochemistry on cartilage biopsies and cartilage explants. VEGF effects on chondrocyte proliferation was analysed by a fluorescent dye that binds nucleic acids. VEGF production by osteoartritis (OA) chondrocytes was significantly reduced by IL-1beta while it was increased in the presence of TGFbeta. Cartilage VEGFR-1 immunostaining was significantly downregulated in 'early' OA patients compared to normal controls (NC). VEGFR-2 expression was negligible both in OA and in NC. VEGF decreased the expression of caspase-3 and cathepsin B, whereas it did not affect proliferation. VEGF is able to down-modulate chondrocyte activities related to catabolic events involved in OA cartilage degradation.

  16. Telomerase Activity in Articular Chondrocytes Is Lost after Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brooke; Novakofski, Kira D.; Donocoff, Rachel Sacher; Liang, Yan-Xiang Amber

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Telomere length and telomerase activity are important indicators of cellular senescence and replicative ability. Loss of telomerase is associated with ageing and the development of osteoarthritis. Implantation of telomerase-positive cells, chondrocytes, or stem cells expressing a normal chondrocyte phenotype is desired for cartilage repair procedures. The objective of this study was to identify at what age chondrocytes and at what passage bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) become senescent based on telomerase activity. The effect of osteogenic protein–1 (OP-1) or interleukin-1α (IL-1α) treatment on telomerase activity in chondrocytes was also measured to determine the response to anabolic or catabolic stimuli. Methods: Articular cartilage was collected from horses (n = 12) aged 1 month to 18 years. Chondrocytes from prepubescent horses (<15 months) were treated with OP-1 or IL-1α. Bone marrow aspirate from adult horses was collected and cultured for up to 10 days to isolate MSCs. Telomerase activity was measured using the TeloTAGGG Telomerase PCR ELISA kit. Results: Chondrocytes from prepubescent horses were positive for telomerase activity. Treatment with IL-1α resulted in a decrease in chondrocyte telomerase activity; however, treatment with OP-1 did not change telomerase activity. One MSC culture sample was positive for telomerase activity on day 2; all samples were negative for telomerase activity on day 10. Conclusions: These results suggest that chondrocytes from prepubescent donors are potentially more suitable for cartilage repair procedures and that telomerase activity is diminished by anabolic and catabolic cytokine stimulation. If MSCs are utilized in cartilage repair, minimal passaging should be performed prior to implantation. PMID:26069700

  17. Haploinsufficiency of osterix in chondrocytes impairs skeletal growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaohong; Xing, Weirong; Zhou, Xin; Mohan, Subburaman

    2013-10-01

    Osterix (Osx) is essential for both intramembranous or endochondral bone formation. Osteoblast-specific ablation of Osx using Col1α1-Cre resulted in osteopenia, because of impaired osteoblast differentiation in adult mice. Since Osx is also known to be expressed in chondrocytes, we evaluated the role of Osx expressed in chondrocytes by examining the skeletal phenotype of mice with conditional disruption of Osx in Col2α1-expressing chondrocytes. Surprisingly, Cre-positive mice that were homozygous for Osx floxed alleles died after birth. Alcian blue and alizarin red staining revealed that the lengths of skeleton, femur, and vertebrae were reduced by 21, 26, and 14% (P < 0.01), respectively, in the knockout (KO) compared with wild-type mice. To determine if haploid insufficiency of Osx in chondrocytes influenced postnatal skeletal growth, we compared skeletal phenotype of floxed heterozygous mice that were Cre-positive or Cre-negative. Body length was reduced by 8% (P < 0.001), and areal BMD of total body, femur, and tibia was reduced by 5, 7, and 8% (P < 0.05), respectively, in mice with conditional disruption of one allele of Osx in chondrocytes. Micro-CT showed reduced cortical volumetric bone mineral density and trabecular bone volume to total volume in the femurs of Osx(flox/+);col2α1-Cre mice. Histological analysis revealed that the impairment of longitudinal growth was associated with disrupted growth plates in the Osx(flox/+);col2α1-Cre mice. Primary chondrocytes isolated from KO embryos showed reduced expression of chondral ossification markers but elevated expression of chondrogenesis markers. Our findings indicate that Osx expressed in chondrocytes regulates bone growth in part by regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy.

  18. Membrane channel gene expression in human costal and articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, A.; Barrett-Jolley, R.; Werner, A.; Kelly, R.; Stacey, M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chondrocytes are the uniquely resident cells found in all types of cartilage and key to their function is the ability to respond to mechanical loads with changes of metabolic activity. This mechanotransduction property is, in part, mediated through the activity of a range of expressed transmembrane channels; ion channels, gap junction proteins, and porins. Appropriate expression of ion channels has been shown essential for production of extracellular matrix and differential expression of transmembrane channels is correlated to musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis and Albers-Schönberg. In this study we analyzed the consistency of gene expression between channelomes of chondrocytes from human articular and costal (teenage and fetal origin) cartilages. Notably, we found 14 ion channel genes commonly expressed between articular and both types of costal cartilage chondrocytes. There were several other ion channel genes expressed only in articular (6 genes) or costal chondrocytes (5 genes). Significant differences in expression of BEST1 and KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) were observed between fetal and teenage costal cartilage. Interestingly, the large Ca2+ activated potassium channel (BKα, or KCNMA1) was very highly expressed in all chondrocytes examined. Expression of the gap junction genes for Panx1, GJA1 (Cx43) and GJC1 (Cx45) was also observed in chondrocytes from all cartilage samples. Together, this data highlights similarities between chondrocyte membrane channel gene expressions in cells derived from different anatomical sites, and may imply that common electrophysiological signaling pathways underlie cellular control. The high expression of a range of mechanically and metabolically sensitive membrane channels suggest that chondrocyte mechanotransduction may be more complex than previously thought. PMID:27116676

  19. Geranylgeranylacetone suppresses hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Masaki; Sakai, Tadahiro; Mitsuyama, Hirohito; Hiraiwa, Hideki; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2011-11-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common disease, afflicting many sufferers with both pain and functional disorders. Various therapies have been attempted for OA, but no fully effective treatment has been established yet. Apoptosis of chondrocytes caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been considered important in the pathogenesis of OA. The progression of OA may be prevented by suppressing apoptosis of chondrocytes. Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) has been used as an anti-ulcer drug in Japan for more than 20 years. Several recent studies have shown that GGA can induce heat shock protein (HSP) and exert cytoprotective actions on a large variety of cells and tissues. In this study, we investigated the effects of GGA on the apoptosis of OA chondrocytes induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Human isolated OA chondrocytes were cultured in the absence or presence of GGA. Cell viability, caspase 3/7 and 9 activities, HSP70 mRNA and protein expressions were examined, and morphological analyses were conducted after exposure of cells to H(2)O(2) to induce apoptosis. Geranylgeranylacetone dose-dependently reversed the H(2)O(2)-induced decrease in cell viability. It was recognized that GGA rendered OA chondrocytes resistant to H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis from Hoechst 33342 staining and TUNEL staining. Caspases 3 and 9 were activated by addition of H(2)O(2), and GGA suppressed this H(2)O(2)-induced activation of both caspases. H(2)O(2)-induced induction of HSP70 was enhanced in OA chondrocytes by pretreatment with GGA. The results showed that GGA can suppress apoptosis of chondrocytes and enhance production of HSP70. This study is the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that GGA protects OA chondrocytes from H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis, at least in part by enhancing HSP70 production. These results indicate that GGA is a potentially useful drug for the treatment of OA.

  20. CCN1 Regulates Chondrocyte Maturation and Cartilage Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongchun; Sheu, Tzong-jen; Hoak, Donna; Shen, Jie; Hilton, Matthew J; Zuscik, Michael J; Jonason, Jennifer H; O’Keefe, Regis J

    2016-01-01

    WNT/β-CATENIN signaling is involved in multiple aspects of skeletal development, including chondrocyte differentiation and maturation. Although the functions of β-CATENIN in chondrocytes have been extensively investigated through gain-of-function and loss-of-function mouse models, the precise downstream effectors through which β-CATENIN regulates these processes are not well defined. Here, we report that the matricellular protein, CCN1, is induced by WNT/β-CATENIN signaling in chondrocytes. Specifically, we found that β-CATENIN signaling promotes CCN1 expression in isolated primary sternal chondrocytes and both embryonic and postnatal cartilage. Additionally, we show that, in vitro, CCN1 overexpression promotes chondrocyte maturation, whereas inhibition of endogenous CCN1 function inhibits maturation. To explore the role of CCN1 on cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, we generated a novel transgenic mouse model for conditional Ccn1 overexpression and show that cartilage-specific CCN1 overexpression leads to chondrodysplasia during development and cartilage degeneration in adult mice. Finally, we demonstrate that CCN1 expression increases in mouse knee joint tissues after meniscal/ligamentous injury (MLI) and in human cartilage after meniscal tear. Collectively, our data suggest that CCN1 is an important regulator of chondrocyte maturation during cartilage development and homeostasis. PMID:26363286

  1. Antioxidant effect of bisphosphonates and simvastatin on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrecht, E.J.; De Tollenaere, C.B.; Aerts, K.; Cos, P.; Schuerwegh, A.J.; Bridts, C.H.; Van Offel, J.F.; Ebo, D.G.; Stevens, W.J. . E-mail: immuno@ua.ac.be; De Clerck, L.S.

    2006-09-22

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bisphosphonates (BPs) and simvastatin on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. For this purpose, a flow cytometrical method using C11-BODIPY{sup 581/591} was developed to detect hydroperoxide-induced lipid peroxidation in chondrocytes. Tertiary butylhydroperoxide (t-BHP) induced a time and concentration dependent increase in chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. Addition of a Fe{sup 2+}/EDTA complex to t-BHP or hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) clearly enhanced lipid peroxidation. The lipophilic simvastatin demonstrated a small inhibition in the chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. None of three tested BPs (clodronate, pamidronate, and risedronate) had an effect on chondrocyte lipid peroxidation induced by t-BHP. However, when Fe{sup 2+}/EDTA complex was added to t-BHP or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, BPs inhibited the lipid peroxidation process varying from 25% to 58%. This study demonstrates that BPs have antioxidant properties as iron chelators, thereby inhibiting the chondrocyte lipid peroxidation. These findings add evidence to the therapeutic potential of bisphosphonates and statins in rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Endogenous versus Exogenous Growth Factor Regulation of Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shuiliang; Chan, Albert G.; Mercer, Scott; Eckert, George J.; Trippel, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Anabolic growth factors that regulate the function of articular chondrocytes are candidates for articular cartilage repair. Such factors may be delivered by pharmacotherapy in the form of exogenous proteins, or by gene therapy as endogenous proteins. It is unknown whether delivery method influences growth factor effectiveness in regulating articular chondrocyte reparative functions. We treated adult bovine articular chondrocytes with exogenous recombinant insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1), or with the genes encoding these growth factors for endogenous production. Treatment effects were measured as change in chondrocyte DNA content, glycosaminoglycan production, and aggrecan gene expression. We found that IGF-I stimulated chondrocyte biosynthesis similarly when delivered by either exogenous or endogenous means. In contrast, exogenous TGF-ß1 stimulated these reparative functions, while endogenous TGF-ß1 had little effect. Endogenous TGF-ß1 became more bioactive following activation of the transgene protein product. These data indicate that effective mechanisms of growth factor delivery for articular cartilage repair may differ for different growth factors. In the case of IGF-I, gene therapy or protein therapy appear to be viable options. In contrast, TGF-ß1 gene therapy may be constrained by a limited ability of chondrocytes to convert latent complexes to an active form. PMID:24105960

  3. Sphingosine-1-phosphate stimulates rat primary chondrocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Lee, Ha Young; Kwak, Jong-Young; Park, Joo-In; Yun, Jeanho; Bae, Yoe-Sik . E-mail: yoesik@donga.ac.kr

    2006-06-23

    Rat primary chondrocytes express the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor, S1P{sub 2}, S1P{sub 3}, S1P{sub 4}, but not S1P{sub 1}. When chondrocytes were stimulated with S1P or phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PhS1P, an S1P{sub 1}- and S1P{sub 4}-selective agonist), phospholipase C-mediated cytosolic calcium increase was dramatically induced. S1P and PhS1P also stimulated two kinds of mitogen-activated protein kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 kinase in chondrocytes. In terms of the two phospholipids-mediated functional modulation of chondrocytes, S1P and PhS1P stimulated cellular proliferation. The two phospholipids-induced chondrocyte proliferations were almost completely blocked by PD98059 but not by SB203580, suggesting that ERK but not p38 kinase is essentially required for the proliferation. Pertussis toxin almost completely inhibited the two phospholipids-induced cellular proliferation and ERK activation, indicating the crucial role of G{sub i} protein. This study demonstrates the physiological role of two important phospholipids (S1P and PhS1P) on the modulation of rat primary chondrocyte proliferation, and the crucial role played by ERK in the process.

  4. Multi-membrane chitosan hydrogels as chondrocytic cell bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Ladet, S G; Tahiri, K; Montembault, A S; Domard, A J; Corvol, M-T M

    2011-08-01

    We investigated the bioactivity of new chitosan-based multi-membrane hydrogel (MMH) architectures towards chondrocyte-like cells. The microstructure of the hydrogels constituting the membranes precludes any living cell penetration, whereas their lower scale architecture allows the protein diffusion. The biological behavior of chondrocytes implanted within the MMH inter-membrane spaces was studied for 45 days in culture. Chondrocytes formed cell aggregates and proliferated without loosing their chondrogenic phenotype as illustrated by collagen II and aggrecan expressions at the mRNA and protein levels. Cells produced neo-formed alcyan blue matrix proteins filling MMH interspaces. The HiF-2α/SOX9 pattern of expression suggested that the elevated chondrocytic phenotype in MMH could be related to a better hypoxic local environment than in classical culture conditions. Pro-inflammatory markers were not expressed during the period of culture. The low level of nitric oxide accumulation within the inter-membrane spaces and in the incubation medium implied that chitosan consumed nitrites produced by entrapped chondrocytes, in relation with the decrease of its molecular weight of 50%. Our data suggest that MMH structures may be considered as complex chondrocytic cell bioreactors; "active decoys of biological media", potentially promising for various biomedical applications like the inter-vertebral disk replacement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of autophagy induced by dexamethasone on senescence in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Enxing; Zhang, Yu; Song, Bing; Xiao, Jun; Shi, Zhanjun

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to explore the effects of dexamethasone (DXM) on autophagy and senescence in chondrocytes. Collagen II and aggrecan were examined in normal chondrocytes isolated from Sprague‑Dawley rats. Following stimulation with DXM, LysoTracker Red staining, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, green fluorescent protein‑red fluorescent protein‑light chain 3 (LC3) and western blotting were used to detect autophagy levels in the chondrocytes. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway‑associated molecules were investigated by western blotting. Cell senescence was analyzed by senescence‑associated (SA)‑β‑galactosidase (β‑gal) staining. A dose‑dependent increase in the number of autophagic vacuoles was observed in the DXM‑treated chondrocytes, as demonstrated by LysoTracker Red and MDC staining. A dose‑dependent increase in autophagosome formation was observed in the DXM‑treated chondrocytes. Expression of LC3‑II and beclin‑1 was increased by DXM, in particular in the cells treated with DXM for 4 days. However, P62 expression was reduced as a result of treatment. SA‑β‑gal staining indicated that DXM increased cell senescence. Notably, DXM‑induced cell senescence was exacerbated by the autophagic inhibitor 3‑MA. Autophagy induced by DXM protected chondrocytes from senescence, and it is suggested that the mTOR pathway may be involved in the activation of DXM‑induced autophagy.

  6. CCN1 Regulates Chondrocyte Maturation and Cartilage Development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongchun; Sheu, Tzong-jen; Hoak, Donna; Shen, Jie; Hilton, Matthew J; Zuscik, Michael J; Jonason, Jennifer H; O'Keefe, Regis J

    2016-03-01

    WNT/β-CATENIN signaling is involved in multiple aspects of skeletal development, including chondrocyte differentiation and maturation. Although the functions of β-CATENIN in chondrocytes have been extensively investigated through gain-of-function and loss-of-function mouse models, the precise downstream effectors through which β-CATENIN regulates these processes are not well defined. Here, we report that the matricellular protein, CCN1, is induced by WNT/β-CATENIN signaling in chondrocytes. Specifically, we found that β-CATENIN signaling promotes CCN1 expression in isolated primary sternal chondrocytes and both embryonic and postnatal cartilage. Additionally, we show that, in vitro, CCN1 overexpression promotes chondrocyte maturation, whereas inhibition of endogenous CCN1 function inhibits maturation. To explore the role of CCN1 on cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, we generated a novel transgenic mouse model for conditional Ccn1 overexpression and show that cartilage-specific CCN1 overexpression leads to chondrodysplasia during development and cartilage degeneration in adult mice. Finally, we demonstrate that CCN1 expression increases in mouse knee joint tissues after meniscal/ligamentous injury (MLI) and in human cartilage after meniscal tear. Collectively, our data suggest that CCN1 is an important regulator of chondrocyte maturation during cartilage development and homeostasis.

