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Sample records for polymerase conferring differential

  1. RNA polymerase errors cause splicing defects and can be regulated by differential expression of RNA polymerase subunits.

    PubMed

    Carey, Lucas B

    2015-12-10

    Errors during transcription may play an important role in determining cellular phenotypes: the RNA polymerase error rate is >4 orders of magnitude higher than that of DNA polymerase and errors are amplified >1000-fold due to translation. However, current methods to measure RNA polymerase fidelity are low-throughout, technically challenging, and organism specific. Here I show that changes in RNA polymerase fidelity can be measured using standard RNA sequencing protocols. I find that RNA polymerase is error-prone, and these errors can result in splicing defects. Furthermore, I find that differential expression of RNA polymerase subunits causes changes in RNA polymerase fidelity, and that coding sequences may have evolved to minimize the effect of these errors. These results suggest that errors caused by RNA polymerase may be a major source of stochastic variability at the level of single cells.

  2. RNA polymerase errors cause splicing defects and can be regulated by differential expression of RNA polymerase subunits

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Lucas B

    2015-01-01

    Errors during transcription may play an important role in determining cellular phenotypes: the RNA polymerase error rate is >4 orders of magnitude higher than that of DNA polymerase and errors are amplified >1000-fold due to translation. However, current methods to measure RNA polymerase fidelity are low-throughout, technically challenging, and organism specific. Here I show that changes in RNA polymerase fidelity can be measured using standard RNA sequencing protocols. I find that RNA polymerase is error-prone, and these errors can result in splicing defects. Furthermore, I find that differential expression of RNA polymerase subunits causes changes in RNA polymerase fidelity, and that coding sequences may have evolved to minimize the effect of these errors. These results suggest that errors caused by RNA polymerase may be a major source of stochastic variability at the level of single cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09945.001 PMID:26652005

  3. International Conference on Multiscale Methods and Partial Differential Equations.

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Hou

    2006-12-12

    The International Conference on Multiscale Methods and Partial Differential Equations (ICMMPDE for short) was held at IPAM, UCLA on August 26-27, 2005. The conference brought together researchers, students and practitioners with interest in the theoretical, computational and practical aspects of multiscale problems and related partial differential equations. The conference provided a forum to exchange and stimulate new ideas from different disciplines, and to formulate new challenging multiscale problems that will have impact in applications.

  4. Multidrug resistance conferred by novel DNA polymerase mutations in human cytomegalovirus isolates.

    PubMed

    Scott, Gillian M; Weinberg, Adriana; Rawlinson, William D; Chou, Sunwen

    2007-01-01

    The emergence of antiviral-resistant cytomegalovirus (CMV) strains is a continuing clinical problem, with increased numbers of immunocompromised patients given longer-duration antiviral prophylaxis. Two previously unrecognized CMV DNA polymerase mutations (N408K and A834P) identified separately and together in at-risk lung and kidney transplant recipients and a third mutation (L737M) identified in a liver transplant recipient were characterized by marker transfer to antiviral-sensitive laboratory strains AD169 and Towne. Subsequent phenotypic analyses of recombinant strains demonstrated the ability of mutation N408K to confer ganciclovir (GCV) and cidofovir (CDV) resistance and of mutation A834P to confer GCV, foscarnet, and CDV resistance. Mutation L737M did not confer resistance to any of the antiviral agents tested. A recombinant strain containing both N408K and A834P demonstrated increased GCV and CDV resistance compared to the levels of resistance of the virus containing only the A834P mutation. The addition of mutation N408K in combination with A834P also partially reconstituted the replication impairment of recombinant virus containing only A834P. This suggests that perturbation of both DNA polymerization (A834P) and exonuclease (N408K) activities contributes to antiviral resistance and altered replication kinetics in these mutant strains. The identification of these multidrug-resistant CMV strains in at-risk seronegative recipients of organs from seropositive donors suggests that improved prophylactic and treatment strategies are required. The additive effect of multiple mutations on antiviral susceptibility suggests that increasing antiviral-resistant phenotypes can result from different virus-antiviral interactions.

  5. Helix–hairpin–helix motifs confer salt resistance and processivity on chimeric DNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Andrey R.; Belova, Galina I.; Kozyavkin, Sergei A.; Slesarev, Alexei I.

    2002-01-01

    Helix–hairpin–helix (HhH) is a widespread motif involved in sequence-nonspecific DNA binding. The majority of HhH motifs function as DNA-binding modules with typical occurrence of one HhH motif or one or two (HhH)2 domains in proteins. We recently identified 24 HhH motifs in DNA topoisomerase V (Topo V). Although these motifs are dispensable for the topoisomerase activity of Topo V, their removal narrows the salt concentration range for topoisomerase activity tenfold. Here, we demonstrate the utility of Topo V's HhH motifs for modulating DNA-binding properties of the Stoffel fragment of TaqDNA polymerase and Pfu DNA polymerase. Different HhH cassettes fused with either NH2 terminus or COOH terminus of DNA polymerases broaden the salt concentration range of the polymerase activity significantly (up to 0.5 M NaCl or 1.8 M potassium glutamate). We found that anions play a major role in the inhibition of DNA polymerase activity. The resistance of initial extension rates and the processivity of chimeric polymerases to salts depend on the structure of added HhH motifs. Regardless of the type of the construct, the thermal stability of chimeric Taq polymerases increases under the optimal ionic conditions, as compared with that of TaqDNA polymerase or its Stoffel fragment. Our approach to raise the salt tolerance, processivity, and thermostability of Taq and Pfu DNA polymerases may be applied to all pol1- and polB-type polymerases, as well as to other DNA processing enzymes. PMID:12368475

  6. Helix-hairpin-helix motifs confer salt resistance and processivity on chimeric DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Andrey R; Belova, Galina I; Kozyavkin, Sergei A; Slesarev, Alexei I

    2002-10-15

    Helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) is a widespread motif involved in sequence-nonspecific DNA binding. The majority of HhH motifs function as DNA-binding modules with typical occurrence of one HhH motif or one or two (HhH)(2) domains in proteins. We recently identified 24 HhH motifs in DNA topoisomerase V (Topo V). Although these motifs are dispensable for the topoisomerase activity of Topo V, their removal narrows the salt concentration range for topoisomerase activity tenfold. Here, we demonstrate the utility of Topo V's HhH motifs for modulating DNA-binding properties of the Stoffel fragment of TaqDNA polymerase and Pfu DNA polymerase. Different HhH cassettes fused with either NH(2) terminus or COOH terminus of DNA polymerases broaden the salt concentration range of the polymerase activity significantly (up to 0.5 M NaCl or 1.8 M potassium glutamate). We found that anions play a major role in the inhibition of DNA polymerase activity. The resistance of initial extension rates and the processivity of chimeric polymerases to salts depend on the structure of added HhH motifs. Regardless of the type of the construct, the thermal stability of chimeric Taq polymerases increases under the optimal ionic conditions, as compared with that of TaqDNA polymerase or its Stoffel fragment. Our approach to raise the salt tolerance, processivity, and thermostability of Taq and Pfu DNA polymerases may be applied to all pol1- and polB-type polymerases, as well as to other DNA processing enzymes.

  7. Microsatellite instability induced mutations in DNA repair genes CtIP and MRE11 confer hypersensitivity to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors in myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Gaymes, Terry J.; Mohamedali, Azim M.; Patterson, Miranda; Matto, Nazia; Smith, Alexander; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Chelliah, Rajani; Curtin, Nicola; Farzaneh, Farzin; Shall, Sydney; Mufti, Ghulam J.

    2013-01-01

    Inactivation of the DNA mismatch repair pathway manifests as microsatellite instability, an accumulation of mutations that drives carcinogenesis. Here, we determined whether microsatellite instability in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome correlated with chromosomal instability and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor sensitivity through disruption of DNA repair function. Acute myeloid leukemia cell lines (n=12) and primary cell samples (n=18), and bone marrow mononuclear cells from high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients (n=63) were profiled for microsatellite instability using fluorescent fragment polymerase chain reaction. PARP inhibitor sensitivity was performed using cell survival, annexin V staining and cell cycle analysis. Homologous recombination was studied using immunocytochemical analysis. SNP karyotyping was used to study chromosomal instability. RNA silencing, Western blotting and gene expression analysis was used to study the functional consequences of mutations. Acute myeloid leukemia cell lines (4 of 12, 33%) and primary samples (2 of 18, 11%) exhibited microsatellite instability with mono-allelic mutations in CtIP and MRE11. These changes were associated with reduced expression of mismatch repair pathway components, MSH2, MSH6 and MLH1. Both microsatellite instability positive primary acute myeloid leukemia samples and cell lines demonstrated a downregulation of homologous recombination DNA repair conferring marked sensitivity to PARP inhibitors. Similarly, bone marrow mononuclear cells from 11 of 56 (20%) patients with de novo high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome exhibited microsatellite instability. Significantly, all 11 patients with microsatellite instability had cytogenetic abnormalities with 4 of them (36%) possessing a mono-allelic microsatellite mutation in CtIP. Furthermore, 50% reduction in CtIP expression by RNA silencing also down-regulated homologous recombination DNA repair responses conferring PARP

  8. Fake/Bogus Conferences: Their Features and Some Subtle Ways to Differentiate Them from Real Ones.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Amin; Rahbar, Nader; Rezvani, Mohammad Javad; Asadi, Fahime

    2017-04-10

    The main objective of the present paper is to introduce some features of fake/bogus conferences and some viable approaches to differentiate them from the real ones. These fake/bogus conferences introduce themselves as international conferences, which are multidisciplinary and indexed in major scientific digital libraries. Furthermore, most of the fake/bogus conference holders offer publishing the accepted papers in ISI journals and use other techniques in their advertisement e-mails.

  9. Acanthamoeba can be differentiated by the polymerase chain reaction and simple plating assays.

    PubMed

    Khan, N A; Jarroll, E L; Paget, T A

    2001-09-01

    Acanthamoeba are opportunistic pathogens with invasive and noninvasive species. For clinical purposes it is important to differentiate potentially pathogenic from nonpathogenic isolates. For the rapid and sensitive identification of Acanthamoeba at the genus level, we used a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method which detected as few as five cells. Further, we tested nine isolates of Acanthamoeba for their ability to produce cytopathic effects (CPE) on corneal epithelial cells. On the basis of the results, Acanthamoeba were divided into pathogenic or nonpathogenic groups. However, because CPE assays are not available to every diagnostic laboratory, we developed a simple plating assay based on osmotolerance which correlated well with the CPE assays. Pathogenic Acanthamoeba showed growth on higher osmolarity (agar plates containing one molar mannitol), while growth of nonpathogens was inhibited on these plates. In conclusion, we have developed methods for the rapid identification and differentiation of Acanthamoeba.

  10. DNA Polymerase Conformational Dynamics and the Role of Fidelity-Conferring Residues: Insights from Computational Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Meli, Massimiliano; Sustarsic, Marko; Craggs, Timothy D.; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Herein we investigate the molecular bases of DNA polymerase I conformational dynamics that underlie the replication fidelity of the enzyme. Such fidelity is determined by conformational changes that promote the rejection of incorrect nucleotides before the chemical ligation step. We report a comprehensive atomic resolution study of wild type and mutant enzymes in different bound states and starting from different crystal structures, using extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations that cover a total timespan of ~5 ms. The resulting trajectories are examined via a combination of novel methods of internal dynamics and energetics analysis, aimed to reveal the principal molecular determinants for the (de)stabilization of a certain conformational state. Our results show that the presence of fidelity-decreasing mutations or the binding of incorrect nucleotides in ternary complexes tend to favor transitions from closed toward open structures, passing through an ensemble of semi-closed intermediates. The latter ensemble includes the experimentally observed ajar conformation which, consistent with previous experimental observations, emerges as a molecular checkpoint for the selection of the correct nucleotide to incorporate. We discuss the implications of our results for the understanding of the relationships between the structure, dynamics, and function of DNA polymerase I at the atomistic level. PMID:27303671

  11. Application of restriction fragment differential display-polymerase chain reaction in study on differential expression profiles of human diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong-ying; Mei, Yan; Lu, You-guang; Li, Ai-dong; Tang, En-jie; Yang, Hui-jun

    2005-06-01

    To establish the restriction fragment differential display-polymerase chain reaction (RFDD-PCR) as an efficient technique for constructing and studying the gene expression profile of human tissues. The tissues of mamma adenocarcinoma (T), cancerometastasis lymph node (L) and normal mammary (N) from one mammary infiltrating ductal carcinoma case were collected, and the gene expression profile of each kind of tissue was constructed using RFDD-PCR technique at equal pace according to the operating manual of Qbio-gene Company. Then all fragments of the three gene expression profiles were separated and displayed by electrophoresis. With the use of gene database at the website http://www.Qbio-gene.com/display, the authors identified the names of the probable fragments by bioinformatics analysis. Through comparison of the three profiles, the numbers and types of most differentially expressed gene fragments were displayed. The expression profiles of the three kinds of tissue have been constructed covering 1716 fragments of mammary adenocarcinoma, 1769 of cancerometastasis lymph nodes and 1922 of normal mammary tissue. Among these 5407 fragments, 39.39% were exactly the same. While 33.9% sequences of T and L showed differences in abundance or presence, 40.9% of T and N and 39.6% fragments of L and N were observed differentially expressed. These differentially expressed gene fragments were found to relate with metastasis, differentiation, inflammation and so on. RFDD-PCR is an efficient technique for research in human diseases genomics as a mass screening for complete gene expression profile with high-flux. Through comparison among three or more profiles, the screening for candidate genes of a certain disease can be accomplished, and there is probably a chance to identify novel gene or expressed sequence tag.

  12. Polymerase I and transcript release factor (PTRF) regulates adipocyte differentiation and determines adipose tissue expandability

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Diaz, Sergio; Johnson, Lance A.; DeKroon, Robert M.; Moreno-Navarrete, Jose M.; Alzate, Oscar; Fernandez-Real, Jose M.; Maeda, Nobuyo; Arbones-Mainar, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired adipogenesis renders an adipose tissue unable to expand, leading to lipotoxicity and conditions such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. While factors important for adipogenesis have been studied extensively, those that set the limits of adipose tissue expansion remain undetermined. Feeding a Western-type diet to apolipoprotein E2 knock-in mice, a model of metabolic syndrome, produced 3 groups of equally obese mice: mice with normal glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemic yet glucose-tolerant mice, and prediabetic mice with impaired glucose tolerance and reduced circulating insulin. Using proteomics, we compared subcutaneous adipose tissues from mice in these groups and found that the expression of PTRF (polymerase I and transcript release factor) associated selectively with their glucose tolerance status. Lentiviral and pharmacologically overexpressed PTRF, whose function is critical for caveola formation, compromised adipocyte differentiation of cultured 3T3-L1cells. In human adipose tissue, PTRF mRNA levels positively correlated with markers of lipolysis and cellular senescence. Furthermore, a negative relationship between telomere length and PTRF mRNA levels was observed in human subcutaneous fat. PTRF is associated with limited adipose tissue expansion underpinning the key role of caveolae in adipocyte regulation. Furthermore, PTRF may be a suitable adipocyte marker for predicting pathological obesity and inform clinical management.—Perez-Diaz, S., Johnson, L. A., DeKroon, R. M., Moreno-Navarrete, J. M., Alzate, O., Fernandez-Real, J. M., Maeda, N., Arbones-Mainar, J. M. Polymerase I and transcript release factor (PTRF) regulates adipocyte differentiation and determines adipose tissue expandability. PMID:24812087

  13. Differential diagnosis of Taenia saginata and Taenia solium infections: from DNA probes to polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    González, Luis Miguel; Montero, Estrella; Sciutto, Edda; Harrison, Leslie J S; Parkhouse, R Michael E; Garate, Teresa

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this work was the rapid and easy differential diagnosis of Taenia saginata and T. solium. First, a T. saginata size-selected genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (gDNA) library was constructed in the vector lambda gt10 using the 2-4 kb fraction from the parasite DNA digested with EcoR1, under 'star' conditions. After differential screening of the library and hybridization analysis with DNA from T. saginata, T. solium, T. taeniaeformis, T. crassiceps, and Echinococcus granulosus (bovine, porcine, and human), 2 recombinant phages were selected. They were designated HDP1 and HDP2. HDP1 reacted specifically with T. saginata DNA, and HDP2 recognized DNA from both T. saginata and T. solium. The 2 DNA probes were then sequenced and further characterized. HDP1 was a repetitive sequence with a 53 bp monomeric unit repeated 24 times in direct tandem along the 1272 bp fragment, while the 3954 bp HDP2 was not a repetitive sequence. Using the sequencing data, oligonucleotides were designed and used in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The 2 selected oligonucleotides from probe HDP1 (PTs4F1 and PTs4R1) specifically amplified gDNA from T. saginata, but not T. solium or other related cestodes, with a sensitivity of < 10 pg of T. saginata gDNA, about the quantity of DNA in one taeniid egg. The 3 oligonucleotides selected from the HDP2 sequence (PTs7S35F1, PTs7S35F2, and PTs7S35R1) allowed the differential amplification of gDNA from T. saginata, T. solium and E. granulosus in a multiplex PCR, again with a sensitivity of < 10 pg. These diagnostic tools have immediate application in the differential diagnosis of T. solium and T. saginata in humans and in the diagnosis of dubious cysts in the slaughterhouse. We also hope to apply them to epidemiological surveys of, for example, soil and water in endemic areas.

  14. Development of a diagnostic multiplex polymerase chain reaction microarray assay to detect and differentiate Brucella spp.

    PubMed

    Schmoock, Gernot; Ehricht, Ralf; Melzer, Falk; Elschner, Mandy; Tomaso, Herbert; Neubauer, Heinrich; Al Dahouk, Sascha

    2011-12-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonosis leading to tremendous economic losses and severe human illness. Fast and reliable laboratory tests are needed to detect disease in both humans and animals and to monitor the production of safe food products and feed. For rapid identification of the genus Brucella and differentiation of its species, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction microarray assay based on 11 signature sequences and redundant oligonucleotide probes was developed. The gene targets included genus-specific sequences in bcsp31, perA, cgs, and omp2b, as well as chromosomal regions displaying species-specific hybridization patterns. Brucella reference strains and a representative panel of 102 field isolates were unambiguously identified by their hybridization patterns. The differentiation of species, however, was limited in members of the groups B. suis bv 3/4/B. canis and B. neotomae/B. microti. In summary, the newly developed Brucella ArrayTube® assay is an easy-to-handle molecular test for high-throughput and parallel analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. RNA Polymerase Sigma Factor That Blocks Morphological Differentiation by Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, Amy M.; Yoo, Narie J.; Losick, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The filamentous bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor undergoes a complicated process of morphological differentiation that begins with the formation of an aerial mycelium and culminates in sporulation. Genes required for the initiation of aerial mycelium formation have been termed bld (bald), describing the smooth, undifferentiated colonies of mutant strains. By using an insertional mutagenesis protocol that relies on in vitro transposition, we have isolated a bld mutant harboring an insertion in a previously uncharacterized gene, SCE59.12c, renamed here rsuA. The insertion mutant exhibited no measurable growth defect but failed to produce an aerial mycelium and showed a significant delay in the production of the polyketide antibiotic actinorhodin. The rsuA gene encodes an apparent anti-sigma factor and is located immediately downstream of SCE59.13c, renamed here sigU, whose product is inferred to be a member of the extracytoplasmic function subfamily of RNA polymerase sigma factors. The absence of rsuA in a strain that contained sigU caused a block in development, and the overexpression of sigU in an otherwise wild-type strain caused a delay in aerial mycelium formation. However, a strain in which both rsuA and sigU had been deleted was able to undergo morphological differentiation normally. We conclude that the rsuA-encoded anti-sigma factor is responsible for antagonizing the function of the sigma factor encoded by sigU. We also conclude that the sigU-encoded sigma factor is not normally required for development but that its uncontrolled activity obstructs morphological differentiation at an early stage. PMID:11566999

  16. A multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay differentiates between Bolbphorus damnificus and Bolbophorus type II sp

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A duplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was developed to differentiate between Bolbophorus damnificus and Bolbophorus type II species cercariae. Both trematode species are prevalent throughout the commercial catfish industry,.as both infect the ram’s horn snail, Plano...

  17. Differential role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in D. discoideum growth and development.

    PubMed

    Rajawat, Jyotika; Mir, Hina; Begum, Rasheedunnisa

    2011-03-09

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase is evolutionarily conserved as a responder to various forms of stress. Though PARP's role in cell death is well addressed, its role in development and multicellularity is still an enigma. We have previously reported the role of PARP in oxidative stress induced delayed development of D. discoideum. In the current study we highlight the involvement of PARP during D. discoideum development. Oxidative stress affects expression of aca and cAR1 thus affecting aggregation. Although parp expression is not affected during oxidative stress but it is involved during normal development as confirmed by our PARP down-regulation studies. Constitutive PARP down-regulation resulted in blocked development while no effect was observed on D. discoideum growth. Interestingly, stage specific PARP down-regulation arrested development at the slug stage. These results emphasize that PARP is essential for complex differentiation and its function may be linked to multicellularity. This is the first report where the involvement of PARP during normal multicellular development in D. discoideum, an ancient eukaryote, is established which could be of evolutionary significance. Thus our study adds one more role to the multitasking function of PARP.

  18. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Inhibitor AZ-27 Differentially Inhibits Different Polymerase Activities at the Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Noton, Sarah L.; Nagendra, Kartikeya; Dunn, Ewan F.; Mawhorter, Michael E.; Yu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of pediatric respiratory disease. RSV has an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase that transcribes and replicates the viral negative-sense RNA genome. The large polymerase subunit (L) has multiple enzymatic activities, having the capability to synthesize RNA and add and methylate a cap on each of the viral mRNAs. Previous studies (H. Xiong et al., Bioorg Med Chem Lett, 23:6789–6793, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2013.10.018; C. L. Tiong-Yip et al., Antimicrob Agents Chemother, 58:3867–3873, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.02540-14) had identified a small-molecule inhibitor, AZ-27, that targets the L protein. In this study, we examined the effect of AZ-27 on different aspects of RSV polymerase activity. AZ-27 was found to inhibit equally both mRNA transcription and genome replication in cell-based minigenome assays, indicating that it inhibits a step common to both of these RNA synthesis processes. Analysis in an in vitro transcription run-on assay, containing RSV nucleocapsids, showed that AZ-27 inhibits synthesis of transcripts from the 3′ end of the genome to a greater extent than those from the 5′ end, indicating that it inhibits transcription initiation. Consistent with this finding, experiments that assayed polymerase activity on the promoter showed that AZ-27 inhibited transcription and replication initiation. The RSV polymerase also can utilize the promoter sequence to perform a back-priming reaction. Interestingly, addition of AZ-27 had no effect on the addition of up to three nucleotides by back-priming but inhibited further extension of the back-primed RNA. These data provide new information regarding the mechanism of inhibition by AZ-27. They also suggest that the RSV polymerase adopts different conformations to perform its different activities at the promoter. IMPORTANCE Currently, there are no effective antiviral drugs to treat RSV infection. The RSV polymerase is an

  19. SciCADE 95: International conference on scientific computation and differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This report consists of abstracts from the conference. Topics include algorithms, computer codes, and numerical solutions for differential equations. Linear and nonlinear as well as boundary-value and initial-value problems are covered. Various applications of these problems are also included.

  20. The Teacher and His Staff: Differentiating Teaching Roles. Report of the 1968 Regional TEPS Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. National Commission on Teacher Education and Professional Standards.

    This book contains 10 papers selected from those presented at the 1968 regional conferences of the NEA National Commission on Teacher Education and Professional Standards (NCTEPS) on differentiated staffing: "Teacher Education: Analysis and Recommendations," John Macdonald, chairman, Department of Education, Sir George Williams Univ.; "New…

  1. Rapid and inexpensive species differentiation using a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction high-resolution melt assay.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Kelly M; Perez, Anjelica C U; Sweetin, Katherine C

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a method for developing real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) high-resolution melt (HRM) assays to identify multiple species present in a mixture simultaneously using LCGreen Plus and melt temperatures. Highly specific PCR primers are designed to yield amplicons with different melt temperatures for simple routine species identification compared with differentiating melt curve kinetics traces or difference plots. This method is robust and automatable, and it leads to savings in time and reagent costs, is easily modified to probe any species of interest, eliminates the need for post-PCR gel or capillary electrophoresis in routine assays, and requires no expensive dye-labeled primers.

  2. Differentiation of Giardia duodenalis from other Giardia spp. by using polymerase chain reaction and gene probes.

    PubMed Central

    Mahbubani, M H; Bej, A K; Perlin, M H; Schaefer, F W; Jakubowski, W; Atlas, R M

    1992-01-01

    Giardia spp. are waterborne organisms that are the most commonly identified pathogenic intestinal protozoans in the United States. Current detection techniques for Giardia species in water include microscopy and immunofluorescence techniques. Species of the genus Giardia are classified on the basis of taxonomic criteria, such as cell morphology, and on host specificity. We have developed a polymerase chain reaction- and gene probe-based detection system specific for Giardia spp., which can discriminate between the relevant species of the G. duodenalis type pathogenic to humans and other Giardia species that are not human pathogens. This method can detect a single Giardia cyst and is therefore sensitive enough for environmental monitoring. Images PMID:1734070

  3. Differential diagnosis of Goatpox virus in Taiwan by multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay and high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kun-Wei; Lee, Ming-Liang; Yang, Wei-Cheng; Wong, Min-Liang; Hsu, Wei-Li; Ho, Chia-Fang; Hsieh, Yao-Ching; Wang, Chi-Young

    2014-03-01

    The A32L gene from a Goatpox virus (GTPV) strain isolated from a goat in Yunlin County (Taiwan) displays several substitutions compared with the sequence of the Kenyan GTPV vaccine strain SGP0240 and the Pellor GTPV strain. Samples from the skin lesions on 6 goats with GTPV infection or from goats with Orf virus (ORFV) infection were tested in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system that used primers GPF, GPR1, and GPR2 as well as previously published primers specific for ORFV. These primers were able to amplify either GTPV or ORFV without cross-reactivity. A high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) was carried out on amplified DNA from the skin lesions of 6 goats with GTPV infection and with the GTPV SGP0240 strain. The results indicated that the melting temperature profiles amplified from samples with Yunlin GTPV infection can be differentiated from the GTPV SGP0240 strain. The findings showed that a successful differential assay for these GTPVs had been developed. Accordingly, both methods can be used to detect and differentiate GTPV isolated from animals that may have either been vaccinated or been infected with a wild strain. The multiplex PCR and HRMA could be used on skin samples of suspected cases to serve as the front-line and confirmative assays, respectively, which will be beneficial to the eradication of GTPV.

  4. Detection and differentiation of filarial parasites by universal primers and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Nuchprayoon, Surang; Junpee, Alisa; Poovorawan, Yong; Scott, Alan L

    2005-11-01

    Filarial nematode parasites are a serious cause of morbidity in humans and animals. Identification of filarial infection using traditional morphologic criteria can be difficult and lead to misdiagnosis. We report on a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP)-based method to detect and differentiate a broad range of filarial species in a single PCR. The first internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) along with the flanking 18S and 5.8S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were isolated and cloned from Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, and Brugia pahangi. Sequence analysis identified conserved sites in the 18S and 5.8S rDNA sequence that could be used as universal priming sites to generate ITS1-distinctive PCR products that were useful for distinguishing filariae at the genus level. The addition of a digestion of the ITS1 PCR product with the restriction endonuclease Ase I generated a fragment profile that allowed differentiation down to the species level for W. bancrofti, B. malayi, B. pahangi, Dirofilaria immitis, and D. repens. The PCR-RFLP of ITS1 rDNA will be useful in diagnosing and differentiating filarial parasites in human, animal reservoir hosts, and mosquito vectors in disease-endemic areas.

  5. Diagnosis of whooping cough in Switzerland: differentiating Bordetella pertussis from Bordetella holmesii by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Pittet, Laure F; Emonet, Stéphane; François, Patrice; Bonetti, Eve-Julie; Schrenzel, Jacques; Hug, Melanie; Altwegg, Martin; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Posfay-Barbe, Klara M

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella holmesii, an emerging pathogen, can be misidentified as Bordetella pertussis by routine polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In some reports, up to 29% of the patients diagnosed with pertussis have in fact B. holmesii infection and invasive, non-respiratory B. holmesii infections have been reported worldwide. This misdiagnosis undermines the knowledge of pertussis' epidemiology, and may lead to misconceptions on pertussis vaccine's efficacy. Recently, the number of whooping cough cases has increased significantly in several countries. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether B. holmesii was contributing to the increase in laboratory-confirmed cases of B. pertussis in Switzerland. A multiplex species-specific quantitative PCR assay was performed on 196 nasopharyngeal samples from Swiss patients with PCR-confirmed Bordetella infection (median age: 6 years-old, minimum 21 days-old, maximum 86 years-old), formerly diagnosed as Bordetella pertussis (IS481+). No B. holmesii (IS481+, IS1001-, hIS1001+) was identified. We discuss whether laboratories should implement specific PCR to recognize different Bordetella species. We conclude that in Switzerland B. holmesii seems to be circulating less than in neighboring countries and that specific diagnostic procedures are not necessary routinely. However, as the epidemiological situation may change rapidly, periodic reevaluation is suggested.

  6. Diagnosis of Whooping Cough in Switzerland: Differentiating Bordetella pertussis from Bordetella holmesii by Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Pittet, Laure F.; Emonet, Stéphane; François, Patrice; Bonetti, Eve-Julie; Schrenzel, Jacques; Hug, Melanie; Altwegg, Martin; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Posfay-Barbe, Klara M.

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella holmesii, an emerging pathogen, can be misidentified as Bordetella pertussis by routine polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In some reports, up to 29% of the patients diagnosed with pertussis have in fact B. holmesii infection and invasive, non-respiratory B. holmesii infections have been reported worldwide. This misdiagnosis undermines the knowledge of pertussis' epidemiology, and may lead to misconceptions on pertussis vaccine's efficacy. Recently, the number of whooping cough cases has increased significantly in several countries. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether B. holmesii was contributing to the increase in laboratory-confirmed cases of B. pertussis in Switzerland. A multiplex species-specific quantitative PCR assay was performed on 196 nasopharyngeal samples from Swiss patients with PCR-confirmed Bordetella infection (median age: 6 years-old, minimum 21 days-old, maximum 86 years-old), formerly diagnosed as Bordetella pertussis (IS481+). No B. holmesii (IS481+, IS1001−, hIS1001+) was identified. We discuss whether laboratories should implement specific PCR to recognize different Bordetella species. We conclude that in Switzerland B. holmesii seems to be circulating less than in neighboring countries and that specific diagnostic procedures are not necessary routinely. However, as the epidemiological situation may change rapidly, periodic reevaluation is suggested. PMID:24586447

  7. Detection and differentiation of the six Brucella species by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Sifuentes-Rincón, A. M.; Revol, A.; Barrera-Saldaña, H. A.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brucelosis is a severe acute febrile disease caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella. Its current diagnosis is based on clinical observations that may be complemented by serology and microbiological culture tests; however, the former is limited in sensitivity and specificity, the latter is time consuming. To improve brucelosis diagnosis we developed a test which is specific and sensitive and is capable of differentiating the six species of Brucella. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four primers were designed from B. abortus sequences at the well-conserved Omp2 locus that are able to amplify the DNAs of all six species of Brucella. RESULTS: Our test detected all six species of Brucella. Their differentiation resulted directly from differences in the amplification patterns or was achieved indirectly using a RFLP present in one of the PCR products. The sensitivity and specificity of the new test were then determined; it was applied successfully in confirming the diagnosis of a patient whose clinical history and serology indicated infection with Brucella. CONCLUSIONS: The results make possible the use of a PCR test for Brucella detection and differentiation without relying on the measurement of the antibodies or microorganism culture. Our first results showed that the PCR test can confirm the presence of Brucella in blood samples of infected patients. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:9407549

  8. Detection and differentiation of the six Brucella species by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Sifuentes-Rincón, A M; Revol, A; Barrera-Saldaña, H A

    1997-11-01

    Brucelosis is a severe acute febrile disease caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella. Its current diagnosis is based on clinical observations that may be complemented by serology and microbiological culture tests; however, the former is limited in sensitivity and specificity, the latter is time consuming. To improve brucelosis diagnosis we developed a test which is specific and sensitive and is capable of differentiating the six species of Brucella. Four primers were designed from B. abortus sequences at the well-conserved Omp2 locus that are able to amplify the DNAs of all six species of Brucella. Our test detected all six species of Brucella. Their differentiation resulted directly from differences in the amplification patterns or was achieved indirectly using a RFLP present in one of the PCR products. The sensitivity and specificity of the new test were then determined; it was applied successfully in confirming the diagnosis of a patient whose clinical history and serology indicated infection with Brucella. The results make possible the use of a PCR test for Brucella detection and differentiation without relying on the measurement of the antibodies or microorganism culture. Our first results showed that the PCR test can confirm the presence of Brucella in blood samples of infected patients.

  9. Differential detection of shrimp and crab for food labeling using polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Hiromu; Watanabe, Satoshi; Temmei, Yusuke; Hirao, Takashi; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Sakai, Shinobu; Adachi, Reiko; Sakata, Kozue; Urisu, Atsuo; Teshima, Reiko

    2011-04-27

    Shrimp and crab are well-known as allergenic ingredients. According to Japanese food allergy labeling regulations, shrimp species (including prawns, crayfishes, and lobsters) and crab species must be differentially declared when ≥10 ppm (total protein) of an allergenic ingredient is present. However, the commercial ELISA tests for the detection of crustacean proteins cannot differentiate between shrimp and crab. Therefore, two methods were developed to discriminate shrimp and crab: a shrimp-PCR method with postamplification digestion and a crab-PCR method that specifically amplifies a fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. The sensitivity and specificity of both PCR methods were verified by experiments using DNA extracted from 15 shrimp species, 13 crab species, krill, mysid, mantis shrimp, other food samples (cephalopod, shellfish, and fish), incurred foods, and commercial food products. Both PCR methods could detect 5 pg of DNA extracted from target species and 50 ng of genomic DNA extracted from incurred foods containing 10 ppm (μg/g) total protein of shrimp or crab. The two PCR methods were considered to be specific enough to separately detect species belonging to shrimp and crab. Although false-positive and false-negative results were obtained from some nontarget crustacean species, the proposed PCR methods, when used in conjunction with ELISA tests, would be a useful tool for confirmation of the validity of food allergy labeling and management of processed food safety for allergic patients.

  10. [Differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica from Entamoeba dispar using Gal/GalNAc-lectin and polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    López, Omaira Y; López, Myriam C; Corredor, Vladimir; Echeverri, M Clara; Pinilla, Análida E

    2012-04-01

    Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar are morphologically identical. However, the former is highly pathogenic and the latter is not. To differentiate Entamoeba histolytica from Entamoeba dispar through ELISA and PCR techniques in Colombian isolates from feces. Descriptive study of Colombian fecal samples from 53 males and 47 women, that were positive for the complex E. histolytica/E. dispar on light microscopy. Positive samples were cultured on Robinson medium to isolate trophozoites. The presence of specific Gal/ GalNAc-lectin was determined by ELISA and polymerase chain reaction in genomic DNA, using the combination of three nucleotides that recognize a variable region of 16S small subunit ribosomal RNA, generating a 166 base pair (bp) product for E. histolytica and 752 pb product for E. dispar. After verification, only eight of the 100 samples were positive for the complex E. histolytica/E. dispar and were cultivated. Isolates were obtained in six cultures, one corresponded to E. histolytica and six to E. dispar. The presence of E. histolytica/E. dispar complex was largely overestimated with light microscopy. In the few samples where isolates were obtained, the technique described differentiated between both strains.

  11. Identification of nickel response genes in abnormal early developments of sea urchin by differential display polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Tae Kwon; Lee, Gunsup; Rhee, Yong; Park, Heung-Sik; Chang, Man; Lee, Sukchan; Lee, Jaean; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2012-10-01

    Bioassays and biomarkers have been previously developed to assess the effects of heavy metal contaminants on the early life stages of the sea urchin. In this study, malformation in the early developmental processes was observed in sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus intermedius) larvae exposed to 10 ppm Ni for over 30 h. The most critical stage at which the triggering of nickel effects takes place is thought to be the blastula stage, which occurs after fertilization in larval development. To investigate the molecular-level responses of sea urchin exposed to heavy metal stress and to explore the differentially expressed genes that are induced or repressed by nickel, differential display polymerase chain reaction (DD-PCR) was used with sea urchin mRNAs. The malformation-related genes expressed in the early life stages of the sea urchin were cloned from larvae exposed to 10 ppm of nickel for 15 h, and accessed via DD-PCR. Sequence analysis results revealed that each of the genes evidenced high homology with EGF2, PCSK9, serine/threonine protein kinase, apolipophorin precursor protein, and MGC80921 protein/transcript variant 2. This result may prove useful in the development of novel biomarkers for the assessment of heavy metal stresses on sea urchin embryos. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Myogenic differentiation of L6 rat myoblasts: evidence for pleiotropic effects on myogenesis by RNA polymerase II mutations to alpha-amanitin resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Crerar, M M; Leather, R; David, E; Pearson, M L

    1983-01-01

    To assess the functional role of RNA polymerase II in the regulation of transcription during muscle differentiation, we isolated and characterized a large number of independent alpha-amanitin-resistant (AmaR) mutants of L6 rat myoblasts that express both wild-type and altered RNA polymerase II activities. We also examined their myogenic (Myo) phenotype by determining their ability to develop into mature myotubes, to express elevated levels of muscle creatine kinase, and to synthesize muscle-characteristic proteins as detected by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We found a two- to threefold increase in the frequency of clones with a myogenic-defective phenotype in the AmaR (RNA polymerase II) mutants as compared to control ethyl methane sulfonate-induced, 6-thioguanine-resistant (hypoxanthine, guanine phosphoribosyl transferase) mutants or to unselected survivors also exposed to ethyl methane sulfonate. Subsequent analysis showed that about half of these myogenic-defective AmaR mutants had a conditional Myo(ama) phenotype; when cultured in the presence of amanitin, they exhibited a Myo- phenotype; in its absence they exhibited a Myo+ phenotype. This conditional Myo(ama) phenotype is presumably caused by the inactivation by amanitin of the wild-type amanitin-sensitive RNA polymerase II activity and the subsequent rise in the level of mutant amanitin-resistant RNA polymerase II activity. In these Myo(ama) mutants, the wild-type RNA polymerase II is normally dominant with respect to the Myo+ phenotype, whereas the mutant RNA polymerase II is recessive and results in a Myo- phenotype only when the wild-type enzyme is inactivated. These findings suggest that certain mutations in the amaR structural gene for the amanitin-binding subunit of RNA polymerase II can selectively impair the transcription of genes specific for myogenic differentiation but not those specific for myoblast proliferation. Images PMID:6865946

  13. Homology-Based Identification of a Mutation in the Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase That Confers Resistance to Multiple Mutagens

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Nicole R.; Smith, Everett Clinton; Blanc, Hervé; Vignuzzi, Marco; Peersen, Olve B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Positive-sense RNA viruses encode RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) essential for genomic replication. With the exception of the large nidoviruses, such as coronaviruses (CoVs), RNA viruses lack proofreading and thus are dependent on RdRps to control nucleotide selectivity and fidelity. CoVs encode a proofreading exonuclease in nonstructural protein 14 (nsp14-ExoN), which confers a greater-than-10-fold increase in fidelity compared to other RNA viruses. It is unknown to what extent the CoV polymerase (nsp12-RdRp) participates in replication fidelity. We sought to determine whether homology modeling could identify putative determinants of nucleotide selectivity and fidelity in CoV RdRps. We modeled the CoV murine hepatitis virus (MHV) nsp12-RdRp structure and superimposed it on solved picornaviral RdRp structures. Fidelity-altering mutations previously identified in coxsackie virus B3 (CVB3) were mapped onto the nsp12-RdRp model structure and then engineered into the MHV genome with [nsp14-ExoN(+)] or without [nsp14-ExoN(−)] ExoN activity. Using this method, we identified two mutations conferring resistance to the mutagen 5-fluorouracil (5-FU): nsp12-M611F and nsp12-V553I. For nsp12-V553I, we also demonstrate resistance to the mutagen 5-azacytidine (5-AZC) and decreased accumulation of mutations. Resistance to 5-FU, and a decreased number of genomic mutations, was effectively masked by nsp14-ExoN proofreading activity. These results indicate that nsp12-RdRp likely functions in fidelity regulation and that, despite low sequence conservation, some determinants of RdRp nucleotide selectivity are conserved across RNA viruses. The results also indicate that, with regard to nucleotide selectivity, nsp14-ExoN is epistatic to nsp12-RdRp, consistent with its proposed role in a multiprotein replicase-proofreading complex. IMPORTANCE RNA viruses have evolutionarily fine-tuned replication fidelity to balance requirements for genetic stability and diversity

  14. Nucleotide selectivity defect and mutator phenotype conferred by a colon cancer-associated DNA polymerase δ mutation in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Tony M.; Baranovskiy, Andrey G.; Wang, Jing; Tahirov, Tahir H.; Shcherbakova, Polina V.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the POLD1 and POLE genes encoding DNA polymerases δ (Polδ) and ε (Polε) cause hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) and have been found in many sporadic colorectal and endometrial tumors. Much attention has been focused on POLE exonuclease domain mutations, which occur frequently in hypermutated DNA mismatch repair (MMR)-proficient tumors and appear to be responsible for the bulk of genomic instability in these tumors. In contrast, somatic POLD1 mutations are seen less frequently and typically occur in MMR-deficient tumors. Their functional significance is often unclear. Here we demonstrate that expression of the cancer-associated POLD1-R689W allele is strongly mutagenic in human cells. The mutation rate increased synergistically when the POLD1-R689W expression was combined with a MMR defect, indicating that the mutator effect of POLD1-R689W results from a high rate of replication errors. Purified human Polδ-R689W has normal exonuclease activity, but the nucleotide selectivity of the enzyme is severely impaired, providing a mechanistic explanation for the increased mutation rate in the POLD1-R689W-expressing cells. The vast majority of mutations induced by the POLD1-R689W are GC→TA transversions and GC→AT transitions, with transversions showing a strong strand bias and a remarkable preference for polypurine/polypyrimidine sequences. The mutational specificity of the Polδ variant matches that of the hypermutated CRC cell line, HCT15, in which this variant was first identified. The results provide compelling evidence for the pathogenic role of the POLD1-R689W mutation in the development of the human tumor and emphasize the need to experimentally determine the significance of Polδ variants present in sporadic tumors. PMID:28368425

  15. Simultaneous detection and differentiation of three genotypes of Brassica yellows virus by multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Peng, Yanmei; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Zongying; Li, Dawei; Yu, Jialin; Han, Chenggui

    2016-11-22

    Brassica yellows virus (BrYV), proposed to be a new polerovirus species, three distinct genotypes (BrYV-A, BrYV-B and BrYV-C) have been described. This study was to develop a simple, rapid, sensitive, cost-effective method for simultaneous detection and differentiation of three genotypes of BrYV. In this study, a multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR) was developed for simultaneous detection and differentiation of the three genotypes of BrYV. The three genotypes of BrYV and Tunip yellows virus (TuYV) could be differentiated simultaneously using six optimized specific oligonucleotide primers, including one universal primer for detecting BrYV, three BrYV genotype-specific primers, and a pair of primers for specific detection of TuYV. Primers were designed from conserved regions of each virus and their specificity was confirmed by sequencing PCR products. The mRT-PCR products were 278 bp for BrYV-A, 674 bp for BrYV-B, 505 bp for BrYV-C, and 205 bp for TuYV. Amplification of three target genotypes was optimized by increasing the PCR annealing temperatures to 62 °C. One to three fragments specific for the virus genotypes were simultaneously amplified from infected samples and identified by their specific molecular sizes in agarose gel electrophoresis. No specific products could be amplified from cDNAs of other viruses which could infect crucifer crops. Detection limits of the plasmids for multiplex PCR were 100 fg for BrYV-A and BrYV-B, 10 pg for BrYV-C, and 1 pg for TuYV, respectively. The mRT-PCR was applied successfully for detection of three BrYV genotypes from field samples collected in China. The simple, rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective mRT-PCR was developed successfully for detection and differentiation of the three genotypes of BrYV.

  16. NRPB3, the third largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, is essential for stomatal patterning and differentiation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Guan, Liping; Qian, Pingping; Xu, Fan; Wu, Zhongliang; Wu, Yujun; He, Kai; Gou, Xiaoping; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2016-05-01

    Stomata are highly specialized epidermal structures that control transpiration and gas exchange between plants and the environment. Signal networks underlying stomatal development have been previously uncovered but much less is known about how signals involved in stomatal development are transmitted to RNA polymerase II (Pol II or RPB), which plays a central role in the transcription of mRNA coding genes. Here, we identify a partial loss-of-function mutation of the third largest subunit of nuclear DNA-dependent Pol II (NRPB3) that exhibits an increased number of stomatal lineage cells and paired stomata. Phenotypic and genetic analyses indicated that NRPB3 is not only required for correct stomatal patterning, but is also essential for stomatal differentiation. Protein-protein interaction assays showed that NRPB3 directly interacts with two basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, FAMA and INDUCER OF CBF EXPRESSION1 (ICE1), indicating that NRPB3 serves as an acceptor for signals from transcription factors involved in stomatal development. Our findings highlight the surprisingly conserved activating mechanisms mediated by the third largest subunit of Pol II in eukaryotes. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Detection of nonauthorized genetically modified organisms using differential quantitative polymerase chain reaction: application to 35S in maize.

    PubMed

    Cankar, Katarina; Chauvensy-Ancel, Valérie; Fortabat, Marie-Noelle; Gruden, Kristina; Kobilinsky, André; Zel, Jana; Bertheau, Yves

    2008-05-15

    Detection of nonauthorized genetically modified organisms (GMOs) has always presented an analytical challenge because the complete sequence data needed to detect them are generally unavailable although sequence similarity to known GMOs can be expected. A new approach, differential quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), for detection of nonauthorized GMOs is presented here. This method is based on the presence of several common elements (e.g., promoter, genes of interest) in different GMOs. A statistical model was developed to study the difference between the number of molecules of such a common sequence and the number of molecules identifying the approved GMO (as determined by border-fragment-based PCR) and the donor organism of the common sequence. When this difference differs statistically from zero, the presence of a nonauthorized GMO can be inferred. The interest and scope of such an approach were tested on a case study of different proportions of genetically modified maize events, with the P35S promoter as the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus common sequence. The presence of a nonauthorized GMO was successfully detected in the mixtures analyzed and in the presence of (donor organism of P35S promoter). This method could be easily transposed to other common GMO sequences and other species and is applicable to other detection areas such as microbiology.

  18. Two-step polymerase chain reactions and restriction endonuclease analyses detect and differentiate ompA DNA of Chlamydia spp.

