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Sample records for polymerase conferring differential

  1. Allele-specific duplex polymerase chain reaction to differentiate Mycobacterium abscessus subspecies and to detect highly clarithromycin-resistant isolates.

    PubMed

    Kim, H Y; Lee, S Y; Kim, B J; Kook, Y H

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of the structural differences of erm, we used a duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to differentiate Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus and subsp. massiliense isolates and to detect the point mutations of 23S rRNA gene that confer a high level of resistance to clarithromycin. Subsp. massiliense strains occupying almost half of the clinical isolates can be simply identified, and their clarithromycin susceptibility can be rapidly determined. PMID:27514964

  2. Specific Residues of PB2 and PA Influenza Virus Polymerase Subunits Confer the Ability for RNA Polymerase II Degradation and Virus Pathogenicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Llompart, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus transcription requires functional coupling with cellular transcription for the cap-snatching process. Despite this fact, RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) is degraded during infection in a process triggered by the viral polymerase. Reassortant viruses from the A/PR/8/34 (PR8) strain that induce (hvPR8) or do not induce (lvPR8) RNAP II degradation led to the identification of PA and PB2 subunits as responsible for the degradation process. Three changes in the PB2 sequence (I105M, N456D, and I504V) and two in PA (Q193H and I550L) differentiate PA and PB2 of lvPR8 from those of hvPR8. Using recombinant viruses, we observed that changes at position 504 of PB2, together with 550 of PA, confer the ability on lvPR8 for RNAP II degradation and, conversely, abolish hvPR8 degradation capacity. Since hvPR8 is more pathogenic than lvPR8 in mice, we tested the potential contribution of RNAP II degradation in a distant viral strain, the 2009 pandemic A/California/04/09 (CAL) virus, whose PA and PB2 subunits are of avian origin. As in the hvPR8 virus, mutations at positions 504 of PB2 and 550 of PA in CAL virus abolished its RNAP II degradation capacity. Moreover, in an in vivo model, the CAL-infected mice lost more body weight, and 75% lethality was observed in this situation compared with 100% survival in mutant-CAL- or mock-infected animals. These results confirm the involvement of specific PB2 and PA residues in RNAP II degradation, which correlates with pathogenicity in mice of viruses containing human or avian polymerase PB2 and PA subunits. IMPORTANCE The influenza virus polymerase induces the degradation of RNAP II, which probably cooperates to avoid the antiviral response. Here, we have characterized two specific residues located in the PA and PB2 polymerase subunits that mediate this degradation in different influenza viruses. Moreover, a clear correlation between RNAP II degradation and in vivo pathogenicity in mice was observed, indicating that the

  3. International Conference on Multiscale Methods and Partial Differential Equations.

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Hou

    2006-12-12

    The International Conference on Multiscale Methods and Partial Differential Equations (ICMMPDE for short) was held at IPAM, UCLA on August 26-27, 2005. The conference brought together researchers, students and practitioners with interest in the theoretical, computational and practical aspects of multiscale problems and related partial differential equations. The conference provided a forum to exchange and stimulate new ideas from different disciplines, and to formulate new challenging multiscale problems that will have impact in applications.

  4. Loss of the RNA polymerase III repressor MAF1 confers obesity resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bonhoure, Nicolas; Byrnes, Ashlee; Moir, Robyn D.; Hodroj, Wassim; Preitner, Frédéric; Praz, Viviane; Marcelin, Genevieve; Chua, Streamson C.; Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Singh, Rajat; Moullan, Norman; Auwerx, Johan; Willemin, Gilles; Shah, Hardik; Hartil, Kirsten; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Kurland, Irwin

    2015-01-01

    MAF1 is a global repressor of RNA polymerase III transcription that regulates the expression of highly abundant noncoding RNAs in response to nutrient availability and cellular stress. Thus, MAF1 function is thought to be important for metabolic economy. Here we show that a whole-body knockout of Maf1 in mice confers resistance to diet-induced obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by reducing food intake and increasing metabolic inefficiency. Energy expenditure in Maf1−/− mice is increased by several mechanisms. Precursor tRNA synthesis was increased in multiple tissues without significant effects on mature tRNA levels, implying increased turnover in a futile tRNA cycle. Elevated futile cycling of hepatic lipids was also observed. Metabolite profiling of the liver and skeletal muscle revealed elevated levels of many amino acids and spermidine, which links the induction of autophagy in Maf1−/− mice with their extended life span. The increase in spermidine was accompanied by reduced levels of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase, which promotes polyamine synthesis, enables nicotinamide salvage to regenerate NAD+, and is associated with obesity resistance. Consistent with this, NAD+ levels were increased in muscle. The importance of MAF1 for metabolic economy reveals the potential for MAF1 modulators to protect against obesity and its harmful consequences. PMID:25934505

  5. Loss of the RNA polymerase III repressor MAF1 confers obesity resistance.

    PubMed

    Bonhoure, Nicolas; Byrnes, Ashlee; Moir, Robyn D; Hodroj, Wassim; Preitner, Frédéric; Praz, Viviane; Marcelin, Genevieve; Chua, Streamson C; Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Singh, Rajat; Moullan, Norman; Auwerx, Johan; Willemin, Gilles; Shah, Hardik; Hartil, Kirsten; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Kurland, Irwin; Hernandez, Nouria; Willis, Ian M

    2015-05-01

    MAF1 is a global repressor of RNA polymerase III transcription that regulates the expression of highly abundant noncoding RNAs in response to nutrient availability and cellular stress. Thus, MAF1 function is thought to be important for metabolic economy. Here we show that a whole-body knockout of Maf1 in mice confers resistance to diet-induced obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by reducing food intake and increasing metabolic inefficiency. Energy expenditure in Maf1(-/-) mice is increased by several mechanisms. Precursor tRNA synthesis was increased in multiple tissues without significant effects on mature tRNA levels, implying increased turnover in a futile tRNA cycle. Elevated futile cycling of hepatic lipids was also observed. Metabolite profiling of the liver and skeletal muscle revealed elevated levels of many amino acids and spermidine, which links the induction of autophagy in Maf1(-/-) mice with their extended life span. The increase in spermidine was accompanied by reduced levels of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase, which promotes polyamine synthesis, enables nicotinamide salvage to regenerate NAD(+), and is associated with obesity resistance. Consistent with this, NAD(+) levels were increased in muscle. The importance of MAF1 for metabolic economy reveals the potential for MAF1 modulators to protect against obesity and its harmful consequences. PMID:25934505

  6. Mutations in the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase gene can confer resistance to 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine.

    PubMed Central

    Coen, D M; Furman, P A; Gelep, P T; Schaffer, P A

    1982-01-01

    Mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 resistant to the antiviral drug 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine (araA) have been isolated and characterized. AraA-resistant mutants can be isolated readily and appear at an appreciable frequency in low-passage stocks of wild-type virus. Of 13 newly isolated mutants, at least 11 were also resistant to phosphonoacetic acid (PAA). Of four previously described PAA-resistant mutants, two exhibited substantial araA resistance. The araA resistance phenotype of one of these mutants, PAAr5, has been mapped to the HpaI-B fragment of herpes simplex virus DNA by marker transfer, and araA resistance behaved in marker transfer experiments as if it were closely linked to PAA resistance, a recognized marker for the viral DNA polymerase locus. PAAr5 induced viral DNA polymerase activity which was much less susceptible to inhibition by the triphosphate derivative of araA than was wild-type DNA polymerase. These genetic and biochemical data indicate that the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase gene is a locus which, when mutated, can confer resistance to araA and thus that the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase is a target for this antiviral drug. PMID:6284981

  7. Detection of hog cholera virus and differentiation from other pestiviruses by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Wirz, B; Tratschin, J D; Müller, H K; Mitchell, D B

    1993-05-01

    Reverse transcription coupled with the polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used for the detection and differentiation of pestiviruses. For this purpose, one primer pair was selected from a highly conserved region of the genome of pestiviruses. Using these primers (PEST 1-PEST 2), DNA fragments of between 72 and 74 bp could be amplified from all pestivirus isolates tested. In order to differentiate hog cholera virus (HCV) from bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and border disease virus (BDV), we selected a primer pair from a conserved region in the genome of HCV strains that differed from that sequenced in the genome of BVDV strains. By using these primers (HCV 1-HCV 2), a DNA fragment of 478 bp could be specifically amplified from HCV isolates. By these means, viral RNA was detected in extracts of lymph node, spleen, tonsil, and lung. Such extracts were used directly for RT-PCR without prior RNA isolation. We also performed multiplex PCR by using both the PEST 1-PEST 2 and HCV 1-HCV 2 primer pairs in a single reaction. This allowed the differentiation of HCV from BVDV and BDV in one step. To assess the sensitivity of the method, RT-PCR was compared with virus propagation in tissue culture and subsequent detection by immunofluorescence staining. The results show that RT-PCR is useful for the rapid detection and differentiation of pestiviruses. PMID:8388887

  8. DNA Polymerase Conformational Dynamics and the Role of Fidelity-Conferring Residues: Insights from Computational Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Meli, Massimiliano; Sustarsic, Marko; Craggs, Timothy D.; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Herein we investigate the molecular bases of DNA polymerase I conformational dynamics that underlie the replication fidelity of the enzyme. Such fidelity is determined by conformational changes that promote the rejection of incorrect nucleotides before the chemical ligation step. We report a comprehensive atomic resolution study of wild type and mutant enzymes in different bound states and starting from different crystal structures, using extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations that cover a total timespan of ~5 ms. The resulting trajectories are examined via a combination of novel methods of internal dynamics and energetics analysis, aimed to reveal the principal molecular determinants for the (de)stabilization of a certain conformational state. Our results show that the presence of fidelity-decreasing mutations or the binding of incorrect nucleotides in ternary complexes tend to favor transitions from closed toward open structures, passing through an ensemble of semi-closed intermediates. The latter ensemble includes the experimentally observed ajar conformation which, consistent with previous experimental observations, emerges as a molecular checkpoint for the selection of the correct nucleotide to incorporate. We discuss the implications of our results for the understanding of the relationships between the structure, dynamics, and function of DNA polymerase I at the atomistic level. PMID:27303671

  9. Analysis of gene amplification in archival tissue by differential polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, A; Neubauer, B; He, M; Effert, P; Iglehart, D; Frye, R A; Liu, E

    1992-05-01

    Oncogene amplification is found in many human tumors, and its detection may have important prognostic value. However, analysis of gene amplification may be hampered by inadequate tissue or poor DNA quality. We have previously described a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based procedure called differential PCR that can detect variations in gene dosage using miniscule amounts of tumor DNA [Frye, R.A., Benz, C.C. & Liu, E. (1989). Oncogene, 4, 1153-1157]. We now report the optimization of this technique for the analysis of oncogene amplification in paraffin-embedded archival tissues. We find that differential PCR is able to detect amplification of the HER2 (c-erbB-2) and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) genes and can be used to arrive at a semiquantitative estimate of gene dosage. Furthermore, our approach can determine gene amplification in samples in which the DNA is significantly degraded. Using differential PCR on paraffin-embedded tissues from cases previously investigated by standard DNA extraction and dot-blot procedures, good correlation between the two methods was found. Approaches are described to overcome technical problems posed by factors that affect the differential PCR, including the method of DNA extraction and extreme fragmentation of the DNA (less than 200 base pairs). Furthermore, the resulting analytical algorithm reported herein has proved effective in detecting oncogene amplification in archival breast cancer specimens from standard pathology laboratories. Thus, differential PCR will be particularly helpful in the analysis of tumor specimens that are archived, small in size or rare in occurrence.

  10. Optimization of competitively differentiated polymerase chain reaction in detection of HBV basal core promoter mutation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiao-Mou; Gu, Lin; Chen, Xue-Juan; Li, Jian-Guo; Huang, Yang-Su; Gao, Zhi-Liang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To improve competitively differentiated polymerase chain reaction (CD-PCR) in detection of HBV basal core promoter mutation. METHODS: Recombinant plasmid of double point mutation A1762T/G1764A in basal core promoter of HBV constructed by site-directed mutagenesis was used as mutant control. To reveal the deficiency mechanism of CD-PCR, relationship between the circle number of PCR and the increased speed of products of each competitive primer was comparatively studied. Diversified amount of dNTPs and mutual primer of the competitive primers were tried to optimize CD-PCR. Optimized CD-PCR was evaluated by detecting A1762T/G1764A mutation in recombinant plasmids and clinical sera from patients with HBV infection. RESULTS: The deficiency mechanism of CD-PCR was that the products of mismatched competitive primer grew fast when the amplification of matched primer entered into plateau stage, which led to decrease in or disappearance of the difference in the amount of their products. This phenomenon could be eliminated by reducing dNTPs to 10 μmol/L and mutual primer to about 100 nmol/L. Optimized CD-PCR could detect both mutant and wild strain indepe-ndent of the amount of templates and the number of PCR cycles. Its detection limit was 103 copies/mL, about 50 copies/reaction. About 10% of mutant DNAs among wild type DNAs could be detected. A1762T/G1764A mutant was detected in 41.8% (51/122) of patients with HBV infection, but not detected in controls with negative HBsAg. CONCLUSION: Optimized CD-PCR can detect mutation independent of the amount of initial templates and the number of PCR cycles. PMID:15962387

  11. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Inhibitor AZ-27 Differentially Inhibits Different Polymerase Activities at the Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Noton, Sarah L.; Nagendra, Kartikeya; Dunn, Ewan F.; Mawhorter, Michael E.; Yu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of pediatric respiratory disease. RSV has an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase that transcribes and replicates the viral negative-sense RNA genome. The large polymerase subunit (L) has multiple enzymatic activities, having the capability to synthesize RNA and add and methylate a cap on each of the viral mRNAs. Previous studies (H. Xiong et al., Bioorg Med Chem Lett, 23:6789–6793, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2013.10.018; C. L. Tiong-Yip et al., Antimicrob Agents Chemother, 58:3867–3873, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.02540-14) had identified a small-molecule inhibitor, AZ-27, that targets the L protein. In this study, we examined the effect of AZ-27 on different aspects of RSV polymerase activity. AZ-27 was found to inhibit equally both mRNA transcription and genome replication in cell-based minigenome assays, indicating that it inhibits a step common to both of these RNA synthesis processes. Analysis in an in vitro transcription run-on assay, containing RSV nucleocapsids, showed that AZ-27 inhibits synthesis of transcripts from the 3′ end of the genome to a greater extent than those from the 5′ end, indicating that it inhibits transcription initiation. Consistent with this finding, experiments that assayed polymerase activity on the promoter showed that AZ-27 inhibited transcription and replication initiation. The RSV polymerase also can utilize the promoter sequence to perform a back-priming reaction. Interestingly, addition of AZ-27 had no effect on the addition of up to three nucleotides by back-priming but inhibited further extension of the back-primed RNA. These data provide new information regarding the mechanism of inhibition by AZ-27. They also suggest that the RSV polymerase adopts different conformations to perform its different activities at the promoter. IMPORTANCE Currently, there are no effective antiviral drugs to treat RSV infection. The RSV polymerase is an

  12. SciCADE 95: International conference on scientific computation and differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This report consists of abstracts from the conference. Topics include algorithms, computer codes, and numerical solutions for differential equations. Linear and nonlinear as well as boundary-value and initial-value problems are covered. Various applications of these problems are also included.

  13. The Teacher and His Staff: Differentiating Teaching Roles. Report of the 1968 Regional TEPS Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. National Commission on Teacher Education and Professional Standards.

    This book contains 10 papers selected from those presented at the 1968 regional conferences of the NEA National Commission on Teacher Education and Professional Standards (NCTEPS) on differentiated staffing: "Teacher Education: Analysis and Recommendations," John Macdonald, chairman, Department of Education, Sir George Williams Univ.; "New…

  14. Differential Incorporation of β-actin as A Component of RNA Polymerase II into Regulatory Regions of Stemness/Differentiation Genes in Retinoic Acid-Induced Differentiated Human Embryonic Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Falahzadeh, Khadijeh; Shahhoseini, Maryam; Afsharian, Parvaneh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nuclear actin is involved in transcription regulation by recruitment of histone modifiers and chromatin remodelers to the regulatory regions of active genes. In recent years, further attention has been focused on the role of actin as a nuclear protein in transcriptional processes. In the current study, the epigenetic role of nuclear actin on transcription regulation of two stemness (OCT4 and NANOG) and two differentiation) NESTIN and PAX6) marker genes was evaluated in a human embryonal carcinoma cell line (NT2) before and after differentiation induction. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, differentiation of embryonal cells was induced by retinoic acid (RA), and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to evaluate differential expression of marker genes before and 3 days after RA- induced differentiation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled with real-time PCR was then undertaken to monitor the incorporation of β-actin, as a functional component of RNA polymerase II, in the regulatory regions of marker genes. Results Data showed significant change in nuclear actin incorporation into the promoter regions of NESTIN and PAX6 after RA-induction. Conclusion We emphasize the dynamic functional role of nuclear actin in differentiation of embryonal cells and its role as a subunit of RNA polymerase II. PMID:27540526

  15. Diagnosis of whooping cough in Switzerland: differentiating Bordetella pertussis from Bordetella holmesii by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Pittet, Laure F; Emonet, Stéphane; François, Patrice; Bonetti, Eve-Julie; Schrenzel, Jacques; Hug, Melanie; Altwegg, Martin; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Posfay-Barbe, Klara M

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella holmesii, an emerging pathogen, can be misidentified as Bordetella pertussis by routine polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In some reports, up to 29% of the patients diagnosed with pertussis have in fact B. holmesii infection and invasive, non-respiratory B. holmesii infections have been reported worldwide. This misdiagnosis undermines the knowledge of pertussis' epidemiology, and may lead to misconceptions on pertussis vaccine's efficacy. Recently, the number of whooping cough cases has increased significantly in several countries. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether B. holmesii was contributing to the increase in laboratory-confirmed cases of B. pertussis in Switzerland. A multiplex species-specific quantitative PCR assay was performed on 196 nasopharyngeal samples from Swiss patients with PCR-confirmed Bordetella infection (median age: 6 years-old, minimum 21 days-old, maximum 86 years-old), formerly diagnosed as Bordetella pertussis (IS481+). No B. holmesii (IS481+, IS1001-, hIS1001+) was identified. We discuss whether laboratories should implement specific PCR to recognize different Bordetella species. We conclude that in Switzerland B. holmesii seems to be circulating less than in neighboring countries and that specific diagnostic procedures are not necessary routinely. However, as the epidemiological situation may change rapidly, periodic reevaluation is suggested.

  16. Differential roles of phosphorylation in the formation of transcriptional active RNA polymerase I

    PubMed Central

    Fath, Stephan; Milkereit, Philipp; Peyroche, Gerald; Riva, Michel; Carles, Christophe; Tschochner, Herbert

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of rDNA transcription depends on the formation and dissociation of a functional complex between RNA polymerase I (pol I) and transcription initiation factor Rrn3p. We analyzed whether phosphorylation is involved in this molecular switch. Rrn3p is a phosphoprotein that is predominantly phosphorylated in vivo when it is not bound to pol I. In vitro, Rrn3p is able both to associate with pol I and to enter the transcription cycle in its nonphosphorylated form. By contrast, phosphorylation of pol I is required to form a stable pol I-Rrn3p complex for efficient transcription initiation. Furthermore, association of pol I with Rrn3p correlates with a change in the phosphorylation state of pol I in vivo. We suggest that phosphorylation at specific sites of pol I is a prerequisite for proper transcription initiation and that phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of pol I is one possibility to modulate cellular rDNA transcription activity. PMID:11717393

  17. Detection and differentiation of the six Brucella species by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Sifuentes-Rincón, A. M.; Revol, A.; Barrera-Saldaña, H. A.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brucelosis is a severe acute febrile disease caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella. Its current diagnosis is based on clinical observations that may be complemented by serology and microbiological culture tests; however, the former is limited in sensitivity and specificity, the latter is time consuming. To improve brucelosis diagnosis we developed a test which is specific and sensitive and is capable of differentiating the six species of Brucella. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four primers were designed from B. abortus sequences at the well-conserved Omp2 locus that are able to amplify the DNAs of all six species of Brucella. RESULTS: Our test detected all six species of Brucella. Their differentiation resulted directly from differences in the amplification patterns or was achieved indirectly using a RFLP present in one of the PCR products. The sensitivity and specificity of the new test were then determined; it was applied successfully in confirming the diagnosis of a patient whose clinical history and serology indicated infection with Brucella. CONCLUSIONS: The results make possible the use of a PCR test for Brucella detection and differentiation without relying on the measurement of the antibodies or microorganism culture. Our first results showed that the PCR test can confirm the presence of Brucella in blood samples of infected patients. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:9407549

  18. Myogenic differentiation of L6 rat myoblasts: evidence for pleiotropic effects on myogenesis by RNA polymerase II mutations to alpha-amanitin resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Crerar, M M; Leather, R; David, E; Pearson, M L

    1983-01-01

    To assess the functional role of RNA polymerase II in the regulation of transcription during muscle differentiation, we isolated and characterized a large number of independent alpha-amanitin-resistant (AmaR) mutants of L6 rat myoblasts that express both wild-type and altered RNA polymerase II activities. We also examined their myogenic (Myo) phenotype by determining their ability to develop into mature myotubes, to express elevated levels of muscle creatine kinase, and to synthesize muscle-characteristic proteins as detected by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We found a two- to threefold increase in the frequency of clones with a myogenic-defective phenotype in the AmaR (RNA polymerase II) mutants as compared to control ethyl methane sulfonate-induced, 6-thioguanine-resistant (hypoxanthine, guanine phosphoribosyl transferase) mutants or to unselected survivors also exposed to ethyl methane sulfonate. Subsequent analysis showed that about half of these myogenic-defective AmaR mutants had a conditional Myo(ama) phenotype; when cultured in the presence of amanitin, they exhibited a Myo- phenotype; in its absence they exhibited a Myo+ phenotype. This conditional Myo(ama) phenotype is presumably caused by the inactivation by amanitin of the wild-type amanitin-sensitive RNA polymerase II activity and the subsequent rise in the level of mutant amanitin-resistant RNA polymerase II activity. In these Myo(ama) mutants, the wild-type RNA polymerase II is normally dominant with respect to the Myo+ phenotype, whereas the mutant RNA polymerase II is recessive and results in a Myo- phenotype only when the wild-type enzyme is inactivated. These findings suggest that certain mutations in the amaR structural gene for the amanitin-binding subunit of RNA polymerase II can selectively impair the transcription of genes specific for myogenic differentiation but not those specific for myoblast proliferation. Images PMID:6865946

  19. Differential detection of shrimp and crab for food labeling using polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Hiromu; Watanabe, Satoshi; Temmei, Yusuke; Hirao, Takashi; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Sakai, Shinobu; Adachi, Reiko; Sakata, Kozue; Urisu, Atsuo; Teshima, Reiko

    2011-04-27

    Shrimp and crab are well-known as allergenic ingredients. According to Japanese food allergy labeling regulations, shrimp species (including prawns, crayfishes, and lobsters) and crab species must be differentially declared when ≥10 ppm (total protein) of an allergenic ingredient is present. However, the commercial ELISA tests for the detection of crustacean proteins cannot differentiate between shrimp and crab. Therefore, two methods were developed to discriminate shrimp and crab: a shrimp-PCR method with postamplification digestion and a crab-PCR method that specifically amplifies a fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. The sensitivity and specificity of both PCR methods were verified by experiments using DNA extracted from 15 shrimp species, 13 crab species, krill, mysid, mantis shrimp, other food samples (cephalopod, shellfish, and fish), incurred foods, and commercial food products. Both PCR methods could detect 5 pg of DNA extracted from target species and 50 ng of genomic DNA extracted from incurred foods containing 10 ppm (μg/g) total protein of shrimp or crab. The two PCR methods were considered to be specific enough to separately detect species belonging to shrimp and crab. Although false-positive and false-negative results were obtained from some nontarget crustacean species, the proposed PCR methods, when used in conjunction with ELISA tests, would be a useful tool for confirmation of the validity of food allergy labeling and management of processed food safety for allergic patients. PMID:21395255

  20. Molecular insights into the mechanism of phenotypic tolerance to rifampicin conferred on mycobacterial RNA polymerase by MsRbpA.

    PubMed

    Dey, Abhinav; Verma, Amit Kumar; Chatterji, Dipankar

    2011-07-01

    The protein MsRbpA from Mycobacterium smegmatis rescues RNA polymerase (RNAP) from the inhibitory effect of rifampicin (Rif). We have reported previously that MsRbpA interacts with the β-subunit of RNAP and that the effect of MsRbpA on Rif-resistant (Rif(R)) RNAP is minimal. Here we attempted to gain molecular insights into the mechanism of action of this protein with respect to its role in rescuing RNAP from Rif-mediated transcription inhibition. Our experimental approach comprised multiple-round transcription assays, fluorescence spectroscopy, MS and surface plasmon resonance in order to meet the above objective. Based on our molecular studies we propose here that Rif is released from its binding site in the RNAP-Rif complex in the presence of MsRbpA. Biophysical studies reveal that the location of MsRbpA on RNAP is at the junction of the β- and β'-subunits, close to the Rif-binding site and the (i+1) site on RNAP.

  1. Differential diagnosis of fowlpox and infectious laryngotracheitis viruses in chicken diphtheritic manifestations by mono and duplex real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Irit; Raibstein, Israel; Altory, Amira

    2015-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) and fowlpox virus (FPV) cause diphtheritic lesions in chicken tracheas and can simultaneously infect the same bird. A differential molecular diagnostic test, the duplex real-time polymerase chain reaction, is now reported using ILTV and FPV vaccine viruses and clinical samples from chickens, either uninfected or naturally infected with ILTV or FPV, or with both viruses. The dual virus amplification by real-time polymerase chain reaction was demonstrated to behave similarly to monoplex amplification, in spite of the fact that the real-time exponential amplification plots of the vaccine viruses were more illustrative than those of the clinical samples.

  2. Detection of nonauthorized genetically modified organisms using differential quantitative polymerase chain reaction: application to 35S in maize.

    PubMed

    Cankar, Katarina; Chauvensy-Ancel, Valérie; Fortabat, Marie-Noelle; Gruden, Kristina; Kobilinsky, André; Zel, Jana; Bertheau, Yves

    2008-05-15

    Detection of nonauthorized genetically modified organisms (GMOs) has always presented an analytical challenge because the complete sequence data needed to detect them are generally unavailable although sequence similarity to known GMOs can be expected. A new approach, differential quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), for detection of nonauthorized GMOs is presented here. This method is based on the presence of several common elements (e.g., promoter, genes of interest) in different GMOs. A statistical model was developed to study the difference between the number of molecules of such a common sequence and the number of molecules identifying the approved GMO (as determined by border-fragment-based PCR) and the donor organism of the common sequence. When this difference differs statistically from zero, the presence of a nonauthorized GMO can be inferred. The interest and scope of such an approach were tested on a case study of different proportions of genetically modified maize events, with the P35S promoter as the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus common sequence. The presence of a nonauthorized GMO was successfully detected in the mixtures analyzed and in the presence of (donor organism of P35S promoter). This method could be easily transposed to other common GMO sequences and other species and is applicable to other detection areas such as microbiology.

  3. Detection of nonauthorized genetically modified organisms using differential quantitative polymerase chain reaction: application to 35S in maize.

    PubMed

    Cankar, Katarina; Chauvensy-Ancel, Valérie; Fortabat, Marie-Noelle; Gruden, Kristina; Kobilinsky, André; Zel, Jana; Bertheau, Yves

    2008-05-15

    Detection of nonauthorized genetically modified organisms (GMOs) has always presented an analytical challenge because the complete sequence data needed to detect them are generally unavailable although sequence similarity to known GMOs can be expected. A new approach, differential quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), for detection of nonauthorized GMOs is presented here. This method is based on the presence of several common elements (e.g., promoter, genes of interest) in different GMOs. A statistical model was developed to study the difference between the number of molecules of such a common sequence and the number of molecules identifying the approved GMO (as determined by border-fragment-based PCR) and the donor organism of the common sequence. When this difference differs statistically from zero, the presence of a nonauthorized GMO can be inferred. The interest and scope of such an approach were tested on a case study of different proportions of genetically modified maize events, with the P35S promoter as the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus common sequence. The presence of a nonauthorized GMO was successfully detected in the mixtures analyzed and in the presence of (donor organism of P35S promoter). This method could be easily transposed to other common GMO sequences and other species and is applicable to other detection areas such as microbiology. PMID:18346452

  4. NRPB3, the third largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, is essential for stomatal patterning and differentiation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Guan, Liping; Qian, Pingping; Xu, Fan; Wu, Zhongliang; Wu, Yujun; He, Kai; Gou, Xiaoping; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stomata are highly specialized epidermal structures that control transpiration and gas exchange between plants and the environment. Signal networks underlying stomatal development have been previously uncovered but much less is known about how signals involved in stomatal development are transmitted to RNA polymerase II (Pol II or RPB), which plays a central role in the transcription of mRNA coding genes. Here, we identify a partial loss-of-function mutation of the third largest subunit of nuclear DNA-dependent Pol II (NRPB3) that exhibits an increased number of stomatal lineage cells and paired stomata. Phenotypic and genetic analyses indicated that NRPB3 is not only required for correct stomatal patterning, but is also essential for stomatal differentiation. Protein-protein interaction assays showed that NRPB3 directly interacts with two basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, FAMA and INDUCER OF CBF EXPRESSION1 (ICE1), indicating that NRPB3 serves as an acceptor for signals from transcription factors involved in stomatal development. Our findings highlight the surprisingly conserved activating mechanisms mediated by the third largest subunit of Pol II in eukaryotes. PMID:26989174

  5. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method for differentiation of uropathogenic specific protein gene types.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yun Mei; Zaw, Myo Thura; Shamsudin, Shamsul Bahari; Lin, Zaw

    2016-08-01

    The putative pathogenicity island (PAI) containing the uropathogenic specific protein (usp) gene and three small open reading frames (orfU1, orfU2, and orfU3) encoding 98, 97, and 96 amino acid proteins is widely distributed among uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains. This PAI was designated as PAIusp. Sequencing analysis of PAIusp has revealed that the usp gene can be divided into two types - uspI and uspII - based on sequence variation at the 3' terminal region and the number and position of orfUs differ from strain to strain. Based on usp gene types and orfU sequential patterns, PAIusp can be divided into four subtypes. Subtyping of PAIusp is a useful method to characterize UPEC strains. In this study, we developed a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method to differentiate usp gene types. This method could correctly identify the usp gene type in usp-positive UPEC strains in our laboratory.

  6. NRPB3, the third largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, is essential for stomatal patterning and differentiation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Guan, Liping; Qian, Pingping; Xu, Fan; Wu, Zhongliang; Wu, Yujun; He, Kai; Gou, Xiaoping; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2016-05-01

    Stomata are highly specialized epidermal structures that control transpiration and gas exchange between plants and the environment. Signal networks underlying stomatal development have been previously uncovered but much less is known about how signals involved in stomatal development are transmitted to RNA polymerase II (Pol II or RPB), which plays a central role in the transcription of mRNA coding genes. Here, we identify a partial loss-of-function mutation of the third largest subunit of nuclear DNA-dependent Pol II (NRPB3) that exhibits an increased number of stomatal lineage cells and paired stomata. Phenotypic and genetic analyses indicated that NRPB3 is not only required for correct stomatal patterning, but is also essential for stomatal differentiation. Protein-protein interaction assays showed that NRPB3 directly interacts with two basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, FAMA and INDUCER OF CBF EXPRESSION1 (ICE1), indicating that NRPB3 serves as an acceptor for signals from transcription factors involved in stomatal development. Our findings highlight the surprisingly conserved activating mechanisms mediated by the third largest subunit of Pol II in eukaryotes. PMID:26989174

  7. Differential anti-proliferative activities of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in triple-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Hsiao-Ching; Kapuriya, Naval; Kulp, Samuel K.; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the clinical evaluation of various poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients, data defining potential anti-tumor mechanisms beyond PARP inhibition for these agents are lacking. To address this issue, we investigated the effects of four different PARP inhibitors (AG-014699, AZD-2281, ABT-888, and BSI-201) in three genetically distinct TNBC cell lines (MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-231, and Cal-51). Assays of cell viability and colony formation and flow cytometric analysis were used to determine effects on cell growth and cell cycle progression. PARP-dependent and -independent signaling mechanisms of each PARP inhibitor were investigated by western blotting and shRNA approaches. Potential synergistic interactions between PARP inhibitors and cisplatin in suppressing TNBC cell viability were assessed. These PARP inhibitors exhibited differential anti-tumor activities, with the relative potencies of AG-014699 > AZD-2281 > ABT-888 > BSI-201. The higher potencies of AG-014699 and AZD-2281 were associated with their effects on G2/M arrest and DNA damage as manifested by γ-H2AX formation and, for AG-014699, its unique ability to suppress Stat3 phosphorylation. Abilities of individual PARP inhibitors to sensitize TNBC cells to cisplatin varied to a great extent in a cell context- and cell line-specific manner. Differential activation of signaling pathways suggests that the PARP inhibitors currently in clinical trials have different anti-tumor mechanisms beyond PARP inhibition and these PARP-independent mechanisms warrant further investigation. PMID:22678161

  8. Differentiation of dorsal-spined elaphostrongyline larvae by polymerase chain reaction amplification of ITS-2 of rDNA.

    PubMed

    Gajadhar, A; Steeves-Gurnsey, T; Kendall, J; Lankester, M; Stéen, M

    2000-10-01

    Molecular genetics was used to devise the first reliable diagnostic tool for differentiating morphologically indistinguishable dorsal-spined, first-stage larvae (L1's) and other stages of the nematode protostrongylid subfamily Elaphostrongylinae. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay employing specifically designed primers was developed to selectively amplify DNA of the ITS-2 region of the ribosomal gene. Amplification of the entire ITS-2 region differentiated between larvae of the genera Elaphostrongylus and Parelaphostrongylus, based on the lengths of fragments produced. Three sets of primers were designed and used successfully to distinguish larvae at the species level. Although it was demonstrated that one primer set in a single PCR assay was capable of distinguishing each of the three Parelaphostrongylus spp., a second primer set would be required for confirmation in routine diagnostic use. Two of the three primer sets were capable of amplifying DNA from all six elaphostrongyline species and of identifying Elaphostrongylus alces and Parelaphostrongylus odocoilei. Although two separate fragments were produced from each Elaphostrongylus cervi and Elaphostrongylus rangiferi, it was not possible to distinguish these two parasites from each other based on the fragment size. The use of various nematodes, hosts, and fecal controls demonstrated the reliability of the primers for all developmental stages including L1's, third-stage larvae, and adult worms. These primers also have potential for identifying other lungworms as was shown by the amplification of Umingmakstrongylus pallikuukensis, the muskox protostrongylid, and Dictyocaulus sp. from white-tailed deer. Although this assay may benefit from further refinement, its present design provides researchers, wildlife managers, clinicians, and animal health regulators with a practical tool for the control, management, and study of meningeal and tissue worms and their close relatives. PMID:11085433

  9. A DNA polymerase V homologue encoded by TOL plasmid pWW0 confers evolutionary fitness on Pseudomonas putida under conditions of environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Tark, Mariliis; Tover, Andres; Tarassova, Kairi; Tegova, Radi; Kivi, Gaily; Hõrak, Rita; Kivisaar, Maia

    2005-08-01

    Plasmids in conjunction with other mobile elements such as transposons are major players in the genetic adaptation of bacteria in response to changes in environment. Here we show that a large catabolic TOL plasmid, pWW0, from Pseudomonas putida carries genes (rulAB genes) encoding an error-prone DNA polymerase Pol V homologue which increase the survival of bacteria under conditions of accumulation of DNA damage. A study of population dynamics in stationary phase revealed that the presence of pWW0-derived rulAB genes in the bacterial genome allows the expression of a strong growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP) phenotype of P. putida. When rulAB-carrying cells from an 8-day-old culture were mixed with Pol V-negative cells from a 1-day-old culture, cells derived from the aged culture out-competed cells from the nonaged culture and overtook the whole culture. At the same time, bacteria from an aged culture lacking the rulAB genes were only partially able to out-compete cells from a fresh overnight culture of the parental P. putida strain. Thus, in addition to conferring resistance to DNA damage, the plasmid-encoded Pol V genes significantly increase the evolutionary fitness of bacteria during prolonged nutritional starvation of a P. putida population. The results of our study indicate that RecA is involved in the control of expression of the pWW0-encoded Pol V. PMID:16030214

  10. Natural Polymorphisms Conferring Resistance to HCV Protease and Polymerase Inhibitors in Treatment-Naïve HIV/HCV Co-Infected Patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Charles; Hu, Fengyu; Ning, Chuanyi; Lan, Yun; Tang, Xiaoping; Tucker, Joseph D.; Cai, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Background The advent of direct-acting agents (DAAs) has improved treatment of HCV in HIV co-infection, but may be limited by primary drug resistance. This study reports the prevalence of natural polymorphisms conferring resistance to NS3/4A protease inhibitors and NS5B polymerase inhibitors in treatment-naïve HIV/HCV co-infected individuals in China. Methods Population based NS3/4A sequencing was completed for 778 treatment-naïve HIV/HCV co-infected patients from twelve provinces. NS3 sequences were amplified by nested PCR using in-house primers for genotypes 1–6. NS5B sequencing was completed for genotyping in 350 sequences. Resistance-associated variants (RAVs) were identified in positions associated with HCV resistance. Results Overall, 72.8% (566/778) of all HCV sequences had at least one RAV associated with HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor resistance. Variants were found in 3.6% (7/193) of genotype 1, 100% (23/23) of genotype 2, 100% (237/237) of genotype 3 and 92% (299/325) of genotype 6 sequences. The Q80K variant was present in 98.4% of genotype 6a sequences. High-level RAVs were rare, occurring in only 0.8% of patients. 93% (64/69) patients with genotype 1b also carried the C316N variant associated with NS5B low-level resistance. Conclusions The low frequency of high-level RAVs associated with primary HCV DAA resistance among all genotypes in HIV/HCV co-infected patients is encouraging. Further phenotypic studies and clinical research are needed. PMID:27341031

  11. Rapid detection of poliovirus by reverse transcription and polymerase chain amplification: application for differentiation between poliovirus and nonpoliovirus enteroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, R; Chonmaitree, T; McCombs, J; Prabhakar, B; Lo Verde, P T; Ogra, P L

    1993-01-01

    This report describes a rapid method of detection of poliovirus from viral isolates of clinical specimens using a single set of primers selected from the conserved 5' noncoding region of the poliovirus genome. Of the 144 clinical viral isolates examined, 81 were positive for polioviruses and 50 were positive for nonpoliovirus enteroviruses by tissue culture neutralization and infectivity. All 81 (100%) of the viral isolates identified as poliovirus by tissue culture infectivity were also positive by polymerase chain reaction. Of 50 nonpoliovirus enterovirus isolates found to be negative for poliovirus by tissue culture neutralization and infectivity, 48 were also negative by polymerase chain reaction. The high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (96%) of the primer set indicate that this assay has potential clinical applicability in the diagnosis of nonpoliovirus enterovirus infection. Images PMID:7679404

  12. Neurogenic differentiation factor NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Du, Aonan; Xu, Jing; Ma, Yanchao; Cao, Han; Yang, Chao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Chun-Gen; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, especially the small intestine, is particularly sensitive to radiation, and is prone to radiation-induced injury as a result. Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is an evolutionarily-conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor. NeuroD contains a protein transduction domain (PTD), which allows it to be exogenously delivered across the membrane of mammalian cells, whereupon its transcription activity can be unleashed. Whether NeuroD has therapeutic effects for radiation-induced injury remains unclear. In the present study, we prepared a NeuroD-EGFP recombinant protein, and explored its protective effects on the survival and intestinal damage induced by ionizing radiation. Our results showed that NeuroD-EGFP could be transduced into small intestine epithelial cells and tissues. NeuroD-EGFP administration significantly increased overall survival of mice exposed to lethal total body irradiation (TBI). This recombinant NeuroD also reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury and apoptosis, and improved crypt survival. Expression profiling of NeuroD-EGFP-treated mice revealed upregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), a known inhibitor of apoptosis in mammalian cells. In conclusion, NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury, and provides a novel therapeutic clinical option for the prevention of intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and the treatment of victims of incidental exposure. PMID:27436572

  13. Detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus by a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Dong, X Y; Li, W H; Zhu, J L; Liu, W J; Zhao, M Q; Luo, Y W; Chen, J D

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is the cause of canine distemper (CD) which is a severe and highly contagious disease in dogs. In the present study, a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of CDV. Four primers were designed to detect and discriminate the two viruses by generating 638- and 781-bp cDNA products, respectively. Furthermore, the duplex RT-PCR method was used to detect 67 field samples suspected of CD from Guangdong province in China. Results showed that, 33 samples were to be wild-type-like. The duplex RT-PCR method exhibited high specificity and sensitivity which could be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type and vaccine CDV, indicating its use for clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance. PMID:27175171

  14. Detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus by a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Dong, X. Y.; Li, W. H.; Zhu, J. L.; Liu, W. J.; Zhao, M. Q.; Luo, Y. W.; Chen, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is the cause of canine distemper (CD) which is a severe and highly contagious disease in dogs. In the present study, a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of CDV. Four primers were designed to detect and discriminate the two viruses by generating 638- and 781-bp cDNA products, respectively. Furthermore, the duplex RT-PCR method was used to detect 67 field samples suspected of CD from Guangdong province in China. Results showed that, 33 samples were to be wild-type-like. The duplex RT-PCR method exhibited high specificity and sensitivity which could be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type and vaccine CDV, indicating its use for clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance. PMID:27175171

  15. Differentiating Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar and Entamoeba moshkovskii using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in rural communities in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study, a total of 426 human faecal samples were examined for the presence of Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, Entamoeba moshkovskii infection via a combination of microscopic examination and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting 16S ribosomal RNA of Entamoeba species. Methods Faecal sample were collected from 426 participants in five rural villages in Peninsular Malaysia. The faecal samples were processed by direct wet smear and formalin ethyl acetate concentration technique followed by iodine staining and examined via microscopy for the presence of Entamoeba species and other intestinal parasites. Microscopically positive samples for Entamoeba species cysts were further characterized using a Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (Nested-PCR) targeting 16S-like ribosomal RNA gene. The data entry and analysis was carried out using the SPSS software (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) program for Windows version 17 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). Results Based on single faecal examination, overall prevalence of Entamoeba infection was 17.6% (75/426). Females (19.1%) were more commonly infected compared to males (15.9%). Comparison by age groups showed that adults (23.9%) had higher infection rates than children (15.3%). The PCR results showed that 52 out of 75 microscopy positive samples successfully generated species-specific amplicons. The infection with E. histolytica (75.0%; 39/52) was the most common, followed by E. dispar (30.8%; 18/52) and E. moshkovskii (5.8%; 3/52). Of these, 33 (63.5%) were shown to contain only E. histolytica, 10 (19.2%) contained E. dispar and 3 (5.8%) contained only E. moshkovskii. Mixed infection with E. histolytica and E. dispar was found in 6 (11.5%) samples. Conclusions The present study essentially emphasized the benefit of molecular techniques in discriminating the pathogenic Entamoeba species from the non-pathogenic for accurate diagnosis and better management of amoebiasis. The presence of E

  16. Polymerase chain reaction - restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis for the differentiation of Trichinella nativa and Trichinella britovi.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Scholl, A; Broglia, A; Reckinger, S; Nöckler, K

    2014-06-16

    Recently, Trichinella nativa was identified in foxes in Germany and Poland, indicating that the geographical distribution of T. nativa is not restricted to areas north of the isotherm -4°C in January. In the European Union, legislation requires that a regular monitoring of the occurrence of Trichinella spp. in indicator animals such as foxes or raccoon dogs be carried out. The Trichinella isolates must also be identified on a species level. The multiplex PCR recommended by the Community Reference Laboratory for Trichinella allows species identification, yet the differentiation of T. nativa and Trichinella britovi, a widespread Trichinella species in the temperate regions of Europe, is unstable. We therefore describe an easy and reliable method for the differentiation of the two species, which can be utilised to monitor a potential spread of T. nativa in Central Europe.

  17. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method for detection of Canine distemper virus modified live vaccine shedding for differentiation from infection with wild-type strains.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Rebecca P; Sanchez, Elena; Riley, Matthew C; Kennedy, Melissa A

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) remains a common cause of infectious disease in dogs, particularly in high-density housing situations such as shelters. Vaccination of all dogs against CDV is recommended at the time of admission to animal shelters and many use a modified live virus (MLV) vaccine. From a diagnostic standpoint for dogs with suspected CDV infection, this is problematic because highly sensitive diagnostic real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests are able to detect MLV virus in clinical samples. Real-time PCR can be used to quantitate amount of virus shedding and can differentiate vaccine strains from wild-type strains when shedding is high. However, differentiation by quantitation is not possible in vaccinated animals during acute infection, when shedding is low and could be mistaken for low level vaccine virus shedding. While there are gel-based RT-PCR assays for differentiation of vaccine strains from field strains based on sequence differences, the sensitivity of these assays is unable to match that of the real-time RT-PCR assay currently used in the authors' laboratory. Therefore, a real-time RT-PCR assay was developed that detects CDV MLV vaccine strains and distinguishes them from wild-type strains based on nucleotide sequence differences, rather than the amount of viral RNA in the sample. The test is highly sensitive, with detection of as few as 5 virus genomic copies (corresponding to 10(-1) TCID(50)). Sequencing of the DNA real-time products also allows phylogenetic differentiation of the wild-type strains. This test will aid diagnosis during outbreaks of CDV in recently vaccinated animals.

  18. Differential and Concordant Roles for Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in Regulating WRN and RECQL5 Activities

    PubMed Central

    Khadka, Prabhat; Hsu, Joseph K.; Veith, Sebastian; Tadokoro, Takashi; Shamanna, Raghavendra A.; Mangerich, Aswin; Croteau, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase 1 (PARP1) catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) of proteins, a posttranslational modification which forms the nucleic acid-like polymer PAR. PARP1 and PAR are integral players in the early DNA damage response, since PARylation orchestrates the recruitment of repair proteins to sites of damage. Human RecQ helicases are DNA unwinding proteins that are critical responders to DNA damage, but how their recruitment and activities are regulated by PARPs and PAR is poorly understood. Here we report that all human RecQ helicases interact with PAR noncovalently. Furthermore, we define the effects that PARP1, PARylated PARP1, and PAR have on RECQL5 and WRN, using both in vitro and in vivo assays. We show that PARylation is involved in the recruitment of RECQL5 and WRN to laser-induced DNA damage and that RECQL5 and WRN have differential responses to PARylated PARP1 and PAR. Furthermore, we show that the loss of RECQL5 or WRN resulted in increased sensitivity to PARP inhibition. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PARP1 and PAR actively, and in some instances differentially, regulate the activities and cellular localization of RECQL5 and WRN, suggesting that PARylation acts as a fine-tuning mechanism to coordinate their functions in time and space during the genotoxic stress response. PMID:26391948

  19. Differential and Concordant Roles for Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in Regulating WRN and RECQL5 Activities.

    PubMed

    Khadka, Prabhat; Hsu, Joseph K; Veith, Sebastian; Tadokoro, Takashi; Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Mangerich, Aswin; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase 1 (PARP1) catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) of proteins, a posttranslational modification which forms the nucleic acid-like polymer PAR. PARP1 and PAR are integral players in the early DNA damage response, since PARylation orchestrates the recruitment of repair proteins to sites of damage. Human RecQ helicases are DNA unwinding proteins that are critical responders to DNA damage, but how their recruitment and activities are regulated by PARPs and PAR is poorly understood. Here we report that all human RecQ helicases interact with PAR noncovalently. Furthermore, we define the effects that PARP1, PARylated PARP1, and PAR have on RECQL5 and WRN, using both in vitro and in vivo assays. We show that PARylation is involved in the recruitment of RECQL5 and WRN to laser-induced DNA damage and that RECQL5 and WRN have differential responses to PARylated PARP1 and PAR. Furthermore, we show that the loss of RECQL5 or WRN resulted in increased sensitivity to PARP inhibition. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PARP1 and PAR actively, and in some instances differentially, regulate the activities and cellular localization of RECQL5 and WRN, suggesting that PARylation acts as a fine-tuning mechanism to coordinate their functions in time and space during the genotoxic stress response.

  20. Differential and Concordant Roles for Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in Regulating WRN and RECQL5 Activities.

    PubMed

    Khadka, Prabhat; Hsu, Joseph K; Veith, Sebastian; Tadokoro, Takashi; Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Mangerich, Aswin; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase 1 (PARP1) catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) of proteins, a posttranslational modification which forms the nucleic acid-like polymer PAR. PARP1 and PAR are integral players in the early DNA damage response, since PARylation orchestrates the recruitment of repair proteins to sites of damage. Human RecQ helicases are DNA unwinding proteins that are critical responders to DNA damage, but how their recruitment and activities are regulated by PARPs and PAR is poorly understood. Here we report that all human RecQ helicases interact with PAR noncovalently. Furthermore, we define the effects that PARP1, PARylated PARP1, and PAR have on RECQL5 and WRN, using both in vitro and in vivo assays. We show that PARylation is involved in the recruitment of RECQL5 and WRN to laser-induced DNA damage and that RECQL5 and WRN have differential responses to PARylated PARP1 and PAR. Furthermore, we show that the loss of RECQL5 or WRN resulted in increased sensitivity to PARP inhibition. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PARP1 and PAR actively, and in some instances differentially, regulate the activities and cellular localization of RECQL5 and WRN, suggesting that PARylation acts as a fine-tuning mechanism to coordinate their functions in time and space during the genotoxic stress response. PMID:26391948

  1. A preliminary assessment of genetic differentiation of Triatoma dimidiata (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in Guatemala by random amplification of polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Claudia I; Dorn, Patricia L; Melgar, Sergio; Chávez, Juan José; Rodas, Antonieta; Rosales, Regina; Monroy, Carlota M

    2004-09-01

    The population genetics of Triatoma dimidiata (Latreille, 1811) from five different provinces in Guatemala, including three sylvan and three domestic populations, was investigated by random amplification of polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction. There is a high degree of genetic variation in all of the T. dimidiata populations as evidenced by high levels of average expected heterozygosity and polymorphism. Domestic populations are more closely related to each other (D = 0.05-0.085, Nei's genetic distance) than are the sylvan (D = 0.121-0.189). Within the limited sample size of three populations, there was a correlation with geographic and genetic distance for the domestic populations, but not for the sylvan. Surprisingly, one of the sylvan populations was genetically very similar to the domestic populations. The FST demonstrated a high degree of differentiation at the country-wide level (FST = 0.175) and a moderate degree of differentiation within the sylvan (FST = 0.135) or domestic (FST = 0.097) populations. Although these results demonstrated that gene flow is limited between different provinces in Guatemala, hierarchical analysis showed that barriers between the Atlantic and Pacific drainage slopes were not biologically significant limiters of gene flow.

  2. Differential diagnosis of Entamoeba spp. in clinical stool samples using SYBR green real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Thiago Dos Santos; Garcia, Mariana Coimbra; de Souza Cunha, Flavia; Werneck de Macedo, Heloisa; Peralta, José Mauro; Peralta, Regina Helena Saramago

    2014-01-01

    Amoebiasis, a disease caused by Entamoeba histolytica, is usually diagnosed by microscopic examination, which does not differentiate the morphologically identical species of the E. histolytica/E. dispar complex. Furthermore, morphologically similar species such as Entamoeba hartmanni contribute to misidentification. Therefore, there is a need for more sensitive and specific methods. This study standardized a multiplex real-time PCR system for E. histolytica and E. dispar and a single real-time PCR for E. hartmanni. The multiplex protocol detected up to 0.0143 pg of E. histolytica DNA and 0.5156 pg of E. dispar DNA, and the average melting temperature (T(m)) was 73 °C and 70 °C, respectively. For E. hartmanni, the T(m) was 73 °C and the amplification was successful down to 0.03 fg of plasmid DNA. Negative controls and other intestinal parasites presented no amplification. Among the 48 samples tested, E. dispar DNA was detected in 37; none exhibited E. histolytica DNA and 11 were negative in the multiplex protocol. In 4 of these 11 samples, however, E. hartmanni DNA was amplified. SYBR Green is demonstrated to be an interesting option and these combined PCR reactions can improve laboratory diagnosis of amoebiasis in developing countries. PMID:24693242

  3. Differential Diagnosis of Entamoeba spp. in Clinical Stool Samples Using SYBR Green Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Thiago dos Santos; Garcia, Mariana Coimbra; de Souza Cunha, Flavia; Peralta, José Mauro; Peralta, Regina Helena Saramago

    2014-01-01

    Amoebiasis, a disease caused by Entamoeba histolytica, is usually diagnosed by microscopic examination, which does not differentiate the morphologically identical species of the E. histolytica/E. dispar complex. Furthermore, morphologically similar species such as Entamoeba hartmanni contribute to misidentification. Therefore, there is a need for more sensitive and specific methods. This study standardized a multiplex real-time PCR system for E. histolytica and E. dispar and a single real-time PCR for E. hartmanni. The multiplex protocol detected up to 0.0143 pg of E. histolytica DNA and 0.5156 pg of E. dispar DNA, and the average melting temperature (Tm) was 73°C and 70°C, respectively. For E. hartmanni, the Tm was 73°C and the amplification was successful down to 0.03 fg of plasmid DNA. Negative controls and other intestinal parasites presented no amplification. Among the 48 samples tested, E. dispar DNA was detected in 37; none exhibited E. histolytica DNA and 11 were negative in the multiplex protocol. In 4 of these 11 samples, however, E. hartmanni DNA was amplified. SYBR Green is demonstrated to be an interesting option and these combined PCR reactions can improve laboratory diagnosis of amoebiasis in developing countries. PMID:24693242

  4. Differential diagnosis of Entamoeba spp. in clinical stool samples using SYBR green real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Thiago Dos Santos; Garcia, Mariana Coimbra; de Souza Cunha, Flavia; Werneck de Macedo, Heloisa; Peralta, José Mauro; Peralta, Regina Helena Saramago

    2014-01-01

    Amoebiasis, a disease caused by Entamoeba histolytica, is usually diagnosed by microscopic examination, which does not differentiate the morphologically identical species of the E. histolytica/E. dispar complex. Furthermore, morphologically similar species such as Entamoeba hartmanni contribute to misidentification. Therefore, there is a need for more sensitive and specific methods. This study standardized a multiplex real-time PCR system for E. histolytica and E. dispar and a single real-time PCR for E. hartmanni. The multiplex protocol detected up to 0.0143 pg of E. histolytica DNA and 0.5156 pg of E. dispar DNA, and the average melting temperature (T(m)) was 73 °C and 70 °C, respectively. For E. hartmanni, the T(m) was 73 °C and the amplification was successful down to 0.03 fg of plasmid DNA. Negative controls and other intestinal parasites presented no amplification. Among the 48 samples tested, E. dispar DNA was detected in 37; none exhibited E. histolytica DNA and 11 were negative in the multiplex protocol. In 4 of these 11 samples, however, E. hartmanni DNA was amplified. SYBR Green is demonstrated to be an interesting option and these combined PCR reactions can improve laboratory diagnosis of amoebiasis in developing countries.

  5. [Detection and differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar by polymerase chain reaction in a community in Zulia State, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Rivero, Zulbey; Bracho, Angela; Calchi, Marinella; Díaz, Iris; Acurero, Ellen; Maldonado, Adriana; Chourio, Glenis; Arráiz, Nailet; Corzo, Gilbert

    2009-01-01

    Differential identification of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar is essential for both appropriate patient treatment and epidemiological purposes. To determine the prevalence of these amoeba infections in Santa Rosa de Agua (Maracaibo, Zulia State, Venezuela), a PCR assay using specific primers for each species was standardized and applied. 204 stool samples were analyzed through direct microscopic examination with SSF (0.85%) and lugol, formol-ether concentration, and PCR. Under direct microscopy, 42 individuals (20.58%) presented the E. histolytica/E. dispar complex. Meanwhile PCR showed 47 positive cases for these amoebas: 22 E. histolytica (10.78%), 16 E. dispar (7.84%), and 9 (4.41%) mixed infections. There was no significant difference in the presence of E. histolytica and/or E. dispar according to either gender or age. There were no cases of these amoebas in children under 2 years of age. Observed frequency of E. histolytica (31/204) shows the endemic nature of amoeba infection in this community.

  6. Rapid identification and differentiation of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli using polymerase chain reaction coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jinling; Wang, Fei; Li, Feng; Housley, Roberta; Carolan, Heather; Yasuda, Irene; Burrows, Erik; Binet, Rachel; Sampath, Rangarajan; Zhang, Jianmin; Allard, Marc W; Meng, Jianghong

    2013-08-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mass spectroscopy assay was developed to identify non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) with Plex-ID biosensor system, a platform identifying short PCR amplicons by specific base compositions. This assay simultaneously amplifies five fragments of two housekeeping genes, two subunits of stx2 gene, and four other virulence genes of STEC. A total of 164 well-characterized STEC isolates were examined with the assay to build a DNA base composition database. Another panel of 108 diverse STEC isolates was tested with the established database to evaluate the assay's identification capability. Among the 108 isolates, the assay specificity was 100% for three (stx1, eae, and aggA) out of five tested virulence genes, but 99% for stx2 and 96% for hlyA, respectively. Main stx1/stx2 subtypes and multiple alleles of stx1/stx2 could be differentiated. The assay successfully identified several clinically significant serotypes, including O91:H14, O103:H25, O145:H28/NM, O113:H21, and O104:H4. Meanwhile, it was able to group isolates with different levels of pathogenic potential. The results suggest that this high-throughput method may be useful in clinical and regulatory laboratories for STEC identification, particularly strains with increased pathogenic potential.