  7. ATF3 deficiency in chondrocytes alleviates osteoarthritis development.

    PubMed

    Iezaki, Takashi; Ozaki, Kakeru; Fukasawa, Kazuya; Inoue, Makoto; Kitajima, Shigetaka; Muneta, Takeshi; Takeda, Shu; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Onishi, Yuki; Horie, Tetsuhiro; Yoneda, Yukio; Takarada, Takeshi; Hinoi, Eiichi

    2016-08-01

    Activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases, including cancer and inflammation, as well as in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the involvement of Atf3 in developmental skeletogenesis and joint disease has not been well studied to date. Here, we show that Atf3 is a critical mediator of osteoarthritis (OA) development through its expression in chondrocytes. ATF3 expression was markedly up-regulated in the OA cartilage of both mice and humans. Conditional deletion of Atf3 in chondrocytes did not result in skeletal abnormalities or affect the chondrogenesis, but alleviated the development of OA generated by surgically inducing knee joint instability in mice. Inflammatory cytokines significantly up-regulated Atf3 expression through the nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) pathway, while cytokine-induced interleukin-6 (Il6) expression was repressed, in ATF3-deleted murine and human chondrocytes. Mechanistically, Atf3 deficiency decreased cytokine-induced Il6 transcription in chondrocytes through repressing NF-kB signalling by the attenuation of the phosphorylation status of IkB and p65. These findings suggest that Atf3 is implicated in the pathogenesis of OA through modulation of inflammatory cytokine expression in chondrocytes, and the feed-forward loop of inflammatory cytokines/NF-kB/Atf3 in chondrocytes may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment for OA. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Statins do not inhibit the FGFR signaling in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fafilek, B; Hampl, M; Ricankova, N; Vesela, I; Balek, L; Kunova Bosakova, M; Gudernova, I; Varecha, M; Buchtova, M; Krejci, P

    2017-09-01

    Statins are widely used drugs for cholesterol lowering, which were recently found to counteract the effects of aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR3) signaling in cell and animal models of FGFR3-related chondrodysplasia. This opened an intriguing therapeutic possibility for human dwarfing conditions caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGFR3, although the mechanism of statin action on FGFR3 remains unclear. Here, we determine the effect of statins on FGFR signaling in chondrocytes. Cultured chondrocyte cell lines, mouse embryonic tibia cultures and limb bud micromasses were treated with FGF2 to activate FGFR signaling. The effects of atorvastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin and pravastatin on FGFR3 protein stability and on FGFR-mediated chondrocyte growth-arrest, loss of extracellular matrix (ECM), induction of premature senescence and hypertrophic differentiation were evaluated. Statins did not alter the level of FGFR3 protein expression nor produce any effect on FGFR-mediated inhibition of chondrocyte proliferation and hypertrophic differentiation in cultured chondrocyte cell lines, mouse tibia cultures or limb bud micromasses. We conclude that statins do not inhibit the FGFR signaling in chondrocytes. Therefore the statin-mediated rescue of FGFR3-related chondrodysplasia, described before, is likely not intrinsic to the growth plate cartilage. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of autophagy induced by dexamethasone on senescence in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Enxing; Zhang, Yu; Song, Bing; Xiao, Jun; Shi, Zhanjun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to explore the effects of dexamethasone (DXM) on autophagy and senescence in chondrocytes. Collagen II and aggrecan were examined in normal chondrocytes isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats. Following stimulation with DXM, LysoTracker Red staining, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, green fluorescent protein-red fluorescent protein-light chain 3 (LC3) and western blotting were used to detect autophagy levels in the chondrocytes. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway-associated molecules were investigated by western blotting. Cell senescence was analyzed by senescence-associated (SA)-β-galactosidase (β-gal) staining. A dose-dependent increase in the number of autophagic vacuoles was observed in the DXM-treated chondrocytes, as demonstrated by LysoTracker Red and MDC staining. A dose-dependent increase in autophagosome formation was observed in the DXM-treated chondrocytes. Expression of LC3-II and beclin-1 was increased by DXM, in particular in the cells treated with DXM for 4 days. However, P62 expression was reduced as a result of treatment. SA-β-gal staining indicated that DXM increased cell senescence. Notably, DXM-induced cell senescence was exacerbated by the autophagic inhibitor 3-MA. Autophagy induced by DXM protected chondrocytes from senescence, and it is suggested that the mTOR pathway may be involved in the activation of DXM-induced autophagy. PMID:27572674

  10. Packaging consideration of two-dimensional polymer-based photonic crystals for laser beam steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Xinyuan; Chen, Xiaonan; Chen, Maggie Yihong; Wang, Alan Xiaolong; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Ray T.

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we report the theoretical study of polymer-based photonic crystals for laser beam steering which is based on the superprism effect as well as the experiment fabrication of the two dimensional photonic crystals for the laser beam steering. Superprism effect, the principle for beam steering, was separately studied in details through EFC (Equifrequency Contour) analysis. Polymer based photonic crystals were fabricated through double exposure holographic interference method using SU8-2007. The experiment results were also reported.

  11. Influence on chondrogenesis of human osteoarthritic chondrocytes in co-culture with donor-matched mesenchymal stem cells from infrapatellar fat pad and subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Lopa, S; Colombini, A; Sansone, V; Preis, F W Baruffaldi; Moretti, M

    2013-01-01

    Co-culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and articular chondrocytes (ACs) has been proposed for autologous cartilage cell-based therapies, to overcome the issues associated to limited availability of articular chondrocytes (ACs). To evaluate the potentiality of a co-culture approach in aged osteoarthritic patients, MSCs from infrapatellar fat pad (IFP-MSCs) and knee subcutaneous adipose tissue (ASCs) were co-cultured with donor-matched osteoarthritic, expanded and cryopreserved, ACs in a 75%/25% ratio. Co-cultures were prepared also from nasal chondrocytes (NCs) to evaluate their possible use as an alternative to ACs. Pellets were differentiated for 14 days, using mono-cultures of each cell type as reference. Chondrogenic genes SOX9, COL2A1, ACAN were less expressed in co-cultures compared to ACs and NCs. Total GAGs content in co-cultures did not differ significantly from values predicted as the sum of each cell type contribution corrected for the co-culture ratio, as confirmed by histology. No significant differences were observed for GAGs/DNA in mono-cultures, demonstrating a reduced chondrogenic potential of ACs and NCs. In conclusion, a small percentage of expanded and cryopreserved ACs and NCs did not lead to IFP-MSCs and ASCs chondro-induction. Our results suggest that chondrogenic potential and origin of chondrocytes may play a relevant role in the outcome of co-cultures, indicating a need for further investigations to demonstrate their clinical relevance in the treatment of aged osteoarthritic patients.

  12. Serum-free medium supplemented with high-concentration FGF2 for cell expansion culture of human ear chondrocytes promotes redifferentiation capacity.

    PubMed

    Mandl, Erik W; van der Veen, Simone W; Verhaar, Jan A N; van Osch, Gerjo J V M

    2002-08-01

    For tissue engineering of autologous cartilage, cell expansion is needed to obtain the cell numbers required. Standard expansion media contain bovine serum. This has several disadvantages, that is, the risk of transmitting diseases and serum-batch variations. The aim of this study was to find a serum-free medium with at least the same potential to expand cell numbers as serum-containing media. Ear chondrocytes of three young children were expanded in either serum-containing medium (SCM; DMEM with 10% fetal calf serum) or serum-free medium (SFM; DMEM with ITS+) supplemented with 5 or 100 ng/mL fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2). To promote cell adherence onto the culture flask, the serum-free conditions were cultured with 10% serum for 1 day after each trypsinization. After the fourth passage, the chondrocytes were encapsuled in alginate beads and redifferentiated in a SFM (DMEM with ITS+, hydrocortisone, and L-ascorbic acid) supplemented with 10 ng/mL IGF-I and 10 ng/mL TGFbeta-2. Results showed that expansion in SFM with 100 ng/mL FGF2 was comparable to expansion in SCM. Redifferentiation with SFM with IGF-I and TGFbeta-2 showed high collagen type II expression and high GAG/DNA production regardless of which expansion medium had been used. However, chondrocytes expanded in SFM with 100 ng/mL FGF2 resulted in less positive cells for collagen type I and 11-fibrau (a fibroblast membrane marker). The present study shows that it is possible to use serum-free medium for tissue engineering of cartilage. Expansion of immature ear chondrocytes in SFM supplemented with high-concentration FGF2 resulted in high cell numbers, which in addition had better redifferentiation capacity than cells expanded in medium with 10% serum.

  13. Viscoelastic properties of polymer based layered-silicate nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jiaxiang

    Polymer based layered-silicate nanocomposites offer the potential for dramatically improved mechanical, thermal, and barrier properties while keeping the material density low. Understanding the linear and non-linear viscoelastic response for such materials is crucial because of the ability of such measurements to elucidate the mesoscale dispersion of layered-silicates and changes in such dispersion to applied flows as would be encountered in processing of these materials. A series of intercalated polystyrene (and derivatives of polystyrene) layered-silicate nanocomposites are studied to demonstrate the influence of mesoscale dispersion and organic---inorganic interactions on the linear and non-linear viscoelastic properties. A layered-silicate network structure is exhibited for the nanocomposites with strong polymer-silicate interaction such as montmorillonite (2C18M) and fluorohectorite (C18F) and the percolation threshold is ˜ 6 wt % for the 2C18M based hybrids. However, the nanocomposites based on hectorite (2C18H) with weak polymer-silicate interaction exhibit liquid-like terminal zone behavior. Furthermore, the enhanced terminal zone elastic modulus and viscosity of high brominated polystyrene and high molecular weight polystyrene based 2C18M nanocomposites suggest an improved delamination and dispersion of layered-silicates in the polymer matrix. The non-linear viscoelastic properties, specifically, the non-linear stress relaxation behavior and the applicability of time---strain separability, the effect of increasing strain amplitude on the oscillatory shear flow properties, and the shear rate dependence of the steady shear flow properties are examined. The silicate sheets (or collections of sheets) exhibit the ability to be oriented by the applied flow. Experimentally, the empirical Cox - Merz rule is demonstrated to be inapplicable for the hybrids. Furthermore, the K-BKZ constitutive model is used to model the steady shear properties. While being able to

  14. Responsive polymer-based colloids for drug delivery and bioconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudina, Olena

    Responsive polymer-based colloids (RPBC) are the colloidal structures containing responsive polymeric component which is able to adapt its physico-chemical properties to the environment by undergoing chemical and/or conformational changes. The goal of the dissertation is to develop and characterize several groups of RPBC with different morphological complexity and explore their potential in drug delivery and bioconversion. The role of RPBC morphology for these specific applications is discussed in details. Three groups of RPBC were fabricated: i. polymeric micelles; ii. mixed polymeric micelles; iii. hybrid polymer-inorganic particles. All fabricated RPBCs contain polymeric component in their structure. The dissertation investigates how the changes of the responsive polymeric component properties are reflected in morphologies of RPBC. The first group of RPBC, polymeric micelles, was formed by the self-assembly of amphiphilic invertible polymers (AIPs) synthesized in our group. AIPs self-assemble into invertible micellar assemblies (IMAs) in solvents of different polarity. In this work, IMAs ability to invert the structure as a response to the change in solvent polarity was demonstrated using 1H NMR spectroscopy and SANS. It was shown that the IMAs incorporate hydrophobic cargo either in the core or in the shell, depending on the chemical structure of cargo molecules. Following in vitro study demonstrates that loaded with drug (curcumin) IMAs are cytotoxic to osteosarcoma cells. Mixed polymeric micelles represent another, more complex, RPBC morphologies studied in the dissertation. Mixed micelles were fabricated from AIPs and amphiphilic oligomers synthesized from pyromellitic dianhydride, polyethylene glycol methyl ethers, and alkanols/cholesterol. The combination of selected AIP and oligomers based on cholesterol results in mixed micelles with an increased drug-loading capacity (from 10% w/w loaded curcumin in single component IMAs to 26%w/w in mixed micelles

  15. Simplified enrollment for autologous transfusion: automatic referral of presurgical patients for assessment for autologous blood collections.

    PubMed

    Moore, S B; Swenke, P K; Foss, M L; Rand, J A; Cabanela, M E; Kavanagh, B; Taswell, H F

    1992-04-01

    We implemented a pilot program at our institution for automatic referral of patients for presurgical assessment for preoperative and intraoperative collection of autologous blood. Although patients and clinicians support the use of autologous transfusion, often a request for collection of autologous blood is not initiated. During 11 months, 269 patients (82%) of three orthopedic surgeons entered the program, and 218 underwent operation and were dismissed from the hospital. A total of 940 units of autologous blood (675 preoperatively and 265 intraoperatively) was collected from these 218 patients, and 84% of the units were transfused. Throughout hospitalization, 86% of the patients received only autologous blood, whereas 14% received various proportions of homologous and autologous blood. In contrast, only 26% of a concomitant control group of 220 consecutive orthopedic surgical patients not participating in the automatic-referral program received only autologous blood. Thus, the automatic-referral program increased the percentage of elective orthopedic surgical patients who received only autologous blood from 26% to 86% (P less than 0.001). This study also showed that the same amount of blood was used for autologous transfusions as was routinely used for homologous transfusions in similar cases. The automatic-referral system was convenient for physicians and patients and offered the benefits of reduction of transfusion-associated risks and amelioration of patient anxieties.

  16. In vitro development of personalized cartilage microtissues uncovers an individualized differentiation capacity of human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Frank; Lehmann, Mario; Sack, Ulrich; Anderer, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    may be a suitable basis to establish a "personalized diagnostic tool" with the opportunity to assess the capacity of expanded chondrocytes to respond to an autologous cell-based therapy. Impact statement A challenge in cell-based cartilage regeneration therapies is the identification of a "personalized diagnostic tool" to predict the chondrogenic potency of cells from patients who are going to be treated with autologous cells. Comparing the phenotype of isolated chondrocytes from different donors in vitro revealed an individual cartilage-specific differentiation capacity. These personalized features are not detectable in vitro until the monolayer cells have the possibility to rearrange in 3D tissues. Cells from articular cartilage in monolayer culture may not be a suitable basis to discriminate responders from non-responders with respect to a personalized cell-based therapy to treat cartilage defects. A more physiological 3D (micro-)environment enable the cells to present their individual differentiation capacity. The here described microtissue model might be the basis for an in vitro platform to predict the therapeutic outcome of autologous cell-based cartilage repair and/or a suitable tool to identify early biomarkers to classify the patients.

  17. Autogenous cultured growth plate chondrocyte transplantation in the treatment of physeal injury in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewski, R.; Bohosiewicz, J.; Gap, A.; Bursig, H.; Wysocka, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this experimental study on New Zealand’s white rabbits was to investigate the transplantation of autogenous growth plate cells in order to treat the injured growth plate. They were assessed in terms of measurements of radiological tibial varus and histological characteristics. Methods An experimental model of plate growth medial partial resection of the tibia in 14 New Zealand white rabbits was created. During this surgical procedure the plate growth cells were collected and cultured. While the second surgery was being performed, the autologous cultured growth plate cells were grafted at the right tibia, whereas the left tibia was used as a control group. Results Histological examinations showed that the grafted right tibia presented the regular shape of the plate growth with hypertrophic maturation, chondrocyte columniation and endochondral calcification. Radiological study shows that the mean tibial deformity at the left angle was 20.29° (6.25 to 33) and 7.21° (5 to 10) in the right angle. Conclusion This study has demonstrated that grafting of autogenous cultured growth plate cells into a defect of the medial aspect of the proximal tibial physis can prevent bone bridge formation, growth arrest and the development of varus deformity. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:310–16 PMID:25376625

  18. The mechanical microenvironment of high concentration agarose for applying deformation to primary chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zignego, Donald L; Jutila, Aaron A; Gelbke, Martin K; Gannon, Daniel M; June, Ronald K

    2014-06-27

    Cartilage and chondrocytes experience loading that causes alterations in chondrocyte biological activity. In vivo chondrocytes are surrounded by a pericellular matrix with a stiffness of ~25-200kPa. Understanding the mechanical loading environment of the chondrocyte is of substantial interest for understanding chondrocyte mechanotransduction. The first objective of this study was to analyze the spatial variability of applied mechanical deformations in physiologically stiff agarose on cellular and sub-cellular length scales. Fluorescent microspheres were embedded in physiologically stiff agarose hydrogels. Microsphere positions were measured via confocal microscopy and used to calculate displacement and strain fields as a function of spatial position. The second objective was to assess the feasibility of encapsulating primary human chondrocytes in physiologically stiff agarose. The third objective was to determine if primary human chondrocytes could deform in high-stiffness agarose gels. Primary human chondrocyte viability was assessed using live-dead imaging following 24 and 72h in tissue culture. Chondrocyte shape was measured before and after application of 10% compression. These data indicate that (1) displacement and strain precision are ~1% and 6.5% respectively, (2) high-stiffness agarose gels can maintain primary human chondrocyte viability of >95%, and (3) compression of chondrocytes in 4.5% agarose can induce shape changes indicative of cellular compression. Overall, these results demonstrate the feasibility of using high-concentration agarose for applying in vitro compression to chondrocytes as a model for understanding how chondrocytes respond to in vivo loading.

  19. Formation of Hyaline Cartilage Tissue by Passaged Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Vanessa J; Weber, Joanna F; Waldman, Stephen D; Backstein, David; Kandel, Rita A

    2017-02-01

    When serially passaged in standard monolayer culture to expand cell number, articular chondrocytes lose their phenotype. This results in the formation of fibrocartilage when they are used clinically, thus limiting their use for cartilage repair therapies. Identifying a way to redifferentiate these cells in vitro is critical if they are to be used successfully. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) family members are known to be crucial for regulating differentiation of fetal limb mesenchymal cells and mesenchymal stromal cells to chondrocytes. As passaged chondrocytes acquire a progenitor-like phenotype, the hypothesis of this study was that TGFβ supplementation will stimulate chondrocyte redifferentiation in vitro in serum-free three-dimensional (3D) culture. Human articular chondrocytes were serially passaged twice (P2) in monolayer culture. P2 cells were then placed in high-density (3D) culture on top of membranes (Millipore) and cultured for up to 6 weeks in chemically defined serum-free redifferentiation media (SFRM) in the presence or absence of TGFβ. The tissues were evaluated histologically, biochemically, by immunohistochemical staining, and biomechanically. Passaged human chondrocytes cultured in SFRM supplemented with 10 ng/mL TGFβ3 consistently formed a continuous layer of articular-like cartilage tissue rich in collagen type 2 and aggrecan and lacking collagen type 1 and X in the absence of a scaffold. The tissue developed a superficial zone characterized by expression of lubricin and clusterin with horizontally aligned collagen fibers. This study suggests that passaged human chondrocytes can be used to bioengineer a continuous layer of articular cartilage-like tissue in vitro scaffold free. Further study is required to evaluate their ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo.

  20. The chondrocytic journey in endochondral bone growth and skeletal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Yeung Tsang, Kwok; Wa Tsang, Shun; Chan, Danny; Cheah, Kathryn S E

    2014-03-01

    The endochondral bones of the skeleton develop from a cartilage template and grow via a process involving a cascade of chondrocyte differentiation steps culminating in formation of a growth plate and the replacement of cartilage by bone. This process of endochondral ossification, driven by the generation of chondrocytes and their subsequent proliferation, differentiation, and production of extracellular matrix constitute a journey, deviation from which inevitably disrupts bone growth and development, and is the basis of human skeletal dysplasias with a wide range of phenotypic severity, from perinatal lethality to progressively deforming. This highly coordinated journey of chondrocyte specification and fate determination is controlled by a myriad of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. SOX9 is the master transcription factor that, in concert with varying partners along the way, directs the different phases of the journey from mesenchymal condensation, chondrogenesis, differentiation, proliferation, and maturation. Extracellular signals, including bone morphogenetic proteins, wingless-related MMTV integration site (WNT), fibroblast growth factor, Indian hedgehog, and parathyroid hormone-related peptide, are all indispensable for growth plate chondrocytes to align and organize into the appropriate columnar architecture and controls their maturation and transition to hypertrophy. Chondrocyte hypertrophy, marked by dramatic volume increase in phases, is controlled by transcription factors SOX9, Runt-related transcription factor, and FOXA2. Hypertrophic chondrocytes mediate the cartilage to bone transition and concomitantly face a live-or-die situation, a subject of much debate. We review recent insights into the coordination of the phases of the chondrocyte journey, and highlight the need for a systems level understanding of the regulatory networks that will facilitate the development of therapeutic approaches for skeletal dysplasia.