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenboeck, B; Kousoulas, K G; Storz, J

    1992-01-01

    Specific and sensitive amplification of major outer membrane protein (MOMP) gene (ompA) DNA sequences of Chlamydia species with various MOMP genotypes was achieved by a two-step polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Degenerate, inosine-containing oligonucleotide primers homologous to the 5' and 3' ends of the translated regions of all chlamydial MOMP genes were used in a PCR to amplify a DNA fragment of approximately 1,120 bp. A portion of this DNA fragment was amplified in a second genus-specific reaction that yielded a DNA fragment of approximately 930 bp. A pair of degenerate oligonucleotide primers homologous to internal sequences of the primary DNA fragment was used in this PCR. This method detected three cognate chlamydial genomes in a background of 1 microgram of unrelated DNA. MOMP genes of 13 representative chlamydial MOMP genotypes of the species C. trachomatis, C. pneumoniae, and C. psittaci were amplified. In a secondary PCR, group-specific detection was achieved by the simultaneous use of one genus-specific primer and three primers derived from different fingerprint regions of three major groups of chlamydiae. This multiplex PCR differentiated the groups by the length of the amplified DNA fragments and detected the simultaneous presence of DNA sequences of the Chlamydia spp. with different MOMP genotypes. Further differentiation as ompA restriction fragment length polymorphism types among all chlamydial strains with the various MOMP genotypes analyzed here was achieved by restriction endonuclease analysis of the secondary PCR products. DNA sequences corresponding to the ompA restriction fragment length polymorphism type B577 of C. psittaci were detected in two of seven milk samples from cases of bovine mastitis. Images PMID:1349899

  19. Differential diagnosis of fowlpox and infectious laryngotracheitis viruses in chicken diphtheritic manifestations by mono and duplex real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Irit; Raibstein, Israel; Altory, Amira

    2015-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) and fowlpox virus (FPV) cause diphtheritic lesions in chicken tracheas and can simultaneously infect the same bird. A differential molecular diagnostic test, the duplex real-time polymerase chain reaction, is now reported using ILTV and FPV vaccine viruses and clinical samples from chickens, either uninfected or naturally infected with ILTV or FPV, or with both viruses. The dual virus amplification by real-time polymerase chain reaction was demonstrated to behave similarly to monoplex amplification, in spite of the fact that the real-time exponential amplification plots of the vaccine viruses were more illustrative than those of the clinical samples.

  20. Natural Polymorphisms Conferring Resistance to HCV Protease and Polymerase Inhibitors in Treatment-Naïve HIV/HCV Co-Infected Patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Charles; Hu, Fengyu; Ning, Chuanyi; Lan, Yun; Tang, Xiaoping; Tucker, Joseph D.; Cai, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Background The advent of direct-acting agents (DAAs) has improved treatment of HCV in HIV co-infection, but may be limited by primary drug resistance. This study reports the prevalence of natural polymorphisms conferring resistance to NS3/4A protease inhibitors and NS5B polymerase inhibitors in treatment-naïve HIV/HCV co-infected individuals in China. Methods Population based NS3/4A sequencing was completed for 778 treatment-naïve HIV/HCV co-infected patients from twelve provinces. NS3 sequences were amplified by nested PCR using in-house primers for genotypes 1–6. NS5B sequencing was completed for genotyping in 350 sequences. Resistance-associated variants (RAVs) were identified in positions associated with HCV resistance. Results Overall, 72.8% (566/778) of all HCV sequences had at least one RAV associated with HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor resistance. Variants were found in 3.6% (7/193) of genotype 1, 100% (23/23) of genotype 2, 100% (237/237) of genotype 3 and 92% (299/325) of genotype 6 sequences. The Q80K variant was present in 98.4% of genotype 6a sequences. High-level RAVs were rare, occurring in only 0.8% of patients. 93% (64/69) patients with genotype 1b also carried the C316N variant associated with NS5B low-level resistance. Conclusions The low frequency of high-level RAVs associated with primary HCV DAA resistance among all genotypes in HIV/HCV co-infected patients is encouraging. Further phenotypic studies and clinical research are needed. PMID:27341031

  1. Differential furanose selection in the active sites of archaeal DNA polymerases probed by fixed-conformation nucleotide analogues.

    PubMed

    Ketkar, Amit; Zafar, Maroof K; Banerjee, Surajit; Marquez, Victor E; Egli, Martin; Eoff, Robert L

    2012-11-13

    DNA polymerases select for the incorporation of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) using amino acid side-chains that act as a "steric-gate" to bar improper incorporation of rNTPs. An additional factor in the selection of nucleotide substrates resides in the preferred geometry for the furanose moiety of the incoming nucleotide triphosphate. We have probed the role of sugar geometry during nucleotide selection by model DNA polymerases from Sulfolobus solfataricus using fixed conformation nucleotide analogues. North-methanocarba-dATP (N-MC-dATP) locks the central ring into a RNA-type (C2'-exo, North) conformation near a C3'-endo pucker, and South-methanocarba-dATP (S-MC-dATP) locks the central ring system into a (C3'-exo, South) conformation near a C2'-endo pucker. Dpo4 preferentially inserts N-MC-dATP and in the crystal structure of Dpo4 in complex with N-MC-dAMP, the nucleotide analogue superimposes almost perfectly with Dpo4 bound to unmodified dATP. Biochemical assays indicate that the S. solfataricus B-family DNA polymerase Dpo1 can insert and extend from both N-MC-dATP and S-MC-dATP. In this respect, Dpo1 is unexpectedly more tolerant of substrate conformation than Dpo4. The crystal structure of Dpo4 bound to S-MC-dADP shows that poor incorporation of the Southern pucker by the Y-family polymerase results from a hydrogen bond between the 3'-OH group of the nucleotide analogue and the OH group of the steric gate residue, Tyr12, shifting the S-MC-dADP molecule away from the dNTP binding pocket and distorting the base pair at the primer-template junction. These results provide insights into substrate specificity of DNA polymerases, as well as molecular mechanisms that act as a barrier against insertion of rNTPs.

  2. Neurogenic differentiation factor NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Du, Aonan; Xu, Jing; Ma, Yanchao; Cao, Han; Yang, Chao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Chun-Gen; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, especially the small intestine, is particularly sensitive to radiation, and is prone to radiation-induced injury as a result. Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is an evolutionarily-conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor. NeuroD contains a protein transduction domain (PTD), which allows it to be exogenously delivered across the membrane of mammalian cells, whereupon its transcription activity can be unleashed. Whether NeuroD has therapeutic effects for radiation-induced injury remains unclear. In the present study, we prepared a NeuroD-EGFP recombinant protein, and explored its protective effects on the survival and intestinal damage induced by ionizing radiation. Our results showed that NeuroD-EGFP could be transduced into small intestine epithelial cells and tissues. NeuroD-EGFP administration significantly increased overall survival of mice exposed to lethal total body irradiation (TBI). This recombinant NeuroD also reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury and apoptosis, and improved crypt survival. Expression profiling of NeuroD-EGFP-treated mice revealed upregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), a known inhibitor of apoptosis in mammalian cells. In conclusion, NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury, and provides a novel therapeutic clinical option for the prevention of intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and the treatment of victims of incidental exposure. PMID:27436572

  3. Directed Polymerase Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tingjian; Romesberg, Floyd E.

    2014-01-01

    Polymerases evolved in nature to synthesize DNA and RNA, and they underlie the storage and flow of genetic information in all cells. The availability of these enzymes for use at the bench has driven a revolution in biotechnology and medicinal research; however, polymerases did not evolve to function efficiently under the conditions required for some applications and their high substrate fidelity precludes their use for most applications that involve modified substrates. To circumvent these limitations, researchers have turned to directed evolution to tailor the properties and/or substrate repertoire of polymerases for different applications, and several systems have been developed for this purpose. These systems draw on different methods of creating a pool of randomly mutated polymerases and are differentiated by the process used to isolate the most fit members. A variety of polymerases have been evolved, providing new or improved functionality, as well as interesting new insight into the factors governing activity. PMID:24211837

  4. Differential furanose selection in the active sites of archaeal DNA polymerases probed by fixed-conformation nucleotide analogues

    PubMed Central

    Ketkar, Amit; Zafar, Maroof K.; Banerjee, Surajit; Marquez, Victor E.; Egli, Martin; Eoff, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    DNA polymerases select for the incorporation of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs) using amino acid side-chains that act as a “steric-gate” to bar improper incorporation of rNTPs. An additional factor in the selection of nucleotide substrates resides in the preferred geometry for the furanose moiety of the incoming nucleotide triphosphate. We have probed the role of sugar geometry during nucleotide selection by model DNA polymerases from Sulfolobus solfataricus using fixed conformation nucleotide analogues. North-methanocarba-dATP (N-MC-dATP) locks the central ring into a RNA-type (C2′-exo, North) conformation near a C3′-endo pucker and South-methanocarba-dATP (S-MC-dATP) locks the central ring system into a (C3′-exo, South) conformation near a C2′-endo pucker. Dpo4 preferentially inserts N-MC-dATP and in the crystal structure of Dpo4 in complex with N-MC-dAMP, the nucleotide analogue superimposes almost perfectly with Dpo4 bound to unmodified dATP. Biochemical assays indicate that the S. solfataricus B-family DNA polymerase Dpo1 can insert and extend from both N-MC-dATP and S-MC-dATP. In this respect, Dpo1 is unexpectedly more tolerant of substrate conformation than Dpo4. The crystal structure of Dpo4 bound to S-MC-dADP shows that poor incorporation of the Southern pucker by the Y-family polymerase results from a hydrogen bond between the 3′-OH group of the nucleotide analogue and the OH group of the steric gate residue, Tyr12, shifting the S-MC-dADP molecule away from the dNTP binding pocket and distorting the base pair at the primer-template junction. These results provide insights into substrate specificity of DNA polymerases, as well as molecular mechanisms that act as a barrier against insertion of rNTPs. PMID:23050956

  5. Differentiation of the traditional Chinese medicinal plants Euphorbia humifusa and E. maculata from adulterants by TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Xue, Heng-Gang; Wang, Hong; Li, De-Zhu; Xue, Chun-Ying; Wang, Qing-Zhong

    2008-02-01

    DNA sequence analysis of the rDNA internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction were exploited for their applications in the differentiation of the traditional chinese medicinal plants euphorbia humifusa and e. maculata from three related adulterants e. hypericifolia, E. atoto and E. prostrata. The data demonstrated that variations in the ITS1 regions were very low at the intra-species level but extremely high at the inter-species level, so that they could be easily distinguished at the DNA level. The sequence difference allowed an effective and reliable differentiation of E. humifusa and E. maculata from the adulterants by TaqMan real-time PCR.

  6. Detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus by a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Dong, X. Y.; Li, W. H.; Zhu, J. L.; Liu, W. J.; Zhao, M. Q.; Luo, Y. W.; Chen, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is the cause of canine distemper (CD) which is a severe and highly contagious disease in dogs. In the present study, a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of CDV. Four primers were designed to detect and discriminate the two viruses by generating 638- and 781-bp cDNA products, respectively. Furthermore, the duplex RT-PCR method was used to detect 67 field samples suspected of CD from Guangdong province in China. Results showed that, 33 samples were to be wild-type-like. The duplex RT-PCR method exhibited high specificity and sensitivity which could be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type and vaccine CDV, indicating its use for clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance. PMID:27175171

  7. Detection and differentiation of genotype I and III Japanese encephalitis virus in mosquitoes by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y Y; Lin, J W; Fan, Y C; Chiou, S S

    2014-02-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a disease that threatens both human and animal populations in Asian countries, and the causative agent of JE, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), has recently changed from genotype III (GIII) to genotype I (GI). However, a test for the rapid differentiation of GI and GIII JEV is still unavailable, especially one that can be used for mosquito-based surveillance. We have designed GI- and GIII-specific primer sets for the rapid detection and differentiation of GI and GIII JEV by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (multiplex RT-PCR). The GI-specific and GIII-specific primer sets were able to specifically amplify the target gene from GI and GIII JEV, respectively. The limitations of detection were 0.00225 and 0.225 pfu for the GI-specific and GIII-specific primers, respectively. Using a mixture of GI-specific and GIII-specific primers, the multiplex RT-PCR was able to specifically detect and differentiate GI and GIII JEV. The multiplex RT-PCR was able to successfully differentiate GI and GIII virus in JEV-infected mosquitoes. Thus, a sensitive and specific multiplex RT-PCR system for the rapid detection and differentiation of GI and GIII JEV has been developed, and this test is likely to be valuable when carrying out mosquito-based JEV surveillance. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Epidermal loss of Gαq confers a migratory and differentiation defect in keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Callejas-Valera, Juan Luis; Hansen, Karina K.; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Inoue, Asuka; Offermanns, Stefan; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2017-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which activate heterotrimeric G proteins, are an essential class of transmembrane receptors that are responsible for a myriad of signaling events in normal and pathologic conditions. Two members of the G protein family, Gαq and Gα11, activate one of the main GPCR pathways and function as oncogenes by integrating mitogen-stimulated signaling cascades that are active under malignant conditions. Recently, it has been shown that targeted deletion of Gα11 and Gαq from endothelial cells impairs the Rho-mediated formation of focal adherens junctions, suggesting that Gα11/q signaling may also play a significant role in cytoskeletal-mediated cellular responses in epithelial cells. Indeed, combined deletion of Gα11 and Gαq confers a significant migratory defect in keratinocytes that delays cutaneous wound healing in an in vivo setting. This delay can be attributed to a defect during the reepithelialization phase due to significantly attenuated migratory capacity of Gαq-null keratinocytes under combined Gα11 deficiency. In fact, cells lacking Gα11/q demonstrate a severely reduced ability to respond to mitogenic and migratory signals in the microenvironment, leading to inappropriate and premature terminal differentiation. These results suggest that Gα11/q signaling pathways may be critical for integrating mitogenic signals and cytoskeletal function to achieve normal physiological responses. Emergence of a malignant phenotype may therefore arise from both under- and overexpression of Gα11/q signaling, implicating its upstream regulation as a potential therapeutic target in a host of pathologic conditions. PMID:28301547

  9. An oligonucleotide-ligation assay for the differentiation between Cyclospora and Eimeria spp. polymerase chain reaction amplification products.

    PubMed

    Jinneman, K C; Wetherington, J H; Hill, W E; Omiescinski, C J; Adams, A M; Johnson, J M; Tenge, B J; Dang, N L; Wekell, M M

    1999-06-01

    An oligonucleotide-ligation assay (OLA) was developed and compared to a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) test for distinguishing between 294-bp polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification products of the 18S rRNA gene from Cyclospora and Eimeria spp. The PCR/OLA correctly distinguished between three Cyclospora, three E. tenella, and one E. mitis strains and the ratio of positive to negative spectrophotometric absorbance (A490) values for each strain ranged from 4.086 to 15.280 (median 9.5). PCR/OLA provides a rapid, reliable, spectrophotometric alternative to PCR/RFLP.

  10. Polymerase chain reaction assay based on ratA gene allows differentiation between Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Gallinarum biovars Gallinarum and Pullorum.

    PubMed

    Batista, Diego Felipe Alves; de Freitas Neto, Oliveiro Caetano; Lopes, Priscila Diniz; de Almeida, Adriana Maria; Barrow, Paul Andrew; Berchieri, Angelo

    2013-03-01

    Salmonella Pullorum and Salmonella Gallinarum are classified as biovars of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Gallinarum. These salmonellae are the causative agents of Pullorum disease and fowl typhoid, respectively, and are widely distributed throughout the world. Although many developed countries have eradicated these diseases from commercial poultry, they are still the cause of significant economic loss in developing countries. When serovar Gallinarum is isolated, it is difficult to immediately differentiate between biovars because they are antigenically identical by serotyping. However, they cause distinct diseases with different epidemiology, and therefore it is important to differentiate them. This may be done biochemically but takes 2 to 3 days. In the present study, S. Pullorum and S. Gallinarum whole genomes were compared, and 1 genomic region of difference, which is part of the ratA gene, was chosen as a molecular marker for a polymerase chain reaction assay to differentiate rapidly between these organisms. In all, 26 strains of S. Gallinarum and 17 S. Pullorum strains were tested and successfully differentiated by the assay.

  11. Differentiation-Associated Downregulation of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase-1 Expression in Myoblasts Serves to Increase Their Resistance to Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Oláh, Gábor; Szczesny, Bartosz; Brunyánszki, Attila; López-García, Isabel A; Gerö, Domokos; Radák, Zsolt; Szabo, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), the major isoform of the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase family, is a constitutive nuclear and mitochondrial protein with well-recognized roles in various essential cellular functions such as DNA repair, signal transduction, apoptosis, as well as in a variety of pathophysiological conditions including sepsis, diabetes and cancer. Activation of PARP-1 in response to oxidative stress catalyzes the covalent attachment of the poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) groups on itself and other acceptor proteins, utilizing NAD+ as a substrate. Overactivation of PARP-1 depletes intracellular NAD+ influencing mitochondrial electron transport, cellular ATP generation and, if persistent, can result in necrotic cell death. Due to their high metabolic activity, skeletal muscle cells are particularly exposed to constant oxidative stress insults. In this study, we investigated the role of PARP-1 in a well-defined model of murine skeletal muscle differentiation (C2C12) and compare the responses to oxidative stress of undifferentiated myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. We observed a marked reduction of PARP-1 expression as myoblasts differentiated into myotubes. This alteration correlated with an increased resistance to oxidative stress of the myotubes, as measured by MTT and LDH assays. Mitochondrial function, assessed by measuring mitochondrial membrane potential, was preserved under oxidative stress in myotubes compared to myoblasts. Moreover, basal respiration, ATP synthesis, and the maximal respiratory capacity of mitochondria were higher in myotubes than in myoblasts. Inhibition of the catalytic activity of PARP-1 by PJ34 (a phenanthridinone PARP inhibitor) exerted greater protective effects in undifferentiated myoblasts than in differentiated myotubes. The above observations in C2C12 cells were also confirmed in a rat-derived skeletal muscle cell line (L6). Forced overexpression of PARP1 in C2C12 myotubes sensitized the cells to oxidant

  12. Differentiating Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar and Entamoeba moshkovskii using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in rural communities in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ngui, Romano; Angal, Lorainne; Fakhrurrazi, Siti Aminah; Lian, Yvonne Lim Ai; Ling, Lau Yee; Ibrahim, Jamaiah; Mahmud, Rohela

    2012-09-04

    In this study, a total of 426 human faecal samples were examined for the presence of Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, Entamoeba moshkovskii infection via a combination of microscopic examination and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting 16S ribosomal RNA of Entamoeba species. Faecal sample were collected from 426 participants in five rural villages in Peninsular Malaysia. The faecal samples were processed by direct wet smear and formalin ethyl acetate concentration technique followed by iodine staining and examined via microscopy for the presence of Entamoeba species and other intestinal parasites. Microscopically positive samples for Entamoeba species cysts were further characterized using a Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (Nested-PCR) targeting 16S-like ribosomal RNA gene. The data entry and analysis was carried out using the SPSS software (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) program for Windows version 17 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). Based on single faecal examination, overall prevalence of Entamoeba infection was 17.6% (75/426). Females (19.1%) were more commonly infected compared to males (15.9%). Comparison by age groups showed that adults (23.9%) had higher infection rates than children (15.3%). The PCR results showed that 52 out of 75 microscopy positive samples successfully generated species-specific amplicons. The infection with E. histolytica (75.0%; 39/52) was the most common, followed by E. dispar (30.8%; 18/52) and E. moshkovskii (5.8%; 3/52). Of these, 33 (63.5%) were shown to contain only E. histolytica, 10 (19.2%) contained E. dispar and 3 (5.8%) contained only E. moshkovskii. Mixed infection with E. histolytica and E. dispar was found in 6 (11.5%) samples. The present study essentially emphasized the benefit of molecular techniques in discriminating the pathogenic Entamoeba species from the non-pathogenic for accurate diagnosis and better management of amoebiasis. The presence of E. moshkovskii is of great public health

  13. Differentiating Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar and Entamoeba moshkovskii using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in rural communities in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study, a total of 426 human faecal samples were examined for the presence of Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, Entamoeba moshkovskii infection via a combination of microscopic examination and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting 16S ribosomal RNA of Entamoeba species. Methods Faecal sample were collected from 426 participants in five rural villages in Peninsular Malaysia. The faecal samples were processed by direct wet smear and formalin ethyl acetate concentration technique followed by iodine staining and examined via microscopy for the presence of Entamoeba species and other intestinal parasites. Microscopically positive samples for Entamoeba species cysts were further characterized using a Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (Nested-PCR) targeting 16S-like ribosomal RNA gene. The data entry and analysis was carried out using the SPSS software (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) program for Windows version 17 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). Results Based on single faecal examination, overall prevalence of Entamoeba infection was 17.6% (75/426). Females (19.1%) were more commonly infected compared to males (15.9%). Comparison by age groups showed that adults (23.9%) had higher infection rates than children (15.3%). The PCR results showed that 52 out of 75 microscopy positive samples successfully generated species-specific amplicons. The infection with E. histolytica (75.0%; 39/52) was the most common, followed by E. dispar (30.8%; 18/52) and E. moshkovskii (5.8%; 3/52). Of these, 33 (63.5%) were shown to contain only E. histolytica, 10 (19.2%) contained E. dispar and 3 (5.8%) contained only E. moshkovskii. Mixed infection with E. histolytica and E. dispar was found in 6 (11.5%) samples. Conclusions The present study essentially emphasized the benefit of molecular techniques in discriminating the pathogenic Entamoeba species from the non-pathogenic for accurate diagnosis and better management of amoebiasis. The presence of E

  14. Influenza virus polymerase confers independence of the cellular cap-binding factor eIF4E for viral mRNA translation

    PubMed Central

    Yángüez, Emilio; Rodriguez, Paloma; Goodfellow, Ian; Nieto, Amelia

    2012-01-01

    The influenza virus mRNAs are structurally similar to cellular mRNAs nevertheless; the virus promotes selective translation of viral mRNAs despite the inhibition of host cell protein synthesis. The infection proceeds normally upon functional impairment of eIF4E cap-binding protein, but requires functional eIF4A helicase and eIF4G factor. Here, we have studied whether the presence of cis elements in viral mRNAs or the action of viral proteins are responsible for this eIF4E-independence. The eIF4E protein is required for viral mRNAs translation in vitro, indicating that cis-acting RNA sequences are not involved in this process. We also show that PB2 viral polymerase subunit interacts with the eIF4G protein. In addition, a chimeric mRNA containing viral UTRs sequences transcribed by the viral polymerase out of the infection is successfully translated independently of an impaired eIF4E factor. These data support that the viral polymerase is responsible for the eIF4E independence of influenza virus mRNAs translation. PMID:22112850

  15. Development of fluorogenic probe-based and high-resolution melting-based polymerase chain reaction assays for the detection and differentiation of Bartonella quintana and Bartonella henselae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun-Yan; Zhao, Long-Sheng; Song, Xiu-Ping; Du, Peng-Chen; Li, Dong-Mei; Chen, Zhong-Ke; Liu, Qi-Yong

    2017-07-01

    Bartonella henselae and Bartonella quintana are the major etiological agents of infective endocarditis, which pose a serious threat to human health. To simultaneously detect and differentiate B. henselae and B. quintana, a reliable and fast method to simultaneously detect and differentiate B. henselae and B. quintana is required. In this study, we developed and validated two rapid, highly sensitive and specific, duplex, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays-one based on high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis, and the other on TaqMan probes-to simultaneously detect and differentiate B. henselae and B. quintana. The sensitivity of developed assays were found 100 times more sensitive than that of conventional PCR. The specificity of the assays were validated by the absence of any cross reaction with the other Bartonella species, non-Bartonella bacteria and other animals. The results indicate that the duplex HRM-based and TaqMan probe-based assays have high specificity and sensitivity, and good reproducibility for simultaneous the detection of B. henselae and B. quintana. They are cost-effective, sensitive and reliable methods; and are thus suitable for clinical diagnosis, epidemiological surveys, and disease surveillance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Polymerase chain reaction-hybridization method using urease gene sequences for high-throughput Ureaplasma urealyticum and Ureaplasma parvum detection and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Zhang, Nan; Huo, Qianyu; Chen, Minghui; Wang, Rengfeng; Liu, Zhili; Li, Xue; Liu, Yunde; Bao, Huijing

    2016-04-15

    In this article, we discuss the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-hybridization assay that we developed for high-throughput simultaneous detection and differentiation of Ureaplasma urealyticum and Ureaplasma parvum using one set of primers and two specific DNA probes based on urease gene nucleotide sequence differences. First, U. urealyticum and U. parvum DNA samples were specifically amplified using one set of biotin-labeled primers. Furthermore, amine-modified DNA probes, which can specifically react with U. urealyticum or U. parvum DNA, were covalently immobilized to a DNA-BIND plate surface. The plate was then incubated with the PCR products to facilitate sequence-specific DNA binding. Horseradish peroxidase-streptavidin conjugation and a colorimetric assay were used. Based on the results, the PCR-hybridization assay we developed can specifically differentiate U. urealyticum and U. parvum with high sensitivity (95%) compared with cultivation (72.5%). Hence, this study demonstrates a new method for high-throughput simultaneous differentiation and detection of U. urealyticum and U. parvum with high sensitivity. Based on these observations, the PCR-hybridization assay developed in this study is ideal for detecting and discriminating U. urealyticum and U. parvum in clinical applications.

  17. Development and evaluation of a 1-step duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for differential diagnosis of chikungunya and dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Dash, Paban Kumar; Parida, Manmohan; Santhosh, S R; Saxena, Parag; Srivastava, Ambuj; Neeraja, Mamidi; Lakshmi, V; Rao, P V Lakshmana

    2008-09-01

    Dengue (DEN) and chikungunya (CHIK) have emerged as the 2 most important arboviral infections of global significance. The similarities in clinical presentations, their circulation in the same geographic area, and the transmission through the same vector necessitate an urgent need for the differential diagnosis of these 2 infections. So far, no single assay is reported for differential diagnosis of these 2 infections. In this study, we report the development and evaluation of a 1-step single-tube duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (D-RT-PCR) assay by targeting E1 gene of CHIK and C-prM gene junction of DEN virus (DENV), respectively. The sensitivity of this assay was found to be better than conventional virus isolation and could detect as low as 100 copies of genomic RNA, which is equivalent to respective virus-specific RT-PCR. The evaluation was carried out with 360 clinical samples from recent CHIK and DEN outbreaks in India. This assay could also be able to detect dual infection of CHIK and DEN in 3 patients. The phylogenetic analysis based on the nucleotide sequencing of D-RT-PCR amplicon could precisely identify the genotypes of all the serotypes of DENV and CHIK viruses (CHIKV). These findings demonstrate the potential clinical and epidemiologic application of D-RT-PCR for rapid sensitive detection, differentiation, and genotyping of DENV and CHIKV in clinical samples.

  18. Use of genetic polymorphisms detected by the random-amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) for differentiation and identification of Aedes aegypti subspecies and populations.

    PubMed

    Ballinger-Crabtree, M E; Black, W C; Miller, B R

    1992-12-01

    Amplification of random regions of genomic DNA using 10-base primers in the random-amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) was used to differentiate and identify mosquito populations based on genetic variation. Genomic DNA was extracted from individual mosquitoes from 11 geographic populations of Aedes aegypti and amplified in PCR reactions using single primers of arbitrary nucleotide sequence. Discriminant analysis of the population frequencies of RAPD fragments produced using three different primers allowed accurate discrimination between the geographic populations in 89% of individuals and between subspecies (Ae. aegypti aegypti versus Ae. aegypti formosus) in 100% of mosquitoes tested. The genetic relatedness of the populations was estimated using three different statistical methods, and unknown populations were correctly classified in a blind test. These results indicate that the RAPD-PCR technique will be useful in studies of arthropod molecular taxonomy and in epidemiologic studies of the relatedness of geographic populations and vector movement.

  19. [Evaluation of the efficiency of differential diagnosis of influenza by multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Lobodanov, S A; Nikonova, A A; Faĭzuloev, E B; Trushakova, S V; Zabiiaka, Iu I; Kalinkina, M A; Ivanova, V T; Shevchenko, E S; Zverev, V V; Burtseva, E I

    2012-01-01

    The paper gives the results of a comparative analysis of the detection of influenza viruses in clinical samples, by using multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and by virus isolation in MDCK cell cultures. The investigation employed 267 nasopharyngeal swab specimens obtained from patients with influenza symptoms during two epidemic seasons (2008-2009 and 2009-2010). Influenza viruses were found in 104 samples (48 with influenza A virus (IAV) and 56 with influenza B virus (IBV)) by multiplex RT-RCR and in 84 samples (35 with IAV and 49 with IBV) by a cultural technique. The results of detection of influenza viruses by the two methods showed 89.4% agreement. The diagnostic sensitivity of multiplex RT-PCR testing a panel of the clinical samples in question was estimated to be 94.3% for IAV and 95.9% for IBV. The diagnostic sensitivity of multiplex RT-PCR in virus detection was demonstrated to be not only highly competitive with virus isolation, but also superior to the latter.

  20. TATA box-binding protein (TBP) is a constituent of the polymerase I-specific transcription initiation factor TIF-IB (SL1) bound to the rRNA promoter and shows differential sensitivity to TBP-directed reagents in polymerase I, II, and III transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Radebaugh, C A; Matthews, J L; Geiss, G K; Liu, F; Wong, J M; Bateman, E; Camier, S; Sentenac, A; Paule, M R

    1994-01-01

    The role of the Acanthamoeba castellanii TATA-binding protein (TBP) in transcription was examined. Specific antibodies against the nonconserved N-terminal domain of TBP were used to verify the presence of TBP in the fundamental transcription initiation factor for RNA polymerase I, TIF-IB, and to demonstrate that TBP is part of the committed initiation complex on the rRNA promoter. The same antibodies inhibit transcription in all three polymerase systems, but they do so differentially. Oligonucleotide competitors were used to evaluate the accessibility of the TATA-binding site in TIF-IB, TFIID, and TFIIIB. The results suggest that insertion of TBP into the polymerase II and III factors is more similar than insertion into the polymerase I factor. Images PMID:8264628

  1. TATA box-binding protein (TBP) is a constituent of the polymerase I-specific transcription initiation factor TIF-IB (SL1) bound to the rRNA promoter and shows differential sensitivity to TBP-directed reagents in polymerase I, II, and III transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Radebaugh, C A; Matthews, J L; Geiss, G K; Liu, F; Wong, J M; Bateman, E; Camier, S; Sentenac, A; Paule, M R

    1994-01-01

    The role of the Acanthamoeba castellanii TATA-binding protein (TBP) in transcription was examined. Specific antibodies against the nonconserved N-terminal domain of TBP were used to verify the presence of TBP in the fundamental transcription initiation factor for RNA polymerase I, TIF-IB, and to demonstrate that TBP is part of the committed initiation complex on the rRNA promoter. The same antibodies inhibit transcription in all three polymerase systems, but they do so differentially. Oligonucleotide competitors were used to evaluate the accessibility of the TATA-binding site in TIF-IB, TFIID, and TFIIIB. The results suggest that insertion of TBP into the polymerase II and III factors is more similar than insertion into the polymerase I factor.

  2. Extended C termini of CPC-LIKE MYB proteins confer functional diversity in Arabidopsis epidermal cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tominaga-Wada, Rumi; Wada, Takuji

    2017-07-01

    The CAPRICE (CPC) gene encodes a R3-type MYB transcription factor that promotes differentiation of root hair cells in Arabidopsis thaliana Here, we have compared the functions of five CPC-homologous genes for epidermal cell differentiation using CPC promoter-driven transgenic plants. Our results show that TRIPTYCHON (TRY) and ENHANCER OF TRY AND CPC2 (ETC2) were less effective in root hair cell differentiation and were unstable in root epidermal cells when compared with CPC, ETC1 or CPC LIKE MYB3 (CPL3). The deletion of the extended C-terminal domain of TRY and ETC2 enhanced protein stability and conferred the ability to induce root hair cell differentiation on them. Treatment with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, also led to the accumulation of TRY, indicating that TRY proteolysis is mediated by the proteasome-dependent pathway. Our results indicate that the CPC family includes relatively stable (CPC, ETC1 and CPL3) and unstable (TRY and ETC2) proteins that might be degraded by the proteasome. Our findings provide new insights into the regulatory mechanism of CPC family proteins that mediate root hair cell differentiation and should be useful in understanding epidermal development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method for detection of Canine distemper virus modified live vaccine shedding for differentiation from infection with wild-type strains.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Rebecca P; Sanchez, Elena; Riley, Matthew C; Kennedy, Melissa A

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) remains a common cause of infectious disease in dogs, particularly in high-density housing situations such as shelters. Vaccination of all dogs against CDV is recommended at the time of admission to animal shelters and many use a modified live virus (MLV) vaccine. From a diagnostic standpoint for dogs with suspected CDV infection, this is problematic because highly sensitive diagnostic real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests are able to detect MLV virus in clinical samples. Real-time PCR can be used to quantitate amount of virus shedding and can differentiate vaccine strains from wild-type strains when shedding is high. However, differentiation by quantitation is not possible in vaccinated animals during acute infection, when shedding is low and could be mistaken for low level vaccine virus shedding. While there are gel-based RT-PCR assays for differentiation of vaccine strains from field strains based on sequence differences, the sensitivity of these assays is unable to match that of the real-time RT-PCR assay currently used in the authors' laboratory. Therefore, a real-time RT-PCR assay was developed that detects CDV MLV vaccine strains and distinguishes them from wild-type strains based on nucleotide sequence differences, rather than the amount of viral RNA in the sample. The test is highly sensitive, with detection of as few as 5 virus genomic copies (corresponding to 10(-1) TCID(50)). Sequencing of the DNA real-time products also allows phylogenetic differentiation of the wild-type strains. This test will aid diagnosis during outbreaks of CDV in recently vaccinated animals.

  4. Taenia saginata: differential diagnosis of human taeniasis by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Cáris Maroni; Dias, Ana Karina Kerche; Dias, Francisca Elda Ferreira; Aoki, Sérgio Moraes; de Paula, Henrique Borges; Lima, Luis Gustavo Ferraz; Garcia, José Fernando

    2005-08-01

    Speciation of Taenia in human stool is important because of their different clinical and epidemiological features. DNA analysis has recently become possible which overcomes the problems of differentiating human taeniid cestodes morphologically. In the present study, we evaluated PCR coupled to restriction fragment length polymorphism to differentiate Taenia solium from Taenia saginata eggs present in fecal samples from naturally infected patients. A different DraI-RFLP pattern: a two-band pattern (421 and 100 bp) for T. saginata and a three-band pattern (234, 188, and 99 bp) for T. solium was observed allowing the two species to be separated. The lower detection limit of the PCR-RFLP using a non-infected fecal sample prepared with a given number of T. saginata eggs was 34 eggs in 2 g stool sediment. The 521 bp mtDNA fragment was detected in 8 out of 12 Taenia sp. carriers (66.6%). Of these, three showed a T. solium pattern and five a T. saginata pattern.

  5. Detection and haplotype differentiation of Southeast Asian alpha-thalassemia using polymerase chain reaction and a piezoelectric biosensor immobilized with a single oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Vattanaviboon, Phantip; Sangseekhiow, Kulphassorn; Winichagoon, Pranee; Promptmas, Chamras

    2008-05-01

    DNA-based diagnosis of alpha-thalassemias routinely relies on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gel electrophoresis. Here, we developed a new procedure for the detection and haplotype differentiation of Southeast Asian (SEA) alpha-thalassemia using a 3-primer system for PCR coupling with a DNA-based piezoelectric biosensor. PCR products amplified from genomic DNA were differentiated directly by using a quartz crystal microbalance immobilized with a single oligonucleotide probe. The frequency changes after hybridization of the PCR products amplified from a representative sample of normal alpha-globin, SEA alpha-thalassemia heterozygote, and homozygote were 206+/-11, 256+/-5, and 307+/-3 Hz, respectively. The fabricated biosensor was evaluated through an examination of 18 blind specimens. It could accurately discriminate between normal and SEA alpha-thalassemic samples, which suggests that this biosensor system is a promising alternative technique to detect SEA alpha-thalassemia because of its specificity and less hazardous exposure as compared with conventional methods.

  6. Differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar by the polymerase chain reaction in stool samples of patients with gastrointestinal symptoms in the Sanliurfa Province.

    PubMed

    Zeyrek, Fadile Yıldız; Turgay, Nevin; Unver, Aysegül; Ustün, Sebnem; Akarca, Ulus; Töz, Seray

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to diagnose amebiasis and also identify Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica) and Entamoeba dispar (E. dispar) in patients with gastrointestinal symptoms in an endemic region in Turkey. Stool samples obtained from 181 patients with gastrointestinal symptoms from the Harran University Hospital of Sanliurfa were examined for the diagnosis of amebiasis by the three methods which are as follows:- In house polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the 135 base pair region located on the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene to differentiate E. histolytica from E. dispar; and the commercial kit, RIDASCREEN® stool ELISA, that identifies Entamoeba sensu lato antigen and microscopical examination of Trichrome stained smears of stool samples. Positivity for E. histolytica/E. dispar complex was found to be 79 (43.6%) by microscopy versus 83 (45.9%) by PCR out of 181 stool samples. A total of 45 patients were found to be positive by the antigen detection method. PCR and microscopy were both positive in 59 samples. The number of patients infected with E. dispar (39.8%) was found to be higher than E. histolytica (3.3%) while 5 patients (2.8%) had mixed E. histolytica+E. dispar infections according to PCR results. Routine diagnosis of amebiasis by a combination of microscopy and antigen detection technique should be complemented with a PCR assay as a reference test for sensitive differentiation of both species.

  7. Differential and Concordant Roles for Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in Regulating WRN and RECQL5 Activities

    PubMed Central

    Khadka, Prabhat; Hsu, Joseph K.; Veith, Sebastian; Tadokoro, Takashi; Shamanna, Raghavendra A.; Mangerich, Aswin; Croteau, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase 1 (PARP1) catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) of proteins, a posttranslational modification which forms the nucleic acid-like polymer PAR. PARP1 and PAR are integral players in the early DNA damage response, since PARylation orchestrates the recruitment of repair proteins to sites of damage. Human RecQ helicases are DNA unwinding proteins that are critical responders to DNA damage, but how their recruitment and activities are regulated by PARPs and PAR is poorly understood. Here we report that all human RecQ helicases interact with PAR noncovalently. Furthermore, we define the effects that PARP1, PARylated PARP1, and PAR have on RECQL5 and WRN, using both in vitro and in vivo assays. We show that PARylation is involved in the recruitment of RECQL5 and WRN to laser-induced DNA damage and that RECQL5 and WRN have differential responses to PARylated PARP1 and PAR. Furthermore, we show that the loss of RECQL5 or WRN resulted in increased sensitivity to PARP inhibition. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PARP1 and PAR actively, and in some instances differentially, regulate the activities and cellular localization of RECQL5 and WRN, suggesting that PARylation acts as a fine-tuning mechanism to coordinate their functions in time and space during the genotoxic stress response. PMID:26391948

  8. [Detection and differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar by polymerase chain reaction in a community in Zulia State, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Rivero, Zulbey; Bracho, Angela; Calchi, Marinella; Díaz, Iris; Acurero, Ellen; Maldonado, Adriana; Chourio, Glenis; Arráiz, Nailet; Corzo, Gilbert

    2009-01-01

    Differential identification of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar is essential for both appropriate patient treatment and epidemiological purposes. To determine the prevalence of these amoeba infections in Santa Rosa de Agua (Maracaibo, Zulia State, Venezuela), a PCR assay using specific primers for each species was standardized and applied. 204 stool samples were analyzed through direct microscopic examination with SSF (0.85%) and lugol, formol-ether concentration, and PCR. Under direct microscopy, 42 individuals (20.58%) presented the E. histolytica/E. dispar complex. Meanwhile PCR showed 47 positive cases for these amoebas: 22 E. histolytica (10.78%), 16 E. dispar (7.84%), and 9 (4.41%) mixed infections. There was no significant difference in the presence of E. histolytica and/or E. dispar according to either gender or age. There were no cases of these amoebas in children under 2 years of age. Observed frequency of E. histolytica (31/204) shows the endemic nature of amoeba infection in this community.

  9. Differential diagnosis of Entamoeba spp. in clinical stool samples using SYBR green real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Thiago Dos Santos; Garcia, Mariana Coimbra; de Souza Cunha, Flavia; Werneck de Macedo, Heloisa; Peralta, José Mauro; Peralta, Regina Helena Saramago

    2014-01-01

    Amoebiasis, a disease caused by Entamoeba histolytica, is usually diagnosed by microscopic examination, which does not differentiate the morphologically identical species of the E. histolytica/E. dispar complex. Furthermore, morphologically similar species such as Entamoeba hartmanni contribute to misidentification. Therefore, there is a need for more sensitive and specific methods. This study standardized a multiplex real-time PCR system for E. histolytica and E. dispar and a single real-time PCR for E. hartmanni. The multiplex protocol detected up to 0.0143 pg of E. histolytica DNA and 0.5156 pg of E. dispar DNA, and the average melting temperature (T(m)) was 73 °C and 70 °C, respectively. For E. hartmanni, the T(m) was 73 °C and the amplification was successful down to 0.03 fg of plasmid DNA. Negative controls and other intestinal parasites presented no amplification. Among the 48 samples tested, E. dispar DNA was detected in 37; none exhibited E. histolytica DNA and 11 were negative in the multiplex protocol. In 4 of these 11 samples, however, E. hartmanni DNA was amplified. SYBR Green is demonstrated to be an interesting option and these combined PCR reactions can improve laboratory diagnosis of amoebiasis in developing countries.

  10. Differential Diagnosis of Entamoeba spp. in Clinical Stool Samples Using SYBR Green Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Thiago dos Santos; Garcia, Mariana Coimbra; de Souza Cunha, Flavia; Peralta, José Mauro; Peralta, Regina Helena Saramago

    2014-01-01

    Amoebiasis, a disease caused by Entamoeba histolytica, is usually diagnosed by microscopic examination, which does not differentiate the morphologically identical species of the E. histolytica/E. dispar complex. Furthermore, morphologically similar species such as Entamoeba hartmanni contribute to misidentification. Therefore, there is a need for more sensitive and specific methods. This study standardized a multiplex real-time PCR system for E. histolytica and E. dispar and a single real-time PCR for E. hartmanni. The multiplex protocol detected up to 0.0143 pg of E. histolytica DNA and 0.5156 pg of E. dispar DNA, and the average melting temperature (Tm) was 73°C and 70°C, respectively. For E. hartmanni, the Tm was 73°C and the amplification was successful down to 0.03 fg of plasmid DNA. Negative controls and other intestinal parasites presented no amplification. Among the 48 samples tested, E. dispar DNA was detected in 37; none exhibited E. histolytica DNA and 11 were negative in the multiplex protocol. In 4 of these 11 samples, however, E. hartmanni DNA was amplified. SYBR Green is demonstrated to be an interesting option and these combined PCR reactions can improve laboratory diagnosis of amoebiasis in developing countries. PMID:24693242

  11. Heparanase confers a growth advantage to differentiating murine embryonic stem cells, and enhances oligodendrocyte formation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Anqi; Kundu, Soumi; Forsberg, Maud; Xiong, Yuyuan; Bergström, Tobias; Paavilainen, Tanja; Kjellén, Lena; Li, Jin-Ping; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin

    2017-10-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), ubiquitous components of mammalian cells, play important roles in development and homeostasis. These molecules are located primarily on the cell surface and in the pericellular matrix, where they interact with a multitude of macromolecules, including many growth factors. Manipulation of the enzymes involved in biosynthesis and modification of HSPG structures alters the properties of stem cells. Here, we focus on the involvement of heparanase (HPSE), the sole endo-glucuronidase capable of cleaving of HS, in differentiation of embryonic stem cells into the cells of the neural lineage. Embryonic stem (ES) cells overexpressing HPSE (Hpse-Tg) proliferated more rapidly than WT ES cells in culture and formed larger teratomas in vivo. In addition, differentiating Hpse-Tg ES cells also had a higher growth rate, and overexpression of HPSE in NSPCs enhanced Erk and Akt phosphorylation. Employing a two-step, monolayer differentiation, we observed an increase in HPSE as wild-type (WT) ES cells differentiated into neural stem and progenitor cells followed by down-regulation of HPSE as these NSPCs differentiated into mature cells of the neural lineage. Furthermore, NSPCs overexpressing HPSE gave rise to more oligodendrocytes than WT cultures, with a concomitant reduction in the number of neurons. Our present findings emphasize the importance of HS, in neural differentiation and suggest that by regulating the availability of growth factors and, or other macromolecules, HPSE promotes differentiation into oligodendrocytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A PB1 T296R substitution enhance polymerase activity and confer a virulent phenotype to a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhijun; Cheng, Kaihui; Sun, Weiyang; Zhang, Xinghai; Li, Yuanguo; Wang, Tiecheng; Wang, Hualei; Zhang, Qianyi; Xin, Yue; Xue, Li; Zhang, Kun; Huang, Jing; Yang, Songtao; Qin, Chuan; Wilker, Peter R; Yue, Donghui; Chen, Hualan; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2015-12-01

    While the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus has become established in the human population as a seasonal influenza virus, continued adaptation may alter viral virulence. Here, we passaged a 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (A/Changchun/01/2009) in mice. Serial passage in mice generated viral variants with increased virulence. Adapted variants displayed enhanced replication kinetics in vitro and vivo. Analysis of the variants genomes revealed 6 amino acid changes in the PB1 (T296R), PA (I94V), HA (H3 numbering; N159D, D225G, and R226Q), and NP (D375N). Using reverse genetics, we found that a PB1-T296R substitution found in all adapted viral variants enhanced viral replication kinetics in vitro and vivo, increased viral polymerase activity in human cells, and was sufficient for enhanced virulence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus in mice. Therefore, we defined a novel influenza pathogenic determinant, providing further insights into the pathogenesis of influenza viruses in mammals.

  13. A simple and rapid nested polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique for differentiation of pathogenic and nonpathogenic Leptospira spp.

    PubMed

    Djadid, Navid Dinparast; Ganji, Zahra Faghanzadeh; Gouya, Mohammad Mehdi; Rezvani, Mahmood; Zakeri, Sedigheh

    2009-03-01

    A rapid and specific nested polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) has been developed to detect and differentiate pathogenic and nonpathogenic Leptospira spp. Leptospiral genomic DNA was extracted from suspected human sera using an improved method of standard phenol-chloroform, and specific primers have been used to amplify 16S ribosomal RNA from all pathogenic and nonpathogenic Leptospira spp. The PCR products of all nonpathogenic species were digested with ApoI enzyme, but not pathogenic. To evaluate this assay, we analyzed 283 serum samples collected from suspected patients with leptospirosis. Nested PCR assay confirmed that 42 (14.8%) of 283 samples harbored Leptospira infection, and RFLP assay confirmed 38 (90.5%) of 42 and 4 (9.5%) of 42 positive cases had pathogenic and nonpathogenic Leptospira spp., respectively. Based on sequencing results, Leptospira interrogans, Leptospira kirschneri, and Leptospira wolffii and nonpathogenic Leptospira biflexa and Leptospira genomospecies 3 have been detected among analyzed samples. The nested PCR-RFLP assay developed in this study fulfills this requirement in the early stage of infection.

  14. Rapid differentiation and identification of potential severe strains of Citrus tristeza virus by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays.

    PubMed

    Yokomi, R K; Saponari, M; Sieburth, P J

    2010-04-01

    A multiplex Taqman-based real-time reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to identify potential severe strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and separate genotypes that react with the monoclonal antibody MCA13. Three strain-specific probes were developed using intergene sequences between the major and minor coat protein genes (CPi) in a multiplex reaction. Probe CPi-VT3 was designed for VT and T3 genotypes; probe CPi-T36 for T36 genotypes; and probe CPi-T36-NS to identify isolates in an outgroup clade of T36-like genotypes mild in California. Total nucleic acids extracted by chromatography on silica particles, sodium dodecyl sulfate-potassium acetate, and CTV virion immunocapture all yielded high quality templates for real-time PCR detection of CTV. These assays successfully differentiated CTV isolates from California, Florida, and a large panel of CTV isolates from an international collection maintained in Beltsville, MD. The utility of the assay was validated using field isolates collected in California and Florida.