  7. Rapid differentiation and identification of potential severe strains of Citrus tristeza virus by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays.

    PubMed

    Yokomi, R K; Saponari, M; Sieburth, P J

    2010-04-01

    A multiplex Taqman-based real-time reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to identify potential severe strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and separate genotypes that react with the monoclonal antibody MCA13. Three strain-specific probes were developed using intergene sequences between the major and minor coat protein genes (CPi) in a multiplex reaction. Probe CPi-VT3 was designed for VT and T3 genotypes; probe CPi-T36 for T36 genotypes; and probe CPi-T36-NS to identify isolates in an outgroup clade of T36-like genotypes mild in California. Total nucleic acids extracted by chromatography on silica particles, sodium dodecyl sulfate-potassium acetate, and CTV virion immunocapture all yielded high quality templates for real-time PCR detection of CTV. These assays successfully differentiated CTV isolates from California, Florida, and a large panel of CTV isolates from an international collection maintained in Beltsville, MD. The utility of the assay was validated using field isolates collected in California and Florida. PMID:20205535

  8. Combination of differential growth at two different temperatures with a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to determine temperature-sensitive phenotype of Mycoplasma synoviae.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad A; Ghorashi, Seyed A; Agnew-Crumpton, Rebecca; Markham, Philip F; Marenda, Marc S; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2013-04-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae infections result in significant economic losses in the chicken and turkey industries. A commercially available live temperature-sensitive (ts (+)) vaccine strain MS-H has been found to be effective in controlling M. synoviae infections in commercial layer and broiler breeder farms in various countries, including Australia. Detection and differentiation of MS-H from field strains (ts (-)) and from ts (-) MS-H reisolates in vaccinated flocks is vital in routine flock status monitoring. At present microtitration is the only available technique to determine the ts phenotype of M. synoviae. This technique is time consuming and not amenable to automation. In the present study, a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) was combined with simultaneous culturing of M. synoviae at two different temperatures (33°C and 39.5°C) to determine the ts phenotype of 22 Australian M. synoviae strains/isolates. The M. synoviae type strain WVU-1853 was also included for comparison. A ratio of the copy numbers of the variable lipoprotein haemagglutinin (vlhA) gene at the two temperatures was calculated and a cut-off value was determined and used to delineate the ts phenotype. In all M. synoviae strains/isolates tested in this study, the ts phenotype determined using Q-PCR was in agreement with that determined using conventional microtitration. Combination of Q-PCR with differential growth at two different temperatures is a rapid, reliable and accurate technique that could be used as an effective tool in laboratories actively involved in ts phenotyping of M. synoviae strains/isolates.

  9. Detection of Differentially Expressed Genes in an Isogenic Breast Metastasis Model using RNA Arbitrarily Primed-Polymerase Chain Reaction Coupled with Array Hybridization (RAP-Array)

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Derek D.; Nicholson, Ben; Urquidi, Virginia; Goodison, Steve

    2004-01-01

    To facilitate the study of the mechanisms of breast cancer metastasis we have previously characterized a pair of breast tumor cell lines that originate from the same breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-435, but which have diametrically opposite metastatic capabilities. These cell lines constitute a stable and accessible experimental system for the identification of metastasis-related genes and for the study of their role in the process of metastasis. In this study, we used a combination of RNA arbitrarily primed-polymerase chain reaction (RAP-PCR) fingerprinting and cDNA arrays (here termed “RAP-array”) to identify genes differentially expressed with respect to metastatic phenotype. RAP-PCR was used to generate radioactive probes of reduced complexity for hybridization to nylon membranes containing 588 cDNAs of known identity. Single RAP-PCR fingerprint probes hybridized from 61 (10.4%) to 116 (19.7%) of the filter array targets, with a signal detection overlap of ∼21%. A total of 344 (57%) of the 588 target genes were detected by five single RAP-PCR fingerprints. The advantage of using reduced complexity probes was highlighted by the fact that the combination of RAP probes before hybridization compromised the overall detection rate by up to 40%. Sequential application of RAP-PCR probes allowed the screening of a greater, and an alternative fraction of the transcript population than was achieved with a radiolabeled total cDNA probe. Verification by quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR confirmed significantly increased expression of keratin 9 (>100-fold) in nonmetastatic breast tumor cells and of CD70 (fivefold) in metastatic cells. The differential expression of keratin 9 and CD70 was maintained between cells grown as primary xenografts in athymic mice. The RAP-array method enabled the detection of genes not revealed using other screening methods and that are candidates for further investigation in the context of metastatic phenotype. PMID:14695344

  10. Acquisition of multiple nuclei and the activity of DNA polymerase alpha and reinitiation of DNA replication in terminally differentiated adult cardiac muscle cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Claycomb, W.C.; Bradshaw, H.D. Jr.

    1983-10-01

    Terminally differentiated ventricular cardiac muscle cells isolated from the adult rat and maintained in cell culture have been observed to acquire multiple nuclei. In one cultured myocyte as many as 10 nuclei have been counted. Apparently, these multiple nuclei are formed by DNA replication followed by karyokinesis; the cells must then fail to complete mitosis and divide. To investigate whether DNA synthesis was occurring, the cells were cultured in the presence of (3H)thymidine and then processed for autoradiography. Mononucleated, binucleated, and multinucleated cells incorporate (3H)thymidine into DNA as evidenced by the high concentration of silver grains over their nuclei. Peak periods of incorporation were observed to occur at 10- to 12-day intervals; at 11, 23, and 33 days after initially placing the cells in culture. When the cells were maintained in the presence of (3H)thymidine continuously from Day 7 to Day 17 of culture, 23% of the cells became labeled. If the cells were cultured continuously for 30 days in the presence of (3H)thymidine, from Day 10 to Day 40, 56% of the cells were labeled. Isopycnic gradient analysis indicates that this thymidine incorporation was into DNA that was being replicated semiconservatively; these experiments did not eliminate the possibility, however, that this incorporation was due to amplification of specific genes, such as those coding for the contractile proteins. The activity of DNA polymerase alpha also returns to these cells. These studies demonstrate that the terminally differentiated mammalian ventricular cardiac muscle cell, previously thought to have permanently lost the capacity to replicate DNA during early development, is able to reinitiate semiconservative DNA replication when grown in culture.

  11. A PB1 T296R substitution enhance polymerase activity and confer a virulent phenotype to a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhijun; Cheng, Kaihui; Sun, Weiyang; Zhang, Xinghai; Li, Yuanguo; Wang, Tiecheng; Wang, Hualei; Zhang, Qianyi; Xin, Yue; Xue, Li; Zhang, Kun; Huang, Jing; Yang, Songtao; Qin, Chuan; Wilker, Peter R; Yue, Donghui; Chen, Hualan; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2015-12-01

    While the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus has become established in the human population as a seasonal influenza virus, continued adaptation may alter viral virulence. Here, we passaged a 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (A/Changchun/01/2009) in mice. Serial passage in mice generated viral variants with increased virulence. Adapted variants displayed enhanced replication kinetics in vitro and vivo. Analysis of the variants genomes revealed 6 amino acid changes in the PB1 (T296R), PA (I94V), HA (H3 numbering; N159D, D225G, and R226Q), and NP (D375N). Using reverse genetics, we found that a PB1-T296R substitution found in all adapted viral variants enhanced viral replication kinetics in vitro and vivo, increased viral polymerase activity in human cells, and was sufficient for enhanced virulence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus in mice. Therefore, we defined a novel influenza pathogenic determinant, providing further insights into the pathogenesis of influenza viruses in mammals.

  12. The alternate AP-1 adaptor subunit Apm2 interacts with the Mil1 regulatory protein and confers differential cargo sorting

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Shawn T.; Burston, Helen E.; Bean, Björn D. M.; Raghuram, Nandini; Maldonado-Báez, Lymarie; Davey, Michael; Wendland, Beverly; Conibear, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Heterotetrameric adaptor protein complexes are important mediators of cargo protein sorting in clathrin-coated vesicles. The cell type–specific expression of alternate μ chains creates distinct forms of AP-1 with altered cargo sorting, but how these subunits confer differential function is unclear. Whereas some studies suggest the μ subunits specify localization to different cellular compartments, others find that the two forms of AP-1 are present in the same vesicle but recognize different cargo. Yeast have two forms of AP-1, which differ only in the μ chain. Here we show that the variant μ chain Apm2 confers distinct cargo-sorting functions. Loss of Apm2, but not of Apm1, increases cell surface levels of the v-SNARE Snc1. However, Apm2 is unable to replace Apm1 in sorting Chs3, which requires a dileucine motif recognized by the γ/σ subunits common to both complexes. Apm2 and Apm1 colocalize at Golgi/early endosomes, suggesting that they do not associate with distinct compartments. We identified a novel, conserved regulatory protein that is required for Apm2-dependent sorting events. Mil1 is a predicted lipase that binds Apm2 but not Apm1 and contributes to its membrane recruitment. Interactions with specific regulatory factors may provide a general mechanism to diversify the functional repertoire of clathrin adaptor complexes. PMID:26658609

  13. Antisense myb inhibition of purified erythroid progenitors in development and differentiation is linked to cycling activity and expression of DNA polymerase alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Valtieri, M.; Venturelli, D.; Care, A.; Fossati, C.; Pelosi, E.; Labbaye, C.; Mattia, G.; Gewirtz, A.M.; Calabretta, B.; Peschle, C. )

    1991-03-15

    These studies aimed to determine the expression and functional role of c-myb in erythroid progenitors with different cycling activities. In the first series of experiments the erythroid burst-forming unit (BFU-E) and colony-forming unit (CFU-E) populations from adult peripheral blood (PB), bone marrow (BM), and embryonic-fetal liver (FL) were treated with either c-myb antisense oligomers or 3H-thymidine (3H-TdR). A direct correlation was always observed between the inhibitory effect of anti-myb oligomers and the level of cycling activity. Thus, the inhibitory effect of antisense c-myb on the number of BFU-E colonies was 28.3% +/- 15.8% in PB, 53.4% +/- 9.3% in BM, and 68.2% +/- 24.5% in FL. Both adult and embryonic CFU-E were markedly inhibited. Using purified PB progenitors, we observed a similar pattern, although with slightly lower inhibitory effects. In the 3H-TdR suicide assay the killing index of BFU-E was 8.9% +/- 4.2% in PB, 29.4% +/- 6.5% in BM, and 40.1% +/- 9.6% in FL. The values for adult and embryonic CFU-E were 55.7% +/- 7.9% and 60.98% +/- 6.6%, respectively. We then investigated the kinetics of c-myb mRNA level during the erythroid differentiation of purified adult PB and FL BFU-E, as evaluated in liquid-phase culture by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Adult erythroid precursors showed a gradual increase of c-myb mRNA from day 4 through day 8 of culture and a sharp decrease at later times, whereas the expression of c-myb mRNA and protein in differentiation embryonic precursors peaked 2 days earlier. In both cases, c-myb mRNA level peaked at the CFU-E stage of differentiation. Finally, highly purified adult PB BFU-E were stimulated into cycling by a 3-day treatment with interleukin-3 in liquid phase: both the sensitivity to c-myb antisense oligomers and the 3H-TdR suicide index showed a gradual, strictly parallel increase.

  14. Crizotinib-resistant NPM-ALK mutants confer differential sensitivity to unrelated Alk inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ceccon, Monica; Mologni, Luca; Bisson, William; Scapozza, Leonardo; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2013-02-01

    The dual ALK/MET inhibitor crizotinib was recently approved for the treatment of metastatic and late-stage ALK+ NSCLC, and is currently in clinical trial for other ALK-related diseases. As predicted after other tyrosine kinase inhibitors' clinical experience, the first mutations that confer resistance to crizotinib have been described in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and in one patient inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT). Here, we focused our attention on the anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), where the oncogenic fusion protein NPM-ALK, responsible for 70% to 80% of cases, represents an ideal crizotinib target. We selected and characterized 2 human NPM-ALK+ ALCL cell lines, KARPAS-299 and SUP-M2, able to survive and proliferate at different crizotinib concentrations. Sequencing of ALK kinase domain revealed that a single mutation became predominant at high crizotinib doses in each cell line, namely L1196Q and I1171N in Karpas-299 and SUP-M2 cells, respectively. These mutations also conferred resistance to crizotinib in Ba/F3 cells expressing human NPM-ALK. The resistant cell populations, as well as mutated Ba/F3 cells, were characterized for sensitivity to two additional ALK inhibitors: the dual ALK/EGFR inhibitor AP26113 and NVP-TAE684. While L1196Q-positive cell lines were sensitive to both inhibitors, cells carrying I1171N substitution showed cross-resistance to all ALK inhibitors tested. This study provides potentially relevant information for the management of patients with ALCL that may relapse after crizotinib treatment.

  15. Genetic characterization of the vaccinia virus DNA polymerase: cytosine arabinoside resistance requires a variable lesion conferring phosphonoacetate resistance in conjunction with an invariant mutation localized to the 3'-5' exonuclease domain.

    PubMed

    Taddie, J A; Traktman, P

    1993-07-01

    In this report, we describe the isolation, molecular genetic mapping, and phenotypic characterization of vaccinia virus mutants resistant to cytosine arabinoside (araC) and phosphonoacetic acid (PAA). At 37 degrees C, 8 microM araC was found to prevent macroscopic plaque formation by wild-type virus and to cause a 10(4)-fold reduction in viral yield. Mutants resistant to 8 microM araC were selected by serial passage of a chemically mutagenized viral stock in the presence of drug. Because recovery of mutants required that initial passages be performed under less stringent selective conditions, and because plaque-purified isolates were found to be cross-resistant to 200 micrograms of PAA per ml, it seemed likely that resistance to araC required more than one genetic lesion. This hypothesis was confirmed by genetic and physical mapping of the responsible mutations. PAAr was accorded by the acquisition of one of three G-A transitions in the DNA polymerase gene which individually alter cysteine 356 to tyrosine, glycine 372 to aspartic acid, or glycine 380 to serine. AraCr was found to require one of these substitutions plus an additional T-C transition within codon 171 of the DNA polymerase gene, a change which replaces the wild-type phenylalanine with serine. Congenic viral stocks carrying one of the three PAAr lesions, either alone or in conjunction with the upstream araCr lesion, in an otherwise wild-type background were generated. The PAAr mutations conferred nearly complete resistance to PAA, a slight degree of resistance to araC, hypersensitivity to aphidicolin, and decreased spontaneous mutation frequency. Addition of the mutation at codon 171 significantly augmented araC resistance and aphidicolin hypersensitivity but caused no further change in mutation frequency. Several lines of evidence suggest that the PAAr mutations primarily affect the deoxynucleoside triphosphate-binding site, whereas the codon 171 mutation, lying within a conserved motif associated with

  16. Matrilineage differentiation of the genus Tetragonisca using mitochondrial DNA markers and the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique.

    PubMed

    Santos, S A; Bronzato, A R; Moreira, B M T; Araujo, K F; Ronqui, L; Mangolin, C A; Toledo, V A A; Ruvolo-Takasusuki, M C C

    2015-10-21

    The Meliponinae are important pollinators of plant species, and one of the most managed species is Tetragonisca angustula. Initially, two subspecies were identified in T. angustula: T. angustula angustula and T. angustula fiebrigi. Subsequently, T. a. fiebrigi was considered a species, based on the coloration of its mesepisternum. The objective of the present study was to obtain genetic markers that could differentiate the two species by amplifying regions of mitochondrial DNA and conducting polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Worker bees were collected in three Brazilian states: Paraná (Maringá, Altônia, and Foz do Iguaçu), São Paulo (Dracena, São Carlos, and Santa Cruz do Rio Pardo), and Rondônia (Ariquemes). Ten pairs of insect heterologous primers were tested and four were used (primer pair 1, ND2 and COI; primer pair 2, COI; primer pair 8, 16S and 12S; and primer pair 9, COII). For the restriction analysis, 13 enzymes were tested: EcoRI, EcoRV, HindIII, HinfI, RsaI, PstI, XbaI, HaeIII, ClaI, XhoI, BglII, PvuII, and ScaI. Markers were obtained (primer pair 8 cleaved with EcoRV and XbaI and primer pair 9 cleaved with HaeIII, RsaI, and XbaI) that enabled matrilineage identification in the nests studied, which confirmed that hybridization could occur between both Tetragonisca species. The beginning of speciation was probably recent, and secondary contact has resulted in crosses between T. angustula females and T. fiebrigi males. Because of this hybridization, it would be appropriate to consider them as two subspecies of T. angustula.

  17. Differential transactivation by orphan nuclear receptor NOR1 and its fusion gene product EWS/NOR1: possible involvement of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase I, PARP-1.

    PubMed

    Ohkura, Naganari; Nagamura, Yuko; Tsukada, Toshihiko

    2008-10-15

    In extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma, a chromosomal translocation creates a gene fusion between EWS and an orphan nuclear receptor, NOR1. The resulting fusion protein EWS/NOR1 has been believed to lead to malignant transformation by functioning as a transactivator for NOR1-target genes. By comparing the gene expression profiles of NOR1- and EWS/NOR1-overexpressing cells, we found that they largely shared up-regulated genes, but no significant correlation was observed with respect to the transactivation levels of each gene. In addition, the proteins associated with NOR1 and EWS/NOR1 were mostly the same in these cells. The results suggest that these proteins differentially transactivate overlapping target genes through a similar transcriptional machinery. To clarify the mechanisms underlying the transcriptional divergence between NOR1 and EWS/NOR1, we searched for alternatively associated proteins, and identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase I (PARP-1) as an NOR1-specific binding protein. Consistent with its binding properties, PARP-1 acted as a transcriptional repressor of NOR1, but not EWS/NOR1, in a luciferase reporter assay employing PARP-1(-/-) fibroblasts. Interestingly, suppressive activity of PARP-1 was observed in a DNA response element-specific manner, and in a subtype-specific manner toward the NR4A family (Nur77, Nurr1, and NOR1), suggesting that PARP-1 plays a role in the diversity of transcriptional regulation mediated by the NR4A family in normal cells. Altogether, our findings suggest that NOR1 and EWS/NOR1 regulate overlapping target genes differently by utilizing associated proteins, including PARP-1; and that EWS/NOR1 may acquire oncogenic activities by avoiding (or gaining) transcription factor-specific modulation by the associated proteins.

  18. Differential binding of ppGpp and pppGpp to E. coli RNA polymerase: photo-labeling and mass spectral studies.

    PubMed

    Syal, Kirtimaan; Chatterji, Dipankar

    2015-12-01

    (p)ppGpp, a secondary messenger, is induced under stress and shows pleiotropic response. It binds to RNA polymerase and regulates transcription in Escherichia coli. More than 25 years have passed since the first discovery was made on the direct interaction of ppGpp with E. coli RNA polymerase. Several lines of evidence suggest different modes of ppGpp binding to the enzyme. Earlier cross-linking experiments suggested that the β-subunit of RNA polymerase is the preferred site for ppGpp, whereas recent crystallographic studies pinpoint the interface of β'/ω-subunits as the site of action. With an aim to validate the binding domain and to follow whether tetra- and pentaphosphate guanosines have different location on RNA polymerase, this work was initiated. RNA polymerase was photo-labeled with 8-azido-ppGpp/8-azido-pppGpp, and the product was digested with trypsin and subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. We observed three new peptides in the trypsin digest of the RNA polymerase labeled with 8-azido-ppGpp, of which two peptides correspond to the same pocket on β'-subunit as predicted by X-ray structural analysis, whereas the third peptide was mapped on the β-subunit. In the case of 8-azido-pppGpp-labeled RNA polymerase, we have found only one cross-linked peptide from the β'-subunit. However, we were unable to identify any binding site of pppGpp on the β-subunit. Interestingly, we observed that pppGpp at high concentration competes out ppGpp bound to RNA polymerase more efficiently, whereas ppGpp cannot titrate out pppGpp. The competition between tetraphosphate guanosine and pentaphosphate guanosine for E. coli RNA polymerase was followed by gel-based assay as well as by a new method known as DRaCALA assay.

  19. Advances in islet cell biology: from stem cell differentiation to clinical transplantation: conference report.

    PubMed

    Kandeel, Fouad; Smith, Craig V; Todorov, Ivan; Mullen, Yoko

    2003-10-01

    The 3rd Annual Rachmiel Levine Symposium entitled "Advances in Islet Cell Biology-From Stem Cell Differentiation to Clinical Transplantation" was organized by the Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism at the City of Hope National Medical Center, with the support of the Southern California Islet Cell Resources Center, American Diabetes Association-David Shapiro Research Fund, Ross Foundation, the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) of the National Institutes of Health. The symposium was held at the Hilton Anaheim Hotel in Anaheim, CA, in October 2002, and was attended by nearly 400 participants from 23 countries and 30 U.S. states. The symposium consisted of 11 sessions focusing on 3 areas: (1) pancreas and islet cell differentiation and islet generation, (2) beta cell biology and insulin synthesis and/or secretion, and (3) pancreatic islet transplantation in patients with type I diabetes. Thirty-nine world experts lectured on the most current information in each field. Fifty-three abstracts were selected for presentation and discussed at the poster session. The first author of each of the top 10 posters received a Young Investigator Travel Award provided by the National Center for Research Resources and the Southern California Islet Cell Resources Center. The symposium also offered special Meet the Professor sessions, which gave the attendees an opportunity to closely interact with the participating speakers of the day.

  20. The evolutionary conservation of DNA polymerase. alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.A.; Korn, D.; Wang, T.S.F. )

    1988-08-25

    The evolutionary conservation of DNA polymerase {alpha} was assessed by immunological and molecular genetic approaches. Four anti-human KB cell DNA polymerase {alpha} monoclonal antibodies were tested for their ability to recognize a phylogenetically broad array of eukaryotic DNA polymerases. While the single non-neutralizing antibody used in this study recognizes higher mammalian (human, simian, canine, and bovine) polymerases only, three neutralizing antibodies exhibit greater, but variable, extents of cross-reactivity among vertebrate species. Genomic Southern hybridization studies with the cDNA of the human DNA polymerase {alpha} catalytic polypeptide identify the existence of many consensus DNA sequences within the DNA polymerase genes of vertebrate, invertebrate, plant and unicellular organisms. These findings illustrate the differential evolutionary conservation of four unique epitopes on DNA sequences, presumably reflective of critical functional domains, in the DNA polymerase genes from a broad diversity of living forms.

  1. [The implementation of polymerase chain reaction technique: the real time to reveal and differentiate the viruses of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk].

    PubMed

    Andosova, L D; Kontorshchikova, K N; Blatova, O L; Kudel'kina, S Iu; Kuznetsova, I A; Belov, A V; Baĭkova, R A

    2011-07-01

    The polymerase chain reaction technique was applied in "real time" format to evaluate the occurrence rate and infection ratio of various genotypes of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk in virus-positive women and contact persons. The examination sampling consisted of 738 women aged of 17-50 years. The examination results permitted to establish high percentage of infection of 546 patients (74%) by carcinogenic papilloma viruses. The analysis of detection rate of various genotypes of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk established that the 56th and 16th types of high carcinogenic risk are revealed more often than others--in 33% and 15.4% correspondingly. In males, first place in occurrence rate is for those types of virus of human papilloma: the 56th n = 10 (33.3%), 16th n = 3 (10%), 45th n = 3 (10%), 51th n = 3 (10%). The rest of genotypes are detected in 3-7% cases.

  2. T7-RNA Polymerase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    T7-RNA Polymerase grown on STS-81. Structure-Function Relationships of RNA Polymerase: DNA-dependent RNA polymerase is the key enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of RNA, a process known as transcription. Principal Investigator's include Dr. Dan Carter, Dr. B.C. Wang, and Dr. John Rose of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  3. Jarid2 is a PRC2 component in embryonic stem cells required for multi-lineage differentiation and recruitment of PRC1 and RNA Polymerase II to developmental regulators.

    PubMed

    Landeira, David; Sauer, Stephan; Poot, Raymond; Dvorkina, Maria; Mazzarella, Luca; Jørgensen, Helle F; Pereira, C Filipe; Leleu, Marion; Piccolo, Francesco M; Spivakov, Mikhail; Brookes, Emily; Pombo, Ana; Fisher, Cynthia; Skarnes, William C; Snoek, Tim; Bezstarosti, Karel; Demmers, Jeroen; Klose, Robert J; Casanova, Miguel; Tavares, Ligia; Brockdorff, Neil; Merkenschlager, Matthias; Fisher, Amanda G

    2010-06-01

    Polycomb Repressor Complexes (PRCs) are important regulators of embryogenesis. In embryonic stem (ES) cells many genes that regulate subsequent stages in development are enriched at their promoters for PRC1, PRC2 and Ser 5-phosphorylated RNA Polymerase II (RNAP), and contain domains of 'bivalent' chromatin (enriched for H3K4me3; histone H3 di- or trimethylated at Lys 4 and H3K27me3; histone H3 trimethylated at Lys 27). Loss of individual PRC components in ES cells can lead to gene de-repression and to unscheduled differentiation. Here we show that Jarid2 is a novel subunit of PRC2 that is required for the co-recruitment of PRC1 and RNAP to genes that regulate development in ES cells. Jarid2-deficient ES cells showed reduced H3K4me2/me3 and H3K27me3 marking and PRC1/PRC2 recruitment, and did not efficiently establish Ser 5-phosporylated RNAP at target genes. ES cells lacking Jarid2, in contrast to previously characterized PRC1 and PRC2 mutants, did not inappropriately express PRC2 target genes. Instead, they show a severely compromised capacity for successful differentiation towards neural or mesodermal fates and failed to correctly initiate lineage-specific gene expression in vitro. Collectively, these data indicate that transcriptional priming of bivalent genes in pluripotent ES cells is Jarid2-dependent, and suggests that priming is critical for subsequent multi-lineage differentiation.

  4. DNA polymerases and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sabine S.; Takata, Kei-ichi; Wood, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    There are fifteen different DNA polymerases encoded in mammalian genomes, which are specialized for replication, repair or the tolerance of DNA damage. New evidence is emerging for lesion-specific and tissue-specific functions of DNA polymerases. Many point mutations that occur in cancer cells arise from the error-generating activities of DNA polymerases. However, the ability of some of these enzymes to bypass DNA damage may actually defend against chromosome instability in cells and at least one DNA polymerase, POLζ, is a suppressor of spontaneous tumorigenesis. Because DNA polymerases can help cancer cells tolerate DNA damage, some of these enzymes may be viable targets for therapeutic strategies. PMID:21258395

  5. Difference in root K+ retention ability and reduced sensitivity of K+-permeable channels to reactive oxygen species confer differential salt tolerance in three Brassica species.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Koushik; Bose, Jayakumar; Shabala, Lana; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    Brassica species are known to possess significant inter and intraspecies variability in salinity stress tolerance, but the cell-specific mechanisms conferring this difference remain elusive. In this work, the role and relative contribution of several key plasma membrane transporters to salinity stress tolerance were evaluated in three Brassica species (B. napus, B. juncea, and B. oleracea) using a range of electrophysiological assays. Initial root growth assay and viability staining revealed that B. napus was most tolerant amongst the three species, followed by B. juncea and B. oleracea At the mechanistic level, this difference was conferred by at least three complementary physiological mechanisms: (i) higher Na(+) extrusion ability from roots resulting from increased expression and activity of plasma membrane SOS1-like Na(+)/H(+) exchangers; (ii) better root K(+) retention ability resulting from stress-inducible activation of H(+)-ATPase and ability to maintain more negative membrane potential under saline conditions; and (iii) reduced sensitivity of B. napus root K(+)-permeable channels to reactive oxygen species (ROS). The last two mechanisms played the dominant role and conferred most of the differential salt sensitivity between species. Brassica napus plants were also more efficient in preventing the stress-induced increase in GORK transcript levels and up-regulation of expression of AKT1, HAK5, and HKT1 transporter genes. Taken together, our data provide the mechanistic explanation for differential salt stress sensitivity amongst these species and shed light on transcriptional and post-translational regulation of key ion transport systems involved in the maintenance of the root plasma membrane potential and cytosolic K/Na ratio as a key attribute for salt tolerance in Brassica species. PMID:27340231

  6. Difference in root K+ retention ability and reduced sensitivity of K+-permeable channels to reactive oxygen species confer differential salt tolerance in three Brassica species

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Koushik; Bose, Jayakumar; Shabala, Lana; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Brassica species are known to possess significant inter and intraspecies variability in salinity stress tolerance, but the cell-specific mechanisms conferring this difference remain elusive. In this work, the role and relative contribution of several key plasma membrane transporters to salinity stress tolerance were evaluated in three Brassica species (B. napus, B. juncea, and B. oleracea) using a range of electrophysiological assays. Initial root growth assay and viability staining revealed that B. napus was most tolerant amongst the three species, followed by B. juncea and B. oleracea. At the mechanistic level, this difference was conferred by at least three complementary physiological mechanisms: (i) higher Na+ extrusion ability from roots resulting from increased expression and activity of plasma membrane SOS1-like Na+/H+ exchangers; (ii) better root K+ retention ability resulting from stress-inducible activation of H+-ATPase and ability to maintain more negative membrane potential under saline conditions; and (iii) reduced sensitivity of B. napus root K+-permeable channels to reactive oxygen species (ROS). The last two mechanisms played the dominant role and conferred most of the differential salt sensitivity between species. Brassica napus plants were also more efficient in preventing the stress-induced increase in GORK transcript levels and up-regulation of expression of AKT1, HAK5, and HKT1 transporter genes. Taken together, our data provide the mechanistic explanation for differential salt stress sensitivity amongst these species and shed light on transcriptional and post-translational regulation of key ion transport systems involved in the maintenance of the root plasma membrane potential and cytosolic K/Na ratio as a key attribute for salt tolerance in Brassica species. PMID:27340231

  7. A Real-Time Reverse-Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction for Differentiation of Massachusetts Vaccine and Brazilian Field Genotypes of Avian Infectious Bronchitis Virus.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Aline Padilha de; Ikuta, Nilo; Fonseca, André Salvador Kazantzi; Spilki, Fernando Rosado; Balestrin, Eder; Rodrigues, Carolina Dias; Canal, Cláudio Wageck; Lunge, Vagner Ricardo

    2016-03-01

    The avian infectious bronchitis virus is classified into serotypes or genotypes (or both) in different poultry-producing countries of the world. In Brazil, Massachusetts type (Mass), used as a live vaccine, and local field Brazilian variants (genotypes; BR) predominate in the commercial poultry flocks. This study describes the development and validation of two real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reactions (RT-qPCR) for the specific detection of Mass and BR genotypes in allantoic fluids and clinical samples. Genotype-specific primers, combined with a generic probe targeted to the S1 gene, originated Mass RT-qPCR and BR RT-qPCR-specific assays. Analytical sensitivity and linearity of these assays were determined in comparison with an IBV generic real-time RT-PCR based on the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR RT-qPCR). Mass RT-qPCR detected five Mass field isolates, three vaccine samples, and one coinfected sample (BR and Mass) while BR RT-qPCR detected 16 BR field isolates. Both assays were linear (R(2) > 0.98), reproducible, and as sensitive as the classical 5'UTR RT-qPCR used to detect IBV. In the analysis of 141 IBV clinical samples, 8 were positive for Mass RT-qPCR, 76 for BR RT-qPCR, and 2 for both assays. In the remaining 55 samples, 25 were positive only for 5'UTR RT-qPCR and 30 were negative for the three assays. In conclusion, both assays were able to detect Mass and BR genotypes, allowing rapid and easy IBV molecular typing from allantoic fluids and clinical samples.

  8. DNA polymerase profiling.

    PubMed

    Summerer, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    We report a simple homogeneous fluorescence assay for quantification of DNA polymerase function in high throughput. The fluorescence signal is generated by the DNA polymerase triggering opening of a molecular beacon extension of the template strand. A resulting distance alteration is reported by fluorescence resonance energy transfer between two dyes introduced into the molecular beacon stem. We describe real-time reaction profiling of two model DNA polymerases. We demonstrate kinetic characterization, rapid optimization of reaction conditions, and inhibitor profiling using the presented assay. Furthermore, to supersede purification steps in screening procedures of DNA polymerase mutant libraries, detection of enzymatic activity in bacterial expression lysates is described.

  9. A novel nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for differential detection of Entamoeba histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar DNA in stool samples

    PubMed Central

    Khairnar, Krishna; Parija, Subhash C

    2007-01-01

    Background E. histolytica, a pathogenic amoeba, is indistinguishable in its cyst and trophozoite stages from those of non-pathogenic E. moshkovskii and E. dispar by light microscopy. We have developed a nested multiplex PCR targeting a 16S-like rRNA gene for differential detection of all the three morphologically similar forms of E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar simultaneously in stool samples. Results The species specific product size for E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar was 439, 553 and 174 bp respectively, which was clearly different for all the three Entamoeba species. The nested multiplex PCR showed a sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 100% for the demonstration of E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar DNA in stool samples. The PCR was positive for E. histolytica, E. moshkovskii and E. dispar in a total of 190 out of 202 stool specimens (94% sensitive) that were positive for E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii by examination of stool by microscopy and/or culture. All the 35 negative control stool samples that were negative for E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii by microscopy and culture were also found negative by the nested multiplex PCR (100% specific). The result from the study shows that only 34.6% of the patient stool samples that were positive for E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii by examination of stool by microscopy and/or culture, were actually positive for pathogenic E. histolytica and the remaining majority of the stool samples were positive for non-pathogenic E. dispar or E. moshkovskii as demonstrated by the use of nested multiplex PCR. Conclusion The present study reports a new nested multiplex PCR strategy for species specific detection and differentiation of E. histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii DNA in stool specimens. The test is highly specific, sensitive and also rapid, providing the results within 12 hours of receiving stool specimens. PMID:17524135

  10. Differentiation of canine distemper virus isolates in fur animals from various vaccine strains by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism according to phylogenetic relations in china

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In order to effectively identify the vaccine and field strains of Canine distemper virus (CDV), a new differential diagnostic test has been developed based on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). We selected an 829 bp fragment of the nucleoprotein (N) gene of CDV. By RFLP analysis using BamHI, field isolates were distinguishable from the vaccine strains. Two fragments were obtained from the vaccine strains by RT-PCR-RFLP analysis while three were observed in the field strains. An 829 nucleotide region of the CDV N gene was analyzed in 19 CDV field strains isolated from minks, raccoon dogs and foxes in China between 2005 and 2007. The results suggest this method is precise, accurate and efficient. It was also determined that three different genotypes exist in CDV field strains in fur animal herds of the north of China, most of which belong to Asian type. Mutated field strains, JSY06-R1, JSY06-R2 and JDH07-F1 also exist in Northern China, but are most closely related to the standard virulent strain A75/17, designated in Arctic and America-2 genetype in the present study, respectively. PMID:21352564

  11. The identification and differentiation of the Candida parapsilosis complex species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-01-01

    Currently, it is accepted that there are three species that were formerly grouped under Candida parapsilosis: C. para- psilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis, andCandida metapsilosis. In fact, the antifungal susceptibility profiles and distinct virulence attributes demonstrate the differences in these nosocomial pathogens. An accurate, fast, and economical identification of fungal species has been the main goal in mycology. In the present study, we searched sequences that were available in the GenBank database in order to identify the complete sequence for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S-ITS2 region, which is comprised of the forward and reverse primers ITS1 and ITS4. Subsequently, an in silico polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to differentiate the C. parapsilosis complex species. Ninety-eight clinical isolates from patients with fungaemia were submitted for analysis, where 59 isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 were identified as C. orthopsilosis, and two were identified as C. metapsilosis. PCR-RFLP quickly and accurately identified C. parapsilosis complex species, making this method an alternative and routine identification system for use in clinical mycology laboratories. PMID:27074256

  12. The identification and differentiation of the Candida parapsilosis complex species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA.

    PubMed

    Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-04-01

    Currently, it is accepted that there are three species that were formerly grouped under Candida parapsilosis: C. para- psilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis, and Candida metapsilosis. In fact, the antifungal susceptibility profiles and distinct virulence attributes demonstrate the differences in these nosocomial pathogens. An accurate, fast, and economical identification of fungal species has been the main goal in mycology. In the present study, we searched sequences that were available in the GenBank database in order to identify the complete sequence for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S-ITS2 region, which is comprised of the forward and reverse primers ITS1 and ITS4. Subsequently, an in silico polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to differentiate the C. parapsilosis complex species. Ninety-eight clinical isolates from patients with fungaemia were submitted for analysis, where 59 isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 were identified as C. orthopsilosis, and two were identified as C. metapsilosis. PCR-RFLP quickly and accurately identified C. parapsilosis complex species, making this method an alternative and routine identification system for use in clinical mycology laboratories.

  13. The RNA Polymerase Omega Factor RpoZ Is Regulated by PhoP and Has an Important Role in Antibiotic Biosynthesis and Morphological Differentiation in Streptomyces coelicolor▿†

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Beneit, Fernando; Barriuso-Iglesias, Mónica; Fernández-Martínez, Lorena T.; Martínez-Castro, Miriam; Sola-Landa, Alberto; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; Martín, Juan F.

    2011-01-01

    The RNA polymerase (RNAP) omega factor (ω) forms a complex with the α2ββ′ core of this enzyme in bacteria. We have characterized the rpoZ gene of Streptomyces coelicolor, which encodes a small protein (90 amino acids) identified as the omega factor. Deletion of the rpoZ gene resulted in strains with a slightly reduced growth rate, although they were still able to sporulate. The biosynthesis of actinorhodin and, particularly, that of undecylprodigiosin were drastically reduced in the ΔrpoZ strain, suggesting that expression of these secondary metabolite biosynthetic genes is dependent upon the presence of RpoZ in the RNAP complex. Complementation of the ΔrpoZ mutant with the wild-type rpoZ allele restored both phenotype and antibiotic production. Interestingly, the rpoZ gene contains a PHO box in its promoter region. DNA binding assays showed that the phosphate response regulator PhoP binds to such a region. Since luciferase reporter studies showed that rpoZ promoter activity was increased in a ΔphoP background, it can be concluded that rpoZ is controlled negatively by PhoP, thus connecting phosphate depletion regulation with antibiotic production and morphological differentiation in Streptomyces. PMID:21908625

  14. A Rapid and Sensitive Method to Identify and Differentiate Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica Serotype 4,[5],12:i:- by Combining Traditional Serotyping and Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Barco, Lisa; Lettini, Antonia Anna; Ramon, Elena; Longo, Alessandra; Saccardin, Cristina; Pozza, Maria Cristina Dalla

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype 4,[5],12:i:- is an emerging serovar considered as a monophasic variant of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium. The antigenic and genetic similarity between Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- and Salmonella Typhimurium suggests that they may behave in a similar way and represent a comparable threat to public health. As serotyping alone does not necessarily provide for identification of Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- and its differentiation from Salmonella Typhimurium, a method that combines traditional serotyping and a multiplex polymerase chain reaction has been tested on 208 strains serotyped as Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:-, Salmonella Typhimurium, and similar serovars of serogroup B sharing the same phase-1 antigen “i.” For 191 strains, the combined method fully confirmed the results provided by traditional serotyping, whereas for 17 strains of Salmonella 4,[5],12:i:- and Salmonella Typhimurium some inconsistencies emerged between the two methods. The combined method resulted in a more accurate and faster identification of these two relevant serovars. PMID:21247297

  15. Poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with lymphoid stroma (lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas) of the stomach. Report of three cases with Epstein-Barr virus genome demonstrated by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Min, K W; Holmquist, S; Peiper, S C; O'Leary, T J

    1991-08-01

    Lymphoepithelioma of the nasopharynx is an undifferentiated carcinoma with prominent lymphoid infiltration. Histologically similar tumors have been documented in the skin, lung, thymus, salivary gland, tonsil, and uterine cervix. The authors report three cases of gastric carcinoma that were histologically and immunohistochemically similar to lymphoepithelioma. The patients were elderly white persons (61, 76, and 77 years of age); two of them had previous partial gastric resections for benign ulcer disease. The tumors were located on the lesser gastric curvature (two cases) and at a previous anastomotic site (one case) and measured 3, 4, and 7 cm in largest dimension. Grossly, each neoplasm was a raised plaque-like lesion with a central ulcer. Microscopically, all three tumors were similar, with poorly differentiated polygonal tumor cells scattered throughout a dense lymphocytic background. In a few areas, tumor cells formed ill-defined cords. In two cases, the neoplasms invaded the gastric muscle layer but had a well-delineated (pushing) margin. The tumor cells were immunohistochemically positive for AE3-defined keratin, confirming their epithelial nature. The lymphocytes were a mixture of UCHL-1-positive T cells and L-26-positive B cells. Portions of the Epstein-Barr virus genome were present in all cases, as detected by the polymerase chain reaction. The morphologic features of these cases are similar to those of lymphoepithelioma in other anatomic sites, and these tumors represent a unique subtype of gastric carcinoma.

  16. RNA Polymerases of Maize: Nuclear RNA Polymerases*

    PubMed Central

    Strain, Gustave C.; Mullinix, Kathleen P.; Bogorad, Lawrence

    1971-01-01

    Two DNA-dependent RNA polymerases of nuclear origin have been purified from leaves of Zea mays. The two enzymes can be separated on DEAE-cellulose columns. Enzymes I and II are eluted with 0.08 and 0.20 M (NH4)2SO4, respectively. Both enzymes prefer maize nuclear DNA as a template; they are also more active in the presence of Mg++ than Mn++ and are inhibited by (NH4)2-SO4 or KCl. Neither enzyme is inhibited by rifamycin SV. Enzyme II is strongly inhibited by α-amanitin, whereas enzyme I is not significantly affected. Their ability to use native and denatured DNA as templates varies according to the extent and method of purification of the polymerase. Furthermore, enzyme II can be resolved by DEAE-chromatography or glycerol-gradient centrifugation into two components, one of which prefers native DNA, while the other prefers denatured DNA. PMID:5288239

  17. Sprouty-2 Overexpression in C2C12 Cells Confers Myogenic Differentiation Properties in the Presence of FGF2D⃞

    PubMed Central

    de Alvaro, Cristina; Martinez, Natalia; Rojas, Jose M.; Lorenzo, Margarita

    2005-01-01

    Myoblast C2C12 cells cultured in the presence of FGF2 actively proliferate and showed a differentiation-defective phenotype compared with cells cultured in low serum or in the presence of insulin. These FGF2 effects are associated with sustained activation of p44/p42-MAPK and lack of activation of AKT. Here we demonstrate that Sprouty-2, a protein involved in the negative feedback of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, when stably overexpressed in C2C12 cells and in the presence of FGF2 produces growth arrest (precluding the expression of PCNA and the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma and inducing the expression of p21CIP) and myogenesis (multinucleated myotubes formation, induction of creatine kinase and expression of myosin heavy chain protein). These events were accompanied by repression of p44/p42-MAPK and activation of AKT. When C2C12 cells were stably transfected with a Sprouty-2 (Y55F) mutant defective in inhibiting p44/p42-MAPK activation by FGF, myoblasts in the presence of FGF continue to grow and completely fail to form myotubes. This work is the first evidence of the contribution of sprouty genes to myogenic differentiation in the presence of FGF2. PMID:16000370

  18. The expanding polymerase universe.

    PubMed

    Goodman, M F; Tippin, B

    2000-11-01

    Over the past year, the number of known prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases has exploded. Many of these newly discovered enzymes copy aberrant bases in the DNA template over which 'respectable' polymerases fear to tread. The next step is to unravel their functions, which are thought to range from error-prone copying of DNA lesions, somatic hypermutation and avoidance of skin cancer, to restarting stalled replication forks and repairing double-stranded DNA breaks.

  19. Differentiation of bacterial versus viral otitis media using a combined Raman scattering spectroscopy and low coherence interferometry probe (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Youbo; Shelton, Ryan L.; Tu, Haohua; Nolan, Ryan M.; Monroy, Guillermo L.; Chaney, Eric J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-02-01

    Otitis media (OM) is a highly prevalent disease that can be caused by either a bacterial or viral infection. Because antibiotics are only effective against bacterial infections, blind use of antibiotics without definitive knowledge of the infectious agent, though commonly practiced, can lead to the problems of potential harmful side effects, wasteful misuse of medical resources, and the development of antimicrobial resistance. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using a combined Raman scattering spectroscopy and low coherence interferometry (LCI) device to differentiate OM infections caused by viruses and bacteria and improve our diagnostic ability of OM. Raman spectroscopy, an established tool for molecular analysis of biological tissue, has been shown capable of identifying different bacterial species, although mostly based on fixed or dried sample cultures. LCI has been demonstrated recently as a promising tool for determining tympanic membrane (TM) thickness and the presence and thickness of middle-ear biofilm located behind the TM. We have developed a fiber-based ear insert that incorporates spatially-aligned Raman and LCI probes for point-of-care diagnosis of OM. As shown in human studies, the Raman probe provides molecular signatures of bacterial- and viral-infected OM and normal middle-ear cavities, and LCI helps to identify depth-resolved structural information as well as guide and monitor positioning of the Raman spectroscopy beam for relatively longer signal acquisition time. Differentiation of OM infections is determined by correlating in vivo Raman data collected from human subjects with the Raman features of different bacterial and viral species obtained from cultured samples.

  20. Differential regulation of Tec1 by Fus3 and Kss1 confers signaling specificity in yeast development.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Stefan; Köhler, Tim; Braus, Gerhard H; Heise, Barbara; Bolte, Melanie; Mösch, Hans-Ulrich

    2004-12-01

    Transcriptional regulation by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascades is a major control mechanism for eukaryotic development. In budding yeast, Fus3 and Kss1 are two MAP kinases that control two distinct developmental programs-mating and invasive growth. We investigated whether signal-specific activation of mating and invasive growth involves regulation of the transcription factor Tec1 by Fus3 and Kss1. We present evidence that, during mating, Fus3 phosphorylates Tec1 to downregulate this invasive growth-specific transcription factor and its target genes. This function of Fus3 is essential for correct execution of the mating program and is not shared by Kss1. We find that Kss1 controls the activity of Tec1 mainly during invasive growth by control of TEC1 gene expression. Our study suggests that signaling specificity can arise from differential regulation of a single transcription factor by two MAP kinases with shared functions in distinct developmental programs. PMID:15558284

  1. A chimeric human APOBEC3A protein with a three amino acid insertion confers differential HIV-1 and adeno-associated virus restriction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaqiong; Wang, Zekun; Pramanik, Ankita; Santiago, Mario L; Qiu, Jianming; Stephens, Edward B

    2016-11-01

    Old World monkey (OWM) and hominid APOBEC3Aproteins exhibit differential restriction activities against lentiviruses and DNA viruses. Human APOBEC3A(hA3A)has weak restriction activity against HIV-1Δvifbut is efficiently restricted by an artificially generated chimeric from mandrills (mndA3A/G). We show that a chimeric hA3Acontaining the "WVS" insertion (hA3A[(27)WVS(29)]) conferred potent HIV-1restriction activity. Analysis of each amino acid of the "WVS" motif show that the length and not necessarily the charge or hydrophobicity of the amino acids accounted for restriction activity. Our results suggest that hA3A[(27)WVS(29)]restricts HIV-1at the level of reverse transcription in target cells. Finally, our results suggest that insertion of "WVS" into hA3Amodestly reduces restriction of adeno-associated virus 2(AAV-2)while insertion of the AC Loop1region of the mndA3A/G into hA3A abolished AAV-2 restriction, strengthening the role of this molecular interface in the functional evolution of primate A3A. PMID:27584592

  2. Single-molecule studies reveal the function of a third polymerase in the replisome

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, Roxana E; Kurth, Isabel; O'Donnell, Mike E

    2013-01-01

    The Escherichia coli replisome contains three polymerases, one more than necessary to duplicate the two parental strands. Using single-molecule studies, we reveal two advantages conferred by the third polymerase. First, dipolymerase replisomes are inefficient at synthesizing lagging strands, leaving single-strand gaps, whereas tripolymerase replisomes fill strands almost to completion. Second, tripolymerase replisomes are much more processive than dipolymerase replisomes. These features account for the unexpected three-polymerase-structure of bacterial replisomes. PMID:22157955

  3. Polymerase chain reaction system

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Stratton, Paul L.; Hadley, Dean R.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Belgrader, Phil; Meyer, Peter L.

    2004-03-02

    A portable polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification and detection system includes one or more chamber modules. Each module supports a duplex assay of a biological sample. Each module has two parallel interrogation ports with a linear optical system. The system is capable of being handheld.

  4. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase

    DOE PAGES

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Errormore » rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu , Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition.« less

  5. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Error rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu, Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition. PMID:25197572

  6. Essential role for polymerase specialization in cellular nonhomologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Pryor, John M; Waters, Crystal A; Aza, Ana; Asagoshi, Kenjiro; Strom, Christina; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Blanco, Luis; Ramsden, Dale A

    2015-08-18

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) repairs chromosome breaks and must remain effective in the face of extensive diversity in broken end structures. We show here that this flexibility is often reliant on the ability to direct DNA synthesis across strand breaks, and that polymerase (Pol) μ and Pol λ are the only mammalian DNA polymerases that have this activity. By systematically varying substrate in cells, we show each polymerase is uniquely proficient in different contexts. The templating nucleotide is also selected differently, with Pol μ using the unpaired base adjacent to the downstream 5' phosphate even when there are available template sites further upstream of this position; this makes Pol μ more flexible but also less accurate than Pol λ. Loss of either polymerase alone consequently has clear and distinguishable effects on the fidelity of repair, but end remodeling by cellular nucleases and the remaining polymerase helps mitigate the effects on overall repair efficiency. Accordingly, when cells are deficient in both polymerases there is synergistic impact on NHEJ efficiency, both in terms of repair of defined substrates and cellular resistance to ionizing radiation. Pol μ and Pol λ thus provide distinct solutions to a problem for DNA synthesis that is unique to this pathway and play a key role in conferring on NHEJ the flexibility required for accurate and efficient repair.

  7. Essential role for polymerase specialization in cellular nonhomologous end joining

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, John M.; Waters, Crystal A.; Aza, Ana; Asagoshi, Kenjiro; Strom, Christina; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Blanco, Luis; Ramsden, Dale A.

    2015-01-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) repairs chromosome breaks and must remain effective in the face of extensive diversity in broken end structures. We show here that this flexibility is often reliant on the ability to direct DNA synthesis across strand breaks, and that polymerase (Pol) μ and Pol λ are the only mammalian DNA polymerases that have this activity. By systematically varying substrate in cells, we show each polymerase is uniquely proficient in different contexts. The templating nucleotide is also selected differently, with Pol μ using the unpaired base adjacent to the downstream 5′ phosphate even when there are available template sites further upstream of this position; this makes Pol μ more flexible but also less accurate than Pol λ. Loss of either polymerase alone consequently has clear and distinguishable effects on the fidelity of repair, but end remodeling by cellular nucleases and the remaining polymerase helps mitigate the effects on overall repair efficiency. Accordingly, when cells are deficient in both polymerases there is synergistic impact on NHEJ efficiency, both in terms of repair of defined substrates and cellular resistance to ionizing radiation. Pol μ and Pol λ thus provide distinct solutions to a problem for DNA synthesis that is unique to this pathway and play a key role in conferring on NHEJ the flexibility required for accurate and efficient repair. PMID:26240371

  8. Polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Arnhelm, N. ); Levenson, C.H. )

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) an in-vitro method of amplifying DNA sequences. Beginning with DNA of any origin- bacterial, viral, plant, or animal- PCR can increase the amount of a DNA sequence hundreds of millions to billions of times. The procedure can amplify a targeted sequence even when it makes up less than one part in a million of the total initial sample. PCR is an enzymatic process that is carried out in discrete cycles of amplification, each of which can double the amount of target DNA in the sample. Thus, n cycles can produce 2{sup n} times as much target as was present to begin with. This paper discusses how PCR has had an impact on molecular biology, human genetics, infectious and genetic disease diagnosis, forensic science, and evolutionary biology.

  9. Conference Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-04-01

    Since the first IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (Paris, March 2002) and the Second Conference (Rio de Janeiro, May 2005), progress has continued in most countries and world regions to attract girls to physics and advance women into leadership roles, and many working groups have formed. The Third Conference (Seoul, October 2008), with 283 attendees from 57 countries, was dedicated to celebrating the physics achievements of women throughout the world, networking toward new international collaborations, building each participant's capacity for career success, and aiding the formation of active regional working groups to advance women in physics. Despite the progress, women remain a small minority of the physics community in most countries.

  10. Biomedical Conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    As a result of Biomedical Conferences, Vivo Metric Systems Co. has produced cardiac electrodes based on NASA technology. Frequently in science, one highly specialized discipline is unaware of relevant advances made in other areas. In an attempt to familiarize researchers in a variety of disciplines with medical problems and needs, NASA has sponsored conferences that bring together university scientists, practicing physicians and manufacturers of medical instruments.

  11. Ribonucleic Acid Polymerases of the Yeast Phase of Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Boguslawski, George; Schlessinger, David; Medoff, Gerald; Kobayashi, George

    1974-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerases of Histoplasma capsulatum (yeast phase) were fractionated by phosphocellulose chromatography and partially characterized. Three distinct, active fractions were seen. The major RNA polymerase species was inhibited strongly by α-amanitin, whereas the other two were resistant. When either slightly purified (HSE) extract or the major active component was assayed at 37 C, the incorporation of tritiated uridine monophosphate into RNA stopped after 10 to 15 min. In contrast, the synthesis continued for at least 1 h at 23 C. The other two RNA polymerase species exhibited higher rates of incorporation when tested at 37 C, and continued to synthesize RNA even after 60 min. However, by that time the levels of incorporation at 23 C were higher than at 37 C for all three enzymes. The temperature sensitivity was not affected by changing substrate concentration or employing either native or denatured calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid as a template. These results are compared with the data obtained with RNA polymerases from different fungi and other organisms. A possible involvement of RNA polymerase(s) in morphological differentiation of H. capsulatum is discussed. PMID:4828308

  12. Euglena gracilis DNA dependent RNA polymerase II: a zinc metalloenzyme.

    PubMed

    Falchuk, K H; Mazus, B; Ulpino, L; Vallee, B L

    1976-10-01

    Zinc is essential for cellular proliferation. Zinc deficiency of Euglena gracilis results in arrest of cell division and deranges nucleic acid and protein metabolism pointing to a decisive role of zinc in transcription and translation. We have, therefore, investigated the role of zinc in the function of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerases of this organism. Two RNA polymerases from zinc sufficient organisms were purified first by affinity chromatography on a DNA cellulose column and subsequently separated on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-Sephadex A-25. The two fractions were characterized as polymerase I and II by their elution pattern from DEAE-Sephadex and sensitivity to alpha-amanitin. RNA polymerase II has a provisional molecular weight of 700 000 and contains an average of 2.2 g=atoms of zinc per mol of enzyme, but not Mn, Cu, or Fe, as measured by microwave emission spectroscopy. Chelating agents, such as 1,10-phenanthroline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid, and lomofungin, inhibit activity. In contrast, the nonchelating analogues, 1,7-and 4,7-phenanthroline, do not affect activity. Inhibition by 1,10-phenanthroline is instantaneous and fully reversible by dilution. 1,10-Phenanthroline also inhibits RNA polymerase I, suggesting a role of zinc in its function. The demonstration that RNA polymerase II is a zinc enzyme indicates the involvement of zinc in eukaryotic RNA synthesis and serves as a further basis for the definition of the role of this element in eukaryotic cell growth, division, and differentiation.

  13. Genetic structure of soil population of fungus Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend.: Fr.: Molecular reidentification of the species and genetic differentiation of isolates using polymerase chain reaction technique with universal primers (UP-PCR)

    SciTech Connect

    Bulat, S.A.; Mironenko, N.V.; Zholkevich, Yu.G.

    1995-07-01

    The genetic structure of three soil populations of fungus Fusarium oxysporum was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction with universal primers (UP-PCR). Distinct UP-PCR variants revealed by means of cross-dot hybridization of amplified DNA and restriction analysis of nuclear ribosomal DNA represent subspecies or sibling species of F. oxysporum. The remaining isolates of F. oxysporum showed moderate UP-PCR polymorphism characterized by numerous types, whose relatedness was analyzed by computer treatment of the UP-PCR patterns. The genetic distance trees based on the UP-PCR patterns, which were obtained with different universal primers, demonstrated similar topology. This suggests that evolutionarily important genome rearrangements correlatively occur within the entire genome. Isolates representing different UP-PCR polymorphisms were encountered in all populations, being distributed asymmetrically in two of these. In general, soil populations of F. oxysporum were represented by numerous genetically isolated groups with a similar genome structure. The genetic heterogeneity of the isolates within these groups is likely to be caused by the parasexual process. The usefulness of the UP-PCR technique for population studies of F. oxysporum was demonstrated. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Conference Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, James L., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Celebrations and special events were in order this year as the Minority University-Space Interdisciplinary Network (MU-SPIN) Program and NASA's Minority University Research and Education Division (MURED) both reached their 10th anniversaries. In honor of this occasion, the 2000 Annual Users' Conference held at Morris Brown College (MBC) in Atlanta, Georgia, September 11-15, 2000, was the first to be jointly hosted by MU-SPIN and MURED. It was particularly fitting that this anniversary should fall in the year 2000. The start of the new millennium propelled us to push bold new ideas and renew our commitment to minority university participation in all areas of NASA. With the theme 'Celebrating Our Tenth Year With Our Eyes on the Prize,' the conference provided a national forum for showcasing successful MU-SPIN and MURED Program (MUREP) experiences to enhance faculty/student development in areas of scientific and technical research and education. Our NASA-relevant conference agenda resulted in a record-breaking 220 registered attendees. Using feedback from past participants, we designed a track of student activities closely tailored to their interests. The resulting showcase of technical assistance and best practices set a new standard for our conferences in the years to come. This year's poster session was our largest ever, with over 50 presentations from students, faculty, and teachers. Posters covered a broad range of NASA activities from 'A Study of the Spiral Galaxy M101' to 'Network Cabling Characteristics.'