  1. Chondrocytic Atf4 regulates osteoblast differentiation and function via Ihh

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiguang; Lian, Na; Ma, Yun; Li, Lingzhen; Gallant, Richard C.; Elefteriou, Florent; Yang, Xiangli

    2012-01-01

    Atf4 is a leucine zipper-containing transcription factor that activates osteocalcin (Ocn) in osteoblasts and indian hedgehog (Ihh) in chondrocytes. The relative contribution of Atf4 in chondrocytes and osteoblasts to the regulation of skeletal development and bone formation is poorly understood. Investigations of the Atf4–/–;Col2a1-Atf4 mouse model, in which Atf4 is selectively overexpressed in chondrocytes in an Atf4-null background, demonstrate that chondrocyte-derived Atf4 regulates osteogenesis during development and bone remodeling postnatally. Atf4 overexpression in chondrocytes of the Atf4–/–;Col2a1-Atf4 double mutants corrects the reduction in stature and limb in Atf4–/– embryos and rectifies the decrease in Ihh expression, Hh signaling, proliferation and accelerated hypertrophy that characterize the Atf4–/– developing growth plate cartilages. Unexpectedly, this genetic manipulation also restores the expression of osteoblastic marker genes, namely Ocn and bone sialoprotein, in Atf4–/– developing bones. In Atf4–/–;Col2a1-Atf4 adult mice, all the defective bone parameters found in Atf4–/– mice, including bone volume, trabecular number and thickness, and bone formation rate, are rescued. In addition, the conditioned media of ex vivo cultures from wild-type or Atf4–/–;Col2a1-Atf4, but not Atf4–/– cartilage, corrects the differentiation defects of Atf4–/– bone marrow stromal cells and Ihh-blocking antibody eliminates this effect. Together, these data indicate that Atf4 in chondrocytes is required for normal Ihh expression and for its paracrine effect on osteoblast differentiation. Therefore, the cell-autonomous role of Atf4 in chondrocytes dominates the role of Atf4 in osteoblasts during development for the control of early osteogenesis and skeletal growth. PMID:22190639

  2. [Influence of BMP-7 on chondrocyte secretion and expression of Col-II,AGG and Sox9 mRNA in porous tantalum-chondrocyte composites in vitro].

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Li, L; Wang, Q; Gan, H Q; Wang, H; Bi, C; Li, Q J; Wang, Z Q

    2015-04-18

    To study the influence of bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) on chondrocyte secretion and expression of type II collagen (Col-II), aggrecan (AGG) and SRY-related high mobility group-box gene 9 (Sox9) mRNA in porous tantalum-chondrocyte composites. The articular chondrocytes were isolated from 3-week-old New Zealand immature rabbits and identified. The 2nd generation of chondrocytes with 1×10(6)/mL inoculate concentration was seeded in porous tantalum and divided into 4 groups, and control group (tantalum/chondrocyte), 50 μg/L BMP-7 group (50 μg/L BMP-7/tantalum/chondrocyte), 100 μg/L BMP-7 group (100 μg/L BMP-7/tantalum/chondrocyte), and 200 μg/L BMP-7 group (200 μg/L BMP-7/tantalum/chondrocyte). The proliferation of chondrocytes was measured by CCK-8 assay. The chondrocyte growth and morphology were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The synthesis of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) in chondrocytes was tested by dimethyl methylene blue (DMMB) colorimetric quantification method. Col-II, AGG and Sox9 mRNA in chondrocytes were detected by real-time PCR. The chondrocytes were spindle-shaped in 24 hours of primary cell culture and most cells became polygonal shaped in 4 days. The chondrocytes were affirmed by alcian blue, safranin O and Col-II immunocytochemistry staining. The result of CCK-8 assay showed that the level of cell proliferation in 100 μg/L BMP-7 groups were higher than those in the other groups (P<0.05). The chondrocytes implanted into porous tantalum scaffolds with BMP-7 had better functions, by which cytoplasmic processes developed and extended to the surface and inner of porous tantalum by SEM observation. DMMB quantitative determination of GAG showed that GAG amount of chondrocytes in 100 μg/L BMP-7 groups was significantly higher than those in the other groups (P<0.05). The expressions of Col-II, AGG and Sox9 mRNA in chondrocytes were up-regulated in the experimental groups, compared with the control group and the best effect appeared

  3. Polymer-based oral rehydration solution for treating acute watery diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Gregorio, Germana V; Gonzales, Maria Liza M; Dans, Leonila F; Martinez, Elizabeth G

    2009-04-15

    Acute diarrhoea is one of the principal causes of morbidity and mortality among children in low-income countries. Glucose-based ORS helps replace fluid and prevent further dehydration from acute diarrhoea. Since 2004, the World Health Organization has recommended the osmolarity < 270 mOsm/L (ORS 310 mOsm/L formulation (ORS >/= 310). Glucose polymer-based ORS (eg prepared using rice or wheat) slowly releases glucose and may be superior. To compare polymer-based ORS with glucose-based ORS for treating acute watery diarrhoea. In September 2008, we searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 3), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and mRCT. We also contacted researchers, organizations, and pharmaceutical companies, and searched reference lists. Randomized controlled trials of people with acute watery diarrhoea (cholera and non-cholera associated) comparing polymer-based and glucose-based ORS (with identical electrolyte contents). Two authors independently assessed the search results and risk of bias, and extracted data. In multiple treatment arms with two or more treatment groups, we combined outcomes as appropriate and compared collectively with the control group. Thirty-four trials involving 4214 participants met the inclusion criteria: 27 in children, five in adults and two in both. Twelve trials used adequate methods to conceal allocation. Most compared polymer-based ORS with ORS >/= 310. There were fewer unscheduled intravenous infusions in the polymer-based ORS group compared with glucose-based ORS (ORS >/= 310 and polymer-based ORS than with ORS

  4. Control of Collagen Production in Mouse Chondrocytes by Using a Combination of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 and Small Interfering RNA Targeting Col1a1 for Hydrogel-Based Tissue-Engineered Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Perrier-Groult, Emeline; Pasdeloup, Marielle; Malbouyres, Marilyne; Galéra, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Because articular cartilage does not self-repair, tissue-engineering strategies should be considered to regenerate this tissue. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is already used for treatment of focal damage of articular cartilage. Unfortunately, this technique includes a step of cell amplification, which results in dedifferentiation of chondrocytes, with expression of type I collagen, a protein characteristic of fibrotic tissues. Therefore, the risk of producing a fibrocartilage exists. The aim of this study was to propose a new strategy for authorizing the recovery of the differentiated status of the chondrocytes after their amplification on plastic. Because the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 are cytokines both proposed as stimulants for cartilage repair, we undertook a detailed comparative analysis of their biological effects on chondrocytes. As a cellular model, we used mouse chondrocytes after their expansion on plastic and we tested the capability of BMP-2 or TGF-β1 to drive their redifferentiation, with special attention given to the nature of the proteins synthesized by the cells. To prevent any fibrotic character of the newly synthesized extracellular matrix, we silenced type I collagen by transfecting small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the chondrocytes, before their exposure to BMP-2 or TGF-β1. Our results showed that addition of siRNA targeting the mRNA encoded by the Col1a1 gene (Col1a1 siRNA) and BMP-2 represents the most efficient combination to control the production of cartilage-characteristic collagen proteins. To go one step further toward scaffold-based cartilage engineering, Col1a1 siRNA-transfected chondrocytes were encapsulated in agarose hydrogel and cultured in vitro for 1 week. The analysis of the chondrocyte–agarose constructs by using real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western-blotting, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy techniques demonstrated that the BMP-2/Col1a1 si

  5. Modification of polylactide bioplastic using hyperbranched polymer based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Rahul

    Polylactide (PLA) is the most well known renewable resource based biodegradable polymer. The inherent brittleness and poor processability of PLA pose considerable technical challenges and limit its range of commercial applications. The broad objective of this research was to investigate novel pathways for polylactide modification to enhance its mechanical and rheological properties. The focus of this work was to tailor the architecture of a dendritic hyperbranched polymer (HBP) and study its influence on the mechanical and rheological properties of PLA bioplastic. The hyperbranched polymers under consideration are biodegradable aliphatic hydroxyl-functional hyperbranched polyesters having nanoscale dimensions, unique physical properties and high peripheral functionalities. This work relates to identifying a new and industrially relevant research methodology to develop PLA based nanoblends having outstanding stiffness-toughness balance. In this approach, a hydroxyl functional hyperbranched polymer was crosslinked in-situ with a polyanhydride (PA) in the PLA matrix during melt processing, leading to the generation of new nanoscale hyperbranched polymer based domains in the PLA matrix. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the "sea-island" morphology of PLA-crosslinked HBP blends. The domain size of a large portion of the crosslinked HBP particles in PLA matrix was less than 100 nm. The presence of crosslinked hyperbranched polymers exhibited more than 500% and 800% improvement in the tensile toughness and elongation at break values of PLA, respectively, with a minimal sacrifice of tensile strength and modulus as compared to unmodified PLA. The toughening mechanism of PLA in the presence of crosslinked HBP particles was comprised of shear yielding and crazing. The volume fraction of crosslinked HBP particles and matrix ligament thickness (inter-particle distance) were found to be the critical parameters for the toughening of PLA. The

  6. Long-Term Comparison of Rib and Ear Cartilage Grafts in Autologous and Allogenic Fascia Lata: An Experimental Study in a White Rabbit Model.

    PubMed

    Jurk, Viktor; Kampmann, Hendrike; Iblher, Niklas; Bannasch, Holger; Gubisch, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Diced cartilage in fascia has become the graft material of choice for dorsal grafts in rhinoplasty. Allogenic fascia lata has not yet been investigated as an isolated fascial graft or as a combined graft with ear and rib cartilage, especially in comparison with autologous fascia and over a long implantation period. Ten different grafts were built from either autologous or allogenic fascia lata alone or as diced cartilage in fascia grafts with diced costal or ear cartilage and implanted into the dorsal skin of 15 rabbits. After 3 or 9 months, the grafts were explanted and analyzed histologically. Chondrocytes and cartilage matrix characteristics, including calcification, ossification, formation of bone marrow, fibrosis ingrowth and fibrotic transformation, the presence of immune reactions, vascular ingrowth, regenerative capacity, and capsule formation, were examined in a semiquantitative manner. All grafts were vital and without inflammatory response. The cartilage showed regular nuclei, a normal matrix, and regenerative capacity. A higher grade of calcification and ossification was observed in the fascia/cartilage grafts than in isolated cartilage grafts, and was more pronounced for costal cartilage. Both types of fascia were shown to be equally stable and without degradation. There were no significant differences in the diced cartilage in fascia grafts built with autologous compared to allogenic fascia. This study shows the equivalency of diced cartilage in fascia grafts and isolated fascial grafts using allogenic fascia lata compared to autologous fascia. The type of cartilage used accounts for different long-term characteristics of diced cartilage in fascia grafts.

  7. Protective effect of Capparis spinosa on chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Panico, A M; Cardile, V; Garufi, F; Puglia, C; Bonina, F; Ronsisvalle, G

    2005-09-30

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro chondroprotective effects of the lyophilised methanolic extract from flowering buds of Capparis Spinosa L (LECS). This plant, common to the Mediterranean basin, has been used by the traditional medicine for its diuretic and antihypertensive effects and also in certain pathological conditions related to uncontrolled lipid peroxidation. The extract contains many constituents, in particular some flavonoids (kaempferol and quercetin derivatives) and hydrocinammic acids with several known biological effects such as the anti-inflammatory and the antioxidant ones. In this study, we assayed the effect of LECS on human chondrocytes cultures stimulated by proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and we determined the production of key molecules released during chronic inflammatory events (nitric oxide, glycosaminoglycans, prostaglandins and reactive oxygen species). We observed that LECS was able to counteract the harmful effects induced by IL-1beta. This protection appeared to be greater than that elicited by indomethacin, which is usually employed in joint diseases. Since LECS possess a chondroprotective effect, it might be used in the management of cartilage damage during the inflammatory processes.

  8. Customized biomaterials to augment chondrocyte gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Izath Nizeet; Trippel, Stephen; Shi, Shuiliang; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2017-02-07

    A persistent challenge in enhancing gene therapy is the transient availability of the target gene product. This is particularly true in tissue engineering applications. The transient exposure of cells to the product could be insufficient to promote tissue regeneration. Here we report the development of a new material engineered to have a high affinity for a therapeutic gene product. We focus on insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) for its highly anabolic effects on many tissues such as spinal cord, heart, brain and cartilage. One of the ways that tissues store IGF-I is through a group of insulin like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs), such as IGFBP-5. We grafted the IGF-I binding peptide sequence from IGFBP-5 onto alginate in order to retain the endogenous IGF-I produced by transfected chondrocytes. This novel material bound IGF-I and released the growth factor for at least 30days in culture. We found that this binding enhanced the biosynthesis of transfected cells up to 19-fold. These data demonstrate the coordinated engineering of cell behavior and material chemistry to greatly enhance extracellular matrix synthesis and tissue assembly, and can serve as a template for the enhanced performance of other therapeutic proteins.

  9. [Chondrogenesis of passaged chondrocytes induced by different dynamic loads in bioreactor].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Chen, Jiying; Zhang, Guoqiang; Chai, Wei

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the effect of dynamic compression and rotation motion on chondrogenesis of the 3rd passage cell-loaded three-dimensional scaffold in a joint-specific bioreactor in vitro so as to provide theoretical basis of the autologous chondrocyte transplantation in clinical practice. Primary chondrocytes were isolated and cultured from the knee cartilage of 3-4 months old calves. The 3rd passage cells were seeded onto fibrin-polyurethane scaffolds (8 mm x 4 mm). Experiment included 5 groups: unloaded culture for 2 weeks (group A), direct load for 2 weeks (group B), unloaded culture for 4 weeks (group C), direct load for 4 weeks (group D), and unload for 2 weeks followed by load for 2 weeks (group E). The cell-scaffold was incubated in incubator (unload) or in a joint-specific bioreactor (load culture). At different time points, the samples were collected for DNA and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) quantification detect; mRNA expressions of chondrogenic marker genes such as collagen type I, collagen type II, Aggrecan, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), and superficial zone protein (SZP) were detected by real-time quantitative PCR; and histology observations were done by toluidine blue staining and immunohistochemistry staining. No significant difference was found in DNA content, GAG content, and the ratio of GAG to DNA among 5 groups (P > 0.05). After load, there was a large number of GAG in the medium, and the GAG significantly increased with time (P < 0.05). The mRNA expression of collagen type I showed no significant difference among 5 groups (P > 0.05). The mRNA expression of collagen type II in group B was significantly increased when compared with group A (P < 0.01), and groups D and E were significantly higher than group C (P < 0.01); the mRNA expression of Aggrecan in groups D and E were significantly increased when compared with group C (P < 0.01), and group E was significantly higher than group D (P < 0.01); the mRNA expression of COMP in group B was

  10. The Signaling Pathways Involved in Chondrocyte Differentiation and Hypertrophic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianmei

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocytes communicate with each other mainly via diffusible signals rather than direct cell-to-cell contact. The chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is well regulated by the interactions of varieties of growth factors, cytokines, and signaling molecules. A number of critical signaling molecules have been identified to regulate the differentiation of chondrocyte from mesenchymal progenitor cells to their terminal maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes, including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), SRY-related high-mobility group-box gene 9 (Sox9), parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), Indian hedgehog (Ihh), fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), and β-catenin. Except for these molecules, other factors such as adenosine, O2 tension, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) also have a vital role in cartilage formation and chondrocyte maturation. Here, we outlined the complex transcriptional network and the function of key factors in this network that determine and regulate the genetic program of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte differentiation. PMID:28074096

  11. Roles of Chondrocytes in Endochondral Bone Formation and Fracture Repair.

    PubMed

    Hinton, R J; Jing, Y; Jing, J; Feng, J Q

    2017-01-01

    The formation of the mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) and its subchondral bone is an important but understudied topic in dental research. The current concept regarding endochondral bone formation postulates that most hypertrophic chondrocytes undergo programmed cell death prior to bone formation. Under this paradigm, the MCC and its underlying bone are thought to result from 2 closely linked but separate processes: chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. However, recent investigations using cell lineage tracing techniques have demonstrated that many, perhaps the majority, of bone cells are derived via direct transformation from chondrocytes. In this review, the authors will briefly discuss the history of this idea and describe recent studies that clearly demonstrate that the direct transformation of chondrocytes into bone cells is common in both long bone and mandibular condyle development and during bone fracture repair. The authors will also provide new evidence of a distinct difference in ossification orientation in the condylar ramus (1 ossification center) versus long bone ossification formation (2 ossification centers). Based on our recent findings and those of other laboratories, we propose a new model that contrasts the mode of bone formation in much of the mandibular ramus (chondrocyte-derived) with intramembranous bone formation of the mandibular body (non-chondrocyte-derived).