  15. Heavy transcription of yeast genes correlates with differential loss of histone H2B relative to H4 and queued RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Hope A.; Ocampo, Josefina; Iben, James R.; Chereji, Răzvan V.; Clark, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is composed of nucleosomes, which contain nearly two coils of DNA wrapped around a central histone octamer. The octamer contains an H3-H4 tetramer and two H2A-H2B dimers. Gene activation is associated with chromatin disruption: a wider nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) at the promoter and reduced nucleosome occupancy over the coding region. Here, we examine the nature of disrupted chromatin after induction, using MNase-seq to map nucleosomes and subnucleosomes, and a refined high-resolution ChIP-seq method to map H4, H2B and RNA polymerase II (Pol II) genome-wide. Over coding regions, induced genes show a differential loss of H2B relative to H4, which correlates with Pol II density and the appearance of subnucleosomes. After induction, Pol II is surprisingly low at the promoter, but accumulates on the gene and downstream of the termination site, implying that dissociation is very slow. Thus, induction-dependent chromatin disruption reflects both eviction of H2A-H2B dimers and the presence of queued Pol II elongation complexes. We propose that slow Pol II dissociation after transcription is a major factor in chromatin disruption and that it may be of critical importance in gene regulation. PMID:25348398

  16. Detection of monoclonality in intestinal lymphoma with polymerase chain reaction for antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis to differentiate from enteritis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ohmura, S; Leipig, M; Schöpper, I; Hergt, F; Weber, K; Rütgen, B C; Tsujimoto, H; Hermanns, W; Hirschberger, J

    2017-03-01

    The diagnosis of canine intestinal lymphoma by morphological examination is challenging, especially when endoscopic tissue specimens are used. The utility of detection of antigen receptor gene rearrangement by polymerase chain reaction (PARR) in canine lymphoma has been well established, but its usefulness to distinguish enteritis and intestinal lymphoma remains unclear. In this retrospective study we assessed clonality of 29 primary canine intestinal lymphoma, 14 enteritis and 15 healthy control cases by PARR analysis, using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded full-thickness tissue specimens. We could detect monoclonal rearrangements in 22 of 29 canine intestinal lymphomas [76%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 56-90%] and polyclonal rearrangements in all of the enteritis and healthy control cases (100%; CI 88-100%). We revealed a predominance of T-cell phenotype compared to B-cell phenotype (85%; CI 65-96% and 15%; CI 4-35%, respectively). We showed that PARR analysis contributes to differentiation of canine intestinal lymphoma from enteritis and to phenotyping of lymphomas.

  17. Differential Mutation Patterns in Thymidine Kinase and DNA Polymerase Genes of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Clones Passaged in the Presence of Acyclovir or Penciclovir

    PubMed Central

    Suzutani, Tatsuo; Ishioka, Ken; De Clercq, Erik; Ishibashi, Kei; Kaneko, Hisatoshi; Kira, Toshihiko; Hashimoto, Koh-ichi; Ogasawara, Masahiro; Ohtani, Katsuki; Wakamiya, Nobutaka; Saijo, Masayuki

    2003-01-01

    A total of 21 clones of acyclovir (ACV)-resistant (ACVr) herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and 23 clones of penciclovir (PCV)-resistant (PCVr) HSV-1, emerging during serial passages in the presence of ACV or PCV, were isolated under conditions excluding contamination of resistant mutants in the starting virus culture, and their mutations in the thymidine kinase (TK) and DNA polymerase (DNA Pol) genes were analyzed comparatively. Mutations in the TK genes from ACVr mutants consisted of 50% single nucleotide substitutions and 50% frameshift mutations, while the corresponding figures for the PCVr mutants were 4 and 96%, respectively (P < 0.001). Eight of the 21 ACVr clones, but none of the 23 PCVr clones, had mutations in DNA Pol. Only nucleotide substitution(s) could be detected in the DNA Pol gene, as the gene is essential for virus replication. Therefore, the results for the DNA Pol mutants are concordant with those for the TK mutants in that a single nucleotide substitution was commonly observed in the ACVr, but not in the PCVr, mutants. These results clearly point to differential mutation patterns between ACVr and PCVr HSV-1 clones. PMID:12709344

  18. A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction for detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Si, Wei; Zhou, Shun; Wang, Zhao; Cui, Shang-jin

    2010-05-01

    A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nPCR) method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus (CDV). A pair of primers (P1 and P4) specific for CDV corresponding to the highly conserved region of the CDV genome were used as a common primer pair in the first-round PCR of the nested PCR. Primers P2 specific for CDV wild-type strains, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4 in the second round of nested PCR. Primers P3, P5 specific for CDV wild-type strain or vaccine strain, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4+P6 in the second round of nested PCR. A fragment of 177 bp was amplified from vaccine strain genomic RNA, and a fragment of 247 bp from wild-type strain genomic RNA in the RT-nPCR, and two fragments of 247 bp and 177 bp were amplified from the mixed samples of vaccine and wild-type strains. No amplification was achieved for uninfected cells, or cells infected with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), canine parvovirus (CPV), canine coronavirus (CCV), rabies virus (RV), or canine adenovirus (CAV). The RT-nPCR method was used to detect 30 field samples suspected of canine distemper from Heilongjiang and Jilin Provinces, and 51 samples in Shandong province. As a result of 30 samples, were found to be wild-type-like, and 5 to be vaccine-strain-like. The RT-nPCR method can be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type CDV-infected dogs from dogs vaccinated with CDV vaccine, and thus can be used in clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance.

  19. A mutation in the yeast mitochondrial core RNA polymerase, Rpo41, confers defects in both specificity factor interaction and promoter utilization.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Michio; Jaehning, Judith A

    2004-01-16

    The yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase (RNAP) is composed of the core RNAP, Rpo41, and the mitochondrial transcription factor, Mtf1. Both are required for mitochondrial transcription, but how the two proteins interact to create a functional, promoter-selective holoenzyme is still unknown. Rpo41 is similar to the single polypeptide bacteriophage T7RNAP, which does not require additional factors for promoter-selective initiation but whose activity is modulated during infection by association with T7 lysozyme. In this study we used the co-crystal structure of T7RNAP and T7 lysozyme as a model to define a potential Mtf1 interaction surface on Rpo41, making site-directed mutations in Rpo41 at positions predicted to reside at the same location as the T7RNAP/T7 lysozyme interface. We identified Rpo41 mutant E1224A as having reduced interactions with Mtf1 in a two-hybrid assay and a temperature-sensitive petite phenotype in vivo. Although the E1224A mutant has full activity in a non-selective in vitro transcription assay, it is temperature-sensitive for selective transcription from linear DNA templates containing the 14S rRNA, COX2, and tRNAcys mitochondrial promoters. The tRNAcys promoter defect can be rescued by template supercoiling but not by addition of a dinucleotide primer. The fact that mutation of Rpo41 results in selective transcription defects indicates that the core RNAP, like T7RNAP, plays an important role in promoter utilization.

  20. Antisense myb inhibition of purified erythroid progenitors in development and differentiation is linked to cycling activity and expression of DNA polymerase alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Valtieri, M.; Venturelli, D.; Care, A.; Fossati, C.; Pelosi, E.; Labbaye, C.; Mattia, G.; Gewirtz, A.M.; Calabretta, B.; Peschle, C. )

    1991-03-15

    These studies aimed to determine the expression and functional role of c-myb in erythroid progenitors with different cycling activities. In the first series of experiments the erythroid burst-forming unit (BFU-E) and colony-forming unit (CFU-E) populations from adult peripheral blood (PB), bone marrow (BM), and embryonic-fetal liver (FL) were treated with either c-myb antisense oligomers or 3H-thymidine (3H-TdR). A direct correlation was always observed between the inhibitory effect of anti-myb oligomers and the level of cycling activity. Thus, the inhibitory effect of antisense c-myb on the number of BFU-E colonies was 28.3% +/- 15.8% in PB, 53.4% +/- 9.3% in BM, and 68.2% +/- 24.5% in FL. Both adult and embryonic CFU-E were markedly inhibited. Using purified PB progenitors, we observed a similar pattern, although with slightly lower inhibitory effects. In the 3H-TdR suicide assay the killing index of BFU-E was 8.9% +/- 4.2% in PB, 29.4% +/- 6.5% in BM, and 40.1% +/- 9.6% in FL. The values for adult and embryonic CFU-E were 55.7% +/- 7.9% and 60.98% +/- 6.6%, respectively. We then investigated the kinetics of c-myb mRNA level during the erythroid differentiation of purified adult PB and FL BFU-E, as evaluated in liquid-phase culture by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Adult erythroid precursors showed a gradual increase of c-myb mRNA from day 4 through day 8 of culture and a sharp decrease at later times, whereas the expression of c-myb mRNA and protein in differentiation embryonic precursors peaked 2 days earlier. In both cases, c-myb mRNA level peaked at the CFU-E stage of differentiation. Finally, highly purified adult PB BFU-E were stimulated into cycling by a 3-day treatment with interleukin-3 in liquid phase: both the sensitivity to c-myb antisense oligomers and the 3H-TdR suicide index showed a gradual, strictly parallel increase.

  1. Development and validation of a multiplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of Mollicutes impurities in human cells, cultured under good manufacturing practice conditions, and following European Pharmacopoeia requirements and the International Conference on Harmonization guidelines.

    PubMed

    Vanni, Irene; Ugolotti, Elisabetta; Raso, Alessandro; Di Marco, Eddi; Melioli, Giovanni; Biassoni, Roberto

    2012-07-01

    The clinical applications of in vitro manipulated cultured cells and their precursors are often made use of in therapeutic trials. However, tissue cultures can be easily contaminated by the ubiquitous Mollicutes micro-organisms, which can cause various and severe alterations in cellular function. Thus methods able to detect and trace Mollicutes impurities contaminating cell cultures are required before starting any attempt to grow cells under good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions. We developed a multiplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay specific for the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions, for the Tuf and P1 cytoadhesin genes, able to detect contaminant Mollicutes species in a single tube reaction. The system was validated by analyzing different cell lines and the positive samples were confirmed by 16S and P1 cytoadhesin gene dideoxy sequencing. Our multiplex qPCR detection system was able to reach a sensitivity, specificity and robustness comparable with the culture and the indicator cell culture method, as required by the European Pharmacopoeia guidelines. We have developed a multiplex qPCR method, validated following International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines, as a qualitative limit test for impurities, assessing the validation characteristics of limit of detection and specificity. It also follows the European Pharmacopoeia guidelines and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requirements.

  2. A novel multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of both HLA-A*31:01/HLA-B*15:02 alleles, which confer susceptibility to carbamazepine-induced severe cutaneous adverse reactions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D V; Vidal, C; Chi, H C; Do, N T Q; Fulton, R; Li, J; Fernando, S L

    2017-09-08

    HLA-A*31:01 and HLA-B*15:02 have been widely reported to confer genetic susceptibility to carbamazepine (CBZ)-induced severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs). Accordingly, the screening for these alleles has been highly recommended to prevent SCAR prior to introducing CBZ therapy. Although a number of methods are available for screening of HLA-A*31:01 or HLA-B*15:02 alleles separately, developing an assay that can detect both these alleles would be more clinically practical, cost-effective and less time-consuming. Therefore, in this study, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using TaqMan Probe was designed and validated to be able to detect HLA-A*31:01 and HLA-B*15:02. In comparison with Luminex-SSO/SBT/SSB, the multiplex PCR assay for detection of HLA-A*31:01 and HLA-B*15:02 had a perfect agreement in the validation group of 125 samples. The method was able to detect the target genes at the DNA concentration of 0.037 ng/μL. The unit cost of this assay is less than $5 USD with total time of 110 minutes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Picoliter-Droplet Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction-Based Analysis of Cell-Free Plasma DNA to Assess EGFR Mutations in Lung Adenocarcinoma That Confer Resistance to Tyrosine-Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yoshitaka; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Kohno, Takashi; Takai, Erina; Sunami, Kuniko; Goto, Yasushi; Horinouchi, Hidehito; Kanda, Shintaro; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi; Ohe, Yuichiro

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the utility of analyzing cell-free plasma DNA (cfDNA) by picoliter-droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) to detect EGFR mutations that confer resistance to tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs) used for treatment of lung adenocarcinoma (LADC). Thirty-five LADC patients who received epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-TKI therapy, including ten who received tumor rebiopsy after development of resistance, were subjected to picoliter-ddPCR-cfDNA analysis to determine the fraction of cfDNA with TKI-sensitive (L858R and inflame exon 19 deletions) and -resistant (i.e., T790M) mutations, as well as their concordance with mutation status in rebiopsied tumor tissues. cfDNA samples from 15 (94%) of 16 patients who acquired resistance were positive for TKI-sensitive mutations. Also, 7 (44%) were positive for the T790M mutation, with fractions of T790M (+) cfDNA ranging from 7.4% to 97%. T790M positivity in cfDNA was consistent in eight of ten patients for whom rebiopsied tumor tissues were analyzed, whereas the remaining cases were negative in cfDNA and positive in rebiopsied tumors. Prior to EGFR-TKI therapy, cfDNAs from 9 (38%) and 0 of 24 patients were positive for TKI-sensitive and T790M mutations, respectively. Next-generation sequencing of cfDNA from one patient who exhibited innate resistance to TKI despite a high fraction of TKI-sensitive mutations and the absence of the T790M mutation in his cfDNA revealed the presence of the L747P mutation, a known driver of TKI resistance. Picoliter-ddPCR examination of cfDNA, supported by next-generation sequencing analysis, enables noninvasive assessment of EGFR mutations that confer resistance to TKIs. Noninvasive monitoring of the predominance of tumors harboring the secondary T790M mutation in the activating mutation in EGFR gene is necessary for precise and effective treatment of lung adenocarcinoma. Because cells harboring the T790M mutation are resistant to epidermal

  4. Rapid and sensitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction based detection and differential diagnosis of fish pathogenic rhabdoviruses in organ samples and cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Miller, T A; Rapp, J; Wastlhuber, U; Hoffmann, R W; Enzmann, P J

    1998-09-11

    A reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed and applied to the detection and differentiation of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) and infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in organ samples and cultured cells, regardless of the serotype. This method was developed by selecting primer sets corresponding to highly conserved regions of the glycoprotein G-gene sequences of the 2 viruses. The very fast RNA extraction, reverse transcription and PCR permitted us to read the agarose gels within 7 to 9 h after samples, cultured cells and whole fish arrived, which is of great importance when there is reason to believe that VHSV or IHNV may be present. This is also the first report of a large-scale field trial comparing the RT-PCR assay in trout from 30 German fish farms (a total of 330 rainbow trout) with the usual virus isolation and identification method in order to evaluate the efficiency of the RT-PCR assay for general use in fish health management programs. RT-PCR followed by semi-nested PCR using RNA directly extracted from fish tissue turned out to be the most sensitive method. It recognized 9 fish farms as VHS-positive and 7 as IHN-positive. This is 3 VHS- and 4 IHN-farms more than detected by the traditional virus isolation method. By directly examining the tissue by means of a PCR test it was possible to detect viral RNA in acutely and subacutely to chronically diseased fish as well as in asymptomatic VHS/IHN-carrier fish. Therefore, this effective and powerful assay for detecting VHSV and IHNV by means of PCR has great advantages compared with the presently used procedures.

  5. Differential transactivation by orphan nuclear receptor NOR1 and its fusion gene product EWS/NOR1: possible involvement of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase I, PARP-1.

    PubMed

    Ohkura, Naganari; Nagamura, Yuko; Tsukada, Toshihiko

    2008-10-15

    In extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma, a chromosomal translocation creates a gene fusion between EWS and an orphan nuclear receptor, NOR1. The resulting fusion protein EWS/NOR1 has been believed to lead to malignant transformation by functioning as a transactivator for NOR1-target genes. By comparing the gene expression profiles of NOR1- and EWS/NOR1-overexpressing cells, we found that they largely shared up-regulated genes, but no significant correlation was observed with respect to the transactivation levels of each gene. In addition, the proteins associated with NOR1 and EWS/NOR1 were mostly the same in these cells. The results suggest that these proteins differentially transactivate overlapping target genes through a similar transcriptional machinery. To clarify the mechanisms underlying the transcriptional divergence between NOR1 and EWS/NOR1, we searched for alternatively associated proteins, and identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase I (PARP-1) as an NOR1-specific binding protein. Consistent with its binding properties, PARP-1 acted as a transcriptional repressor of NOR1, but not EWS/NOR1, in a luciferase reporter assay employing PARP-1(-/-) fibroblasts. Interestingly, suppressive activity of PARP-1 was observed in a DNA response element-specific manner, and in a subtype-specific manner toward the NR4A family (Nur77, Nurr1, and NOR1), suggesting that PARP-1 plays a role in the diversity of transcriptional regulation mediated by the NR4A family in normal cells. Altogether, our findings suggest that NOR1 and EWS/NOR1 regulate overlapping target genes differently by utilizing associated proteins, including PARP-1; and that EWS/NOR1 may acquire oncogenic activities by avoiding (or gaining) transcription factor-specific modulation by the associated proteins. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Development of a multiplex amplification refractory mutation system reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay for the differential diagnosis of Feline leukemia virus vaccine and wild strains.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chia-Fang; Chan, Kun-Wei; Yang, Wei-Cheng; Chiang, Yu-Chung; Chung, Yang-Tsung; Kuo, James; Wang, Chi-Young

    2014-07-01

    A multiplex amplification refractory mutation system reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (ARMS RT-PCR) was developed for the differential diagnosis of Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) vaccine and wild-type strains based on a point mutation between the vaccine strain (S) and the wild-type strain (T) located in the p27 gene. This system was further upgraded to obtain a real-time ARMS RT-PCR (ARMS qRT-PCR) with a high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) platform. The genotyping of various strains of FeLV was determined by comparing the HRMA curves with the defined wild-type FeLV (strain TW1), and the results were expressed as a percentage confidence. The detection limits of ARMS RT-PCR and ARMS qRT-PCR combined with HRMA were 100 and 1 copies of transcribed FeLV RNA per 0.5 ml of sample, respectively. No false-positive results were obtained with 6 unrelated pathogens and 1 feline cell line. Twelve FeLV Taiwan strains were correctly identified using ARMS qRT-PCR combined with HRMA. The genotypes of the strains matched the defined FeLV wild-type strain genotype with at least 91.17% confidence. A higher degree of sequence polymorphism was found throughout the p27 gene compared with the long terminal repeat region. In conclusion, the current study describes the phylogenetic relationship of the FeLV Taiwan strains and demonstrates that the developed ARMS RT-PCR assay is able to be used to detect the replication of a vaccine strain that has not been properly inactivated, thus acting as a safety check for the quality of FeLV vaccines.

  7. Ethanol confers differential protection against generalist and specialist parasitoids of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Zachary R; Schlenke, Todd A; Morran, Levi T; de Roode, Jacobus C

    2017-01-01

    As parasites coevolve with their hosts, they can evolve counter-defenses that render host immune responses ineffective. These counter-defenses are more likely to evolve in specialist parasites than generalist parasites; the latter face variable selection pressures between the different hosts they infect. Natural populations of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster are commonly threatened by endoparasitoid wasps in the genus Leptopilina, including the specialist L. boulardi and the generalist L. heterotoma, and both wasp species can incapacitate the cellular immune response of D. melanogaster larvae. Given that ethanol tolerance is high in D. melanogaster and stronger in the specialist wasp than the generalist, we tested whether fly larvae could use ethanol as an anti-parasite defense and whether its effectiveness would differ against the two wasp species. We found that fly larvae benefited from eating ethanol-containing food during exposure to L. heterotoma; we observed a two-fold decrease in parasitization intensity and a 24-fold increase in fly survival to adulthood. Although host ethanol consumption did not affect L. boulardi parasitization rates or intensities, it led to a modest increase in fly survival. Thus, ethanol conferred stronger protection against the generalist wasp than the specialist. We tested whether fly larvae can self-medicate by seeking ethanol-containing food after being attacked by wasps, but found no support for this hypothesis. We also allowed female flies to choose between control and ethanol-containing oviposition sites in the presence vs. absence of wasps and generally found significant preferences for ethanol regardless of wasp presence. Overall, our results suggest that D. melanogaster larvae obtain protection from certain parasitoid wasp species through their mothers' innate oviposition preferences for ethanol-containing food sources.

  8. Ethanol confers differential protection against generalist and specialist parasitoids of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Schlenke, Todd A.; Morran, Levi T.; de Roode, Jacobus C.

    2017-01-01

    As parasites coevolve with their hosts, they can evolve counter-defenses that render host immune responses ineffective. These counter-defenses are more likely to evolve in specialist parasites than generalist parasites; the latter face variable selection pressures between the different hosts they infect. Natural populations of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster are commonly threatened by endoparasitoid wasps in the genus Leptopilina, including the specialist L. boulardi and the generalist L. heterotoma, and both wasp species can incapacitate the cellular immune response of D. melanogaster larvae. Given that ethanol tolerance is high in D. melanogaster and stronger in the specialist wasp than the generalist, we tested whether fly larvae could use ethanol as an anti-parasite defense and whether its effectiveness would differ against the two wasp species. We found that fly larvae benefited from eating ethanol-containing food during exposure to L. heterotoma; we observed a two-fold decrease in parasitization intensity and a 24-fold increase in fly survival to adulthood. Although host ethanol consumption did not affect L. boulardi parasitization rates or intensities, it led to a modest increase in fly survival. Thus, ethanol conferred stronger protection against the generalist wasp than the specialist. We tested whether fly larvae can self-medicate by seeking ethanol-containing food after being attacked by wasps, but found no support for this hypothesis. We also allowed female flies to choose between control and ethanol-containing oviposition sites in the presence vs. absence of wasps and generally found significant preferences for ethanol regardless of wasp presence. Overall, our results suggest that D. melanogaster larvae obtain protection from certain parasitoid wasp species through their mothers’ innate oviposition preferences for ethanol-containing food sources. PMID:28700600

  9. A new full-field interferometry approach for counting and differentiating aquatic biotic nanoparticles (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccara, A. Claude; Fedala, Yasmina; Voronkoff, Justine; Paffoni, Nina; Boccara, Martine

    2017-03-01

    Due to the huge abundance and the major role that viruses and membrane vesicles play in the seas or rivers ecosystems it is necessary to develop simple, sensitive, compact and reliable methods for their detection and characterization. Our approach is based on the measurement of the weak light level scattered by the biotic nanoparticles. We describe a new full-field, incoherently illuminated, shot-noise limited, common-path interferometric detection method coupled with the analysis of Brownian motion to detect, quantify, and differentiate biotic nanoparticles. The last developments take advantage of a new fast (700 Hz) camera with 2 Me- full well capacity that improves the signal to noise ratio and increases the precision of the Brownian motion characterization. We validated the method with calibrated nanoparticles and homogeneous DNA or RNA.viruses. The smallest virus size that we characterized with a suitable signal-to-noise ratio was around 30 nm in diameter with a target towards the numerous 20 nm diameter viruses. We show for the first time anisotropic trajectories for myoviruses meaning that there is a memory of the initial direction of their Brownian motions. Significant improvements have been made in the handling of the sample as well as in the statistical analysis for differentiating the various families of vesicles and virus. We further applied the method for vesicles detection and for analysis of coastal and oligotrophic samples from Tara Oceans circumnavigation as well of various rivers.

  10. Advances in islet cell biology: from stem cell differentiation to clinical transplantation: conference report.

    PubMed

    Kandeel, Fouad; Smith, Craig V; Todorov, Ivan; Mullen, Yoko

    2003-10-01

    The 3rd Annual Rachmiel Levine Symposium entitled "Advances in Islet Cell Biology-From Stem Cell Differentiation to Clinical Transplantation" was organized by the Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism at the City of Hope National Medical Center, with the support of the Southern California Islet Cell Resources Center, American Diabetes Association-David Shapiro Research Fund, Ross Foundation, the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) of the National Institutes of Health. The symposium was held at the Hilton Anaheim Hotel in Anaheim, CA, in October 2002, and was attended by nearly 400 participants from 23 countries and 30 U.S. states. The symposium consisted of 11 sessions focusing on 3 areas: (1) pancreas and islet cell differentiation and islet generation, (2) beta cell biology and insulin synthesis and/or secretion, and (3) pancreatic islet transplantation in patients with type I diabetes. Thirty-nine world experts lectured on the most current information in each field. Fifty-three abstracts were selected for presentation and discussed at the poster session. The first author of each of the top 10 posters received a Young Investigator Travel Award provided by the National Center for Research Resources and the Southern California Islet Cell Resources Center. The symposium also offered special Meet the Professor sessions, which gave the attendees an opportunity to closely interact with the participating speakers of the day.

  11. Imaging of single retinal ganglion cell with differential interference contrast microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Juyeong; Kim, Yu Jeong; Kim, Chul-Ki; Lee, Taik Jin; Seo, Mina; Lee, Seok; Woo, Deok Ha; Jun, Seong Chan; Park, Ki-Ho; Kim, Seok Hwan; Kim, Jae Hun

    2017-02-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy, characterized by the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Therefore, monitoring the change of number or morphology of RGC is essential for the early detection as well as investigation of pathophysiology of glaucoma. Since RGC layer is transparent and hyporeflective, the direct optical visualization of RGCs has not been successful so far. Therefore, glaucoma evaluation mostly depends on indirect diagnostic methods such as the evaluation of optic disc morphology or retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurement by optical coherence tomography. We have previously demonstrated single photoreceptor cell imaging with differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. Herein, we successfully visualized single RGC using DIC microscopy. Since RGC layer is much less reflective than photoreceptor layer, various techniques including the control of light wavelength and bandwidth using a tunable band pass filter were adopted to reduce the chromatic aberration in z-axis for higher and clearer resolution. To verify that the imaged cells were the RGCs, the flat-mounted retina of Sprague-Dawley rat, in which the RGCs were retrogradely labeled with fluorescence, was observed by both fluorescence and DIC microscopies for direct comparison. We have confirmed that the cell images obtained by fluorescence microscopy were perfectly matched with cell images by DIC microscopy. As conclusion, we have visualized single RGC with DIC microscopy, and confirmed with fluorescence microscopy.

  12. Rapid Differentiation and Identification of Potential Severe Strains of Citrus tristeza Virus by Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A multiplex Taqman®-based real-time reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to detect all strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and to identify potentially severe strains of the virus. A CTV TaqMan probe (CTV-CY5) based on the coat protein (CP) gene sequences...

  13. [The implementation of polymerase chain reaction technique: the real time to reveal and differentiate the viruses of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk].

    PubMed

    Andosova, L D; Kontorshchikova, K N; Blatova, O L; Kudel'kina, S Iu; Kuznetsova, I A; Belov, A V; Baĭkova, R A

    2011-07-01

    The polymerase chain reaction technique was applied in "real time" format to evaluate the occurrence rate and infection ratio of various genotypes of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk in virus-positive women and contact persons. The examination sampling consisted of 738 women aged of 17-50 years. The examination results permitted to establish high percentage of infection of 546 patients (74%) by carcinogenic papilloma viruses. The analysis of detection rate of various genotypes of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk established that the 56th and 16th types of high carcinogenic risk are revealed more often than others--in 33% and 15.4% correspondingly. In males, first place in occurrence rate is for those types of virus of human papilloma: the 56th n = 10 (33.3%), 16th n = 3 (10%), 45th n = 3 (10%), 51th n = 3 (10%). The rest of genotypes are detected in 3-7% cases.

  14. Difference in root K+ retention ability and reduced sensitivity of K+-permeable channels to reactive oxygen species confer differential salt tolerance in three Brassica species

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Koushik; Bose, Jayakumar; Shabala, Lana; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Brassica species are known to possess significant inter and intraspecies variability in salinity stress tolerance, but the cell-specific mechanisms conferring this difference remain elusive. In this work, the role and relative contribution of several key plasma membrane transporters to salinity stress tolerance were evaluated in three Brassica species (B. napus, B. juncea, and B. oleracea) using a range of electrophysiological assays. Initial root growth assay and viability staining revealed that B. napus was most tolerant amongst the three species, followed by B. juncea and B. oleracea. At the mechanistic level, this difference was conferred by at least three complementary physiological mechanisms: (i) higher Na+ extrusion ability from roots resulting from increased expression and activity of plasma membrane SOS1-like Na+/H+ exchangers; (ii) better root K+ retention ability resulting from stress-inducible activation of H+-ATPase and ability to maintain more negative membrane potential under saline conditions; and (iii) reduced sensitivity of B. napus root K+-permeable channels to reactive oxygen species (ROS). The last two mechanisms played the dominant role and conferred most of the differential salt sensitivity between species. Brassica napus plants were also more efficient in preventing the stress-induced increase in GORK transcript levels and up-regulation of expression of AKT1, HAK5, and HKT1 transporter genes. Taken together, our data provide the mechanistic explanation for differential salt stress sensitivity amongst these species and shed light on transcriptional and post-translational regulation of key ion transport systems involved in the maintenance of the root plasma membrane potential and cytosolic K/Na ratio as a key attribute for salt tolerance in Brassica species. PMID:27340231

  15. T7-RNA Polymerase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    T7-RNA Polymerase grown on STS-81. Structure-Function Relationships of RNA Polymerase: DNA-dependent RNA polymerase is the key enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of RNA, a process known as transcription. Principal Investigator's include Dr. Dan Carter, Dr. B.C. Wang, and Dr. John Rose of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  16. T7-RNA Polymerase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    T7-RNA Polymerase grown on STS-81. Structure-Function Relationships of RNA Polymerase: DNA-dependent RNA polymerase is the key enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of RNA, a process known as transcription. Principal Investigator's include Dr. Dan Carter, Dr. B.C. Wang, and Dr. John Rose of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  17. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the rpoB gene for identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and differentiation of Mycobacterium avium subspecies.

    PubMed

    Whang, Jake; Lee, Byung Soo; Choi, Go-Eun; Cho, Sang-Nae; Kil, Park Young; Collins, Michael T; Shin, Sung Jae

    2011-05-01

    Mycobacterial speciation by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (PRA) of the rpoB gene was evaluated for identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and other Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) members to the species or subspecies level by comparison with conventional methods including hsp65 sequencing, high-performance liquid chromatography, and PCR for accepted species- or subspecies-specific genomic targets. A total of 185 type and clinical mycobacterial strains from humans, animals, and environments were tested. A 360-bp PCR product was subsequently digested with MspI, HaeIII, and SmaI restriction enzymes. The PRA using SmaI restriction showed a unique digestion pattern for MAP distinguishing it from other MAC members and other Mycobacterium spp. Moreover, HaeIII and MspI restriction of the rpoB gene enabled MAC-species and -subspecies discrimination. The rpoB-PRA using SmaI or MspI and HaeIII restriction of the rpoB gene is a simple, convenient, and reliable confirmatory assay for simultaneous identification of MAP and other MAC members.

  18. Characterization of full-length and polymerase chain reaction-derived partial-length Gottfried and OSU gene 4 probes for serotypic differentiation of porcine rotaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, B I; Parwani, A V; Gorziglia, M; Larralde, G; Saif, L J

    1992-01-01

    To determine the VP4 (P type) specificity of porcine rotaviruses, full- and partial-length gene 4 probes were produced from cloned Gottfried and OSU porcine rotavirus genomic segment 4 cDNAs. The gene 4 segments from the prototype Gottfried (VP7 serotype 4) and OSU (VP7 serotype 5) porcine rotavirus strains were selected for study because of their distinct P types and the occurrence of rotaviruses with similar serotypes among swine. Partial-length gene 4 cDNAs were produced and amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and encompassed portions of the variable region (nucleotides 211 to 612) of VP8 encoded by genomic segment 4. The hybridization stringency conditions necessary for optimal probe specificity and sensitivity were determined by dot or Northern (RNA) blot hybridizations against a diverse group of human and animal rotaviruses of heterologous group A serotypes and against representative group B and C porcine rotaviruses. The PCR-derived gene 4 probes were more specific than the full-length gene 4 probes but demonstrated equivalent sensitivity. The Gottfried PCR-derived probe hybridized with Gottfried, SB2, SB3, and SB5 G serotype 4 porcine rotaviruses. The OSU PCR-derived probe hybridized with OSU, EE, A580, and SB-1A porcine rotaviruses and equine H1 rotavirus. Results of the hybridization reactions of the PCR-derived gene 4 probes with selected porcine rotavirus strains agreed with previous serological or genetic analyses, indicating their suitability as diagnostic reagents. Images PMID:1328281

  19. The rpoZ Gene, Encoding the RNA Polymerase Omega Subunit, Is Required for Antibiotic Production and Morphological Differentiation in Streptomyces kasugaensis

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Ikuo; Kasuga, Kano; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Fukasawa, Akira; Mizuno, Satoshi; Arisawa, Akira; Akagawa, Hisayoshi

    2002-01-01

    The occurrence of pleiotropic mutants that are defective in both antibiotic production and aerial mycelium formation is peculiar to streptomycetes. Pleiotropic mutant KSB was isolated from wild-type Streptomyces kasugaensis A1R6, which produces kasugamycin, an antifungal aminoglycoside antibiotic. A 9.3-kb DNA fragment was cloned from the chromosomal DNA of strain A1R6 by complementary restoration of kasugamycin production and aerial hypha formation to mutant KSB. Complementation experiments with deletion plasmids and subsequent DNA analysis indicated that orf5, encoding 90 amino acids, was responsible for the restoration. A protein homology search revealed that orf5 was a homolog of rpoZ, the gene that is known to encode RNA polymerase subunit omega (ω), thus leading to the conclusion that orf5 was rpoZ in S. kasugaensis. The pleiotropy of mutant KSB was attributed to a 2-bp frameshift deletion in the rpoZ region of mutant KSB, which probably resulted in a truncated, incomplete ω of 47 amino acids. Furthermore, rpoZ-disrupted mutant R6D4 obtained from strain A1R6 by insertion of Tn5 aphII into the middle of the rpoZ-coding region produced neither kasugamycin nor aerial mycelia, similar to mutant KSB. When rpoZ of S. kasugaensis and Streptomyces coelicolor, whose deduced products differed in the sixth amino acid residue, were introduced into mutant R6D4 via a plasmid, both transformants produced kasugamycin and aerial hyphae without significant differences. This study established that rpoZ is required for kasugamycin production and aerial mycelium formation in S. kasugaensis and responsible for pleiotropy. PMID:12426327

  20. Achaete-scute homolog 1 as a marker of poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas of different sites: a validation study using immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on 335 cases.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Stefano; Marando, Alessandro; Gatti, Gaia; Rapa, Ida; Volante, Marco; Papotti, Mauro; Sessa, Fausto; Capella, Carlo

    2013-07-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinomas show overlapping morphological and immunohistochemical features independently of their site of origin, which makes identification of the primary location problematic when they are diagnosed as metastases of unknown origin. Neuroendocrine carcinomas are easily morphologically differentiated from neuroendocrine tumors in surgical material, although this distinction can be difficult when using small biopsy specimens. The diagnostic usefulness of different transcription factors as site-specific markers or as discriminating markers between neuroendocrine carcinomas and neuroendocrine tumors has been previously studied with sometimes contradictory results. In this respect, the role of achaete-scute homolog 1 has been poorly investigated, although some recent findings demonstrate its expression in neuroendocrine carcinomas. Using immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, we investigated the expression of achaete-scute homolog 1 in 335 neuroendocrine neoplasms (194 neuroendocrine carcinomas and 141 neuroendocrine tumors) of different sites, to check its possible utility as diagnostic marker. High concordance between immunohistochemical and molecular findings was found. Achaete-scute homolog 1 expression was identified in 82% of lung neuroendocrine carcinomas and 70% of extrapulmonary neuroendocrine carcinomas. Achaete-scute homolog 1 was not detected in any gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumor and was found in only a minority of lung carcinoids. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of achaete-scute homolog 1 expression were 82.4% and 89.7% in distinguishing neuroendocrine carcinomas from neuroendocrine tumors of the lung, 40.6% and 100% to differentiate extrapulmonary neuroendocrine carcinomas from neuroendocrine tumors, and 82.4% and 59.4% in distinguishing lung from extrapulmonary neuroendocrine carcinomas. Our data suggest that achaete-scute homolog 1 is not a site-specific marker. However, achaete

  1. In vitro bypass of malondialdehyde-deoxyguanosine adducts: differential base selection during extension by the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I is the critical determinant of replication outcome.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Muhammed F; Riggins, James N; Schnetz-Boutaud, Nathalie; Voehler, Markus; Stone, Michael P; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2004-09-21

    The major malondialdehyde-derived adduct in DNA is 3-(2'-deoxy-beta-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)pyrimido[1,2-alpha]purin-10(3H)-one (M(1)dG). M(1)dG undergoes hydrolytic ring opening in duplex DNA to 9-(2'-deoxy-beta-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-N(2)-(3-oxo-1-propenyl)guanine (N(2)OPdG). Template-primers were constructed containing M(1)dG or N(2)OPdG in a (CpG)(4) repeat sequence and replicated with the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I (Kf). Incorporation opposite the lesion and replication beyond the adduct sites by Kf was reduced compared to unadducted controls. The amount of bypass to full-length products was significantly greater with the acyclic adduct, N(2)OPdG, than with the cyclic adduct, M(1)dG. Sequence analysis indicated that the fully extended primers contained dC opposite both adducts when replication was conducted with Kf exo(+). In contrast, with Kf exo(-), primers extended past M(1)dG contained T opposite the adduct, but primers extended past N(2)OPdG contained dC opposite the adduct. Single nucleotide incorporation experiments indicated that Kf exo(-) incorporates all four nucleotides opposite M(1)dG or N(2)OPdG. Kf exo(+) removed dA, dG, and T opposite M(1)dG and N(2)OPdG but was much less active when dC was opposite the adduct. NMR studies on duplex DNA indicated that N(2)OPdG hydrogen bonds with dC in the complementary strand. The fact that base pairing can occur for the acyclic adduct may explain why N(2)OPdG is less blocking than M(1)dG. These results support in vivo findings that the ring-closed adduct, M(1)dG, is more mutagenic than the ring-opened adduct, N(2)OPdG. They also provide a detailed picture of in vitro replication in which the outcome is determined primarily by the selectivity of template-primer extension beyond rather than insertion opposite the adducts.

  2. Differentiation of toxigenic Staphylococcus aureus in staphylococcal isolates from prepared and frozen foods by combined arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction and DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Maria G; Jordano, Rafael; Aranda, Emilio; Benito, Maria J; Córdoba, Juan J

    2003-06-01

    In prepared and frozen flamenquín and hake fish fingers Staphylococcus aureus as sanitary hazards have been detected. In the present work, a combined method that includes an arbitrarily primed PCR (AP-PCR) and a mixed DNA probe hybridisation designed for the enterotoxigenic genes sea, seb, sec, and sed will be assayed to differentiate enterotoxigenic S. aureus from other staphylococcal species isolated during the processing of prepared and frozen foods. From the protocols tested for the AP-PCR, the highest number of amplification bands showing the best resolution was achieved at 30 degrees C annealing and 35 degrees C extension temperatures. Several staphylococci identified by a biochemical test as S. aureus showed in the AP-PCR analysis different banding patterns to the references S. aureus. The isolates, were investigated by slot blot hybridisation for genes encoding A, B, C, and D staphylococcal enterotoxins to determine their enterotoxigenic potential. Several isolates characterised by the AP-PCR analysis as S. aureus hybridised with the DNA probe mixture. The combined AP-PCR and DNA probe hybridisation assayed was able to differentiate toxigenic S. aureus from other staphylococcal species from prepared and frozen foods. This method could be considered as microbial quality assurance in these products.

  3. Fine-tuning of histone H3 Lys4 methylation during pseudohyphal differentiation by the CDK submodule of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Law, Michael J; Ciccaglione, Kerri

    2015-02-01

    Transcriptional regulation is dependent upon the interactions between the RNA pol II holoenzyme complex and chromatin. RNA pol II is part of a highly conserved multiprotein complex that includes the core mediator and CDK8 subcomplex. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the CDK8 subcomplex, composed of Ssn2p, Ssn3p, Ssn8p, and Srb8p, is thought to play important roles in mediating transcriptional control of stress-responsive genes. Also central to transcriptional control are histone post-translational modifications. Lysine methylation, dynamically balanced by lysine methyltransferases and demethylases, has been intensively studied, uncovering significant functions in transcriptional control. A key question remains in understanding how these enzymes are targeted during stress response. To determine the relationship between lysine methylation, the CDK8 complex, and transcriptional control, we performed phenotype analyses of yeast lacking known lysine methyltransferases or demethylases in isolation or in tandem with SSN8 deletions. We show that the RNA pol II CDK8 submodule components SSN8/SSN3 and the histone demethylase JHD2 are required to inhibit pseudohyphal growth-a differentiation pathway induced during nutrient limitation-under rich conditions. Yeast lacking both SSN8 and JHD2 constitutively express FLO11, a major regulator of pseudohyphal growth. Interestingly, deleting known FLO11 activators including FLO8, MSS11, MFG1, TEC1, SNF1, KSS1, and GCN4 results in a range of phenotypic suppression. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we found that SSN8 inhibits H3 Lys4 trimethylation independently of JHD2 at the FLO11 locus, suggesting that H3 Lys4 hypermethylation is locking FLO11 into a transcriptionally active state. These studies implicate the CDK8 subcomplex in fine-tuning H3 Lys4 methylation levels during pseudohyphal differentiation. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  4. Does the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) polymorphism (rs2254298) confer 'vulnerability' for psychopathology or 'differential susceptibility'? Insights from evolution.

    PubMed

    Brüne, Martin

    2012-04-17

    The diathesis-stress model of psychiatric conditions has recently been challenged by the view that it might be more accurate to speak of 'differential susceptibility' or 'plasticity' genes, rather than one-sidedly focusing on individual vulnerability. That is, the same allelic variation that predisposes to a psychiatric disorder if associated with (developmentally early) environmental adversity may lead to a better-than-average functional outcome in the same domain under thriving (or favourable) environmental conditions. Studies of polymorphic variations of the serotonin transporter gene, the monoamino-oxidase-inhibitor A coding gene or the dopamine D4 receptor gene indicate that the early environment plays a crucial role in the development of favourable versus unfavourable outcomes. Current evidence is limited, however, to establishing a link between genetic variation and behavioural phenotypes. In contrast, little is known about how plasticity may be expressed at the neuroanatomical level as a 'hard-wired' correlate of observable behaviour. The present review article seeks to further strengthen the argument in favour of the differential susceptibility theory by incorporating findings from behavioural and neuroanatomical studies in relation to genetic variation of the oxytocin receptor gene. It is suggested that polymorphic variation at the oxytocin receptor gene (rs2254298) is associated with sociability, amygdala volume and differential risk for psychiatric conditions including autism, depression and anxiety disorder, depending on the quality of early environmental experiences. Seeing genetic variation at the core of developmental plasticity can explain, in contrast to the diathesis-stress perspective, why evolution by natural selection has maintained such 'risk' alleles in the gene pool of a population.

  5. Differential role for competitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and intracellular cytokine staining as diagnostic tools for the assessment of intragraft cytokine profiles in rejecting and nonrejecting heart allografts.

    PubMed

    Spriewald, B M; Hara, M; Bushell, A; Jenkins, S; Morris, P J; Wood, K J

    2000-11-01

    The early and reliable diagnosis of allograft rejection is a difficult task and the assessment of cytokine expression in the grafts can be a helpful parameter. We have compared competitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with intracellular cytokine staining by flow cytometry as tools to measure cytokine expression in rejecting and nonrejecting murine cardiac allografts. Both techniques gave comparable results for cytokine expression in rejecting allografts and syngeneic controls. Grafts from mice pretreated with anti-CD4 antibody and donor-specific blood transfusion showed a marked reduction in cytokine expression, as assessed by competitive RT-PCR, even though a cellular infiltrate was present in the graft. In contrast, the cytokine production measured by intracellular cytokine staining of the isolated graft-infiltrating cells was high and exceeded even that of the rejecting allografts. We conclude that intracellular cytokine staining of graft-infiltrating leukocytes by flow cytometry does not necessarily reflect accurately the cytokine milieu in the graft. This technique might therefore have a limited clinical application in contrast to competitive RT-PCR for the differentiation between graft acceptance and graft rejection.

  6. The identification and differentiation of the Candida parapsilosis complex species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region of the rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Barbedo, Leonardo Silva; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Muniz, Mauro de Medeiros; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-01-01

    Currently, it is accepted that there are three species that were formerly grouped under Candida parapsilosis: C. para- psilosis sensu stricto, Candida orthopsilosis, andCandida metapsilosis. In fact, the antifungal susceptibility profiles and distinct virulence attributes demonstrate the differences in these nosocomial pathogens. An accurate, fast, and economical identification of fungal species has been the main goal in mycology. In the present study, we searched sequences that were available in the GenBank database in order to identify the complete sequence for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S-ITS2 region, which is comprised of the forward and reverse primers ITS1 and ITS4. Subsequently, an in silico polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to differentiate the C. parapsilosis complex species. Ninety-eight clinical isolates from patients with fungaemia were submitted for analysis, where 59 isolates were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, 37 were identified as C. orthopsilosis, and two were identified as C. metapsilosis. PCR-RFLP quickly and accurately identified C. parapsilosis complex species, making this method an alternative and routine identification system for use in clinical mycology laboratories. PMID:27074256

  7. Differentiation of canine distemper virus isolates in fur animals from various vaccine strains by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism according to phylogenetic relations in china.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengxue; Yan, Xijun; Chai, Xiuli; Zhang, Hailing; Zhao, Jianjun; Wen, Yongjun; Wu, Wei

    2011-02-27

    In order to effectively identify the vaccine and field strains of Canine distemper virus (CDV), a new differential diagnostic test has been developed based on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). We selected an 829 bp fragment of the nucleoprotein (N) gene of CDV. By RFLP analysis using BamHI, field isolates were distinguishable from the vaccine strains. Two fragments were obtained from the vaccine strains by RT-PCR-RFLP analysis while three were observed in the field strains. An 829 nucleotide region of the CDV N gene was analyzed in 19 CDV field strains isolated from minks, raccoon dogs and foxes in China between 2005 and 2007. The results suggest this method is precise, accurate and efficient. It was also determined that three different genotypes exist in CDV field strains in fur animal herds of the north of China, most of which belong to Asian type. Mutated field strains, JSY06-R1, JSY06-R2 and JDH07-F1 also exist in Northern China, but are most closely related to the standard virulent strain A75/17, designated in Arctic and America-2 genetype in the present study, respectively.

  8. Development and use of a multiplex real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for detection and differentiation of Porcine circovirus-2 genotypes 2a and 2b in an epidemiological survey.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Carl A; del Castillo, Jérome R E; Music, Nedzad; Fontaine, Guy; Harel, Josée; Tremblay, Donald

    2008-09-01

    By the end of 2004, the Canadian swine population had experienced a severe increase in the incidence of Porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD), a problem that was associated with the emergence of a new Porcine circovirus-2 genotype (PCV-2b), previously unrecovered in North America. Thus, it became important to develop a diagnostic tool that could differentiate between the old and new circulating genotypes (PCV-2a and PCV-2b, respectively). Consequently, a multiplex real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (mrtqPCR) assay that could sensitively and specifically identify and differentiate PCV-2 genotypes was developed. A retrospective epidemiologic survey that used the mrtqPCR assay was performed to determine if cofactors could affect the risk of PCVAD. From 121 PCV-2-positive cases gathered for this study, 4.13%, 92.56%, and 3.31% were positive for PCV-2a, PCV-2b, and both genotypes, respectively. In a data analysis using univariate logistic regressions, the PCVAD-compatible (PCVAD/c) score was significantly associated with the presence of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), PRRSV viral load, PCV-2 viral load, and PCV-2 immunohistochemistry (IHC) results. Polytomous logistic regression analysis revealed that PCVAD/c score was affected by PCV-2 viral load (P = 0.0161) and IHC (P = 0.0128), but not by the PRRSV variables (P > 0.9), which suggests that mrtqPCR in tissue is a reliable alternative to IHC. Logistic regression analyses revealed that PCV-2 increased the odds ratio of isolating 2 major swine pathogens of the respiratory tract, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Streptococcus suis serotypes 1/2, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7, which are serotypes commonly associated with clinical diseases.