  15. Thirteenth International Laser Radar Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    One hundred fifteen papers were presented in both oral and poster sessions. The topics of the conference sessions were: spaceborne lidar applications; extinction/visibility; differential absorption lidar; winds and tropospheric studies; middle atmosphere; clouds and multiple scattering; pollution studies; and new systems.

  16. Identification of upstream and intragenic regulatory elements that confer cell-type-restricted and differentiation-specific expression on the muscle creatine kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, E.A.; Spizz, G.; Perry, W.M.; Vizard, D.; Weil, T.; Olson, E.N.

    1988-07-01

    Terminal differentiation of skeletal myobalsts is accompanied by induction of a series of tissue-specific gene products, which includes the muscle isoenzymte of creatine kinase (MCK). To begin to define the sequences and signals involved in MCK regulation in developing muscle cells, the mouse MCK gene has been isolated. Sequence analysis of 4,147 bases of DNA surrounding the transcription initiation site revealed several interesting structural features, some of which are common to other muscle-specific genes and to cellular and viral enhancers.

  17. Norovirus Proteinase-Polymerase and Polymerase Are Both Active Forms of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Belliot, Gaël; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Babu, Vijay; Uche, Uzo; Arnold, Jamie J.; Cameron, Craig E.; Green, Kim Y.

    2005-01-01

    In vitro mapping studies of the MD145 norovirus (Caliciviridae) ORF1 polyprotein identified two stable cleavage products containing the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains: ProPol (a precursor comprised of both the proteinase and polymerase) and Pol (the mature polymerase). The goal of this study was to identify the active form (or forms) of the norovirus polymerase. The recombinant ProPol (expressed as Pro−Pol with an inactivated proteinase domain to prevent autocleavage) and recombinant Pol were purified after synthesis in bacteria and shown to be active RdRp enzymes. In addition, the mutant His-E1189A-ProPol protein (with active proteinase but with the natural ProPol cleavage site blocked) was active as an RdRp, confirming that the norovirus ProPol precursor could possess two enzymatic activities simultaneously. The effects of several UTP analogs on the RdRp activity of the norovirus and feline calicivirus Pro−Pol enzymes were compared and found to be similar. Our data suggest that the norovirus ProPol is a bifunctional enzyme during virus replication. The availability of this recombinant ProPol enzyme might prove useful in the development of antiviral drugs for control of the noroviruses associated with acute gastroenteritis. PMID:15681440

  18. Next conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexemer, Alexander; Toney, Michael F.

    2010-11-01

    After the successful conference on Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science (SRPS) in Rolduc Abbey (the Netherlands), we are now looking forward to the next meeting in this topical series started in 1995 by H G Zachmann, one of the pioneers of the use of synchrotron radiation techniques in polymer science. Earlier meetings were held in Hamburg (1995), Sheffield (2002), Kyoto (2006), and Rolduc (2009). In September of 2012 the Synchrotron Radiation and Polymer Science V conferences will be organized in a joint effort by the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Advanced Light Source at LBL Advanced Light Source at LBL The conference will be organised in the heart of beautiful San Francisco. The program will consist of invited and contributed lectures divided in sessions on the use of synchrotron SAXS/WAXD, imaging and tomography, soft x-rays, x-ray spectroscopy, GISAXS and reflectivity, micro-beams and hyphenated techniques in polymer science. Poster contributions are more than welcome and will be highlighted during the poster sessions. Visits to both SLAC as well as LBL will be organised. San Francisco can easily be reached. It is served by two major international airports San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport. Both are being served by most major airlines with easy connections to Europe and Asia as well as national destinations. Both also boast excellent connections to San Francisco city centre. We are looking forward to seeing you in the vibrant city by the Bay in September 2012. Golden gate bridge Alexander Hexemer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Michael F Toney Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Menlo Pk, CA 94025, USA E-mail: ahexemer@lbl.gov, mftoney@slac.stanford.edu

  19. Conference Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, R. S.

    2008-10-01

    This first Subaru international conference has highlighted the remarkably diverse and significant contributions made using the 8.2m Subaru telescope by both Japanese astronomers and the international community. As such, it serves as a satisfying tribute to the pioneering efforts of Professors Keiichi Kodaira and Sadanori Okamura whose insight and dedication is richly rewarded. Here I try to summarize the recent impact of wide field science in extragalactic astronomy and cosmology and take a look forward to the key questions we will address in the near future.

  20. Conferences revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radcliffe, Jonathan

    2008-08-01

    Way back in the mid-1990s, as a young PhD student, I wrote a Lateral Thoughts article about my first experience of an academic conference (Physics World 1994 October p80). It was a peach of a trip - most of the lab decamped to Grenoble for a week of great weather, beautiful scenery and, of course, the physics. A whole new community was there for me to see in action, and the internationality of it all helped us to forget about England's non-appearance in the 1994 World Cup finals.

  1. Genetics of eukaryotic RNA polymerases I, II, and III.

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, J; Friesen, J D

    1993-01-01

    . In addition to providing information about the structure and function of eukaryotic RNA polymerases, the study of mutations and of the pleiotropic phenotypes they imposed has underscored the central role played by these enzymes in many fundamental processes such as development and cellular differentiation. PMID:8246845

  2. Molecular Typing and Differentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, general background and bench protocols are provided for a number of molecular typing techniques in common use today. Methods for the molecular typing and differentiation of microorganisms began to be widely adopted following the development of the polymerase chai...

  3. A new family of polymerases related to superfamily A DNA polymerases and T7-like DNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Abhiman, Saraswathi; Aravind, L

    2008-01-01

    Using sequence profile methods and structural comparisons we characterize a previously unknown family of nucleic acid polymerases in a group of mobile elements from genomes of diverse bacteria, an algal plastid and certain DNA viruses, including the recently reported Sputnik virus. Using contextual information from domain architectures and gene-neighborhoods we present evidence that they are likely to possess both primase and DNA polymerase activity, comparable to the previously reported prim-pol proteins. These newly identified polymerases help in defining the minimal functional core of superfamily A DNA polymerases and related RNA polymerases. Thus, they provide a framework to understand the emergence of both DNA and RNA polymerization activity in this class of enzymes. They also provide evidence that enigmatic DNA viruses, such as Sputnik, might have emerged from mobile elements coding these polymerases. PMID:18834537

  4. Conference summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebolo, R.

    ``Brown dwarfs come of age" was a stimulating conference attended by a large number of very active researchers, including many young students and post-docs who were largely responsible for the lively atmosphere that we enjoyed during the full meeting. Major theoretical and observational challenges currently faced in the study of brown dwarfs were reviewed. Key spectroscopic work is being conducted to determine atmospheric temperatures, surface gravities and metallicities, essential to understand the evolution of substellar objects. Research on ultracool atmospheres is extended down to temperatures typical of the atmosphere of the Earth. Characterisation of brown dwarfs at all wavelengths from X-ray to radio is ongoing and investigation of time domain phenomena reveal interesting new processes in cool atmospheres. In addition to talks on these topics, a large number of presentations addressed the formation and evolution of brown dwarfs, the lower end of the Initial Mass Function, the properties of substellar binaries, the angular momentum and disk evolution in very low-mass systems, results of large scale surveys aimed to find the lowest luminosity and coolest brown dwarfs, searches in star clusters delineating the evolution with age of the properties of brown dwarfs, binary searches and subsequent follow-up work enabling dynamical mass determinations. The excellent level of the review talks, oral and poster presentations and the work of the enthusiastic researchers that attended the meeting ensure a brilliant future for substellar research 18 years after the discovery of the first brown dwarfs.

  5. Archaeal DNA polymerases in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Likui; Kang, Manyu; Xu, Jiajun; Huang, Yanchao

    2015-08-01

    DNA polymerase (pol) is a ubiquitous enzyme that synthesizes DNA strands in all living cells. In vitro, DNA pol is used for DNA manipulation, including cloning, PCR, site-directed mutagenesis, sequencing, and several other applications. Family B archaeal DNA pols have been widely used for molecular biological methods. Biochemical and structural studies reveal that each archaeal DNA pol has different characteristics with respect to fidelity, processivity and thermostability. Due to their high fidelity and strong thermostability, family B archaeal DNA pols have the extensive application on high-fidelity PCR, DNA sequencing, and site-directed mutagenesis while family Y archaeal DNA pols have the potential for error-prone PCR and random mutagenesis because of their low fidelity and strong thermostability. This information combined with mutational analysis has been used to construct novel DNA pols with altered properties that enhance their use as biotechnological reagents. In this review, we focus on the development and use of family B archaeal DNA pols.

  6. A putative Leishmania DNA polymerase theta protects the parasite against oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Orgiler, Abel; Martínez-Jiménez, María I.; Alonso, Ana; Alcolea, Pedro J.; Requena, Jose M.; Thomas, María C.; Blanco, Luis; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania infantum is a protozoan parasite that is phagocytized by human macrophages. The host macrophages kill the parasite by generating oxidative compounds that induce DNA damage. We have identified, purified and biochemically characterized a DNA polymerase θ from L. infantum (LiPolθ), demonstrating that it is a DNA-dependent DNA polymerase involved in translesion synthesis of 8oxoG, abasic sites and thymine glycol lesions. Stably transfected L. infantum parasites expressing LiPolθ were significantly more resistant to oxidative and interstrand cross-linking agents, e.g. hydrogen peroxide, cisplatin and mitomycin C. Moreover, LiPolθ-overexpressing parasites showed an increased infectivity toward its natural macrophage host. Therefore, we propose that LiPolθ is a translesion synthesis polymerase involved in parasite DNA damage tolerance, to confer resistance against macrophage aggression. PMID:27131366

  7. Polymerase Gamma Disease through the Ages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saneto, Russell P.; Naviaux, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    The most common group of mitochondrial disease is due to mutations within the mitochondrial DNA polymerase, polymerase gamma 1 ("POLG"). This gene product is responsible for replication and repair of the small mitochondrial DNA genome. The structure-function relationship of this gene product produces a wide variety of diseases that at times, seems…

  8. A global profile of replicative polymerase usage

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Carolin A.; Miyabe, Izumi; Brooks, Tony; Retkute, Renata; Hubank, Mike; Nieduszyski, Conrad A.; Carr, Antony M.

    2014-01-01

    Three eukaryotic DNA polymerases are essential for genome replication. Polα-primase initiates each synthesis event and is rapidly replaced by processive DNA polymerases: Polε replicates the leading strand while Polδ performs lagging strand synthesis. However, it is not known whether this division of labour is maintained across the whole genome or how uniform it is within single replicons. Using S. pombe, we have developed a polymerase usage sequencing (Pu-seq) strategy to map polymerase usage genome–wide. Pu–seq provides direct replication origin location and efficiency data and indirect estimates of replication timing. We confirm that the division of labour is broadly maintained across an entire genome. However, our data suggest a subtle variability in the usage of the two polymerases within individual replicons. We propose this results from occasional leading strand initiation by Polδ followed by exchange for Polε. PMID:25664722

  9. Paused RNA polymerase II as a developmental checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Levine, Michael

    2011-05-13

    The textbook view of gene activation is that the rate-limiting step is the interaction of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) with the gene's promoter. However, studies in a variety of systems, including human embryonic stem cells and the early Drosophila embryo, have begun to challenge this view. There is increasing evidence that differential gene expression often depends on the regulation of transcription elongation via the release of Pol II from the proximal promoter. I review the implications of this mechanism of gene activation with respect to the orderly unfolding of complex gene networks governing animal development. PMID:21565610

  10. Structure of a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of a DNA Polymerase Sliding Clamp

    SciTech Connect

    Georgescu, R.; Yurieva, O; Kim, S; Kuriyan, J; Kong, X; O'Donnell, M

    2008-01-01

    DNA polymerases attach to the DNA sliding clamp through a common overlapping binding site. We identify a small-molecule compound that binds the protein-binding site in the Escherichia coli ?-clamp and differentially affects the activity of DNA polymerases II, III, and IV. To understand the molecular basis of this discrimination, the cocrystal structure of the chemical inhibitor is solved in complex with ? and is compared with the structures of Pol II, Pol III, and Pol IV peptides bound to ?. The analysis reveals that the small molecule localizes in a region of the clamp to which the DNA polymerases attach in different ways. The results suggest that the small molecule may be useful in the future to probe polymerase function with ?, and that the ?-clamp may represent an antibiotic target.

  11. Thermally multiplexed polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Phaneuf, Christopher R; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D Curtis; Holst, Gregory L; Birjiniuk, Joav; Nagpal, Nikita; Culpepper, Stephen; Popler, Emily; Shane, Andi L; Jerris, Robert; Forest, Craig R

    2015-07-01

    Amplification of multiple unique genetic targets using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly required in molecular biology laboratories. Such reactions are typically performed either serially or by multiplex PCR. Serial reactions are time consuming, and multiplex PCR, while powerful and widely used, can be prone to amplification bias, PCR drift, and primer-primer interactions. We present a new thermocycling method, termed thermal multiplexing, in which a single heat source is uniformly distributed and selectively modulated for independent temperature control of an array of PCR reactions. Thermal multiplexing allows amplification of multiple targets simultaneously-each reaction segregated and performed at optimal conditions. We demonstrate the method using a microfluidic system consisting of an infrared laser thermocycler, a polymer microchip featuring 1 μl, oil-encapsulated reactions, and closed-loop pulse-width modulation control. Heat transfer modeling is used to characterize thermal performance limitations of the system. We validate the model and perform two reactions simultaneously with widely varying annealing temperatures (48 °C and 68 °C), demonstrating excellent amplification. In addition, to demonstrate microfluidic infrared PCR using clinical specimens, we successfully amplified and detected both influenza A and B from human nasopharyngeal swabs. Thermal multiplexing is scalable and applicable to challenges such as pathogen detection where patients presenting non-specific symptoms need to be efficiently screened across a viral or bacterial panel. PMID:26339317

  12. Thermally multiplexed polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Phaneuf, Christopher R.; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D. Curtis; Holst, Gregory L.; Birjiniuk, Joav; Nagpal, Nikita; Culpepper, Stephen; Popler, Emily; Shane, Andi L.; Jerris, Robert; Forest, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Amplification of multiple unique genetic targets using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly required in molecular biology laboratories. Such reactions are typically performed either serially or by multiplex PCR. Serial reactions are time consuming, and multiplex PCR, while powerful and widely used, can be prone to amplification bias, PCR drift, and primer-primer interactions. We present a new thermocycling method, termed thermal multiplexing, in which a single heat source is uniformly distributed and selectively modulated for independent temperature control of an array of PCR reactions. Thermal multiplexing allows amplification of multiple targets simultaneously—each reaction segregated and performed at optimal conditions. We demonstrate the method using a microfluidic system consisting of an infrared laser thermocycler, a polymer microchip featuring 1 μl, oil-encapsulated reactions, and closed-loop pulse-width modulation control. Heat transfer modeling is used to characterize thermal performance limitations of the system. We validate the model and perform two reactions simultaneously with widely varying annealing temperatures (48 °C and 68 °C), demonstrating excellent amplification. In addition, to demonstrate microfluidic infrared PCR using clinical specimens, we successfully amplified and detected both influenza A and B from human nasopharyngeal swabs. Thermal multiplexing is scalable and applicable to challenges such as pathogen detection where patients presenting non-specific symptoms need to be efficiently screened across a viral or bacterial panel. PMID:26339317

  13. Use of RNA polymerase molecular beacon assay to measure RNA polymerase interactions with model promoter fragments.

    PubMed

    Mekler, Vladimir; Severinov, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase-promoter interactions that keep the transcription initiation complex together are complex and multipartite, and formation of the RNA polymerase-promoter complex proceeds through multiple intermediates. Short promoter fragments can be used as a tool to dissect RNA polymerase-promoter interactions and to pinpoint elements responsible for specific properties of the entire promoter complex. A recently developed fluorometric molecular beacon assay allows one to monitor the enzyme interactions with various DNA probes and quantitatively characterize partial RNA polymerase-promoter interactions. Here, we present detailed protocols for the preparation of an Escherichia coli molecular beacon and its application to study RNA polymerase interactions with model promoter fragments.

  14. Monitoring DNA polymerase with nanotube-based nanocircuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry; Collins, Philip

    DNA polymerases play an important role in the process of life by accurately and efficiently replicating our genetic information. They use a single-stranded DNA as a template and incorporate nucleotides to create the full, double-stranded DNA. Recent experiments have successfully monitored this process by attaching a Klenow fragment of polymerase I to a carbon nanotube and measuring the current along the tube. Follow-up experiments have shown promise for distinguishing between DNA base pairs when nucleotide analogs are used, thus opening a new avenue for DNA sequencing. In this talk, we present results from computational studies on DNA polymerase I nanocircuits. The enzyme was first equilibrated in molecular dynamics and then density functional theory and Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function methods were used to calculate the ballistic transmission coefficients and currents for different enzymatic states. Our results show significant change in current when the enzyme alternates between open (idle) and closed (synthesizing) states. We can also differentiate between some template bases when modified nucleotides and gate scanning are used.

  15. Protein Affinity Chromatography with Purified Yeast DNA Polymerase α Detects Proteins that Bind to DNA Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Jeff; Formosa, Tim

    1992-02-01

    We have overexpressed the POL1 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified the resulting DNA polymerase α polypeptide in an apparently intact form. We attached the purified DNA polymerase covalently to an agarose matrix and used this matrix to chromatograph extracts prepared from yeast cells. At least six proteins bound to the yeast DNA polymerase α matrix that did not bind to a control matrix. We speculate that these proteins might be DNA polymerase α accessory proteins. Consistent with this interpretation, one of the binding proteins, which we have named POB1 (polymerase one binding), is required for normal chromosome transmission. Mutations in this gene cause increased chromosome loss and an abnormal cell morphology, phenotypes that also occur in the presence of mutations in the yeast α or δ polymerase genes. These results suggest that the interactions detected by polymerase affinity chromatography are biologically relevant and may help to illuminate the architecture of the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery.

  16. The General Conference Mennonites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    General Conference Mennonites and Old Order Amish are compared and contrasted in the areas of physical appearance, religious beliefs, formal education, methods of farming, and home settings. General Conference Mennonites and Amish differ in physical appearance and especially in dress. The General Conference Mennonite men and women dress the same…

  17. Parent Conferences. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Roslyn; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents six workshop sessions on parent conferences: (1) "Parents' Perspectives on Conferencing" (R. Duffy); (2) "Three Way Conferences" (G. Zeller); (3) "Conferencing with Parents of Infants" (K. Albrecht); (4) "Conferencing with Parents of School-Agers" (L. G. Miller); (5) "Cross Cultural Conferences" (J. Gonzalez-Mena); and (6) "Working with…

  18. Rifampicin-resistance, rpoB polymorphism and RNA polymerase genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Alifano, Pietro; Palumbo, Carla; Pasanisi, Daniela; Talà, Adelfia

    2015-05-20

    Following its introduction in 1967, rifampicin has become a mainstay of therapy in the treatment of tuberculosis, leprosy and many other widespread diseases. Its potent antibacterial activity is due to specific inhibition of bacterial RNA polymerase. However, resistance to rifampicin was reported shortly after its introduction in the medical practice. Studies in the model organism Escherichia coli helped to define the molecular mechanism of rifampicin-resistance demonstrating that resistance is mostly due to chromosomal mutations in rpoB gene encoding the RNA polymerase β chain. These studies also revealed the amazing potential of the molecular genetics to elucidate the structure-function relationships in bacterial RNA polymerase. The scope of this paper is to illustrate how rifampicin-resistance has been recently exploited to better understand the regulatory mechanisms that control bacterial cell physiology and virulence, and how this information has been used to maneuver, on a global scale, gene expression in bacteria of industrial interest. In particular, we reviewed recent literature regarding: (i) the effects of rpoB mutations conferring rifampicin-resistance on transcription dynamics, bacterial fitness, physiology, metabolism and virulence; (ii) the occurrence in nature of "mutant-type" or duplicated rifampicin-resistant RNA polymerases; and (iii) the RNA polymerase genetic engineering method for strain improvement and drug discovery.

  19. RNA polymerase gene, microorganism having said gene and the production of RNA polymerase by the use of said microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Kotani, Hirokazu; Hiraoka, Nobutsugu; Obayashi, Akira

    1991-01-01

    SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase is produced by cultivating a new microorganism (particularly new strains of Escherichia coli) harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene and recovering SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase from the culture broth. SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene is provided as are new microorganisms harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene.

  20. A transposon-derived DNA polymerase from Entamoeba histolytica displays intrinsic strand displacement, processivity and lesion bypass.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Palacios, Guillermo; López-Ramírez, Varinia; Cardona-Felix, Cesar S; Brieba, Luis G

    2012-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica encodes four family B2 DNA polymerases that vary in amino acid length from 813 to 1279. These DNA polymerases contain a N-terminal domain with no homology to other proteins and a C-terminal domain with high amino acid identity to archetypical family B2 DNA polymerases. A phylogenetic analysis indicates that these family B2 DNA polymerases are grouped with DNA polymerases from transposable elements dubbed Polintons or Mavericks. In this work, we report the cloning and biochemical characterization of the smallest family B2 DNA polymerase from E. histolytica. To facilitate its characterization we subcloned its 660 amino acids C-terminal region that comprises the complete exonuclease and DNA polymerization domains, dubbed throughout this work as EhDNApolB2. We found that EhDNApolB2 displays remarkable strand displacement, processivity and efficiently bypasses the DNA lesions: 8-oxo guanosine and abasic site.Family B2 DNA polymerases from T. vaginalis, G. lambia and E. histolytica contain a Terminal Region Protein 2 (TPR2) motif twice the length of the TPR2 from φ29 DNA polymerase. Deletion studies demonstrate that as in φ29 DNA polymerase, the TPR2 motif of EhDNApolB2 is solely responsible of strand displacement and processivity. Interestingly the TPR2 of EhDNApolB2 is also responsible for efficient abasic site bypass. These data suggests that the 21 extra amino acids of the TPR2 motif may shape the active site of EhDNApolB2 to efficiently incorporate and extended opposite an abasic site. Herein we demonstrate that an open reading frame derived from Politons-Mavericks in parasitic protozoa encode a functional enzyme and our findings support the notion that the introduction of novel motifs in DNA polymerases can confer specialized properties to a conserved scaffold. PMID:23226232

  1. Ribonucleic Acid Polymerase in Allomyces arbuscula

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Alice K.; Nester, Eugene W.

    1973-01-01

    Three distinct species of ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase were resolved from Allomyces arbuscula by diethylaminoethyl-cellulose chromatography and characterized as to ionic strength and divalent cation preference. α-Amanitin specifically inhibited enzyme II; neither rifampin nor cycloheximide had any effect on the three enzymes. RNA polymerase was isolated from three stages of the diploid life cycle: the hyphal growth stage, mycelia in the process of forming sporangia, and the mitospores. The same three enzyme species could be resolved from each stage. Thus, there is no evidence from this work that RNA polymerase plays a major role in the control of development. PMID:4728272

  2. Bacterial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, L; Agabian-Keshishian, N; Bendis, I

    1971-09-01

    technique can be used to select for mutants blocked in the various stages of morphogenesis. 3) Temperature-sensitive mutants of Caulobacter that are restricted in macromolecular synthesis and development at elevated temperatures have been isolated. 4) Genetic exchange in the Calflobacter genus has been demonstrated and is now being defined. Two questions related to control processes can now readily be approached experimentally. (i) Is the temporal progression of events occurring during bacterial differentiation controlled by regulator gene products? (ii) Is the differentiation cycle like a biosynthetic pathway where one event must follow another? The availability of temperature-sensitive mutants blocked at various stages of development permits access to both questions. An interesting feature of the differentiation cycle is that the polar organelle may represent a special segregated unit which is operative in the control of the differentiation process. Perhaps the sequential morphogenic changes exhibited by Caulobacter are dependent on the initial synthesis of this organelle. Because the ultimate expression of cell changes are dependent on selective protein synthesis, specific messenger RNA production-either from DNA present in an organelle or from the chromosome-may prove to be a controlling factor in cell differentiation. We have begun studies with RNA polymerase purified from Caulobacter crescentus to determine whether cell factors or alterations in the enzyme structure serve to change the specificity of transcription during the cell cycle. Control of sequential cell changes at the level of transcription has long been postulated and has recently been substantiated in the case of Bacillus sporulation (6). The Caulobacter bacteria now present another system in which direct analysis of these control mechanisms is feasible. PMID:5572165

  3. DNA polymerase having modified nucleotide binding site for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Modified gene encoding a modified DNA polymerase wherein the modified polymerase incorporates dideoxynucleotides at least 20-fold better compared to the corresponding deoxynucleotides as compared with the corresponding naturally-occurring DNA polymerase.

  4. DNA polymerase having modified nucleotide binding site for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, S.; Richardson, C.

    1997-03-25

    A modified gene encoding a modified DNA polymerase is disclosed. The modified polymerase incorporates dideoxynucleotides at least 20-fold better compared to the corresponding deoxynucleotides as compared with the corresponding naturally-occurring DNA polymerase. 6 figs.

  5. Structures of the Leishmania infantum polymerase beta

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Edison; Burak, Matthew; Alonso, Ana; Larraga, Vicente; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Bebenek, Katarzyna; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Protozoans of the genus Leishmania, the pathogenic agent causing leishmaniasis, encode the family X DNA polymerase Li Pol β. Here, we report the first crystal structures of Li Pol β. Our pre- and post-catalytic structures show that the polymerase adopts the common family X DNA polymerase fold. However, in contrast to other family X DNA polymerases, the dNTP-induced conformational changes in Li Pol β are much more subtle. Moreover, pre- and post-catalytic structures reveal that Li Pol β interacts with the template strand through a nonconserved, variable region known as loop3. Li Pol β Δloop3 mutants display a higher catalytic rate, catalytic efficiency and overall error rates with respect to WT Li Pol β. These results further demonstrate the subtle structural variability that exists within this family of enzymes and provides insight into how this variability underlies the substantial functional differences among their members. PMID:24666693

  6. Multiplexed Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay To Detect Intestinal Protozoa.

    PubMed

    Crannell, Zachary; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Nair, Gayatri; Mejia, Rojelio; White, A Clinton; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2016-02-01

    This work describes a proof-of-concept multiplex recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assay with lateral flow readout that is capable of simultaneously detecting and differentiating DNA from any of the diarrhea-causing protozoa Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Entamoeba. Together, these parasites contribute significantly to the global burden of diarrheal illness. Differential diagnosis of these parasites is traditionally accomplished via stool microscopy. However, microscopy is insensitive and can miss up to half of all cases. DNA-based diagnostics such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are far more sensitive; however, they rely on expensive thermal cycling equipment, limiting their availability to centralized reference laboratories. Isothermal DNA amplification platforms, such as the RPA platform used in this study, alleviate the need for thermal cycling equipment and have the potential to broaden access to more sensitive diagnostics. Until now, multiplex RPA assays have not been developed that are capable of simultaneously detecting and differentiating infections caused by different pathogens. We developed a multiplex RPA assay to detect the presence of DNA from Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Entamoeba. The multiplex assay was characterized using synthetic DNA, where the limits-of-detection were calculated to be 403, 425, and 368 gene copies per reaction of the synthetic Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Entamoeba targets, respectively (roughly 1.5 orders of magnitude higher than for the same targets in a singleplex RPA assay). The multiplex assay was also characterized using DNA extracted from live parasites spiked into stool samples where the limits-of-detection were calculated to be 444, 6, and 9 parasites per reaction for Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Entamoeba parasites, respectively. This proof-of-concept assay may be reconfigured to detect a wide variety of targets by re-designing the primer and probe sequences.

  7. Multiplexed Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay To Detect Intestinal Protozoa.

    PubMed

    Crannell, Zachary; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Nair, Gayatri; Mejia, Rojelio; White, A Clinton; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2016-02-01

    This work describes a proof-of-concept multiplex recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assay with lateral flow readout that is capable of simultaneously detecting and differentiating DNA from any of the diarrhea-causing protozoa Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Entamoeba. Together, these parasites contribute significantly to the global burden of diarrheal illness. Differential diagnosis of these parasites is traditionally accomplished via stool microscopy. However, microscopy is insensitive and can miss up to half of all cases. DNA-based diagnostics such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are far more sensitive; however, they rely on expensive thermal cycling equipment, limiting their availability to centralized reference laboratories. Isothermal DNA amplification platforms, such as the RPA platform used in this study, alleviate the need for thermal cycling equipment and have the potential to broaden access to more sensitive diagnostics. Until now, multiplex RPA assays have not been developed that are capable of simultaneously detecting and differentiating infections caused by different pathogens. We developed a multiplex RPA assay to detect the presence of DNA from Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Entamoeba. The multiplex assay was characterized using synthetic DNA, where the limits-of-detection were calculated to be 403, 425, and 368 gene copies per reaction of the synthetic Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Entamoeba targets, respectively (roughly 1.5 orders of magnitude higher than for the same targets in a singleplex RPA assay). The multiplex assay was also characterized using DNA extracted from live parasites spiked into stool samples where the limits-of-detection were calculated to be 444, 6, and 9 parasites per reaction for Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Entamoeba parasites, respectively. This proof-of-concept assay may be reconfigured to detect a wide variety of targets by re-designing the primer and probe sequences. PMID:26669715

  8. New high fidelity polymerases from Thermococcus species.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Kate; Nayak, Sunil; Park, Kyusung; Mandelman, David; Modrell, Brett; Lee, Jun; Ng, Bernie; Gibbs, Moreland D; Bergquist, Peter L

    2007-03-01

    Two DNA polymerase genes have been isolated from Thermococcus strains, Thermococcus zilligii from New Zealand, and the other, Thermococcus 'GT', a fast-growing strain isolated from the Galapagos trench. Both genes were isolated by genomic walking PCR, a technique that does not require expression of the gene product. Phylogenetic analysis of SSU rDNA showed that the two strains were not closely related, as confirmed by an examination of the DNA polymerase sequences. Inteinless versions of each gene were generated by overlap-extension PCR and transferred into plasmid expression vectors. The proteins were produced in an Escherichia coli strain with additional copies of tRNAs corresponding to rarely used codons and purified by standard chromatographic procedures. Both enzymes were able to support PCR, but the Thermococcus 'GT' polymerase required higher concentrations of template than the enzyme from T. zilligii. Both enzymes showed 3' to 5' exonuclease activity, which was abolished in the case of T. zilligii by mutating the aspartic acid at position 141 and the glutamic acid at position 143 to alanine. Both enzymes showed a significant increase in fidelity of replication compared to the family A Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase, in agreement with other results reported for family B polymerases with proof-reading ability. PMID:16982200

  9. Cloning the Horse RNA Polymerase I Promoter and Its Application to Studying Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; He, Dong; Wang, Zengchao; Ou, Shudan; Yuan, Rong; Li, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    An influenza virus polymerase reconstitution assay based on the human, dog, or chicken RNA polymerase I (PolI) promoter has been developed and widely used to study the polymerase activity of the influenza virus in corresponding cell types. Although it is an important member of the influenza virus family and has been known for sixty years, no studies have been performed to clone the horse PolI promoter or to study the polymerase activity of equine influenza virus (EIV) in horse cells. In our study, the horse RNA PolI promoter was cloned from fetal equine lung cells. Using the luciferase assay, it was found that a 500 bp horse RNA PolI promoter sequence was required for efficient transcription. Then, using the developed polymerase reconstitution assay based on the horse RNA PolI promoter, the polymerase activity of two EIV strains was compared, and equine myxovirus resistance A protein was identified as having the inhibiting EIV polymerase activity function in horse cells. Our study enriches our knowledge of the RNA PolI promoter of eukaryotic species and provides a useful tool for the study of influenza virus polymerase activity in horse cells. PMID:27258298

  10. Cloning the Horse RNA Polymerase I Promoter and Its Application to Studying Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Gang; He, Dong; Wang, Zengchao; Ou, Shudan; Yuan, Rong; Li, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    An influenza virus polymerase reconstitution assay based on the human, dog, or chicken RNA polymerase I (PolI) promoter has been developed and widely used to study the polymerase activity of the influenza virus in corresponding cell types. Although it is an important member of the influenza virus family and has been known for sixty years, no studies have been performed to clone the horse PolI promoter or to study the polymerase activity of equine influenza virus (EIV) in horse cells. In our study, the horse RNA PolI promoter was cloned from fetal equine lung cells. Using the luciferase assay, it was found that a 500 bp horse RNA PolI promoter sequence was required for efficient transcription. Then, using the developed polymerase reconstitution assay based on the horse RNA PolI promoter, the polymerase activity of two EIV strains was compared, and equine myxovirus resistance A protein was identified as having the inhibiting EIV polymerase activity function in horse cells. Our study enriches our knowledge of the RNA PolI promoter of eukaryotic species and provides a useful tool for the study of influenza virus polymerase activity in horse cells. PMID:27258298

  11. 76 FR 64083 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Technical Conference on Tuesday, November...

  12. DNA polymerase alpha and beta in the California urchin.

    PubMed Central

    Racine, F M; Morris, P W

    1978-01-01

    DNA polymerase alpha and beta were identified in the urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. The DNA polymerase beta sedimented at 3.4 S, constituted 5% of total DNA polymerase activity, and was resistant to N-ethylmaleimide and high ionic strength. The polymerase alpha sedimented at 6--8 S, was inhibited by N-ethylmalemide or 0.1 M (NH4)2SO4, and was dependent upon glycerol for preservation of activity. Both the polymerases alpha and beta were nuclear associated in embryos. The DNA polymerase alpha was markedly heterogeneous on DEAE-Sephadex ion exchange and showed three modal polymerase species. These polymerase alpha species were indistinguishable by template activity assays but the DNA polymerase associated ribonucleotidyl transferase (Biochemistry 75 : 3106-3113, 1976) was found predominantly with only one of the DNA polymerase alpha species. PMID:569291

  13. RNA polymerase II mediated transcription from the polymerase III promoters in short hairpin RNA expression vector

    SciTech Connect

    Rumi, Mohammad; Ishihara, Shunji . E-mail: si360405@med.shimane-u.ac.jp; Aziz, Monowar; Kazumori, Hideaki; Ishimura, Norihisa; Yuki, Takafumi; Kadota, Chikara; Kadowaki, Yasunori; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-13

    RNA polymerase III promoters of human ribonuclease P RNA component H1, human U6, and mouse U6 small nuclear RNA genes are commonly used in short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vectors due their precise initiation and termination sites. During transient transfection of shRNA vectors, we observed that H1 or U6 promoters also express longer transcripts enough to express several reporter genes including firefly luciferase, green fluorescent protein EGFP, and red fluorescent protein JRed. Expression of such longer transcripts was augmented by upstream RNA polymerase II enhancers and completely inhibited by downstream polyA signal sequences. Moreover, the transcription of firefly luciferase from human H1 promoter was sensitive to RNA polymerase II inhibitor {alpha}-amanitin. Our findings suggest that commonly used polymerase III promoters in shRNA vectors are also prone to RNA polymerase II mediated transcription, which may have negative impacts on their targeted use.

  14. [RNA polymerase as a molecular machine].

    PubMed

    Spirin, A S

    2002-01-01

    Structure and function of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase is considered in terms of a conveying molecular machine. The use of mechanical energy and mechanical devices, such as "power-stroke motor", is supposed unlikely in the conveying function of RNA polymerase, as well as other molecular machines. Brownian motion and thermal mobility of macromolecules and their parts are postulated as the only motive impulse at the molecular level. Binding of substrates and subsequent chemical reaction as the energy input may provide successive selection and fixation of alternative conformational states of the enzyme complex thus providing the directionality of the conveyance ("Brownian ratchet mechanism"). The following sequence of events "substrate binding--fixation of a certain conformational state--chemical reaction--fixation of an alternative conformational state--translocation (dissociation and downstream reassociation) of product-template duplex" is proposed as the principal scheme of the forward movement of RNA polymerase along DNA template.

  15. [Real-time polymerase chain reaction in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Salina, T Iu; Morozova, T I

    2008-01-01

    To enhance the efficiency of diagnosis of oligo- and abacillar pulmonary tuberculosis and its differential diagnosis with other lung diseases, the authors studied the informative value of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) used in 62 patients with different clinical forms of tuberculosis and 108 differentially diagnostic patients. Real-time PCR has been ascertained to be a significantly more sensitive and highly specific tool in tuberculosis diagnosis, which considerably improves the specific recognition of the etiology of a pathogenetic process in oligo- and abacillar patients. Particularly encouraging results have been obtained when examining differentially diagnostic patients with the rounded shadows being formed in the lung. PMID:18710048

  16. District Leadership Conference Planner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Coordinating Council for Occupational Education, Olympia.

    This manual provides usable guidelines and planning forms and materials for planning district leadership conferences, which were designed and initiated in Washington State to meet the problems in student enrollment and, consequently, Distributive Education Clubs of America membership. The conferences have become a useful means to increase…

  17. [Conference Time Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National School Public Relations Association, Washington, DC.

    This multimedia kit, for use with and by teachers from kindergarten through the upper elementary grades, consists of four components: 1) a filmstrip for teachers; 2) the 1970 edition of a handbook, "Conference Time for Teachers and Parents"; 3) a filmstrip for parents; 4) a supporting parent information leaflet "How To Confer Successfully with…

  18. [Kweichow planned parenthood conference].

    PubMed

    1978-12-15

    On December 5th the Kweichow Provincial Planned Parenthood Leadership Group held its 1st conference to discuss the problems of planned parenthood in the province. Miao Chun-ting, deputy secretary of the provincial CCP committee and head of the provincial planned parenthood leadership group, presided over the conference.

  19. From Conference to Journal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Robert; Tenenberg, Josh

    2008-01-01

    Revising and extending conference articles for journal publication benefits both authors and readers. The new articles are more complete, and benefit from peer review, feedback from conference presentation, and greater editorial consistency. For those articles that are appropriate, we encourage authors to do this, and present two examples of such…

  20. The Conference in Retrospect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Marjorie H.

    1982-01-01

    Presents an overview of the 6th International Conference on Chemical Education held at the University of Maryland (August 9-14, 1981), focusing on such organizational activities as roster building, people activating, innovative publishing, resolution and recommendation drafting, conference infrastructure and managerial mode, hospitality center,…

  1. The Learning Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravn, Ib

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to call attention to the fact that conferences for professionals rely on massive one-way communication and hence produce little learning for delegates--and to introduce an alternative, the "learning conference", that involves delegates in fun and productive learning processes. Design/methodology/approach: A…

  2. ASE Annual Conference 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCune, Roger

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the ASE Annual Conference 2010 which was held at Nottingham after a gap of 22 years. As always, the main conference was preceded by International Day, an important event for science educators from across the world. There were two strands to the programme: (1) "What works for me?"--sharing new ideas and tried…

  3. Lyndon Johnson's Press Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Stephen

    Because President Lyndon Johnson understood well the publicity value of the American news media, he sought to exploit them. He saw reporters as "torch bearers" for his programs and policies and used the presidential press conference chiefly for promotional purposes. Although he met with reporters often, his press conferences were usually…

  4. ICCK Conference Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Green, William H.

    2013-05-28

    The 7th International Conference on Chemical Kinetics (ICCK) was held July 10-14, 2011, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in Cambridge, MA, hosted by Prof. William H. Green of MIT's Chemical Engineering department. This cross-disciplinary meeting highlighted the importance of fundamental understanding of elementary reactions to the full range of chemical investigations. The specific conference focus was on elementary-step kinetics in both the gas phase and in condensed phase. The meeting provided a unique opportunity to discuss how the same reactive species and reaction motifs manifest under very different reaction conditions (e.g. atmospheric, aqueous, combustion, plasma, in nonaqueous solvents, on surfaces.). The conference featured special sessions on new/improved experimental techniques, improved models and data analysis for interpreting complicated kinetics, computational kinetics (especially rate estimates for large kinetic models), and a panel discussion on how the community should document/archive kinetic data. In the past, this conference had been limited to homogeneous gas-phase and liquid-phase systems. This conference included studies of heterogeneous kinetics which provide rate constants for, or insight into, elementary reaction steps. This Grant from DOE BES covered about half of the subsidies we provided to students and postdocs who attended the conference, by charging them reduced-rate registration fees. The complete list of subsidies provided are listed in Table 1 below. This DOE funding was essential to making the conference affordable to graduate students, and indeed the attendance at this conference was higher than at previous conferences in this series. Donations made by companies provided additional subsidies, leveraging the DOE funding. The conference was very effective in educating graduate students and important in fostering scientific interactions, particularly between scientists studying gas phase and liquid phase kinetics

  5. In Vitro Resistance Study of AG-021541, a Novel Nonnucleoside Inhibitor of the Hepatitis C Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, S.T.; Herlihy, K.J.; Graham, J.P.; Fuhrman, S.A.; Doan, C.; Parge, H.; Hickey, M.; Gao, J.; Yu, X.; Chau, F.; Gonzalez, J.; Li, H.; Lewis, C.; Patrick, A.K.; Duggal, R.

    2009-05-27

    A novel class of nonnucleoside hepatitis C virus (HCV) polymerase inhibitors characterized by a dihydropyrone core was identified by high-throughput screening. Crystallographic studies of these compounds in complex with the polymerase identified an allosteric binding site close to the junction of the thumb and finger domains, approximately 30 A away from the catalytic center. AG-021541, a representative compound from this series, displayed measurable in vitro antiviral activity against the HCV genotype 1b subgenomic replicon with a mean 50% effective concentration of 2.9 muM. To identify mutations conferring in vitro resistance to AG-021541, resistance selection was carried out using HCV replicon cells either by serial passages in increasing concentrations of AG-021541 or by direct colony formation at fixed concentrations of the compound. We identified several amino acid substitutions in the AG-021541-binding region of the polymerase, including M423(T/V/I), M426T, I482(S/T), and V494A, with M423T as the predominant change observed. These mutants conferred various levels of resistance to AG-021541 and structurally related compounds but remained sensitive to interferon and HCV polymerase inhibitors known to interact with the active site or other allosteric sites of the protein. In addition, dihydropyrone polymerase inhibitors retained activity against replicons that contain signature resistance changes to other polymerase inhibitors, including S282T, C316N, M414T, and P495(S/L), indicating their potential to be used in combination therapies with these polymerase inhibitors. AG-021541-resistant replicon cell lines provide a valuable tool for mechanism-of-action studies of dihydropyrone polymerase inhibitors. The clinical relevance of in vitro resistance to HCV polymerase inhibitors remains to be investigated.

  6. Competitive fitness during feast and famine: how SOS DNA polymerases influence physiology and evolution in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Corzett, Christopher H; Goodman, Myron F; Finkel, Steven E

    2013-06-01

    Escherichia coli DNA polymerases (Pol) II, IV, and V serve dual roles by facilitating efficient translesion DNA synthesis while simultaneously introducing genetic variation that can promote adaptive evolution. Here we show that these alternative polymerases are induced as cells transition from exponential to long-term stationary-phase growth in the absence of induction of the SOS regulon by external agents that damage DNA. By monitoring the relative fitness of isogenic mutant strains expressing only one alternative polymerase over time, spanning hours to weeks, we establish distinct growth phase-dependent hierarchies of polymerase mutant strain competitiveness. Pol II confers a significant physiological advantage by facilitating efficient replication and creating genetic diversity during periods of rapid growth. Pol IV and Pol V make the largest contributions to evolutionary fitness during long-term stationary phase. Consistent with their roles providing both a physiological and an adaptive advantage during stationary phase, the expression patterns of all three SOS polymerases change during the transition from log phase to long-term stationary phase. Compared to the alternative polymerases, Pol III transcription dominates during mid-exponential phase; however, its abundance decreases to <20% during long-term stationary phase. Pol IV transcription dominates as cells transition out of exponential phase into stationary phase and a burst of Pol V transcription is observed as cells transition from death phase to long-term stationary phase. These changes in alternative DNA polymerase transcription occur in the absence of SOS induction by exogenous agents and indicate that cell populations require appropriate expression of all three alternative DNA polymerases during exponential, stationary, and long-term stationary phases to attain optimal fitness and undergo adaptive evolution. PMID:23589461

  7. CONFERENCE NOTE: Conference on Precision Electromagnetic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-01-01

    The next Conference on Precision Electromagnetic Measurements (CPEM), will be held from 9 to 12 June 1992 at the Centre des Nouvelles Industries et Technologies (CNIT), La Défense, Paris, France. This conference, which is held every two years and whose importance and high level, confirmed by thirty years' experience, are recognized throughout the world, can be considered as a forum in which scientists, metrologists and professionals will have the opportunity to present and compare their research results on fundamental constants, standards and new techniques of precision measurement in the electromagnetic domain. Topics The following topics are regarded as the most appropriate for this conference: realization of units and fundamental constants d.c. a.c. and high voltage time and frequency radio-frequency and microwaves dielectrics, antennas, fields lasers, fibre optics advanced instrumentation, cryoelectronics. There will also be a session on international cooperation. Conference Language The conference language will be English. No translation will be provided. Organizers Société des Electriciens et des Electroniciens (SEE). Bureau National de Métrologie (BNM) Sponsors Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Instrumentation & Measurement Society Union Radio Scientifique Internationale United States National Institute of Standards and Technology Centre National d'Etudes des Télécommunications Mouvement Français pour la Qualité, Section Métrologie Comité National Français de Radioélectricité Scientifique Contact Jean Zara, CPEM 92 publicity, Bureau National de Métrologie, 22, rue Monge, 75005 Paris Tel.: (33) 1 46 34 48 16, Fax: (33) 1 46 34 48 63

  8. Structural insights into transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Grünberg, Sebastian; Hahn, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is one of the most important steps in control of cell identity, growth, differentiation and development. Many signaling pathways controlling these processes ultimately target the core transcription machinery that, for protein coding genes, consists of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the general transcription factors (GTFs). New studies on the structure and mechanism of the core assembly and how it interfaces with promoter DNA and coactivator complexes have given tremendous insight into early steps in the initiation process, genome-wide binding, and mechanisms conserved for all nuclear and archaeal Pols. Here we review recent developments in dissecting the architecture of the Pol II core machinery with a focus on early and regulated steps in transcription initiation. PMID:24120742

  9. DNA sequencing using polymerase substrate-binding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Previte, Michael John Robert; Zhou, Chunhong; Kellinger, Matthew; Pantoja, Rigo; Chen, Cheng-Yao; Shi, Jin; Wang, BeiBei; Kia, Amirali; Etchin, Sergey; Vieceli, John; Nikoomanzar, Ali; Bomati, Erin; Gloeckner, Christian; Ronaghi, Mostafa; He, Molly Min

    2015-01-23

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has transformed genomic research by decreasing the cost of sequencing. However, whole-genome sequencing is still costly and complex for diagnostics purposes. In the clinical space, targeted sequencing has the advantage of allowing researchers to focus on specific genes of interest. Routine clinical use of targeted NGS mandates inexpensive instruments, fast turnaround time and an integrated and robust workflow. Here we demonstrate a version of the Sequencing by Synthesis (SBS) chemistry that potentially can become a preferred targeted sequencing method in the clinical space. This sequencing chemistry uses natural nucleotides and is based on real-time recording of the differential polymerase/DNA-binding kinetics in the presence of correct or mismatch nucleotides. This ensemble SBS chemistry has been implemented on an existing Illumina sequencing platform with integrated cluster amplification. We discuss the advantages of this sequencing chemistry for targeted sequencing as well as its limitations for other applications.

  10. DNA sequencing using polymerase substrate-binding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Previte, Michael John Robert; Zhou, Chunhong; Kellinger, Matthew; Pantoja, Rigo; Chen, Cheng-Yao; Shi, Jin; Wang, BeiBei; Kia, Amirali; Etchin, Sergey; Vieceli, John; Nikoomanzar, Ali; Bomati, Erin; Gloeckner, Christian; Ronaghi, Mostafa; He, Molly Min

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has transformed genomic research by decreasing the cost of sequencing. However, whole-genome sequencing is still costly and complex for diagnostics purposes. In the clinical space, targeted sequencing has the advantage of allowing researchers to focus on specific genes of interest. Routine clinical use of targeted NGS mandates inexpensive instruments, fast turnaround time and an integrated and robust workflow. Here we demonstrate a version of the Sequencing by Synthesis (SBS) chemistry that potentially can become a preferred targeted sequencing method in the clinical space. This sequencing chemistry uses natural nucleotides and is based on real-time recording of the differential polymerase/DNA-binding kinetics in the presence of correct or mismatch nucleotides. This ensemble SBS chemistry has been implemented on an existing Illumina sequencing platform with integrated cluster amplification. We discuss the advantages of this sequencing chemistry for targeted sequencing as well as its limitations for other applications. PMID:25612848

  11. A movie of RNA polymerase II transcription.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Alan C M; Cramer, Patrick

    2012-06-22

    We provide here a molecular movie that captures key aspects of RNA polymerase II initiation and elongation. To create the movie, we combined structural snapshots of the initiation-elongation transition and of elongation, including nucleotide addition, translocation, pausing, proofreading, backtracking, arrest, reactivation, and inhibition. The movie reveals open questions about the mechanism of transcription and provides a useful teaching tool.

  12. Polymerase Chain Reaction for Educational Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Stephen J.; dePamphillis, Claude

    1994-01-01

    Suggests the incorporation of the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique into high school and college biology laboratories. Discusses the following sections: (1) current PCR applications; (2) PCR technique; (3) Manual and Machine PCR; (4) Manual PCR Preparations and Procedure; (5) Materials, Supplies, and Recipes; (6) Primer Selection; and (7)…

  13. A polymerase engineered for bisulfite sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Doug; Christova, Yonka; Holliger, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Bisulfite sequencing is a key methodology in epigenetics. However, the standard workflow of bisulfite sequencing involves heat and strongly basic conditions to convert the intermediary product 5,6-dihydrouridine-6-sulfonate (dhU6S) (generated by reaction of bisulfite with deoxycytidine (dC)) to uracil (dU). These harsh conditions generally lead to sample loss and DNA damage while milder conditions may result in incomplete conversion of intermediates to uracil. Both can lead to poor recovery of bisulfite-treated DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as either damaged DNA and/or intermediates of bisulfite treatment are poor substrate for standard DNA polymerases. Here we describe an engineered DNA polymerase (5D4) with an enhanced ability to replicate and PCR amplify bisulfite-treated DNA due to an ability to bypass both DNA lesions and bisulfite intermediates, allowing significantly milder conversion conditions and increased sensitivity in the PCR amplification of bisulfite-treated DNA. Incorporation of the 5D4 DNA polymerase into the bisulfite sequencing workflow thus promises significant sensitivity and efficiency gains. PMID:26271989

  14. RNA polymerase and the regulation of transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Reznikoff, W.S.; Gross, C.A.; Burgess, R.R.; Record, M.T.; Dahlberg, J.E.; Wickens, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of eight sections, each containing several papers. The section titles are: RNA Polymerases; Transcription Initiation - Bacterial; Regulation of Bacterial Transcription Initiation; Stable RNA Synthesis in Eukaryotes: Chromatin Structure; Promoters; Enhancers; and the Global Control of Eukaryotic Transcription; Specific Eukaryotic Transcription Factors; Termination of Transcription; and Short Communications.

  15. Determining Annealing Temperatures for Polymerase Chain Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.; Enners, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common technique used in high school and undergraduate science teaching. Students often do not fully comprehend the underlying principles of the technique and how optimization of the protocol affects the outcome and analysis. In this molecular biology laboratory, students learn the steps of PCR with an…

  16. A polymerase engineered for bisulfite sequencing.

    PubMed

    Millar, Doug; Christova, Yonka; Holliger, Philipp

    2015-12-15

    Bisulfite sequencing is a key methodology in epigenetics. However, the standard workflow of bisulfite sequencing involves heat and strongly basic conditions to convert the intermediary product 5,6-dihydrouridine-6-sulfonate (dhU6S) (generated by reaction of bisulfite with deoxycytidine (dC)) to uracil (dU). These harsh conditions generally lead to sample loss and DNA damage while milder conditions may result in incomplete conversion of intermediates to uracil. Both can lead to poor recovery of bisulfite-treated DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as either damaged DNA and/or intermediates of bisulfite treatment are poor substrate for standard DNA polymerases. Here we describe an engineered DNA polymerase (5D4) with an enhanced ability to replicate and PCR amplify bisulfite-treated DNA due to an ability to bypass both DNA lesions and bisulfite intermediates, allowing significantly milder conversion conditions and increased sensitivity in the PCR amplification of bisulfite-treated DNA. Incorporation of the 5D4 DNA polymerase into the bisulfite sequencing workflow thus promises significant sensitivity and efficiency gains.

  17. 47 CFR 1.248 - Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. 1.248 Section 1.248 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Hearing Proceedings Prehearing Procedures § 1.248 Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. (a)...

  18. Circulating polymerase chain reaction chips utilizing multiple-membrane activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yu; Liao, Chia-Sheng; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Huei-Huang; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports a new micromachined, circulating, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for nucleic acid amplification. The PCR chip is comprised of a microthermal control module and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic control module. The microthermal control modules are formed with three individual heating and temperature-sensing sections, each modulating a specific set temperature for denaturation, annealing and extension processes, respectively. Micro-pneumatic valves and multiple-membrane activations are used to form the microfluidic control module to transport sample fluids through three reaction regions. Compared with other PCR chips, the new chip is more compact in size, requires less time for heating and cooling processes, and has the capability to randomly adjust time ratios and cycle numbers depending on the PCR process. Experimental results showed that detection genes for two pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes, 777 bps) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae, 273 bps), can be successfully amplified using the new circulating PCR chip. The minimum number of thermal cycles to amplify the DNA-based S. pyogenes for slab gel electrophoresis is 20 cycles with an initial concentration of 42.5 pg µl-1. Experimental data also revealed that a high reproducibility up to 98% could be achieved if the initial template concentration of the S. pyogenes was higher than 4 pg µl-1. The preliminary results of the current paper were presented at the 19th IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (IEEE MEMS 2006), Istanbul, Turkey, 22-26 January, 2006.

  19. Regulating RNA polymerase pausing and transcription elongation in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Irene M; Waterfall, Joshua J; Core, Leighton J; Munroe, Robert J; Schimenti, John; Lis, John T

    2011-04-01

    Transitions between pluripotent stem cells and differentiated cells are executed by key transcription regulators. Comparative measurements of RNA polymerase distribution over the genome's primary transcription units in different cell states can identify the genes and steps in the transcription cycle that are regulated during such transitions. To identify the complete transcriptional profiles of RNA polymerases with high sensitivity and resolution, as well as the critical regulated steps upon which regulatory factors act, we used genome-wide nuclear run-on (GRO-seq) to map the density and orientation of transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerases in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In both cell types, progression of a promoter-proximal, paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) into productive elongation is a rate-limiting step in transcription of ∼40% of mRNA-encoding genes. Importantly, quantitative comparisons between cell types reveal that transcription is controlled frequently at paused Pol II's entry into elongation. Furthermore, "bivalent" ESC genes (exhibiting both active and repressive histone modifications) bound by Polycomb group complexes PRC1 (Polycomb-repressive complex 1) and PRC2 show dramatically reduced levels of paused Pol II at promoters relative to an average gene. In contrast, bivalent promoters bound by only PRC2 allow Pol II pausing, but it is confined to extremely 5' proximal regions. Altogether, these findings identify rate-limiting targets for transcription regulation during cell differentiation.

  20. The Pseudorabies Virus DNA Polymerase Accessory Subunit UL42 Directs Nuclear Transport of the Holoenzyme.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Ping; Du, Wen-Juan; Huang, Li-Ping; Wei, Yan-Wu; Wu, Hong-Li; Feng, Li; Liu, Chang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) DNA replication occurs in the nuclei of infected cells and requires the viral DNA polymerase. The PRV DNA polymerase comprises a catalytic subunit, UL30, and an accessory subunit, UL42, that confers processivity to the enzyme. Its nuclear localization is a prerequisite for its enzymatic function in the initiation of viral DNA replication. However, the mechanisms by which the PRV DNA polymerase holoenzyme enters the nucleus have not been determined. In this study, we characterized the nuclear import pathways of the PRV DNA polymerase catalytic and accessory subunits. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that UL42 localizes independently in the nucleus, whereas UL30 alone predominantly localizes in the cytoplasm. Intriguingly, the localization of UL30 was completely shifted to the nucleus when it was coexpressed with UL42, demonstrating that nuclear transport of UL30 occurs in an UL42-dependent manner. Deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis of the two proteins showed that UL42 contains a functional and transferable bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) at amino acids 354-370 and that K(354), R(355), and K(367) are important for the NLS function, whereas UL30 has no NLS. Coimmunoprecipitation assays verified that UL42 interacts with importins α3 and α4 through its NLS. In vitro nuclear import assays demonstrated that nuclear accumulation of UL42 is a temperature- and energy-dependent process and requires both importins α and β, confirming that UL42 utilizes the importin α/β-mediated pathway for nuclear entry. In an UL42 NLS-null mutant, the UL42/UL30 heterodimer was completely confined to the cytoplasm when UL42 was coexpressed with UL30, indicating that UL30 utilizes the NLS function of UL42 for its translocation into the nucleus. Collectively, these findings suggest that UL42 contains an importin α/β-mediated bipartite NLS that transports the viral DNA polymerase holoenzyme into the nucleus in an in vitro expression

  1. Aircraft Engine Emissions. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A conference on a aircraft engine emissions was held to present the results of recent and current work. Such diverse areas as components, controls, energy efficient engine designs, and noise and pollution reduction are discussed.