  12. Osmotic Challenge Drives Rapid and Reversible Chromatin Condensation in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Irianto, Jerome; Swift, Joe; Martins, Rui P.; McPhail, Graham D.; Knight, Martin M.; Discher, Dennis E.; Lee, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in extracellular osmolality have been shown to alter gene expression patterns and metabolic activity of various cell types, including chondrocytes. However, mechanisms by which physiological or pathological changes in osmolality impact chondrocyte function remain unclear. Here we use quantitative image analysis, electron microscopy, and a DNase I assay to show that hyperosmotic conditions (>400 mOsm/kg) induce chromatin condensation, while hypoosmotic conditions (100 mOsm/kg) cause decondensation. Large density changes (p < 0.001) occur over a very narrow range of physiological osmolalities, which suggests that chondrocytes likely experience chromatin condensation and decondensation during a daily loading cycle. The effect of changes in osmolality on nuclear morphology (p < 0.01) and chromatin condensation (p < 0.001) also differed between chondrocytes in monolayer culture and three-dimensional agarose, suggesting a role for cell adhesion. The relationship between condensation and osmolality was accurately modeled by a polymer gel model which, along with the rapid nature of the chromatin condensation (<20 s), reveals the basic physicochemical nature of the process. Alterations in chromatin structure are expected to influence gene expression and thereby regulate chondrocyte activity in response to osmotic changes. PMID:23442954

  13. Repair Mechanism of Osteochondral Defect Promoted by Bioengineered Chondrocyte Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Kamei, Naosuke; Adachi, Nobuo; Hamanishi, Michio; Kamei, Goki; Mahmoud, Elhussein Elbadry; Nakano, Tomohiro; Iwata, Takanori; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    Cell sheet engineering has developed as a remarkable method for cell transplantation. In the field of cartilage regeneration, several studies previously reported that cartilage defects could be regenerated by transplantation of a chondrocyte sheet using cell sheet engineering. However, it remains unclear how such a thin cell sheet could repair a deep cartilage defect. We, therefore, focused on the mechanism of cartilage repair using cell sheet engineering in this study. Chondrocyte sheets and synovial cell sheets were fabricated using cell sheet engineering, and these allogenic cell sheets were transplanted to cover an osteochondral defect in a rat model. Macroscopic and histological evaluation was performed at 4 and 12 weeks after transplantation. Analysis of the gene expression of each cell sheet and of the regenerated tissue at 1 week after transplantation was performed. In addition, green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic rats were used as donors (transplanted chondrocyte sheets) or recipients (osteochondral defect models) to identify the cell origin of regenerated cartilage. Cartilage repair was significantly better in the group implanted with a chondrocyte sheet than in that with a synovial cell sheet. The results of gene expression analysis suggest that the possible factor contributing to cartilage repair might be TGFβ1. Cell tracking experiments using GFP transgenic rats showed that the regenerated cartilage was largely composed of cells derived from the transplanted chondrocyte sheets. PMID:25396711

  14. LRP4 induces extracellular matrix productions and facilitates chondrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Asai, Nobuyuki; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2014-08-22

    Endochondral ossification is an essential step for skeletal development, which requires chondrocyte differentiation in growth cartilage. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4), a member of LDLR family, is an inhibitor for Wnt signaling, but its roles in chondrocyte differentiation remain to be investigated. Here we found by laser capture microdissection that LRP4 expression was induced during chondrocyte differentiation in growth plate. In order to address the roles, we overexpressed recombinant human LRP4 or knocked down endogenous LRP4 by lentivirus in mouse ATDC5 chondrocyte cells. We found that LRP4 induced gene expressions of extracellular matrix proteins of type II collagen (Col2a1), aggrecan (Acan), and type X collagen (Col10a1), as well as production of total proteoglycans in ATDC5 cells, whereas LRP4 knockdown had opposite effects. Interestingly, LRP4-knockdown reduced mRNA expression of Sox9, a master regulator for chondrogenesis, as well as Dkk1, an extracellular Wnt inhibitor. Analysis of Wnt signaling revealed that LRP4 blocked the Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity in ATDC5 cells. Finally, the reduction of these extracellular matrix productions by LRP4-knockdown was rescued by a β-catenin/TCF inhibitor, suggesting that LRP4 is an important regulator for extracellular matrix productions and chondrocyte differentiation by suppressing Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hyperosmotic stress-induced apoptotic signaling pathways in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Racz, Boglarka; Reglodi, Dora; Fodor, Barnabas; Gasz, Balazs; Lubics, Andrea; Gallyas, Ferenc; Roth, Erzsebet; Borsiczky, Balazs

    2007-06-01

    Articular chondrocytes have a well-developed osmoregulatory system that enables cells to survive in a constantly changing osmotic environment. However, osmotic loading exceeding that occurring under physiological conditions severely compromises chondrocyte function and leads to degenerative changes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the form of cell death and changes in apoptotic signaling pathways under hyperosmotic stress using a primary chondrocyte culture. Cell viability and apoptosis assays performed with annexin V and propidium iodide staining showed that a highly hyperosmotic medium (600 mOsm) severely reduced chondrocyte viability and led mainly to apoptotic cell death, while elevating osmotic pressure within the physiological range caused no changes compared to isosmotic conditions. Western blot analysis revealed that a 600 mOsm hyperosmotic environment induced the activation of proapoptotic members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38, and led to an increased level of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2). Hyperosmotic stress also induced the activation of caspase-3. In summary, our results show that hyperosmotic stress leads to mainly apoptotic cell death via the involvement of proapoptotic signaling pathways in a primary chondrocyte culture.

  16. The influence of scaffold material on chondrocytes under inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Heenam; Sun, Lin; Cairns, Dana M; Rainbow, Roshni S; Preda, Rucsanda C; Kaplan, David L; Zeng, Li

    2013-05-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering aims to repair damaged cartilage tissue in arthritic joints. As arthritic joints have significantly higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as IL-1β and TNFα that cause cartilage destruction, it is critical to engineer stable cartilage in an inflammatory environment. Biomaterial scaffolds constitute an important component of the microenvironment for chondrocytes in engineered cartilage. However, it remains unclear how the scaffold material influences the response of chondrocytes seeded in these scaffolds under inflammatory stimuli. Here we have compared the responses of articular chondrocytes seeded within three different polymeric scaffolding materials (silk, collagen and polylactic acid (PLA)) to IL-1β and TNFα. These scaffolds have different physical characteristics and yielded significant differences in the expression of genes associated with cartilage matrix production and degradation, cell adhesion and cell death. The silk and collagen scaffolds released pro-inflammatory cytokines faster and had higher uptake water abilities than PLA scaffolds. Correspondingly, chondrocytes cultured in silk and collagen scaffolds maintained higher levels of cartilage matrix than those in PLA, suggesting that these biophysical properties of scaffolds may regulate gene expression and the response to inflammatory stimuli in chondrocytes. Based on this study we conclude that selecting the proper scaffold material will aid in the engineering of more stable cartilage tissues for cartilage repair, and that silk and collagen are better scaffolds in terms of supporting the stability of three-dimensional cartilage under inflammatory conditions.

  17. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair.

  18. Autophagy Modulates Articular Cartilage Vesicle Formation in Primary Articular Chondrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Ann K.; Gohr, Claudia M.; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Jackson, William T.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair. PMID:25869133

  19. [Autologous fat grafting and rhinoplasty].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, P S; Baptista, C; Casanova, D; Bardot, J; Magalon, G

    2014-12-01

    Revision rhinoplasty can be very challenging especially in cases of thin skin. Autologous fat graft is utilized in numerous applications in plastic surgery; however, its use relative to the nasal region remains uncommon. Adipose tissue, by virtue of its volumetric qualities and its action on skin trophicity, can be considered to be a gold standard implant. From 2006 until 2012, we have treated patients by lipofilling in order to correct sequelae of rhinoplasty. The mean quantity of adipose tissue injected was 2.1cm(3) depending on the importance of the deformity and the area of injection: irregularity of the nasal dorsum, visible lateral osteotomies, saddle nose. Following the course of our practice, we conceived micro-cannulas that allow a much greater accuracy in the placement of the graft and enable to perform interventions under local anesthesia. These non-traumatic micro-cannulas do not cause post-operative ecchymosis and swelling which shorten the recovery time for the patient. On patients who have undergone multiple operations, lipofilling can be a simple and reliable alternative to correct imperfections that may take place after a rhinoplasty.

  20. Dlx5 is a positive regulator of chondrocyte differentiation during endochondral ossification.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Deborah; Kosher, Robert A

    2002-12-15

    The process of endochondral ossification in which the bones of the limb are formed after generation of cartilage models is dependent on a precisely regulated program of chondrocyte maturation. Here, we show that the homeobox-containing gene Dlx5 is expressed at the onset of chondrocyte maturation during the conversion of immature proliferating chondrocytes into postmitotic hypertrophying chondrocytes, a critical step in the maturation process. Moreover, retroviral misexpression of Dlx5 during differentiation of the skeletal elements of the chick limb in vivo results in the formation of severely shortened skeletal elements that contain excessive numbers of hypertrophying chondrocytes which extend into ectopic regions, including sites normally occupied by immature chondrocytes. The expansion in the extent of hypertrophic maturation detectable histologically is accompanied by expanded and upregulated domains of expression of molecular markers of chondrocyte maturation, particularly type X collagen and osteopontin, and by expansion of mineralized cartilage matrix, which is characteristic of terminal hypertrophic differentiation. Furthermore, Dlx5 misexpression markedly reduces chondrocyte proliferation concomitant with promoting hypertrophic maturation. Taken together, these results indicate that Dlx5 is a positive regulator of chondrocyte maturation and suggest that it regulates the process at least in part by promoting conversion of immature proliferating chondrocytes into hypertrophying chondrocytes. Retroviral misexpression of Dlx5 also enhances formation of periosteal bone, which is derived from the Dlx5-expressing perichondrium that surrounds the diaphyses of the cartilage models. This suggests that Dlx5 may be involved in regulating osteoblast differentiation, as well as chondrocyte maturation, during endochondral ossification.

  1. Expression Pattern and Role of Chondrocyte Clusters in Osteoarthritic Human Knee Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Hoshiyama, Yoshiaki; Otsuki, Shuhei; Oda, Shuhei; Kurokawa, Yoshitaka; Nakajima, Mikio; Jotoku, Tsuyoshi; Tamura, Ryuichi; Okamoto, Yoshinori; Lotz, Martin K.; Neo, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the site-specific expression pattern and the role of chondrocyte clusters in human OA knee. Cartilage explants were obtained from 45 varus knees of medial and lateral femoral condyle undergoing total knee replacement surgery. Cartilage degeneration, number of chondrocytes, and the cell arrangement were evaluated by live/dead assay and immunohistochemical analyses with antibodies of STRO-1, FGF2, and Ki-67. Chondrocytes from medial and lateral femoral condyle were cultured to compare the potential of cell proliferation and production of cartilaginous nodules. Finally, cartilage tissue from medial femoral condyle, which included cartilage cleft with chondrocyte clusters, was observed the histological alternation. As the results, chondrocyte density adjacent to severe cartilage degeneration was highest, whereas chondrocytes in lateral femoral condyle displayed low density with single type of cells. Over 80% of these chondrocyte clusters were survived, expressing STRO-1, FGF2, and Ki-67. Furthermore, chondrocyte clusters proliferated faster and produced more cartilaginous nodules than single type of chondrocytes. Cartilage clefts involving numerous chondrocyte clusters were filled with extracellular matrix during organ culture. In conclusion, chondrocyte clusters adjacent to severe cartilage degeneration have shown completely specific characteristics with progenitor and proliferative potential. Regulating chondrocyte clusters may offer new approaches to cartilage repair and OA therapy in the future. PMID:25691232

  2. A Review of Thermal Spray Metallization of Polymer-Based Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, R.; Ashrafizadeh, H.; Lopera, A.; Mertiny, P.; McDonald, A.

    2016-06-01

    A literature review on the thermal spray deposition of metals onto polymer-based structures is presented. The deposition of metals onto polymer-based structures has been developed to enhance the thermal and electrical properties of the resulting metal-polymer material system. First, the description of the thermal spray metallization processes and technologies for polymer-based materials are outlined. Then, polymer surface preparation methods and the deposition of metal bond-coats are explored. Moreover, the thermal spray process parameters that affect the properties of metal deposits on polymers are described, followed by studies on the temperature distribution within the polymer substrate during the thermal spray process. The objective of this review is devoted to testing and potential applications of thermal-sprayed metal coatings deposited onto polymer-based substrates. This review aims to summarize the state-of-the-art contributions to research on the thermal spray metallization of polymer-based materials, which has gained recent attention for potential and novel applications.

  3. Astaxanthin reduces matrix metalloproteinase expression in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ping; Xiong, Yan; Shi, Yong-Xiang; Hu, Peng-Fei; Bao, Jia-Peng; Wu, Li-Dong

    2014-03-01

    Astaxanthin is a red carotenoid pigment which exerts multiple biological activities. However, little is known about the effects of astaxanthin on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in OA. The present study investigated the effects of astaxanthin on MMPs in human chondrocytes. Human chondrocytes were pretreated with astaxanthin at 1, 10 or 50μM, then, cells were stimulated with IL-1β (10ng/ml) for 24h. MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-13 were observed. We found that astaxanthin reduced the expression of MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-13 as well as the phosphorylation of two mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) (p38 and ERK1/2) in IL-1β-stimulated chondrocytes. Astaxanthin also blocked the IκB-α degradation. These results suggest that astaxanthin may be beneficial in the treatment of OA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Epigenetic Regulation of Chondrocyte Catabolism and Anabolism in Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeonkyeong; Kang, Donghyun; Cho, Yongsik; Kim, Jin-Hong

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent forms of joint disorder, associated with a tremendous socioeconomic burden worldwide. Various non-genetic and lifestyle-related factors such as aging and obesity have been recognized as major risk factors for OA, underscoring the potential role for epigenetic regulation in the pathogenesis of the disease. OA-associated epigenetic aberrations have been noted at the level of DNA methylation and histone modification in chondrocytes. These epigenetic regulations are implicated in driving an imbalance between the expression of catabolic and anabolic factors, leading eventually to osteoarthritic cartilage destruction. Cellular senescence and metabolic abnormalities driven by OA-associated risk factors appear to accompany epigenetic drifts in chondrocytes. Notably, molecular events associated with metabolic disorders influence epigenetic regulation in chondrocytes, supporting the notion that OA is a metabolic disease. Here, we review accumulating evidence supporting a role for epigenetics in the regulation of cartilage homeostasis and OA pathogenesis.

  5. Peritoneal transport characteristics with glucose polymer based dialysate.

    PubMed

    Ho-dac-Pannekeet, M M; Schouten, N; Langendijk, M J; Hiralall, J K; de Waart, D R; Struijk, D G; Krediet, R T

    1996-09-01

    Dialysate fluids containing glucose polymers as osmotic agent are different from the conventional solutions, because they are iso-osmotic to plasma and produce transcapillary ultrafiltration (TCUF) by colloid osmosis. To investigate the effects on fluid and solute kinetics, a comparison was made between a 7.5% glucose polymer based dialysate (icodextrin) and 1.36% and 3.86% glucose based dialysate in 10 stable CAPD patients. In each patient three standard peritoneal permeability analyses (SPA) were done with the osmotic agents and concentrations mentioned above. Dextran 70 was added to the glucose solutions to calculate fluid kinetics. In the glucose polymer SPAs fluid kinetics were calculated from the dilution and disappearance of dextrin. The TCUF rate with icodextrin was closer to that obtained with 3.86% glucose than to 1.36% glucose. Extrapolation of the fluid profiles revealed sustained ultrafiltration with icodextrin. TCUF increased linearly in time in the icodextrin tests, whereas a hyperbola best described the glucose profiles. The effective lymphatic absorption rate with icodextrin was similar to the glucose based solutions. Mass transfer area coefficients of low molecular weight solutes with icodextrin were also similar to the values obtained with glucose, as was D/P creatinine. A positive correlation was present between the MTAC creatinine and the TCUF rate with icodextrin (r = 0.66, P = 0.05), which was absent in the glucose SPAs. This suggests that in patients with a larger effective peritoneal surface area, more ultrafiltration can be achieved by glucose polymer solutions. Clearances of beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) were higher with icodextrin than with 3.86% glucose and 1.36% glucose dialysate (P < 0.05). No differences were found for the larger serum proteins albumin, IgG and alpha 2-macroglobulin. Initial D/PNa-->was higher (0.96) with icodextrin than with the glucose based solutions (0.92), due to the higher Na+ concentration of icodextrin, and

  6. Chondrocytes Directly Transform into Bone Cells in Mandibular Condyle Growth

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Y.; Zhou, X.; Han, X.; Jing, J.; von der Mark, K.; Wang, J.; de Crombrugghe, B.; Hinton, R.J.; Feng, J.Q.

    2015-01-01

    For decades, it has been widely accepted that hypertrophic chondrocytes undergo apoptosis prior to endochondral bone formation. However, very recent studies in long bone suggest that chondrocytes can directly transform into bone cells. Our initial in vivo characterization of condylar hypertrophic chondrocytes revealed modest numbers of apoptotic cells but high levels of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 expression, some dividing cells, and clear alkaline phosphatase activity (early bone marker). Ex vivo culture of newborn condylar cartilage on a chick chorioallantoic membrane showed that after 5 d the cells on the periphery of the explants had begun to express Col1 (bone marker). The cartilage-specific cell lineage–tracing approach in triple mice containing Rosa 26tdTomato (tracing marker), 2.3 Col1GFP (bone cell marker), and aggrecan CreERT2 (onetime tamoxifen induced) or Col10-Cre (activated from E14.5 throughout adult stage) demonstrated the direct transformation of chondrocytes into bone cells in vivo. This transformation was initiated at the inferior portion of the condylar cartilage, in contrast to the initial ossification site in long bone, which is in the center. Quantitative data from the Col10-Cre compound mice showed that hypertrophic chondrocytes contributed to ~80% of bone cells in subchondral bone, ~70% in a somewhat more inferior region, and ~40% in the most inferior part of the condylar neck (n = 4, P < 0.01 for differences among regions). This multipronged approach clearly demonstrates that a majority of chondrocytes in the fibrocartilaginous condylar cartilage, similar to hyaline cartilage in long bones, directly transform into bone cells during endochondral bone formation. Moreover, ossification is initiated from the inferior portion of mandibular condylar cartilage with expansion in one direction. PMID:26341973

  7. Pericellular coat of chick embryo chondrocytes: structural role of hyaluronate

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Chondrocytes produce large pericellular coats in vitro that can be visualized by the exclusion of particles, e.g., fixed erythrocytes, and that are removed by treatment with Streptomyces hyaluronidase, which is specific for hyaluronate. In this study, we examined the kinetics of formation of these coats and the relationship of hyaluronate and proteoglycan to coat structure. Chondrocytes were isolated from chick tibia cartilage by collagenase-trypsin digestion and were characterized by their morphology and by their synthesis of both type II collagen and high molecular weight proteoglycans. The degree of spreading of the chondrocytes and the size of the coats were quantitated at various times subsequent to seeding by tracing phase-contrast photomicrographs of the cultures. After seeding, the chondrocytes attached themselves to the tissue culture dish and exhibited coats within 4 h. The coats reached a maximum size after 3-4 d and subsequently decreased over the next 2-3 d. Subcultured chondrocytes produced a large coat only if passaged before 4 d. Both primary and first passage cells, with or without coats, produced type II collagen but not type I collagen as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Treatment with Streptomyces hyaluronidase (1.0 mU/ml, 15 min), which completely removed the coat, released 58% of the chondroitin sulfate but only 9% of the proteins associated with the cell surface. The proteins released by hyaluronidase were not digestible by bacterial collagenase. Monensin and cycloheximide (0.01-10 microM, 48 h) caused a dose-dependent decrease in coat size that was linearly correlated to synthesis of cell surface hyaluronate (r = 0.98) but not chondroitin sulfate (r = 0.2). We conclude that the coat surrounding chondrocytes is dependent on hyaluronate for its structure and that hyaluronate retains a large proportion of the proteoglycan in the coat. PMID:6501414

  8. Transabdominal sacrocolpopexy with autologous rectus fascia graft.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Nitya; Quirouet, Adrienne; Goldman, Howard B

    2016-08-01

    Extrusion and infection are potential postoperative complications when using synthetic mesh for abdominal sacrocolpopexy. Long-term follow-up in the Colpopexy and Urinary Reduction Efforts (CARE) trial revealed an estimated 9.9 % risk of mesh extrusion. There are 26 reports of spondylodiscitis after sacrocolpopexy with synthetic mesh. These surgical risks may be decreased by using autologous fascia. To date, there have been no reports of extrusion or spondylodiscitis after using autologous fascia for sacrocolpopexy. This video demonstrates transabdominal sacrocolpopexy with an autologous rectus fascia graft. A 76-year-old woman with symptomatic stage 3 prolapse also had a history of diverticulitis and sigmoid abscess requiring sigmoid colectomy with end colostomy and incidental left ureteral transection with subsequent left nephrostomy tube placement. She presented for colostomy reversal, ureteral reimplantation, and prolapse repair. Given the need for concomitant colon and ureteral reconstruction, the risk of infection was potentially higher if synthetic mesh were used. The patient therefore underwent transabdominal sacrocolpopexy with autologous rectus fascia graft. At 4 months' follow-up the patient reported resolution of her symptoms and on examination she had no pelvic organ prolapse. Transabdominal sacrocolpopexy using autologous rectus fascia graft is a feasible option, especially in cases in which infection and synthetic mesh extrusion risks are potentially higher.