  9. Archaeal RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Akira; Murakami, Katsuhiko S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The recently solved X-ray crystal structures of archaeal RNA polymerase allows a structural comparison of the transcription machinery among all three domains of life. Archaeal transcription is very simple and all components, including the structures of general transcription factors and RNA polymerase, are highly conserved in eukaryotes. Therefore, it could be a new model for dissection of the eukaryotic transcription apparatus. The archaeal RNA polymerase structure also provides a framework for addressing the functional role that Fe–S clusters play within the transcription machinery of archaea and eukaryotes. A comparison between bacterial and archaeal open complex models reveals likely key motifs of archaeal RNA polymerase for DNA unwinding during the open complex formation. PMID:19880312

  10. M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor expression confers differential cholinergic modulation to neurochemically distinct hippocampal basket cell subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Cea-del Rio, Christian A.; Lawrence, J. Josh; Tricoire, Ludovic; Erdelyi, Ferenc; Szabo, Gabor; McBain, Chris J.

    2010-01-01

    Cholinergic neuromodulation of hippocampal circuitry promotes network oscillations and facilitates learning and memory through cellular actions on both excitatory and inhibitory circuits. Despite widespread recognition that neurochemical content discriminates between functionally distinct interneuron populations, there has been no systematic examination of whether neurochemically distinct interneuron classes undergo differential cholinergic neuromodulation in the hippocampus. Using GFP transgenic mice that enable the visualization of perisomatically targeting parvalbumin-positive (PV+) or cholecystokinin-positive (CCK+) basket cells (BCs), we tested the hypothesis that neurochemically distinct interneuron populations are differentially engaged by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) activation. Cholinergic fiber activation revealed that CCK BCs were more sensitive to synaptic release of ACh than PV BCs. In response to depolarizing current steps, mAChR activation of PV BCs and CCK BCs also elicited distinct cholinergic response profiles, differing in mAChR-induced changes in action potential (AP) waveform, firing frequency, and intrinsic excitability. In contrast to PV BCs, CCK BCs exhibited a mAChR-induced afterdepolarization (mADP) that was frequency and activity-dependent. Pharmacological, molecular, and loss-of-function data converged on the presence of M3 mAChRs in distinguishing CCK BCs from PV BCs. Firing frequency of CCK BCs was controlled through M3 mAChRs but PV BC excitability was altered solely through M1 mAChRs. Finally, upon mAChR activation, glutamatergic transmission enhanced cellular excitability preferentially in CCK BCs but not in PV BCs. Our findings demonstrate that cell-type specific cholinergic specializations are present on neurochemically distinct interneuron subtypes in the hippocampus, revealing an organizing principle that cholinergic neuromodulation depends critically on neurochemical identity. PMID:20427660

  11. Identification of differentially expressed genes that potentially confer pest resistance in transgenic ChIFN-γ tobacco.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong-Jun; Wu, Yu-Jun; Luo, Xi; Shen, Xi-Long; Zhao, De-Gang

    2014-06-15

    Chicken interferon-γ (ChIFN-γ) is both an inhibitor of viral replication and a regulator of numerous immunological functions. However, since little is known about the mechanisms underlying the insect-resistance of transgenic ChIFN-γ, a transgenic ChIFN-γ tobacco line was employed in the present study to explore this mechanism. A cDNA microarray (with 43,760 unigenes) was used to analyze the gene expression profiles of transgenic and wild-type (WT) tobacco leaves at two different growth stages. Compared with the WT, 1529 and 405 expressed sequence tags were significantly up- or downregulated on days 119 and 147, respectively. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) are involved in metabolic regulation, cell division and differentiation, material synthesis and transport, signal transduction, and protein synthesis and degradation. Candidate genes that may increase cell density, thicken cell walls, promote secondary metabolite synthesis, and mediate plant hormone-induced resistance responses were used to identify the ChIFN-γ-mediated insect-resistance mechanisms. The insect-resistance of transgenic ChIFN-γ tobacco possibly involves unknown signaling pathways, which may directly or indirectly affect DEG expression-mediating genes. The degree of pest resistance increased as the plants grew. Three genes likely to be related to jasmonic acid- or salicylic acid-dependent plant defense responses, including CAF 1, Cop 8/CSN, and HD, are implicated in the insect-resistance of the transgenic plants. The mechanism of transgenic ChIFN-γ tobacco resistance also involves RPS20 and other genes that induce microRNA-based gene regulation. The ChIFN-γ-mediated DGEs contribute to insect-resistance in transgenic ChIFN-γ tobacco, which provides new insight into the role of ChIFN-γ.

  12. Differentiation of bacterial versus viral otitis media using a combined Raman scattering spectroscopy and low coherence interferometry probe (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Youbo; Shelton, Ryan L.; Tu, Haohua; Nolan, Ryan M.; Monroy, Guillermo L.; Chaney, Eric J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-02-01

    Otitis media (OM) is a highly prevalent disease that can be caused by either a bacterial or viral infection. Because antibiotics are only effective against bacterial infections, blind use of antibiotics without definitive knowledge of the infectious agent, though commonly practiced, can lead to the problems of potential harmful side effects, wasteful misuse of medical resources, and the development of antimicrobial resistance. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using a combined Raman scattering spectroscopy and low coherence interferometry (LCI) device to differentiate OM infections caused by viruses and bacteria and improve our diagnostic ability of OM. Raman spectroscopy, an established tool for molecular analysis of biological tissue, has been shown capable of identifying different bacterial species, although mostly based on fixed or dried sample cultures. LCI has been demonstrated recently as a promising tool for determining tympanic membrane (TM) thickness and the presence and thickness of middle-ear biofilm located behind the TM. We have developed a fiber-based ear insert that incorporates spatially-aligned Raman and LCI probes for point-of-care diagnosis of OM. As shown in human studies, the Raman probe provides molecular signatures of bacterial- and viral-infected OM and normal middle-ear cavities, and LCI helps to identify depth-resolved structural information as well as guide and monitor positioning of the Raman spectroscopy beam for relatively longer signal acquisition time. Differentiation of OM infections is determined by correlating in vivo Raman data collected from human subjects with the Raman features of different bacterial and viral species obtained from cultured samples.

  13. The expanding polymerase universe.

    PubMed

    Goodman, M F; Tippin, B

    2000-11-01

    Over the past year, the number of known prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases has exploded. Many of these newly discovered enzymes copy aberrant bases in the DNA template over which 'respectable' polymerases fear to tread. The next step is to unravel their functions, which are thought to range from error-prone copying of DNA lesions, somatic hypermutation and avoidance of skin cancer, to restarting stalled replication forks and repairing double-stranded DNA breaks.

  14. Differential structured illumination microendoscopy for in vivo imaging of molecular contrast agents and cervical dysplasia (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keahey, Pelham; Ramalingam, Preetha; Schmeler, Kathleen; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2017-02-01

    Fiber-optic microendoscopes have shown promise as an imaging tool capable of visualizing molecular contrast agents used to study disease in vivo. The small size and flexibility of fiber-bundle probes make them ideal for in vivo use. However, image contrast can be severely limited when imaging highly scattering tissue. Optical sectioning techniques such as confocal or structured illumination can improve image contrast in microendoscopes by rejecting out-of-focus light generated in highly scattering tissue. However, optical sectioning techniques can reduce imaging speed or require complex opto-mechanical components to be installed on the distal end of the fiber-bundle. Here we present differential structured illumination microendoscopy (DSIMe) capable of performing structured illumination imaging in a fiber-optic microendoscope. Sectioning can be performed at video rates without the need for opto-mechanical components attached to the distal end of the fiber-bundle. Improved axial response of DSIMe is demonstrated using an optical phantom and we show image contrast enhancement in highly scattering mouse tissue imaged ex vivo. We also demonstrate contrast enhancement using DSIMe to image cervical tissue in vivo in patients diagnosed with cervical adenocarcinoma in situ and an improved ability to identify cellular changes associated with neoplasia.

  15. A differential absorption lidar instrument for the measurment of carbon dioxide and methane in the lower troposphere (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinov, Daniel; Clements, Robert; Rae, Cameron F.; Moncrieff, John B.; Jack, James W.

    2016-12-01

    Developments in the remote detection of trace gases in the atmosphere using Differential Absorption Lidar have been driven largely by improvements in two key technologies: lasers and detectors. We have designed and built a narrow linewidth pulsed laser source with a well-controlled output wavelength and sufficient pulse energy to measure the concentration profile of CO2 and CH4 to a range in excess of 4km. We describe here the initial measurements of concentration profiles recorded with this instrument. The system is built around a custom-designed Newtonian telescope with a 40cm diameter primary mirror. Laser sources and detectors attach directly to the side of the telescope allowing for flexible customization with a range of additional equipment. The instrument features an all-solid-state laser source based on an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by an YLF based diode-laser pumped solid-state laser and seeded by a tuned DFB seed. This provides a range of available wavelengths suitable for DIAL within the 1.5-1.6 μm spectral region. The output of the OPO is beam expanded and transmitted coaxially from the receiver telescope. A gas cell within the laser source controls the seed wavelength and allows the wavelength to be tuned to match a specific absorption feature of the selected gas species. The source can be rapidly tuned between the on-line and off-line wavelengths to make a DIAL measurement of either CO2 or CH4 The receiver is based on an InGaAs avalanche photodetector. Whilst photodiode detectors are a low-cost solution their limited sensitivity restricts the maximum range over which a signal can be detected. The receiver signal is digitised for subsequent processing to produce a sightline concentration profile. The instrument is mounted on a robust gimballed mount providing full directional movement within the upper hemisphere. Both static pointing and angular scan modes are available. Accurate angular position is available giving the sightline

  16. The polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Welch, Hazel M

    2012-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has had a significant impact on all aspects of the molecular biosciences, from cancer research to forensic science. The sensitivity and specificity inherent in the technique allow minute quantities of genetic material to be detected while the unique properties of thermostable DNA polymerase ensure that abundant copies are reliably reproduced to levels that can be visualized and/or used for further applications. This chapter describes applications of PCR and PCR-RT to investigate primary cancer and metastatic disease at both the DNA and mRNA expression levels.

  17. Conference Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, W. Warner, Ed.; Beckhard, Richard, Ed.

    This book, written to instruct in the use of a conference as a medium of social intercourse, is divided into four sections. Section I, which contains five articles, deals with factors to be considered in planning a conference. Specific techniques one can employ to improve a conference and several different techniques for evaluating the…

  18. Polymerase chain reaction system

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Stratton, Paul L.; Hadley, Dean R.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Belgrader, Phil; Meyer, Peter L.

    2004-03-02

    A portable polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification and detection system includes one or more chamber modules. Each module supports a duplex assay of a biological sample. Each module has two parallel interrogation ports with a linear optical system. The system is capable of being handheld.

  19. Independent mutations in the Rdl locus confer dieldrin resistance to Anopheles gambiae and An. arabiensis.

    PubMed

    Du, W; Awolola, T S; Howell, P; Koekemoer, L L; Brooke, B D; Benedict, M Q; Coetzee, M; Zheng, L

    2005-04-01

    Substitutions of a conserved alanine residue in the Rdl locus coding for a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor subunit with serine or glycine confer resistance to dieldrin in various insect species. Here, we show that alanine to glycine substitution in the Rdl locus of the malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae, is genetically linked to resistance to dieldrin. An alanine to serine substitution developed independently in a dieldrin resistant strain of An. arabiensis. An allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was able to differentiate dieldrin resistant and susceptible mosquitoes.

  20. Regulation through the RNA Polymerase Secondary Channel

    PubMed Central

    Symersky, Jindrich; Perederina, Anna; Vassylyeva, Marina N.; Svetlov, Vladimir; Artsimovitch, Irina; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.

    2006-01-01

    Gre factors enhance the intrinsic endonucleolytic activity of RNA polymerase to rescue arrested transcription complexes and are thought to confer the high fidelity and processivity of RNA synthesis. The Gre factors insert the extended α-helical coiled-coil domains into the RNA polymerase secondary channel to position two invariant acidic residues at the coiled-coil tip near the active site to stabilize the catalytic metal ion. Gfh1, a GreA homolog from Thermus thermophilus, inhibits rather than activates RNA cleavage. Here we report the structure of the T. thermophilus Gfh1 at 2.4 Å resolution revealing a two-domain architecture closely resembling that of GreA. However, the interdomain orientation is strikingly distinct (~162° rotation) between the two proteins. In contrast to GreA, which has two acidic residues on a well fixed self-stabilized α-turn, the tip of the Gfh1 coiled-coil is flexible and contains four acidic residues. This difference is likely the key to the Gre functional diversity, while Gfh1 inhibits exo- and endonucleolytic cleavage, RNA synthesis, and pyrophosphorolysis, GreA enhances only the endonucleolytic cleavage. We propose that Gfh1 acidic residues stabilize the RNA polymerase active center in a catalytically inactive configuration through Mg2+-mediated interactions. The excess of the acidic residues and inherent flexibility of the coiled-coil tip might allow Gfh1 to adjust its activity to structurally distinct substrates, thereby inhibiting diverse catalytic reactions of RNA polymerase. PMID:16298991

  1. Selenotrisulfide inhibits initiation by RNA polymerase II but not elongation

    SciTech Connect

    Frenkel, G.D.; Falvey, D.

    1989-03-01

    We previously reported that RNA polymerase II (purified from wheat germ) is inhibited by selenotrisulfides, the products of the reaction of selenite with sulfhydryl compounds. We have now found that the initiation stage of the reaction is inhibited by selenotrisulfide but the elongation stage of the reaction is not. The actual start of the RNA chain is not inhibited by the selenotrisulfide, but rather the formation of the enzyme-DNA binary complex. Selenotrisulfide has a similar differential effect on initiation and elongation by RNA polymerase II from HeLa cells; in contrast, with E. coli RNA polymerase, it inhibits elongation as well.

  2. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase

    DOE PAGES

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Errormore » rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu , Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition.« less

  3. Essential role for polymerase specialization in cellular nonhomologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Pryor, John M; Waters, Crystal A; Aza, Ana; Asagoshi, Kenjiro; Strom, Christina; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Blanco, Luis; Ramsden, Dale A

    2015-08-18

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) repairs chromosome breaks and must remain effective in the face of extensive diversity in broken end structures. We show here that this flexibility is often reliant on the ability to direct DNA synthesis across strand breaks, and that polymerase (Pol) μ and Pol λ are the only mammalian DNA polymerases that have this activity. By systematically varying substrate in cells, we show each polymerase is uniquely proficient in different contexts. The templating nucleotide is also selected differently, with Pol μ using the unpaired base adjacent to the downstream 5' phosphate even when there are available template sites further upstream of this position; this makes Pol μ more flexible but also less accurate than Pol λ. Loss of either polymerase alone consequently has clear and distinguishable effects on the fidelity of repair, but end remodeling by cellular nucleases and the remaining polymerase helps mitigate the effects on overall repair efficiency. Accordingly, when cells are deficient in both polymerases there is synergistic impact on NHEJ efficiency, both in terms of repair of defined substrates and cellular resistance to ionizing radiation. Pol μ and Pol λ thus provide distinct solutions to a problem for DNA synthesis that is unique to this pathway and play a key role in conferring on NHEJ the flexibility required for accurate and efficient repair.

  4. Conference Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-04-01

    Since the first IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (Paris, March 2002) and the Second Conference (Rio de Janeiro, May 2005), progress has continued in most countries and world regions to attract girls to physics and advance women into leadership roles, and many working groups have formed. The Third Conference (Seoul, October 2008), with 283 attendees from 57 countries, was dedicated to celebrating the physics achievements of women throughout the world, networking toward new international collaborations, building each participant's capacity for career success, and aiding the formation of active regional working groups to advance women in physics. Despite the progress, women remain a small minority of the physics community in most countries.

  5. Polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Arnhelm, N. ); Levenson, C.H. )

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) an in-vitro method of amplifying DNA sequences. Beginning with DNA of any origin- bacterial, viral, plant, or animal- PCR can increase the amount of a DNA sequence hundreds of millions to billions of times. The procedure can amplify a targeted sequence even when it makes up less than one part in a million of the total initial sample. PCR is an enzymatic process that is carried out in discrete cycles of amplification, each of which can double the amount of target DNA in the sample. Thus, n cycles can produce 2{sup n} times as much target as was present to begin with. This paper discusses how PCR has had an impact on molecular biology, human genetics, infectious and genetic disease diagnosis, forensic science, and evolutionary biology.

  6. Biomedical Conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    As a result of Biomedical Conferences, Vivo Metric Systems Co. has produced cardiac electrodes based on NASA technology. Frequently in science, one highly specialized discipline is unaware of relevant advances made in other areas. In an attempt to familiarize researchers in a variety of disciplines with medical problems and needs, NASA has sponsored conferences that bring together university scientists, practicing physicians and manufacturers of medical instruments.

  7. RNA Polymerase in Mumps Virion

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jacqueline P.; Northrop, Robert L.

    1974-01-01

    Mumps virions of the Enders' strain were examined for polymerase activity in vitro. An RNA-dependent RNA polymerase was found to be associated with the virion. The general properties of the reaction appear to be similar to those described for other paramyxoviruses. PMID:4836602

  8. Exploiting polymerase promiscuity: A simple colorimetric RNA polymerase assay.

    PubMed

    Vassiliou, W; Epp, J B; Wang, B B; Del Vecchio, A M; Widlanski, T; Kao, C C

    2000-09-01

    We developed a convenient colorimetric assay for monitoring RNA synthesis from DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (DdRp) and viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp). ATP and GTP with a p-nitrophenyl moiety attached to the gamma-phosphate were synthesized (PNP-NTPs). These PNP-NTPs can be used for RNA synthesis by several RNA polymerases, including the RdRps from brome mosaic virus and bovine viral diarrhea virus and the DdRps from bacteriophage T7 and SP6. When the polymerase reactions were performed in the presence of alkaline phosphatase, which digests the p-nitrophenylpyrophosphate side-product of phosphoryl transfer to the chromogenic p-nitrophenylate, an increase in absorbence at 405 nm was observed. These nucleotide analogues were used in continuous colorimetric monitoring of polymerase activity. Furthermore, the PNP-NTPs were found to be stable and utilized by RNA polymerases in the presence of human plasma. This simple colorimetric polymerase assay can be performed in a standard laboratory spectrophotometer and will be useful in screens for inhibitors of viral RNA synthesis.

  9. Conference reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongpei, Chen; Yulong, Ma

    1994-12-01

    The Ultrasonic Electronics Branch Society of the China Acoustics Society, and the Electronics Countermeasure Branch Society of the China Electronics Society held and All-China Applications Conference of Ultrasonic Electronics Devices in Electronic Countermeasures, Radar and Military Communication Technology. A total of 66 papers was received by the conference with contents relating to surface acoustic wave devices, high-frequency acoustic wave devices, acousto-optical devices, applications of devices in radar, applications of devices in electronic countermeasures, and applications of devices in military communication systems.

  10. Conference Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Cait

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes an original conference, organised by the Child Care Research Forum (http://www.qub.ac.uk/sites/ccrf/), which brought together experts from all over Northern Ireland to showcase some of the wealth of research with children and young people that is going on in the country today. Developed around the six high-level outcomes of…

  11. The conference

    Treesearch

    Gordon M. Heisler; Lee P. Herrington

    1977-01-01

    This is a report on the Conference on Metropolitan Physical Environment, held in August 1975 at Syracuse, N.Y., where some 160 scientists and planners met to discuss the use of vegetation, space, and structures to improve the amenities for people who live in metropolitan areas.

  12. Conference Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillett, Wade

    2016-01-01

    The following is an exploration of the spatial configurations (and their implications) within a typical panel session at an academic conference. The presenter initially takes up different roles and hyperbolically describes some possible messages that the spatial arrangement sends. Eventually, the presenter engages the audience members in atypical…

  13. Conference Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillett, Wade

    2016-01-01

    The following is an exploration of the spatial configurations (and their implications) within a typical panel session at an academic conference. The presenter initially takes up different roles and hyperbolically describes some possible messages that the spatial arrangement sends. Eventually, the presenter engages the audience members in atypical…

  14. Thirteenth International Laser Radar Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    One hundred fifteen papers were presented in both oral and poster sessions. The topics of the conference sessions were: spaceborne lidar applications; extinction/visibility; differential absorption lidar; winds and tropospheric studies; middle atmosphere; clouds and multiple scattering; pollution studies; and new systems.

  15. Adaptive strategies of the influenza virus polymerase for replication in humans.

    PubMed

    Mehle, Andrew; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2009-12-15

    Transmission of influenza viruses into the human population requires surmounting barriers to cross-species infection. Changes in the influenza polymerase overcome one such barrier. Viruses isolated from birds generally contain polymerases with the avian-signature glutamic acid at amino acid 627 in the PB2 subunit. These polymerases display restricted activity in human cells. An adaptive change in this residue from glutamic acid to the human-signature lysine confers high levels of polymerase activity in human cells. This mutation permits escape from a species-specific restriction factor that targets polymerases from avian viruses. A 2009 swine-origin H1N1 influenza A virus recently established a pandemic infection in humans, even though the virus encodes a PB2 with the restrictive glutamic acid at amino acid 627. We show here that the 2009 H1N1 virus has acquired second-site suppressor mutations in its PB2 polymerase subunit that convey enhanced polymerase activity in human cells. Introduction of this polymorphism into the PB2 subunit of a primary avian isolate also increased polymerase activity and viral replication in human and porcine cells. An alternate adaptive strategy has also been identified, whereby introduction of a human PA subunit into an avian polymerase overcomes restriction in human cells. These data reveal a strategy used by the 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus and identify other pathways by which avian and swine-origin viruses may evolve to enhance replication, and potentially pathogenesis, in humans.

  16. Development and Validation of TaqMan Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays for the Quantitative and Differential Detection of Wild-Type Infectious Laryngotracheitis Viruses from a Glycoprotein G-Deficient Candidate Vaccine Strain.

    PubMed

    Shil, Niraj K; Legione, Alistair R; Markham, Philip F; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Devlin, Joanne M

    2015-03-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a significant upper respiratory tract disease of chickens with a worldwide distribution. Differentiating between wild-type and vaccine strains of ILT virus (ILTV) would be useful for enhancing disease control, and in the early stages of a disease outbreak molecular diagnostic tools for the detection and differentiation of the circulating virus could be applied. This study developed TaqMan real-time PCR (qPCR) assays to detect and differentiate the glycoprotein G (gG)-deficient (ΔgG) ILTV candidate vaccine strain of ILTV from ILTV strains that contain the gG gene. The gG+ve and gG-ve ILTV TaqMan assays were used in individual and multiplex format to detect, differentiate, and quantitate ILTV DNA in laboratory and clinical samples. The assays were highly sensitive and highly specific, with a detection limit of 10 viral template copies for each assay. Low interassay coefficients of variation were recorded (0.021-0.042 and 0.013-0.039) for gG+ve and gG-ve TaqMan assays, respectively. The multiplex assay was successfully used to examine the replication kinetics of wild-type and ΔgG strains of ILTV in cultured leghorn male hepatoma cells and embryonated hen eggs under coinfection conditions. The results showed that the TaqMan qPCR assay, along with the ΔgG ILTV vaccine, has the potential to be used in a "Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals" strategy for the control and eradication of ILT.

  17. Genetic structure of soil population of fungus Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend.: Fr.: Molecular reidentification of the species and genetic differentiation of isolates using polymerase chain reaction technique with universal primers (UP-PCR)

    SciTech Connect

    Bulat, S.A.; Mironenko, N.V.; Zholkevich, Yu.G.

    1995-07-01

    The genetic structure of three soil populations of fungus Fusarium oxysporum was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction with universal primers (UP-PCR). Distinct UP-PCR variants revealed by means of cross-dot hybridization of amplified DNA and restriction analysis of nuclear ribosomal DNA represent subspecies or sibling species of F. oxysporum. The remaining isolates of F. oxysporum showed moderate UP-PCR polymorphism characterized by numerous types, whose relatedness was analyzed by computer treatment of the UP-PCR patterns. The genetic distance trees based on the UP-PCR patterns, which were obtained with different universal primers, demonstrated similar topology. This suggests that evolutionarily important genome rearrangements correlatively occur within the entire genome. Isolates representing different UP-PCR polymorphisms were encountered in all populations, being distributed asymmetrically in two of these. In general, soil populations of F. oxysporum were represented by numerous genetically isolated groups with a similar genome structure. The genetic heterogeneity of the isolates within these groups is likely to be caused by the parasexual process. The usefulness of the UP-PCR technique for population studies of F. oxysporum was demonstrated. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Disengaging polymerase: Terminating RNA polymerase II transcription in budding yeast☆

    PubMed Central

    Mischo, Hannah E.; Proudfoot, Nick J.

    2013-01-01

    Termination of transcription by RNA polymerase II requires two distinct processes: The formation of a defined 3′ end of the transcribed RNA, as well as the disengagement of RNA polymerase from its DNA template. Both processes are intimately connected and equally pivotal in the process of functional messenger RNA production. However, research in recent years has elaborated how both processes can additionally be employed to control gene expression in qualitative and quantitative ways. This review embraces these new findings and attempts to paint a broader picture of how this final step in the transcription cycle is of critical importance to many aspects of gene regulation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA polymerase II Transcript Elongation. PMID:23085255

  19. Altering the interaction between σ70 and RNA polymerase generates complexes with distinct transcription-elongation properties

    PubMed Central

    Berghöfer-Hochheimer, Yvonne; Lu, Chi Zen; Gross, Carol A.

    2005-01-01

    We compare the elongation behavior of native Escherichia coli RNA polymerase holoenzyme assembled in vivo, holoenzyme reconstituted from σ70 and RNA polymerase in vitro, and holoenzyme with a specific alteration in the interface between σ70 and RNA polymerase. Elongating RNA polymerase from each holoenzyme has distinguishable properties, some of which cannot be explained by differential retention or rebinding of σ70 during elongation, or by differential presence of elongation factors. We suggest that interactions between RNA polymerase and σ70 may influence the ensemble of conformational states adopted by RNA polymerase during initiation. These states, in turn, may affect the conformational states adopted by the elongating enzyme, thereby physically and functionally imprinting RNA polymerase. PMID:15650048

  20. Human placental eXpanded (PLX) mesenchymal-like adherent stromal cells confer neuroprotection to nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells exposed to ischemia by secretion of IL-6 and VEGF.

    PubMed

    Lahiani, Adi; Zahavi, Efrat; Netzer, Nir; Ofir, Racheli; Pinzur, Lena; Raveh, Shani; Arien-Zakay, Hadar; Yavin, Ephraim; Lazarovici, Philip

    2015-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are potent candidates in stroke therapy due to their ability to secrete protective anti-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of human placental mesenchymal-like adherent stromal cells (PLX) using an established ischemic model of nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated pheochromocytoma PC12 cells exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) followed by reperfusion. Under optimal conditions, 2 × 10⁵ PLX cells, added in a trans-well system, conferred 30-60% neuroprotection to PC12 cells subjected to ischemic insult. PC12 cell death, measured by LDH release, was reduced by PLX cells or by conditioned medium derived from PLX cells exposed to ischemia, suggesting the active release of factorial components. Since neuroprotection is a prominent function of the cytokine IL-6 and the angiogenic factor VEGF165, we measured their secretion using selective ELISA of the cells under ischemic or normoxic conditions. IL-6 and VEGF165 secretion by co-culture of PC12 and PLX cells was significantly higher under ischemic compared to normoxic conditions. Exogenous supplementation of 10 ng/ml each of IL-6 and VEGF165 to insulted PC12 cells conferred neuroprotection, reminiscent of the neuroprotective effect of PLX cells or their conditioned medium. Growth factors as well as co-culture conditioned medium effects were reduced by 70% and 20% upon pretreatment with 240 ng/ml Semaxanib (anti VEGF165) and/or 400 ng/ml neutralizing anti IL-6 antibody, respectively. Therefore, PLX-induced neuroprotection in ischemic PC12 cells may be partially explained by IL-6 and VEGF165 secretion. These findings may also account for the therapeutic effects seen in clinical trials after treatment with these cells.

  1. Genome walking by Klenow polymerase.

    PubMed

    Volpicella, Mariateresa; Leoni, Claudia; Fanizza, Immacolata; Rius, Sebastian; Gallerani, Raffaele; Ceci, Luigi R

    2012-11-15

    Genome walking procedures are all based on a final polymerase chain reaction amplification, regardless of the strategy employed for the synthesis of the substrate molecule. Here we report a modification of an already established genome walking strategy in which a single-strand DNA substrate is obtained by primer extension driven by Klenow polymerase and which results suitable for the direct sequencing of complex eukaryotic genomes. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated by the identification of nucleotide sequences in the case of two gene families (chiA and P1) in the genomes of several maize species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification of upstream and intragenic regulatory elements that confer cell-type-restricted and differentiation-specific expression on the muscle creatine kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, E.A.; Spizz, G.; Perry, W.M.; Vizard, D.; Weil, T.; Olson, E.N.

    1988-07-01

    Terminal differentiation of skeletal myobalsts is accompanied by induction of a series of tissue-specific gene products, which includes the muscle isoenzymte of creatine kinase (MCK). To begin to define the sequences and signals involved in MCK regulation in developing muscle cells, the mouse MCK gene has been isolated. Sequence analysis of 4,147 bases of DNA surrounding the transcription initiation site revealed several interesting structural features, some of which are common to other muscle-specific genes and to cellular and viral enhancers.

  3. Next conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexemer, Alexander; Toney, Michael F.

    2010-11-01

    After the successful conference on Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science (SRPS) in Rolduc Abbey (the Netherlands), we are now looking forward to the next meeting in this topical series started in 1995 by H G Zachmann, one of the pioneers of the use of synchrotron radiation techniques in polymer science. Earlier meetings were held in Hamburg (1995), Sheffield (2002), Kyoto (2006), and Rolduc (2009). In September of 2012 the Synchrotron Radiation and Polymer Science V conferences will be organized in a joint effort by the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Advanced Light Source at LBL Advanced Light Source at LBL The conference will be organised in the heart of beautiful San Francisco. The program will consist of invited and contributed lectures divided in sessions on the use of synchrotron SAXS/WAXD, imaging and tomography, soft x-rays, x-ray spectroscopy, GISAXS and reflectivity, micro-beams and hyphenated techniques in polymer science. Poster contributions are more than welcome and will be highlighted during the poster sessions. Visits to both SLAC as well as LBL will be organised. San Francisco can easily be reached. It is served by two major international airports San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport. Both are being served by most major airlines with easy connections to Europe and Asia as well as national destinations. Both also boast excellent connections to San Francisco city centre. We are looking forward to seeing you in the vibrant city by the Bay in September 2012. Golden gate bridge Alexander Hexemer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Michael F Toney Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Menlo Pk, CA 94025, USA E-mail: ahexemer@lbl.gov, mftoney@slac.stanford.edu

  4. Plant hemoglobins may be maintained in functional form by reduced flavins in the nuclei, and confer differential tolerance to nitro-oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sainz, Martha; Pérez-Rontomé, Carmen; Ramos, Javier; Mulet, Jose Miguel; James, Euan K; Bhattacharjee, Ujjal; Petrich, Jacob W; Becana, Manuel

    2013-12-01

    The heme of bacteria, plant and animal hemoglobins (Hbs) must be in the ferrous state to bind O(2) and other physiological ligands. Here we have characterized the full set of non-symbiotic (class 1 and 2) and 'truncated' (class 3) Hbs of Lotus japonicus. Class 1 Hbs are hexacoordinate, but class 2 and 3 Hbs are pentacoordinate. Three of the globins, Glb1-1, Glb2 and Glb3-1, are nodule-enhanced proteins. The O(2) affinity of Glb1-1 (50 pm) was the highest known for any Hb, and the protein may function as an O(2) scavenger. The five globins were reduced by free flavins, which transfer electrons from NAD(P)H to the heme iron under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Class 1 Hbs were reduced at very fast rates by FAD, class 2 Hbs at slower rates by both FMN and FAD, and class 3 Hbs at intermediate rates by FMN. The members of the three globin classes were immunolocalized predominantly in the nuclei. Flavins were quantified in legume nodules and nuclei, and their concentrations were sufficient to maintain Hbs in their functional state. All Hbs, except Glb1-1, were expressed in a flavohemoglobin-deficient yeast mutant and found to confer tolerance to oxidative stress induced by methyl viologen, copper or low temperature, indicating an anti-oxidative role for the hemes. However, only Glb1-2 and Glb2 afforded protection against nitrosative stress induced by S-nitrosoglutathione. Because this compound is specifically involved in transnitrosylation reactions with thiol groups, our results suggest a contribution of the single cysteine residues of both proteins in the stress response.

  5. Conferences revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radcliffe, Jonathan

    2008-08-01

    Way back in the mid-1990s, as a young PhD student, I wrote a Lateral Thoughts article about my first experience of an academic conference (Physics World 1994 October p80). It was a peach of a trip - most of the lab decamped to Grenoble for a week of great weather, beautiful scenery and, of course, the physics. A whole new community was there for me to see in action, and the internationality of it all helped us to forget about England's non-appearance in the 1994 World Cup finals.

  6. Molecular imaging of melanin distribution in vivo and quantitative differential diagnosis of human pigmented lesions using label-free harmonic generation biopsy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chi-Kuang; Wei, Ming-Liang; Su, Yu-Hsiang; Weng, Wei-Hung; Liao, Yi-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Harmonic generation microscopy is a noninvasive repetitive imaging technique that provides real-time 3D microscopic images of human skin with a sub-femtoliter resolution and high penetration down to the reticular dermis. In this talk, we show that with a strong resonance effect, the third-harmonic-generation (THG) modality provides enhanced contrast on melanin and allows not only differential diagnosis of various pigmented skin lesions but also quantitative imaging for longterm tracking. This unique capability makes THG microscopy the only label-free technique capable of identifying the active melanocytes in human skin and to image their different dendriticity patterns. In this talk, we will review our recent efforts to in vivo image melanin distribution and quantitatively diagnose pigmented skin lesions using label-free harmonic generation biopsy. This talk will first cover the spectroscopic study on the melanin enhanced THG effect in human cells and the calibration strategy inside human skin for quantitative imaging. We will then review our recent clinical trials including: differential diagnosis capability study on pigmented skin tumors; as well as quantitative virtual biopsy study on pre- and post- treatment evaluation on melasma and solar lentigo. Our study indicates the unmatched capability of harmonic generation microscopy to perform virtual biopsy for noninvasive histopathological diagnosis of various pigmented skin tumors, as well as its unsurpassed capability to noninvasively reveal the pathological origin of different hyperpigmentary diseases on human face as well as to monitor the efficacy of laser depigmentation treatments. This work is sponsored by National Health Research Institutes.

  7. Cdc73p and Paf1p are found in a novel RNA polymerase II-containing complex distinct from the Srbp-containing holoenzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, X; Chang, M; Wolf, A J; Chang, C H; Frazer-Abel, A A; Wade, P A; Burton, Z F; Jaehning, J A

    1997-01-01

    The products of the yeast CDC73 and PAF1 genes were originally identified as RNA polymerase II-associated proteins. Paf1p is a nuclear protein important for cell growth and transcriptional regulation of a subset of yeast genes. In this study we demonstrate that the product of CDC73 is a nuclear protein that interacts directly with purified RNA polymerase II in vitro. Deletion of CDC73 confers a temperature-sensitive phenotype. Combination of the cdc73 mutation with the more severe paf1 mutation does not result in an enhanced phenotype, indicating that the two proteins may function in the same cellular processes. To determine the relationship between Cdc73p and Paf1p and the recently described holoenzyme form of RNA polymerase II, we created yeast strains containing glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged forms of CDC73, PAF1, and TFG2 functionally replacing the chromosomal copies of the genes. Isolation of GST-tagged Cdc73p and Paf1p complexes has revealed a unique form of RNA polymerase II that contains both Cdc73p and Paf1p but lacks the Srbps found in the holoenzyme. The Cdc73p-Paf1p-RNA polymerase II-containing complex also includes Gal11p, and the general initiation factors TFIIB and TFIIF, but lacks TBP, TFIIH, and transcription elongation factor TFIIS as well as the Srbps. The Srbp-containing holoenzyme does not include either Paf1p or Cdc73p, demonstrating that these two forms of RNA polymerase II are distinct. In confirmation of the hypothesis that the two forms coexist in yeast cells, we found that a TFIIF-containing complex isolated via the GST-tagged Tfg2p construct contains both (i) the Srbps and (ii) Cdc73p and Paf1p. The Srbps and Cdc73p-Paf1p therefore appear to define two complexes with partially redundant, essential functions in the yeast cell. Using the technique of differential display, we have identified several genes whose transcripts require Cdc73p and/or Paf1p for normal levels of expression. Our analysis suggests that there are multiple RNA

  8. Fluctuation and fidelity control of a non-proofreading polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jin

    2014-03-01

    Polymerases catalyze gene replication and transcription. They modulate activation barriers of nucleotide incorporation and amplify maximal free energy differentiation between the right and wrong nucleotides. It is essential for the polymerases to achieve sufficiently high fidelity at sufficiently high speed. We had noticed a small free energy bias in the translocation of T7 RNA polymerase (RNAP) that aids nucleotide selection. We investigated further how polymerases select against wrong nucleotides efficiently with given kinetics for the right, and with controlled differentiation capacities. We found that early selections on the reaction path outperform the late ones in error reduction. In particular, initial screening seems indispensable for lowering error rates without lowering much the speed. To see how exactly the nucleotide selection proceeds, we studied T7 RNAP also in atomistic simulations. We found that substantial nucleotide selection happens early, prior to full insertion of the nucleotide for complete Watson-Crick base pairing. A highly conserved residue brings up the small translocation energy bias by marginally blocking the active site. The residue senses the nucleotide species upon the nucleotide pre-insertion, and selectively `gates' the nucleotide during insertion. Our studies thus provide a kinetic survey of the nucleotide selection system along with underlying molecular mechanisms.

  9. Norovirus proteinase-polymerase and polymerase are both active forms of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Belliot, Gaël; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Babu, Vijay; Uche, Uzo; Arnold, Jamie J; Cameron, Craig E; Green, Kim Y

    2005-02-01

    In vitro mapping studies of the MD145 norovirus (Caliciviridae) ORF1 polyprotein identified two stable cleavage products containing the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains: ProPol (a precursor comprised of both the proteinase and polymerase) and Pol (the mature polymerase). The goal of this study was to identify the active form (or forms) of the norovirus polymerase. The recombinant ProPol (expressed as Pro(-)Pol with an inactivated proteinase domain to prevent autocleavage) and recombinant Pol were purified after synthesis in bacteria and shown to be active RdRp enzymes. In addition, the mutant His-E1189A-ProPol protein (with active proteinase but with the natural ProPol cleavage site blocked) was active as an RdRp, confirming that the norovirus ProPol precursor could possess two enzymatic activities simultaneously. The effects of several UTP analogs on the RdRp activity of the norovirus and feline calicivirus Pro(-)Pol enzymes were compared and found to be similar. Our data suggest that the norovirus ProPol is a bifunctional enzyme during virus replication. The availability of this recombinant ProPol enzyme might prove useful in the development of antiviral drugs for control of the noroviruses associated with acute gastroenteritis.

  10. Norovirus Proteinase-Polymerase and Polymerase Are Both Active Forms of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Belliot, Gaël; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Babu, Vijay; Uche, Uzo; Arnold, Jamie J.; Cameron, Craig E.; Green, Kim Y.

    2005-01-01

    In vitro mapping studies of the MD145 norovirus (Caliciviridae) ORF1 polyprotein identified two stable cleavage products containing the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains: ProPol (a precursor comprised of both the proteinase and polymerase) and Pol (the mature polymerase). The goal of this study was to identify the active form (or forms) of the norovirus polymerase. The recombinant ProPol (expressed as Pro−Pol with an inactivated proteinase domain to prevent autocleavage) and recombinant Pol were purified after synthesis in bacteria and shown to be active RdRp enzymes. In addition, the mutant His-E1189A-ProPol protein (with active proteinase but with the natural ProPol cleavage site blocked) was active as an RdRp, confirming that the norovirus ProPol precursor could possess two enzymatic activities simultaneously. The effects of several UTP analogs on the RdRp activity of the norovirus and feline calicivirus Pro−Pol enzymes were compared and found to be similar. Our data suggest that the norovirus ProPol is a bifunctional enzyme during virus replication. The availability of this recombinant ProPol enzyme might prove useful in the development of antiviral drugs for control of the noroviruses associated with acute gastroenteritis. PMID:15681440

  11. Rescue of embryonic epithelium reveals that the homozygous deletion of the retinoblastoma gene confers growth factor independence and immortality but does not influence epithelial differentiation or tissue morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Day, Kathleen C; McCabe, Michael T; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Yuzhuo; Davis, Joanne N; Phillips, John; Von Geldern, Marion; Ried, Thomas; KuKuruga, Mark A; Cunha, Gerald R; Hayward, Simon W; Day, Mark L

    2002-11-15

    The ability to rescue viable prostate precursor tissue from retinoblastoma-deficient (Rb-/-) fetal mice has allowed for the isolation and characterization of the first Rb-/- prostate epithelial cell line. This cell line, designated Rb-/-PrE, was utilized for experiments examining the consequences of Rb loss on an epithelial population. These findings demonstrated that Rb deletion has no discernible effect on prostatic histodifferentiation in Rb-/-PrE cultures. When Rb-/-PrE cells were recombined with embryonic rat urogenital mesenchyme and implanted into athymic male, nude mouse hosts, the recombinants developed into fully differentiated and morphologically normal prostate tissue. The Rb-/-PrE phenotype was characterized by serum independence in culture and immortality in vivo, when compared with wild type controls. Cell cycle analysis revealed elevated S phase DNA content accompanied by increased expression of cyclin E1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Rb-/-PrE cultures also exhibited a diminished ability to growth arrest under high density culture conditions. We believe that the development of Rb-/- prostate tissue and cell lines has provided a unique experimental platform with which to investigate the consequences of Rb deletion in epithelial cells under various physiological conditions. Additionally, the development of this technology will allow similar studies in other tissues and cell populations rescued from Rb-/- fetuses.

  12. Conference Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, David B.

    2014-07-01

    This conference on ``Multi-wavelength AGN Surveys and Studies'' has provided a detailed look at the explosive growth over the past decade, of available astronomical data from a growing list of large scale sky surveys, from radio-to-gamma rays. We are entering an era were multi-epoch (months to weeks) surveys of the entire sky, and near-instantaneous follow-up observations of variable sources, are elevating time-domain astronomy to where it is becoming a major contributor to our understanding of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). While we can marvel at the range of extragalactic phenomena dispayed by sources discovered in the original ``Markarian Survey'' - the first large-scale objective prism survey of the Northern Sky carried out at the Byurakan Astronomical Observtory almost a half-century ago - it is clear from the talks and posters presented at this meeting that the data to be be obtained over the next decade will be needed if we are to finally understand which phase of galaxy evolution each Markarian Galaxy represents.

  13. The enzymological basis for resistance of herpesvirus DNA polymerase mutants to acyclovir: Relationship to the structure of α-like DNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin; Ishii, Keiko Kumura; Zuccola, Harmon; Gehring, Amy M.; Hwang, Charles B. C.; Hogle, James; Coen, Donald M.

    1999-01-01

    Acyclovir (ACV), like many antiviral drugs, is a nucleoside analog. In vitro, ACV triphosphate inhibits herpesvirus DNA polymerase by means of binding, incorporation into primer/template, and dead-end complex formation in the presence of the next deoxynucleoside triphosphate. However, it is not known whether this mechanism operates in vivo. To address this and other questions, we analyzed eight mutant polymerases encoded by drug-resistant viruses, each altered in a region conserved among α-like DNA polymerases. We measured Km and kcat values for dGTP and ACV triphosphate incorporation and Ki values of ACV triphosphate for dGTP incorporation for each mutant. Certain mutants showed increased Km values for ACV triphosphate incorporation, suggesting a defect in inhibitor binding. Other mutants showed reduced kcat values for ACV triphosphate incorporation, suggesting a defect in incorporation of inhibitor into DNA, while the rest of the mutants exhibited both altered km and kcat values. In most cases, the fold increase in Ki of ACV triphosphate for dGTP incorporation relative to wild-type polymerase was similar to fold resistance conferred by the mutation in vivo; however, one mutation conferred a much greater increase in resistance than in Ki. The effects of mutations on enzyme kinetics could be explained by using a model of an α-like DNA polymerase active site bound to primer/template and inhibitor. The results have implications for mechanisms of action and resistance of antiviral nucleoside analogs in vivo, in particular for the importance of incorporation into DNA and for the functional roles of conserved regions of polymerases. PMID:9892653

  14. Conference Scene

    PubMed Central

    Leeder, J Steven; Lantos, John; Spielberg, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for clinicians, pharmaceutical companies and regulatory agencies is to better understand the relative contributions of ontogeny and genetic variation to observed variability in drug disposition and response across the pediatric age spectrum from preterm and term newborns, to infants, children and adolescents. Extrapolation of adult experience with pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine to pediatric patients of different ages and developmental stages, is fraught with many challenges. Compared with adults, pediatric pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics involves an added measure of complexity as variability owing to developmental processes, or ontogeny, is superimposed upon genetic variation. Furthermore, some pediatric diseases have no adult correlate or are more prevalent in children compared with adults, and several adverse drug reactions are unique to children, or occur at a higher frequency in children. The primary objective of this conference was to initiate an ongoing series of annual meetings on ‘Pediatric Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine’ organized by the Center for Personalized Medicine and Therapeutic Innovation and Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Medical Therapeutics at Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics in Kansas City, MO, USA. The primary goals of the inaugural meeting were: to bring together clinicians, basic and translational scientists and allied healthcare practitioners, and engage in a multi- and cross-disciplinary dialog aimed at implementing personalized medicine in pediatric settings; to provide a forum for the presentation and the dissemination of research related to the application of pharmacogenomic strategies to investigations of variability of drug disposition and response in children; to explore the ethical, legal and societal implications of pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine that are unique to children; and finally, to create networking opportunities for stimulating discussion

  15. Alphavirus polymerase and RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, Maija K; Hellström, Kirsi; Ahola, Tero

    2017-01-16

    Alphaviruses are typically arthropod-borne, and many are important pathogens such as chikungunya virus. Alphaviruses encode four nonstructural proteins (nsP1-4), initially produced as a polyprotein P1234. nsP4 is the core RNA-dependent RNA polymerase but all four nsPs are required for RNA synthesis. The early replication complex (RC) formed by the polyprotein P123 and nsP4 synthesizes minus RNA strands, and the late RC composed of fully processed nsP1-nsP4 is responsible for the production of genomic and subgenomic plus strands. Different parts of nsP4 recognize the promoters for minus and plus strands but the binding also requires the other nsPs. The alphavirus polymerase has been purified and is capable of de novo RNA synthesis only in the presence of the other nsPs. The purified nsP4 also has terminal adenylyltransferase activity, which may generate the poly(A) tail at the 3' end of the genome. Membrane association of the nsPs is vital for replication, and alphaviruses induce membrane invaginations called spherules, which form a microenvironment for RNA synthesis by concentrating replication components and protecting double-stranded RNA intermediates. The RCs isolated as crude membrane preparations are active in RNA synthesis in vitro, but high-resolution structure of the RC has not been achieved, and thus the arrangement of viral and possible host components remains unknown. For some alphaviruses, Ras-GTPase-activating protein (Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain)-binding proteins (G3BPs) and amphiphysins have been shown to be essential for RNA replication and are present in the RCs. Host factors offer an additional target for antivirals, as only few alphavirus polymerase inhibitors have been described.