  2. Conference Summary Final Remarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Walter

    2007-05-01

    Finally we come to the last talk. The end of the Conference is near! I try to reflect on an interesting Conference, with many different - diverse - topics and 5 parallel afternoon sessions. How to solve this difficulty? I do it my way and present a selection of what I personally found interesting. I illustrate these topics with the help of slides which are borrowed from various speakers at the conference. There are outstanding problems, which will also find attention and interest if explained to non-nuclear physicists, common people. I will address four such topics which were were discussed at this conference: Heavy-Ion Cancer Therapy Extension of the Periodic Table - Superheavy Elements Nuclear Astrophysics Hot compressed elementary matter - Production - Phases

  3. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  4. Lunar & Planetary Science Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Jeffrey L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Summaries of different topics discussed at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference are presented to provide updated information to nonplanetologists. Some topics include Venus, isotopes, chondrites, creation science, cosmic dust, cratering, moons and rings, igneous rocks, and lunar soil. (DC)

  5. The juxtamembrane sequence of the Hepatitis C virus polymerase can affect RNA synthesis and inhibition by allosteric polymerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wen, Y; Lin, X; Fan, B; Ranjith-Kumar, C T; Kao, C C

    2015-08-01

    The Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B), is anchored in the membrane through a C-terminal helix. A sequence of ca. 12 residues that connects the catalytically competent portion of the RdRp and the C-terminal helix, the juxtamembrane sequence (JMS), has a poorly defined role in RdRp function in a large part since it is translated from a cis-acting RNA element (CRE) that is essential for HCV replication. Using a HCV replicon that transposed a second copy of CRE to the 3' UTR of the HCV replicon, we demonstrate that amino acid substitutions in the JMS were detrimental for HCV replicon replication. Substitutions in the JMS also resulted in a defect in de novo-initiated RNAs synthesis in vitro and in a cell-based reporter assay. A nonnucleoside inhibitor of the NS5B that binds to the catalytic pocket was less potent in inhibiting NS5B in the presence of JMS mutations. The JMS mutants exhibit reduced stability in thermodenaturation assays, suggesting that the JMS helps confer a more stable conformation to NS5B that could impact RNA synthesis. PMID:25895103

  6. Molecular cloning of Drosophila mus308, a gene involved in DNA cross-link repair with homology to prokaryotic DNA polymerase I genes.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, P V; Mazina, O M; Leonhardt, E A; Case, R B; Boyd, J B; Burtis, K C

    1996-01-01

    Mutations in the Drosophila mus308 gene confer specific hypersensitivity to DNA-cross-linking agents as a consequence of defects in DNA repair. The mus308 gene is shown here to encode a 229-kDa protein in which the amino-terminal domain contains the seven conserved motifs characteristic of DNA and RNA helicases and the carboxy-terminal domain shares over 55% sequence similarity with the polymerase domains of prokaryotic DNA polymerase I-like enzymes. This is the first reported member of this family of DNA polymerases in a eukaryotic organism, as well as the first example of a single polypeptide with homology to both DNA polymerase and helicase motifs. Identification of a closely related gene in the genome of Caenorhabditis elegans suggests that this novel polypeptide may play an evolutionarily conserved role in the repair of DNA damage in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:8816490

  7. Human DNA polymerase. alpha. : Predicted functional domains and relationships with viral DNA polymerases

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.S.F.; Wong, S.W.; Korn, D. )

    1989-01-01

    The primary sequence of human DNA polymerase {alpha} deduced from the full-length cDNA contains regions of striking similarity to sequences in replicative DNA polymerases from Escherichia coli phages PRD1 and T4, Bacillus phage {phi}19, yeast DNA polymerase I, yeast linear plasmid pGKL1, maize S1 mitochondrial DNA, herpes family viruses, vaccinia virus, and adenovirus. The conservation of these homologous regions across this vast phylogenetic expanse indicates that these prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases may all have evolved from a common primordial gene. Based on the sequence analysis and genetic results from yeast and herpes simplex virus studies, these consensus sequences are suggested to define potential sites that subserve essential roles in the DNA polymerase reaction. Two of these conserved regions appear to participate directly in the active site required for substrate deoxynucleotide interaction. One region toward the carboxyl-terminus has the potential to be the DNA interacting domain is predicted toward the amino-terminus. The provisional assignment of these domains can be used to identify unique or dissimilar features of functionally homologous catalytic sites in viral DBA polymerases of pathogenetic significance and thereby serve to guide more rational antiviral drug design.

  8. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  9. Conference scene: DGVS spring conference 2009.

    PubMed

    Kolligs, Frank Thomas

    2009-10-01

    The 3rd annual DGVS Spring Conference of the German Society for Gastroenterology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Verdauungs- und Stoffwechselkrankheiten) was held at the Seminaris Campus Hotel in Berlin, Germany, on 8-9 May, 2009. The conference was organized by Roland Schmid and Matthias Ebert from the Technical University of Munich, Germany. The central theme of the meeting was 'translational gastrointestinal oncology: towards personalized medicine and individualized therapy'. The conference covered talks on markers for diagnosis, screening and surveillance of colorectal cancer, targets for molecular therapy, response prediction in clinical oncology, development and integration of molecular imaging in gastrointestinal oncology and translational research in clinical trial design. Owing to the broad array of topics and limitations of space, this article will focus on biomarkers, response prediction and the integration of biomarkers into clinical trials. Presentations mentioned in this summary were given by Matthias Ebert (Technical University of Munich, Germany), Esmeralda Heiden (Epigenomics, Berlin, Germany), Frank Kolligs (University of Munich, Germany), Florian Lordick (University of Heidelberg, Germany), Hans Jorgen Nielsen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark), Anke Reinacher-Schick (University of Bochum, Germany), Christoph Röcken (University of Berlin, Germany), Wolff Schmiegel (University of Bochum, Germany) and Thomas Seufferlein (University of Halle, Germany).

  10. Nucleolin Is Required for RNA Polymerase I Transcription In Vivo▿

    PubMed Central

    Rickards, Brenden; Flint, S. J.; Cole, Michael D.; LeRoy, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packaged with histones and accessory proteins in the form of chromatin. RNA polymerases and their accessory proteins are sufficient for transcription of naked DNA, but not of chromatin, templates in vitro. In this study, we purified and identified nucleolin as a protein that allows RNA polymerase II to transcribe nucleosomal templates in vitro. As immunofluorescence confirmed that nucleolin localizes primarily to nucleoli with RNA polymerase I, we demonstrated that nucleolin allows RNA polymerase I transcription of chromatin templates in vitro. The results of chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments established that nucleolin is associated with chromatin containing rRNA genes transcribed by RNA polymerase I but not with genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II or III. Knockdown of nucleolin by RNA interference resulted in specific inhibition of RNA polymerase I transcription. We therefore propose that an important function of nucleolin is to permit RNA polymerase I to transcribe nucleolar chromatin. PMID:17130237

  11. Structural biology of bacterial RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Katsuhiko S

    2015-05-11

    Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477-42485), an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP). In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank), describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  12. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR): general methods.

    PubMed

    Waters, Daniel L E; Shapter, Frances M

    2014-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) converts very low quantities of DNA into very high quantities and is the foundation of many specialized techniques of molecular biology. PCR utilizes components of the cellular machinery of mitotic cell division in vitro which respond predictably to user inputs. This chapter introduces the principles of PCR and discusses practical considerations from target sequence definition through to optimization and application.

  13. Colony Polymerase Chain Reaction with Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Murray, Johanne M; Watson, Adam T; Carr, Antony M

    2016-01-01

    When screening a large number of individual Schizosaccharomyces pombe strains by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a rapid "colony PCR" approach may be used. Numerous colony PCR protocols are available, and fundamental to them all is that the colony must be fresh (grown overnight) and that as few cells as possible are used. In this protocol, we present three reliable methods for preparing S. pombe cells for colony PCR.

  14. Reticulocyte RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Kathleen M.; Byrnes, John J.; Jurmark, Bonnie S.; So, Antero G.

    1973-01-01

    A cytoplasmic, microsomal bound RNA-dependent RNA polymerase has been purified 2500-fold from rabbit reticulocyte lysates. The synthesis of RNA with the purified enzyme is absolutely dependent on the addition of an RNA template. The best template is hemoglobin messenger RNA, while bacteriophage RNA and poly(A,G) are less active, and DNA is completely inactive as a template. With poly(A,G) as a template, only UTP and CTP are incorporated into polynucleotide chains, indicating that the RNA polymerase is an RNA replicase and not a terminal transferase. With messenger RNA as a template, all four ribonucleoside triphosphates are required for maximal activity. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase reaction is extremely sensitive to low concentrations of heme, rifamycin AF/013, and ribonuclease and resistant to actinomycin D and DNase. The discovery of RNA-directed RNA synthesis in reticulocytes offers an additional site for control of gene expression in mammalian cells and provides a possible mechanism for amplification of the expression of specific genes. PMID:4519633

  15. Involvement of a joker mutation in a polymerase-independent lethal mutagenesis escape mechanism.

    PubMed

    Agudo, Rubén; de la Higuera, Ignacio; Arias, Armando; Grande-Pérez, Ana; Domingo, Esteban

    2016-07-01

    We previously characterized a foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) with three amino acid replacements in its polymerase (3D) that conferred resistance to the mutagenic nucleoside analogue ribavirin. Here we show that passage of this mutant in the presence of high ribavirin concentrations resulted in selection of viruses with the additional replacement I248T in 2C. This 2C substitution alone (even in the absence of replacements in 3D) increased FMDV fitness mainly in the presence of ribavirin, prevented an incorporation bias in favor of A and U associated with ribavirin mutagenesis, and conferred the ATPase activity of 2C decreased sensitivity to ribavirin-triphosphate. Since in previous studies we described that 2C with I248T was selected under different selective pressures, this replacement qualifies as a joker substitution in FMDV evolution. The results have identified a role of 2C in nucleotide incorporation, and have unveiled a new polymerase-independent mechanism of virus escape to lethal mutagenesis. PMID:27136067

  16. Marzipan: polymerase chain reaction-driven methods for authenticity control.

    PubMed

    Brüning, Philipp; Haase, Ilka; Matissek, Reinhard; Fischer, Markus

    2011-11-23

    According to German food guidelines, almonds are the only oilseed ingredient allowed for the production of marzipan. Persipan is a marzipan surrogate in which the almonds are replaced by apricot or peach kernels. Cross-contamination of marzipan products with persipan may occur if both products are produced using the same production line. Adulterations or dilutions, respectively, of marzipan with other plant-derived products, for example, lupine or pea, have also been found. Almond and apricot plants are closely related. Consequently, classical analytical methods for the identification/differentiation often fail or are not sensitive enough to quantify apricot concentrations below 1%. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods have been shown to enable the differentiation of closely related plant species in the past. These methods are characterized by high specificity and low detection limits. Isolation methods were developed and evaluated especially with respect to the matrix marzipan in terms of yield, purity, integrity, and amplificability of the isolated DNA. For the reliable detection of apricot, peach, pea, bean, lupine, soy, cashew, pistachio, and chickpea, qualitative standard and duplex PCR methods were developed and established. The applicability of these methods was tested by cross-reaction studies and analysis of spiked raw pastes. Contaminations at the level of 0.1% could be detected.

  17. Structure of the SSB-DNA polymerase III interface and its role in DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Marceau, Aimee H; Bahng, Soon; Massoni, Shawn C; George, Nicholas P; Sandler, Steven J; Marians, Kenneth J; Keck, James L

    2012-05-22

    Interactions between single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) and the DNA replication machinery are found in all organisms, but the roles of these contacts remain poorly defined. In Escherichia coli, SSB's association with the χ subunit of the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme has been proposed to confer stability to the replisome and to aid delivery of primers to the lagging-strand DNA polymerase. Here, the SSB-binding site on χ is identified crystallographically and biochemical and cellular studies delineate the consequences of destabilizing the χ/SSB interface. An essential role for the χ/SSB interaction in lagging-strand primer utilization is not supported. However, sequence changes in χ that block complex formation with SSB lead to salt-dependent uncoupling of leading- and lagging-strand DNA synthesis and to a surprising obstruction of the leading-strand DNA polymerase in vitro, pointing to roles for the χ/SSB complex in replisome establishment and maintenance. Destabilization of the χ/SSB complex in vivo produces cells with temperature-dependent cell cycle defects that appear to arise from replisome instability.

  18. 1a/1b subtype profiling of nonnucleoside polymerase inhibitors of hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Nyanguile, Origène; Devogelaere, Benoit; Vijgen, Leen; Van den Broeck, Walter; Pauwels, Frederik; Cummings, Maxwell D; De Bondt, Hendrik L; Vos, Ann M; Berke, Jan M; Lenz, Oliver; Vandercruyssen, Geneviève; Vermeiren, Katrien; Mostmans, Wendy; Dehertogh, Pascale; Delouvroy, Frédéric; Vendeville, Sandrine; VanDyck, Koen; Dockx, Koen; Cleiren, Erna; Raboisson, Pierre; Simmen, Kenneth A; Fanning, Gregory C

    2010-03-01

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an unusually attractive target for drug discovery since it contains five distinct drugable sites. The success of novel antiviral therapies will require nonnucleoside inhibitors to be active in at least patients infected with HCV of subtypes 1a and 1b. Therefore, the genotypic assessment of these agents against clinical isolates derived from genotype 1-infected patients is an important prerequisite for the selection of suitable candidates for clinical development. Here we report the 1a/1b subtype profiling of polymerase inhibitors that bind at each of the four known nonnucleoside binding sites. We show that inhibition of all of the clinical isolates tested is maintained, except for inhibitors that bind at the palm-1 binding site. Subtype coverage varies across chemotypes within this class of inhibitors, and inhibition of genotype 1a improves when hydrophobic contact with the polymerase is increased. We investigated if the polymorphism of the palm-1 binding site is the sole cause of the reduced susceptibility of subtype 1a to inhibition by 1,5-benzodiazepines by using reverse genetics, X-ray crystallography, and surface plasmon resonance studies. We showed Y415F to be a key determinant in conferring resistance on subtype 1a, with this effect being mediated through an inhibitor- and enzyme-bound water molecule. Binding studies revealed that the mechanism of subtype 1a resistance is faster dissociation of the inhibitor from the enzyme.

  19. 1a/1b Subtype Profiling of Nonnucleoside Polymerase Inhibitors of Hepatitis C Virus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Nyanguile, Origène; Devogelaere, Benoit; Vijgen, Leen; Van den Broeck, Walter; Pauwels, Frederik; Cummings, Maxwell D.; De Bondt, Hendrik L.; Vos, Ann M.; Berke, Jan M.; Lenz, Oliver; Vandercruyssen, Geneviève; Vermeiren, Katrien; Mostmans, Wendy; Dehertogh, Pascale; Delouvroy, Frédéric; Vendeville, Sandrine; VanDyck, Koen; Dockx, Koen; Cleiren, Erna; Raboisson, Pierre; Simmen, Kenneth A.; Fanning, Gregory C.

    2010-01-01

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an unusually attractive target for drug discovery since it contains five distinct drugable sites. The success of novel antiviral therapies will require nonnucleoside inhibitors to be active in at least patients infected with HCV of subtypes 1a and 1b. Therefore, the genotypic assessment of these agents against clinical isolates derived from genotype 1-infected patients is an important prerequisite for the selection of suitable candidates for clinical development. Here we report the 1a/1b subtype profiling of polymerase inhibitors that bind at each of the four known nonnucleoside binding sites. We show that inhibition of all of the clinical isolates tested is maintained, except for inhibitors that bind at the palm-1 binding site. Subtype coverage varies across chemotypes within this class of inhibitors, and inhibition of genotype 1a improves when hydrophobic contact with the polymerase is increased. We investigated if the polymorphism of the palm-1 binding site is the sole cause of the reduced susceptibility of subtype 1a to inhibition by 1,5-benzodiazepines by using reverse genetics, X-ray crystallography, and surface plasmon resonance studies. We showed Y415F to be a key determinant in conferring resistance on subtype 1a, with this effect being mediated through an inhibitor- and enzyme-bound water molecule. Binding studies revealed that the mechanism of subtype 1a resistance is faster dissociation of the inhibitor from the enzyme. PMID:20071590

  20. Mutability of DNA polymerase I: implications for the creation of mutant DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Loh, Ern; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2005-12-01

    DNA polymerases of the Family A catalyze the addition of deoxynucleotides to a primer with high efficiency, processivity, and selectivity-properties that are critical to their function both in nature and in the laboratory. These polymerases tolerate many amino acid substitutions, even in regions that are evolutionarily conserved. This tolerance can be exploited to create DNA polymerases with novel properties and altered substrate specificities, using rational design and molecular evolution. These efforts have focused mainly on the Family A DNA polymerises -Taq, E. coli Pol I, and T7 - because they are widely utilized in biotechnology today. The redesign of polymerases often requires knowledge of the function of specific residues in the protein, including those located in six evolutionarily conserved regions. The most well characterized of these are motifs A and B, which regulate the fidelity of replication and the incorporation of nucleotide analogs such as dideoxynucleotides. Regions that remain to be more thoroughly characterized are motif C, which is critical for catalysis, and motifs 1, 2 and 6, all of which bind to DNA primer or template. Several recently identified mutants with abilities to incorporate nucleotides with bulky adducts have mutations that are not located within conserved regions and warrant further study. Analysis of these mutants will help advance our understanding of how DNA polymerases select bases with high fidelity. PMID:16230053

  1. Biochemical Effect of Resistance Mutations against Synergistic Inhibitors of RSV RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Amy; Stevens, Sarah K.; Jordan, Paul C.; Gromova, Tatiana; Taylor, Joshua S.; Hong, Jin; Meng, Jia; Wang, Guangyi; Dyatkina, Natalia; Prhavc, Marija; Symons, Julian A.; Beigelman, Leo

    2016-01-01

    ALS-8112 is the parent molecule of ALS-8176, a first-in-class nucleoside analog prodrug effective in the clinic against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. The antiviral activity of ALS-8112 is mediated by its 5'-triphosphate metabolite (ALS-8112-TP, or 2'F-4'ClCH2-cytidine triphosphate) inhibiting the RNA polymerase activity of the RSV L-P protein complex through RNA chain termination. Four amino acid mutations in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain of L (QUAD: M628L, A789V, L795I, and I796V) confer in vitro resistance to ALS-8112-TP by increasing its discrimination relative to natural CTP. In this study, we show that the QUAD mutations specifically recognize the ClCH2 group of ALS-8112-TP. Among the four mutations, A789V conferred the greatest resistance phenotype, which was consistent with its putative position in the active site of the RdRp domain. AZ-27, a non-nucleoside inhibitor of RSV, also inhibited the RdRp activity, with decreased inhibition potency in the presence of the Y1631H mutation. The QUAD mutations had no effect on the antiviral activity of AZ-27, and the Y1631H mutation did not significantly increase the discrimination of ALS-8112-TP. Combining ALS-8112 with AZ-27 in vitro resulted in significant synergistic inhibition of RSV replication. Overall, this is the first mechanistic study showing a lack of cross-resistance between mutations selected by different classes of RSV polymerase inhibitors acting in synergy, opening the door to future potential combination therapies targeting different regions of the L protein. PMID:27163448

  2. Biochemical Effect of Resistance Mutations against Synergistic Inhibitors of RSV RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Deval, Jerome; Fung, Amy; Stevens, Sarah K; Jordan, Paul C; Gromova, Tatiana; Taylor, Joshua S; Hong, Jin; Meng, Jia; Wang, Guangyi; Dyatkina, Natalia; Prhavc, Marija; Symons, Julian A; Beigelman, Leo

    2016-01-01

    ALS-8112 is the parent molecule of ALS-8176, a first-in-class nucleoside analog prodrug effective in the clinic against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. The antiviral activity of ALS-8112 is mediated by its 5'-triphosphate metabolite (ALS-8112-TP, or 2'F-4'ClCH2-cytidine triphosphate) inhibiting the RNA polymerase activity of the RSV L-P protein complex through RNA chain termination. Four amino acid mutations in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain of L (QUAD: M628L, A789V, L795I, and I796V) confer in vitro resistance to ALS-8112-TP by increasing its discrimination relative to natural CTP. In this study, we show that the QUAD mutations specifically recognize the ClCH2 group of ALS-8112-TP. Among the four mutations, A789V conferred the greatest resistance phenotype, which was consistent with its putative position in the active site of the RdRp domain. AZ-27, a non-nucleoside inhibitor of RSV, also inhibited the RdRp activity, with decreased inhibition potency in the presence of the Y1631H mutation. The QUAD mutations had no effect on the antiviral activity of AZ-27, and the Y1631H mutation did not significantly increase the discrimination of ALS-8112-TP. Combining ALS-8112 with AZ-27 in vitro resulted in significant synergistic inhibition of RSV replication. Overall, this is the first mechanistic study showing a lack of cross-resistance between mutations selected by different classes of RSV polymerase inhibitors acting in synergy, opening the door to future potential combination therapies targeting different regions of the L protein. PMID:27163448

  3. Data of expression and purification of recombinant Taq DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Fang, Na; Zhong, Niannian; Yang, Yueyang; Guo, Yujian; Ji, Shaoping

    2016-12-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique is widely used in many experimental conditions, and Taq DNA polymerase is critical in PCR process. In this article, the Taq DNA polymerase expression plasmid is reconstructed and the protein product is obtained by rapid purification, ("Rapid purification of high-activity Taq DNA polymerase" (Pluthero, 1993 [1]), "Single-step purification of a thermostable DNA polymerase expressed in Escherichia coli" (Desai and Pfaffle, 1995 [2])). Here we present the production data from protein expression and provide the analysis results of the production from two different vectors. Meanwhile, the purification data is also provided to show the purity of the protein product. PMID:27656666

  4. Mutational clusters generated by non-processive polymerases: A case study using DNA polymerase betain vitro.

    PubMed

    García-Villada, Libertad; Drake, John W

    2010-08-01

    Available DNA mutational spectra reveal that the number of mutants with multiple mutations ("multiples") is usually greater than expected from a random distribution of mutations among mutants. These overloads imply the occurrence of non-random clusters of mutations, probably generated during episodes of low-fidelity DNA synthesis. Excess multiples have been reported not only for viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotic cells but also for the DNA polymerases of phages T4 and RB69 in vitro. In the simplest case of a purified polymerase, non-random clusters may be generated by a subfraction of phenotypic variants able to introduce more errors per cycle of DNA synthesis than the normal enzyme. According to this hypothesis, excess multiples are not expected with non-processive polymerases even if they harbor rare mutator variants. DNA polymerase beta (Pol beta) is a mammalian DNA-repair polymerase with very low processivity. Although several Pol beta mutational spectra have been described, there is conflicting evidence on whether or not excess multiples occur, with spectra based on the HSV-tk system tending to show excess multiples. Excess multiples generated by Pol beta or any of its mutants might imply that the excesses of multiples observed in numerous other systems, especially those with processive polymerases, could be artifactual. Here, the distributions of mutations generated by native and recombinant rat Pol beta and by the Pol beta(Y265C) mutator were analyzed in the M13mp2 lacZalpha system. Our results present no evidence for a significant excess of multiples over the expected numbers with any of the Pol beta enzymes tested in this system. The reported excess of Pol beta-generated multiples in the HSV-tk system may reflect a reduced efficiency of detection of base substitutions that cause weak phenotypes, which in turn may artifactually increase the frequency of multiples. PMID:20627824

  5. RNA polymerase molecular beacon as tool for studies of RNA polymerase-promoter interactions.

    PubMed

    Mekler, Vladimir; Severinov, Konstantin

    2015-09-15

    The molecular details of formation of transcription initiation complex upon the interaction of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) with promoters are not completely understood. One way to address this problem is to understand how RNAP interacts with different parts of promoter DNA. A recently developed fluorometric RNAP molecular beacon assay allows one to monitor the RNAP interactions with various unlabeled DNA probes and quantitatively characterize partial RNAP-promoter interactions. This paper focuses on methodological aspects of application of this powerful assay to study the mechanism of transcription initiation complex formation by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase σ(70) holoenzyme and its regulation by bacterial and phage encoded factors.

  6. RNA polymerase molecular beacon as tool for studies of RNA polymerase - promoter interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mekler, Vladimir; Severinov, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    The molecular details of formation of transcription initiation complex upon the interaction of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) with promoters are not completely understood. One way to address this problem is to understand how RNAP interacts with different parts of promoter DNA. A recently developed fluorometric RNAP molecular beacon assay allows one to monitor the RNAP interactions with various unlabeled DNA probes and quantitatively characterize partial RNAP-promoter interactions. This paper focuses on methodological aspects of application of this powerful assay to study the mechanism of transcription initiation complex formation by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase σ70 holoenzyme and its regulation by bacterial and phage encoded factors. PMID:25956222

  7. Aire unleashes stalled RNA polymerase to induce ectopic gene expression in thymic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Matthieu; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Abramson, Jakub; Rahl, Peter B; Young, Richard A; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2012-01-10

    Aire is a transcriptional regulator that induces expression of peripheral tissue antigens (PTA) in thymic medullary epithelial cells (MECs), driving immunological self-tolerance in differentiating T cells. To elucidate its mechanistic pathways, we examined its transcriptional impact in MECs in vivo by microarray analysis with mRNA-spanning probes. This analysis revealed initiation of Aire-activated genes to be comparable in Aire-deficient and wild-type MECs, but with a block to elongation after 50-100 bp in the absence of Aire, suggesting activation by release of stalled polymerases by Aire. In contrast, patterns of activation by transcription factors such as Klf4 were consistent with regulation of initiation. Mapping of Aire and RNA polymerase-II (Pol-II) by ChIP and high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed that Aire bound all Pol-II-rich transcriptional start sites (TSS), irrespective of its eventual effect. However, the genes it preferentially activated were characterized by a relative surfeit of stalled polymerases at the TSS, which resolved once Aire was introduced into cells. Thus, transcript mapping and ChIP-seq data indicate that Aire activates ectopic transcription not through specific recognition of PTA gene promoters but by releasing stalled polymerases.

  8. ppGpp: magic beyond RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Dalebroux, Zachary D; Swanson, Michele S

    2012-02-16

    During stress, bacteria undergo extensive physiological transformations, many of which are coordinated by ppGpp. Although ppGpp is best known for enhancing cellular resilience by redirecting the RNA polymerase (RNAP) to certain genes, it also acts as a signal in many other cellular processes in bacteria. After a brief overview of ppGpp biosynthesis and its impact on promoter selection by RNAP, we discuss how bacteria exploit ppGpp to modulate the synthesis, stability or activity of proteins or regulatory RNAs that are crucial in challenging environments, using mechanisms beyond the direct regulation of RNAP activity.

  9. 78 FR 27963 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Technical Conference on Tuesday, July 9,...

  10. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-09-16

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3'-5' exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5'-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  11. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities

    PubMed Central

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C.; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J.; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3′-5′ exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5′-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  12. Cranfield Conference on Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Franklin F.

    The Third Cranfield Conference on Mechanised Information Storage and Retrieval Systems was held on 20-23 July 1971 in Cranfield, England. The report describes a number of the key papers presented at this conference. (Author)

  13. Planning a Women's Studies Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saul, Jean Rannells

    1992-01-01

    Describes the organization and implementation of a women's studies conference. Discusses fund raising, identifying speakers, developing publicity, local arrangement efforts, and providing hospitality. Includes nine recommendations and a suggested conference timeline. (CFR)

  14. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineering Education, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presents the abstracts of 158 papers presented at the American Society for Engineering Education's annual conference at Knoxville, Tennessee, June 14-17, 1976. Included are engineering topics covering education, aerospace, agriculture, biomedicine, chemistry, computers, electricity, acoustics, environment, mechanics, and women. (SL)

  15. Government Quality Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Government Quality Conference was an attempt to bring together executive organizations and senior individuals in the Federal Government that have a desire to improve productivity. It was designed to provide an exchange of ideas based on experience, and to encourage individual management initiatives to tap the capabilities of Federal employees.

  16. Conducting Telephone Conference IEPs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Philip Patrick; Petit, Constance; Williams, Shandelyn

    2007-01-01

    Synchronizing the availability of team members for Individual Education Plan (IEP) meetings can be a daunting task. Fortunately, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 permits alternative means of conducting such meetings. An example of an alternate means is a telephone conference, whereby parents communicate over the…

  17. Conference Rules, Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Linda K.

    2008-01-01

    Most academic conferences are preceded by some effort to make the sessions different from the usual format, but the usual format overwhelmingly prevails. That is: Each panel discussion runs no longer than two hours, during which two, three, or four specialists stand at a lectern and talk. Sometimes they will read a prepared paper; sometimes they…

  18. International waste management conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the international waste management conference. Topics covered include: Quality assurance in the OCR WM program; Leading the spirit of quality; Dept. of Energy hazardous waste remedial actions program; management of hazardous waste projects; and System management and quality assurance.

  19. REGIONAL CONFERENCE SUMMARIES, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    AN AVERAGE OF 200 TEACHER EDUCATORS, STATE DIRECTORS, LAYMEN, AND REPRESENTATIVES OF VARIOUS AGENCIES ATTENDED EACH OF NINE REGIONAL CONFERENCES CONDUCTED THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES TO DISCUSS THE INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHANGES AND PROBLEMS IN PLANNING AND CONDUCTING VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS. MAJOR SPEECHES PRESENTED…

  20. Grammar! A Conference Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Lid, Ed.; Boaks, Peter, Ed.

    Papers from a conference on the teaching of grammar, particularly in second language instruction, include: "Grammar: Acquisition and Use" (Richard Johnstone); "Grammar and Communication" (Brian Page); "Linguistic Progression and Increasing Independence" (Bernardette Holmes); "La grammaire? C'est du bricolage!" ("Grammar? That's Hardware!") (Barry…

  1. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Includes abstracts of papers presented at the 80th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education. The broad areas include aerospace, affiliate and associate member council, agricultural engineering, biomedical engineering, continuing engineering studies, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computers, cooperative…

  2. Metabolic Engineering X Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, Evan

    2015-05-07

    The International Metabolic Engineering Society (IMES) and the Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), both technological communities of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), hosted the Metabolic Engineering X Conference (ME-X) on June 15-19, 2014 at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver, British Columbia. It attracted 395 metabolic engineers from academia, industry and government from around the globe.

  3. APPA 2011 Conference Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facilities Manager, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents highlights of APPA conference that was held on July 16-18, 2011. The highlights feature photos of 2011-2012 board of directors, outgoing senior regional representatives to the board, meritorious service award, APPA fellow, president's recognition and gavel exchange, and diamond business partner award.

  4. Creating Better Satellite Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Tommy

    1998-01-01

    Presents four ways to improve broadcasts of company satellite conferences, including creative site selection (using facilities at educational institutions rather than hotel rooms); creative programming (using graphics and other interruptions to break up lectures or speeches); creative crew selection; and creative downlink site activities (to…

  5. Conference on Censorship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meltzer, Milton; And Others

    In this collection of seven speeches from the University of Missouri Conference on Censorship, writers focus on the various aspects of censorship. Speeches are by (1) Milton Meltzer, who lauds those writers who were forced to battle with censors; (2) Enid Olson, who explores the censorship problems faced by teachers and school librarians; (3)…

  6. The interparliamentary conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of information on environmental problems with global origins and consequences. The areas of major concern included the following: global climate change; deforestation and desertification; preservation of biological diversity; safeguarding oceans and water resources; population growth; destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer; and sustainable development.

  7. Microbicides 2006 conference

    PubMed Central

    Ramjee, Gita; Shattock, Robin; Delany, Sinead; McGowan, Ian; Morar, Neetha; Gottemoeller, Megan

    2006-01-01

    Current HIV/AIDS statistics show that women account for almost 60% of HIV infections in Sub-Saharan Africa. HIV prevention tools such as male and female condoms, abstinence and monogamy are not always feasible options for women due to various socio-economic and cultural factors. Microbicides are products designed to be inserted in the vagina or rectum prior to sex to prevent HIV acquisition. The biannual Microbicides conference took place in Cape Town, South Africa from 23–26 April 2006. The conference was held for the first time on the African continent, the region worst affected by the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The conference brought together a record number of 1,300 scientists, researchers, policy makers, healthcare workers, communities and advocates. The conference provided an opportunity for an update on microbicide research and development as well as discussions around key issues such as ethics, acceptability, access and community involvement. This report discusses the current status of microbicide research and development, encompassing basic and clinical science, social and behavioural science, and community mobilisation and advocacy activities. PMID:17038196

  8. 2002 NASPSA Conference Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Contains abstracts from the 2002 conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. The publication is divided into three sections: the preconference workshop, "Effective Teaching Methods in the Classroom;" symposia (motor development, motor learning and control, and sport psychology); and free…

  9. On the Conference Circuit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyckoson, David A.

    1987-01-01

    Summarizes three conference presentations on the effects of the economic climate on academic libraries in Iowa. These presentations focused on the impact of austerity budgets on collection development, library services and personnel, and possible management approaches to retrenchment in these areas. (CLB)

  10. Conference on Navajo Orthography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohannessian, Sirarpi; And Others

    This report on the Conference on Navajo Orthography, held in Albuquerque, New Mexico on May 2-3, 1969 constitutes a summary of the discussion and decisions of a meeting which was convened by the Center for Applied Linguistics under contract with the Bureau of Indian Affairs to agree on an orthography for the Navajo language. The immediate purpose…

  11. Report on the Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ralph S.

    1983-01-01

    The themes of the 1982 annual conference of the American Association of University Professors are outlined. They include the importance of planning, selective versus across-the-board retrenchment strategies, definitions and problems of financial exigency, program reduction, and affirmative action claims. (MSE)

  12. Open Mind Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Alexander H.

    1995-01-01

    Open Mind, The Association for the achievement of diversity in higher education, met in conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico, between October 16 and 18, 1992. A number of workgroups met to discuss the goals, structure, and generally evaluate the Association and its achievements. A summary of the workgroup sessions and their minutes are included.

  13. A Conference of Hope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Printing House for the Blind, Louisville, KY. Dept. of Educational Research.

    Presented are the proceedings of the First Historic Helen Keller World Conference on Services to Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults, held in New York City in September, 1977 on the theme "The Deaf-Blind Person in the Community." Reports have the following titles and authors: "Definition, Demography, Causes and Prevention of Deaf-Blindness; Finding and…

  14. IATUL Conference 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Services and Use, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Summarizes presentations at conference on theme "The future of information resources for science and technology and role of libraries": industrial and commercial use of national, regional, and university resources; balance between public- and private-sector resources; local access in national and regional context; access to information in…

  15. In Vitro Activity and Resistance Profile of Dasabuvir, a Nonnucleoside Hepatitis C Virus Polymerase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Koev, Gennadiy; Irvin, Michelle; Beyer, Jill; Liu, Yaya; Krishnan, Preethi; Reisch, Thomas; Mondal, Rubina; Wagner, Rolf; Molla, Akhteruzzaman; Maring, Clarence; Collins, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Dasabuvir (ABT-333) is a nonnucleoside inhibitor of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase encoded by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B gene. Dasabuvir inhibited recombinant NS5B polymerases derived from HCV genotype 1a and 1b clinical isolates, with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values between 2.2 and 10.7 nM, and was at least 7,000-fold selective for the inhibition of HCV genotype 1 polymerases over human/mammalian polymerases. In the HCV subgenomic replicon system, dasabuvir inhibited genotype 1a (strain H77) and 1b (strain Con1) replicons with 50% effective concentration (EC50) values of 7.7 and 1.8 nM, respectively, with a 13-fold decrease in inhibitory activity in the presence of 40% human plasma. This level of activity was retained against a panel of chimeric subgenomic replicons that contained HCV NS5B genes from 22 genotype 1 clinical isolates from treatment-naive patients, with EC50s ranging between 0.15 and 8.57 nM. Maintenance of replicon-containing cells in medium containing dasabuvir at concentrations 10-fold or 100-fold greater than the EC50 resulted in selection of resistant replicon clones. Sequencing of the NS5B coding regions from these clones revealed the presence of variants, including C316Y, M414T, Y448C, Y448H, and S556G, that are consistent with binding to the palm I site of HCV polymerase. Consequently, dasabuvir retained full activity against replicons known to confer resistance to other polymerase inhibitors, including the S282T variant in the nucleoside binding site and the M423T, P495A, P495S, and V499A single variants in the thumb domain. The use of dasabuvir in combination with inhibitors targeting HCV NS3/NS4A protease (ABT-450 with ritonavir) and NS5A (ombitasvir) is in development for the treatment of HCV genotype 1 infections. PMID:25534735

  16. Solving the RNA polymerase I structural puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno-Morcillo, María; Taylor, Nicholas M. I.; Gruene, Tim; Legrand, Pierre; Rashid, Umar J.; Ruiz, Federico M.; Steuerwald, Ulrich; Müller, Christoph W.; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    Details of the RNA polymerase I crystal structure determination provide a framework for solution of the structures of other multi-subunit complexes. Simple crystallographic experiments are described to extract relevant biological information such as the location of the enzyme active site. Knowing the structure of multi-subunit complexes is critical to understand basic cellular functions. However, when crystals of these complexes can be obtained they rarely diffract beyond 3 Å resolution, which complicates X-ray structure determination and refinement. The crystal structure of RNA polymerase I, an essential cellular machine that synthesizes the precursor of ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus of eukaryotic cells, has recently been solved. Here, the crucial steps that were undertaken to build the atomic model of this multi-subunit enzyme are reported, emphasizing how simple crystallographic experiments can be used to extract relevant biological information. In particular, this report discusses the combination of poor molecular replacement and experimental phases, the application of multi-crystal averaging and the use of anomalous scatterers as sequence markers to guide tracing and to locate the active site. The methods outlined here will likely serve as a reference for future structural determination of large complexes at low resolution.

  17. Targeting DNA Polymerase β for Therapeutic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Goellner, Eva M.; Svilar, David; Almeida, Karen H.; Sobol, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous disease processes. Hence, it is suggested that DNA repair proteins, which maintain the integrity of the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, play a critical role in reducing the onset of multiple diseases, including cancer, diabetes and neurodegeneration. As the primary DNA polymerase involved in base excision repair, DNA polymerase β (Polβ) has been implicated in multiple cellular processes, including genome maintenance and telomere processing and is suggested to play a role in oncogenic transformation, cell viability following stress and the cellular response to radiation, chemotherapy and environmental genotoxicants. Therefore, Polβ inhibitors may prove to be effective in cancer treatment. However, Polβ has a complex and highly regulated role in DNA metabolism. This complicates the development of effective Polβ-specific inhibitors useful for improving chemotherapy and radiation response without impacting normal cellular function. With multiple enzymatic activities, numerous binding partners and complex modes of regulation from post-translational modifications, there are many opportunities for Polβ inhibition that have yet to be resolved. To shed light on the varying possibilities and approaches of targeting Polβ for potential therapeutic intervention, we summarize the reported small molecule inhibitors of Polβ and discuss the genetic, biochemical and chemical studies that implicate additional options for Polβ inhibition. Further, we offer suggestions on possible inhibitor combinatorial approaches and the potential for tumor specificity for Polβ-inhibitors. PMID:22122465

  18. In vitro replication slippage by DNA polymerases from thermophilic organisms.

    PubMed

    Viguera, E; Canceill, D; Ehrlich, S D

    2001-09-14

    Replication slippage of DNA polymerases is a potential source of spontaneous genetic rearrangements in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Here we show that different thermostable DNA polymerases undergo replication slippage in vitro, during single-round replication of a single-stranded DNA template carrying a hairpin structure. Low-fidelity polymerases, such as Thermus aquaticus (Taq), high-fidelity polymerases, such as Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) and a highly thermostable polymerase from Pyrococcus abyssi (Pyra exo(-)) undergo slippage. Thermococcus litoralis DNA polymerase (Vent) is also able to slip; however, slippage can be inhibited when its strand-displacement activity is induced. Moreover, DNA polymerases that have a constitutive strand-displacement activity, such as Bacillus stearothermophilus DNA polymerase (Bst), do not slip. Polymerases that slip during single-round replication generate hairpin deletions during PCR amplification, with the exception of Vent polymerase because its strand-displacement activity is induced under these conditions. We show that these hairpin deletions occurring during PCR are due to replication slippage, and not to a previously proposed process involving polymerization across the hairpin base.

  19. Directed evolution of polymerase function by compartmentalized self-replication

    PubMed Central

    Ghadessy, Farid J.; Ong, Jennifer L.; Holliger, Philipp

    2001-01-01

    We describe compartmentalized self-replication (CSR), a strategy for the directed evolution of enzymes, especially polymerases. CSR is based on a simple feedback loop consisting of a polymerase that replicates only its own encoding gene. Compartmentalization serves to isolate individual self-replication reactions from each other. In such a system, adaptive gains directly (and proportionally) translate into genetic amplification of the encoding gene. CSR has applications in the evolution of polymerases with novel and useful properties. By using three cycles of CSR, we obtained variants of Taq DNA polymerase with 11-fold higher thermostability than the wild-type enzyme or with a >130-fold increased resistance to the potent inhibitor heparin. Insertion of an extra stage into the CSR cycle before the polymerase reaction allows its application to enzymes other than polymerases. We show that nucleoside diphosphate kinase and Taq polymerase can form such a cooperative CSR cycle based on reciprocal catalysis, whereby nucleoside diphosphate kinase produces the substrates required for the replication of its own gene. We also find that in CSR the polymerase genes themselves evolve toward more efficient replication. Thus, polymerase genes and their encoded polypeptides cooperate to maximize postselection copy number. CSR should prove useful for the directed evolution of enzymes, particularly DNA or RNA polymerases, as well as for the design and study of in vitro self-replicating systems mimicking prebiotic evolution and viral replication. PMID:11274352

  20. Purification and Characterization of Recombinant Deinococcus radiodurans RNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Esyunina, D M; Kulbachinskiy, A V

    2015-10-01

    The radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is one of the most interesting models for studies of cell stress resistance. Analysis of the mechanisms of gene expression in D. radiodurans revealed some specific features of the transcription apparatus that might play a role in cell resistance to DNA-damaging conditions. In particular, RNA polymerase from D. radiodurans forms unstable promoter complexes and during transcription elongation has a much higher rate of RNA cleavage than RNA polymerase from Escherichia coli. Analysis of the structure and functions of D. radiodurans RNA polymerase is complicated due to the absence of convenient genetic systems for making mutations in the RNA polymerase genes and difficulties with enzyme purification. In this work, we developed a system for expression of D. radiodurans RNA polymerase in E. coli cells. We obtained an expression vector encoding all core RNA polymerase subunits and defined optimal conditions for the expression and purification of the RNA polymerase. It was found that D. radiodurans RNA polymerase has much higher rates of RNA cleavage than E. coli RNA polymerase under a wide range of conditions, including variations in the concentration of catalytic magnesium ions and pH values of the reaction buffer. The expression system can be used for further studies of the RNA cleavage reaction and the mechanisms of transcription regulation in D. radiodurans, including analysis of mutant RNA polymerase variants.

  1. ALA Conference 2009: Chicago Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    There is joy among those who have the funds to go to Chicago for the American Library Association (ALA) annual conference, July 9-15. Every librarian knows there is nothing better than a Chicago gathering, with the city's wonderful haunts, museums, restaurants, and fine memories of past conferences. The conference program covers nearly every…

  2. Summary: A Very Timely Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2012-04-01

    The conference poster includes a very apt phrase that describes a primary motivation for this conference: Time discovers truth. This aphorism, attributed to Seneca, was certainly affirmed by the many exciting talks and discussions at this conference, in both formal and informal settings.

  3. Guanine-rich sequences inhibit proofreading DNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Jing; Sun, Shuhui; Xie, Binghua; Hu, Xuemei; Zhang, Zunyi; Qiu, Mengsheng; Dai, Zhong-Min

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerases with proofreading activity are important for accurate amplification of target DNA. Despite numerous efforts have been made to improve the proofreading DNA polymerases, they are more susceptible to be failed in PCR than non-proofreading DNA polymerases. Here we showed that proofreading DNA polymerases can be inhibited by certain primers. Further analysis showed that G-rich sequences such as GGGGG and GGGGHGG can cause PCR failure using proofreading DNA polymerases but not Taq DNA polymerase. The inhibitory effect of these G-rich sequences is caused by G-quadruplex and is dose dependent. G-rich inhibitory sequence-containing primers can be used in PCR at a lower concentration to amplify its target DNA fragment. PMID:27349576

  4. The Closing Mechanism of DNA Polymerase I at Atomic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Miller, Bill R; Beese, Lorena S; Parish, Carol A; Wu, Eugene Y

    2015-09-01

    DNA polymerases must quickly and accurately distinguish between similar nucleic acids to form Watson-Crick base pairs and avoid DNA replication errors. Deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) binding to the DNA polymerase active site induces a large conformational change that is difficult to characterize experimentally on an atomic level. Here, we report an X-ray crystal structure of DNA polymerase I bound to DNA in the open conformation with a dNTP present in the active site. We use this structure to computationally simulate the open to closed transition of DNA polymerase in the presence of a Watson-Crick base pair. Our microsecond simulations allowed us to characterize the key steps involved in active site assembly, and propose the sequence of events involved in the prechemistry steps of DNA polymerase catalysis. They also reveal new features of the polymerase mechanism, such as a conserved histidine as a potential proton acceptor from the primer 3'-hydroxyl. PMID:26211612

  5. Mapping of the vaccinia virus DNA polymerase gene by marker rescue and cell-free translation of selected RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.V.; Moss, B.

    1984-01-01

    The previous demonstration that a phosphonoacetate (PAA)-resistant (PAA/sup r/) vaccinia virus mutant synthesized an altered DNA polymerase provided the key to mapping this gene. Marker rescue was performed in cells infected with wild-type PAA-sensitive (PAA/sup s/) vaccinia by transfecting with calcium phosphate-precipitated DNA from a PAA/sup r/ mutant virus. Formation of PAA/sup r/ recombinants was measured by plaque assay in the presence of PAA. Of the 12 HindIII fragments cloned in plasmid or cosmid vectors, only fragment E conferred the PAA/sup r/ phenotype. Successive subcloning of the 15-kilobase HindIII fragment E localized the marker within a 7.5-kilobase BamHI-HindIII fragment and then within a 2.9-kilobase EcoRI fragment. The location of the DNA polymerase gene, about 57 kilobases from the left end of the genome, was confirmed by cell-free translation of mRNA selected by hybridization to plasmids containing regions of PAA/sup r/ vaccinia DNA active in marker rescue. A 100,000-dalton polypeptide that comigrated with authentic DNA polymerase was synthesized. Correspondence of the in vitro translation product with purified vaccinia DNA polymerase was established by peptide mapping.

  6. Chimeric Bivalent Virus-Like Particle Vaccine for H5N1 HPAI and ND Confers Protection against a Lethal Challenge in Chickens and Allows a Strategy of Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals (DIVA).

    PubMed

    Noh, Jin-Yong; Park, Jae-Keun; Lee, Dong-Hun; Yuk, Seong-Su; Kwon, Jung-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) and Newcastle disease (ND) are considered as the most devastating poultry infections, owing to their worldwide distribution and economical threat. Vaccines have been widely used to control these diseases in the poultry industry in endemic countries. However, vaccination policy without differentiating infected animals from vaccinated animals (DIVA) makes the virus surveillance difficult. In this study, we developed a bivalent virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine that is composed of the hemagglutinin (HA) and matrix 1 (M1) proteins of the H5N1 HPAI virus (HPAIV) and a chimeric protein containing the ectodomain of the ND virus (NDV) fusion (F) protein fused with the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains of the HPAIV HA protein. A single immunization of chickens with the chimeric VLP vaccine induced high levels of hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titers against H5N1 HPAI virus and anti-NDV antibody detected in ELISA and protected chickens against subsequent lethal HPAIV and NDV infections. Furthermore, we could easily perform DIVA test using the commercial NP-cELISA tests against HPAIV and HI assay against NDV. These results strongly suggest that utilization of chimeric VLP vaccine in poultry species would be a promising strategy for the better control of HPAI and ND simultaneously. PMID:27626934

  7. Chimeric Bivalent Virus-Like Particle Vaccine for H5N1 HPAI and ND Confers Protection against a Lethal Challenge in Chickens and Allows a Strategy of Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals (DIVA)

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jin-Yong; Park, Jae-Keun; Lee, Dong-Hun; Yuk, Seong-Su; Kwon, Jung-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) and Newcastle disease (ND) are considered as the most devastating poultry infections, owing to their worldwide distribution and economical threat. Vaccines have been widely used to control these diseases in the poultry industry in endemic countries. However, vaccination policy without differentiating infected animals from vaccinated animals (DIVA) makes the virus surveillance difficult. In this study, we developed a bivalent virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine that is composed of the hemagglutinin (HA) and matrix 1 (M1) proteins of the H5N1 HPAI virus (HPAIV) and a chimeric protein containing the ectodomain of the ND virus (NDV) fusion (F) protein fused with the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains of the HPAIV HA protein. A single immunization of chickens with the chimeric VLP vaccine induced high levels of hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titers against H5N1 HPAI virus and anti-NDV antibody detected in ELISA and protected chickens against subsequent lethal HPAIV and NDV infections. Furthermore, we could easily perform DIVA test using the commercial NP-cELISA tests against HPAIV and HI assay against NDV. These results strongly suggest that utilization of chimeric VLP vaccine in poultry species would be a promising strategy for the better control of HPAI and ND simultaneously. PMID:27626934

  8. Inhibition of RNA polymerase by streptolydigin: no cycling allowed.

    PubMed

    Kyzer, Scotty; Zhang, Jinwei; Landick, Robert

    2005-08-26

    Bacterial RNA polymerase is a common target for many antibiotics. In two recent papers in Cell and Molecular Cell, and describe a structural basis for inhibition of bacterial RNA polymerase by the antibiotic streptolydigin. Streptolydigin may prevent distortion of a "bridge" alpha helix postulated to occur during the nucleotide addition cycle of RNA polymerase or may block a small movement of the bridge helix that helps load nucleotide triphosphates into the active site. PMID:16122417

  9. Identification of toxigenic Clostridium difficile by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, N; Ou, C Y; Kato, H; Bartley, S L; Brown, V K; Dowell, V R; Ueno, K

    1991-01-01

    Toxigenic strains of Clostridium difficile are causative agents of pseudomembranous colitis and antimicrobial agent-associated diarrhea and colitis. The toxigenicity is routinely assayed by using highly sensitive cell cultures. We used a simple and rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to differentiate toxigenic and nontoxigenic strains of C. difficile. Two sets of oligonucleotide primer pairs derived from nonrepeating sequences of the toxin A gene were used to amplify 546- and 252-bp DNA fragments. A primer pair derived from repeating sequences of the toxin A gene was used to amplify a 1,266-bp DNA product. Amplified products were visualized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by ethidium bromide staining. All 35 cytotoxic strains of C. difficile tested generated the expected amplified DNA. In contrast, none of the 26 noncytotoxic strains tested gave positive results. Although the toxins of C. difficile have been demonstrated to cross-react serologically with the toxins of Clostridium sordellii, we did not detect any amplified DNA in two cytotoxic strains or seven noncytotoxic strains of C. sordellii. PCR was negative in all 30 strains of 20 other Clostridium species. Southern hybridization of HindIII-digested genomic DNA by use of subgenomic probes showed a single hybridization band in toxigenic strains but not in nontoxigenic strains. PCR appears to be a sensitive and specific assay for the rapid identification of toxigenic C. difficile. Nontoxigenic C. difficile appeared to lack the C. difficile toxin A gene. Images PMID:1993763

  10. Energy Conferences and Symposia; (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, J.H.; Simpson, W.F. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Energy Conferences and Symposia, a monthly publication, was instituted to keep scientists, engineers, managers, and related energy professionals abreast of meetings sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and by other technical associations. Announcements cover conference, symposia, workshops, congresses, and other formal meetings pertaining to DOE programmatic interests. Complete meeting information, including title, sponsor, and contact, is presented in the main section, which is arranged alphabetically by subject area. Within a subject, citations are sorted by beginning data of the meeting. New listings are indicated by a bullet after the conference number and DOE-sponsored conferences are indicated by a star. Two indexes are provided for cross referencing conference information. The Chronological Index lists conference titles by dates and gives the subject area where complete information they may be found. The Location Index is alphabetically sorted by the city where the conference will be held.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of DNA Polymerase Clamp Loaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelch, Brian; Makino, Debora; Simonetta, Kyle; O'Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John

    Clamp loaders are ATP-driven multiprotein machines that couple ATP hydrolysis to the opening and closing of a circular protein ring around DNA. This ring-shaped clamp slides along DNA, and interacts with numerous proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair and cell cycle control. Recently determined structures of clamp loader complexes from prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases have revealed exciting new details of how these complex AAA+ machines perform this essential clamp loading function. This review serves as background to John Kuriyan's lecture at the 2010 Erice School, and is not meant as a comprehensive review of the contributions of the many scientists who have advanced this field. These lecture notes are derived from recent reviews and research papers from our groups.

  12. Polymerase Chain Reaction on a Viral Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Carr-Smith, James; Pacheco-Gómez, Raúl; Little, Haydn A; Hicks, Matthew R; Sandhu, Sandeep; Steinke, Nadja; Smith, David J; Rodger, Alison; Goodchild, Sarah A; Lukaszewski, Roman A; Tucker, James H R; Dafforn, Timothy R

    2015-12-18

    The field of synthetic biology includes studies that aim to develop new materials and devices from biomolecules. In recent years, much work has been carried out using a range of biomolecular chassis including α-helical coiled coils, β-sheet amyloids and even viral particles. In this work, we show how hybrid bionanoparticles can be produced from a viral M13 bacteriophage scaffold through conjugation with DNA primers that can template a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This unprecedented example of a PCR on a virus particle has been studied by flow aligned linear dichroism spectroscopy, which gives information on the structure of the product as well as a new protototype methodology for DNA detection. We propose that this demonstration of PCR on the surface of a bionanoparticle is a useful addition to ways in which hybrid assemblies may be constructed using synthetic biology.

  13. Dual phase multiplex polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Pemov, Alexander; Bavykin, Sergei

    2008-10-07

    Highly specific and sensitive methods were developed for multiplex amplification of nucleic acids on supports such as microarrays. Based on a specific primer design, methods include five types of amplification that proceed in a reaction chamber simultaneously. These relate to four types of multiplex amplification of a target DNA on a solid support, directed by forward and reverse complex primers immobilized to the support and a fifth type--pseudo-monoplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of multiple targets in solution, directed by a single pair of unbound universal primers. The addition of the universal primers in the reaction mixture increases the yield over the traditional "bridge" amplification on a solid support by approximately ten times. Methods that provide multitarget amplification and detection of as little as 0.45-4.5.times.10.sup.-12 g (equivalent to 10.sup.2-10.sup.3 genomes) of a bacterial genomic DNA are disclosed.

  14. RNA Polymerase Pausing during Initial Transcription.

    PubMed

    Duchi, Diego; Bauer, David L V; Fernandez, Laurent; Evans, Geraint; Robb, Nicole; Hwang, Ling Chin; Gryte, Kristofer; Tomescu, Alexandra; Zawadzki, Pawel; Morichaud, Zakia; Brodolin, Konstantin; Kapanidis, Achillefs N

    2016-09-15

    In bacteria, RNA polymerase (RNAP) initiates transcription by synthesizing short transcripts that are either released or extended to allow RNAP to escape from the promoter. The mechanism of initial transcription is unclear due to the presence of transient intermediates and molecular heterogeneity. Here, we studied initial transcription on a lac promoter using single-molecule fluorescence observations of DNA scrunching on immobilized transcription complexes. Our work revealed a long pause ("initiation pause," ∼20 s) after synthesis of a 6-mer RNA; such pauses can serve as regulatory checkpoints. Region sigma 3.2, which contains a loop blocking the RNA exit channel, was a major pausing determinant. We also obtained evidence for RNA backtracking during abortive initial transcription and for additional pausing prior to escape. We summarized our work in a model for initial transcription, in which pausing is controlled by a complex set of determinants that modulate the transition from a 6- to a 7-nt RNA. PMID:27618490

  15. RNA Polymerase Pausing during Initial Transcription.

    PubMed

    Duchi, Diego; Bauer, David L V; Fernandez, Laurent; Evans, Geraint; Robb, Nicole; Hwang, Ling Chin; Gryte, Kristofer; Tomescu, Alexandra; Zawadzki, Pawel; Morichaud, Zakia; Brodolin, Konstantin; Kapanidis, Achillefs N

    2016-09-15

    In bacteria, RNA polymerase (RNAP) initiates transcription by synthesizing short transcripts that are either released or extended to allow RNAP to escape from the promoter. The mechanism of initial transcription is unclear due to the presence of transient intermediates and molecular heterogeneity. Here, we studied initial transcription on a lac promoter using single-molecule fluorescence observations of DNA scrunching on immobilized transcription complexes. Our work revealed a long pause ("initiation pause," ∼20 s) after synthesis of a 6-mer RNA; such pauses can serve as regulatory checkpoints. Region sigma 3.2, which contains a loop blocking the RNA exit channel, was a major pausing determinant. We also obtained evidence for RNA backtracking during abortive initial transcription and for additional pausing prior to escape. We summarized our work in a model for initial transcription, in which pausing is controlled by a complex set of determinants that modulate the transition from a 6- to a 7-nt RNA.