  9. Chondrocytes transdifferentiate into osteoblasts in endochondral bone during development, postnatal growth and fracture healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; von der Mark, Klaus; Henry, Stephen; Norton, William; Adams, Henry; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    2014-12-01

    One of the crucial steps in endochondral bone formation is the replacement of a cartilage matrix produced by chondrocytes with bone trabeculae made by osteoblasts. However, the precise sources of osteoblasts responsible for trabecular bone formation have not been fully defined. To investigate whether cells derived from hypertrophic chondrocytes contribute to the osteoblast pool in trabecular bones, we genetically labeled either hypertrophic chondrocytes by Col10a1-Cre or chondrocytes by tamoxifen-induced Agc1-CreERT2 using EGFP, LacZ or Tomato expression. Both Cre drivers were specifically active in chondrocytic cells and not in perichondrium, in periosteum or in any of the osteoblast lineage cells. These in vivo experiments allowed us to follow the fate of cells labeled in Col10a1-Cre or Agc1-CreERT2 -expressing chondrocytes. After the labeling of chondrocytes, both during prenatal development and after birth, abundant labeled non-chondrocytic cells were present in the primary spongiosa. These cells were distributed throughout trabeculae surfaces and later were present in the endosteum, and embedded within the bone matrix. Co-expression studies using osteoblast markers indicated that a proportion of the non-chondrocytic cells derived from chondrocytes labeled by Col10a1-Cre or by Agc1-CreERT2 were functional osteoblasts. Hence, our results show that both chondrocytes prior to initial ossification and growth plate chondrocytes before or after birth have the capacity to undergo transdifferentiation to become osteoblasts. The osteoblasts derived from Col10a1-expressing hypertrophic chondrocytes represent about sixty percent of all mature osteoblasts in endochondral bones of one month old mice. A similar process of chondrocyte to osteoblast transdifferentiation was involved during bone fracture healing in adult mice. Thus, in addition to cells in the periosteum chondrocytes represent a major source of osteoblasts contributing to endochondral bone formation in vivo.

  10. Multifunctional Polymer-Based Graphene Foams with Buckled Structure and Negative Poisson’s Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zhaohe; Weng, Chuanxin; Liu, Luqi; Hou, Yuan; Zhao, Xuanliang; Kuang, Jun; Shi, Jidong; Wei, Yueguang; Lou, Jun; Zhang, Zhong

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we report the polymer-based graphene foams through combination of bottom-up assembly and simple triaxially buckled structure design. The resulting polymer-based graphene foams not only effectively transfer the functional properties of graphene, but also exhibit novel negative Poisson’s ratio (NPR) behaviors due to the presence of buckled structure. Our results show that after the introduction of buckled structure, improvement in stretchability, toughness, flexibility, energy absorbing ability, hydrophobicity, conductivity, piezoresistive sensitivity and crack resistance could be achieved simultaneously. The combination of mechanical properties, multifunctional performance and unusual deformation behavior would lead to the use of our polymer-based graphene foams for a variety of novel applications in future such as stretchable capacitors or conductors, sensors and oil/water separators and so on.

  11. Multifunctional Polymer-Based Graphene Foams with Buckled Structure and Negative Poisson’s Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhaohe; Weng, Chuanxin; Liu, Luqi; Hou, Yuan; Zhao, Xuanliang; Kuang, Jun; Shi, Jidong; Wei, Yueguang; Lou, Jun; Zhang, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the polymer-based graphene foams through combination of bottom-up assembly and simple triaxially buckled structure design. The resulting polymer-based graphene foams not only effectively transfer the functional properties of graphene, but also exhibit novel negative Poisson’s ratio (NPR) behaviors due to the presence of buckled structure. Our results show that after the introduction of buckled structure, improvement in stretchability, toughness, flexibility, energy absorbing ability, hydrophobicity, conductivity, piezoresistive sensitivity and crack resistance could be achieved simultaneously. The combination of mechanical properties, multifunctional performance and unusual deformation behavior would lead to the use of our polymer-based graphene foams for a variety of novel applications in future such as stretchable capacitors or conductors, sensors and oil/water separators and so on. PMID:27608928

  12. Rapid prototyping of polymer-based MEMS devices using UV YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, K. C.; Mei, S. M.; Yue, T. M.

    2004-12-01

    This paper deals with the laser micro processing technology in the fabrication of micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) device. A polymer-based capacitive micro accelerometer is designed and modeled in this paper, and is fabricated with laser micromachining and micro patterning technologies. The fabricated micro accelerometer is finally experimentally verified by measuring the shock of a dropping hammer. It is demonstrated that pulsed UV laser micro processing technology provides a quite suitable fabrication method for polymer-based MEMS rapid prototyping and small volume production.

  13. TNF-α Mediates Diabetes-Enhanced Chondrocyte Apoptosis During Fracture Healing and Stimulates Chondrocyte Apoptosis Through FOXO1

    PubMed Central

    Kayal, Rayyan A; Siqueira, Michelle; Alblowi, Jazia; McLean, Jody; Krothapalli, Nanarao; Faibish, Dan; Einhorn, Thomas A; Gerstenfeld, Louis C; Graves, Dana T

    2010-01-01

    To gain insight into the effect of diabetes on fracture healing, experiments were carried out focusing on chondrocyte apoptosis during the transition from cartilage to bone. Type 1 diabetes was induced in mice by multiple low-dose streptozotocin injections, and simple transverse fractures of the tibia or femur was carried out. Large-scale transcriptional profiling and gene set enrichment analysis were performed to examine apoptotic pathways on total RNA isolated from fracture calluses on days 12, 16, and 22, a period of endochondral bone formation when cartilage is resorbed and chondrocyte numbers decrease. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) protein levels were assessed by ELISA and caspase-3 by bioactivity assay. The role of TNF was examined by treating mice with the TNF-specific inhibitor pegsunercept. In vitro studies investigated the proapoptotic transcription factor FOXO1 in regulating TNF-induced apoptosis of chondrogenic ATDC5 and C3H10T1/2 cells as representative of differentiated chondrocytes, which are important during endochondral ossification. mRNA profiling revealed an upregulation of gene sets related to apoptosis in the diabetic group on day 16 when cartilage resorption is active but not day 12 or day 22. This coincided with elevated TNF-α protein levels, chondrocyte apoptosis, enhanced caspase-3 activity, and increased FOXO1 nuclear translocation (p < .05). Inhibition of TNF significantly reduced these parameters in the diabetic mice but not in normoglycemic control mice (p < .05). Silencing FOXO1 using siRNA in vitro significantly reduced TNF-induced apoptosis and caspase activity in differentiated chondrocytes. The mRNA levels of the proapoptotic genes caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, and TRAIL were significantly reduced with silencing of FOXO1 in chondrocytic cells. Inhibiting caspase-8 and caspase-9 significantly reduced TNF-induced apoptosis in chondrogenic cells. These results suggest that diabetes causes an upregulation of proapoptotic genes

  14. Repopulation of laser-perforated chondroepiphyseal matrix with xenogeneic chondrocytes: An experimental model

    SciTech Connect

    Caruso, E.M.; Lewandrowski, K.U.; Ohlendorf, C.; Tomford, W.W.; Zaleske, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    Growth of chondrocytes into a xenogeneic chondroepiphyseal matrix was investigated in an in vitro experimental model by combining viable calf chondrocytes with chick epiphyseal matrix devoid of viable chondrocytes. The chondrocytes were harvested from the wrist joints of newborn calves and cultured for 2 days. The epiphyses were harvested from the distal femurs and the proximal tibias of fetal chicks after development was arrested at 17 days by freezing. The epiphyseal specimens were prepared in four ways. These included femoral and tibial epiphyses without holes and femoral and tibial epiphyses with holes made by a laser. These epiphyseal specimens were co-cultured with calf chondrocytes for various periods. After digestion of the epiphyseal matrix, viable chondrocytes were counted in suspension. Chondrocyte division in the matrix was assessed by [{sup 3}H]thymidine incorporation. The growth of calf chondrocytes into the xenogeneic chick matrix was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy on fresh thick epiphyseal sections. The percentage of viable chondrocytes in the xenogeneic epiphyseal matrix increased with culture time to a maximum at day 21. The addition of laser-drilled holes was found to extend a plateau of chondrocyte viability until day 29. A decrease in cell viability was detected at later observation points. This study demonstrates that xenogeneic matrix may serve as a morphogenetic scaffold for chondrocytic growth. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Pituitary abscess after autologous bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Leff, R S; Martino, R L; Pollock, W J; Knight, W A

    1989-05-01

    The first case of pituitary abscess arising in a patient during recovery from autologous bone marrow transplantation is reported. A 31-year-old man with a 9 month history of T-cell lymphoma died suddenly more than 60 days after successful treatment with high-dose cyclophosphamide, total body irradiation, and autologous bone marrow infusion. Autopsy revealed a pituitary abscess associated with clinically silent sphenoid sinusitis. Unique aspects of this case are presented and clinical and pathologic features of pituitary abscess are reviewed. Although rare, pituitary abscess may complicate recovery from bone marrow transplantation.

  16. Autologous fibrin adhesive in experimental tubal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Rajaram, S; Rusia, U; Agarwal, S; Agarwal, N

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate autologous fibrin in rabbit oviduct anastomosis versus 7-0 vikryl, a conventional suture material used in tubal anastomosis. Thrombin was added to the autologous fibrinogen at the site of anastomosis to obtain a tissue adhesive. The anastomotic time, pregnancy rate, and litter size were evaluated. Three months later, a relaparotomy was done to evaluate patency and degree of adhesions, and a tubal biopsy was taken from the site of anastomosis. Analysis of results showed a statistically significant (P < .001) shortened anastomotic time and superior histopathological union in the tissue adhesive group. Patency rate, pregnancy rate, and degree of adhesions were comparable in both groups.

  17. Construction of a functional silk-based biomaterial complex with immortalized chondrocytes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yusu; Jiang, Yi; Wen, Jianchuan; Shao, Zhenzhong; Chen, Xin; Sun, Shan; Yu, Huiqian; Li, Wen

    2014-04-01

    To explore the feasibility of constructing a functional biomaterial complex with regenerated silk fibroin membrane and immortalized chondrocytes in vivo. Rat auricular chondrocytes (RACs) were transfected with the lentivirus vector pGC-FU-hTERT-3FLAG or pGC-FU-GFP-3FLAG, encoding the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) or GFP gene. The effects of regenerated silk fibroin film on the adhesion, growth of immortalized chondrocytes and expression of collagen II in vitro were analyzed with immunofluorescent histochemistry. Immortalized RACs were transformed. Induction by nutrient medium promoted higher expression levels of collagen II in transformed chondrocytes. The regenerated silk fibroin film was not cytotoxic to immortalized chondrocytes and had no adverse influence on their adhesion. Collagen II expression was good in the immortalized chondrocytes in vivo. The construction of a silk-based biomaterial complex with immortalized chondrocytes may provide a feasible kind of functional biomaterial for the repair of cartilage defects in clinical applications.

  18. Effect of thiram on avian growth plate chondrocytes in culture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thiram (tetramethyl thiuram disulfide) is a general use pesticide. It causes tibial dyschondroplasia, a cartilage defect in poultry leading to growth plate deformation and lameness. The mechanism of its action on chondrocytes is not understood. Since proteins play significant role in development an...

  19. Polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide inhibit proteoglycan synthesis of human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Röhner, Eric; Hoff, Paula; Winkler, Tobias; von Roth, Philipp; Seeger, Jörn Bengt; Perka, Carsten; Matziolis, Georg

    2011-03-01

    The use of local antiseptics is a common method in septic joint surgery. We tested polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide, two of the most frequently used antiseptics with high efficacy and low toxicity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of both antiseptics on the extracellular cartilaginous matrix synthesis of human chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were isolated from donated human knee joints, embedded in alginate beads, and incubated for 10 and 30 minutes with polyhexanide (0.04%), hydrogen peroxide (3%), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) for control. Cartilaginous matrix production was quantified through light microscopic analysis of Alcian blue staining. Cell number and morphology were detected by histological analysis. Chondrocytes showed a decreased intensity of blue colouring after antiseptic treatment versus PBS. In contrast to that, neither the cell number per view field nor the cell morphology differed between the groups. Polyhexanide has more toxic potential than hydrogen peroxide. Based on the fact that the cell number and morphology was not altered by the substances at the examined concentrations, the lower intensity of Alcian blue staining of treated chondrocytes indicates a decreased cartilage-specific matrix synthesis by polyhexanide more than by hydrogen peroxide and control.

  20. Effects of concanavalin A on chondrocyte hypertrophy and matrix calcification.

    PubMed

    Yan, W; Pan, H; Ishida, H; Nakashima, K; Suzuki, F; Nishimura, M; Jikko, A; Oda, R; Kato, Y

    1997-03-21

    Resting chondrocytes do not usually undergo differentiation to the hypertrophic stage and calcification. However, incubating these cells with concanavalin A resulted in 10-100-fold increases in alkaline phosphatase activity, binding of 1,25(OH)2-vitamin D3, type X collagen synthesis, 45Ca incorporation into insoluble material, and calcium content. On the other hand, other lectins tested (including wheat germ agglutinin, lentil lectin, pea lectin, phytohemagglutinin-L, and phytohemagglutinin-E) marginally affected alkaline phosphatase activity, although they activate lymphocytes. Methylmannoside reversed the effect of concanavalin A on alkaline phosphatase within 48 h. Concanavalin A did not increase alkaline phosphatase activity in articular chondrocyte cultures. In resting chondrocyte cultures, succinyl concanavalin A was as potent as concanavalin A in increasing alkaline phosphatase activity, the incorporation of [35S]sulfate, D-[3H]glucosamine, and [3H]serine into proteoglycans, and the incorporation of [3H]serine into protein, although concanavalin A, but not succinyl concanavalin A, induced a rapid change in the shape of the cells from flat to spherical. These findings suggest that concanavalin A induces a switch from the resting, to the growth-plate stage, and that this action of concanavalin A is not secondary to changes in the cytoskeleton. Chondrocytes exposed to concanavalin A may be useful as a novel model of endochondral bone formation.

  1. Loading of Articular Cartilage Compromises Chondrocyte Respiratory Function

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Mitchell C.; Ramakrishnan, Prem S.; Brouillette, Marc J.; Martin, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Determine whether repeatedly overloading healthy cartilage disrupts mitochondrial function in a manner similar to that associated with osteoarthritis pathogenesis. Methods We exposed normal articular cartilage on bovine osteochondral explants to 1 day or 7 consecutive days of cyclic axial compression (0.25 or 1.0 MPa, 0.5 Hz, 3 hours) and evaluated effects on chondrocyte viability, ATP concentration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, indicators of oxidative stress, respiration, and mitochondrial membrane potential. Results Neither 0.25 nor 1.0 MPa cyclic compression caused extensive chondrocyte death, macroscopic tissue damage, or overt changes in stress-strain behavior. After one day of loading, differences in respiratory activities between the 0.25 and 1.0 MPa groups were minimal; after 7 loading days, however, respiratory activity and ATP levels were suppressed in the 1.0 MPa group relative to the 0.25 MPa group, an effect prevented with pretreatment with 10 mM N-acetylcysteine. These changes were accompanied by increased proton leakage and decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential as well as by increased ROS formation indicated by dihydroethidium staining and glutathione oxidation. Conclusion Repeated overloading leads to chondrocyte oxidant-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction. This mitochondrial dysfunction may contribute to destabilization of cartilage during various stages of OA in distinct ways by disrupting chondrocyte anabolic responses to mechanical stimuli. PMID:26473613

  2. Confocal microscopy indentation system for studying in situ chondrocyte mechanics.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang-Kuy; Colarusso, Pina; Herzog, Walter

    2009-10-01

    Chondrocytes synthesize extracellular matrix molecules, thus they are essential for the development, adaptation and maintenance of articular cartilage. Furthermore, it is well accepted that the biosynthetic activity of chondrocytes is influenced by the mechanical environment. Therefore, their response to mechanical stimuli has been studied extensively. Much of the knowledge in this area of research has been derived from testing of isolated cells, cartilage explants, and fixed cartilage specimens: systems that differ in important aspects from chondrocytes embedded in articular cartilage and observed during loading conditions. In this study, current model systems have been improved by working with the intact cartilage in real time. An indentation system was designed on a confocal microscope that allows for simultaneous loading and observation of chondrocytes in their native environment. Cell mechanics were then measured under precisely controlled loading conditions. The indentation system is based on a light transmissible cylindrical glass indentor of 0.17 mm thickness and 1.64 mm diameter that is aligned along the focal axis of the microscope and allows for real time observation of live cells in their native environment. The system can be used to study cell deformation and biological responses, such as calcium sparks, while applying prescribed loads on the cartilage surface. It can also provide novel information on the relationship between cell loading and cartilage adaptive/degenerative processes in the intact tissue.

  3. Stored human septal chondrocyte viability analyzed by confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, David L; Sage, August B; Schumacher, Barbara L; Jadin, Kyle D; Agustin, Ramses M; Sah, Robert L; Watson, Deborah

    2006-10-01

    To analyze the effects of prolonged storage time, at warm and cold temperatures, on the viability of human nasal septal chondrocytes and to understand the implications for tissue engineering of septal cartilage. Basic science. Septal cartilage was obtained from 10 patients and placed in bacteriostatic isotonic sodium chloride solution. Four specimens were kept at 23 degrees C, and 4 were kept at 4 degrees C. The viability of the chondrocytes within the cartilage was assessed using confocal laser scanning microscopy every 5 days. The 2 other specimens were assessed for viability on the day of harvest. Viability on the day of harvest was 96%, implying minimal cell death from surgical trauma. After 1 week, cell survival in all specimens was essentially unchanged from the day of harvest. At 23 degrees C, the majority (54%) of cells were alive after 20 days. At 4 degrees C, 70% of cells survived 1 month and 38% were alive at 2 months. Qualitatively, chondrocytes died in a topographically uniform distribution in warm specimens, whereas cold specimens displayed a more irregular pattern of cell death. Septal chondrocytes remain viable for prolonged periods when stored in simple bacteriostatic isotonic sodium chloride solution, and such survival is enhanced by cold storage.