  16. Molecular Typing and Differentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, general background and bench protocols are provided for a number of molecular typing techniques in common use today. Methods for the molecular typing and differentiation of microorganisms began to be widely adopted following the development of the polymerase chai...

  17. Molecular Typing and Differentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, general background and bench protocols are provided for a number of molecular typing techniques in common use today. Methods for the molecular typing and differentiation of microorganisms began to be widely adopted following the development of the polymerase chai...

  18. A new family of polymerases related to superfamily A DNA polymerases and T7-like DNA-dependent RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Abhiman, Saraswathi; Aravind, L

    2008-01-01

    Using sequence profile methods and structural comparisons we characterize a previously unknown family of nucleic acid polymerases in a group of mobile elements from genomes of diverse bacteria, an algal plastid and certain DNA viruses, including the recently reported Sputnik virus. Using contextual information from domain architectures and gene-neighborhoods we present evidence that they are likely to possess both primase and DNA polymerase activity, comparable to the previously reported prim-pol proteins. These newly identified polymerases help in defining the minimal functional core of superfamily A DNA polymerases and related RNA polymerases. Thus, they provide a framework to understand the emergence of both DNA and RNA polymerization activity in this class of enzymes. They also provide evidence that enigmatic DNA viruses, such as Sputnik, might have emerged from mobile elements coding these polymerases. This article was reviewed by Eugene Koonin and Mark Ragan. PMID:18834537

  19. A new family of polymerases related to superfamily A DNA polymerases and T7-like DNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Abhiman, Saraswathi; Aravind, L

    2008-10-04

    Using sequence profile methods and structural comparisons we characterize a previously unknown family of nucleic acid polymerases in a group of mobile elements from genomes of diverse bacteria, an algal plastid and certain DNA viruses, including the recently reported Sputnik virus. Using contextual information from domain architectures and gene-neighborhoods we present evidence that they are likely to possess both primase and DNA polymerase activity, comparable to the previously reported prim-pol proteins. These newly identified polymerases help in defining the minimal functional core of superfamily A DNA polymerases and related RNA polymerases. Thus, they provide a framework to understand the emergence of both DNA and RNA polymerization activity in this class of enzymes. They also provide evidence that enigmatic DNA viruses, such as Sputnik, might have emerged from mobile elements coding these polymerases.

  20. Conference Abstracts: AEDS '82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Abstracts from nine selected papers presented at the 1982 Association for Educational Data Systems (AEDS) conference are provided. Copies of conference proceedings may be obtained for fifteen dollars from the Association. (MP)

  1. DNA polymerase activities of human milk.

    PubMed

    Gerwin, B I; Ebert, P S; Chopra, H C; Smith, S G; Kvedar, J P; Albert, S; Brennan, M J

    1973-04-15

    DNA polymerases have been partially purified from human milk. A DNA polymerase detected by phosphocellulose chromatography is similar to the enzymes of RNA tumor viruses in that a hybrid of polyriboadenylate and oligodeoxythymidylate is a better template than is DNA. However, this polymerase differed from that of the RNA tumor viruses in its chromatographic behavior. Three different methods of detecting "reverse transcriptase" activity failed to correlate with the donor's family history of cancer.

  2. Parent Conferences. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Roslyn; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents six workshop sessions on parent conferences: (1) "Parents' Perspectives on Conferencing" (R. Duffy); (2) "Three Way Conferences" (G. Zeller); (3) "Conferencing with Parents of Infants" (K. Albrecht); (4) "Conferencing with Parents of School-Agers" (L. G. Miller); (5) "Cross Cultural Conferences" (J. Gonzalez-Mena); and (6) "Working with…

  3. EDITORIAL: Conference program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-04-01

    Some of the papers and talks given at the conference have not been published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The attached PDF file lists the full conference program and indicates (with an asterisk) those papers or talks which are not present in this volume.

  4. The General Conference Mennonites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    General Conference Mennonites and Old Order Amish are compared and contrasted in the areas of physical appearance, religious beliefs, formal education, methods of farming, and home settings. General Conference Mennonites and Amish differ in physical appearance and especially in dress. The General Conference Mennonite men and women dress the same…

  5. Youth Conference Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Brenda H.

    This handbook is designed to provide practical aid to those who have charge of the planning and organization of a youth conference, Defined as a conference to provide practical information as well as information about possible responsibilities, risks, and consequences of actions, related to the chosen conference topic. Suggestions are given for…

  6. Mutagenic and Recombinagenic Responses to Defective DNA Polymerase δ Are Facilitated by the Rev1 Protein in pol3-t Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Mito, Erica; Mokhnatkin, Janet V.; Steele, Molly C.; Buettner, Victoria L.; Sommer, Steve S.; Manthey, Glenn M.; Bailis, Adam M.

    2008-01-01

    Defective DNA replication can result in substantial increases in the level of genome instability. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the pol3-t allele confers a defect in the catalytic subunit of replicative DNA polymerase δ that results in increased rates of mutagenesis, recombination, and chromosome loss, perhaps by increasing the rate of replicative polymerase failure. The translesion polymerases Pol η, Pol ζ, and Rev1 are part of a suite of factors in yeast that can act at sites of replicative polymerase failure. While mutants defective in the translesion polymerases alone displayed few defects, loss of Rev1 was found to suppress the increased rates of spontaneous mutation, recombination, and chromosome loss observed in pol3-t mutants. These results suggest that Rev1 may be involved in facilitating mutagenic and recombinagenic responses to the failure of Pol δ. Genome stability, therefore, may reflect a dynamic relationship between primary and auxiliary DNA polymerases. PMID:18711219

  7. Prokaryotic histone-like protein interacting with RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Lathe, R; Buc, H; Lecocq, J P; Bautz, E K

    1980-01-01

    firA mutation of Escherichia coli can render RNA synthesis thermosensitive and confer abnormal sensitivity to rifampicin, an antibiotic that specifically inhibits the activity of RNA polymerase. We previously described the cloning of a chromosomal HindIII fragment containing the firA gene, and we now present strong evidence that the product of this gene is a 17,000-dalton polypeptide which, by various criteria, closely resembles the eukaryotic histones. This protein forms the largest of a unique set of three abundant histone-like proteins (HLP) found in E. coli and is hence referred to as HLPI. We discuss possible routes by which these proteins might affect transcription. Images PMID:6447875

  8. Tagetitoxin Inhibits RNA Polymerase through Trapping of the Trigger Loop*

    PubMed Central

    Artsimovitch, Irina; Svetlov, Vladimir; Nemetski, Sondra Maureen; Epshtein, Vitaly; Cardozo, Timothy; Nudler, Evgeny

    2011-01-01

    Tagetitoxin (Tgt) inhibits multisubunit chloroplast, bacterial, and some eukaryotic RNA polymerases (RNAPs). A crystallographic structure of Tgt bound to bacterial RNAP apoenzyme shows that Tgt binds near the active site but does not explain why Tgt acts only at certain sites. To understand the Tgt mechanism, we constructed a structural model of Tgt bound to the transcription elongation complex. In this model, Tgt interacts with the β′ subunit trigger loop (TL), stabilizing it in an inactive conformation. We show that (i) substitutions of the Arg residue of TL contacted by Tgt confer resistance to inhibitor; (ii) Tgt inhibits RNAP translocation, which requires TL movements; and (iii) paused complexes and a “slow” enzyme, in which the TL likely folds into an altered conformation, are resistant to Tgt. Our studies highlight the role of TL as a target through which accessory proteins and antibiotics can alter the elongation complex dynamics. PMID:21976682

  9. Polymerase Gamma Disease through the Ages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saneto, Russell P.; Naviaux, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    The most common group of mitochondrial disease is due to mutations within the mitochondrial DNA polymerase, polymerase gamma 1 ("POLG"). This gene product is responsible for replication and repair of the small mitochondrial DNA genome. The structure-function relationship of this gene product produces a wide variety of diseases that at times, seems…

  10. Polymerase Gamma Disease through the Ages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saneto, Russell P.; Naviaux, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    The most common group of mitochondrial disease is due to mutations within the mitochondrial DNA polymerase, polymerase gamma 1 ("POLG"). This gene product is responsible for replication and repair of the small mitochondrial DNA genome. The structure-function relationship of this gene product produces a wide variety of diseases that at times, seems…

  11. The RNA polymerase II elongation complex.

    PubMed

    Aso, T; Conaway, J W; Conaway, R C

    1995-11-01

    The initiation stage of transcription by RNA polymerase II has long been regarded as the primary site for regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. Nevertheless, a growing body of evidence reveals that the RNA polymerase II elongation complex is also a major target for regulation. Biochemical studies are implicating an increasing number of transcription factors in the regulation of elongation, and these transcription factors are being found to function by a diverse collection of mechanisms. Moreover, unexpected features of the structure and catalytic mechanism of RNA polymerase II are forcing a reconsideration of long-held views on the mechanics of some of the most basic aspects of polymerase function. In this review, we will describe recent insights into the structures and functions of RNA polymerase II and the transcription factors that control its activity during the elongation stage of eukaryotic messenger RNA synthesis.

  12. Polymerase chain reaction in liposomes.

    PubMed

    Oberholzer, T; Albrizio, M; Luisi, P L

    1995-10-01

    Compartmentalization of biochemical reactions within a spherically closed bilayer is an important step in the molecular evolution of cells. Liposomes are the most suitable structures to model this kind of chemistry. We have used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to demonstrate that complex biochemical reactions such as DNA replication can be carried out inside these compartments. We describe the first example of DNA amplification by the PCR occurring inside liposomes composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), or of a mixture of POPC and phosphatidylserine. We show that these liposomes are stable even under the high temperature conditions used for PCR. Although only a very small fraction of liposomes contains all eight different reagents together, a significant amount of DNA is produced which can be observed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This work shows that it is possible to carry out complex biochemical reactions within liposomes, which may be germane to the question of the origin of living cells. We have established the parameters and conditions that are critical for carrying out this complex reaction within the liposome compartment.

  13. Thermally multiplexed polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Phaneuf, Christopher R.; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D. Curtis; Holst, Gregory L.; Birjiniuk, Joav; Nagpal, Nikita; Culpepper, Stephen; Popler, Emily; Shane, Andi L.; Jerris, Robert; Forest, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Amplification of multiple unique genetic targets using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly required in molecular biology laboratories. Such reactions are typically performed either serially or by multiplex PCR. Serial reactions are time consuming, and multiplex PCR, while powerful and widely used, can be prone to amplification bias, PCR drift, and primer-primer interactions. We present a new thermocycling method, termed thermal multiplexing, in which a single heat source is uniformly distributed and selectively modulated for independent temperature control of an array of PCR reactions. Thermal multiplexing allows amplification of multiple targets simultaneously—each reaction segregated and performed at optimal conditions. We demonstrate the method using a microfluidic system consisting of an infrared laser thermocycler, a polymer microchip featuring 1 μl, oil-encapsulated reactions, and closed-loop pulse-width modulation control. Heat transfer modeling is used to characterize thermal performance limitations of the system. We validate the model and perform two reactions simultaneously with widely varying annealing temperatures (48 °C and 68 °C), demonstrating excellent amplification. In addition, to demonstrate microfluidic infrared PCR using clinical specimens, we successfully amplified and detected both influenza A and B from human nasopharyngeal swabs. Thermal multiplexing is scalable and applicable to challenges such as pathogen detection where patients presenting non-specific symptoms need to be efficiently screened across a viral or bacterial panel. PMID:26339317

  14. Role of disulfide bridges in archaeal family-B DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Killelea, Tom; Connolly, Bernard A

    2011-06-14

    The family-B DNA polymerases obtained from the order Thermococcales, for example, Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu-Pol) are commonly used in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) because of their high thermostability and low error rates. Most of these polymerases contain four cysteines, arranged as two disulfide bridges. With Pfu-Pol C429-C443 forms one of the disulfides (DB1) and C507-C510 (DB2) the other. Although the disulfides are well conserved in the enzymes from the hyperthermophilic Thermococcales, they are less prevalent in euryarchaeal polymerases from other orders, and tend to be only found in other hyperthermophiles. Here, we report on the effects of deleting the disulfide bridges by mutating the relevant cysteines to serines. A variety of techniques, including differential scanning calorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry, have shown that both disulfides make a contribution to thermostability, with DB1 being more important than DB2. However, even when both disulfides are removed, sufficient thermostability remains for normal (identical to the wild type) performance in PCR and quantitative (real-time) PCR. Therefore, polymerases totally lacking cysteine are fully compatible with most PCR-based applications. This observation opens the way to further engineering of polymerases by introduction of a single cysteine followed by appropriate chemical modification. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Transcription by RNA polymerase III: insights into mechanism and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Turowski, Tomasz W.; Tollervey, David

    2016-01-01

    The highly abundant, small stable RNAs that are synthesized by RNA polymerase III (RNAPIII) have key functional roles, particularly in the protein synthesis apparatus. Their expression is metabolically demanding, and is therefore coupled to changing demands for protein synthesis during cell growth and division. Here, we review the regulatory mechanisms that control the levels of RNAPIII transcripts and discuss their potential physiological relevance. Recent analyses have revealed differential regulation of tRNA expression at all steps on its biogenesis, with significant deregulation of mature tRNAs in cancer cells. PMID:27911719

  16. Monitoring DNA polymerase with nanotube-based nanocircuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry; Collins, Philip

    DNA polymerases play an important role in the process of life by accurately and efficiently replicating our genetic information. They use a single-stranded DNA as a template and incorporate nucleotides to create the full, double-stranded DNA. Recent experiments have successfully monitored this process by attaching a Klenow fragment of polymerase I to a carbon nanotube and measuring the current along the tube. Follow-up experiments have shown promise for distinguishing between DNA base pairs when nucleotide analogs are used, thus opening a new avenue for DNA sequencing. In this talk, we present results from computational studies on DNA polymerase I nanocircuits. The enzyme was first equilibrated in molecular dynamics and then density functional theory and Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function methods were used to calculate the ballistic transmission coefficients and currents for different enzymatic states. Our results show significant change in current when the enzyme alternates between open (idle) and closed (synthesizing) states. We can also differentiate between some template bases when modified nucleotides and gate scanning are used.

  17. DNA polymerase preference determines PCR priming efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is one of the most important developments in modern biotechnology. However, PCR is known to introduce biases, especially during multiplex reactions. Recent studies have implicated the DNA polymerase as the primary source of bias, particularly initiation of polymerization on the template strand. In our study, amplification from a synthetic library containing a 12 nucleotide random portion was used to provide an in-depth characterization of DNA polymerase priming bias. The synthetic library was amplified with three commercially available DNA polymerases using an anchored primer with a random 3’ hexamer end. After normalization, the next generation sequencing (NGS) results of the amplified libraries were directly compared to the unamplified synthetic library. Results Here, high throughput sequencing was used to systematically demonstrate and characterize DNA polymerase priming bias. We demonstrate that certain sequence motifs are preferred over others as primers where the six nucleotide sequences at the 3’ end of the primer, as well as the sequences four base pairs downstream of the priming site, may influence priming efficiencies. DNA polymerases in the same family from two different commercial vendors prefer similar motifs, while another commercially available enzyme from a different DNA polymerase family prefers different motifs. Furthermore, the preferred priming motifs are GC-rich. The DNA polymerase preference for certain sequence motifs was verified by amplification from single-primer templates. We incorporated the observed DNA polymerase preference into a primer-design program that guides the placement of the primer to an optimal location on the template. Conclusions DNA polymerase priming bias was characterized using a synthetic library amplification system and NGS. The characterization of DNA polymerase priming bias was then utilized to guide the primer-design process and demonstrate varying amplification

  18. Protein Affinity Chromatography with Purified Yeast DNA Polymerase α Detects Proteins that Bind to DNA Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Jeff; Formosa, Tim

    1992-02-01

    We have overexpressed the POL1 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified the resulting DNA polymerase α polypeptide in an apparently intact form. We attached the purified DNA polymerase covalently to an agarose matrix and used this matrix to chromatograph extracts prepared from yeast cells. At least six proteins bound to the yeast DNA polymerase α matrix that did not bind to a control matrix. We speculate that these proteins might be DNA polymerase α accessory proteins. Consistent with this interpretation, one of the binding proteins, which we have named POB1 (polymerase one binding), is required for normal chromosome transmission. Mutations in this gene cause increased chromosome loss and an abnormal cell morphology, phenotypes that also occur in the presence of mutations in the yeast α or δ polymerase genes. These results suggest that the interactions detected by polymerase affinity chromatography are biologically relevant and may help to illuminate the architecture of the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery.

  19. Rifampicin-resistance, rpoB polymorphism and RNA polymerase genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Alifano, Pietro; Palumbo, Carla; Pasanisi, Daniela; Talà, Adelfia

    2015-05-20

    Following its introduction in 1967, rifampicin has become a mainstay of therapy in the treatment of tuberculosis, leprosy and many other widespread diseases. Its potent antibacterial activity is due to specific inhibition of bacterial RNA polymerase. However, resistance to rifampicin was reported shortly after its introduction in the medical practice. Studies in the model organism Escherichia coli helped to define the molecular mechanism of rifampicin-resistance demonstrating that resistance is mostly due to chromosomal mutations in rpoB gene encoding the RNA polymerase β chain. These studies also revealed the amazing potential of the molecular genetics to elucidate the structure-function relationships in bacterial RNA polymerase. The scope of this paper is to illustrate how rifampicin-resistance has been recently exploited to better understand the regulatory mechanisms that control bacterial cell physiology and virulence, and how this information has been used to maneuver, on a global scale, gene expression in bacteria of industrial interest. In particular, we reviewed recent literature regarding: (i) the effects of rpoB mutations conferring rifampicin-resistance on transcription dynamics, bacterial fitness, physiology, metabolism and virulence; (ii) the occurrence in nature of "mutant-type" or duplicated rifampicin-resistant RNA polymerases; and (iii) the RNA polymerase genetic engineering method for strain improvement and drug discovery.

  20. Proteolysis of the proofreading subunit controls the assembly of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III catalytic core.

    PubMed

    Bressanin, Daniela; Stefan, Alessandra; Piaz, Fabrizio Dal; Cianchetta, Stefano; Reggiani, Luca; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro

    2009-11-01

    The C-terminal region of the proofreading subunit (epsilon) of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III is shown here to be labile and to contain the residues (identified between F187 and R213) responsible for association with the polymerase subunit (alpha). We also identify two alpha-helices of the polymerase subunit (comprising the residues E311-M335 and G339-D353, respectively) as the determinants of binding to epsilon. The C-terminal region of epsilon is degraded by the ClpP protease assisted by the GroL molecular chaperone, while other factors control the overall concentration in vivo of epsilon. Among these factors, the chaperone DnaK is of primary importance for preserving the integrity of epsilon. Remarkably, inactivation of DnaK confers to Escherichia coli inviable phenotype at 42 degrees C, and viability can be restored over-expressing epsilon. Altogether, our observations indicate that the association between epsilon and alpha subunits of DNA polymerase III depends on small portions of both proteins, the association of which is controlled by proteolysis of epsilon. Accordingly, the factors catalysing (ClpP, GroL) or preventing (DnaK) this proteolysis exert a crucial checkpoint of the assembly of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III core.

  1. Fidelity of DNA polymerases in DNA amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Keohavong, P.; Thilly, W.G. )

    1989-12-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to separate and isolate the products of DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The strategy permitted direct enumeration and identification of point mutations created by T4, modified T7, Klenow fragment of polymerase I, and Thermus aquaticus (Tag) DNA polymerases. Incorrectly synthesized sequences were separated from the wild type by DGGE as mutant/wild-type heteroduplexes and the heteroduplex fraction was used to calculate the average error rate (mutations per base duplication). The error rate induced in the 104-base-pair low-temperature melting domain of exon 3 of the human hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene was {approx} 3.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} for modified T7, 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} for Klenow fragment, and 2.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} for Taq polymerases after a 10{sup 6}-fold amplification. The error rate for T4 DNA polymerase was not more than 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} error per base duplication. The predominant mutations were sequenced and found to be transitions of G{center dot}C to A{center dot}T for T4 and modified T7 DNA polymerases, and A{center dot}T to G{center dot}C for Taq polymerase. Klenow fragment induced both possible transitions and deletions of 2 and 4 base pairs.

  2. 47 CFR 1.248 - Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. 1... Hearing Proceedings Prehearing Procedures § 1.248 Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. (a) The... to appear at a specified time and place for a conference prior to a hearing, or to submit...

  3. Transcription by RNA polymerases I and III

    PubMed Central

    Paule, Marvin R.; White, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    The task of transcribing nuclear genes is shared between three RNA polymerases in eukaryotes: RNA polymerase (pol) I synthesises the large rRNA, pol II synthesises mRNA and pol III synthesises tRNA and 5S rRNA. Although pol II has received most attention, pol I and pol III are together responsible for the bulk of transcriptional activity. This survey will summarise what is known about the process of transcription by pol I and pol III, how it happens and the proteins involved. Attention will be drawn to the similarities between the three nuclear RNA polymerase systems and also to their differences. PMID:10684922

  4. RNA polymerase II transcription: structure and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Bushnell, David A; Kornberg, Roger D

    2013-01-01

    A minimal RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcription system comprises the polymerase and five general transcription factors (GTFs) TFIIB, -D, -E, -F, and -H. The addition of Mediator enables a response to regulatory factors. The GTFs are required for promoter recognition and the initiation of transcription. Following initiation, pol II alone is capable of RNA transcript elongation and of proofreading. Structural studies reviewed here reveal roles of GTFs in the initiation process and shed light on the transcription elongation mechanism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA Polymerase II Transcript Elongation.

  5. RNA polymerase gene, microorganism having said gene and the production of RNA polymerase by the use of said microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Kotani, Hirokazu; Hiraoka, Nobutsugu; Obayashi, Akira

    1991-01-01

    SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase is produced by cultivating a new microorganism (particularly new strains of Escherichia coli) harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene and recovering SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase from the culture broth. SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene is provided as are new microorganisms harboring a plasmid that carries SP6 bacteriophage RNA polymerase gene.

  6. GE STEM Teacher's Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-13

    Teachers participate in the Rocketry Engineering Design Challenge during the 2017 GE Foundation High School STEM Integration Conference at the Center for Space Education at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. High school teachers from across the country took part in the week-long conference, which is designed to explore effective ways for teachers, schools and districts from across the country to integrate STEM throughout the curriculum. The conference is a partnership between GE Foundation and the National Science Teachers Association.

  7. DNA polymerase having modified nucleotide binding site for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Modified gene encoding a modified DNA polymerase wherein the modified polymerase incorporates dideoxynucleotides at least 20-fold better compared to the corresponding deoxynucleotides as compared with the corresponding naturally-occurring DNA polymerase.

  8. DNA polymerase having modified nucleotide binding site for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, S.; Richardson, C.

    1997-03-25

    A modified gene encoding a modified DNA polymerase is disclosed. The modified polymerase incorporates dideoxynucleotides at least 20-fold better compared to the corresponding deoxynucleotides as compared with the corresponding naturally-occurring DNA polymerase. 6 figs.

  9. Effect of Translesion DNA Polymerases, Endonucleases and RpoS on Mutation Rates in Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Koskiniemi, Sanna; Hughes, Diarmaid; Andersson, Dan I.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that bacteria have evolved mechanisms to increase their mutation rate in response to various stresses and that the translesion DNA polymerase Pol IV under control of the LexA regulon and the alternative sigma factor RpoS are involved in regulating this mutagenesis. Here we examined in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2 the rates for four different types of mutations (rifampicin, nalidixic acid, and chlorate resistance and Lac+ reversion) during various growth conditions and with different levels of four translesion DNA polymerases (Pol II, Pol IV, Pol V, and SamAB) and RpoS. Constitutive derepression of the LexA regulon by a lexA(def) mutation had no effect on Lac+ reversion rates but increased the other three mutation rates up to 11-fold, and the contribution of the translesion DNA polymerases to this mutagenesis varied with the type of mutation examined. The increase in mutation rates in the lexA(def) mutant required the presence of the LexA-controlled UvrB protein and endonucleases UvrC and Cho. With regard to the potential involvement of RpoS in mutagenesis, neither an increase in RpoS levels conferred by artificial overexpression from a plasmid nor long-term stationary phase incubation or slow growth caused an increase in any of the four mutation rates measured, alone or in combination with overexpression of the translesion DNA polymerases. In conclusion, mutation rates are remarkably robust and no combination of growth conditions, induction of translesion DNA polymerases by inactivation of LexA, or increased RpoS expression could confer an increase in mutation rates higher than the moderate increase caused by derepression of the LexA regulon alone. PMID:20421601

  10. 76 FR 64083 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Technical Conference on Tuesday, November...

  11. Picornaviral polymerase structure, function, and fidelity modulation.

    PubMed

    Peersen, Olve B

    2017-02-02

    Like all positive strand RNA viruses, the picornaviruses replicate their genomes using a virally encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase enzyme known as 3D(pol). Over the past decade we have made tremendous advances in our understanding of 3D(pol) structure and function, including the discovery of a novel mechanism for closing the active site that allows these viruses to easily fine tune replication fidelity and quasispecies distributions. This review summarizes current knowledge of picornaviral polymerase structure and how the enzyme interacts with RNA and other viral proteins to form stable and processive elongation complexes. The picornaviral RdRPs are among the smallest viral polymerases, but their fundamental molecular mechanism for catalysis appears to be generally applicable as a common feature of all positive strand RNA virus polymerases.

  12. RNA Polymerase II Transcription: Structure and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Bushnell, David A.; Kornberg, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    A minimal RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcription system comprises the polymerase and five general transcription factors (GTFs) TFIIB, -D, -E, -F, and -H. The addition of Mediator enables a response to regulatory factors. The GTFs are required for promoter recognition and the initiation of transcription. Following initiation, pol II alone is capable of RNA transcript elongation and of proofreading. Structural studies reviewed here reveal roles of GTFs in the initiation process and shed light on the transcription elongation mechanism. PMID:23000482

  13. Transcription termination by nuclear RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Patricia; Manley, James L.

    2009-01-01

    Gene transcription in the cell nucleus is a complex and highly regulated process. Transcription in eukaryotes requires three distinct RNA polymerases, each of which employs its own mechanisms for initiation, elongation, and termination. Termination mechanisms vary considerably, ranging from relatively simple to exceptionally complex. In this review, we describe the present state of knowledge on how each of the three RNA polymerases terminates and how mechanisms are conserved, or vary, from yeast to human. PMID:19487567

  14. DNA polymerase activity in encysting Entamoeba invadens.

    PubMed

    Makioka, A; Kumagai, M; Ohtomo, H; Kobayashi, S; Takeuchi, T

    1999-07-01

    Using an axenic encystation system of Entamoeba invadens as a model for E. histolytica encystation, we examined the level of DNA polymerase activity in E. invadens during encystation induced in vitro. We first characterized the DNA polymerase activity of trophozoites of E. invadens, comparing it with that of E. histolytica, and found that the activity of E. invadens was lower than that of E. histolytica at pH 2, 4, and 6 and was higher at pH 8 and 10. The activity of E. invadens was completely inhibited by high concentrations of K(-). Among inhibitors of mammalian DNA polymerases, aphidicolin and N-ethylmaleimide inhibited the activity, but 2',3'-dideoxythymidine-5'-triphosphate did not. Thus, the sensitivity of the E. invadens activity to salt and inhibitors of mammalian DNA polymerases was basically the same as that recorded for E. histolytica in our previous results. The level of DNA polymerase activity in cysts decreased as encystation proceeded as compared with that of trophozoites. The results indicate that encystation is accompanied by a reduced level of DNA polymerase activity, which correlates with the previous finding that nuclear division occurs during cyst maturation in the absence of DNA synthesis.

  15. Chloroplast RNA polymerases: Role in chloroplast biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Börner, Thomas; Aleynikova, Anastasia Yu; Zubo, Yan O; Kusnetsov, Victor V

    2015-09-01

    Plastid genes are transcribed by two types of RNA polymerase in angiosperms: the bacterial type plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) and one (RPOTp in monocots) or two (RPOTp and RPOTmp in dicots) nuclear-encoded RNA polymerase(s) (NEP). PEP is a bacterial-type multisubunit enzyme composed of core subunits (coded for by the plastid rpoA, rpoB, rpoC1 and rpoC2 genes) and additional protein factors (sigma factors and polymerase associated protein, PAPs) encoded in the nuclear genome. Sigma factors are required by PEP for promoter recognition. Six different sigma factors are used by PEP in Arabidopsis plastids. NEP activity is represented by phage-type RNA polymerases. Only one NEP subunit has been identified, which bears the catalytic activity. NEP and PEP use different promoters. Many plastid genes have both PEP and NEP promoters. PEP dominates in the transcription of photosynthesis genes. Intriguingly, rpoB belongs to the few genes transcribed exclusively by NEP. Both NEP and PEP are active in non-green plastids and in chloroplasts at all stages of development. The transcriptional activity of NEP and PEP is affected by endogenous and exogenous factors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. ASE Annual Conference 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCune, Roger

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the ASE Annual Conference 2010 which was held at Nottingham after a gap of 22 years. As always, the main conference was preceded by International Day, an important event for science educators from across the world. There were two strands to the programme: (1) "What works for me?"--sharing new ideas…

  17. District Leadership Conference Planner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Coordinating Council for Occupational Education, Olympia.

    This manual provides usable guidelines and planning forms and materials for planning district leadership conferences, which were designed and initiated in Washington State to meet the problems in student enrollment and, consequently, Distributive Education Clubs of America membership. The conferences have become a useful means to increase…

  18. [Conference Time Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National School Public Relations Association, Washington, DC.

    This multimedia kit, for use with and by teachers from kindergarten through the upper elementary grades, consists of four components: 1) a filmstrip for teachers; 2) the 1970 edition of a handbook, "Conference Time for Teachers and Parents"; 3) a filmstrip for parents; 4) a supporting parent information leaflet "How To Confer Successfully with…

  19. Facilitating Learning at Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravn, Ib; Elsborg, Steen

    2011-01-01

    The typical conference consists of a series of PowerPoint presentations that tend to render participants passive. Students of learning have long abandoned the transfer model that underlies such one-way communication. We propose an alternative theory of conferences that sees them as a forum for learning, mutual inspiration and human flourishing. We…

  20. The Learning Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravn, Ib

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to call attention to the fact that conferences for professionals rely on massive one-way communication and hence produce little learning for delegates--and to introduce an alternative, the "learning conference", that involves delegates in fun and productive learning processes.…

  1. The Learning Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravn, Ib

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to call attention to the fact that conferences for professionals rely on massive one-way communication and hence produce little learning for delegates--and to introduce an alternative, the "learning conference", that involves delegates in fun and productive learning processes.…

  2. Lyndon Johnson's Press Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Stephen

    Because President Lyndon Johnson understood well the publicity value of the American news media, he sought to exploit them. He saw reporters as "torch bearers" for his programs and policies and used the presidential press conference chiefly for promotional purposes. Although he met with reporters often, his press conferences were usually…

  3. ASE Annual Conference 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCune, Roger

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the ASE Annual Conference 2010 which was held at Nottingham after a gap of 22 years. As always, the main conference was preceded by International Day, an important event for science educators from across the world. There were two strands to the programme: (1) "What works for me?"--sharing new ideas…

  4. From Conference to Journal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Robert; Tenenberg, Josh

    2008-01-01

    Revising and extending conference articles for journal publication benefits both authors and readers. The new articles are more complete, and benefit from peer review, feedback from conference presentation, and greater editorial consistency. For those articles that are appropriate, we encourage authors to do this, and present two examples of such…

  5. ICCK Conference Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Green, William H.

    2013-05-28

    The 7th International Conference on Chemical Kinetics (ICCK) was held July 10-14, 2011, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in Cambridge, MA, hosted by Prof. William H. Green of MIT's Chemical Engineering department. This cross-disciplinary meeting highlighted the importance of fundamental understanding of elementary reactions to the full range of chemical investigations. The specific conference focus was on elementary-step kinetics in both the gas phase and in condensed phase. The meeting provided a unique opportunity to discuss how the same reactive species and reaction motifs manifest under very different reaction conditions (e.g. atmospheric, aqueous, combustion, plasma, in nonaqueous solvents, on surfaces.). The conference featured special sessions on new/improved experimental techniques, improved models and data analysis for interpreting complicated kinetics, computational kinetics (especially rate estimates for large kinetic models), and a panel discussion on how the community should document/archive kinetic data. In the past, this conference had been limited to homogeneous gas-phase and liquid-phase systems. This conference included studies of heterogeneous kinetics which provide rate constants for, or insight into, elementary reaction steps. This Grant from DOE BES covered about half of the subsidies we provided to students and postdocs who attended the conference, by charging them reduced-rate registration fees. The complete list of subsidies provided are listed in Table 1 below. This DOE funding was essential to making the conference affordable to graduate students, and indeed the attendance at this conference was higher than at previous conferences in this series. Donations made by companies provided additional subsidies, leveraging the DOE funding. The conference was very effective in educating graduate students and important in fostering scientific interactions, particularly between scientists studying gas phase and liquid phase kinetics

  6. Multiplexed Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay To Detect Intestinal Protozoa.

    PubMed

    Crannell, Zachary; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Nair, Gayatri; Mejia, Rojelio; White, A Clinton; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2016-02-02

    This work describes a proof-of-concept multiplex recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assay with lateral flow readout that is capable of simultaneously detecting and differentiating DNA from any of the diarrhea-causing protozoa Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Entamoeba. Together, these parasites contribute significantly to the global burden of diarrheal illness. Differential diagnosis of these parasites is traditionally accomplished via stool microscopy. However, microscopy is insensitive and can miss up to half of all cases. DNA-based diagnostics such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are far more sensitive; however, they rely on expensive thermal cycling equipment, limiting their availability to centralized reference laboratories. Isothermal DNA amplification platforms, such as the RPA platform used in this study, alleviate the need for thermal cycling equipment and have the potential to broaden access to more sensitive diagnostics. Until now, multiplex RPA assays have not been developed that are capable of simultaneously detecting and differentiating infections caused by different pathogens. We developed a multiplex RPA assay to detect the presence of DNA from Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Entamoeba. The multiplex assay was characterized using synthetic DNA, where the limits-of-detection were calculated to be 403, 425, and 368 gene copies per reaction of the synthetic Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Entamoeba targets, respectively (roughly 1.5 orders of magnitude higher than for the same targets in a singleplex RPA assay). The multiplex assay was also characterized using DNA extracted from live parasites spiked into stool samples where the limits-of-detection were calculated to be 444, 6, and 9 parasites per reaction for Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Entamoeba parasites, respectively. This proof-of-concept assay may be reconfigured to detect a wide variety of targets by re-designing the primer and probe sequences.

  7. Free RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Michael; Dennis, Patrick P; Ehrenberg, Mans; Bremer, Hans

    2015-12-01

    The frequencies of transcription initiation of regulated and constitutive genes depend on the concentration of free RNA polymerase holoenzyme [Rf] near their promoters. Although RNA polymerase is largely confined to the nucleoid, it is difficult to determine absolute concentrations of [Rf] at particular locations within the nucleoid structure. However, relative concentrations of free RNA polymerase at different growth rates, [Rf]rel, can be estimated from the activities of constitutive promoters. Previous studies indicated that the rrnB P2 promoter is constitutive and that [Rf]rel in the vicinity of rrnB P2 increases with increasing growth rate. Recently it has become possible to directly visualize Rf in growing Escherichia coli cells. Here we examine some of the important issues relating to gene expression based on these new observations. We conclude that: (i) At a growth rate of 2 doublings/h, there are about 1000 free and 2350 non-specifically DNA-bound RNA polymerase molecules per average cell (12 and 28%, respectively, of 8400 total) which are in rapid equilibrium. (ii) The reversibility of the non-specific binding generates more than 1000 free RNA polymerase molecules every second in the immediate vicinity of the DNA. Of these, most rebind non-specifically to the DNA within a few ms; the frequency of non-specific binding is at least two orders of magnitude greater than specific binding and transcript initiation. (iii) At a given amount of RNA polymerase per cell, [Rf] and the density of non-specifically DNA-bound RNA polymerase molecules along the DNA both vary reciprocally with the amount of DNA in the cell. (iv) At 2 doublings/h an E. coli cell contains, on the average, about 1 non-specifically bound RNA polymerase per 9 kbp of DNA and 1 free RNA polymerase per 20 kbp of DNA. However some DNA regions (i.e. near active rRNA operons) may have significantly higher than average [Rf].

  8. 1985 oil spill conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-02-01

    This 1985 Oil Spill Conference, our ninth biennial meeting, presents another unique opportunity fo industry, government, and academic representatives to meet and exchange ideas to enhance our knowledge and understanding of the prevention, behavior, control, and cleanup of oil spills. Growing international and domestic participation, and the continued worldwide use of the Proceedings of past oil spill conferences as valuable reference sources affirms the importance and quality of these conferences. It is my firm belief, furthermore, that the conferences have contributed substantially to the reduction in the number of marine oil spills, and to our increased cleanup capabilities. The sponsoring organizations--the United States Coast Guard, the American Petroleum Institute, and the United States Environmental Protection Agency--have combined their efforts to provide a program of timely technical content which affords the opportunity to review the state-of-the-art accomplishments since our last conference in 1983. Finally, I hope that the knowledge and associations developed at this conference will influence your decision to participate in the 1987 Oil Spill Conference, to be held in Baltimore, Maryland.

  9. Polynucleotide recognition by DNA alpha-polymerase.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S H; Matsukage, A; Bohn, E W; Chen, Y C; Sivarajan, M

    1977-11-01

    In a survey of template-primer preference of a mouse myeloma DNA alpha-polymerase, the fastest rate of DNA synthesis was with poly(dT) as template and (rA)24 as primer. Such a preference for poly(dT).oligo(rA) was not observed with other DNA polymerases of mouse origin. DNA synthesis in this system resulted in formation of oligo(dA) chains, not template-length poly(dA); thus, the average enzyme molecule bound to a poly(dT).(rA)24 complex and initiated a new oligo(dA) chain many times during the incubation. Binding experiments revealed that the alpha-polymerase had high affinity for poly(dT). Although the alpha-polymerase did not bind to poly(dl) and failed to replicate it inreactions with a base pair complementary primer, poly(dl) was replicated after a (dT) block had been grafted to its 3'-end and the oligo(rA) primer had been added. In similar experiments, the (dT) block was found to be much more effective than other 3'-terminal blocks in promoting replication of denatured calf thymus DNA. The results indicate that specific base sequences may regulate initiation of DNA syntehsis by this alpha-polymerase.

  10. RNA Polymerase II Collision Interrupts Convergent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, David J.; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Svejstrup, Jesper Q.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Antisense noncoding transcripts, genes-within-genes, and convergent gene pairs are prevalent among eukaryotes. The existence of such transcription units raises the question of what happens when RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules collide head-to-head. Here we use a combination of biochemical and genetic approaches in yeast to show that polymerases transcribing opposite DNA strands cannot bypass each other. RNAPII stops but does not dissociate upon head-to-head collision in vitro, suggesting that opposing polymerases represent insurmountable obstacles for each other. Head-to-head collision in vivo also results in RNAPII stopping, and removal of collided RNAPII from the DNA template can be achieved via ubiquitylation-directed proteolysis. Indeed, in cells lacking efficient RNAPII polyubiquitylation, the half-life of collided polymerases increases, so that they can be detected between convergent genes. These results provide insight into fundamental mechanisms of gene traffic control and point to an unexplored effect of antisense transcription on gene regulation via polymerase collision. PMID:23041286

  11. Cloning the Horse RNA Polymerase I Promoter and Its Application to Studying Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; He, Dong; Wang, Zengchao; Ou, Shudan; Yuan, Rong; Li, Shoujun

    2016-05-31

    An influenza virus polymerase reconstitution assay based on the human, dog, or chicken RNA polymerase I (PolI) promoter has been developed and widely used to study the polymerase activity of the influenza virus in corresponding cell types. Although it is an important member of the influenza virus family and has been known for sixty years, no studies have been performed to clone the horse PolI promoter or to study the polymerase activity of equine influenza virus (EIV) in horse cells. In our study, the horse RNA PolI promoter was cloned from fetal equine lung cells. Using the luciferase assay, it was found that a 500 bp horse RNA PolI promoter sequence was required for efficient transcription. Then, using the developed polymerase reconstitution assay based on the horse RNA PolI promoter, the polymerase activity of two EIV strains was compared, and equine myxovirus resistance A protein was identified as having the inhibiting EIV polymerase activity function in horse cells. Our study enriches our knowledge of the RNA PolI promoter of eukaryotic species and provides a useful tool for the study of influenza virus polymerase activity in horse cells.

  12. Conference Report: Wyoming Invitational Conference on Instructional Applications of Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansky, Bob

    This report: (1) describes the organization of an invitational conference aimed at gathering direction from classroom teachers regarding instructional applications of computers; (2) provides copies of all materials used in organizing such a conference; and (3) reports the results of the conference in terms of conference products (resolutions,…

  13. 48 CFR 6101.11 - Conferences; conference memorandum [Rule 11].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conferences; conference memorandum . 6101.11 Section 6101.11 Federal Acquisition Regulations System CIVILIAN BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS, GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT DISPUTE CASES 6101.11 Conferences; conference...

  14. GE STEM Teacher's Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-13

    Teachers prepare to demonstrate the projects they built for the Rocketry Engineering Design Challenge during the 2017 GE Foundation High School STEM Integration Conference at the Center for Space Education at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. High school teachers from across the country took part in the week-long conference, which is designed to explore effective ways for teachers, schools and districts from across the country to integrate STEM throughout the curriculum. The conference is a partnership between GE Foundation and the National Science Teachers Association.

  15. GE STEM Teacher's Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-13

    Education Specialists Lynn Dotson, left, of the NASA Public Engagement Center, and Lester Morales, right, of Texas State University's NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative, explain the Rocketry Engineering Design Challenge to teachers participating in the 2017 GE Foundation High School STEM Integration Conference at the Center for Space Education at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. High school teachers from across the country took part in the week-long conference, which is designed to explore effective ways for teachers, schools and districts from across the country to integrate STEM throughout the curriculum. The conference is a partnership between GE Foundation and the National Science Teachers Association.

  16. Escherichia coli RNA polymerase is the target of the cyclopeptide antibiotic microcin J25.

    PubMed

    Delgado, M A; Rintoul, M R; Farías, R N; Salomón, R A

    2001-08-01

    Escherichia coli microcin J25 (MccJ25) is a plasmid-encoded, cyclic peptide antibiotic consisting of 21 unmodified amino acid residues. It is primarily active on gram-negative bacteria related to the producer strain, inducing cell filamentation in an SOS-independent way. A mutation causing resistance to MccJ25 was isolated. Genetic analysis indicated that it resided in the rpoC gene, encoding the beta' subunit of RNA polymerase, at 90 min on the E. coli genetic map. The mutation was genetically crossed on to a plasmid containing the wild-type rpoC gene. The presence of the recombinant plasmid conferred complete resistance to otherwise sensitive strains. Nucleotide sequencing of the plasmid-borne, mutant rpoC gene revealed a ACC (Thr)-to-ATC (Ile) change at codon 931, within homology block G, an evolutionarily conserved region in the large subunits of all RNA polymerases. MccJ25 decreased RNA synthesis both in vivo and in vitro. These results point to the RNA polymerase as the target of microcin action. We favor the possibility that the filamentous phenotype induced by MccJ25 results from impaired transcription of genes coding for cell division proteins. As far as we know, MccJ25 is the first peptide antibiotic shown to affect RNA polymerase.

  17. A genetic system to identify DNA polymerase β mutator mutants

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Stacy L.; Yoon, Margaret S.; Chagovetz, Alexander M.; Li, Shu-Xia; Clairmont, Caroline A.; Preston, Bradley D.; Eckert, Kristin A.; Sweasy, Joann B.

    1997-01-01

    DNA polymerase β (pol β) is a 39-kDa protein that functions in DNA repair processes in mammalian cells. As a first step toward understanding mechanisms of polymerase fidelity, we developed a genetic method to identify mammalian pol β mutator mutants. This screen takes advantage of a microbial genetics assay and the ability of rat pol β to substitute for Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I in DNA replication in vivo. Using this screen, we identified 13 candidate pol β mutator mutants. Three of the candidate mutator mutants were further characterized in vivo and shown to confer an increased spontaneous mutation frequency over that of wild-type pol β to our bacterial strain. Purification and subsequent analysis of one of our putative mutator proteins, the pol β-14 protein, showed that it possesses intrinsic mutator activity in four different assays that measure the fidelity of DNA synthesis. Therefore, residue 265, which is altered in pol β-14 and another of our mutant proteins, pol β-166, is probably critical for accurate DNA synthesis by pol β. Thus, our genetic method of screening for pol β mutator mutants is useful in identifying active mammalian DNA polymerase mutants that encode enzymes that catalyze DNA synthesis with altered fidelity compared with the wild-type pol β enzyme. PMID:9037051

  18. High-Resolution Phenotypic Landscape of the RNA Polymerase II Trigger Loop

    PubMed Central

    Erinne, Olivia C.; Dave, Jui M.; Cui, Ping; Jin, Huiyan; Muthukrishnan, Nandhini; Tang, Leung K.; Lam, Kenny C.; Strohner, Ralf; Van den Brulle, Jan; Sze, Sing-Hoi; Kaplan, Craig D.

    2016-01-01

    The active sites of multisubunit RNA polymerases have a “trigger loop” (TL) that multitasks in substrate selection, catalysis, and translocation. To dissect the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II TL at individual-residue resolution, we quantitatively phenotyped nearly all TL single variants en masse. Three mutant classes, revealed by phenotypes linked to transcription defects or various stresses, have distinct distributions among TL residues. We find that mutations disrupting an intra-TL hydrophobic pocket, proposed to provide a mechanism for substrate-triggered TL folding through destabilization of a catalytically inactive TL state, confer phenotypes consistent with pocket disruption and increased catalysis. Furthermore, allele-specific genetic interactions among TL and TL-proximal domain residues support the contribution of the funnel and bridge helices (BH) to TL dynamics. Our structural genetics approach incorporates structural and phenotypic data for high-resolution dissection of transcription mechanisms and their evolution, and is readily applicable to other essential yeast proteins. PMID:27898685

  19. DNA polymerase activity of tomato fruit chromoplasts.

    PubMed

    Serra, E C; Carrillo, N

    1990-11-26

    DNA polymerase activity was measured in chromoplasts of ripening tomato fruits. Plastids isolated from young leaves or mature red fruits showed similar DNA polymerase activities. The same enzyme species was present in either chloroplasts or chromoplasts as judged by pH and temperature profiles, sensitivities towards different inhibitors and relative molecular mass (Mr 88 kDa). The activities analyzed showed the typical behaviour of plastid-type polymerases. The results presented here suggest that chromoplast maintain their DNA synthesis potential in fruit tissue at chloroplast levels. Consequently, the sharp decrease of the plastid chromosome transcription observed at the onset of fruit ripening could not be due to limitations in the availability of template molecules. Other mechanisms must be involved in the inhibition of chromoplast RNA synthesis.