  16. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  17. IEEE conference record -- Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This conference covers the following areas: computational plasma physics; vacuum electronic; basic phenomena in fully ionized plasmas; plasma, electron, and ion sources; environmental/energy issues in plasma science; space plasmas; plasma processing; ball lightning/spherical plasma configurations; plasma processing; fast wave devices; magnetic fusion; basic phenomena in partially ionized plasma; dense plasma focus; plasma diagnostics; basic phenomena in weakly ionized gases; fast opening switches; MHD; fast z-pinches and x-ray lasers; intense ion and electron beams; laser-produced plasmas; microwave plasma interactions; EM and ETH launchers; solid state plasmas and switches; intense beam microwaves; and plasmas for lighting. Separate abstracts were prepared for 416 papers in this conference.

  18. Metabolic Engineering VII Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Korpics

    2012-12-04

    The aims of this Metabolic Engineering conference are to provide a forum for academic and industrial researchers in the field; to bring together the different scientific disciplines that contribute to the design, analysis and optimization of metabolic pathways; and to explore the role of Metabolic Engineering in the areas of health and sustainability. Presentations, both written and oral, panel discussions, and workshops will focus on both applications and techniques used for pathway engineering. Various applications including bioenergy, industrial chemicals and materials, drug targets, health, agriculture, and nutrition will be discussed. Workshops focused on technology development for mathematical and experimental techniques important for metabolic engineering applications will be held for more in depth discussion. This 2008 meeting will celebrate our conference tradition of high quality and relevance to both industrial and academic participants, with topics ranging from the frontiers of fundamental science to the practical aspects of metabolic engineering.

  19. NSI conference support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, Susan

    1991-01-01

    One of the many services NSI provides as an extension of customer/user support is to attend major scientific conferences. The conference effort provides NASA/OSSA scientists with many benefits: (1) scientist get to see NSI in action; they utilize the network to read email, and have recently begun to demonstrate their scientific research to their colleagues; (2) scientist get an opportunity to meet and interact with NSI Staff, which gives scientists a chance to get status on their requirements, ask about network status, get acquainted with our procedures, and learn about services; and (3) scientists are exposed to networking in a larger sense; particularly by knowing about other NASA groups who provide valuable scientific resources over the Internet.

  20. High-Throughput Polymerase Fidelity Evolution in Microfluidic Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Jesse; de Paz, Alexandra; Cybulski, Ted; Bhan, Namita; Zhang, Huidan; Weitz, Dave; Tyo, Keith; Kording, Konrad

    Polymerases are technologically important as a tool in molecular biology, and are scientifically important for their role in DNA replication and inheritance. We study large numbers (at least millions) of polymerase mutants by compartmentalizing each gene in a droplet in a microfluidic device. Also in each droplet are in vitro transcription and translation proteins, such that mutant polymerases can be generated to extend their own gene along a known DNA template. Reading the resulting sequence tells us both the mutant gene sequence and the number of and particular errors that the resulting mutant polymerase made during extension. This work is supported by the NIH.

  1. Structural and functional relationships between prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Bernad, A; Zaballos, A; Salas, M; Blanco, L

    1987-12-20

    The Bacillus subtilis phage luminal diameter 29 DNA polymerase, involved in protein-primed viral DNA replication, was inhibited by phosphonoacetic acid (PAA), a known inhibitor of alpha-like DNA polymerases, by decreasing the rate of elongation. Three highly conserved regions of amino acid homology, found in several viral alpha-like DNA polymerases and in the luminal diameter 29 DNA polymerase, one of them proposed to be the PAA binding site, were also found in the T4 DNA polymerase. This prokaryotic enzyme was highly sensitive to the drugs aphidicolin and the nucleotide analogues butylanilino dATP (BuAdATP) and butylphenyl dGTP (BuPdGTP), known to be specific inhibitors of eukaryotic alpha-like DNA polymerases. Two potential DNA polymerases from the linear plasmid pGKL1 from yeast and the S1 mitochondrial DNA from maize have been identified, based on the fact that they contain the three conserved regions of amino acid homology. Comparison of DNA polymerases from prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin showed extensive amino acid homology in addition to highly conserved domains. These findings reflect evolutionary relationships between hypothetically unrelated DNA polymerases.

  2. DNA replication. A familiar ring to DNA polymerase processivity.

    PubMed

    Wyman, C; Botchan, M

    1995-04-01

    Structural similarity reveals that prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases share a mechanism for processivity--but the conservation of additional chromosomal replication mechanisms remains to be determined.

  3. Modification of RNA polymerase IIO subspecies after poliovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, L M; Fernandez-Tomas, C; Dahmus, M E; Gariglio, P

    1987-01-01

    Infection of HeLa cells with poliovirus results in a shutdown of host transcription. In an effort to understand the mechanism(s) that underlies this process, we analyzed the distribution of RNA polymerase IIO before and after viral infection. Analysis of free and chromatin-bound enzyme indicated that there is a significant reduction in RNA polymerase IIO following infection. This observation, together with increasing evidence that transcription is catalyzed by RNA polymerase IIO, supports the hypothesis that poliovirus-induced inhibition of host transcription occurs at the level of RNA chain initiation and involves the direct modification of RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:3029396

  4. Substrate-induced DNA polymerase β activation.

    PubMed

    Beard, William A; Shock, David D; Batra, Vinod K; Prasad, Rajendra; Wilson, Samuel H

    2014-11-01

    DNA polymerases and substrates undergo conformational changes upon forming protein-ligand complexes. These conformational adjustments can hasten or deter DNA synthesis and influence substrate discrimination. From structural comparison of binary DNA and ternary DNA-dNTP complexes of DNA polymerase β, several side chains have been implicated in facilitating formation of an active ternary complex poised for chemistry. Site-directed mutagenesis of these highly conserved residues (Asp-192, Arg-258, Phe-272, Glu-295, and Tyr-296) and kinetic characterization provides insight into the role these residues play during correct and incorrect insertion as well as their role in conformational activation. The catalytic efficiencies for correct nucleotide insertion for alanine mutants were wild type ∼ R258A > F272A ∼ Y296A > E295A > D192A. Because the efficiencies for incorrect insertion were affected to about the same extent for each mutant, the effects on fidelity were modest (<5-fold). The R258A mutant exhibited an increase in the single-turnover rate of correct nucleotide insertion. This suggests that the wild-type Arg-258 side chain generates a population of non-productive ternary complexes. Structures of binary and ternary substrate complexes of the R258A mutant and a mutant associated with gastric carcinomas, E295K, provide molecular insight into intermediate structural conformations not appreciated previously. Although the R258A mutant crystal structures were similar to wild-type enzyme, the open ternary complex structure of E295K indicates that Arg-258 stabilizes a non-productive conformation of the primer terminus that would decrease catalysis. Significantly, the open E295K ternary complex binds two metal ions indicating that metal binding cannot overcome the modified interactions that have interrupted the closure of the N-subdomain. PMID:25261471

  5. A Cross-chiral RNA Polymerase Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Sczepanski, Jonathan T.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2014-01-01

    Thirty years ago it was shown that the non-enzymatic, template-directed polymerization of activated mononucleotides proceeds readily in a homochiral system, but is severely inhibited by the presence of the opposing enantiomer.1 This finding poses a severe challenge for the spontaneous emergence of RNA-based life, and has led to the suggestion that either RNA was preceded by some other genetic polymer that is not subject to chiral inhibition2 or chiral symmetry was broken through chemical processes prior to the origin of RNA-based life.3,4 Once an RNA enzyme arose that could catalyze the polymerization of RNA, it would have been possible to distinguish among the two enantiomers, enabling RNA replication and RNA-based evolution to occur. It is commonly thought that the earliest RNA polymerase and its substrates would have been of the same handedness, but this is not necessarily the case. Replicating D-and L-RNA molecules may have emerged together, based on the ability of structured RNAs of one handedness to catalyze the templated polymerization of activated mononucleotides of the opposite handedness. Such a cross-chiral RNA polymerase has now been developed using in vitro evolution. The D-RNA enzyme, consisting of 83 nucleotides, catalyzes the joining of L-mono- or oligonucleotide substrates on a complementary L-RNA template, and similarly for the L-enzyme with D-substrates and a D-template. Chiral inhibition is avoided because the 106-fold rate acceleration of the enzyme only pertains to cross-chiral substrates. The enzyme's activity is sufficient to generate full-length copies of its enantiomer through the templated joining of 11 component oligonucleotides. PMID:25363769

  6. Genome sequencing conference II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Genome Sequencing Conference 2 was held September 30 to October 30, 1990. 26 speaker abstracts and 33 poster presentations were included in the program report. New and improved methods for DNA sequencing and genetic mapping were presented. Many of the papers were concerned with accuracy and speed of acquisition of data with computers and automation playing an increasing role. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

  7. Moldova. Historic regional conference.

    PubMed

    Moshin, V

    1995-05-01

    The Directorate of Maternal and Child Health and the Family Planning Association of Moldova organized a regional conference, which was held October 18-19, 1994, in Kishinev, Moldova, with the support of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF). The conference,"Problems of Family Planning in Eastern Europe," was attended by approximately 400 Moldovan delegates of governmental and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and by 25 delegates from Romania, Russia, Belarus, the Ukraine, and Georgia. The President of Moldova and the Ministry of Public Health of Moldova gave their approval. The main objectives of the conference were to inform the public about the recommendations of the ICPD, to analyze the status of women's reproductive health and family planning in Eastern Europe, and to find ways of implementing the ICPD Plan of Action. Major problems identified during the conference were: 1) the social and economic problems facing most families; 2) the high rate of morbidity and mortality; 3) the decrease in birth rate; 4) the increase in abortions; 5) the rising incidence of venereal disease; and 6) the absence of an effective family planning system. It was agreed that cooperation between governments and NGOs is essential in designing population programs for each country. The following goals were set: 1) to provide populations with sufficient contraceptives; 2) to actively promote family planning concepts through the mass media; 3) to train specialists and to open family planning offices and centers; 4) to introduce sex education in the curricula of Pedagogical Institutes; and 5) to create national and regional statistical and sociological databases on population issues.

  8. 2004 Mutagenesis Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sue Jinks-Robertson

    2005-09-16

    Mutations are genetic alterations that drive biological evolution and cause many, if not all, human diseases. Mutation originates via two distinct mechanisms: ''vertical'' variation is de novo change of one or few bases, whereas ''horizontal'' variation occurs by genetic recombination, which creates new mosaics of pre-existing sequences. The Mutagenesis Conference has traditionally focused on the generation of mutagenic intermediates during normal DNA synthesis or in response to environmental insults, as well as the diverse repair mechanisms that prevent the fixation of such intermediates as permanent mutations. While the 2004 Conference will continue to focus on the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis, there will be increased emphasis on the biological consequences of mutations, both in terms of evolutionary processes and in terms of human disease. The meeting will open with two historical accounts of mutation research that recapitulate the intellectual framework of this field and thereby place the current research paradigms into perspective. The two introductory keynote lectures will be followed by sessions on: (1) mutagenic systems, (2) hypermutable sequences, (3) mechanisms of mutation, (4) mutation avoidance systems, (5) mutation in human hereditary and infectious diseases, (6) mutation rates in evolution and genotype-phenotype relationships, (7) ecology, mutagenesis and the modeling of evolution and (8) genetic diversity of the human population and models for human mutagenesis. The Conference will end with a synthesis of the meeting as the keynote closing lecture.

  9. Polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of sheep and goat meats.

    PubMed

    K Chikuni; T Tabata; M Kosugiyama; M Monma; M Saito

    1994-01-01

    Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was applied to a qualitative differentiation between sheep, goat and bovine meats. Oligonucleotide primers were designed for the amplification of sheep satellite I DNA sequence. The PCR amplified 374 bp fragments from sheep and goat DNA, but no fragment from bovine, water buffalo, sika deer, pig, horse, rabbit and chicken DNA. Sheep DNA (10 pg) was detected by 4% agarose gel electrophoresis following PCR amplification. Althoug cooking of the sample meats reduced the PCR products, sheep DNA was detected in the meat heated at 120°C. In order to differentiate between sheep and goat meats, nucleotide sequences of the PCR products were determined directly by cycle sequencing. The sequence of PCR products showed 92% of homology between sheep and goat. They were differentiated by ApaI digestion of the PCR products because sheep had one ApaI site and goat had no site in the PCR products.

  10. RNA Polymerases of Maize. Purification and Molecular Structure of DNA-dependent RNA Polymerase II*

    PubMed Central

    Mullinix, Kathleen P.; Strain, Gustave C.; Bogorad, Lawrence

    1973-01-01

    Nuclear DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II has been purified from leaves of Zea mays by a new procedure that improves enzyme stability and thus permits more manipulation during purification. The purification procedure includes a heating step, gel filtration on Sepharose 6B and 4B, and chromatography on DEAE- and DNA-celluloses. This method of purification yields an enzyme that exhibits maximal activity when denatured DNA is used as a template. Electrophoresis of highly purified enzyme on polyacrylamide gels containing sodium dodecyl sulfate indicates that maize RNA polymerase IIa is composed of several polypeptide subunits. The most highly purified preparations contain polypeptides with molecular weights of 200,000, 160,000, 35,000, 25,000, 20,000, and 17,000. Images PMID:4525172

  11. PREFACE: Wake Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, Andrew; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Ivanell, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The 44 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the 2015 Wake Conference, held in Visby on the island of Gotland in Sweden. It is the fourth time this conference has been held. The Wake Conference series started in Visby, where it was held in 2009 and 2011. In 2013 it took place in Copenhagen where it was combined with the International Conference on Offshore Wind Energy and Ocean Energy. In 2015 it is back where it started in Visby, where it takes place at Uppsala University Campus Gotland, June 9th-11th. The global yearly production of electrical energy by wind turbines has grown tremendously in the past decade and it now comprises more than 3% of the global electrical power consumption. Today the wind power industry has a global annual turnover of more than 50 billion USD and an annual average growth rate of more than 20%. State-of-the-art wind turbines have rotor diameters of up to 150 m and 8 MW installed capacity. These turbines are often placed in large wind farms that have a total production capacity corresponding to that of a nuclear power plant. In order to make a substantial impact on one of the most significant challenges of our time, global warming, the industry's growth has to continue for a decade or two yet. This in turn requires research into the physics of wind turbine wakes and wind farms. Modern wind turbines are today clustered in wind farms in which the turbines are fully or partially influenced by the wake of upstream turbines. As a consequence, the wake behind the wind turbines has a lower mean wind speed and an increased turbulence level, as compared to the undisturbed flow outside the farm. Hence, wake interaction results in decreased total production of power, caused by lower kinetic energy in the wind, and an increase in the turbulence intensity. Therefore, understanding the physical nature of the vortices and their dynamics in the wake of a turbine is important for the optimal design of a wind farm. This conference is aimed

  12. Architecture of conference control functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausar, Nadia; Crowcroft, Jon

    1999-11-01

    Conference control is an integral part in many-to-many communications that is used to manage and co-ordinate multiple users in conferences. There are different types of conferences which require different types of control. Some of the features of conference control may be user invoked while others are for internal management of a conference. In recent years, ITU (International Telecommunication Union) and IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force) have standardized two main models of conferencing, each system providing a set of conference control functionalities that are not easily provided in the other one. This paper analyzes the main activities appropriate for different types of conferences and presents an architecture for conference control called GCCP (Generic Conference Control Protocol). GCCP interworks different types of conferencing and provides a set of conference control functions that can be invoked by users directly. As an example of interworking, interoperation of IETF's SIP and ITU's H.323 call control functions have been examined here. This paper shows that a careful analysis of a conferencing architecture can provide a set of control functions essential for any group communication model that can be extensible if needed.

  13. Three-dimensional mapping of differential amino acids of human, murine, canine and equine TLR4/MD-2 receptor complexes conferring endotoxic activation by lipid A, antagonism by Eritoran and species-dependent activities of Lipid IVA in the mammalian LPS sensor system

    PubMed Central

    Scior, Thomas; Lozano-Aponte, Jorge; Figueroa-Vazquez, Vianihuini; Yunes-Rojas, Julian A.; Zähringer, Ulrich; Alexander, Christian

    2013-01-01

    A literature review concerning the unexpected species differences of the vertebrate innate immune response to lipid IVA was published in CSBJ prior to the present computational study to address the unpaired activity-sequence correlation of prototypic E. coli -type lipid A and its precursor lipid IVA regarding human, murine, equine and canine species. To this end, their sequences and structures of hitherto known Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) complexes were aligned and their differential side chain patterns studied. If required due to the lack of the corresponding X-ray crystallographic data, three-dimensional models of TLR4/MD-2/ligand complexes were generated using mono and dimeric crystal structures as templates and in silico docking of the prototypic ligands lipid A, lipid IVA and Eritoran. All differential amino acids were mapped to pinpoint species dependency on an atomic scale, i.e. the possible concert of mechanistically relevant side chains. In its most abstract and general form the three-dimensional (3D-) models devise a triangular interface or “wedge” where molecular interactions between TLR4, MD-2 and ligand itself take place. This study identifies two areas in the wedge related to either agonism or antagonism reflecting why ligands like lipid IVA can possess a species dependent dual activity. Lipid IVA represents an imperfect (underacylated and backbone-flipped), low affinity ligand of mammalian TLR4/MD-2 complexes. Its specific but weak antagonistic activity in the human system is in particular due to the loss of phosphate attraction in the wedge-shaped region conferred by nonhomologous residue changes when compared to crystal and modeled structures of the corresponding murine and equine TLR4/MD-2 complexes. The counter-TLR4/MD-2 unit was also taken into account since agonist-mediated dimerization in a defined m-shaped complex composed of two TLR4/MD-2/agonist subunits triggers intracellular signaling during

  14. Three-dimensional mapping of differential amino acids of human, murine, canine and equine TLR4/MD-2 receptor complexes conferring endotoxic activation by lipid A, antagonism by Eritoran and species-dependent activities of Lipid IVA in the mammalian LPS sensor system.

    PubMed

    Scior, Thomas; Lozano-Aponte, Jorge; Figueroa-Vazquez, Vianihuini; Yunes-Rojas, Julian A; Zähringer, Ulrich; Alexander, Christian

    2013-01-01

    A literature review concerning the unexpected species differences of the vertebrate innate immune response to lipid IVA was published in CSBJ prior to the present computational study to address the unpaired activity-sequence correlation of prototypic E. coli -type lipid A and its precursor lipid IVA regarding human, murine, equine and canine species. To this end, their sequences and structures of hitherto known Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) complexes were aligned and their differential side chain patterns studied. If required due to the lack of the corresponding X-ray crystallographic data, three-dimensional models of TLR4/MD-2/ligand complexes were generated using mono and dimeric crystal structures as templates and in silico docking of the prototypic ligands lipid A, lipid IVA and Eritoran. All differential amino acids were mapped to pinpoint species dependency on an atomic scale, i.e. the possible concert of mechanistically relevant side chains. In its most abstract and general form the three-dimensional (3D-) models devise a triangular interface or "wedge" where molecular interactions between TLR4, MD-2 and ligand itself take place. This study identifies two areas in the wedge related to either agonism or antagonism reflecting why ligands like lipid IVA can possess a species dependent dual activity. Lipid IVA represents an imperfect (underacylated and backbone-flipped), low affinity ligand of mammalian TLR4/MD-2 complexes. Its specific but weak antagonistic activity in the human system is in particular due to the loss of phosphate attraction in the wedge-shaped region conferred by nonhomologous residue changes when compared to crystal and modeled structures of the corresponding murine and equine TLR4/MD-2 complexes. The counter-TLR4/MD-2 unit was also taken into account since agonist-mediated dimerization in a defined m-shaped complex composed of two TLR4/MD-2/agonist subunits triggers intracellular signaling during the

  15. Overexpression of the influenza virus polymerase can titrate out inhibition by the murine Mx1 protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, T; Pavlovic, J; Staeheli, P; Krystal, M

    1992-07-01

    The murine Mx1 protein is an interferon-inducible protein which confers selective resistance to influenza virus infection both in vitro and in vivo. The precise mechanism by which the murine Mx1 specifically inhibits replication of influenza virus is not known. Previously, sensitive replication systems for influenza virus ribonucleoprotein, in which a synthetic influenza virus-like ribonucleoprotein is replicated and transcribed by influenza virus proteins provided in trans, have been developed. With these systems, the antiviral activity of the murine Mx1 protein was examined. It was found that continued expression of influenza polymerase polypeptides via vaccinia virus vectors can titrate out the inhibitory action of the murine Mx1 protein. This titration of inhibitory activity also occurs when the viral PB2 protein alone is overexpressed, suggesting that an antiviral target for the murine Mx1 polypeptide is the viral PB2 protein.

  16. A DNA polymerase activity is associated with Cauliflower Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed Central

    Menissier, J; Laquel, P; Lebeurier, G; Hirth, L

    1984-01-01

    A DNA polymerase activity is found within the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) particle. Analysis of the reaction product reveals that the linear form of the virion DNA is preferentially labelled. The molecular weight of the DNA polymerase as determined on an "activity gel" is 76 kDa. Images PMID:6514573

  17. Human DNA polymerase beta mutations allowing efficient abasic site bypass.

    PubMed

    Gieseking, Sonja; Bergen, Konrad; Di Pasquale, Francesca; Diederichs, Kay; Welte, Wolfram; Marx, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    The DNA of every cell in the human body gets damaged more than 50,000 times a day. The most frequent damages are abasic sites. This kind of damage blocks proceeding DNA synthesis by several DNA polymerases that are involved in DNA replication and repair. The mechanistic basis for the incapability of these DNA polymerases to bypass abasic sites is not clarified. To gain insights into the mechanistic basis, we intended to identify amino acid residues that govern for the pausing of DNA polymerase β when incorporating a nucleotide opposite to abasic sites. Human DNA polymerase β was chosen because it is a well characterized DNA polymerase and serves as model enzyme for studies of DNA polymerase mechanisms. Moreover, it acts as the main gap-filling enzyme in base excision repair, and human tumor studies suggest a link between DNA polymerase β and cancer. In this study we employed high throughput screening of a library of more than 11,000 human DNA polymerase β variants. We identified two mutants that have increased ability to incorporate a nucleotide opposite to an abasic site. We found that the substitutions E232K and T233I promote incorporation opposite the lesion. In addition to this feature, the variants have an increased activity and a lower fidelity when processing nondamaged DNA. The mutations described in this work are located in well characterized regions but have not been reported before. A crystallographic structure of one of the mutants was obtained, providing structural insights.

  18. Human DNA Polymerase β Mutations Allowing Efficient Abasic Site Bypass*

    PubMed Central

    Gieseking, Sonja; Bergen, Konrad; Di Pasquale, Francesca; Diederichs, Kay; Welte, Wolfram; Marx, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The DNA of every cell in the human body gets damaged more than 50,000 times a day. The most frequent damages are abasic sites. This kind of damage blocks proceeding DNA synthesis by several DNA polymerases that are involved in DNA replication and repair. The mechanistic basis for the incapability of these DNA polymerases to bypass abasic sites is not clarified. To gain insights into the mechanistic basis, we intended to identify amino acid residues that govern for the pausing of DNA polymerase β when incorporating a nucleotide opposite to abasic sites. Human DNA polymerase β was chosen because it is a well characterized DNA polymerase and serves as model enzyme for studies of DNA polymerase mechanisms. Moreover, it acts as the main gap-filling enzyme in base excision repair, and human tumor studies suggest a link between DNA polymerase β and cancer. In this study we employed high throughput screening of a library of more than 11,000 human DNA polymerase β variants. We identified two mutants that have increased ability to incorporate a nucleotide opposite to an abasic site. We found that the substitutions E232K and T233I promote incorporation opposite the lesion. In addition to this feature, the variants have an increased activity and a lower fidelity when processing nondamaged DNA. The mutations described in this work are located in well characterized regions but have not been reported before. A crystallographic structure of one of the mutants was obtained, providing structural insights. PMID:21107011

  19. A Practical Polymerase Chain Reaction Laboratory for Introductory Biology Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowlus, R. David; Grether, Susan C.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) laboratory exercise that can be performed by introductory biology students in 1 45- to 55-minute class period. Includes a general description of the polymerase chain reaction, materials needed, procedure, and details of interest to teachers. (JRH)

  20. Incorporation of reporter-labeled nucleotides by DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jon P; Angerer, Bernhard; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2005-02-01

    The incorporation of fluorescently labeled nucleotides into DNA by DNA polymerases has been used extensively for tagging genes and for labeling DNA. However, we lack studies comparing polymerase efficiencies for incorporating different fluorescently labeled nucleotides. We analyzed the incorporation of fluorescent deoxynucleoside triphosphates by 10 different DNA polymerases, representing a cross-section of DNA polymerases from families A, B, and reverse transcriptase. The substitution of one or more different reporter-labeled nucleotides for the cognate nucleotides was initially investigated by using an in vitro polymerase extension filter-binding assay with natural DNA as a template. Further analysis on longer DNA fragments containing one or more nucleotide analogs was performed using a newly developed extension cut assay. The results indicate that incorporation of fluorescent nucleotides is dependent on the DNA polymerase, fluorophore, linker between the nucleotide and the fluorophore, and position for attachment of the linker and the cognate nucleotide. Of the polymerases tested, Taq and Vent exo DNA polymerases were most efficient at incorporating a variety of fluorescently labeled nucleotides. This study suggests that it should be feasible to copy DNA with reactions mixtures that contain all four fluorescently labeled nucleotides allowing for high-density labeling of DNA. PMID:15727132

  1. The RNA Polymerase of Marine Cyanophage Syn5*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bin; Tabor, Stanley; Raytcheva, Desislava A.; Hernandez, Alfredo; King, Jonathan A.; Richardson, Charles C.

    2013-01-01

    A single subunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified and purified to apparent homogeneity from cyanophage Syn5 that infects the marine cyanobacteria Synechococcus. Syn5 is homologous to bacteriophage T7 that infects Escherichia coli. Using the purified enzyme its promoter has been identified by examining transcription of segments of Syn5 DNA and sequencing the 5′-termini of the transcripts. Only two Syn5 RNAP promoters, having the sequence 5′-ATTGGGCACCCGTAA-3′, are found within the Syn5 genome. One promoter is located within the Syn5 RNA polymerase gene and the other is located close to the right genetic end of the genome. The purified enzyme and its promoter have enabled a determination of the requirements for transcription. Unlike the salt-sensitive bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, this marine RNA polymerase requires 160 mm potassium for maximal activity. The optimal temperature for Syn5 RNA polymerase is 24 °C, much lower than that for T7 RNA polymerase. Magnesium is required as a cofactor although some activity is observed with ferrous ions. Syn5 RNA polymerase is more efficient in utilizing low concentrations of ribonucleotides than T7 RNA polymerase. PMID:23258537

  2. Molecular Evolution of Multi-subunit RNA Polymerases: Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lane, William J.; Darst, Seth A.

    2009-01-01

    Transcription in all cellular organisms is performed by multi-subunit, DNA-dependent RNA polymerases that synthesize RNA from DNA templates. Previous sequence and structural studies have elucidated the importance of shared regions common to all multi-subunit RNA polymerases. In addition RNA polymerases contain multiple lineage-specific domain insertions involved in protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions. We have created comprehensive multiple sequence alignments using all available sequence data for the multi-subunit RNA polymerase large subunits, including the bacterial β and β′ subunits and their homologues from archaebacterial RNA polymerases, the eukaryotic RNA polymerases I, II, and III, the nuclear-cytoplasmic large double-stranded DNA Virus RNA polymerases, and plant plastid RNA polymerases. In order to overcome technical difficulties inherent to the large subunit sequences, including large sequence length, small and large lineage-specific insertions, split subunits, and fused proteins, we created an automated and customizable sequence retrieval and processing system. In addition, we used our alignments to create a more expansive set of shared sequence regions and bacterial lineage-specific domain insertions. We also analyzed the intergenic gap between the bacterial β and β′ genes. PMID:19895820

  3. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2001-07-03

    The present invention relates to purine analogs that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such purine analogs to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  4. A general strategy for expanding polymerase function by droplet microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Andrew C.; Dunn, Matthew R.; Hatch, Andrew; Sau, Sujay P.; Youngbull, Cody; Chaput, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerases that synthesize artificial genetic polymers hold great promise for advancing future applications in synthetic biology. However, engineering natural polymerases to replicate unnatural genetic polymers is a challenging problem. Here we present droplet-based optical polymerase sorting (DrOPS) as a general strategy for expanding polymerase function that employs an optical sensor to monitor polymerase activity inside the microenvironment of a uniform synthetic compartment generated by microfluidics. We validated this approach by performing a complete cycle of encapsulation, sorting and recovery on a doped library and observed an enrichment of ∼1,200-fold for a model engineered polymerase. We then applied our method to evolve a manganese-independent α-L-threofuranosyl nucleic acid (TNA) polymerase that functions with >99% template-copying fidelity. Based on our findings, we suggest that DrOPS is a versatile tool that could be used to evolve any polymerase function, where optical detection can be achieved by Watson–Crick base pairing. PMID:27044725

  5. A general strategy for expanding polymerase function by droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Andrew C; Dunn, Matthew R; Hatch, Andrew; Sau, Sujay P; Youngbull, Cody; Chaput, John C

    2016-04-05

    Polymerases that synthesize artificial genetic polymers hold great promise for advancing future applications in synthetic biology. However, engineering natural polymerases to replicate unnatural genetic polymers is a challenging problem. Here we present droplet-based optical polymerase sorting (DrOPS) as a general strategy for expanding polymerase function that employs an optical sensor to monitor polymerase activity inside the microenvironment of a uniform synthetic compartment generated by microfluidics. We validated this approach by performing a complete cycle of encapsulation, sorting and recovery on a doped library and observed an enrichment of ∼1,200-fold for a model engineered polymerase. We then applied our method to evolve a manganese-independent α-L-threofuranosyl nucleic acid (TNA) polymerase that functions with >99% template-copying fidelity. Based on our findings, we suggest that DrOPS is a versatile tool that could be used to evolve any polymerase function, where optical detection can be achieved by Watson-Crick base pairing.

  6. A third mitochondrial RNA polymerase in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Richter, Uwe; Richter, Björn; Weihe, Andreas; Börner, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    In most organisms, the mitochondrial genes are transcribed by RNA polymerases related to the single-subunit RNA polymerases of bacteriophages like T3 and T7. In flowering plants, duplication(s) of the RpoTm gene coding for the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (RPOTm) led to the evolution of additional RNA polymerases transcribing genes in plastids (RPOTp) or in both mitochondria and plastids (RPOTmp). Two putative RPOTmp enzymes were previously described to be encoded by the nuclear genes RpoTmp1 and RpoTmp2 in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Here, we report on a third Physcomitrella RpoT gene. We determined the sequence of the cDNA. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with sequences of plant organellar RNA polymerases suggests that this gene encodes a functional phage-type RNA polymerase. The 78 N-terminal amino acids of the putative RNA polymerase were fused to GFP and found to target the fusion protein exclusively to mitochondria in Arabidopsis protoplasts. P. patens is the only known organism to possess three mitochondrial RNA polymerases.

  7. A general strategy for expanding polymerase function by droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Andrew C; Dunn, Matthew R; Hatch, Andrew; Sau, Sujay P; Youngbull, Cody; Chaput, John C

    2016-01-01

    Polymerases that synthesize artificial genetic polymers hold great promise for advancing future applications in synthetic biology. However, engineering natural polymerases to replicate unnatural genetic polymers is a challenging problem. Here we present droplet-based optical polymerase sorting (DrOPS) as a general strategy for expanding polymerase function that employs an optical sensor to monitor polymerase activity inside the microenvironment of a uniform synthetic compartment generated by microfluidics. We validated this approach by performing a complete cycle of encapsulation, sorting and recovery on a doped library and observed an enrichment of ∼1,200-fold for a model engineered polymerase. We then applied our method to evolve a manganese-independent α-L-threofuranosyl nucleic acid (TNA) polymerase that functions with >99% template-copying fidelity. Based on our findings, we suggest that DrOPS is a versatile tool that could be used to evolve any polymerase function, where optical detection can be achieved by Watson-Crick base pairing. PMID:27044725

  8. Problem-Solving Test: Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: polymerase chain reaction, DNA amplification, electrophoresis, breast cancer, "HER2" gene, genomic DNA, "in vitro" DNA synthesis, template, primer, Taq polymerase, 5[prime][right arrow]3[prime] elongation activity, 5[prime][right arrow]3[prime] exonuclease activity, deoxyribonucleoside…

  9. DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II from Acanthamoeba castellanii. Comparison of the catalytic properties and subunit architectures of the trophozoite and cyst enzymes.

    PubMed

    Detke, S; Paule, M R

    1978-09-27

    The actively growing cells (trophozoites) of the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii were found to contain three or perhaps four different forms of class II DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.6). The chromatographic and catalytic properties of all forms of the Acanthamoeba class II polymerases suggest them to be cognates of the class II polymerases previously reported. The predominant form was purified to near homogeneity and its subunit composition determined. Nine different polypeptides were found associated with the purified enzyme: 21 000; 185 000; 140 000; 70 000; 35 000; 21 000; 19 000; 18 500 and 16 200. These polypeptides were interpreted in terms of two class II RNA polymerases which differ in the molecular weight of their largest subunit. When A. castellanii is transferred to a medium lacking nutrients, the cells undergo cellular differentiation resulting in the formation of metabolically inactive cells (cyst formation). During this process there are significant changes in the RNA sequences transcribed. In contrast to this, we find that the chromatographic and catalytic properties of all of the class II RNA polymerases remain unchanged. Further, the subunit architecture of the predominant form(s) of polymerase II is unaltered. These findings suggest that although new RNA sequences are transcribed during encystment their appearance is not a consequence of extensive alterations in the subunit composition of the major class II RNA polymerase. PMID:708741

  10. Role of polymerase η in mitochondrial mutagenesis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Pabla, Ritu; Siede, Wolfram

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► DNA polymerase η is detectable in mitochondria of budding yeast. ► Pol η reduces UV-induced mitochondrial base pair substitutions and frameshifts. ► For UV-induced base pair substitutions, Pol η and Pol ζ interact epistatically. -- Abstract: DNA polymerase η mostly catalyzes an error-free bypass of the most frequent UV lesions, pyrimidine dimers of the cyclobutane-type. In addition to its nuclear localization, we show here for the first time its mitochondrial localization in budding yeast. In mitochondria, this polymerase improves bypass replication fidelity opposite UV damage as shown in base pair substitution and frameshift assays. For base pair substitutions, polymerase η appears to be related in function and epistatic to DNA polymerase ζ which, however, plays the opposite role in the nucleus.

  11. Molecular breeding of polymerases for resistance to environmental inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Baar, Claudia; d'Abbadie, Marc; Vaisman, Alexandra; Arana, Mercedes E; Hofreiter, Michael; Woodgate, Roger; Kunkel, Thomas A; Holliger, Philipp

    2011-04-01

    Potent inhibitors limit the use of PCR assays in a wide spectrum of specimens. Here, we describe the engineering of polymerases with a broad resistance to complex environmental inhibitors using molecular breeding of eight different polymerase orthologues from the genus Thermus and directed evolution by CSR in the presence of inhibitors. Selecting for resistance to the inhibitory effects of Neomylodon bone powder, we isolated 2D9, a chimeric polymerase comprising sequence elements derived from DNA polymerases from Thermus aquaticus, Thermus oshimai, Thermus thermophilus and Thermus brockianus. 2D9 displayed a striking resistance to a broad spectrum of complex inhibitors of highly divergent composition including humic acid, bone dust, coprolite, peat extract, clay-rich soil, cave sediment and tar. The selected polymerase promises to have utility in PCR-based applications in a wide range of fields including palaeobiology, archaeology, conservation biology, forensic and historic medicine.

  12. The deoxyribonucleic acid polymerases of non-vertebrate eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    McLennan, A G; Keir, H M

    1977-01-01

    DNA-dependent DNA polymerases have now been purified from a number of invertebrate animals, protists, higher plants and fungi. In this article we review the properties of these enzymes and compare them with the better-known enzymes of vertebrate animals and prokaryotes. Three facts emerge. Firstly, plants, protists and fungi contain high-molecular-weight DNA polymerases which may be capable of categorization into two groups on the basis of their properties in vitro. Secondly, no enzyme analogous to the vertebrate polymerase-beta has yet been found in such organisms, and thirdly, many of these enzymes possess associated exonuclease activities like those of the bacterial DNA polymerases. On the basis of these findings, some tentative proposals are made about the evolution of DNA polymerases.

  13. Persistent nuclear actin filaments inhibit transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Serebryannyy, Leonid A; Parilla, Megan; Annibale, Paolo; Cruz, Christina M; Laster, Kyle; Gratton, Enrico; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Kosak, Steven T; Gottardi, Cara J; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2016-09-15

    Actin is abundant in the nucleus and it is clear that nuclear actin has important functions. However, mystery surrounds the absence of classical actin filaments in the nucleus. To address this question, we investigated how polymerizing nuclear actin into persistent nuclear actin filaments affected transcription by RNA polymerase II. Nuclear filaments impaired nuclear actin dynamics by polymerizing and sequestering nuclear actin. Polymerizing actin into stable nuclear filaments disrupted the interaction of actin with RNA polymerase II and correlated with impaired RNA polymerase II localization, dynamics, gene recruitment, and reduced global transcription and cell proliferation. Polymerizing and crosslinking nuclear actin in vitro similarly disrupted the actin-RNA-polymerase-II interaction and inhibited transcription. These data rationalize the general absence of stable actin filaments in mammalian somatic nuclei. They also suggest a dynamic pool of nuclear actin is required for the proper localization and activity of RNA polymerase II.

  14. Rural Energy Conference Project

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Witmer; Shannon Watson

    2008-12-31

    Alaska remains, even at the beginning of the 21st century, a place with many widely scattered, small, remote communities, well beyond the end of both the road system and the power grid. These communities have the highest energy costs of any place in the United States, despite the best efforts of the utilities that service them. This is due to the widespread dependence on diesel electric generators, which require small capital investments, but recent increases in crude oil prices have resulted in dramatic increases in the cost of power. In the enabling legislation for the Arctic Energy Office in 2001, specific inclusion was made for the study of ways of reducing the cost of electrical power in these remote communities. As part of this mandate, the University of Alaska has, in conjunction with the US Department of Energy, the Denali Commission and the Alaska Energy Authority, organized a series of rural energy conferences, held approximately every 18 months. The goal of these meeting was to bring together rural utility operators, rural community leaders, government agency representatives, equipment suppliers, and researchers from universities and national laboratories to discuss the current state of the art in rural power generation, to discuss current projects, including successes as well as near successes. Many of the conference presenters were from industry and not accustomed to writing technical papers, so the typical method of organizing a conference by requesting abstracts and publishing proceedings was not considered viable. Instead, the organizing committee solicited presentations from appropriate individuals, and requested that (if they were comfortable with computers) prepare Power point presentations that were collected and posted on the web. This has become a repository of many presentations, and may be the best single source of information about current projects in the state of Alaska.

  15. Aerospace Environmental Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The mandated elimination of CFC's, Halons, TCA, and other ozone depleting chemicals and specific hazardous materials has required changes and new developments in aerospace materials and processes. The aerospace industry has been involved for several years in providing product substitutions, redesigning entire production processes, and developing new materials that minimize or eliminate damage to the environment. These activities emphasize replacement cleaning solvents and their application verifications, compliant coatings including corrosion protection systems, and removal techniques, chemical propulsion effects on the environment, and the initiation of modifications to relevant processing and manufacturing specifications and standards. The Executive Summary of this Conference is published as NASA CP-3297.

  16. Networks Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tasaki, Keiji K. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The papers included in these proceedings represent the most interesting and current topics being pursued by personnel at GSFC's Networks Division and supporting contractors involved in Space, Ground, and Deep Space Network (DSN) technical work. Although 29 papers are represented in the proceedings, only 12 were presented at the conference because of space and time limitations. The proceedings are organized according to five principal technical areas of interest to the Networks Division: Project Management; Network Operations; Network Control, Scheduling, and Monitoring; Modeling and Simulation; and Telecommunications Engineering.

  17. SVC 2003 Technical Conference Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.

    2003-07-01

    The 46th Annual Technical Conference of the Society of Vacuum Coaters was held in San Francisco May 2-8. All the world events apparently did not affect the attendance or the spirit of the attendees. The Conference was a huge success and very well attended. Many feel that it was the best Techcon yet. This year's Conference really raised the bar for the 47th Annual Technical Conference in Dallas next year. Congratulations go out to the program committee, board of directors, education committee, scholarship committee and Management Plus for a job well done. Excellent accommodations were provided by the San Francisco Marriott.

  18. Control Center Technology Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Conference papers and presentations are compiled and cover evolving architectures and technologies applicable to flight control centers. Advances by NASA Centers and the aerospace industry are presented.

  19. [Characterization and modification of phage T7 DNA polymerase for use in DNA sequencing]: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This project focuses on the DNA polymerase and accessory proteins of phage T7 for use in DNA sequence analysis. T7 DNA polymerase (gene 5 protein) interacts with accessory proteins for the acquisition of properties such as processivity that are necessary for DNA replication. One goal is to understand these interactions in order to modify the proteins to increase their usefulness with DNA sequence analysis. Using a genetically modified gene 5 protein lacking 3` to 5` exonuclease activity we have found that in the presence of manganese there is no discrimination against dideoxynucleotides, a property that enables novel approaches to DNA sequencing using automated technology. Pyrophosphorolysis can create problems in DNA sequence determination, a problem that can be eliminated by the addition of pyrophosphatase. Crystals of the gene 5 protein/thioredoxin complex have now been obtained and X-ray diffraction analysis will be undertaken once their quality has been improved. Amino acid changes in gene 5 protein have been identified that alter its interaction with thioredoxin. Characterization of these proteins should help determine how thioredoxin confers processivity on polymerization. We have characterized the 17 DNA binding protein, the gene 2.5 protein, and shown that it interacts with gene 5 protein and gene 4 protein. The gene 2.5 protein mediates homologous base pairing and strand uptake. Gene 5.5 protein interacts with E. coli Hl protein and affects gene expression. Biochemical and genetic studies on the T7 56-kDa gene 4 protein, the helicase, are focused on its physical interaction with T7 DNA polymerase and the mechanism by which the hydrolysis of nucleoside triphosphates fuels its unidirectional translocation on DNA.

  20. [Characterization and modification of phage T7 DNA polymerase for use in DNA sequencing]: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This project focuses on the DNA polymerase and accessory proteins of phage T7 for use in DNA sequence analysis. T7 DNA polymerase (gene 5 protein) interacts with accessory proteins for the acquisition of properties such as processivity that are necessary for DNA replication. One goal is to understand these interactions in order to modify the proteins to increase their usefulness with DNA sequence analysis. Using a genetically modified gene 5 protein lacking 3' to 5' exonuclease activity we have found that in the presence of manganese there is no discrimination against dideoxynucleotides, a property that enables novel approaches to DNA sequencing using automated technology. Pyrophosphorolysis can create problems in DNA sequence determination, a problem that can be eliminated by the addition of pyrophosphatase. Crystals of the gene 5 protein/thioredoxin complex have now been obtained and X-ray diffraction analysis will be undertaken once their quality has been improved. Amino acid changes in gene 5 protein have been identified that alter its interaction with thioredoxin. Characterization of these proteins should help determine how thioredoxin confers processivity on polymerization. We have characterized the 17 DNA binding protein, the gene 2.5 protein, and shown that it interacts with gene 5 protein and gene 4 protein. The gene 2.5 protein mediates homologous base pairing and strand uptake. Gene 5.5 protein interacts with E. coli Hl protein and affects gene expression. Biochemical and genetic studies on the T7 56-kDa gene 4 protein, the helicase, are focused on its physical interaction with T7 DNA polymerase and the mechanism by which the hydrolysis of nucleoside triphosphates fuels its unidirectional translocation on DNA.

  1. Conserved Endonuclease Function of Hantavirus L Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Rothenberger, Sylvia; Torriani, Giulia; Johansson, Maria U; Kunz, Stefan; Engler, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are important emerging pathogens belonging to the Bunyaviridae family. Like other segmented negative strand RNA viruses, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) also known as L protein of hantaviruses lacks an intrinsic "capping activity". Hantaviruses therefore employ a "cap snatching" strategy acquiring short 5' RNA sequences bearing 5'cap structures by endonucleolytic cleavage from host cell transcripts. The viral endonuclease activity implicated in cap snatching of hantaviruses has been mapped to the N-terminal domain of the L protein. Using a combination of molecular modeling and structure-function analysis we confirm and extend these findings providing evidence for high conservation of the L endonuclease between Old and New World hantaviruses. Recombinant hantavirus L endonuclease showed catalytic activity and a defined cation preference shared by other viral endonucleases. Based on the previously reported remarkably high activity of hantavirus L endonuclease, we established a cell-based assay for the hantavirus endonuclase function. The robustness of the assay and its high-throughput compatible format makes it suitable for small molecule drug screens to identify novel inhibitors of hantavirus endonuclease. Based on the high degree of similarity to RdRp endonucleases, some candidate inhibitors may be broadly active against hantaviruses and other emerging human pathogenic Bunyaviruses.

  2. Integrated polymerase chain reaction/electrophoresis instrument

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.

    2000-01-01

    A new approach and instrument for field identification of micro-organisms and DNA fragments using a small and disposable device containing integrated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enzymatic reaction wells, attached capillary electrophoresis (CE) channels, detectors, and read-out all on/in a small hand-held package. The analysis instrument may be made inexpensively, for example, of plastic, and thus is disposable, which minimizes cross contamination and the potential for false positive identification between samples. In addition, it is designed for multiple users with individual applications. The integrated PCR/CE is manufactured by the PCR well and CE channels are "stamped" into plastic depressions where conductive coatings are made in the wells and ends of the CE microchannels to carry voltage and current to heat the PCR reaction mixtures and simultaneously draw DNA bands up the CE channels. Light is transmitted through the instrument at appropriate points and detects PCR bands and identifies DNA fragments by size (retention time) and quantifies each by the amount of light generated as each phototransistor positioned below each CE channel detects a passing band. The instrument is so compact that at least 100 PCR/CE reactions/analyses can be performed easily on one detection device.

  3. Conserved Endonuclease Function of Hantavirus L Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Rothenberger, Sylvia; Torriani, Giulia; Johansson, Maria U; Kunz, Stefan; Engler, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are important emerging pathogens belonging to the Bunyaviridae family. Like other segmented negative strand RNA viruses, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) also known as L protein of hantaviruses lacks an intrinsic "capping activity". Hantaviruses therefore employ a "cap snatching" strategy acquiring short 5' RNA sequences bearing 5'cap structures by endonucleolytic cleavage from host cell transcripts. The viral endonuclease activity implicated in cap snatching of hantaviruses has been mapped to the N-terminal domain of the L protein. Using a combination of molecular modeling and structure-function analysis we confirm and extend these findings providing evidence for high conservation of the L endonuclease between Old and New World hantaviruses. Recombinant hantavirus L endonuclease showed catalytic activity and a defined cation preference shared by other viral endonucleases. Based on the previously reported remarkably high activity of hantavirus L endonuclease, we established a cell-based assay for the hantavirus endonuclase function. The robustness of the assay and its high-throughput compatible format makes it suitable for small molecule drug screens to identify novel inhibitors of hantavirus endonuclease. Based on the high degree of similarity to RdRp endonucleases, some candidate inhibitors may be broadly active against hantaviruses and other emerging human pathogenic Bunyaviruses. PMID:27144576

  4. Methylation-sensitive polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Moore, Hannah R; Meehan, Richard R; Young, Lorraine E

    2006-01-01

    Here, we describe a robust and reproducible methylation-sensitive polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR) method to detect the percentage methylation in repeat sequences of individual pre-implantation ovine embryos produced by different embryo technologies. This method allows the comparison of embryos produced by nuclear transfer with other production and embryo culture methods, accounting for the heterogeneity between embryos within a single treatment. DNA extracted from single embryos is digested with a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme to determine the percentage methylation after PCR amplification in comparison with an undigested control. The undigested control represents 100% methylation because methylation-sensitive enzymes do not cut methylated DNA, allowing the entire sample to be amplified by PCR. Image analysis quantification of the digested subsample PCR product on an ethidium bromide-stained agarose gel is proportional to the amount of methylated DNA in each embryo. By comparing quadruplicate values obtained for each embryo against a standard curve, we are able to ensure the validity of our results for each individual embryo. Compared with bisulphite sequencing methods, the method described is rapid, inexpensive, and relatively high-throughput. PMID:16761730

  5. Recruitment of RNA polymerase III in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kenneth, Niall S; Marshall, Lynne; White, Robert J

    2008-06-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) III contains a dissociable subcomplex that is required for initiation, but not for elongation or termination of transcription. This subcomplex is composed of subunits RPC3, RPC6 and RPC7, and interacts with TFIIIB, a factor that is necessary and sufficient to support accurate pol III transcription in vitro. Direct binding of TFIIIB to RPC6 is believed to recruit pol III to its genetic templates. However, this has never been tested in vivo. Here we combine chromatin immunoprecipitation with RNA interference to demonstrate that the RPC3/6/7 subcomplex is required for pol III recruitment in mammalian cells. Specific knockdown of RPC6 by RNAi results in post-transcriptional depletion of the other components of the subcomplex, RPC3 and RPC7, without destabilizing core pol III subunits or TFIIIB. The resultant core enzyme is defective in associating with TFIIIB and target genes in vivo. Promoter occupancy by pol II is unaffected, despite sharing five subunits with the pol III core. These observations provide evidence for the validity in vivo of the model for pol III recruitment that was built on biochemical data.

  6. Conserved Endonuclease Function of Hantavirus L Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberger, Sylvia; Torriani, Giulia; Johansson, Maria U.; Kunz, Stefan; Engler, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are important emerging pathogens belonging to the Bunyaviridae family. Like other segmented negative strand RNA viruses, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) also known as L protein of hantaviruses lacks an intrinsic “capping activity”. Hantaviruses therefore employ a “cap snatching” strategy acquiring short 5′ RNA sequences bearing 5′cap structures by endonucleolytic cleavage from host cell transcripts. The viral endonuclease activity implicated in cap snatching of hantaviruses has been mapped to the N-terminal domain of the L protein. Using a combination of molecular modeling and structure–function analysis we confirm and extend these findings providing evidence for high conservation of the L endonuclease between Old and New World hantaviruses. Recombinant hantavirus L endonuclease showed catalytic activity and a defined cation preference shared by other viral endonucleases. Based on the previously reported remarkably high activity of hantavirus L endonuclease, we established a cell-based assay for the hantavirus endonuclase function. The robustness of the assay and its high-throughput compatible format makes it suitable for small molecule drug screens to identify novel inhibitors of hantavirus endonuclease. Based on the high degree of similarity to RdRp endonucleases, some candidate inhibitors may be broadly active against hantaviruses and other emerging human pathogenic Bunyaviruses. PMID:27144576

  7. Involvement of DNA polymerase beta overexpression in the malignant transformation induced by benzo[a]pyrene

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Wu, Mei; Lai, Yanhao; Deng, Wenwen; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Zunzhen

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between DNA polymerase β (pol β) overexpression and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) carcinogenesis. Methods Firstly, mouse embryonic fibroblasts that express wild-type level of DNA polymerase β (pol β cell) and high level of pol β (pol β oe cell) were treated by various concentrations of BaP to determine genetic instability induced by BaP under differential expression levels of pol β. Secondly, malignant transformation of pol β cells by low concentration of BaP (20 μM) was determined by soft agar colony formation assay and transformation focus assay. Thirdly, the mRNA and protein levels of BaP-transformed pol β cells (named pol β-T cells) was measured by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot, and the genetic instability of these cells were examined by HPRT gene mutation assay and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay. Results Pol β cells were successfully transformed into malignant pol β-T cells by an exposure to low concentration of BaP for 6 months. Pol β-T cells exhibited increased levels of pol β gene expression, HPRT gene mutation frequency and polymorphisms of RAPD products that were comparable to those of pol β oe cells. Conclusion Pol β overexpression and its-associated genetic instability may play a key role in BaP carcinogenesis. PMID:23652152

  8. 48 CFR 6101.11 - Conferences; conference memorandum [Rule 11].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... agreements disposing of matters in dispute; or (6) Ways to expedite disposition of the case or to facilitate settlement of the dispute, including, if the parties and the Board agree, the use of alternative dispute... APPEALS, GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT DISPUTE CASES 6101.11 Conferences; conference...

  9. 48 CFR 6101.11 - Conferences; conference memorandum [Rule 11].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... agreements disposing of matters in dispute; or (6) Ways to expedite disposition of the case or to facilitate settlement of the dispute, including, if the parties and the Board agree, the use of alternative dispute... APPEALS, GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT DISPUTE CASES 6101.11 Conferences; conference...

  10. (Tribology conferences and forums)

    SciTech Connect

    Yust, C.S.

    1990-11-30

    The principal meeting attended during this trip was the Japan International Tribology Conference Nagoya 1990. The conference encompassed a wide range of topics, including the tribology of ceramics, the tribology in high-performance automobiles, and many aspects of lubrication technology. Associated forums were also held on the tribology of advanced ceramics, on solid lubrication, and on automotive lubricants. Presentations made during the latter forum discussed anticipated trends in engine development and anticipated improvements in lubricants required for the next generation of engines. In addition to meetings, site visits were made to five industrial organizations to discuss ceramic tribology. Nippon Steel Corporation and Toshiba Corporation are both very active in the ceramic area, Nippon Steel from their interest in research on new materials and Toshiba from both an interest in new materials and in support of their work in electronic devices. Two engine manufacturers were also visited, Toyota Motor Corporation, and Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. These companies were somewhat reserved in their discussion of progress in the utilization of ceramics in automobile engines.

  11. History of NAMES Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Lev

    2013-03-01

    -Russian International Centre was demonstrated. By the high standards of the reports presented, as well as by its overall organization, the second Seminar met the standards of an international conference. Reviews of state-of-the-art developments in materials science were given by leading scientists from Moscow and from the Lorraine region. The three days of the seminar were structured into four main themes: Functional Materials Coatings, Films and Surface Engineering Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies The Environment and three Round Table discussions: Defining practical means of carrying out Franco-Russian collaborations in technology transfer and innovation Materials science ARCUS: Lorraine-Russian collaboration in materials science and the environment 32 oral and 25 poster presentations within four sections were given by a total of 110 participants. NAMES 2007, the 3rd Franco-Russian Seminar on New Achievements in Materials and Environmental Sciences, took place in Metz, France on 7-9 November 2007. The conference highlights fundamentals and development of the five main themes connected to the Lorraine-Russia ARCUS project with possible extension to other topics. The five main subjects included in the ARCUS project are: Bulk-surface-interface material sciences Nanomaterials and nanotechnologies Environment and natural resources Plasma physics—ITER project Vibrational dynamics The first, second and third NAMES conferences were financially supported by the following organizations: Ambassade de France à Moscou Communauté Urbaine du Grand Nancy Région Lorraine Conseil Général de Meurthe et Moselle Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine Université de Metz Université Henry Poincaré CNRS ANVAR Federal Agency on Science and Innovations of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation Moscow Committee on Science and Technologies Moscow Institute of Steel and Alloys (Technological University) The 4th conference is supported by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of

  12. History of NAMES Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Lev

    2013-03-01

    -Russian International Centre was demonstrated. By the high standards of the reports presented, as well as by its overall organization, the second Seminar met the standards of an international conference. Reviews of state-of-the-art developments in materials science were given by leading scientists from Moscow and from the Lorraine region. The three days of the seminar were structured into four main themes: Functional Materials Coatings, Films and Surface Engineering Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies The Environment and three Round Table discussions: Defining practical means of carrying out Franco-Russian collaborations in technology transfer and innovation Materials science ARCUS: Lorraine-Russian collaboration in materials science and the environment 32 oral and 25 poster presentations within four sections were given by a total of 110 participants. NAMES 2007, the 3rd Franco-Russian Seminar on New Achievements in Materials and Environmental Sciences, took place in Metz, France on 7-9 November 2007. The conference highlights fundamentals and development of the five main themes connected to the Lorraine-Russia ARCUS project with possible extension to other topics. The five main subjects included in the ARCUS project are: Bulk-surface-interface material sciences Nanomaterials and nanotechnologies Environment and natural resources Plasma physics—ITER project Vibrational dynamics The first, second and third NAMES conferences were financially supported by the following organizations: Ambassade de France à Moscou Communauté Urbaine du Grand Nancy Région Lorraine Conseil Général de Meurthe et Moselle Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine Université de Metz Université Henry Poincaré CNRS ANVAR Federal Agency on Science and Innovations of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation Moscow Committee on Science and Technologies Moscow Institute of Steel and Alloys (Technological University) The 4th conference is supported by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of

  13. Calendar of Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-08-01

    8 - 18 August 1996 International Summer School on Plasma Physics and Technology La Jolla, CA, USA Contact: Mr V Stefan, Institute for Advanced Physics Studies, PO Box 2964, La Jolla, CA 92038, USA. Tel +1-619-456-5737. 26 - 30 August 1996 Joint Varenna - Lausanne International Workshop on Theory of Fusion Plasmas Villa Monastero, Varenna, Italy Contact: Centro di Cultura Villa Monastero, 1 Piazza Venini, 22050 Varenna (Lecco), Italy. Tel +39-341-831261, Fax +39-341-831281. Application and abstract deadline: 15 June 1996. 2 - 5 September 1996 EU - US Workshop on Transport in Fusion Plasmas Villa Monastero, Varenna, Italy Further information: G Gorini, ISPP, 16 Via Celoria, I-20133 Milano, Italy. Tel +39-2-2392637, Fax +39-2-2392205, E-mail ggorini@mi.infn.it. Administrative contact: Centro di Cultura Villa Monastero, 1 Piazza Venini, 22050 Varenna (Lecco), Italy. Tel +39-341-831261, Fax +39-341-831281. Application and abstract deadline: 15 June 1996. 9 - 13 September 1996 International Conference on Plasma Physics Nagoya, Japan Contact: Conference Secretariat, c/o Prof. Hiromu Momota, National Institute for Fusion Science, Nagoya 464-01, Japan. Tel +81-52-789-4260, Fax +81-52-789-1037, E-mail icpp96@nifs.ac.jp. Abstract deadline: 31 March 1996. 16 - 20 September 1996 19th Symposium on Fusion Technology Lisbon, Portugal Contact: Professor Carlos Varandas, Centro de Fusão Nuclear, 1096 Lisboa Codex, Portugal. Fax +351-1-8417819, E-mail cvarandas@cfn.ist.utl.pt. General information will be available via WWW with URL http://www.cfn.ist.utl.pt. 25 - 29 September 1996 Summer University of Plasma Physics Garching, Germany Contact: Ms Ch Stahlberg, Max-Planck-Institut für PlasmaPhysik, Boltzmannstr 2, D-85748 Garching, Germany. Tel +49-89-3299-2232, Fax +49-89-3299-1001. 11 - 15 November 1996 38th Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics, APS Denver, CO, USA Contact: Dr Richard Hazeltine, University of Texas

  14. Clinical application of a polymerase chain reaction assay in the diagnosis of pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi in a horse.