  4. Cartilage homeoprotein 1, a homeoprotein selectively expressed in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, G Q; Zhou, X; Eberspaecher, H; Solursh, M; de Crombrugghe, B

    1993-09-15

    We identified a rat cDNA that encodes cartilage homeoprotein 1 (Cart-1). The deduced amino acid sequence of Cart-1 contains a paired-type homeodomain. Northern blot hybridization and RNase protection assay revealed that Cart-1 RNA was present at high levels in a well-differentiated rat chondrosarcoma tumor and in a cell line derived from this tumor. Cart-1 RNA was detected in primary mouse and rat chondrocytes but not in various fibroblasts including mouse 10T1/2 cells, NIH 3T3 cells, BALB 3T3 cells, and rat skin fibroblasts. It was also undetectable in mouse C2 myoblasts, S194 myeloma cells, and embryonic stem cells. Cart-1 RNA was present at a very low level in tested but was not detected in other soft tissues of 8-week-old rats. In situ hybridization of rat embryos between 14.5 and 16.5 days post coitum revealed relatively high levels of Cart-1 RNA in condensed prechondrocytic mesenchymal cells and in early chondrocytes of cartilage primordia. The levels of Cart-1 RNA were lower in mature chondrocytes. No hybridization was observed in brain, spinal cord, heart, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, liver, and muscle. We speculate that Cart-1 has a role in chondrocyte differentiation.

  5. Cartilage homeoprotein 1, a homeoprotein selectively expressed in chondrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, G Q; Zhou, X; Eberspaecher, H; Solursh, M; de Crombrugghe, B

    1993-01-01

    We identified a rat cDNA that encodes cartilage homeoprotein 1 (Cart-1). The deduced amino acid sequence of Cart-1 contains a paired-type homeodomain. Northern blot hybridization and RNase protection assay revealed that Cart-1 RNA was present at high levels in a well-differentiated rat chondrosarcoma tumor and in a cell line derived from this tumor. Cart-1 RNA was detected in primary mouse and rat chondrocytes but not in various fibroblasts including mouse 10T1/2 cells, NIH 3T3 cells, BALB 3T3 cells, and rat skin fibroblasts. It was also undetectable in mouse C2 myoblasts, S194 myeloma cells, and embryonic stem cells. Cart-1 RNA was present at a very low level in tested but was not detected in other soft tissues of 8-week-old rats. In situ hybridization of rat embryos between 14.5 and 16.5 days post coitum revealed relatively high levels of Cart-1 RNA in condensed prechondrocytic mesenchymal cells and in early chondrocytes of cartilage primordia. The levels of Cart-1 RNA were lower in mature chondrocytes. No hybridization was observed in brain, spinal cord, heart, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, liver, and muscle. We speculate that Cart-1 has a role in chondrocyte differentiation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7690966

  6. Insights on Molecular Mechanisms of Chondrocytes Death in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Charlier, Edith; Relic, Biserka; Deroyer, Céline; Malaise, Olivier; Neuville, Sophie; Collée, Julie; Malaise, Michel G.; De Seny, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint pathology characterized by progressive cartilage degradation. Medical care is mainly based on alleviating pain symptoms. Compelling studies report the presence of empty lacunae and hypocellularity in cartilage with aging and OA progression, suggesting that chondrocyte cell death occurs and participates to OA development. However, the relative contribution of apoptosis per se in OA pathogenesis appears complex to evaluate. Indeed, depending on technical approaches, OA stages, cartilage layers, animal models, as well as in vivo or in vitro experiments, the percentage of apoptosis and cell death types can vary. Apoptosis, chondroptosis, necrosis, and autophagic cell death are described in this review. The question of cell death causality in OA progression is also addressed, as well as the molecular pathways leading to cell death in response to the following inducers: Fas, Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Tumor Necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), leptin, nitric oxide (NO) donors, and mechanical stresses. Furthermore, the protective role of autophagy in chondrocytes is highlighted, as well as its decline during OA progression, enhancing chondrocyte cell death; the transition being mainly controlled by HIF-1α/HIF-2α imbalance. Finally, we have considered whether interfering in chondrocyte apoptosis or promoting autophagy could constitute therapeutic strategies to impede OA progression. PMID:27999417

  7. Influence of cell printing on biological characters of chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Miao; Gao, Xiaoyan; Hou, Yikang; Shen, Congcong; Xu, Yourong; Zhu, Ming; Wang, Hengjian; Xu, Haisong; Chai, Gang; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To establish a two-dimensional biological printing technique of chondrocytes and compare the difference of related biological characters between printed chondrocytes and unprinted cells so as to control the cell transfer process and keep cell viability after printing. Methods: Primary chondrocytes were obtained from human mature and fetal cartilage tissues and then were regularly sub-cultured to harvest cells at passage 2 (P2), which were adjusted to the single cell suspension at a density of 1×106/mL. The experiment was divided into 2 groups: experimental group P2 chondrocytes were transferred by rapid prototype biological printer (driving voltage value 50 V, interval in x-axis 300 μm, interval in y-axis 1500 μm). Afterwards Live/Dead viability Kit and flow cytometry were respectively adopted to detect cell viability; CCK-8 Kit was adopted to detect cell proliferation viability; immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR was employed to identify related markers of chondrocytes; control group steps were the same as the printing group except that cell suspension received no printing. Results: Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analyses showed that there was no significant difference between experimental group and control group in terms of cell viability. After 7-day in vitro culture, control group exhibited higher O.D values than experimental group from 2nd day to 7th day but there was no distinct difference between these two groups (P>0.05). Inverted microscope observation demonstrated that the morphology of these two groups had no significant difference either. Similarly, Immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR assays also showed that there was no significant difference in the protein and gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan between these two groups (P>0.05). Conclusion Cell printing has no distinctly negative effect on cell vitality, proliferation and phenotype of chondrocytes. Biological printing technique may

  8. Influence of cell printing on biological characters of chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Qu, Miao; Gao, Xiaoyan; Hou, Yikang; Shen, Congcong; Xu, Yourong; Zhu, Ming; Wang, Hengjian; Xu, Haisong; Chai, Gang; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    To establish a two-dimensional biological printing technique of chondrocytes and compare the difference of related biological characters between printed chondrocytes and unprinted cells so as to control the cell transfer process and keep cell viability after printing. Primary chondrocytes were obtained from human mature and fetal cartilage tissues and then were regularly sub-cultured to harvest cells at passage 2 (P2), which were adjusted to the single cell suspension at a density of 1×10(6)/mL. The experiment was divided into 2 groups: experimental group P2 chondrocytes were transferred by rapid prototype biological printer (driving voltage value 50 V, interval in x-axis 300 μm, interval in y-axis 1500 μm). Afterwards Live/Dead viability Kit and flow cytometry were respectively adopted to detect cell viability; CCK-8 Kit was adopted to detect cell proliferation viability; immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR was employed to identify related markers of chondrocytes; control group steps were the same as the printing group except that cell suspension received no printing. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analyses showed that there was no significant difference between experimental group and control group in terms of cell viability. After 7-day in vitro culture, control group exhibited higher O.D values than experimental group from 2nd day to 7th day but there was no distinct difference between these two groups (P>0.05). Inverted microscope observation demonstrated that the morphology of these two groups had no significant difference either. Similarly, Immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR assays also showed that there was no significant difference in the protein and gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan between these two groups (P>0.05). Conclusion Cell printing has no distinctly negative effect on cell vitality, proliferation and phenotype of chondrocytes. Biological printing technique may provide a novel approach

  9. Efficient, Low-Cost Nucleofection of Passaged Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Parreno, Justin; Delve, Elizabeth; Andrejevic, Katarina; Paez-Parent, Sabrina; Wu, Po-han; Kandel, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Nucleofection of chondrocytes has been shown to be an adequate method of transfection. Using Amaxa’s nucleofection system, transfection efficiencies up to 89% were achievable for vector (pmaxGFP) and 98% for siRNA (siGLO) into passaged chondrocytes. However, such methods rely on costly commercial kits with proprietary reagents limiting its use in basic science labs and in clinical translation. Bovine-passaged chondrocytes were plated in serum reduced media conditionsand then nucleofected using various in laboratory-produced buffers. Cell attachment, confluency, viability, and transfection efficiency was assessed following nucleofection. For each parameter the buffers were scored and a final rank for each buffer was determined. Buffer denoted as 1M resulted in no significant difference for cell attachment, confluency, and viability as compared to non-nucleofected controls. Nucleofection in 1M buffer, in the absence of DNA vectors, resulted in increased col2, ki67, ccnd1 mRNA levels, and decreased col1 mRNA levels at 4 days of culture. Flow cytometry revealed that the transfection efficiency of 1M buffer was comparable to that obtained using the Amaxa commercial kit. siRNA designed against lamin A/C resulted in an average reduction of lamin A and C proteins to 19% and 8% of control levels, respectively. This study identifies a cost-effective, efficient method of nonviral nucleofection of bovine-passaged chondrocytes using known buffer formulations. Human-passaged chondrocytes could also be successfully nucleofected in 1M buffer. Thus this method should facilitate cost-efficient gene targeting of cells used for articular cartilage repair in a research setting. PMID:26958320

  10. Maturational differences in superficial and deep zone articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Chisa; Cheng, Christina; Alexandre, Deborah; Bhargava, Madhu; Torzilli, Peter A

    2006-01-01

    To examine whether differences in chondrocytes from skeletally immature versus adult individuals are important in cartilage healing, repair, or tissue engineering, superficial zone chondrocytes (SZC, from within 100 microm of the articular surface) and deep zone chondrocytes (DZC, from 30%-45% of the deepest un-mineralized part of articular cartilage) were harvested from immature (1-4 months) and young adult (18-36 months) steers and compared. Cell size, matrix gene expression and protein levels, integrin levels, and chemotactic ability were measured in cells maintained in micromass culture for up to 7 days. Regardless of age, SZC were smaller, had a lower type II to type I collagen gene expression ratio, and higher gene expression of SZ proteins than their DZC counterparts. Regardless of zone, chondrocytes from immature steers had higher levels of Sox 9 and type II collagen gene expression. Over 7 days in culture, the SZC of immature steers had the highest rate of proliferation. Phenotypically, the SZC of immature and adult steers were more stable than their respective DZC. Cell surface alpha5 and alpha2 integrin subunit levels were higher in the SZC of immature than of adult steers, whereas beta1 integrin subunit levels were similar. Both immature and adult SZC were capable of chemotaxis in response to fetal bovine serum or basic fibroblast growth factor. Our data indicate that articular chondrocytes vary in the different zones of cartilage and with the age of the donor. These differences may be important for cartilage growth, tissue engineering, and/or repair.

  11. Efficient, Low-Cost Nucleofection of Passaged Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Parreno, Justin; Delve, Elizabeth; Andrejevic, Katarina; Paez-Parent, Sabrina; Wu, Po-Han; Kandel, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Nucleofection of chondrocytes has been shown to be an adequate method of transfection. Using Amaxa's nucleofection system, transfection efficiencies up to 89% were achievable for vector (pmaxGFP) and 98% for siRNA (siGLO) into passaged chondrocytes. However, such methods rely on costly commercial kits with proprietary reagents limiting its use in basic science labs and in clinical translation. Bovine-passaged chondrocytes were plated in serum reduced media conditionsand then nucleofected using various in laboratory-produced buffers. Cell attachment, confluency, viability, and transfection efficiency was assessed following nucleofection. For each parameter the buffers were scored and a final rank for each buffer was determined. Buffer denoted as 1M resulted in no significant difference for cell attachment, confluency, and viability as compared to non-nucleofected controls. Nucleofection in 1M buffer, in the absence of DNA vectors, resulted in increased col2, ki67, ccnd1 mRNA levels, and decreased col1 mRNA levels at 4 days of culture. Flow cytometry revealed that the transfection efficiency of 1M buffer was comparable to that obtained using the Amaxa commercial kit. siRNA designed against lamin A/C resulted in an average reduction of lamin A and C proteins to 19% and 8% of control levels, respectively. This study identifies a cost-effective, efficient method of nonviral nucleofection of bovine-passaged chondrocytes using known buffer formulations. Human-passaged chondrocytes could also be successfully nucleofected in 1M buffer. Thus this method should facilitate cost-efficient gene targeting of cells used for articular cartilage repair in a research setting.

  12. Characteristics of tissue-engineered cartilage from human auricular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Stephen S; Jin, Hong Ryul; Chi, David H; Taylor, Ray S

    2004-05-01

    This study was done to define the mechanical and histological properties of tissue-engineered cartilage (TEC) derived from human chondrocytes and to compare these findings with those of native cartilage. Chondrocytes were obtained from 10 human auricular cartilages and seeded onto a biodegradable template of polyglycolic acid and poly L-lactic acid. Each template was shaped into a 1 cm x 2 cm rectangle. The templates were implanted in athymic mice for 8 weeks. Eight human auricular cartilages were used for comparison. Mechanical analysis with a tensile testing device provided values of ultimate tensile strength (UTS), stiffness, and resilience. Statistical analysis was performed with the Student's t-test. Histological assessment was done with hematoxylin-eosin staining along with other special stains. The TEC had UTS of 2.07 MPa, stiffness of 3.7 MPa, and resilience of 0.37 J/m3. The control specimens had UTS of 2.18 MPa, stiffness of 5.11 MPa, and resilience of 0.42 J/m3. No statistical difference was found between the experimental and control groups for each of the three parameters. Histological analysis showed mature cartilage with characteristic collagen, glycosaminoglycans, and elastin in the TEC. The neo-cartilage showed slightly smaller size and more irregular distribution of chondrocytes and unique fibrous capsule formation with peripheral infiltration of fibrous tissue. This study showed that the mechanical qualities of TEC from human chondrocytes are similar to those of native auricular cartilage. It suggests that the engineered cartilage from human chondrocytes may have sufficient strength and durability for clinical uses. The histological findings revealed some differences with neo-cartilage.

  13. RAGE, Receptor of Advanced Glycation Endoproducts, Negatively Regulates Chondrocytes Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaka, Yuko; Nishimura, Haruka; Tanabe, Motoki; Takakura, Yuuki; Iwai, Keisuke; Waki, Takuya; Fujita, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    RAGE, receptor for advanced glycation endoproducts (AGE), has been characterized as an activator of osteoclastgenesis. However, whether RAGE directly regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation is unclear. Here, we show that RAGE has an inhibitory role in chondrocyte differentiation. RAGE expression was observed in chondrocytes from the prehypertrophic to hypertrophic regions. In cultured cells, overexpression of RAGE or dominant-negative-RAGE (DN-RAGE) demonstrated that RAGE inhibited cartilaginous matrix production, while DN-RAGE promoted production. Additionally, RAGE regulated Ihh and Col10a1 negatively but upregulated PTHrP receptor. Ihh promoter analysis and real-time PCR analysis suggested that downregulation of Cdxs was the key for RAGE-induced inhibition of chondrocyte differentiation. Overexpression of the NF-κB inhibitor I-κB-SR inhibited RAGE-induced NF-κB activation, but did not influence inhibition of cartilaginous matrix production by RAGE. The inhibitory action of RAGE was restored by the Rho family GTPases inhibitor Toxin B. Furthermore, inhibitory action on Ihh, Col10a1 and Cdxs was reproduced by constitutively active forms, L63RhoA, L61Rac, and L61Cdc42, but not by I-κB-SR. Cdx1 induced Ihh and Col10a1 expressions and directly interacted with Ihh promoter. Retinoic acid (RA) partially rescued the inhibitory action of RAGE. These data combined suggests that RAGE negatively regulates chondrocyte differentiation at the prehypertrophic stage by modulating NF-κB-independent and Rho family GTPases-dependent mechanisms. PMID:25275461

  14. Cord Blood Banking Standards: Autologous Versus Altruistic.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) is either donated to public CB banks for use by any patient worldwide for whom it is a match or stored in a private bank for potential autologous or family use. It is a unique cell product that has potential for treating life-threatening diseases. The majority of CB products used today are for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and are accessed from public banks. CB is still evolving as a hematopoietic stem cell source, developing as a source for cellular immunotherapy products, such as natural killer, dendritic, and T-cells, and fast emerging as a non-hematopoietic stem cell source in the field of regenerative medicine. This review explores the regulations, standards, and accreditation schemes that are currently available nationally and internationally for public and private CB banking. Currently, most of private banking is under regulated as compared to public banking. Regulations and standards were initially developed to address the public arena. Early responses from the medical field regarding private CB banking was that at the present time, because of insufficient scientific data to support autologous banking and given the difficulty of making an accurate estimate of the need for autologous transplantation, private storage of CB as "biological insurance" should be discouraged (1, 2, 3). To ensure success and the true realization of the full potential of CB, whether for autologous or allogeneic use, it is essential that each and every product provided for current and future treatments meets high-quality, international standards.

  15. Cord Blood Banking Standards: Autologous Versus Altruistic

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) is either donated to public CB banks for use by any patient worldwide for whom it is a match or stored in a private bank for potential autologous or family use. It is a unique cell product that has potential for treating life-threatening diseases. The majority of CB products used today are for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and are accessed from public banks. CB is still evolving as a hematopoietic stem cell source, developing as a source for cellular immunotherapy products, such as natural killer, dendritic, and T-cells, and fast emerging as a non-hematopoietic stem cell source in the field of regenerative medicine. This review explores the regulations, standards, and accreditation schemes that are currently available nationally and internationally for public and private CB banking. Currently, most of private banking is under regulated as compared to public banking. Regulations and standards were initially developed to address the public arena. Early responses from the medical field regarding private CB banking was that at the present time, because of insufficient scientific data to support autologous banking and given the difficulty of making an accurate estimate of the need for autologous transplantation, private storage of CB as “biological insurance” should be discouraged (1, 2, 3). To ensure success and the true realization of the full potential of CB, whether for autologous or allogeneic use, it is essential that each and every product provided for current and future treatments meets high-quality, international standards. PMID:26779485

  16. Autologous Diced Cartilage in Nasal Septoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sersar, Sameh Ibrahim; Yassin, Ibrahim; Eldin Aly, Mohammed Saad

    2016-01-01

    Diced rib cartilage is an acceptable option in severe nasal deformities. We present our preliminary experience in KAMC in nasal septoplasties using the autologous diced costal cartilage. This is a retrospective study of the 22 cases who needed the autologous diced costal cartilage in our centre in 4 years. All our patients needed autologous diced rib cartilages. Twelve were wrapped with temporalis fascia, eight needed rectus fascia and perichondrium was used in only 2 cases. The naso-frontal angle for the whole series decreased by a mean of 4.41° (p=0.008) for the group using the rectus fascia diced cartilage graft. From the aesthetic point of view, all cases were satisfied except 3 (13.6%); two in the group of diced cartilage temporalis fascia; group 1. From the functional breathing view, only 1 case was not satisfied. He was in group 1. Autologous rib cartilage was shown to be a good graft in nasal septoplasty especially if wrapped with rectus fascia. PMID:27853694

  17. Autologous blood products in rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Mei-Dan, Omer; Carmont, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    We review the management of rotator cuff tears, the mechanism of action of autologous blood products, principally platelet-rich plasma, and the current evidence for effective use of platelet-rich plasma, particularly in relation to the shoulder and chronic rotator cuff tears, for biological augmentation of rotator cuff repair.