  20. DNA polymerase alpha and beta in the California urchin.

    PubMed Central

    Racine, F M; Morris, P W

    1978-01-01

    DNA polymerase alpha and beta were identified in the urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. The DNA polymerase beta sedimented at 3.4 S, constituted 5% of total DNA polymerase activity, and was resistant to N-ethylmaleimide and high ionic strength. The polymerase alpha sedimented at 6--8 S, was inhibited by N-ethylmalemide or 0.1 M (NH4)2SO4, and was dependent upon glycerol for preservation of activity. Both the polymerases alpha and beta were nuclear associated in embryos. The DNA polymerase alpha was markedly heterogeneous on DEAE-Sephadex ion exchange and showed three modal polymerase species. These polymerase alpha species were indistinguishable by template activity assays but the DNA polymerase associated ribonucleotidyl transferase (Biochemistry 75 : 3106-3113, 1976) was found predominantly with only one of the DNA polymerase alpha species. PMID:569291

  1. Aircraft Engine Emissions. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A conference on a aircraft engine emissions was held to present the results of recent and current work. Such diverse areas as components, controls, energy efficient engine designs, and noise and pollution reduction are discussed.

  2. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineer Randy Bresnik of NASA answers a reporter's question during a crew press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. STS-135 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060448 (30 June 2011) --- NASA astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-135 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  4. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineer Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos answers a reporter's question during a crew press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. STS-135 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060450 (30 June 2011) --- NASA astronaut Rex Walheim, STS-135 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  6. Expedition 32 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-13

    Quarantined Expedition 32 Canadian backup crewmember Chris Hadfield answers reporters questions from behind glass during a prelaunch press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel on Friday, July 13, 2012 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  7. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028493 (24 March 2011) --- NASA astronaut Mark Kelly, STS-134 commander, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  8. STS-135 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060415 (30 June 2011) --- NASA astronaut Sandy Magnus, STS-135 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  9. STS-135 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060445 (30 June 2011) --- NASA astronaut Sandy Magnus, STS-135 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  10. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineer Paolo Nespoli of ESA answers a reporter's question during a crew press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028492 (24 March 2011) --- NASA astronaut Greg Chamitoff, STS-134 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  12. STS-135 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060413 (30 June 2011) --- NASA astronaut Chris Ferguson, STS-135 commander, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  13. Lunar & Planetary Science Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Jeffrey L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Summaries of different topics discussed at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference are presented to provide updated information to nonplanetologists. Some topics include Venus, isotopes, chondrites, creation science, cosmic dust, cratering, moons and rings, igneous rocks, and lunar soil. (DC)

  14. Expedition 6 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-05

    Expedition 6 Commander Ken Bowersox, left and NASA International Space Station Science Officer Don Pettit speak during a press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Thursday, May 6, 2003. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Expedition 6 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-05

    Expedition 6 International Space Station Science Officer Don Pettit speaks during a press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Thursday, May 6, 2003. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Lunar & Planetary Science Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Jeffrey L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Summaries of different topics discussed at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference are presented to provide updated information to nonplanetologists. Some topics include Venus, isotopes, chondrites, creation science, cosmic dust, cratering, moons and rings, igneous rocks, and lunar soil. (DC)

  17. STS-132 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-03

    JSC2010-E-063790 (3 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Garrett Reisman, STS-132 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during an STS-132 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  18. STS-132 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-03

    JSC2010-E-063807 (3 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Mike Good, STS-132 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during an STS-132 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  19. STS-131 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-09

    JSC2010-E-038795 (9 March 2010) --- NASA astronaut Stephanie Wilson, STS-131 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during an STS-131 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  20. STS-132 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-03

    JSC2010-E-063799 (3 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-132 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during an STS-132 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  1. STS-132 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-03

    JSC2010-E-063808 (3 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Garrett Reisman, STS-132 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during an STS-132 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  2. STS-131 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-09

    JSC2010-E-038797 (9 March 2010) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, STS-131 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during an STS-131 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  3. STS-132 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-03

    JSC2010-E-063797 (3 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Steve Bowen, STS-132 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during an STS-132 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  4. STS-131 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-09

    JSC2010-E-038794 (9 March 2010) --- NASA astronaut Alan Poindexter, STS-131 commander, responds to a question from a reporter during an STS-131 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  5. STS-135 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-30

    JSC2011-E-060439 (30 June 2011) --- NASA astronaut Chris Ferguson, STS-135 commander, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA

  6. STS-131 press conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-09

    JSC2010-E-038799 (9 March 2010) --- NASA astronaut Clayton Anderson, STS-131 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during an STS-131 preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

  7. Expedition 19 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-03-24

    Expedition 19 Flight Engineer Michael R. Barratt smiles at his family from a quarantined glass room after a press conference on Wednesday, March 25, 2009 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Insider conference tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennant, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Attending an educator conference and its associated exhibit hall can be a rewarding experience for your brain. But if you keep in mind these insider's tips, your feet, arms, stomach, and wallet will also thank you.

  9. National COPD conference summary.

    PubMed

    Buist, A Sonia; Bailey, William; Hurd, Suzanne S

    2004-01-01

    The first National COPD Conference, sponsored by the US COPD Coalition was held in Arlington, Virginia on November 14-15, 2003. The theme for the conference was developed around the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Healthy People 2010 goals for COPD and included plenary speeches, roundtable discussions, abstracts, and workshops on spirometry, patient/physician education materials, and home monitoring/telemetry. The goal was to bring together a multidisciplinary group to identify important issues relating to COPD in the United States, specifically the barriers to a wider recognition of the disease, and to develop an orchestrated action plan. Over 500 scientists, clinicians, respiratory therapists, nurses, patients, government officials, and representatives from pharmaceutical companies participated. This summary provides the recommendations from the conference that will be used to develop an action plan for the US COPD Coalition. It includes actions proposed by plenary speakers, roundtable faculty and conference participants.

  10. Tackling conference carbon footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozier, Jim

    2016-12-01

    In reply to Margaret Harris's Lateral Thoughts article "Putting my foot down", which discussed the challenges of attending a conference with a physical disability (October p76) and a subsequent letter by Anna Wood (November p18).

  11. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  12. EPOXI Mission Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-18

    Michael A'Hearn, EPOXI Principal Investigator, University of Maryland, holds a plastic bottle containing ice to illustrate a point during a press conference, Thursday, Nov. 18, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The press conference was held to discuss the Nov. 4 successful flyby of Comet Hartley 2 by NASA's EPOXI Mission Spacecraft. Images from the flyby provided scientists the most extensive observations of a comet in history. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  13. EPOXI Mission Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-18

    Dr. James Green, Director of Planetary Science, NASA Headquarters, at podium, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Nov. 18, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The press conference was held to discuss the Nov. 4 successful flyby of Comet Hartley 2 by NASA's EPOXI Mission Spacecraft. Images from the flyby provided scientists the most extensive observations of a comet in history. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  14. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  15. Conference scene: DGVS spring conference 2009.

    PubMed

    Kolligs, Frank Thomas

    2009-10-01

    The 3rd annual DGVS Spring Conference of the German Society for Gastroenterology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Verdauungs- und Stoffwechselkrankheiten) was held at the Seminaris Campus Hotel in Berlin, Germany, on 8-9 May, 2009. The conference was organized by Roland Schmid and Matthias Ebert from the Technical University of Munich, Germany. The central theme of the meeting was 'translational gastrointestinal oncology: towards personalized medicine and individualized therapy'. The conference covered talks on markers for diagnosis, screening and surveillance of colorectal cancer, targets for molecular therapy, response prediction in clinical oncology, development and integration of molecular imaging in gastrointestinal oncology and translational research in clinical trial design. Owing to the broad array of topics and limitations of space, this article will focus on biomarkers, response prediction and the integration of biomarkers into clinical trials. Presentations mentioned in this summary were given by Matthias Ebert (Technical University of Munich, Germany), Esmeralda Heiden (Epigenomics, Berlin, Germany), Frank Kolligs (University of Munich, Germany), Florian Lordick (University of Heidelberg, Germany), Hans Jorgen Nielsen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark), Anke Reinacher-Schick (University of Bochum, Germany), Christoph Röcken (University of Berlin, Germany), Wolff Schmiegel (University of Bochum, Germany) and Thomas Seufferlein (University of Halle, Germany).

  16. In Vitro Resistance Study of AG-021541, a Novel Nonnucleoside Inhibitor of the Hepatitis C Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, S.T.; Herlihy, K.J.; Graham, J.P.; Fuhrman, S.A.; Doan, C.; Parge, H.; Hickey, M.; Gao, J.; Yu, X.; Chau, F.; Gonzalez, J.; Li, H.; Lewis, C.; Patrick, A.K.; Duggal, R.

    2009-05-27

    A novel class of nonnucleoside hepatitis C virus (HCV) polymerase inhibitors characterized by a dihydropyrone core was identified by high-throughput screening. Crystallographic studies of these compounds in complex with the polymerase identified an allosteric binding site close to the junction of the thumb and finger domains, approximately 30 A away from the catalytic center. AG-021541, a representative compound from this series, displayed measurable in vitro antiviral activity against the HCV genotype 1b subgenomic replicon with a mean 50% effective concentration of 2.9 muM. To identify mutations conferring in vitro resistance to AG-021541, resistance selection was carried out using HCV replicon cells either by serial passages in increasing concentrations of AG-021541 or by direct colony formation at fixed concentrations of the compound. We identified several amino acid substitutions in the AG-021541-binding region of the polymerase, including M423(T/V/I), M426T, I482(S/T), and V494A, with M423T as the predominant change observed. These mutants conferred various levels of resistance to AG-021541 and structurally related compounds but remained sensitive to interferon and HCV polymerase inhibitors known to interact with the active site or other allosteric sites of the protein. In addition, dihydropyrone polymerase inhibitors retained activity against replicons that contain signature resistance changes to other polymerase inhibitors, including S282T, C316N, M414T, and P495(S/L), indicating their potential to be used in combination therapies with these polymerase inhibitors. AG-021541-resistant replicon cell lines provide a valuable tool for mechanism-of-action studies of dihydropyrone polymerase inhibitors. The clinical relevance of in vitro resistance to HCV polymerase inhibitors remains to be investigated.

  17. The contribution of translesion synthesis polymerases on geminiviral replication.

    PubMed

    Richter, Kathrin S; Götz, Monika; Winter, Stephan; Jeske, Holger

    2016-01-15

    Geminiviruses multiply primarily in the plant phloem, but never in meristems. Their Rep protein can activate DNA synthesis in differentiated cells. However, when their single-stranded DNA is injected into the phloem by insects, no Rep is present for inducing initial complementary strand replication. Considering a contribution of translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerases in plants, four of them (Polη, Polζ, Polκ, Rev1) are highly and constitutively expressed in differentiated tissues like the phloem. Two geminiviruses (Euphorbia yellow mosaic virus, Cleome leaf crumple virus), inoculated either biolistically or by whiteflies, replicated in Arabidopsis thaliana mutant lines of these genes to the same extent as in wild type plants. Comparative deep sequencing of geminiviral DNAs, however, showed a high exchange rate (10(-4)-10(-3)) similar to the phylogenetic variation described before and a significant difference in nucleotide substation rates if Polη and Polζ were absent, with a differential response to the viral DNA components. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. DNA sequencing using polymerase substrate-binding kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Previte, Michael John Robert; Zhou, Chunhong; Kellinger, Matthew; Pantoja, Rigo; Chen, Cheng-Yao; Shi, Jin; Wang, BeiBei; Kia, Amirali; Etchin, Sergey; Vieceli, John; Nikoomanzar, Ali; Bomati, Erin; Gloeckner, Christian; Ronaghi, Mostafa; He, Molly Min

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has transformed genomic research by decreasing the cost of sequencing. However, whole-genome sequencing is still costly and complex for diagnostics purposes. In the clinical space, targeted sequencing has the advantage of allowing researchers to focus on specific genes of interest. Routine clinical use of targeted NGS mandates inexpensive instruments, fast turnaround time and an integrated and robust workflow. Here we demonstrate a version of the Sequencing by Synthesis (SBS) chemistry that potentially can become a preferred targeted sequencing method in the clinical space. This sequencing chemistry uses natural nucleotides and is based on real-time recording of the differential polymerase/DNA-binding kinetics in the presence of correct or mismatch nucleotides. This ensemble SBS chemistry has been implemented on an existing Illumina sequencing platform with integrated cluster amplification. We discuss the advantages of this sequencing chemistry for targeted sequencing as well as its limitations for other applications. PMID:25612848

  19. The bacterial enhancer-dependent RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Darbari, Vidya C.; Glyde, Robert; Zhang, Xiaodong; Buck, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Transcription initiation is highly regulated in bacterial cells, allowing adaptive gene regulation in response to environment cues. One class of promoter specificity factor called sigma54 enables such adaptive gene expression through its ability to lock the RNA polymerase down into a state unable to melt out promoter DNA for transcription initiation. Promoter DNA opening then occurs through the action of specialized transcription control proteins called bacterial enhancer-binding proteins (bEBPs) that remodel the sigma54 factor within the closed promoter complexes. The remodelling of sigma54 occurs through an ATP-binding and hydrolysis reaction carried out by the bEBPs. The regulation of bEBP self-assembly into typically homomeric hexamers allows regulated gene expression since the self-assembly is required for bEBP ATPase activity and its direct engagement with the sigma54 factor during the remodelling reaction. Crystallographic studies have now established that in the closed promoter complex, the sigma54 factor occupies the bacterial RNA polymerase in ways that will physically impede promoter DNA opening and the loading of melted out promoter DNA into the DNA-binding clefts of the RNA polymerase. Large-scale structural re-organizations of sigma54 require contact of the bEBP with an amino-terminal glutamine and leucine-rich sequence of sigma54, and lead to domain movements within the core RNA polymerase necessary for making open promoter complexes and synthesizing the nascent RNA transcript. PMID:27789741

  20. Determining Annealing Temperatures for Polymerase Chain Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.; Enners, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common technique used in high school and undergraduate science teaching. Students often do not fully comprehend the underlying principles of the technique and how optimization of the protocol affects the outcome and analysis. In this molecular biology laboratory, students learn the steps of PCR with an…

  1. Polymerase Chain Reaction for Educational Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Stephen J.; dePamphillis, Claude

    1994-01-01

    Suggests the incorporation of the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique into high school and college biology laboratories. Discusses the following sections: (1) current PCR applications; (2) PCR technique; (3) Manual and Machine PCR; (4) Manual PCR Preparations and Procedure; (5) Materials, Supplies, and Recipes; (6) Primer Selection; and (7)…

  2. Determining Annealing Temperatures for Polymerase Chain Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.; Enners, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common technique used in high school and undergraduate science teaching. Students often do not fully comprehend the underlying principles of the technique and how optimization of the protocol affects the outcome and analysis. In this molecular biology laboratory, students learn the steps of PCR with an…

  3. A polymerase engineered for bisulfite sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Doug; Christova, Yonka; Holliger, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Bisulfite sequencing is a key methodology in epigenetics. However, the standard workflow of bisulfite sequencing involves heat and strongly basic conditions to convert the intermediary product 5,6-dihydrouridine-6-sulfonate (dhU6S) (generated by reaction of bisulfite with deoxycytidine (dC)) to uracil (dU). These harsh conditions generally lead to sample loss and DNA damage while milder conditions may result in incomplete conversion of intermediates to uracil. Both can lead to poor recovery of bisulfite-treated DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as either damaged DNA and/or intermediates of bisulfite treatment are poor substrate for standard DNA polymerases. Here we describe an engineered DNA polymerase (5D4) with an enhanced ability to replicate and PCR amplify bisulfite-treated DNA due to an ability to bypass both DNA lesions and bisulfite intermediates, allowing significantly milder conversion conditions and increased sensitivity in the PCR amplification of bisulfite-treated DNA. Incorporation of the 5D4 DNA polymerase into the bisulfite sequencing workflow thus promises significant sensitivity and efficiency gains. PMID:26271989

  4. Polymerase Chain Reaction for Educational Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Stephen J.; dePamphillis, Claude

    1994-01-01

    Suggests the incorporation of the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique into high school and college biology laboratories. Discusses the following sections: (1) current PCR applications; (2) PCR technique; (3) Manual and Machine PCR; (4) Manual PCR Preparations and Procedure; (5) Materials, Supplies, and Recipes; (6) Primer Selection; and (7)…

  5. Catalytic editing properties of DNA polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Canard, B; Cardona, B; Sarfati, R S

    1995-01-01

    Enzymatic incorporation of 2',3'-dideoxynucleotides into DNA results in chain termination. We report that 3'-esterified 2'-deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates (dNTPs) are false chain-terminator substrates since DNA polymerases, including human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase, can incorporate them into DNA and, subsequently, use this new 3' end to insert the next correctly paired dNTP. Likewise, a DNA substrate with a primer chemically esterified at the 3' position can be extended efficiently upon incubation with dNTPs and T7 DNA polymerase lacking 3'-to-5' exonuclease activity. This enzyme is also able to use dTTP-bearing reporter groups in the 3' position conjugated through amide or thiourea bonds and cleave them to restore a DNA chain terminated by an amino group at the 3' end. Hence, a number of DNA polymerases exhibit wide catalytic versatility at the 3' end of the nascent DNA strand. As part of the polymerization mechanism, these capabilities extend the number of enzymatic activities associated with these enzymes and also the study of interactions between DNA polymerases and nucleotide analogues. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7479898

  6. Red light-controlled polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A; Schikora, Margot; Mokhir, A

    2015-09-04

    A 23-mer DNA "caged" at its 3'-terminus with a 9-anthracenyl moiety was prepared. It can be uncaged in the presence of photosensitizer (In(pyropheophorbide-a)chloride)-containing DNAs (9-12 mers) and upon irradiation with red light. This mixture of DNAs was used to design red-light controlled polymerase chain reaction.

  7. Evolution of DNA polymerases: an inactivated polymerase-exonuclease module in Pol epsilon and a chimeric origin of eukaryotic polymerases from two classes of archaeal ancestors.

    PubMed

    Tahirov, Tahir H; Makarova, Kira S; Rogozin, Igor B; Pavlov, Youri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2009-03-18

    Evolution of DNA polymerases, the key enzymes of DNA replication and repair, is central to any reconstruction of the history of cellular life. However, the details of the evolutionary relationships between DNA polymerases of archaea and eukaryotes remain unresolved. We performed a comparative analysis of archaeal, eukaryotic, and bacterial B-family DNA polymerases, which are the main replicative polymerases in archaea and eukaryotes, combined with an analysis of domain architectures. Surprisingly, we found that eukaryotic Polymerase epsilon consists of two tandem exonuclease-polymerase modules, the active N-terminal module and a C-terminal module in which both enzymatic domains are inactivated. The two modules are only distantly related to each other, an observation that suggests the possibility that Pol epsilon evolved as a result of insertion and subsequent inactivation of a distinct polymerase, possibly, of bacterial descent, upstream of the C-terminal Zn-fingers, rather than by tandem duplication. The presence of an inactivated exonuclease-polymerase module in Pol epsilon parallels a similar inactivation of both enzymatic domains in a distinct family of archaeal B-family polymerases. The results of phylogenetic analysis indicate that eukaryotic B-family polymerases, most likely, originate from two distantly related archaeal B-family polymerases, one form giving rise to Pol epsilon, and the other one to the common ancestor of Pol alpha, Pol delta, and Pol zeta. The C-terminal Zn-fingers that are present in all eukaryotic B-family polymerases, unexpectedly, are homologous to the Zn-finger of archaeal D-family DNA polymerases that are otherwise unrelated to the B family. The Zn-finger of Polepsilon shows a markedly greater similarity to the counterpart in archaeal PolD than the Zn-fingers of other eukaryotic B-family polymerases. Evolution of eukaryotic DNA polymerases seems to have involved previously unnoticed complex events. We hypothesize that the archaeal

  8. Circulating polymerase chain reaction chips utilizing multiple-membrane activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yu; Liao, Chia-Sheng; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Huei-Huang; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports a new micromachined, circulating, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for nucleic acid amplification. The PCR chip is comprised of a microthermal control module and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic control module. The microthermal control modules are formed with three individual heating and temperature-sensing sections, each modulating a specific set temperature for denaturation, annealing and extension processes, respectively. Micro-pneumatic valves and multiple-membrane activations are used to form the microfluidic control module to transport sample fluids through three reaction regions. Compared with other PCR chips, the new chip is more compact in size, requires less time for heating and cooling processes, and has the capability to randomly adjust time ratios and cycle numbers depending on the PCR process. Experimental results showed that detection genes for two pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes, 777 bps) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae, 273 bps), can be successfully amplified using the new circulating PCR chip. The minimum number of thermal cycles to amplify the DNA-based S. pyogenes for slab gel electrophoresis is 20 cycles with an initial concentration of 42.5 pg µl-1. Experimental data also revealed that a high reproducibility up to 98% could be achieved if the initial template concentration of the S. pyogenes was higher than 4 pg µl-1. The preliminary results of the current paper were presented at the 19th IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (IEEE MEMS 2006), Istanbul, Turkey, 22-26 January, 2006.

  9. Independent Structural Domains in Paramyxovirus Polymerase Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Dochow, Melanie; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Crowe, James E.; Moore, Martin L.; Plemper, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    All enzymatic activities required for genomic replication and transcription of nonsegmented negative strand RNA viruses (or Mononegavirales) are believed to be concentrated in the viral polymerase (L) protein. However, our insight into the organization of these different enzymatic activities into a bioactive tertiary structure remains rudimentary. Fragments of Mononegavirales polymerases analyzed to date cannot restore bioactivity through trans-complementation, unlike the related L proteins of segmented NSVs. We investigated the domain organization of phylogenetically diverse Paramyxovirus L proteins derived from measles virus (MeV), Nipah virus (NiV), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Through a comprehensive in silico and experimental analysis of domain intersections, we defined MeV L position 615 as an interdomain candidate in addition to the previously reported residue 1708. Only position 1708 of MeV and the homologous positions in NiV and RSV L also tolerated the insertion of epitope tags. Splitting of MeV L at residue 1708 created fragments that were unable to physically interact and trans-complement, but strikingly, these activities were reconstituted by the addition of dimerization tags to the fragments. Equivalently split fragments of NiV, RSV, and MeV L oligomerized with comparable efficiency in all homo- and heterotypic combinations, but only the homotypic pairs were able to trans-complement. These results demonstrate that synthesis as a single polypeptide is not required for the Mononegavirales polymerases to adopt a proper tertiary conformation. Paramyxovirus polymerases are composed of at least two truly independent folding domains that lack a traditional interface but require molecular compatibility for bioactivity. The functional probing of the L domain architecture through trans-complementation is anticipated to be applicable to all Mononegavirales polymerases. PMID:22215662

  10. Nuclear Rocket Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center has a strong interest in nuclear rocket propulsion and provides active support of the graphite reactor program in such nonnuclear areas as cryogenics, two-phase flow, propellant heating, fluid systems, heat transfer, nozzle cooling, nozzle design, pumps, turbines, and startup and control problems. A parallel effort has also been expended to evaluate the engineering feasibility of a nuclear rocket reactor using tungsten-matrix fuel elements and water as the moderator. Both of these efforts have resulted in significant contributions to nuclear rocket technology. Many successful static firings of nuclear rockets have been made with graphite-core reactors. Sufficient information has also been accumulated to permit a reasonable Judgment as to the feasibility of the tungsten water-moderated reactor concept. We therefore consider that this technoIogy conference on the nuclear rocket work that has been sponsored by the Lewis Research Center is timely. The conference has been prepared by NASA personnel, but the information presented includes substantial contributions from both NASA and AEC contractors. The conference excludes from consideration the many possible mission requirements for nuclear rockets. Also excluded is the direct comparison of nuclear rocket types with each other or with other modes of propulsion. The graphite reactor support work presented on the first day of the conference was partly inspired through a close cooperative effort between the Cleveland extension of the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office (headed by Robert W. Schroeder) and the Lewis Research Center. Much of this effort was supervised by Mr. John C. Sanders, chairman for the first day of the conference, and by Mr. Hugh M. Henneberry. The tungsten water-moderated reactor concept was initiated at Lewis by Mr. Frank E. Rom and his coworkers. The supervision of the recent engineering studies has been shared by Mr. Samuel J. Kaufman, chairman for the second day of the

  11. Regulating RNA polymerase pausing and transcription elongation in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Irene M; Waterfall, Joshua J; Core, Leighton J; Munroe, Robert J; Schimenti, John; Lis, John T

    2011-04-01

    Transitions between pluripotent stem cells and differentiated cells are executed by key transcription regulators. Comparative measurements of RNA polymerase distribution over the genome's primary transcription units in different cell states can identify the genes and steps in the transcription cycle that are regulated during such transitions. To identify the complete transcriptional profiles of RNA polymerases with high sensitivity and resolution, as well as the critical regulated steps upon which regulatory factors act, we used genome-wide nuclear run-on (GRO-seq) to map the density and orientation of transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerases in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In both cell types, progression of a promoter-proximal, paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) into productive elongation is a rate-limiting step in transcription of ∼40% of mRNA-encoding genes. Importantly, quantitative comparisons between cell types reveal that transcription is controlled frequently at paused Pol II's entry into elongation. Furthermore, "bivalent" ESC genes (exhibiting both active and repressive histone modifications) bound by Polycomb group complexes PRC1 (Polycomb-repressive complex 1) and PRC2 show dramatically reduced levels of paused Pol II at promoters relative to an average gene. In contrast, bivalent promoters bound by only PRC2 allow Pol II pausing, but it is confined to extremely 5' proximal regions. Altogether, these findings identify rate-limiting targets for transcription regulation during cell differentiation.

  12. Role of DNA polymerase gamma in adenovirus DNA replication. Mechanism of inhibition by 2',3'-dideoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates.

    PubMed

    van der Vliet, P C; Kwant, M M

    1981-04-28

    In contrast to cellular or SV40 DNA replication, adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) or type 2 (Ad2) DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei is strongly inhibited by low concentrations of 2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate (ddTTP). On the basis of differential sensitivity of cellular DNA polymerases, a role of DNA polymerase gamma in adenovirus DNA replication has been proposed. We have investigated the mechanism of inhibition of adenovirus DNA synthesis, using [alpha-32P]ddTTP and other dNTP analogues. Both ddATP and ddGTP were as inhibitory as ddTTP, while ddCTP had an even stronger effect on adenovirus DNA replication. DNA polymerase alpha was resistant to all four ddNTP's, while DNA polymerase gamma was very sensitive. The inhibition by ddTTP in isolated infected nuclei was slowly reversible. [alpha-32P]ddTTP was incorporated into Ad5 DNA as a chain-terminating nucleotide, and the analogue could be used as a substrate by DNA polymerase gamma. Under similar conditions, incorporation in cellular DNA or using DNA polymerase alpha was not observed. The nucleoside analogues ddA and ddC suppressed adenovirus. DNA replication in intact cells and reduced plaque formation. These results provide further evidence for a function of DNA polymerase gamma in adenovirus DNA synthesis.

  13. Microbial metagenome profiling using amplicon length heterogeneity-polymerase chain reaction proves more effective than elemental analysis in discriminating soil specimens.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Lilliana I; Mills, DeEtta K; Entry, James; Sautter, Robert T; Mathee, Kalai

    2006-11-01

    The combination of soil's ubiquity and its intrinsic abiotic and biotic information can contribute greatly to the forensic field. Although there are physical and chemical characterization methods of soil comparison for forensic purposes, these require a level of expertise not always encountered in crime laboratories. We hypothesized that soil microbial community profiling could be used to discriminate between soil types by providing biological fingerprints that confer uniqueness. Three of the six Miami-Dade soil types were randomly selected and sampled. We compared the microbial metagenome profiles generated using amplicon length heterogeneity-polymerase chain reaction analysis of the 16S rRNA genes with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy analysis of 13 elements (Al, B, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, S, Si, and Zn) that are commonly encountered in soils. Bray-Curtis similarity index and analysis of similarity were performed on all data to establish differences within sites, among sites, and across two seasons. These data matrices were used to group samples that shared similar community patterns using nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis. We concluded that while chemical characterization could provide some differentiation between soils, microbial metagenome profiling was better able to discriminate between the soil types and had a high degree of reproducibility, therefore proving to be a potential tool for forensic soil comparisons.

  14. Structural biology of bacterial RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Katsuhiko S

    2015-05-11

    Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477-42485), an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP). In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank), describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  15. Structural Biology of Bacterial RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Katsuhiko S.

    2015-01-01

    Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477–42485), an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP). In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank), describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription. PMID:25970587

  16. Human DNA polymerase alpha gene: sequences controlling expression in cycling and serum-stimulated cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, B E; Nasheuer, H P; Wang, T S

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the DNA polymerase alpha promoter sequence requirements for the expression of a heterologous gene in actively cycling cells and following serum addition to serum-deprived cells. An 11.4-kb genomic clone that spans the 5' end of this gene and includes 1.62 kb of sequence upstream from the translation start site was isolated. The transcription start site was mapped at 46 +/- 1 nucleotides upstream from the translation start site. The upstream sequence is GC rich and lacks a TATA sequence but has a CCAAT sequence on the opposite strand. Analysis of a set of deletion constructs in transient transfection assays demonstrated that efficient expression of the reporter in cycling cells requires 248 bp of sequence upstream from the cap site. Clustered within these 248 nucleotides are sequences similar to consensus sequences for Sp1-, Ap1-, Ap2-, and E2F-binding sites. The CCAAT sequence and the potential E2F- and Ap1-binding sites are shown to be protected from DNase I digestion by partially purified nuclear proteins. The DNA polymerase alpha promoter can confer upon the reporter an appropriate, late response to serum addition. No single sequence element could be shown to confer serum inducibility. Rather, multiple sequence elements appear to mediate the full serum response. Images PMID:2005899

  17. Involvement of a joker mutation in a polymerase-independent lethal mutagenesis escape mechanism.

    PubMed

    Agudo, Rubén; de la Higuera, Ignacio; Arias, Armando; Grande-Pérez, Ana; Domingo, Esteban

    2016-07-01

    We previously characterized a foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) with three amino acid replacements in its polymerase (3D) that conferred resistance to the mutagenic nucleoside analogue ribavirin. Here we show that passage of this mutant in the presence of high ribavirin concentrations resulted in selection of viruses with the additional replacement I248T in 2C. This 2C substitution alone (even in the absence of replacements in 3D) increased FMDV fitness mainly in the presence of ribavirin, prevented an incorporation bias in favor of A and U associated with ribavirin mutagenesis, and conferred the ATPase activity of 2C decreased sensitivity to ribavirin-triphosphate. Since in previous studies we described that 2C with I248T was selected under different selective pressures, this replacement qualifies as a joker substitution in FMDV evolution. The results have identified a role of 2C in nucleotide incorporation, and have unveiled a new polymerase-independent mechanism of virus escape to lethal mutagenesis.

  18. DNA-polymerase inhibitors. Rifamycin derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Frolova, L Y; Meldrays, Y A; Kochkina, L L; Giller, S A; Eremeyev, A V; Grayevskaya, N A; Kisselev, L L

    1977-01-01

    Ten new derivatives of the antibiotic rifamycin with variable side chains at position 3 were synthesized. The inhibitory activity of these derivatives against DNA-polymerases isolated from avian myeloblastosis virus, E. coli and calf thymus were studied at various conditions. 3-(2,4,6-trinitrophenylhydrazone-(methyl) rifamycin SV is a strong inhibitor for all the polymerases tested and belongs to the C class inhibitors of reverse transcriptase. 3-(monoallylhydrazone-(methyl) rifamycin SV possesses a selective action on polymerases: at 0.1 mg/ml concentration it almost completely inhibits the reverse transcriptase and less than half of the bacterial and eukaryotic enzymes. A drug is found which strongly inhibits the DNA-polymerases from E. coli and calf thymus and weakly the viral enzyme. The inhibitory effect on reverse transcriptase is independent of the choice of template-primer; it could be overcome by the addition of excess enzyme but not of excess template-primer; the inhibition could be completely reversed by dilution of the drug-enzyme mixture. From Lineweaver-Burk analysis, the inhibition is noncompetitive with respect to the template-primer and, thus the drugs bind to the site different from the active site for the template-primer. From protective action of the template-primer and other data it might be suggested that the rifamycin derivatives act at an early step(s) in DNA synthesis catalyzed by reverse transcriptase. The obtained data are in agreement with the results for other derivatives of rifamycin SV described in literature. PMID:68462

  19. A movie of RNA polymerase II transcription.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Alan C M; Cramer, Patrick

    2012-06-22

    We provide here a molecular movie that captures key aspects of RNA polymerase II initiation and elongation. To create the movie, we combined structural snapshots of the initiation-elongation transition and of elongation, including nucleotide addition, translocation, pausing, proofreading, backtracking, arrest, reactivation, and inhibition. The movie reveals open questions about the mechanism of transcription and provides a useful teaching tool. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The architecture of RNA polymerase fidelity.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Craig D

    2010-06-22

    The basis for transcriptional fidelity by RNA polymerase is not understood, but the 'trigger loop', a conserved structural element that is rearranged in the presence of correct substrate nucleotides, is thought to be critical. A study just published in BMC Biology sheds new light on the ways in which the trigger loop may promote selection of correct nucleotide triphosphate substrates. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/54.

  1. Enzymatic initiation of DNA synthesis by yeast DNA polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Plevani, P; Chang, L M

    1977-01-01

    Partially purified yeast RNA polymerases (RNA nucleotidyltransferases) initiate DNA synthesis by yeast DNA polymerase (DNA nucleotidyltransferase) I and to a lesser extent yeast DNA polymerase II in the replication of single-stranded DNA. The enzymatic initiation of DNA synthesis on phage fd DNA template occurs with dNTPs alone and is further stimulated by the presence of rNTPs in DNA polymerase I reactions. The presence of rNTPs has no effect on the RNA polymerase initiation of the DNA polymerase II reaction. RNA polymerases I and III are more efficient in initiation of DNA synthesis than RNA polymerase II. Analyses of the products of fd DNA replication show noncovalent linkage between the newly synthesized DNA and the template DNA, and covalent linkage between the newly synthesized RNA and DNA. PMID:325562

  2. DNA polymerase mu, a candidate hypermutase?

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, J F; Domínguez, O; Laín de Lera, T; Garcia-Díaz, M; Bernad, A; Blanco, L

    2001-01-01

    A novel DNA polymerase (Pol mu) has been recently identified in human cells. The amino-acid sequence of Pol mu is 42% identical to that of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT), a DNA-independent DNA polymerase that contributes to antigen-receptor diversity. In this paper we review the evidence supporting the role of Pol mu in somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes, a T-dependent process that selectively occurs at germinal centres: (i) preferential expression in secondary lymphoid organs; (ii) expression associated to developing germinal centres; and (iii) very low base discrimination during DNA-dependent DNA polymerization by Pol mu, a mutator phenotype enormously accentuated by the presence of activating Mn2+ ions. Moreover, its similarity to TdT, together with extrapolation to the crystal structure of DNA polymerase beta complexed (Pol beta) with DNA, allows us to discuss the structural basis for the unprecedented error proneness of Pol mu, and to predict that Pol mu is structurally well suited to participate also in DNA end-filling steps occurring both during V(D)J recombination and repair of DNA double-strand breaks that are processed by non-homologous end-joining. PMID:11205337

  3. 10 CFR 501.32 - Conferences (other than prepetition conferences).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Conferences (other than prepetition conferences). 501.32 Section 501.32 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES AND SANCTIONS Written Comments, Public Hearings and Conferences During Administrative Proceedings § 501.32...

  4. 10 CFR 501.32 - Conferences (other than prepetition conferences).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conferences (other than prepetition conferences). 501.32 Section 501.32 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES AND SANCTIONS Written Comments, Public Hearings and Conferences During Administrative Proceedings § 501.32...

  5. 10 CFR 501.32 - Conferences (other than prepetition conferences).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conferences (other than prepetition conferences). 501.32 Section 501.32 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES AND SANCTIONS Written Comments, Public Hearings and Conferences During Administrative Proceedings § 501.32...

  6. 10 CFR 501.32 - Conferences (other than prepetition conferences).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Conferences (other than prepetition conferences). 501.32 Section 501.32 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES AND SANCTIONS Written Comments, Public Hearings and Conferences During Administrative Proceedings § 501.32...

  7. 10 CFR 501.32 - Conferences (other than prepetition conferences).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conferences (other than prepetition conferences). 501.32 Section 501.32 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES AND SANCTIONS Written Comments, Public Hearings and Conferences During Administrative Proceedings § 501.32...

  8. 78 FR 27963 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Technical Conference on Tuesday, July 9,...

  9. ARC Conference Showcases Telecommunications Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    1996-01-01

    The Appalachian Regional Commission's 1996 Conference, "Building Blocks for Using Telecommunications and Information Technology," held in Binghamton, New York, focused on the role of telecommunications in Appalachia in education and training, telemedicine, business, and government. Highlights conference presentations on special…

  10. ARC Conference Showcases Telecommunications Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    1996-01-01

    The Appalachian Regional Commission's 1996 Conference, "Building Blocks for Using Telecommunications and Information Technology," held in Binghamton, New York, focused on the role of telecommunications in Appalachia in education and training, telemedicine, business, and government. Highlights conference presentations on special…

  11. Turbomachinery controls conference (TCC) 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The proceedings of the Turbomachinery Controls Conference 1995 are presented. Eleven papers were presented at the conference. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the nine papers for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. Multisubunit DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases from Vaccinia Virus and Other Nucleocytoplasmic Large-DNA Viruses: Impressions from the Age of Structure.

    PubMed

    Mirzakhanyan, Yeva; Gershon, Paul D

    2017-09-01

    The past 17 years have been marked by a revolution in our understanding of cellular multisubunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (MSDDRPs) at the structural level. A parallel development over the past 15 years has been the emerging story of the giant viruses, which encode MSDDRPs. Here we link the two in an attempt to understand the specialization of multisubunit RNA polymerases in the domain of life encompassing the large nucleocytoplasmic DNA viruses (NCLDV), a superclade that includes the giant viruses and the biochemically well-characterized poxvirus vaccinia virus. The first half of this review surveys the recently determined structural biology of cellular RNA polymerases for a microbiology readership. The second half discusses a reannotation of MSDDRP subunits from NCLDV families and the apparent specialization of these enzymes by virus family and by subunit with regard to subunit or domain loss, subunit dissociability, endogenous control of polymerase arrest, and the elimination/customization of regulatory interactions that would confer higher-order cellular control. Some themes are apparent in linking subunit function to structure in the viral world: as with cellular RNA polymerases I and III and unlike cellular RNA polymerase II, the viral enzymes seem to opt for speed and processivity and seem to have eliminated domains associated with higher-order regulation. The adoption/loss of viral RNA polymerase proofreading functions may have played a part in matching intrinsic mutability to genome size. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Mitochondrial polymerase gamma dysfunction and aging cause cardiac nuclear DNA methylation changes.

    PubMed

    Koczor, Christopher A; Ludlow, Ivan; Fields, Earl; Jiao, Zhe; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Lewis, William

    2016-04-01

    Cardiomyopathy (CM) is an intrinsic weakening of myocardium with contractile dysfunction and congestive heart failure (CHF). CHF has been postulated to result from decreased mitochondrial energy production and oxidative stress. Effects of decreased mitochondrial oxygen consumption also can accelerate with aging. We previously showed DNA methylation changes in human hearts with CM. This was associated with mitochondrial DNA depletion, being another molecular marker of CM. We examined the relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and cardiac epigenetic DNA methylation changes in both young and old mice. We used genetically engineered C57Bl/6 mice transgenic for a cardiac-specific mutant of the mitochondrial polymerase-γ (termed Y955C). Y955C mice undergo left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) at a young age (∼ 94 days old), and LVH decompensated to CHF at old age (∼ 255 days old). Results found 95 genes differentially expressed as a result of Y955C expression, while 4,452 genes were differentially expressed as a result of aging hearts. Moreover, cardiac DNA methylation patterns differed between Y955C (4,506 peaks with 68.5% hypomethylation) and aged hearts (73,286 peaks with 80.2% hypomethylated). Correlatively, of the 95 Y955C-dependent differentially expressed genes, 30 genes (31.6%) also displayed differential DNA methylation; in the 4,452 age-dependent differentially expressed genes, 342 genes (7.7%) displayed associated DNA methylation changes. Both Y955C and aging demonstrated significant enrichment of CACGTG-associated E-box motifs in differentially methylated regions. Cardiac mitochondrial polymerase dysfunction alters nuclear DNA methylation. Furthermore, aging causes a robust change in cardiac DNA methylation that is partially associated with mitochondrial polymerase dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Twitter use in physics conferences.

    PubMed

    Webb, Stephen

    An analysis of Twitter use in 116 conferences suggests that the service is used more extensively at PACS10 conferences (those devoted to the physics of elementary particles and fields) and PACS90 conferences (those devoted to geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics) than at conferences in other fields of physics. Furthermore, Twitter is used in a qualitatively different manner. A possible reason for these differences is discussed.

  15. Conducting Telephone Conference IEPs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Philip Patrick; Petit, Constance; Williams, Shandelyn

    2007-01-01

    Synchronizing the availability of team members for Individual Education Plan (IEP) meetings can be a daunting task. Fortunately, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 permits alternative means of conducting such meetings. An example of an alternate means is a telephone conference, whereby parents communicate over the…

  16. REGIONAL CONFERENCE SUMMARIES, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    AN AVERAGE OF 200 TEACHER EDUCATORS, STATE DIRECTORS, LAYMEN, AND REPRESENTATIVES OF VARIOUS AGENCIES ATTENDED EACH OF NINE REGIONAL CONFERENCES CONDUCTED THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES TO DISCUSS THE INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHANGES AND PROBLEMS IN PLANNING AND CONDUCTING VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS. MAJOR SPEECHES PRESENTED…

  17. Open Mind Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Alexander H.

    1995-01-01

    Open Mind, The Association for the achievement of diversity in higher education, met in conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico, between October 16 and 18, 1992. A number of workgroups met to discuss the goals, structure, and generally evaluate the Association and its achievements. A summary of the workgroup sessions and their minutes are included.

  18. The interparliamentary conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of information on environmental problems with global origins and consequences. The areas of major concern included the following: global climate change; deforestation and desertification; preservation of biological diversity; safeguarding oceans and water resources; population growth; destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer; and sustainable development.

  19. Press Conference - Skylab 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-08-14

    S72-46699 (19 Jan. 1972) --- Prime crew members of the scheduled second Skylab mission are introduced to the media during a press conference in January 1972 at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). From left to right are astronauts Jack R. Lousma, pilot; Owen K. Garriott, science pilot, and Alan L. Bean, commander. Photo credit: NASA

  20. Creating Better Satellite Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Tommy

    1998-01-01

    Presents four ways to improve broadcasts of company satellite conferences, including creative site selection (using facilities at educational institutions rather than hotel rooms); creative programming (using graphics and other interruptions to break up lectures or speeches); creative crew selection; and creative downlink site activities (to…

  1. Government Quality Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Government Quality Conference was an attempt to bring together executive organizations and senior individuals in the Federal Government that have a desire to improve productivity. It was designed to provide an exchange of ideas based on experience, and to encourage individual management initiatives to tap the capabilities of Federal employees.

  2. Metabolic Engineering X Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, Evan

    2015-05-07

    The International Metabolic Engineering Society (IMES) and the Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), both technological communities of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), hosted the Metabolic Engineering X Conference (ME-X) on June 15-19, 2014 at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver, British Columbia. It attracted 395 metabolic engineers from academia, industry and government from around the globe.

  3. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028491 (24 March 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, STS-134 mission specialist, fields a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  4. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028498 (24 March 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, STS-134 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  5. Expedition 34 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-18

    Russian backup crew member Fyodor Yurchikin, right, answers a reporter's question at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, on Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Seen next to him are NASA backup crew member Karen Nyberg and Expedition 34/35 Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  6. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028488 (24 March 2011) --- NASA astronaut Greg H. Johnson, STS-134 pilot, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  7. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028490 (24 March 2011) --- NASA astronaut Michael Fincke, STS-134 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  8. STS-134 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-03-24

    JSC2011-E-028496 (24 March 2011) --- NASA astronaut Andrew Feustel, STS-134 mission specialist, responds to a question from a reporter during a preflight press conference at NASA's Johnson Space Center. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  9. Microbicides 2006 conference

    PubMed Central

    Ramjee, Gita; Shattock, Robin; Delany, Sinead; McGowan, Ian; Morar, Neetha; Gottemoeller, Megan

    2006-01-01

    Current HIV/AIDS statistics show that women account for almost 60% of HIV infections in Sub-Saharan Africa. HIV prevention tools such as male and female condoms, abstinence and monogamy are not always feasible options for women due to various socio-economic and cultural factors. Microbicides are products designed to be inserted in the vagina or rectum prior to sex to prevent HIV acquisition. The biannual Microbicides conference took place in Cape Town, South Africa from 23–26 April 2006. The conference was held for the first time on the African continent, the region worst affected by the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The conference brought together a record number of 1,300 scientists, researchers, policy makers, healthcare workers, communities and advocates. The conference provided an opportunity for an update on microbicide research and development as well as discussions around key issues such as ethics, acceptability, access and community involvement. This report discusses the current status of microbicide research and development, encompassing basic and clinical science, social and behavioural science, and community mobilisation and advocacy activities. PMID:17038196

  10. Effective Parent Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Conferences with an upset parent, teacher, or student should be opportunities for schools to build relationships with the community and to foster a positive school culture. But in reality, they are often held because a problem has arisen and often end with stakeholders having a less-than-positive image of the school. Understanding the steps that…

  11. Conference on Censorship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meltzer, Milton; And Others

    In this collection of seven speeches from the University of Missouri Conference on Censorship, writers focus on the various aspects of censorship. Speeches are by (1) Milton Meltzer, who lauds those writers who were forced to battle with censors; (2) Enid Olson, who explores the censorship problems faced by teachers and school librarians; (3)…

  12. APPA 2011 Conference Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facilities Manager, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents highlights of APPA conference that was held on July 16-18, 2011. The highlights feature photos of 2011-2012 board of directors, outgoing senior regional representatives to the board, meritorious service award, APPA fellow, president's recognition and gavel exchange, and diamond business partner award.