    PubMed

    Vivrette, S L; Sellon, D C; Gibbons, D S

    2000-11-01

    Diagnosis of pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi can be made more rapidly by use of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay than by use of conventional bacteriologic culture techniques. Use of a PCR assay aids in the differentiation between virulent and avirulent strains of R equi, and the assay may be used to identify R equi in feces and soil of breeding farms. PMID:11061388

  15. Detection of Chlamydia pneumoniae by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Campbell, L A; Perez Melgosa, M; Hamilton, D J; Kuo, C C; Grayston, J T

    1992-02-01

    While criteria for serodiagnosis of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection are well established, isolation of the organism is often difficult. To increase detection of this organism, C. pneumoniae-specific sequences were identified to permit amplification of C. pneumoniae by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A cloned C. pneumoniae 474-bp PstI fragment was shown by dot blot and Southern hybridization to differentiate C. pneumoniae from the other Chlamydia spp., react with all C. pneumoniae isolates tested, and not recognize DNA from normal throat flora or common respiratory tract agents. This cloned fragment was sequenced and primers for use in PCR were chosen on the bases of GenBank analysis, G + C ratio, and absence of secondary structure. All C. pneumoniae isolates tested were amplified by the HL-1-HR-1 primer pair or the HM-1-HR-1 primer pair, producing the expected 437- and 229-bp amplification products, respectively. None of the Chlamydia trachomatis serovars (B/TW-5/OT, C/TW-3/OT, D/UW-3/Cx, E/UW-5/Cx, F/UW-6/Cx, H/UW-4/Cx, I/UW-12/Ur, and L2/434/Bu), Chlamydia psittaci strains (Mn, 6BC, GPIC, FP, and OA), HeLa cells, or other organisms tested were amplified. Reaction conditions including MgCl2, oligonucleotides, and primer concentrations and temperature were optimized before application to clinical samples. Clinical specimens from patients from whom C. pneumoniae was isolated were also positive by PCR, while samples from patients with known C. trachomatis or C. psittaci infection were not amplified by PCR.

  16. A sulphoquinovosyl diacylglycerol is a DNA polymerase epsilon inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Xu, Xianai; Asahara, Hitomi; Takeuchi, Ryo; Oshige, Masahiko; Shimazaki, Noriko; Takemura, Masaharu; Yamaguchi, Toyofumi; Kuroda, Kazufumi; Linn, Stuart; Yoshida, Hiromi; Koiwai, Osamu; Saneyoshi, Mineo; Sugawara, Fumio; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2003-01-01

    Sulphoquinovosyl diacylglycerol (SQDG) was reported as a selective inhibitor of eukaryotic DNA polymerases alpha and beta [Hanashima, Mizushina, Ohta, Yamazaki, Sugawara and Sakaguchi (2000) Jpn. J. Cancer Res. 91, 1073-1083] and an immunosuppressive agent [Matsumoto, Sahara, Fujita, Shimozawa, Takenouchi, Torigoe, Hanashima, Yamazaki, Takahashi, Sugawara et al. (2002) Transplantation 74, 261-267]. The purpose of this paper is to elucidate the biochemical properties of the inhibition more precisely. As expected, SQDG could inhibit the activities of mammalian DNA polymerases such as alpha, delta, eta and kappa in vitro in the range of 2-5 micro M, and beta and lambda in vitro in the range of 20-45 micro M. However, SQDG could inhibit only mammalian DNA polymerases epsilon (pol epsilon) activity at less than 0.04 micro M. SQDG bound more tightly to mammalian pol epsilon than the other mammalian polymerases tested. Moreover, SQDG could inhibit the activities of all the polymerases from animals such as fish and insect, but not of the polymerases from plant and prokaryotes. SQDG should, therefore, be called a mammalian pol epsilon-specific inhibitor or animal polymerase-specific inhibitor. To our knowledge, this represents the first report about an inhibitor specific to mammalian pol epsilon. PMID:12435270

  17. DNA polymerase-associated lectin (DPAL) and its binding to the galactose-containing glycoconjugate of the replication complex.

    PubMed

    Kelley, T J; St Amand, T; Groll, J M; Ray, S; Basu, S

    1999-10-01

    The highly purified DNA Pol-alpha from rat prostate tumor (PA-3) and human neuroblastoma (IMR-32) cells appeared to be inhibited by Ricin (RCA-II), and Con-A. Loss of activity (40 to 60%) of a specific form of DNA polymerase from IMR-32 was observed when the cells were treated with tunicamycin [Bhattacharya, P. and Basu, S. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA 79:1488-1492]. Binding of ConA and RCA to human recombinant DNA polymerase-alpha showed a specific labile site in the N-terminus [Hsi et al.. (1990) Nucleic Acid Res. 18:6231-6237]. The catalytic polypeptide, DNA polymerase-alpha of eukaryotic origin, was isolated from developing tissues or cultured cells as a family of 180 to 120 kDa polypeptides, perhaps derived from a single primary structure. Immunoblot analysis with a monoclonal antibody (SJK-237-71) indicated that the lower molecular weight polypeptides resulted from either proteolytic cleavage of post-translational modification after specific cleavages. Present results suggest DNA polymerase-alpha from embryonic chicken brain (ECB) contains an alpha-galactose-binding subunit which may be involved in developmental regulation of the enzyme. It was shown before that the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-alpha reduces from 186 kDa in 11-day-old ECB to 120 kDa in 19-day-old ECB [Ray, S. et al. Cell Growth and Differentiation 2:567-573] by the treatment with methyl-alpha-galactose. The low molecular weight DNA polymerase activity (120 kDa) can be reconstituted to high molecular weight (Mr = 186 kDa) with an alpha-galactose binding, 56kDa lectin-like protein. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the purified lectin were able to precipitate DNA. Pol-alpha as determined by immunostaining with the polymerase-alpha-specific monoclonal antibody SJK 132-20, suggesting this is a DNA polymerase associated-lectin (DPAL). RCA-II and GS-I-Sepharose 4B chromatographies resulted in significant purification of DNA-alpha and a complete separation of polymerase complex and

  18. Bluetongue virus: dissection of the polymerase complex

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Polly

    2009-01-01

    Summary Bluetongue is a vector-borne viral disease of ruminants that is endemic in tropical and subtropical countries. Since 1998 the virus has also appeared in Europe. Partly due to the seriousness of the disease bluetongue virus (BTV), a member of genus Orbivirus within the family Reoviridae, has been a subject of intense molecular study for the last three decades and is now one of the best understood viruses at the molecular and structural levels. BTV is a complex non-enveloped virus with seven structural proteins arranged in two capsids and a genome of ten double-stranded (ds) RNA segments. Shortly after cell entry the outer capsid is lost to release an inner capsid (the core) which synthesises capped mRNAs from each genomic segment, extruding them into the cytoplasm. This requires the efficient co-ordination of a number of enzymes including helicase, polymerase and RNA capping activities. This review will focus on our current understanding of these catalytic proteins as derived from the use of recombinant proteins, combined with functional assays and the in vitro reconstitution of the transcription/replication complex. In some cases, 3D structures have complemented this analysis to reveal the fine structural detail of these proteins. The combined activities of the core enzymes produce infectious transcripts necessary and sufficient to initiate BTV infection. Such infectious transcripts can now be synthesised wholly in vitro and, when introduced into cells by transfection, lead to the recovery of infectious virus. Future studies thus hold the possibility of analysing the consequence of mutation in a replicating virus system. PMID:18632949

  19. The Writing Conference as Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newkirk, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    Provides an overview of the conversational roles taken on by students and teachers during college-level writing conferences. Uses the performative theory of Erving Goffman to analyze these role patterns. Illuminates the specific performative demands presented by writing conferences on both students and teachers. (HB)

  20. SLA at 100: Conference Preview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstein, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    When School Library Association (SLA) convenes its annual conference in Washington, DC, June 14-17, 2009, the association will be celebrating its 100th birthday. This occasion allows for grand gestures--the SLA Salutes! Awards and Leadership Reception will be held in the Library of Congress's Great Hall. The conference also draws upon Washington…

  1. Conference Connections: Rewiring the Circuit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siemens, George; Tittenberger, Peter; Anderson, Terry

    2008-01-01

    Increased openness, two-way dialogue, and blurred distinctions between experts and amateurs have combined with numerous technology tools for dialogue, personal expression, networking, and community formation to "remake" conferences, influencing not only how attendees participate in but also how organizers host conferences today. (Contains 31…

  2. Sixth National Conference on Citizenship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    The document presents proceedings from the sixth in a series of annual national citizenship conferences. Held in Washington, D.C. in 1951, the conference served as a forum where educational, political, business, religious, labor, civic, and communications leaders could explore functions and duties of American citizenship. The theme of the…

  3. 10 CFR 2.329 - Prehearing conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... place for a conference or conferences before trial. A prehearing conference in a proceeding involving a... proceeding; (10) The setting of a hearing schedule, including any appropriate limitations on the scope...

  4. 10 CFR 2.329 - Prehearing conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... place for a conference or conferences before trial. A prehearing conference in a proceeding involving a... proceeding; (10) The setting of a hearing schedule, including any appropriate limitations on the scope...

  5. 77 FR 38306 - GFIRST Conference Stakeholder Evaluation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... SECURITY GFIRST Conference Stakeholder Evaluation AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS... concerning new Information Collection Request--GFIRST Conference Stakeholder Evaluation. DHS previously... Conference Stakeholder Evaluation Forms. There is no reference to the I-9 Form on the GFIRST...

  6. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... STATES FOR ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment,...

  7. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment, Expansion, and...

  8. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment, Expansion, and...

  9. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment, Expansion, and...

  10. Control of Transcriptional Elongation by RNA Polymerase II: A Retrospective.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Kris; Bentley, David L

    2012-01-01

    The origins of our current understanding of control of transcription elongation lie in pioneering experiments that mapped RNA polymerase II on viral and cellular genes. These studies first uncovered the surprising excess of polymerase molecules that we now know to be situated at the at the 5' ends of most genes in multicellular organisms. The pileup of pol II near transcription start sites reflects a ubiquitous bottle-neck that limits elongation right at the start of the transcription elongation. Subsequent seminal work identified conserved protein factors that positively and negatively control the flux of polymerase through this bottle-neck, and make a major contribution to control of gene expression. PMID:22567377

  11. Inhibition of Influenza Virus Ribonucleic Acid Polymerase by Ribavirin Triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Bertil; Helgstrand, Erik; Johansson, Nils Gunnar; Larsson, Alf; Misiorny, Alfons; Noren, Jan Olof; Philipson, Lennart; Stenberg, Kjell; Stening, Goran; Stridh, Stig; Öberg, Bo

    1977-01-01

    Ribavirin 5′-triphosphate (RTP), derived from the broad-spectrum antiviral compound ribavirin (Virazole), can selectively inhibit influenza virus ribonucleic acid polymerase in a cell-free assay. Ribavirin and its 5′-monophosphate have no effect on the polymerase. The inhibition is competitive with respect to adenosine 5′-triphosphate and guanosine 5′-triphosphate. RTP also inhibits ApG- and GpC-stimulated influenza virus ribonucleic acid polymerase. Since ribavirin is phosphorylated in the cell, the inhibition of influenza multiplication in the cell may also be caused by RTP. PMID:879760

  12. Megagauss X: a conference milestone /

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, C. M.

    2004-01-01

    The first Megagauss Conference now known as MG I, was held in 1965. Thirty-nine years later, we are now attending MG X. As topical conferences go, this is a fairly long time. For comparison, the first IEEE International Pulsed Power Conference was held in 1976. It seems appropriate in the opening address of this 'Milestone' conference to note some highlights of the earlier MG conferences. Some relatively new research lines in progress will also be noted, as well as the speaker's 'wish list' of projects he would like to see pursued. Mention will be made of the growing number of explosive flux compression facilities around the world, as well as some facilities that no longer exist, but that made significant contributions in their time.

  13. Galileo Space Probe News Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) video release presents Part 2 of a press conference regarding the successful entry of the Galileo Space Probe into Jupiter's atmosphere. The press conference panel is comprised of twelve principal investigators and project scientists that oversee the Galileo mission. The press conference question and answer period is continued from Part 1. Atmospheric thermal structure, water abundances, wind profiles, and electricity are among the topics discussed. The question and answer period is followed by a 3 minute presentation in which all of the visuals that are shown during the press conference are reviewed. Parts 1 and 3 of the press conference can be found in document numbers NONP-NASA-VT-2000001073, and NONP-NASA-VT-2000001075.

  14. The DNA polymerase III holoenzyme contains γ and is not a trimeric polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Dohrmann, Paul R.; Correa, Raul; Frisch, Ryan L.; Rosenberg, Susan M.; McHenry, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    There is widespread agreement that the clamp loader of the Escherichia coli replicase has the composition DnaX3δδ’χψ. Two DnaX proteins exist in E. coli, full length τ and a truncated γ that is created by ribosomal frameshifting. τ binds DNA polymerase III tightly; γ does not. There is a controversy as to whether or not DNA polymerase III holoenzyme (Pol III HE) contains γ. A three-τ form of Pol III HE would contain three Pol IIIs. Proponents of the three-τ hypothesis have claimed that γ found in Pol III HE might be a proteolysis product of τ. To resolve this controversy, we constructed a strain that expressed only τ from a mutated chromosomal dnaX. γ containing a C-terminal biotinylation tag (γ-Ctag) was provided in trans at physiological levels from a plasmid. A 2000-fold purification of Pol III* (all Pol III HE subunits except β) from this strain contained one molecule of γ-Ctag per Pol III* assembly, indicating that the dominant form of Pol III* in cells is Pol III2τ2 γδδ’χψ. Revealing a role for γ in cells, mutants that express only τ display sensitivity to ultraviolet light and reduction in DNA Pol IV-dependent mutagenesis associated with double-strand-break repair, and impaired maintenance of an F’ episome. PMID:26786318

  15. Complementation between polymerase- and exonuclease-deficient mitochondrial DNA polymerase mutants in genomically engineered flies

    PubMed Central

    Macao, Bertil; Grönke, Sebastian; Siibak, Triinu; Stewart, James B; Baggio, Francesca; Dols, Jacqueline; Partridge, Linda; Falkenberg, Maria; Wredenberg, Anna; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2016-01-01

    Replication errors are the main cause of mtDNA mutations and a compelling approach to decrease mutation levels would therefore be to increase the fidelity of the catalytic subunit (POLγA) of the mtDNA polymerase. Here we genomically engineered the tamas locus, encoding fly POLγA, and introduced alleles expressing exonuclease- (exo-) and polymerase-deficient (pol-) POLγA versions. The exo- mutant leads to accumulation of point mutations and linear deletions of mtDNA, whereas pol- mutants cause mtDNA depletion. The mutant tamas alleles are developmentally lethal but can complement each other in trans resulting in viable flies with clonally expanded mtDNA mutations. Reconstitution of human mtDNA replication in vitro confirms that replication is a highly dynamic process where POLγA goes on and off the template to allow complementation during proofreading and elongation. The created fly models are valuable tools to study germ line transmission of mtDNA and the pathophysiology of POLγA mutation disease. PMID:26554610

  16. Aerospace Environmental Technology Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, A.F.

    1995-03-01

    The mandated elimination of CFC`s, Halons, TCA, and other ozone depleting chemicals and specific hazardous materials has required changes and new developments in aerospace materials and processes. The aerospace industry has been involved for several years in providing product substitutions, redesigning entire production processes, and developing new materials that minimize or eliminate damage to the environment. These activities emphasize replacement cleaning solvents and their application verifications, compliant coatings including corrosion protection systems, and removal techniques, chemical propulsion effects on the environment, and the initiation of modifications to relevant processing and manufacturing specifications and standards. The Executive Summary of this Conference is published as NASA CP-3297. Separate abstracts have been prepared for some articles from this report.

  17. 2006 environmental controls conference

    SciTech Connect

    2006-07-01

    The two topics covered at the conference were: selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selection non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) for NOx control, and techniques for managing sulfur trioxide. A total of 45 presentations are summarized on the NETL website of which 22 are available in full. These include keynote addresses for each of the two major topics. In addition four poster papers are listed. The papers are arranged in sections headed: regulatory considerations; overview of SCR/SNCR; managing SCR catalysts; gas monitoring and analysis; predictive performance tools; non-coal applications; layered SCR; flow distribution and modeling; hybrid systems; innovative applications; SO{sub 2} conversion to SO{sub 3}; SO{sub 3} overview; acid gas control issues; sorbent injection for acid gas migration; and effects of SO{sub 3} on mercury control.

  18. Personalized cancer care conference.

    PubMed

    Zänker, Kurt S; Mihich, Enrico; Huber, Hans-Peter; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    The Oslo University Hospital (Norway), the K.G. Jebsen Centre for Breast Cancer Research (Norway), The Radiumhospital Foundation (Norway) and the Fritz-Bender-Foundation (Germany) designed under the conference chairmen (E. Mihich, K.S. Zänker, A.L. Borresen-Dale) and advisory committee (A. Borg, Z. Szallasi, O. Kallioniemi, H.P. Huber) a program at the cutting edge of "PERSONALIZED CANCER CARE: Risk prediction, early diagnosis, progression and therapy resistance." The conference was held in Oslo from September 7 to 9, 2012 and the science-based presentations concerned six scientific areas: (1) Genetic profiling of patients, prediction of risk, late side effects; (2) Molecular profiling of tumors and metastases; (3) Tumor-host microenvironment interaction and metabolism; (4) Targeted therapy; (5) Translation and (6) Informed consent, ethical challenges and communication. Two satellite workshops on (i) Ion Ampliseq-a novel tool for large scale mutation detection; and (ii) Multiplex RNA ISH and tissue homogenate assays for cancer biomarker validation were additionally organized. The report concludes that individual risk prediction in carcinogenesis and/or metastatogenesis based on polygenic profiling may be useful for intervention strategies for health care and therapy planning in the future. To detect distinct and overlapping DNA sequence alterations in tumor samples and adjacent normal tissues, including point mutations, small insertions or deletions, copy number changes and chromosomal rearrangements will eventually make it possible to design personalized management plans for individualized patients. However, large individualized datasets need a new approach in bio-information technology to reduce this enormous data dimensionally to simply working hypotheses about health and disease for each individual. PMID:25562519

  19. Personalized Cancer Care Conference

    PubMed Central

    Zänker, Kurt S.; Mihich, Enrico; Huber, Hans-Peter; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    The Oslo University Hospital (Norway), the K.G. Jebsen Centre for Breast Cancer Research (Norway), The Radiumhospital Foundation (Norway) and the Fritz-Bender-Foundation (Germany) designed under the conference chairmen (E. Mihich, K.S. Zänker, A.L. Borresen-Dale) and advisory committee (A. Borg, Z. Szallasi, O. Kallioniemi, H.P. Huber) a program at the cutting edge of “PERSONALIZED CANCER CARE: Risk prediction, early diagnosis, progression and therapy resistance.” The conference was held in Oslo from September 7 to 9, 2012 and the science-based presentations concerned six scientific areas: (1) Genetic profiling of patients, prediction of risk, late side effects; (2) Molecular profiling of tumors and metastases; (3) Tumor-host microenvironment interaction and metabolism; (4) Targeted therapy; (5) Translation and (6) Informed consent, ethical challenges and communication. Two satellite workshops on (i) Ion Ampliseq—a novel tool for large scale mutation detection; and (ii) Multiplex RNA ISH and tissue homogenate assays for cancer biomarker validation were additionally organized. The report concludes that individual risk prediction in carcinogenesis and/or metastatogenesis based on polygenic profiling may be useful for intervention strategies for health care and therapy planning in the future. To detect distinct and overlapping DNA sequence alterations in tumor samples and adjacent normal tissues, including point mutations, small insertions or deletions, copy number changes and chromosomal rearrangements will eventually make it possible to design personalized management plans for individualized patients. However, large individualized datasets need a new approach in bio-information technology to reduce this enormous data dimensionally to simply working hypotheses about health and disease for each individual. PMID:25562519

  20. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO{sub 2} corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  1. ISMB Conference Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Teresa, Gaasterand; Martin, Vingron

    2011-07-01

    This special issue comprises the papers accepted for presentation at the 19th Annual International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology, joint with the 10th European Conference on Computational Biology, an official conference of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB; http://www.iscb.org). ISMB/ECCB 2011 (http://www.iscb.org/ismb2011/) will take place in Vienna, Austria, from July 17 through July 19, 2011; preceded during July 14–16 by eight 1- or 2- day Special Interest Group (SIG) meetings, three satellite meetings and nine half-day tutorials; and followed by two additional satellite meetings. The 48 papers in this volume were selected from 258 submitted papers. Submitted papers were assigned to 13 areas. Area Chairs led each topic area by selecting their area's program committee and overseeing the reviewing process. Many Area Chairs were new compared to 2010, and two completely new areas were added in 2011, ‘Data Visualization’ and ‘Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics’. Six papers for which Area Chairs were in conflict were reviewed under a ‘Conflicts Management’ section headed by the Proceedings Chairs; one such paper was accepted in ‘Bioimaging’. Areas, co-chairs and acceptance information are listed in Table 1. Compared to prior years, five mature topic areas had steady submissions, ‘Evolution and Comparative Genomics’, ‘Gene Regulation and Transcriptomics’, ‘Protein Structure and Function’, ‘Sequence Analysis’, ‘Text Mining’. Two areas newer to ISMB were underrepresented this year, ‘Bioimaging’ and ‘Disease Models and Epidemiology’. One area doubled, ‘Applied Bioinformatics’, renamed from last year's ‘Other Bioinformatics Applications’; and one tripled, ‘Protein Interactions and Molecular Networks’. Across the areas, 326 members of the bioinformatics community provided reviews. Most papers received three reviews and several received four or more. There was

  2. 29 CFR 6.53 - Prehearing conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FEDERALLY ASSISTED CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS AND FEDERAL SERVICE CONTRACTS Substantial Variance and Arm's Length Proceedings § 6.53 Prehearing conference. (a) At the prehearing conference the Administrative...

  3. Hypermutagenesis in mutA cells is mediated by mistranslational corruption of polymerase, and is accompanied by replication fork collapse.

    PubMed

    Al Mamun, Abu Amar M; Gautam, Satyendra; Humayun, M Zafri

    2006-12-01

    Elevated mistranslation induces a mutator response termed translational stress-induced mutagenesis (TSM) that is mediated by an unidentified modification of DNA polymerase III. Here we address two questions: (i) does TSM result from direct polymerase corruption, or from an indirect pathway triggered by increased protein turnover? (ii) Why are homologous recombination functions required for the expression of TSM under certain conditions, but not others? We show that replication of bacteriophage T4 in cells expressing the mutA allele of the glyVtRNA gene (Asp-Gly mistranslation), leads to both increased mutagenesis, and to an altered mutational specificity, results that strongly support mistranslational corruption of DNA polymerase. We also show that expression of mutA, which confers a recA-dependent mutator phenotype, leads to increased lambdoid prophage induction (selectable in vivo expression technology assay), suggesting that replication fork collapse occurs more frequently in mutA cells relative to control cells. No such increase in prophage induction is seen in cells expressing alaVGlu tRNA (Glu-->Ala mistranslation), in which the mutator phenotype is recA-independent. We propose that replication fork collapse accompanies episodic hypermutagenic replication cycles in mutA cells, requiring homologous recombination functions for fork recovery, and therefore, for mutation recovery. These findings highlight hitherto under-appreciated links among translation, replication and recombination, and suggest that translational fidelity, which is affected by genetic and environmental signals, is a key modulator of replication fidelity.

  4. Computational Biology Support: RECOMB Conference Series (Conference Support)

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Waterman

    2006-06-15

    This funding was support for student and postdoctoral attendance at the Annual Recomb Conference from 2001 to 2005. The RECOMB Conference series was founded in 1997 to provide a scientific forum for theoretical advances in computational biology and their applications in molecular biology and medicine. The conference series aims at attracting research contributions in all areas of computational molecular biology. Typical, but not exclusive, the topics of interest are: Genomics, Molecular sequence analysis, Recognition of genes and regulatory elements, Molecular evolution, Protein structure, Structural genomics, Gene Expression, Gene Networks, Drug Design, Combinatorial libraries, Computational proteomics, and Structural and functional genomics. The origins of the conference came from the mathematical and computational side of the field, and there remains to be a certain focus on computational advances. However, the effective use of computational techniques to biological innovation is also an important aspect of the conference. The conference had a growing number of attendees, topping 300 in recent years and often exceeding 500. The conference program includes between 30 and 40 contributed papers, that are selected by a international program committee with around 30 experts during a rigorous review process rivaling the editorial procedure for top-rate scientific journals. In previous years papers selection has been made from up to 130--200 submissions from well over a dozen countries. 10-page extended abstracts of the contributed papers are collected in a volume published by ACM Press and Springer, and are available at the conference. Full versions of a selection of the papers are published annually in a special issue of the Journal of Computational Biology devoted to the RECOMB Conference. A further point in the program is a lively poster session. From 120-300 posters have been presented each year at RECOMB 2000. One of the highlights of each RECOMB conference is a

  5. RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity of RNA tumor virus. VI. Processive mode of action of avian myeloblastosis virus polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Leis, J P

    1976-01-01

    Purified avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV) polymerase consisting of alpha,beta subunits has been shown to act processively in catalyzing DNA synthesis primed with 34S AMV RNA oligo(dT), poly(A)-poly(dT), and poly(I)-poly(dC). DNA transcripts prepared with 34S AMV RNA-oligo(dT)14 and AMV polymerase (alphabeta) have been shown to have a molecular weight of 1.05 X 10(6), or approximately one-third the size of the 34S RNA genome. Polymerase subunit alpha acts nonprocessively with the above templates. PMID:61286

  6. Engineered DNA polymerase improves PCR results for plastid DNA1

    PubMed Central

    Schori, Melanie; Appel, Maryke; Kitko, AlexaRae; Showalter, Allan M.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Secondary metabolites often inhibit PCR and sequencing reactions in extractions from plant material, especially from silica-dried and herbarium material. A DNA polymerase that is tolerant to inhibitors improves PCR results. • Methods and Results: A novel DNA amplification system, including a DNA polymerase engineered via directed evolution for improved tolerance to common plant-derived PCR inhibitors, was evaluated and PCR parameters optimized for three species. An additional 31 species were then tested with the engineered enzyme and optimized protocol, as well as with regular Taq polymerase. • Conclusions: PCR products and high-quality sequence data were obtained for 96% of samples for rbcL and 79% for matK, compared to 29% and 21% with regular Taq polymerase. PMID:25202519

  7. PCNA tool belts and polymerase bridges form during translesion synthesis.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Elizabeth M; Spies, Maria; Washington, M Todd

    2016-09-30

    Large multi-protein complexes play important roles in many biological processes, including DNA replication and repair, transcription, and signal transduction. One of the challenges in studying such complexes is to understand their mechanisms of assembly and disassembly and their architectures. Using single-molecule total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy, we have examined the assembly and disassembly of the multi-protein complex that carries out translesion synthesis, the error-prone replication of damaged DNA. We show that the ternary complexes containing proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and two non-classical DNA polymerases, Rev1 and DNA polymerase η, have two architectures: PCNA tool belts and Rev1 bridges. Moreover, these complexes are dynamic and their architectures can interconvert without dissociation. The formation of PCNA tool belts and Rev1 bridges and the ability of these complexes to change architectures are likely means of facilitating selection of the appropriate non-classical polymerase and polymerase-switching events.

  8. The origin and early evolution of nucleic acid polymerases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazcano, A.; Cappello, R.; Valverde, V.; Llaca, V.; Oro, J.

    1992-01-01

    The hypothesis that vestiges of the ancestral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase involved in the replication of RNA genomes of Archean cells are present in the eubacterial RNA-polymerase beta-prime subunit and its homologues is discussed. It is shown that, in the DNA-dependent RNA polymerases from three cellular lineages, a very conserved sequence of eight amino acids, also found in a small RNA-binding site previously described for the E. coli polynucleotide phosphorylase and the S1 ribosomal protein, is present. The optimal conditions for the replicase activity of the avian-myeloblastosis-virus reverse transcriptase are presented. The evolutionary significance of the in vitro modifications of substrate and template specificities of RNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases is discussed.

  9. Redistributive properties of the vesicular stomatitis virus polymerase.

    PubMed

    Helfman, W B; Perrault, J

    1989-08-01

    The template for transcription of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) genome consists of a negative-strand RNA (approximately 11 kb) tightly associated with approximately 1250 copies of the nucleocapsid or N protein (N-RNA template). The interaction between the virion-associated polymerase and this template was probed with a novel assay using purified N-RNA complexes added to detergent-disrupted uv-irradiated standard virions or unirradiated defective interfering (DI) particles. In contrast to the well-known stability of assembled cellular transcription complexes, the VSV polymerase copied exogenously added templates efficiently and yielded products indistinguishable from control virus transcription. Addition of uv-irradiated N-RNA templates to unirradiated virus effectively competed for transcription of endogenous template indicating that most or all of the polymerase can freely redistribute. Furthermore preincubation of virus and added templates at high ionic strength to solubilize L and NS polymerase proteins did not release additional active enzyme for redistribution. Pretranscription of virus also had little or no effect on redistributed activity indicating that polymerase complexes are capable of multiple rounds of synthesis beginning at the 3' end promoter. Unexpectedly, titration with saturating amounts of added N-RNA showed that active polymerase complexes are only in slight excess relative to template in standard or DI particles despite the large surplus of packaged L and NS polypeptides. Moreover, added standard virus templates competed equally well for the redistributing polymerase from DI particles or standard virus indicating no significant polymerase-binding preference for interfering templates. These findings bear important implications regarding mechanisms of VSV transcription and replication.

  10. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2004-10-12

    The present invention relates to 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  11. Kinetics and thermodynamics of DNA polymerases with exonuclease proofreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Kinetic theory and thermodynamics are applied to DNA polymerases with exonuclease activity, taking into account the dependence of the rates on the previously incorporated nucleotide. The replication fidelity is shown to increase significantly thanks to this dependence at the basis of the mechanism of exonuclease proofreading. In particular, this dependence can provide up to a 100-fold lowering of the error probability under physiological conditions. Theory is compared with numerical simulations for the DNA polymerases of T7 viruses and human mitochondria.

  12. Inhibition of DNA polymerase alpha by aphidicolin derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Arabshahi, L; Brown, N; Khan, N; Wright, G

    1988-01-01

    17-Acetylaphidicolin was 10-fold weaker and two derivatives lacking hydroxyl groups at the 16 and 17 positions were 100-fold weaker than aphidicolin as inhibitors of DNA polymerase alpha from HeLa and Chinese hamster ovary cells. 17,18-Diacetyl, 3,17,18-triacetyl and 3-epi derivatives of aphidicolin were inactive. Active compounds were, like aphidicolin, competitive with dCTP and did not inhibit aphidicolin-resistant DNA polymerases. PMID:3133639

  13. Inhibition of DNA polymerase alpha by aphidicolin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Arabshahi, L; Brown, N; Khan, N; Wright, G

    1988-06-10

    17-Acetylaphidicolin was 10-fold weaker and two derivatives lacking hydroxyl groups at the 16 and 17 positions were 100-fold weaker than aphidicolin as inhibitors of DNA polymerase alpha from HeLa and Chinese hamster ovary cells. 17,18-Diacetyl, 3,17,18-triacetyl and 3-epi derivatives of aphidicolin were inactive. Active compounds were, like aphidicolin, competitive with dCTP and did not inhibit aphidicolin-resistant DNA polymerases.

  14. Techniques used to study the DNA polymerase reaction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Catherine M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary A minimal reaction pathway for DNA polymerases was established over 20 years ago using chemical quench methods. Since that time there has been considerable interest in noncovalent steps in the reaction pathway, conformational changes involving the polymerase or its DNA substrate that may play a role in substrate specificity. Fluorescence-based assays have been devised in order to study these conformational transitions and the results obtained have added new detail to the reaction pathway. PMID:19665596

  15. Unusual promoter-independent transcription reactions with bacteriophage RNA polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Krupp, G

    1989-01-01

    Efficient transcription reactions of DNA-dependent RNA polymerases require the presence of a specific promoter sequence. This report shows that in the absence of their cognate promoter, two bacteriophage RNA polymerases are capable of performing unusual transcription reactions: (i) the DNA template serves also as a primer for RNA synthesis and this leads to hybrid DNA/RNA molecules, (ii) if the DNA template forms a hairpin structure, the linear DNA can be transcribed via the 'rolling circle' mechanism. Images PMID:2471146

  16. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

    2009-05-04

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  17. A meiotic DNA polymerase from a mushroom, Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed Central

    Takami, K; Matsuda, S; Sono, A; Sakaguchi, K

    1994-01-01

    A meiotic DNA polymerase [DNA nucleotidyltransferase (DNA-directed), EC 2.7.7.7], which likely has a role in meiotic DNA repair, was isolated from a mushroom, Agaricus bisporus. The purified fraction displays three bands in SDS/PAGE, at molecular masses of 72 kDa, 65 kDa and 36 kDa. Optimal activity is at pH 7.0-8.0 in the presence of 5 mM Mg2+ and 50 mM KCl and at 28-30 degrees C, which is the temperature for meiosis. This enzyme is resistant to N-ethylmaleimide and sensitive to 2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate, suggesting that it is a beta-like DNA polymerase. These characteristics are similar to those of Coprinus DNA polymerase beta [Sakaguchi and Lu (1982) Mol. Cell. Biol. 2, 752-757]. In Western-blot analysis, the antiserum against the Coprinus polymerase reacts only with the 65 kDa band, which coincides with the molecular mass of the Coprinus polymerase. Western-blot analysis also showed that the antiserum could react with crude extracts not only from the Agaricales family, to which Agaricus and Coprinus belong, but also from different mushroom families and Saccharomyces. The Agaricus polymerase activity can be found only in the meiotic-cell-rich fraction, but the enzyme is also present in the somatic cells in an inactive state. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8172591

  18. DNA Polymerase in Virions of a Reptilian Type C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Twardzik, Daniel R.; Papas, Takis S.; Portugal, Frank H.

    1974-01-01

    A study was made of the DNA polymerase of reptilian type C virus isolated from Russell's viper spleen cells. Simultaneous detection experiments demonstrated the presence of 70S RNA and RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity in reptilian type C virions. The endogenous activity was dependent on the addition of all four deoxynucleotide triphosphates and demonstrated an absolute requirement for a divalent cation. The reptilian viral DNA polymerase elutes from phosphocellulose at 0.22 M salt. In this respect, it is similar to the avian (avian myeloblastosis virus; AMV) viral enzyme but is different from the mammalian (Rauscher leukemia virus; RLV) viral enzyme which elutes at 0.4 M salt. The molecular weight of the viper DNA polymerase as estimated from glycerol gradient centrifugation is 109,000. It is a smaller enzyme than the AMV DNA polymerase (180,000 daltons) and somewhat larger than the RLV enzyme (70,000 daltons). A comparison of other properties of the type C reptilian DNA polymerase with the enzyme found in other type C oncogenic viruses is made. PMID:4129837

  19. Sphingosine, a Modulator of Human Translesion DNA Polymerase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Kamath-Loeb, Ashwini S.; Balakrishna, Sharath; Whittington, Dale; Shen, Jiang-Cheng; Emond, Mary J.; Okabe, Takayoshi; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio; Nishimura, Susumu; Loeb, Lawrence A.

    2014-01-01

    Translesion (TLS) DNA polymerases are specialized, error-prone enzymes that synthesize DNA across bulky, replication-stalling DNA adducts. In so doing, they facilitate the progression of DNA synthesis and promote cell proliferation. To potentiate the effect of cancer chemotherapeutic regimens, we sought to identify inhibitors of TLS DNA polymerases. We screened five libraries of ∼3000 small molecules, including one comprising ∼600 nucleoside analogs, for their effect on primer extension activity of DNA polymerase η (Pol η). We serendipitously identified sphingosine, a lipid-signaling molecule that robustly stimulates the activity of Pol η by ∼100-fold at low micromolar concentrations but inhibits it at higher concentrations. This effect is specific to the Y-family DNA polymerases, Pols η, κ, and ι. The addition of a single phosphate group on sphingosine completely abrogates this effect. Likewise, the inclusion of other sphingolipids, including ceramide and sphingomyelin to extension reactions does not elicit this response. Sphingosine increases the rate of correct and incorrect nucleotide incorporation while having no effect on polymerase processivity. Endogenous Pol η activity is modulated similarly as the recombinant enzyme. Importantly, sphingosine-treated cells exhibit increased lesion bypass activity, and sphingosine tethered to membrane lipids mimics the effects of free sphingosine. Our studies have uncovered sphingosine as a modulator of TLS DNA polymerase activity; this property of sphingosine may be associated with its known role as a signaling molecule in regulating cell proliferation in response to cellular stress. PMID:24928506

  20. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNA polymerases have homologous core subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Sweetser, D; Nonet, M; Young, R A

    1987-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerases are complex aggregates whose component subunits are functionally ill-defined. The gene that encodes the 140,000-dalton subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II was isolated and studied in detail to obtain clues to the protein's function. This gene, RPB2, exists in a single copy in the haploid genome. Disruption of the gene is lethal to the yeast cell. RPB2 encodes a protein of 138,750 daltons, which contains sequences implicated in binding purine nucleotides and zinc ions and exhibits striking sequence homology with the beta subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. These observations suggest that the yeast and the E. coli subunit have similar roles in RNA synthesis, as the beta subunit contains binding sites for nucleotide substrates and a portion of the catalytic site for RNA synthesis. The subunit homologies reported here, and those observed previously with the largest RNA polymerase subunit, indicate that components of the prokaryotic RNA polymerase "core" enzyme have counterparts in eukaryotic RNA polymerases. PMID:3547406

  1. Purification of bacterial RNA polymerase: tools and protocols

    PubMed Central

    Svetlov, Vladimir; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacterial RNA polymerase is the first point of gene expression and a validated target for antibiotics. Studied for several decades, the Escherichia coli transcriptional apparatus is by far the best characterized, with numerous RNA polymerase mutants and auxiliary factors isolated and analyzed in great detail. Since the E. coli enzyme was refractory to crystallization, structural studies have been focused on Thermus RNA polymerase s, revealing atomic details of the catalytic center and RNA polymerase interactions with nucleic acids, antibiotics, and regulatory proteins. However, numerous differences between these enzymes, including resistance of Thermus RNA polymerases to some antibiotics, underscored the importance of the E. coli enzyme structures. Three groups published the se long awaited structures in 2013, enabling functional and structural studies of the same model system. This progress was made possible, in large part, by the use of multicistronic vectors for expression of the E. coli enzyme in large quantities and in a highly active form. Here we describe the commonly used vectors and procedures for purification of the E. coli RNA polymerase. PMID:25665556

  2. Dysregulation of RNA polymerase I transcription during disease.

    PubMed

    Hannan, K M; Sanij, E; Rothblum, L I; Hannan, R D; Pearson, R B

    2013-01-01

    Transcription of the ribosomal RNA genes by the dedicated RNA polymerase I enzyme and subsequent processing of the ribosomal RNA are fundamental control steps in the synthesis of functional ribosomes. Dysregulation of Pol I transcription and ribosome biogenesis is linked to the etiology of a broad range of human diseases. Diseases caused by loss of function mutations in the molecular constituents of the ribosome, or factors intimately associated with RNA polymerase I transcription and processing are collectively termed ribosomopathies. Ribosomopathies are generally rare and treatment options are extremely limited tending to be more palliative than curative. Other more common diseases are associated with profound changes in cellular growth such as cardiac hypertrophy, atrophy or cancer. In contrast to ribosomopathies, altered RNA polymerase I transcriptional activity in these diseases largely results from dysregulated upstream oncogenic pathways or by direct modulation by oncogenes or tumor suppressors at the level of the RNA polymerase I transcription apparatus itself. Ribosomopathies associated with mutations in ribosomal proteins and ribosomal RNA processing or assembly factors have been covered by recent excellent reviews. In contrast, here we review our current knowledge of human diseases specifically associated with dysregulation of RNA polymerase I transcription and its associated regulatory apparatus, including some cases where this dysregulation is directly causative in disease. We will also provide insight into and discussion of possible therapeutic approaches to treat patients with dysregulated RNA polymerase I transcription. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Transcription by Odd Pols. PMID:23153826

  3. DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from Crithidia oncopelti kinetoplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitseva, G.N.; Levchenko, I.V.; Tarasov, I.A.; Kuz'min, E.V.

    1986-03-10

    Mitochondrial DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was isolated from Crithidia oncopelti kinetoplasts, and its properties were studied. RNA polymerase was solubilized from the structures with 2% digitonin in 0.25 M KCl. The enzyme was purified 550-fold according to activity by gel filtration through Sephadex 4B, followed by chromatography on heparin-Sepharose 4B, phosphocellulose, and DEAE-Sephadex A-50. The optimum conditions of the RNA polymerase reaction (time of incubation, temperature, Mg/sup 2 +/, K/sup +/ concentrations, etc) were determined. It was established that the activity of the enzyme is not inhibited by ..cap alpha..-amanitin, rifampicin, and streptolidigin, but is strongly suppressed by Mn/sup 2 +/ ions, a high KCl concentrations, as well as ethidium bromide. The RNA polymerase isolated transcribes denatured DNA substantially better than the native form. The enzyme utilizes mtDNA (in hybrid plasmids) as a substrate appreciably more actively than the nuclear form. Among the substrates used, the greatest template activity is possessed by single-stranded poly(dAT). In all the properties studied, DNA-dependent RNA polymerase from C. oncopelti kinetoplasts is similar to the mitochondrial enzymes of other eukaryotes but differs from the nuclear enzymes of this organism and from bacterial RNA polymerases.

  4. PREFACE: The Irago Conference 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Adarsh; Okada, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    The Irago Conference 2012 - 360 degree outlook on critical scientific and technological challenges for a sustainable society Organized by the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology, the Irago Conference, held recently (15-16 November) in Aichi, Japan, aimed to enhance mutual understanding between scientists, engineers and policymakers. Over 180 participants tackled topics ranging from energy and natural resources to public health and disaster prevention. The 360-degree outlook of the conference impressed speakers and guests. ''This conference has been extremely informative,'' noted Robert Gellar from the University of Tokyo. ''A unique conference with experts from a range of backgrounds,'' agreed Uracha Ruktanonchai from the National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC) in Thailand. Similarly, G P Li, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of California Irvine commented that he had been ''able to think the unthinkable'' as a range of topics came together. The conference was streamed live on Ustream to ensure that researchers from across the world could benefit from thought-provoking presentations examining global issues such as energy, disaster mitigation and nanotechnology. ''This was wonderful,'' said Oussama Khatib from Stanford University, ''A good recipe of speakers from such a range of backgrounds.'' Manuscripts submitted to the organizers were peer-reviewed, and the papers in this proceedings were accepted for Journal of Physics: Conference Series. In addition to the formal speaker programme, graduate-student sessions provided a platform for graduate students to describe their latest findings as oral presentations. A series of excursions to relevant locations, such as the Tahara megasolar region under construction and a local car-manufacturing factory, gave participants the opportunity to further consider practical applications of their research in industry

  5. Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Poe, C.C. Jr.; Harris, C.E.

    1995-10-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference in Hampton, Virginia, December 6-8, 1994. This conference was the culmination of a 3-year program that was initiated by NASA late in 1990 to develop mechanics of textile composites in support of the NASA Advanced Composites Technology Program (ACT). The goal of the program was to develop mathematical models of textile preform materials and test methods to facilitate structural analysis and design. Participants in the program were from NASA, academia, and industry. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for articles from this conference.

  6. Hot isostatic pressing: Conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Froes, F.H.; Hebeisen, J.; Widmer, R.

    1996-12-31

    The International Conference on Hot Isostatic Pressing was held on May 20-22, 1996, in Andover, Massachusetts. This conference discussed the state-of-the-art of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and competing compaction techniques. HIP allows complex cost-effective near net shapes to be produced from powder products, densification of castings thereby enhancing performance, retention of metastable structures such as nano-sized grains, and even creative food processing. Sections in the conference covered such items as fundamentals, mathematical modeling, equipment and instrumentation, advanced materials and processes, composite materials, casting densification, surface treatments, HIP bonding, and competing technologies. Forty five papers were processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  7. DOE Workshop at Tapia Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Valerie

    2015-02-19

    The DE-SC0013568 DOE Grant, in the amount of $11,822.79, was used to support five doctoral students from underrepresented groups to attend the 2015 Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing Conference, held February 18-21 in Boston, MA. Each scholarship was approximately $1200 to cover conference registration, travel, and lodging for the duration of the conference. The remaining $5,822.79 was used to support a DOE Breakfast Workshop during breakfast on Thursday, February 19. The Breakfast supported approximately 140 graduate students from underrepresented groups to learn about the different career opportunities at the different DOE National Laboratories.

  8. Differentiated Staffing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geisinger, Robert W.; And Others

    This report describes school operation changes in scheduling, curriculum, decisionmaking powers, and individualization of instruction that are concurrent with the adoption of differentiated staffing. The author defines differentiated staffing, explains where and at what levels it has been utilized, provides descriptions of results achieved, gives…

  9. Differential games.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varaiya, P. P.

    1972-01-01

    General discussion of the theory of differential games with two players and zero sum. Games starting at a fixed initial state and ending at a fixed final time are analyzed. Strategies for the games are defined. The existence of saddle values and saddle points is considered. A stochastic version of a differential game is used to examine the synthesis problem.

  10. Topical conference: Opportunities in biology for physicists. Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    2002-12-16

    The conference was aimed at early career physicists who were interested in exploring the possibilities of working at the interface between physics and biology, in particular, graduate students and postdocs considering applying the methods of physics to biological research. Areas of major importance were genomics and evolution, biological networks, biomolecular dynamics, high-resolution imaging of living cells, and technologies for biological investigation. A total of 205 persons attended the conference.

  11. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2006 Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang; Wang, En-Ke; Cai, Xu; Huang, Huan-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    The Quark Matter 2006 conference was held on 14 20 November 2006 at the Shanghai Science Hall of the Shanghai Association of Sciences and Technology in Shanghai, China. It was the 19th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus Nucleus Collisions. The conference was organized jointly by SINAP (Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)) and CCNU (Central China Normal University, Wuhan). Over 600 scientists from 32 countries in five continents attended the conference. This is the first time that China has hosted such a premier conference in the field of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, an important event for the Chinese high energy nuclear physics community. About one half of the conference participants are junior scientists—a clear indication of the vigor and momentum for this field, in search of the fundamental nature of the nuclear matter at extreme conditions. Professor T D Lee, honorary chair of the conference and one of the founders of the quark matter research, delivered an opening address with his profound and philosophical remarks on the recent discovery of the nature of strongly-interacting quark-gluon-plasma (sQGP). Professor Hongjie Xu, director of SINAP, gave a welcome address to all participants on behalf of the two hosting institutions. Dr Peiwen Ji, deputy director of the Mathematics and Physics Division of the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), also addressed the conference participants and congratulated them on the opening of the conference. Professor Mianheng Jiang, vice president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), gave a concise introduction about the CAS as the premier research institution in China. He highlighted continued efforts at CAS to foster international collaborations between China and other nations. The Quark Matter 2006 conference is an example of such a successful collaboration between high energy nuclear physicists in China and other nations all over the world. The

  12. Genetic evidence that both dNTP-stabilized and strand slippage mechanisms may dictate DNA polymerase errors within mononucleotide microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Baptiste, Beverly A; Jacob, Kimberly D; Eckert, Kristin A

    2015-05-01

    Mononucleotide microsatellites are tandem repeats of a single base pair, abundant within coding exons and frequent sites of mutation in the human genome. Because the repeated unit is one base pair, multiple mechanisms of insertion/deletion (indel) mutagenesis are possible, including strand-slippage, dNTP-stabilized, and misincorportion-misalignment. Here, we examine the effects of polymerase identity (mammalian Pols α, β, κ, and η), template sequence, dNTP pool size, and reaction temperature on indel errors during in vitro synthesis of mononucleotide microsatellites. We utilized the ratio of insertion to deletion errors as a genetic indicator of mechanism. Strikingly, we observed a statistically significant bias toward deletion errors within mononucleotide repeats for the majority of the 28 DNA template and polymerase combinations examined, with notable exceptions based on sequence and polymerase identity. Using mutator forms of Pol β did not substantially alter the error specificity, suggesting that mispairing-misalignment mechanism is not a primary mechanism. Based on our results for mammalian DNA polymerases representing three structurally distinct families, we suggest that dNTP-stabilized mutagenesis may be an alternative mechanism for mononucleotide microsatellite indel mutation. The change from a predominantly dNTP-stabilized mechanism to a strand-slippage mechanism with increasing microsatellite length may account for the differential rates of tandem repeat mutation that are observed genome-wide. PMID:25758780

  13. Genetic Evidence That Both dNTP-Stabilized and Strand Slippage Mechanisms May Dictate DNA Polymerase Errors Within Mononucleotide Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Baptiste, Beverly A.; Jacob, Kimberly D.; Eckert, Kristin A.

    2015-01-01

    Mononucleotide microsatellites are tandem repeats of a single base pair, abundant within coding exons and frequent sites of mutation in the human genome. Because the repeated unit is one base pair, multiple mechanisms of insertion/deletion (indel) mutagenesis are possible, including strand-slippage, dNTP-stabilized, and misincorportion-misalignment. Here, we examine the effects of polymerase identity (mammalian Pols α, β, κ, and η), template sequence, dNTP pool size, and reaction temperature on indel errors during in vitro synthesis of mononucleotide microsatellites. We utilized the ratio of insertion to deletion errors as a genetic indicator of mechanism. Strikingly, we observed a statistically significant bias towards deletion errors within mononucleotide repeats for the majority of the 28 DNA template and polymerase combinations examined, with notable exceptions based on sequence and polymerase identity. Using mutator forms of Pol β did not substantially alter the error specificity, suggesting that mispairing-misalignment mechanism is not a primary mechanism. Based on our results for mammalian DNA polymerases representing three structurally distinct families, we suggest that dNTP-stabilized mutagenesis may be an alternative mechanism for mononucleotide microsatellite indel mutation. The change from a predominantly dNTP-stabilized mechanism to a strand-slippage mechanism with increasing microsatellite length may account for the differential rates of tandem repeat mutation that are observed genome-wide. PMID:25758780

  14. Genetic evidence that both dNTP-stabilized and strand slippage mechanisms may dictate DNA polymerase errors within mononucleotide microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Baptiste, Beverly A; Jacob, Kimberly D; Eckert, Kristin A

    2015-05-01

    Mononucleotide microsatellites are tandem repeats of a single base pair, abundant within coding exons and frequent sites of mutation in the human genome. Because the repeated unit is one base pair, multiple mechanisms of insertion/deletion (indel) mutagenesis are possible, including strand-slippage, dNTP-stabilized, and misincorportion-misalignment. Here, we examine the effects of polymerase identity (mammalian Pols α, β, κ, and η), template sequence, dNTP pool size, and reaction temperature on indel errors during in vitro synthesis of mononucleotide microsatellites. We utilized the ratio of insertion to deletion errors as a genetic indicator of mechanism. Strikingly, we observed a statistically significant bias toward deletion errors within mononucleotide repeats for the majority of the 28 DNA template and polymerase combinations examined, with notable exceptions based on sequence and polymerase identity. Using mutator forms of Pol β did not substantially alter the error specificity, suggesting that mispairing-misalignment mechanism is not a primary mechanism. Based on our results for mammalian DNA polymerases representing three structurally distinct families, we suggest that dNTP-stabilized mutagenesis may be an alternative mechanism for mononucleotide microsatellite indel mutation. The change from a predominantly dNTP-stabilized mechanism to a strand-slippage mechanism with increasing microsatellite length may account for the differential rates of tandem repeat mutation that are observed genome-wide.

  15. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2006 Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang; Wang, En-Ke; Cai, Xu; Huang, Huan-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    The Quark Matter 2006 conference was held on 14 20 November 2006 at the Shanghai Science Hall of the Shanghai Association of Sciences and Technology in Shanghai, China. It was the 19th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus Nucleus Collisions. The conference was organized jointly by SINAP (Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)) and CCNU (Central China Normal University, Wuhan). Over 600 scientists from 32 countries in five continents attended the conference. This is the first time that China has hosted such a premier conference in the field of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, an important event for the Chinese high energy nuclear physics community. About one half of the conference participants are junior scientists—a clear indication of the vigor and momentum for this field, in search of the fundamental nature of the nuclear matter at extreme conditions. Professor T D Lee, honorary chair of the conference and one of the founders of the quark matter research, delivered an opening address with his profound and philosophical remarks on the recent discovery of the nature of strongly-interacting quark-gluon-plasma (sQGP). Professor Hongjie Xu, director of SINAP, gave a welcome address to all participants on behalf of the two hosting institutions. Dr Peiwen Ji, deputy director of the Mathematics and Physics Division of the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), also addressed the conference participants and congratulated them on the opening of the conference. Professor Mianheng Jiang, vice president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), gave a concise introduction about the CAS as the premier research institution in China. He highlighted continued efforts at CAS to foster international collaborations between China and other nations. The Quark Matter 2006 conference is an example of such a successful collaboration between high energy nuclear physicists in China and other nations all over the world. The

  16. Norovirus Polymerase Fidelity Contributes to Viral Transmission In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, Lucy; Ghurburrun, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intrahost genetic diversity and replication error rates are intricately linked to RNA virus pathogenesis, with alterations in viral polymerase fidelity typically leading to attenuation during infections in vivo. We have previously shown that norovirus intrahost genetic diversity also influences viral pathogenesis using the murine norovirus model, as increasing viral mutation frequency using a mutagenic nucleoside resulted in clearance of a persistent infection in mice. Given the role of replication fidelity and genetic diversity in pathogenesis, we have now investigated whether polymerase fidelity can also impact virus transmission between susceptible hosts. We have identified a high-fidelity norovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase mutant (I391L) which displays delayed replication kinetics in vivo but not in cell culture. The I391L polymerase mutant also exhibited lower transmission rates between susceptible hosts than the wild-type virus and, most notably, another replication defective mutant that has wild-type levels of polymerase fidelity. These results provide the first experimental evidence that norovirus polymerase fidelity contributes to virus transmission between hosts and that maintaining diversity is important for the establishment of infection. This work supports the hypothesis that the reduced polymerase fidelity of the pandemic GII.4 human norovirus isolates may contribute to their global dominance. IMPORTANCE Virus replication fidelity and hence the intrahost genetic diversity of viral populations are known to be intricately linked to viral pathogenesis and tropism as well as to immune and antiviral escape during infection. In this study, we investigated whether changes in replication fidelity can impact the ability of a virus to transmit between susceptible hosts by the use of a mouse model for norovirus. We show that a variant encoding a high-fidelity polymerase is transmitted less efficiently between mice than the wild-type strain. This

  17. Mechanism of translesion DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase II. Comparison to DNA polymerases I and III core.