  18. Editorial Commentary: Chondrocytes Trump Ligaments! Partial Release of the Medial Collateral Ligament During Knee Arthroscopy Protects Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Leland, J Martin

    2016-10-01

    With knee arthroscopy being the most common orthopaedic procedure performed in the United States, it is crucial to be able to access the entire knee without iatrogenic injury. Frequently orthopaedic surgeons encounter tight medial compartments, creating difficulty in accessing the posterior horn of the medial meniscus without damaging the articular cartilage. Partial release of the medial collateral ligament during knee arthroscopy protects chondrocytes.

  19. Conditional expression of constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} in chondrocytes impairs longitudinal bone growth in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Tsukui, Tohru; Imazawa, Yukiko; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional transgenic mice expressing constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} (caER{alpha}) in chondrocytes were developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of caER{alpha} in chondrocytes impaired longitudinal bone growth in mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer caER{alpha} affects chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This mouse model is useful for understanding the physiological role of ER{alpha}in vivo. -- Abstract: Estrogen plays important roles in the regulation of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, which are essential steps for longitudinal bone growth; however, the mechanisms of estrogen action on chondrocytes have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we generated conditional transgenic mice, designated as caER{alpha}{sup ColII}, expressing constitutively active mutant estrogen receptor (ER) {alpha} in chondrocytes, using the chondrocyte-specific type II collagen promoter-driven Cre transgenic mice. caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice showed retardation in longitudinal growth, with short bone lengths. BrdU labeling showed reduced proliferation of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the proliferating layer of the growth plate of tibia in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. In situ hybridization analysis of type X collagen revealed that the maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes was impaired in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. These results suggest that ER{alpha} is a critical regulator of chondrocyte proliferation and maturation during skeletal development, mediating longitudinal bone growth in vivo.

  20. Autologous osteoblast transplantation, an innovative method of bone defect treatment: role of a tissue and cell bank in the process.

    PubMed

    Olender, E; Brubaker, S; Uhrynowska-Tyszkiewicz, I; Wojtowicz, A; Kaminski, A

    2014-10-01

    The idea of cell treatment of various diseases and medical conditions has become very popular. Some procedures are well established, as is autologous chondrocyte implantation, whereas others are still in the process of early development, laboratory experiments, and some clinical trials. This report is devoted to an example of an emerging cell treatment: bone augmentation with the use of autologous cells and its legal and technical background. Various requirements set by law must be met by tissue banks performing cell seeding of grafts. In Europe, the requirements are described in directives 2004/23/EC, 2006/17/EC, 2006/86/EC, and in the regulation 2007/1394/EC. Revitalization of biostatic allografts gives new, promising tools for creation of functional parts of organs; brings the methodology used in tissue banks closer to tissue engineering; places the enterprise in the mainstream of advanced biotechnology; allows the full potential of tissue allografts; and opens a new, large area for clinical and laboratory research. Cell and tissue processing also have a financial impact on the treatment: it produces additional expenditures. Clinical effectiveness will be the most decisive factor of whether this innovative treatment will be applied in a particular type of medical condition. From a tissue establishment perspective, the most important issue is to develop a procedure that ensures safety for the patient in graft quality terms.

  1. Harpagoside suppresses IL-6 expression in primary human osteoarthritis chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Haseeb, Abdul; Ansari, Mohammad Yunus; Haqqi, Tariq M

    2017-02-01

    There is growing evidence in support of the involvement of inflammatory response in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Harpagoside, one of the bioactive components of Harpagophytum procumbens (Hp), has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties. Here we used an in vitro model of inflammation in OA to investigate the potential of harpagoside to suppress the production of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines such as IL-6 and matrix degrading proteases. We further investigated the likely targets of harpagoside in primary human OA chondrocytes. OA chondrocytes were pre-treated with harpagoside before stimulation with IL-1β. mRNA expression profile of 92 cytokines/chemokines was determined using TaqMan Human Chemokine PCR Array. Expression levels of selected mRNAs were confirmed using TaqMan assays. Protein levels of IL-6 and MMP-13 were assayed by ELISA and immunoblotting. Total protein levels and phosphorylation of signaling proteins were determined by immunoblotting. Cellular localization of IL-6 and c-Fos was performed by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. DNA binding activity of c-FOS/AP-1 was determined by ELISA. Harpagoside significantly altered the global chemokine expression profile in IL-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Expression of IL-6 was highly induced by IL-1β, which was significantly inhibited by pre-treatment of OA chondrocytes with harpagoside. Harpagoside did not inhibit the IL-1β-induced activation of NF-κB and C/EBPβ transcription factors but suppressed the IL-1β-triggered induction, phosphorylation, and DNA binding activity of c-FOS, one of the main components of AP-1 transcription factors. Further, harpagoside significantly inhibited the expression of MMP-13 in OA chondrocytes under pathological conditions. siRNA-mediated knockdown of IL-6 resulted in suppressed expression and secretion of MMP-13 directly linking the role of IL-6 with MMP-13 expression. Taken together, the present study suggests that harpagoside exerts a

  2. Chondrocyte intracellular calcium, cytoskeletal organization, and gene expression responses to dynamic osmotic loading.

    PubMed

    Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; West, Alan C; Hung, Clark T

    2006-10-01

    While chondrocytes in articular cartilage experience dynamic stimuli from joint loading activities, few studies have examined the effects of dynamic osmotic loading on their signaling and biosynthetic activities. We hypothesize that dynamic osmotic loading modulates chondrocyte signaling and gene expression differently than static osmotic loading. With the use of a novel microfluidic device developed in our laboratory, dynamic hypotonic loading (-200 mosM) was applied up to 0.1 Hz and chondrocyte calcium signaling, cytoskeleton organization, and gene expression responses were examined. Chondrocytes exhibited decreasing volume and calcium responses with increasing loading frequency. Phalloidin staining showed osmotic loading-induced changes to the actin cytoskeleton in chondrocytes. Real-time PCR analysis revealed a stimulatory effect of dynamic osmotic loading compared with static osmotic loading. These studies illustrate the utility of the microfluidic device in cell signaling investigations, and their potential role in helping to elucidate mechanisms that mediate chondrocyte mechanotransduction to dynamic stimuli.

  3. Dynamic formation of oriented patches in chondrocyte cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Grote, Marcus J; Palumberi, Viviana; Wagner, Barbara; Barbero, Andrea; Martin, Ivan

    2011-10-01

    Growth factors have a significant impact not only on the growth dynamics but also on the phenotype of chondrocytes (Barbero et al. in J. Cell. Phys. 204:830-838, 2005). In particular, as chondrocytes approach confluence, the cells tend to align and form coherent patches. Starting from a mathematical model for fibroblast populations at equilibrium (Mogilner et al. in Physica D 89:346-367, 1996), a dynamic continuum model with logistic growth is developed. Both linear stability analysis and numerical solutions of the time-dependent nonlinear integro-partial differential equation are used to identify the key parameters that lead to pattern formation in the model. The numerical results are compared quantitatively to experimental data by extracting statistical information on orientation, density and patch size through Gabor filters.

  4. 13cRA regulates the differentiation of antler chondrocytes through targeting Runx3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Liang; Cao, Hang; Yang, Zhan-Qing; Geng, Shuang; Wang, Kai; Yu, Hai-Fan; Guo, Bin; Yue, Zhan-Peng

    2017-03-01

    Although 13cRA is involved in the regulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation, its physiological roles in chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation still remain unknown. Here, we showed that 13cRA could induce the proliferation of sika deer antler chondrocytes and expression of Ccnd3 and Cdk6. Administration of 13cRA to antler chondrocytes resulted in an obvious increase in the expression of chondrocyte marker Col II and hypertrophic chondrocyte marker Col X. Silencing of Crabp2 expression by specific siRNA could prevent the 13cRA-induced up-regulation of Col X, whereas overexpression of Crabp2 showed the opposite effects. Further study found that Crabp2 mediated the regulation of 13cRA on the expression of Runx3 which was highly expressed in the antler cartilage and inhibited the differentiation of antler chondrocytes. Moreover, attenuation of Runx3 expression greatly raised 13cRA-induced chondrocyte differentiation. Simultaneously, 13cRA could stimulate the expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1 in the antler chondrocytes. Inhibition of Cyp26a1 and/or Cyp26b1 reinforced the effects of 13cRA on the expression of Col X and Runx3, while overexpression of Cyp26b1 rendered the antler chondrocytes hyposensitive to 13cRA. Collectively, 13cRA may play an important role in the differentiation of antler chondrocytes through targeting Runx3. Crabp2 enhances the effects of 13cRA on chondrocyte differentiation, while Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1 weaken the sensitivity of antler chondrocytes to 13cRA.

  5. Autologous antibodies that bind neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujing; Sholler, Giselle S; Shukla, Girja S; Pero, Stephanie C; Carman, Chelsea L; Zhao, Ping; Krag, David N

    2015-11-01

    Antibody therapy of neuroblastoma is promising and our goal is to derive antibodies from patients with neuroblastoma for developing new therapeutic antibodies. The feasibility of using residual bone marrow obtained for clinical indications as a source of tumor cells and a source of antibodies was assessed. From marrow samples, neuroblastoma cells were recovered, grown in cell culture and also implanted into mice to create xenografts. Mononuclear cells from the marrow were used as a source to generate phage display antibody libraries and also hybridomas. Growth of neuroblastoma patient cells was possible both in vitro and as xenografts. Antibodies from the phage libraries and from the monoclonal hybridomas bound autologous neuroblastoma cells with some selectivity. It appears feasible to recover neuroblastoma cells from residual marrow specimens and to generate human antibodies that bind autologous neuroblastoma cells. Expansion of this approach is underway to collect more specimens, optimize methods to generate antibodies, and to evaluate the bioactivity of neuroblastoma-binding antibodies.

  6. Autologous split peroneus longus lateral ankle stabilization.

    PubMed

    Budny, Adam M; Schuberth, John M

    2012-01-01

    Lateral ankle instability is a common clinical entity, and a variety of surgical procedures are available for stabilization after conservative management fails. Herein the authors reviewed outcomes after performing autologous split peroneus longus lateral ankle stabilization, using a previously described surgical technique to anatomically recreate the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments. Twenty-five consecutive patients from 2 surgeons' practices underwent reconstruction between March 2007 and January 2011 with a minimum follow-up of 12 (range 12 to 51) months (mean 29.5 months). Follow-up interviews demonstrated 92.0% good or excellent outcomes with only 8.0% rating the outcome as fair and none as poor; 92.0% had no recurrent sprains or difficulty going up or down hills; 88.0% related no difficulty with uneven ground. The authors conclude that the autologous split peroneus longus lateral ankle stabilization results in a stable ankle with a low rate of complications and high patient satisfaction.

  7. [Integrated autologous fat graft in face recontouring].

    PubMed

    Xie, Yun; Zheng, Dan-Ning; Liu, Kai; Gu, Bin; Li, Qing-Feng

    2010-05-01

    To discuss the integrated autologous fat graft technique in face recontouring. In this study we treated 83 cases of face recontouring with 3L3M technique (low pressure suction, low speed centrifugation, low volume, multi-plane, multi-tunnel, multi-point injection). Each case was treated 1-3 times and the interval period is 3-6 months. The result was based on comparing the photos taken from pre-operation and post operation, observing the expression recovery, cysts, local absorption, and patients self evaluation. Long time follow up showed that fat graft can be alive in the recipient site for long time after 1-3 times autologous fat injection. More than 73.5% patients were satisfactory with the curative effect while less than 4.8% patients were unsatisfactory. 3L3M integrated fat graft technique is an effective and safe treatment in face recontouring.

  8. Human articular chondrocytes express functional leukotriene B4 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Ann Kristin; Indrevik, Jill-Tove; Figenschau, Yngve; Martinez-Zubiaurre, Inigo; Sveinbjörnsson, Baldur

    2015-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a potent chemoattractant associated with the development of osteoarthritis (OA), while its receptors BLT1 and BLT2 have been found in synovium and subchondral bone. In this study, we have investigated whether these receptors are also expressed by human cartilage cells and their potential effects on cartilage cells. The expression of LTB4 receptors in native tissue and cultured cells was assessed by immunohistochemistry, immunocytochemistry, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and electron microscopy. The functional significance of the LTB4 receptor expression was studied by Western blotting, using phospho-specific antibodies in the presence or absence of receptor antagonists. In further studies, the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, growth factors and metalloproteinases by LTB4-stimulated chondrocytes was measured by multiplex protein assays. The effects of LTB4 in cartilage signature gene expression in cultured cells were assessed by quantitative PCR, whereas the LTB4-promoted matrix synthesis was determined using 3D pellet cultures. Both receptors were present in cultured chondrocytes, as was confirmed by immunolabelling and PCR. The relative quantification by PCR demonstrated a higher expression of the receptors in cells from healthy joints compared with OA cases. The stimulation of cultured chondrocytes with LTB4 resulted in a phosphorylation of downstream transcription factor Erk 1/2, which was reduced after blocking BLT1 signalling. No alteration in the secretion of cytokine and metalloproteinases was recorded after challenging cultured cells with LTB4; likewise, cartilage matrix gene expression and 3D tissue synthesis were unaffected. Chondrocytes express BLT1 and BLT2 receptors, and LTB4 activates the downstream Erk 1/2 pathway by engaging the high-affinity receptor BLT1. However, any putative role in cartilage biology could not be revealed, and remains to be clarified. PMID:25677035

  9. A practical way to prepare primer human chondrocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Isyar, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Yasar Sirin, Duygu; Yalcin, Sercan; Guler, Olcay; Mahirogullari, Mahir

    2016-09-01

    Biological cartilage repair is one of the most important targets for orthopedic surgeons currently. For this purpose, it is mandatory to know how to prepare a chondrocyte culture. In this study, our purpose was to introduce a method enabling orthopedic surgeons to practice their knowledge and skills on molecular experimental setup at cellular level, based on our experiences from previous pilot studies. Thus, we believe it will encourage orthopedic surgeons.

  10. Engineering Superficial Zone Chondrocytes from Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Emily E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent cartilage engineering efforts have focused on development of zonally organized tissue. However, there remains a need for protocols that differentiate progenitor populations into chondrocytes of zonal phenotype. Here, we evaluate the potential of coculture of bovine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and zonal explants of bovine cartilage tissue to drive MSC differentiation to chondrocytes with the superficial zone phenotype. Two coculture systems were set up: one between alginate encapsulated MSCs and superficial zone cartilage explants, and one between MSCs and middle/deep zone cartilage explants. Chondrogenic and superficial zone markers were monitored over a 21-day differentiation period via gene and protein expression. A control conditioned media study was used to determine the impact of communication via soluble factors between cell populations during differentiation. At day 21, results show superficial zone explant coculture without transforming-growth factor β3 supplementation induces upregulation of chondrogenic gene expression markers SOX9 and type II collagen 3.4-fold and 11.4-fold, respectively, over standard chondrogenic control media. Further, coculture of MSCs and superficial zone explants can be used to upregulate mRNA expression of the superficial zone marker proteoglycan-4 in MSCs (1.75-fold over chondrogenic control at day 21), indicating the superficial zone chondrocyte phenotype. Gene expression data show middle/deep zone explant and MSC coculture did not induce the chondrogenesis observed in superficial zone explant coculture. Likewise, poor chondrogenesis was observed in all conditioned media groups. Results highlight the importance of superficial zone cartilage and cells in guiding stem cell fate and regulating differentiation of MSCs to chondrocytes of the superficial zone type. PMID:24279336

  11. Metabolic Effects of Avocado/Soy Unsaponifiables on Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nardo, Joseph V.; Harlan, Robert; Chiou, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    Avocado/soy unsaponifiable (ASU) components are reported to have a chondroprotective effect by virtue of anti-inflammatory and proanabolic effects on articular chondrocytes. The identity of the active component(s) remains unknown. In general, sterols, the major component of unsaponifiable plant material have been demonstrated to be anti-inflammatory in vitro and in animal models. These studies were designed to clarify whether the sterol content of ASU preparations were the primary contributors to biological activity in articular chondrocytes. ASU samples were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and GC mass spectrometry. The sterol content was normalized between diverse samples prior to in vitro testing on bovine chondrocytes. Anabolic activity was monitored by uptake of 35-sulfate into proteoglycans and quantitation of labeled hydroxyproline and proline content after incubation with labeled proline. Anti-inflammatory activity was assayed by measuring reduction of interleukin-1 (IL-1)-induced synthesis of PGE2 and metalloproteases and release of label from tissue prelabeled with S-35.All ASU samples exerted a similar time-dependent up-regulation of 35-sulfate uptake in bovine cells reaching a maximum of greater than 100% after 72 h at sterol doses of 1–10 μg/ml. Non-collagenous protein (NCP) and collagen synthesis were similarly up-regulated. All ASU were equally effective in dose dependently inhibiting IL-1-induced MMP-3 activity (23–37%), labeled sulfate release (15–23%) and PGE2 synthesis (45–58%). Up-regulation of glycosaminoglycan and collagen synthesis and reduction of IL-1 effects in cartilage are consistent with chondroprotective activity. The similarity of activity of ASU from diverse sources when tested at equal sterol levels suggests sterols are important for biologic effects in articular chondrocytes. PMID:18604259

  12. The effects of fixed electrical charge on chondrocyte behavior.

    PubMed

    Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Pumberger, Matthias; Casper, Michelle E; Shogren, Kristin; Giuliani, Melissa; Ruesink, Terry; Hefferan, Theresa E; Currier, Bradford L; Yaszemski, Michael J

    2011-05-01

    In this study we have compared the effects of negative and positive fixed charges on chondrocyte behavior in vitro. Electrical charges have been incorporated into oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) (OPF) using small charged monomers such as sodium methacrylate (SMA) and (2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl)-trimethyl ammonium chloride (MAETAC) to produce negatively and positively charged hydrogels, respectively. The physical and electrical properties of the hydrogels were characterized by measuring and calculating the swelling ratio and zeta potential, respectively. Our results revealed that the properties of these OPF modified hydrogels varied according to the concentration of charged monomers. Zeta potential measurements demonstrated that the electrical properties of the OPF hydrogel surfaces changed on incorporation of SMA and MAETAC and that these changes in electrical properties were dose-dependent. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to determine the hydrogel surface composition. To assess the effects of surface properties on chondrocyte behavior primary chondrocytes isolated from rabbit ears were seeded as a monolayer on top of the hydrogels. We demonstrated that the cells remained viable over 7 days and began to proliferate while seeded on top of the hydrogels. Collagen type II staining was positive in all samples, however, the staining intensity was higher on negatively charged hydrogels. Similarly, glycosaminoglycan production was significantly higher on negatively charged hydrogels compared with a neutral hydrogel. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction showed up-regulation of collagen type II and down-regulation of collagen type I on the negatively charged hydrogels. These findings indicate that charge plays an important role in establishing an appropriate environment for chondrocytes and, hence, in the engineering of cartilage. Thus, further investigations into charged hydrogels for cartilage tissue