  13. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum, left, and Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov of Russia share a laugh during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  14. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov answers a reporter’s question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. The mission is set to launch November 14 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  15. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum, speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  16. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  17. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum, left, and Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov of Russia are seen during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  18. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 backup crew members NASA Flight Engineer Joseph Acaba, far left, Russian Soyuz Commander Gennady Padalka, center, and Russian Flight Engineer Sergei Revin are seen at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  19. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 NASA Flight Engineer Dan Burbank answers a reporter’s question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Expedition 29 NASA Flight Engineer Dan Burbank, Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov and Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin is scheduled for November 14. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  20. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA backup Flight Engineer Don Pettit looks on during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  1. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov of Russia speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 7, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  2. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 NASA backup crew member Joe Acaba is seen at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch November 14 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  3. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    NASA backup Flight Engineer Don Pettit speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  4. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  5. Expedition 39 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-24

    Expedition 39 flight engineer Steve Swanson of NASA is seen in quarantine, behind glass, during the final press conference be Monday, March 24, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch March 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Russian backup Flight Engineer Oleg Kononenko speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  7. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 backup crew members Joseph Acaba, left, and Russian Flight Engineer Gennady Padalka share a few words during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  8. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin is seen at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch November 14 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  9. Expedition 40 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-27

    A man taking a picture with a cell phone is seen reflected in the glass separating the quarantined crew during a press conference on Tuesday, May 27, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch May 29 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  10. Expedition 29 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-12

    Expedition 29 Russian Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin answers a reporter’s question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Ivanishin, Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov and NASA Flight Engineer Dan Burbank is scheduled for November 14. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  11. Expedition 28 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-06

    Expedition 28 NASA Flight Engineer Mike Fossum, left, looks on as Soyuz Commander Sergei Volkov speaks during a press conference, Monday, June 6, 2011, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission is set to launch on Tuesday, June 8, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  12. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    NASA Expedition 41 backup crew member Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) answers a question during a press conference Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The prime crew is set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  13. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Includes abstracts of papers presented at the 80th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education. The broad areas include aerospace, affiliate and associate member council, agricultural engineering, biomedical engineering, continuing engineering studies, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computers, cooperative…

  14. Conference summary - Personal views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lub, J.

    2016-05-01

    This is a collection of remarks on the three and a half days of the RR Lyrae 2015 Conference, limited only by my own lack of attention and understanding. I end with some personal recollections on my complete failure, even though doing the necessary calculations, to spot the importance and the possible application of Fourier amplitudes and phases of the RR Lyrae light curves.

  15. Grammar! A Conference Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Lid, Ed.; Boaks, Peter, Ed.

    Papers from a conference on the teaching of grammar, particularly in second language instruction, include: "Grammar: Acquisition and Use" (Richard Johnstone); "Grammar and Communication" (Brian Page); "Linguistic Progression and Increasing Independence" (Bernardette Holmes); "La grammaire? C'est du bricolage!" ("Grammar? That's Hardware!") (Barry…

  16. 2008 Combat Vehicles Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-22

    General Michael M. Brogan Combat Vehicles Conference Marine Corps Systems Command 21 October 2008 2 MCSC •LAV •AAV •Tank •HMMWV/ ECV •MRAP PEO LS...34,226 Total 56,649 1985 IOC 1996 M1114 armored HMMWV Limited Production 2006 M1100 series begins fielding scalable armor 2009-10 ECV II

  17. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Includes abstracts of papers presented at the 80th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education. The broad areas include aerospace, affiliate and associate member council, agricultural engineering, biomedical engineering, continuing engineering studies, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computers, cooperative…

  18. Expedition 6 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-05

    Expedition 6 Flight Engineer Nikolai Budarin, left, Commander Ken Bowersox and International Space Station Science Officer Don Pettit, right, pose for photos at a press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Thursday, May 6, 2003. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Expedition 6 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-05

    Expedition 6 Flight Engineer Nikolai Budarin, left, Commander Ken Bowersox and NASA International Space Station Science Officer Don Pettit, right, answer questions during a press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Thursday, May 6, 2003. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, left, Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, are seen during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems, center, speaks as Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, looks on during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Hydrogen Conference: Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1989-10-01

    Hydrogen is currently a major chemical/fuel with long-term energy system benefits that may impact the industry's physical and economic well-being. EPRI's recent hydrogen conference concluded that to be competitive, the production cost must take into account environmental and end-use efficiency benefits.

  3. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Andrew Chaikin, author of "A Man on the Moon" speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Buzz Aldrin, the second man to walk on the moon, speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin, the second man to walk on the Moon, speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver, speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Tiffany Montague, Technical Program Manager for NASA and Google Lunar X PRIZE, Google, Inc., speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Brian McLendon, VP of Engineering, Google, Inc., speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Yoshinori Yoshimura, a respresentative from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Michael Weiss-Malik, Product Manager for Moon in Google Earth, Google, Inc., speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Miles O'Brien, former chief science and tech correspondent for CNN, speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Conference presentations with confidence.

    PubMed

    Strickland, T

    1999-01-01

    Remember that great presentation you heard at last year's convention? Perhaps the marketing case study was especially interesting. Or perhaps you wondered whether you could use the organizational tools the speaker described in your own work. Finally, you might have wondered, "Could I offer a conference presentation at some point?" The answer: yes!

  13. 2002 NASPSA Conference Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Contains abstracts from the 2002 conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. The publication is divided into three sections: the preconference workshop, "Effective Teaching Methods in the Classroom;" symposia (motor development, motor learning and control, and sport psychology); and free…

  14. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineering Education, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presents the abstracts of 158 papers presented at the American Society for Engineering Education's annual conference at Knoxville, Tennessee, June 14-17, 1976. Included are engineering topics covering education, aerospace, agriculture, biomedicine, chemistry, computers, electricity, acoustics, environment, mechanics, and women. (SL)

  15. 2002 NASPSA Conference Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Contains abstracts from the 2002 conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. The publication is divided into three sections: the preconference workshop, "Effective Teaching Methods in the Classroom;" symposia (motor development, motor learning and control, and sport psychology); and free…

  16. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineers Paolo Nespoli of ESA, left, Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos, center, and Expedition 52 flight engineer Randy Bresnik of NASA pose for group photograph at the conclusion of their crew press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Expedition 50 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-26

    Expedition 50 NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson, left, Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy of Roscosmos, center, and ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet pose for a group photograph at the conclusion of a press conference, Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016, at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    A painting of Yuri Gagarin is seen in the lobby of the building where the Expedition 52 prime and backup crews held a crew press conference on the grounds of the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. DEVELOP students attend conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Last month, Madeline Brozen and Jason Jones of the DEVELOP Program at John C. Stennis Space Center joined members from the program's national office at Langley Research Center to attend the Southern Growth Policies Board annual conference in Biloxi. Pictured are (l to r): Karen Allsbrook, Jonathan Gleason, Gov. Haley Barbour, Madeline Brozen, Lindsay Rogers and Tracey Silcox.

  20. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Dean Acosta, NASA Deputy Assistant Administrator and Press Secretary, moderates a press conference with NASA Administrator Michael Griffin Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems, left, looks on as Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, left, looks on as Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Members of the media listen during a press conference with NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, speaks during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems, left, and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, are seen during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human Moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Conference on Navajo Orthography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohannessian, Sirarpi; And Others

    This report on the Conference on Navajo Orthography, held in Albuquerque, New Mexico on May 2-3, 1969 constitutes a summary of the discussion and decisions of a meeting which was convened by the Center for Applied Linguistics under contract with the Bureau of Indian Affairs to agree on an orthography for the Navajo language. The immediate purpose…

  8. Conference Abstracts: AEDS '84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, William E.

    1985-01-01

    The Association of Educational Data Systems (AEDS) conference included 102 presentations. Abstracts of seven of these presentations are provided. Topic areas considered include LOGO, teaching probability through a computer game, writing effective computer assisted instructional materials, computer literacy, research on instructional…

  9. Effective Parent Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Conferences with an upset parent, teacher, or student should be opportunities for schools to build relationships with the community and to foster a positive school culture. But in reality, they are often held because a problem has arisen and often end with stakeholders having a less-than-positive image of the school. Understanding the steps that…

  10. A Conference of Hope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Printing House for the Blind, Louisville, KY. Dept. of Educational Research.

    Presented are the proceedings of the First Historic Helen Keller World Conference on Services to Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults, held in New York City in September, 1977 on the theme "The Deaf-Blind Person in the Community." Reports have the following titles and authors: "Definition, Demography, Causes and Prevention of Deaf-Blindness; Finding and…

  11. Google Moon Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Alan Eustace, Senior VP of Engineering and Research, Google, Inc., speaks during a press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, announcing the launch of Moon in Google Earth, an immersive 3D atlas of the Moon, accessible within Google Earth 5.0, Monday, July 20, 2009, at the Newseum in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. DEVELOP students attend conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-08

    Last month, Madeline Brozen and Jason Jones of the DEVELOP Program at John C. Stennis Space Center joined members from the program's national office at Langley Research Center to attend the Southern Growth Policies Board annual conference in Biloxi. Pictured are (l to r): Karen Allsbrook, Jonathan Gleason, Gov. Haley Barbour, Madeline Brozen, Lindsay Rogers and Tracey Silcox.

  13. A Conference of Hope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Printing House for the Blind, Louisville, KY. Dept. of Educational Research.

    Presented are the proceedings of the First Historic Helen Keller World Conference on Services to Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults, held in New York City in September, 1977 on the theme "The Deaf-Blind Person in the Community." Reports have the following titles and authors: "Definition, Demography, Causes and Prevention of Deaf-Blindness; Finding and…

  14. 1,5-Benzodiazepines, a Novel Class of Hepatitis C Virus Polymerase Nonnucleoside Inhibitors ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nyanguile, Origène; Pauwels, Frederik; Van den Broeck, Walter; Boutton, Carlo W.; Quirynen, Ludo; Ivens, Tania; van der Helm, Liesbet; Vandercruyssen, Geneviève; Mostmans, Wendy; Delouvroy, Frédéric; Dehertogh, Pascale; Cummings, Maxwell D.; Bonfanti, Jean-Francois; Simmen, Kenneth A.; Raboisson, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The exogenous control of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication can be mediated through the inhibition of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity of NS5B. Small-molecule inhibitors of NS5B include nucleoside and nonnucleoside analogs. Here, we report the discovery of a novel class of HCV polymerase nonnucleoside inhibitors, 1,5-benzodiazepines (1,5-BZDs), identified by high-throughput screening of a library of small molecules. A fluorescence-quenching assay and X-ray crystallography revealed that 1,5-BZD 4a bound stereospecifically to NS5B next to the catalytic site. When introduced into replicons, mutations known to confer resistance against chemotypes that bind at this site were detrimental to inhibition by 1,5-BZD 7a. Using a panel of enzyme isolates that covered genotypes 1 to 6, we showed that compound 4a inhibited genotype 1 only. In mechanistic studies, 4a was found to inhibit the RdRp activity of NS5B noncompetitively with GTP and to inhibit the formation of the first phosphodiester bond during the polymerization cycle. The specificity for the HCV target was evaluated by profiling the 1,5-BZDs against other viral and human polymerases, as well as BZD receptors. PMID:18852280

  15. Structure of the SSB-DNA polymerase III interface and its role in DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Marceau, Aimee H; Bahng, Soon; Massoni, Shawn C; George, Nicholas P; Sandler, Steven J; Marians, Kenneth J; Keck, James L

    2012-05-22

    Interactions between single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) and the DNA replication machinery are found in all organisms, but the roles of these contacts remain poorly defined. In Escherichia coli, SSB's association with the χ subunit of the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme has been proposed to confer stability to the replisome and to aid delivery of primers to the lagging-strand DNA polymerase. Here, the SSB-binding site on χ is identified crystallographically and biochemical and cellular studies delineate the consequences of destabilizing the χ/SSB interface. An essential role for the χ/SSB interaction in lagging-strand primer utilization is not supported. However, sequence changes in χ that block complex formation with SSB lead to salt-dependent uncoupling of leading- and lagging-strand DNA synthesis and to a surprising obstruction of the leading-strand DNA polymerase in vitro, pointing to roles for the χ/SSB complex in replisome establishment and maintenance. Destabilization of the χ/SSB complex in vivo produces cells with temperature-dependent cell cycle defects that appear to arise from replisome instability.

  16. ALA Conference 2009: Chicago Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    There is joy among those who have the funds to go to Chicago for the American Library Association (ALA) annual conference, July 9-15. Every librarian knows there is nothing better than a Chicago gathering, with the city's wonderful haunts, museums, restaurants, and fine memories of past conferences. The conference program covers nearly every…

  17. Making Connections: Attending Professional Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherrstrom, Catherine A.

    2012-01-01

    Attending a professional conference is an effective way to explore and advance knowledge, skills, and careers. For graduate students, attending a conference is an effective way to explore academic fields and new professions. However, attending a professional conference requires precious resources--time and money--so the decision to attend, or not,…

  18. ALA Conference 2009: Chicago Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    There is joy among those who have the funds to go to Chicago for the American Library Association (ALA) annual conference, July 9-15. Every librarian knows there is nothing better than a Chicago gathering, with the city's wonderful haunts, museums, restaurants, and fine memories of past conferences. The conference program covers nearly every…

  19. Summary: A Very Timely Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2012-04-01

    The conference poster includes a very apt phrase that describes a primary motivation for this conference: Time discovers truth. This aphorism, attributed to Seneca, was certainly affirmed by the many exciting talks and discussions at this conference, in both formal and informal settings.

  20. NIH Consensus Conference. Acupuncture.

    PubMed

    1998-11-04

    To provide clinicians, patients, and the general public with a responsible assessment of the use and effectiveness of acupuncture to treat a variety of conditions. A nonfederal, nonadvocate, 12-member panel representing the fields of acupuncture, pain, psychology, psychiatry, physical medicine and rehabilitation, drug abuse, family practice, internal medicine, health policy, epidemiology, statistics, physiology, biophysics, and the representatives of the public. In addition, 25 experts from these same fields presented data to the panel and a conference audience of 1200. Presentations and discussions were divided into 3 phases over 2 1/2 days: (1) presentations by investigators working in areas relevant to the consensus questions during a 2-day public session; (2) questions and statements from conference attendees during open discussion periods that were part of the public session; and (3) closed deliberations by the panel during the remainder of the second day and morning of the third. The conference was organized and supported by the Office of Alternative Medicine and the Office of Medical Applications of Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md. The literature, produced from January 1970 to October 1997, was searched through MEDLINE, Allied and Alternative Medicine, EMBASE, and MANTIS, as well as through a hand search of 9 journals that were not indexed by the National Library of Medicine. An extensive bibliography of 2302 references was provided to the panel and the conference audience. Expert speakers prepared abstracts of their own conference presentations with relevant citations from the literature. Scientific evidence was given precedence over clinical anecdotal experience. The panel, answering predefined questions, developed their conclusions based on the scientific evidence presented in the open forum and scientific literature. The panel composed a draft statement, which was read in its entirety and circulated to the experts and the audience

  1. European Conference on Health Economics.

    PubMed

    Malmivaara, Antti

    2010-12-01

    The biennial European Conference on Health Economics was held in Finland this year, at the Finlandia Hall in the centre of Helsinki. The European conferences rotate among European countries and fall between the biennial world congresses organized by the International Health Economics Association (iHEA). A record attendance of approximately 800 delegates from 50 countries around the world were present at the Helsinki conference. The theme of the conference was 'Connecting Health and Economics'. All major topics of health economics were covered in the sessions. For the first time, social care economics was included in the agenda of the European Conference as a session of its own.

  2. Evidence that sigma factors are components of chloroplast RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Troxler, R F; Zhang, F; Hu, J; Bogorad, L

    1994-01-01

    Plastid genes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase(s), which have been incompletely characterized and have been examined in a limited number of species. Plastid genomes contain rpoA, rpoB, rpoC1, and rpoC2 coding for alpha, beta, beta', and beta" RNA polymerase subunits that are homologous to the alpha, beta, and beta' subunits that constitute the core moiety of RNA polymerase in bacteria. However, genes with homology to sigma subunits in bacteria have not been found in plastid genomes. An antibody directed against the principal sigma subunit of RNA polymerase from the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was used to probe western blots of purified chloroplast RNA polymerase from maize, rice, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and Cyanidium caldarium. Chloroplast RNA polymerase from maize and rice contained an immunoreactive 64-kD protein. Chloroplast RNA polymerase from C. reinhardtii contained immunoreactive 100- and 82-kD proteins, and chloroplast RNA polymerase from C. caldarium contained an immunoreactive 32-kD protein. The elution profile of enzyme activity of both algal chloroplast RNA polymerases coeluted from DEAE with the respective immunoreactive proteins, indicating that they are components of the enzyme. These results provide immunological evidence for sigma-like factors in chloroplast RNA polymerase in higher plants and algae. PMID:8159791

  3. Interplay between polymerase II- and polymerase III-assisted expression of overlapping genes.

    PubMed

    Lukoszek, Radoslaw; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Ignatova, Zoya

    2013-11-15

    Up to 15% of the genes in different genomes overlap. This architecture, although beneficial for the genome size, represents an obstacle for simultaneous transcription of both genes. Here we analyze the interference between RNA-polymerase II (Pol II) and RNA-polymerase III (Pol III) when transcribing their target genes encoded on opposing strands within the same DNA fragment in Arabidopsis thaliana. The expression of a Pol II-dependent protein-coding gene negatively correlated with the transcription of a Pol III-dependent, tRNA-coding gene set. We suggest that the architecture of the overlapping genes introduces an additional layer of control of gene expression.

  4. Conditions for Using DNA Polymerase I as an RNA-Dependent DNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, S. C.; Kacian, D. L.; Spiegelman, S.

    1974-01-01

    Conditions are described for using Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I for synthesizing complementary DNA copies of natural RNA molecules, which are suitable for use in hybridization experiments. The molar ratio of enzyme to template is critical; below a certain level, synthesis is not observed. Hybrids formed with the complementary DNA are of comparable specificity and stability to those formed with complementary DNAs synthesized by viral RNA-directed DNA polymerase. Synthesis of dA-dT polymers, a common occurrence with this enzyme, can be eliminated by including distamycin in the reaction mixture. PMID:4133845

  5. RNA polymerase: the vehicle of transcription.

    PubMed

    Borukhov, Sergei; Nudler, Evgeny

    2008-03-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) is the principal enzyme of gene expression and regulation for all three divisions of life: Eukaryota, Archaea and Bacteria. Recent progress in the structural and biochemical characterization of RNAP illuminates this enzyme as a flexible, multifunctional molecular machine. During each step of the transcription cycle, RNAP undergoes elaborate conformational changes. As many fundamental and previously mysterious aspects of how RNAP works begin to be understood, this enzyme reveals intriguing similarities to man-made engineered devices. These resemblances can be found in the mechanics of RNAP-DNA complex formation, in RNA chain initiation and in the elongation processes. Here we highlight recent advances in understanding RNAP function and regulation.

  6. Energy Conferences and Symposia; (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, J.H.; Simpson, W.F. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Energy Conferences and Symposia, a monthly publication, was instituted to keep scientists, engineers, managers, and related energy professionals abreast of meetings sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and by other technical associations. Announcements cover conference, symposia, workshops, congresses, and other formal meetings pertaining to DOE programmatic interests. Complete meeting information, including title, sponsor, and contact, is presented in the main section, which is arranged alphabetically by subject area. Within a subject, citations are sorted by beginning data of the meeting. New listings are indicated by a bullet after the conference number and DOE-sponsored conferences are indicated by a star. Two indexes are provided for cross referencing conference information. The Chronological Index lists conference titles by dates and gives the subject area where complete information they may be found. The Location Index is alphabetically sorted by the city where the conference will be held.

  7. Identification of mammalian-adapting mutations in the polymerase complex of an avian H5N1 influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Taft, Andrew S.; Ozawa, Makoto; Fitch, Adam; Depasse, Jay V.; Halfmann, Peter J.; Hill-Batorski, Lindsay; Hatta, Masato; Friedrich, Thomas C.; Lopes, Tiago J. S.; Maher, Eileen A.; Ghedin, Elodie; Macken, Catherine A.; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype pose a serious global health threat due to the high mortality (>60%) associated with the disease caused by these viruses and the lack of protective antibodies to these viruses in the general population. The factors that enable avian H5N1 influenza viruses to replicate in humans are not completely understood. Here we use a high-throughput screening approach to identify novel mutations in the polymerase genes of an avian H5N1 virus that confer efficient polymerase activity in mammalian cells. Several of the identified mutations (which have previously been found in natural isolates) increase viral replication in mammalian cells and virulence in infected mice compared with the wild-type virus. The identification of amino-acid mutations in avian H5N1 influenza virus polymerase complexes that confer increased replication and virulence in mammals is important for the identification of circulating H5N1 viruses with an increased potential to infect humans. PMID:26082035

  8. Identification of mammalian-adapting mutations in the polymerase complex of an avian H5N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Taft, Andrew S; Ozawa, Makoto; Fitch, Adam; Depasse, Jay V; Halfmann, Peter J; Hill-Batorski, Lindsay; Hatta, Masato; Friedrich, Thomas C; Lopes, Tiago J S; Maher, Eileen A; Ghedin, Elodie; Macken, Catherine A; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-06-17

    Avian influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype pose a serious global health threat due to the high mortality (>60%) associated with the disease caused by these viruses and the lack of protective antibodies to these viruses in the general population. The factors that enable avian H5N1 influenza viruses to replicate in humans are not completely understood. Here we use a high-throughput screening approach to identify novel mutations in the polymerase genes of an avian H5N1 virus that confer efficient polymerase activity in mammalian cells. Several of the identified mutations (which have previously been found in natural isolates) increase viral replication in mammalian cells and virulence in infected mice compared with the wild-type virus. The identification of amino-acid mutations in avian H5N1 influenza virus polymerase complexes that confer increased replication and virulence in mammals is important for the identification of circulating H5N1 viruses with an increased potential to infect humans.

  9. The Functions of Serine 687 Phosphorylation of Human DNA Polymerase η in UV Damage Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaoxia; You, Changjun; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-06-01

    DNA polymerase η (polη) is a Y-family translesion synthesis polymerase that plays a key role in the cellular tolerance toward UV irradiation-induced DNA damage. Here, we identified, for the first time, the phosphorylation of serine 687 (Ser(687)), which is located in the highly conserved nuclear localization signal (NLS) region of human polη and is mediated by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). We also showed that this phosphorylation is stimulated in human cells upon UV light exposure and results in diminished interaction of polη with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Furthermore, we demonstrated that the phosphorylation of Ser(687) in polη confers cellular protection from UV irradiation and increases the efficiency in replication across a site-specifically incorporated cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer in human cells. Based on these results, we proposed a mechanistic model where Ser(687) phosphorylation functions in the reverse polymerase switching step of translesion synthesis: The phosphorylation brings negative charges to the NLS of polη, which facilitates its departure from PCNA, thereby resetting the replication fork for highly accurate and processive DNA replication. Thus, our study, together with previous findings, supported that the posttranslational modifications of NLS of polη played a dual role in polymerase switching, where Lys(682) deubiquitination promotes the recruitment of polη to PCNA immediately prior to lesion bypass and Ser(687) phosphorylation stimulates its departure from the replication fork immediately after lesion bypass. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-09-16

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3'-5' exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5'-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities.

  11. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities

    PubMed Central

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C.; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J.; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3′-5′ exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5′-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  12. Low-Fidelity Polymerases of Alphaviruses Recombine at Higher Rates To Overproduce Defective Interfering Particles

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Enzo Z.; Mounce, Bryan C.; Rozen-Gagnon, Kathryn; Hooikaas, Peter Jan; Stapleford, Kenneth A.; Moratorio, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Low-fidelity RNA-dependent RNA polymerases for many RNA virus mutators have been shown to confer attenuated phenotypes, presumably due to increased mutation rates. Additionally, for many RNA viruses, replication to high titers results in the production of defective interfering particles (DIs) that also attenuate infection. We hypothesized that fidelity, recombination, and DI production are tightly linked. We show that a Sindbis virus mutator replicating at a high multiplicity of infection manifests an earlier and greater accumulation of DIs than its wild-type counterpart. The isolated DIs interfere with the replication of full-length virus in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, the ability of the mutator virus to overproduce DIs could be linked to an increased recombination frequency. These data confirm that RNA-dependent RNA polymerase fidelity and recombination are inversely correlated for this mutator. Our findings suggest that defective interference resulting from higher recombination rates may be more detrimental to RNA virus mutators than the increase in mutational burden. IMPORTANCE Replication, adaptation, and evolution of RNA viruses rely in large part on their low-fidelity RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Viruses artificially modified in their polymerases to decrease fidelity (mutator viruses) are attenuated in vivo, demonstrating the important role of fidelity in viral fitness. However, attenuation was attributed solely to the modification of the viral mutation rate and the accumulation of detrimental point mutations. In this work, we described an additional phenotype of mutator viruses: an increased recombination rate leading to defective interfering particle (DI) overproduction. Because DIs are known for their inhibitory effect on viral replication, our work suggests that fidelity variants may be attenuated in vivo via several mechanisms. This has important implications in the development of fidelity variants as live attenuated vaccine strains

  13. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  14. Metabolic Engineering VII Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Korpics

    2012-12-04

    The aims of this Metabolic Engineering conference are to provide a forum for academic and industrial researchers in the field; to bring together the different scientific disciplines that contribute to the design, analysis and optimization of metabolic pathways; and to explore the role of Metabolic Engineering in the areas of health and sustainability. Presentations, both written and oral, panel discussions, and workshops will focus on both applications and techniques used for pathway engineering. Various applications including bioenergy, industrial chemicals and materials, drug targets, health, agriculture, and nutrition will be discussed. Workshops focused on technology development for mathematical and experimental techniques important for metabolic engineering applications will be held for more in depth discussion. This 2008 meeting will celebrate our conference tradition of high quality and relevance to both industrial and academic participants, with topics ranging from the frontiers of fundamental science to the practical aspects of metabolic engineering.

  15. NSI conference support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, Susan

    1991-01-01

    One of the many services NSI provides as an extension of customer/user support is to attend major scientific conferences. The conference effort provides NASA/OSSA scientists with many benefits: (1) scientist get to see NSI in action; they utilize the network to read email, and have recently begun to demonstrate their scientific research to their colleagues; (2) scientist get an opportunity to meet and interact with NSI Staff, which gives scientists a chance to get status on their requirements, ask about network status, get acquainted with our procedures, and learn about services; and (3) scientists are exposed to networking in a larger sense; particularly by knowing about other NASA groups who provide valuable scientific resources over the Internet.

  16. Aire unleashes stalled RNA polymerase to induce ectopic gene expression in thymic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Matthieu; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Abramson, Jakub; Rahl, Peter B; Young, Richard A; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2012-01-10

    Aire is a transcriptional regulator that induces expression of peripheral tissue antigens (PTA) in thymic medullary epithelial cells (MECs), driving immunological self-tolerance in differentiating T cells. To elucidate its mechanistic pathways, we examined its transcriptional impact in MECs in vivo by microarray analysis with mRNA-spanning probes. This analysis revealed initiation of Aire-activated genes to be comparable in Aire-deficient and wild-type MECs, but with a block to elongation after 50-100 bp in the absence of Aire, suggesting activation by release of stalled polymerases by Aire. In contrast, patterns of activation by transcription factors such as Klf4 were consistent with regulation of initiation. Mapping of Aire and RNA polymerase-II (Pol-II) by ChIP and high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed that Aire bound all Pol-II-rich transcriptional start sites (TSS), irrespective of its eventual effect. However, the genes it preferentially activated were characterized by a relative surfeit of stalled polymerases at the TSS, which resolved once Aire was introduced into cells. Thus, transcript mapping and ChIP-seq data indicate that Aire activates ectopic transcription not through specific recognition of PTA gene promoters but by releasing stalled polymerases.

  17. Transcriptional analysis of the DNA polymerase gene of Bombyx mori parvo-like virus (China isolate).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Jie; Chen, Ke-Ping; Yao, Qin; Han, Xu

    2007-04-01

    The Bombyx mori parvo-like virus (China isolate) DNA polymerase (BmDNV-3 dnapol) gene has been tentatively identified based on the presence of conserved motifs. In the present study, we perform a transcriptional analysis of the BmDNV-3 dnapol gene using the total RNA isolated from BmDNV-3 infected silkworm at different times. Northern blot analysis with a BmDNV-3 dnapol-specific riboprobe showed a major transcript of 3.3 kb. 5'-RACE revealed that the major transcription start point was located 20 nucleotides downstream of the TATA box. In a temporal expression analysis using differential RT-PCR, BmDNV-3 dnapol transcript was detected at low levels at 6 h.p.i., increased from 6 to 36 h.p.i., and remained fairly constant thereafter. Analysis of the predicted DNA polymerase sequence using neighborjoining and protein parsimony algorithms indicated that the predicted 1115-residue polypeptide contained five motifs associated with DNA polymerases synthetic activities and three additional motifs associated with polymerases possessing 3' to 5' exonuclease activity. The molecular phylogenetic analysis of this gene supported the placement of Bombyx mori parvo-like virus in a separate virus family.

  18. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    Expedition 41 Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos hold up tiger toys that will be carried with them to the International Space Station to commemorate International Tiger Day at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. The mission is set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  19. Expedition 32 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-13

    Quarantined Expedition 32 JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) Flight Engineer Akihiko Hoshide answers reporters questions from behind glass during a prelaunch press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel on Friday, July 13, 2012 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Hoshide, Soyuz Commander Yuri Malenchenko, and NASA Flight Engineer Sunita Williams is scheduled for 8:40 a.m. local time on Sunday, July 15. Photo Credit (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  20. Expedition 34 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-18

    Expedition 34/35 NASA Flight Engineer Tom Marshburn answers a reporter's question at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, on Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for December 19 and will send Marshburn, Roman Romanenko of ROSCOSMOS and Chris Hadfield of the Canadian Space Agency on a five-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  1. Expedition 32 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-13

    Quarantined Expedition 32 JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) Flight Engineer Akihiko Hoshide, left, answers reporters questions from behind glass during a prelaunch press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel on Friday, July 13, 2012 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Seated next to him is Soyuz Commander Yuri Malenchenko. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Hoshide, Malenchenko, and NASA Flight Engineer Sunita Williams is scheduled for 8:40 a.m. local time on Sunday, July 15. Photo Credit (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  2. Expedition 34 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-18

    Expedition 34/35 Flight Engineer and Expedition 35 Commander Chris Hadfield of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) answers a reporter's question at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, on Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2012, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for December 19 and will send Hadfield, Tom Marshburn of NASA and Roman Romanenko of ROSCOSMOS on a five-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  3. Expedition 33 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-22

    Expedition 33 Soyuz Commander Oleg Novitskiy answers a reporters question during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, on Monday, October 22, 2012, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for October 23 and will send Expedition 33/34 Flight Engineer Kevin Ford of NASA, Soyuz Commander Oleg Novitskiy and Flight Engineer Evgeny Tarelkin of ROSCOSMOS on a five-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Expedition 32 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-07-13

    Quarantined Expedition 32 Soyuz Commander Yuri Malenchenko, right, answers reporters questions from behind glass during a prelaunch press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel on Friday, July 13, 2012 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Seated next to him is JAXA Flight Engineer Akihiko Hoshide. The launch of the Soyuz spacecraft with Malenchenko, NASA Flight Engineer Sunita Williams and Hoshide is scheduled for 8:40 a.m. local time on Sunday, July 15. Photo Credit (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  5. Expedition 37 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-24

    Expedition 37 NASA Flight Engineer Michael Hopkins answers a reporter's question at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for September 26 and will send Hopkins, Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov and Russian Flight Engineer Sergei Ryazansky on a five and a half-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  6. Expedition 37 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-24

    Expedition 37 backup crewmember Alexander Skvortsov anwers a reporter’s question at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, on Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for September 26 and will send Kotov, Hopkins and Ryazansky on a five and a half-month mission aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  7. Astrobiology Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-02

    Steven Benner, a distinguished fellow at the Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. NASA-funded astrobiology research has changed the fundamental knowledge about what comprises all known life on Earth. Researchers conducting tests in the harsh environment of Mono Lake in California have discovered the first known microorganism on Earth able to thrive and reproduce using the toxic chemical arsenic. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  8. Astrobiology Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-02

    Felisa Wolfe-Simon, a lead researcher and NASA astrobiology research fellow, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. NASA-funded astrobiology research has changed the fundamental knowledge about what comprises all known life on Earth. Researchers conducting tests in the harsh environment of Mono Lake in California have discovered the first known microorganism on Earth able to thrive and reproduce using the toxic chemical arsenic. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  9. Astrobiology Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-02

    Felisa Wolfe-Simon, director, Astrobiology Program, NASA Headquarters, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. NASA-funded astrobiology research has changed the fundamental knowledge about what comprises all known life on Earth. Researchers conducting tests in the harsh environment of Mono Lake in California have discovered the first known microorganism on Earth able to thrive and reproduce using the toxic chemical arsenic. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  10. Astrobiology Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-02

    Pamela Conrad, an astrobiologist from Goddard Space Flight Center, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. NASA-funded astrobiology research has changed the fundamental knowledge about what comprises all known life on Earth. Researchers conducting tests in the harsh environment of Mono Lake in California have discovered the first known microorganism on Earth able to thrive and reproduce using the toxic chemical arsenic. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  11. Military Energy Alternatives Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-08

    Power Generation and Alternative Energy Branch US Army RDECOM CERDEC CP&ID Power Division Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD...RDER-CCA-PG PG A E - C R – 1 2– 0 1 M ili ta ry E ne rg y A lte rn at iv es C on fe re nc e Military Energy ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Energy Alternatives Conference 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jonathan

  12. Expedition 38 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-06

    Expedition 38 backup crew member Reid Wiseman of NASA is seen in quarantine, behind glass, during the final press conference held a day ahead of the launch of Expedition 38 prime crew members; Flight Engineer Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, and, Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA, to the International Space Station, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    NASA Expedition 41 backup crew member Flight Engineer Scott Kelly of NASA answers a question during a press conference Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Expedition 41 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos are set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  14. Expedition 38 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-06

    Expedition 38 Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, right, talks as Flight Engineer Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, listens, from quarantine behind glass, during the final press conference held a day ahead of their launch with fellow crew mate, Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA, to the International Space Station, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Expedition 38 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-06

    Expedition 38 Flight Engineer Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency is seen in quarantine, behind glass, during the final press conference held a day ahead of his launch with fellow crew mates, Expedition 38 Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, and, Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA, to the International Space Station, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    Expedition 41 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA answers a question during a press conference on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for Sept. 26 and will carry Wilmore, Elena Serova of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), and Alexander Samokutyaev of Roscosmos into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  17. Expedition 38 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-06

    Expedition 38 Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos is seen in quarantine behind glass during the final press conference held a day ahead of his launch with fellow crew mates, Flight Engineer Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, and, Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA, to the International Space Station, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Expedition 38 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-06

    Expedition 38 backup crew member Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency is seen in quarantine, behind glass, during the final press conference held a day ahead of the launch of Expedition 38 prime crew members; Flight Engineer Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, and, Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA, to the International Space Station, Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2013 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Kepler Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-05

    William Bo-Ricki, Kepler principal investigator at NASA's Ames Research Center, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington about the scientific observations coming from the Kepler spacecraft that was launched this past March. Kepler is NASA's first mission that is capable of discovering earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of stars like our Sun. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  20. Kepler Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-05

    Jon Morse, NASA's Astrophysics Division Director, left, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington about the scientific observations coming from the Kepler spacecraft that was launched this past March asWilliam Bo-Ricki, Kepler principal investigator at NASA's Ames Research Center, looks on. Kepler is NASA's first mission that is capable of discovering earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of stars like our Sun. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  1. Kepler Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-05

    Sara Seager, Professor of Planetary Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington about the scientific observations coming from the Kepler spacecraft that was launched this past March. Kepler is NASA's first mission that is capable of discovering earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of stars like our Sun. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  2. Constellation Program Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-06-04

    NASA Administrator Michael Griffin, seated left, Scott Horowitz, NASA Associate Administrator for Exploration Systems and Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager, right, are seen during a press conference outlining specific center responsibilities associated with the Constellation Program for robotic and human moon and Mars exploration, Monday, June 5, 2006, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Dean Acosta, NASA Deputy Assistant Administrator and Press Secretary, far left, moderates the program. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. SAARC Conference on Children.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    In September 1992, in Colombo, Sri Lanka, ministry representatives attended the 2nd South Asian Ministerial Conference on Children to discuss child survival and safe motherhood, maternal and child nutrition, basic education, safe water, sanitation, the environment, child rights, and sociopolitical strategy to reach goals and to reduce poverty. To achieve the 7 major goals and essential supportive goals for the region, each country must define tasks in manageable terms based on country-specific and community-specific needs and importance while at the same time countries should cooperate to strengthen prospects of achieving goals emerging as priorities. The Conference called for countries to reinforce their National Plans of Action with a regional perspective and to consider representative goals in primary education, diarrhea control, iodine deficiency disorders, reducing gender disparity, family size, child labor, drinking water, guinea worm disease, immunization, maternal mortality, and nutrition. The Conference emphasized that the strategy for reaching child-centered goals should be integrated with the total development strategy and be a holistic approach. For example, governments need to expand social safety programs for children and women because of structural adjustments in the economy. The resolution also called on governments to allow community-led local planning. A working group at the conference made recommendations for supporting/sectoral goals on water supply, sanitation, and environment. For example, it called for universal access to potable water and sanitary means of excreta disposal by 2000 and for adequate shelter and services to improve the living environment of children in South Asia. Some recommended strategies to achieve these goals were community participation; decentralization; promotion of self-reliance, cost-sharing, and sustainability; and special training for women. Other areas they addressed were home gardens for vegetables and fruits

  4. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    Expedition 41 prime crew members, Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, left, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), center, and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos, right, pose for a photo at the conclusion of the press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. Their mission to the International Space Station is set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  5. Expedition 52 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 prime and backup crews: Paolo Nespoli of ESA, left, Randy Bresnik of NASA, Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos, Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos, Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and, Mark Vande Hei of NASA pose for group photograph at the conclusion of their crew press conference at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC), Monday, July 10, 2017 in Star City, Russia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Expedition 40 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-27

    Expedition 40 Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, ESA, left, Soyuz Commander Maxim Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, center, and Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman of NASA, right, wave to those gathered at the conclusion of a press conference, Tuesday, May 27, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch May 29 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  7. Expedition 42 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-22

    Expedition 42 Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA (left), Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) (center), and Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (right), pose for a photo at the conclusion of the press conference, Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch Nov. 24 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  8. Expedition 40 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-27

    Expedition 40 Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, ESA, left, Soyuz Commander Maxim Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, center, and Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman of NASA, right, pose for a picture at the conclusion of a press conference, Tuesday, May 27, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch May 29 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  9. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    Expedition 41 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, left, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), center, and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos, right, wave to the crowd at the conclusion of the press conference, Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  10. GLORY Mission Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-20

    Joy Bretthauer, Glory Program Executive, NASA Headquarters, talks about the launch of the GLORY mission during a news conference at NASA Headquarters, Thursday, Jan. 20, 2011, in Washington. NASA's newest Earth-observing research mission is scheduled for launch form Vandenburg Air Force Base in California on Feb. 23. The mission will improve our understanding of how the sun and tiny atmosppheric particles called aerosols affect Earth's climate. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  11. GLORY Mission Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-20

    Michael Mischenko, from NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies, and a Glory project scientist, talks about the launch of the GLORY mission during a news conference at NASA Headquarters, Thursday, Jan. 20, 2011, in Washington. NASA's newest Earth-observing research mission is scheduled for launch form Vandenburg Air Force Base in California on Feb. 23. The mission will improve our understanding of how the sun and tiny atmosppheric particles called aerosols affect Earth's climate. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  12. Kepler Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-05

    Alan Boss, an astrophyscist at the Carnegie Institution at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington about the scientific observations coming from the Kepler spacecraft that was launched this past March. Kepler is NASA's first mission that is capable of discovering earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of stars like our Sun. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  13. Co-evolution of RNA polymerase with RbpA in the phylum Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Abhinav; Adithi, V.R.; Chatterji, Dipankar

    2012-01-01

    The role of RbpA in the backdrop of M. smegmatis showed that it rescues mycobacterial RNA polymerase from rifampicin-mediated inhibition (Dey et al., 2010; Dey et al., 2011). Paget and co-workers (Paget et al., 2001; Newell et al., 2006) have revealed that RbpA homologs occur exclusively in actinobacteria. Newell et al. (2006) showed that MtbRbpA, when complemented in a ∆rbpA mutant of S. coelicolor, showed a low recovery of MIC (from 0.75 to 2 μg/ml) as compared to complementation by native RbpA of S. coelicolor (MIC increases from 0.75 to 11 μg/ml). Our studies on MsRbpA show that it is a differential marker for M. smegmatis RNA polymerase as compared to E. coli RNA polymerase at IC50 levels of rifampicin. A recent sequence-based analysis by Lane and Darst (2010) has shown that RNA polymerases from Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria have had a divergent evolution. E. coli is a representative of Proteobacteria and M. smegmatis is an Actinobacterium. RbpA has an exclusive occurrence in Actinobacteria. Since protein–protein interactions might not be conserved across different species, therefore, the probable reason for the indifference of MsRbpA toward E. coli RNA polymerase could be the lineage-specific differences between actinobacterial and proteobacterial RNA polymerases. These observations led us to ask the question as to whether the evolution of RbpA in Actinobacteria followed the same route as that of RNA polymerase subunits from actinobacterial species. We show that the exclusivity of RbpA in Actinobacteria and the unique evolution of RNA polymerase in this phylum share a co-evolutionary link. We have addressed this issue by a blending of experimental and bioinformatics based approaches. They comprise of induction of bacterial cultures coupled to rifampicin-tolerance, transcription assays and statistical comparison of phylogenetic trees for different pairs of proteins in actinobacteria. PMID:27896048

  14. 2004 Mutagenesis Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sue Jinks-Robertson

    2005-09-16

    Mutations are genetic alterations that drive biological evolution and cause many, if not all, human diseases. Mutation originates via two distinct mechanisms: ''vertical'' variation is de novo change of one or few bases, whereas ''horizontal'' variation occurs by genetic recombination, which creates new mosaics of pre-existing sequences. The Mutagenesis Conference has traditionally focused on the generation of mutagenic intermediates during normal DNA synthesis or in response to environmental insults, as well as the diverse repair mechanisms that prevent the fixation of such intermediates as permanent mutations. While the 2004 Conference will continue to focus on the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis, there will be increased emphasis on the biological consequences of mutations, both in terms of evolutionary processes and in terms of human disease. The meeting will open with two historical accounts of mutation research that recapitulate the intellectual framework of this field and thereby place the current research paradigms into perspective. The two introductory keynote lectures will be followed by sessions on: (1) mutagenic systems, (2) hypermutable sequences, (3) mechanisms of mutation, (4) mutation avoidance systems, (5) mutation in human hereditary and infectious diseases, (6) mutation rates in evolution and genotype-phenotype relationships, (7) ecology, mutagenesis and the modeling of evolution and (8) genetic diversity of the human population and models for human mutagenesis. The Conference will end with a synthesis of the meeting as the keynote closing lecture.

  15. SALT Science Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, David; Schroeder, Anja

    2015-06-01

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) has seen great changes in the last years following the beginning of full time science operations in 2011. The three first generation instruments, namely the SALTICAM imager, the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) and its multiple modes and finally in 2014, the new High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS), have commissioned it. The SALT community now eagerly anticipate the installation and commissioning of the near-infrared arm of RSS, likely to commence in 2016. The the third "Science with SALT" conference was held at the Stellenbosch Institute of Advanced Study from 1-5 June 2015. The goals of this conference were to: -Present and discuss recent results from SALT observations; -Anticipate scientific programs that will be carried out with new SALT instrumentation such as RSS-NIR; -Provide a scientific environment in which to foster inter-institutional and inter-facility collaborations between scientists at the different SALT partners; -Provide an opportunity for students and postdocs to become more engaged in SALT science and operations; -Encourage the scientific strategic planning that will be necessary to insure an important role for SALT in an era of large astronomical facilities in the southern hemisphere such as MeerKAT, the SKA, LSST, and ALMA; -Consider options for future instrumentation and technical development of SALT; and, -Present, discuss, and engage in the SALT Collateral Benefits program led by SAAO. Conference proceedings editors: David Buckley and Anja Schroeder

  16. CONFERENCE NOTE: Forthcoming Conference on Frequency Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-04-01

    The Third Symposium on Frequency Standards and Metrology will be held 5 7 October 1981 at the Centre Paul Langevin, Aussois, Savoie, France. This Conference will follow the lines of its predecessors at Forêt Montmorency, Quebec, Canada in September 1971 and at Copper Mountain, Colorado, USA in July 1976. It is intended to serve as a discussion forum on recent progress and ideas relating to precision frequency standards, the associated metrology and the specific fields of applications. A tentative list of the topics to be covered is the following: Progress in the field of atomic/molecular frequency standards throughout the electromagnetic spectrum Current trends and discussion of the precision capabilities of new techniques (Ramsey fringes in optics, cooling of atoms and ions . . . ) System application (VLBI, navigation . . .) and scientific applications (relativity, geodesy . . .) of atomic/molecular frequency standards and needs in these fields Modern distant time and frequency comparisons Progress in frequency synthesis of microwave to visible frequencies, etc. Most of the talks will be by invitation. Time will be provided for discussion, as well as for presentation of selected late ideas and results. Those interested in the Symposium should communicate with: Dr C Audoin, Laboratoire de l'Horloge Atomique, Bât. 221, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex, France.

  17. Evolution of DNA polymerases: an inactivated polymerase-exonuclease module in Pol ε and a chimeric origin of eukaryotic polymerases from two classes of archaeal ancestors

    PubMed Central

    Tahirov, Tahir H; Makarova, Kira S; Rogozin, Igor B; Pavlov, Youri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2009-01-01

    Background Evolution of DNA polymerases, the key enzymes of DNA replication and repair, is central to any reconstruction of the history of cellular life. However, the details of the evolutionary relationships between DNA polymerases of archaea and eukaryotes remain unresolved. Results We performed a comparative analysis of archaeal, eukaryotic, and bacterial B-family DNA polymerases, which are the main replicative polymerases in archaea and eukaryotes, combined with an analysis of domain architectures. Surprisingly, we found that eukaryotic Polymerase ε consists of two tandem exonuclease-polymerase modules, the active N-terminal module and a C-terminal module in which both enzymatic domains are inactivated. The two modules are only distantly related to each other, an observation that suggests the possibility that Pol ε evolved as a result of insertion and subsequent inactivation of a distinct polymerase, possibly, of bacterial descent, upstream of the C-terminal Zn-fingers, rather than by tandem duplication. The presence of an inactivated exonuclease-polymerase module in Pol ε parallels a similar inactivation of both enzymatic domains in a distinct family of archaeal B-family polymerases. The results of phylogenetic analysis indicate that eukaryotic B-family polymerases, most likely, originate from two distantly related archaeal B-family polymerases, one form giving rise to Pol ε, and the other one to the common ancestor of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ζ. The C-terminal Zn-fingers that are present in all eukaryotic B-family polymerases, unexpectedly, are homologous to the Zn-finger of archaeal D-family DNA polymerases that are otherwise unrelated to the B family. The Zn-finger of Polε shows a markedly greater similarity to the counterpart in archaeal PolD than the Zn-fingers of other eukaryotic B-family polymerases. Conclusion Evolution of eukaryotic DNA polymerases seems to have involved previously unnoticed complex events. We hypothesize that the archaeal

  18. Solving the RNA polymerase I structural puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno-Morcillo, María; Taylor, Nicholas M. I.; Gruene, Tim; Legrand, Pierre; Rashid, Umar J.; Ruiz, Federico M.; Steuerwald, Ulrich; Müller, Christoph W.; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    Details of the RNA polymerase I crystal structure determination provide a framework for solution of the structures of other multi-subunit complexes. Simple crystallographic experiments are described to extract relevant biological information such as the location of the enzyme active site. Knowing the structure of multi-subunit complexes is critical to understand basic cellular functions. However, when crystals of these complexes can be obtained they rarely diffract beyond 3 Å resolution, which complicates X-ray structure determination and refinement. The crystal structure of RNA polymerase I, an essential cellular machine that synthesizes the precursor of ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus of eukaryotic cells, has recently been solved. Here, the crucial steps that were undertaken to build the atomic model of this multi-subunit enzyme are reported, emphasizing how simple crystallographic experiments can be used to extract relevant biological information. In particular, this report discusses the combination of poor molecular replacement and experimental phases, the application of multi-crystal averaging and the use of anomalous scatterers as sequence markers to guide tracing and to locate the active site. The methods outlined here will likely serve as a reference for future structural determination of large complexes at low resolution.