    PubMed

    Paz-Elizur, T; Takeshita, M; Goodman, M; O'Donnell, M; Livneh, Z

    1996-10-01

    Bypass synthesis by DNA polymerase II was studied using a synthetic 40-nucleotide-long gapped duplex DNA containing a site-specific abasic site analog, as a model system for mutagenesis associated with DNA lesions. Bypass synthesis involved a rapid polymerization step terminating opposite the nucleotide preceding the lesion, followed by a slow bypass step. Bypass was found to be dependent on polymerase and dNTP concentrations, on the DNA sequence context, and on the size of the gap. A side-by-side comparison of DNA polymerases I, II, and III core revealed the following. 1) Each of the three DNA polymerases bypassed the abasic site analog unassisted by other proteins. 2) In the presence of physiological-like salt conditions, only DNA polymerase II bypassed the lesion. 3) Bypass by each of the three DNA polymerases increased dramatically in the absence of proofreading. These results support a model (Tomer, G., Cohen-Fix, O. , O'Donnell, M., Goodman, M. and Livneh, Z. (1996) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 93, 1376-1380) by which the RecA, UmuD, and UmuC proteins are accessory factors rather than being absolutely required for the core mutagenic bypass reaction in induced mutagenesis in Escherichia coli.

  18. Proceedings: Condenser technology conference

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, J.L. ); Mussalli, Y.G. )

    1991-08-01

    Seam surface condenser and associated systems performance strongly affects availability and heat rate in nuclear and fossil power plants. Thirty-six papers presented at a 1990 conference discuss research results, industry experience, and case histories of condenser problems and solutions. This report contains papers on life extension, performance improvement, corrosion and failure analysis, fouling prevention, and recommendation for future R D. The information represents recent work on condenser problems and solutions to improve the procurement, operation, and maintenance functions of power plant personnel. Several key points follow: A nuclear and a fossil power plant report show that replacing titanium tube bundles improves condenser availability and performance. One paper reports 10 years of experience with enhanced heat transfer tubes in utility condensers. The newly developed enhanced condenser tubes could further improve condensing heat transfer. A new resistance summation method improves the accuracy of condenser performance prediction, especially for stainless steel and titanium tubed condensers. Several papers describe improved condenser fouling monitoring techniques, including a review of zebra mussel issues.

  19. Conference OKs science budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    With the budget process all but complete for next fiscal year, the National Science Foundation and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration observers were saying that science had not done that badly in Congress, for an election year. NSF got half the budget increase it requested, NASA two-thirds. The Space Station did well, at the expense of environmental and social programs, which are funded by Congress from the same pot of money as NASA and NSF.A House-Senate conference finished work on a $59 billion appropriations bill for the Department of Housing and Urban Development and independent agencies, including EPA, NASA, and NSF, in early August. The House and Senate then quickly passed the measure before their recess; the President is expected to sign it soon. Included in the Fiscal Year 1989 spending bill are $1,885 billion for NSF, a 9.8% increase over FY 1988, and $10.7 billion for NASA, 18.5% more than the year before.

  20. Oceans '86 conference record

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    These five volumes represent the proceedings of the Oceans '86 Conference Washington, DC, 23-25 September 1986. Volume 1 includes papers on Underwater Photography and Sensing; Marine Recreation; Diving; CTACTS (Charleston Tactical Aircrew Combat Training System); Offshore and Coastal Structures; Underwater Welding, Burning and Cutting; Advances in Ocean Mapping; Ocean Energy; Biofouling and Corrosion; Moorings, Cables and Connections; Marine Minerals; Remote Sensing and Satellites; and Acoustics Analysis. Volume 2 covers Data Base Management; Modeling and Simulation; Ocean Current Simulation; Instrumentation; Artificial Reefs and Fisheries; US Status and Trends; Education and Technology Transfer; Economic Potential and Coastal Zone Management; and Water Quality. Volume 3 includes papers on National and Regional Monitoring Strategies; New Techniques and Strategies for Monitoring; Indicator Parameters/Organisms; Historical Data; Crystal Cube for Coastal and Estuarine Degradation; and the Monitoring Gap. Volume 4 covers the Organotin Symposium - Chemistry; Toxicity Studies; and Environmental Monitoring and Modeling. Volume 5 includes papers on Advances in Oceanography; Applied Oceanography; Unmanned Vehicles and ROV's; Manned Vehicles; and Oceanographic Ships.

  1. Role of Accessory DNA Polymerases in DNA Replication in Escherichia coli: Analysis of the dnaX36 Mutator Mutant▿

    PubMed Central

    Gawel, Damian; Pham, Phuong T.; Fijalkowska, Iwona J.; Jonczyk, Piotr; Schaaper, Roel M.

    2008-01-01

    The dnaX36(TS) mutant of Escherichia coli confers a distinct mutator phenotype characterized by enhancement of transversion base substitutions and certain (−1) frameshift mutations. Here, we have further investigated the possible mechanism(s) underlying this mutator effect, focusing in particular on the role of the various E. coli DNA polymerases. The dnaX gene encodes the τ subunit of DNA polymerase III (Pol III) holoenzyme, the enzyme responsible for replication of the bacterial chromosome. The dnaX36 defect resides in the C-terminal domain V of τ, essential for interaction of τ with the α (polymerase) subunit, suggesting that the mutator phenotype is caused by an impaired or altered α-τ interaction. We previously proposed that the mutator activity results from aberrant processing of terminal mismatches created by Pol III insertion errors. The present results, including lack of interaction of dnaX36 with mutM, mutY, and recA defects, support our assumption that dnaX36-mediated mutations originate as errors of replication rather than DNA damage-related events. Second, an important role is described for DNA Pol II and Pol IV in preventing and producing, respectively, the mutations. In the system used, a high fraction of the mutations is dependent on the action of Pol IV in a (dinB) gene dosage-dependent manner. However, an even larger but opposing role is deduced for Pol II, revealing Pol II to be a major editor of Pol III mediated replication errors. Overall, the results provide insight into the interplay of the various DNA polymerases, and of τ subunit, in securing a high fidelity of replication. PMID:18156258

  2. 10. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  3. 10 CFR 205.171 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conferences. 205.171 Section 205.171 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES AND SANCTIONS Conferences, Hearings, and Public Hearings § 205.171 Conferences. (a) The DOE in its discretion may direct that a conference be convened, on its own initiative...

  4. 9. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This conference was held November 12--16, 1995 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on genetic mapping in mice. This report contains abstracts of presentations, focusing on the following areas: mutation identification; comparative mapping; informatics and complex traits; mutagenesis; gene identification and new technology; and genetic and physical mapping.

  5. NASA Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, D. C. (Compiler); McCauley, D. E. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held July 14-16, 1998 at the Von Braun Center in Huntsville, AL. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications. It was the third NASA conference of this type in the microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approximately 125 investigations and 100 principal investigators in FY98, almost all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference. The conference's purpose was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity in preparation for a NASA Research Announcement scheduled for release in late 1998 by the Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A tour of the Marshall Space Flight Center microgravity research facilities was held on July 16, 1998. This volume is comprised of the research reports submitted by the principal investigators after the conference.

  6. NASA Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szofran, Frank R. (Compiler); McCauley, D. (Compiler); Walker, C. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held June 10-11, 1996 at the Von Braun Civic Center in Huntsville, AL. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Science and Applications Division at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications (AMMSA). It was the second NASA conference of this type in the microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approximately 80 investigations and 69 principal investigators in FY96, all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference. The conference's purpose was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity in preparation for a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) scheduled for release in late 1996 by the Microgravity Science and Applications Division at NASA Headquarters. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A tour of the MSFC microgravity research facilities was held on June 12, 1996. This volume is comprised of the research reports submitted by the principal investigators after the conference and presentations made by various NASA microgravity science managers.

  7. Eighteen Years of the Great Lakes Regional Counseling Psychology Conference: Revisiting the Need for Regional Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado-Romero, Edward A.; Bowman, Sharon L.; Gerstein, Lawrence H.

    2006-01-01

    The Great Lakes Regional Conference on Counseling Psychology is the only conference to continuously fulfill the 1987 mandate issued by Division 17 for regional counseling conferences. The rationale for regional conferences is reviewed, and the 18-year history of the Great Lakes Regional Conference is examined. The authors conclude by noting the…

  8. PREFACE: XXI Fluid Mechanics Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmyd, Janusz S.; Fornalik-Wajs, Elzbieta; Jaszczur, Marek

    2014-08-01

    This Conference Volume contains the papers presented at the 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference (XXI FMC) held at AGH - University of Science and Technology in Krakow, Poland, 15-18 June 2014, and accepted for Proceedings published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The Fluid Mechanics Conferences have been taking place every two years since 1974, a total of forty years. The 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference (XXI FMC) is being organized under the auspices of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Committee of Mechanics. The goal of this conference is to provide a forum for the exposure and exchange of ideas, methods and results in fluid mechanics. Conference topics include, but are not limited to Aerodynamics, Atmospheric Science, Bio-Fluids, Combustion and Reacting Flows, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Experimental Fluid Mechanics, Flow Machinery, General Fluid Dynamics, Hydromechanics, Heat and Fluid Flow, Measurement Techniques, Micro- and Nano- Flow, Multi-Phase Flow, Non-Newtonian Fluids, Rotating and Stratified Flows, Turbulence. Within the general subjects of this conference, the Professor Janusz W. Elsner Competition for the best fluid mechanics paper presented during the Conference is organized. Authors holding a M.Sc. or a Ph.D. degree and who are not older than 35 years of age may enter the Competition. Authors with a Ph.D. degree must present individual papers; authors with a M.Sc. degree may present papers with their supervisor as coauthor, including original results of experimental, numerical or analytic research. Six state-of-the-art keynote papers were delivered by world leading experts. All contributed papers were peer reviewed. Recommendations were received from the International Scientific Committee, reviewers and the advisory board. Accordingly, of the 163 eligible extended abstracts submitted, after a review process by the International Scientific Committee, 137 papers were selected for presentation at the 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference, 68

  9. Molecular determinants of macrophage tropism and viral persistence: importance of single amino acid changes in the polymerase and glycoprotein of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Matloubian, M; Kolhekar, S R; Somasundaram, T; Ahmed, R

    1993-01-01

    This study documents that the immunosuppressive lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) variant, clone 13, shows a specific predilection for enhanced infection of macrophages both in vitro and in vivo and that single amino acid changes in the viral polymerase and glycoprotein are responsible for macrophage tropism. The growth difference seen between variant clone 13 and the parental Armstrong strain was specific for macrophages, since both clone 13 and Armstrong grew equally well in fibroblasts and neither isolate infected lymphocytes efficiently. Complete sequencing of the clone 13 genome, along with genetic analysis, showed that a single amino acid change in the polymerase (K-->Q at position 1079) was the major determinant of virus yield in macrophages. This was proven unequivocally by comparing the sequences of parental and reassortant viruses, which were identical at all loci except for the single mutation in the polymerase gene. This finding was further strengthened by showing that reversion at this site back to lysine (Q-->K) resulted in loss of macrophage tropism. In addition, an independently derived macrophage-tropic variant of LCMV, clone 28b, had a K-->N mutation at the same position. Thus, these results show that substitution of the positively charged amino acid K with a neutral amino acid (either Q or N) at residue 1079 of the polymerase resulted in enhanced viral replication in macrophages. In addition to the polymerase change, a mutation in the glycoprotein was also associated with macrophage tropism. This single amino acid change in the glycoprotein (F-->L at position 260) did not affect virus yield per macrophage but was critical in determining the number of macrophages infected. Our previous studies have shown that the same two mutations in the polymerase and glycoprotein are essential for establishing a chronic infection in adult mice. Since the same mutations confer macrophage tropism and ability to persist in vivo, these studies provide

  10. A deep phylogeny of viral and cellular right-hand polymerases.

    PubMed

    Černý, Jiří; Černá Bolfíková, Barbora; de A Zanotto, Paolo M; Grubhoffer, Libor; Růžek, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Right-hand polymerases are important players in genome replication and repair in cellular organisms as well as in viruses. All right-hand polymerases are grouped into seven related protein families: viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases, reverse transcriptases, single-subunit RNA polymerases, and DNA polymerase families A, B, D, and Y. Although the evolutionary relationships of right-hand polymerases within each family have been proposed, evolutionary relationships between families remain elusive because their sequence similarity is too low to allow classical phylogenetic analyses. The structure of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases recently was shown to be useful in inferring their evolution. Here, we address evolutionary relationships between right-hand polymerase families by combining sequence and structure information. We used a set of 22 viral and cellular polymerases representing all right-hand polymerase families with known protein structure. In contrast to previous studies, which focused only on the evolution of particular families, the current approach allowed us to present the first robust phylogenetic analysis unifying evolution of all right-hand polymerase families. All polymerase families branched into discrete lineages, following a fairly robust adjacency pattern. Only single-subunit RNA polymerases formed an inner group within DNA polymerase family A. RNA-dependent RNA polymerases of RNA viruses and reverse transcriptases of retroviruses formed two sister groups and were distinguishable from all other polymerases. DNA polymerases of DNA bacteriophages did not form a monophyletic group and are phylogenetically mixed with cellular DNA polymerase families A and B. Based on the highest genetic variability and structural simplicity, we assume that RNA-dependent RNA polymerases are the most ancient group of right-hand polymerases, in agreement with the RNA World hypothesis, because RNA-dependent RNA polymerases are enzymes that could serve in replication of

  11. A deep phylogeny of viral and cellular right-hand polymerases.

    PubMed

    Černý, Jiří; Černá Bolfíková, Barbora; de A Zanotto, Paolo M; Grubhoffer, Libor; Růžek, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Right-hand polymerases are important players in genome replication and repair in cellular organisms as well as in viruses. All right-hand polymerases are grouped into seven related protein families: viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases, reverse transcriptases, single-subunit RNA polymerases, and DNA polymerase families A, B, D, and Y. Although the evolutionary relationships of right-hand polymerases within each family have been proposed, evolutionary relationships between families remain elusive because their sequence similarity is too low to allow classical phylogenetic analyses. The structure of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases recently was shown to be useful in inferring their evolution. Here, we address evolutionary relationships between right-hand polymerase families by combining sequence and structure information. We used a set of 22 viral and cellular polymerases representing all right-hand polymerase families with known protein structure. In contrast to previous studies, which focused only on the evolution of particular families, the current approach allowed us to present the first robust phylogenetic analysis unifying evolution of all right-hand polymerase families. All polymerase families branched into discrete lineages, following a fairly robust adjacency pattern. Only single-subunit RNA polymerases formed an inner group within DNA polymerase family A. RNA-dependent RNA polymerases of RNA viruses and reverse transcriptases of retroviruses formed two sister groups and were distinguishable from all other polymerases. DNA polymerases of DNA bacteriophages did not form a monophyletic group and are phylogenetically mixed with cellular DNA polymerase families A and B. Based on the highest genetic variability and structural simplicity, we assume that RNA-dependent RNA polymerases are the most ancient group of right-hand polymerases, in agreement with the RNA World hypothesis, because RNA-dependent RNA polymerases are enzymes that could serve in replication of

  12. Amplification of RNA by an RNA polymerase ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Horning, David P; Joyce, Gerald F

    2016-08-30

    In all extant life, genetic information is stored in nucleic acids that are replicated by polymerase proteins. In the hypothesized RNA world, before the evolution of genetically encoded proteins, ancestral organisms contained RNA genes that were replicated by an RNA polymerase ribozyme. In an effort toward reconstructing RNA-based life in the laboratory, in vitro evolution was used to improve dramatically the activity and generality of an RNA polymerase ribozyme by selecting variants that can synthesize functional RNA molecules from an RNA template. The improved polymerase ribozyme is able to synthesize a variety of complex structured RNAs, including aptamers, ribozymes, and, in low yield, even tRNA. Furthermore, the polymerase can replicate nucleic acids, amplifying short RNA templates by more than 10,000-fold in an RNA-catalyzed form of the PCR. Thus, the two prerequisites of Darwinian life-the replication of genetic information and its conversion into functional molecules-can now be accomplished with RNA in the complete absence of proteins. PMID:27528667

  13. Single-molecule Studies of RNA Polymerase: Motoring Along

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Kristina M.; Greenleaf, William J.; Block, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques have advanced our understanding of transcription by RNA polymerase. A new arsenal of approaches, including single-molecule fluorescence, atomic-force microscopy, magnetic tweezers, and optical traps have been employed to probe the many facets of the transcription cycle. These approaches supply fresh insights into the means by which RNA polymerase identifies a promoter; initiates transcription, translocates and pauses along the DNA template, proofreads errors, and ultimately terminates transcription. Results from single-molecule experiments complement knowledge gained from biochemical and genetic assays by facilitating the observation of states that are otherwise obscured by ensemble averaging, such as those resulting from heterogeneity in molecular structure, elongation rate, or pause propensity. Most studies to date have been performed with bacterial RNA polymerase, but work is also being carried out with eukaryotic polymerase (Pol II) and single-subunit polymerases from bacteriophages. We discuss recent progress achieved by single-molecule studies, highlighting some of the unresolved questions and ongoing debates. PMID:18410247

  14. RNA polymerase II subunit composition, stoichiometry, and phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziej, P A; Woychik, N; Liao, S M; Young, R A

    1990-01-01

    RNA polymerase II subunit composition, stoichiometry, and phosphorylation were investigated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by attaching an epitope coding sequence to a well-characterized RNA polymerase II subunit gene (RPB3) and by immunoprecipitating the product of this gene with its associated polypeptides. The immunopurified enzyme catalyzed alpha-amanitin-sensitive RNA synthesis in vitro. The 10 polypeptides that immunoprecipitated were identical in size and number to those previously described for RNA polymerase II purified by conventional column chromatography. The relative stoichiometry of the subunits was deduced from knowledge of the sequence of the subunits and from the extent of labeling with [35S]methionine. Immunoprecipitation from 32P-labeled cell extracts revealed that three of the subunits, RPB1, RPB2, and RPB6, are phosphorylated in vivo. Phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of RPB1 could be distinguished; approximately half of the RNA polymerase II molecules contained a phosphorylated RPB1 subunit. These results more precisely define the subunit composition and phosphorylation of a eucaryotic RNA polymerase II enzyme. Images PMID:2183013

  15. DIFFERENTIAL ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Sorensen, E.G.; Gordon, C.M.

    1959-02-10

    Improvements in analog eomputing machines of the class capable of evaluating differential equations, commonly termed differential analyzers, are described. In general form, the analyzer embodies a plurality of basic computer mechanisms for performing integration, multiplication, and addition, and means for directing the result of any one operation to another computer mechanism performing a further operation. In the device, numerical quantities are represented by the rotation of shafts, or the electrical equivalent of shafts.

  16. Sexual differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sinisi, A A; Pasquali, D; Notaro, A; Bellastella, A

    2003-01-01

    In humans, like as in other mammals, the gonads, the internal genital ducts, and the external genital structures all develop from bipotential embryologic tissues. Male or female phenotype develops through a cascade of processes which initiate with sex determination and follow with sex differentiation. The karyotype (46, XY or 46, XX) of the embryo (genetic sex) determines whether primordial gonad differentiates into a testis or an ovary, respectively (gonadal differentiation). A Y-related gene, SRY, acts as a switch signal for testis differentiation. Testis development process involves several steps controlled by other non-OY-linked genes, such as Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1), EMX2, LIM1, steroidogenic factor 1(SF-1), SRY box-related gene 9 (SOX9). Since other genes, such as Wnt-4 and DAX-1, are necessary for the initiation of female pathway in sex determination, female development cannot be considered a default process. Hormonal production of differentiated gonads is relevant for differentiation of the internal and external genitalia during fetal life, and for the development of secondary sex characteristics at puberty. Antimullerian hormone (AMH) secreted by Sertoli cells inhibits the development of female internal genitalia (tube, uterus, upper part of vagina); testosterone secreted by Leydig cells induces stabilization of wolffian ducts and development of internal male genitalia. Differentiation of external male genitalia requires the transformation of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone by 5alpha reductase type 2 expressed in genital skin and urogenital sinus. The effects of androgens occur in presence of functional androgen receptor (AR) protein. Mutations of genes coding for steroidogenic enzymes, AMH, AMH receptor, AR and 5alpha reductase are all associated with impairment of sex differentiation and result in genital ambiguity. PMID:12834017

  17. Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase POLG1 Disease Mutations and Germline Variants Promote Tumorigenic Properties.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupendra; Owens, Kjerstin M; Bajpai, Prachi; Desouki, Mohamed Mokhtar; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh; Tiwari, Hemant K; Singh, Keshav K

    2015-01-01

    Germline mutations in mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (POLG1) induce mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, depletion, and decrease oxidative phosphorylation. Earlier, we identified somatic mutations in POLG1 and the contribution of these mutations in human cancer. However, a role for germline variations in POLG1 in human cancers is unknown. In this study, we examined a role for disease associated germline variants of POLG1, POLG1 gene expression, copy number variation and regulation in human cancers. We analyzed the mutations, expression and copy number variation in POLG1 in several cancer databases and validated the analyses in primary breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines. We discovered 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine led epigenetic regulation of POLG1, mtDNA-encoded genes and increased mitochondrial respiration. We conducted comprehensive race based bioinformatics analyses of POLG1 gene in more than 33,000 European-Americans and 5,000 African-Americans. We identified a mitochondrial disease causing missense variation in polymerase domain of POLG1 protein at amino acid 1143 (E1143G) to be 25 times more prevalent in European-Americans (allele frequency 0.03777) when compared to African-American (allele frequency 0.00151) population. We identified T251I and P587L missense variations in exonuclease and linker region of POLG1 also to be more prevalent in European-Americans. Expression of these variants increased glucose consumption, decreased ATP production and increased matrigel invasion. Interestingly, conditional expression of these variants revealed that matrigel invasion properties conferred by these germline variants were reversible suggesting a role of epigenetic regulators. Indeed, we identified a set of miRNA whose expression was reversible after variant expression was turned off. Together, our studies demonstrate altered genetic and epigenetic regulation of POLG1 in human cancers and suggest a role for POLG1 germline variants in promoting tumorigenic

  18. Direct Characterization of Transcription Elongation by RNA Polymerase I

    PubMed Central

    Ucuncuoglu, Suleyman; Engel, Krysta L.; Purohit, Prashant K.; Dunlap, David D.; Schneider, David A.

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcribes ribosomal DNA and is responsible for more than 60% of transcription in a growing cell. Despite this fundamental role that directly impacts cell growth and proliferation, the kinetics of transcription by Pol I are poorly understood. This study provides direct characterization of S. Cerevisiae Pol I transcription elongation using tethered particle microscopy (TPM). Pol I was shown to elongate at an average rate of approximately 20 nt/s. However, the maximum speed observed was, in average, about 60 nt/s, comparable to the rate calculated based on the in vivo number of active genes, the cell division rate and the number of engaged polymerases observed in EM images. Addition of RNA endonucleases to the TPM elongation assays enhanced processivity. Together, these data suggest that additional transcription factors contribute to efficient and processive transcription elongation by RNA polymerase I in vivo. PMID:27455049

  19. In-ice evolution of RNA polymerase ribozyme activity

    PubMed Central

    Attwater, James; Wochner, Aniela; Holliger, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms of molecular self-replication have the potential to shed light upon the origins of life. In particular, self-replication through RNA-catalysed templated RNA synthesis is thought to have supported a primordial ‘RNA World’. However, existing polymerase ribozymes lack the capacity to synthesise RNAs approaching their own size. Here we report the in vitro evolution of such catalysts directly in the RNA-stabilising medium of water-ice, which yielded RNA polymerase ribozymes specifically adapted to sub-zero temperatures and able to synthesise RNA in ices at temperatures as low as −19°C. Combination of cold-adaptive mutations with a previously described 5′ extension operating at ambient temperatures enabled the design of a first polymerase ribozyme capable of catalysing the accurate synthesis of an RNA sequence longer than itself (adding up to 206 nucleotides), an important stepping stone towards RNA self-replication. PMID:24256864

  20. Glycosylation of RNA polymerase II from wheat germ.

    PubMed

    Cervoni, L; Turano, C; Ferraro, A; Ciavatta, P; Marmocchi, F; Eufemi, M

    1997-11-10

    RNA polymerase II from wheat germ was analyzed for the presence of sugars. The two largest subunits and the 27 and 25 kDa subunits were found to be glycosylated by a variety of sugars. However, no N-acetylglucosamine was detected, which was found by Kelly et al. (J. Biol. Chem. (1993) 268, 10416-10424) in the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II from calf thymus. Thus it appears that the regulatory function of this sugar, postulated by Kelly et al., is performed in the wheat germ enzyme by other monosaccharides. Carbohydrate analysis of the two largest subunits of the calf thymus enzyme also revealed the presence, beside N-acetylglucosamine, of other sugars. Some similarities in the features of glycosylation of the two polymerases, isolated from very different organisms, suggest that the sugar moieties have an important role in the structure and/or function of these enzymes. PMID:9395301

  1. Direct Characterization of Transcription Elongation by RNA Polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Ucuncuoglu, Suleyman; Engel, Krysta L; Purohit, Prashant K; Dunlap, David D; Schneider, David A; Finzi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcribes ribosomal DNA and is responsible for more than 60% of transcription in a growing cell. Despite this fundamental role that directly impacts cell growth and proliferation, the kinetics of transcription by Pol I are poorly understood. This study provides direct characterization of S. Cerevisiae Pol I transcription elongation using tethered particle microscopy (TPM). Pol I was shown to elongate at an average rate of approximately 20 nt/s. However, the maximum speed observed was, in average, about 60 nt/s, comparable to the rate calculated based on the in vivo number of active genes, the cell division rate and the number of engaged polymerases observed in EM images. Addition of RNA endonucleases to the TPM elongation assays enhanced processivity. Together, these data suggest that additional transcription factors contribute to efficient and processive transcription elongation by RNA polymerase I in vivo. PMID:27455049

  2. In-ice evolution of RNA polymerase ribozyme activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attwater, James; Wochner, Aniela; Holliger, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    Mechanisms of molecular self-replication have the potential to shed light on the origins of life. In particular, self-replication through RNA-catalysed templated RNA synthesis is thought to have supported a primordial ‘RNA world’. However, existing polymerase ribozymes lack the capacity to synthesize RNAs approaching their own size. Here, we report the in vitro evolution of such catalysts directly in the RNA-stabilizing medium of water ice, which yielded RNA polymerase ribozymes specifically adapted to sub-zero temperatures and able to synthesize RNA in ices at temperatures as low as -19 °C. The combination of cold-adaptive mutations with a previously described 5‧ extension operating at ambient temperatures enabled the design of a first polymerase ribozyme capable of catalysing the accurate synthesis of an RNA sequence longer than itself (adding up to 206 nucleotides), an important stepping stone towards RNA self-replication.

  3. In-ice evolution of RNA polymerase ribozyme activity.

    PubMed

    Attwater, James; Wochner, Aniela; Holliger, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    Mechanisms of molecular self-replication have the potential to shed light on the origins of life. In particular, self-replication through RNA-catalysed templated RNA synthesis is thought to have supported a primordial 'RNA world'. However, existing polymerase ribozymes lack the capacity to synthesize RNAs approaching their own size. Here, we report the in vitro evolution of such catalysts directly in the RNA-stabilizing medium of water ice, which yielded RNA polymerase ribozymes specifically adapted to sub-zero temperatures and able to synthesize RNA in ices at temperatures as low as -19 °C. The combination of cold-adaptive mutations with a previously described 5' extension operating at ambient temperatures enabled the design of a first polymerase ribozyme capable of catalysing the accurate synthesis of an RNA sequence longer than itself (adding up to 206 nucleotides), an important stepping stone towards RNA self-replication. PMID:24256864

  4. Creative template-dependent synthesis by human polymerase mu

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Andrea F.; Gosavi, Rajendrakumar A.; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Bebenek, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Among the many proteins used to repair DNA double-strand breaks by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) are two related family X DNA polymerases, Pol λ and Pol µ. Which of these two polymerases is preferentially used for filling DNA gaps during NHEJ partly depends on sequence complementarity at the break, with Pol λ and Pol µ repairing complementary and noncomplementary ends, respectively. To better understand these substrate preferences, we present crystal structures of Pol µ on a 2-nt gapped DNA substrate, representing three steps of the catalytic cycle. In striking contrast to Pol λ, Pol µ “skips” the first available template nucleotide, instead using the template base at the 5′ end of the gap to direct nucleotide binding and incorporation. This remarkable divergence from canonical 3′-end gap filling is consistent with data on end-joining substrate specificity in cells, and provides insights into polymerase substrate choices during NHEJ. PMID:26240373

  5. A possible mechanism for the dynamics of transition between polymerase and exonuclease sites in a high-fidelity DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2009-08-01

    The fidelity of DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase is significantly increased by a mechanism of proofreading that is performed at the exonuclease active site separate from the polymerase active site. Thus, the transition of DNA between the two active sites is an important activity of DNA polymerase. Here, based on our proposed model, the rates of DNA transition between the two active sites are theoretically studied. With the relevant parameters, which are determined from the available crystal structure and other experimental data, the calculated transfer rate of correctly base-paired DNA from the polymerase to exonuclease sites and the transfer rate after incorporation of a mismatched base are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The transfer rates in the presence of two and three mismatched bases are also consistent with the previous experimental data. In addition, the calculated transfer rate from the exonuclease to polymerase sites has a large value even with the high binding affinity of 3'-5' ssDNA for the exonuclease site, which is also consistent with the available experimental value. Moreover, we also give some predictive results for the transfer rate of DNA containing only A:T base pairs and that of DNA containing only G:C base pairs.

  6. [Use of the nested polymerase chain reaction in the differential diagnosis of human herpes simplex virus].

    PubMed

    Glukhov, A I; Gordeev, S A; Al'tshuler, M L; Severin, S E

    2003-02-01

    Herpes is one of the most widespread human viral pathologies. The article depicts a special modification of polymerized chain reaction--(PCR)--(referred to as "nested"), which has a higher sensitivity, specificity and reliability as compared to the ordinary PCR, and which is designed to detect the herpes viruses. The method was initially tested at purified preparation of viral DNA, and later--at clinical materials obtained from patients and healthy donors. Secretions from the urogenital tract (smears), scrapes from the urogenital tracts and urinal cellular samples were examined in patients. Herpes simplex was detected in all cases. As for the healthy people, the identical examinations produced in them mainly the negative findings. Therefore, the nested PCR is a simple, sensitive and effective instrument in the diagnostics and prevention of herpes; it can be recommended for a comprehensive usage in medical practice.

  7. DIFFERENTIATING HUMAN FROM ANIMAL ISOLATES OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    We analyzed 9s Cryptosporidium parvum isolates from humans and animals by a polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism method based on the thrombospondin-related anonymous protein 2 gene sequence. Used as a molecular marker, this method can differentiate ...

  8. Consensus conference. Electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    1985-10-18

    mechanism of action, clarify the extent of adverse effects, and determine optimum treatment technique. Despite recent research effort yielding substantial information, permitting professional and public evaluation of the safety and efficacy of ECT, the investigation of ECT has not generally been in the mainstream of mental health research. To help resolve questions surrounding these issues, the National Institutes of Health in conjunction with the National Institute of Mental Health convened a Consensus Development Conference on Electroconvulsive Therapy from June 10 to 12, 1985.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:4046138

  9. Kinetics and thermodynamics of exonuclease-deficient DNA polymerases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    A kinetic theory is developed for exonuclease-deficient DNA polymerases, based on the experimental observation that the rates depend not only on the newly incorporated nucleotide, but also on the previous one, leading to the growth of Markovian DNA sequences from a Bernoullian template. The dependencies on nucleotide concentrations and template sequence are explicitly taken into account. In this framework, the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of DNA replication, in particular, the mean growth velocity, the error probability, and the entropy production are calculated analytically in terms of the rate constants and the concentrations. Theory is compared with numerical simulations for the DNA polymerases of T7 viruses and human mitochondria.

  10. ASM Conference on Prokaryotic Development

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, H. B.

    2005-07-13

    Support was provided by DOE for the 2nd ASM Conference on Prokaryotic Development. The final conference program and abstracts book is attached. The conference presentations are organized around topics that are central to the current research areas in prokaryotic development. The program starts with topics that involve relatively simple models systems and ends with systems that are more complex. The topics are: i) the cell cycle, ii) the cytoskeleton, iii) morphogenesis, iv) developmental transcription, v) signaling, vi) multicellularity, and vii) developmental diversity and symbiosis. The best-studied prokaryotic development model systems will be highlighted at the conference through research presentations by leaders in the field. Many of these systems are also model systems of relevance to the DOE mission including carbon sequestration (Bradyrizobium, Synechococcus), energy production (Anabaena, Rhodobacter) and bioremediation (Caulobacter, Mesorhizobium). In addition, many of the highlighted organisms have important practical applications; the actinomycetes and myxobacteria produce antimicrobials that are of commercial interest. It is certain that the cutting-edge science presented at the conference will be applicable to the large group of bacteria relevant to the DOE mission.

  11. Galileo Space Probe News Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) video release presents Part 3 of a press conference from Ames Research Center (ARC) regarding the successful entry of the Galileo Space Probe into Jupiter's atmosphere. The press conference panel is comprised of twelve principal investigators and project scientists that oversee the Galileo mission. The press conference question and answer period is continued from Part 2. Atmospheric thermal structure, water abundances, wind profiles, radiation, cloud structure, chemical composition, and electricity are among the topics discussed. The question and answer period is followed by a presentation in which all of the visuals that are shown during the press conference are reviewed. The video ends with several animations depicting the entry of the probe, descent, and the first measurements of the Jovian atmosphere, historical footage of the building of the probe, and a short interview with Dr. Richard Young (Galileo Probe Scientist, ARC). Parts 1 and 2 of the press conference can be found in document numbers NONP-NASA-VT-2000001073, and NONP-NASA-VT-2000001074.

  12. Social sciences conference on AIDS.

    PubMed

    1997-03-01

    This paper reports on the 1996 South African Universities Social Sciences Conference on AIDS held in Mmambatho, Northwest Province, South Africa. The conference was attended with a strong contingent from Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. In the conference, various papers explored the needs of, and programmatic responses to women, orphaned children, university students, communities, youth private enterprise, the informal sector, and policy and socioeconomic concerns at a broader level. In addition, several papers specifically discussed the situation of women and AIDS, as well as relevant policy issues. A recommendation was made for governments to coordinate their efforts, with a call for increased openness at all levels rather than facing the epidemic individually. In this respect, the conference noted that the media could play a much more decisive role. This report also highlights the major comments made during the conference and some of the key issues that were raised in each of the following areas: 1) awareness and prevention, 2) children, 3) women, and 4) household costs.

  13. Advancing Excellence. Conference Proceedings of the Annual Society for the Advancement of Gifted Education (SAGE) Conference (5th, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, September 30-October 1, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society for the Advancement of Gifted Education, Calgary (Alberta).

    These conference proceedings consider the unique needs of gifted and talented individuals, focusing on state-of-the-art knowledge regarding school reform initiatives, cooperative learning, creative achievement, social-emotional development, differentiated curriculum, charter schools, and parenting issues. Summaries are provided of the following…

  14. IEEE International conference on plasma science: Conference record--Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The conference covered the following topics: basic plasma physics; vacuum electronics; gaseous and electrical gas discharges; laser-produced plasma; space plasmas; computational plasma science; plasma diagnostics; electron, ion and plasma sources; intense electron and ion beams; intense beam microwaves; fast wave M/W devices; microwave-plasma interactions; magnetic fusion; MHD; plasma focus; ultrafast z-pinches and x-ray lasers; plasma processing; fast-opening switches; EM and ETH launchers; solid-state plasmas and switches; plasmas for lighting; ball lightning and spherical plasma configurations; and environmental/energy issues. Separate abstracts were prepared for 379 items in this conference.

  15. Dynamics of interaction of RNA polymerase II with nucleosomes. II. During read-through and elongation.

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, P.

    1993-01-01

    The sulfhydryl-specific fluorescence probe 1,5-IAEDANS (5-(2-((iodoacetyl)amino)ethyl)amino-naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) was attached to the single cysteine of H3, and reconstituted fluorescent mononucleosomes were used as the template for in vitro transcription by the yeast RNA polymerase II (pol II). DNase I digestion analysis revealed that transcription of nucleosomes by pol II resulted in an overall loosening of the structure. Monitoring the transcription event by steady-state fluorescence analysis showed that nucleosomes only partially open during transcription. This opening is transient in nature, and nucleosomes close back as soon as the pol II falls off the template. Thus, using the technique of fluorescence spectroscopy, partial opening of nucleosome structure could be differentiated from complete dissociation into free DNA and histone octamer, a distinction that may not be possible by techniques like gel electrophoresis. Time-resolved fluorescence emission spectroscopy suggested that during read-through of the template by the pol II, histone octamers do not fall off the DNA. Only minor conformational changes within the histone octamer take place to accommodate the transcribing polymerase. PMID:8298468

  16. Genetic interaction between transcription elongation factor TFIIS and RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, J; Lacroute, F; Ruet, A; Friesen, J D

    1992-01-01

    Little is known about the regions of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) that are involved in the process of transcript elongation and interaction with elongation factors. One elongation factor, TFIIS, stimulates transcript elongation by binding to RNAPII and facilitating its passage through intrinsic pausing sites in vitro. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, TFIIS is encoded by the PPR2 gene. Deletion of PPR2 from the yeast genome is not lethal but renders cells sensitive to the uracil analog 6-azauracil (6AU). Here, we show that mutations conferring 6AU sensitivity can also be isolated in the gene encoding the largest subunit of S. cerevisiae RNAPII (RPO21). A screen for mutations in RPO21 that confer 6AU sensitivity identified seven mutations that had been generated by either linker-insertion or random chemical mutagenesis. All seven mutational alterations are clustered within one region of the largest subunit that is conserved among eukaryotic RNAPII. The finding that six of the seven rpo21 mutants failed to grow at elevated temperature underscores the importance of this region for the functional and/or structural integrity of RNAPII. We found that the 6AU sensitivity of the rpo21 mutants can be suppressed by increasing the dosage of the wild-type PPR2 gene, presumably as a result of overexpression of TFIIS. These results are consistent with the proposal that in the rpo21 mutants, the formation of the RNAPII-TFIIS complex is rate limiting for the passage of the mutant enzyme through pausing sites. In addition to implicating a region of the largest subunit of RNAPII in the process of transcript elongation, our observations provide in vivo evidence that TFIIS is involved in transcription by RNAPII. Images PMID:1508210

  17. Evolutionary connection between the catalytic subunits of DNA-dependent RNA polymerases and eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and the origin of RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Koonin, Eugene V; Aravind, L

    2003-01-01

    Background The eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDRP) is involved in the amplification of regulatory microRNAs during post-transcriptional gene silencing. This enzyme is highly conserved in most eukaryotes but is missing in archaea and bacteria. No evolutionary relationship between RDRP and other polymerases has been reported so far, hence the origin of this eukaryote-specific polymerase remains a mystery. Results Using extensive sequence profile searches, we identified bacteriophage homologs of the eukaryotic RDRP. The comparison of the eukaryotic RDRP and their homologs from bacteriophages led to the delineation of the conserved portion of these enzymes, which is predicted to harbor the catalytic site. Further, detailed sequence comparison, aided by examination of the crystal structure of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (DDRP), showed that the RDRP and the β' subunit of DDRP (and its orthologs in archaea and eukaryotes) contain a conserved double-psi β-barrel (DPBB) domain. This DPBB domain contains the signature motif DbDGD (b is a bulky residue), which is conserved in all RDRPs and DDRPs and contributes to catalysis via a coordinated divalent cation. Apart from the DPBB domain, no similarity was detected between RDRP and DDRP, which leaves open two scenarios for the origin of RDRP: i) RDRP evolved at the onset of the evolution of eukaryotes via a duplication of the DDRP β' subunit followed by dramatic divergence that obliterated the sequence similarity outside the core catalytic domain and ii) the primordial RDRP, which consisted primarily of the DPBB domain, evolved from a common ancestor with the DDRP at a very early stage of evolution, during the RNA world era. The latter hypothesis implies that RDRP had been subsequently eliminated from cellular life forms and might have been reintroduced into the eukaryotic genomes through a bacteriophage. Sequence and structure analysis of the DDRP led to further insights into the evolution of RNA polymerases

  18. α,β-D-Constrained Nucleic Acids Are Strong Terminators of Thermostable DNA Polymerases in Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Mahéo, Sabrina; Gross, Grégori; Bodin, Pierre; Teissié, Justin; Escudier, Jean-Marc; Paquereau, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    (SC5′, RP) α,β-D- Constrained Nucleic Acids (CNA) are dinucleotide building blocks that can feature either B-type torsional angle values or non-canonical values, depending on their 5′C and P absolute stereochemistry. These CNA are modified neither on the nucleobase nor on the sugar structure and therefore represent a new class of nucleotide with specific chemical and structural characteristics. They promote marked bending in a single stranded DNA so as to preorganize it into a loop-like structure, and they have been shown to induce rigidity within oligonucleotides. Following their synthesis, studies performed on CNA have only focused on the constraints that this family of nucleotides introduced into DNA. On the assumption that bending in a DNA template may produce a terminator structure, we investigated whether CNA could be used as a new strong terminator of polymerization in PCR. We therefore assessed the efficiency of CNA as a terminator in PCR, using triethylene glycol phosphate units as a control. Analyses were performed by denaturing gel electrophoresis and several PCR products were further analysed by sequencing. The results showed that the incorporation of only one CNA was always skipped by the polymerases tested. On the other hand, two CNA units always stopped proofreading polymerases, such as Pfu DNA polymerase, as expected for a strong replication terminator. Non-proofreading enzymes, e.g. Taq DNA polymerase, did not recognize this modification as a strong terminator although it was predominantly stopped by this structure. In conclusion, this first functional use of CNA units shows that these modified nucleotides can be used as novel polymerization terminators of proofreading polymerases. Furthermore, our results lead us to propose that CNA and their derivatives could be useful tools for investigating the behaviour of different classes of polymerases. PMID:21991314

  19. Inaugural AGU Science Policy Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlenbrock, Kristan

    2012-01-01

    AGU will present its inaugural Science Policy Conference, 30 April to 3 May 2012, at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, located in downtown Washington, D. C. This conference will bring together leading scientists, policy makers, industry professionals, press, and other stakeholders to discuss natural hazards, natural resources, oceans, and Arctic science and the role these sciences play in serving communities. To bridge the science and policy fields, AGU plans to host this conference every 2 years and focus on the applications of Earth and space sciences to serve local and national communities. "Our nation faces a myriad of challenges such as the sustainability of our natural resources, current and future energy needs, and the ability to mitigate and adapt to natural and manmade hazards," said Michael McPhaden, president of AGU. "It is essential that policies to address these challenges be built on a solid foundation of credible scientific knowledge."

  20. 2002 Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald (Editor); Ramachandran, Narayanan (Editor); Murphy, Karen (Editor); McCauley, Dannah (Editor); Bennett, Nancy (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held June 25-26, 2002, at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. Organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Physical Sciences Research Division, NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and member institutions under the Cooperative Research in Biology and Materials Science (CORBAMS) agreement, the conference provided a forum to review the current research and activities in materials science, discuss the envisioned long-term goals, highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to the Physical Sciences Research Division, and inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity. An abstracts book was published and distributed at the conference to the approximately 240 people attending, who represented industry, academia, and other NASA Centers. This CD-ROM proceedings is comprised of the research reports submitted by the Principal Investigators in the Microgravity Materials Science program.

  1. 9th Caribbean Geological Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Gren

    The ninth in a series of Caribbean Geological Conferences, which are held every 3 or 4 years, took place in Santo Domingo, capital of the Dominican Republic, from the 15th to 26th of August 1980. The conference, which was sponsored by the government of the Dominican Republic and the Universidad Catolica Madre y Maestra, was preceded by 2 days of field trips and was opened by President Antonio Guzman on the evening of the 17th of August. Generous support was provided by Alcoa Exploration Co., Falconbridge Dominicana, and Rosario Dominicana.Geologists and geophysicists from 25 countries presented about 130 papers on a wide variety of topics ranging from geophysics to paleontology. While the whole Caribbean area was discussed, there was special emphasis on the northern Caribbean and Hispaniola, as befitted the site of the conference. The contribution of workers from the Dirección General de Mineriá was particularly notable.

  2. Message from the Conference Chairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Sanjay; Perera, Unil

    2015-05-01

    We were very excited to host the 8th International Workshop on Quantum Structure Infrared Photodetectors (QSIP 2014), in picturesque Santa Fe, New Mexico from June 29th-July 3rd, 2014. This followed successful QSIP conferences at Dana Point (2000), Torino (2002), Kananaskis (2004), Kandy (2006), Yosimite (2009), Istanbul (2010) and Corsica (2012). The QSIP workshop is a high level scientific conference that aims to bring together scientists, engineers, industrial organizations, students and users in order to discuss recent advances, and to share the "State of the Art" in this field. QSIP conferences provide an international forum for attendees to present and discuss progress in infrared device physics and modeling, materials growth and processing issues, focal plane array development and characterization.

  3. Rapid Detection and Identification of a Pathogen's DNA Using Phi29 DNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Dunn, J.; Gao, S.; Bruno, J. F.; Luft, B. J.

    2008-10-31

    Zoonotic pathogens including those transmitted by insect vectors are some of the most deadly of all infectious diseases known to mankind. A number of these agents have been further weaponized and are widely recognized as being potentially significant biothreat agents. We describe a novel method based on multiply-primed rolling circle in vitro amplification for profiling genomic DNAs to permit rapid, cultivation-free differential detection and identification of circular plasmids in infectious agents. Using Phi29 DNA polymerase and a two-step priming reaction we could reproducibly detect and characterize by DNA sequencing circular DNA from Borrelia burgdorferi B31 in DNA samples containing as little as 25 pg of Borrelia DNA amongst a vast excess of human DNA. This simple technology can ultimately be adapted as a sensitive method to detect specific DNA from both known and unknown pathogens in a wide variety of complex environments.

  4. Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Poe, C.C.; Harris, C.E.

    1995-10-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference in Hampton, Virginia, December 6-8, 1994. This conference was the culmination of a 3-year program that was initiated by NASA late in 1990 to develop mechanics of textile composites in support of the NASA Advance Composites Technology Program (ACT). The goal of the program was to develop mathematical models of textile preform materials and test methods to facilitate structural analysis and design. Participants in the program were from NASA, academia, and industry. Separate abstracts were prepared for articles from this document.

  5. Ethnic minority energy conference: report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The report of a 1977 energy conference sponsored by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People summarizes the basic concern that US energy policy was not addressing the importance of full employment or the impact of rising energy costs on the poor. Conference speakers spoke of the social and economic changes that are needed if minorities are to participate in the economics of the technological age. These include better educational opportunities and cooperation between civil rights groups and energy planners. Other topics were venture opportunities for minorities in energy-related fields and opportunities for minority advocacy and energy efficiency actions.

  6. Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, Clarence C. (Editor); Harris, Charles E. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference in Hampton, Virginia, December 6-8, 1994. This conference was the culmination of a 3-year program that was initiated by NASA late in 1990 to develop mechanics of textile composites in support of the NASA Advance Composites Technology Program (ACT). The goal of the program was to develop mathematical models of textile preform materials and test methods to facilitate structural analysis and design. Participants in the program were from NASA, academia, and industry.

  7. Conference Proceedings: Health Manpower Planning Conference. May, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hospital Educational and Research Foundation of Pennsylvania, Camp Hill.

    A two-day Health Manpower Planning Conference was held at State College, Pennsylvania, in 1971. The speakers represented a variety of organizations with responsibility for aspects of manpower planning and others not normally involved in planning. Program content was structured in such a way as to broaden the context within which manpower issues…

  8. Inter Association Child Care Conference. Conference Proceedings 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, David, Ed.

    This publication of the proceedings of the Inter Association Child Care Conference includes a debate for and against professionalization in the field of child care. A section on meeting the treatment needs of children through educational preparation of child care practitioners discusses background factors, levels of education for practitioners,…

  9. Nineteenth annual actinide separations conference: Conference program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Bronson, M.

    1995-12-31

    This report contains the abstracts from the conference presentations. Sessions were divided into the following topics: Waste treatment; Spent fuel treatment; Issues and responses to Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board 94-1; Pyrochemical technologies; Disposition technologies; and Aqueous separation technologies.

  10. A Perspective on the Enhancer Dependent Bacterial RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Buck, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Here we review recent findings and offer a perspective on how the major variant RNA polymerase of bacteria, which contains the sigma54 factor, functions for regulated gene expression. We consider what gaps exist in our understanding of its genetic, biochemical and biophysical functioning and how they might be addressed. PMID:26010401

  11. Kinetic Analysis of an Efficient DNA-Dependent TNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Horhota, Allen; Zou, Keyong; Ichida, Justin K.; Yu, Biao; McLaughlin, Larry W.; Szostak, Jack W.

    2005-01-01

    α-l-Threofuranosyl nucleoside triphosphates (tNTPs) are tetrafuranose nucleoside derivatives and potential progenitors of present-day β-d-2‘-deoxyribofuranosyl nucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs). Therminator DNA polymerase, a variant of the 9°N DNA polymerase, is an efficient DNA-directed threosyl nucleic acid (TNA) polymerase. Here we report a detailed kinetic comparison of Therminator-catalyzed TNA and DNA syntheses. We examined the rate of single-nucleotide incorporation for all four tNTPs and dNTPs from a DNA primer−template complex and carried out parallel experiments with a chimeric DNA−TNA primer−DNA template containing five TNA residues at the primer 3‘-terminus. Remarkably, no drop in the rate of TNA incorporation was observed in comparing the DNA−TNA primer to the all-DNA primer, suggesting that few primer-enzyme contacts are lost with a TNA primer. Moreover, comparison of the catalytic efficiency of TNA synthesis relative to DNA synthesis at the downstream positions reveals a difference of no greater than 5-fold in favor of the natural DNA substrate. This disparity becomes negligible when the TNA synthesis reaction mixture is supplemented with 1.25 mM MnCl2. These results indicate that Therminator DNA polymerase can recognize both a TNA primer and tNTP substrates and is an effective catalyst of TNA polymerization despite changes in the geometry of the reactants. PMID:15898792

  12. DNA Polymerase θ: A Unique Multifunctional End-Joining Machine.

    PubMed

    Black, Samuel J; Kashkina, Ekaterina; Kent, Tatiana; Pomerantz, Richard T

    2016-01-01

    The gene encoding DNA polymerase θ (Polθ) was discovered over ten years ago as having a role in suppressing genome instability in mammalian cells. Studies have now clearly documented an essential function for this unique A-family polymerase in the double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway alternative end-joining (alt-EJ), also known as microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ), in metazoans. Biochemical and cellular studies show that Polθ exhibits a unique ability to perform alt-EJ and during this process the polymerase generates insertion mutations due to its robust terminal transferase activity which involves template-dependent and independent modes of DNA synthesis. Intriguingly, the POLQ gene also encodes for a conserved superfamily 2 Hel308-type ATP-dependent helicase domain which likely assists in alt-EJ and was reported to suppress homologous recombination (HR) via its anti-recombinase activity. Here, we review our current knowledge of Polθ-mediated end-joining, the specific activities of the polymerase and helicase domains, and put into perspective how this multifunctional enzyme promotes alt-EJ repair of DSBs formed during S and G2 cell cycle phases. PMID:27657134

  13. Polymerase Chain Reaction for Detection of Systemic Plant Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter outlines the advances and application of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) since its development in 1984 and its enhancements and applications to detection of viruses, viroids and phytoplasma in pome and stone fruits. PCR is probably the most rapidly and widely adopted technology eve...

  14. Conformational dynamics of Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase I during catalysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cuiling; Maxwell, Brian A; Suo, Zucai

    2014-08-12

    Despite the fact that DNA polymerases have been investigated for many years and are commonly used as tools in a number of molecular biology assays, many details of the kinetic mechanism they use to catalyze DNA synthesis remain unclear. Structural and kinetic studies have characterized a rapid, pre-catalytic open-to-close conformational change of the Finger domain during nucleotide binding for many DNA polymerases including Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase I (Taq Pol), a thermostable enzyme commonly used for DNA amplification in PCR. However, little has been performed to characterize the motions of other structural domains of Taq Pol or any other DNA polymerase during catalysis. Here, we used stopped-flow Förster resonance energy transfer to investigate the conformational dynamics of all five structural domains of the full-length Taq Pol relative to the DNA substrate during nucleotide binding and incorporation. Our study provides evidence for a rapid conformational change step induced by dNTP binding and a subsequent global conformational transition involving all domains of Taq Pol during catalysis. Additionally, our study shows that the rate of the global transition was greatly increased with the truncated form of Taq Pol lacking the N-terminal domain. Finally, we utilized a mutant of Taq Pol containing a de novo disulfide bond to demonstrate that limiting protein conformational flexibility greatly reduced the polymerization activity of Taq Pol. PMID:24931550

  15. [The contamination under polymerase chain reaction studies: problems and solutions].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Ameliushkina, V A; Rozhkova, T A

    2015-01-01

    The study was carried out to determine risk factors of false positive and false negative results under polymerase chain reaction-analysis of clinical material. The samples with high viral load can be the source of false positive results. The contamination with nucleic acids can occur at any section of polymerase chain reaction analysis. The study data permitted to establish that the most sensitive stage is isolation and purification of nucleic acids especially under manual mode of operation. The detection of positive signal in most samples of one setting indicates total contamination. The cases when only several samples are polluted are special challenge. The presence of sample with high concentration of viral nucleic acid and several samples with low concentration in one setting means necessity of repeated analysis beginning with stage of isolation of nucleic acid. The analysis of curves of accumulation of products of amplification, their forms and positioning on chart is the obligatory stage of polymerase chain reaction study in real time regimen. These actions permit to exclude the readouts of false negative testing results to departments. The study conclusions are equipotent for polymerase chain reaction testing of any nucleic acid targets.

  16. A noncontact temperature measurement method in polymerase chain reaction reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochivko, D. G.; Varlamov, D. A.; Fedorov, A. A.; Kurochkin, V. E.

    2016-04-01

    A new noncontact method for measuring temperatures of liquids, which is based on the fluorescent probes, is proposed. The method is intended for measuring temperatures of reaction media in reactors of devices for polymerase chain reactions in real time and can be used for determining dynamic temperature parameters.

  17. Mammalian Cells with Altered Forms of RNA Polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Chan, V. L.; Whitmore, G. F.; Siminovitch, Louis

    1972-01-01

    Mutants of Chinese hamster ovary cells that are resistant to α-amanitin can be isolated. At least some of these mutants contain an altered form of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II, as indicated by its resistance to α-amanitin. These results indicate that mutation to α-amanitin resistance involves a change of a structural gene. PMID:4508306

  18. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes by using the polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bessesen, M.T.; Luo, Q.; Blaser, M.J.; Ellison, R.T. III.; Rotbart. H.A. )

    1990-09-01

    A method was developed for detection of Listeria monocytogens by polymerase chain reaction amplification followed by agarose gel electrophoresis or dot blot analysis with {sup 32}P-labeled internal probe. The technique identified 95 of 95 L. monocytogenes strains, 0 of 12 Listeria strains of other species, and 0 of 12 non-Listeria strains.

  19. Stochastic resetting in backtrack recovery by RNA polymerases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán, Édgar; Lisica, Ana; Sánchez-Taltavull, Daniel; Grill, Stephan W.

    2016-06-01

    Transcription is a key process in gene expression, in which RNA polymerases produce a complementary RNA copy from a DNA template. RNA polymerization is frequently interrupted by backtracking, a process in which polymerases perform a random walk along the DNA template. Recovery of polymerases from the transcriptionally inactive backtracked state is determined by a kinetic competition between one-dimensional diffusion and RNA cleavage. Here we describe backtrack recovery as a continuous-time random walk, where the time for a polymerase to recover from a backtrack of a given depth is described as a first-passage time of a random walker to reach an absorbing state. We represent RNA cleavage as a stochastic resetting process and derive exact expressions for the recovery time distributions and mean recovery times from a given initial backtrack depth for both continuous and discrete-lattice descriptions of the random walk. We show that recovery time statistics do not depend on the discreteness of the DNA lattice when the rate of one-dimensional diffusion is large compared to the rate of cleavage.

  20. Continuous in vitro evolution of bacteriophage RNA polymerase promoters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, R. R.; Banerji, A.; Joyce, G. F.

    1994-01-01

    Rapid in vitro evolution of bacteriophage T7, T3, and SP6 RNA polymerase promoters was achieved by a method that allows continuous enrichment of DNAs that contain functional promoter elements. This method exploits the ability of a special class of nucleic acid molecules to replicate continuously in the presence of both a reverse transcriptase and a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Replication involves the synthesis of both RNA and cDNA intermediates. The cDNA strand contains an embedded promoter sequence, which becomes converted to a functional double-stranded promoter element, leading to the production of RNA transcripts. Synthetic cDNAs, including those that contain randomized promoter sequences, can be used to initiate the amplification cycle. However, only those cDNAs that contain functional promoter sequences are able to produce RNA transcripts. Furthermore, each RNA transcript encodes the RNA polymerase promoter sequence that was responsible for initiation of its own transcription. Thus, the population of amplifying molecules quickly becomes enriched for those templates that encode functional promoters. Optimal promoter sequences for phage T7, T3, and SP6 RNA polymerase were identified after a 2-h amplification reaction, initiated in each case with a pool of synthetic cDNAs encoding greater than 10(10) promoter sequence variants.