  13. Structural differences in epiphyseal and physeal hypertrophic chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Frederic; Flynn, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    We have observed that epiphyseal and physeal hypertrophic chondrocytes in BALB/c mice show considerable differences of light microscopic and ultrastructural appearance, even when the cells are at the same stage of differentiation. In addition, cell structure maintenance improved with tissue preparation controlled for osmolarity and for membrane stabilization using 0.5% ruthenium hexammine trichloride (RHT) for both light microscopy (LM) and electron microscopy (EM) or 0.5% lanthanum nitrate for LM. Physeal hypertrophic chondrocytes showed a gradual increase in size closer to the metaphysis and a change in shape as cells elongated along the long axis. The nucleus remained central, with uniformly dispersed chromatin, and the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) was randomly dispersed throughout cytoplasm with little to no presence against the cell membrane. Even the lowermost cells showed thin elongated or dilated cisternae of RER and intact cell membranes. Epiphyseal chondrocytes remained circular to oval with no elongation. Nucleus and RER were positioned as a complete transcellular central nucleocytoplasmic column or as an incomplete bud with RER of the column/bud always continuous with RER peripherally against the intact cell membrane. RER was densely packed with parallel cisternae with adjacent cytoplasm empty of organelles but often filled with circular deposits of moderately electron-dense material consistent with fat. Optimal technique for LM involved fixation using glutaraldehyde (GA) 1.3%, paraformaldehyde (PFA) 1% and RHT 0.5% (mOsm 606) embedded in JB-4 plastic and stained with 0.5% toluidine blue. Optimal technique for EM used fixation with GA 1.3%, PFA 1%, RHT 0.5% and cacodylate buffer 0.03 M (mOsm 511) and post-fixation including 1% osmium tetroxide. These observations lead to the possibility that the same basic cell, the hypertrophic chondrocyte, has differing functional mechanisms at different regions of the developing bone. PMID:25987982

  14. Microenvironmental changes during differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells towards chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Djouad, Farida; Delorme, Bruno; Maurice, Marielle; Bony, Claire; Apparailly, Florence; Louis-Plence, Pascale; Canovas, François; Charbord, Pierre; Noël, Danièle; Jorgensen, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Chondrogenesis is a process involving stem-cell differentiation through the coordinated effects of growth/differentiation factors and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were found within the cartilage, which constitutes a specific niche composed of ECM proteins with unique features. Therefore, we hypothesized that the induction of MSC differentiation towards chondrocytes might be induced and/or influenced by molecules from the microenvironment. Using microarray analysis, we previously identified genes that are regulated during MSC differentiation towards chondrocytes. In this study, we wanted to precisely assess the differential expression of genes associated with the microenvironment using a large-scale real-time PCR assay, according to the simultaneous detection of up to 384 mRNAs in one sample. Chondrogenesis of bone-marrow-derived human MSCs was induced by culture in micropellet for various periods of time. Total RNA was extracted and submitted to quantitative RT-PCR. We identified molecules already known to be involved in attachment and cell migration, including syndecans, glypicans, gelsolin, decorin, fibronectin, and type II, IX and XI collagens. Importantly, we detected the expression of molecules that were not previously associated with MSCs or chondrocytes, namely metalloproteases (MMP-7 and MMP-28), molecules of the connective tissue growth factor (CTGF); cef10/cyr61 and nov (CCN) family (CCN3 and CCN4), chemokines and their receptors chemokine CXC motif ligand (CXCL1), Fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FlT3L), chemokine CC motif receptor (CCR3 and CCR4), molecules with A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase domain (ADAM8, ADAM9, ADAM19, ADAM23, A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motif ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5), cadherins (4 and 13) and integrins (α4, α7 and β5). Our data suggest that crosstalk between ECM components of the microenvironment and MSCs within the cartilage is

  15. Hydrogen peroxide induces apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway in chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Cai-ping; Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2012-03-01

    The degenerative joint disease such as osteoarthritis (OA) is closely associated with the death of chondrocytes in apoptosis fashion. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), higher expression following acute damage in OA patients, has been shown to be up-regulated during apoptosis in a bulk of experimental models. This study was aimed to explore the mechanism of H2O2-induced rabbit chondrocytes apoptosis. Articular cartilage was biopsied from the joints of 6 weeks old New Zealand rabbits. Cell Counting Kit (CCK-8) assay was used to assess the inhibitory effect of H2O2 on cell viability. H2O2 treatment induced a remarkable reduction of cell viability. We used flow cytometry to assess the form of cell death with Annexin-V/PI double staining, and found that H2O2 treatment induced apoptosis in a dose-and time-dependent manner. Exposure of chondrocytes to 1.5 mM of H2O2 for 2 h induced a burst apoptosis that can be alleviated by N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) pretreatment, an anti-oxidant amino-acid derivative. Loss of mitochondria membrane potential (▵Ψm) was evaluated using confocal microscopy imaging and flow cytometry (FCM). H2O2 treatment induced a marked reduction of ▵Ψm, and the abrupt disappearance of ▵Ψm occurred within 5 minutes. These results indicate that H2O2 induces a rapid apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway in rabbit chondrocytes.

  16. MicroRNA-33 suppresses CCL2 expression in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Meng; Xie, Qingyun; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Fan; Cheng, Yue; Guo, Dongyang; Wang, Ying; Mo, Liweng; Wang, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    CCL2-mediated macrophage infiltration in articular tissues plays a pivotal role in the development of the osteoarthritis (OA). miRNAs regulate the onset and progression of diseases via controlling the expression of a series of genes. How the CCL2 gene was regulated by miRNAs was still not fully elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrated that the binding sites of miR-33 in the 3′UTR of CCL2 gene were conserved in human, mouse and rat species. By performing gain- or loss-of-function studies, we verified that miR-33 suppressed CCL2 expression in the mRNA and protein levels. We also found that miR-33 suppressed the CCL2 levels in the supernatant of cultured primary mouse chondrocytes. With reporter gene assay, we demonstrated that miR-33 targeted at AAUGCA in the 3′UTR of CCL2 gene. In transwell migration assays, we demonstrated that the conditional medium (CM) from miR-33 deficient chondrocytes potentiated the monocyte chemotaxis in a CCL2 dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrated that the level of miR-33 was decreased, whereas the CCL2 level was increased in the articular cartilage from the OA patients compared with the control group. In summary, we identified miR-33 as a novel suppressor of CCL2 in chondrocytes. The miR-33/CCL2 axis in chondrocytes regulates monocyte chemotaxis, providing a potential mechanism of macrophage infiltration in OA. PMID:27129293

  17. Fate of Meckel's cartilage chondrocytes in ocular culture

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, J.M.; Diewert, V.M.

    1988-09-01

    Modulation of the chondrocyte phenotype was observed in an organ culture system using Meckel's cartilage. First branchial arch cartilage was dissected from fetal rats of 16- and 17-day gestation. Perichondrium was mechanically removed, cartilage was split at the rostral process, and each half was grafted into the anterior chamber of an adult rat eye. The observed pattern of development in nonirradiated specimens was the following: hypertrophy of the rostral process and endochondral-type ossification, fibrous atrophy in the midsection, and mineralization of the malleus and incus. A change in matrix composition of the implanted cartilage was demonstrated with immunofluorescence staining for cartilage-specific proteoglycan (CSPG). After 15 days of culture, CSPG was found in the auricular process but not in the midsection or rostral process. In order to mark the implanted cells and follow their fate, cartilage was labeled in vitro with (3H)thymidine (3H)TdR). Immediately after labeling 20% of the chondrocytes contained (3H)TdR. After culturing for 5 days, 20% of the chondrocytes were still labeled and 10% of the osteogenic cells also contained radioactive label. The labeling index decreased in both cell types with increased duration of culture. Multinucleated clast-type cells did not contain label. Additional cartilages not labeled with (3H)TdR were exposed to between 20000 and 6000 rad of gamma irradiation before ocular implantation. Irradiated cartilage did not hypertrophy or form bone but a fibrous region developed in the midsection. Cells of the host animal were not induced to form bone around the irradiated cartilage. Our studies suggest that fully differentiated chondrocytes of Meckel's cartilage have the capacity to become osteocytes, osteoblasts, and fibroblasts.

  18. Microenvironmental changes during differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells towards chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Djouad, Farida; Delorme, Bruno; Maurice, Marielle; Bony, Claire; Apparailly, Florence; Louis-Plence, Pascale; Canovas, François; Charbord, Pierre; Noël, Danièle; Jorgensen, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Chondrogenesis is a process involving stem-cell differentiation through the coordinated effects of growth/differentiation factors and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were found within the cartilage, which constitutes a specific niche composed of ECM proteins with unique features. Therefore, we hypothesized that the induction of MSC differentiation towards chondrocytes might be induced and/or influenced by molecules from the microenvironment. Using microarray analysis, we previously identified genes that are regulated during MSC differentiation towards chondrocytes. In this study, we wanted to precisely assess the differential expression of genes associated with the microenvironment using a large-scale real-time PCR assay, according to the simultaneous detection of up to 384 mRNAs in one sample. Chondrogenesis of bone-marrow-derived human MSCs was induced by culture in micropellet for various periods of time. Total RNA was extracted and submitted to quantitative RT-PCR. We identified molecules already known to be involved in attachment and cell migration, including syndecans, glypicans, gelsolin, decorin, fibronectin, and type II, IX and XI collagens. Importantly, we detected the expression of molecules that were not previously associated with MSCs or chondrocytes, namely metalloproteases (MMP-7 and MMP-28), molecules of the connective tissue growth factor (CTGF); cef10/cyr61 and nov (CCN) family (CCN3 and CCN4), chemokines and their receptors chemokine CXC motif ligand (CXCL1), Fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FlT3L), chemokine CC motif receptor (CCR3 and CCR4), molecules with A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase domain (ADAM8, ADAM9, ADAM19, ADAM23, A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motif ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5), cadherins (4 and 13) and integrins (alpha4, alpha7 and beta5). Our data suggest that crosstalk between ECM components of the microenvironment and MSCs within the cartilage is

  19. The Role of the Membrane Potential in Chondrocyte Volume Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; Asplin, Katie E; Bruce, Gareth; Dart, Caroline; Mobasheri, Ali; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Many cell types have significant negative resting membrane potentials (RMPs) resulting from the activity of potassium-selective and chloride-selective ion channels. In excitable cells, such as neurones, rapid changes in membrane permeability underlie the generation of action potentials. Chondrocytes have less negative RMPs and the role of the RMP is not clear. Here we examine the basis of the chondrocyte RMP and possible physiological benefits. We demonstrate that maintenance of the chondrocyte RMP involves gadolinium-sensitive cation channels. Pharmacological inhibition of these channels causes the RMP to become more negative (100 µM gadolinium: ΔVm = −30 ± 4 mV). Analysis of the gadolinium-sensitive conductance reveals a high permeability to calcium ions (PCa/PNa ≈80) with little selectivity between monovalent ions; similar to that reported elsewhere for TRPV5. Detection of TRPV5 by PCR and immunohistochemistry and the sensitivity of the RMP to the TRPV5 inhibitor econazole (ΔVm = −18 ± 3 mV) suggests that the RMP may be, in part, controlled by TRPV5. We investigated the physiological advantage of the relatively positive RMP using a mathematical model in which membrane stretch activates potassium channels allowing potassium efflux to oppose osmotic water uptake. At very negative RMP potassium efflux is negligible, but at more positive RMP it is sufficient to limit volume increase. In support of our model, cells clamped at −80 mV and challenged with a reduced osmotic potential swelled approximately twice as much as cells at +10 mV. The positive RMP may be a protective adaptation that allows chondrocytes to respond to the dramatic osmotic changes, with minimal changes in cell volume. J. Cell. Physiol. 226: 2979–2986, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21328349

  20. Solid-state, polymer-based fiber solar cells with carbon nanotube electrodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dianyi; Zhao, Mingyan; Li, Yan; Bian, Zuqiang; Zhang, Luhui; Shang, Yuanyuan; Xia, Xinyuan; Zhang, Sen; Yun, Daqin; Liu, Zhiwei; Cao, Anyuan; Huang, Chunhui

    2012-12-21

    Most previous fiber-shaped solar cells were based on photoelectrochemical systems involving liquid electrolytes, which had issues such as device encapsulation and stability. Here, we deposited classical semiconducting polymer-based bulk heterojunction layers onto stainless steel wires to form primary electrodes and adopted carbon nanotube thin films or densified yarns to replace conventional metal counter electrodes. The polymer-based fiber cells with nanotube film or yarn electrodes showed power conversion efficiencies in the range 1.4% to 2.3%, with stable performance upon rotation and large-angle bending and during long-time storage without further encapsulation. Our fiber solar cells consisting of a polymeric active layer sandwiched between steel and carbon electrodes have potential in the manufacturing of low-cost, liquid-free, and flexible fiber-based photovoltaics.

  1. Current Advances in Polymer-Based Nanotheranostics for Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nanotheranostics is a relatively new, fast-growing field that combines the advantages of treatment and diagnosis via a single nanoscale carrier. The ability to bundle both therapeutic and diagnostic capabilities into one package offers exciting prospects for the development of novel nanomedicine. Nanotheranostics can deliver treatment while simultaneously monitoring therapy response in real-time, thereby decreasing the potential of over- or under-dosing patients. Polymer-based nanomaterials, in particular, have been used extensively as carriers for both therapeutic and bioimaging agents and thus hold great promise for the construction of multifunctional theranostic formulations. Herein, we review recent advances in polymer-based systems for nanotheranostics, with a particular focus on their applications in cancer research. We summarize the use of polymer nanomaterials for drug delivery, gene delivery, and photodynamic therapy, combined with imaging agents for magnetic resonance imaging, radionuclide imaging, and fluorescence imaging. PMID:25014486

  2. Pyoderma gangrenosum following autologous breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tuffaha, Sami H.; Robbins, Sanford H.; Bonawitz, Steven C.

    2017-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an uncommon disorder characterized by the development of painful cutaneous ulceration, commonly precipitated by dermal injury at surgical sites. It is a diagnostic challenge as it manifests as necrotizing wounds which are commonly misdiagnosed as postoperative wound infection or ischemia. We discuss the clinical features and histopathological findings that allow for rapid identification of PG following autologous breast reconstruction and suggest an algorithm to aid diagnosis. PMID:28210559

  3. Pyoderma gangrenosum following autologous breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prateush; Tuffaha, Sami H; Robbins, Sanford H; Bonawitz, Steven C

    2017-02-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an uncommon disorder characterized by the development of painful cutaneous ulceration, commonly precipitated by dermal injury at surgical sites. It is a diagnostic challenge as it manifests as necrotizing wounds which are commonly misdiagnosed as postoperative wound infection or ischemia. We discuss the clinical features and histopathological findings that allow for rapid identification of PG following autologous breast reconstruction and suggest an algorithm to aid diagnosis.

  4. Recovery of autologous erythrocytes in transfused patients.

    PubMed

    Wallas, C H; Tanley, P C; Gorrell, L P

    1980-01-01

    A microcapillary method utilizing phthalate esters or an ultracentrifuge method are both capable of separating autologous from homologous erythrocytes in polytransfused patients. The microcapillary technique which is readily adaptable to blood bank laboratories provides a previously unavailable method for defining blood group antigen typings in transfused patients. Such typings are of vital importance in the laboratory evaluation of transfused patients with multiple or weak blood group antibodies.

  5. Cryptococcal meningitis post autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chaaban, S; Wheat, L J; Assi, M

    2014-06-01

    Disseminated Cryptococcus disease occurs in patients with defective T-cell immunity. Cryptococcal meningitis following autologous stem cell transplant (SCT) has been described previously in only 1 patient, 4 months post SCT and while off antifungal prophylaxis. We present a unique case of Cryptococcus meningitis pre-engraftment after autologous SCT, while the patient was receiving fluconazole prophylaxis. A 41-year-old man with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma underwent autologous SCT. Post-transplant prophylaxis consisted of fluconazole 400 mg daily, levofloxacin 500 mg daily, and acyclovir 800 mg twice daily. On day 9 post transplant, he developed fever and headache. Peripheral white blood cell count (WBC) was 700/μL. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed lesions consistent with meningoencephalitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed a WBC of 39 with 77% lymphocytes, protein 63, glucose 38, CSF pressure 20.5 cmH2 O, and a positive cryptococcal antigen. CSF culture confirmed Cryptococcus neoformans. The patient was treated with liposomal amphotericin B 5 mg/kg intravenously daily, and flucytosine 37.5 mg/kg orally every 6 h. He was switched to fluconazole 400 mg daily after 3 weeks of amphotericin therapy, with sterilization of the CSF with negative CSFCryptococcus antigen and negative CSF culture. Review of the literature revealed 9 cases of cryptococcal disease in recipients of SCT. Median time of onset was 64 days post transplant. Only 3 meningitis cases were described; 2 of them after allogeneic SCT. Fungal prophylaxis with fluconazole post autologous SCT is recommended at least through engraftment, and for up to 100 days in high-risk patients. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose and treat opportunistic infections, especially in the face of immunosuppression and despite adequate prophylaxis. Infection is usually fatal without treatment, thus prompt diagnosis and therapy might be life saving.

  6. Inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment drives primary human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Röhner, Eric; Matziolis, Georg; Perka, Carsten; Füchtmeier, Bernd; Gaber, Timo; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Buttgereit, Frank; Hoff, Paula

    2012-06-01

    The role of human chondrocytes in the pathogenesis of cartilage degradation in rheumatic joint diseases has presently gained increasing interest. An active chondrocyte participation in local inflammation may play a role in the initiation and progression of inflammatory joint diseases and in a disruption of cartilage repair mechanisms resulting in cartilage degradation. In the present study, we hypothesized that inflammatory synovial fluid triggers human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory processes in rheumatic joint diseases. Primary human chondrocytes were incubated in synovial fluids gained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis arthritis and reactive arthritis. The detection of vital cell numbers was determined by using Casy Cell Counter System. Apoptosis was measured by Annexin-V and 7AAD staining. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was determined by a multiplex suspension array. Detection of vital cells showed a highly significant decrease in chondrocyte numbers. Flow cytometry demonstrated a significant increase in apoptotic chondrocytes after the incubation. An active secretion of cytokines such as MCP-1 and MIF by chondrocytes was observed. The inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment mediates apoptosis and cell death of chondrocytes. Moreover, in terms of cytokine secretion, it also induces an active participation of chondrocytes in ongoing inflammation.

  7. Bushen Zhuangjin decoction inhibits TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pingdong; Weng, Xiaping; Liu, Fayuan; Ma, Yuhuan; Chen, Houhuang; Shao, Xiang; Zheng, Wenwei; Liu, Xianxiang; Ye, Hongzhi; Li, Xihai

    2015-12-01

    Chondrocyte apoptosis triggered by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Bushen Zhuangjin decoction (BZD) has been widely used in the treatment of OA. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the inhibitory effects of BZD on chondrocyte apoptosis remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of BZD on ER stress-induced chondrocyte apoptosis using a chondrocyte in vitro model o