  19. Polymerase chain reaction assay for avian polyomavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Phalen, D N; Wilson, V G; Graham, D L

    1991-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction assay was developed for detection of budgerigar fledgling disease virus (BFDV). The assay used a single set of primers complementary to sequences located in the putative coding region for the BFDV VP1 gene. The observed amplification product had the expected size of 550 bp and was confirmed to derive from BFDV DNA by its restriction digestion pattern. This assay was specific for BFDV and highly sensitive, being able to detect as few as 20 copies of the virus. By using the polymerase chain reaction, BFDV was detected in adult, nestling, and embryo budgerigar (Melopsitticus undulatus) tissue DNAs and in sera from adult and nestling budgerigars. These results suggest the possibility of persistent infections in adult birds and lend further support to previously described evidence of possible in ovo transmission. BFDV was also detected in chicken embryo fibroblast cell cultures and chicken eggs inoculated with the virus. A 550-bp product with identical restriction enzyme sites was amplified from a suspected polyomavirus isolated from a peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis pesonata) and from tissue DNA from a Hahn's macaw (Ara nobilis) and a sun conure (Aratinga solstitialis) with histological lesions suggestive of polyomavirus infection. These fragments also hybridized with a BFDV-derived probe, proving that they were derived from a polyomavirus very similar, if not identical, to BFDV. Images PMID:1647403

  20. Polymerase chain reaction assay for avian polyomavirus.

    PubMed

    Phalen, D N; Wilson, V G; Graham, D L

    1991-05-01

    A polymerase chain reaction assay was developed for detection of budgerigar fledgling disease virus (BFDV). The assay used a single set of primers complementary to sequences located in the putative coding region for the BFDV VP1 gene. The observed amplification product had the expected size of 550 bp and was confirmed to derive from BFDV DNA by its restriction digestion pattern. This assay was specific for BFDV and highly sensitive, being able to detect as few as 20 copies of the virus. By using the polymerase chain reaction, BFDV was detected in adult, nestling, and embryo budgerigar (Melopsitticus undulatus) tissue DNAs and in sera from adult and nestling budgerigars. These results suggest the possibility of persistent infections in adult birds and lend further support to previously described evidence of possible in ovo transmission. BFDV was also detected in chicken embryo fibroblast cell cultures and chicken eggs inoculated with the virus. A 550-bp product with identical restriction enzyme sites was amplified from a suspected polyomavirus isolated from a peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis pesonata) and from tissue DNA from a Hahn's macaw (Ara nobilis) and a sun conure (Aratinga solstitialis) with histological lesions suggestive of polyomavirus infection. These fragments also hybridized with a BFDV-derived probe, proving that they were derived from a polyomavirus very similar, if not identical, to BFDV.

  1. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Three DNA polymerases — Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ — are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson–Crick base pairing and 3′exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to ‘polymerase proofreading associated polyposis’ (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an ‘ultramutator’ phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions. PMID:24583393

  2. Archaeal RNA polymerase and transcription regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Sung-Hoon; Reichlen, Matthew J.; Tajiri, Momoko; Murakami, Katsuhiko S.

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of transcription by cellular RNA polymerases (RNAPs), high resolution X-ray crystal structures together with structure-guided biochemical, biophysical and genetics studies are essential. The recently-solved X-ray crystal structures of archaeal RNA polymerase (RNAP) allow a structural comparison of the transcription machinery among all three domains of life. The archaea were once thought of closely related to bacteria, but they are now considered to be more closely related to the eukaryote at the molecular level than bacteria. According to these structures, the archaeal transcription apparatus, which includes RNAP and general transcription factors, is similar to the eukaryotic transcription machinery. Yet, the transcription regulators, activators and repressors, encoded by archaeal genomes are closely related to bacterial factors. Therefore, archaeal transcription appears to possess an intriguing hybrid of eukaryotic-type transcription apparatus and bacterial-like regulatory mechanisms. Elucidating the transcription mechanism in archaea, which possesses a combination of bacterial and eukaryotic transcription mechanisms that are commonly regarded as separate and mutually exclusive, can provide data that will bring basic transcription mechanisms across all three domains of life. PMID:21250781

  3. Ratcheting of RNA polymerase toward structural principles of RNA polymerase operations

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Shun-ichi; Murayama, Yuko; Svetlov, Vladimir; Nudler, Evgeny; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) performs various tasks during transcription by changing its conformational states, which are gradually becoming clarified. A recent study focusing on the conformational transition of RNAP between the ratcheted and tight forms illuminated the structural principles underlying its functional operations. PMID:26226152

  4. RNA Polymerase III Accurately Initiates Transcription from RNA Polymerase II Promoters in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Duttke, Sascha H. C.

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, there are three major RNA polymerases (Pol) in the nucleus, which are commonly described as transcribing non-overlapping subsets of genes. Structural studies have highlighted a conserved core shared among all three transcription systems. Initiation of human Pol III from TATA box-containing Pol II promoters under conditions with impaired Pol II transcription activity have been described previously. RNA polymerase III and Pol II were found to co-localize at the promoters of the c-myc gene and the RPPH1 sRNA in vivo. Here, I report that Pol III can, like Pol II, initiate transcription from most tested Pol II core promoters when assayed with crude human nuclear extracts (HSK, SNF, or Dignam). Both polymerases often initiate from the same transcription start site, and depend on a TATA box or AT-rich region but not the downstream promoter element (DPE) or the motif ten element (MTE). Moderate (∼2-fold) changes in the ratio of DNA template to nuclear extract were sufficient to change Pol II-mediated transcription to a mixture of Pol II- and Pol III-, or to a solely Pol III-dependent initiation of transcription from Pol II promoters. Polymerase specificity is thus not fixed but a variable that depends on the properties of the promoter and the transcription conditions. These findings provide functional evidence for a close similarity between the Pol II and Pol III transcription complexes, and additionally explain previous controversies in the literature. PMID:24917680

  5. PREFACE: Wake Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, Andrew; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Ivanell, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The 44 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the 2015 Wake Conference, held in Visby on the island of Gotland in Sweden. It is the fourth time this conference has been held. The Wake Conference series started in Visby, where it was held in 2009 and 2011. In 2013 it took place in Copenhagen where it was combined with the International Conference on Offshore Wind Energy and Ocean Energy. In 2015 it is back where it started in Visby, where it takes place at Uppsala University Campus Gotland, June 9th-11th. The global yearly production of electrical energy by wind turbines has grown tremendously in the past decade and it now comprises more than 3% of the global electrical power consumption. Today the wind power industry has a global annual turnover of more than 50 billion USD and an annual average growth rate of more than 20%. State-of-the-art wind turbines have rotor diameters of up to 150 m and 8 MW installed capacity. These turbines are often placed in large wind farms that have a total production capacity corresponding to that of a nuclear power plant. In order to make a substantial impact on one of the most significant challenges of our time, global warming, the industry's growth has to continue for a decade or two yet. This in turn requires research into the physics of wind turbine wakes and wind farms. Modern wind turbines are today clustered in wind farms in which the turbines are fully or partially influenced by the wake of upstream turbines. As a consequence, the wake behind the wind turbines has a lower mean wind speed and an increased turbulence level, as compared to the undisturbed flow outside the farm. Hence, wake interaction results in decreased total production of power, caused by lower kinetic energy in the wind, and an increase in the turbulence intensity. Therefore, understanding the physical nature of the vortices and their dynamics in the wake of a turbine is important for the optimal design of a wind farm. This conference is aimed

  6. Unusual organization of a developmentally regulated mitochondrial RNA polymerase (TBMTRNAP) gene in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Sandra L.; Koslowsky, Donna J.

    2009-01-01

    We report here the characterization of a developmentally regulated mitochondrial RNA polymerase transcript in the parasitic protozoan, Trypanosoma brucei. The 3822 bp protein-coding region of the T. brucei mitochondrial RNA polymerase (TBMTRNAP) gene is predicted to encode a 1274 amino acid polypeptide, the carboxyl-terminal domain of which exhibits 29–37% identity with the mitochondrial RNA polymerases from other organisms in the molecular databases. Interestingly, the TBMTRNAP mRNA is one of several mature mRNA species post-transcriptionally processed from a stable, polycistronic precursor. Alternative polyadenylation of the TBMTRNAP mRNA produces two mature transcripts that differ by 500 nt and that show stage-specific differences in abundance during the T. brucei life cycle. This alternative polyadenylation event appears to be accompanied by the alternative splicing of a high abundance, non-coding downstream transcript of unknown function. Our finding that the TBMTRNAP gene is transcribed into two distinct mRNAs subject to differential regulation during the T. brucei life cycle suggests that mitochondrial differentiation might be achieved in part through the regulated expression of this gene. PMID:11470527

  7. The DnaE polymerase from Deinococcus radiodurans features RecA-dependent DNA polymerase activity

    PubMed Central

    Randi, Lorenzo; Perrone, Alessandro; Maturi, Mirko; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Camerani, Michela; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    We report in the present study on the catalytic properties of the Deinococcus radiodurans DNA polymerase III α subunit (αDr). The αDr enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, both in soluble form and as inclusion bodies. When purified from soluble protein extracts, αDr was found to be tightly associated with E. coli RNA polymerase, from which αDr could not be dissociated. On the contrary, when refolded from inclusion bodies, αDr was devoid of E. coli RNA polymerase and was purified to homogeneity. When assayed with different DNA substrates, αDr featured slower DNA extension rates when compared with the corresponding enzyme from E. coli (E. coli DNA Pol III, αEc), unless under high ionic strength conditions or in the presence of manganese. Further assays were performed using a ssDNA and a dsDNA, whose recombination yields a DNA substrate. Surprisingly, αDr was found to be incapable of recombination-dependent DNA polymerase activity, whereas αEc was competent in this action. However, in the presence of the RecA recombinase, αDr was able to efficiently extend the DNA substrate produced by recombination. Upon comparing the rates of RecA-dependent and RecA-independent DNA polymerase activities, we detected a significant activation of αDr by the recombinase. Conversely, the activity of αEc was found maximal under non-recombination conditions. Overall, our observations indicate a sharp contrast between the catalytic actions of αDr and αEc, with αDr more performing under recombination conditions, and αEc preferring DNA substrates whose extension does not require recombination events. PMID:27789781

  8. Chimeric Bivalent Virus-Like Particle Vaccine for H5N1 HPAI and ND Confers Protection against a Lethal Challenge in Chickens and Allows a Strategy of Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals (DIVA).

    PubMed

    Noh, Jin-Yong; Park, Jae-Keun; Lee, Dong-Hun; Yuk, Seong-Su; Kwon, Jung-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) and Newcastle disease (ND) are considered as the most devastating poultry infections, owing to their worldwide distribution and economical threat. Vaccines have been widely used to control these diseases in the poultry industry in endemic countries. However, vaccination policy without differentiating infected animals from vaccinated animals (DIVA) makes the virus surveillance difficult. In this study, we developed a bivalent virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine that is composed of the hemagglutinin (HA) and matrix 1 (M1) proteins of the H5N1 HPAI virus (HPAIV) and a chimeric protein containing the ectodomain of the ND virus (NDV) fusion (F) protein fused with the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains of the HPAIV HA protein. A single immunization of chickens with the chimeric VLP vaccine induced high levels of hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titers against H5N1 HPAI virus and anti-NDV antibody detected in ELISA and protected chickens against subsequent lethal HPAIV and NDV infections. Furthermore, we could easily perform DIVA test using the commercial NP-cELISA tests against HPAIV and HI assay against NDV. These results strongly suggest that utilization of chimeric VLP vaccine in poultry species would be a promising strategy for the better control of HPAI and ND simultaneously.

  9. Chimeric Bivalent Virus-Like Particle Vaccine for H5N1 HPAI and ND Confers Protection against a Lethal Challenge in Chickens and Allows a Strategy of Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals (DIVA)

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jin-Yong; Park, Jae-Keun; Lee, Dong-Hun; Yuk, Seong-Su; Kwon, Jung-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) and Newcastle disease (ND) are considered as the most devastating poultry infections, owing to their worldwide distribution and economical threat. Vaccines have been widely used to control these diseases in the poultry industry in endemic countries. However, vaccination policy without differentiating infected animals from vaccinated animals (DIVA) makes the virus surveillance difficult. In this study, we developed a bivalent virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine that is composed of the hemagglutinin (HA) and matrix 1 (M1) proteins of the H5N1 HPAI virus (HPAIV) and a chimeric protein containing the ectodomain of the ND virus (NDV) fusion (F) protein fused with the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains of the HPAIV HA protein. A single immunization of chickens with the chimeric VLP vaccine induced high levels of hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titers against H5N1 HPAI virus and anti-NDV antibody detected in ELISA and protected chickens against subsequent lethal HPAIV and NDV infections. Furthermore, we could easily perform DIVA test using the commercial NP-cELISA tests against HPAIV and HI assay against NDV. These results strongly suggest that utilization of chimeric VLP vaccine in poultry species would be a promising strategy for the better control of HPAI and ND simultaneously. PMID:27626934

  10. DNA microarray analysis of genes differentially expressed in adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chunyan; Xiao, Yanfeng; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Erdi; Liu, Weihua; Yi, Xiaoqing; Chang, Ming

    2014-06-01

    In the present study, the human liposarcoma cell line SW872 was used to identify global changes in gene expression profiles occurring during adipogenesis. We further explored some of the genes expressed during the late phase of adipocyte differentiation. These genes may play a major role in promoting excessive proliferation and accumulation of lipid droplets, which contribute to the development of obesity. By using microarray-based technology, we examined differential gene expression in early differentiated adipocytes and late differentiated adipocytes. Validated genes exhibited a greater than or equal to 10-fold increase in the late phase of adipocyte differentiation by polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Compared with undifferentiated preadipocytes, we found that 763 genes were increased in early differentiated adipocytes, and 667 genes were increased in later differentiated adipocytes. Furthermore, 21 genes were found being expressed 10-fold higher in the late phase of adipocyte differentiation. The results were in accordance with the RTPCR test, which validated 11 genes, namely, CIDEC, PID1, LYRM1, ADD1, PPAR?2, ANGPTL4, ADIPOQ, ACOX1, FIP1L1, MAP3K2 and PEX14. Most of these genes were found being expressed in the later phase of adipocyte differentiation involved in obesity-related diseases. The findings may help to better understand the mechanism of obesity and related diseases.

  11. Germline and somatic polymerase ε and δ mutations define a new class of hypermutated colorectal and endometrial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Sarah; Tomlinson, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Polymerases ϵ and δ are the main enzymes that replicate eukaryotic DNA. Accurate replication occurs through Watson–Crick base pairing and also through the action of the polymerases' exonuclease (proofreading) domains. We have recently shown that germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) of POLE and POLD1 confer a high risk of multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma (CRC). POLD1 mutations also predispose to endometrial cancer (EC). These mutations are associated with high penetrance and dominant inheritance, although the phenotype can be variable. We have named the condition polymerase proofreading-associated polyposis (PPAP). Somatic POLE EDMs have also been found in sporadic CRCs and ECs, although very few somatic POLD1 EDMs have been detected. Both the germline and the somatic DNA polymerase EDMs cause an ‘ultramutated’, apparently microsatellite-stable, type of cancer, sometimes leading to over a million base substitutions per tumour. Here, we present the evidence for POLE and POLD1 as important contributors to the pathogenesis of CRC and EC, and highlight some of the key questions in this emerging field. Copyright © 2013 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd PMID:23447401

  12. Multisubunit RNA Polymerase Cleavage Factors Modulate the Kinetics and Energetics of Nucleotide Incorporation: An RNA Polymerase I Case Study.

    PubMed

    Appling, Francis D; Schneider, David A; Lucius, Aaron L

    2017-10-11

    All cellular RNA polymerases are influenced by protein factors that stimulate RNA polymerase-catalyzed cleavage of the nascent RNA. Despite divergence in amino acid sequence, these so-called "cleavage factors" appear to share a common mechanism of action. Cleavage factors associate with the polymerase through a conserved structural element of the polymerase known as the secondary channel or pore. This mode of association enables the cleavage factor to reach through the secondary channel into the polymerase active site to reorient the active site divalent metal ions. This reorientation converts the polymerase active site into a nuclease active site. Interestingly, eukaryotic RNA polymerases I and III (Pols I and III, respectively) have incorporated their cleavage factors as bona fide subunits known as A12.2 and C11, respectively. Although it is clear that A12.2 and C11 dramatically stimulate the polymerase's cleavage activity, it is not known if or how these subunits affect the polymerization mechanism. In this work we have used transient-state kinetic techniques to characterize a Pol I isoform lacking A12.2. Our data clearly demonstrate that the A12.2 subunit profoundly affects the kinetics and energetics of the elementary steps of Pol I-catalyzed nucleotide incorporation. Given the high degree of conservation between polymerase-cleavage factor interactions, these data indicate that cleavage factor-modulated nucleotide incorporation mechanisms may be common to all cellular RNA polymerases.

  13. Rift Valley Fever Virus Lacking the NSs and NSm Genes Is Highly Attenuated, Confers Protective Immunity from Virulent Virus Challenge, and Allows for Differential Identification of Infected and Vaccinated Animals▿

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Brian H.; Albariño, César G.; Hartman, Amy L.; Erickson, Bobbie Rae; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Nichol, Stuart T.

    2008-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus is a mosquito-borne human and veterinary pathogen associated with large outbreaks of severe disease throughout Africa and more recently the Arabian peninsula. Infection of livestock can result in sweeping “abortion storms” and high mortality among young animals. Human infection results in self-limiting febrile disease that in ∼1 to 2% of patients progresses to more serious complications including hepatitis, encephalitis, and retinitis or a hemorrhagic syndrome with high fatality. The virus S segment-encoded NSs and the M segment-encoded NSm proteins are important virulence factors. The development of safe, effective vaccines and tools to screen and evaluate antiviral compounds is critical for future control strategies. Here, we report the successful reverse genetics generation of multiple recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged RVF viruses containing either the full-length, complete virus genome or precise deletions of the NSs gene alone or the NSs/NSm genes in combination, thus creating attenuating deletions on multiple virus genome segments. These viruses were highly attenuated, with no detectable viremia or clinical illness observed with high challenge dosages (1.0 × 104 PFU) in the rat lethal disease model. A single-dose immunization regimen induced robust anti-RVF virus immunoglobulin G antibodies (titer, ∼1:6,400) by day 26 postvaccination. All vaccinated animals that were subsequently challenged with a high dose of virulent RVF virus survived infection and could be serologically differentiated from naïve, experimentally infected animals by the lack of NSs antibodies. These rationally designed marker RVF vaccine viruses will be useful tools for in vitro screening of therapeutic compounds and will provide a basis for further development of RVF virus marker vaccines for use in endemic regions or following the natural or intentional introduction of the virus into previously unaffected areas. PMID:18199647

  14. The wheat WRKY transcription factors TaWRKY49 and TaWRKY62 confer differential high-temperature seedling-plant resistance to Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjuan; Tao, Fei; Tian, Wei; Guo, Zhongfeng; Chen, Xianming; Xu, Xiangming; Shang, Hongsheng; Hu, Xiaoping

    2017-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs) play crucial roles in plant resistance responses to pathogens. Wheat stripe rust, caused by the fungal pathogen Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is a destructive disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum) worldwide. In this study, the two WRKY genes TaWRKY49 and TaWRKY62 were originally identified in association with high-temperature seedling-plant resistance to Pst (HTSP) resistance in wheat cultivar Xiaoyan 6 by RNA-seq. Interestingly, the expression levels of TaWRKY49 and TaWRKY62 were down- and up-regulated, respectively, during HTSP resistance in response to Pst. Silencing of TaWRKY49 enhanced whereas silencing TaWRKY62 reduced HTSP resistance. The enhanced resistance observed on leaves following the silencing of TaWRKY49 was coupled with increased expression of salicylic acid (SA)- and jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive genes TaPR1.1 and TaAOS, as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS)-associated genes TaCAT and TaPOD; whereas the ethylene (ET)-responsive gene TaPIE1 was suppressed. The decreased resistance observed on leaves following TaWRKY62 silencing was associated with increased expression of TaPR1.1 and TaPOD, and suppression of TaAOS and TaPIE1. Furthermore, SA, ET, MeJA (methyl jasmonate), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments increased TaWRKY62 expression. On the other hand, MeJA did not affect the expression of TaWRKY49, and H2O2 reduced TaWRKY49 expression. In conclusion, TaWRKY49 negatively regulates while TaWRKY62 positively regulates wheat HTSP resistance to Pst by differential regulation of SA-, JA-, ET and ROS-mediated signaling.

  15. The wheat WRKY transcription factors TaWRKY49 and TaWRKY62 confer differential high-temperature seedling-plant resistance to Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junjuan; Tao, Fei; Tian, Wei; Guo, Zhongfeng; Chen, Xianming; Xu, Xiangming; Shang, Hongsheng

    2017-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs) play crucial roles in plant resistance responses to pathogens. Wheat stripe rust, caused by the fungal pathogen Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is a destructive disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum) worldwide. In this study, the two WRKY genes TaWRKY49 and TaWRKY62 were originally identified in association with high-temperature seedling-plant resistance to Pst (HTSP) resistance in wheat cultivar Xiaoyan 6 by RNA-seq. Interestingly, the expression levels of TaWRKY49 and TaWRKY62 were down- and up-regulated, respectively, during HTSP resistance in response to Pst. Silencing of TaWRKY49 enhanced whereas silencing TaWRKY62 reduced HTSP resistance. The enhanced resistance observed on leaves following the silencing of TaWRKY49 was coupled with increased expression of salicylic acid (SA)- and jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive genes TaPR1.1 and TaAOS, as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS)-associated genes TaCAT and TaPOD; whereas the ethylene (ET)-responsive gene TaPIE1 was suppressed. The decreased resistance observed on leaves following TaWRKY62 silencing was associated with increased expression of TaPR1.1 and TaPOD, and suppression of TaAOS and TaPIE1. Furthermore, SA, ET, MeJA (methyl jasmonate), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments increased TaWRKY62 expression. On the other hand, MeJA did not affect the expression of TaWRKY49, and H2O2 reduced TaWRKY49 expression. In conclusion, TaWRKY49 negatively regulates while TaWRKY62 positively regulates wheat HTSP resistance to Pst by differential regulation of SA-, JA-, ET and ROS-mediated signaling. PMID:28742872

  16. Automated Author Aiding System Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    0V) 0 Technical Report 684 r-Vass A Automated Author Aiding System Conference: Final Report edited by Nancy K. Atwood University of California at...AUTHOR AIDING SYSTEM CONFERENCE: Final Report FINAL REPORT June 84 through June 85 4. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOM(I4~dited by Nancy K...Dots Entered) Technical Report 684 Automated Author Aiding System Conference: Final Report edited by Nancy K. Atwood University of California at Los

  17. Polymerase chain reaction with nearby primers.

    PubMed

    Garafutdinov, Ravil R; Galimova, Aizilya A; Sakhabutdinova, Assol R

    2017-02-01

    DNA analysis of biological specimens containing degraded nucleic acids such as mortal remains, archaeological artefacts, forensic samples etc. has gained more attention in recent years. DNA extracted from these samples is often inapplicable for conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), so for its amplification the nearby primers are commonly used. Here we report the data that clarify the features of PCR with nearby and abutting primers. We have shown that the proximity of primers leads to significant reduction of the reaction time and ensures the successful performance of DNA amplification even in the presence of PCR inhibitors. The PCR with abutting primers is usually characterized by the absence of nonspecific amplification products that causes extreme sensitivity with limit of detection on single copy level. The feasibility of PCR with abutting primers was demonstrated on species identification of 100 years old rotten wood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of DNA Polymerase Clamp Loaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelch, Brian; Makino, Debora; Simonetta, Kyle; O'Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John

    Clamp loaders are ATP-driven multiprotein machines that couple ATP hydrolysis to the opening and closing of a circular protein ring around DNA. This ring-shaped clamp slides along DNA, and interacts with numerous proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair and cell cycle control. Recently determined structures of clamp loader complexes from prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases have revealed exciting new details of how these complex AAA+ machines perform this essential clamp loading function. This review serves as background to John Kuriyan's lecture at the 2010 Erice School, and is not meant as a comprehensive review of the contributions of the many scientists who have advanced this field. These lecture notes are derived from recent reviews and research papers from our groups.

  19. Dual phase multiplex polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Pemov, Alexander; Bavykin, Sergei

    2008-10-07

    Highly specific and sensitive methods were developed for multiplex amplification of nucleic acids on supports such as microarrays. Based on a specific primer design, methods include five types of amplification that proceed in a reaction chamber simultaneously. These relate to four types of multiplex amplification of a target DNA on a solid support, directed by forward and reverse complex primers immobilized to the support and a fifth type--pseudo-monoplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of multiple targets in solution, directed by a single pair of unbound universal primers. The addition of the universal primers in the reaction mixture increases the yield over the traditional "bridge" amplification on a solid support by approximately ten times. Methods that provide multitarget amplification and detection of as little as 0.45-4.5.times.10.sup.-12 g (equivalent to 10.sup.2-10.sup.3 genomes) of a bacterial genomic DNA are disclosed.

  20. The RNA polymerase I transcription machinery.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jackie; Zomerdijk, Joost C B M

    2006-01-01

    The rRNAs constitute the catalytic and structural components of the ribosome, the protein synthesis machinery of cells. The level of rRNA synthesis, mediated by Pol I (RNA polymerase I), therefore has a major impact on the life and destiny of a cell. In order to elucidate how cells achieve the stringent control of Pol I transcription, matching the supply of rRNA to demand under different cellular growth conditions, it is essential to understand the components and mechanics of the Pol I transcription machinery. In this review, we discuss: (i) the molecular composition and functions of the Pol I enzyme complex and the two main Pol I transcription factors, SL1 (selectivity factor 1) and UBF (upstream binding factor); (ii) the interplay between these factors during pre-initiation complex formation at the rDNA promoter in mammalian cells; and (iii) the cellular control of the Pol I transcription machinery.

  1. Conformational flexibility of bacterial RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Darst, Seth A.; Opalka, Natacha; Chacon, Pablo; Polyakov, Andrey; Richter, Catherine; Zhang, Gongyi; Wriggers, Willy

    2002-01-01

    The structure of Escherichia coli core RNA polymerase (RNAP) was determined by cryo-electron microscopy and image processing of helical crystals to a nominal resolution of 15 Å. Because of the high sequence conservation between the core RNAP subunits, we were able to interpret the E. coli structure in relation to the high-resolution x-ray structure of Thermus aquaticus core RNAP. A very large conformational change of the T. aquaticus RNAP x-ray structure, corresponding to opening of the main DNA/RNA channel by nearly 25 Å, was required to fit the E. coli map. This finding reveals, at least partially, the range of conformational flexibility of the RNAP, which is likely to have functional implications for the initiation of transcription, where the DNA template must be loaded into the channel. PMID:11904365

  2. The punctilious RNA polymerase II core promoter.

    PubMed

    Vo Ngoc, Long; Wang, Yuan-Liang; Kassavetis, George A; Kadonaga, James T

    2017-07-01

    The signals that direct the initiation of transcription ultimately converge at the core promoter, which is the gateway to transcription. Here we provide an overview of the RNA polymerase II core promoter in bilateria (bilaterally symmetric animals). The core promoter is diverse in terms of its composition and function yet is also punctilious, as it acts with strict rules and precision. We additionally describe an expanded view of the core promoter that comprises the classical DNA sequence motifs, sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors, chromatin signals, and DNA structure. This model may eventually lead to a more unified conceptual understanding of the core promoter. © 2017 Vo ngoc et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  3. A conserved family of nuclear phosphoproteins localized to sites of polymerase II transcription

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    An antibody was identified previously that recognizes sites of polymerase II transcription on lampbrush chromosomes, puffs on polytene chromosomes, and many small granules in the nucleoplasm of all cells tested. This antibody binds a conserved family of phosphorylated polypeptides in vertebrate and invertebrate cells. We developed a method for purifying these proteins that involves differential solubility in MgCl2. We isolated a Drosophila cDNA encoding one of the proteins using information obtained from microsequencing. In vivo expression studies show that this protein is concentrated on sites of polymerase II transcription and that it is highly phosphorylated. The protein shares a high degree of homology with proteins involved in alternative splicing of pre-mRNA suggesting the possibility that this protein plays a role in pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:1717489

  4. A Cross-chiral RNA Polymerase Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Sczepanski, Jonathan T.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2014-01-01

    Thirty years ago it was shown that the non-enzymatic, template-directed polymerization of activated mononucleotides proceeds readily in a homochiral system, but is severely inhibited by the presence of the opposing enantiomer.1 This finding poses a severe challenge for the spontaneous emergence of RNA-based life, and has led to the suggestion that either RNA was preceded by some other genetic polymer that is not subject to chiral inhibition2 or chiral symmetry was broken through chemical processes prior to the origin of RNA-based life.3,4 Once an RNA enzyme arose that could catalyze the polymerization of RNA, it would have been possible to distinguish among the two enantiomers, enabling RNA replication and RNA-based evolution to occur. It is commonly thought that the earliest RNA polymerase and its substrates would have been of the same handedness, but this is not necessarily the case. Replicating D-and L-RNA molecules may have emerged together, based on the ability of structured RNAs of one handedness to catalyze the templated polymerization of activated mononucleotides of the opposite handedness. Such a cross-chiral RNA polymerase has now been developed using in vitro evolution. The D-RNA enzyme, consisting of 83 nucleotides, catalyzes the joining of L-mono- or oligonucleotide substrates on a complementary L-RNA template, and similarly for the L-enzyme with D-substrates and a D-template. Chiral inhibition is avoided because the 106-fold rate acceleration of the enzyme only pertains to cross-chiral substrates. The enzyme's activity is sufficient to generate full-length copies of its enantiomer through the templated joining of 11 component oligonucleotides. PMID:25363769

  5. Rural Energy Conference Project

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Witmer; Shannon Watson

    2008-12-31

    Alaska remains, even at the beginning of the 21st century, a place with many widely scattered, small, remote communities, well beyond the end of both the road system and the power grid. These communities have the highest energy costs of any place in the United States, despite the best efforts of the utilities that service them. This is due to the widespread dependence on diesel electric generators, which require small capital investments, but recent increases in crude oil prices have resulted in dramatic increases in the cost of power. In the enabling legislation for the Arctic Energy Office in 2001, specific inclusion was made for the study of ways of reducing the cost of electrical power in these remote communities. As part of this mandate, the University of Alaska has, in conjunction with the US Department of Energy, the Denali Commission and the Alaska Energy Authority, organized a series of rural energy conferences, held approximately every 18 months. The goal of these meeting was to bring together rural utility operators, rural community leaders, government agency representatives, equipment suppliers, and researchers from universities and national laboratories to discuss the current state of the art in rural power generation, to discuss current projects, including successes as well as near successes. Many of the conference presenters were from industry and not accustomed to writing technical papers, so the typical method of organizing a conference by requesting abstracts and publishing proceedings was not considered viable. Instead, the organizing committee solicited presentations from appropriate individuals, and requested that (if they were comfortable with computers) prepare Power point presentations that were collected and posted on the web. This has become a repository of many presentations, and may be the best single source of information about current projects in the state of Alaska.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA integrity is not dependent on DNA polymerase-beta activity.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Alexis B; Griner, Nicholas B; Anderson, Jon P; Kujoth, Greg C; Prolla, Tomas A; Loeb, Lawrence A; Glick, Eitan

    2006-01-05

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are involved in a variety of pathologies, including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, as well as in aging. mtDNA mutations result predominantly from damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS) that is not repaired prior to replication. Repair of ROS-damaged bases occurs mainly via base excision repair (BER) in mitochondria and nuclei. In nuclear BER, the two penultimate steps are carried out by DNA polymerase-beta (Polbeta), which exhibits both 5'-deoxyribose-5-phosphate (5'-dRP) lyase and DNA polymerase activities. In mitochondria, DNA polymerase-gamma (Polgamma) is believed to be the sole polymerase and is therefore assumed to function in mitochondrial BER. However, a recent report suggested the presence of Polbeta or a "Polbeta-like" enzyme in bovine mitochondria. Consequently, in the present work, we tested the hypothesis that Polbeta is present and functions in mammalian mitochondria. Initially we identified two DNA polymerase activities, one corresponding to Polgamma and the other to Polbeta, in mitochondrial preparations obtained by differential centrifugation and discontinuous sucrose density gradient centrifugation. However, upon further fractionation in linear Percoll gradients, we were able to separate Polbeta from mitochondria and to show that intact mitochondria, identified by electron microscopy, lacked Polbeta activity. In a functional test for the presence of Polbeta function in mitochondria, we used a new assay for detection of random (i.e., non-clonal) mutations in single mtDNA molecules. We did not detect enhanced mutation frequency in mtDNA from Polbeta null cells. In contrast, mtDNA from cells harboring mutations in the Polgamma exonuclease domain that abolish proofreading displayed a >or=17-fold increase in mutation frequency. We conclude that Polbeta is not an essential component of the machinery that maintains mtDNA integrity.

  7. Control Center Technology Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Conference papers and presentations are compiled and cover evolving architectures and technologies applicable to flight control centers. Advances by NASA Centers and the aerospace industry are presented.

  8. SVC 2003 Technical Conference Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.

    2003-07-01

    The 46th Annual Technical Conference of the Society of Vacuum Coaters was held in San Francisco May 2-8. All the world events apparently did not affect the attendance or the spirit of the attendees. The Conference was a huge success and very well attended. Many feel that it was the best Techcon yet. This year's Conference really raised the bar for the 47th Annual Technical Conference in Dallas next year. Congratulations go out to the program committee, board of directors, education committee, scholarship committee and Management Plus for a job well done. Excellent accommodations were provided by the San Francisco Marriott.

  9. Expedition 18 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-10

    Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke answers reporters' questions during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Fincke will launch on the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft along with Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott on Oct. 12 and dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Expedition 18 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-10

    American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott, left, and Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke answer reporters' questions during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Garriott and Fincke will launch on the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft along with Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov on Oct. 12 and dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Expedition 18 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-10

    Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov, right, Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott, left, pose for photographs after a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The Expedition 18 crew will launch on the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft on Oct. 12 and dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Expedition 18 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-10

    The quarantined crew, from left, American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott, Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke, Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov, back up Expedition 18 Commander Gennady Padalka, Flight Engineer Mike Barratt and spaceflight participant Nik Halik answer reporters questions during a press conference at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Fincke, Lonchakov and Garriott are scheduled to launch Oct. 12 and dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Expedition 18 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-10

    Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke, left, and Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov answer reporters' questions during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Fincke and Lonchakov will launch on the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft along with American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott on Oct. 12 and dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Expedition 18 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-10

    American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott answers reporters' questions during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Garriott will launch on the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft along with Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke and Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov on Oct. 12 and dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Expedition 18 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-10

    Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov answers reporters' questions during a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel, Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008, in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Lonchakov will launch on the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft along with Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott on Oct. 12 and dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Aerospace Environmental Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The mandated elimination of CFC's, Halons, TCA, and other ozone depleting chemicals and specific hazardous materials has required changes and new developments in aerospace materials and processes. The aerospace industry has been involved for several years in providing product substitutions, redesigning entire production processes, and developing new materials that minimize or eliminate damage to the environment. These activities emphasize replacement cleaning solvents and their application verifications, compliant coatings including corrosion protection systems, and removal techniques, chemical propulsion effects on the environment, and the initiation of modifications to relevant processing and manufacturing specifications and standards. The Executive Summary of this Conference is published as NASA CP-3297.

  17. Networks Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tasaki, Keiji K. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The papers included in these proceedings represent the most interesting and current topics being pursued by personnel at GSFC's Networks Division and supporting contractors involved in Space, Ground, and Deep Space Network (DSN) technical work. Although 29 papers are represented in the proceedings, only 12 were presented at the conference because of space and time limitations. The proceedings are organized according to five principal technical areas of interest to the Networks Division: Project Management; Network Operations; Network Control, Scheduling, and Monitoring; Modeling and Simulation; and Telecommunications Engineering.

  18. Expedition 43 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-26

    Expedition 43 Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) listens to a reporter’s question as he and, Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko of Roscosmos, and NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly participate in a crew press conference, Thursday, March 26, 2015, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Kelly, Kornienko, and Padalka launched to the International Space Station in the Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan March 28, Kazakh time (March 27 Eastern time.) As the one-year crew, Kelly and Kornienko will return to Earth on Soyuz TMA-18M in March 2016. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Expedition 43 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-26

    Expedition 43 Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) answers reporter’s questions as he and, Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka of Roscosmos, and NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly participate in a crew press conference, Thursday, March 26, 2015, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Kelly, Kornienko, and Padalka launched to the International Space Station in the Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan March 28, Kazakh time (March 27 Eastern time.) As the one-year crew, Kelly and Kornienko will return to Earth on Soyuz TMA-18M in March 2016. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Expedition 40 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-27

    Expedition 40 Soyuz Commander Maxim Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, second left, reacts as he is introduced during a press conference, Tuesday, May 27, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Expedition 40 Soyuz Commander Maxim Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, ESA, and Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman of NASA will launch aboard their Soyuz TMA-13M spacecraft on their mission to the International Space Station in the early hours of May 29. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  1. Astrobiology Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-02

    Steven Benner, a distinguished fellow at the Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution, right, speaks during a press conference as Mary Voytek, director of the Astrobiology Program at NASA looks on, Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. NASA-funded astrobiology research has changed the fundamental knowledge about what comprises all known life on Earth. Researchers conducting tests in the harsh environment of Mono Lake in California have discovered the first known microorganism on Earth able to thrive and reproduce using the toxic chemical arsenic. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  2. Astrobiology Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-12-02

    Felisa Wolfe-Simon, a lead researcher and NASA astrobiology research fellow, speaks during a press conference, as Mary Voytek, Steven Benner and Pamela Conrad look on, Thursday, Dec. 2, 2010, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. NASA-funded astrobiology research has changed the fundamental knowledge about what comprises all known life on Earth. Researchers conducting tests in the harsh environment of Mono Lake in California have discovered the first known microorganism on Earth able to thrive and reproduce using the toxic chemical arsenic. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  3. Kepler Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-05

    William Bo-Ricki, Kepler principal investigator at NASA's Ames Research Center, second from left, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington about the scientific observations coming from the Kepler spacecraft that was launched this past March as Jon Morse, NASA's Astrophysics Division Director, left, looks on. Kepler is NASA's first mission that is capable of discovering earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of stars like our Sun. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  4. GLORY Mission Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-20

    Greg Kopp, from the University of Colorado's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics in Boulder, Colo., talks about the launch of the GLORY mission during a news conference at NASA Headquarters, Thursday, Jan. 20, 2011, in Washington. NASA's newest Earth-observing research mission is scheduled for launch form Vandenburg Air Force Base in California on Feb. 23. The mission will improve our understanding of how the sun and tiny atmosppheric particles called aerosols affect Earth's climate. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  5. Kepler Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-05

    William Bo-Ricki, Kepler principal investigator at NASA's Ames Research Center, second from left, speaks during a press conference, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington about the scientific observations coming from the Kepler spacecraft that was launched this past March. Others seated include Jon Morse, NASA's Astrophysics Director, Sara Seager, Professor of Planetary Science and Physics at MIT, and Alan Boss, an Astrophysicist at the Carnegie Institution at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism in Washington, right. Kepler is NASA's first mission that is capable of discovering earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of stars like our Sun. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  6. Expedition 40 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-27

    Expedition 40 prime crew members Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, ESA, far left, Soyuz Commander Maxim Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, second left, and Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman of NASA, center, pose for a picture with Expedition 40 backup crew members Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA, third right, Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of Roscosmos, and Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of ESA at the conclusion a press conference, Tuesday, May 27, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch May 29 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  7. Expedition 42 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-22

    Family visits with Expedition 42 Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) through glass at the conclusion of the press conference, Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for Nov. 24 and will carry Shkaplerov, Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA , and Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  8. Expedition 42 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-22

    Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (ESA) speaks with friends and family through glass at the conclusion of the press conference, Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for Nov. 24 and will carry Cristoforetti, Flight Engineer Terry Virts of NASA , and Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  9. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    Expedition 41 prime crew members, Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, right, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), center, and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos, left, pose for a photo with items they will take with them to the International Space Station at the conclusion of the press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. The mission is set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  10. Expedition 40 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-27

    A reflection of the audience can been seen in the quarantine glass as Expedition 40 Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency, ESA, left, Soyuz Commander Maxim Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, center, and Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman of NASA, right, pose for a group picture at the conclusion of a press conference, Tuesday, May 27, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch May 29 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  11. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ([bar p]) physics presented at the LEAP '92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, [bar N]N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, [bar N] annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy [bar p]'s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with [bar p] (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new [bar p] facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ([ge] 2 GeV/c).

  12. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ({bar p}) physics presented at the LEAP `92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, {bar N}N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, {bar N} annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy {bar p}`s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with {bar p} (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new {bar p} facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ({ge} 2 GeV/c).

  13. Kepler Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-05

    William Bo-Ricki, Kepler principal investigator at NASA's Ames Research Center, second from left, is joined by Jon Morse, left, Sara Seager, and Alan Boss while speaking at a press conference, Thursday, Aug. 6, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington about the scientific observations coming from the Kepler spacecraft that was launched this past March. Kepler is NASA's first mission that is capable of discovering earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of stars like our Sun. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  14. Structural and functional relationships between prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Bernad, A; Zaballos, A; Salas, M; Blanco, L

    1987-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis phage luminal diameter 29 DNA polymerase, involved in protein-primed viral DNA replication, was inhibited by phosphonoacetic acid (PAA), a known inhibitor of alpha-like DNA polymerases, by decreasing the rate of elongation. Three highly conserved regions of amino acid homology, found in several viral alpha-like DNA polymerases and in the luminal diameter 29 DNA polymerase, one of them proposed to be the PAA binding site, were also found in the T4 DNA polymerase. This prokaryotic enzyme was highly sensitive to the drugs aphidicolin and the nucleotide analogues butylanilino dATP (BuAdATP) and butylphenyl dGTP (BuPdGTP), known to be specific inhibitors of eukaryotic alpha-like DNA polymerases. Two potential DNA polymerases from the linear plasmid pGKL1 from yeast and the S1 mitochondrial DNA from maize have been identified, based on the fact that they contain the three conserved regions of amino acid homology. Comparison of DNA polymerases from prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin showed extensive amino acid homology in addition to highly conserved domains. These findings reflect evolutionary relationships between hypothetically unrelated DNA polymerases. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:3127204

  15. High-Throughput Polymerase Fidelity Evolution in Microfluidic Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Jesse; de Paz, Alexandra; Cybulski, Ted; Bhan, Namita; Zhang, Huidan; Weitz, Dave; Tyo, Keith; Kording, Konrad

    Polymerases are technologically important as a tool in molecular biology, and are scientifically important for their role in DNA replication and inheritance. We study large numbers (at least millions) of polymerase mutants by compartmentalizing each gene in a droplet in a microfluidic device. Also in each droplet are in vitro transcription and translation proteins, such that mutant polymerases can be generated to extend their own gene along a known DNA template. Reading the resulting sequence tells us both the mutant gene sequence and the number of and particular errors that the resulting mutant polymerase made during extension. This work is supported by the NIH.

  16. RNA binding and replication by the poliovirus RNA polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Oberste, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    RNA binding and RNA synthesis by the poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase were studied in vitro using purified polymerase. Templates for binding and RNA synthesis studies were natural RNAs, homopolymeric RNAs, or subgenomic poliovirus-specific RNAs synthesized in vitro from cDNA clones using SP6 or T7 RNA polymerases. The binding of the purified polymerase to poliovirion and other RNAs was studied using a protein-RNA nitrocellulose filter binding assay. A cellular poly(A)-binding protein was found in the viral polymerase preparations, but was easily separated from the polymerase by chromatography on poly(A) Sepharose. The binding of purified polymerase to {sup 32}P-labeled ribohomopolymeric RNAs was examined, and the order of binding observed was poly(G) >>> poly(U) > poly(C) > poly(A). The K{sub a} for polymerase binding to poliovirion RNA and to a full-length negative strand transcript was about 1 {times} 10{sup 9} M{sup {minus}1}. The polymerase binds to a subgenomic RNAs which contain the 3{prime} end of the genome with a K{sub a} similar to that for virion RNA, but binds less well to 18S rRNA, globin mRNA, and subgenomic RNAs which lack portions of the 3{prime} noncoding region.

  17. Basic mechanism of transcription by RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Svetlov, Vladimir; Nudler, Evgeny

    2012-01-01

    RNA polymerase II-like enzymes carry out transcription of genomes in Eukaryota, Archaea, and some viruses. They also exhibit fundamental similarity to RNA polymerases from bacteria, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. In this review we take an inventory of recent studiesilluminating different steps of basic transcription mechanism, likely common for most multi-subunit RNA polymerases. Through the amalgamation of structural and computational chemistry data we attempt to highlight the most feasible reaction pathway for the two-metal nucleotidyl transfer mechanism, and to evaluate the way catalysis can be linked to translocation in the mechano-chemical cycle catalyzed by RNA polymerase II. PMID:22982365

  18. Functional oligomerization of poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Pata, J D; Schultz, S C; Kirkegaard, K

    1995-01-01

    Using a hairpin primer/template RNA derived from sequences present at the 3' end of the poliovirus genome, we investigated the RNA-binding and elongation activities of highly purified poliovirus 3D polymerase. We found that surprisingly high polymerase concentrations were required for efficient template utilization. Binding of template RNAs appeared to be the primary determinant of efficient utilization because binding and elongation activities correlated closely. Using a three-filter binding assay, polymerase binding to RNA was found to be highly cooperative with respect to polymerase concentration. At pH 5.5, where binding was most cooperative, a Hill coefficient of 5 was obtained, indicating that several polymerase molecules interact to retain the 110-nt RNA in a filter-bound complex. Chemical crosslinking with glutaraldehyde demonstrated physical polymerase-polymerase interactions, supporting the cooperative binding data. We propose a model in which poliovirus 3D polymerase functions both as a catalytic polymerase and as a cooperative single-stranded RNA-binding protein during RNA-dependent RNA synthesis. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 PMID:7489508

  19. Elongation of primed DNA templates by eukaryotic DNA polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, J E; Longiaru, M; Horwitz, M S; Hurwitz, J

    1980-01-01

    The combined action of DNA polymerase alpha and DNA polymerase beta leads to the synthesis of full-length linear DNA strands with phi X174 DNA templates containing an RNA primer. The reaction can be carried out in two stages. In the first stage, DNA polymerase alpha catalyzes the synthesis of a chain that averaged 230 deoxynucleotides long and was covalently linked to the RNA primer. In the second stage, DNA polymerase beta elongates the DNA strand covalently attached to the RNA primer to full length. With DNA primers, DNA polymerase alpha catalyzes only limited deoxynucleotide addition whereas DNA polymerase beta alone elongates DNA primed templates to full length. DNA polymerase beta can also stimulate the synthesis of adenovirus DNA in vitro in the presence of a cytosol extract from adenovirus-infected cells. In all of these systems, dNMP incorporation catalyzed by DNA polymerase beta was sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide; however, this polymerase activity was resistant to N-ethylmaleimide with poly(rA) x (dT) as the primer template. Images PMID:6160581

  20. 5 CFR 185.120 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prehearing conferences. 185.120 Section... FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.120 Prehearing conferences. (a) The ALJ may schedule prehearing conferences... conference at a reasonable time in advance of the hearing. (c) The ALJ may use prehearing conferences...