  1. A perspective on the enhancer dependent bacterial RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Buck, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Here we review recent findings and offer a perspective on how the major variant RNA polymerase of bacteria, which contains the sigma54 factor, functions for regulated gene expression. We consider what gaps exist in our understanding of its genetic, biochemical and biophysical functioning and how they might be addressed. PMID:26010401

  2. Intervening sequences in an Archaea DNA polymerase gene.

    PubMed

    Perler, F B; Comb, D G; Jack, W E; Moran, L S; Qiang, B; Kucera, R B; Benner, J; Slatko, B E; Nwankwo, D O; Hempstead, S K

    1992-06-15

    The DNA polymerase gene from the Archaea Thermococcus litoralis has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. It is split by two intervening sequences (IVSs) that form one continuous open reading frame with the three polymerase exons. To our knowledge, neither IVS is similar to previously described introns. However, the deduced amino acid sequences of both IVSs are similar to open reading frames present in mobile group I introns. The second IVS (IVS2) encodes an endonuclease, I-Tli I, that cleaves at the exon 2-exon 3 junction after IVS2 has been deleted. IVS2 self-splices in E. coli to yield active polymerase, but processing is abolished if the IVS2 reading frame is disrupted. Silent changes in the DNA sequence at the exon 2-IVS2 junction that maintain the original protein sequence do not inhibit splicing. These data suggest that protein rather than mRNA splicing may be responsible for production of the mature polymerase. PMID:1608969

  3. DNA Polymerase θ: A Unique Multifunctional End-Joining Machine

    PubMed Central

    Black, Samuel J.; Kashkina, Ekaterina; Kent, Tatiana; Pomerantz, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    The gene encoding DNA polymerase θ (Polθ) was discovered over ten years ago as having a role in suppressing genome instability in mammalian cells. Studies have now clearly documented an essential function for this unique A-family polymerase in the double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway alternative end-joining (alt-EJ), also known as microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ), in metazoans. Biochemical and cellular studies show that Polθ exhibits a unique ability to perform alt-EJ and during this process the polymerase generates insertion mutations due to its robust terminal transferase activity which involves template-dependent and independent modes of DNA synthesis. Intriguingly, the POLQ gene also encodes for a conserved superfamily 2 Hel308-type ATP-dependent helicase domain which likely assists in alt-EJ and was reported to suppress homologous recombination (HR) via its anti-recombinase activity. Here, we review our current knowledge of Polθ-mediated end-joining, the specific activities of the polymerase and helicase domains, and put into perspective how this multifunctional enzyme promotes alt-EJ repair of DSBs formed during S and G2 cell cycle phases. PMID:27657134

  4. Assembly of a functional Machupo virus polymerase complex.

    PubMed

    Kranzusch, Philip J; Schenk, Andreas D; Rahmeh, Amal A; Radoshitzky, Sheli R; Bavari, Sina; Walz, Thomas; Whelan, Sean P J

    2010-11-16

    Segmented negative-sense viruses of the family Arenaviridae encode a large polymerase (L) protein that contains all of the enzymatic activities required for RNA synthesis. These activities include an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) and an RNA endonuclease that cleaves capped primers from cellular mRNAs to prime transcription. Using purified catalytically active Machupo virus L, we provide a view of the overall architecture of this multifunctional polymerase and reconstitute complex formation with an RNA template in vitro. The L protein contains a central ring domain that is similar in appearance to the RdRP of dsRNA viruses and multiple accessory appendages that may be responsible for 5' cap formation. RNA template recognition by L requires a sequence-specific motif located at positions 2-5 in the 3' terminus of the viral genome. Moreover, L-RNA complex formation depends on single-stranded RNA, indicating that inter-termini dsRNA interactions must be partially broken for complex assembly to occur. Our results provide a model for arenavirus polymerase-template interactions and reveal the structural organization of a negative-strand RNA virus L protein.

  5. Mathematics analysis of polymerase chain reaction kinetic curves.

    PubMed

    Sochivko, D G; Fedorov, A A; Varlamov, D A; Kurochkin, V E; Petrov, R V

    2016-01-01

    The paper reviews different approaches to the mathematical analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) kinetic curves. The basic principles of PCR mathematical analysis are presented. Approximation of PCR kinetic curves and PCR efficiency curves by various functions is described. Several PCR models based on chemical kinetics equations are suggested. Decision criteria for an optimal function to describe PCR efficiency are proposed.

  6. Stochastic resetting in backtrack recovery by RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Roldán, Édgar; Lisica, Ana; Sánchez-Taltavull, Daniel; Grill, Stephan W

    2016-06-01

    Transcription is a key process in gene expression, in which RNA polymerases produce a complementary RNA copy from a DNA template. RNA polymerization is frequently interrupted by backtracking, a process in which polymerases perform a random walk along the DNA template. Recovery of polymerases from the transcriptionally inactive backtracked state is determined by a kinetic competition between one-dimensional diffusion and RNA cleavage. Here we describe backtrack recovery as a continuous-time random walk, where the time for a polymerase to recover from a backtrack of a given depth is described as a first-passage time of a random walker to reach an absorbing state. We represent RNA cleavage as a stochastic resetting process and derive exact expressions for the recovery time distributions and mean recovery times from a given initial backtrack depth for both continuous and discrete-lattice descriptions of the random walk. We show that recovery time statistics do not depend on the discreteness of the DNA lattice when the rate of one-dimensional diffusion is large compared to the rate of cleavage. PMID:27415302

  7. Improvement of φ29 DNA polymerase amplification performance by fusion of DNA binding motifs

    PubMed Central

    de Vega, Miguel; Lázaro, José M.; Mencía, Mario; Blanco, Luis; Salas, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    Bacteriophage φ29 DNA polymerase is a unique enzyme endowed with two distinctive properties, high processivity and faithful polymerization coupled to strand displacement, that have led to the development of protocols to achieve isothermal amplification of limiting amounts of both circular plasmids and genomic DNA. To enhance the amplification efficiency of φ29 DNA polymerase, we have constructed chimerical DNA polymerases by fusing DNA binding domains to the C terminus of the polymerase. The results show that the addition of Helix-hairpin-Helix [(HhH)2] domains increases DNA binding of the hybrid polymerases without hindering their replication rate. In addition, the chimerical DNA polymerases display an improved and faithful multiply primed DNA amplification proficiency on both circular plasmids and genomic DNA and are unique φ29 DNA polymerase variants with enhanced amplification performance. The reported chimerical DNA polymerases will contribute to make φ29 DNA polymerase-based amplification technologies one of the most powerful tools for genomics. PMID:20823261

  8. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz

    2011-01-11

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reaction chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.

  9. Improvement of φ29 DNA polymerase amplification performance by fusion of DNA binding motifs.

    PubMed

    de Vega, Miguel; Lázaro, José M; Mencía, Mario; Blanco, Luis; Salas, Margarita

    2010-09-21

    Bacteriophage ϕ29 DNA polymerase is a unique enzyme endowed with two distinctive properties, high processivity and faithful polymerization coupled to strand displacement, that have led to the development of protocols to achieve isothermal amplification of limiting amounts of both circular plasmids and genomic DNA. To enhance the amplification efficiency of ϕ29 DNA polymerase, we have constructed chimerical DNA polymerases by fusing DNA binding domains to the C terminus of the polymerase. The results show that the addition of Helix-hairpin-Helix [(HhH)(2)] domains increases DNA binding of the hybrid polymerases without hindering their replication rate. In addition, the chimerical DNA polymerases display an improved and faithful multiply primed DNA amplification proficiency on both circular plasmids and genomic DNA and are unique ϕ29 DNA polymerase variants with enhanced amplification performance. The reported chimerical DNA polymerases will contribute to make ϕ29 DNA polymerase-based amplification technologies one of the most powerful tools for genomics. PMID:20823261

  10. Functional Genomics Reveals Linkers Critical for Influenza Virus Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lulan; Wu, Aiping; Wang, Yao E.; Quanquin, Natalie; Li, Chunfeng; Wang, Jingfeng; Chen, Hsiang-Wen; Liu, Suyang; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Hong; Qin, F. Xiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus mRNA synthesis by the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase involves binding and cleavage of capped cellular mRNA by the PB2 and PA subunits, respectively, and extension of viral mRNA by PB1. However, the mechanism for such a dynamic process is unclear. Using high-throughput mutagenesis and sequencing analysis, we have not only generated a comprehensive functional map for the microdomains of individual subunits but also have revealed the PA linker to be critical for polymerase activity. This PA linker binds to PB1 and also forms ionic interactions with the PA C-terminal channel. Nearly all mutants with five-amino-acid insertions in the linker were nonviable. Our model further suggests that the PA linker plays an important role in the conformational changes that occur between stages that favor capped mRNA binding and cleavage and those associated with viral mRNA synthesis. IMPORTANCE The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza virus consists of the PB1, PB2, and PA subunits. By combining genome-wide mutagenesis analysis with the recently discovered crystal structure of the influenza polymerase heterotrimer, we generated a comprehensive functional map of the entire influenza polymerase complex. We identified the microdomains of individual subunits, including the catalytic domains, the interaction interfaces between subunits, and nine linkers interconnecting different domains. Interestingly, we found that mutants with five-amino-acid insertions in individual linkers were nonviable, suggesting the critical roles these linkers play in coordinating spatial relationships between the subunits. We further identified an extended PA linker that binds to PB1 and also forms ionic interactions with the PA C-terminal channel. PMID:26719244

  11. 1995 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This book is a guide to the 1995 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference. It consists largely of abstracts of the oral and poster presentations that were to be made, and gives some general information about the conference and its schedule.

  12. 22 CFR 224.19 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ACT § 224.19 Prehearing conferences. (a) The ALJ may schedule prehearing conferences as appropriate... exhibits; (8) Discovery; (9) The time and place for the hearing; and (10) Such other matters as may tend...

  13. 37 CFR 351.7 - Settlement conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ROYALTY JUDGES RULES AND PROCEDURES PROCEEDINGS § 351.7 Settlement conference. A post-discovery settlement conference will be held among the participants, within 21 days after the close of discovery, outside of...

  14. Technology Utilization Conference Series, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The design, development, and results of a series of technology utilization conferences are presented. The conference series represents the development of a viable and successful means of encouraging the transfer of technology to the minority business community.

  15. 7 CFR 1.167 - Conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... that conducting the conference by audio-visual telecommunication: (i) Is necessary to prevent prejudice... in the conference: (i) Is necessary to prevent prejudice to a party; (ii) Is necessary because of...

  16. A Report of the Bordeaux Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerlach, Jeanne Marcum

    1999-01-01

    Offers a brief description of the Third International Conference for Global Conversations on Language and Literacy, held in Bordeaux, France, in August 1998. Gives brief summaries of five conference presentations or sessions. (SR)

  17. Multisubunit RNA Polymerases IV and V: Purveyors of Non-Coding RNA for Plant Gene Silencing

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2011-08-01

    In all eukaryotes, nuclear DNA-dependent RNA polymerases I, II and III synthesize the myriad RNAs that are essential for life. Remarkably, plants have evolved two additional multisubunit RNA polymerases, RNA polymerases IV and V, which orchestrate non-coding RNA-mediated gene silencing processes affecting development, transposon taming, antiviral defence and allelic crosstalk. Biochemical details concerning the templates and products of RNA polymerases IV and V are lacking. However, their subunit compositions reveal that they evolved as specialized forms of RNA polymerase II, which provides the unique opportunity to study the functional diversification of a eukaryotic RNA polymerase family.

  18. Modified pseudomonas oleovorans phaC1 nucleic acids encoding bispecific polyhydroxyalkanoate polymerase

    DOEpatents

    Srienc, Friedrich; Jackson, John K.; Somers, David A.

    2000-01-01

    A genetically engineered Pseudomonas oleovorans phaC1 polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) polymerase having tailored substrate specificity is provided. The modified PHA polymerase is preferably a "bispecific" PHA polymerase capable of copolymerizing a short chain length monomer and a medium chain length monomer is provided. Methods for making the modified PHA polymerase and for making nucleic acids encoding the modified PHA polymerase are also disclosed, as are methods of producing PHA using the modified PHA polymerase. The invention further includes methods to assay for altered substrate specificity.

  19. IEEE Conference Publications in Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Karl E.

    1984-01-01

    Conclusions of surveys (63 libraries, OCLC database, University of Rhode Island users) assessing handling of Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) conference publications indicate that most libraries fully catalog these publications using LC cataloging, and library patrons frequently require series access to publications. Eight…

  20. CIEE 1993 annual conference: Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The California Institute for Energy efficiency`s third annual conference highlights the results of CIEE-sponsored multiyear research in three programs: Building Energy Efficiency, Air Quality Impacts of Energy Efficiency, and End-Use Resource Planning. Results from scoping studies, Director`s discretionary research, and exploratory research are also featured.

  1. Pan Pacific Microgravity Conference -- Outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Teachers, students, and parents listen as scientists explain what is different about the microgravity envirornment of space and why it is a valuable tool for research. This was part of the outreach session of the Pan Pacific Microgravity Conference on May 2, 2001, at the California Science Center.

  2. Columbine Author Speaks at Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Andrea J.

    2004-01-01

    Brooks Brown, the author of No Easy Answers: The Truth Behind Death at Columbine High School, spoke at the 11th annual Reclaiming Youth International No Disposable Kids conference at Rushmore Plaza Holiday Inn. Brown, who worked with Michael Moore on his Academy Award winning documentary, "Bowling for Columbine," said the letters he received from…

  3. Ozone Conference II: Abstract Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    Ozone Conference II: Pre- and Post-Harvest Applications Two Years After Gras, was held September 27-28, 1999 in Tulare, California. This conference, sponsored by EPRI's Agricultural Technology Alliance and Southern California Edison's AgTAC facility, was coordinated and organized by the on-site ATA-AgTAC Regional Center. Approximately 175 people attended the day-and-a-half conference at AgTAC. During the Conference twenty-two presentations were given on ozone food processing and agricultural applications. Included in the presentations were topics on: (1) Ozone fumigation; (2) Ozone generation techniques; (3) System and design applications; (4) Prewater treatment requirements; (5) Poultry water reuse; (6) Soil treatments with ozone gas; and (7) Post-harvest aqueous and gaseous ozone research results. A live videoconference between Tulare and Washington, D.C. was held to discuss the regulators' view from inside the beltway. Attendees participated in two Roundtable Question and Answer sessions and visited fifteen exhibits and demonstrations. The attendees included university and governmental researchers, regulators, consultants and industry experts, technology developers and providers, and corporate and individual end-users. This report is comprised of the Abstracts of each presentation, biographical sketches for each speaker and a registration/attendees list.

  4. The Third International Conference: Tokyo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, J. Roby

    1972-01-01

    The Tokyo Conference featured more of an acceptance of established theory, agreement on broad programs, and consolidation of approaches. It also made clear the fact that governments now take, and expect to take a much greater responsibility for adult education. (Author/RK)

  5. Space Station Freedom Utilization Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The topics addressed in Space Station Freedom Utilization Conference are: (1) space station freedom overview and research capabilities; (2) space station freedom research plans and opportunities; (3) life sciences research on space station freedom; (4) technology research on space station freedom; (5) microgravity research and biotechnology on space station freedom; and (6) closing plenary.

  6. Computer Conferences: Success or Failure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Amy Friedman

    This examination of the aspects of computers and computer conferencing that can lead to their successful design and utilization focuses on task-related functions and emotional interactions in human communication and human-computer interactions. Such aspects of computer conferences as procedures, problems, advantages, and suggestions for future…

  7. International Women's Leadership Conference Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Presents proceedings of the American Association of Dental Schools' International Women's Leadership Conference. Addresses, panel presentations, and general-sessions topics included leadership training and promotion for women in dental education, women's health issues and research, the glass ceiling, infrastructures for research and training,…

  8. 2001 MAPLD International Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This CD contains the proceedings from the '2001 MAPLD International Conference', held on 11-13 September 2001 at Johns Hopkins University. Sessions included the following: (1) Applications: Military and Aerospace; (2) Design 1: Processors, Logic, and Programmable Devices; (3) Reliability: Devices and The Effects of the Radiation Environment; (4) Design 2: Systems; and (5) Design 3: Fault Tolerance.

  9. The United Nations Water Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations and Water, 1977

    1977-01-01

    This Water Conference adapted a set of detailed action recommendations on various aspects of water resources development and management and decided that this set of recommendations would be known as the "Mar del Plata Action Plan." This article presents an abridged version of selected recommendations in the Action Plan. (Author/MA)

  10. Longwall - USA international exhibition conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This conferences presents 16 papers dealing with longwall mining. Most of the papers deal with longwall mining of coal. In addition, there are two papers dealing with wages of miners. Each of the papers has been abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

  11. Apollo 11 Lunar Science Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Wendell

    1970-01-01

    Report of a conference called to discuss the findings of 142 scientists from their investigations of samples of lunar rock and soil brought back by the Apollo 11 mission. Significant findings reported include the age and composition of the lunar samples, and the absence of water and organic matter. Much discussed was the origin and structure of…

  12. Conference Abstracts: Microcomputers in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, William E.

    1985-01-01

    Provides abstracts of five papers presented at the Fourth Annual Microcomputers in Education Conference. Papers considered microcomputers in science laboratories, Apple II Plus/e computer-assisted instruction in chemistry, computer solutions for space mechanics concerns, computer applications to problem solving and hypothesis testing, and…

  13. What Good Are Conferences, Anyway?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietro, David C.

    1996-01-01

    According to Frederick Herzberg's studies of employee motivation, humans are driven by motivating factors that allow them to grow psychologically and hygiene factors that help them meet physical needs. Good education conferences can enhance both factors by helping principals refocus their energies, exchange ideas with trusted colleagues, and view…

  14. Virtual screening reveals a viral-like polymerase inhibitor that complexes with the DNA polymerase of Moniliophthora perniciosa.

    PubMed

    Andrade, B S; Souza, C S; Santos, G; Góes-Neto, A

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa is a basidiomycota that causes the witches' broom disease in cocoa trees (Theobroma cacao L.). The mitochondrial DNA polymerase of M. perniciosa (MpmitDNApol) is classified within the B family of DNA polymerases, which can be found in viruses and cellular organelles. Using virtual screening processes, accessing KEGG, PubChem, and ZINC databases, we selected the 27 best putative nucleoside viral-like polymerase inhibitors to test against MpmitDNApol. We used Autodock Vina to perform docking simulations of the selected molecules and to return energy values in several ligand conformations. Then, we used Pymol v1.7.4.4 to check the stereochemistry of chiral carbons, hydrogen bonding receptors, absence or presence of hydrogen, sub and superstructure, numbers of rings, rotatable bonds, and donor groups. We selected the Entecavir Hydrate, a drug used to control hepatitis B; subsequently AMBER 14 was used to describe the behavior of polymerase-entecavir complex after setting up 3500 ps of simulation in water at a temperature of 300 K. From the simulation, a graph of Potential Energy was generated revealing that the ligand remains in the catalytic site after 3500 ps with a final energy of -612,587.4214 kcal/mol. PMID:27323084

  15. Identification of co-occurring Branchinecta fairy shrimp species from encysted embryos using multiplex polymerase chain reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergast, A.G.; Wood, D.A.; Simovich, M.; Bohonak, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Morphological identification of many fairy shrimp species is difficult because distinguishing characters are restricted to adults. We developed two multiplex polymerase chain reaction assays that differentiate among three Branchinecta fairy shrimp with distributional overlap in southern California vernal pools. Two of the species are federally listed as threatened. Molecular identification of Branchinecta from cysts allows for species surveys to be conducted during the dry season, expanding the timeframe for population assessment and providing a less intrusive method of sampling sensitive vernal pool habitats. ?? Published 2009. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. Ribosomal RNA-based panbacterial polymerase chain reaction for rapid diagnosis of septicaemia in Intensive Care Unit patients.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mahua Das; Kaur, Harsimran; Ray, Pallab; Gautam, Vikas; Puri, G D

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of sepsis by appropriate antibiotics is of utmost importance. Therefore, we evaluated 16S rRNA panbacterial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for rapid diagnosis of sepsis in 49 adult patients in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) and compared it with an automated blood culture. 8 ml of 10 ml blood collected was inoculated into BACTEC® aerobic bottle and the remaining 2 ml was used for DNA extraction and PCR. 109 of 115 (93%) episodes of suspected sepsis showed concordant results between automated culture and PCR. Six episodes were positive by PCR only. Panbacterial PCR reduces turnaround time with rapid differentiation between systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis. PMID:27080778

  17. Genome Sequencing and Analysis Conference IV

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    J. Craig Venter and C. Thomas Caskey co-chaired Genome Sequencing and Analysis Conference IV held at Hilton Head, South Carolina from September 26--30, 1992. Venter opened the conference by noting that approximately 400 researchers from 16 nations were present four times as many participants as at Genome Sequencing Conference I in 1989. Venter also introduced the Data Fair, a new component of the conference allowing exchange and on-site computer analysis of unpublished sequence data.

  18. Modeling RNA polymerase interaction in mitochondria of chordates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In previous work, we introduced a concept, a mathematical model and its computer realization that describe the interaction between bacterial and phage type RNA polymerases, protein factors, DNA and RNA secondary structures during transcription, including transcription initiation and termination. The model accurately reproduces changes of gene transcription level observed in polymerase sigma-subunit knockout and heat shock experiments in plant plastids. The corresponding computer program and a user guide are available at http://lab6.iitp.ru/en/rivals. Here we apply the model to the analysis of transcription and (partially) translation processes in the mitochondria of frog, rat and human. Notably, mitochondria possess only phage-type polymerases. We consider the entire mitochondrial genome so that our model allows RNA polymerases to complete more than one circle on the DNA strand. Results Our model of RNA polymerase interaction during transcription initiation and elongation accurately reproduces experimental data obtained for plastids. Moreover, it also reproduces evidence on bulk RNA concentrations and RNA half-lives in the mitochondria of frog, human with or without the MELAS mutation, and rat with normal (euthyroid) or hyposecretion of thyroid hormone (hypothyroid). The transcription characteristics predicted by the model include: (i) the fraction of polymerases terminating at a protein-dependent terminator in both directions (the terminator polarization), (ii) the binding intensities of the regulatory protein factor (mTERF) with the termination site and, (iii) the transcription initiation intensities (initiation frequencies) of all promoters in all five conditions (frog, healthy human, human with MELAS syndrome, healthy rat, and hypothyroid rat with aberrant mtDNA methylation). Using the model, absolute levels of all gene transcription can be inferred from an arbitrary array of the three transcription characteristics, whereas, for selected genes only

  19. Teacher Centering: A National Institute. Conference Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tague, Linda Clark, Ed.; And Others

    This report is organized around six chapters: (1) "How This Institute Came About"; (2) "Agenda"; (3) "Teacher Centering in 1976: The Real Experience"; (4) "Description of Teacher Centers"; (5) "Conference Reactions"; and (6) "Conference Directory of Participants." The first chapter discusses the sponsors, and organizers of the conference. Chapter…

  20. West Tennessee ACEI 2006 Fall Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Anna; Hailey, Beth

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the West Tennessee ACEI 2006 Fall Conference held at Union University in Jackson, Tennessee on October 14, 2006. The conference theme, Turning the Pages: A Focus on Children's Literature, was emphasized throughout the day. During the conference, the early childhood classroom teachers, preservice teachers, and administrators…

  1. 10 CFR 820.22 - Informal conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Informal conference. 820.22 Section 820.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR DOE NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES Enforcement Process § 820.22 Informal conference. The Director may convene an informal conference to discuss any situation that might be a violation of the Act or a DOE Nuclear...

  2. 20 CFR 416.557 - Personal conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Personal conference. 416.557 Section 416.557... DISABLED Payment of Benefits, Overpayments, and Underpayments § 416.557 Personal conference. (a) If waiver... notified in writing and given the dates, times and place of the file review and personal conference;...

  3. 6 CFR 13.19 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Prehearing conferences. 13.19 Section 13.19 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.19 Prehearing conferences. (a) The ALJ may schedule prehearing conferences as appropriate....

  4. 6 CFR 13.19 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Prehearing conferences. 13.19 Section 13.19 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.19 Prehearing conferences. (a) The ALJ may schedule prehearing conferences as appropriate....

  5. Ready, Set, Conference! Mastering the Logistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Margaret

    2005-01-01

    Planning to have a successful NAEYC Annual Conference experience is similar to preparing for a day of bargain shopping. In this article, the author describes how to get the most out of NAEYC's Annual Conference by analyzing their goals, preparing ahead, and being flexible. As a veteran conference attendee, the author learned from her mistakes and…

  6. Making Conferences Human Places of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Open Space Technology is a cumbersome name for a participative conference model that enables dynamic inclusive engagement and challenges traditional, highly structured hierarchical conference formats. Based on self-organising systems, (Wenger, 1998) Open Space Technology conferences have an open process, start with no agenda and empower the most…

  7. Conference-Courses for Academic Credit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobes, Marvin

    1979-01-01

    The Wayne State University Studies/Weekend College Program demonstrates a cost effective, flexible model for conference courses. Designed to give adult, part-time students short-term intensive learning experiences, the conference course adapts typical conference activities (guest speakers, films, workshops) to a single or multidisciplinary theme,…

  8. [The Third International Conference on Apomixis].

    PubMed

    Sokolv, V A; Tarakanova, T K; Abdyrkhmanova, E A

    2008-11-01

    The materials of the Third International Conference on Apomixis held in Germany are presented. The oral presentations and most posters of the conference are discussed in detail. Based on comparing the materials of three international conferences, the global trends in investigations of apomixis are traced.

  9. Women's Participation in Academic Conferences in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eden, Devorah

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the participation of women in academic conferences in Israel, a country in which women are under-represented in academia vertically and horizontally. Data were retrieved from announcements of academic conferences in Israel, for one academic year, covering 56 conferences that attracted 997 participants. Participation was…

  10. The conferences for undergraduate women in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blessing, Susan K.

    2015-12-01

    The American Physical Society Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics are the continuation of a grassroots collaborative effort that began in 2006. The goals of the conferences are to increase retention and improve career outcomes of undergraduate women in physics. I describe the conferences, including organization and participant response, and encourage other countries to host similar programs for their undergraduate women.

  11. Functional differentiation in the leucine-rich repeat domains of closely related plant virus-resistance proteins that recognize common avr proteins.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Ken-Taro; Tomita, Reiko; Takeuchi, Shigeharu; Atsumi, Go; Saitoh, Hiromasa; Mizumoto, Hiroyuki; Kiba, Akinori; Yamaoka, Naoto; Nishiguchi, Masamichi; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Kobayashi, Kappei

    2012-09-01

    The N' gene of Nicotiana sylvestris and L genes of Capsicum plants confer the resistance response accompanying the hypersensitive response (HR) elicited by tobamovirus coat proteins (CP) but with different viral specificities. Here, we report the identification of the N' gene. We amplified and cloned an N' candidate using polymerase chain reaction primers designed from L gene sequences. The N' candidate gene was a single 4143 base pairs fragment encoding a coiled-coil nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-type resistance protein of 1,380 amino acids. The candidate gene induced the HR in response to the coexpression of tobamovirus CP with the identical specificity as reported for N'. Analysis of N'-containing and tobamovirus-susceptible N. tabacum accessions supported the hypothesis that the candidate is the N' gene itself. Chimera analysis between N' and L(3) revealed that their LRR domains determine the spectrum of their tobamovirus CP recognition. Deletion and mutation analyses of N' and L(3) revealed that the conserved sequences in their C-terminal regions have important roles but contribute differentially to the recognition of common avirulence proteins. The results collectively suggest that Nicotiana N' and Capsicum L genes, which most likely evolved from a common ancestor, differentiated in their recognition specificity through changes in the structural requirements for LRR function.

  12. Synovial Sarcoma With Myoid Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Qassid, Omar; Ali, Ahmed; Thway, Khin

    2016-09-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal tumor with variable epithelial differentiation, which is defined by the presence of a specific t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation that generates SS18-SSX fusion oncogenes. Synovial sarcoma typically arises within extremity deep soft tissue (particularly around large joints) of young adults, but has been shown to occur at almost any location. When it arises in more unusual sites, such as the abdomen, it can present a significant diagnostic challenge. We describe a case of intraabdominal monophasic synovial sarcoma that immunohistochemically showed strong expression of smooth muscle actin and calponin but only very scanty cytokeratin, and which showed morphologic and immunohistochemical overlap with other spindle cell neoplasms that can arise at this site, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor and myofibrosarcoma. As correct diagnosis is of clinical and prognostic importance, surgical pathologists should be aware of the potential for synovial sarcoma to occur at a variety of anatomic sites and of its spectrum of immunoreactivity. Synovial sarcoma should be in the differential diagnosis of spindle cell neoplasms with myoid differentiation that do not fall into any definite tumor category, for which there should be a relatively low threshold for performing fluorescence in situ hybridization or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to assess for the specific SS18 gene rearrangement or SS18-SSX fusion transcripts, which remain the diagnostic gold standard. PMID:27106779

  13. Proceedings: Summer Conference for College Teachers on Applied Mathematics, University of Missouri-Rolla, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics, Berkeley, CA.

    Proceedings from four sessions of the Summer Conference for College Teachers on Applied Mathematics are presented. The four sessions were: (1) Applications of Elementary Calculus, (2) Applications of Linear Algebra, (3) Applications of Elementary Differential Equations, and (4) Applications of Probability and Statistics. Nine lectures were given…

  14. 2005 clean coal and power conference. Conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    2005-07-01

    The theme of the conference was 'The paradox: today's coal technologies versus tomorrow's promise'. The sessions covered: today's technologies, tomorrow's potential; economic stability; energy security; transition to sustainable energy future; new coal power technologies leading to zero emission coal; existing power plants - improved performance through use of new technology; and carbon capture and storage R & D - challenges and opportunities. Some of the papers only consist of the viewgraphs/overheads.

  15. Cairo conference affirms CEDPA priorities.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) that was held in Cairo during September adopted a 20-year Programme of Action endorsing the empowerment of women as the foundation of sustainable development. 178 countries and more than a 1000 nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), including the Centre for Development and Population Activities (CEDPA), from 100 countries attended the conference and the parallel NGO forum. The final document sets out specific steps for achievement of universal access to a full range of voluntary, quality family planning and reproductive health services for women and men; provision of services for the special needs of adolescents; closure of the gender gap in education; and empowerment of women via education, health care, and economic options. The CEDPA network of alumnae from 30 countries had worked over the 3 years prior to the conference for the inclusion of women's priorities in policies and to achieve consensus among the government and NGO caucuses. 14 alumnae, including Peggy Curlin (CEDPA President and US delegate), were appointed to their countries' delegations and directly influenced the Programme of Action. The NGO Forum provided a place to exchange experiences and expertise; CEDPA mounted an exhibit, "Empowering Women." The network's theme was "Access, Choice, and Participation." With support from the United Nations Population Fund, CEDPA developed a manual, "After Cairo: A Handbook on Advocacy for Women Leaders," which has been distributed at training sessions and workshops and was translated into French (with support from the US Agency for International Development in Mali) for distribution at the Dakar conference in November in preparation for the World Conference on Women. CEDPA and The Global Committee for Cairo honored the secretary-general of the conference, Dr. Nafis Sadik, for her leadership of the ICPD and UNFPA, and Aziza Hussein, co-chair of the NGO steering committee, at a luncheon; Dr. Sadik

  16. Population conference: consensus and conflict.

    PubMed

    Willson, P D

    1984-01-01

    The United Nations-sponsored International Conference on Population held in Mexico City was both a rejection and an affirmation of a new policy of the Reagan administration. The policy denies international family planning funds to nongovernmental organizations that perform or actively promote abortion as a family planning method in other nations. A compromise statement was accepted urging governments to take appropriate measures to discourage abortion as a family planning method and when possible to provide for the humane treatment and counseling of women ho resorted to abortion. The statement on abortion was 1 of 88 reccomendations approved by the conference. The commitment expressed in the 10-year-old World Population Plan of Action to the rights and responsiblity to all people as reaffirmed. The conference also endorsed family life education and sex education as well as suitable family planning, information and services for adolescents, with due consideration given to the role, rights and obligations of parents. Increased support for international population and family planning programs was urged and World Bank President, Clausen, urged a 4-fold increase in international funding by the year 2000. Most of the conference's recommendations re devoted to the broad range of population policy issues, including morbidity and mortality, international and internal migration, the relationship between population and economic development and the status of women. The purpose of the recommendations is to increase the momentum of international support. The Mexico City conference was characterized by a remarkable degree of consensus about population policies with respect to integration with economic development, the need to respect individual rights and the recognition that all nations have sovereign rights to develop and implement their own population policies. Conflict and controversy arose in the areas of the arms race and the Middle East. The US position on abortion funding

  17. Ethics in the computer age. Conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Kizza, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    These proceedings contain the papers presented at the Ethics in the Computer Age conference held in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, November 11-13, 1994. The conference was sponsored by ACM SIGCAS (Computers and Society) to which I am very grateful. The Ethics in the Computer Age conference sequence started in 1991 with the first conference at the campus of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. The second was help at the same location a year later. These two conferences were limited to only invited speakers, but their success was overwhelming. This is the third in the sequence and the first truly international one. Plans are already under way for the fourth in 1996.

  18. Real-time DNA sequencing from single polymerase molecules.

    PubMed

    Korlach, Jonas; Bjornson, Keith P; Chaudhuri, Bidhan P; Cicero, Ronald L; Flusberg, Benjamin A; Gray, Jeremy J; Holden, David; Saxena, Ravi; Wegener, Jeffrey; Turner, Stephen W

    2010-01-01

    Pacific Biosciences has developed a method for real-time sequencing of single DNA molecules (Eid et al., 2009), with intrinsic sequencing rates of several bases per second and read lengths into the kilobase range. Conceptually, this sequencing approach is based on eavesdropping on the activity of DNA polymerase carrying out template-directed DNA polymerization. Performed in a highly parallel operational mode, sequential base additions catalyzed by each polymerase are detected with terminal phosphate-linked, fluorescence-labeled nucleotides. This chapter will first outline the principle of this single-molecule, real-time (SMRT) DNA sequencing method, followed by descriptions of its underlying components and typical sequencing run conditions. Two examples are provided which illustrate that, in addition to the DNA sequence, the dynamics of DNA polymerization from each enzyme molecules is directly accessible: the determination of base-specific kinetic parameters from single-molecule sequencing reads, and the characterization of DNA synthesis rate heterogeneities. PMID:20580975

  19. Getting it Right: How DNA Polymerases Select the Right Nucleotide.

    PubMed

    Ludmann, Samra; Marx, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    All living organisms are defined by their genetic code encrypted in their DNA. DNA polymerases are the enzymes that are responsible for all DNA syntheses occurring in nature. For DNA replication, repair and recombination these enzymes have to read the parental DNA and recognize the complementary nucleotide out of a pool of four structurally similar deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) for a given template. The selection of the nucleotide is in accordance with the Watson-Crick rule. In this process the accuracy of DNA synthesis is crucial for the maintenance of the genome stability. However, to spur evolution a certain degree of freedom must be allowed. This brief review highlights the mechanistic basis for selecting the right nucleotide by DNA polymerases.

  20. Designing Polymerase Chain Reaction Primers Using Primer3Plus.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jui-Hung; Weng, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    Designing oligonucleotide primers is a crucial step for successful molecular biology experiments that require the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR involves cycles of three steps: denaturation, annealing, and extension. During denaturation, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules (templates) are separated into single strands. During annealing, a pair of primers is annealed to the complementary regions of the single-stranded molecules. In the extension step, DNA polymerase extends the primers to produce DNA molecules that correspond to the region bracketed by the primers (the amplicons). All of these steps are temperature sensitive, and the common choice of temperatures is 94°C, 60°C, and 70°C, respectively. Poorly designed primers may lead to no amplification product or additional undesired amplified fragments. The goals of primer design include good primer specificity, high annealing efficiency, appropriate melting temperature, proper GC content, and the prevention of primer hairpins or primer dimers. PMID:27574202

  1. Methods in molecular cardiology: the polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sonnemans, D.G.P.; de Windt, L.J.; de Muinck, E.D.; Doevendans, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    Several polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques are described in this review to give insight into the potential applications for cardiovascular research. Although PCR can be performed in several ways, all applications are based on the same general principle, the amplification of DNA or RNA by the enzyme polymerase. This amplification provides the opportunity to detect, identify and multiply a single copy of DNA or RNA, in or outside the cell. This powerful technique can be used in several directions of DNA and RNA research resulting in the ability to specifically detect the presence and activity of genes. The use of these techniques in cardiovascular research is discussed here. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:25696037

  2. A heteromeric transcription factor required for mammalian RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, S; Tanaka, Y; Kawaguchi, T; Nagaoka, T; Weissman, S M; Yasukochi, Y

    1990-01-01

    A general transcription factor, FC, essential for specific initiation of in vitro transcription by mammalian RNA polymerase II was identified and a procedure developed to purify it to near homogeneity from HeLa cell nuclei. Purified FC is composed of two polypeptides of apparent molecular masses 80 kDa and 30 kDa, on SDS-PAGE, and has a native size of 280 kDa estimated by gel filtration column. Both polypeptides were shown to be essential for reconstituting in vitro transcription activity. Biochemical analysis showed that the 80 kDa and 30 kDa components were present in a 1:1 molar ratio. FC was also demonstrated to interact directly or indirectly with purified RNA polymerase II. Similarities between FC and transcription factors reported by others from human, rat or Drosophila cells are discussed. Images PMID:2395645

  3. Detection of Entamoeba histolytica by Recombinase Polymerase Amplification.

    PubMed

    Nair, Gayatri; Rebolledo, Mauricio; White, A Clinton; Crannell, Zachary; Richards-Kortum, R Rebecca; Pinilla, A Elizabeth; Ramírez, Juan David; López, M Consuelo; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro

    2015-09-01

    Amebiasis is an important cause of diarrheal disease worldwide and has been associated with childhood malnutrition. Traditional microscopy approaches are neither sensitive nor specific for Entamoeba histolytica. Antigen assays are more specific, but many cases are missed unless tested by molecular methods. Although polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is effective, the need for sophisticated, expensive equipment, infrastructure, and trained personnel limits its usefulness, especially in the resource-limited, endemic areas. Here, we report development of a recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) method to detect E. histolytica specifically. Using visual detection by lateral flow (LF), the test was highly sensitive and specific and could be performed without additional equipment. The availability of this inexpensive, sensitive, and field-applicable diagnostic test could facilitate rapid diagnosis and treatment of amebiasis in endemic regions.

  4. Detection of Entamoeba histolytica by Recombinase Polymerase Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Gayatri; Rebolledo, Mauricio; White, A. Clinton; Crannell, Zachary; Richards-Kortum, R. Rebecca; Pinilla, A. Elizabeth; Ramírez, Juan David; López, M. Consuelo; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Amebiasis is an important cause of diarrheal disease worldwide and has been associated with childhood malnutrition. Traditional microscopy approaches are neither sensitive nor specific for Entamoeba histolytica. Antigen assays are more specific, but many cases are missed unless tested by molecular methods. Although polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is effective, the need for sophisticated, expensive equipment, infrastructure, and trained personnel limits its usefulness, especially in the resource-limited, endemic areas. Here, we report development of a recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) method to detect E. histolytica specifically. Using visual detection by lateral flow (LF), the test was highly sensitive and specific and could be performed without additional equipment. The availability of this inexpensive, sensitive, and field-applicable diagnostic test could facilitate rapid diagnosis and treatment of amebiasis in endemic regions. PMID:26123960

  5. Synergistic action of RNA polymerases in overcoming the nucleosomal barrier.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing; Bai, Lu; Johnson, Daniel S; Fulbright, Robert M; Kireeva, Maria L; Kashlev, Mikhail; Wang, Michelle D

    2010-06-01

    During gene expression, RNA polymerase (RNAP) encounters a major barrier at a nucleosome and yet must access the nucleosomal DNA. Previous in vivo evidence has suggested that multiple RNAPs might increase transcription efficiency through nucleosomes. Here we have quantitatively investigated this hypothesis using Escherichia coli RNAP as a model system by directly monitoring its location on the DNA via a single-molecule DNA-unzipping technique. When an RNAP encountered a nucleosome, it paused with a distinctive 10-base pair periodicity and backtracked by approximately 10-15 base pairs. When two RNAPs elongate in close proximity, the trailing RNAP apparently assists in the leading RNAP's elongation, reducing its backtracking and enhancing its transcription through a nucleosome by a factor of 5. Taken together, our data indicate that histone-DNA interactions dictate RNAP pausing behavior, and alleviation of nucleosome-induced backtracking by multiple polymerases may prove to be a mechanism for overcoming the nucleosomal barrier in vivo.

  6. Detection of Entamoeba histolytica by Recombinase Polymerase Amplification.

    PubMed

    Nair, Gayatri; Rebolledo, Mauricio; White, A Clinton; Crannell, Zachary; Richards-Kortum, R Rebecca; Pinilla, A Elizabeth; Ramírez, Juan David; López, M Consuelo; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro

    2015-09-01

    Amebiasis is an important cause of diarrheal disease worldwide and has been associated with childhood malnutrition. Traditional microscopy approaches are neither sensitive nor specific for Entamoeba histolytica. Antigen assays are more specific, but many cases are missed unless tested by molecular methods. Although polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is effective, the need for sophisticated, expensive equipment, infrastructure, and trained personnel limits its usefulness, especially in the resource-limited, endemic areas. Here, we report development of a recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) method to detect E. histolytica specifically. Using visual detection by lateral flow (LF), the test was highly sensitive and specific and could be performed without additional equipment. The availability of this inexpensive, sensitive, and field-applicable diagnostic test could facilitate rapid diagnosis and treatment of amebiasis in endemic regions. PMID:26123960

  7. Chromosomal localization of human RNA polymerase II subunit genes

    SciTech Connect

    Acker, J.; Wintzerith, M.; Vigneron, M.; Kedinger, C. ); Mattei, M.G.; Roeckel, N.; Depetris, D. )

    1994-04-01

    The eukaryotic DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (or B) is composed of 10 to 14 polypeptides ranging from 220 to 10 kDa. To gain further insight into the molecular structure and function of these subunits, the authors have undertaken the molecular cloning of nucleotide sequences corresponding to the human enzyme. The cDNAs of five subunits (hRPB220, hRPB140, hRPB33, hRPB25, and hRPB14.5) have been isolated. Using in situ hybridization, they show that the genes of these subunits have distinct chromosomal locations (17p13, 4q12, 16q13-q21, 19p13.3, and 19q12, respectively). Thus, if assembly of active polymerase molecules requires coordinated expression from these independent genes, mechanisms that ensure tight coregulation of the corresponding promoters must exist. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Transcriptional mapping of the DNA polymerase gene of vaccinia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Traktman, P.; Sridhar, P.; Condit, R.C.; Roberts, B.E.

    1984-01-01

    Vaccinia virus DNA polymerase, a single-subunit enzyme of 110,000 molecular weight, is induced early after infection. Genetic analysis suggests that the gene encoding the enzyme maps within a 15-kilobase HindIII fragment located 45 kilobases from the left-hand end of the genome. The authors identified the in vitro translation product with these propeties and mapped the transcript by hybrid selection, RNA filter hybridization, and S1 nuclease mapping. Two mRNAs from this region, 3.4 and 3.9 kilobases in size, could be translated in vitro to yield a 110K polypeptide. The two RNAs shared a common 5' terminus and had staggered 3' ends. Sequences mapping entirely within the gene were shown to be biologically active in rescuing mutants with temperature-sensitive or drug-resistant polymerase activity to the wild-type phenotype.

  9. Mechanism of asymmetric polymerase assembly at the eukaryotic replication fork

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, Roxana E; Langston, Lance; Yao, Nina Y; Yurieva, Olga; Zhang, Dan; Finkelstein, Jeff; Agarwal, Tani; O’Donnell, Mike E

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotes use distinct polymerases for leading- and lagging-strand replication, but how they target their respective strands is uncertain. We reconstituted Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication forks and found that CMG helicase selects polymerase (Pol) ε to the exclusion of Pol δ on the leading strand. Even if Pol δ assembles on the leading strand, Pol ε rapidly replaces it. Pol δ–PCNA is distributive with CMG, in contrast to its high stability on primed ssDNA. Hence CMG will not stabilize Pol δ, instead leaving the leading strand accessible for Pol ε and stabilizing Pol ε. Comparison of Pol ε and Pol δ on a lagging-strand model DNA reveals the opposite. Pol δ dominates over excess Pol ε on PCNA-primed ssDNA. Thus, PCNA strongly favors Pol δ over Pol ε on the lagging strand, but CMG over-rides and flips this balance in favor of Pol ε on the leading strand. PMID:24997598

  10. Mechanism of asymmetric polymerase assembly at the eukaryotic replication fork.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Roxana E; Langston, Lance; Yao, Nina Y; Yurieva, Olga; Zhang, Dan; Finkelstein, Jeff; Agarwal, Tani; O'Donnell, Mike E

    2014-08-01

    Eukaryotes use distinct polymerases for leading- and lagging-strand replication, but how they target their respective strands is uncertain. We reconstituted Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication forks and found that CMG helicase selects polymerase (Pol) ɛ to the exclusion of Pol δ on the leading strand. Even if Pol δ assembles on the leading strand, Pol ɛ rapidly replaces it. Pol δ-PCNA is distributive with CMG, in contrast to its high stability on primed ssDNA. Hence CMG will not stabilize Pol δ, instead leaving the leading strand accessible for Pol ɛ and stabilizing Pol ɛ. Comparison of Pol ɛ and Pol δ on a lagging-strand model DNA reveals the opposite. Pol δ dominates over excess Pol ɛ on PCNA-primed ssDNA. Thus, PCNA strongly favors Pol δ over Pol ɛ on the lagging strand, but CMG over-rides and flips this balance in favor of Pol ɛ on the leading strand. PMID:24997598

  11. Transcription termination by the eukaryotic RNA polymerase III

    PubMed Central

    Arimbasseri, Aneeshkumar G.; Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    RNA polymerase (pol) III transcribes a multitude of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes as well as other small RNA genes distributed through the genome. By being sequence-specific, precise and efficient, transcription termination by pol III not only defines the 3′ end of the nascent RNA which directs subsequent association with the stabilizing La protein, it also prevents transcription into downstream DNA and promotes efficient recycling. Each of the RNA polymerases appears to have evolved unique mechanisms to initiate the process of termination in response to different types of termination signals. However, in eukaryotes much less is known about the final stage of termination, destabilization of the elongation complex with release of the RNA and DNA from the polymerase active center. By comparison to pols I & II, pol III exhibits the most direct coupling of the initial and final stages of termination, both of which occur at a short oligo(dT) tract on the non-template strand (dA on the template) of the DNA. While pol III termination is autonomous involving the core subunits C2 and probably C1, it also involves subunits C11, C37 and C53, which act on the pol III catalytic center and exhibit homology to the pol II elongation factor TFIIS, and TFIIFα/β respectively. Here we compile knowledge of pol III termination and associate mutations that affect this process with structural elements of the polymerase that illustrate the importance of C53/37 both at its docking site on the pol III lobe and in the active center. The models suggest that some of these features may apply to the other eukaryotic pols. PMID:23099421

  12. Engineered polymerases amplify the potential of ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Beth

    2008-06-01

    The generation of genomic data from mammoths and Neanderthals has reinvigorated discussion about whether extinct species could be brought back within the foreseeable future. However, post-mortem DNA decay rapidly reduces the number and quality of surviving DNA fragments, consequently increasing rates of sequencing error and forming a significant obstacle to accurate sequence reconstruction. Recent work has shown that it is possible to engineer a polymerase capable of using even highly damaged fragments as template sequences. PMID:18440082

  13. Mechanism of Ribonucleotide Incorporation by Human DNA Polymerase η.

    PubMed

    Su, Yan; Egli, Martin; Guengerich, F Peter

    2016-02-19

    Ribonucleotides and 2'-deoxyribonucleotides are the basic units for RNA and DNA, respectively, and the only difference is the extra 2'-OH group on the ribonucleotide sugar. Cellular rNTP concentrations are much higher than those of dNTP. When copying DNA, DNA polymerases not only select the base of the incoming dNTP to form a Watson-Crick pair with the template base but also distinguish the sugar moiety. Some DNA polymerases use a steric gate residue to prevent rNTP incorporation by creating a clash with the 2'-OH group. Y-family human DNA polymerase η (hpol η) is of interest because of its spacious active site (especially in the major groove) and tolerance of DNA lesions. Here, we show that hpol η maintains base selectivity when incorporating rNTPs opposite undamaged DNA and the DNA lesions 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer but with rates that are 10(3)-fold lower than for inserting the corresponding dNTPs. X-ray crystal structures show that the hpol η scaffolds the incoming rNTP to pair with the template base (dG) or 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine with a significant propeller twist. As a result, the 2'-OH group avoids a clash with the steric gate, Phe-18, but the distance between primer end and Pα of the incoming rNTP increases by 1 Å, elevating the energy barrier and slowing polymerization compared with dNTP. In addition, Tyr-92 was identified as a second line of defense to maintain the position of Phe-18. This is the first crystal structure of a DNA polymerase with an incoming rNTP opposite a DNA lesion.

  14. Modulation of DNA Polymerase Noncovalent Kinetic Transitions by Divalent Cations.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Joseph M; Lieberman, Kate R; Wang, Hongyun

    2016-03-18

    Replicative DNA polymerases (DNAPs) require divalent metal cations for phosphodiester bond formation in the polymerase site and for hydrolytic editing in the exonuclease site. Me(2+) ions are intimate architectural components of each active site, where they are coordinated by a conserved set of amino acids and functional groups of the reaction substrates. Therefore Me(2+) ions can influence the noncovalent transitions that occur during each nucleotide addition cycle. Using a nanopore, transitions in individual Φ29 DNAP complexes are resolved with single-nucleotide spatial precision and sub-millisecond temporal resolution. We studied Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), which support catalysis, and Ca(2+), which supports deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) binding but not catalysis. We examined their effects on translocation, dNTP binding, and primer strand transfer between the polymerase and exonuclease sites. All three metals cause a concentration-dependent shift in the translocation equilibrium, predominantly by decreasing the forward translocation rate. Me(2+) also promotes an increase in the backward translocation rate that is dependent upon the primer terminal 3'-OH group. Me(2+) modulates the translocation rates but not their response to force, suggesting that Me(2+) does not affect the distance to the transition state of translocation. Absent Me(2+), the primer strand transfer pathway between the polymerase and exonuclease sites displays additional kinetic states not observed at >1 mm Me(2+). Complementary dNTP binding is affected by Me(2+) identity, with Ca(2+) affording the highest affinity, followed by Mn(2+), and then Mg(2+). Both Ca(2+) and Mn(2+) substantially decrease the dNTP dissociation rate relative to Mg(2+), while Ca(2+) also increases the dNTP association rate.

  15. Use of polymerase chain reaction for rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, D V; Wilton, S D; Francis, B R; Gow, B L

    1992-01-01

    A DNA amplification assay using the polymerase chain reaction technique designed for the rapid identification of Mycobacterium bovis organisms was used to test 211 human mycobacterial isolates and 177 clinical specimens previously submitted for routine mycobacterial culture. The procedures described could be used by routine or specialist laboratories for identification of M. tuberculosis complex organisms in 4 h and/or as a rapid screening method for the direct detection of M. tuberculosis complex organisms in specimens. Images PMID:1734065

  16. Discovery of an irreversible HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qingbei; Nair, Anilkumar G; Rosenblum, Stuart B; Huang, Hsueh-Cheng; Lesburg, Charles A; Jiang, Yueheng; Selyutin, Oleg; Chan, Tin-Yau; Bennett, Frank; Chen, Kevin X; Venkatraman, Srikanth; Sannigrahi, Mousumi; Velazquez, Francisco; Duca, Jose S; Gavalas, Stephen; Huang, Yuhua; Pu, Haiyan; Wang, Li; Pinto, Patrick; Vibulbhan, Bancha; Agrawal, Sony; Ferrari, Eric; Jiang, Chuan-kui; Li, Cheng; Hesk, David; Gesell, Jennifer; Sorota, Steve; Shih, Neng-Yang; Njoroge, F George; Kozlowski, Joseph A

    2013-12-15

    The discovery of lead compound 2e was described. Its covalent binding to HCV NS5B polymerase enzyme was investigated by X-ray analysis. The results of distribution, metabolism and pharmacokinetics were reported. Compound 2e was demonstrated to be potent (replicon GT-1b EC50 = 0.003 μM), highly selective, and safe in in vitro and in vivo assays.

  17. Mechanism of histone survival during transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Kulaeva, Olga I; Studitsky, Vasily M

    2010-01-01

    This work is related to and stems from our recent NSMB paper, "Mechanism of chromatin remodeling and recovery during passage of RNA polymerase II" (December 2009). Synopsis. Recent genomic studies from many laboratories have suggested that nucleosomes are not displaced from moderately transcribed genes. Furthermore, histones H3/H4 carrying the primary epigenetic marks are not displaced or exchanged (in contrast to H2A/H2B histones) during moderate transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in vivo. These exciting observations suggest that the large molecule of Pol II passes through chromatin structure without even transient displacement of H3/H4 histones. The most recent analysis of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-type mechanism of chromatin remodeling in vitro (described in our NSMB 2009 paper) suggests that nucleosome survival is tightly coupled with formation of a novel intermediate: a very small intranucleosomal DNA loop (Ø-loop) containing transcribing Pol II. In the submitted manuscript we critically evaluate one of the key predictions of this model: the lack of even transient displacement of histones H3/H4 during Pol II transcription in vitro. The data suggest that, indeed, histones H3/H4 are not displaced during Pol II transcription in vitro. These studies are directly connected with the observation in vivo on the lack of exchange of histones H3/H4 during Pol II transcription.

  18. Evidence implying DNA polymerase beta function in excision repair.

    PubMed

    Siedlecki, J A; Szyszko, J; Pietrzykowska, I; Zmudzka, B

    1980-01-25

    Comparison was made of the ability of calf thymus DNA polymerases alpha and beta to replicate the following templates: native E. coli CR-34 DNA (T-DNA), calf thymus DNA activated by DNase I (act.DNA), BU-DNA (from E. coli CR-34 cells cultured on BUdR-containing medium) with damages resulting from incomplete excision repair, as well as thermally denatured act.DNA and BU-DNA (s.s.act.DNA and s.s.BU-DNA). 3H-TTP incorporation during extensive replication of act.DNA was similar for both enzymes, being, as expected, 40 times higher than for T-DNA. Likewise, the differences in the yield of the s.s.act.DNA or s.s.BU-DNA replication between both enzymes were negligible. In contrast, damaged native DNA was 6 - 30 times more extensively replicated by DNA polymerase beta than alpha. We propose that this is due to the greater ability of DNA polymerase beta compared with alpha to replicate single-stranded gaps, the presence of which is more likely in damaged BU-DNA than in T-DNA and act.DNA.

  19. Nascent transcription affected by RNA polymerase IV in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Erhard, Karl F; Talbot, Joy-El R B; Deans, Natalie C; McClish, Allison E; Hollick, Jay B

    2015-04-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define the nascent transcriptomes of rpd1 mutant and wild-type (WT) seedlings using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to identify the broader targets of RPD1-based regulation. Comparisons of WT and rpd1 mutant GRO-seq profiles indicate that Pol IV globally affects transcription at both transcriptional start sites and immediately downstream of polyadenylation addition sites. We found no evidence of divergent transcription from gene promoters as seen in mammalian GRO-seq profiles. Statistical comparisons identify genes and TEs whose transcription is affected by RPD1. Most examples of significant increases in genic antisense transcription appear to be initiated by 3'-proximal long terminal repeat retrotransposons. These results indicate that maize Pol IV specifies Pol II-based transcriptional regulation for specific regions of the maize genome including genes having developmental significance.

  20. Mechanisms of backtrack recovery by RNA polymerases I and II

    PubMed Central

    Lisica, Ana; Engel, Christoph; Jahnel, Marcus; Roldán, Édgar; Galburt, Eric A.; Cramer, Patrick; Grill, Stephan W.

    2016-01-01

    During DNA transcription, RNA polymerases often adopt inactive backtracked states. Recovery from backtracks can occur by 1D diffusion or cleavage of backtracked RNA, but how polymerases make this choice is unknown. Here, we use single-molecule optical tweezers experiments and stochastic theory to show that the choice of a backtrack recovery mechanism is determined by a kinetic competition between 1D diffusion and RNA cleavage. Notably, RNA polymerase I (Pol I) and Pol II recover from shallow backtracks by 1D diffusion, use RNA cleavage to recover from intermediary depths, and are unable to recover from extensive backtracks. Furthermore, Pol I and Pol II use distinct mechanisms to avoid nonrecoverable backtracking. Pol I is protected by its subunit A12.2, which decreases the rate of 1D diffusion and enables transcript cleavage up to 20 nt. In contrast, Pol II is fully protected through association with the cleavage stimulatory factor TFIIS, which enables rapid recovery from any depth by RNA cleavage. Taken together, we identify distinct backtrack recovery strategies of Pol I and Pol II, shedding light on the evolution of cellular functions of these key enzymes. PMID:26929337